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Sample records for administration permissible exposure

  1. 30 CFR 62.130 - Permissible exposure level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible exposure level. 62.130 Section 62... REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.130 Permissible exposure level. (a) The mine operator must assure that no miner is exposed during any work shift to noise that exceeds the permissible exposure level....

  2. 46 CFR 197.515 - Permissible exposure limits (PELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible exposure limits (PELs). 197.515 Section 197.515 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.515 Permissible exposure limits (PELs). The...

  3. 46 CFR 197.515 - Permissible exposure limits (PELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible exposure limits (PELs). 197.515 Section 197.515 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.515 Permissible exposure limits (PELs). The...

  4. 46 CFR 197.515 - Permissible exposure limits (PELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible exposure limits (PELs). 197.515 Section 197.515 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.515 Permissible exposure limits (PELs). The...

  5. 46 CFR 197.515 - Permissible exposure limits (PELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible exposure limits (PELs). 197.515 Section 197.515 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.515 Permissible exposure limits (PELs). The...

  6. 46 CFR 197.515 - Permissible exposure limits (PELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible exposure limits (PELs). 197.515 Section 197.515 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.515 Permissible exposure limits (PELs). The...

  7. 10 CFR 850.22 - Permissible exposure limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... concentration of beryllium greater than the permissible exposure limit established in 29 CFR 1910.1000, as... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible exposure limit. 850.22 Section 850.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements §...

  8. 10 CFR 850.22 - Permissible exposure limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... concentration of beryllium greater than the permissible exposure limit established in 29 CFR 1910.1000, as... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible exposure limit. 850.22 Section 850.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements §...

  9. 10 CFR 850.22 - Permissible exposure limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... concentration of beryllium greater than the permissible exposure limit established in 29 CFR 1910.1000, as... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible exposure limit. 850.22 Section 850.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements §...

  10. 10 CFR 850.22 - Permissible exposure limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... concentration of beryllium greater than the permissible exposure limit established in 29 CFR 1910.1000, as... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible exposure limit. 850.22 Section 850.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements §...

  11. 10 CFR 850.22 - Permissible exposure limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... concentration of beryllium greater than the permissible exposure limit established in 29 CFR 1910.1000, as... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible exposure limit. 850.22 Section 850.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements §...

  12. Laser Transmission Holograms Maximum Permissible Exposure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Paula; Wilksch, P. A.

    2010-05-01

    The laser illumination of holograms for public display is governed by international standard IEC 60825-3, to which the Australian Standard AS/NZS 2211.3 conforms. These standards do not accommodate vital mitigating factors of hologram replay that impinge on the level of laser power i.e. angle of the replay reference beam, the divergence of the beam, the distance of the viewer from the holographic plate and the diffraction efficiency of the hologram plate itself. Such factors indicate that a more meaningful calculation of the radiation level would be obtained from direct measurement at the position of the viewer of the hologram. The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of these factors in realistically determining the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) for viewers of large format holograms. Materials and Methods: A comparison is made between measurements based on the power or energy that can pass through a fully open pupil for Class 3B and Class 4 lasers (1. medical copper bromide laser, 2. diode laser, and 3. argon continuous wave laser), and the actual power levels when the measurement is taken from the beholder's point of view. Discussion and conclusion: these results indicate a need to review current standards.

  13. Analysis of the asbestos permissible-exposure-level threshold standard. Master's thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, M.W.

    1991-06-01

    This thesis examines the reasoning of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) decision to set stringent exposure levels for airborne asbestos in the work place. Technical recommendations from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the Bureau of Mines, and the American conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists were presented to OSHA for consideration. OSHA and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) set industry standards for permissible exposure levels (PEL) of airborne asbestos. Exposure to asbestos poses a health hazard to workers, their families, and consumers of asbestos products. Because it poses an unreasonable risk human life, OSHA has repeatedly lowered the Permissible Exposure Levels and the EPA will ban the manufacture, importation, processing and commercial distribution of asbestos containing products from the United States in phases by 1997. These decisions may have been made too hastily because of the long latency (15-40 years) period before cancer develops, and the added risks that smoking imposes.

  14. Permissible Exposure Level for Lunar Dusts: Gaps are Closing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully Robert; Santana, Patricia; Cooper, Bonnie; McKay, David; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Castranova, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Space faring nations plan to return human explorers to the moon within the next decade. Experience during the Apollo flights suggests that lunar dust will invariably get into the habitat where the finest portion (less than 5 micrometers) could be inhaled by the crew before it is cleared from the atmosphere. NASA is developing a database from which a 6-month, episodic exposure standard for lunar dust can be set. Three kinds of moon dust were prepared from a parent sample of Apollo 14 regolith #14003,96. Our goal was to prepare each type of dust sample with a mean diameter less than 2 m, which is suitable for instillation into the lungs of rats. The three samples were prepared as follows: separation from the parent sample using a fluidized bed, grinding using a jet mill grinder, or grinding with a ball-mill grinder. Grinding simulated restoration of surface activation of dust expected to occur at the surface of the moon on native lunar dust. We used two grinding methods because they seemed to produce different modes of activation. The effects of grinding were preserved by maintaining the dust in ultra-pure nitrogen until immediately before it was placed in suspension for administration to rats. The dust was suspended in physiological saline with 10% Survanta, a lung surfactant. Rats were given intratrachael instillations of the dust suspension at three doses. In addition to the three moon dusts (A, C and E), we instilled the same amount of a negative control (TiO2, B) and a highly-toxic, positive control (quartz, D). These additional mineral dusts were selected because they have well-established and very different permissible exposure levels (PELs). Our goal was to determine where lunar dusts fit between these extremes, and then estimate a PEL for each lunar dust. We evaluated many indices of toxicity to the lung. The figure shows the changes in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a marker of cell death, for the five dusts. Benchmark dose software (Version 2.1.2) from the

