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Sample records for administration noaa satellite

  1. Data compression for National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration /NOAA/ weather satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rice, R. F.; Schlutsmeyer, A. P.

    1980-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) receives high quality infrared weather images from each of its two geostationary weather satellites at an average data rate of 57 kilobits/second. These images are currently distributed to field stations over 3 kilohertz analog phone lines. The resulting loss in image quality renders the images unacceptable for proposed digital image processing. This paper documents the study leading to a current effort to implement a microprocessor-based universal noiseless coder/decoder to satisfy NOAA's requirements of high quality, good coverage and timely transmission of its infrared images.

  2. NOAA-L satellite arrives at Vandenberg AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A crated National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-L) satellite arrives at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. It is part of the Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) program that provides atmospheric measurements of temperature, humidity, ozone and cloud images, tracking weather patterns that affect the global weather and climate. The launch of the NOAA-L satellite is scheduled no earlier than Sept. 12 aboard a Lockheed Martin Titan II rocket. NOAA-L satellite arrives at Vandenberg AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A crated National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-L) satellite is moved inside the B16-10 spacecraft processing hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif. NOAA-L is part of the Polar- Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) program that provides atmospheric measurements of temperature, humidity, ozone and cloud images, tracking weather patterns that affect the global weather and climate. The launch of the NOAA-L satellite is scheduled no earlier than Sept. 12 aboard a Lockheed Martin Titan II rocket. NOAA-L satellite arrives at Vandenberg AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the B16-10 spacecraft processing hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., workers oversee the uncrating of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-L) satellite. NOAA-L is part of the Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) program that provides atmospheric measurements of temperature, humidity, ozone and cloud images, tracking weather patterns that affect the global weather and climate. The launch of the NOAA-L satellite is scheduled no earlier than Sept. 12 aboard a Lockheed Martin Titan II rocket. NOAA-L satellite is lifted for mating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the B16-10 spacecraft processing hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., workers oversee the lifting and rotating of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-L) satellite to allow for mating of the Apogee Kick Motor (AKM). NOAA-L is part of the Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) program that provides atmospheric measurements of temperature, humidity, ozone and cloud images, tracking weather patterns that affect the global weather and climate. The launch of the NOAA-L satellite is scheduled no earlier than Sept. 12 aboard a Lockheed Martin Titan II rocket. NOAA-L satellite arrives at Vandenberg AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Outside the B16-10 spacecraft processing hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., a crated National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-L) satellite is lowered to the ground before being moved inside. NOAA-L is part of the Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) program that provides atmospheric measurements of temperature, humidity, ozone and cloud images, tracking weather patterns that affect the global weather and climate. The launch of the NOAA-L satellite is scheduled no earlier than Sept. 12 aboard a Lockheed Martin Titan II rocket. Antenna Automation For NOAA Satellite Images Reception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahal, W. L.; Benabadji, N.; Belbachir, A. H.

    2008-06-01

    In this paper, we present a novel, precise and efficient software tool (LAAR-TRACK) for Low Earth Orbit (LEO) Satellites orbit determination. It's based on using orbital elements, which are given by the NORAD (North American Aerospace Defence) by taking into considerations orbital perturbations due to the atmospheric drag, the influence of the moon and the sun and the geopotential field. The LAAR-TRACK gives the azimuth and the elevation that must have the antenna for pointing in real time the LEO satellites. This software is loaded on a computer directly connected, via the parallel port, to the tracking interface that we have developed, and which will be detailed in this paper. By this way the antenna can be automatically directed for receiving NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) HRPT (High Resolution Picture Transmission) pictures.

  3. 47 CFR 25.259 - Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Time sharing between NOAA meteorological... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.259 Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite... spectrum in the 137-138 MHz band with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)...

  4. 47 CFR 25.259 - Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Time sharing between NOAA meteorological... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.259 Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite... spectrum in the 137-138 MHz band with National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)...

  5. The NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Stephen; Maier, Mark; Di Pietro, David

    2016-01-01

    NOAA is beginning a study, the NOAA Satellite Observing System Architecture (NSOSA) study, to plan for the future operational environmental satellite system that will follow GOES and JPSS, beginning about 2030. This is an opportunity to design a modern architecture with no pre-conceived notions regarding instruments, platforms, orbits, etc. The NSOSA study will develop and evaluate architecture alternatives to include partner and commercial alternatives that are likely to become available. The objectives will include both functional needs and strategic characteristics (e.g., flexibility, responsiveness, sustainability). Part of this study is the Space Platform Requirements Working Group (SPRWG), which is being commissioned by NESDIS. The SPRWG is charged to assess new or existing user needs and to provide relative priorities for observational needs in the context of the future architecture. SPRWG results will serve as input to the process for new foundational (Level 0 and Level 1) requirements for the next generation of NOAA satellites that follow the GOES-R, JPSS, DSCOVR, Jason-3, and COSMIC-2 missions.

  6. NOAA GOES Satellite Sees March 12/13 Storm

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES satellite data shows the progression of the major winter storm over the U.S. Mid-Atlantic and Northeastern U.S. on March 12 and 13.Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Denn...

  7. NOAA administrator reviews agency progress and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-12-01

    The approach of the new year is a traditional time to tally up successes, failures, and the path ahead. Jane Lubchenco, administrator of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), examined some agency advances and significant challenges during the 7 December Union Agency Lecture at the AGU Fall Meeting, during a press briefing, and in an interview with Eos. Lubchenco focused on several key areas including the concern about monitoring, mitigating, and managing extreme events; budgetary pressures the agency faces in current fiscal year (FY) 2012 and in FY 2013, with President Barack Obama on 18 November having signed into law a bill, HR 2112, following congressional agreement on a budget legislation conference report; and NOAA's newly released scientific integrity policy (see "NOAA issues scientific integrity policy," Eos Trans. AGU, 92(50), 467, doi:10.1029/2011EO500004, 2011).

  8. 47 CFR 25.259 - Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Time sharing between NOAA meteorological... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.259 Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite... Atmospheric Administration (“NOAA”) satellite systems. When calculating the protection areas for a...

  9. 47 CFR 25.259 - Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Time sharing between NOAA meteorological... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.259 Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite... Atmospheric Administration (“NOAA”) satellite systems. When calculating the protection areas for a...

  10. 47 CFR 25.259 - Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite systems and non-voice, non-geostationary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Time sharing between NOAA meteorological... SATELLITE COMMUNICATIONS Technical Standards § 25.259 Time sharing between NOAA meteorological satellite... Atmospheric Administration (“NOAA”) satellite systems. When calculating the protection areas for a...

  11. NOAA-L satellite is mated to Apogee Kick Motor at Vandenberg AFB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Inside the B16-10 spacecraft processing hangar at Vandenberg Air Force Base, Calif., workers oversee the mating of the Apogee Kick Motor (below) to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA-L) satellite above. NOAA-L is part of the Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) program that provides atmospheric measurements of temperature, humidity, ozone and cloud images, tracking weather patterns that affect the global weather and climate. The launch of the NOAA-L satellite is scheduled no earlier than Sept. 12 aboard a Lockheed Martin Titan II rocket. Improved NOAA satellite scheduled for launch. [mission update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, W. J.; Mccormack, D.; Senstad, K.

    1981-01-01

    A description of the NOAA-C satellite and its Atlas launch vehicle are presented. The satellite instrumentation and data transmission systems are discussed. A flight sequence of events is given along with a listing of the mission management responsibilities.

  12. Terrestrial Observations from NOAA Operational Satellites.

    PubMed

    Yates, H; Strong, A; McGinnis, D; Tarpley, D

    1986-01-31

    Important applications to oceanography, hydrology, and agriculture have been developed from operational satellites of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and are currently expanding rapidly. Areas of interest involving the oceans include sea surface temperature, ocean currents, and ocean color. Satellites can monitor various hydrological phenomena, including regional and global snow cover, river and sea ice extent, and areas of global inundation. Agriculturally important quantities derived from operational satellite observations include precipitation, daily temperature extremes, canopy temperatures, insolation, and snow cover. This overview describes the current status of each area.

  13. Effects of Atmospheric Water Vapor and Clouds on NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) Satellite Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    smoke , smog, dust and water ;erosols usually falls within the Mie Regime. The combination of Rayleigh and Mie scattering causes the selective...T. L., 1984. Department of Commerce, NOAA, NESDIS, Assesment Services Center, Columbia, MO, Personal Communications. Barnett, T. L. and Thompson, D...Washington, D.C., NOAA Technical Memorandum, NESS 107, 73 pp. LeDuc, S. K., 1984. U.S. Department of Commerce, NOAA, NESDIS, Assesment Information Services

  14. Geostatistics and remote sensing using NOAA-AVHRR satellite imagery as predictive tools in tick distribution and habitat suitability estimations for Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) in South America. National Oceanographic and Atmosphere Administration-Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer.

    PubMed

    Estrada-Peña, A

    1999-02-01

    Remote sensing based on NOAA (National Oceanographic and Atmosphere Administration) satellite imagery was used, together with geostatistics (cokriging) to model the correlation between the temperature and vegetation variables and the distribution of the cattle tick, Boophilus microplus (Canestrini), in the Neotropical region. The results were used to map the B. microplus habitat suitability on a continental scale. A database of B. microplus capture localities was used, which was tabulated with the AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) images from the NOAA satellite series. They were obtained at 10 days intervals between 1983 and 1994, with an 8 km resolution. A cokriging system was generated to extrapolate the results. The data for habitat suitability obtained through two vegetation and four temperature variables were strongly correlated with the known distribution of B. microplus (sensitivity 0.91; specificity 0.88) and provide a good estimation of the tick habitat suitability. This model could be used as a guide to the correct interpretation of the distribution limits of B. microplus. It can be also used to prepare eradication campaigns or to make predictions about the effects of global change on the distribution of the parasite.

  1. State Geography Using NOAA Polar-Orbiting Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadler, Stephen J.

    1985-01-01

    NOAA polar-orbiting satellites have the capability of providing views of entire states. This article describes the characteristics of data from these satellites, indicates their advantages and disadvantages, and shows how the satellite data can be used in a statewide representation of physical geography for students at the introductory level. (RM)

  2. Disaster warning system study summary. [cost estimates using NOAA satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leroy, B. F.; Maloy, J. E.; Braley, R. C.; Provencher, C. E.; Schumaker, H. A.; Valgora, M. E.

    1977-01-01

    A conceptual satellite system to replace or complement NOAA's data collection, internal communications, and public information dissemination systems for the mid-1980's was defined. Program cost and cost sensitivity to variations in communications functions are analyzed.

  3. NOAA's GOES-West Satellite Animation Shows Seymour's Start

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from Oct. 21 to early on Oct. 24 shows the development of Tropical Depression 20 and explosive growth into Hurricane S...

  4. NOAA budget would boost satellite funding but cut some key areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-03-01

    The White House's proposed fiscal year (FY) 2013 budget for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), announced on 13 February, looks favorable at first glance. The administration's request calls for $5.1 billion, an increase of $153 million (3.1%) above the FY 2012 estimated budget. However, the increase for NOAA satellites is $163 million, which means that other areas within the agency would be slated for decreased funding, including programs within the National Ocean Service (NOS), National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Weather Service (NWS), and some NOAA education programs. The proposed overall budget for the agency “reflects the overarching importance of weather satellites to public safety, to national security, and to the economy,” NOAA director Jane Lubchenco said at a 16 February briefing, noting that difficult choices were made regarding the budget. “Due to significant resources required for our weather satellites and the economic conditions in the country, other parts of our budget have been reduced, in some cases quite significantly,” she said. She added that the imperative to fund both the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and geostationary satellites in FY 2013 “imposes serious constraints on the rest of NOAA's budget.”

  5. Sensor calibration in support for NOAA's satellite mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X. Q.; Cao, C. Y.

    2006-01-01

    Sensor calibration, including its definition, purpose, traceability options, methodology, complexity, and importance, is examined in this paper in the context of supporting NOAA's satellite mission. Common understanding of sensor calibration is essential for the effective communication among sensor vendors, calibration scientists, satellite operators, program managers, and remote sensing data users, who must cooperate to ensure that a nation's strategic investment in a sophisticated operational environmental satellite system serves the nation's interest and enhances the human lives around the world. Examples of calibration activities at NOAA/NESDIS/ORA are selected to further illustrate these concepts and to demonstrate the lessons learned from the past experience.

  6. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration /NOAA/ contamination monitoring instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maag, C. R.

    1980-01-01

    The JPL has designed and built a plume contamination monitoring package to be installed on a NOAA environmental services satellite. The package is designed to monitor any condensible contamination that occurs during the ignition and burn of a TE-M-364-15 apogee kick motor. The instrumentation and system interface are described, and attention is given to preflight analysis and test.

  7. Optical Passive Sensor Calibration for Satellite Remote Sensing and the Legacy of NOAA and NIST Cooperation

    PubMed Central

    Datla, Raju; Weinreb, Michael; Rice, Joseph; Johnson, B. Carol; Shirley, Eric; Cao, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the cooperative efforts of scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to improve the calibration of operational satellite sensors for remote sensing of the Earth’s land, atmosphere and oceans. It gives a chronological perspective of the NOAA satellite program and the interactions between the two agencies’ scientists to address pre-launch calibration and issues of sensor performance on orbit. The drive to improve accuracy of measurements has had a new impetus in recent years because of the need for improved weather prediction and climate monitoring. The highlights of this cooperation and strategies to achieve SI-traceability and improve accuracy for optical satellite sensor data are summarized1. PMID:26601030

  8. Optical Passive Sensor Calibration for Satellite Remote Sensing and the Legacy of NOAA and NIST Cooperation.

    PubMed

    Datla, Raju; Weinreb, Michael; Rice, Joseph; Johnson, B Carol; Shirley, Eric; Cao, Changyong

    2014-01-01

    This paper traces the cooperative efforts of scientists at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to improve the calibration of operational satellite sensors for remote sensing of the Earth's land, atmosphere and oceans. It gives a chronological perspective of the NOAA satellite program and the interactions between the two agencies' scientists to address pre-launch calibration and issues of sensor performance on orbit. The drive to improve accuracy of measurements has had a new impetus in recent years because of the need for improved weather prediction and climate monitoring. The highlights of this cooperation and strategies to achieve SI-traceability and improve accuracy for optical satellite sensor data are summarized.

  9. Which satellites were used?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    The three satellites ERBS, NOAA-9, NOAA-10 carrying two ERBE instrument packages (Scanner and NonScanner) were used. The NASA Goddard Space Flight Center built the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) on which ... and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather monitoring satellites, NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 in 1984 and 1986, respectively. ...

  10. NOAA's Multi-Sensor Fire Detection Program Using Environmental Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, D. P.; Stephens, G.; Fennimore, R.; Kasheta, T.; Callsen, T.; Ruminski, M.; Ramsay, B. H.

    2002-05-01

    NOAA/NESDIS built a comprehensive fire detection program, capitalized on existing sensors on the current suite of environmental satellites, and developed an innovative method to distribute the data to the fire community and public. Current detections are incorporated into the system from GOES, AVHRR, DMSP/OLS and MODIS. Data layers are made individually from each sensor. Once a day (soon to be twice a day), a trained satellite analyst prepares an integrated product using the Hazard Mapping System. The analyst validates detects from the automated algorithms and adds detects seen on satellite imagery. Data are available to the public in GIS formats via an Internet map server. Current efforts are focused on validating each data layer, improving the integrated product, adding smoke retrievals, and including additional civil and military data sources.

  11. 76 FR 53883 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA Satellite Ground Station Customer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA... (NOAA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce, as part of its continuing effort to reduce... marlin.o.perkins@noaa.gov or Paul Seymour, 301-817-4521 or paul.seymourf@noaa.gov ....

  12. Vegetation monitoring and classification using NOAA/AVHRR satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greegor, D. H., Jr.; Norwine, J. R.

    1983-01-01

    A vegetation gradient model, based on a new surface hydrologic index and NOAA/AVHRR meteorological satellite data, has been analyzed along a 1300 km east-west transect across the state of Texas. The model was developed to test the potential usefulness of such low-resolution data for vegetation stratification and monitoring. Normalized Difference values (ratio of AVHRR bands 1 and 2, considered to be an index of greenness) were determined and evaluated against climatological and vegetation characteristics at 50 sample locations (regular intervals of 0.25 deg longitude) along the transect on five days in 1980. Statistical treatment of the data indicate that a multivariate model incorporating satellite-measured spectral greenness values and a surface hydrologic factor offer promise as a new technique for regional-scale vegetation stratification and monitoring.

  13. Science and applications from the next generation of particle and field instruments on the NOAA satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Janet; Onsager, Terrance; Rodriguez, Juan; Singer, Howard

    The vision of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) is, "A nation prepared to mitigate the effects of space weather through the understanding and use of actionable alerts, forecasts, and data products." To achieve this vision, NOAA maintains a constellation of satellites equipped with space weather sensors in geosynchronous and low Earth orbits. The data from these sensors drive space weather models and forecasts delivered to customers such as power utilities, airlines, GPS users, and satellite operators through our operational forecast office and website. Here we describe the heritage and new sensors onboard the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES)-NOP, GOES-R, and Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) and the relevance of the data for radiation belt studies and modeling. We describe the implementation of a new radiation belt and satellite charging product known as the Space Environmental Anomalies Expert System-Real Time [O'Brien et al., 2009]. Finally, we discuss the anticipated direction for new space weather models and research at SWPC.

  14. 77 FR 74174 - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climate Assessment and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: This notice sets forth the schedule of a forthcoming meeting of the DoC NOAA National Climate Assessment...

  15. Monitoring tropical cyclone evolution with NOAA satellite microwave observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Velden, C.; Smith, W. L.

    1983-01-01

    NOAA satellite microwave soundings, which penetrate high clouds, delineate the development and dissipation of the upper tropospheric warm core associated with a tropical cyclone. The storm's 'core" may be detected from microwave imagery. Vertical cross sections reveal the intensification of the upper tropospheric warm core as the storm develops, and the downward propagation of the warm core as the storm dissipates. Excellent correlation is found between the horizontal Laplacian of an upper tropospheric temperature field and the intensity of the storm, as categorized by its surface central pressure and maximum sustained wind speed at the eye wall. The microwave monitoring of tropical cyclones is achieved in real time at the University of Wisconsin's Space Science and Engineering Center through high-speed teleconnections to direct readout receiving systems at Wallops Island, Virginia and Redwood City, California.

  16. How to Get Data from NOAA Environmental Satellites: An Overview of Operations, Products, Access and Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoho, N.; Graumann, A.; McNamara, D. P.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we will highlight access and availability of NOAA satellite data for near real time (NRT) and retrospective product users. The presentation includes an overview of the current fleet of NOAA satellites and methods of data distribution and access to hundreds of imagery and products offered by the Environmental Satellite Processing Center (ESPC) and the Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS). In particular, emphasis on the various levels of services for current and past observations will be presented. The National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) is dedicated to providing timely access to global environmental data from satellites and other sources. In special cases, users are authorized direct access to NESDIS data distribution systems for environmental satellite data and products. Other means of access include publicly available distribution services such as the Global Telecommunication System (GTS), NOAA satellite direct broadcast services and various NOAA websites and ftp servers, including CLASS. CLASS is NOAA's information technology system designed to support long-term, secure preservation and standards-based access to environmental data collections and information. The National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) is responsible for the ingest, quality control, stewardship, archival and access to data and science information. This work will also show the latest technology improvements, enterprise approach and future plans for distribution of exponentially increasing data volumes from future NOAA missions. A primer on access to NOAA operational satellite products and services is available at http://www.ospo.noaa.gov/Organization/About/access.html. Access to post-operational satellite data and assorted products is available at http://www.class.noaa.gov

  17. Comparison of 18 months of longwave radiation results from Nimbus-7 and the ERBE NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bess, T. D.; Smith, G. L.

    1992-01-01

    The outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) data from ERBE wide-field-of-view (WFOV) and scanning sensor are compared with Nimbus-7 WFOV results. Monthly averaged OLR data from the ERBE WFOV instruments aboard the NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 polar orbiting satellites during the 3-year overlap period with Nimbus-7 are deconvolved using spherical harmonics. Results of a comparison of the data sets are presented on regional, zonal, and global scales in the spatial domain and on a monthly scale in the time domain.

  18. Earth radiation budget - Results of outgoing longwave radiation from Nimbus-7, NOAA-9, and ERBS satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bess, T. D.; Smith, G. L.

    1993-01-01

    Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) data from Nimbus-7 ERB wide field-of-view instruments are compared with results from the ERBE instruments aboard the NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 satellites. Over most regions of the globe, the agreement between the two sets of OLR results is generally to within 8 W/sq m. There are larger differences at higher latitudes and regions concentrated over land and desert. Results of daytime and nighttime differences suggest that the shortwave channels may be at fault due to their different design for Nimbus-7 and NOAA-9. Some of the differences may also be related to different viewing geometry of the two satellites.

  19. NOAA/NASA/DOD Workshop on Satellite Data Assimilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Errico, Ronald M.; Ohring, George; Derber, John; Joiner, Joanna

    2000-01-01

    A workshop on the assimilation of satellite sounding information using global forecast and climate models was held at College Park, MD, 23-25 August 1999. Topics discussed included: comparisons of assimilations of satellite retrievals versus satellite-observed radiances, planning for the use of advanced infrared sounders, the use of satellite sounding data affected by land surfaces, radiative transfer issues, and error characteristics of models and observations. The workshop concluded with a number of general and specific recommendations to advance the state of the art of assimilation of satellite sounding data.

  20. Defense meteorological satellite program capabilities through the end of this century and requirements for the converged DMSP NOAA system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goyette, John; Belsma, Leslie; Bohlson, John S.; Glackin, David L.

    1995-12-01

    The Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites currently in orbit are designated the Block SD-2 series. Characterized by on-board processing and near full redundancy, the Block 5D-2 design provides a stable, highly reliable platform for a sophisticated sensor suite. Under both solar and lunar illumination conditions, the payload instruments provide visual radiances with very high dynamic range, as well as calibrated radiances in the infrared and microwave spectral regimes. Additional space environmental sensors provide in-situ measurements of electrons and ions, energy distribution of charged particles, and changes in the local magnetic field. The DMSP mission sensor digital data is now available from the National Geophysical Data Center in Boulder, Colorado. The future 5D-3 spacecraft, currently in production, will be a larger structure with increased power and weight capability to accommodate a greater payload, including a combined microwave sensor providing imaging and temperature and moisture profiling in one instrument. New space environmental instruments observing in the ultraviolet spectrum will improve specification ofthe ionosphere. On 5 May 1994, the U.S. President directed convergence ofthe Department ofDefense (DOD) DMSP system and the Department of Commerce (DOC) National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES). The Integrated Program Office (IPO) was formed to implement the merger and develop a single system, the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS), to provide data for U.S. civil and defense as well as international needs. Negotiations between NOAA and EUMETSAT are underway for an interim Joint Polar System (JPS). This is proposed to be a two-satellite constellation in which one satellite is POES and one is from EUMETSAT. In the timeframe ofNPOESS, it is anticipated that continued cooperation with EUMETSAT will lead to a three-satellite

  1. Improved NOAA weather satellite scheduled for NASA launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A description of the GOES-E mission is presented and includes the instrumentation of the satellite, data acquisition, spacecraft description, and Delta Launch Vehicle description. The launch operations are presented and include major launch events, post-launch events, and a review of the Delta/GOES-E team.

  2. Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) as signatures of pre-seismic activities before Nepal 2015 Earthquakes using onboard NOAA satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Suman; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Sasmal, Sudipta

    2016-07-01

    Earthquake preparation processes start almost a month before its actual occurrence. There are various tools in detecting such processes among which Outgoing Longwave Radiation (OLR) measurements is a significant one. We studied these signals before the devastating Nepal earthquake that occurred on 12 May, 2015 at 12:50 pm local time (07:05 UTC) with a Richter scale magnitude of M = 7.3 and depth 10 km (6.21 miles) at southeast of Kodari. To study the effects of seismic activities on OLR, we used the data archived by the National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS) of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) onto two degree grids for a period of more than 27 years. For the period 2005 till date, data from NOAA18 satellite is used. The data has been chosen with a temporal coverage from 8th May to 17th May, 2015 and a spatial coverage from 20 ^{o}N to 36 ^{o}N latitudes, 78 ^{o}E to 94 ^{o}E longitudes. We followed the method of 'Eddy field calculation mean' to find anomalies in daily OLR curves. We found singularities in Eddy field around the earthquake epicentre three days prior to the earthquake day and its disappearance after the event. Such intensification of Eddy field and its fading away after the shock event can be due to the large amount of energy released before the earthquake.

  3. The Use of Satellites by Schools and Colleges, Part 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duff, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    Provides information about and suggestions for using orbital satellite-carrying amateur radio (OSCAR) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites for instructional purposes. (JN)

  4. NOAA NESDIS global automated satellite-based snow mapping system and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanov, Peter

    2016-05-01

    Accurate, timely and spatially detailed information on the snow cover distribution and on the snow pack properties is needed in various research and practical applications including numerical weather prediction, climate modeling, river runoff estimates and flood forecasts. Owing to the wide area coverage, high spatial resolution and short repeat cycle of observations satellites present one of the key components of the global snow and ice cover monitoring system. The Global Multisensor Automated Snow and Ice Mapping System (GMASI) has been developed at the request of NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) and NOAA National Ice Center (NIC) to facilitate NOAA operational monitoring of snow and ice cover and to provide information on snow and ice for use in NWP models. Since 2006 the system has been routinely generating daily snow and ice cover maps using combined observations in the visible/infrared and in the microwave from operational meteorological satellites. The output product provides continuous (gap free) characterization of the global snow and ice cover distribution at 4 km spatial resolution. The paper presents a basic description of the snow and ice mapping algorithms incorporated in the system as well as of the product generated with GMASI. It explains the approach used to validate the derived snow and ice maps and provides the results of their accuracy assessment.

  5. Contrail Coverage Over the USA Derived from NOAA and EOS Satellite Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palikonda, Rabindra; Minnis, Patrick; Duda, David P.

    2004-01-01

    Contrails, like natural cirrus clouds, can cause a warming of the Earth-atmospheric system by absorbing longwave radiation from the surface and lower troposphere and radiating additional radiation back to the surface. They can also produce some cooling of the surface during the daytime by reflecting some sunlight back to space. Recently, Minnis et al. (2004) determined from surface observations of cirrus cloud cover that the overall impact appears to be a warming that is consistent with theoretical calculations, at least over the United States of America (USA) and surrounding areas. This finding highlights the need to better understand the formation and persistence of contrails and their radiative properties. To better assess the climatic impact of contrails, it is essential to determine the variability of the contrail microphysical properties, their impact on the atmospheric radiation budget, and their relationship to the atmospheric state. To that end, this paper continues the analyses of Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data from the NOAA-15 (N15), NOAA-16 (N16), and NOAA-17 (N17) satellites, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data from the Terra and Aqua satellites. The combination of these satellites provides a relatively comprehensive coverage of the daily cycle of air traffic. Thus, it should be possible to use these data to help understand the impact of air traffic on the upper tropospheric humidity during the day as well as determine the local-time variability of contrail coverage. The results will be valuable for developing models of contrail effects and methods for mitigating the impact of aviation on climate.

  6. NOAA In Situ - Satellite Blended Analysis of Surface Salinity (BASS): Prototype Algorithm and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, P.; Boyer, T.; Bayler, E. J.; Xue, Y.; Byrne, D. A.; Reagan, J. R.; Locarnini, R. A.; Kumar, A.

    2012-12-01

    A prototype analysis of monthly sea surface salinity (SSS) has been constructed on a 1olat/lon grid over the global ocean by blending information from in situ measurements and satellite retrievals. Three data sets are included as inputs to the blended analysis, i.e., in situ SSS measurements aggregated and quality controlled by NOAA/NODC, and the passive microwave (PMW) retrievals from the Aquarius/SAC-D and SMOS satellites, received and post-processed at NOAA/STAR. The in situ SSS measurements used here are mainly from the Argo program, but also include those from the tropical moored buoy array (TAO/TRITON, PIRATA, RAMA) data and CTDs and glider data. The blended analysis is defined in two sequential steps. First, the bias in the satellite retrievals is removed through PDF matching against the co-located in situ measurements. The final blended analysis is then defined through the optimal interpolation (OI), where the analysis for the previous time step is used as the first guess while the in situ measurements and the bias-corrected satellite retrievals are employed as the observations to update the first guess. Cross-validations tests are conducted by comparing the blended analysis against the withdrawn SSS measurements from the PIRATA arrays. Results showed improved quantitative accuracy of the blended analysis compared to the satellite estimates and the in situ data alone analysis in the tropical Atlantic. The blended analysis, constructed from January 2010 to the present, is used to examine the co-variability among the SSS, E-P, SST, SSH, and surface wind stress in the annual cycle over the tropical Atlantic and to estimate the SSS bias in the NCEP's Climate Forecast System Reanalysis (CFSR) and Global Ocean Data Assimilation System (GODAS) . Results will be reported at the meeting.

  7. NOAA Satellites Provide a Keen View of the Martin Luther King Solar Storm of January 2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, D. C.; Allen, J. H.

    2005-05-01

    Solar active region 0720 rotated onto the east limb on January 10th and put on a pyrotechnic display uncharacteristic for this phase of the solar cycle before disappearing beyond the west limb on January 23rd. On January 15th this region released the first of five X-class solar flares. The last of those flares, January 20th, was associated with an extraordinary ion storm whose effect reached Earth's surface. This paper highlights the record of this event made by NOAA's GOES satellites via their Space Environment Monitor (SEM) subsystems that measures X-ray, energetic particles, and the magnetic field vector at the satellite. Displays of those data are supplemented by neutron monitor data to illustrate their relationship to the January 20th Ground Level Event. GOES-12 is also equipped with the Solar X-ray Imager (SXI) that produces an image of the Sun in X-ray wavelengths once per minute. Movies created from those data perfectly illustrate the cause-and-effect relationship between intense solar activity and satellite disruptions. The flares on January 17th and 20th are closely followed by noise in the SXI telescope resulting from energetic ions penetrating SXI. Ions with sufficient velocity and atomic number can penetrate satellite components and deposit charge along their path. Sufficient charge deposition can introduce erroneous information into solid-state devices. A survey of satellites that experienced problems of this type during this event will also be presented.

  8. Utilization of Precipitation and Moisture Products Derived from Satellites to Support NOAA Operational Precipitation Forecasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, R.; Zhao, L.; Kuligowski, R. J.; Kusselson, S.; Ma, L.; Kidder, S. Q.; Forsythe, J. M.; Jones, A. S.; Ebert, E. E.; Valenti, E.

    2012-12-01

    NOAA/NESDIS operates a constellation of polar and geostationary orbiting satellites to support weather forecasts and to monitor the climate. Additionally, NOAA utilizes satellite assets from other U.S. agencies like NASA and the Department of Defense, as well as those from other nations with similar weather and climate responsibilities (i.e., EUMETSAT and JMA). Over the past two decades, through joint efforts between U.S. and international government researchers, academic partners, and private sector corporations, a series of "value added" products have been developed to better serve the needs of weather forecasters and to exploit the full potential of precipitation and moisture products generated from these satellites. In this presentation, we will focus on two of these products - Ensemble Tropical Rainfall Potential (eTRaP) and Blended Total Precipitable Water (bTPW) - and provide examples on how they contribute to hydrometeorological forecasts. In terms of passive microwave satellite products, TPW perhaps is most widely used to support real-time forecasting applications, as it accurately depicts tropospheric water vapor and its movement. In particular, it has proven to be extremely useful in determining the location, timing, and duration of "atmospheric rivers" which contribute to and sustain flooding events. A multi-sensor approach has been developed and implemented at NESDIS in which passive microwave estimates from multiple satellites and sensors are merged to create a seamless, bTPW product that is more efficient for forecasters to use. Additionally, this product is being enhanced for utilization for television weather forecasters. Examples will be shown to illustrate the roll of atmospheric rivers and contribution to flooding events, and how the bTPW product was used to improve the forecast of these events. Heavy rains associated with land falling tropical cyclones (TC) frequently trigger floods that cause millions of dollars of damage and tremendous loss

  9. Minding the gaps: new insights into R&D management and operational transitions of NOAA satellite products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colton, Marie C.; Powell, Alfred M.; Jordan, Gretchen; Mote, Jonathon; Hage, Jerald; Frank, Donald

    2004-10-01

    The NESDIS Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR), formerly ORA, Office of Research and Applications, consists of three research and applications divisions that encompass satellite meteorology, oceanography, climatology, and cooperative research with academic institutions. With such a wide background of talent, and a charter to develop operational algorithms and applications, STAR scientists develop satellite-derived land, ice, ocean, and atmospheric environmental data products in support of all of NOAA"s mission goals. In addition, in close association with the Joint Center for Satellite Data Assimilation, STAR scientists actively work with the numerical modeling communities of NOAA, NASA, and DOD to support the development of new methods for assimilation of satellite data. In this new era of observations from many new satellite instruments, STAR aims to effectively integrate these data into multi-platform data products for utilization by the forecast and applications communities. Much of our work is conducted in close partnerships with other agencies, academic institutes, and industry. In order to support the nearly 400 current satellite-derived products for various users on a routine basis from our sister operations office, and to evolve to future systems requires an ongoing strategic planning approach that maps research and development activities from NOAA goals to user requirements. Since R&D accomplishments are not necessarily amenable to precise schedules, appropriate motivators and measures of scientific progress must be developed to assure that the product development cycle remains aligned with the other engineering segments of a satellite program. This article presents the status and results of this comprehensive effort to chart a course from the present set of operational satellites to the future.

  10. A Statistical Correlation Between Low L-shell Electrons Measured by NOAA Satellites and Strong Earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fidani, C.

    2015-12-01

    More than 11 years of the Medium Energy Protons Electrons Detector data from the NOAA polar orbiting satellites were analyzed. Significant electron counting rate fluctuations were evidenced during geomagnetic quiet periods by using a set of adiabatic coordinates. Electron counting rates were compared to earthquakes by defining a seismic event L-shell obtained radially projecting the epicenter geographical positions to a given altitude. Counting rate fluctuations were grouped in every satellite semi-orbit together with strong seismic events and these were chosen with the L-shell coordinates close to each other. Electron data from July 1998 to December 2011 were compared for nearly 1,800 earthquakes with magnitudes larger than or equal to 6, occurring worldwide. When considering 30 - 100 keV energy channels by the vertical NOAA telescopes and earthquake epicenter projections at altitudes greater that 1,300 km, a 4 sigma correlation appeared where time of particle precipitations Tpp occurred 2 - 3 hour prior time of large seismic events Teq. This was in physical agreement with different correlation times obtained from past studies that considered particles with greater energies. The correlation suggested a 4-8 hour advance in preparedness of strong earthquakes influencing the ionosphere. Considering this strong correlation between earthquakes and electron rate fluctuations, and the hypothesis that such fluctuations originated with magnetic disturbances generated underground, a small scale experiment with low cost at ground level is advisable. Plans exists to perform one or more unconventional experiments around an earthquake affected area by private investor in Italy.

  11. Acquisition of Gulfstream IV-SP jet for environmental measurements in the upper troposphere by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)

    SciTech Connect

    Philippsborn, F.R.

    1996-11-01

    Acquisition of a Gulfstream IV-SP jet by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is intended to address the critical shortage of platforms capable of making intensive in situ meteorological and atmospheric observations in the upper troposphere. Its primary function will be Hurricane Synoptic Surveillance. In its initial configuration, the jet will significantly improve the ability of NOAA scientists to predict the expected path of hurricanes by gathering vertical profiles of wind, temperature, and humidity within 1,000 km of tropical cyclones by means of dropwindsondes over the data-sparse oceanic regions of the western Atlantic, Caribbean Sea and Gulf of Mexico. Future missions proposed for the aircraft include winter storm surveillance, hurricane reconnaissance, weather research, global climate studies, air chemistry, validation of satellite data, and development of remote sensors. 5 refs.

  12. NOAA-L

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCain, Harry G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) have jointly developed a valuable series of polar-orbiting Earth environmental observation satellites since 1978. These satellites provide global data to NOAA's short- and long-range weather forecasting systems. The system consists of two polar-orbiting satellites known as the Advanced Television Infrared Observation Satellites (TIROS-N) (ATN). Operating as a pair, these satellites ensure that environmental data, for any region of the Earth, is no more than six hours old. These polar-orbiting satellites have not only provided cost-effective data for very immediate and real needs but also for extensive climate and research programs. The weather data (including images seen on television news programs) has afforded both convenience and safety to viewers throughout the world. The satellites also support the SARSAT (Search and Rescue Satellite Aided Tracking) part of the COSPAS-SARSAT constellation. Russia provides the COSPAS (Russian for Space Systems for the Search of Vessels in Distress) satellites. The international COSPAS-SARSAT system provides for the detection and location of emergency beacons for ships, aircraft, and people in distress and has contributed to the saving of more than 10,000 lives since its inception in 1982.

  13. The use of visible-channel data from NOAA satellites to measure total ozone amount over Antarctica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boime, Robert D.; Warren, Steven G.; Gruber, Arnold

    1994-01-01

    Accurate, detailed maps of total ozone were not available until the launch of the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) in late 1978. However, the Scanning Radiometer (SR), an instrument on board the NOAA series satellites during the 1970s, had a visible channel that overlapped closely with the Chappuis absorption band of ozone. We are investigating whether data from the SR can be used to map Antarctic ozone prior to 1978. The method is being developed with 1980s data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), which succeeded the SR on the NOAA polar-orbiting satellites. Visible-derived total ozone maps can then be compared able on the NOAA satellites, which precludes the use of a differential absorption technique to measure ozone. Consequently, our method works exclusively over scenes whose albedos are large and unvarying, i.e. scenes that contain ice sheets and/or uniform cloud-cover. Initial comparisons of time series for October-December 1987 at locations in East Antarctica show that the visible absorption by ozone in measurable and that the technique may be usable for the 1970s, but with much less accuracy than TOMS. This initial test assumes that clouds, snow, and ice all reflect the same percentage of visible light towards the satellite, regardless of satellite position or environmental conditions. This assumption is our greatest source of error. To improve the accuracy of ozone retrievals, realistic anisotropic reflectance factors are needed, which are strongly influenced by cloud and snow surface features.

  14. Applications systems verification and transfer project. Volume 6: Operational applications of satellite snow-cover observations NOAA/NESS support study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, S. R.

    1981-01-01

    Geostationary and polar orbiting satellite data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration were used to operationally provide field hydrologists with basin snowcover percentages for inclusion in runoff models. Data reduction is accomplished thru the use of optical rectification devices and electronic color density slicers. Over two thousand satellite-derived snow maps covering 30 different basins in the western United States were provided to users. Plans for improving snowmapping techniques on computer interactive systems and by all-digital analysis are presented. A description of the newest generation of NOAA polar orbiters, TIROS-N, and its potential for snowmapping is reviewed. Snowcover percentages for all basins determined between November 1974 and July 1978 are presented in tabular format.

  15. Simulated NASA Satellite Data Products for the NOAA Integrated Coral Reef Observation Network/Coral Reef Early Warning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estep, Leland; Spruce, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    This RPC (Rapid Prototyping Capability) experiment will demonstrate the use of VIIRS (Visible/Infrared Imager/Radiometer Suite) and LDCM (Landsat Data Continuity Mission) sensor data as significant input to the NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) ICON/ CREWS (Integrated Coral Reef Observation System/Coral Reef Early Warning System). The project affects the Coastal Management Program Element of the Applied Sciences Program.

  16. NOAA Would Receive an 11% Increase Under Obama Administration's Proposed Budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-05-01

    The White House's proposed fiscal year (FY) 2014 budget for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) would provide the agency with 5.45 billion, 11% above the FY 2012 spend plan of 4.91 billion (see Table ). The proposal, which was sent to Congress on 10 April, would increase funding for operations, research, and facilities to 3.41 billion (up 7.97% over FY 2012) and for procurement, acquisition, and construction to 2.12 billion (up 17.51%). The budget proposal uses the FY 2012 spend plan as a comparison because Congress approved the FY 2013 appropriations only a few weeks before the FY 2014 proposal was released.

  17. Earth Radiation Budget: Results of outgoing longwave radiation from Nimbus-7, NOAA-9, and ERBS satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Bess, T.D.; Smith, G.L. )

    1993-05-01

    Eighteen months of wide field-of-view (WFOV) outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) measurements from the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 spacecraft have been deconvolved to produce resolution-enhanced flux maps at the top of the atmosphere. NOAA-9 had a 0230 LST equator-crossing time, and NOAA-10 a 0730 LST equator-crossing time. Intercomparison of these results with ERBE scanner and numerical filtered WFOV results is made. Results have also been compared with corresponding months of deconvolved results from the Nimbus-7 spacecraft (1200 LST equator crossing). Comparisons have been made of zonal profile plots of OLR for the different sensors and of contour maps of differences in OLR between sensors. In general Nimbus-7 OLR results show reasonable agreement with NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 over most regions of the globe. The largest differences occur over the extratropics, noticeably over land and especially over deserts. This study suggests that long-term monitoring of OLR with WFOV sensors is feasible for globally averaged trends to an accuracy of less than 1 W m[sup [minus]2], for the global absolute mean to within 3 W m[sup [minus]2], and for regional monthly means to within 8 W m[sup [minus]2] for most of the globe. Global averages for numerical filtered and deconvolved NOAA-9 WFOV results are consistently higher than Nimbus-7 deconvolved results because NOAA-9 results over land and deserts are higher. However, the ERBE NOAA-9 scanner gives smaller values of OLR over most regions of the globe than either the NOAA-9 WFOV numerical filtered or WFOV deconvolved results. 17 refs., 15 figs.

  18. Satellite Based Soil Moisture Product Validation Using NOAA-CREST Ground and L-Band Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norouzi, H.; Campo, C.; Temimi, M.; Lakhankar, T.; Khanbilvardi, R.

    2015-12-01

    Soil moisture content is among most important physical parameters in hydrology, climate, and environmental studies. Many microwave-based satellite observations have been utilized to estimate this parameter. The Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2) is one of many remotely sensors that collects daily information of land surface soil moisture. However, many factors such as ancillary data and vegetation scattering can affect the signal and the estimation. Therefore, this information needs to be validated against some "ground-truth" observations. NOAA - Cooperative Remote Sensing and Technology (CREST) center at the City University of New York has a site located at Millbrook, NY with several insitu soil moisture probes and an L-Band radiometer similar to Soil Moisture Passive and Active (SMAP) one. This site is among SMAP Cal/Val sites. Soil moisture information was measured at seven different locations from 2012 to 2015. Hydra probes are used to measure six of these locations. This study utilizes the observations from insitu data and the L-Band radiometer close to ground (at 3 meters height) to validate and to compare soil moisture estimates from AMSR2. Analysis of the measurements and AMSR2 indicated a weak correlation with the hydra probes and a moderate correlation with Cosmic-ray Soil Moisture Observing System (COSMOS probes). Several differences including the differences between pixel size and point measurements can cause these discrepancies. Some interpolation techniques are used to expand point measurements from 6 locations to AMSR2 footprint. Finally, the effect of penetration depth in microwave signal and inconsistencies with other ancillary data such as skin temperature is investigated to provide a better understanding in the analysis. The results show that the retrieval algorithm of AMSR2 is appropriate under certain circumstances. This validation algorithm and similar study will be conducted for SMAP mission. Keywords: Remote Sensing, Soil

  19. Broadcasting-satellite and fixed-satellite service considerations after the 1979 World Administrative Radio Conference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akima, H.

    1981-04-01

    The revisions of World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) of the inter-national radio regulations of the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) including the international table of frequency allocations are reviewed. The revised Radio Regulations will govern internationally the use of the radiofrequency spectrum and the geostationary satellite orbit for the rest of this century. Restricting its scope to the topics related to the broadcasting satellite and fixed satellite services in ITU Region 2 are reported.

  20. 75 FR 38079 - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Science Advisory Board (SAB)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    .... Please refer to the Web page http://www.sab.noaa.gov/Meetings/meetings.html for the most up-to-date...-5700. Please check the SAB Web site http://www.sab.noaa.gov for confirmation of the venue and for... on July 21 at 2:15 p.m. (check Web site to confirm time). The SAB expects that public...

  1. Web Services at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climatic Data Center (NCDC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S.; Baldwin, R.; Del Greco, S.; Lott, N.; Rutledge, G.

    2007-12-01

    NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) currently archives over 1.5 petabytes of climatological data from various networks and sources including in-situ, numerical models, radar and satellite. Access to these datasets is evolving from interactive web interfaces utilizing database technology to standardized web services in a Service Oriented Architecture (SOA). NCDC is currently offering several web services using Simple Object Access Protocol (SOAP), XML over Representational State Transfer (REST/XML), Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) / Web Feature Service (WFS) / Web Coverage Service (WCS) and OPeNDAP web service protocols. These services offer users a direct connection between their client applications and NCDC data servers. In addition, users may embed access to the services in custom applications to efficiently navigate and subset data in an automated fashion. NCDC currently provides gridded numerical model data through a THREDDS Data Server and GrADS Data Server which offers OPeNDAP and WCS access. In-situ network metadata are available through WMS and WFS while the corresponding time-series data are accessible through SOAP and REST web services. These in-situ services are a part of the Consortium of Universities for the Advancement of Hydrologic Science (CUAHSI) WaterOneFlow services, a consolidated access system for hydrologic data, and comply with the WaterOneFlow specifications. NCDC's Severe Weather Data Inventory (SWDI), which provides user access to archives of several datasets critical to the detection and evaluation of severe weather, is also accessible through REST/XML services. Providing cataloging, access and search capabilities for many of NCDC's datasets using community driven standards is a top priority for the ever increasing data volumes being archived at NCDC. Providing interoperable access is critical to supporting data stewardship across multiple scientific disciplines and user types. This demonstration will

  2. Sentinels in the Sky: Weather Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haynes, Robert

    This publication describes forecasting weather activity using satellites. Information is included on the development of weather satellites, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Satellite System (including the polar-orbiting satellites), and the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). The publication…

  3. Digital Video Needs for Oceanographic Images for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA): Phase 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    www.lib.noaa.gov) and the worldwide online library catalog, WorldCat (http://www.oclc.org/ worldcat /). WorldCat is the world’s largest and richest database...OE expeditions will also be available through NOAALINC and WorldCat . E. The Digital Atlas Working Group This group has developed a Geographic...future NOAA video portal, and WorldCat . Input will be provided from both the NOAA Data Centers and the Internet for video images. Multi-platform

  4. Applications of NASA and NOAA Satellite Observations by NASA's Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center in Response to Natural Disasters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Burks, Jason E.; McGrath, Kevin M.; Jedlovec, Gary J.

    2012-01-01

    NASA s Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center supports the transition of unique NASA and NOAA research activities to the operational weather forecasting community. SPoRT emphasizes real-time analysis and prediction out to 48 hours. SPoRT partners with NOAA s National Weather Service (NWS) Weather Forecast Offices (WFOs) and National Centers to improve current products, demonstrate future satellite capabilities and explore new data assimilation techniques. Recently, the SPoRT Center has been involved in several activities related to disaster response, in collaboration with NOAA s National Weather Service, NASA s Applied Sciences Disasters Program, and other partners.

  5. An evaluation of soundings, analyses and model forecasts derived from TIROS-N and NOAA-6 satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koehler, T. L.; Derber, J. C.; Schmidt, B. D.; Horn, L. H.

    1983-01-01

    TIROS-N and NOAA-6 temperature soundings over North America during three days in January 1980, and synoptic analyses and numerical-model forecasts derived from them, are compared with conventional data and analyses from NMC's limited-area fine-mesh model (LFM). The collocated sounding comparison revealed significant errors, especially near the surface and the tropopause. Satellite-derived thermal gradients were found to be weak, and thickness-analysis difference fields to propagate eastward, suggesting that sounding errors are correlated with synoptic patterns. The same pattern of anomalies is seen in the model forecasts. More detailed determinations of the correlation detected here could be used to optimize the assimilation of satellite soundings to conventional data.

  6. NOAA/APT Satellite Data for Online and Real Time Monitoring of Tungurahua Volcanic Eruption and Temperature Profile in Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaffer, G.; Nader, R.; Koudelka, O.

    2010-12-01

    The Ecuadorian Space Agency (EXA) has built HERMES, an online and real time ground station (GS) available to participating schools/universities for free access to NOAA and other remote sensing satellites. The GS is being used by students and scientists in Austria, USA, Japan and Ecuador to access NOAA satellites and spacecrafts online using only a computer and an internet connection with immediate access to satellite imaging and science data for their educational and research projects. The accuracy of analysed data can be used in research areas like forecasting, monitoring and damage assessment caused by eruptions. The HERMES internet-to-orbit gateway transforms a laptop into a full space-qualified GS on-the-move. The purpose of this paper is to present results of Andean mountain area in Ecuador being affected by high temperatures over 30 degree Celsius located over 3000 m high. From May 15 - 20, 2010, we received images from NOAA-18 and NOAA-19 using HERMS GS and applied Surface Temperature (ST), a remote sensing tool to process these images in real-time. Moreover, measured results have been validated by the records from the local meteorological stations network. Additionally, the visual observations revealed that due to high temperature, those glaciers were in fact receding and exposing terrain, never seen before. This paper also highlights the possible causes of this rapid thermal change. The second event dealt by this paper happened on May 28th; we captured a large ash cloud emanating from Tungurahua volcano eruption in the Andean region along with a large ash cloud from the Pacaya volcano in Guatemala using far infrared images from NOAA-18 satellite with overlaid geo-reference coordinates. Both events were analysed with remote sensing tools and image enhancement schemes like 'thermal', 'hvct' and 'fire', available in weather decoding software using free APT data. The aftermath correlation results of volcanic eruption with high temperature profile in the same

  7. Use of NOAA-N satellites for land/water discrimination and flood monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tappan, G.; Horvath, N. C.; Doraiswamy, P. C.; Engman, T.; Goss, D. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1983-01-01

    A tool for monitoring the extent of major floods was developed using data collected by the NOAA-6 advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR). A basic understanding of the spectral returns in AVHRR channels 1 and 2 for water, soil, and vegetation was reached using a large number of NOAA-6 scenes from different seasons and geographic locations. A look-up table classifier was developed based on analysis of the reflective channel relationships for each surface feature. The classifier automatically separated land from water and produced classification maps which were registered for a number of acquisitions, including coverage of a major flood on the Parana River of Argentina.

  8. In-flight measurement of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-10 static Earth sensor error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvie, E.; Filla, O.; Baker, D.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis performed in the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) Flight Dynamics Division (FDD) measures error in the static Earth sensor onboard the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-10 spacecraft using flight data. Errors are computed as the difference between Earth sensor pitch and roll angle telemetry and reference pitch and roll attitude histories propagated by gyros. The flight data error determination illustrates the effect on horizon sensing of systemic variation in the Earth infrared (IR) horizon radiance with latitude and season, as well as the effect of anomalies in the global IR radiance. Results of the analysis provide a comparison between static Earth sensor flight performance and that of scanning Earth sensors studied previously in the GSFC/FDD. The results also provide a baseline for evaluating various models of the static Earth sensor. Representative days from the NOAA-10 mission indicate the extent of uniformity and consistency over time of the global IR horizon. A unique aspect of the NOAA-10 analysis is the correlation of flight data errors with independent radiometric measurements of stratospheric temperature. The determination of the NOAA-10 static Earth sensor error contributes to realistic performance expectations for missions to be equipped with similar sensors.

  9. Mission Description and In-Flight Operations of ERBE Instruments on ERBS, NOAA 9, and NOAA 10 Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Dianne; Bush, Kathryn; Lee, Kam-Pui; Summerville, Jessica

    1998-01-01

    Instruments of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) have operated on three different Earth-orbiting spacecraft. The Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) is operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the NOAA 9 and NOAA 10 weather satellites are operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This paper is one of a series that describes the ERBE mission, in-orbit environments, instrument design and operational features, and data processing and validation procedures. This paper also describes the in-flight operations for the ERBE nonscanner instruments aboard the ERBS, NOAA 9, and NOAA 10 spacecraft from January 1990 through December 1990. Validation and archives of radiation measurements made by ERBE nonscanner instruments during this period were completed in August 1996. This paper covers normal and special operations of the spacecraft and instruments, operational anomalies, and the responses of the instruments to in-orbit and seasonal variations in the solar environment.

  10. A gradient model of vegetation and climate utilizing NOAA satellite imagery. Phase 1: Texas transect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greegor, D. H.; Norwine, J.

    1981-01-01

    A new experimental climatological model/variable termed the sponge, a measure of moisture availability based on daily temperature maxima and minima and precipitation, is tested for potential biogeographic, ecological, and agro-climatological applications. Results, depicted in tabular and graphic from, suggest that, as a generalized climatic index, sponge's simplicity and sensitivity make particularly appropriate for trans-regional biogeographic studies (e.g., large-area and global vegetation monitoring). The feasibility of utilizing NOAA/AVHRR data for vegetation classification was investigated and a vegetation gradient model that utilizes sponge, and AVHRR pixel data (channels 1 and 2) were obtained for 12 locations. The normalized difference values for the AVHRR data when plotted against vegetation characteristics (biomass, net productivity, leaf area) and sponge values suggest that a multivariate gradient model incorporating AVHRR and sponge data may indeed be useful in global vegetation stratification and monitoring.

  11. A gradient model of vegetation and climate utilizing NOAA satellite imagery. Phase 1: Texas transect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greegor, D.; Norwine, J. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    A climatological model/variable termed the sponge (a measure of moisture availability based on daily temperature maxima and minima, and precipitation) was tested for potential biogeograhic, ecological, and agro-climatological applications. Results, depicted in tabular and graphic form, suggest that, as generalized climatic index, sponge is particularly appropriate for large-area and global vegetation monitoring. The feasibility of utilizing NOAA/AVHRR data for vegetation classification was investigated and a vegetation gradient model that utilizes sponge and AVHRR data was initiated. Along an east-west Texas gradient, vegetation, sponge, and AVHRR pixel data (channels 1 and 2) were obtained for 12 locations. The normalized difference values for the AVHRR data when plotted against vegetation characteristics (biomass, net productivity, leaf area) and sponge values along the Texas gradient suggest that a multivariate gradient model incorporating AVHRR and sponge data may indeed be useful in global vegetation stratification and monitoring.

  12. Real-Time Environment Monitoring Using Data From Meteosat And Noaa Imaging Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ingen, H. A.; Venema, J. C.

    1988-01-01

    An operational remote sensing system is described which supports the environment monitoring using the multi sensor - multi temporal data acquired by the geostationary and polar orbiting weather satellites. The information derived from the satellite images are maps on a continental scale with data on the estimated rainfall, the vegetation index (NDVI), and for experimental use, with data on the soil water available for crops. The operational system, called ARTEMIS, will meet the information requirements of the FAO monitoring programmes in the areas of food and feed security and plant protection.

  13. GOES-R satellite solar panels ready for space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-07-01

    An array of five photovoltaic panels has been approved and is ready to be incorporated into the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) new Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites-R (GOES-R). GOES-R, a collaborative effort between NOAA and NASA, aims to provide more timely and accurate weather forecasts once in orbit. The satellite is scheduled to launch in early 2016.

  14. Comparison of the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and the NOAA Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) Program,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-10-01

    Gamma and X- Ray Spectrometer (SSB/A)......... .. VI-14 H. Gamma and X- Ray Detector (SSB/S and SSB/X) ..... o VI-14 I. Space Environment Monitor (SEM...of importance ): -- 1.5 nmi IR, 1.5 nmi visible, 0.3 nmi IR, 0.3 nmi visible. (Centralized applications) ---- 0.3 nmi visible, 0.3 nmi IR, 1.5 nmi...balloons, are important in satellite services. Collection and relay of messages from emergency transmitters -- borne by aircraft and ships as a part of the

  15. In Congress NOAA budget set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    In late November, President Ronald Reagan signed into law the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) budget, which is part of the appropriations bill for the Departments of Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary, and related agencies; at the same time, he also signed into law an amendment attached to that bill that prohibits the sale of the weather satellites (Eos, May 17, 1983, p. 377, and March 22, 1983, p. 113). Commercialization of the land remote sensing satellite system is still being considered, however.As a result of the conference between the House of Representatives and the Senate appropriations committees, the appropriation for NOAA totals $1020.6 million, with a program level of $1073.1 million. The appropriation is the money that comes from the federal treasury; the program level represents all of the funds—including treasury funds, transfers, residuals, etc.—actually available for the program. Strictly in terms of dollars, the total fiscal 1984 NOAA appropriation is almost level with the fiscal 1983 appropriation of $1000.9 million. In fiscal 1984, NOAA's research core, called Operations, Research, and Facilities (ORF), receives an appropriation of $988.2 million, with a program level of $1014.8 million

  16. Using CLARREO for spectral calibration of NOAA operational satellite sensors: Lessons learned from studies with AIRS and IASI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, L.; Cao, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) Mission will provide the spectrally resolved thermal IR and reflected solar measurements with high absolute accuracy. These SI traceable measurements will provide the basis for absolute calibration for a wide range of visible and infrared (IR) Earth observing sensors. In particular, CLARREO can potentially reduce the spectral uncertainties of NOAA’s operational satellite sensors. This study explores the potential of using CLARREO measurements for on-orbit spectral calibration for future NOAA operational sensors on both polar-orbiting and geostationary platforms. Lessons learned from the on-orbit spectral calibration of current systems will be reviewed based on our studies using Atmospheric Infrared Sounders (AIRS) and Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) as quasi on-orbit standards in assessing Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), GOES Imagers and Sounders, and High Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS). The on-going effort of spectral cross-check between AIRS and IASI with simultaneous nadir observations (SNOs) will be discussed. This method will also be used to verify the Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) using CLARREO measurements. Similar work is planned to verify GOES-R Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) using CLARREO based on studies between IASI/AIRS and GOES Imager as proxy.

  17. Development, Validation, and Potential Enhancements to the Second-Generation Operational Aerosol Product at the National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stowe, Larry L.; Ignatov, Alexander M.; Singh, Ramdas R.

    1997-01-01

    A revised (phase 2) single-channel algorithm for aerosol optical thickness, tau(sup A)(sub SAT), retrieval over oceans from radiances in channel 1 (0.63 microns) of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) has been implemented at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service for the NOAA 14 satellite launched December 30, 1994. It is based on careful validation of its operational predecessor (phase 1 algorithm), implemented for NOAA 14 in 1989. Both algorithms scale the upward satellite radiances in cloud-free conditions to aerosol optical thickness using an updated radiative transfer model of the ocean and atmosphere. Application of the phase 2 algorithm to three matchup Sun-photometer and satellite data sets, one with NOAA 9 in 1988 and two with NOAA 11 in 1989 and 1991, respectively, show systematic error is less than 10%, with a random error of sigma(sub tau) approx. equal 0.04. First results of tau(sup A)(sub SAT) retrievals from NOAA 14 using the phase 2 algorithm, and from checking its internal consistency, are presented. The potential two-channel (phase 3) algorithm for the retrieval of an aerosol size parameter, such as the Junge size distribution exponent, by adding either channel 2 (0.83 microns) from the current AVHRR instrument, or a 1.6-microns channel to be available on the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission and the NOAA-KLM satellites by 1997 is under investigation. The possibility of using this additional information in the retrieval of a more accurate estimate of aerosol optical thickness is being explored.

  18. The Meteosat ground stations for NOAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Berg, C. M. A.

    1993-05-01

    In September 1991, it was decided that ESA would support the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) by operating the European Meteosat-3 satellite around the much more westerly position of 90 deg W. As a result, ESOC's Stations and Communications Engineering Department was charged with providing additional ground facilities at the NOAA and NASA sites on Wallops Island, at ESA's Kourou facilities in French Guiana, and at ESOC itself. These new facilities had to be fully operational within one year of the commitment being made.

  19. User's guide to image processing applications of the NOAA satellite HRPT/AVHRR data. Part 1: Introduction to the satellite system and its applications. Part 2: Processing and analysis of AVHRR imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huh, Oscar Karl; Leibowitz, Scott G.; Dirosa, Donald; Hill, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The use of NOAA Advanced Very High Resolution Radar/High Resolution Picture Transmission (AVHRR/HRPT) imagery for earth resource applications is provided for the applications scientist for use within the various Earth science, resource, and agricultural disciplines. A guide to processing NOAA AVHRR data using the hardware and software systems integrated for this NASA project is provided. The processing steps from raw data on computer compatible tapes (1B data format) through usable qualitative and quantitative products for applications are given. The manual is divided into two parts. The first section describes the NOAA satellite system, its sensors, and the theoretical basis for using these data for environmental applications. Part 2 is a hands-on description of how to use a specific image processing system, the International Imaging Systems, Inc. (I2S) Model 75 Array Processor and S575 software, to process these data.

  20. Differences in visible and near-IR responses, and derived vegetation indices, for the NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 AVHRRs: a case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallo, Kevin P.; Eidenshink, Jeffery C.

    1988-01-01

    This study evaluates the differences in the visible and near-IR responses of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers (AVHRR) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-9 and -10 satellites for coincident sample locations. The study also evaluates the differences in vegetation indices computed from those data. Data were acquired of the southeast portion of the United States for the 6 December 1986 daylight orbits of NOAA-9 and NOAA-10 satellites. The results suggest that, with appropriate gain and offset, the vegetation indices of the two sensor systems may be interchangeable for assessment of land surfaces.

  1. Droughts of the Late 1980s in the United States as Derived from NOAA Polar-Orbiting Satellite Data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogan, Felix N.

    1995-05-01

    Drought is one of the most adverse and powerful weather-related disasters that occur every year across a portion of the United States. The consequences of droughts quite often can be devastating. To mitigate these consequences, droughts require careful monitoring. Recently, NOAA's National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service developed a new Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer-based vegetation condition index (VCI) that showed good results when it was used for drought detection and tracking. The VCI is a vegetation index with reduced noise and is adjusted for land climate, ecology, and weather conditions. This index provides a quantitative estimate of weather impact on vegetation and also measures vegetation conditions. Several large-area experiments showed that the VCI had excellent ability to detect drought and to measure the time of its onset and its intensity, duration, and impact on vegetation. The VCI provides accurate drought information not only for the cases with well-defined, prolonged, widespread, and very strong droughts, but also for very localized, short-term, and ill-defined droughts. The advantages of this index compared to conventional ground data are in providing more comprehensive, timely, and accurate drought information. This paper describes the methodology and technical principles used to derive the vegetation condition index, explores data processing, and gives many examples of VCI application for drought monitoring in the United States during 1985-90. The spatial and temporal patterns of VCI-derived drought were in a very good agreement with the identical patterns identified from precipitation and yield anomalies.

  2. 76 FR 9209 - Draft NOAA National Aquaculture Policy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... February 16, 2011 Part IV Department of Commerce National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Draft NOAA... and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XA214 Draft NOAA National Aquaculture Policy AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce....

  3. GIS Services, Visualization Products, and Interoperability at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climatic Data Center (NCDC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, R.; Ansari, S.; Reid, G.; Lott, N.; Del Greco, S.

    2007-12-01

    The main goal in developing and deploying Geographic Information System (GIS) services at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) is to provide users with simple access to data archives while integrating new and informative climate products. Several systems at NCDC provide a variety of climatic data in GIS formats and/or map viewers. The Online GIS Map Services provide users with data discovery options which flow into detailed product selection maps, which may be queried using standard "region finder" tools or gazetteer (geographical dictionary search) functions. Each tabbed selection offers steps to help users progress through the systems. A series of additional base map layers or data types have been added to provide companion information. New map services include: Severe Weather Data Inventory, Local Climatological Data, Divisional Data, Global Summary of the Day, and Normals/Extremes products. THREDDS Data Server technology is utilized to provide access to gridded multidimensional datasets such as Model, Satellite and Radar. This access allows users to download data as a gridded NetCDF file, which is readable by ArcGIS. In addition, users may subset the data for a specific geographic region, time period, height range or variable prior to download. The NCDC Weather Radar Toolkit (WRT) is a client tool which accesses Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) data locally or remotely from the NCDC archive, NOAA FTP server or any URL or THREDDS Data Server. The WRT Viewer provides tools for custom data overlays, Web Map Service backgrounds, animations and basic filtering. The export of images and movies is provided in multiple formats. The WRT Data Exporter allows for data export in both vector polygon (Shapefile, Well-Known Text) and raster (GeoTIFF, ESRI Grid, VTK, NetCDF, GrADS) formats. As more users become accustom to GIS, questions of better, cheaper, faster access soon follow. Expanding use and availability can best be accomplished through

  4. The NOAA Big Data Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2015-12-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is a Big Data producer, generating tens of terabytes per day from hundreds of sensors on satellites, radars, aircraft, ships, and buoys, and from numerical models. These data are of critical importance and value for NOAA's mission to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans, and coasts. In order to facilitate extracting additional value from this information, NOAA has established Cooperative Research and Development Agreements (CRADAs) with five Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS) providers — Amazon, Google, IBM, Microsoft, Open Cloud Consortium — to determine whether hosting NOAA data in publicly-accessible Clouds alongside on-demand computational capability stimulates the creation of new value-added products and services and lines of business based on the data, and if the revenue generated by these new applications can support the costs of data transmission and hosting. Each IaaS provider is the anchor of a "Data Alliance" which organizations or entrepreneurs can join to develop and test new business or research avenues. This presentation will report on progress and lessons learned during the first 6 months of the 3-year CRADAs.

  5. NOAA requirements and programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanders, A. F.

    1975-01-01

    Service programs in NOAA that contemplate using the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GEOS) Data Collection System (DCS) are considered. The GEOS DCS will be operated by the National Environmental Satellite Service of NOAA as an integral part of the national operation environmental satellite program. This plan is concerned with that part of the GEOS program connected with collection and relay of data from remote locations. Service programs include: (1) hydrological data collection; (2) oceanographic data collection; (3) marine observations from data buoys; (4) Tsunami warning service; and (5) meteorological service.

  6. Inter-Satellite Calibration Linkages for the Visible and Near-Infrared Channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer on the NOAA-7, -9, and -11 Spacecraft. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    NagarajaRao, C. R.; Chen, J.

    1996-01-01

    The post-launch degradation of the visible (channel 1: 0.58- 068 microns) and near-infrared (channel 2: approx. 0.72 - l.l microns) channels of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) on the NOAA-7, -9, and -11 Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) was estimated using the south-eastern part of the Libyan Desert as a radiometrically stable calibration target. The relative annual degradation rates, in per cent, for the two channels are, respectively: 3.6 and 4.3 (NOAA-7); 5.9 and 3.5 (NOAA-9); and 1.2 and 2.0 (NOAA-11). Using the relative degradation rates thus determined, in conjunction with absolute calibrations based on congruent path aircraft/satellite radiance measurements over White Sands, New Mexico (USA), the variation in time of the absolute gain or slope of the AVHRR on NOAA-9 was evaluated. Inter-satellite calibration linkages were established, using the AVHRR on NOAA-9 as a normalization standard. Formulae for the calculation of calibrated radiances and albedos (AVHRR usage), based on these interlinkages, are given for the three AVHRRs.

  7. 76 FR 36094 - Draft NOAA Scientific Integrity Policy and Handbook; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Draft NOAA Scientific Integrity Policy and Handbook... Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Draft NOAA Scientific Integrity Policy and Handbook for Public Review. SUMMARY: NOAA's draft scientific integrity policy is available for public...

  8. 75 FR 5566 - NOAA Cooperative Institutes (CIs): (1) A CI To Support NOAA Research Facilities in the Pacific...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-03

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA Cooperative Institutes (CIs): (1) A CI To Support NOAA... Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of... three new NOAA cooperative institutes (CIs): (1) A CI To Support NOAA Research Facilities in the...

  9. Ozone measurements from the NOAA-9 and the Nimbus-7 satellites: Implications of short and long term variabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; McPeters, R.D.; Hudson, R.D. ); Planet, W. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper gives an overview of the measurements of total ozone and ozone profiles by the SBUV/2 instrument on the NOAA-9 spacecraft relative to similar measurements from the SBUV and TOMS instruments on Nimbus-7. It is shown that during the three year period from March 14, 1985, to February 28, 1988, when these data sets overlap, there have been significant changes in the calibrations of the three instruments that may be attributed to diffuser plate degradation (for SBUV/TOMS) and to the drift of the NOAA-9 orbit to later equator crossing times (for SBUV/2). These changes in instrument characteristics have affected the absolute values of the trends derived from the three instruments, but their geophysical characteristics and response to short term variations are accurate and correlate well among the three instruments. For example, the total column ozone measured by the three instruments shows excellent agreement with respect to its day to day, seasonal, and latitudinal variabilities. At high latitudes, the day to day fluctuations in total ozone show a strong positive correlation with temperature in the lower stratosphere, as one might expect from the dynamical coupling of the two parameters at these latitudes.

  10. Ozone measurements from the NOAA-9 and the Nimbus-7 satellites - Implications of short and long term variabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Mcpeters, R. D.; Hudson, R. D.; Planet, W.

    1990-01-01

    An overview of the measurements of total ozone and ozone profiles by the SBUV/2 instrument on the NOAA-9 spacecraft relative to similar measurements from the solar backscatter ultraviolet (SBUV) and TOMS instruments on Nimbus-7 is presented. During the three-year period from March 14, 1985 to February 28, 1988, when these data sets overlap, it is shown that there have been significant changes in the calibrations of the three instruments that may be attributed to diffuser plate degradation (for SBUV/TOMS) and to the drift of the NOAA-9 orbit to later equator crossing times (for SBUV/2). Though these instrument characteristic changes have effected the absolute values of the trends derived from the three instruments, their geophysical characteristics and response to short-term variations are accurate and correlate well among the three instruments. It is seen that the total column ozone measured by the three instruments shows good agreement with respect to its day-to-day, seasonal, and latitudinal variabilities.

  11. Providing satellite systems for the national weather satellite services.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroud, W. G.; Press, H.; Stampfl, R. A.

    1973-01-01

    Discussion of cooperative arrangements and agreements among NASA, the Department of Commerce, and other governmental agencies in developing and operating meteorological satellite systems. The development of present interagency agreements and their conditions are discussed along with differences from the usual NASA program introduced by the supplier-client relationship between NASA and NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration).

  12. High-resolution satellite imagery for mesoscale meteorological studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David B.; Flament, Pierre; Bernstein, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    In this article high-resolution satellite imagery from a variety of meteorological and environmental satellites is compared. Digital datasets from Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), Landsat, and Satellite Pour l'Observation de la Terre (SPOT) satellites were archived as part of the 1990 Hawaiian Rainband Project (HaRP) and form the basis of the comparisons. During HaRP, GOES geostationary satellite coverage was marginal, so the main emphasis is on the polar-orbiting satellites.

  13. 75 FR 82377 - NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) Strategic Plan FY 2011-FY 2015

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER... Atmospheric Research (OAR), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of availability and request for public comment. SUMMARY: NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration...

  14. The Veterans Administration Experiments in Health Communications on the Applications Technology Satellite (ATS-6). Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Kathryn S.

    Because many of the Veterans Administration hospitals in Appalachia are located great distances from medical teaching facilities, high powered communication satellites have been employed to facilitate quality two-way communication between medical personnel scattered throughout the region. To achieve diagnostic, therapeutic, and educational…

  15. Mission description and in-flight operations of ERBE instruments on ERBS and NOAA 10 spacecraft, February 1987 - February 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Busch, Kathryn A.; Degnan, Keith T.

    1994-01-01

    Instruments of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are operating on three different Earth-orbiting spacecraft. The Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) is operated by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and the NOAA 9 and NOAA 10 weather satellites are operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This paper is the third in a series that describes the ERBE mission in-orbit environments, instrument design and operational features, and data processing and validation procedures. This paper describes the in-flight operations for the ERBE instruments aboard the ERBS and NOAA 10 spacecraft for the period from February 1987 through February 1990. Validation and archival of radiation measurements made by ERBE instruments during this period were completed in May 1992. This paper covers normal and special operations of the spacecraft and instruments, operational anomalies, and the responses of the instruments to in-orbit and seasonal variations in the solar environment.

  16. Ozone measurements from the NOAA-9 and the Nimbus-7 satellites: Implications of short and long term variabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Mcpeters, Richard D.; Hudson, R. D.; Planet, Walter G.

    1990-01-01

    An overview is given of the measurements of total ozne and ozone profiles by the SBUV/2 instrument on the NOAA-9 spacecraft relative to similar measurements from the SBUV and TOMS instruments on Nimbus-7. It is shown that during the three year period from March 14, 1985, to February 28, 1988, when these data sets overlap, there have been significant changes in the calibrations of the three instruments which may be attributed to the drift of the NOSS-9 orbit to later equator crossing times (for SBUV/2). These changes in instrument characteristics have affected the absolute values of the trends derived from the three instruments, but their geophysical characteristics and response to short term variations are accurate and correlate well among the three instruments. For example, the total column ozone measured by the three instruments shows excellent agreement with respect to its day to day, seasonal, and latitudinal variabilities. At high latitudes, the day to day fluctuations in total ozone show a strong positive correlation with temperature in the lower stratosphere, as one might expect from the dynamical coupling of the two parameters at these latitudes.

  17. The solar cycle variation of ozone in the stratosphere inferred from Nimbus 7 and NOAA 11 satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chandra, S.; Mcpeters, R. D.

    1994-01-01

    The combined Nimbus 7 solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) and NOAA 11 SBUV/2 ozone data, covering a period of more than a solar cycle (about 15 years), are used to study the UV response of ozone in the stratosphere. The study shows that about 2% change in total column ozone and about 5-7% change in ozone mixing ratio in the upper stratosphere (0.7 to 2 hPa) may be attributed to the change in the solar UV flux over a solar cycle. In the upper stratosphere, where photochemical processes are expected to play a major role, the measured solar cycle variation of ozone is significantly larger than inferred either from the photochemical models or from the ozone response to the 27-day solar UV modulation. For example, the observed solar cycle related change in ozone mixing ratio at 2 hPa is about 1% for 1% change in the solar UV flux near 200 nm. The inferred change in ozone from either the photochemical models or from the 27-day ozone-UV response is about a factor of 2-3 lower than this value.

  18. The solar cycle variation of ozone in the stratosphere inferred from Nimbus 7 and NOAA 11 satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Chandra, S.; Mcpeters, R.D.

    1994-10-01

    The combined Nimbus 7 solar backscattered ultraviolet (SBUV) and NOAA 11 SBUV/2 ozone data, covering a period of more than a solar cycle (about 15 years), are used to study the UV response of ozone in the stratosphere. The study shows that about 2% change in total column ozone and about 5-7% change in ozone mixing ratio in the upper stratosphere (0.7 to 2 hPa) may be attributed to the change in the solar UV flux over a solar cycle. In the upper stratosphere, where photochemical processes are expected to play a major role, the measured solar cycle variation of ozone is significantly larger than inferred either from the photochemical models or from the ozone response to the 27-day solar UV modulation. For example, the observed solar cycle related change in ozone mixing ratio at 2 hPa is about 1% for 1% change in the solar UV flux near 200 nm. The inferred change in ozone from either the photochemical models or from the 27-day ozone-UV response is about a factor of 2-3 lower than this value.

  19. Using Ncl to Visualize and Analyse of NASA/NOAA Satellite Data in Format of Netcdf, Hdf, Hdf-Eos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, W.

    2014-12-01

    The NCAR Command Language (NCL, http://www.ncl.ucar.edu), a product of National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) and sponsored by the National Science Foundation, is a free interpreted language designed specifically for scientific data processing and visualization. NCL has robust file input of NetCDF, HDF, HDF-EOS, and can be OPenDAP-enabled. NCL team has developed examples to handle some of NASA data and posted at: http://www.ncl.ucar.edu/Applications/HDF.shtml. The HDF group has used developed more examples at:http://hdfeos.org/zoo. In order to serve the community better, and to handle future NASA/NOAA data, such as: AIRS, TRMM, MERRA, TOMS, OMI, HIRDLS, BUV, SWDB, GSSTF, GOSAT/ACOS, MOD, MYD, NPP, VIIRS, MCD, VIP, WELD, GED, CALIPSO, CERES, MISR, MOPITT, etc., better, the NCL team is willing to share source code, and examples used to visualize and analyze the above data, and want to hear from the community to improve our work.

  20. Mission description and in-flight operations of ERBE instruments on ERBS, NOAA 9, and NOAA 10 spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, William L.; Bush, Kathryn A.; Degnan, Keith T.; Howerton, Clayton E.; Tolson, Carol J.

    1992-01-01

    Instruments of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are operating on three different Earth-orbiting spacecraft. The Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS) is operated by NASA, and NOAA 9 and NOAA 10 weather satellites are operated by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This paper is the second in a series that describes the ERBE mission, and data processing and validation procedures. This paper describes the spacecraft and instrument operations for the second full year of in-orbit operations, which extend from February 1986 through January 1987. Validation and archival of radiation measurements made by ERBE instruments during this second year of operation were completed in July 1991. This period includes the only time, November 1986 through January 1987, during which all ERBE instruments aboard the ERBE, NOAA 9, and NOAA 10 spacecraft were simultaneously operational. This paper covers normal and special operations of the spacecraft and instruments, operational anomalies, and the responses of the instruments to in-orbit and seasonal variations in the solar environment.

  1. TRAN*STAR 2 evaluation for NOAA data buoy office, part A. [utilizing the US Navy Navigation Satellite System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The capability of the TRAN*STAR 2 receiver equipment utilizing the U.S. Navy Navigation Satellite System to provide reliable position locations with reasonable accuracy and frequency was evaluated. Two receivers, an antenna, and a test set were procured, and position fix data collected at NSTL from a fixed known location during the months of May and June. The data were processed through a computer program and analyzed. The results of the evaluation are summarized.

  2. Design and Flight Performance of NOAA-K Spacecraft Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Chetty, P. R. K.; Spitzer, Tom; Chilelli, P.

    1999-01-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates the Polar Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) spacecraft (among others) to support weather forecasting, severe storm tracking, and meteorological research by the National Weather Service (NWS). The latest in the POES series of spacecraft, named as NOAA-KLMNN, is in orbit and four more are in various phases of development. The NOAA-K spacecraft was launched on May 13, 1998. Each of these spacecraft carry three Nickel-Cadmium batteries designed and manufactured by Lockheed Martin. The battery, which consists of seventeen 40 Ah cells manufactured by SAFT, provides the spacecraft power during the ascent phase, orbital eclipse and when the power demand is in excess of the solar array capability. The NOAA-K satellite is in a 98 degree inclination, 7:30AM ascending node orbit. In this orbit the satellite experiences earth occultation only 25% of the year. This paper provides a brief overview of the power subsystem, followed by the battery design and qualification, the cell life cycle test data, and the performance during launch and in orbit.

  3. NASA/NOAA implementation of the USAID-sponsored satellite ground station and data processing facility for Bangladesh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dodge, J. C.; Vermillion, C. H.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of a project to transfer multiple environmental satellite data reception, processing, and interpretation capabilities from the U.S. to Bangladesh. The goal of the project is to improve the management of resources related primarily to agriculture, water development, forestry, and fisheries. It is also hoped to improve the existing cyclone/storm surge warning system. An account is given of the interagency and international cooperation underlying the project. The remote-sensing installation in Dhaka, Bangladesh, is described, and the most likely system applications are summarized. Attention is also given to the special requirements concerning this type of technology transfer, and an assessment is made of the project's practical value to Bangladesh.

  4. Envisioning Improvements in NOAA Environmental Data Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2012-12-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) produces and maintains a huge, heterogeneous and continuously updated collection of environmental data from a diverse suite of observing systems including satellites, radars, aircraft, ships, in situ sensors, and animal tagging. These data are an irreplaceable national resource and must be discoverable, accessible, well-documented, and preserved for future users. Figure 1 illustrates the concept of operations for the desired target architecture. In this paper we describe current work toward these goals. The NOAA Environmental Data Management (EDM) Committee and other collaborators in the agency are developing an EDM Framework that includes over-arching Principles, Governance, Resources, Standards, Architecture, Assessment, and Infrastructure which apply broadly to many classes of data, and individual Data Lifecycles for particular data collections. See Figure 2. This Framework will inform, organize and support NOAA data management activities. NOAA Procedural Directives regarding archiving, data management planning, metadata, and data sharing by grantees are now being implemented; new Directives regarding data access and data citation are being developed. We have begun initial assessments of how data from our primary observing systems are managed. A Dashboard to measure and encourage progress in these areas is being prototyped. We have established an EDM Wiki to share best practices. Finally, participation in standards bodies and collaboration with other agencies and organizations is helping us to maximize compatibility and leverage existing work.Figure 1: Conceptual overview of the desired target state of NOAA data management activities. Not all activities are illustrated. Figure 2: High-level overview of the conceptual framework for environmental data management activities.

  5. 75 FR 10755 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2010 NOAA Engagement Survey Tool

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; 2010 NOAA Engagement Survey Tool AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), DOC. ACTION: Notice... instrument and instructions should be directed to Louisa Koch, Director, NOAA Office of Education, (202)...

  6. 77 FR 14347 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA Restoration Center Performance Progress...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA Restoration Center Performance Progress Report AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA... Robin.Bruckner@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract This request is for an extension of...

  7. 77 FR 65674 - Solicitation for Members of the NOAA Science Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Solicitation for Members of the NOAA Science Advisory Board AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of solicitation for members of the NOAA Science Advisory Board....

  8. 78 FR 59339 - Intracoastal Waterway Route “Magenta Line” on NOAA Nautical Charts

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Intracoastal Waterway Route ``Magenta Line'' on NOAA Nautical Charts AGENCY: National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. (NOAA... Intracoastal Waterways, produced by the U.S. Coast and Geodetic Survey and, subsequently, NOAA, have...

  9. NOAA backscatter studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Post, Madison J.

    1991-01-01

    In the past year, NOAA has measured and analyzed another year's worth of backscatter over Boulder, CO. The average profile was computed from 80 satellite observations of backscatter spread throughout the year, using NOAA's CO2 coherent lidar operating at a wavelength of 10.59 microns. The seasonal averages show a familiar trend (highest backscattering in spring, perhaps due to Asian dust or biomass burning, and lowest backscattering in fall). The 1990 average profile was not significantly different from the 1988 or 1989 profiles, except that it displays a slight increase in the upper troposphere, perhaps due to the Redoubt Volcano. The NOAA's backscatter processing program (BETA) was refined to enable the calculation of gaseous absorption effects based on rawinsonde measurements, as well as using atmospheric models. NOAA participated in two intercomparisons of aerosol measuring instruments near Boulder, called FRLAB (Front Range Lidar, Aircraft, and Balloon Experiment). Considerable effort was also put into developing a multiagency science proposal to NASA headquarters to work with both JPL and NASA-Marshall to produce an airborne Doppler lidar facility for the DC-8.

  10. Satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, J.A.; Matthews, M.S.

    1986-01-01

    The present work is based on a conference: Natural Satellites, Colloquium 77 of the IAU, held at Cornell University from July 5 to 9, 1983. Attention is given to the background and origins of satellites, protosatellite swarms, the tectonics of icy satellites, the physical characteristics of satellite surfaces, and the interactions of planetary magnetospheres with icy satellite surfaces. Other topics include the surface composition of natural satellites, the cratering of planetary satellites, the moon, Io, and Europa. Consideration is also given to Ganymede and Callisto, the satellites of Saturn, small satellites, satellites of Uranus and Neptune, and the Pluto-Charon system.

  11. Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting (TAMDAR) Sensor Validation and Verification on National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Lockheed WP-3D Aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsoucalas, George; Daniels, Taumi S.; Zysko, Jan; Anderson, Mark V.; Mulally, Daniel J.

    2010-01-01

    As part of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Aviation Safety and Security Program, the Tropospheric Airborne Meteorological Data Reporting project (TAMDAR) developed a low-cost sensor for aircraft flying in the lower troposphere. This activity was a joint effort with support from Federal Aviation Administration, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and industry. This paper reports the TAMDAR sensor performance validation and verification, as flown on board NOAA Lockheed WP-3D aircraft. These flight tests were conducted to assess the performance of the TAMDAR sensor for measurements of temperature, relative humidity, and wind parameters. The ultimate goal was to develop a small low-cost sensor, collect useful meteorological data, downlink the data in near real time, and use the data to improve weather forecasts. The envisioned system will initially be used on regional and package carrier aircraft. The ultimate users of the data are National Centers for Environmental Prediction forecast modelers. Other users include air traffic controllers, flight service stations, and airline weather centers. NASA worked with an industry partner to develop the sensor. Prototype sensors were subjected to numerous tests in ground and flight facilities. As a result of these earlier tests, many design improvements were made to the sensor. The results of tests on a final version of the sensor are the subject of this report. The sensor is capable of measuring temperature, relative humidity, pressure, and icing. It can compute pressure altitude, indicated air speed, true air speed, ice presence, wind speed and direction, and eddy dissipation rate. Summary results from the flight test are presented along with corroborative data from aircraft instruments.

  12. Evaluating ammonia (NH3) predictions in the NOAA National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NAQFC) using in situ aircraft, ground-level, and satellite measurements from the DISCOVER-AQ Colorado campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battye, William H.; Bray, Casey D.; Aneja, Viney P.; Tong, Daniel; Lee, Pius; Tang, Youhua

    2016-09-01

    The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is responsible for forecasting elevated levels of air pollution within the National Air Quality Forecast Capability (NAQFC). The current research uses measurements gathered in the DISCOVER-AQ Colorado field campaign and the concurrent Front Range Air Pollution and Photochemistry Experiment (FRAPPE) to test performance of the NAQFC CMAQ modeling framework for predicting NH3. The DISCOVER-AQ and FRAPPE field campaigns were carried out in July and August 2014 in Northeast Colorado. Model predictions are compared with measurements of NH3 gas concentrations and the NH4+ component of fine particulate matter concentrations measured directly by the aircraft in flight. We also compare CMAQ predictions with NH3 measurements from ground-based monitors within the DISCOVER-AQ Colorado geographic domain, and from the Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) on the Aura satellite. In situ aircraft measurements carried out in July and August of 2014 suggest that the NAQFC CMAQ model underestimated the NH3 concentration in Northeastern Colorado by a factor of ∼2.7 (NMB = -63%). Ground-level monitors also produced a similar result. Average satellite-retrieved NH3 levels also exceeded model predictions by a factor of 1.5-4.2 (NMB = -33 to -76%). The underestimation of NH3 was not accompanied by an underestimation of particulate NH4+, which is further controlled by factors including acid availability, removal rate, and gas-particle partition. The average measured concentration of NH4+ was close to the average predication (NMB = +18%). Seasonal patterns measured at an AMoN site in the region suggest that the underestimation of NH3 is not due to the seasonal allocation of emissions, but to the overall annual emissions estimate. The underestimation of NH3 varied across the study domain, with the largest differences occurring in a region of intensive agriculture near Greeley, Colorado, and in the vicinity of Denver. The

  13. NOAA seeks healthy budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    The small, crowded room of the House side of the U.S. Capitol building belied the large budget of $1,611,991,000 requested for Fiscal Year 1992 by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. John A. Knauss, Undersecretary for Oceans and Atmosphere, U.S. Department of Commerce, delivered his testimony on February 28 before the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, and State, the Judiciary and Related Agencies. He told the subcommittee that the budget “attempts to balance the two goals of maintaining NOAA's position as an important science agency and addressing the serious budget problems that the government continues to face.”Climate and global change, modernization of the National Weather Service, and the Coastal Ocean Science program are NOAA's three ongoing, high-priority initiatives that the budget addresses. Also, three additional initiatives—a NOAA-wide program to improve environmental data management, President Bush's multiagency Coastal America initiative, and a seafood safety program administered jointly by NOAA and the Food and Drug Administration—are addressed.

  14. 75 FR 15686 - NOAA'S Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) Strategic Plan FY 2011-FY 2015

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA'S Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER... Atmospheric Research (OAR), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of availability and request for public comment. ] SUMMARY: NOAA'S Office of Ocean Exploration...

  15. 78 FR 57131 - Membership of the NOAA Performance Review Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-17

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Membership of the NOAA Performance Review Board AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice of Membership of the NOAA Performance Review Board (PRB). SUMMARY: In accordance with 5 U.S.C. 4314(c)(4),...

  16. Data management in NOAA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callicott, William M.

    1993-01-01

    The NOAA archives contain 150 terabytes of data in digital form, most of which are the high volume GOES satellite image data. There are 630 data bases containing 2,350 environmental variables. There are 375 million film records and 90 million paper records in addition to the digital data base. The current data accession rate is 10 percent per year and the number of users are increasing at a 10 percent annual rate. NOAA publishes 5,000 publications and distributes over one million copies to almost 41,000 paying customers. Each year, over six million records are key entered from manuscript documents and about 13,000 computer tapes and 40,000 satellite hardcopy images are entered into the archive. Early digital data were stored on punched cards and open reel computer tapes. In the late seventies, an advanced helical scan technology (AMPEX TBM) was implemented. Now, punched cards have disappeared, the TBM system was abandoned, most data stored on open reel tapes have been migrated to 3480 cartridges, many specialized data sets were distributed on CD ROM's, special archives are being copied to 12 inch optical WORM disks, 5 1/4 inch magneto-optical disks were employed for workstation applications, and 8 mm EXABYTE tapes are planned for major data collection programs. The rapid expansion of new data sets, some of which constitute large volumes of data, coupled with the need for vastly improved access mechanisms, portability, and improved longevity are factors which will influence NOAA's future systems approaches for data management.

  17. Data management in NOAA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callicott, William M.

    1992-01-01

    NOAA has 11 terabytes of digital data stored on 240,000 computer tapes. There are an additional 100 terabytes (TB) of geostationary satellite data stored in digital form on specially configured SONY U-Matic video tapes at the University of Wisconsin. There are over 90,000,000 non-digital form records in manuscript, film, printed, and chart form which are not easily accessible. The three NOAA Data Centers service 6,000 requests per year and publish 5,000 bulletins which are distributed to 40,000 subscribers. Seventeen CD-ROM's have been produced. Thirty thousand computer tapes containing polar satellite data are being copied to 12 inch WORM optical disks for research applications. The present annual data accumulation rate of 10 TB will grow to 30 TB in 1994 and to 100 TB by the year 2000. The present storage and distribution technologies with their attendant support systems will be overwhelmed by these increases if not improved. Increased user sophistication coupled with more precise measurement technologies will demand better quality control mechanisms, especially for those data maintained in an indefinite archive. There is optimism that the future will offer improved media technologies to accommodate the volumes of data. With the advanced technologies, storage and performance monitoring tools will be pivotal to the successful long-term management of data and information.

  18. NOAA Lists 20 Coral Species as Threatened

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-09-01

    Twenty coral species have been listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act (ESA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced on 27 August. This is NOAA's largest ESA rule making. The coral species include 15 found in the Indo-Pacific region and 5 that are located in the Caribbean. They join two other Caribbean coral species that NOAA listed as threatened in 2006.

  19. Clash over NOAA budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    At the April 26 hearing on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) budget by a Senate Appropriations subcommittee, Sen. Lowell P. Weicker, Jr . (R-Conn.), decried the budget cuts proposed by NOAA and the Reagan Administration. ‘I think it would be almost criminal’ to agree to the proposed cuts, Weicker said, adding that although he understands the broad policy to trim the budget, the proposed cuts amounted to ‘piecemeal emasculation … I won't be part of it.’‘I cannot help but note with regret that for the third year in a row the Administration proposed drastic reductions in oceans-related research and development,’ said Weicker during the hearing conducted by the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on the departments of Commerce, Justice, and State, and the Judiciary. ‘The proposed 37% cut in funding for fisheries programs combined with a 40% cut in other oceans and coastal activities would add up to an $85 million loss for NOAA's oceans programs. To make cuts of this magnitude would be, in effect, to write off the great potential the oceans have for feeding our people and helping to power our economy,’ the Connecticut senator said. ‘In short, the potential of the oceans as well as the pressures placed upon them have never been so great—and they will be even greater tomorrow. In the face of Administration indifference and outright hostility, Congress must maintain its commitment to the oceans and to the positive contributions they can make to our future.’

  20. Chlorofluorocarbon-11, -12, and nitrous oxide measurements at the NOAA/GMCC (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Geophysical Monitoring for Climatic Change) baseline stations (16 September 1973 to 31 December 1979)

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, T.M.; Komhyr, W.D.; Dutton, E.G.

    1985-06-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Air Resources Laboratory (NOAA/ARL) began measuring chlorofluorocarbon-11 in 1973 because of the interest in this anthropogenic pollutant as a tracer for the study of mass transfer processes in the atmosphere and the oceans. Interest in chlorofluorocarbon-11, and in chlorofluorocarbon-12 and nitrous oxide, was heightened during the mid-1970's with the realization that these compounds can be decomposed by photolysis in the stratosphere to cause stratospheric ozone destruction by released chlorine atoms. Measurements of chlorofluorocarbon-12 and nitrous oxide were begun by NOAA/ARL in 1977. The report describes the evolution of the chlorofluorocarbon and N/sub 2/O measurement programs through 1979. By that time, the sample collection and analysis techniques became standardized, and have remained the same to the present.

  1. Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Block 3.0 Communications Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.; Ottinger, K.

    2015-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The JPSS program is the follow-on for both space and ground systems to the Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). Developed and maintained by Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services (IIS), the CGS is a globally distributed, multi-mission system serving NOAA, NASA and their national and international partners. The CGS has demonstrated its scalability and flexibility to incorporate multiple missions efficiently and with minimal cost, schedule and risk, while strengthening global partnerships in weather and environmental monitoring. In a highly successful international partnership between NOAA and the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), the CGS currently provides data routing from McMurdo Station in Antarctica to the EUMETSAT processing center in Darmstadt, Germany. Continuing and building upon that partnership, NOAA and EUMETSAT are collaborating on the development of a new path forward for the 2020's. One approach being explored is a concept of operations where each organization shares satellite downlink resources with the other. This paper will describe that approach, as well as modeling results that demonstrate its feasibility and expected performance.

  2. 77 FR 13095 - Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for NOAA Restoration Center Programmatic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... Statement for NOAA Restoration Center Programmatic Coastal Habitat Restoration Activities AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION... Environmental Quality and procedures issued by NOAA Administrative Order 216-6, NOAA is providing notice of...

  3. 78 FR 37795 - Draft NOAA Procedures for Government to Government Consultation With Federally Recognized Indian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC726 Draft NOAA Procedures for Government to... Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY: NOAA announces the availability of and request for comments on the Draft NOAA Procedures for Government-to-Government...

  4. An Education Plan for NOAA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2004

    2004-01-01

    U.S. Secretary of Commerce Donald L. Evans has said, "Environmental Literacy is critical to enable learners of all ages to pursue knowledge, produce advanced products, and enhance personal growth." The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recognizes it has a role and a responsibility to the nation in advancing education leading…

  5. IASI Products Processing System at the NOAA/NESDIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, A. K.

    2010-12-01

    The Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI), is a hyperspectral infrared sounder residing on the European Space Agency’s (ESA) MetOp series of polar orbiting satellites and has 8461 spectral channels, aligned in three bands between 3.62 and 15.5 micron, with a spectral resolution of 0.5 cm-1 , after apodisation. IASI Level 1C data are made available to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service (NESDIS) through the International Joint Polar-Orbiting Operational Satellite System (IJPS) agreement. The first priority of the IASI Product Processing System (PPS) at the NOAA/NESDIS is to generate radiance products that are produced using Level 1C data, which are ingested in a pipeline mode from the European Organization for the Exploitation Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) via General File Transmission (GFT) protocol, applied to spectral and spatial sub-setting. IASI is a multi-purpose sounding instrument designed for the next generation infrared sounder having element of operational sounding system which provides global measurements with high vertical resolution and accuracy of temperature, water vapor, trace-gases such as ozone, nitrous oxide, carbon dioxide, and methane, as well as surface temperature, surface emissivity, and cloud characteristics. IASI PPS system generates Level 1C Thinned (L1CT) radiance and Level 2 profile products. Currently the IASI level 2 products from MetOp-2 satellite include temperature and humidity profiles, trace gases, and the cloud cleared radiances (CCR) on a global scale and these products are available to the operational user community. In an effort to ensure consistent levels of service and quality assurance for these suites of products, the Office of Satellite and Products Operation (OSPO) is implementing and executing new, innovative tools to better monitor performance and quality of the operational IASI products being generated. The

  6. Instrument interface description for NOAA 2000 instruments with European morning spacecraft and/or NOAA-OPQ spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to describe at a high level the common interface provisions and constraints placed on the NOAA-2000 instruments and the interfacing spacecraft elements in the following areas: electrical interface, mechanical interface, thermal interface, magnetic interface, electromagnetic compatibility, structural/mechanical environmental interface, contamination control, and the ionizing radiation environment. The requirements reflect the fact that these instruments must be compatible with a number of different polar orbiting satellite vehicles including the NOAA-OPQ satellites and the EUMETSAT METOP satellites.

  7. Direct comparison of transient radiation belt topology and dynamics in 1991 based on measurements onboard Mir space station and NOAA satellite.

    PubMed

    Shurshakov, V A; Huston, S L; Dachev TsP; Petrov, V M; Ivanov YuV; Semkova, J V

    1998-01-01

    In March 1991 the CRRES spacecraft measured a new transient radiation belt resulting from a solar proton event and subsequent geomagnetic disturbance. The presence of this belt was also noted by dosimeter-radiometers aboard the Mir space station (approx. 400 km, 51 degrees orbit) and by particle telescopes on the NOAA-10 spacecraft (850 km, 98 degrees). This event provides a unique opportunity to compare particle flux and dose measurements made by different instruments in different orbits under changing conditions. We present here a comparison of the measurements made by the different detectors. We discuss the topology and dynamics of the transient radiation belt over a period of more than one year.

  8. Validation of the Version 1 NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Sea Surface Temperature Data Set

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Elizabeth A.

    1998-01-01

    A high-resolution, global satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) data set called Pathfinder, from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) aboard the NOAA Polar Orbiters, is available from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (JPL PO.DAAC). Suitable for research as well as education, the Pathfinder SST data set is a result of a collaboration between the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and investigators at several universities. NOAA and NASA are the sponsors of the Pathfinder Program, which takes advantage of currently archived Earth science data from satellites. Where necessary, satellite sensors have been intercalibrated, algorithms improved and processing procedures revised, in order to produce long time-series, global measurements of ocean, land and atmospheric properties necessary for climate research. Many Pathfinder data sets are available to researchers now, nearly a decade before the first launch of NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS). The lessons learned from the Pathfinder programs will facilitate the processing and management of terabytes of data from EOS. The Oceans component of Pathfinder has undertaken to reprocess all Global Area Coverage (GAC) data acquired by the 5-channel AVHRRs since 1981. The resultant data products are consistent and stably calibrated [Rao, 1993a, Rao, 1993b, Brown et al., 1993], Earth-gridded SST fields at a variety of spatial and temporal resolutions.

  9. 76 FR 55362 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA Customer Surveys

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA Customer Surveys AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice... instrument and instructions should be directed to Sarah Brabson, (301) 628-5751 or...

  10. 77 FR 32572 - (NOAA) National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory Committee (NCADAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climate Assessment and Development Advisory... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice of Open Meeting. SUMMARY: The.... These times are subject to change. Please refer to the Web page http://...

  11. Joint Polar Satellite System: The United States next generation civilian polar-orbiting environmental satellite system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Mitchell D.; Kilcoyne, Heather; Cikanek, Harry; Mehta, Ajay

    2013-12-01

    next generation polar-orbiting environmental satellite system, designated as the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS), was proposed in February 2010, as part of the President's Fiscal Year 2011 budget request, to be the Civilian successor to the restructured National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). Beginning 1 October 2013, the JPSS baseline consists of a suite of five instruments: advanced microwave and infrared sounders critical for short- and medium-range weather forecasting; an advanced visible and infrared imager needed for environmental assessments such as snow/ice cover, droughts, volcanic ash, forest fires and surface temperature; ozone sensor primarily used for global monitoring of ozone and input to weather and climate models; and an Earth radiation budget sensor for monitoring the Earth's energy budget. NASA will fund the Earth radiation budget sensor and the ozone limb sensor for the second JPSS operational satellite--JPSS-2. JPSS is implemented through a partnership between NOAA and the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). NOAA is responsible for overall funding; maintaining the high-level requirements; establishing international and interagency partnerships; developing the science and algorithms, and user engagement; NOAA also provides product data distribution and archiving of JPSS data. NASA's role is to serve as acquisition Center of Excellence, providing acquisition of instruments, spacecraft and the multimission ground system, and early mission implementation through turnover to NOAA for operations.

  12. Market scenarios and alternative administrative frameworks for US educational satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkmeyer, J. E., Jr.; Morgan, R. P.; Singh, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Costs and benefits of developing an operational educational satellite system in the U.S. are analyzed. Scenarios are developed for each educational submarket and satellite channel and ground terminal requirements for a large-scale educational telecommunications system are estimated. Alternative organizational frameworks for such a system are described.

  13. Can One Satellite Data Set Validation Another? Validation of Envisat SCIAMACHY Data by Comparisons with NOAA-16 SBUV/2 and ERS-2 GOME

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, E.; Bojkov, B. R.; Labow, G.; Weber, M.; Burrows, J.

    2004-01-01

    Validation of satellite data remains a high priority for the construction of climate data sets. Traditionally ground based measurements have provided the primary comparison data for validation. For some atmospheric parameters such as ozone, a thoroughly validated satellite data record can be used to validate a new instrument s data product in addition to using ground based data. Comparing validated data with new satellite data has several advantages; availability of much more data, which will improve precision, larger geographical coverage, and the footprints are closer in size, which removes uncertainty due to different observed atmospheric volumes. To demonstrate the applicability and some limitations of this technique, observations from the newly launched SCIAMACHY instrument were compared with the NOM-16 SBW/2 and ERS-2 GOME instruments. The SBW/2 data had all ready undergone validation by comparing to the total ozone ground network. Overall the SCIAMACHY data were found to low by 3% with respect to satellite data and 1% low with respect to ground station data. There appears to be seasonal and or solar zenith angle dependences in the comparisons with SBW/2 where differences increase with higher solar zenith angles. It is known that accuracies in both satellite and ground based total ozone algorithms decrease at high solar zenith angles. There is a strong need for more accurate measurement from and the ground under these conditions. At the present time SCIAMACHY data are limited and longer data set with more coverage in both hemispheres is needed to unravel the cause of these differences.

  14. Validation of GOES-Derived Surface Radiation Using NOAA's Physical Retrieval Method

    SciTech Connect

    Habte, A.; Sengupta, M.; Wilcox, S.

    2013-01-01

    This report was part of a multiyear collaboration with the University of Wisconsin and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to produce high-quality, satellite-based, solar resource datasets for the United States. High-quality, solar resource assessment accelerates technology deployment by making a positive impact on decision making and reducing uncertainty in investment decisions. Satellite-based solar resource datasets are used as a primary source in solar resource assessment. This is mainly because satellites provide larger areal coverage and longer periods of record than ground-based measurements. With the advent of newer satellites with increased information content and faster computers that can process increasingly higher data volumes, methods that were considered too computationally intensive are now feasible. One class of sophisticated methods for retrieving solar resource information from satellites is a two-step, physics-based method that computes cloud properties and uses the information in a radiative transfer model to compute solar radiation. This method has the advantage of adding additional information as satellites with newer channels come on board. This report evaluates the two-step method developed at NOAA and adapted for solar resource assessment for renewable energy with the goal of identifying areas that can be improved in the future.