  15. The Impact of Different Permissible Exposure Limits on Hearing Threshold Levels Beyond 25 dBA

    PubMed Central

    Sayapathi, Balachandar S; Su, Anselm Ting; Koh, David

    2014-01-01

    Background: Development of noise-induced hearing loss is reliant on a few factors such as frequency, intensity, and duration of noise exposure. The occurrence of this occupational malady has doubled from 120 million to 250 million in a decade. Countries such as Malaysia, India, and the US have adopted 90 dBA as the permissible exposure limit. According to the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the exposure limit for noise is 90 dBA, while that of the US National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) is 85 dBA for 8 hours of noise exposure. Objectives: This study aimed to assess the development of hearing threshold levels beyond 25 dBA on adoption of 85 dBA as the permissible exposure limit compared to 90 dBA. Patients and Methods: This is an intervention study done on two automobile factories. There were 203 employees exposed to noise levels beyond the action level. Hearing protection devices were distributed to reduce noise levels to a level between the permissible exposure limit and action level. The permissible exposure limits were 90 and 85 dBA in factories 1 and 2, respectively, while the action levels were 85 and 80 dBA, respectively. The hearing threshold levels of participants were measured at baseline and at first month of postshift exposure of noise. The outcome was measured by a manual audiometer. McNemar and chi-square tests were used in the statistical analysis. Results: We found that hearing threshold levels of more than 25 dBA has changed significantly from pre-intervention to post-intervention among participants from both factories (3000 Hz for the right ear and 2000 Hz for the left ear). There was a statistically significant association between participants at 3000 Hz on the right ear at ‘deteriorated’ level ( χ² (1) = 4.08, φ = - 0.142, P = 0.043), whereas there was worsening of hearing threshold beyond 25 dBA among those embraced 90 dBA. Conclusions: The adoption of 85 dBA as the permissible exposure

  16. 29 CFR 102.180 - Requests for special permission to appeal referred to Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Requests for special permission to appeal referred to Chief Administrative Law Judge. 102.180 Section 102.180 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD RULES AND REGULATIONS, SERIES 8 Special Procedures When the Board Lacks a Quorum §...

  17. 29 CFR 102.180 - Requests for special permission to appeal referred to Chief Administrative Law Judge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Requests for special permission to appeal referred to Chief Administrative Law Judge. 102.180 Section 102.180 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR RELATIONS BOARD RULES AND REGULATIONS, SERIES 8 Special Procedures When the Board Lacks a Quorum §...

  18. Pulmonary evaluation of permissible exposure limit of syntroleum S-8 synthetic jet fuel in mice.

    PubMed

    Wong, Simon S; Thomas, Alana; Barbaris, Brian; Lantz, R Clark; Witten, Mark L

    2009-06-01

    No current studies have systematically examined pulmonary health effects associated with Syntroleum S-8 synthetic jet fuel (S-8). In order to gain an understanding about the threshold concentration in which lung injury is observed, C57BL/6 male mice were nose-only exposed to S-8 for 1 h/day for 7 days at average concentrations of 0 (control), 93, 352, and 616 mg/m(3). Evaluation of pulmonary function, airway epithelial barrier integrity, and pathohistology was performed 24 h after the final exposures. Significant decreases were detected in expiratory lung resistance and total lung compliance of the 352 mg/m(3) group, for which no clear concentration-dependent alterations could be determined. No significant changes in respiratory permeability were exhibited, indicating that there was no loss of epithelial barrier integrity following S-8 exposure. However, morphological examination and morphometric analysis of distal lung tissue, by using transmission electron microscopy, revealed cellular damage in alveolar type II epithelial cells, with significant increases in volume density of lamellar bodies/vacuoles at 352 and 616 S-8 mg/m(3). Moreover, terminal bronchiolar Clara injury, as evidenced by apical membrane blebs, was observed at relatively low concentrations, suggesting if this synthetic jet fuel is utilized, the current permissible exposure limit of 350 mg/m(3) for hydrocarbon fuels should cautiously be applied. PMID:19357071

  19. Permission and Permissibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gayer, Nancy

    The major purpose of this study is to understand the concept of permission and relate its logical peculiarities to the activities, linguistic and non-linguistic, in which it finds application within authority-subject institutions. It is a conceptual, not an empirical, study proceeding from data provided by philosophical difficulties and…

  20. Laser selection based on maximum permissible exposure limits for visible and middle-near infrared repetitively pulsed lasers.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-03-01

    The Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) is central to laser hazard analysis and is in general a function of the radiant wavelength. The selection of a laser for a particular application may allow for flexibility in the selection of the radiant wavelength. This flexibility would allow the selection of a particular laser based on the MPE and the hazards associated with that radiant wavelength. The Calculations of the MPEs for various laser wavelength ranges are presented. Techniques for determining eye safe viewing distances for both aided and unaided viewing and the determination of flight hazard distances are presented as well.

  1. Long-Term Reduction in Infrared Autofluorescence Caused by Infrared Light Below the Maximum Permissible Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Masella, Benjamin D.; Williams, David R.; Fischer, William S.; Rossi, Ethan A.; Hunter, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Many retinal imaging instruments use infrared wavelengths to reduce the risk of light damage. However, we have discovered that exposure to infrared illumination causes a long-lasting reduction in infrared autofluorescence (IRAF). We have characterized the dependence of this effect on radiant exposure and investigated its origin. Methods. A scanning laser ophthalmoscope was used to obtain IRAF images from two macaques before and after exposure to 790-nm light (15-450 J/cm2). Exposures were performed with either raster-scanning or uniform illumination. Infrared autofluorescence images also were obtained in two humans exposed to 790-nm light in a separate study. Humans were assessed with direct ophthalmoscopy, Goldmann visual fields, multifocal ERG, and photopic microperimetry to determine whether these measures revealed any effects in the exposed locations. Results. A significant decrease in IRAF after exposure to infrared light was seen in both monkeys and humans. In monkeys, the magnitude of this reduction increased with retinal radiant exposure. Partial recovery was seen at 1 month, with full recovery within 21 months. Consistent with a photochemical origin, IRAF decreases caused by either raster-scanning or uniform illumination were not significantly different. We were unable to detect any effect of the light exposure with any measure other than IRAF imaging. We cannot exclude the possibility that changes could be detected with more sensitive tests or longer follow-up. Conclusions. This long-lasting effect of infrared illumination in both humans and monkeys occurs at exposure levels four to five times below current safety limits. The photochemical basis for this phenomenon remains unknown. PMID:24845640

  2. Assessment of the permissible exposure level to manganese in workers exposed to manganese dioxide dust.

    PubMed Central

    Roels, H A; Ghyselen, P; Buchet, J P; Ceulemans, E; Lauwerys, R R

    1992-01-01

    The prevalence of neuropsychological and respiratory symptoms, lung ventilatory parameters, neurofunctional performances (visual reaction time, eye-hand coordination, hand steadiness, audioverbal short term memory), and several biological parameters (calcium, iron, luteinising hormone (LH), follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), and prolactin concentrations in serum, blood counts, manganese (Mn) concentration in blood and in urine) were examined in a group of workers (n = 92) exposed to MnO2 dust in a dry alkaline battery factory and a matched control group (n = 101). In the battery plant, the current exposure of the workers to airborne Mn was measured with personal samplers and amounted on average (geometric mean) to 215 and 948 micrograms Mn/m3 for respirable and total dust respectively. For each worker, the lifetime integrated exposure to respirable and total airborne Mn dust was also assessed. The geometric means of the Mn concentrations in blood (MnB) and in urine (MnU) were significantly higher in the Mn exposed group than in the control group (MnB 0.81 v 0.68 microgram/100 ml; MnU 0.84 v 0.09 microgram/g creatinine). On an individual basis, MnU and MnB were not related to various external exposure parameters (duration of exposure, current exposure, or lifetime integrated exposure to airborne Mn). On a group basis, a statistically significant association was found between MnU and current Mn concentrations in air. No appreciable difference between the exposed and the control workers was found with regard to the other biological measurements (calcium, LH, FSH, and prolactin in serum). Although the erythropoietic parameters and serum iron concentration were in the normal range for both groups, there was a statistically significant trend towards lower values in the Mn exposed workers. The prevalences of reported neuropsychological and respiratory symptoms, the lung function parameters, and the audioverbal short term memory scores did not differ between the control

  3. Permission Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    The prevailing practice in public schools is to routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities that pose potential for liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered to be neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. The following case and the…

  4. Maximum permissible exposure of the retina in the human eye in optical coherence tomography systems using a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Sian; Dobre, George

    2014-01-01

    When using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy to produce images of the eye fundus, maximum permissible exposure (MPE) limits must be considered. These limits are set out in international standards such as the National Standards Institute ANSI Z136.1 Safe Use of Lasers (USA) and BS EN 60825-1: 1994 (UK) and corresponding Euro norms but these documents do not explicitly consider the case of scanned beams. Our study aims to show how MPE values can be calculated for the specific case of retinal scanning by taking into account an array of parameters, such as wavelength, exposure duration, type of scanning, line rate and field size, and how each set of initial parameters results in MPE values that correspond to thermal or photochemical damage to the retina.

  5. 5 CFR 890.1011 - Bases for permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bases for permissive debarments. 890.1011 Section 890.1011 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1011 Bases for permissive debarments. (a)...

  6. 5 CFR 890.1011 - Bases for permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bases for permissive debarments. 890.1011 Section 890.1011 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1011 Bases for permissive debarments. (a)...

  7. 12 CFR 703.14 - Permissible investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible investments. 703.14 Section 703.14 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.14 Permissible investments. (a) Variable rate investment. A Federal credit union may invest in a variable...

  8. 12 CFR 703.14 - Permissible investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible investments. 703.14 Section 703.14 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.14 Permissible investments. (a) Variable rate investment. A Federal credit union may invest in a variable...

  9. 21 CFR 610.17 - Permissible combinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Permissible combinations. 610.17 Section 610.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.17 Permissible...

  10. 21 CFR 610.17 - Permissible combinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permissible combinations. 610.17 Section 610.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.17 Permissible...

  11. 21 CFR 610.17 - Permissible combinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Permissible combinations. 610.17 Section 610.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.17 Permissible...

  12. 21 CFR 610.17 - Permissible combinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permissible combinations. 610.17 Section 610.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.17 Permissible...

  13. 21 CFR 610.17 - Permissible combinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permissible combinations. 610.17 Section 610.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.17 Permissible...

  14. In vivo comparison of epithelial responses for S-8 versus JP-8 jet fuels below permissible exposure limit.

    PubMed

    Wong, Simon S; Vargas, Jason; Thomas, Alana; Fastje, Cindy; McLaughlin, Michael; Camponovo, Ryan; Lantz, R Clark; Heys, Jeffrey; Witten, Mark L

    2008-12-01

    This study was designed to characterize and compare the pulmonary effects in distal lung from a low-level exposure to jet propellant-8 fuel (JP-8) and a new synthetic-8 fuel (S-8). It is hypothesized that both fuels have different airway epithelial deposition and responses. Consequently, male C57BL/6 mice were nose-only exposed to S-8 and JP-8 at average concentrations of 53mg/m(3) for 1h/day for 7 days. A pulmonary function test performed 24h after the final exposure indicated that there was a significant increase in expiratory lung resistance in the S-8 mice, whereas JP-8 mice had significant increases in both inspiratory and expiratory lung resistance compared to control values. Neither significant S-8 nor JP-8 respiratory permeability changes were observed compared to controls, suggesting no loss of epithelial barrier integrity. Morphological examination and morphometric analysis of airway tissue demonstrated that both fuels showed different patterns of targeted epithelial cells: bronchioles in S-8 and alveoli/terminal bronchioles in JP-8. Collectively, our data suggest that both fuels may have partially different deposition patterns, which may possibly contribute to specific different adverse effects in lung ventilatory function. PMID:18930109

  15. Will the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's Proposed Standards for Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica Reduce Workplace Risk?

    PubMed

    Dudley, Susan E; Morriss, Andrew P

    2015-07-01

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is developing regulations to amend existing standards for occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica by establishing a new permissible exposure limit as well as a series of ancillary provisions for controlling exposure. This article briefly reviews OSHA's proposed regulatory approach and the statutory authority on which it is based. It then evaluates OSHA's preliminary determination of significant risk and its analysis of the risk reduction achievable by its proposed controls. It recognizes that OSHA faces multiple challenges in devising a regulatory approach that reduces exposures and health risks and meets its statutory goal. However, the greatest challenge to reducing risks associated with silica exposure is not the lack of incentives (for either employers or employees) but rather lack of information, particularly information on the relative toxicity of different forms of silica. The article finds that OSHA's proposed rule would contribute little in the way of new information, particularly since it is largely based on information that is at least a decade old--a significant deficiency, given the rapidly changing conditions observed over the last 45 years. The article concludes with recommendations for alternative approaches that would be more likely to generate information needed to improve worker health outcomes. PMID:25808427

  16. Differences in computer exposure between university administrators and CAD draftsmen.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsin-Chieh; Liu, Yung-Ping; Chen, Hsieh-Ching

    2010-10-01

    This study utilized an external logger system for onsite measurements of computer activities of two professional groups-twelve university administrators and twelve computer-aided design (CAD) draftsmen. Computer use of each participant was recorded for 10 consecutive days-an average of 7.9+/-1.8 workdays and 7.8+/-1.5 workdays for administrators and draftsmen, respectively. Quantitative parameters computed using recorded data were daily dynamic duration (DD) and static duration, daily keystrokes, mouse clicks, wheel scrolling counts, mouse movement and dragged distance, average typing and clicking rates, and average time holding down keys and mouse buttons. Significant group differences existed in the number of daily keystrokes (p<0.0005) and mouse clicks (p<0.0005), mouse distance moved (p<0.0005), typing rate (p<0.0001), daily mouse DD (p<0.0001), and keyboard DD (p<0.005). Both groups had significantly longer mouse DD than keyboard DD (p<0.0001). Statistical analysis indicates that the duration of computer use for different computer tasks cannot be represented by a single formula with same set of quantitative parameters as those associated with mouse and keyboard activities. Results of this study demonstrate that computer exposure during different tasks cannot be estimated solely by computer use duration. Quantification of onsite computer activities is necessary when determining computer-associated risk of musculoskeletal disorders. Other significant findings are discussed. PMID:20392434

  17. 42 CFR 1002.210 - Permissive exclusions; general authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissive exclusions; general authority. 1002.210 Section 1002.210 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 1002.210 Permissive exclusions; general authority. The State agency must have administrative...