  15. Solutions Network Formulation Report. Improving NOAA's Tides and Currents Through Enhanced Data Inputs from NASA's Ocean Surface Topography Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guest, DeNeice C.

    2006-01-01

    The Nation uses water-level data for a variety of practical purposes, including hydrography, nautical charting, maritime navigation, coastal engineering, and tsunami and storm surge warnings (NOAA, 2002; Digby et al., 1999). Long-term applications include marine boundary determinations, tidal predictions, sea-level trend monitoring, oceanographic research, and climate research. Accurate and timely information concerning sea-level height, tide, and ocean current is needed to understand their impact on coastal management, disaster management, and public health. Satellite altimeter data products are currently used by hundreds of researchers and operational users to monitor ocean circulation and to improve scientists understanding of the role of the oceans in climate and weather. The NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) National Ocean Service has been monitoring sea-level variations for many years (NOAA, 2006). NOAA s Tides & Currents DST (decision support tool, managed by the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, is the portal to a vast collection of oceanographic and meteorological data (historical and real-time), predictions, and nowcasts and forecasts. This report assesses the capacity of NASA s satellite altimeter data to meet societal decision support needs through incorporation into NOAA s Tides & Currents.

  16. 78 FR 55064 - Solicitation for Members of the NOAA Science Advisory Board (SAB) Gulf Coast Ecosystem...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Solicitation for Members of the NOAA Science Advisory Board... Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research. ACTION: Notice... Administration is publishing this notice to solicit nominations for the NOAA Science Advisory Board Gulf...

  17. Using satellite microwave sensors to develop climate data records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferraro, Ralph; Meng, Huan; Luo, Zhengzhao

    2011-08-01

    NOAA Workshop on Climate Data Records From Satellite Passive Microwave Sounders: AMSU/MHS/SSMT2; College Park, Maryland, 2-3 March 2011 ; The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Climate Data Record (CDR) program (http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/cdr/index.html) is an effort to create long-term homogeneous records of satellite measurements and derived products. As part of this effort, scientists at two related projects that focus on passive microwave sensors with the goal of hydrological applications—one led by a National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service/Center for Satellite Applications and Research (STAR) team and one led by the City College of New York (CCNY)—held a joint workshop with the following objectives: To allow the CDR teams to interact with satellite data and product users and other CDR developers on relevant aspects of sensor characteristics and intercalibration that will lead to mature CDRs; To provide a formal mechanism for input by subject matter experts, in particular, sensor scientists and engineers; and> To move toward a community consensus approach for NOAA microwave sounder CDRs.

  18. NOAA & Academia Partnership Building Conference. Highlights (3rd, Washington, DC, November 14-15, 2001).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC), Silver Spring, MD.

    In November 2001 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) hosted the third NOAA and Academia Partnership to evaluate, maintain, and expand on efforts to optimize NOAA-university cooperation. Close partnership between the NOAA and U.S. universities has produced many benefits for the U.S. economy and the environment. Based on the…

  19. 78 FR 26616 - Draft NOAA Five Year Research and Development Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... NOAA Five Year Research and Development Plan AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Draft NOAA Five Year Research and Development Plan for Public Review. SUMMARY: NOAA's draft Five Year Research and Development Plan is available for...

  20. NOAA issues scientific integrity policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced the agency's first-ever scientific integrity policy at a 7 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. The policy follows a December 2010 White House memorandum that issued guidance to federal agencies implementing scientific integrity policies (see "White House issues scientific integrity policies," Eos Trans. AGU, 91(51), 503, doi:10.1029/2010EO510003, 2010). The purpose of the NOAA policy is "to promote a continuing culture of scientific excellence and integrity, and to establish a policy on the integrity of scientific activities that the agency conducts and uses to inform management and policy decisions," the agency's administrative order states. "In addition, the intent of the policy is to strengthen widespread confidence—from scientists, to decisionmakers, to the general public—in the quality, validity, and reliability of NOAA science and to denote the agency's commitment to a culture of support for excellence of NOAA's principal science asset, its employees."

  1. NOAA's National Snow Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carroll, T. R.; Cline, D. W.; Olheiser, C. M.; Rost, A. A.; Nilsson, A. O.; Fall, G. M.; Li, L.; Bovitz, C. T.

    2005-12-01

    NOAA's National Operational Hydrologic Remote Sensing Center (NOHRSC) routinely ingests all of the electronically available, real-time, ground-based, snow data; airborne snow water equivalent data; satellite areal extent of snow cover information; and numerical weather prediction (NWP) model forcings for the coterminous U.S. The NWP model forcings are physically downscaled from their native 13 km2 spatial resolution to a 1 km2 resolution for the CONUS. The downscaled NWP forcings drive an energy-and-mass-balance snow accumulation and ablation model at a 1 km2 spatial resolution and at a 1 hour temporal resolution for the country. The ground-based, airborne, and satellite snow observations are assimilated into the snow model's simulated state variables using a Newtonian nudging technique. The principle advantages of the assimilation technique are: (1) approximate balance is maintained in the snow model, (2) physical processes are easily accommodated in the model, and (3) asynoptic data are incorporated at the appropriate times. The snow model is reinitialized with the assimilated snow observations to generate a variety of snow products that combine to form NOAA's NOHRSC National Snow Analyses (NSA). The NOHRSC NSA incorporate all of the available information necessary and available to produce a "best estimate" of real-time snow cover conditions at 1 km2 spatial resolution and 1 hour temporal resolution for the country. The NOHRSC NSA consist of a variety of daily, operational, products that characterize real-time snowpack conditions including: snow water equivalent, snow depth, surface and internal snowpack temperatures, surface and blowing snow sublimation, and snowmelt for the CONUS. The products are generated and distributed in a variety of formats including: interactive maps, time-series, alphanumeric products (e.g., mean areal snow water equivalent on a hydrologic basin-by-basin basis), text and map discussions, map animations, and quantitative gridded products

  2. The NOAA IOOS Data Integration Framework: Initial Implementation Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-01

    The NOAA IOOS Data Integration Framework: Initial Implementation Report Jeff de La Beaujardière National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...Administration ( NOAA ) Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) program office has begun the implementation of a Data Integration Framework (DIF) to...improve management and delivery of an initial subset of ocean observations. The DIF establishes a web service layer atop key NOAA data providers

  3. 76 FR 26254 - NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) Strategic Plan FY 2011-FY 2015

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) NOAA's Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER... Atmospheric Research (OAR), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice...-FY2015. SUMMARY: NOAA'S Office of Ocean Exploration and Research (OER) is electronically publishing...

  4. NOAA-NASA Coastal Zone Color Scanner reanalysis effort.

    PubMed

    Gregg, Watson W; Conkright, Margarita E; O'Reilly, John E; Patt, Frederick S; Wang, Menghua H; Yoder, James A; Casey, Nancy W

    2002-03-20

    Satellite observations of global ocean chlorophyll span more than two decades. However, incompatibilities between processing algorithms prevent us from quantifying natural variability. We applied a comprehensive reanalysis to the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) archive, called the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NOAA-NASA) CZCS reanalysis (NCR) effort. NCR consisted of (1) algorithm improvement (AI), where CZCS processing algorithms were improved with modernized atmospheric correction and bio-optical algorithms and (2) blending where in situ data were incorporated into the CZCS AI to minimize residual errors. Global spatial and seasonal patterns of NCR chlorophyll indicated remarkable correspondence with modern sensors, suggesting compatibility. The NCR permits quantitative analyses of interannual and interdecadal trends in global ocean chlorophyll.

  5. Detection and mapping vegetation cover based on the Spectral Angle Mapper algorithm using NOAA AVHRR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagoub, Houria; Belbachir, Ahmed Hafid; Benabadji, Noureddine

    2014-06-01

    Satellite data, taken from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have been proposed and used for the detection and the cartography of vegetation cover in North Africa. The data used were acquired at the Analysis and Application of Radiation Laboratory (LAAR) from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor of 1 km spatial resolution. The Spectral Angle Mapper Algorithm (SAM) is used for the classification of many studies using high resolution satellite data. In the present paper, we propose to apply the SAM algorithm to the moderate resolution of the NOAA AVHRR sensor data for classifying the vegetation cover. This study allows also exploiting other classification methods for the low resolution. First, the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) is extracted from two channels 1 and 2 of the AVHRR sensor. In order to obtain an initial density representation of vegetal formation distribution, a methodology, based on the combination between the threshold method and the decision tree, is used. This combination is carried out due to the lack of accurate data related to the thresholds that delimit each class. In a second time, and based on spectral behavior, a vegetation cover map is developed using SAM algorithm. Finally, with the use of low resolution satellite images (NOAA AVHRR) and with only two channels, it is possible to identify the most dominant species in North Africa such as: forests of the Liege oaks, other forests, cereal's cultivation, steppes and bar soil.

  6. Satellites sense rangeland wildfire hazard (summary)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westover, Donald; Sadowski, Franklin G.

    1987-01-01

    Each day, one or more National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites, passing over Nebraska, beam back to receiving stations on earth an enormous amount of information about what they sense below. The Nebraska Forest Service has been investigating the possible use of some of this information to evaluate the fire danger on range and grasslands in the State. Dryness of grasses and other vegetation has an obvious effect on how easily wildfires can start and how fast they spread. Dryness, in turn, is related to the greenness of the vegetation. It is this greenness factor that can be calculated from satellite measurements.

  7. NOAA Plans for Geomagnetic Storm Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, B. L.; Biesecker, D. A.; Mulligan, P.; Simpson, M.

    2012-12-01

    For many years, NOAA has issued geomagnetic storm watches and warnings based on coronal mass ejection (CME) imagery and in-situ solar wind measurements from research satellites. The NOAA Satellite and Information Service (NESDIS) recognizes the importance of this service to protecting technological infrastructure including power grids, polar air travel, and satellite navigation, so is actively planning to replace these assets to ensure their continued availability. NOAA, NASA, and the US Air Force are working on launching the first operational solar wind mission in 2014, the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR), to follow NASA's Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) in making solar wind measurements at the sun-Earth L1 for 15-60 minute geomagnetic storm warning. For continuing operations after the DSCOVR mission, one technology NOAA is looking at is solar sails that could greatly improve the lead time of geomagnetic storm warnings by stationkeeping closer to the sun than L1. We are working with NASA and private industry on the Sunjammer solar sail demonstration mission to test making solar wind measurements from a solar sail in the sun-Earth L1 region. NOAA uses CME imagery from the NASA/ESA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) and the NASA Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory (STEREO) satellites to issue 1-3 day geomagnetic storm watches. For the future, NOAA worked with the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) to develop a Compact Coronagraph (CCOR) through Phase A, and is studying ways to complete instrument development and test fly it for use in the future.

  8. Collection development at the NOAA Central Library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quillen, Steve R.

    1994-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Central Library collection, approximately one million volumes, incorporates the holdings of its predecessor agencies. Within the library, the collections are filed separately, based on their source and/or classification schemes. The NOAA Central Library provides a variety of services to users, ranging from quick reference and interlibrary loan to in-depth research and online data bases.

  9. Future plans by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for operational geosynchronous weather satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gird, Ronald S.; Shenk, William E.

    1991-01-01

    The present status of the GOES program and plans for the GOES I-M system schedules for initial launch in 1992 are reviewed. Plans for improving NASA's capabilities to monitor weather patterns by using operational geosynchronous weather satellites are considered. The requirements for the imager, sounder, Space Environment Monitor, and Data Collection System of GOES-N are presented.

  10. The Weather Radar Toolkit, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Climatic Data Center's support of interoperability and the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S.; Del Greco, S.

    2006-12-01

    In February 2005, 61 countries around the World agreed on a 10 year plan to work towards building open systems for sharing geospatial data and services across different platforms worldwide. This system is known as the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). The objective of GEOSS focuses on easy access to environmental data and interoperability across different systems allowing participating countries to measure the "pulse" of the planet in an effort to advance society. In support of GEOSS goals, NOAA's National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) has developed radar visualization and data exporter tools in an open systems environment. The NCDC Weather Radar Toolkit (WRT) loads Weather Surveillance Radar 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D) volume scan (S-band) data, known as Level-II, and derived products, known as Level-III, into an Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) compliant environment. The application is written entirely in Java and will run on any Java- supported platform including Windows, Macintosh and Linux/Unix. The application is launched via Java Web Start and runs on the client machine while accessing these data locally or remotely from the NCDC archive, NOAA FTP server or any URL or THREDDS Data Server. The WRT allows the data to be manipulated to create custom mosaics, composites and precipitation estimates. The WRT Viewer provides tools for custom data overlays, Web Map Service backgrounds, animations and basic filtering. The export of images and movies is provided in multiple formats. The WRT Data Exporter allows for data export in both vector polygon (Shapefile, Well-Known Text) and raster (GeoTIFF, ESRI Grid, VTK, NetCDF, GrADS) formats. By decoding the various Radar formats into the NetCDF Common Data Model, the exported NetCDF data becomes interoperable with existing software packages including THREDDS Data Server and the Integrated Data Viewer (IDV). The NCDC recently partnered with NOAA's National Severe Storms Lab (NSSL) to decode Sigmet C-band Doppler

  11. NASA/NOAA/AMS Earth Science Electronic Theater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA/AMS Earth Science Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to Florida and the KSC Visitor's Center. Go back to the early weather satellite images from the 1960s see them contrasted with the latest International global satellite weather movies including killer hurricanes & tornadic thunderstorms. See the latest spectacular images from NASA and NOAA remote sensing missions like GOES, NOAA, TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat7, & new Terra which will be visualized with state-of-the art tools.

  12. 75 FR 59686 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA Space-Based Data Collection System (DCS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA... Administration (NOAA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce, as part of its continuing effort to...-4558 or kay.metcalf@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Abstract This notice is for renewal of...

  13. 75 FR 6354 - NOAA Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program Project Grants under the Great Lakes Restoration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-09

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-ZC10 NOAA Great Lakes Habitat Restoration Program... Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce. ACTION... notice published in the Federal Register on January 19, 2010. That notice announced the NOAA Great...

  14. 76 FR 39385 - Payment Policy Change for Access to NOAA Environmental Data, Information, and Related Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Payment Policy Change for Access to NOAA Environmental Data... Service (NESDIS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Policy Change. SUMMARY: NOAA's National Data Centers will not accept checks (nor money...

  15. 75 FR 5765 - NOAA Coastal and Marine Habitat Restoration Project Supplemental Funding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-04

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-ZC05 NOAA Coastal and Marine Habitat Restoration... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of supplemental funding for NOAA Coastal and... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Melanie Gange at (301) 713-0174, or by e-mail at...

  16. 75 FR 60085 - NOAA Proposed Policy on Prohibited and Authorized Uses of the Asset Forfeiture Fund

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XZ29 NOAA Proposed Policy on Prohibited and... Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice; request for comments. SUMMARY... through NOAA to pay certain enforcement related costs from sums received as fines, penalties,...

  17. 78 FR 68816 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA Space-Based Data Collection System (DCS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; NOAA... Administration (NOAA). ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce, as part of its continuing effort to..., 301-817-4543 or Scott.Rogerson@noaa.gov ; or Kay Metcalf, 301-817-4558 or...

  18. 75 FR 55541 - NOAA Regional Ocean Partnership Funding Program-FY2011 Funding Competition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-ZC20 NOAA Regional Ocean Partnership Funding... Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The purpose of this document is to advise...) that NOAA is soliciting proposals for competitive funding for Regional Ocean Partnerships that...

  19. 76 FR 16386 - NOAA Policy on Prohibited and Approved Uses of the Asset Forfeiture Fund

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XZ29 NOAA Policy on Prohibited and Approved Uses... Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act authorizes the Secretary of Commerce through NOAA to pay certain...

  20. Use of Earth Observing Satellites for Operational Hazard Support

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, H. M.; Lauritson, L.

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) relies on Earth observing satellite data to carry out its operational mission to monitor, predict, and assess changes in the Earth's atmosphere, land, and oceans. NOAA's National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) uses satellite data to help lessen the impacts of natural and man-made disasters due to tropical cyclones, flash floods, heavy snowstorms, volcanic ash clouds (for aviation safety), sea ice (for shipping safety), and harmful algal blooms. Communications systems on NOAA satellites are used to support search and rescue and to relay data from data collection platforms to a variety of users. NOAA's Geostationary (GOES) and Polar (POES) Operational Environmental Satellites are used in conjunction with other satellites to support NOAA's operational mission. While NOAA's National Hurricane Center is responsible for predicting tropical cyclones affecting the U.S. mainland, NESDIS continuously monitors the tropics world wide, relaying valuable satellite interpretations of tropical systems strength and position to users throughout the world. Text messages are sent every six hours for tropical cyclones in the Western Pacific, South Pacific, and Indian Oceans. To support the monitoring, prediction, and assessment of flash floods and winter storms, NESDIS sends out text messages alerting U.S. weather forecast offices whenever NOAA satellite imagery indicates the occurrence of heavy rain or snow. NESDIS also produces a 24-hour rainfall composite graphic image covering those areas affected by heavy precipitation. The International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) and other aviation concerns recognized the need to keep aviators informed of volcanic hazards. To that end, nine Volcanic Ash Advisory Centers (VAAC's) were created to monitor volcanic ash plumes within their assigned airspace. NESDIS hosts one of the VAAC's. Although the NESDIS VAAC's primary responsibility is the

  1. NOAA Enterprise Archive Access Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rank, R. H.; McCormick, S.; Cremidis, C.

    2010-12-01

    A challenge for any consumer of National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) environmental data archives is that the disparate nature of these archives makes it difficult for consumers to access data in a unified manner. If it were possible for consumers to have seamless access to these archives, they would be able to better utilize the data and thus maximize the return on investment for NOAA’s archival program. When unified data access is coupled with sophisticated data querying and discovery techniques, it will be possible to provide consumers with access to richer data sets and services that extend the use of key NOAA data. Theoretically, there are two ways that unified archive access may be achieved. The first approach is to develop a single archive or archiving standard that would replace the current NOAA archives. However, the development of such an archive would pose significant technical and administrative challenges. The second approach is to develop a middleware application that would provide seamless access to all existing archives, in effect allowing each archive to exist “as is” but providing a translation service for the consumer. This approach is deemed more feasible from an administrative and technical standpoint; however, it still presents unique technical challenges due to the disparate architectures that exist across NOAA archives. NOAA has begun developing the NEAAT. The purpose of NEAAT is to provide a middleware and a simple standardized API between NOAA archives and data consumers. It is important to note that NEAAT serves two main purposes: 1) To provide a single application programming interface (API) that enables designated consumers to write their own custom applications capable of searching and acquiring data seamlessly from multiple NOAA archives. 2) To allow archive managers to expose their data to consumers in conjunction with other NOAA resources without modifying their archiving systems or way of presenting data

  2. NOAA Big Data Partnership RFI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2014-12-01

    In February 2014, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) issued a Big Data Request for Information (RFI) from industry and other organizations (e.g., non-profits, research laboratories, and universities) to assess capability and interest in establishing partnerships to position a copy of NOAA's vast data holdings in the Cloud, co-located with easy and affordable access to analytical capabilities. This RFI was motivated by a number of concerns. First, NOAA's data facilities do not necessarily have sufficient network infrastructure to transmit all available observations and numerical model outputs to all potential users, or sufficient infrastructure to support simultaneous computation by many users. Second, the available data are distributed across multiple services and data facilities, making it difficult to find and integrate data for cross-domain analysis and decision-making. Third, large datasets require users to have substantial network, storage, and computing capabilities of their own in order to fully interact with and exploit the latent value of the data. Finally, there may be commercial opportunities for value-added products and services derived from our data. Putting a working copy of data in the Cloud outside of NOAA's internal networks and infrastructures should reduce demands and risks on our systems, and should enable users to interact with multiple datasets and create new lines of business (much like the industries built on government-furnished weather or GPS data). The NOAA Big Data RFI therefore solicited information on technical and business approaches regarding possible partnership(s) that -- at no net cost to the government and minimum impact on existing data facilities -- would unleash the commercial potential of its environmental observations and model outputs. NOAA would retain the master archival copy of its data. Commercial partners would not be permitted to charge fees for access to the NOAA data they receive, but

  3. Looking at Earth from space: Direct readout from environmental satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Direct readout is the capability to acquire information directly from meteorological satellites. Data can be acquired from NASA-developed, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-operated satellites, as well as from other nations' meteorological satellites. By setting up a personal computer-based ground (Earth) station to receive satellite signals, direct readout may be obtained. The electronic satellite signals are displayed as images on the computer screen. The images can display gradients of the Earth's topography and temperature, cloud formations, the flow and direction of winds and water currents, the formation of hurricanes, the occurrence of an eclipse, and a view of Earth's geography. Both visible and infrared images can be obtained. This booklet introduces the satellite systems, ground station configuration, and computer requirements involved in direct readout. Also included are lists of associated resources and vendors.

  4. Life-Cycle Data Management at NOAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2014-12-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates over a hundred observing systems which span the environment from the bottom of the ocean to the surface of the Sun. The resulting data are essential for immediate priorities such as weather forecasting, and the data also constitute an irreplaceable resource collected at great cost. It is therefore necessary to carefully preserve this information for ongoing scientific use, for new research and applications, and to ensure reproducibility of scientific conclusions. The NOAA data life-cycle includes activities in three major phases: planning and production, management of the resulting data, and usage activities. This paper will describe current work by the NOAA Environmental Data Management Committee (EDMC), Data Management Integration Team (DMIT), and the NOAA National Data Centers in areas including DM planning, documentation, cataloging, data access, and preservation and stewardship to improve and standardize policies and practices for life-cycle data management.

  5. On Using SysML, DoDAF 2.0 and UPDM to Model the Architecture for the NOAA's Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Ground System (GS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayden, Jeffrey L.; Jeffries, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The JPSS Ground System is a lIexible system of systems responsible for telemetry, tracking & command (TT &C), data acquisition, routing and data processing services for a varied lIeet of satellites to support weather prediction, modeling and climate modeling. To assist in this engineering effort, architecture modeling tools are being employed to translate the former NPOESS baseline to the new JPSS baseline, The paper will focus on the methodology for the system engineering process and the use of these architecture modeling tools within that process, The Department of Defense Architecture Framework version 2,0 (DoDAF 2.0) viewpoints and views that are being used to describe the JPSS GS architecture are discussed. The Unified Profile for DoOAF and MODAF (UPDM) and Systems Modeling Language (SysML), as ' provided by extensions to the MagicDraw UML modeling tool, are used to develop the diagrams and tables that make up the architecture model. The model development process and structure are discussed, examples are shown, and details of handling the complexities of a large System of Systems (SoS), such as the JPSS GS, with an equally complex modeling tool, are described

  6. An airborne meteorological data collection system using satellite relay (ASDAR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagwell, J. W.; Lindow, B. G.

    1978-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed an airborne data acquisition and communication system for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). This system known as ASDAR, the Aircraft to Satellite Data Relay, consists of a microprocessor based controller, time clock, transmitter and antenna. Together they acquire meteorological and position information from existing aircraft systems on B-747 aircraft, convert and format these, and transmit them to the ground via the GOES meteorological satellite series. The development and application of the ASDAR system is described with emphasis on unique features. Performance to date is exceptional, providing horizon-to-horizon coverage of aircraft flights. The data collected is of high quality and is considered a valuable addition to the data base from which NOAA generates its weather forecasts.

  7. NOAA Inter-Agency Networking for Open Data and Research Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2015-12-01

    The US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) generates tens of terabytes of data per day from hundreds of sensors on satellites, radars, aircraft, ships, and buoys, and from numerical models. With rare exceptions, all of these data should be made publicly accessible in a usable fashion. NOAA has long been both an advocate and a practitioner of open data, and has observations going back 150 years in its archives. The NOAA data management community therefore welcomed the White House mandates on Open Data and Open Research, and has striven to improve standardization internally and in collaboration with other organizations. This paper will summarize the state of inter-agency networking by NOAA, and will discuss future perspectives, in particular the need to achieve a state where the appropriate technology choices for particular classes of geospatial data are obvious and beyond discussion, and where data sharing and metadata creation are built into agency workflows for project planning, approval, and execution, so that instead of writing and enforcing mandates we can focus on actually using data from multiple sources to improve understanding and decision-making.

  8. Space Weather impact on the degradation of NOAA POES MEPED proton detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ødegaard, Linn-Kristine Glesnes; Tyssøy, Hilde Nesse; Jakobsen Sandanger, Marit Irene; Stadsnes, Johan; Søraas, Finn

    2016-06-01

    The Medium Energy Proton and Electron Detector (MEPED) on board the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (NOAA POES) is known to degrade with time. In recent years a lot of effort has been put into calibrating the degraded proton detectors. We make use of previous work and show that the degradation of the detectors can be attributed to the radiation dose of each individual instrument. However, the effectiveness of the radiation in degrading the detector is modulated when it is weighted by the mean ap index, increasing the degradation rate in periods with high geomagnetic activity, and decreasing it through periods of low activity. When taking ap and the radiation dose into account, we find that the degradation rate is independent of spacecraft and detector pointing direction. We have developed a model to estimate the correction factor for all the MEPED detectors as a function of accumulated corrected flux and the ap index. We apply the routine to NOAA POES spacecraft starting with NOAA-15, including the European satellites MetOp-02 and MetOp-01, and estimate correction factors.

  9. Meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, L. J. (Editor); Schnapf, A.; Diesen, B. C., III; Martin, P. S.; Schwalb, A.; Bandeen, W. R.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of the meteorological satellite programs that have been evolving from 1958 to the present, and plans for the future meteorological and environmental satellite systems that are scheduled to be placed into service in the early 1980's are reviewed. The development of the TIROS family of weather satellites, including TIROS, ESSA, ITOS/NOAA, and the present TIROS-N (the third generation operational system) is summarized. The contribution of the Nimbus and ATS technology satellites to the development of the operational-orbiting and geostationary satellites is discussed. Included are descriptions of both the TIROS-N and the DMSP payloads currently under development to assure a continued and orderly growth of these systems into the 1980's.

  10. National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Design and Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinnant, F.

    2008-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Defense (DoD), and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system - the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). NPOESS will replace the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) managed by the DoD and will provide continuity for the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) with the launch of the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP). This poster will provide an overview of the NPOESS architecture, which includes four segments. The space segment includes satellites in two orbits that carry a suite of sensors to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the Earth, atmosphere, and near-Earth space environment. The NPOESS design allows centralized mission management and delivers high quality environmental products to military, civil and scientific users through a Command, Control, and Communication Segment (C3S). The data processing for NPOESS is accomplished through an Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS)/Field Terminal Segment (FTS) that processes NPOESS satellite data to provide environmental data products to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government as well as to remote terminal users. The Launch Support Segment completes the four segments that make up NPOESS that will enhance the connectivity between research and operations and provide critical operational and scientific environmental measurements to military, civil, and scientific users until 2026.

  11. Satellite Movie Shows Hurricane Cristobal Speeding Through North Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from August 26 through 29 shows Hurricane Cristobal changing into a post-tropical storm in the North Atlantic Ocean. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project

  12. Satellite Movie Shows Development of Tropical Storm Julia

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from Sept. 12 to Sept. 14 shows the development of Tropical Storm Julia over Florida and movement into Georgia. TRT 00:22 Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES...

  13. Satellite Movie Shows Hurricane Joaquin in the Bahamas

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of images captured from September 29 to October 1 from NOAA's GOES-East satellite shows Hurricane Joaquin become a major hurricane in the Bahamas. TRT: 00:32Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Pr...

  14. TRMM Satellite Rainfall Data on Iselle

    NASA Video Gallery

    TRMM satellite rainfall data overlaid on an enhanced infrared image from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows heavy rainfall occurring around the Iselle's eye. The most intense rain was falling at a ra...

  15. TRMM Satellite Shows Heavy Rainfall in Cristina

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's TRMM satellite rainfall data was overlaid on an enhanced visible/infrared image from NOAA's GOES-East satellite showing cloud and rainfall extent. Green areas indicate rainfall at over 20 mm...

  16. Education Strategic Plan 2015-2035: Advancing NOAA's Mission through Education. Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Education Strategic Plan provides a framework to guide collaboration across the NOAA education community and a structure in which to track and report progress. Congress recognized the importance of NOAA's education programs with the passage of the America COMPETES Act. The America COMPETES…

  17. Education Strategic Plan 2015-2035: Advancing NOAA's Mission through Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Education Strategic Plan provides a framework to guide collaboration across the NOAA education community and a structure in which to track and report progress. Congress recognized the importance of NOAA's education programs with the passage of the America COMPETES Act. The America COMPETES…

  18. 76 FR 4091 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Certification Requirements for NOAA's...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ...; Certification Requirements for NOAA's Hydrographic Product Quality Assurance Program AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Department of Commerce... to David B. Enabnit, (301) 713-2770 x132, Dave.Enabnit@noaa.gov . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  19. 76 FR 41453 - Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for Replacement of NOAA National Marine Fisheries...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-14

    ... of NOAA National Marine Fisheries Service Southwest Fisheries Science Center in La Jolla, CA AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce... comments. SUMMARY: NOAA announces its intention to prepare an SEIS in accordance with the...

  20. Rescuing NOAA's Earliest Airphoto Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, F. C.; Baugh, K.; Elvidge, C.; Hendy, M. V.

    2014-12-01

    In 2004 NGDC had rediscovered a previously lost collection of airphotos produced by Coast and Geodetic Survey (later NOAA-NOS National Geodetic Survey) dated from late 1920s to 1960s. The collection focuses on U.S. coastline and the primary goal of these photos was to provide reference for coastal map construction. There are approximately 200,000 frames of film and print taken by multiple instruments. The majority of the photographs were taken by multilens cameras which captures nadir and oblique imageries to cover a larger area hence reduce the number of flightlines required. This huge collection not only shows the change of U.S coast over decades but also gracefully demonstrates how the technique of photogrammetry evolved. It is regarded as the premier record of land cover and coastal features for the era prior to the advent of satellite remote sensing. The collection was stored for many years at the Federal Records Center in Takoma Park, Maryland. After aging past the retention date, the FRC was ready to dispose the collection. NGDC volunteered to pay for the shipping and the collection was transferred to NGDC in 2004. In 2009-11 approximately 10% of the collection was digitally scanned by NOAA's Climate Data Modernization Program. NGDC has organized the scanned photos based on flight lines and has built a web access system. The unscanned portion of the collection is in storage with the Federal Record Center in Denver, Colorado.

  1. NOAA Operational Space Environmental Monitoring - Current Capabilities and Future Directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denig, William; Redmon, Rob; Mulligan, Patricia

    2014-05-01

    During the next few years the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will field new operational capabilities for monitoring the near-earth space environment in addition to maintaining continued measurements in geostationary orbit. The most exciting new capability will be transitioning routine solar wind and magnetic field measurements at L1 (240 Re) from the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite to the Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) which will be launched in early 2015 with a projected on-orbit readiness in mid-2015. Also under consideration is a solar-sail demonstration mission, called SUNJAMMER, for acquiring plasma and field measurements at twice the L1 location. Both DSCOVR and SUNJAMMER will provide a near-term advanced warning of impending space weather events that can adversely affect communications, satellite operations, GPS positioning and commercial air transportation. NESDIS has also supported the development of a Compact Coronagraph (CCOR) which could provide a several day warning of space weather when coupled with an interplanetary disturbance propagation model like ENLIL. Routine monitoring of the ionosphere will be provided by the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) II as a system which is a partnership among the Taiwan's National Space Organization, the U.S. Air Force and NOAA. The new operational capabilities provided by DSCOVR, SUNJAMMER, CCOR and COSMIC II are provided against the backdrop of continued space environmental measurements from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES) which, in the near future, will transition to the GOES-R series of advanced space weather sensors. Continued space environmental measurements in polar low earth orbit (LEO) will continue to be provided by the remaining Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and the European MetOp satellites. Instrument specialists at the National Geophysical Data Center

  2. THE SCIENTIFIC BASIS OF NOAA'S AIR QUALITY FORECASTING PROGRAM

    EPA Science Inventory

    For many years, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has conducted atmospheric research, including chemical and physical measurements, process studies, and the development and evaluation of experimental meteorological and photochemical air quality models. ...

  3. THE NOAA - EPA NATIONAL AIR QUALITY FORECASTING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Building upon decades of collaboration in air pollution meteorology research, in 2003 the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) signed formal partnership agreements to develop and implement an operationa...

  4. 77 FR 76000 - Notice of Availability of Draft Report of the NOAA Research and Development Portfolio Review Task...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Science Advisory Board RIN 0648-XC378 Notice of Availability of Draft Report of the NOAA Research and Development Portfolio Review Task Force and Request for... Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice of availability and request for...

  5. 75 FR 4043 - Science Advisory Board; Draft Report of the NOAA Science Advisory Board Oceans and Health Working...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-26

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Science Advisory Board; Draft Report of the NOAA Science...), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice of availability and request for public comment. SUMMARY: NOAA Research (OAR) publishes this notice on behalf...

  6. 75 FR 13259 - NOAA Is Hosting a Series of Informational Webinars for Individuals and Organizations To Learn...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration NOAA Is Hosting a Series of Informational Webinars for Individuals and Organizations To Learn About the Proposed NOAA Climate Service AGENCY: Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice...

  7. Satellite instrument provides nighttime sensing capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-12-01

    "This is not your father's low-light sensor," Steve Miller, senior research scientist and deputy director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in the Atmosphere at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, said at a 5 December news briefing at the AGU Fall Meeting. He and others at the briefing were showing off the nighttime sensing capability of the day/night band of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) of instruments onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) Earth-observing research satellite, a joint NASA and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellite that was launched on 28 October 2011. Noting that low-light satellite technology has been available for about 40 years, Miller said that the VIIRS day/night band "is truly a paradigm shift in the technology and capability."

  8. Regional Bias of Satellite Precipitation Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modrick, T. M.; Georgakakos, K. P.; Spencer, C. R.

    2012-12-01

    Satellite-based estimates of precipitation have improved the spatial availability of precipitation data particularly for regions with limited gauge networks due to limited accessibility or infrastructure. Understanding the quality and reliability of satellite precipitation estimates is important, especially when the estimates are utilitized for real-time hydrologic forecasting and for fast-responding phenomena. In partnership with the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the U.S. Agency of International Development (USAID) and the National Ocean and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Hydrologic Research Center has begun implementation of real-time flash flood warning systems for diverse regions around the world. As part of this effort, bias characteristics of satellite precipitation have been examined in these various regions, such includes portions of Southeastern Asia, Southeastern Europe, the Middle East, Central America, and the southern half of the African continent. The work has focused on the Global Hydro-Estimator (GHE) precipitation product from NOAA/NESDIS. These real-time systems utilize the GHE given low latency times of this product. This presentation focuses on the characterization of precipitation bias as compared to in-situ gauge records, and the regional variations or similarities. Additional analysis is currently underway considering regional bias for other satellite precipitation products (e.g., CMORPH) for comparison with the GHE results.

  9. Global Warming: Evidence from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R.; Yoo, J.-M.; Dalu, G.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Observations made in Channel 2 (53.74 GHz) of the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) radiometer, flown onboard sequential, sun-synchronous, polar-orbiting NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) operational satellites, indicate that the mean temperature of the atmosphere over the globe increased during the period 1980 to 1999. In this study, we have minimized systematic errors in the time series introduced by satellite orbital drift in an objective manner. This is done with the help of the onboard warm-blackbody temperature, which is used in the calibration of the MSU radiometer. The corrected MSU Channel 2 observations of the NOAA satellite series reveal that the vertically-weighted global-mean temperature of the atmosphere, with a peak weight near the mid troposphere, warmed at the rate of 0.13 +/- 0.05 K/decade during 1980 to 1999. The global warming deduced from conventional meteorological data that have been corrected for urbanization effects agrees reasonably with this satellite-deduced result.

  10. Satellite Animation Shows California Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows a series of moisture-laden storms affecting California from Jan. 6 through Jan. 9, 2017. TRT: 00:36 Credit: NASA...

  11. Satellite Movie Shows Erika Dissipate

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from Aug. 27 to 29 shows Tropical Storm Erika move through the Eastern Caribbean Sea and dissipate near eastern Cuba. ...

  12. Simulation of meteorological satellite (METSAT) data using LANDSAT data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, W. W.; Ryland, W. E.

    1983-01-01

    The information content which can be expected from the advanced very high resolution radiometer system, AVHRR, on the NOAA-6 satellite was assessed, and systematic techniques of data interpretation for use with meteorological satellite data were defined. In-house data from LANDSAT 2 and 3 were used to simulate the spatial, spectral, and sampling methods of the NOAA-6 satellite data.

  13. The NOAA Big Data Project: NEXRAD on the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundwall, Jed; Bouffler, Brendan

    2016-04-01

    Last year, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) made headlines when it entered into a research agreement with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to explore sustainable models to increase the output of open NOAA data. Publicly available NOAA data drives multi-billion dollar industries and critical research efforts. Under this new agreement, AWS and its Data Alliance collaborators are looking at ways to push more NOAA data to the cloud and build an ecosystem of innovation around it. In this presentation, we will provide a brief overview of the NOAA Big Data Project and the AWS Data Alliance, then dive into a specific example of data that has been made available (high resolution Doppler radar from the NEXRAD system) and early use cases.

  14. The NOAA Big Data Project: NEXRAD on the Cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, A.; Weber, J.

    2015-12-01

    This past April, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) made headlines when it entered into a research agreement with Amazon Web Services (AWS) to explore sustainable models to increase the output of open NOAA data. Publicly available NOAA data drives multi-billion dollar industries and critical research efforts. Under this new agreement, AWS and its Data Alliance collaborators are looking at ways to push more NOAA data to the cloud and build an ecosystem of innovation around it. In this presentation, we will provide a brief overview of the NOAA Big Data Project and the AWS Data Alliance, then dive into a specific example of data that has been made available (high resolution Doppler radar from the NEXRAD system) and early use cases.

  15. Presenting DSCOVR: The First NOAA Mission to Leave Earth Orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Reinard, A.; Cash, M. D.; Johnson, J.; Burek, M.; de Koning, C. A.; Szabo, A.; Koval, A.; Kasper, J. C.; Stevens, M. L.; Case, A. W.; Berberich, K.; Mulligan, P.

    2015-12-01

    On February 11, 2015 the NOAA Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR) satellite was launched and is now in a Lissajous Orbit about the L1 Lagrange point. DSCOVR replaces the NASA Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) as the operational Real-Time Solar Wind (RTSW) monitor at the L1 Lagrange point. This is the first NOAA operational satellite to perform this function and represents the first of many expected satellites from NOAA to maintain this essential space weather monitoring capability. In this talk, we will review basic details of the DSCOVR mission as well as the real-time space weather data being provided, including comparisons to ACE. This will include a discussion of the robust averaging algorithms (Maximum Likelihood and Hodges-Lehmann) being applied to the data to ignore outliers and noisy data. We will also show the way users can access real-time DSCOVR data from the NOAA/Space Weather Prediction Center (SWPC) website. Finally, we will present the baseline NOAA mission for the DSCOVR replacement and detail the path forward.

  16. NOAA GCOM-W1/AMSR2 Oceanic Environmental Products: Phase-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenak, Z.; Alsweiss, S.; Chang, P.; Park, J. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Passive microwave radiometry is a special application of microwave communications technology for the purpose of collecting Earth's electromagnetic radiation. With the use of radiometers onboard earth orbiting satellites, scientists are able to monitor the Earth's environment and climate system on both short- and long-term temporal scales with near global coverage. The Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) is part of the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) broader commitment toward global and long-term observation of the Earth's environment. GCOM consists of two polar orbiting satellite series, GCOM-W (Water) and GCOM-C (Climate), with 1-year overlap between them for inter-calibration. AMSR2 onboard GCOM-W1 is a microwave radiometer system that measures dual polarized radiances at 6.9, 7.3, 10.65, 18.7, 23.8, 36.5, and 89.0 GHz. It is a sun-synchronous orbiter that acquires microwave radiances by conically scanning the Earth's surface at a nominal earth incidence angle of 55 degrees that results in a wide swath of 1450 km. As a part of Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) program the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) GCOM-W1 product development and validation project will provide NOAA's users access to critical geophysical products derived from AMSR-2. These products, which are detailed in NOAA's JPSS Level 1 Requirements Document Supplement, include: microwave brightness temperature, total precipitable water, cloud liquid water, precipitation type/rate, sea surface temperature, and Sea Surface Wind Speed. Phase-1 of the AMSR-2 project at NOAA included inter-calibration of AMSR-2 measured brightness temperatures with the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Microwave Imager as the reference radiometer. The second phase of the project utilized the calibrated brightness temperatures in a robust Bayesian network to retrieve more accurate geophysical parameters over the ocean surface. It can handle retrievals even with missing channels and

  17. Access High Quality Imagery from the NOAA View Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisut, D.; Powell, A. M.; Loomis, T.; Goel, V.; Mills, B.; Cowan, D.

    2013-12-01

    NOAA curates a vast treasure trove of environmental data, but one that is sometimes not easily accessed, especially for education, outreach, and media purposes. Traditional data portals in NOAA require extensive knowledge of the specific names of observation platforms, models, and analyses, along with nomenclature for variable outputs. A new website and web mapping service (WMS) from NOAA attempts to remedy such issues. The NOAA View data imagery portal provides a seamless entry point into data from across the agency: satellite, models, in-situ analysis, etc. The system provides the user with ability to browse, animate, and download high resolution (e.g., 4,000 x 2,000 pixel) imagery, Google Earth, and even proxy data files. The WMS architecture also allows the resources to be ingested into other software systems or applications.

  18. Traditional Knowledge Strengthens NOAA's Environmental Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stovall, W. K.; McBride, M. A.; Lewinski, S.; Bennett, S.

    2010-12-01

    Environmental education efforts are increasingly recognizing the value of traditional knowledge, or indigenous science, as a basis to teach the importance of stewardship. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Pacific Services Center incorporates Polynesian indigenous science into formal and informal education components of its environmental literacy program. By presenting indigenous science side by side with NOAA science, it becomes clear that the scientific results are the same, although the methods may differ. The platforms for these tools span a vast spectrum, utilizing media from 3-D visualizations to storytelling and lecture. Navigating the Pacific Islands is a Second Life project in which users navigate a virtual Polynesian voyaging canoe between two islands, one featuring native Hawaiian practices and the other where users learn about NOAA research and ships. In partnership with the University of Hawai‘i Waikiki Aquarium, the Nana I Ke Kai (Look to the Sea) series focuses on connecting culture and science during cross-discipline, publicly held discussions between cultural practitioners and research scientists. The Indigenous Science Video Series is a multi-use, animated collection of short films that showcase the efforts of NOAA fisheries management and ship navigation in combination with the accompanying Polynesian perspectives. Formal education resources and lesson plans for grades 3-5 focusing on marine science have also been developed and incorporate indigenous science practices as examples of conservation success. By merging traditional knowledge and stewardship practices with NOAA science in educational tools and resources, NOAA's Pacific Services Center is helping to build and increase environmental literacy through the development of educational tools and resources that are applicable to place-based understanding and approaches.

  19. Faster from the Depths to Decision: Collecting, Distributing, and Applying Data from NOAA`s Deep-Sea Tsunameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, R. H.; Wang, D.; Branski, F.

    2008-05-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates two tsunami warning centers (TWCs): the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center (ATWC) and Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (PTWC). ATWC provides tsunami alerts to Canadian coastal regions, Virgin Islands, Puerto Rico, and the coasts of continental US and Alaska. PTWC provides local/regional tsunami alerts/advisories to the state of Hawaii. An operational center of the Tsunami Warning System of the Pacific, it provides tsunami alerts to most countries of the Pacific Rim. PTWC also provides tsunami alerts for the Caribbean and Indian Ocean countries on an interim basis. The TWCs aim to issue first tsunami bulletins within 10-15 minutes of the earthquake for tele-tsunamis and within a few minutes for local tsunamis. The TWCs have a requirement for offshore tsunami detection in real-time with a data latency of 1 minute or less. Offshore detection of tsunamis is the purpose of NOAA`s recently completed 39-station array of deep-sea tsunameters. The tsunameters, employing the second-generation DART (Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis) technology, can speed tsunami detection information to the TWCs in less than 3 minutes from depths of 6000 meters in the Pacific and Western Atlantic oceans. The tsunameters consist of a Bottom Pressure Recorder (BPR) and a surface buoy. Communication from the BPR to the buoy is via underwater acoustic transmissions. Satellite communications carry the data from the buoy to NOAA`s National Data Buoy Center (NDBC), which operates the tsunameters. The BPRs make pressure measurements, converts them to an equivalent water-column height, and passes them through a tsunami detection algorithm. If the algorithm detects a sufficient change in the height, the tsunameter goes into a rapid reporting mode or Event Mode. The acoustic modem-satellite telecommunications path takes approximately 50 seconds to reach the NDBC server. In a few seconds, NDBC reformats the data and

  20. NOAA-ISRO joint science projects on Earth observation system science, technology, and applications for societal benefits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, A.; Jayarman, V.; Kondragunta, S.; Kogan, F.; Kuligowski, R.; Maturi, E.

    2006-12-01

    India and the United States of America (U.S.A.) held a joint conference from June 21-25, 2004 in Bangalore, India to strengthen and expand cooperation in the area of space science, applications, and commerce. Following the recommendations in the joint vision statement released at the end of the conference, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Indian Space and Reconnaissance Organization (ISRO) initiated several joint science projects in the area of satellite product development and applications. This is an extraordinary step since it concentrates on improvements in the data and scientific exchange between India and the United States, consistent with a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by the two nations in 1997. With the relationship between both countries strengthening with President Bush's visit in early 2006 and new program announcements between the two countries, there is a renewed commitment at ISRO and other Indian agencies and at NOAA in the U.S. to fulfill the agreements reached on the joint science projects. The collaboration is underway with several science projects that started in 2005 providing initial results. NOAA and ISRO agreed that the projects must promote scientific understanding of the satellite data and lead to a satellite-based decision support systems for disaster and public health warnings. The projects target the following areas: --supporting a drought monitoring system for India --improving precipitation estimates over India from Kalpana-1 --increasing aerosol optical depth measurements and products over India --developing early indicators of malaria and other vector borne diseases via satellite monitoring of environmental conditions and linking them to predictive models --monitoring sea surface temperature (SST) from INSAT-3D to support improved forecasting of regional storms, monsoon onset and cyclones. The research collaborations and results from these projects will be presented and discussed in the

  1. Measurements of stratospheric volcanic aerosol optical depth from NOAA TIROS Observational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierangelo, CléMence; ChéDin, Alain; Chazette, Patrick

    2004-02-01

    We show that the infrared optical depth of stratospheric volcanic aerosols produced by the eruption of Mount Pinatubo in June 1991 may be retrieved from the observations of the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS-2) on board the polar meteorological satellites of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Evolution of the concentration in time and in space, in particular the migration of the aerosols from the tropics to the Northern and Southern Hemispheres, is found to be consistent with our knowledge of the consequences of this eruption. The method relies on the analysis of the differences between the satellite observations and simulations from an aerosol-free radiative transfer model using collocated radiosonde data as the prime input. Thus aerosol optical depths are retrieved directly without making assumptions about the aerosol size distribution or absorption coefficient. The aerosol optical depths reached a maximum in August 1991 in the tropical zone (0.055 at 8.3 μm, 0.03 at 4.0 μm, and 0.02 at 11.1 μm). The peak occurred in November 1991 in the southern midlatitudes and in March/April 1992 in the northern midlatitudes. A reanalysis of the almost 25 year archive of NOAA TIROS-N Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) observations holds considerable promise for improved knowledge of the atmosphere loading in volcanic aerosols.

  2. Anomalous event diagnosis for environmental satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsay, Bruce H.

    1993-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) is responsible for the operation of the NOAA geostationary and polar orbiting satellites. NESDIS provides a wide array of operational meteorological and oceanographic products and services and operates various computer and communication systems on a 24-hour, seven days per week schedule. The Anomaly Reporting System contains a database of anomalous events regarding the operations of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), communication, or computer systems that have degraded or caused the loss of GOES imagery. Data is currently entered manually via an automated query user interface. There are 21 possible symptoms (e.g., No Data), and 73 possible causes (e.g., Sectorizer - World Weather Building) of an anomalous event. The determination of an event's cause(s) is made by the on-duty computer operator, who enters the event in a paper based daily log, and by the analyst entering the data into the reporting system. The determination of the event's cause(s) impacts both the operational status of these systems, and the performance evaluation of the on-site computer and communication operations contractor.

  3. NOAA Research Vessel Explores Atlantic Ocean Seamounts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-10-01

    Mike Ford, a biological oceanographer with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), sat rapt in front of a bank of high-definition monitors. They provided live video and data feeds from a tethered pair of instrument-laden remotely operated vehicles (ROVs) that were descending 4692 meters on their deepest dive ever. Their target: an unnamed and unexplored New England seamount discovered in the North Atlantic last year.

  4. Solutions Network Formulation Report: Improving NOAA's PORTS(R) Through Enhanced Data Inputs from NASA's Ocean Surface Topography Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guest, DeNeice

    2007-01-01

    The Nation uses water-level data for a variety of practical purposes, including nautical charting, maritime navigation, hydrography, coastal engineering, and tsunami and storm surge warnings. Long-term applications include marine boundary determinations, tidal predictions, sea-level trend monitoring, oceanographic research, and climate research. Accurate and timely information concerning sea-level height, tide, and ocean current is needed to understand their impact on coastal management, disaster management, and public health. Satellite altimeter data products are currently used by hundreds of researchers and operational users to monitor ocean circulation and to improve scientists understanding of the role of the oceans in climate and weather. The NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) National Ocean Service has been monitoring sea-level variations for many years. NOAA s PORTS (Physical Oceanographic Real-Time System) DST (decision support tool), managed by the Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, supports safe and cost-efficient navigation by providing ship masters and pilots with accurate real-time information required to avoid groundings and collisions. This report assesses the capacity of NASA s satellite altimeter data to meet societal decision support needs through incorporation into NOAA s PORTS. NASA has a long heritage of collecting data for ocean research, including its current Terra and Aqua missions. Numerous other missions provide additional important information for coastal management issues, and data collection will continue in the coming decade with such missions as the OSTM (Ocean Surface Topography Mission). OSTM will provide data on sea-surface heights for determining ocean circulation, climate change, and sea-level rise. We suggest that NASA incorporate OSTM altimeter data (C- and Ku-band) into NOAA s PORTS DST in support of NASA s Coastal Management National Application with secondary support to the

  5. Workshop on Bridging Satellite Climate Data Gaps.

    PubMed

    Cooksey, Catherine; Datla, Raju

    2011-01-01

    Detecting the small signals of climate change for the most essential climate variables requires that satellite sensors make highly accurate and consistent measurements. Data gaps in the time series (such as gaps resulting from launch delay or failure) and inconsistencies in radiometric scales between satellites undermine the credibility of fundamental climate data records, and can lead to erroneous analysis in climate change detection. To address these issues, leading experts in Earth observations from National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Adminstration (NOAA), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and academia assembled at the National Institute of Standards and Technology on December 10, 2009 for a workshop to prioritize strategies for bridging and mitigating data gaps in the climate record. This paper summarizes the priorities for ensuring data continuity of variables relevant to climate change in the areas of atmosphere, land, and ocean measurements and the recommendations made at the workshop for overcoming planned and unplanned gaps in the climate record.

  6. Satellite Video Captures the Eastern U.S. Winter Storm Track

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES satellite data shows the progression of the major winter storm over the U.S. Mid-Atlantic and southern states on March 2 and 3. Credit: NASA/NOAA GOES Project, Dennis ...

  7. Satellite Animation Shows February Return of the Pineapple Express

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of satellite imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from Feb. 1 to Feb. 4, 2015 captured the movement of a stream of clouds associated with moisture called "The Pineapple Express." Cr...