  18. 42 CFR 1002.210 - Permissive exclusions; general authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissive exclusions; general authority. 1002.210 Section 1002.210 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 1002.210 Permissive exclusions; general authority. The State agency must have administrative...

  19. 42 CFR 1002.210 - Permissive exclusions; general authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissive exclusions; general authority. 1002.210 Section 1002.210 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 1002.210 Permissive exclusions; general authority. The State agency must have administrative...

  20. 42 CFR 1002.210 - Permissive exclusions; general authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissive exclusions; general authority. 1002.210 Section 1002.210 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 1002.210 Permissive exclusions; general authority. The State agency must have administrative...

  1. 42 CFR 1002.210 - Permissive exclusions; general authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissive exclusions; general authority. 1002.210 Section 1002.210 Public Health OFFICE OF INSPECTOR GENERAL-HEALTH CARE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... § 1002.210 Permissive exclusions; general authority. The State agency must have administrative...

  2. 30 CFR 75.503 - Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. 75.503 Section 75.503 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.503 Permissible electric...

  3. 45 CFR 73.735-602 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible activities. 73.735-602 Section 73.735-602 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Political Activity § 73.735-602 Permissible activities. (a) Section 7324 of Title 5, United States...

  4. 50 CFR 216.213 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Structure Removal Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico § 216.213 Permissible... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 216.213... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF...

  5. 50 CFR 216.213 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Structure Removal Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico § 216.213 Permissible... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 216.213... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF...

  6. 50 CFR 216.213 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Structure Removal Operations on the Outer Continental Shelf in the U.S. Gulf of Mexico § 216.213 Permissible... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 216.213... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF...

  7. 12 CFR 750.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 750.5 Section 750.5 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.5 Permissible indemnification payments. (a)...

  8. 12 CFR 750.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 750.5 Section 750.5 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.5 Permissible indemnification payments. (a)...

  9. 12 CFR 750.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 750.5 Section 750.5 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.5 Permissible indemnification payments. (a)...

  10. Intensity/frequency indicator for detection in space: the high values of the incident solar or laser optical radiation in comparison with the appropriate maximum permissible exposure.

    PubMed

    Tsitomeneas, S; Petropoulos, B

    2001-01-01

    The solar or laser optical radiation impact to humans in space depends on the intensity, on the exposure type (direct or indirect) & duration and on the matching of radiation wavelength to tissue characteristics. The main protection factor in space is the application of exposure limits. This paper describes the main biological optical interaction parameters, the optical exposure hazards and the development of a small active lightweight indicator, with output beeper rate depended to the ratio of optical irradiance/exposure limit. The indicator may be used as warning element on the side of helmets, goggles, spectacles, etc, with low power consumption. Electronically the indicator is an intensity/frequency converter, based on the value of the ratio of exposure/exposure limits, with audio & light beepers like the indication output of the ionizing (radioactive) radiation monitors. PMID:11669120

  11. Workplace Measurements by the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration since 1979: Descriptive Analysis and Potential Uses for Exposure Assessment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background : Inspectors from the US Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) have been collecting industrial hygiene samples since 1972 to verify compliance with Permissible Exposure Limits. Starting in 1979, these measurements were computerized into the Integrated Management Information System (IMIS). In 2010, a dataset of over 1 million personal sample results analysed at OSHA’s central laboratory in Salt Lake City [Chemical Exposure Health Data (CEHD)], only partially overlapping the IMIS database, was placed into public domain via the internet. We undertook this study to inform potential users about the relationship between this newly available OSHA data and IMIS and to offer insight about the opportunities and challenges associated with the use of OSHA measurement data for occupational exposure assessment. Methods : We conducted a literature review of previous uses of IMIS in occupational health research and performed a descriptive analysis of the data recently made available and compared them to the IMIS database for lead, the most frequently sampled agent. Results : The literature review yielded 29 studies reporting use of IMIS data, but none using the CEHD data. Most studies focused on a single contaminant, with silica and lead being most frequently analysed. Sixteen studies addressed potential bias in IMIS, mostly by examining the association between exposure levels and ancillary information. Although no biases of appreciable magnitude were consistently reported across studies and agents, these assessments may have been obscured by selective under-reporting of non-detectable measurements. The CEHD data comprised 1 450 836 records from 1984 to 2009, not counting analytical blanks and erroneous records. Seventy eight agents with >1000 personal samples yielded 1 037 367 records. Unlike IMIS, which contain administrative information (company size, job description), ancillary information in the CEHD data is mostly analytical. When the IMIS and

  12. Relevance, Derogation and Permission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolpe, Audun

    We show that a recently developed theory of positive permission based on the notion of derogation is hampered by a triviality result that indicates a problem with the underlying full-meet contraction operation. We suggest a solution that presupposes a particular normal form for codes of norms, adapted from the theory of relevance through propositional letter sharing. We then establish a correspondence between contractions on sets of norms in input/output logic (derogations), and AGM-style contractions on sets of formulae, and use it as a bridge to migrate results on propositional relevance from the latter to the former idiom. Changing the concept accordingly we show that positive permission now incorporates a relevance requirement that wards off triviality.

  13. Transient increase in alcohol self-administration following a period of chronic exposure to corticosterone.

    PubMed

    Besheer, Joyce; Fisher, Kristen R; Lindsay, Tessa G; Cannady, Reginald

    2013-09-01

    Stressful life events and chronic stressors have been associated with escalations in alcohol drinking. Stress exposure leads to the secretion of glucocorticoids (cortisol in the human; corticosterone (CORT) in the rodent). To model a period of heightened elevations in CORT, the present work assessed the effects of chronic exposure to the stress hormone CORT on alcohol self-administration. Male Long Evans rats were trained to self-administer a sweetened alcohol solution (2% sucrose/15% alcohol) resulting in moderate levels of daily alcohol intake (0.5-0.7 g/kg). Following stable baseline operant self-administration, rats received CORT in the drinking water for 7 days. A transient increase in alcohol self-administration was observed on the first self-administration session following CORT exposure, and behavior returned to control levels by the second session. Control experiments determined that this increase in alcohol self-administration was specific to alcohol, unrelated to general motor activation, and functionally dissociated from decreased CORT levels at the time of testing. These results indicate that repeated exposure to heightened levels of stress hormone (e.g., as may be experienced during stressful episodes) has the potential to lead to exacerbated alcohol intake in low to moderate drinkers. Given that maladaptive drinking patterns, such as escalated alcohol drinking following stressful episodes, have the potential to put an individual at risk for future drinking disorders, utilization of this model will be important for examination of neuroadaptations that occur as a consequence of CORT exposure in order to better understand escalated drinking following stressful episodes in nondependent individuals. PMID:23643750

  14. An Overly Permissive Extension.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Jerome

    2016-07-01

    In this article, I describe how the current practice of classifying as a stressor any event that is accompanied by a change in any of a number of biological or behavioral measures-even when it is not accompanied by a long-term compromise in an organism's health or capacity to cope with daily challenges-has limited the utility of this concept. This permissive posture, which began with Selye's writings more than 65 years ago, is sustained by the public's desire for a simple term that might explain the tension generated by the threat of terrorists, growing economic inequality, increased competiveness in the workplace or for admission to the best universities, rogue nuclear bombs, and media reports of threats to health in food and water. I believe that the concept stress should be limited to select events that pose a serious threat to an organism's well-being or discarded as too ambiguous to be theoretically useful. PMID:27474132

  15. Preweaning cocaine exposure alters brain glucose metabolic rates following repeated amphetamine administration in the adult rat.

    PubMed

    Melnick, Susan M; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Dow-Edwards, Diana L

    2004-10-15

    Developmental cocaine exposure produces long-term alterations in function of many neuronal circuits. This study examined glucose metabolic rates following repeated amphetamine administration in adult male and female rats pretreated with cocaine during postnatal days (PND) 11-20. PND11-20 cocaine increased the response to amphetamine in many components of the motor system and the dorsal caudate-putamen, in particular, and decreased the metabolic response in the hypothalamus. While amphetamine alone produced widespread increases in metabolism, there were no cocaine-related effects in the mesolimbic, limbic or sensory structures. These data suggest that a brief cocaine exposure during development can alter ontogeny and result in abnormal neuronal responses to repeated psychostimulant administration in adulthood. PMID:15464226

  16. Alterations in the striatal dopamine system during intravenous methamphetamine exposure: effects of contingent and noncontingent administration.

    PubMed

    Laćan, Goran; Hadamitzky, Martin; Kuczenski, Ronald; Melega, William P

    2013-08-01

    The continuing spread of methamphetamine (METH) abuse has stimulated research aimed at understanding consequences of its prolonged exposure. Alterations in nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system parameters have been characterized in experimental studies after discontinuation of long-term METH but fewer studies have included similar assessments during METH exposure. Here, we report METH plasma pharmacokinetics and striatal DA system alterations in rat after noncontingent and contingent METH administration for 7.5 weeks. Escalating METH exposure was delivered by dynamic infusion (DI) that incorporated a "humanized" plasma METH half life or by intravenous self-administration (IVSA) that included binge intakes. Kinetic modeling of DI and IVSA for 24 h periods during the final week of METH exposure showed that plasma METH levels remained between 0.7 and 1.5 µM. Animals were sacrificed during their last METH administration for autoradiography assessment using [³H]ligands and D2 agonist-induced [³⁵S]GTPγS binding. DA transporter binding was decreased (DI, 34%; IVSA, 15%) while vesicular monoamine transporter binding and substantia nigra DA cell numbers were unchanged. Decreases were measured for D2 receptor (DI and IVSA, 15-20%) and [³⁵S]GTPγS binding (DI, 35%; IVSA, 18%). These similar patterns of DI and IVSA associated decreases in striatal DA markers reflect consequences of cumulative METH exposure and not the drug delivery method. For METH IVSA, individual differences were observed, yet each animal's total intake was similar within and across three 24-h binges. IVSA rodent models may be useful for identifying molecular mechanisms that are associated with METH binges in humans. PMID:23417852

  17. Alterations in the Striatal Dopamine System During Intravenous Methamphetamine Exposure: Effects of Contingent and Noncontingent Administration

    PubMed Central

    Laćan, Goran; Hadamitzky, Martin; Kuczenski, Ronald; Melega, William P.

    2014-01-01

    The continuing spread of methamphetamine (METH) abuse has stimulated research aimed at understanding consequences of its prolonged exposure. Alterations in nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system parameters have been characterized in experimental studies after discontinuation of long term METH but fewer studies have included similar assessments during METH exposure. Here, we report METH plasma pharmacokinetics and striatal DA system alterations in rat after noncontingent and contingent METH administration for 7.5 weeks. Escalating METH exposure was delivered by dynamic infusion (DI) that incorporated a ‘humanized’ plasma METH half life, or by intravenous self-administration (IVSA) that included binge intakes. Kinetic modeling of DI and IVSA for 24 h periods during the final week of METH exposure showed that plasma METH levels remained between 0.7–1.5 μM. Animals were sacrificed during their last METH administration for autoradiography assessment using [3H]ligands and D2 agonist-induced [35S]GTPγS binding. DA transporter binding was decreased (DI, 34%; IVSA, 15%) while vesicular monoamine transporter binding and substantia nigra DA cell numbers were unchanged. Decreases were measured for D2 receptor (DI and IVSA, 15–20%) and [35S]GTPγS binding (DI, 35%; IVSA, 18%). These similar patterns of DI and IVSA associated decreases in striatal DA markers reflect consequences of cumulative METH exposure and not the drug delivery method. For METH IVSA, individual differences were observed, yet each animal’s total intake was similar within and across three 24 h binges. IVSA rodent models may be useful for identifying molecular mechanisms that are associated with METH binges in humans. PMID:23417852

  18. Exposure to Fentanyl After Transdermal Patch Administration for Cancer Pain Management.

    PubMed

    Bista, Sudeep R; Haywood, Alison; Hardy, Janet; Norris, Ross; Hennig, Stefanie

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to describe exposure after fentanyl transdermal patch administration in patients with advanced cancer to quantify variability around the exposure. Patients (n  =  56) with advanced cancer who received transdermal fentanyl (Durogesic®; median dose, 50 μg/h; range, 12-200 μg/h) provided venous blood samples (n  =  163) at various times (0.5-72 hours) during several patch application intervals. Plasma fentanyl concentration was determined (median, 0.9 μg/L; range, 0.04-9.7 μg/L) by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Pharmacokinetic analysis was performed using nonlinear mixed-effects modeling with NONMEM. A 1-compartment distribution model with first-order absorption and elimination described fentanyl exposure after transdermal patch administration. Fentanyl apparent clearance (between-subject variability [BSV], %) was estimated at 122 L/h/70 kg and 38.5%, respectively. The absorption rate constant was 0.013 h(-1) . Between-occasion variability on apparent clearance was 22.0%, which was lower than BSV, suggesting predictable exposure within the same patient and justifying therapeutic drug monitoring. Except for weight-based dosing, no other patient characteristic could be identified to guide initial fentanyl dose selection in patients with advanced cancer. PMID:26381285

  19. 5 CFR 890.1022 - Contesting proposed permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contesting proposed permissive debarments. 890.1022 Section 890.1022 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... debarment authority may challenge the debarment by filing a written contest with the debarring...