  8. Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) System Architecture: Suomi-NPP to the Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furgerson, J.; Layns, A.; Feeley, J. H.; Griffin, A.; Trumbower, G.

    2014-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is acquiring the next-generation weather and environmental satellite system, named the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). NOAA has overall responsibility for the system including funding and requirements while the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) serves as the acquisition and development agent. The Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite was launched on 28 October, 2011, and is a pathfinder for JPSS and provides continuity for the NASA Earth Observation System and the NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite (POES) system. S-NPP and the follow-on JPSS satellites will operate in the 1330 LTAN orbit. JPSS-1 is scheduled to launch in early 2017. NASA is developing the Common Ground System which will process JPSS data and has the flexibility to process data from other satellites. This poster will provide a top level status update of the program, as well as an overview of the JPSS system architecture. The space segment carries a suite of sensors that collect meteorological, oceanographic, and climatological observations of the earth and atmosphere. The system design allows centralized mission management and delivers high quality environmental products to military, civil and scientific users through a Command, Control, and Communication Segment (C3S). The data processing for S-NPP/JPSS is accomplished through an Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS)/Field Terminal Segment (FTS) that processes S-NPP/JPSS satellite data to provide environmental data products to U.S. and international partners as well as remote terminal users throughout the world.

  9. Verification of a New NOAA/NSIDC Passive Microwave Sea-Ice Concentration Climate Record

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meier, Walter N.; Peng, Ge; Scott, Donna J.; Savoie, Matt H.

    2014-01-01

    A new satellite-based passive microwave sea-ice concentration product developed for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)Climate Data Record (CDR) programme is evaluated via comparison with other passive microwave-derived estimates. The new product leverages two well-established concentration algorithms, known as the NASA Team and Bootstrap, both developed at and produced by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The sea ice estimates compare well with similar GSFC products while also fulfilling all NOAA CDR initial operation capability (IOC) requirements, including (1) self describing file format, (2) ISO 19115-2 compliant collection-level metadata,(3) Climate and Forecast (CF) compliant file-level metadata, (4) grid-cell level metadata (data quality fields), (5) fully automated and reproducible processing and (6) open online access to full documentation with version control, including source code and an algorithm theoretical basic document. The primary limitations of the GSFC products are lack of metadata and use of untracked manual corrections to the output fields. Smaller differences occur from minor variations in processing methods by the National Snow and Ice Data Center (for the CDR fields) and NASA (for the GSFC fields). The CDR concentrations do have some differences from the constituent GSFC concentrations, but trends and variability are not substantially different.

  10. Tsunami.gov: NOAA's Tsunami Information Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiro, B.; Carrick, J.; Hellman, S. B.; Bernard, M.; Dildine, W. P.

    2014-12-01

    We present the new Tsunami.gov website, which delivers a single authoritative source of tsunami information for the public and emergency management communities. The site efficiently merges information from NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers (TWC's) by way of a comprehensive XML feed called Tsunami Event XML (TEX). The resulting unified view allows users to quickly see the latest tsunami alert status in geographic context without having to understand complex TWC areas of responsibility. The new site provides for the creation of a wide range of products beyond the traditional ASCII-based tsunami messages. The publication of modern formats such as Common Alerting Protocol (CAP) can drive geographically aware emergency alert systems like FEMA's Integrated Public Alert and Warning System (IPAWS). Supported are other popular information delivery systems, including email, text messaging, and social media updates. The Tsunami.gov portal allows NOAA staff to easily edit content and provides the facility for users to customize their viewing experience. In addition to access by the public, emergency managers and government officials may be offered the capability to log into the portal for special access rights to decision-making and administrative resources relevant to their respective tsunami warning systems. The site follows modern HTML5 responsive design practices for optimized use on mobile as well as non-mobile platforms. It meets all federal security and accessibility standards. Moving forward, we hope to expand Tsunami.gov to encompass tsunami-related content currently offered on separate websites, including the NOAA Tsunami Website, National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program, NOAA Center for Tsunami Research, National Geophysical Data Center's Tsunami Database, and National Data Buoy Center's DART Program. This project is part of the larger Tsunami Information Technology Modernization Project, which is consolidating the software architectures of NOAA's existing TWC's into

  11. Introduction to the NOAA Earth Information System (NEIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, J.; MacDermaid, C.; Hackathorn, E.; Lynge, J.; Smith, J.; Pierce, R.; Davis, D.

    2012-12-01

    Across the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and other government agencies, there exists a wide variety of environmental data and information systems meeting various agency missions. To meet NOAA's mission -- to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans, and coasts, to share that knowledge and information with others, and to conserve and manage coastal and marine ecosystems and resources -- NOAA's data and systems need to be easily accessible and interoperable. Achieving this would lead to a more efficient organization. A concept conceived at Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) called the NOAA Earth Information System (NEIS) can provide this functionality. While the concept is visionary, the core requirements of this new system are: 1. Provide access to all information and data for all time scales 2. Provide the information when the user needs it 3. Provide the information in a form the user can interpret 4. Make information available on all platforms NOAA Earth Information System (NEIS) is a framework of layered services designed to help NOAA's mission areas by facilitating the discovery, access, integration, and understanding of all NOAA data (past, present, and future). Designed for a world where everything is in motion, NEIS allows fluid data integration and interaction across 4D time and space. This presentation will provide an overview the NEIS concept and prototype, as well as information regarding ongoing and future activities related to this project.

  12. NOAA Plans for Improving Public Access to Science Research (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2013-12-01

    The White House Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) issued a memorandum on 2013 February 22 calling for federal agencies to enhance public access to research results (PARR), and required agencies to submit, within 6 months of the memo, draft plans explaining how they would implement the requirements. For the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), research results include digital data about the Earth's environment and publications based on those data. Regarding environmental data, NOAA is already very active in ensuring and improving public access. Indeed, National Weather Service (NWS) data was highlighted as one of the good examples in the OSTP memo. More generally, the NOAA National Data Centers, the Environmental Data Management Committee (EDMC), and scientific and technical personnel across the agency are striving to ensure NOAA data are discoverable and accessible on-line, well-documented and formatted for usability, and preserved for future generations as a national asset. This presentation will describe current and potential activities in support of public access to NOAA and NOAA-funded environmental data. Regarding publications, there is greater uncertainty. The fundamental issue is how to ensure no-cost access (after an embargo period) to publications that typically require subscriptions. That issue must be addressed at the interagency level with the journal publishers. The plan indicates that NOAA will adopt shared mechanisms and agreements to the extent possible rather than building new systems. Some elements remain under discussion; this presentation will be limited to those aspects on which there is general agreement.

  13. Retrieval of Fog Microphysical Parameters from NOAA AVHRR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ling

    1995-01-01

    Identifying the droplet size distribution, frequency and location of land-based fog is valuable for climate studies, because of the effects on agricultural productivity projections, highway traffic safety, and urban pollution monitoring. It's especially important to the Central Valley of California, which frequently suffers lingering, heavy fog. Land-based fog plays an important role in surface radiation budgets, by blocking daytime solar heating and nocturnal long wave cooling. The droplet size distribution determines the optical depth and radiative attenuation of fog. An operational retrieval method for obtaining droplet size and optical depth has been developed for land -based fog from the multichannel NOAA (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) AVHRR (Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer) digital image data. The visible and near infrared images provide the reflectances of both channels, which vary with droplet microphysical characteristics. The reflectances are interpolated to radiative cloud modeling results. A new field method has been used for obtaining the measurements of land-based fog microphysical and thermodynamic parameters. A tethered balloon carries a meteorological package and a cloud droplet imaging system which transfer the images to a recording system on the ground. The results from the satellite imagery at Esparto (ESP), California are well matched with field sampling results at the same location.

  14. Operational Applications of Satellite Snowcover Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rango, A. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    LANDSAT and NOAA satellites data were used to study snow depth. These snow measurements were used to help forecast runoff and flooding. Many areas of California, Arizona, Colorado, and Wyoming were emphasized.

  15. GOES-West Satellite Sees 'Pineapple Express'

    NASA Video Gallery

    Visible and infrared images taken from NOAA's Geostationary Operational Environmental, or GOES-West, satellite from Feb. 7 through 9, 2014, were animated by the NASA GOES Project at NASA's Goddard ...

  16. Satellite Movie Sees Southern California Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from Jan. 5 through Jan 7 shows the progression of storm systems in the Eastern Pacific Ocean that hit southern California and generated flooding a...

  17. AIR QUALITY FORECAST VERIFICATION USING SATELLITE DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    NOAA 's operational geostationary satellite retrievals of aerosol optical depths (AODs) were used to verify National Weather Service (NWS) experimental (research mode) particulate matter (PM2.5) forecast guidance issued during the summer 2004 International Consortium for Atmosp...

  18. GOES Satellite Data Shows Tornado Development

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite data shows the development and movement of the weather system that spawned tornadoes affecting the southern and eastern U.S. states on April 27-29, 2014...

  19. GOES Satellite Movie of 2014 Winter Storms

    NASA Video Gallery

    This new animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery shows the movement of winter storms from January 1 to March 24 making for a snowier-than-normal winter along the U.S. East coast and Midwest...

  20. Satellite Tracks Double Eastern Pacific Hurricanes

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from Aug. 27 to Aug. 30, 2016, shows the movement of Category 4 Hurricane Madeline approaching Hawaii in the Central Pacific Ocean and Category ...

  1. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) program Economic and programmatic, considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aller, R. O.

    1985-01-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) represents the principal element of a new space-based tracking and communication network which will support NASA spaceflight missions in low earth orbit. In its complete configuration, the TDRSS network will include a space segment consisting of three highly specialized communication satellites in geosynchronous orbit, a ground segment consisting of an earth terminal, and associated data handling and control facilities. The TDRSS network has the objective to provide communication and data relay services between the earth-orbiting spacecraft and their ground-based mission control and data handling centers. The first TDRSS spacecraft has been now in service for two years. The present paper is concerned with the TDRSS experience from the perspective of the various programmatic and economic considerations which relate to the program.

  2. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) program Economic and programmatic, considerations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aller, R. O.

    1985-10-01

    The Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) represents the principal element of a new space-based tracking and communication network which will support NASA spaceflight missions in low earth orbit. In its complete configuration, the TDRSS network will include a space segment consisting of three highly specialized communication satellites in geosynchronous orbit, a ground segment consisting of an earth terminal, and associated data handling and control facilities. The TDRSS network has the objective to provide communication and data relay services between the earth-orbiting spacecraft and their ground-based mission control and data handling centers. The first TDRSS spacecraft has been now in service for two years. The present paper is concerned with the TDRSS experience from the perspective of the various programmatic and economic considerations which relate to the program.

  3. Improving NOAA's NWLON Through Enhanced Data Inputs from NASA's Ocean Surface Topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guest, DeNeice C.

    2010-01-01

    This report assesses the benefit of incorporating NASA's OSTM (Ocean Surface Topography Mission) altimeter data (C- and Ku-band) into NOAA's (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) NWLON (National Water Level Observation Network) DSS (Decision Support System). This data will enhance the NWLON DSS by providing additional inforrnation because not all stations collect all meteorological parameters (sea-surface height, ocean tides, wave height, and wind speed over waves). OSTM will also provide data where NWLON stations are not present. OSTM will provide data on seasurface heights for determining sea-level rise and ocean circulation. Researchers and operational users currently use satellite altimeter data products with the GSFCOO NASA data model to obtain sea-surface height and ocean circulation inforrnation. Accurate and tirnely inforrnation concerning sea-level height, tide, and ocean currents is needed to irnprove coastal tidal predictions, tsunarni and storm surge warnings, and wetland restoration.

  4. Multi-mission Satellite Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Teter, M. A.; Grant, K. D.; Dougherty, B.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA's next-generation environmental satellite, the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES). JPSS satellites carry sensors which collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The first JPSS satellite was launched in 2011 and is currently NOAA's primary operational polar satellite. The JPSS ground system is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3) and data processing (DP). A multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3/DP for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD, and international missions. In preparation for the next JPSS satellite, CGS improved its multi-mission capabilities to enhance mission operations for larger constellations of earth observing satellites with the added benefit of streamlining mission operations for other NOAA missions. CGS's multi-mission capabilities allows management all of assets as a single enterprise, more efficiently using ground resources and personnel and consolidating multiple ground systems into one. Sophisticated scheduling algorithms compare mission priorities and constraints across all ground stations, creating an enterprise schedule optimized to mission needs, which CGS executes to acquire the satellite link, uplink commands, downlink and route data to the operations and data processing facilities, and generate the final products for delivery to downstream users. This paper will illustrate the CGS's ability to manage multiple, enterprise-wide polar orbiting missions by demonstrating resource modeling and tasking, production of enterprise contact schedules for NOAA's Fairbanks ground station (using both standing and ad hoc requests), deconflicting resources due to ground outages, and updating resource allocations through dynamic priority definitions.

  5. Satellite-Respondent Buoys Identify Ocean Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA operates a series of Earth-observing satellites, which help scientists learn more about our home planet. Through partnerships with universities and other government agencies, like the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the Space Agency helps scientists around the world capture precise movements of the Earth s crust to learn more about the underground processes related to earthquakes and volcanic eruptions, create accurate assessments of wind resources for future energy use, and preserve endangered species by generating much-needed data about their environments. This work, done primarily from space with satellites using a variety of complex instruments to take readings of the surface below, generates leagues of valuable data that aid scientists on the ground - or in some cases on the water. As much of the Earth is covered in water liquid, frozen, saltwater, or fresh much of NASA s remote sensing work focuses on the oceans and their health. This valuable, mammoth (yet fragile) resource provides insight into the overall health of our planet, as water, in addition to being abundant, is a key ingredient to all known life on Earth. As part of its ocean-observing work, NASA partnered with NOAA and private industry to develop remote sensing technologies for protecting the seas of the North Pacific from a nefarious and pervasive problem: derelict fishing gear.

  6. Integration of Administrative, Clinical, and Environmental Data to Support the Management of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: From Satellites to Clinical Care.

    PubMed

    Dagliati, Arianna; Marinoni, Andrea; Cerra, Carlo; Decata, Pasquale; Chiovato, Luca; Gamba, Paolo; Bellazzi, Riccardo

    2015-12-01

    A very interesting perspective of "big data" in diabetes management stands in the integration of environmental information with data gathered for clinical and administrative purposes, to increase the capability of understanding spatial and temporal patterns of diseases. Within the MOSAIC project, funded by the European Union with the goal to design new diabetes analytics, we have jointly analyzed a clinical-administrative dataset of nearly 1.000 type 2 diabetes patients with environmental information derived from air quality maps acquired from remote sensing (satellite) data. Within this context we have adopted a general analysis framework able to deal with a large variety of temporal, geo-localized data. Thanks to the exploitation of time series analysis and satellite images processing, we studied whether glycemic control showed seasonal variations and if they have a spatiotemporal correlation with air pollution maps. We observed a link between the seasonal trends of glycated hemoglobin and air pollution in some of the considered geographic areas. Such findings will need future investigations for further confirmation. This work shows that it is possible to successfully deal with big data by implementing new analytics and how their exploration may provide new scenarios to better understand clinical phenomena.

  7. Coordinating activities between NOAA and other agencies.

    PubMed

    Fritz, A T; Buchman, M F

    1997-11-01

    The Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (NCP) mandate protection of public health, welfare, and the environment at Superfund hazardous waste sites. The NCP requires lead response agenciesto integrate baseline risk assessments into the remedial process that "assess threats to the environment." EPA policy statements direct regional offices to perform thorough, consistent ecological risk assessments, and stress the importance of coordination and technical consultation with the natural resource trustees. As a Federal natural trustee, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) role and responsibilities within the CERCLA process also are defined and mandated by Federal law. NOAA is responsible for identifying sites in the coastal zone that may affect natural resources, evaluating injury to trust resources, and providing technical advice on assessments and remedial and restoration alternatives. Statutes require lead cleanup agencies and trustee agencies to notify and coordinate with each other during CERCLA response. Over the past ten years, NOAA has gained valuable experience and technical expertise in environmental assessments and in evaluating contaminated aquatic environments. NOAA fulfills its responsibilities through an effective network of Coastal Resource Coordinators (CRCs) who can rapidly respond to local technical requirements and priorities, and coordinate effectively with technical and trustee representatives. In addition to CRCs, an interdisciplinary support group provides technical expertise in the scientific disciplines required to respond to the needs of regional activities. NOAA provides CRCs to coastal EPA regional offices for technical support, and to act as liaisons with Federal and state natural resource trustee agencies. The CRCs help EPA and other lead response agencies identify and assess risks to coastal resources

  8. NOAA-11 SBUV/2 measurements of solar UV variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, R. P.; Deland, M. T.; Hilsenrath, E.

    1995-01-01

    The SBUV/2 instrument onboard the NOAA-11 satellite made daily solar spectral irradiance measurements in the wavelength region 160405 nm at 1.1 nm resolution between January 1989 and October 1994. These observations continued the uninterrupted series of solar measurements begun by the Nimbus-7 SBUV in 1978 and continued by NOAA-9 SBUV/2. While the measurements made by the SBUV-series instruments furnish an excellent data base for studies of solar UV variability, these instruments do not have an internal mew to evaluate and correct for long-term instrument sensitivity degradation, needed to evaluate solar cycle timescale irradiance change. During yearly Shuttle flights the Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) also performs solar spectral irradiance measurements in the wavelength region 200 to 400 nm with an instrument that is calibrated preflight, inflight, and postflight. Comparisons between the simultaneous NOAA-11 SBUV/2 and SSBUV solar measurements are used to identify and correct long term sensitivity changes in the satellite instrument. The NOAA-11 data will then be used to evaluate long-term solar change. We present a progress report on the above process. At this preliminary stage uncertainties in the calibration transfer between SSBUV and NOAA-11 SBUV/2 are too large to accurately evaluate long-term solar change near the A1 edge, but solar rotational activity variations can be evaluated. We find that rotational activity declined from roughly 6% peak-to-peak (p-p) near the maximum of solar cycle 22 in 1989-1991 to approximately 3% p-p in mid 1992 and 2% p-p by mid 1994. Emphasizing rotational variations, comparisons between the 200 nm data and the NOAA-11 Mg II proxy index are presented.

  9. In Congress Budget Update for NOAA, USGS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Among the agenda items facing Congress as it reconvenes this week are the fiscal 1984 budgets for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), which is part of the Department of Commerce, and for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which is within the Department of the Interior. Fiscal year 1984 begins October 1, 1983. As Congress rolls up its shirtsleeves and gets down to business, Eos presents a status report on the two agency budgets.Both House and Senate appropriations committees have finished their work on the NOAA budget, which had been targeted by President Ronald Reagan for a $799.8 million appropriation request (program level of $843.2 million) in his proposed fiscal 1984 budget (Eos, February 15, 1983, p. 65). The House appropriation for NOAA (H.R. 3134 and H.R. 3222) is $998.5 million, with a program level of $1043.9 million. The Senate Appropriations Committee set its appropriation (S. 1721) at $987.8 million, with a program level of $1041.0 million.

  10. The NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.

    2003-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations from space in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to Cambridge and Harvard University. Zoom through the Cosmos to SLC and site of the 2002 Winter Olympics using 1 m IKONOS "Spy Satellite" data. Contrast the 1972 Apollo 17 "Blue Marble" image of the Earth with the latest US and International global satellite images that allow us to view our Planet from any vantage point. See the latest spectacular images from NASA/NOAA remote sensing missions like Terra, GOES, TRMM, SeaWiFS, & Landsat 7, of storms & fires like Hurricane Isabel and the LNSan Diego firestorms of 2003. See how High Definition Television (HDTV) is revolutionizing the way we do science communication. Take the pulse of the planet on a daily, annual and 30-year time scale. See daily thunderstorms, the annual blooming of the northern hemisphere landmasses and oceans, fires in Africa, dust storms in Iraq, and carbon monoxide exhaust from global burning. See visualizations featured on Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science covers & National & International Network TV. Spectacular new global visualizations of the observed and simulated atmosphere & oceans are shown. See the currents and vortexes in the oceans that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny plankton and draw the fish, whales and fishermen. See the how the ocean blooms in response to El Niiioh Niiia climate changes. The Etheater will be presented using the latest High Definition TV (HDTV) and video projection technology on a large screen. See the global city lights, and the great NE US blackout of August 2003 observed by the "night-vision" DMSP satellite.

  11. NOAA SBUV(/2) Ozone Merged Cohesive Climate Data Record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, C. S.; Wild, J.; Beach, E.

    2015-12-01

    The Solar Backscatter UltraViolet (SBUV) instrument flown on Nimbus-7 and the SBUV/2 instruments flown on the NOAA 09, 11, 14, 16, 17, 18, and 19 satellites have produced a continuous record of nadir profile ozone observations from 1979 through the present (2015). NASA's latest reprocessing of the individual satellite data sets have created a version 8.6 which strives to eliminate inter-satellite biases. However, there still are differences in data quality between the instruments flown on the various satellites. Our goal is to remove the remaining differences. Adjustments are made to individual instrument records based on periods of overlap, to account for any variations in the observed annual cycle as well as an overall bias. Rather than an average of all available observations, a single satellite is chosen for each period based on the best latitudinal coverage allowing the clean retention of satellite characteristics such as time of measurement, solar zenith angle, etc. to be identified with an ozone value. Measurements from NOAA-9 are included in a short period to allow greater global coverage in the bridge from NOAA-11 to -14. Measurements from the NASA BUV on Nimbus-4 are excluded since there is no overlap with the subsequent instruments. We will present examples of the methodology to adjust overlapping satellites. We will contrast the original unadjusted data set with our final data set. We will present results from applying a piece-wise linear trend to the data set dividing the depletion period from the recovery period. These results will be shown in comparison with other trend results from other ozone profile datasets.

  12. 75 FR 30383 - NOAA's Arctic Vision and Strategy; Comment Period Extension

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XT64 NOAA's Arctic Vision and Strategy; Comment.... SUMMARY: NOAA wishes to ensure its Arctic Vision and Strategy document reaches the broadest possible... increasing global strategic interest. DATES: Comments must be submitted by June 25, 2010. ADDRESSES:...

  13. 75 FR 25843 - Notice of Public Review and Comment Period on NOAA's Arctic Vision and Strategy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-10

    ... NOAA's Arctic Vision and Strategy AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. ACTION... increasing global strategic interest. DATES: Comments must be submitted by June 10, 2010. ADDRESSES: Submit.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: To view the document, go to http://www.arctic.noaa.gov/ . I. Summary of the...

  14. Joint Polar Satellite System Common Ground System Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS will contribute the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the restructured National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). As such, JPSS replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA and the ground processing component of both Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) replacement, previously known as the Defense Weather Satellite System (DWSS), managed by the Department of Defense (DoD). The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS), and consists of a Command, Control, and Communications Segment (C3S) and an Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS). Both segments are developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems (IIS). The C3S currently flies the Suomi National Polar Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite and transfers mission data from Suomi NPP and between the ground facilities. The IDPS processes Suomi NPP satellite data to provide Environmental Data Records (EDRs) to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. When the JPSS-1 satellite is launched in early 2017, the responsibilities of the C3S and the IDPS will be expanded to support both Suomi NPP and JPSS-1. The JPSS CGS currently provides data processing for Suomi NPP, generating multiple terabytes per day across over two dozen environmental data products; that workload will be multiplied by two when the JPSS-1 satellite is

  15. VIIRS ocean color data visualization and processing with IDL-based NOAA-SeaDAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xiaoming; Jiang, Lide; Wang, Menghua; Sun, Junqiang

    2014-11-01

    The NOAA Sea-viewing Data Analysis System (NOAA-SeaDAS) is an Interactive Data Language (IDL)-based satellite data visualization, analysis, and processing system based on the version 6.4 of the NASA's Sea-viewing Wide Field-ofview (SeaWiFS) Data Analysis System (SeaDAS) released in 2012. NOAA-SeaDAS inherited all the original functionalities of SeaDAS 6.4 and was upgraded with many new functions and new sensor supports, particularly the support of the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership (SNPP). The main goal of the NOAA-SeaDAS development is primarily in support of NOAA ocean color team's calibration and validation activities. The current version of NOAA-SeaDAS can visualize, analyze, and process VIIRS Sensor Data Records (SDR or Level-1B data) produced by the NOAA Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), ocean color Environmental Data Records (EDR or Level-2 data) produced by the NOAA Multi-Sensor Level-1 to Level- 2 (MSL12) ocean color data processing system, and Level-3 data binned or mapped from Level-2 data produced by NOAA-MSL12. NOAA-SeaDAS is currently serving an active IDL user group at NOAA and will serve other institutions and universities in the future. The goal is to allow various scientific users to visualize, analyze, and process VIIRS data from Level-1B through Level-2 and Level-3. In addition, NOAA-SeaDAS can also visualize satellite images from the Korean Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI), as well as many other satellite ocean color sensors, e.g., SeaWiFS, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), etc. NOAA-SeaDAS is under constant development to create new system functionalities and enhance user experience. With constantly increasing volume in the global ocean color data archive, NOAA-SeaDAS will play an important role in support of global marine environment data analysis and various scientific applications.

  16. Performance of Nickel-Cadmium Batteries on the POES Series of Weather Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Chetty, P. R. K.; Boyce, Ron; Smalls, Vanessa; Spitzer, Tom

    1998-01-01

    The advanced Television Infrared Observation satellite program is a cooperative effort between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the United Kingdom, Canada and France, for providing day and night global environmental and associated data. NASA is responsible for procurement launch, and checkout of these spacecraft before transferring them over to NOAA, who operates the spacecraft to support weather forecasting, severe storm tracking, and 'meteorological research by the National Weather Service. These spacecraft with all weather monitoring instruments imposed challenging requirements for the onboard electrical power subsystem (EPS). This paper provides first a brief overview of the overall power subsystem, followed by a description of batteries. A unique power subsystem design which provides 'tender-loving-care' to these batteries is highlighted. This is followed by the on-orbit maintenance and performance data of the batteries since launch.

  17. Intergrating Data From NASA Missions Into NOAAs Pacific Region Intergrated Climatology Information Products (PRICIP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benham, L.; Chester, K.; Eisberg, A.; Iyer, S.; Lee, K.; Marra, J.; Schmidt, C.; Skiles, J.

    2008-12-01

    The Pacific Region Integrated Climatology Information Products (PRICIP) Project is developing a number of products that will successfully promote awareness and understanding of the patterns and effects of "storminess" in the Pacific Rim. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Integrated Data and Environmental Applications (IDEA) Center initiated the PRICIP Project to improve our understanding of such storm processes by creating a web portal containing both scientific and socioeconomic information about Pacific storms. Working in conjunction with partners at NOAA, students from the NASA Ames DEVELOP internship program are integrating NASA satellite imagery into the PRICIP web portal by animating eight storm systems that took place in the South Pacific Ocean between 1992 and 2005, four other anomalous high water events in the Hawaiian Islands, and annual storm tracks. The primary intended audience includes coastal disaster management decision-makers and other similarly concerned agencies. The broad access of these web-based products is also expected to reach scientists, the National Weather Service (NWS), the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and media broadcasting consumers. The newly integrated and animated hindcast data will also help educate laypersons about past storms and help them for future storms.

  18. A Quality Control study of the distribution of NOAA MIRS Cloudy retrievals during Hurricane Sandy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    Cloudy radiance present a difficult challenge to data assimilation (DA) systems, through both the radiative transfer system as well the hydrometers required to resolve the cloud and precipitation. In most DA systems the hydrometers are not control variables due to many limitations. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) is producing products from the NPP-ATMS satellite where the scene is cloud and precipitation affected. The test case that we present here is the life time of Hurricane and then Superstorm Sandy in October 2012. As a quality control study we shall compare the retrieved water vapor content during the lifetime of Sandy with the first guess and the analysis from the NOAA Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI) system. The assessment involves the gross error check system against the first guess with different values for the observational error's variance to see if the difference is within three standard deviations. We shall also compare against the final analysis at the relevant cycles to see if the products which have been retrieved through a cloudy radiance are similar, given that the DA system does not assimilate cloudy radiances yet.

  19. The Impact of NOAA Satellite Soundings on the Numerical Analysis and Forecast System of the People’s Republic of China. Part 1. FGGE Data. Part 2. December 1987 Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    1987 data set is in ON 29 format. Satellite soundings are converted from layet thickness values to heights at mandatory levels by adding the 1000 mb...8217The US of TOmS Data in ’Evaluating and Improving the ’otal Ozone fro: TOVS Measurements. James H. Lienesch and Prabhat .’. [landey, July 1)85. (PB86

  20. Improvements and Extensions for Joint Polar Satellite System Algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, K. D.; Feeley, J. H.; Miller, S. W.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS replaced the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the old POES system managed by the NOAA. JPSS satellites will carry sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground processing system for the JPSS is the Common Ground System (CGS), and provides command, control, and communications (C3), data processing and product delivery. CGS's data processing capability processes the data from the JPSS satellites to provide environmental data products (including Sensor Data Records (SDRs) and Environmental Data Records (EDRs)) to the NOAA Satellite Operations Facility. The first satellite in the JPSS constellation, known as the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, was launched on 28 October 2011. CGS is currently processing and delivering SDRs and EDRs for S-NPP and will continue through the lifetime of the JPSS program. The EDRs for S-NPP are currently undergoing an extensive Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) campaign. Changes identified by the Cal/Val campaign are coming available for implementation into the operational system in support of both S-NPP and JPSS-1 (scheduled for launch in 2017). Some of these changes will be available in time to update the S-NPP algorithm baseline, while others will become operational just prior to JPSS-1 launch. In addition, new capabilities, such as higher spectral and spatial resolution, will be exercised on JPSS-1. This paper will describe changes to current algorithms and products as a result of the Cal/Val campaign and related initiatives for improved capabilities. Improvements include Cross Track Infrared Sounder high spectral

  1. Algorithm Development Library for Environmental Satellite Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D. C.; Grant, K. D.; Miller, S. W.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS will contribute the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the restructured National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS). As such, the Joint Polar Satellite System replaces the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the ground processing component of both Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) replacement, previously known as the Defense Weather Satellite System (DWSS), managed by the Department of Defense (DoD). The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological, and solar-geophysical observations of the earth, atmosphere, and space. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS), and consists of a Command, Control, and Communications Segment (C3S) and an Interface Data Processing Segment (IDPS). Both segments are developed by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems (IIS). The C3S currently flies the Suomi National Polar Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite and transfers mission data from Suomi NPP and between the ground facilities. The IDPS processes Suomi NPP satellite data to provide Environmental Data Records (EDRs) to NOAA and DoD processing centers operated by the United States government. When the JPSS-1 satellite is launched in early 2017, the responsibilities of the C3S and the IDPS will be expanded to support both Suomi NPP and JPSS-1. The EDRs for Suomi NPP are currently undergoing an extensive Calibration and Validation (Cal/Val) campaign. As Cal/Val proceeds, changes to the

  2. Satellite data-relay activities in Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boner, F.C.; Blee, J.W.; Shope, W.G.

    1985-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Arizona District collects data from automated streamflow stations for a wide variety of uses. Data from these stations are provided to Federal, State, and local agencies that have a responsibility to issue flood warnings; to generate forecasts of water availability; to monitor flow to insure compliance with treaties and other legal mandates; and to manage reservoirs for hydropower, flood abatement, and municipal and irrigation water supply. In the mid-1970's, the escalation of data collection costs and a need for more timely data led the Arizona District to examine alternatives for remote data acquisition. On the basis of successful data communications experiments with NASA 's Landsat satellite, an operational system for satellite-data relay was developed in 1976 using the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administrations 's (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). A total of 62 data collection platforms (DCP's) was operated in 1983. Satellite telemetry operations are controlled at the remote data-collection stations by small battery-operated data collection platforms. The DCP 's periodically collect data from the sensors, store the data in computer memory, and at preset times transmit the data to the GOES satellite. The satellite retransmits the data to Earth where a ground-receive station transmits or transfers the data by land communications to the USGS computer in Reston, Virginia, for processing. The satellite relay transfers the data from sensor to computer in minutes; therefore, the data are available to users on a near real-time basis. (Author 's abstract)

  3. Satellite derived precipitation mapping using GIS technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyras, Izabela

    2005-10-01

    The paper presents the GIS technology application allowing mapping the precipitation from the microwave satellite data. The analysis results are prepared in the form of maps of precipitation intensity and range from an Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) on board of NOAA (15-17) satellites. The products such as Rain Rate (RR), Scattering Index (SI), Total Precipitation Water (TPW), Precipitation Probability (PP) and Liquid Water Path (LWP) were prepared basing on the regression algorithms. Surface data are converted into thematic coverages, too. The developed system allows displaying the precipitation observed with the satellite data and other ancillary information. Satellite and lightning data layers were also introduced to the system. Such approach allows presentation and analysis of the data coming from the various sources and enables validating the methods for the precipitation algorithms from microwave data. The problems related to the data specific spatial, temporal resolution and variability are presented and discussed. The maps of precipitation with additional geographical data and administrative boundaries are available for the weather forecasting units via Intranet. It is planned to make images available on the web for internal and external customers using web map server.

  4. Impact of Scatterometer Ocean Wind Vector Data on NOAA Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jelenak, Z.; Chang, P.; Brennan, M. J.; Sienkiewicz, J. M.

    2015-12-01

    Near real-time measurements of ocean surface vector winds (OSVW), including both wind speed and direction from non-NOAA satellites, are being widely used in critical operational NOAA forecasting and warning activities. The scatterometer wind data data have had major operational impact in: a) determining wind warning areas for mid-latitude systems (gale, storm,hurricane force); b) determining tropical cyclone 34-knot and 50-knot wind radii. c) tracking the center location of tropical cyclones, including the initial identification of their formation. d) identifying and warning of extreme gap and jet wind events at all latitudes. e) identifying the current location of frontal systems and high and low pressure centers. f) improving coastal surf and swell forecasts Much has been learned about the importance and utility of satellite OSVW data in operational weather forecasting and warning by exploiting OSVW research satellites in near real-time. Since December 1999 when first data from QuikSCAT scatterometer became available in near real time NOAA operations have been benefiting from ASCAT scatterometer observations on MetOp-A and B, Indian OSCAT scatterometer on OceanSat-3 and lately NASA's RapidScat mission on International Space Station. With oceans comprising over 70 percent of the earth's surface, the impacts of these data have been tremendous in serving society's needs for weather and water information and in supporting the nation's commerce with information for safe, efficient, and environmentally sound transportation and coastal preparedness. The satellite OSVW experience that has been gained over the past decade by users in the operational weather community allows for realistic operational OSVW requirements to be properly stated for future missions. Successful model of transitioning research data into operation implemented by Ocean Winds Team in NOAA's NESDIS/STAR office and subsequent data impacts will be presented and discussed.

  5. NOAA's Education Program: Review and Critique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrington, John W., Ed.; Feder, Michael A., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    There is a national need to educate the public about the ocean, coastal resources, atmosphere and climate. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), the agency responsible for understanding and predicting changes in the Earth's environment and conserving and managing coastal and marine resources to meet the nation's…

  6. Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Current Technical Performance Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, S.; Panas, M.; Jamilkowski, M. L.; Miller, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    ABSTRACT The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The Joint Polar Satellite System will replace the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). Developed and maintained by Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services (IIS), the CGS is a multi-mission enterprise system serving NOAA, NASA and their national and international partners. The CGS has demonstrated its scalability and flexibility to incorporate multiple missions efficiently and with minimal cost, schedule and risk, while strengthening global partnerships in weather and environmental monitoring. The CGS architecture is being upgraded to Block 2.0 in 2015 to "operationalize" S-NPP, leverage lessons learned to date in multi-mission support, take advantage of more reliable and efficient technologies, and satisfy new requirements and constraints in the continually evolving budgetary environment. To ensure the CGS meets these needs, we have developed 49 Technical Performance Measures (TPMs) across 10 categories, such as data latency, operational availability and scalability. This paper will provide an overview of the CGS Block 2.0 architecture, with particular focus on the 10 TPM categories listed above. We will provide updates on how we ensure the deployed architecture meets these TPMs to satisfy our multi-mission objectives with the deployment of Block 2.0.

  7. Historical Space Weather Datasets within NOAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denig, W. F.; Mabie, J. J.; Horan, K.; Clark, C.

    2013-12-01

    The National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is primarily responsible for scientific data stewardship of operational space weather data from NOAA's fleet of environmental satellites in geostationary and polar, low-earth orbits. In addition to this and as the former World Data Center for Solar Terrestrial Physics from 1957 to 2011 NGDC acquired a large variety of solar and space environmental data in differing formats including paper records and on film. Management of this heterogeneous collection of environmental data is a continued responsibility of NGDC as a participant in the new World Data System. Through the former NOAA Climate Data Modernization Program many of these records were converted to digital format and are readily available online. However, reduced funding and staff have put a strain on NGDC's ability to effectively steward these historical datasets, some of which are unique and, in particular cases, were the basis of fundamental scientific breakthroughs in our understanding of the near-earth space environment. In this talk, I will provide an overview of the historical space weather datasets which are currently managed by NGDC and discuss strategies for preserving these data during these fiscally stressing times.

  8. Satellite Observations for Detecting and Tracking Changes in Atmospheric Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neil, Doreen O.; Kondragunbta, Shobha; Osterman, Gregory; Pickering, Kenneth; Pinder, Robert W.; Prados, Ana I.; Szykman, James

    2009-01-01

    The satellite observations provide constraints on detailed atmospheric modeling, including emissions inventories, indications of transport, harmonized data over vast areas suitable for trends analysis, and a link between spatial scales ranging from local to global, and temporal scales from diurnal to interannual. 1 The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) long-term commitments help provide these observations in cooperation with international meteorological organizations. NASA s long-term commitments will advance scientifically important observations as part of its Earth Science Program, and will assist the transition of the science measurements to applied analyses through the Applied Science Program. Both NASA and NOAA have begun to provide near realtime data and tools to visualize and analyze satellite data,2 while maintaining data quality, validation, and standards. Consequently, decision-makers can expect satellite data services to support air quality decision making now and in the future. The international scientific community's Integrated Global Atmosphere Chemistry Observation System Report3 outlined a plan for ground-based, airborne and satellite measurements and models to integrate the observations into a four-dimensional representation of the atmosphere (space and time) to support assessment and policy information needs. This plan is being carried out under the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS). Demonstrations of such an integrated capability4 provide new understanding of the changing atmosphere and link policy decisions to benefits for society. In this article, we highlight the use of satellite data to constrain biomass burning emissions, to assess oxides of nitrogen (NO(x)) emission reductions, and to contribute to state implementation plans, as examples of the use of satellite observations for detecting and tracking changes in atmospheric composition.

  9. Noaa's Jpss Program: the Next Generation of Operational Earth Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System is NOAA's new operational satellite program and includes the SUOMI National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) as a bridge between NOAA's operational Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) series, which began in 1978, and the first JPSS operational satellite scheduled for launch in 2017. The NPP was completed as originally planned and launched on October 28, 2011 and carries the following five sensors: - Visible/Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) that provides advanced imaging and radiometric capabilities. - Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) that provides improved atmospheric moisture and temperature profiles in clear conditions. - Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) that provides improved atmospheric moisture and temperature profiles in cloudy conditions. - Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) that provides improved vertical and horizontal measurements of the distribution of ozone in the Earth's atmosphere. - Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) sensor that continues precise, calibrated global measurements of the earth's radiation budget JPSS provides critical data for key NOAA product and services, which the Nation depends on. These products and services include: Weather forecasting - data from the CRIS and the ATMS are needed to forecast weather events out to 7 days. Nearly 85% of all data used in weather forecasting are from polar orbiting satellites. Environmental monitoring - data from the VIIRS are used to monitor the environment including the health of coastal ecosystems, drought conditions, hydrology, fire, smoke, dust, snow and ice, and the state of oceans, including sea surface temperature and ocean color. Climate monitoring - data from JPSS instruments, including OMPS, CERES and TSIS will provide continuity to climate data records established using NOAA POES and NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite observations. These data records provide a unified and coherent long

  10. NOAA's Portfolio of Operational Climate Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Newport, B. J.; Cecil, D.; Hutchins, C.; Preston, C.; Stachniewicz, J. S.; Wunder, D.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA's Climate Data Record (CDR) Program was established by the National Centers for Environmental Information (NCEI) (formerly the National Climatic Data Center) in order to develop and implement a robust, sustainable, and scientifically defensible approach to producing and preserving climate records from satellite data. Since its inception in 2009 the CDR Program has transitioned 30 CDRs developed by various research groups to an initial operational state at NCEI. As a result of this transition the CDR dataset, metadata, documentation, and source code are archived by NCEI and accessible to the public, and most of the datasets are being extended by the Principal Investigator with CDR Program support. Consistency is maintained by using a formal change control process, with reprocessing and re-archiving as needed. The current portfolio of operational CDRs includes 15 Atmospheric CDRs, four Oceanic CDRs, four Terrestrial CDRs, and seven Fundamental CDRs. The main features of the portfolio will be presented, along with some potential and emerging uses.

  11. The NOAA-NASA CZCS Reanalysis Effort

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Conkright, Margarita E.; OReilly, John E.; Patt, Frederick S.; Wang, Meng-Hua; Yoder, James; Casey-McCabe, Nancy; Koblinsky, Chester J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite observations of global ocean chlorophyll span over two decades. However, incompatibilities between processing algorithms prevent us from quantifying natural variability. We applied a comprehensive reanalysis to the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) archive, called the NOAA-NASA CZCS Reanalysis (NCR) Effort. NCR consisted of 1) algorithm improvement (AI), where CZCS processing algorithms were improved using modernized atmospheric correction and bio-optical algorithms, and 2) blending, where in situ data were incorporated into the CZCS AI to minimize residual errors. The results indicated major improvement over the previously available CZCS archive. Global spatial and seasonal patterns of NCR chlorophyll indicated remarkable correspondence with modern sensors, suggesting compatibility. The NCR permits quantitative analyses of interannual and interdecadal trends in global ocean chlorophyll.

  12. 78 FR 68819 - Final NOAA Procedures for Government-to-Government Consultation With Federally Recognized Indian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE...: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION: Notice of Final Handbook. SUMMARY: In compliance with Executive Order (E.O.) 13175, ``Consultation and Coordination with Indian...

  13. 77 FR 40341 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Application for Appointment in the NOAA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-09

    ..., and Information Service, National Marine Fisheries Service, National Ocean Service, National Weather... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Application for Appointment in the NOAA Commissioned Officer Corps AGENCY: National Oceanic and...

  14. NOAA Looks for Advice to Make Its Data Easier to Use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-03-01

    "There is no sector in American business that wouldn't like to have better environmental information," said Joseph Klimavicz, chief information officer for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

  15. Draft U.S. ocean policy plan precedes proposal to move NOAA to Interior department

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-01-01

    The Obama administration's ambitious plan to protect oceans was released on 12 January, just 1 day prior to the administration's apparently unrelated announcement of a proposed governmental reorganization that would move the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) from the Department of Commerce to the Department of the Interior. The proposed NOAA move is part of a larger administration proposal to consolidate six federal agencies that are focused on business and trade into one department. The action is contingent upon congressional approval. The proposal to move NOAA to the Interior department has prompted a variety of reactions, with some considering it common sense to group agencies dealing with natural resources in the same department. Others have charged that the proposed move could blunt NOAA's leading role in protecting oceans, among other concerns.

  16. NOAA Budget Proposal Calls for a Small Increase, But Several Programs Would Be Sharply Cut

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-04-01

    The White House's proposed budget of 5.497 billion for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) for fiscal year (FY) 2015 would be good news for the agency overall if Congress goes along with the Obama administration's funding plan. The proposal would increase NOAA's discretionary budget by 174.1 million, 3.27% above the FY 2014 enacted budget (see Table ). The White House announced the overall federal budget on 4 March, and the NOAA budget "blue book" with specific funding numbers was issued in mid-March.

  17. Identification of Solar Cycle 23 Minimum from Solar UV Measurements: NOAA-9 and NOAA-11 SBUV/2, UARS SUSIM, UARS Solstice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeLand, Matthew T.; Cebula, Richard P.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present results from the study of solar cycles from solar UV measurements from March 1985 to May 1997. The study determined solar minimum date from daily spectral irradiance data sensitive to noise and the means through which long-term calibration was obtained. In this study magnesium II time series was determined from NOAA-9, and UARS (Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite) SUMIM and SOLSTICE satellites.

  18. The NOAA/NESDIS Operational Microwave Integrated Retrieval System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, L.

    2009-04-01

    The Microwave Integrated Retrieval System (MIRS) is a state-of-the-art retrieval system developed to support POES, MetOp, DMSP, NPP/NPOESS programs at NOAA/NESDIS in generating operational temperature, water vapor, surface and hydrological parameters from microwave sensors. It is based on an assimilation-type scheme and capable of optimally retrieving atmospheric and surface state parameters in all weather and over all-surface conditions. The MIRS is being implemented at NESDIS to build a one-stop shop for operational microwave products from various satellites with different instrumental configurations. With its capability of providing optimal and physically-based retrievals of atmospheric and surface state parameters, the operational MIRS provides advanced near-real-time surface and precipitation products in all-weather and over all-surface conditions. These products are retrieved with brightness temperature measurements from microwave instruments, including AMSU-A and AMSU-B/MHS instruments onboard NOAA and EUMETSAT polar orbiting satellites, SSMIS on DMSP polar satellites and are operationally available to both real-time users and climate users through the NESDIS Environment Satellite Processing Center (ESPC) Data Distribution Sever (DDS) and Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS). In this presentation, we will discuss the operational MIRS system, its products and their application in supporting NESDIS precipitation operation.

  19. 77 FR 15358 - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Availability of Seats for the Monitor National Marine...), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice and..., National Ocean Service, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. BILLING CODE 3510-NK-M...

  20. Satellites map the oceans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hibbs, A. R.; Wilson, W. S.

    1983-01-01

    Satellite remote sensing systems, both operational and planned, for monitoring the ocean winds, temperatures, chlorophyll concentrations, ice flows, and the sea surface and ocean floor topographies are described. Seasat demonstrated the effectiveness of scatterometer measurements for measuring wind velocities and directions, and a new scatterometer may be launched on the U.S. Navy NROSS spacecraft in 1988. The NOAA-7 and -8 satellites carry IR sensors to monitor ocean temperatures, and can thus forewarn of the onset of El Nino. Ocean currents are traced with radar altimeters such as the one planned for the Topex satellite as a follow-on to instrumentation tested during the three-month lifetime of the Seasat satellite. Further analytical development is required, however, to improve the data analyses of the altimeter and scatterometer readings, and to account for errors introduced by the observed features and the interposed atmospheric phenomena.

  1. NOAA Activities and Plans for New Operational Space Weather Platforms and Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesecker, D. A.; Mulligan, P.; Cash, M. D.; Reinard, A.; Simpson, M.; Diedrich, B.; Socker, D. G.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is vigorously pursuing several space weather platforms that have been demonstrated as requiring replacement. In this time of limited budgets, this has led to the need for creative and innovative solutions. Just as importantly, NOAA is only 13 months away from the launch of its first L1 solar wind monitor, the DSCOVR mission. At the same time, a private company, L'Garde Inc. will be launching a solar sail mission with NOAA as a partner. Recognizing the importance of solar wind monitoring and the need for continuity, the planning process is already underway for the DSCOVR follow-on mission and scenarios for that include commercial data purchases and solar sails. Finally, NOAA planning for an operational coronagraph is moving forward, with continuing development of the Naval Research Laboratory's Compact Coronagraph (CCOR). We will provide details on the current NOAA plans for each of these missions.

  2. NASA/NOAA/AMS Earth Science Electronic Theatre

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz; Pierce, Hal; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA/AMS Earth Science Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to Florida and the KSC Visitor's Center. Go back to the early weather satellite images from the 1960s see them contrasted with the latest International global satellite weather movies including killer hurricanes & tornadic thunderstorms. See the latest spectacular images from NASA and NOAA remote sensing missions like GOES, NOAA, TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat 7, & new Terra which will be visualized with state-of-the art tools. Shown in High Definition TV resolution (2048 x 768 pixels) are visualizations of hurricanes Lenny, Floyd, Georges, Mitch, Fran and Linda. See visualizations featured on covers of magazines like Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science and on National & International Network TV. New Digital Earth visualization tools allow us to roam & zoom through massive global images including a Landsat tour of the US, with drill-downs into major cities using 1 m resolution spy-satellite technology from the Space Imaging IKONOS satellite, Spectacular new visualizations of the global atmosphere & oceans are shown. See massive dust storms sweeping across Africa. See ocean vortexes and currents that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny plankton and draw the fish, giant whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in response to these currents and El Nino/La Nina climate changes. The demonstration is interactively driven by a SGI Octane Graphics Supercomputer with dual CPUs, 5 Gigabytes of RAM and Terabyte disk using two projectors across the super sized Universe Theater panoramic screen.

  3. Weather Satellite Enterprise Information Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamilkowski, M. L.; Grant, K. D.; Miller, S. W.; Cochran, S.

    2015-12-01

    NOAA & NASA are acquiring the next-generation civilian operational weather satellite: Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). Contributing the afternoon orbit & ground system (GS) to replace current NOAA POES Satellites, its sensors will collect meteorological, oceanographic & climatological data. The JPSS Common Ground System (CGS), consisting of C3 and IDP segments, is developed by Raytheon. It now flies the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) satellite, transferring data between ground facilities, processing them into environmental products for NOAA weather centers, and expanding to support JPSS-1 in 2017. As a multi-mission system, CGS provides combinations of C3, data processing, and product delivery for numerous NASA, NOAA, DoD and international missions.The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: Command and control and mission management for the S-NPP mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite mission in 2017 Data acquisition for S-NPP, the JAXA's Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the DoD Data routing over a global fiber network for S-NPP, JPSS-1, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, NASA EOS missions, MetOp for EUMETSAT and the National Science Foundation Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 The CGS plays a key role in facilitating the movement and value-added enhancement of data all the way from satellite-based sensor data to delivery to the consumers who generate forecasts and produce watches and warnings. This presentation will discuss the information flow from sensors, through data routing and processing, and finally to product delivery. It will highlight how advances in architecture developed through lessons learned from S-NPP and implemented for JPSS-1 will increase data availability and reduce latency for end user applications.

  4. Distributed Datamining for NASA/NOAA databases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, R.; Park, B. H.; Sivakumar, K.; Kargupta, H.; Ma, J.; da, M.

    2002-12-01

    sources: NASA DAO data and NOAA SAA data. The NASA DAO data is a subset of the Data Assimilation Office's (DAO) monthly mean data set. It has global spatial coverage and a temporal coverage ranging from March 1980 to November 1993. The NOAA SAA data is a product of NOAA and US department of defense (DOD) US Polar-orbiting environment satellites (POES). Seventeen features from NASA DAO and eight features from NOAA SAA data was used in our experiments. A Bayesian network (BN) model was first contructed from the two datasets combined. This BN, referred to as the centralized BN, served as the ground truth for comparing the performance of our collective BN learning algorithm. Our preliminary experiments reveal a number of interesting trends. Correlations between specific DAO and NOAA data features are evident. Specific features are consistently observed as root nodes in the BN, suggesting that these features could possibly be the ``cause'' for certain phenomenon. Seasonal trends in the data reflect appropriate seasonal changes in the BN model.

  5. Satellite Movie Shows Three Tropical Cyclones in Eastern Pacific

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-Wast satellite imagery from August 2 through 4 shows the movement of Tropical Depression Genevieve (left) southwest of Hawaii, Hurricane Iselle (center) in the Eastern...

  6. Satellite Movie Shows Andres Weaken to a Tropical Storm

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from June 1 to 3 shows Hurricane Andres eye disappear and weaken to a tropical storm in the Eastern Pacific Ocean, south of Baja California...