  20. 5 CFR 890.1022 - Contesting proposed permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Contesting proposed permissive debarments. 890.1022 Section 890.1022 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... debarment authority may challenge the debarment by filing a written contest with the debarring...

  1. 5 CFR 890.1022 - Contesting proposed permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Contesting proposed permissive debarments. 890.1022 Section 890.1022 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... debarment authority may challenge the debarment by filing a written contest with the debarring...

  2. 5 CFR 890.1022 - Contesting proposed permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Contesting proposed permissive debarments. 890.1022 Section 890.1022 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... debarment authority may challenge the debarment by filing a written contest with the debarring...

  3. 5 CFR 890.1022 - Contesting proposed permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Contesting proposed permissive debarments. 890.1022 Section 890.1022 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... debarment authority may challenge the debarment by filing a written contest with the debarring...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.52 - Occupational noise exposure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Table D-2). If the value of F e exceeds unity (1) the exposure exceeds permissible levels. (iii) A... value of F e does not exceed unity, the exposure is within permissible limits. (e) Exposure to...

  5. Managing clinical research permissions electronically

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Iain C; Obeid, Jihad S; Madathil, Kapil Chalil; Gerken, Katherine; Fryar, Katrina; Rugg, Daniel; Alstad, Colin E; Alexander, Randall; Brady, Kathleen T; Gramopadhye, Anand K; Moskowitz, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Background One mechanism to increase participation in research is to solicit potential research participants’ general willingness to be recruited into clinical trials. Such research permissions and consents typically are collected on paper upon patient registration. We describe a novel method of capturing this information electronically. Purpose The objective is to enable the collection of research permissions and informed consent data electronically to permit tracking of potential research participants’ interest in current and future research involvement and to provide a foundation for facilitating the research workflow. Methods The project involved systematic analysis focused on key areas, including existing business practices, registration processes, and permission collection workflows, and ascertaining best practices for presenting consent information to users via tablet technology and capturing permissions data. Analysis was followed by an iterative software development cycle with feedback from subject matter experts and users. Results An initial version of the software was piloted at one institution in South Carolina for a period of 1 year, during which consents and permission were collected during 2524 registrations of patients. The captured research permission data were transmitted to a clinical data warehouse. The software was later released as an open-source package that can be adopted for use by other institutions. Limitations There are significant ethical, legal, and informatics challenges that must be addressed at an institution to deploy such a system. We have not yet assessed the long-term impact of the system on recruitment of patients to clinical trials. Conclusions We propose that by improving the ability to track willing potential research participants, we can improve recruitment into clinical trials and, in the process, improve patient education by introducing multimedia to informed consent documents. PMID:23785065

  6. Electronic reserves: copyright and permissions

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Karen J.

    2000-01-01

    Electronic reserves present a new service option for libraries to provide needed materials during hours that the library is not open and to user groups located some distance from library collections. Possible changes to current copyright law and publishers permissions policies have delayed the development of electronic reserves in many libraries. This paper reviews the current state of electronic reserves materials in the publishing and library communities and presents the results of a survey of publishers to determine permissions policies for electronic materials. Issues of concern to both libraries and publishers are discussed. PMID:10658960

  7. 21 CFR 1005.22 - Granting permission to bring product into compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Granting permission to bring product into compliance. 1005.22 Section 1005.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.22 Granting permission...

  8. 46 CFR 502.271 - Special docket application for permission to refund or waive freight charges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special docket application for permission to refund or waive freight charges. 502.271 Section 502.271 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION GENERAL AND ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Refund or Waiver of Freight Charges § 502.271 Special docket application for permission to...

  9. 20 CFR 369.3 - Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... seal. 369.3 Section 369.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.3 Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal. Requests for written permission to use the seal of the Railroad Retirement...

  10. 20 CFR 369.3 - Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the seal. 369.3 Section 369.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.3 Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal. Requests for written permission to use the seal of the Railroad Retirement...

  11. 20 CFR 369.3 - Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the seal. 369.3 Section 369.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.3 Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal. Requests for written permission to use the seal of the Railroad Retirement...

  12. 20 CFR 369.3 - Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the seal. 369.3 Section 369.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.3 Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal. Requests for written permission to use the seal of the Railroad Retirement...

  13. 20 CFR 369.3 - Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... seal. 369.3 Section 369.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.3 Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal. Requests for written permission to use the seal of the Railroad Retirement...

  14. 45 CFR 73.735-502 - Permissible acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible acceptance of gifts, entertainment... GENERAL ADMINISTRATION STANDARDS OF CONDUCT Gifts, Entertainment, and Favors § 73.735-502 Permissible acceptance of gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) An employee may accept a gift, gratuity,...

  15. 50 CFR 217.202 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 217.202 Section 217.202 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKE OF MARINE MAMMALS INCIDENTAL TO SPECIFIED ACTIVITIES...

  16. 30 CFR 75.503 - Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; maintenance. 75.503 Section 75.503 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.503 Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. The operator of each coal mine...

  17. 30 CFR 75.503 - Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; maintenance. 75.503 Section 75.503 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.503 Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. The operator of each coal mine...

  18. 30 CFR 75.503 - Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; maintenance. 75.503 Section 75.503 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.503 Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. The operator of each coal mine...

  19. 50 CFR 218.122 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 218.122 Section 218.122 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Taking and...

  20. 50 CFR 218.171 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 218.171 Section 218.171 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Taking Marine...

  1. 50 CFR 218.122 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 218.122 Section 218.122 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Taking and...

  2. 50 CFR 217.62 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 217.62 Section 217.62 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKE OF MARINE MAMMALS INCIDENTAL TO SPECIFIED ACTIVITIES Taking...

  3. 50 CFR 217.72 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 217.72 Section 217.72 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKE OF MARINE MAMMALS INCIDENTAL TO SPECIFIED ACTIVITIES Taking...

  4. 50 CFR 217.13 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 217.13 Section 217.13 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKE OF MARINE MAMMALS INCIDENTAL TO SPECIFIED ACTIVITIES Taking...

  5. 49 CFR 172.502 - Prohibited and permissive placarding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Prohibited and permissive placarding. 172.502 Section 172.502 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS MATERIALS REGULATIONS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TABLE, SPECIAL PROVISIONS,...