  7. Satellite Movie Shows Birth of Atlantic's Tropical Storm Lorenzo

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from Oct. 20 to 22 shows the development and strengthening of Tropical Depression 13L into Tropical Storm Lorenzo in the Atlantic (far right), a...

  8. Satellite Animation Shows Hurricane Matthew Moving Through Bahamas

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from Oct. 4 to Oct. 6 shows Hurricane Matthew making landfall on Oct. 4 in western Haiti and moving through the Bahamas on Oct. 6. TRT: 00:38. C...

  9. Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Chantal Move Over Hispaniola

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NOAA GOES-East satellite animation from July 6 to July 10 shows the development of Tropical Storm Chantal in the Atlantic Ocean and movement over Hispaniola by July 10. TRT 0:06 Credit: NASA/N...

  10. Satellite Sees Tropical Storm Isaac Move Slowly Over Louisiana

    NASA Video Gallery

    An animation of NOAA's GOES-13 satellite observations from August 28-30, 2012, shows Hurricane Isaac make two landfalls in southeastern Louisiana on Aug. 28 at 7:45 p.m. EDT (1145 UTC) and Aug. 29 ...

  11. Satellite Movie Shows Bertha Becoming Second Atlantic Hurricane

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from August 2 through 4 shows the movement of Tropical Storm Bertha over Puerto Rico, Hispaniola and the Bahamas. It became a hurricane on Augus...

  12. Satellite Tracks Hurricanes Madeline and Lester in the Pacific

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from August 29 to August 31 shows the movement of Hurricane Madeline approaching Hawaii in the Central Pacific Ocean and Hurricane Lester in the...

  13. Satellite Shows Landfall and Movement of Tropical Storm Andrea

    NASA Video Gallery

    This NOAA GOES-East satellite animation shows the landfall and movement of Tropical Storm Andrea from June 5 to June 7. The video ends as Andrea's center was moving over South Carolina on its way u...

  14. Satellite Movie Shows Three Storms in Eastern, Central Pacific

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of visible and infrared imagery from NOAA's GOES-West satellite from Aug. 25 to 27 shows Tropical Storm Kilo in the Central Pacific followed by Hurricane Ignacio and Tropical Storm J...

  15. Satellite Movie Shows Major Hurricane Matthew Affecting Hispaniola

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from Sept. 30 to Oct. 3 shows Matthew become a major hurricane in the Caribbean Sea. Matthew reached Category 5 status late on Oct. 1 and droppe...

  16. GOES Satellite View of Southwest Storm System (Dec. 2015)

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Dec. 26 to 28, 2015, shows the eastward movement of the storm system that generated snow in the Four Corners region and tornadoes in T...

  17. Satellite Animation Shows Landfall of Hurricane Otto in Nicaragua

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from Nov. 22 to Nov. 25 shows Hurricane Otto moving through the southwestern Caribbean Sea and making landfall in southern Nicaragua on Nov. 24....

  18. Satellite Animation Shows Hurricane Matthew Moving Toward Bahamas

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from Oct. 3 to Oct. 5 shows Hurricane Matthew make landfall on Oct. 4 in western Haiti and move toward the Bahamas on Oct. 5. TRT: 00:38 Credit:...

  19. Satellite Movie Sees Major Winter Storm Nearing Mid-Atlantic

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation NOAA's GOES-East satellite imagery from Jan. 20 to 22 shows the movement of the system that is expected to bring a powerful winter storm to the U.S. Mid-Atlantic region. Credit: NASA...

  20. Satellite Tracks Tropical Storm Madeline and Hurricane Lester

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES-West satellite imagery from August 30 to September 2 shows Tropical Storm Madeline move past Hawaii and weaken to a depression and Hurricane Lester approaching the Haw...

  1. Best NOAA budget ever, Knauss says

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bush, Susan

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's budget request of $1.7 billion for fiscal year 1993 is “the best budget we have presented to date,” said John Knauss, Under Secretary for Oceans and Atmosphere, U.S. Department of Commerce. It is an increase of 7.8% over fiscal 1992. NOAA's proposed budget focuses on four major areas: the modernization of the National Weather Service, improving predictions of global change, understanding coastal ocean processes, and managing marine fisheries.The budget “reflects our conviction that we are working to assure the president's belief in the interconnectedness of the environment and the economy,” particularly in the weather service and fisheries programs, said Knauss, testifying before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, State, the Judiciary and Related Agencies on April 9.

  2. Adding a Mission to the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The Joint Polar Satellite System will replace the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). Developed and maintained by Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services (IIS), the CGS is a multi-mission enterprise system serving NOAA, NASA and their national and international partners. The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: 1) Command and control and mission management for the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite and the Polar Free Flyer mission in 2017 2) Data acquisition via a Polar Receptor Network (PRN) for S-NPP, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the Department of Defense (DoD) 3) Data routing over a global fiber Wide Area Network (WAN) for S-NPP, JPSS-1, Polar Free Flyer, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, the NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN, which includes several Earth Observing System [EOS] missions), MetOp for the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) 4) Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 With this established infrastructure and existing suite of missions, the CGS

  3. Creating a More Inclusive Talent Pool for the GeoSciences in NOAA Mission Fields:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, J.; Trotman, A. A.

    2014-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Educational Partnership Program (EPP) with Minority Serving Institutions (MSI) is recognized as a model federal Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics, (STEM) education investment. The EPP has a premier goal of increasing the numbers of students, especially from underrepresented communities, who are trained and awarded degrees in NOAA mission-relevant STEM fields. This goal is being achieved through awards to support undergraduate and graduate level student scholarships and to enhance NOAA mission-relevant education, research and internships at EPP Cooperative Science Centers located at MSIs. The internships allow undergraduate students to gain technical experience in STEM fields while gaining an understanding of a science mission agency such as NOAA. EPP has built evidence supporting the value of internships with its Undergraduate Scholarship Program (USP). Program metrics are used to refine and improve the internship to ensure student success. Scholarships are competitively awarded and requires applicants to submit a personal statement detailing the NOAA-relevant professional experience the applicant seeks to acquire, and gauges the depth of understanding of the work of NOAA.A focus is the EPP USP Student Internship at NOAA, which has two training phases. The first occurs at NOAA HQ in Maryland and incorporates exposure to NOAA professional culture including mentoring and professional development for scholarship recipients. The second occurs at NOAA facilities in the 50 states and US Territories. The internship projects are conducted under the supervision of a NOAA mentor and allow the scholars to: acquire increased science and technology skills: be attached to a research group and participate in a research activity as part of the team; and, acquire practical experience and knowledge of the day-to-day work of the NOAA facility. EPP has recently initiated the Experiential Research and Training

  4. REPETITIVE DIGITAL NOAA-AVHRR DATA FOR ALASKAN ENGINEERING AND SCIENTIFIC APPLICATIONS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christie, William M.; Pawlowski, Robert J.; Fleming, Michael D.

    1986-01-01

    Selected digitally enhanced NOAA - Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) images taken by the NOAA 6, 7, 8 and 9 Polar Orbiting Satellites demonstrate the capability and application of repetitive low-resolution satellite data to Alaska's engineering and science community. Selected cloud-free visible and thermal infrared images are enhanced to depict distinct oceanographic and geologic processes along Alaska's west coast and adjacent seas. Included are the advance of the Bering Sea ice field, transport of Yukon River sediment into Norton Sound, and monitoring of plume trajectories from the Mount Augustine volcanic eruptions. Presented illustrations are representative of the 94 scenes in a cooperative USGS EROS/NOAA Alaskan AVHRR Digital Archive. This paper will discuss the cooperative efforts in establishing the first year data set and identifying Alaskan applications.

  5. Airborne Dust Monitoring Activities at the National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, G.; McNamara, D.; Taylor, J.

    2002-12-01

    Wind blown dust can be a hazard to transportation, industrial, and military operations, and much work has been devoted to its analysis and prediction from a meteorological viewpoint. The detection and forecasting of dust outbreaks in near real time is difficult, particularly in remote desert areas with sparse observation networks. The Regional Haze Regulation, passed by Congress in 1999, mandates a reduction in man made inputs to haze in 156 Class I areas (national parks and wilderness areas). Studies have demonstrated that satellite data can be useful in detection and tracking of dust storms. Environmental satellites offer frequent coverage of large geographic areas. The National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS) of the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) operates a system of polar orbiting and geostationary environmental satellites, which sense data in two visible and three infrared channels. Promising results in the detection of airborne dust have been obtained using multispectral techniques to combine information from two or more channels to detect subtle spectral differences. One technique, using a ratio of two thermal channels, detects the presence of airborne dust, and discriminates it from both underlying ground and meteorological clouds. In addition, NESDIS accesses and is investigating for operational use data from several other satellites. The Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer on board NASA's Earth Probe mission provides an aerosol index product which can detect dust and smoke, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer on NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites provide several channels which can detect aerosols in multispectral channel combinations. NESDIS, in cooperation with NOAA's Air Resources Laboratory, produces a daily smoke transport forecast, combining satellite derived smoke source points with a mathematical transport prediction model; such a scheme could be applied to other aerosol

  6. A NOAA/NOS Sea Level Advisory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sweet, W.

    2011-12-01

    In order for coastal communities to realize current impacts and become resilient to future changes, sea level advisories/bulletins are necessary that systematically monitor and document non-tidal anomalies (residuals) and flood-watch (elevation) conditions. The need became apparent after an exceptional sea level anomaly along the U.S. East Coast in June - July of 2009 when higher than normal sea levels coincided with a perigean-spring tide and flooded many coastal regions. The event spurred numerous public inquiries to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS) from coastal communities concerned because of the lack of any coastal storm signatures normally associated with such an anomaly. A subsequent NOAA report provided insight into some of the mechanisms involved in the event and methods for tracking their reoccurrences. NOAA/CO-OPS is the U.S. authority responsible for defining sea level datums and tracking their relative changes in support of marine navigation and national and state land-use boundaries. These efforts are supported by the National Water Level Observation Network (NWLON), whose long-term and widespread observations largely define a total water level measurement impacting a coastal community. NWLON time series provide estimates of local relative sea level trends, a product increasingly utilized by various stakeholders planning for the future. NWLON data also capture significant short-term changes and conveyance of high-water variations (from surge to seasonal scale) provides invaluable insight into inundation patterns ultimately needed for a more comprehensive planning guide. A NOAA/CO-OPS Sea Level Advisory Project will enhance high-water monitoring capabilities by: - Automatically detecting sea level anomalies and flood-watch occurrences - Seasonally calibrating the anomaly thresholds to a locality in terms of flood potential - Alerting for near

  7. Operational utilization of remotely sensed data. [NOAA programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, J. B.

    1977-01-01

    The use of data from environmental satellites and other remote sensing platforms in some of NOAA's operational services are described. Topics discussed include: hurricanes; severe local storms and tornadoes; forest guidance; weather forecasting; hydrology; space program support; oceanography; search and rescue; and wildlife management. Applications which have become routine, and those which are in advanced field test are included. Some applications yield a clear cut economic benefit. In other cases, benefits -- if any -- are obscure. In yet other cases, benefits in one sector may be offset by detriments in another. Illustrative examples are given.

  8. NOAA AVHRR and its uses for rainfall and evapotranspiration monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Yann H.; Imbernon, J.; Dedieu, G.; Hautecoeur, O.; Lagouarde, J. P.

    1989-01-01

    NOAA-7 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Global Vegetation Indices (GVI) were used during the 1986 rainy season (June-September) over Senegal to monitor rainfall. The satellite data were used in conjunction with ground-based measurements so as to derive empirical relationships between rainfall and GVI. The regression obtained was then used to map the total rainfall corresponding to the growing season, yielding good results. Normalized Difference Vegetation Indices (NDVI) derived from High Resolution Picture Transmission (HRPT) data were also compared with actual evapotranspiration (ET) data and proved to be closely correlated with it with a time lapse of 20 days.

  9. Mission description and in-flight operations of ERBE instruments on ERBS and NOAA 9 spacecraft, November 1984 - January 1986

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, William L.; Bush, Kathryn A.; Harris, Chris J.; Howerton, Clayton E.; Tolson, Carol J.

    1991-01-01

    Instruments of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are operating on three different Earth orbiting spacecrafts: the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite (ERBS), NOAA-9, and NOAA-10. An overview is presented of the ERBE mission, in-orbit environments, and instrument design and operational features. An overview of science data processing and validation procedures is also presented. In-flight operations are described for the ERBE instruments aboard the ERBS and NOAA-9. Calibration and other operational procedures are described, and operational and instrument housekeeping data are presented and discussed.

  10. 77 FR 13562 - Request for Comments on the 5-Year Review of NOAA's Policy on Partnerships in the Provision of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-07

    ... on Partnerships in the Provision of Environmental Information AGENCY: National Weather Service (NWS... request for comments. SUMMARY: The National Weather Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric... National Weather Service of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is undertaking...

  11. NOAA Operational Tsunameter Support for Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, R.; Stroker, K.

    2008-12-01

    In March 2008, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) completed the deployment of the last of the 39-station network of deep-sea tsunameters. As part of NOAA's effort to strengthen tsunami warning capabilities, NDBC expanded the network from 6 to 39 stations and upgraded all stations to the second generation Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis technology (DART II). Consisting of a bottom pressure recorder (BPR) and a surface buoy, the tsunameters deliver water-column heights, estimated from pressure measurements at the sea floor, to Tsunami Warning Centers in less than 3 minutes. This network provides coastal communities in the Pacific, Atlantic, Caribbean, and the Gulf of Mexico with faster and more accurate tsunami warnings. In addition, both the coarse resolution real-time data and the high resolution (15-second) recorded data provide invaluable contributions to research, such as the detection of the 2004 Sumatran tsunami in the Northeast Pacific (Gower and González, 2006) and the experimental tsunami forecast system (Bernard et al., 2007). NDBC normally recovers the BPRs every 24 months and sends the recovered high resolution data to NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) for archive and distribution. NGDC edits and processes this raw binary format to obtain research-quality data. NGDC provides access to retrospective BPR data from 1986 to the present. The DART database includes pressure and temperature data from the ocean floor, stored in a relational database, enabling data integration with the global tsunami and significant earthquake databases. All data are accessible via the Web as tables, reports, interactive maps, OGC Web Map Services (WMS), and Web Feature Services (WFS) to researchers around the world. References: Gower, J. and F. González, 2006. U.S. Warning System Detected the Sumatra Tsunami, Eos Trans. AGU, 87(10). Bernard, E. N., C. Meinig, and A. Hilton, 2007. Deep Ocean

  12. The NOAA Weather and Climate Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, S.; Hutchins, C.; Del Greco, S.

    2008-12-01

    The NOAA Weather and Climate Toolkit (WCT) is an application that provides simple visualization and data export of weather and climate data archived at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) and other organizations. The WCT is built on the Unidata Common Data Model and supports defined feature types such as Grid, Radial, Point, Time Series and Trajectory. Current NCDC datasets supported include NEXRAD Radar data, GOES Satellite imagery, NOMADS Model Data, Integrated Surface Data and the U.S. Drought Monitor (part of the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)). The WCT Viewer provides tools for displaying custom data overlays, Web Map Services (WMS), animations and basic filters. The export of images and movies is provided in multiple formats. The WCT Data Exporter allows for data export in both vector polygon (Shapefile, Well-Known Text) and raster (GeoTIFF, Arc/Info ASCII Grid, VTK, NetCDF) formats. By decoding and exporting data into multiple common formats, a diverse user community can perform analysis using familiar tools such as ArcGIS, MatLAB and IDL. This brings new users to a vast array of weather and climate data at NCDC.

  13. The NOAA GOES-12 Solar X-ray Imager (SXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. M.; Pizzo, V. J.; Wilkinson, D. C.; Davis, J. M.

    2001-05-01

    The Solar X-ray Imager (SXI), planned for launch in July 2001 on NOAA's GOES-12 satellite, will provide nearly uninterrupted, full-disk, soft X-ray solar movies, with a continuous frame rate significantly exceeding that for previous similar instruments. The SXI provides images with a one-minute cadence and a single-image (adjustable) dynamic range near 100. A set of metallic thin-film filters provides a degree of temperature discrimination in the 0.6-6.0 nm bandpass. The spatial resolution of approximately 10 arcseconds FWHM is sampled with 5 arcsecond pixels. NOAA's operational space weather forecasting requirements drive the observing sequences toward long-term uniformity. This will yield an excellent standardized set of contextual data products for the historical record. Sequences can be selected or modified based on solar activity levels. Data products will be made available to the research community via NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center World Wide Web site in near real-time (minutes). Among the data products are raw and calibrated images in SolarSoft compliant FITS format. Other data products will include multiple image products such as standardized movies at fixed UT times and wide dynamic range composite images. The Web interface is designed to be user friendly, providing a range of search and preview capabilities.

  14. 77 FR 69436 - JPSS Polar Satellite-Gap Mitigation-Request for Public Comment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... Comment AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Request for public comment. SUMMARY: NOAA has long been concerned about the potential for a gap... the Government Accountability Office on this topic, NOAA has also convened an Independent Review...

  15. NOAA View: An Exploration Tool to Simplify Data Access and Visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisut, D.; Loomis, T.; Goel, V.; Carroll, J.

    2014-12-01

    A normal search for data would, ideally, start with the defining a variable of interest and eventually moving down to the acquisition method or analysis type. Too often, data archives assume the users understand the complex terminology of sensors and model names, or even worse - their acronyms. Imagine a non-subject matter expert, especially an educator or hobbyist, trying to navigate this sea of data and seemingly nonsense strings of letters like AVHRR, ESM2M, CFSR, or MLOST. At the NOAA VIsualization Lab, we deal with these issues on a routine basis, and are trying to make data discovery for formal and informal educational use much easier. In this talk, we'll describe the efforts to build the NOAA View data exploration tool, which provides access to over 100 variables from a myriad of satellite, in situ, model, and analysis sources across the agency. NOAA View, a WMS and OpenLayers based web tool and data portal, not only serves data imagery, but also links back to original sources in the data archives. The current architecture as well as plans for future versions will be detailed, along with examples of uses across the geophysical sciences. In addition to the talk, please visit NOAA View at the NOAA exhibit. www.nnvl.noaa.gov/view

  16. Accuracy assessment of NOAA gridded daily reference evapotranspiration for the Texas High Plains

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moorhead, Jerry; Gowda, Prasanna H.; Hobbins, Michael; Senay, Gabriel; Paul, George; Marek, Thomas; Porter, Dana

    2015-01-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides daily reference evapotranspiration (ETref) maps for the contiguous United States using climatic data from North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). This data provides large-scale spatial representation of ETref, which is essential for regional scale water resources management. Data used in the development of NOAA daily ETref maps are derived from observations over surfaces that are different from short (grass — ETos) or tall (alfalfa — ETrs) reference crops, often in nonagricultural settings, which carries an unknown discrepancy between assumed and actual conditions. In this study, NOAA daily ETos and ETrs maps were evaluated for accuracy, using observed data from the Texas High Plains Evapotranspiration (TXHPET) network. Daily ETos, ETrs and the climatic data (air temperature, wind speed, and solar radiation) used for calculating ETref were extracted from the NOAA maps for TXHPET locations and compared against ground measurements on reference grass surfaces. NOAA ETrefmaps generally overestimated the TXHPET observations (1.4 and 2.2 mm/day ETos and ETrs, respectively), which may be attributed to errors in the NLDAS modeled air temperature and wind speed, to which reference ETref is most sensitive. Therefore, a bias correction to NLDAS modeled air temperature and wind speed data, or adjustment to the resulting NOAA ETref, may be needed to improve the accuracy of NOAA ETref maps.

  17. 15 CFR 922.50 - Appeals of administrative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrator for Ocean Services and Coastal Zone Management, NOAA 1305 East-West Highway, 13th Floor, Silver... (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND...

  18. 15 CFR 922.50 - Appeals of administrative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Administrator for Ocean Services and Coastal Zone Management, NOAA 1305 East-West Highway, 13th Floor, Silver... (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND...

  19. 15 CFR 922.50 - Appeals of administrative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Administrator for Ocean Services and Coastal Zone Management, NOAA 1305 East-West Highway, 13th Floor, Silver... (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND...

  20. 15 CFR 922.50 - Appeals of administrative action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Administrator for Ocean Services and Coastal Zone Management, NOAA 1305 East-West Highway, 13th Floor, Silver... (Continued) NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE OCEAN AND...

  1. 77 FR 33443 - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Pacific Fishery Management Council; Public Meeting AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce... Assessment Methods for Data-Moderate Stocks will be held at the National Marine Fisheries Service's...

  2. NOAA's hydrolab conducts reef studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    This summer, scuba-diving scientists operating from Hydrolab, NOAA's undersea laboratory, are carrying out four experiments aimed at producing better management of coral reefs and their fishery resources. Hydrolab is located at a depth of 50 feet, near the mouth of the Salt River, off St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands. The lab houses four scientists for up to 2 weeks at a time, permitting them to swim out into the water to conduct research. The projects make use of both the natural coral reef near Hydrolab and the nearby artificial reef constructed for comparison studies.

  3. Climate Model Diagnostic and Evaluation: With a Focus on Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waliser, Duane

    2011-01-01

    Each year, we host a summer school that brings together the next generation of climate scientists - about 30 graduate students and postdocs from around the world - to engage with premier climate scientists from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and elsewhere. Our yearly summer school focuses on topics on the leading edge of climate science research. Our inaugural summer school, held in 2011, was on the topic of "Using Satellite Observations to Advance Climate Models," and enabled students to explore how satellite observations can be used to evaluate and improve climate models. Speakers included climate experts from both NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), who provided updates on climate model diagnostics and evaluation and remote sensing of the planet. Details of the next summer school will be posted here in due course.

  4. Satellite monitoring of remote volcanoes improves study efforts in Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, K.; Servilla, M.; Roach, A.; Foster, B.; Engle, K.

    Satellite monitoring of remote volcanoes is greatly benefitting the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), and last year's eruption of the Okmok Volcano in the Aleutian Islands is a good case in point. The facility was able to issue and refine warnings of the eruption and related activity quickly, something that could not have been done using conventional seismic surveillance techniques, since seismometers have not been installed at these locations.AVO monitors about 100 active volcanoes in the North Pacific (NOPAC) region, but only a handful are observed by costly and logistically complex conventional means. The region is remote and vast, about 5000 × 2500 km, extending from Alaska west to the Kamchatka Peninsula in Russia (Figure 1). Warnings are transmitted to local communities and airlines that might be endangered by eruptions. More than 70,000 passenger and cargo flights fly over the region annually, and airborne volcanic ash is a threat to them. Many remote eruptions have been detected shortly after the initial magmatic activity using satellite data, and eruption clouds have been tracked across air traffic routes. Within minutes after eruptions are detected, information is relayed to government agencies, private companies, and the general public using telephone, fax, and e-mail. Monitoring of volcanoes using satellite image data involves direct reception, real-time monitoring, and data analysis. Two satellite data receiving stations, located at the Geophysical Institute, University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF), are capable of receiving data from the advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) on National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) polar orbiting satellites and from synthetic aperture radar (SAR) equipped satellites.

  5. Operational Applications of Satellite Snowcover Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rango, A. (Editor); Peterson, R. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    The history of remote sensing of snow cover is reviewed and the following topics are covered: various techniques for interpreting LANDSAT and NOAA satellite data; the status of future systems for continuing snow hydrology applications; the use of snow cover observations in streamflow forecasts by Applications Systems Verification and Transfer participants and selected foreign investigators; and the benefits of using satellite snow cover data in runoff prediction.

  6. 2010-2011 Performance of the AirNow Satellite Data Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, A. N.; DeWinter, J. L.; Haderman, M. D.; van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R. V.; Szykman, J.; White, J. E.; Dickerson, P.; Zahn, P. H.; Dye, T. S.

    2012-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) AirNow program provides maps of real time hourly Air Quality Index (AQI) conditions and daily AQI forecasts nationwide (http://www.airnow.gov). The public uses these maps to make health-based decisions. The usefulness of the AirNow air quality maps depends on the accuracy and spatial coverage of air quality measurements. Currently, the maps use only ground-based measurements, which have significant gaps in coverage in some parts of the United States. As a result, contoured AQI levels have high uncertainty in regions far from monitors. To improve the usefulness of air quality maps, scientists at EPA, Dalhousie University, and Sonoma Technology, Inc. have been working in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) to incorporate satellite-estimated surface PM2.5 concentrations into the maps via the AirNow Satellite Data Processor (ASDP). These satellite estimates are derived using NASA/NOAA satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals and GEOS-Chem modeled ratios of surface PM2.5 concentrations to AOD. GEOS-Chem is a three-dimensional chemical transport model for atmospheric composition driven by meteorological input from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GOES). The ASDP can fuse multiple PM2.5 concentration data sets to generate AQI maps with improved spatial coverage. The goal of ASDP is to provide more detailed AQI information in monitor-sparse locations and augment monitor-dense locations with more information. We will present a statistical analysis for 2010-2011 of the ASDP predictions of PM2.5 focusing on performance at validation sites. In addition, we will present several case studies evaluating the ASDP's performance for multiple regions and seasons, focusing specifically on days when large spatial gradients in AQI and wildfire smoke impact were observed.

  7. Visions of our Planet's Atmosphere, Land and Oceans: NASA/NOAA E-Theater 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz

    2003-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations from space in a spectacular way. Fly in from outer space to the conference location as well as the site of the 2002 Olympic Winter Games using data from NASA satellites and the IKONOS "Spy Satellite". See HDTV movie Destination Earth 2002 incorporating the Olympic Zooms, NBC footage of the 2002 Olympics, the shuttle, & the best NASA/NOAA Earth science visualizations. See the latest US and international global satellite weather movies including hurricanes, typhoons & "tornadoes". See the latest visualizations from NASA/NOAA and International remote sensing missions like Terra, Aqua, GOES, GMS, SeaWiFS, & Landsat. Feel the pulse of our planet. See how land vegetation, ocean plankton, clouds and temperatures respond to the sun & seasons. See vortexes and currents in the global oceans that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny algae and draw the fish, whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in response to these currents and El Nino/La Nina climate changes. See the city lights, fishing fleets, gas flares and bio-mass burning of the Earth at night observed by the "night-vision" DMSP satellite. The presentation will be made using the latest HDTV and video projection technology by: Dr. Fritz Hasler NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

  8. Visions of our Planet's Atmosphere, Land and Oceans: NASA/NOAA E-Theater 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz

    2003-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations from space in a spectacular way. Fly in from outer space to the conference location as well as the site of the 2002 Olympic Winter Games using data from NASA satellites and the IKONOS "Spy Satellite". See HDTV movie Destination Earth 2002 incorporating the Olympic Zooms, NBC footage of the 2002 Olympics, the shuttle, & the best NASA/NOAA Earth science visualizations. See the latest US and international global satellite weather movies including hurricanes, typhoons & "tornadoes". See the latest visualizations from NASA/NOAA and International remote sensing missions like Terra, Aqua, GOES, GMS , SeaWiFS, & Landsat. Feel the pulse of our planet. See how land vegetation, ocean plankton, clouds and temperatures respond to the sun & seasons. See vortexes and currents in the global oceans that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny algae and draw the fish, whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in response to these currents and El Nino/La Nina climate changes. See the city lights, fishing fleets, gas flares and bio-mass burning of the Earth at night observed by the the "night-vision" DMSP satellite. The presentation will be made using the latest HDTV and video projection technology by: Dr. Fritz Hasler NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center

  9. Visions of our Planet's Atmosphere, Land and Oceans: NASA/NOAA E-Theater 2003

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, Fritz

    2003-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations from space in a spectacular way. Fly in from outer space to the conference location as well as the site of the 2002 Olympic Winter Games using data from NASA satellites and the IKONOS 'Spy Satellite". See HDTV movie Destination Earth 2002 incorporating the Olympic Zooms, NBC footage of the 2002 Olympics, the shuttle, & the best NASA/NOAA Earth science visualizations. See the latest US and international global satellite weather movies including hurricanes, typhoons & "tornadoes". See the latest visualizations from NASA/NOAA and International remote sensing missions like Terra, Aqua, GOES, GMS, SeaWiFS, & Landsat. Feel the pulse of OUT planet. See how land vegetation, ocean plankton, clouds and temperatures respond to the sun & seasons. See vortexes and currents in the global oceans that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny algae and draw the fish, whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in response to these currents and El Nino/La Nina climate changes. See the city lights, fishing fleets, gas flares and bio-mass burning of the Earth at night observed by the "night-vision" DMSP satellite. The presentation will be made using the latest HDTV and video projection technology by: Dr. Fritz Hasler NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center.

  10. 78 FR 26617 - National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration RIN 0648-XC661 National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Northwest Fisheries Science Center; Online Webinar AGENCY: National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA),...

  11. ENVIROSAT-2000 report: Federal agency satellite requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cotter, D. (Editor); Wolzer, I. (Editor); Blake, N.; Jarman, J.; Lichy, D.; Pangburn, T.; Mcardle, R.; Paul, C.; Shaffer, L.; Thorley, G.

    1985-01-01

    The requirement of Federal agencies, other than NOAA, for the data and services of civil operational environmental satellites (both polar orbiting and geostationary) are summarized. Agency plans for taking advantage of proposed future Earth sensing space systems, domestic and foreign, are cited also. Current data uses and future requirements are addressed as identified by each agency.

  12. The NOAA Annual Greenhouse Gas Index - 2012 Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, J. H.; Montzka, S. A.; Conway, T. J.; Dlugokencky, E. J.; Elkins, J. W.; Masari, K. A.; Schnell, R. C.; Tans, P. P.

    2012-04-01

    For the past several decades, the U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has monitored all of the long-lived atmospheric greenhouse gases. These global measurements have provided input to databases, analyses, and various relevant products, including national and international climate assessments. To make these data more useful and available, NOAA several years ago released its Annual Greenhouse Gas Index (AGGI), http://www.esrl.noaa.gov/gmd/aggi. This index, based on the climate forcing properties of long-lived greenhouse gases, was designed to enhance the connection between scientists and society by providing a normalized standard that can be easily understood and followed. The long-lived gases capture most of the radiative forcing, and uncertainty in their measurement is very small. This allows us to provide a robust measure and assessment of the long-term, radiative influence of these gases. Continuous greenhouse gas measurements are made at baseline climate observatories (Pt. Barrow, Alaska; Mauna Loa, Hawaii; American Samoa; and the South Pole) and weekly flask air samples are collected through a global network of over 60 sites, including an international cooperative program for carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases. The gas samples are analyzed at NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA/ESRL) in Boulder, Colorado, using WMO standard reference gases prepared by NOAA/ESRL. The AGGI is normalized to 1.00 in 1990, the Kyoto Climate Protocol baseline year. In 2010, the AGGI was 1.29, indicating that global radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases had increased 29% since 1990. During the 1980s CO2 accounted for about 50-60% of the annual increase in radiative forcing by long-lived greenhouse gases, whereas, since 2000, it has accounted for 85-90% of this increase each year. After nearly a decade of virtually level concentrations in the atmosphere, methane (CH4) increased measurably over the past 2-3 years, as did its

  13. Progress in Near Real-Time Volcanic Cloud Observations Using Satellite UV Instruments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, N. A.; Yang, K.; Vicente, G.; Hughes, E. J.; Carn, S. A.; Krueger, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    Volcanic clouds from explosive eruptions can wreak havoc in many parts of the world, as exemplified by the 2010 eruption at the Eyjafjöll volcano in Iceland, which caused widespread disruption to air traffic and resulted in economic impacts across the globe. A suite of satellite-based systems offer the most effective means to monitor active volcanoes and to track the movement of volcanic clouds globally, providing critical information for aviation hazard mitigation. Satellite UV sensors, as part of this suite, have a long history of making unique near-real time (NRT) measurements of sulfur dioxide (SO2) and ash (aerosol Index) in volcanic clouds to supplement operational volcanic ash monitoring. Recently a NASA application project has shown that the use of near real-time (NRT,i.e., not older than 3 h) Aura/OMI satellite data produces a marked improvement in volcanic cloud detection using SO2 combined with Aerosol Index (AI) as a marker for ash. An operational online NRT OMI AI and SO2 image and data product distribution system was developed in collaboration with the NOAA Office of Satellite Data Processing and Distribution. Automated volcanic eruption alarms, and the production of volcanic cloud subsets for multiple regions are provided through the NOAA website. The data provide valuable information in support of the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration goal of a safe and efficient National Air Space. In this presentation, we will highlight the advantages of UV techniques and describe the advances in volcanic SO2 plume height estimation and enhanced volcanic ash detection using hyper-spectral UV measurements, illustrated with Aura/OMI observations of recent eruptions. We will share our plan to provide near-real-time volcanic cloud monitoring service using the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS) on the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS).

  14. NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater: 90 Minutes of Spectacular Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations from space in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to Ashville and the Conference Auditorium. Zoom through the Cosmos to SLC and site of the 2002 Winter Olympics using 1 m IKONOS 'Spy Satellite' data. Contrast the 1972 Apollo 17 'Blue Marble' image of the Earth with the latest US and International global satellite images that allow us to view our Planet from any vantage point. See the latest spectacular images from NASA/NOAA remote sensing missions like Terra, GOES, TRMM, SeaWiFS, & Landsat 7, of storms & fires like Hurricane Isabel and the LA/San Diego Fire Storms of 2003. See how High Definition Television (HDTV) is revolutionizing the way we do science communication. Take the pulse of the planet on a daily, annual and 30-year time scale. See daily thunderstorms, the annual blooming of the northern hemisphere land masses and oceans, fires in Africa, dust storms in Iraq, and carbon monoxide exhaust from global burning. See visualizations featured on Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science covers & National & International Network TV. Spectacular new global visualizations of the observed and simulated atmosphere and Oceans are shown. See the currents and vortexes in the Oceans that bring up the nutrients blooms in response to El Nino/La Nina climate changes. The Etheater will be presented using the latest High Definition TV (HDTV) and video projection technology on a large screen. See the global city lights, and the great NE US blackout of August 2003 observed by the 'night-vision' DMSP satellite.

  15. NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater: An Hour of Spectacular Visualization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasier, A. F.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations from space in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to Utah, Logan and the USU Agriculture Station. Compare zooms through the Cosmos to the sites of the 2004 Summer and 2002 Winter Olympic games using 1 m IKONOS "Spy Satellite" data. Contrast the 1972 Apollo 17 "Blue Marble" image of the Earth with the latest US and International global satellite images that allow us to view our Planet from any vantage point. See the latest spectacular images h m NASA/NOAA remote sensing missions like Terra, GOES, TRMM, SeaWiF!3,& Landsat 7, of storms & fires like Hurricanes Charlie & Isabel and the LA/San Diego Fire Storms of 2003. See how High Definition Television (HDTV) is revolutionizing the way we do science communication. Take the pulse of the planet on a daily, annual and 30-year time scale. See daily thunderstorms, the annual greening of the northern hemisphere land masses and oceans, fires in Africa, dust storms in Iraq, and carbon monoxide exhaust from global burning. See visualizations featured on Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science covers & National & International Network TV. Spectacular new global visualizations of the observed and simulated atmosphere & oceans are shown. See the currents and vortexes in the oceans that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny plankton and draw the fish, whales and fishermen. See the how the Ocean blooms in response to El Nino/La Nina climate changes. The E-theater will be presented using the latest High Definition TV and video projection technology on a large screen. See the global city lights, and the great NE US blackout of August 2003 observed by the "night-vision" DMSP satellite.

  16. Visual Data Analysis for Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lau, Yee; Bhate, Sachin; Fitzpatrick, Patrick

    2008-01-01

    The Visual Data Analysis Package is a collection of programs and scripts that facilitate visual analysis of data available from NASA and NOAA satellites, as well as dropsonde, buoy, and conventional in-situ observations. The package features utilities for data extraction, data quality control, statistical analysis, and data visualization. The Hierarchical Data Format (HDF) satellite data extraction routines from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory were customized for specific spatial coverage and file input/output. Statistical analysis includes the calculation of the relative error, the absolute error, and the root mean square error. Other capabilities include curve fitting through the data points to fill in missing data points between satellite passes or where clouds obscure satellite data. For data visualization, the software provides customizable Generic Mapping Tool (GMT) scripts to generate difference maps, scatter plots, line plots, vector plots, histograms, timeseries, and color fill images.

  17. NOAA's Honua: Visualizations of Complex Environmental Information in Formal and Informal Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBride, M. A.; Stovall, W. K.; Lewinski, S.; Bennett, S.

    2010-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Pacific Services Center supports a data visualization program, called NOAA's Honua, for the presentation of geophysical processes and environmental data in both formal and informal education settings using 3-D technology. Many display systems are available for the virtual representation of global environmental data, including Google Earth, NASA World Wind, and ESRI's ArcGIS Explorer. All present global data on virtual 3-D platforms using industry standard vector and raster data sources. Other products project earth system data on 3-D spherical platforms: NOAA's Science on a Sphere, Global Imagination's Magic Planet, and the OmniGlobe spherical display system. The NOAA Pacific Services Center provides resources for formal education in the form of lesson plans that cover ocean, climate, and hazards science. Components of NOAA's Honua also utilize spherical display systems for public outreach in a variety of venues, including conferences, community events, and science learning centers. In these settings, NOAA's Honua combines written narratives and accompanying audio in an interactive kiosk. Web-based 3-D interactive components are available and complement both the formal and informal education components. The strength of this program is that complex geophysical processes are presented in intuitive and compelling formats that are readily accessible via the Internet and can be viewed at science centers and museums.

  18. NOAA draft scientific integrity policy: Comment period open through 20 August

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-08-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is aiming to finalize its draft scientific integrity policy possibly by the end of the year, Larry Robinson, NOAA assistant secretary for conservation and management, indicated during a 28 July teleconference. The policy “is key to fostering an environment where science is encouraged, nurtured, respected, rewarded, and protected,” Robinson said, adding that the agency's comment period for the draft policy, which was released on 16 June, ends on 20 August. “Science underpins all that NOAA does. This policy is one piece of a broader effort to strengthen NOAA science,” Robinson said, noting that the draft “represents the first ever scientific integrity policy for NOAA. Previously, our policy only addressed research misconduct and focused on external grants. What's new about this policy is that it establishes NOAA's principles for scientific integrity, a scientific code of conduct, and a code of ethics for science supervision and management.”

  19. 77 FR 61573 - Science Advisory Board Satellite Task Force; Availability of Draft Report and Request for Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ...), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Department of Commerce (DOC). ACTION: Notice of availability and request for public comment. SUMMARY: NOAA Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research (OAR) publishes this notice on behalf of the NOAA Science Advisory Board (SAB) to announce the availability of...

  20. NOAA's Data Catalog and the Federal Open Data Policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wengren, M. J.; de la Beaujardiere, J.

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 Open Data Policy Presidential Directive requires Federal agencies to create and maintain a 'public data listing' that includes all agency data that is currently or will be made publicly-available in the future. The directive requires the use of machine-readable and open formats that make use of 'common core' and extensible metadata formats according to the best practices published in an online repository called 'Project Open Data', to use open licenses where possible, and to adhere to existing metadata and other technology standards to promote interoperability. In order to meet the requirements of the Open Data Policy, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has implemented an online data catalog that combines metadata from all subsidiary NOAA metadata catalogs into a single master inventory. The NOAA Data Catalog is available to the public for search and discovery, providing access to the NOAA master data inventory through multiple means, including web-based text search, OGC CS-W endpoint, as well as a native Application Programming Interface (API) for programmatic query. It generates on a daily basis the Project Open Data JavaScript Object Notation (JSON) file required for compliance with the Presidential directive. The Data Catalog is based on the open source Comprehensive Knowledge Archive Network (CKAN) software and runs on the Amazon Federal GeoCloud. This presentation will cover topics including mappings of existing metadata in standard formats (FGDC-CSDGM and ISO 19115 XML ) to the Project Open Data JSON metadata schema, representation of metadata elements within the catalog, and compatible metadata sources used to feed the catalog to include Web Accessible Folder (WAF), Catalog Services for the Web (CS-W), and Esri ArcGIS.com. It will also discuss related open source technologies that can be used together to build a spatial data infrastructure compliant with the Open Data Policy.

  1. Consistency in the long-term environmental measurements with NOAA: Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciren, Pubu; Cao, Changyong; Sullivan, Jerry

    2006-08-01

    Lone-term satellite observations, such as Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR), provide an irreplaceable means in monitoring Earth system through a series of satellites. However, to be able to detect the signal related to climate change, one of the critical requirements is the consistency and stability of calibration among the satellites. Applying Simultaneous Nadir Overpass (SNOs) method (Cao et al., 2002)., we fully accessed instrument-related consistency of AVHRR measurements covering all channels (from visible to IR) and time period from 1978 to 2003. It is seen that the inter-satellite biases in visible channels (channel 1 and 2) show larger inconsistency among satellites especially between NOAA-14 and NOAA-12. The inconsistency is shown as both the large bias and trend in the biases, mostly due to the lack of onboard calibration. Comparatively, the biases in IR channels, i.e., channel 4 and 5 are generally smaller, there are within +/- 1 k. However, the difference in the magnitude of the biases among satellites and the dependence of biases on the scene temperature may affect the quality of long term trend derived from such dataset. Analyses of bias root causes indicate that the effect from the difference in Spectral Response Function may not be large enough to account for the observed biases.

  2. New Developments in NOAA's Comprehensive Large Array-Data Stewardship System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, N. A.; Morris, J. S.; Carter, D. J.

    2012-12-01

    The Comprehensive Large Array-data Stewardship System (CLASS) is part of the NOAA strategic goal of Climate Adaptation and Mitigation that gives focus to the building and sustaining of key observational assets and data archives critical to maintaining the global climate record. Since 2002, CLASS has been NOAA's enterprise solution for ingesting, storing and providing access to a host of near real-time remote sensing streams such as the Polar and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (POES and GOES) and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP). Since October, 2011 CLASS has also been the dedicated Archive Data Segment (ADS) of the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP). As the ADS, CLASS receives raw and processed S-NPP records for archival and distribution to the broad user community. Moving beyond just remote sensing and model data, NOAA has endorsed a plan to migrate all archive holdings from NOAA's National Data Centers into CLASS while retiring various disparate legacy data storage systems residing at the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC), National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and the National Oceanographic Data Center (NODC). In parallel to this data migration, CLASS is evolving to a service-oriented architecture utilizing cloud technologies for dissemination in addition to clearly defined interfaces that allow better collaboration with partners. This evolution will require implementation of standard access protocols and metadata which will lead to cost effective data and information preservation.

  3. Historical Weather and Climate KML datasets at NOAA's National Climatic Data Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldwin, R.; Ansari, S.; Reid, G.; Del Greco, S.; Lott, N.

    2008-12-01

    NOAA's National Climatic Data Center is using KML to share historical weather and climate data with the Virtual Globe community. Many diverse datasets are available as dynamic, static or custom manually created KML. The following dynamic datasets include archives delivered as REST-based KML web services: - NEXRAD Level-III point features describing general storm structure, hail, mesocyclone and tornado signatures - NOAA's National Weather Service Storm Events Database - NOAA's National Weather Service Local Storm Reports collected from storm spotters - NOAA's National Weather Service Warnings Static datasets include: - Integrated Surface Data (ISD), worldwide surface weather observations - Global Climate Observing System, a comprehensive system focused on the requirements for climate issues - Monthly Climatic Data for the World, approximately 1200 surface and 500 upper air worldwide stations In addition, the NOAA Weather and Climate Toolkit provides custom KML output for NEXRAD Radar and GOES Satellite Imagery. These various access methods provide KML capability to a wide variety of historical data and enhance the interoperability, integration and usability of NCDC data.

  4. Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Architecture Overview and Technical Performance Measures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grant, K. D.; Johnson, B. R.; Miller, S. W.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

    2014-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The Joint Polar Satellite System will replace the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). Developed and maintained by Raytheon Intelligence, Information and Services (IIS), the CGS is a multi-mission enterprise system serving NOAA, NASA and their national and international partners. The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions. Originally designed to support S-NPP and JPSS, the CGS has demonstrated its scalability and flexibility to incorporate all of these other important missions efficiently and with minimal cost, schedule and risk, while strengthening global partnerships in weather and environmental monitoring. The CGS architecture will be upgraded to Block 2.0 in 2015 to satisfy several key objectives, including: "operationalizing" S-NPP, which had originally been intended as a risk reduction mission; leveraging lessons learned to date in multi-mission support; taking advantage of newer, more reliable and efficient technologies; and satisfying new requirements and constraints due to the continually evolving budgetary environment. To ensure the CGS meets these needs, we have developed 48 Technical Performance Measures (TPMs) across 9 categories: Data Availability, Data Latency, Operational Availability, Margin, Scalability, Situational Awareness, Transition (between environments and sites), WAN Efficiency, and Data Recovery Processing. This

  5. Identification of pixels with stray light and cloud shadow contaminations in the satellite ocean color data processing.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Lide; Wang, Menghua

    2013-09-20

    A new flag/masking scheme has been developed for identifying stray light and cloud shadow pixels that significantly impact the quality of satellite-derived ocean color products. Various case studies have been carried out to evaluate the performance of the new cloud contamination flag/masking scheme on ocean color products derived from the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP). These include direct visual assessments, detailed quantitative case studies, objective statistic analyses, and global image examinations and comparisons. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Multisensor Level-1 to Level-2 (NOAA-MSL12) ocean color data processing system has been used in the study. The new stray light and cloud shadow identification method has been shown to outperform the current stray light flag in both valid data coverage and data quality of satellite-derived ocean color products. In addition, some cloud-related flags from the official VIIRS-SNPP data processing software, i.e., the Interface Data Processing System (IDPS), have been assessed. Although the data quality with the IDPS flags is comparable to that of the new flag implemented in the NOAA-MSL12 ocean color data processing system, the valid data coverage from the IDPS is significantly less than that from the NOAA-MSL12 using the new stray light and cloud shadow flag method. Thus, the IDPS flag/masking algorithms need to be refined and modified to reduce the pixel loss, e.g., the proposed new cloud contamination flag/masking can be implemented in IDPS VIIRS ocean color data processing.

  6. Wild Fire Emissions for the NOAA Operational HYSPLIT Smoke Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. C.; ONeill, S. M.; Ruminski, M.; Shafran, P.; McQueen, J.; DiMego, G.; Kondragunta, S.; Gorline, J.; Huang, J. P.; Stunder, B.; Stein, A. F.; Stajner, I.; Upadhayay, S.; Larkin, N. K.

    2015-12-01

    Particulate Matter (PM) generated from forest fires often lead to degraded visibility and unhealthy air quality in nearby and downstream areas. To provide near-real time PM information to the state and local agencies, the NOAA/National Weather Service (NWS) operational HYSPLIT (Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory Model) smoke modeling system (NWS/HYSPLIT smoke) provides the forecast of smoke concentration resulting from fire emissions driven by the NWS North American Model 12 km weather predictions. The NWS/HYSPLIT smoke incorporates the U.S. Forest Service BlueSky Smoke Modeling Framework (BlueSky) to provide smoke fire emissions along with the input fire locations from the NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (NESDIS)'s Hazard Mapping System fire and smoke detection system. Experienced analysts inspect satellite imagery from multiple sensors onboard geostationary and orbital satellites to identify the location, size and duration of smoke emissions for the model. NWS/HYSPLIT smoke is being updated to use a newer version of USFS BlueSky. The updated BlueSky incorporates the Fuel Characteristic Classification System version 2 (FCCS2) over the continental U.S. and Alaska. FCCS2 includes a more detailed description of fuel loadings with additional plant type categories. The updated BlueSky also utilizes an improved fuel consumption model and fire emission production system. For the period of August 2014 and June 2015, NWS/HYSPLIT smoke simulations show that fire smoke emissions with updated BlueSky are stronger than the current operational BlueSky in the Northwest U.S. For the same comparisons, weaker fire smoke emissions from the updated BlueSky were observed over the middle and eastern part of the U.S. A statistical evaluation of NWS/HYSPLIT smoke predicted total column concentration compared to NOAA NESDIS GOES EAST Aerosol Smoke Product retrievals is underway. Preliminary results show that using the newer version

  7. Satellite Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technology Teacher, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Presents a discussion of communication satellites: explains the principles of satellite communication, describes examples of how governments and industries are currently applying communication satellites, analyzes issues confronting satellite communication, links mathematics and science to the study of satellite communication, and applies…

  8. A User's Guide to the Tsunami Datasets at NOAA's National Data Buoy Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, R. H.; O'Neil, K.; Grissom, K.; Garcia, M.; Bernard, L. J.; Kern, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    The National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) has maintained and operated the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) tsunameter network since 2003. The tsunameters employ the NOAA-developed Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) technology. The technology measures the pressure and temperature every 15 seconds on the ocean floor and transforms them into equivalent water-column height observations. A complex series of subsampled observations are transmitted acoustically in real-time to a moored buoy or marine autonomous vehicle (MAV) at the ocean surface. The surface platform uses its satellite communications to relay the observations to NDBC. NDBC places the observations onto the Global Telecommunication System (GTS) for relay to NOAA's Tsunami Warning Centers (TWC) in Hawai'i and Alaska and to the international community. It takes less than three minutes to speed the observations from the ocean floor to the TWCs. NDBC can retrieve limited amounts of the 15-s measurements from the instrumentation on the ocean floor using the technology's two-way communications. NDBC recovers the full resolution 15-s measurements about every 2 years and forwards the datasets and metadata to the National Geophysical Data Center for permanent archive. Meanwhile, NDBC retains the real-time observations on its website. The type of real-time observation depends on the operating mode of the tsunameter. NDBC provides the observations in a variety of traditional and innovative methods and formats that include descriptors of the operating mode. Datasets, organized by station, are available from the NDBC website as text files and from the NDBC THREDDS server in netCDF format. The website provides alerts and lists of events that allow users to focus on the information relevant for tsunami hazard analysis. In addition, NDBC developed a basic web service to query station information and observations to support the Short-term Inundation Forecasting for Tsunamis (SIFT

  9. NOAA/USGS Demonstration Flash-Flood and Debris-Flow Early-Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, P.; Cannon, S.; Laber, J.; Jorgensen, D.; Werner, K.

    2009-04-01

    Flash floods and debris flows are common following wildfires in southern California. On 25 December 2003, sixteen people were swept to their deaths by debris flows generated from basins in the San Bernardino Mountains that burned the previous fall. In an effort to reduce loss of life by floods and debris flows, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the United States Geological Survey (USGS) established a prototype flash flood and debris flow early warning system for recently burned areas located in eight counties of southern California in the fall of 2005. This prototype system combines the existing NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS) Flash Flood Monitoring and Prediction (FFMP) system and USGS rainfall intensity-duration thresholds for debris flow and flash flood occurrence. Separate sets of thresholds are defined for the occurrence of debris flows and flash floods in response to storms during 1) the first winter after a fire, and 2) following a year of vegetative recovery. The FFMP was modified to identify when both flash floods and debris flows are likely to occur based on comparisons between precipitation (including radar estimates, in situ measurements, and short-term forecasts) and the rainfall intensity-duration thresholds developed specifically for burned areas. Advisory outlooks, watches, and warnings are disseminated to emergency management personnel through NOAA's Advanced Weather Information Processing System (AWIPS). The FFMP provides a cost-effective and efficient approach to implement a warning system on a 24-hour, 7-day-a-week basis. In 2004 the system was advanced to incorporate a web-based procedure developed by the NWS Weather Forecast Office (WFO) in Oxnard, CA that provides information about each fire to forecasters, and displays hazard maps generated by the USGS that show those basins most likely to produce the largest debris flow events within recently burned areas. During four years of operation, the WFOs in Oxnard

  10. Satellite Movie Shows Hurricane Dolores' Remnants Bring Rains to U.S. Southwest

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of images captured July 17 to 22 from NOAA's GOES-West satellite shows Hurricane Dolores' remnants streaming over the southwestern U.S. The remnants dropped heavy rainfall in Califor...

  11. Infrared Satellite Data Indicates Severe Weather For South Central U.S.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Infrared and visible data from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite from March 17 to March 19 at 1740 UTC (1:40 p.m. EST) shows convection (rising air/thunderstorm development) exploding around 0245 UTC on Mar...

  12. Satellite Sees Remnants from Hurricane Patricia Affecting Southern U.S.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This 21 second animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Oct. 24-26 shows the remnants of Hurricane Patricia move through the Gulf of Mexico and Gulf Coast Stat...

  13. Animation from GOES-East Satellite of the Winter Storm in Dec. 2016

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of infrared and visible images from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Dec. 27 to Dec.29 shows the development of the clouds associated with the large weather system expected to bring a...

  14. Accuracy assessment of NOAA's daily reference evapotranspiration maps for the Texas High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides daily reference ET for the continental U.S. using climatic data from North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). This data provides large scale spatial representation for reference ET, which is essential for regional scal...

  15. Accuracy assessment of NOAA gridded daily reference evapotranspiration for the Texas High Plains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) provides daily reference evapotranspiration (ETref) maps for the contiguous United States using climatic data from North American Land Data Assimilation System (NLDAS). This data provides large-scale spatial representation of ETref, which i...

  16. 78 FR 16254 - (NOAA) Science Advisory Board (SAB)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... and Technology (CIOERT); (3) NOAA Response to the SAB Report on Assessing Data from non-NOAA Sources; (4) NOAA Response to the SAB White Paper; On ] the Need for a NOAA Environmental Data Management... programs are of the highest quality and provide optimal support to resource management. Time and Date:...

  17. 15 CFR 995.28 - Use of NOAA emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of NOAA emblem. 995.28 Section 995... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC...

  18. 15 CFR 995.28 - Use of NOAA emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of NOAA emblem. 995.28 Section 995... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC...

  19. 15 CFR 995.28 - Use of NOAA emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of NOAA emblem. 995.28 Section 995... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC...

  20. 15 CFR 995.28 - Use of NOAA emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of NOAA emblem. 995.28 Section 995... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC...

  1. 15 CFR 995.28 - Use of NOAA emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of NOAA emblem. 995.28 Section 995... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR DISTRIBUTORS OF NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS Requirements for Certified Distributors and Value Added Distributors of NOAA ENC...

  2. Progress and Processes for Generating NOAA's Climate Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, S. S.; Glance, W. J.; Bates, J. J.; Kearns, E. J.

    2011-12-01

    NOAA established a satellite Climate Data Record Program (CDRP) at its National Climatic Data Center (NCDC) to provide a systematic reprocessing capability which will generate sustained and authoritative climate information from 30+ years of satellite data. CDRP implements a unique approach in archiving not only the data products themselves, but also the software, ancillary data, and enough documentation to allow any user with the processing power, to reproduce the data. Best practices, such as a common maturity matrix, software guidelines, and format standards, are employed to facilitate both the transition of research algorithms to operational software, and the long-term maintenance of the software. Throughout the implementation and execution of the program, CDRP seeks to adhere to production guidelines from Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) and World Meteorological Organization's (WMO's) Sustained, Coordinated Processing of Environmental Satellite Data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM activity. Elements of the CDR Adaptive Processing System (CAPS) are described, along with the system's implementation approach, performance expectations, and plans for growth to accommodate increased CDR processing. In addition, a cost model has been implemented to capture the cost of CDR generation and maintenance, considering variables such as CDR complexity, source, and maturity at the beginning of the process.

  3. NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center, Forecast Office

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Forecast Office of NOAA's Space Weather Prediction Center is the nation's official source of alerts, warnings, and watches. The office, staffed 24/7, is always vigilant for solar activity that ...

  4. NOAA's Use of High-Resolution Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hund, Erik

    2007-01-01

    NOAA's use of high-resolution imagery consists of: a) Shoreline mapping and nautical chart revision; b) Coastal land cover mapping; c) Benthic habitat mapping; d) Disaster response; and e) Imagery collection and support for coastal programs.

  5. A satellite-based climatology (1989-2012) of lake surface water temperature from AVHRR 1-km for Central European water bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riffler, Michael; Wunderle, Stefan

    2013-04-01

    The temperature of lakes is an important parameter for lake ecosystems influencing the speed of physio-chemical reactions, the concentration of dissolved gazes (e.g. oxygen), and vertical mixing. Even small temperature changes might have irreversible effects on the lacustrine system due to the high specific heat capacity of water. These effects could alter the quality of lake water depending on parameters like lake size and volume. Numerous studies mention lake water temperature as an indicator of climate change and in the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS) requirements it is listed as an essential climate variable. In contrast to in situ observations, satellite imagery offers the possibility to derive spatial patterns of lake surface water temperature (LSWT) and their variability. Moreover, although for some European lakes long in situ time series are available, the temperatures of many lakes are not measured or only on a non-regular basis making these observations insufficient for climate monitoring. However, only few satellite sensors offer the possibility to analyze time series which cover more than 20 years. The Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) is among these and has been flown on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Polar Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) and on the Meteorological Operational Satellites (MetOp) from the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT) as a heritage instrument for almost 35 years. It will be carried on for at least ten more years finally offering a unique opportunity for satellite-based climate studies. Herein we present the results from a study initiated by the Swiss GCOS office to generate a satellite-based LSWT climatology for the pre-alpine water bodies in Switzerland. It relies on the extensive AVHRR 1-km data record (1985-2012) of the Remote Sensing Research Group at the University of Bern (RSGB) and has been derived from the AVHRR/2

  6. Toward consistent radiometric calibration of the NOAA AVHRR visible and near-infrared data record

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatt, Rajendra; Doelling, David R.; Scarino, Benjamin R.; Gopalan, Arun; Haney, Conor O.

    2015-09-01

    The 35-year Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) satellite-instrument data record is critical for studying decadal climate change, provided that the AVHRR sensors are consistently calibrated. Owing to the lack of onboard calibration capability, the AVHRR data need to be adjusted using vicarious approaches. One of the greatest challenges hampering these vicarious calibration techniques, however, is the degrading orbits of the NOAA satellites that house the instruments, or, more specifically, the fact that the satellites eventually drift into a terminator orbit several years after launch. This paper presents a uniform sensor calibration approach for the AVHRR visible (VIS) and nearinfrared (NIR) records using specifically designed NOAA-16 AVHRR-based, top-of-atmosphere (TOA) calibration models that take into account orbit degradation. These models are based on multiple invariant Earth targets, including Saharan deserts, polar ice scenes, and tropical deep-convective clouds. All invariant targets are referenced to the Aqua- MODIS Collection-6 calibration via transfer of the Aqua-MODIS calibration to NOAA-16 AVHRR using simultaneous nadir overpass (SNO) comparisons over the North Pole. A spectral band adjustment factor, based on SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY) spectral radiances, is used to account for the spectrally-induced biases caused by the spectral response function (SRF) differences of the AVHRR and MODIS sensors. Validation of the AVHRR Earth target calibration is performed by comparisons with contemporary MODIS SNOs. Calibration consistency between Earth targets validates the historical AVHRR record.

  7. Intercomparisons of the solar irradiance measurements from the Nimbus-7 SBUV, the NOAA-9 and NOAA-11 SBUV/2, and the STS-34 SSBUV instruments - A preliminary study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cebula, R. P.; Deland, M. T.; Heath, D. F.; Hilsenrath, E.; Hudson, R. D.; Schlesinger, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    Results are presented of solar irradiance measurements in the spectral range 160-400 nm at approximately 0.15-0.20-nm intervals and at 1-nm resolution performed continually since November 1978. Solar irradiance data from the Nimbus-7 SBUV satellite instrument, the SBUV/2 instruments on the NOAA-9 and NOAA-11 satellites, and the October 1989 flight of the Shuttle SBUV instrument are presented and compared. Uncertainties in the instruments' absolute and long-term radiometric calibrations, which vary among the four instruments, are discussed. Comparisons of the initial solar spectra from the four instruments show agreement to within approximately 10 percent, with spectral biases on the order of +/-4 percent. Irradiances measured by the two NOAA instruments and SSBUV agree to within about 5 percent overall from 270 to 360 nm, with spectral biases on the order of about +/-2 percent. The Nimbus-7 SBUV irradiances are an additional 5-10 percent lower in this region than those measured by the other three instruments.

  8. Use and Assessment of Multi-Spectral Satellite Imagery in NWS Operational Forecasting Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew; Fuell, Kevin; Stano, Geoffrey; McGrath, Kevin; Schultz, Lori; LeRoy, Anita

    2015-01-01

    NOAA's Satellite Proving Grounds have established partnerships between product developers and NWS WFOs for the evaluation of new capabilities from the GOES-R and JPSS satellite systems. SPoRT has partnered with various WFOs to evaluate multispectral (RGB) products from MODIS, VIIRS and Himawari/AHI to prepare for GOES-R/ABI. Assisted through partnerships with GINA, UW/CIMSS, NOAA, and NASA Direct Broadcast capabilities.

  9. DOI, USDA, EPA, NOAA and USACE announce additional Resilient Lands and Waters Initiative sites to prepare natural resources for climate change

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Department of the Interior (DOI), Department of Agriculture (USDA), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) today recognized three n

  10. The earth radiation budget satellite system for climate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woerner, C. V.; Cooper, J. E.; Harrison, E. F.

    1978-01-01

    The mission implications of providing earth radiation budget data for climate studies have been thoroughly studied. The results of these studies indicate the need for a multisensor, multisatellite system consisting of high and midinclination orbits. To meet this need, NASA and NOAA are planning a joint Earth Radiation Budget Satellite System (ERBSS) composed of instruments on two of NOAA's near-polar Sun-synchronous TIROS-N/NOAA A through G series of operational satellites and on an NASA midinclination satellite of the Applications Explorer Mission (AEM) type referred to as ERBS-A/AEM. This paper describes the scientific objectives of ERBSS, the associated data analysis methods, mission analysis (sampling), and instrument definition.

  11. An in situ-satellite blended analysis of global sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, P.; Boyer, T.; Bayler, E.; Xue, Y.; Byrne, D.; Reagan, J.; Locarnini, R.; Sun, F.; Joyce, R.; Kumar, A.

    2014-09-01

    The blended monthly sea surface salinity (SSS) analysis, called the NOAA "Blended Analysis of Surface Salinity" (BASS), is constructed for the 4 year period from 2010 to 2013. Three data sets are employed as inputs to the blended analysis: in situ SSS measurements aggregated and quality controlled by NOAA/NODC, and passive microwave (PMW) retrievals from both the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Aquarius/SAC-D and the European Space Agency's (ESA) Soil Moisture-Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellites. The blended analysis comprises two steps. First, the biases in the satellite retrievals are removed through probability distribution function (PDF) matching against temporally spatially colocated in situ measurements. The blended analysis is then achieved through optimal interpolation (OI), where the analysis for the previous time step is used as the first guess while the in situ measurements and bias-corrected satellite retrievals are employed as the observations to update the first guess. Cross validations illustrate improved quality of the blended analysis, with reduction in bias and random errors over most of the global oceans as compared to the individual inputs. Large uncertainty, however, remains in high-latitude oceans and coastal regions where the in situ networks are sparse and current-generation satellite retrievals have limitations. Our blended SSS analysis shows good agreements with the NODC in situ-based analysis over most of the tropical and subtropical oceans, but large differences are observed for high-latitude oceans and along coasts. In the tropical oceans, the BASS is shown to have coherent variability with precipitation and evaporation associated with the evolution of the El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO).

  12. Survey of United States commercial satellites in geosynchronous Earth orbit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunt, Lawerence D.; Miller, Jeffrey L.

    1994-09-01

    This thesis examines the domestic commercial satellite options available for telecommunication and remote sensing services. The study provides a single source, comprehensive examination of the available commercial U.S. geosynchronous telecommunications satellites as well as the remote sensing spacecraft which may be utilized for commercial purposes. A general satellite communications technology overview is provided as background material for the more detailed satellite compendium. The following telecommunications operators are included with their respective domestic communications satellites: Alascom, Alpha Lyracom Pan American, AT&T, Comsat, GE Americom, GTE Spacenet, Hughes and Intelsat. Satellite evolution, overview, key design features, and performance parameters are catalogued. Additionally, each satellite's communications payload is examined in detail. Emerging technologies in the remote sensing field are presented. The current GOES and NOAA satellite systems are surveyed with an emphasis on each satellite's capabilities and operational status.

  13. Integration and Visualization of Multiple Sensors in Generating the NOAA Operational Snow and Ice Cover Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, M.; Helfrich, S.

    2011-12-01

    Global snow and ice cover is a key component in the climate and hydrologic system as well as daily weather forecasting. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has produced a daily northern hemisphere snow and ice cover chart since 1997 through the Interactive Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System (IMS). The IMS integrates and visualizes a wide variety of satellite data, as well as derived snow/ice products and surface observations, to provide meteorologists with the ability to interactively prepare the daily northern hemisphere snow and ice cover chart. These products are presently used as operational inputs into several weather prediction models and are applied in climate monitoring. The IMS is currently on its second version (released in 2004) and scheduled to be upgraded to the third version (V3) in 2013. The IMS V3 will have nearly 40 external inputs as data sources processed by the IMS, which fall into five data formats: binary image, HDF file, GeoTIFF image, Shapefile image and ASCII file. With the exception of the GeoTIFF and Shapefile files, which are used directly by IMS, all other types of data are pre-processed to ENVI image file format and "sectorized" for different areas around the northern hemisphere. The IMS V3 will generate daily snow and ice cover maps in five formats: ASCII, ENVI, GeoTIFF, GIF and GRIB2 and three resolutions: 24km, 4km and 1km. In this presentation, the methods are discussed for accessing and processing satellite data, model results and surface reports. All input data with varying formats and resolutions are processed to a fixed projection. The visualization methodology for IMS are provided for five different resolutions of 48km, 24km, 8km, 4km, 2km and 1km. This work will facilitate the future enhancement of IMS, provide users with an understanding of the software architecture, provide a prospectus on future data sources, and help to preserve the integrity of the long-standing satellite-derived snow and ice

  14. The Role of Orograph and Parallax Corrections on High Resolution Geostationary Satellite Rainfall Estimates for Flash Flood Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vicente, Gilberto A.; Davenport, Clay; Scofield, Rod

    1999-01-01

    The current generation of geosynchronous satellites exhibits considerably improved capabilities in the area of resolution, gridding accuracy, and sampling frequency as compared to their predecessors. These improvements have made it possible to accurately observe the life cycle of small scale, short-live phenomenon like rapidly developing thunderstorms, at a very high spatial and temporal resolutions. While the gain in the improved resolution is not significant for synoptic scale cloud systems, it plays a major role on the computation of precipitation values for mesoscale and stonn scale systems. Two of the important factor on the accurate precision of precipitation from satellite imagery are the position of the cloud tops as viewed by the satellite and the influence of orographic effects on the distribution of precipitation. The first problem has to do with the fact that the accurate estimation of precipitation from data collected by a satellite in geosynchronous orbit requires the knowledge of the exact position of the cloud tops with respect to the ground below. This is not a problem when a cloud is located directly below the satellite; at large viewing angles the geographic coordinates on satellite images are dependent on cloud heights and distance from the sub-satellite point. The latitude and longitude coordinates for high convective cloud tops are displaced away from the sub-satellite point and may be shifted by as much as 20 Km from the sea level coordinates. The second problem has to do with the variations in rainfall distribution with elevation. Ground observations have shown that precipitation amounts tend to increase with height and that the slope of the hill or mountain that is facing the prevailing wind normally receives greater rainfall then do the lee slopes. The purpose of the study is to show the recent developments at the Office of Research and Applications (ORA) at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA/NESDIS) in Camp Springs

  15. Intersatellite calibration of NOAA HIRS CO2 channels for climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Ruiyue; Cao, Changyong; Paul Menzel, W.

    2013-06-01

    30 years of observations from the High-Resolution Infrared Radiation Sounder (HIRS) longwave CO2 channels aboard the NOAA series of satellites are being used to detect climatological changes of cloud. However, the intersatellite radiance discrepancies in the channels need to be removed for the development of a consistent cloud series using HIRS data. By analyzing the intersatellite radiance comparisons at simultaneous-nadir-overpass locations for HIRS longwave CO2 channels onboard the NOAA and MetOp series of satellites, this study optimizes the spectral response functions (SRF) for each HIRS to generate a more consistent long-term set of observations. Intersatellite radiance biases as large as 5% are found for these channels; the spectral differences and spectral uncertainties are shown to be the main causes. To estimate the radiance change for a specific channel due to SRF difference and uncertainty, a linear model is developed to correlate the radiance change for the channel being analyzed with the spectral radiances in the eight selected HIRS channels. The hyperspectral measurements from the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer on the MetOp satellite are used to simulate HIRS observations and estimate the parameters of the linear models. The linear models are applied to the NOAA and MetOp HIRS data at simultaneous-nadir-overpass locations to estimate the intersatellite radiance differences due to the SRF differences and uncertainties. The intersatellite mean radiance biases are minimized toward zero with residual maximum uncertainty less than 1% after the SRF differences and uncertainties are mitigated. Using the MetOp Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer as a reference, the optimized SRFs for every NOAA HIRS are found by effectively minimizing the root-mean-square values of the intersatellite radiance differences. The optimized shifts of the SRF can be as large as 3 cm-1.

  16. Near real time SST retrievals from Himawari-8 at NOAA using ACSPO system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramar, M.; Ignatov, A.; Petrenko, B.; Kihai, Y.; Dash, P.

    2016-05-01

    Japanese Himawari-8 (H8) satellite was launched on October 7, 2014 and placed into a geostationary orbit at ~ 140.7°E. The Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) onboard H8 provides full-disk (FD) observations every 10 minutes, in 16 solar reflectance and thermal infrared (IR) bands, with spatial resolution at nadir of 0.5-1 km and 2 km, respectively. The NOAA Advanced Clear-Sky Processor for Ocean (ACSPO) SST system, previously used with several polar-orbiting sensors, was adapted to process the AHI data. The AHI SST product is routinely validated against quality controlled in situ SSTs available from the NOAA in situ SST Quality monitor (iQuam). The product performance is monitored in the NOAA SST Quality Monitor (SQUAM) system. Typical validation statistics show a bias within +/-0.2 K and standard deviation of 0.4-0.6 K. The ACSPO H8 SST is also compared with the NOAA heritage SST produced at OSPO from the Multifunctional Transport Satellite (MTSAT-2; renamed Himawari-7, or H7 after launch) and with another H8 SST produced by JAXA (Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency). This paper describes the ACSPO AHI SST processing and results of validation and comparisons. Work is underway to generate a reduced volume ACSPO AHI SST product L2C (collated in time; e.g., 1-hr instead of current 10-min) and/or L3C (additionally gridded in space). ACSPO AHI processing chain will be applied to the data of the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), which will be flown onboard the next generation US geostationary satellite, GOES-R, scheduled for launch in October 2016.

  17. Rich client data exploration and research prototyping for NOAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grossberg, Michael; Gladkova, Irina; Guch, Ingrid; Alabi, Paul; Shahriar, Fazlul; Bonev, George; Aizenman, Hannah

    2009-08-01

    Data from satellites and model simulations is increasing exponentially as observations and model computing power improve rapidly. Not only is technology producing more data, but it often comes from sources all over the world. Researchers and scientists who must collaborate are also located globally. This work presents a software design and technologies which will make it possible for groups of researchers to explore large data sets visually together without the need to download these data sets locally. The design will also make it possible to exploit high performance computing remotely and transparently to analyze and explore large data sets. Computer power, high quality sensing, and data storage capacity have improved at a rate that outstrips our ability to develop software applications that exploit these resources. It is impractical for NOAA scientists to download all of the satellite and model data that may be relevant to a given problem and the computing environments available to a given researcher range from supercomputers to only a web browser. The size and volume of satellite and model data are increasing exponentially. There are at least 50 multisensor satellite platforms collecting Earth science data. On the ground and in the sea there are sensor networks, as well as networks of ground based radar stations, producing a rich real-time stream of data. This new wealth of data would have limited use were it not for the arrival of large-scale high-performance computation provided by parallel computers, clusters, grids, and clouds. With these computational resources and vast archives available, it is now possible to analyze subtle relationships which are global, multi-modal and cut across many data sources. Researchers, educators, and even the general public, need tools to access, discover, and use vast data center archives and high performance computing through a simple yet flexible interface.

  18. Utilization of Meteorological Satellite Imagery for World-Wide Environmental Monitoring the Lower Mississippi River Flood of 1979 - Case 1. [St. Louis, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfert, M. R.; Mccrary, D. G.; Gray, T. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The 1979 Lower Mississippi River flood was selected as a test case of environmental disaster monitoring utilizing NOAA-n imagery. A small scale study of the St. Louis Missouri area comparing ERTS-1 (LANDSAT) and NOAA-2 imagery and flood studies using only LANDSAT imagery for mapping the Rad River of the North, and Nimbus-5 imagery for East Australia show the nonmeteorological applications of NOAA satellites. While the level of NOAA-n imagery detail is not that of a LANDSAT image, for operational environmental monitoring users the NOAA-n imagery may provide acceptable linear resolution and spectral isolation.

  19. Next Generation Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R Series): A Space Segment Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krimchansky, Alexander; Machi, Dino; Cauffman, Sandra A.; Davis, Martin A.

    2004-01-01

    The next-generation National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-R series) is currently being developed by NOAA in cooperation with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The GOES-R series satellites represents a significant improvement in spatial, temporal, and spectral observations (several orders of magnitude) over the capabilities of the currently operational GOES-1 series and the about to be launched GOES-N series satellite. The GOES-R series will incorporate technically advanced third-generation instruments and spacecraft enhancements to meet evolving observational requirements of forecasting for the era 2012-2025. The GOES-R instrument complement being developed includes a Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), a Hyperspectral Environmental Suite (HES), a GEO Lighting Mapper (GLM), a Solar Imaging Suite (SIS) and a Space Environment In-Situ Suite (SEISS). Also, candidates for a number of GOES-R Pre-Planned Product Improvements (P(sup 3)Is) includes a Geo microwave Sounder, a Coronograph, a Hyperspectral Imager, and a Solar Irradiance Sensor. Currently, the GOES-R Space Segment architecture is being evaluated as part of a GOES-R system end-to-end architecture study. The GOES-R notional baseline architecture is a constellation of two satellites (A-sat and B-sat) each nominally located at 75 degrees west longitude and at 135 degrees west longitude at geostationary altitude, 0 degrees inclination. The primary mission of the A-sat is to provide imaging from the ABI. The A-sat will also contain the SIS and the GLM. The primary mission of the B-sat is to provide sounding of the hemispherical disk of the earth from the HES. The B-sat also contains the SEISS. Both satellites have mesoscale capabilities for severe weather sounding or imaging. This paper overviews the GOES-R Space Segment development including satellite constellation trade-off, improvements and differences between the current

  20. NOAA tools to support CSC and LCC regional climate science priorities in the western Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, D. P.; Marcy, D.; Robbins, K.; Shafer, M.; Stiller, H.

    2012-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is an active regional partner with the Department of Interior (DOI) in supplying and supporting the delivery of climate science and services. A primary mechanism for NOAA-DOI coordination at the regional scale is the Landscape Conservation Cooperative (LCC) network, which is supported in part by DOI Climate Science Centers (CSC). Together, the CSCs and LCCs provide a framework to identify landscape-scale science and services priorities for conservation and management. As a key partner of the CSCs and an active member of many LCCs, NOAA is working to ensure its own regional product and service delivery efforts will help address these conservation and management challenges. Two examples of NOAA's regional efforts are highlighted here, with a focus on the coastal and interior geographies of the western Gulf of Mexico where NOAA partners with the South Central CSC and participates as a member of the Gulf Coast Prairie LCC. Along the Texas coastline, a sea level rise and coastal flooding impacts viewer, produced by NOAA's Coastal Services Center and available via its Digital Coast interface, allows constituents to visualize estimates of sea level rise, measures of uncertainty, flood frequencies, and environmental (e.g., marsh migration) and socioeconomic (e.g., tidal flooding of built environments) impacts. In the interior of Texas and Louisiana, NOAA's Southern Regional Climate Center is leading a consortium of partners in the development of a unified source of regional water reservoir information, including current conditions, a historical database, and web-based visualization tools to illustrate spatio-temporal variations in water availability to a broad array of hydrological, agricultural, and other customers. These two examples of NOAA products can, in their existing forms, support regional conservation and management priorities for CSCs and LCCs by informing vulnerability assessments and adaptation

  1. NOAA-USGS Debris-Flow Warning System - Final Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2005-01-01

    Landslides and debris flows cause loss of life and millions of dollars in property damage annually in the United States (National Research Council, 2004). In an effort to reduce loss of life by debris flows, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operated an experimental debris-flow prediction and warning system in the San Francisco Bay area from 1986 to 1995 that relied on forecasts and measurements of precipitation linked to empirical precipitation thresholds to predict the onset of rainfall-triggered debris flows. Since 1995, there have been substantial improvements in quantifying precipitation estimates and forecasts, development of better models for delineating landslide hazards, and advancements in geographic information technology that allow stronger spatial and temporal linkage between precipitation forecasts and hazard models. Unfortunately, there have also been several debris flows that have caused loss of life and property across the United States. Establishment of debris-flow warning systems in areas where linkages between rainfall amounts and debris-flow occurrence have been identified can help mitigate the hazards posed by these types of landslides. Development of a national warning system can help support the NOAA-USGS goal of issuing timely Warnings of potential debris flows to the affected populace and civil authorities on a broader scale. This document presents the findings and recommendations of a joint NOAA-USGS Task Force that assessed the current state-of-the-art in precipitation forecasting and debris-flow hazard-assessment techniques. This report includes an assessment of the science and resources needed to establish a demonstration debris-flow warning project in recently burned areas of southern California and the necessary scientific advancements and resources associated with expanding such a warning system to unburned areas and, possibly, to a

  2. Many uses of the geostationary operational environmental satellite-10 sounder and imager during a high inclination state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Timothy J.; Rabin, Robert M.; Bachmeier, A. Scott; Li, Jun; Gunshor, Mathew M.; Steigerwaldt, Henry; Schreiner, Anthony J.; Aune, Robert M.; Wade, Gary S.

    2009-02-01

    Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-10 was the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) operational GOES-West satellite for approximately eight years until it was retired as an operational satellite due to an ever increasing inclination in its orbit. Since its retirement, GOES-10 has been used for a number of applications, such as, special 1-minute imagery over parts of North America during its move to 60° West longitude, routine imagery of the Southern Hemisphere, the first operational Sounder coverage over South America, initialization of regional numerical weather prediction models, and even temporary recalled as the operational GOES-East satellite during a major GOES-12 anomaly. Products from the GOES-10 Sounder and/or Imager include: imagery, cloud-top parameters, atmospheric stability indices, total precipitable water vapor, motion vector winds, volcanic ash detection, fire detection and characterization, and precipitation. As the mission of GOES-10 has continued beyond its retirement as an official operational US satellite, already lasting more than double its five-year life expectancy, many countries have been afforded the opportunity to benefit from on-going GOES-10 measurements. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the history of GOES-10, especially the unique situation of GOES-10 operating in support of central and South America after its operational use.

  3. Movements and Habitat Use of Dwarf and Pygmy Sperm Whales using Remotely-deployed LIMPET Satellite Tags

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    assessment: updating photo-identification catalogs for estimating abundance, assessing the nature and extent of fishery interactions with pantropical...spotted dolphins, and examining false killer whale movements”, funded by the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) under Grant Number...activity: assessment of interactions using satellite tag and fisheries data to develop best practices to reduce bycatch”, funded by the NOAA Bycatch

  4. The Use of Satellite Observed Cloud Patterns in Northern Hemisphere 300 mb and 1000/300 mb Numerical Analysis.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-02-01

    675-696. Bizz4rri, B., 1982: Satellite Dat-i for "umer i We’ he Prediction. Revista Meteorologia Aeronautica, _2, ?6?- 382. Bradley, .J.H.S., Hayden...DC 20233 DIRECTOR NOAA-NESDIS LIAISON, CODE SC2 METEOROLOGIST IN CHARGE PACIFIC MARINE CENTER NASA -JOHNSON SPACE CENTER WEA. SERV. FCST. OFFICE, NOAA

  5. Satellite communications for disaster relief operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sivo, J. N.

    1979-01-01

    The use of existing and planned communication satellite systems to provide assistance in the implementation of disaster relief operations on a global basis was discussed along with satellite communications system implications and their potential impact on field operations in disaster situations. Consideration are given to the utilization of both INTELSAT and MARISAT systems operating at frequencies ranging from 1.5 to 4 GHz and to the size and type of ground terminals necessary for satellite access. Estimates of communication requirements for a global system are given. Some discussion of cost estimates for satellite services to support operations are included. Studies of communication satellites for both pre and post disaster applications conducted for NOAA are included as well as recent experiments conducted in conjunction with the Office of Foreign Disaster Assistance of the Agency for International Development.

  6. GOES, POES, NPOESS - Plans for America s civil operational enivronmental satellite programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dittberner, G.

    GOES. The United States operates two meteorological GOES satellites: GOES-East located at 75° west longitude and GOES-West at 135° West longitude. The combined GOES system covers the central and eastern Pacific Ocean; North, Central, and South America; and the central and western Atlantic Ocean. GOES-8 (East) was launched on April 13, 1994, while GOES-10 (West) was launched April 26, 1997. GOES-11 (launched May 2000) and GOES-12 (June 2001) are in on-orbit storage. The next group of satellites is the GOES-N series, which will provide up to four satellites with essentially the same Imager and Sensor capability. GOES-N is planned to be launched in 2004. Since normal time to develop new satellites is about ten years, planning is already well underway for the GOES-R series, planned to be launched in 2012. GOES-R will have substantially improved instruments. New Imaging requirements will be met by a instrument with between eight and 12 channels, and will cover the United States routinely every five mi utes withn improved resolution. Sounding requirements for temperature, moisture, and wind profiles will be met with an interferometer-like instrument having about 1500 channels and requiring a large increase in data rates. POLAR Systems - POES and NPOESS. The NOAA Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) system series has been providing continuous observations of the Earth since April 1960. Currently, NOAA-16 is the primary afternoon POES and NOAA-15 is the primary morning satellite. NOAA-12 and NOAA-14 serve as backups. At this writing, the next satellite to be launched is NOAA-M in June, 2002. Two more POES satellites remain to be launched as the nation transitions to the new NPOESS system. NOAA's longer-term plans call for increasing cooperation with the European Organization for the Exploitation of Met eorological Satellites (EUMETSAT). Through a joint cooperation agreement, EUMETSAT?s new polar- orbiting satellite, known as METOP, will carry NOAA

  7. Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP): Ground-Based Radiation and Aerosol Validation Using the NOAA Mobile SURFRAD Station Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Michalsky, Joseph; Lantz, Kathy

    2016-05-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is preparing for the launch of the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series (GOES-R) satellite in 2015. This satellite will feature higher time (5-minute versus 30-minute sampling) and spatial resolution (0.5 km vs 1 km in the visible channel) than current GOES instruments provide. NOAA’s National Environmental Satellite Data and Information Service has funded the Global Monitoring Division at the Earth System Research Laboratory to provide ground-based validation data for many of the new and old products the new GOES instruments will retrieve specifically related to radiation at the surface and aerosol and its extensive and intensive properties in the column. The Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) had an emphasis on aerosol; therefore, we asked to be involved in this campaign to de-bug our new instrumentation and to provide a new capability that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility’s Mobile Facilities (AMF) did not possess, namely surface albedo measurement out to 1625 nm. This gave us a chance to test remote operation of our new multi-filter rotating shadowband radiometer/multi-filter radiometer (MFRSR/MFR) combination. We did not deploy standard broadband shortwave and longwave radiation instrumentation because ARM does this as part of every AMF deployment. As it turned out, the ARM standard MFRSR had issues, and we were able to provide the aerosol column data for the first 2 months of the campaign covering the summer flight phase of the deployment. Using these data, we were able to work with personnel at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to retrieve not only aerosol optical depth (AOD), but single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter, as well.

  8. Surface solar radiation from geostationary satellites for renewable energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laszlo, Istvan; Liu, Hongqing; Heidinger, Andrew; Goldberg, Mitchell

    With the launch of the new Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, GOES-R, the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) will begin a new era of geostationary remote sensing. One of its flagship instruments, the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI), will expand frequency and coverage of multispectral remote sensing of atmospheric and surface properties. Products derived from ABI measurements will primarily be heritage meteorological products (cloud and aerosol properties, precipitation, winds, etc.), but some will be for interdisciplinary use, such as for the solar energy industry. The planned rapid observations (5-15 minutes) from ABI provide an opportunity to obtain information needed for solar energy applications where frequent observations of solar radiation reaching the surface are essential for planning and load management. In this paper we describe a physical, radiative-transfer-based algorithm for the retrieval of surface solar irradiance that uses atmospheric and surface parameters derived independently from multispectral ABI radiances. The algorithm is designed to provide basic radiation budget products (total solar irradiance at the surface), as well as products specifically needed for the solar energy industry (average, midday and clear-sky insolation, clear-sky days, diffuse and direct normal radiation, etc.). Two alternative algorithms, which require less ABI atmosphere and surface products or no explicit knowledge of the surface albedo, are also explored along with their limitations. The accuracy of surface solar radiation retrievals are assessed using long-term MODIS and GOES satellite data and surface measurements at the Surface Radiation (SURFRAD) network.

  9. NOAA's Weather-Ready Nation: Progress and Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scharfenberg, K.

    2014-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Weather-Ready Nation program is about building community resilience in the face of increasing vulnerability to extreme weather and water events. Through community partnerships and infusion of new science and technology, better preparedness is reducing the devastating impacts of these extreme events. For the past three years, the National Weather Service has been leading the Weather-Ready Nation strategy through a number of initiatives, focused around a series of pilot projects for transforming internal National Weather Service Operations. The "Emergency Response Specialist" technical role and associated training has been developed to better apply new hazardous weather research and technology to critical community decisions. High-resolution storm surge inundation mapping was introduced to the public in 2014 during Hurricane Arthur with successful results. The dual-polarization upgrade to the Nation's weather radar network has also been completed, with successful application of improved tornado, flash flood, and winter storm warning services. This presentation will focus on the application of these science initiatives under the NOAA Weather-Ready Nation program, and will further discuss NWS plans for operational application of future advances in research and technology.

  10. Weather, land satellite sale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan announced on March 8 plans to sell to private industry the nation's land and meteorological remote-sensing satellites, including the responsibility for any future ocean-observing systems. According to the plan, the private firm successful in its bid to buy the five satellites would sell back to the government the data received by the satellites. The Reagan administration says the sale will save money and will put activities appropriate for commercial ventures into the commercial sector. Response to the announcement from scientists and congressmen has been anything but dulcet; one senator, in fact, charges that the Commerce Department and the corporation most likely to purchase the satellites are engaged in a ‘sweetheart deal.’

  11. Post-Launch Assessment of Performance of the NOAA-19 Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mo, T.

    2009-05-01

    The Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) on the NOAA-19 satellite was successfully launched on 6 February 2009. NOAA-19 is the fifth in a series of five Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) with AMSU-A that provide imaging and sounding capabilities. As it orbits the Earth, NOAA-19 will collect data about the Earth's surface and atmosphere that are vital inputs to NOAA's weather forecasts. AMSU-A is a new generation of total-power microwave radiometers which have been flown on the NOAA-15 to NOAA-18 and METOP-A Satellites since May 1998. AMSU-A is composed of two separate units. AMSU-A2 provides channels 1 and 2 at 23.8 and 31.4 GHz. AMSU-A1 furnishes 12 channels in the 50.3 to 57.3 GHz oxygen band which are used for temperature sounding from the surface to about 50 km (i.e., from 1000 to 1 millbar) plus channel 15 at 89 GHz. Channels 1-3 and 15, which have weighting functions peaked near the surface, aid the retrieval of temperature sounding by providing information to correct the effect due to surface emissivity, atmospheric liquid water, and total precipitable water vapor on temperature sounding. Channels 1 and 2 also provide information on precipitation, sea ice, and snow cover. Before launch, each AMSU-A was tested and calibrated by the instrument contractor Northrop Grumman (formerly Aerojet). These pre-launch calibration data are analyzed at NOAA to derive the calibration parameters which are used in the operational calibration software to produce the AMSU-A Level 1B data sets. A systematic post-launch calibration and validation of the instrumental performances was conducted with on-orbit data. The long-term trends of the housekeeping sensors and radiometric counts from the cold space and warm targets are continuously monitored. Scan-by- scan examination of the radiometric calibration counts is employed to confirm normal functioning of the instrument and to detect any anomalous events, such as lunar contamination (LC) in the cold

  12. Impact of GMI rain rate on East Asian Multi-Satellite Integrated Precipitation Estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B.; Shi, C.; Xie, P.

    2015-12-01

    During the last three years, the East Asian Multi-Satellite Integrated Precipitation (EMSIP) was developed at China Meteorological Administration (CMA) National Meteorological Information Center (NMIC), partially through cooperation with NOAA/CPC. IR TBB data from the FY-2 Geostationary satellite and PMW rain rate retrievals from FY-3B, TRMM, NOAA-18/19, METOP-A/B, and DMSP-F16/17/18 were integrated to produce high-resolution satellite precipitation estimates over East Asia. While the current version of the product relies on retrievals from TMI to inter-calibrate inputs from other platforms, work is underway to improve the quality of EMSIP using retrievals from the GMI. As an important step to infuse the GMI into our integration system, a comprehensive evaluation is performed for the precipitation retrievals from the GMI and the 8 other above mentioned PMW sensors with an emphasis on their performance on detecting and quantifying light rain and snowfall. PMW retrievals are compared against in situ measurements from a dense network of automatic rain gauges over China for a cold season month (January 2015). Impacts of infusing GMI precipitation retrievals into our integrated estimates are examined. Results showed improved capacity of the current version GMI retrievals in capturing light rain and snowfall than other sensors for the test period over China. The FAR score, however, is about the same as that for the TMI's. Partially due to the limited test period, only minor improvements are observed in the EMSIP through infusing GMI. Compared with CMORPH, the correlation of EMSIP and the GMI infused EMSIP is still a little lower over whole china, but sometimes over Tibet Plateau the correlation of EMSIP+GMI is higher than EMSIP and CMORPH.

  13. 15 CFR 996.30 - Use of the NOAA emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of the NOAA emblem. 996.30 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES Other Quality Assurance Program Matters § 996.30 Use of...

  14. 15 CFR 996.30 - Use of the NOAA emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of the NOAA emblem. 996.30 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES Other Quality Assurance Program Matters § 996.30 Use of...

  15. 15 CFR 996.30 - Use of the NOAA emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of the NOAA emblem. 996.30 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES Other Quality Assurance Program Matters § 996.30 Use of...

  16. 15 CFR 996.30 - Use of the NOAA emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of the NOAA emblem. 996.30 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES Other Quality Assurance Program Matters § 996.30 Use of...

  17. 15 CFR 996.30 - Use of the NOAA emblem.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of the NOAA emblem. 996.30 Section... REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CERTIFICATION REQUIREMENTS FOR NOAA HYDROGRAPHIC PRODUCTS AND SERVICES Other Quality Assurance Program Matters § 996.30 Use of...

  18. Using NOAA AVHRR data to assess flood damage in China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan; Watanabe, Masataka; Hayashi, Seiji; Murakami, Shogo

    2003-03-01

    The article used two NOAA-14 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) datasets to assess flood damage in the middle and lower reaches of China's Changjiang River (Yangtze River) in 1998. As the AVHRR is an optical sensor, it cannot penetrate the clouds that frequently cover the land during the flood season, and this technology is greatly limited in flood monitoring. However the widely used normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) can be used to monitor flooding, since water has a much lower NDVI value than other surface features. Though many factors other than flooding (e.g. atmospheric conditions, different sun-target-satellite angles, and cloud) can change NDVI values, inundated areas can be distinguished from other types of ground cover by changes in the NDVI value before and after the flood after eliminating the effects of other factors on NDVI. AVHRR data from 26 May and 22 August, 1998 were selected to represent the ground conditions before and after flooding. After accurate geometric correction by collecting GCPs, and atmospheric and angular corrections by using the 6S code, NDVI values for both days and their differences were calculated for cloud-free pixels. The difference in the NDVI values between these two times, together with the NDVI values and a land-use map, were used to identify inundated areas and to assess the area lost to the flood. The results show a total of 358,867 ha, with 207,556 ha of cultivated fields (paddy and non-irrigated field) inundated during the flood of 1998 in the middle and lower reaches of the Changjiang River Catchment; comparing with the reported total of 321,000 and 197,000 ha, respectively. The discrimination accuracy of this method was tested by comparing the results from two nearly simultaneous sets of remote-sensing data (NOAA's AVHRR data from 10 September, 1998, and JERS-1 synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data from 11 September, 1998, with a lag of about 18.5 hr) over a representative flooded region in the

  19. Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) Common Ground System (CGS) Overview and Architectural Tenets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, S. W.; Grant, K. D.; Jamilkowski, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) are jointly acquiring the next-generation civilian weather and environmental satellite system: the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). The Joint Polar Satellite System will replace the afternoon orbit component and ground processing system of the current Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellites (POES) managed by NOAA. The JPSS satellites will carry a suite of sensors designed to collect meteorological, oceanographic, climatological and geophysical observations of the Earth. The ground processing system for JPSS is known as the JPSS Common Ground System (JPSS CGS). Developed and maintained by Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems (IIS), the CGS is a multi-mission enterprise system serving NOAA, NASA and their national and international partners. The CGS provides a wide range of support to a number of missions: 1) Command and control and mission management for the Suomi National Polar Partnership (S-NPP) mission today, expanding this support to the JPSS-1 satellite and the Polar Free Flyer mission in 2017 2) Data acquisition via a Polar Receptor Network (PRN) for S-NPP, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Global Change Observation Mission - Water (GCOM-W1), POES, and the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) and Coriolis/WindSat for the Department of Defense (DoD) 3) Data routing over a global fiber Wide Area Network (WAN) for S-NPP, JPSS-1, Polar Free Flyer, GCOM-W1, POES, DMSP, Coriolis/WindSat, the NASA Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN, which includes several Earth Observing System [EOS] missions), MetOp for the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), and the National Science Foundation (NSF) 4) Environmental data processing and distribution for S-NPP, GCOM-W1 and JPSS-1 The CGS architecture will receive a technology refresh in 2015 to satisfy several key

  20. Experiment In Aeronautical-Mobile/Satellite Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jedrey, Thomas C.; Lay, Norman E.; Dessouky, Khaled

    1992-01-01

    Report describes study of performance of digital mobile/satellite communication terminals of advanced design intended for use in ground stations and airplanes in aeronautical-mobile service. Study was collaboration of NASA, Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), Communications Satellite Corp. (COMSAT), and International Maritime Satellite System (INMARSAT).

  1. Precipitation Estimation Using Collocated goes Satellite and Surface Data.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    Martin, J. Stout and D. N. Sikdar , 1978. Rain estimation from geosynchronous satellite imager--visible and infrared studies. Mon. Wea. Bev., 106, 1153...Mosher, F., 1975 Appendix to: D. W. Martin, J. Stout, and D. N. Sikdar , 1975: GATE area rain estimation from satellite images. Report, NOAA Grant 04-5...Simpson, J. and V. Wiggert, 1969: Models of precipitating cumulus towers. Mon. Rea. Rev., 89, 471-489. Stout, 4., D. W. Martin and D. N. Sikdar , 1979

  2. The Role of Meteorological Satellites in Tactical Battlefield Weather Support.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-17

    satellite images. Three somewhat different analysis techniques are described, those of Stout, Martin and Sikdar (1979), Griffith and Woodley... Sikdar 1975). At the synoptic scale, a forecaster can predict the movement of lartge scale features which, in combination with the terrain over which...Stout, and D.N. Sikdar (1976). Rainfall estimation from Geosynchronous satellite imagery during daylight hours. NOAA Tech. Rpt. ERL 356-WMPO7, Boulder

  3. Generating the Nighttime Light of the Human Settlements by Identifying Periodic Components from DMSP/OLS Satellite Imagery.

    PubMed

    Letu, Husi; Hara, Masanao; Tana, Gegen; Bao, Yuhai; Nishio, Fumihiko

    2015-09-01

    Nighttime lights of the human settlements (hereafter, "stable lights") are seen as a valuable proxy of social economic activity and greenhouse gas emissions at the subnational level. In this study, we propose an improved method to generate the stable lights from Defense Meteorological Satellite Program/Operational Linescan System (DMSP/OLS) daily nighttime light data for 1999. The study area includes Japan, China, India, and other 10 countries in East Asia. A noise reduction filter (NRF) was employed to generate a stable light from DMSP/OLS time-series daily nighttime light data. It was found that noise from amplitude of the 1-year periodic component is included in the stable light. To remove the amplitude of the 1-year periodic component noise included in the stable light, the NRF method was improved to extract the periodic component. Then, new stable light was generated by removing the amplitude of the 1-year periodic component using the improved NRF method. The resulting stable light was evaluated by comparing it with the conventional nighttime stable light provided by the National Oceanic and Atmosphere Administration/National Geophysical Data Center (NOAA/NGDC). It is indicated that DNs of the NOAA stable light image are lower than those of the new stable light image. This might be attributable to the influence of attenuation effects from thin warm water clouds. However, due to overglow effect of the thin cloud, light area in new stable light is larger than NOAA stable light. Furthermore, the cumulative digital numbers (CDNs) and number of light area pixels (NLAP) of the generated stable light and NOAA/NGDC stable light were applied to estimate socioeconomic variables of population, electric power consumption, gross domestic product, and CO2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption. It is shown that the correlations of the population and CO2FF with new stable light data are higher than those in NOAA stable light data; correlations of the EPC and GDP with NOAA

  4. Satellite observed thermodynamics during FGGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, W. L.

    1985-01-01

    During the First Global Atmospheric Research Program (GARP) Global Experiment (FGGE), determinations of temperature and moisture were made from TIROS-N and NOAA-6 satellite infrared and microwave sounding radiance measurements. The data were processed by two methods differing principally in their horizontal resolution. At the National Earth Satellite Service (NESS) in Washington, D.C., the data were produced operationally with a horizontal resolution of 250 km for inclusion in the FGGE Level IIb data sets for application to large-scale numerical analysis and prediction models. High horizontal resolution (75 km) sounding data sets were produced using man-machine interactive methods for the special observing periods of FGGE at the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center and archived as supplementary Level IIb. The procedures used for sounding retrieval and the characteristics and quality of these thermodynamic observations are given.

  5. Longwave surface radiation over the globe from satellite data - An error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, S. K.; Wilber, A. C.; Darnell, W. L.; Suttles, J. T.

    1993-01-01

    Errors have been analyzed for monthly-average downward and net longwave surface fluxes derived on a 5-deg equal-area grid over the globe, using a satellite technique. Meteorological data used in this technique are available from the TIROS Operational Vertical Sounder (TOVS) system flown aboard NOAA's operational sun-synchronous satellites. The data used are for February 1982 from NOAA-6 and NOAA-7 satellites. The errors in the parametrized equations were estimated by comparing their results with those from a detailed radiative transfer model. The errors in the TOVS-derived surface temperature, water vapor burden, and cloud cover were estimated by comparing these meteorological parameters with independent measurements obtained from other satellite sources. Analysis of the overall errors shows that the present technique could lead to underestimation of downward fluxes by 5 to 15 W/sq m and net fluxes by 4 to 12 W/sq m.

  6. GOES Satellite Video of Feb. 12, 2014 Snowstorm

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of NOAA's GOES satellite data shows the progression of the major winter storm in the U.S. south from Feb. 10 at 1815 UTC/1:15 p.m. EST to Feb. 12 to 1845 UTC/1:45 p.m. EST. Credit: N...

  7. Satellite Views of Severe Storm that Generated Michoud Tornado

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation of infrared and visible imagery from NOAA's GOES-East satellite from Feb. 6 to Feb. 7 at 2115 UTC (4:15 p.m EST) shows the severe weather system that spawned a tornado near NASA's Mi...

  8. Third International Satellite Direct Broadcast Services User's Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamowski, J.; Vermillion, C.

    1988-01-01

    A workshop titled, The Third International Satellite Direct Broadcast Services User's Conference, jointly sponsored by NASA and NOAA/NESDIS was scheduled to be held June 20 to 24, 1988, at the International Hotel located at the Baltimore-Washington Airport. Details concerning the organizing of the conference are given.

  9. Does absorption of ultraviolet B by stratospheric ozone and urban aerosols influence colon and breast cancer mortality rates? Contributions from NASA and NOAA data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorham, Edward D.; Garland, Frank C.; Mohr, Sharif B.; Grant, William B.; Garland, Cedric F.

    2005-08-01

    Although most ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation is absorbed by stratospheric ozone, dense anthropogenic sulfate aerosols in the troposphere may further attenuate UVB in some regions. Mortality rates from colon and breast cancer tend to be much higher in areas with low levels of UVB radiation. These high rates may be due in part to inadequate cutaneous photosynthesis of vitamin D. Satellite data on atmospheric aerosols, stratospheric ozone, and cloud cover were obtained from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). These data were combined with age-adjusted mortality rates from 175 countries reporting to the World Health Organization. Regression was used to assess the relationship of stratospheric ozone thickness, aerosol optical depth, cloud cover, solar UVB irradiance at the top of the atmosphere, average skin exposure, and a dietary factor with colon and breast cancer mortality rates. Solar UVB irradiance at the top of the atmosphere, total cloud cover, and atmospheric aerosols had the strongest associations with mortality rates, apart from a strong influence of diet. Since 95% of circulating vitamin D is derived from current or stored products of photosynthesis, which may be nonexistent or minimal much of the year above 37°N or below 37°S, attenuation of UVB by atmospheric aerosols and clouds may have a greater than expected adverse effect on human health.

  10. Solutions Network Formulation Report. The Potential Contribution of the International GPM Program to the NOAA Estuarine Reserves Division's System-wide Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilbert, Kent; Anderson, Daniel; Lewis, David

    2007-01-01

    Data collected via the International GPM Program could be used to provide a solution for the NOAA Estuarine Reserves Division s System-wide Monitoring Program by augmenting in situ rainfall measurements with data acquired via future satellite-acquired precipitation data. This Candidate Solution is in alignment with the Coastal Management National Application and will benefit society by assisting in estuary preservation.

  11. The Calibration of AVHRR Visible Dual Gain using Meteosat-8 for NOAA-16 to 18

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doelling, David R.; Garber, Donald P.; Avey, L. A.; Nguyen, Louis; Minnis, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    The NOAA AVHRR program has given the remote sensing community over 25 years of imager radiances to retrieve global cloud, vegetation, and aerosol properties. This dataset can be used for long-term climate research, if the AVHRR instrument is well calibrated. Unfortunately, the AVHRR instrument does not have onboard visible calibration and does degrade over time. Vicarious post-launch calibration is necessary to obtain cloud properties that are not biased over time. The recent AVHRR-3 instrument has a dual gain in the visible channels in order to achieve greater radiance resolution in the clear-sky. This has made vicarious calibration of the AVHRR-3 more difficult to unravel. Reference satellite radiances from well-calibrated instruments, usually equipped with solar diffusers, such as MODIS, have been used to successfully vicariously calibrate other visible instruments. Transfer of calibration from one satellite to another using co-angled, collocated, coincident radiances has been well validated. Terra or Aqua MODIS and AVHRR comparisons can only be performed over the poles during summer. However, geostationary satellites offer a transfer medium that captures both parts of the dual gain. This AVHRR-3 calibration strategy uses, calibrated with MODIS, Meteosat-8 radiances simultaneously to determine the dual gains using 50km regions. The dual gain coefficients will be compared with the nominal coefficients. Results will be shown for all visible channels for NOAA-17.