  6. Pre-administration of curcumin prevents neonatal sevoflurane exposure-induced neurobehavioral abnormalities in mice.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mu-Huo; Qiu, Li-Li; Yang, Jiao-Jiao; Zhang, Hui; Sun, Xiao-Ru; Zhu, Si-Hai; Li, Wei-Yan; Yang, Jian-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Sevoflurane, a commonly used inhaled anesthetic, can induce neuronal apoptosis in the developing rodent brain and correlate with functional neurological impairment later in life. However, the mechanisms underlying these deleterious effects of sevoflurane remain unclear and no effective treatment is currently available. Herein, the authors investigated whether curcumin can prevent the sevoflurane anesthesia-induced cognitive impairment in mice. Six-day-old C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 3% sevoflurane 2h daily for 3 consecutive days and were treated with curcumin at the dose of 20 mg/kg or vehicle 30 min before the sevoflurane anesthesia from postnatal days 6 (P6) to P8. Cognitive functions were evaluated by open field, Morris water maze, and fear conditioning tests on P61, P63-69, and P77-78, respectively. In another separate experiment, mice were killed on day P8 or P78, and the brain tissues were harvested and then subjected to biochemistry studies. Our results showed that repeated neonatal sevoflurane exposure led to significant cognitive impairment later in life, which was associated with increased neuronal apoptosis, neuroinflammation, oxidative nitrosative stress, and decreased memory related proteins. By contrast, pre-administration of curcumin ameliorated early neuronal apoptosis, neuroinflammation, oxidative nitrosative stress, memory related proteins, and later cognitive dysfunction. In conclusion, our data suggested that curcumin pre-administration can prevent the sevoflurane exposure-induced cognitive impairment later in life, which may be partly attributed to its ability to attenuate the neural apoptosis, inflammation, and oxidative nitrosative stress in mouse brain. PMID:25447320

  7. Impact of a proposed change in the maximum permissible dose limit for neutrons to radiation-protection programs at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.L.

    1981-09-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has issued a statement advising that it is considering lowering the maximum permissible dose for neutrons. This action would present substantive problems to radiation protection programs at DOE facilities where a potential for neutron exposure exists. In addition to altering administrative controls, a lowering of the maximum permissible dose for neutrons will require advances in personnel neutron dosimetry systems, and neutron detection and measurement instrumentation. Improvement in the characterization of neutron fields and spectra at work locations will also be needed. DOE has initiated research and development programs in these areas. However, problems related to the control of personnel neutron exposure have yet to be resolved and investigators are encouraged to continue collaboration with both United States and international authorities.

  8. When Permission Forms Work Best

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    Public schools routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities of potential liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. This article presents a case involving a student who sustained bicycle injuries…

  9. Inadvertent exposure of pregnant women to ivermectin and albendazole during mass drug administration for lymphatic filariasis.

    PubMed

    Gyapong, John O; Chinbuah, Margaret A; Gyapong, Margaret

    2003-12-01

    The current strategy for the interruption of transmission of lymphatic filariasis in areas where the disease is co-endemic with onchocerciasis is repeated annual mass treatment of endemic communities with ivermectin and albendazole. These drugs are not recommended for use in pregnancy. Pregnant women are excluded on the basis of their last menses. This exclusion criterion based on recall carries some inherent errors, leading sometimes to inadvertent exposure of foetuses to these drugs. This study set out to document the extent of inadvertent exposure of pregnant women to albendazole and ivermectin and assess the relative risk of congenital malformations because of inadvertent treatment with these drugs in early pregnancy. The study was conducted in the Ahanta West District of Ghana. Local pregnancy revelation norms were studied, followed by a household survey of women aged 15-45 years to assess drug administration coverage. All infants born within 42 weeks of the mass drug treatment were examined to document any congenital malformations. Mothers who had lost any such infants responded to a verbal autopsy to ascertain the probable cause of death. Health facilities and local Traditional Birth Attendants were also visited to review maternity records. Of 2985 women of childbearing age (15-49 years) who were interviewed, 343 were pregnant during the mass drug administration. The sensitivity of the last menstrual period in detecting pregnancy and thus being excluded from treatment was 0.854 (293 of 343). Some pregnant women 50 of 343 (14.6%) had thus been inadvertently treated. This represents 1.7% of women in fertile age group (15-49 years). Of the six children found with some congenital malformations in these communities, one had been exposed to the drugs in-utero. The relative risk for congenital malformation after exposure was 1.05 (P=1.0). Two of nine reported spontaneous abortions had been exposed to the drugs (P=0.62). We conclude that the local mode of excluding

  10. Thyroxine administration prevents matrilineal intergenerational consequences of in utero ethanol exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Tunc-Ozcan, Elif; Harper, Kathryn M; Graf, Evan N; Redei, Eva E

    2016-06-01

    The neurodevelopmental fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is characterized by cognitive and behavioral deficits in the offspring. Conferring the deficits to the next generation would increase overall FASD disease burden and prevention of this transmission could be highly significant. Prior studies showed the reversal of these behavioral deficits by low dose thyroxine (T4) supplementation to the ethanol-consuming mothers. Here we aim to identify whether prenatal ethanol (PE) exposure impairs hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in the second-generation (F2) progeny, and whether T4 administration to the ethanol-consuming dam can prevent it. Sprague-Dawley (S) dams received control diets (ad libitum and nutritional control) or ethanol containing liquid diet with and without simultaneous T4 (0.3mg/L diet) administration. Their offspring (SS F1) were mated with naive Brown Norway (B) males and females generating the SB F2 and BS F2 progeny. Hippocampus-dependent contextual fear memory and hippocampal expression of the thyroid hormone-regulated type 3 deiodinase, (Dio3) and neurogranin (Nrgn) were assessed. SS F1 PE-exposed females and their SB F2 progeny exhibited fear memory deficits. T4 administration to the mothers of F1 females reversed these deficits. Although SS F1 PE-exposed males also experienced fear memory deficit, this was neither transmitted to their BS F2 offspring nor reversed by prenatal T4 treatment. Hippocampal Dio3 and Nrgn expression showed similar pattern of changes. Grandmaternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy affects fear memory of the matrilineal second-generation progeny. Low dose T4 supplementation prevents this process likely via altering allele-specific and total expression of Dio3 in the hippocampus. PMID:27090562

  11. 19 CFR 162.62 - Permissible controlled substances on vessels, aircraft, and individuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...), and the regulations of the Drug Enforcement Administration (21 CFR 1301.28, 1311.27), controlled... Controlled Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.62 Permissible controlled substances on...