  12. Satellite RNAs and Satellite Viruses.

    PubMed

    Palukaitis, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Satellite RNAs and satellite viruses are extraviral components that can affect either the pathogenicity, the accumulation, or both of their associated viruses while themselves being dependent on the associated viruses as helper viruses for their infection. Most of these satellite RNAs are noncoding RNAs, and in many cases, have been shown to alter the interaction of their helper viruses with their hosts. In only a few cases have the functions of these satellite RNAs in such interactions been studied in detail. In particular, work on the satellite RNAs of Cucumber mosaic virus and Turnip crinkle virus have provided novel insights into RNAs functioning as noncoding RNAs. These effects are described and potential roles for satellite RNAs in the processes involved in symptom intensification or attenuation are discussed. In most cases, models describing these roles involve some aspect of RNA silencing or its suppression, either directly or indirectly involving the particular satellite RNA.

  13. Aviation Applications for Satellite-Based Observations of Cloud Properties, Convection Initiation, In-flight Icing, Turbulence and Volcanic Ash

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mecikalski, John R.; Feltz, Wayne F.; Murray, John J.; Johnson, David B.; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Bedka, Sarah M.; Wimmers, Anthony J.; Pavolonis, Michael; Berendes, Todd A.; Haggerty, Julie; Minnis, Pat; Bernstein, Ben; Williams, Earl

    2006-01-01

    Advanced Satellite Aviation Weather Products (ASAP) was jointly initiated by the NASA Applied Sciences Program and the NASA Aviation Safety and Security Program in 2002. The initiative provides a valuable bridge for transitioning new and existing satellite information and products into Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Aviation Weather Research Program (AWRP) efforts to increase the safety and efficiency of the airspace system. The ASAP project addresses hazards such as convective weather, turbulence (clear-air and cloud-induced), icing and volcanic ash and is particularly applicable in extending the monitoring of weather over data-sparse areas such as the oceans and other observationally remote locations. ASAP research is conducted by scientists from NASA, the FAA AWRP's Product Development Teams (PDT), NOAA and the academic research community. In this paper we provide a summary of activities since the inception of ASAP that emphasize the use of current-generation satellite technologies toward observing and mitigating specified aviation hazards. A brief overview of future ASAP goals is also provided in light of the next generation of satellite sensors (e.g., hyperspectral; high spatial resolution) to become operational in the 2006-2013 timeframe.

  14. Educator House Call: On-Line Data for Educators' Needs Assessment--Summary Report. NOAA Technical Memorandum GLERL-149

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturtevant, Rochelle A.; Marshall, Ann

    2009-01-01

    On July 15, 2009, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory (GLERL) co-hosted a focus group--Educator House Calls: On-Line Data for Educators. The focus group was conducted at GLERL's main laboratory in Ann Arbor. The workshop was organized and funded by COSEE Great Lakes with student…

  15. Feature Detection Systems Enhance Satellite Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    In 1963, during the ninth orbit of the Faith 7 capsule, astronaut Gordon Cooper skipped his nap and took some photos of the Earth below using a Hasselblad camera. The sole flier on the Mercury-Atlas 9 mission, Cooper took 24 photos - never-before-seen images including the Tibetan plateau, the crinkled heights of the Himalayas, and the jagged coast of Burma. From his lofty perch over 100 miles above the Earth, Cooper noted villages, roads, rivers, and even, on occasion, individual houses. In 1965, encouraged by the effectiveness of NASA s orbital photography experiments during the Mercury and subsequent Gemini manned space flight missions, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) director William Pecora put forward a plan for a remote sensing satellite program that would collect information about the planet never before attainable. By 1972, NASA had built and launched Landsat 1, the first in a series of Landsat sensors that have combined to provide the longest continuous collection of space-based Earth imagery. The archived Landsat data - 37 years worth and counting - has provided a vast library of information allowing not only the extensive mapping of Earth s surface but also the study of its environmental changes, from receding glaciers and tropical deforestation to urban growth and crop harvests. Developed and launched by NASA with data collection operated at various times by the Agency, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Earth Observation Satellite Company (EOSAT, a private sector partnership that became Space Imaging Corporation in 1996), and USGS, Landsat sensors have recorded flooding from Hurricane Katrina, the building boom in Dubai, and the extinction of the Aral Sea, offering scientists invaluable insights into the natural and manmade changes that shape the world. Of the seven Landsat sensors launched since 1972, Landsat 5 and Landsat 7 are still operational. Though both are in use well beyond their intended lifespans, the mid

  16. Weather Prediction Improvement Using Advanced Satellite Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Einaudi, Franco; Uccellini, L.; Purdom, J.; Rogers, D.; Gelaro, R.; Dodge, J.; Atlas, R.; Lord, S.

    2001-01-01

    We discuss in this paper some of the problems that exist today in the fall utilization of satellite data to improve weather forecasts and we propose specific recommendations to solve them. This discussion can be viewed as an aspect of the general debate on how best to organize the transition from research to operational satellites and how to evaluate the impact of a research instrument on numerical weather predictions. A method for providing this transition is offered by the National Polar-Orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP). This mission will bridge the time between the present NOAA and Department of Defense (DOD) polar orbiting missions and the initiation of the converged NPOESS series and will evaluate some of the Earth Observing System (EOS) instruments as appropriate for operational missions. Thus, this mission can be viewed as an effort to meet the operational requirements of NOAA and DOD and the research requirements of NASA. More generally, however, it can be said that the process of going from the conception of new, more advanced instruments to their operational implementation and full utilization by the weather forecast communities is not optimal. Instruments developed for research purposes may have insufficient funding to explore their potential operational capabilities. Furthermore, instrument development programs designed for operational satellites typically have insufficient funding for assimilation algorithms needed to transform the satellite observations into data that can be used by sophisticated global weather forecast models. As a result, years often go by before satellite data are efficiently used for operational forecasts. NASA and NOAA each have unique expertise in the design of satellite instruments, their use for basic and applied research and their utilization in weather and climate research. At a time of limited resources, the two agencies must combine their efforts to work toward common

  17. Atmospheric front over the East China Sea studied by multisensor satellite and in situ data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Andrei Y.; Alpers, Werner; Litovchenko, Konstantin T.; He, Ming-Xia; Feng, Qian; Fang, Mingqiang; Yan, Xiao-Hai

    2004-12-01

    A frontal feature visible on a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) image acquired by the Radarsat satellite over the East China Sea on 19 November 2000 is analyzed in conjunction with data acquired by Quikscat, TOPEX/Poseidon, Tropical Rain Measurement Mission (TRMM), Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) satellites, and with data obtained from ship measurements. Although this frontal feature is located close to the Kuroshio front, it is demonstrated that it is not a sea surface manifestation of an oceanic front, but rather of an atmospheric front extending over 800 km from an area of the Pacific Ocean northeast of Taiwan to the southern coast of Korea. It is a cold front moving in the southeast direction with a speed of approximately 45-50 km/hour and associated with a 40-km-wide rainband trailing the front. The Radarsat image, which has a resolution of 50 m, reveals fine-scale structures of the atmospheric front, in particular small-scale convective rain cells embedded in the front. Conclusion is drawn that accurate interpretation of frontal features in SAR images requires use of additional meteorological and remote sensing data and information.

  18. Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-14 super rapid scan operations to prepare for GOES-R

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmit, Timothy J.; Goodman, Steven J.; Lindsey, Daniel T.; Rabin, Robert M.; Bedka, Kristopher M.; Gunshor, Mathew M.; Cintineo, John L.; Velden, Christopher S.; Scott Bachmeier, A.; Lindstrom, Scott S.; Schmidt, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES)-14 imager was operated by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in an experimental rapid scan 1-min mode that emulates the high-temporal resolution sampling of the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) on the next generation GOES-R series. Imagery with a refresh rate of 1 min of many phenomena were acquired, including clouds, convection, fires, smoke, and hurricanes, including 6 days of Hurricane Sandy through landfall. NOAA had never before operated a GOES in a nearly continuous 1-min mode for such an extended period of time, thereby making these unique datasets to explore the future capabilities possible with GOES-R. The next generation GOES-R imager will be able to routinely take mesoscale (1000 km×1000 km) images every 30 s (or two separate locations every minute). These images can be acquired even while scanning continental United States and full disk images. These high time-resolution images from the GOES-14 imager are being used to prepare for the GOES-R era and its advanced imager. This includes both the imagery and quantitative derived products such as cloud-top cooling. Several animations are included to showcase the rapid change of the many phenomena observed during super rapid scan operations for GOES-R (SRSOR).

  19. Calibration of NOAA-7 AVHRR, GOES-5 and GOES-6 VISSR/VAS solar channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frouin, R.; Gautier, C.

    1986-01-01

    The NOAA-7, GOES-5 and GOES-6 Visible Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer/Vertical Atmospheric Sounder (VISSR/VAS) solar channels were calibrated. The White Sands Monument area in New Mexico, whose reflectance properties are well known, and space are used as calibration targets. The shortwave reflected terrestrial irradiance that is measured at satellite altitude is computed using a fairly accurate radiative transfer model which accounts for multiple scattering and bidirectional effects. The ground target reflectance and relevant characteristics of the overlying atmosphere are estimated from climatological data and observation at the nearest meteorological sites. The approach is believed to produce accuracies of 8 to 13% depending on the channel considered.

  20. Administrators: Nursing Home Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Anne

    1976-01-01

    Responsibilities, skills needed, training needed, earnings, employment outlook, and sources of additional information are outlined for the administrator who holds the top management job in a nursing home. (JT)

  1. Satellite Meteorology Education & Training Resources from COMET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abshire, W. E.; Dills, P. N.; Weingroff, M.; Lee, T. F.

    2012-12-01

    The COMET® Program (www.comet.ucar.edu) receives funding from NOAA NESDIS as well as EUMETSAT and the Meteorological Service of Canada to support education and training in satellite meteorology. These partnerships enable COMET to create educational materials of global interest on geostationary and polar-orbiting remote sensing platforms. These materials focus on the capabilities and applications of current and next-generation satellites and their relevance to operational forecasters and other user communities. By partnering with experts from the Naval Research Laboratory, NOAA-NESDIS and its Cooperative Institutes, Meteorological Service of Canada, EUMETSAT, and other user communities, COMET stimulates greater use of satellite data observations and products. This presentation provides an overview of COMET's recent satellite education efforts in the area of polar orbiting satellites. COMET has a new module on Suomi NPP, which describes the satellite system and discusses the improvements that it is bringing to forecasting, numerical weather prediction, and environmental monitoring. COMET has also published an updated version of its module on the VIIRS instrument. "Imaging with VIIRS: A Convergence of Technologies and Experience, 2nd Edition" covers the instrument's enhanced capabilities by examining the systems that contributed to its development. Special attention is paid to the Day/Night Visible channel as VIIRS is the first instrument on a civilian satellite to image atmospheric and terrestrial features with and without moonlight. An upcoming module will exclusively focus on nighttime imaging with the VIIRS Day/Night Band (DNB). "Applications of the VIIRS Day-Night Band" will introduce the capabilities of DNB imagery to a wide audience ranging from forecasters and emergency managers to wildfire fighters and oceanographers. DNB products will be compared to traditional satellite products made from infrared data, including the "fog" product. Users will learn how DNB

  2. NOAA Climate Users Engagement Using Training Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Verdin, J. P.; Jones, J.; Pulwarty, R. S.

    2009-12-01

    NOAA National Weather Service (NWS) Climate Services Training Program was initiated in 2001. The training original target audience was NOAA NWS regional and local climate services workforce. As a result of eight-year-long development of the training program, NWS offers two training courses and about 25 online distance learning modules covering various climate topics: climate data and observations, climate variability and change, NWS national and local climate products, their tools, skill, and interpretation. Leveraging climate information and expertise available at all NOAA line offices and partners allows delivery of the most relevant, advanced knowledge and is a very critical aspect of the training program. In 2009 the training program launched a pilot project that expanded the training opportunities for specific user groups. The California Department of Water Resources (DWR) requested a training course with emphasis on Climate, Drought and Remote Sensing for their water resources managers, hydrologists, and engineering staff. The National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS) co-sponsored the project. Developing the course NOAA, NIDIS, and DWR staff worked together testing different approaches in order to identify the most appropriate balance between gaps in the target audience climate knowledge and technical level needed for the information communication and delivery. The two-day course was offered in June 2009 for 35 trainees with classroom recording for further dissemination of the training materials in form of online audio-visual presentations (webcasts). The training event brought together NOAA staff and partners from U.S. Geological Survey, the Western Regional Climate Center, NASA, academia, and DWR staff and provided a valuable opportunity for curriculum development and expertise exchange. The course final discussion engaged participants in process of identifying additional climate products and services needed for regional and sector specific

  3. Satellite Vulnerabilities

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-18

    per response, including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and...allies. 8  Satellites and Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance We have become dependent also on our satellite surveillance assets...uninterrupted ISR”, with “space intelligence , surveillance, and reconnaissance (ISR) systems…fundamental to air power—especially to the execution

  4. Evaluation of the AirNow Satellite Data Processor for 2010-2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasch, A. N.; DeWinter, J. L.; Dye, T.; Haderman, M.; Zahn, P. H.; Szykman, J.; White, J. E.; Dickerson, P.; van Donkelaar, A.; Martin, R.

    2013-12-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) AirNow program provides the public with real-time and forecasted air quality conditions. Millions of people each day use information from AirNow to protect their health. The AirNow program (http://www.airnow.gov) reports ground-level ozone (O3) and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) with a standardized index called the Air Quality Index (AQI). AirNow aggregates information from over 130 state, local, and federal air quality agencies and provides tools for over 2,000 agency staff responsible for monitoring, forecasting, and communicating local air quality. Each hour, AirNow systems generate thousands of maps and products. The usefulness of the AirNow air quality maps depends on the accuracy and spatial coverage of air quality measurements. Currently, the maps use only ground-based measurements, which have significant gaps in coverage in some parts of the United States. As a result, contoured AQI levels have high uncertainty in regions far from monitors. To improve the usefulness of air quality maps, scientists at EPA, Dalhousie University, and Sonoma Technology, Inc., in collaboration with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), have completed a project to incorporate satellite-estimated surface PM2.5 concentrations into the maps via the AirNow Satellite Data Processor (ASDP). These satellite estimates are derived using NASA/NOAA satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD) retrievals and GEOS-Chem modeled ratios of surface PM2.5 concentrations to AOD. GEOS-Chem is a three-dimensional chemical transport model for atmospheric composition driven by meteorological input from the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS). The ASDP can fuse multiple PM2.5 concentration data sets to generate AQI maps with improved spatial coverage. The goals of ASDP are to provide more detailed AQI information in monitor-sparse locations and to augment monitor

  5. NOAA Utilization of the Global Hawk Unmanned Aircraft for Atmospheric Research and Forecast Improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wick, G. A.; Hood, R. E.; Black, M. L.; Spackman, J. R.; Ralph, F. M.; Intrieri, J. M.; Hock, T. F.; Neiman, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    High altitude, long endurance unmanned aircraft provide a tremendous new capability for monitoring the atmosphere in support of weather research and forecast improvement. The NOAA Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) program is collaborating with NASA on the use of their Global Hawk (GH) aircraft for research into better understanding and forecasting high-impact weather events. NOAA has participated in multiple field campaigns either in partnership with NASA including the Genesis and Rapid Intensification Processes (GRIP, 2010) and the Hurricane and Severe Storm Sentinel (HS3, 2011-2014) experiments, or under NOAA leadership during the Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR, 2011) experiment. This past year, NOAA began a 3-year project, Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology (SHOUT), to quantify the influence of UAS data on high-impact weather prediction and assess the operational effectiveness of UAS to help mitigate the risk of potential satellite observing gaps. The NOAA UAS system partnered with the National Center for Atmospheric Research in the development of a dropsonde system for the GH which has been flown along with other remote sensing instrumentation. This presentation summarizes our key results to date and describes our planned activities over the next two years. Flights during WISPAR provided measurements of water vapor transport within atmospheric rivers for evaluation of numerical weather prediction forecasts and analyses. A flight sampling the Arctic atmosphere north of Alaska included the first dropsondes released in the Arctic since the 1950's and extensive measurements of boundary-layer variability over an ocean-ice lead feature. Assimilation of GH dropsonde data collected in the environment around tropical storms during HS3 has demonstrated significant positive forecast improvements. Data are also being employed in the validation of multiple satellite-derived products. In SHOUT, campaigns are planned targeting Atlantic

  6. Compendium of meteorological space programs, satellites, and experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dubach, Leland L.; Ng, Carolyn

    1988-01-01

    This compendium includes plans and events known to the authors through January 1987. Compilation of the information began in 1967. This document is intended: (1) as a historical record of all satellites and instrumentation that has been useful for meteorological research or operational uses; and (2) as a working document to be used to assist meteorologists in identifying meteorological satellites, locating data from these satellites, and understanding experiment operation which is related to satellite data that may be of interest to them. A summary of all known launched satellites for all countries and their experiments, which were concerned with meteorological operations or research, are included. Programs covered include AEM, Apollo, ATS, Bhaskara, Cosmos, Discoverer, DMSP, DOD, DODGE, EOLE, ERBE, ESSA, Explorer, Gemini, GMS, GOES/SMS, INSAT, IRS, LANDSAT, Mercury, Meteor 1 and 2, Meteosat, Molniya, MOS, Nimbus, NOAA (1-5)/ITOS, NOAA (6,7,D)/TIROS-N, NOAA (8-10, H-J)/ATN, Salyut, Seasat, Shuttle 1, Shuttle 2: Spacelab, Skylab, Soyuz, TIROS, TOPEX, Vanguard, Voskhod, Vostok, and Zond.

  7. Mapping crop key phenological stages in the North China Plain using NOAA time series images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Jingfeng; Yu, Zhenrong; van Leeuwen, Louise; Driessen, Paul M.

    2002-11-01

    Six key phenological stages were defined based on NOAA/AVHRR NDVI time series data collected in the Huang-Huai-Hai (HHH) Plain of China from 1990 through 2000. In a winter wheat-summer maize rotation, the recovering, heading and maturity stages of winter wheat and the emergence, tasseling and maturity stages of summer maize were recorded using 6 km resolution 10-day composite NDVI. The satellite-derived data proved to be consistent with the 'green wave' moving through the HHH Plain in spring. The recovering stage of winter wheat recorded by satellite was closely correlated to the temperatures measured in February whereas summer maize yields (at zone level) were correlated well with the satellite-derived length of the crop cycle. Comparison with synchronous phenological observations on the ground confirmed the coherence of satellite-derived phenology data. It is expected that satellite data with greater spatial and temporal resolutions and improved smoothing methods will increase the precision of the estimated data still further.

  8. Calibration results for NOAA-11 AVHRR channels 1 and 2 from congruent path aircraft observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abel, Peter; Guenther, B.; Galimore, Reginald N.; Cooper, John W.

    1993-01-01

    A method for using congruent atmospheric path aircraft-satellite observations to calibrate a satellite radiometer is presented. A calibrated spectroradiometer aboard a NASA ER-2 aircraft at an altitude of 19 km above White Sands (New Mexico) was oriented to view White Sands at the overpass time of the NOAA-11 AVHRR instrument along the same view vector as the satellite instrument. The data from six flights between November 1988 and October 1990 were transformed into corresponding estimates of AVHRR channel radiance at the satellite (derived from the aircraft measurements), and average counts (from the AVHRR measurements), both averaged across the footprint of the spectroradiometer. Prelaunch measurements of the AVHRR spectral response profiles are assumed, and the radiance spectrum measured by the spectroradiometer was adjusted to satellite altitude using the LOWTRAN-7 computer code. Results show reduced gains in both channel 1 (0.65 micron) and channel 2 (0.85 micron), compared to prelaunch values, with little further reduction in gain after 200 days in orbit. Results for the gain ratio (channel 1/channel 2), which is important for the calculation of the normalized vegetation index, show constant in-orbit values 5 percent above the prelaunch value.

  9. Global Warming: Evidence from Satellite Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prabhakara, C.; Iacovazzi, R., Jr.; Yoo, J.-M.

    2001-01-01

    Observations made in Channel 2 (53.74 GHz) of the Microwave Sounding Unit (MSU) radiometer, flown on-board sequential, sun-synchronous, polar orbiting NOAA operational satellites, indicate that the mean temperature of the atmosphere over the globe increased during the period 1980 to 1999. In this study we have minimized systematic errors in the time series introduced by the satellite orbital drift in an objective manner. This is done with the help the onboard warm black body temperature, which is used in the calibration of the MSU radiometer. The corrected MSU Channel 2 observations of the NOAA satellite series reveal that the vertically weighted global mean temperature of the atmosphere, with a peak weight near the mid-troposphere, warmed at the rate of 0.13 K per decade (with an uncertainty of 0.05 K per decade) during 1980 to 1999. The global warming deduced from conventional meteorological data that have been corrected for urbanization effects agrees reasonably with this satellite deuced result.

  10. Case studies of NOAA 6/TIROS N data impact on numerical weather forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyan, L. M.; Alperson, Z.; Ben-Amram, T.

    1984-01-01

    The impact of satellite temperatures from systems which predate the launching of the third generation of vertical sounding instruments aboard TIROS N (13 Oct 1978) and NOAA 6 (27 June 1979) is reported. The first evaluation of soundings from TIROS N found that oceanic, cloudy retrievals over NH mid latitudes show a cold bias in winter. It is confirmed for both satellite systems using a larger data base. It is shown that RMS differences between retrievals and colocated radiosonde observations within the swath 30-60N during the 1979-80 winter were generally 2-3K in clear air and higher for cloudy columns. A positive impact of TIROS N temperatures on the analysis of synoptic weather systems is shown. Analyses prepared from only satellite temperatures seemed to give a better definition to weather systems' thermal structure than that provided by corresponding NMC analyses without satellite data. The results of a set of 14 numerical forecast experiments performed with the PE model of the Israel Meteorological Service (IMS) are summarized; these were designed to test the impact of TIROS N and NOAA 6 temperatures within the IMS analysis and forecast cycle. The satellite data coverage over the NH, the mean area/period S1 and RMS verification scores and the spatial distribution of SAT versus NO SAT forecast differences are discussed and it is concluded that positive forecast impact occurs over ocean areas where the extra data improve the specification which is otherwise available from conventional observations. The forecast impact for three cases from the same set of experiments was examined and it is found that satellite temperatures, observed over the Atlantic Ocean contribute to better forecasts over Iceland and central Europe although a worse result was verified over Spain. It is also shown that the better scores of a forecast based also on satellite data and verified over North America actually represent a mixed impact on the forecast synoptic patterns. A superior 48 hr

  11. Status of the Shuttle SBUV (SSBUV) calibration of the NOAA SBUV/2 operational ozone sounders and the detection of trends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest; Mcpeters, Richard E.; Cebula, Richard P.

    1994-01-01

    The Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet (SSBUV) experiment has flown four times since October 1989. The purpose of SSBUV is to perform calibration checks of the SBUV ozone sounding instruments on the Nimbus and NOAA satellites in order to remove calibration drift so that ozone trends in the middle stratosphere can be accurately derived. Calibration checks are performed by comparing coincident observations between SSBUV and the satellite instruments. Regular flights of about once per year and maintenance of the SSBUV calibration to 1 percent from flight to flight are the major challenges for SSBUV. To date the required flight frequency has been met and instrument calibration is known to about 1-2 percent for the first three flights. The first comparisons showed 30 percent differences between SSBUV and the original archived Nimbus SBUV data, but considerably smaller differences with the new SBUV 'Version 6' data. Differences between SSBUV and SBUV/2 instruments on NOAA-11 and NOAA-9 were of the order of 5-10 percent respectively. These differences have not been accounted for in the present NOAA data set since they contain initial calibration biases as well as long term instrument drift. With subsequent SSBUV comparisons, the satellite calibration can be corrected, which will then allow an accurate estimate of ozone trends in the upper stratosphere. In this initial study, 1989 Nimbus-7 SBUV data have been corrected using SSBUV observations and then compared to SBUV data for 1980. This comparison then leads to an ozone trend of 7 percent in the upper stratosphere over the tropics for the period 1980 to 1989.

  12. NASA/NOAA: Earth Science Electronic Theater 1999

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. Fritz

    1999-01-01

    The Electronic Theater (E-theater) presents visualizations which span the period from the original Suomi/Hasler animations of the first ATS-1 GEO weather satellite images in 1966 to the latest 1999 NASA Earth Science Vision for the next 25 years. Hot off the SGI-Onyx Graphics-Supercomputer are NASA's visualizations of Hurricanes Mitch, Georges, Fran and Linda. These storms have been recently featured on the covers of National Geographic, Time, Newsweek and Popular Science. Highlights will be shown from the NASA hurricane visualization resource video tape that has been used repeatedly this season on National and International network TV. Results will be presented from a new paper on automatic wind measurements in Hurricane Luis from 1-min GOES images that appeared in the November BAMS. The visualizations are produced by the NASA Goddard Visualization and Analysis Laboratory (VAL/912), and Scientific Visualization Studio (SVS/930), as well as other Goddard and NASA groups using NASA, NOAA, ESA, and NASDA Earth science datasets. Visualizations will be shown from the Earth Science E-Theater 1999 recently presented in Tokyo, Paris, Munich, Sydney, Melbourne, Honolulu, Washington, New York, and Dallas. The presentation Jan 11-14 at the AMS meeting in Dallas used a 4-CPU SGI/CRAY Onyx Infinite Reality Super Graphics Workstation with 8 GB RAM and a Terabyte Disk at 3840 X 1024 resolution with triple synchronized BarcoReality 9200 projectors on a 60ft wide screen. Visualizations will also be featured from the new Earth Today Exhibit which was opened by Vice President Gore on July 2, 1998 at the Smithsonian Air & Space museum in Washington, as well as those presented for possible use at the American Museum of Natural History (NYC), Disney EPCOT, and other venues. New methods are demonstrated for visualizing, interpreting, comparing, organizing and analyzing immense HyperImage remote sensing datasets and three dimensional numerical model results. We call the data from many

  13. Visions of our Planet's Atmosphere, Land and Oceans: NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haser, Fritz; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to the 2002 Winter Olympic Stadium Site of the Olympic Opening and Closing Ceremonies in Salt Lake City. Fly in and through Olympic Alpine Venues using 1 m IKONOS "Spy Satellite" data. Go back to the early weather satellite images from the 1960s and see them contrasted with the latest US and international global satellite weather movies including hurricanes and "tornadoes". See the latest visualizations of spectacular images from NASA/NOAA remote sensing missions like Terra, GOES, TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat 7 including new 1 - min GOES rapid scan image sequences of Nov 9th 2001 Midwest tornadic thunderstorms and have them explained. See how High-Definition Television (HDTV) is revolutionizing the way we communicate science. (In cooperation with the American Museum of Natural History in NYC) See dust storms in Africa and smoke plumes from fires in Mexico. See visualizations featured on the covers of Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science and on National and International Network TV. New computer software tools allow us to roam and zoom through massive global images e.g. Landsat tours of the US, and Africa, showing desert and mountain geology as well as seasonal changes in vegetation. See animations of the polar ice packs and the motion of gigantic Antarctic Icebergs from SeaWinds. data. Spectacular new visualizations of the global atmosphere and oceans are shown. See vortexes and currents in the global oceans that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny algae and draw the fish, whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in response to these currents and El Nino/La Nina climate changes. See the city lights, fishing fleets, gas flares and bio-mass burning of the Earth at night observed by the "night-vision" DMSP military satellite.

  14. Meteorological Satellite Education Resources: Web-based Learning Modules, Initiatives, and the Environmental Satellite Resource Center (ESRC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schreiber-Abshire, W.; Dills, P.

    2008-12-01

    The COMET® Program (www.comet.ucar.edu) receives funding from NOAA NESDIS and the NPOESS Integrated Program Office (IPO), with additional contributions from the GOES-R Program Office and EUMETSAT, to directly support education and training efforts in the area of satellite meteorology. This partnership enables COMET to create educational materials of global interest on geostationary and polar- orbiting remote sensing platforms and their instruments, data, products, and operational applications. Over the last several years, COMET's satellite education programs have focused on the capabilities and applications of the upcoming next generation operational polar-orbiting NPP/NPOESS system and its relevance to operational forecasters and other user communities. COMET's activities have recently expanded to include education on the future Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites (GOES-R). By partnering with experts from the Naval Research Laboratory, NOAA-NESDIS and various user communities, COMET stimulates greater utilization of both current and future satellite observations and products. In addition, COMET has broadened the scope of its online training to include materials on the EUMETSAT Polar-orbiting System (EPS) and Meteosat geostationary satellites. EPS represents an important contribution to the Initial Joint Polar System (IJPS) between NOAA and EUMETSAT, while Meteosat imaging capabilities provide an early look for the next generation GOES-R satellites. Also in collaboration with EUMETSAT, COMET is developing future modules on the joint NASA-CNES Jason altimetry mission and on satellite capabilities for monitoring the global climate. COMET also provides Spanish translations of relevant GOES materials in order to support the GEOSS (Global Earth Observation System of Systems) Americas effort, which is associated with the move of GOES-10 to provide routine satellite coverage over South America. This poster presentation provides an overview of COMET

  15. BOREAS AFM-6 NOAA/ETL 35 GHz Cloud/Turbulence Radar GIF Images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martner, Brooks E.; Newcomer, Jeffrey A. (Editor); Hall, Forrest G.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-6 team from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Environment Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) operated a 35-GHz cloud-sensing radar in the Northern Study Area (NSA) near the Old Jack Pine (OJP) tower from 16 Jul 1994 to 08 Aug 1994. This data set contains a time series of GIF images that show the structure of the lower atmosphere. The NOAA/ETL 35-GHz cloud/turbulence radar GIF images are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  16. 77 FR 30046 - Ninth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Satellite (Route) Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite... RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services. DATES: The...

  17. 76 FR 66350 - Eighth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 222 Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Satellite (Route) Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Notice of RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route... Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services for the Eighth Meeting. DATES:...

  18. 77 FR 48584 - Tenth Meeting: RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Satellite (Route) Services AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT). ACTION: Meeting Notice of RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite... RTCA Special Committee 222, Inmarsat Aeronautical Mobile Satellite (Route) Services. DATES: The...

  19. Calibration of long term satellite ozone data sets using the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilsenrath, Ernest

    1990-01-01

    Trends in atmospheric ozone continue to be an environmental concern. Drifts in satellite observations are the major obstacle in the detection of changes in global ozone over the long term. Careful re-analysis of satellite ozone data along with groundbased observations have more or less corroborated photochemical models which predict ozone depletion. However, there remains the margin of error in the observations that is as large as the trend itself. The National Plan for Stratospheric Monitoring calls for monitoring global ozone for at lease the next ten years employing the NOAA polar orbiting satellites. Ozone observations will be made with the Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet Spectral Radiometer Mod 2 (SBUV/2) which ia a refinement of the SBUV instrument flying on NASA's Nimbus-7 satellite. The first instrument in the operational series began taking data from the NOAA-9 spacecraft in February 1985. A second instrument was launched on NOAA-11 in September 1988. Both continue to operate. Earlier attempts to calibrate satellite data relied on comparisons with ground based observations. However, differences in instrumental techniques severely complicated these efforts. This problem will be over come by regular flights, about once per year, of the Shuttle Solar Backscatter Ultraviolet radiometer (SSBUV). The data from the SSBUV instrument will be compared with nearly coincident data taken by the NOAA satellite instruments. This procedure will permit a direct calibration transfer in space, since the two instruments observe the same qualities thereby bypassing the inversion algorithm which converts the observations to ozone amounts.

  20. Direct Broadcast Satellite: Radio Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollansworth, James E.

    1992-01-01

    NASA is committed to providing technology development that leads to the introduction of new commercial applications for communications satellites. The Direct Broadcast Satellite-Radio (DBS-R) Program is a joint effort between The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and The United States Information Agency/Voice of America (USIA/VOA) directed at this objective. The purpose of this program is to define the service and develop the technology for a direct-to-listener satellite sound broadcasting system. The DBS-R Program, as structured by NASA and VOA, is now a three-phase program designed to help the U.S. commercial communications satellite and receiver industry bring about this new communications service. Major efforts are being directed towards frequency planning hardware and service development, service demonstration, and experimentation with new satellite and receiver technology.

  1. Advancing Weather and Climate Literacy via NOAA Science On a Sphere Exhibits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowley, P.; Pisut, D.; Ackerman, S. A.; Mooney, M. E.; Schollaert Uz, S.

    2013-12-01

    The EarthNow project (http://sphere.ssec.wisc.edu/) regularly creates weather and climate visualizations for spherical display exhibits, like Science On a Sphere (SOS), using near real-time data such as NOAA's National Climate Data Center's (NCDC) monthly climate reports and the Climate Prediction Center's (CPC) seasonal outlooks. Viewing timely weather and climate stories on a large sphere-format allows museum visitors to more intuitively learn about global-scale earth system science. Along with producing large animations for SOS exhibits with background content, the EarthNow team also visits SOS museums (there are now over 100 SOS sites around the world) to conduct best-practice trainings and consultancies. These training sessions provide museums with implementation methods tailored to each museum's goals, allowing for a more personalized learning experience for museum visitors. This presentation will convey evaluation and feedback results from these training sites. The EarthNow project is led by the Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS), in collaboration with the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites (CICS-MD) and the NOAA Environmental Visualization Lab.

  2. Comparison of PMC Observations From SME, Nimbus-7 SBUV, and NOAA-9 SBUV/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeLand, M. T.; Shettle, E. P.; Thomas, G. E.; Olivero, J. J.

    2001-05-01

    Satellite observations of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) are extremely useful, because they provide wide geographic coverage unavailable to a single ground-based observer. During 1985-1986, measurements of PMCs were made by the SME UVS instrument, the Nimbus-7 SBUV instrument, and the NOAA-9 SBUV/2 instrument. The limb viewing geometry of SME, where bright clouds were viewed against a dark background, was well-suited for PMC detection. Nadir-viewing SBUV-type measurements pose a greater challenge because of the brighter terrestrial background in the mid-UV and the competing effects of geophysical ozone variability. We use a revised version of the algorithm developed by Thomas et al. [1991] to extract PMC events from SBUV and SBUV/2 data. Inter-instrument comparisons of specific PMC observations are complicated by differences in instrument sensitivity, temporal differences between the spacecraft orbits, and spatial coincidence requirements. In this paper, we examine the seasonal and latitudinal variations of PMCs as observed by SME, Nimbus-7 SBUV, and NOAA-9 SBUV/2, and show that they give a consistent picture of PMC climatology. We will be extending this analysis to the full series of SBUV and SBUV/2 measurements covering the 22+ years from November 1978 to the present. This will allow us to examine PMC variations with a single type of satellite measurement covering 2 full solar cycles.

  3. Improvements in NOAA's Operational Tsunameter Network since December 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchard, R.; Kohler, C.; McArthur, S.; Burnett, W. H.; Wells, W. I.; Luke, R.

    2009-12-01

    In December 2004 during the devastating Sumatran Tsunami, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) had five tsunameter stations established in the North Pacific Ocean and one in the South Pacific Ocean operated and maintained by NOAA’s National Data Buoy Center (NDBC). The original six tsunameters employed the technology of the first generation Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART I) developed by NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) and successfully transitioned to NDBC in 2003. The technology consists of a Bottom Pressure Recorder (BPR) that makes pressure measurements near the sea-floor and a surface buoy. It takes less than three minutes for data to get from the BPR, which can reside to depths of 6000 m, to users. The BPR contains a tsunami detection algorithm that will place the BPR in rapid reporting mode(also know as Event Mode). The two most profound improvements to the network were its expansion to 39 stations and the transition and upgrade to the second generation DART II systems. In the aftermath of the Sumatran Tsunami, NOAA expanded the network to 39 stations to bolster the US tsunami warning system by providing coastal communities in the Pacific, Atlantic, Caribbean and the Gulf of Mexico with faster and more accurate tsunami warnings. Cooperating NOAA offices selected the sites in consultation with the US Geological Survey and other interested parties. Since their initial establishment, NDBC has relocated some stations to improve data availability by reducing the risks of vessel collision, extreme winds, seas, and currents. NDBC completed the network in March 2008. During the expansion of the NOAA network, NDBC assisted several countries in the deploying and distributing data from their own DART II tsunameters. NDBC completed the upgraded of all stations to the DART II systems by the end of 2007. The significant capability fielded by the DART II technology was the bi-directional communications

  4. Satellite Videoconferences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    NASA is helping thousands of teachers to learn more about aerospace matters, improve their classroom skills, and expand significantly the content of their aerospace education curricula by means of live educational satellite videoconferences. The 1 1/2 hour 'Update for Teachers' programs originate at Oklahoma State University (OSU) Telecommunications Center. The television signals are transmitted to the WESTAR IV communications satellite, which remits them to participating schools across the U.S. and in parts of Mexico and Canada. The schools are equipped with small home style satellite reception dishes. Education Satellite Videoconference programs are conducted four times yearly, covering a variety of aerospace subjects. Teachers can call toll-free and have questions answered after the speaker's presentations. Information about NASA educational resources and how to obtain them will be provided.

  5. Studying the earth's poles from satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Robert H.

    1991-01-01

    The use of satellite remote sensing is reviewed with respect to the investigation of polar regions and global meteorological processes. Data collected from previous and ongoing satellite missions sponsored by NASA and NOAA are discussed in terms of their ability to describe surface characteristics. Data relating to ocean/atmosphere heat transfer are obtained from microwave radiometers and synthetic aperture radars to give estimates of surface temperatures. Ocean color at several frequencies can be measured to estimate chlorophyll content, and optical and infrared sensors aid in the detection of short- and long-term variance in solar irradiance and earth radiation flux. The geophysical variables collected from satellite data at high latitudes can be used to understand the global climate, atmospheric warming, and other significant mechanisms.

  6. How to Interactively Operate the Global Hawk UAS NOAA/NASA ENSO Payload, from Your Armchair, Five Thousand Kilometers Away

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Don

    2016-01-01

    This paper will describe the information technologies developed by NASA and NOAA for the February 2016 Sensing Hazards with Operational Unmanned Technology (SHOUT) El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) Campaign. The air vehicle is a NASA Global Hawk UAS, with a primary payload of four instruments, two developed by NASA, two developed by NOAA. The aircraft is based at the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center, Edwards Air Force Base, California. The payload components are remotely operated by scientists at various facilities, and the data collected downloaded over satellite links in real time for analysis and collaboration. NOAA: Advanced Vertical Atmospheric Profiling System (AVAPS), developed by NCAR, which deploys dozens of dropsondes at altitudes up to 65,000 ft to collect high vertical resolution measurements of the temperature, pressure, relative humidity, and wind speed and direction. NASA: High-Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP), a radar designed to examine the factors of storm intensity: formation, structure and intensification. NOAA: O3 Photometer (UAS-O3), designed specifically for autonomous, precise, and accurate O3 measurements in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS). NASA JPL: High Altitude MMIC Sounding Radiometer (HAMSR), an atmospheric microwave temperature and humidity sounder instrument that looks at the microwave spectrum.

  7. Satellite (Natural)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    In its most general sense, any celestial object in orbit around a similar larger object. Thus, for example, the Magellanic Clouds are satellite galaxies of our own Milky Way galaxy. Without qualification, the term is used to mean a body in orbit around a planet; an alternative term is moon. The term natural satellite distinguishes these bodies from artificial satellites—spacecraft placed in orbi...

  8. Building a COTS archive for satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, Ken; Terril, Dave; Kelly, Jack; Nichols, Cathy

    1994-01-01

    The goal of the NOAA/NESDIS Active Archive was to provide a method of access to an online archive of satellite data. The archive had to manage and store the data, let users interrogate the archive, and allow users to retrieve data from the archive. Practical issues of the system design such as implementation time, cost and operational support were examined in addition to the technical issues. There was a fixed window of opportunity to create an operational system, along with budget and staffing constraints. Therefore, the technical solution had to be designed and implemented subject to constraint imposed by the practical issues. The NOAA/NESDIS Active Archive came online in July of 1994, meeting all of its original objectives.

  9. GEOSAT Follow-On Radar Altimeter Satellite Performance Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, J. L.; Rau, M.; McMillan, J. D.

    2002-12-01

    Under a Navy Contract with Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation, the first GFO satellite was completed in 1997 and launched on 10 February 1998 on an Orbital Taurus launch vehicle. The satellite was operationally accepted on 29 November 2000. With an anticipated 8-year or more life, GFO (http://gfo.bmpcoe.org/Gfo) is a DoD satellite mission managed by the Space and Naval Warfare Systems Command's (SPAWAR's) Meteorological and Oceanographic (METOC) Systems Program Office (PMW 155) located in San Diego, California. The satellite is in the same Exact Repeat Orbit (ERO) as the original GEOSAT (800 km by 108 degrees inclination). All GFO's data products are available to the scientific community and are distributed by NOAA's Laboratory for Satellite Altimetry. The primary program objective was to develop an operational series of radar altimeter satellites to maintain continuous ocean observation for accurate global measurements of both mesoscale and basin-scale oceanography. Since its acceptance, Computer Sciences Corporation (CSC), under contract with the Navy, has provided a team known as the GFO Cal/Val and assisted by NASA and NOAA personnel has undertaken extensive and continuing calibration and validation activities on an exact repeat cycle basis. This paper will discuss the results of those Cal/Val efforts and present charts showing the performance history of the satellite, its sensors (both the Radar Altimeter and the Water Vapor Radiometer), and other relevant performance measures such as orbit accuracy.

  10. Inverse modelling of CH4 emissions for 2010-2011 using different satellite retrieval products from GOSAT and SCIAMACHY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexe, M.; Bergamaschi, P.; Segers, A.; Detmers, R.; Butz, A.; Hasekamp, O.; Guerlet, S.; Parker, R.; Boesch, H.; Frankenberg, C.; Scheepmaker, R. A.; Dlugokencky, E.; Sweeney, C.; Wofsy, S. C.; Kort, E. A.

    2015-01-01

    At the beginning of 2009 new space-borne observations of dry-air column-averaged mole fractions of atmospheric methane (XCH4) became available from the Thermal And Near infrared Sensor for carbon Observations-Fourier Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) instrument on board the Greenhouse Gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT). Until April 2012 concurrent {methane (CH4) retrievals} were provided by the SCanning Imaging Absorption spectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY) instrument on board the ENVironmental SATellite (ENVISAT). The GOSAT and SCIAMACHY XCH4 retrievals can be compared during the period of overlap. We estimate monthly average CH4 emissions between January 2010 and December 2011, using the TM5-4DVAR inverse modelling system. In addition to satellite data, high-accuracy measurements from the Cooperative Air Sampling Network of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Earth System Research Laboratory (NOAA ESRL) are used, providing strong constraints on the remote surface atmosphere. We discuss five inversion scenarios that make use of different GOSAT and SCIAMACHY XCH4 retrieval products, including two sets of GOSAT proxy retrievals processed independently by the Netherlands Institute for Space Research (SRON)/Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), and the University of Leicester (UL), and the RemoTeC "Full-Physics" (FP) XCH4 retrievals available from SRON/KIT. The GOSAT-based inversions show significant reductions in the root mean square (rms) difference between retrieved and modelled XCH4, and require much smaller bias corrections compared to the inversion using SCIAMACHY retrievals, reflecting the higher precision and relative accuracy of the GOSAT XCH4. Despite the large differences between the GOSAT and SCIAMACHY retrievals, 2-year average emission maps show overall good agreement among all satellite-based inversions, with consistent flux adjustment patterns, particularly across equatorial Africa and North America. Over North

  11. NOAA Climate Data Records Access for Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stachniewicz, J. S.; Cecil, D.; Hollingshead, A.; Newport, B. J.; Wunder, D.

    2015-12-01

    There are many potential uses of NOAA Climate Data Records (CDRs) for decision-making and catastrophic risk management assessment activities in the federal, state, and local government and private sectors, in addition to their traditional uses by the academic/scientific community. There is growing interest in using NOAA CDRs for such applications and straightforward access to the data is essential if these applications are to be successful. User engagement activities determine the types of data that users need, as well as the spatial and temporal subsets. This talk will present the access methods currently available and in development. Alternate representations and sources of some CDRs will also be discussed. Recent improvements include: 1. CDR information web page 2. Dataset types, sizes, growth, latency, grid/swath 3. Dataset discovery, data access, and sub-setting. 4. Knowing our users and their needs. 5. Known uses of some CDRs. 6. Migration to CLASS. 7. Other representations - GeoTIFF, Obs4MIPS 8. Cloud applications - Google, Microsoft

  12. NOAA's contribution to an informed society anticipating and responding to climate and its impacts through Climate.gov

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niepold, F.

    2012-12-01

    Societal concern about the impacts of climate change is growing. Citizens in public and private sectors want easy access to credible climate science information to help them make informed decisions affecting their lives and livelihoods. Weather and climate influences almost every sector of society, and affects up to 40 percent of the United States' 10 trillion annual economy. (NRC report, 2003 entitled "Satellite Observations of the Earth's Environment: Accelerating the Transition of Research to Operations"). As the leading provider of climate, weather, and water information to the nation and the world, NOAA is a logical source for citizens to turn to for climate information. NOAA must expand and improve the way it communicates, educates, reaches out to, and engages with public stakeholders to better meet the nation's needs for timely, authoritative climate data and information. Citizens are increasingly going online to seek credible, authoritative climate information. However, users report having difficulty locating and using NOAA's online data products and services. Thus, resolving this online accessibility issue will be one of the Climate Portal's main benefits. The use of portal technology and emerging data integration and visualization tools provide an opportunity for NOAA to bring together multiple datasets from diverse disciplines and sources to deliver a more comprehensive picture of climate in the context of affected resources, communities and businesses. Additional benefits include wider extension of NOAA's data to other media such as television and free-choice learning venues, thereby increasing public exposure and engagement. The Climate Portal teams take an audience-focused approach to promoting climate science literacy among the public. The program communicates the challenges, processes, and results of NOAA-supported climate science through stories and data visualizations on the Web and in popular media. They provide information to a range of

  13. Exploring new bands in modified multichannel regression SST algorithms for the next-generation infrared sensors at NOAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrenko, B.; Ignatov, A.; Kramar, M.; Kihai, Y.

    2016-05-01

    Multichannel regression algorithms are widely used to retrieve sea surface temperature (SST) from infrared observations with satellite radiometers. Their theoretical foundations were laid in the 1980s-1990s, during the era of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometers which have been flown onboard NOAA satellites since 1981. Consequently, the multi-channel and non-linear SST algorithms employ the bands centered at 3.7, 11 and 12 μm, similar to available in AVHRR. More recent radiometers carry new bands located in the windows near 4 μm, 8.5 μm and 10 μm, which may also be used for SST. Involving these bands in SST retrieval requires modifications to the regression SST equations. The paper describes a general approach to constructing SST regression equations for an arbitrary number of radiometric bands and explores the benefits of using extended sets of bands available with the Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) flown onboard the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) and to be flown onboard the follow-on Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS) satellites, J1-J4, to be launched from 2017-2031; Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometers (MODIS) flown onboard Aqua and Terra satellites; and the Advanced Himawari Imager (AHI) flown onboard the Japanese Himawari-8 satellite (which in turn is a close proxy of the Advanced Baseline Imager (ABI) to be flown onboard the future Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellites - R Series (GOES-R) planned for launch in October 2016.

  14. Assessing Climate Change Effect on the World's Largest Lakes Using Satellite Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Gabriel, R.; Norouzi, H.

    2014-12-01

    The Landsat program offers the longest continuous global record of the Earth's surface using satellite imagery for over forty years (1972-2014). Millions of images and relevant data have since been acquired using the instrument on the Landsat satellite to monitor the Earth's interesting phenomena. There are Landsat receiving stations around the world including the United States that process and archive the images that are a unique resource for global change research and applications in agriculture, forestry, regional planning, geology, cartography and global warming. So far, National Oceanic Atmospheric and Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), have launched a total of eight successfully orbiting satellites throughout its forty-two years of service. The main objective of this project aims to use Landsat images to monitor the changes of the world's largest lakes from 1972 to present. We focus on areas around the planet that are home to large scale lakes such as Lake Urmia, Lake Vanern, Lake Winnipegosis, Lake Albert and Lake Mweru. Then using U.S Geological Survey (USGS) database as a source for gathering cloud free images that are covering each lake, we were able to download and obtain necessary data. For larger lakes, images were mosaic to cover the entire area of the lake and using a Maximum Likelihood technique images were specifically classified into land and water content using ENVI software. The extent of the water content was quantified for each year and a temporal analysis of the area was performed. It is also found that the lakes which locates near the equator or at low latitude are seriously facing threats of becoming mostly dry. Future work is needed for establishing the dynamic characteristic of more lakes' water extent changes and also to compare them with other available information such as precipitation and soil moisture in each region. In lakes where high latitude, the change in extent of ice during winter

  15. Spatial degradation of satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, C. O.; Markham, B. L.; Townshend, J. R. G.; Kennard, R. L.

    1989-01-01

    Consideration is given to a technique for spatially degrading high-resolution satellite data to produce comparable data sets over a range of coarser resolutions. Landsat MSS data is used to produce seven spatial resolution data sets by applying a spatial filter designed to simulate sensor response. Also, spatial degradation of coarse resolution data to provide data compression for the production of global-scale data sets is examined. NOAA AVHRR Global Area Coverage data is compared to other sampling procedures. It is found that sampling procedures that incorporate averaging result in decreased variance, while sampling procedures adopting single-value selection have higher variances and produce data values comparable with those from the original data.

  16. Allocations by the 1992 World Administrative Radio Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyward, Ann O.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of the 1992 World Administrative Radio Conference is presented with viewgraphs. Allocations of radio frequency spectrum are addressed. Mobile satellite service, broadcast satellite service, and uplink power control beacons are also addressed.

  17. NOAA ESRL Atmospheric Research Operations in California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasel, B. A.; Borgeld, J.; Ives, M.; Conway, T.; Karion, A.; Fischer, M. L.; Andrews, A. E.; Sweeney, C.; Andrews, B.; Oltmans, S. J.; Johnson, B. J.; Patrick, L. C.; Berkoff, T.

    2009-12-01

    In 2009 the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory (ESRL) had over two dozen operational research programs within the state of California. These diverse research missions include the Fire Weather Service and Support, the Pt Sur Debris Flow Project, and the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) regional test bed. The ESRL Global Monitoring Division had 10 atmospheric measurement programs with a common goal to understand the regional and global climate impacts in and around California. The NOAA Trinidad Head (THD) baseline observatory, run in cooperation with Humboldt State University (HSU), was recently promoted to the top-tier WMO/Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) global station in 2009. The Trinidad Head observatory was strategically located (April 2002) along the west coast to monitor the air entering the United States and is now being impacted by effluents and anthropogenic aerosols and gases from booming Asian economies. Recent forest fire seasons in CA have had dramatic effects on aerosol properties and ozone concentrations measured at the THD site. Light aircraft flights made by NOAA/ESRL as part of the Airborne Greenhouse Emissions Survey (AGES) campaign in collaboration with Lawrence Berkeley National Lab and UC Davis in the spring and summer of 2008 captured large signals indicative of urban air plumes with highly correlated CO2, CH4, CO, as well as agricultural signatures with enhanced CH4 coincident with depleted CO2. These flights also captured a large signal from the northern CA wildfires enabling the comparison of signatures from forest fires to other sources. Ozonesonde balloon flights have been done weekly at the THD site since August of 1997 and bi-monthly vertical aircraft profiles above THD for carbon cycle gases (>50 gas species) began in September of 2003. In 2008 carbon cycle flasks were added to the HSU research vessel, the Coral Sea, to obtain surface values ~20 nautical miles offshore from the THD observatory. Particular attention will be paid to the

  18. Optimum employment of satellite indirect soundings as numerical model input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. H.; Derber, J. C.; Koehler, T. L.; Schmidt, B. D.

    1981-01-01

    The characteristics of satellite-derived temperature soundings that would significantly affect their use as input for numerical weather prediction models were examined. Independent evaluations of satellite soundings were emphasized to better define error characteristics. Results of a Nimbus-6 sounding study reveal an underestimation of the strength of synoptic scale troughs and ridges, and associated gradients in isobaric height and temperature fields. The most significant errors occurred near the Earth's surface and the tropopause. Soundings from the TIROS-N and NOAA-6 satellites were also evaluated. Results again showed an underestimation of upper level trough amplitudes leading to weaker thermal gradient depictions in satellite-only fields. These errors show a definite correlation to the synoptic flow patterns. In a satellite-only analysis used to initialize a numerical model forecast, it was found that these synoptically correlated errors were retained in the forecast sequence.

  19. Mesoscale temperature and moisture fields from satellite infrared soundings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hillger, D. W.; Vonderhaar, T. H.

    1976-01-01

    The combined use of radiosonde and satellite infrared soundings can provide mesoscale temperature and moisture fields at the time of satellite coverage. Radiance data from the vertical temperature profile radiometer on NOAA polar-orbiting satellites can be used along with a radiosonde sounding as an initial guess in an iterative retrieval algorithm. The mesoscale temperature and moisture fields at local 9 - 10 a.m., which are produced by retrieving temperature profiles at each scan spot for the BTPR (every 70 km), can be used for analysis or as a forecasting tool for subsequent weather events during the day. The advantage of better horizontal resolution of satellite soundings can be coupled with the radiosonde temperature and moisture profile both as a best initial guess profile and as a means of eliminating problems due to the limited vertical resolution of satellite soundings.

  20. NOAA's Integrated Tsunami Database: Data for improved forecasts, warnings, research, and risk assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroker, Kelly; Dunbar, Paula; Mungov, George; Sweeney, Aaron; McCullough, Heather; Carignan, Kelly

    2015-04-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) has primary responsibility in the United States for tsunami forecast, warning, research, and supports community resiliency. NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and co-located World Data Service for Geophysics provide a unique collection of data enabling communities to ensure preparedness and resilience to tsunami hazards. Immediately following a damaging or fatal tsunami event there is a need for authoritative data and information. The NGDC Global Historical Tsunami Database (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/) includes all tsunami events, regardless of intensity, as well as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions that caused fatalities, moderate damage, or generated a tsunami. The long-term data from these events, including photographs of damage, provide clues to what might happen in the future. NGDC catalogs the information on global historical tsunamis and uses these data to produce qualitative tsunami hazard assessments at regional levels. In addition to the socioeconomic effects of a tsunami, NGDC also obtains water level data from the coasts and the deep-ocean at stations operated by the NOAA/NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services, the NOAA Tsunami Warning Centers, and the National Data Buoy Center (NDBC) and produces research-quality data to isolate seismic waves (in the case of the deep-ocean sites) and the tsunami signal. These water-level data provide evidence of sea-level fluctuation and possible inundation events. NGDC is also building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) to support real-time forecasts, implemented at 75 US coastal communities. After a damaging or fatal event NGDC begins to collect and integrate data and information from many organizations into the hazards databases. Sources of data include our NOAA partners, the U.S. Geological Survey, the UNESCO Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) and International Tsunami Information Center

  1. NOAA People Empowered Products (PeEP): Combining social media with scientific models to provide eye-witness confirmed products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Codrescu, S.; Green, J. C.; Redmon, R. J.; Denig, W. F.; Kihn, E. A.

    2012-12-01

    NOAA products and alerts rely on combinations of models and data to provide the public with information regarding space and terrestrial weather hazards. This operational paradigm, while effective, neglects an abundant free source of measurements: millions of eyewitnesses viewing weather events. Here we present a prototype product that combines user reports with scientific model output and discuss the possibilities for creating a generic PeEP framework for use in a wide range of applications. We demonstrate the capabilities of a proto-PeEP that combines the OVATION prime auroral model running at the NOAA National Geophysical Data Center with Twitter reports of observable aurora. The combined product displays the model aurora in real time on Google Earth with markers showing the location and text of tweets from people actually observing the aurora. We discuss how the application can be extended and incorporated to other space weather products such as ionospheric induced GPS errors and radiation related satellite anomalies.

  2. Cloud Detection from Satellite Imagery: A Comparison of Expert-Generated and Automatically-Generated Decision Trees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiffman, Smadar

    2004-01-01

    Automated cloud detection and tracking is an important step in assessing global climate change via remote sensing. Cloud masks, which indicate whether individual pixels depict clouds, are included in many of the data products that are based on data acquired on- board earth satellites. Many cloud-mask algorithms have the form of decision trees, which employ sequential tests that scientists designed based on empirical astrophysics studies and astrophysics simulations. Limitations of existing cloud masks restrict our ability to accurately track changes in cloud patterns over time. In this study we explored the potential benefits of automatically-learned decision trees for detecting clouds from images acquired using the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) instrument on board the NOAA-14 weather satellite of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We constructed three decision trees for a sample of 8km-daily AVHRR data from 2000 using a decision-tree learning procedure provided within MATLAB(R), and compared the accuracy of the decision trees to the accuracy of the cloud mask. We used ground observations collected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Clouds and the Earth s Radiant Energy Systems S COOL project as the gold standard. For the sample data, the accuracy of automatically learned decision trees was greater than the accuracy of the cloud masks included in the AVHRR data product.

  3. Satellite Coordination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, R. J.

    2004-06-01

    The Radio Regulations set out complex procedures to ensure that when new systems start to use the frequency bands allocated to them there is minimal disruption to existing systems using the same bands. The process of satellite coordination is described, and the issues for radio astronomy are discussed. In order to be protected by the ITU-R machinery radio telescopes need to be officially registered. The issue of paper satellites highlights the need for early registration to gain priority over incoming systems. Modern developments including the use of complex Monte-Carlo simulations to predict interference levels, and the issue of adjacent band interference, are discussed.

  4. Engineering calculations for communications satellite systems planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, E.; Aebker, E.; Mata, F.; Reilly, C.

    1991-01-01

    The final phase of a satellite synthesis project is described. Several methods for generating satellite positionings with improved aggregate carrier to interference characteristics were studied. Two general methods for modifying required separation values are presented. Also, two methods for improving aggregate carrier to interference (C/I) performance of given satellite synthesis solutions are presented. A perturbation of the World Administrative Radio Conference (WARC) synthesis is presented.

  5. A new statistical tool for NOAA local climate studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeyeva, M. M.; Meyers, J. C.; Hollingshead, A.

    2011-12-01

    The National Weather Services (NWS) Local Climate Analysis Tool (LCAT) is evolving out of a need to support and enhance the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Weather Service (NWS) field offices' ability to efficiently access, manipulate, and interpret local climate data and characterize climate variability and change impacts. LCAT will enable NOAA's staff to conduct regional and local climate studies using state-of-the-art station and reanalysis gridded data and various statistical techniques for climate analysis. The analysis results will be used for climate services to guide local decision makers in weather and climate sensitive actions and to deliver information to the general public. LCAT will augment current climate reference materials with information pertinent to the local and regional levels as they apply to diverse variables appropriate to each locality. The LCAT main emphasis is to enable studies of extreme meteorological and hydrological events such as tornadoes, flood, drought, severe storms, etc. LCAT will close a very critical gap in NWS local climate services because it will allow addressing climate variables beyond average temperature and total precipitation. NWS external partners and government agencies will benefit from the LCAT outputs that could be easily incorporated into their own analysis and/or delivery systems. Presently we identified five existing requirements for local climate: (1) Local impacts of climate change; (2) Local impacts of climate variability; (3) Drought studies; (4) Attribution of severe meteorological and hydrological events; and (5) Climate studies for water resources. The methodologies for the first three requirements will be included in the LCAT first phase implementation. Local rate of climate change is defined as a slope of the mean trend estimated from the ensemble of three trend techniques: (1) hinge, (2) Optimal Climate Normals (running mean for optimal time periods), (3) exponentially

  6. 14 CFR 141.91 - Satellite bases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Satellite bases. 141.91 Section 141.91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Operating Rules § 141.91 Satellite bases. The holder of...

  7. 14 CFR 141.91 - Satellite bases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Satellite bases. 141.91 Section 141.91 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES PILOT SCHOOLS Operating Rules § 141.91 Satellite bases. The holder of...

  8. Applications Technology Satellite-6 (ATS-6).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC.

    The Applications Technology Satellite-6 (ATS-6) pilot study being conducted by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) includes 20 experiments in the use of satellites for educational delivery systems in rural areas and for scientific and technological information dissemination. Initial usage of the system has been in North…

  9. Verification and analysis of TOVS satellite data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gelman, M. E.; Miller, A. J.; Schmidlin, F. J.

    1984-01-01

    A study which involves the verification of TOVS (TIROS Operational Vertical Soundings) stratospheric temperature information and derived geopotential heights, as well as the higher order derivations of wind, heat flux, and momentum flux, is discussed. Rocketsondes were launched daily at the times of NOAA-7 overpasses of Wallops Island during February 23-March 24, 1982, and resources made available by NASA were used to provide in-situ field measurements and additional analysis. The TOVS satellite products from hemispheric analyses are compared with unsmoothed rocketsonde data. Some of the benefits provided by the comparisons are considered.

  10. The Development of NOAA Education Common Outcome Performance Measures (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, J.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Education Council has embarked on an ambitious Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) project that will allow it to assess education program outcomes and impacts across the agency, line offices, and programs. The purpose of this internal effort is to link outcome measures to program efforts and to evaluate the success of the agency's education programs in meeting the strategic goals. Using an outcome-based evaluation approach, the NOAA Education Council is developing two sets of common outcome performance measures, environmental stewardship and professional development. This presentation will examine the benefits and tradeoffs of common outcome performance measures that collect program results across a portfolio of education programs focused on common outcomes. Common outcome performance measures have a few benefits to our agency and to the climate education field at large. The primary benefit is shared understanding, which comes from our process for writing common outcome performance measures. Without a shared and agreed upon set of definitions for the measure of an outcome, the reported results may not be measuring the same things and would incorrectly indicate levels of performance. Therefore, our writing process relies on a commitment to developing a shared set of definitions based on consensus. We hope that by taking the time to debate and coming to agreement across a diverse set of programs, the strength of our common measures can indicate real progress towards outcomes we care about. An additional benefit is that these common measures can be adopted and adapted by other agencies and organizations that share similar theories of change. The measures are not without their drawbacks, and we do make tradeoffs as part of our process in order to continue making progress. We know that any measure is necessarily a narrow slice of performance. A slice that may not best represent the unique and remarkable contribution

  11. Spacecraft design sensitivity for a disaster warning satellite system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maloy, J. E.; Provencher, C. E.; Leroy, B. E.; Braley, R. C.; Shumaker, H. A.

    1977-01-01

    A disaster warning satellite (DWS) is described for warning the general public of impending natural catastrophes. The concept is responsive to NOAA requirements and maximizes the use of ATS-6 technology. Upon completion of concept development, the study was extended to establishing the sensitivity of the DWSS spacecraft power, weight, and cost to variations in both warning and conventional communications functions. The results of this sensitivity analysis are presented.

  12. Integration of Earth Remote Sensing into the NOAA/NWS Damage Assessment Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthan, A.; Burks, J. E.; Camp, P.; McGrath, K.; Bell, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Following the occurrence of severe weather, NOAA/NWS meteorologists are tasked with performing a storm damage survey to assess the type and severity of the weather event, primarily focused with the confirmation and assessment of tornadoes. This labor-intensive process requires meteorologists to venture into the affected area, acquire damage indicators through photos, eyewitness accounts, and other documentation, then aggregation of data in order to make a final determination of the tornado path length, width, maximum intensity, and other characteristics. Earth remote sensing from operational, polar-orbiting satellites can support the damage assessment process by helping to identify portions of damage tracks that are difficult to access due to road limitations or time constraints by applying change detection techniques. In addition, higher resolution commercial imagery can corroborate ground-based surveys by examining higher-resolution commercial imagery. As part of an ongoing collaboration, NASA and NOAA are working to integrate near real-time Earth remote sensing observations into the NOAA/NWS Damage Assessment Toolkit (DAT), a suite of applications used by meteorologists in the survey process. The DAT includes a handheld application used by meteorologists in the survey process. The team has recently developed a more streamlined approach for delivering data via a web mapping service and menu interface, allowing for caching of imagery before field deployment. Near real-time products have been developed using MODIS and VIIRS imagery and change detection for preliminary track identification, along with conduits for higher-resolution Landsat, ASTER, and commercial imagery as they become available. In addition to tornado damage assessments, the team is also investigating the use of near real-time imagery for identifying hail damage to vegetation, which also results in large swaths of damage, particularly in the central United States during the peak growing season

  13. Integration of Earth Remote Sensing into the NOAA/NWS Damage Assessment Toolkit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew; Burks, Jason; Camp, Parks; McGrath, Kevin; Bell, Jordan

    2014-01-01

    Following the occurrence of severe weather, NOAA/NWS meteorologists are tasked with performing a storm damage survey to assess the type and severity of the weather event, primarily focused with the confirmation and assessment of tornadoes. This labor-intensive process requires meteorologists to venture into the affected area, acquire damage indicators through photos, eyewitness accounts, and other documentation, then aggregation of data in order to make a final determination of the tornado path length, width, maximum intensity, and other characteristics. Earth remote sensing from operational, polar-orbiting satellites can support the damage assessment process by helping to identify portions of damage tracks that are difficult to access due to road limitations or time constraints by applying change detection techniques. In addition, higher resolution commercial imagery can corroborate ground-based surveys by examining higher-resolution commercial imagery. As part of an ongoing collaboration, NASA and NOAA are working to integrate near real-time Earth remote sensing observations into the NOAA/NWS Damage Assessment Toolkit, a handheld application used by meteorologists in the survey process. The team has recently developed a more streamlined approach for delivering data via a web mapping service and menu interface, allowing for caching of imagery before field deployment. Near real-time products have been developed using MODIS and VIIRS imagery and change detection for preliminary track identification, along with conduits for higher-resolution Landsat, ASTER, and commercial imagery as they become available. In addition to tornado damage assessments, the team is also investigating the use of near real-time imagery for identifying hail damage to vegetation, which also results in large swaths of damage, particularly in the central United States during the peak growing season months of June, July, and August. This presentation will present an overview of recent activities

  14. Central Satellite Data Repository Supporting Research and Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, W.; Brust, J.

    2015-12-01

    Near real-time satellite data is critical to many research and development activities of atmosphere, land, and ocean processes. Acquiring and managing huge volumes of satellite data without (or with less) latency in an organization is always a challenge in the big data age. An organization level data repository is a practical solution to meeting this challenge. The STAR (Center for Satellite Applications and Research of NOAA) Central Data Repository (SCDR) is a scalable, stable, and reliable repository to acquire, manipulate, and disseminate various types of satellite data in an effective and efficient manner. SCDR collects more than 200 data products, which are commonly used by multiple groups in STAR, from NOAA, GOES, Metop, Suomi NPP, Sentinel, Himawari, and other satellites. The processes of acquisition, recording, retrieval, organization, and dissemination are performed in parallel. Multiple data access interfaces, like FTP, FTPS, HTTP, HTTPS, and RESTful, are supported in the SCDR to obtain satellite data from their providers through high speed internet. The original satellite data in various raster formats can be parsed in the respective adapter to retrieve data information. The data information is ingested to the corresponding partitioned tables in the central database. All files are distributed equally on the Network File System (NFS) disks to balance the disk load. SCDR provides consistent interfaces (including Perl utility, portal, and RESTful Web service) to locate files of interest easily and quickly and access them directly by over 200 compute servers via NFS. SCDR greatly improves collection and integration of near real-time satellite data, addresses satellite data requirements of scientists and researchers, and facilitates their primary research and development activities.

  15. ESTIMATING THE TRANSFER AND DEPOSITION OF DIOXIN AND ATRZINE TO THE GREAT LAKES BASIN WITH THE NOAA HYSPLIT MODEL - AN OVERVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last few years, the International Joint Commission has been supporting development of a PC-based transfer model, derived from the HYSPLIT model created at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), to determine, in a cost-effective way, the extent of dep...

  16. 15 CFR 911.4 - Use of the NOAA Data Collection Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Use of the NOAA Data Collection... POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.4 Use of the NOAA Data Collection Systems. (a) Use of the NOAA DCS will only be authorized in accordance with...

  17. 15 CFR 911.5 - NOAA Data Collection Systems Use Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false NOAA Data Collection Systems Use... POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.5 NOAA Data Collection Systems Use Agreements. (a)(1) In order to use a NOAA DCS, each user must have an agreement...

  18. 15 CFR 911.4 - Use of the NOAA Data Collection Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Use of the NOAA Data Collection... POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.4 Use of the NOAA Data Collection Systems. (a) Use of the NOAA DCS will only be authorized in accordance with...

  19. 15 CFR 911.7 - Continuation of the NOAA Data Collection Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Continuation of the NOAA Data... REGULATIONS POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.7 Continuation of the NOAA Data Collection Systems. (a) NOAA expects to continue to operate DCS on...

  20. 15 CFR 911.4 - Use of the NOAA Data Collection Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Use of the NOAA Data Collection... POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.4 Use of the NOAA Data Collection Systems. (a) Use of the NOAA DCS will only be authorized in accordance with...

  1. 15 CFR 911.5 - NOAA Data Collection Systems Use Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false NOAA Data Collection Systems Use... POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.5 NOAA Data Collection Systems Use Agreements. (a)(1) In order to use a NOAA DCS, each user must have an agreement...

  2. 15 CFR 911.7 - Continuation of the NOAA Data Collection Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Continuation of the NOAA Data... REGULATIONS POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.7 Continuation of the NOAA Data Collection Systems. (a) NOAA expects to continue to operate DCS on...

  3. 15 CFR 911.5 - NOAA Data Collection Systems Use Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false NOAA Data Collection Systems Use... POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.5 NOAA Data Collection Systems Use Agreements. (a)(1) In order to use a NOAA DCS, each user must have an agreement...

  4. 15 CFR 911.7 - Continuation of the NOAA Data Collection Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Continuation of the NOAA Data... REGULATIONS POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.7 Continuation of the NOAA Data Collection Systems. (a) NOAA expects to continue to operate DCS on...

  5. 15 CFR 911.5 - NOAA Data Collection Systems Use Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false NOAA Data Collection Systems Use... POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.5 NOAA Data Collection Systems Use Agreements. (a)(1) In order to use a NOAA DCS, each user must have an agreement...

  6. 15 CFR 911.5 - NOAA Data Collection Systems Use Agreements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false NOAA Data Collection Systems Use... POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.5 NOAA Data Collection Systems Use Agreements. (a)(1) In order to use a NOAA DCS, each user must have an agreement...

  7. 15 CFR 911.7 - Continuation of the NOAA Data Collection Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Continuation of the NOAA Data... REGULATIONS POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.7 Continuation of the NOAA Data Collection Systems. (a) NOAA expects to continue to operate DCS on...

  8. 15 CFR 911.4 - Use of the NOAA Data Collection Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Use of the NOAA Data Collection... POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.4 Use of the NOAA Data Collection Systems. (a) Use of the NOAA DCS will only be authorized in accordance with...

  9. 15 CFR 911.7 - Continuation of the NOAA Data Collection Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Continuation of the NOAA Data... REGULATIONS POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.7 Continuation of the NOAA Data Collection Systems. (a) NOAA expects to continue to operate DCS on...

  10. 15 CFR 911.4 - Use of the NOAA Data Collection Systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Use of the NOAA Data Collection... POLICIES AND PROCEDURES CONCERNING USE OF THE NOAA SPACE-BASED DATA COLLECTION SYSTEMS § 911.4 Use of the NOAA Data Collection Systems. (a) Use of the NOAA DCS will only be authorized in accordance with...

  11. Military Hydrology. Report 8. Feasibility of Utilizing Satellite and Radar Data in Hydrologic Forecasting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    Martin, D. W., Stout, J., and Sikdar , 1). N. 1976. "Rainfall Estimation from Geo- synchronous Satellite Imagery During Daylight Hours," NOAA...Technical Report ERL 356-WMPO 7, US Department of Commerce. Griffith, C. G., Woodley, W. L., Grube, P. G., Martin, D. W., Stout, J., and Sikdar . D. N. 1978...34 Journal of Applied Meteorology, Vol 5, pp 161-164. Stout, J., Martin, D., and Sikdar , D. N. 1979. "Estimating Rain with Ceosynchronous Satellite Images

  12. Virtual Satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammrs, Stephan R.

    2008-01-01

    Virtual Satellite (VirtualSat) is a computer program that creates an environment that facilitates the development, verification, and validation of flight software for a single spacecraft or for multiple spacecraft flying in formation. In this environment, enhanced functionality and autonomy of navigation, guidance, and control systems of a spacecraft are provided by a virtual satellite that is, a computational model that simulates the dynamic behavior of the spacecraft. Within this environment, it is possible to execute any associated software, the development of which could benefit from knowledge of, and possible interaction (typically, exchange of data) with, the virtual satellite. Examples of associated software include programs for simulating spacecraft power and thermal- management systems. This environment is independent of the flight hardware that will eventually host the flight software, making it possible to develop the software simultaneously with, or even before, the hardware is delivered. Optionally, by use of interfaces included in VirtualSat, hardware can be used instead of simulated. The flight software, coded in the C or C++ programming language, is compilable and loadable into VirtualSat without any special modifications. Thus, VirtualSat can serve as a relatively inexpensive software test-bed for development test, integration, and post-launch maintenance of spacecraft flight software.

  13. NOAA Coral Reef Watch: Decision Support Tools for Coral Reef Managers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauenzahn, J.; Eakin, C.; Skirving, W. J.; Burgess, T.; Christensen, T.; Heron, S. F.; Li, J.; Liu, G.; Morgan, J.; Nim, C.; Parker, B. A.; Strong, A. E.

    2010-12-01

    A multitude of natural and anthropogenic stressors exert substantial influence on coral reef ecosystems and contribute to bleaching events, slower coral growth, infectious disease outbreaks, and mortality. Satellite-based observations can monitor, at a global scale, environmental conditions that influence both short-term and long-term coral reef ecosystem health. From research to operations, NOAA Coral Reef Watch (CRW) incorporates paleoclimatic, in situ, and satellite-based biogeophysical data to provide near-real-time and forecast information and tools to help managers, researchers, and other stakeholders interpret coral health and stress. CRW has developed an operational, near-real-time product suite that includes sea surface temperature (SST), SST time series data, SST anomaly charts, coral bleaching HotSpots, and Degree Heating Weeks (DHW). Bi-weekly global SST analyses are based on operational nighttime-only SST at 50-km resolution. CRW is working to develop high-resolution products to better address thermal stress on finer scales and is applying climate models to develop seasonal outlooks of coral bleaching. Automated Satellite Bleaching Alerts (SBAs), available at Virtual Stations worldwide, provide the only global early-warning system to notify managers of changing reef environmental conditions. Currently, CRW is collaborating with numerous domestic and international partners to develop new tools to address ocean acidification, infectious diseases of corals, combining light and temperature to detect coral photosystem stress, and other parameters.

  14. First Results From the NOAA GOES-12 Solar X-ray Imager (SXI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, S. M.; Pizzo, V. J.; Balch, C. C.

    2001-12-01

    NOAA's GOES-12 weather satellite, launched into geosynchronus orbit on 23 July 2001, carries NOAA's first Solar X-ray Imager (SXI). When it enters regular operations this instrument will provide nearly uninterrupted, full-disk, broadband soft X-ray solar movies, with a continuous frame rate significantly exceeding that for previous similar instruments. The SXI provides images with a one-minute cadence and a single-image (adjustable) dynamic range near 100. A set of metallic thin-film filters provides a degree of temperature discrimination in the 0.6-6.0 nm bandpass. The spatial resolution of approximately 10 arcseconds FWHM is sampled with 5 arcsecond pixels. We present first observational results for the SXI from its post-launch check-out period. Observed coronal phenomenology -- some of it perhaps unique to SXI's spectral band, cadence and continuity of observations -- is presented. Multi-band observations of coronal holes, X-ray bright points, active regions, flares and post-flare loops are presented and qualitatively compared to contemporaneous observations by Yohkoh SXT and SOHO EIT.

  15. The determination of surface albedo from meteorological satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. T.

    1977-01-01

    A surface albedo was determined from visible data collected by the NOAA-4 polar orbiting meteorological satellite. To filter out the major cause of atmospheric reflectivity, namely clouds, techniques were developed and applied to the data resulting in a map of global surface albedo. Neglecting spurious surface albedos for regions with persistent cloud cover, sun glint effects, insufficient reflected light and, at this time, some unresolved influences, the surface albedos retrieved from satellite data closely matched those of a global surface albedo map produced from surface and aircraft measurements and from characteristic albedos for land type and land use.

  16. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration mapping surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Andreasen, C.

    1986-05-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) multibeam surveys within the US Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ) are providing a new data base of bathymetric information significantly superior to existing bathymetric maps compiled from prior survey information. Surveys made with the new Sea Beam and Bathymetric Swath Survey System are intended to provide 100% coverage of selected areas of the continental shelf, slope, and upper rise off the west coast of the US. During the next 2 years, surveys will expand to Hawaii and Alaska. Areas were selected through a cooperative agreement between NOAA and the US Geological Survey (USGS). The intent of the program is to provide detailed bathymetry conducted in conformance with international map standards for use in making geologic interpretations and assessments in conjunction with the GLORIA image data acquired by USGS. The primary objective of the program is to provide high-resolution data to support the development and management of offshore resources, particularly within the US EEZ. Within NOAA, the data are to be used to provide new and revised map and chart products. Also, to maximize the utility of the surveys, arrangements are being sought to acquire other geophysical measurements and ancillary marine data in conjunction with the bathymetric surveys Dissemination of the NOAA data is undecided due to national security concerns. However, efforts are underway in cooperation with the Department of Defense to devise a public product of value to scientific and industrial needs without compromising national security.

  17. The Geostationary Operational Satellite R Series SpaceWire Based Data System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, William; Birmingham, Michael; Krimchansky, Alexander; Lombardi, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    The Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite R-Series Program (GOES-R, S, T, and U) mission is a joint program between National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and National Aeronautics & Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). SpaceWire was selected as the science data bus as well as command and telemetry for the GOES instruments. GOES-R, S, T, and U spacecraft have a mission data loss requirement for all data transfers between the instruments and spacecraft requiring error detection and correction at the packet level. The GOES-R Reliable Data Delivery Protocol (GRDDP) [1] was developed in house to provide a means of reliably delivering data among various on board sources and sinks. The GRDDP was presented to and accepted by the European Cooperation for Space Standardization (ECSS) and is part of the ECSS Protocol Identification Standard [2]. GOES-R development and integration is complete and the observatory is scheduled for launch November 2016. Now that instrument to spacecraft integration is complete, GOES-R Project reviewed lessons learned to determine how the GRDDP could be revised to improve the integration process. Based on knowledge gained during the instrument to spacecraft integration process the following is presented to help potential GRDDP users improve their system designs and implementation.

  18. Evaluation of the latest satellite-gauge precipitation products and their hydrologic applications over the Huaihe River basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Ruochen; Yuan, Huiling; Liu, Xiaoli; Jiang, Xiaoman

    2016-05-01

    Satellite-gauge quantitative precipitation estimate (QPE) products may reduce the errors in near real-time satellite precipitation estimates by combining rain gauge data, which provides great potential to hydrometeorological applications. This study aims to comprehensively evaluate four of the latest satellite-gauge QPEs, including NASA's Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) 3B42V7 product, NOAA's Climate Prediction Center (CPC) MORPHing technique (CMORPH) bias-corrected product (CMORPH CRT), CMORPH satellite-gauge merged product (CMORPH BLD) and CMORPH satellite-gauge merged product developed at the National Meteorological Information Center (NMIC) of the China Meteorological Administration (CMA) (CMORPH CMA). These four satellite-gauge QPEs are statistically evaluated over the Huaihe River basin during 2003-2012 and applied into the distributed Variable Infiltration Capacity (VIC) model to assess hydrologic utilities. Compared to the China Gauge-based Daily Precipitation Analysis (CGDPA) newly developed at CMA/NMIC, the four satellite-gauge QPEs generally depict the spatial distribution well, with the underestimation in the southern mountains and overestimation in the northern plain of the Huaihe River basin. Specifically, both TRMM and CMORPH CRT adopt simple gauge adjustment algorithms and exhibit relatively poor performance, with evidently deteriorated quality in winter. In contrast, the probability density function-optimal interpolation (PDF-OI) gauge adjustment procedure has been applied in CMORPH BLD and CMORPH CMA, resulting in higher quality and more stable performance. CMORPH CMA further benefits from a merged dense gauge observation network and outperforms the other QPEs with significant improvements in rainfall amount and spatial/temporal distributions. Due to the insufficient gauge observations in the merging process, CMORPH BLD features the similar error characteristics of CMORPH CRT with a positive bias of light precipitation and a negative

  19. Let's Get into Some Scijinks! Lessons from Modernizing a Classic NOAA/NASA Kids' Weather Website

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leon, N.; Kasprak, A. H.; Mansfield, K. J.; Novati, A.; Gaches, L.; Karlson, D.

    2014-12-01

    SciJinks.gov—short for Science Hijinks—is a joint NOAA and NASA website that has been in operation for a decade. Filled with information about weather, Earth science, and satellite meteorology, it has always been a helpful resource for students and educators in and outside of the classroom. Geared toward upper middle school and early high school students, we replace around 20% of our audience each year. That means it is imperative to keep the site properly geared toward the needs of a rapidly changing group of students. Our team has recently redesigned SciJinks.gov to be mobile-friendly, modern looking, and teen-friendly. Here, we discuss our strategies and rational for this redesign and highlight the many exciting benefits to this newly imagined weather-adventure website.

  20. Determining coniferous forest cover and forest fragmentation with NOAA-9 advanced very high resolution radiometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ripple, William J.

    1995-01-01

    NOAA-9 satellite data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) were used in conjunction with Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) data to determine the proportion of closed canopy conifer forest cover in the Cascade Range of Oregon. A closed canopy conifer map, as determined from the MSS, was registered with AVHRR pixels. Regression was used to relate closed canopy conifer forest cover to AVHRR spectral data. A two-variable (band) regression model accounted for more variance in conifer cover than the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The spectral signatures of various conifer successional stages were also examined. A map of Oregon was produced showing the proportion of closed canopy conifer cover for each AVHRR pixel. The AVHRR was responsive to both the percentage of closed canopy conifer cover and the successional stage in these temperate coniferous forests in this experiment.

  1. Scan Angle Dependence Of Radiance Recorded By The NOAA-AVHRR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duggin, M. J.; Piwinski, D.; Whitehead, V.; Ryland, G.

    1983-08-01

    NOAA-AVHRR data is being used to monitor global vegetation type and condition and to study various environmental factors in addition to performance of meteorological functions. The AVHRR instrument has +/-54° as a maximum scan angle limits and it is necessary to be aware of the effects of sun-target-sensor geometry at extreme scan angles to be able to properly interpret the satellite images. In order to interpret the images for vegetation type and condition analysis it is necessary to calibrate back to the nadir view position. Both simulation studies and empirical investigations with digital scanner data have been performed in order to sufficiently understand the effects of scan angle and sun angle, as well as the effects of atmospheric scattering, to eventually perform adequate calibrations. Not suprisingly, the effects are large and studies are continuing to provide improved calibrations. It is the results of these investigations which we describe in this paper.

  2. Displaying Planetary and Geophysical Datasets on NOAAs Science On a Sphere (TM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, S. C.; MacDonald, A. E.; Himes, D.

    2005-12-01

    NOAAs Science On a Sphere(TM)(SOS)was developed to educate current and future generations about the changing Earth and its processes. This system presents NOAAs global science through a 3D representation of our planet as if the viewer were looking at the Earth from outer space. In our presentation, we will describe the preparation of various global datasets for display on Science On a Sphere(TM), a 1.7-m diameter spherical projection system developed and patented at the Forecast Systems Laboratory (FSL) in Boulder, Colorado. Four projectors cast rotating images onto a spherical projection screen to create the effect of Earth, planet, or satellite floating in space. A static dataset can be prepared for display using popular image formats such as JPEG, usually sized at 1024x2048 or 2048x4096 pixels. A set of static images in a directory will comprise a movie. Imagery and data for SOS are obtained from a variety of government organizations, sometimes post-processed by various individuals, including the authors. Some datasets are already available in the required cylindrical projection. Readily available planetary maps can often be improved in coverage and/or appearance by reprojecting and combining additional images and mosaics obtained by various spacecraft, such as Voyager, Galileo, and Cassini. A map of Mercury was produced by blending some Mariner 10 photo-mosaics with a USGS shaded-relief map. An improved high-resolution map of Venus was produced by combining several Magellan mosaics, supplied by The Planetary Society, along with other spacecraft data. We now have a full set of Jupiter's Galilean satellite imagery that we can display on Science On a Sphere(TM). Photo-mosaics of several Saturnian satellites were updated by reprojecting and overlaying recently taken Cassini flyby images. Maps of imagery from five Uranian satellites were added, as well as one for Neptune. More image processing was needed to add a high-resolution Voyager mosaic to a pre-existing map

  3. Administrative Synergy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Weckstein, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles to overcome in creating and sustaining an administrative professional learning community (PLC) is time. Administrators are constantly deluged by the tyranny of the urgent. It is a Herculean task to carve out time for PLCs, but it is imperative to do so. In this article, the authors describe how an administrative PLC…

  4. Satellite data assimilation in global forecast system in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basu, Swati

    2014-11-01

    Satellite data is very important for model initialization and verification. A large number of satellite observations are currently assimilated into the Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) systems at the National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF). Apart from Global meteorological observations from GTS, near-real time satellite observations are received at NCMRWF from other operational centres like ISRO, NOAA/NESDIS, EUMETCAST, etc. Recently India has become member of Asia-Pacific Regional ATOVS Retransmission Service (APRARS) for faster access to high resolution global satellite data useful for high resolution regional models. Indian HRPT at Chennai covers the APRARS data gap region over South East Asia. A robust data monitoring system has been implemented at NCMRWF to assess the quantity and quality of the data as well as the satellite sensor strength, before getting assimilated in the models. Validation of new satellite observations, especially from Indian satellites are being carried out against insitu observations and similar space borne platforms. After establishing the quality of the data, Observation System Experiments (OSEs) are being conducted to study their impact in the assimilation and forecast systems. OSEs have been carried out with the Oceansat-2 scatterometer winds and radiance data from Megha-Tropiques SAPHIR sensor. Daily rainfall analysis dataset is being generated by merging satellite estimates and in-situ observations. ASCAT soil wetness measurements from METOP satellite is being assimilated into the global model. Land surface parameters (LuLc and albedo) retrieved from Indian satellites are being explored for its possible usage in the global and regional models. OLR from Indian satellites are used for validating model outputs. This paper reviews the efforts made at NCMRWF in (i) assimilating the data from Indian/International satellites and (ii) generating useful products from the satellite data.

  5. NOAA tsunami water level archive - scientific perspectives and discoveries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mungov, G.; Eble, M. C.; McLean, S. J.

    2013-12-01

    The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) and co-located World Data Service for Geophysics (WDS) provides long-term archive, data management, and access to national and global tsunami data. Currently, NGDC archives and processes high-resolution data recorded by the Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunami (DART) network, the coastal-tide-gauge network from the National Ocean Service (NOS) as well as tide-gauge data recorded by all gauges in the two National Weather Service (NWS) Tsunami Warning Centers' (TWCs) regional networks. The challenge in processing these data is that the observations from the deep-ocean, Pacific Islands, Alaska region, and United States West and East Coasts display commonalities, but, at the same time, differ significantly, especially when extreme events are considered. The focus of this work is on how time integration of raw observations (10-seconds to 1-minute) could mask extreme water levels. Analysis of the statistical and spectral characteristics obtained from records with different time step of integration will be presented. Results show the need to precisely calibrate the despiking procedure against raw data due to the significant differences in the variability of deep-ocean and coastal tide-gauge observations. It is shown that special attention should be drawn to the very strong water level declines associated with the passage of the North Atlantic cyclones. Strong changes for the deep ocean and for the West Coast have implications for data quality but these same features are typical for the East Coast regime.

  6. The FAA satellite communications program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burcham, Karen L.

    1993-01-01

    The Federal Aviation Administration is developing satellite communications capabilities to enhance air traffic services, first in oceanic and remote regions, and later for United States domestic services. The program includes four projects which develop technical standards, assure adequate system performance, support implementation, and provide for research and development for selected areas of U.S. domestic satellite communications. The continuing focus is the application of automated data communications, which is already permitting enhanced and regular position reporting. Voice developments, necessary for non-routine communications, are also included among the necessary activities to improve ATC communications.

  7. Assessing satellite-derived start-of-season measures in the conterminous USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schwartz, Mark D.; Reed, Bradley C.; White, Michael A.

    2002-01-01

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-series satellites, carrying advanced very high-resolution radiometer (AVHRR) sensors, have allowed moderate resolution (1 km) measurements of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) to be collected from the Earth's land surfaces for over 20 years. Across the conterminous USA, a readily accessible and decade-long data set is now available to study many aspects of vegetation activity in this region. One feature, the onset of deciduous plant growth at the start of the spring season (SOS) is of special interest, as it appears to be crucial for accurate computation of several important biospheric processes, and a sensitive measure of the impacts of global change. In this study, satellite-derived SOS dates produced by the delayed moving average (DMA) and seasonal midpoint NDVI (SMN) methods, and modelled surface phenology (spring indices, SI) were compared at widespread deciduous forest and mixed woodland sites during 1990–93 and 1995–99, and these three measures were also matched to native species bud-break data collected at the Harvard Forest (Massachusetts) over the same time period. The results show that both SOS methods are doing a modestly accurate job of tracking the general pattern of surface phenology, but highlight the temporal limitations of biweekly satellite data. Specifically, at deciduous forest sites: (1) SMN SOS dates are close in time to SI first bloom dates (average bias of +0.74 days), whereas DMA SOS dates are considerably earlier (average bias of −41.24 days) and also systematically earlier in late spring than in early spring; (2) SMN SOS tracks overall yearly trends in deciduous forests somewhat better than DMA SOS, but with larger average error (MAEs 8.64 days and 7.37 days respectively); and (3) error in both SOS techniques varies considerably by year. Copyright © 2002 Royal Meteorological Society.

  8. Variational merged of hourly gauge-satellite precipitation in China: Preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Huan; Hong, Yang; Xie, Pingping; Gao, Jidong; Niu, Zheng; Kirstetter, Pierre; Yong, Bin

    2015-10-01

    The article describes a variational scheme for the analysis of high-resolution hourly precipitation from China Meteorological Administration gauges and NOAA CMORPH satellite products in China and tests their impact on data-sparse regions and the heavy rainfall occurrences during the summer season (June-August 2009). In the variational scheme, a cost function is defined to measure the distance between analyzed precipitation field and observed rainfall quantity. A recursive filter is incorporated into the cost function which helps spread the observations to nearby grid points. Then a quasi-Newton method is used to solve the optimal estimation problem by minimizing the cost function. The adjoint technique is used to derive the gradient of cost function with respect to analysis precipitation. A series of experiments are performed to intercompare the variational analysis with the original CMORPH satellite products (CMP) and the bias-adjusted satellite products (Adj-CMP) against the observations. The best overall performance is from the variational analysis especially rainfall intensity by more than 10 mm h-1 with a prevailing mean relative spatial bias nearly reduction zero, and the correlation coefficient is almost around 0.5 in convection active areas. Ground cross-validation experiments in which each affected station is withdrawn at once indicated that the variational analysis can particularly be beneficial and subsequent investigation of heavy rainfall events. It also reveals that the precipitation analysis field has the ability to improve the accuracy of rainfall estimation and capture the spatial precipitation pattern agreements in relatively data-sparse regions.

  9. Evaluation of Bias Correction Method for Satellite-Based Rainfall Data.

    PubMed

    Bhatti, Haris Akram; Rientjes, Tom; Haile, Alemseged Tamiru; Habib, Emad; Verhoef, Wouter

    2016-06-15

    With the advances in remote sensing technology, satellite-based rainfall estimates are gaining attraction in the field of hydrology, particularly in rainfall-runoff modeling. Since estimates are affected by errors correction is required. In this study, we tested the high resolution National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA) Climate Prediction Centre (CPC) morphing technique (CMORPH) satellite rainfall product (CMORPH) in the Gilgel Abbey catchment, Ethiopia. CMORPH data at 8 km-30 min resolution is aggregated to daily to match in-situ observations for the period 2003-2010. Study objectives are to assess bias of the satellite estimates, to identify optimum window size for application of bias correction and to test effectiveness of bias correction. Bias correction factors are calculated for moving window (MW) sizes and for sequential windows (SW's) of 3, 5, 7, 9, …, 31 days with the aim to assess error distribution between the in-situ observations and CMORPH estimates. We tested forward, central and backward window (FW, CW and BW) schemes to assess the effect of time integration on accumulated rainfall. Accuracy of cumulative rainfall depth is assessed by Root Mean Squared Error (RMSE). To systematically correct all CMORPH estimates, station based bias factors are spatially interpolated to yield a bias factor map. Reliability of interpolation is assessed by cross validation. The uncorrected CMORPH rainfall images are multiplied by the interpolated bias map to result in bias corrected CMORPH estimates. Findings are evaluated by RMSE, correlation coefficient (r) and standard deviation (SD). Results showed existence of bias in the CMORPH rainfall. It is found that the 7 days SW approach performs best for bias correction of CMORPH rainfall. The outcome of this study showed the efficiency of our bias correction approach.

  10. Aircraft Observations of Water Vapor Transport in Atmospheric Rivers: Synthesis from Seven Events Using Dropsonde Data from the NASA Global Hawk, NOAA G-IV, and NOAA WP-3D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ralph, F. M.; Wick, G. A.; Neiman, P. J.; Spackman, J. R.; Song, Y.; Hock, T.

    2011-12-01

    Atmospheric water vapor transport is a critical component of the global water cycle and in precipitation formation and prediction. Over roughly the last 15 years research efforts have identified atmospheric rivers (AR) as the primary mechanism for transporting water vapor in the mid latitudes, and possibly from the tropics into the midlatitudes. Numerous studies have used either satellite observations of vertically integrated water vapor (IWV) over the ocean or numerical models to examine AR-related water vapor transport. Some studies have been able to take advantage of vertical profiling information at the coast, and a handful of other studies have been able to carry out aircraft observations over the oceans. This paper is intended to fill a major observational gap associated with quantifying the total amount of water vapor transport in several ARs using a unique set of dropsonde observations using research aircraft. The research addresses research objectives of CalWater associated with ARs. The analysis includes observations from 3 flights of the NASA Global Hawk unmanned aircraft in the NOAA-led Winter Storms and Pacific Atmospheric Rivers (WISPAR) field campaign that demonstrated for the first time a new dropsonde system built by NCAR for NOAA specifically for use on the Global Hawk. It will also document whether tropical water vapor was entrained into the southern extension of two strong ARs. The study will also compare the observed characteristics of the AR water vapor transport (max IWV, max low-altitude winds, max local water vapor transport, and total water vapor transport across the depth and width of the AR) with standard meteorological analyses from the operational GFS numerical weather prediction model and from the 1/2 deg Climate Forecast System reanalysis (CFSR), the 32 km NARR, the NASA MERRA, and the coarser NCEP-NCAR Reanalysis. Observations from the following field experiments and aircraft will be used: - CalJet, NOAA P-3, 25-26 January 1998

  11. 15 CFR 904.104 - Final administrative decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... filed as provided in § 904.201(a), the NOVA becomes effective as the final administrative decision and order of NOAA 30 days after service of the NOVA or on the last day of any delay period granted. (b) If...

  12. 15 CFR 904.104 - Final administrative decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... filed as provided in § 904.201(a), the NOVA becomes effective as the final administrative decision and order of NOAA 30 days after service of the NOVA or on the last day of any delay period granted. (b) If...

  13. 15 CFR 904.104 - Final administrative decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... filed as provided in § 904.201(a), the NOVA becomes effective as the final administrative decision and order of NOAA 30 days after service of the NOVA or on the last day of any delay period granted. (b) If...

  14. 15 CFR 904.104 - Final administrative decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... filed as provided in § 904.201(a), the NOVA becomes effective as the final administrative decision and order of NOAA 30 days after service of the NOVA or on the last day of any delay period granted. (b) If...

  15. 15 CFR 904.104 - Final administrative decision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... filed as provided in § 904.201(a), the NOVA becomes effective as the final administrative decision and order of NOAA 30 days after service of the NOVA or on the last day of any delay period granted. (b) If...

  16. Visions of our Planet's Atmosphere, Land and Oceans: NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to the Olympic Medals Plaza, the new Gateway Center, and the University of Utah Stadium Site of the Olympic Opening and Closing Ceremonies in Salt Lake City. Fly in and through the Park City, and Snow Basin sites of the 2002 Winter Olympic Alpine Venues using 1 m IKONOS "Spy Satellite" data. See the four seasons of the Wasatch Front as observed by Landsat 7 at 15m resolution and watch the trees turn color in the Fall, snow come and go in the mountains and the reservoirs freeze and melt. Go back to the early weather satellite images from the 1960s and see them contrasted with the latest US and international global satellite weather movies Including hurricanes & "tornadoes". See the latest visualizations of spectacular images from NASA/NOAA remote sensing missions like Terra, GOES, TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat 7 including new 1 - min GOES rapid scan image sequences of Nov 9th 2001 Midwest tornadic thunderstorms and have them explained. See how High-Definition Television (HDTV) is revolutionizing the way we communicate science. (In cooperation with the American Museum of Natural History in NYC) See dust storms in Africa and smoke plumes from fires in Mexico. See visualizations featured on the covers Of Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science & on National & International Network TV. New computer software. tools allow us to roam & zoom through massive global images e.g. Landsat tours of the US, and Africa, showing desert and mountain geology as well as seasonal changes in vegetation. See animations of the polar ice packs and the motion of gigantic Antarctic Icebergs from SeaWinds data. Spectacular new visualizations of the global atmosphere & oceans are shown. See vertexes and currents in the global oceans that bring up the nutrients to feed tin) algae and draw the fish, whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in

  17. Visions of our Planet's Atmosphere, Land and Oceans: NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater 2002

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA/NOAA Electronic Theater presents Earth science observations and visualizations in a historical perspective. Fly in from outer space to the Olympic Medals Plaza, the new Gateway Center, and the University of Utah Stadium Site of the Olympic Opening and Closing Ceremonies in Salt Lake City. Fly in and through the Park City, and Snow Basin sites of the 2002 Winter Olympic Alpine Venues using 1 m IKONOS "Spy Satellite" data. See the four seasons of the Wasatch Front as observed by Landsat 7 at 15m resolution and watch the trees turn color in the Fall, snow come and go in the mountains and the reservoirs freeze and melt. Go back to the early weather satellite images from the 1960s and see them contrasted with the latest US and international global satellite weather movies including hurricanes & "tornadoes". See the latest visualizations of spectacular images from NASA/NOAA remote sensing missions like Terra, GOES, TRMM, SeaWiFS, Landsat 7 including new 1 - min GOES rapid scan image sequences of Nov 9th 2001 Midwest tornadic thunderstorms and have them explained. See how High-Definition Television (HDTV) is revolutionizing the way we communicate science. (In cooperation with the American Museum of Natural History in NYC) See dust storms in Africa and smoke plumes from fires in Mexico. See visualizations featured on the covers of Newsweek, TIME, National Geographic, Popular Science & on National & International Network TV. New computer software tools allow us to roam & zoom through massive global images e.g. Landsat tours of the US, and Africa, showing desert and mountain geology as well as seasonal changes in vegetation. See animations of the polar ice packs and the motion of gigantic Antarctic Icebergs from SeaWinds data. Spectacular new visualizations of the global atmosphere & oceans are shown. See vortexes and currents in the global oceans that bring up the nutrients to feed tiny algae and draw the fish, whales and fisherman. See the how the ocean blooms in

  18. Operational Satellite-based Surface Oil Analyses (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streett, D.; Warren, C.

    2010-12-01

    During the Deepwater Horizon spill, NOAA imagery analysts in the Satellite Analysis Branch (SAB) issued more than 300 near-real-time satellite-based oil spill analyses. These analyses were used by the oil spill response community for planning, issuing surface oil trajectories and tasking assets (e.g., oil containment booms, skimmers, overflights). SAB analysts used both Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) and high resolution visible/near IR multispectral satellite imagery as well as a variety of ancillary datasets. Satellite imagery used included ENVISAT ASAR (ESA), TerraSAR-X (DLR), Cosmo-Skymed (ASI), ALOS (JAXA), Radarsat (MDA), ENVISAT MERIS (ESA), SPOT (SPOT Image Corp.), Aster (NASA), MODIS (NASA), and AVHRR (NOAA). Ancillary datasets included ocean current information, wind information, location of natural oil seeps and a variety of in situ oil observations. The analyses were available as jpegs, pdfs, shapefiles and through Google, KML files and also available on a variety of websites including Geoplatform and ERMA. From the very first analysis issued just 5 hours after the rig sank through the final analysis issued in August, the complete archive is still publicly available on the NOAA/NESDIS website http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/MPS/deepwater.html SAB personnel also served as the Deepwater Horizon International Disaster Charter Project Manager (at the official request of the USGS). The Project Manager’s primary responsibility was to acquire and oversee the processing and dissemination of satellite data generously donated by numerous private companies and nations in support of the oil spill response including some of the imagery described above. SAB has begun to address a number of goals that will improve our routine oil spill response as well as help assure that we are ready for the next spill of national significance. We hope to (1) secure a steady, abundant and timely stream of suitable satellite imagery even in the absence of large-scale emergencies such as

  19. Operational Applications from the Suomi Npp and Jpss Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, M.; Furgerson, J.; Sjoberg, W.; Weng, F.; Csiszar, I. A.; Kilcoyne, H.; Gleason, J. F.

    2012-12-01

    The Joint Polar Satellite System is NOAA's new operational satellite program and includes the SUOMI National Polar Partnership (NPP) as a bridge between NOAA's operational Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellite (POES) series, which began in 1978, and the first JPSS operational satellite scheduled for launch in 2017. JPSS provides critical data for key NOAA product and services, which the Nation depends on. These products and services include: Weather forecasting - data from the JPSS Cross-track Infrared Sounder (CrIS) and the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) are needed to forecast weather events out to 7 days. Nearly 85% of all data used in weather forecasting are from polar orbiting satellites. Environmental monitoring - data from the JPSS Visible Infrared Imager Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) are used to monitor the environment including the health of coastal ecosystems, drought conditions, fire, smoke, dust, snow and ice, and the state of oceans, including sea surface temperature and ocean color. Climate monitoring - data from JPSS instruments, including OMPS, CERES and TSIS will provide continuity to climate data records established using NOAA POES and NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite observations. These data records provide a unified and coherent long-term observation of the environment; the records and products are critical to climate modelers, scientists, and decision makers concerned with advancing climate change understanding, prediction, mitigation and adaptation strategies, and policies. Data collection - JPSS satellites continue the POES data collection instruments that relay in situ data and observations from remote transmitters. These instruments relay data from remote, unmanned stations including wind, temperature and salinity readings from ocean buoys, which allow for the monitoring of the ocean. These instruments are also used to track wildlife. Search and rescue - JPSS will continue the search and rescue instruments on POES that

  20. Contracting Out. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Central Library. Report to the Chairman, Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, State, and the Judiciary, Committee on Appropriations, U.S. Senate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC.

    In response to a request by the Senate Committee on Appropriations for an examination of the A-76 program of the Department of Commerce's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), in particular NOAA's decision to contract for the operation of its Central Library, this report describes a General Accounting Office (GAO) review which:…