  12. Systemic exposure to menthol following administration of peppermint oil to paediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Gregory L; Chumpitazi, Bruno Pedro; Abdel-Rahman, Susan M; Garg, Uttam; Shulman, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Objective Peppermint oil (PMO) has been used to treat abdominal ailments dating to ancient Egypt, Greece and Rome. Despite its increasing paediatric use, as in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) treatment, the pharmacokinetics (PK) of menthol in children given PMO has not been explored. Design and setting Single-site, exploratory pilot study of menthol PK following a single 187 mg dose of PMO. Subjects with paediatric Rome II defined (IBS; n=6, male and female, 7–15 years of age) were enrolled. Blood samples were obtained before PMO administration and at 10 discrete time points over a 12 h postdose period. Menthol was quantitated from plasma using a validated gas chromatography mass spectrometry technique. Menthol PK parameters were determined using a standard non-compartmental approach. Results Following a dose of PMO, a substantial lag time (range 1–4 h) was seen in all subjects for the appearance of menthol which in turn, produced a delayed time of peak (Tmax=5.3±2.4 h) plasma concentration (Cmax=698.2±245.4 ng/mL). Tmax and Tlag were significantly more variable than the two exposure parameters; Cmax, mean residence time and total area under the curve (AUC=4039.7±583.8 ng/mL×h) which had a coefficient of variation of <20%. Conclusions Delayed appearance of menthol in plasma after oral PMO administration in children is likely a formulation-specific event which, in IBS, could increase intestinal residence time of the active ingredient. Our data also demonstrate the feasibility of using menthol PK in children with IBS to support definitive studies of PMO dose–effect relationships. PMID:26270949

  13. Early methylphenidate exposure enhances cocaine self-administration but not cocaine-induced conditioned place preference in young adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Cynthia A.; Baella, Shelley A.; Farley, Cristal M.; Herbert, Matthew S.; Horn, Leslie R.; Campbell, Rachel H.; Zavala, Arturo R.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale Previous studies in rodents show that early exposure to methylphenidate alters later responsiveness to drugs of abuse. An interesting feature of these studies is that early methylphenidate treatment decreases the rewarding value of cocaine when measured by conditioned place preference (CPP), but the same treatment increases cocaine self-administration. Objective The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of early methylphenidate exposure on cocaine-induced responding using both reward paradigms. Methods Rats were treated with methylphenidate (0, 2, or 5 mg/kg) from postnatal day (PD) 11 to PD 20 and then cocaine-induced CPP or cocaine self-administration was measured in separate groups of rats in adulthood. The CPP procedure included eight days of acquisition training, eight days of extinction training, and a reinstatement test. Rats were conditioned with 0, 10 or 20 mg/kg cocaine. Reinstatement was assessed after a priming dose of cocaine (10 mg/kg). For the self-administration experiment, a jugular catheter was implanted and rats were trained to press a lever reinforced with cocaine (0.25 or 0.75 mg/kg/infusion) on a fixed ratio (FR) 1 schedule. Rats were gradually moved from an FR1 to an FR10 schedule and, after criterion was reached, rats were placed on a progressive ratio schedule for five days. Results Cocaine produced robust rewarding effects as determined by both the CPP and self-administration experiments; however, early methylphenidate exposure only enhanced the reinforcing effects of cocaine on the self-administration paradigm. Interestingly, this methylphenidate enhancement was only seen in male rats. Conclusions These data suggest that in males methylphenidate enhances the reinforcing value of cocaine, but not cocaine-associated cues. PMID:20848087

  14. 45 CFR 1638.4 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible activities. 1638.4 Section 1638.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION RESTRICTION ON SOLICITATION § 1638.4 Permissible activities. (a) This part does not prohibit recipients or their employees from providing information...

  15. 47 CFR 95.805 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications. 95.805 Section 95.805 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES 218-219 MHz Service General Provisions § 95.805 Permissible communications. A...

  16. 47 CFR 78.11 - Permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible service. 78.11 Section 78.11 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 78.11 Permissible service. (a) CARS stations are authorized to relay TV broadcast and low-power TV...

  17. 47 CFR 78.11 - Permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible service. 78.11 Section 78.11 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 78.11 Permissible service. (a) CARS stations are authorized to relay TV broadcast and low-power TV...

  18. 47 CFR 101.511 - Permissible services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible services. 101.511 Section 101.511 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.511 Permissible services....

  19. 47 CFR 78.11 - Permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible service. 78.11 Section 78.11 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 78.11 Permissible service. (a) CARS stations are authorized to...

  20. 47 CFR 74.631 - Permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible service. 74.631 Section 74.631 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.631 Permissible service....

  1. 47 CFR 74.531 - Permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible service. 74.531 Section 74.531 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Aural Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.531 Permissible service. (a)...

  2. 47 CFR 27.802 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.802 Section 27.802 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.802 Permissible communications. Licensees...

  3. 47 CFR 27.902 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.902 Section 27.902 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1670-1675 MHz Band § 27.902 Permissible communications....

  4. 47 CFR 27.902 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.902 Section 27.902 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1670-1675 MHz Band § 27.902 Permissible communications....

  5. 47 CFR 27.802 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.802 Section 27.802 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.802 Permissible communications. Licensees...

  6. 46 CFR 169.235 - Permission required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permission required. 169.235 Section 169.235 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Inspection and Certification Repairs and Alterations § 169.235 Permission required. (a) Repairs...

  7. 46 CFR 169.235 - Permission required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permission required. 169.235 Section 169.235 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Inspection and Certification Repairs and Alterations § 169.235 Permission required. (a) Repairs...

  8. 46 CFR 169.235 - Permission required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permission required. 169.235 Section 169.235 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Inspection and Certification Repairs and Alterations § 169.235 Permission required. (a) Repairs...

  9. 46 CFR 169.235 - Permission required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permission required. 169.235 Section 169.235 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Inspection and Certification Repairs and Alterations § 169.235 Permission required. (a) Repairs...

  10. 46 CFR 169.235 - Permission required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permission required. 169.235 Section 169.235 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS SAILING SCHOOL VESSELS Inspection and Certification Repairs and Alterations § 169.235 Permission required. (a) Repairs...

  11. 47 CFR 90.1205 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1205 Section 90.1205 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Regulations Governing Licensing and Use of Frequencies in the 4940-4990 MHz Band § 90.1205 Permissible operations....

  12. Voltammetric determination of Pb, Cd, Zn, Cu and Se in milk and dairy products collected from Iran: An emphasis on permissible limits and risk assessment of exposure to heavy metals.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi, Yasser; Ahmadi, Farhad; Fakhari, Farnoosh

    2016-02-01

    This study was carried out to determine the concentrations of some heavy metals in dairy products, collected from five industrial regions in Iran (n = 250 samples) during winter and summer in 2013. The samples were analyzed using the differential pulse anodic and cathodic stripping voltammetry technique. The obtained ranges of mean Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn and Se were as follow: in raw milk 14.0, 1.11, 427, 571, 2.19 μg kg(-1), in pasteurized milk 9.59, 1.0, 378, 447, 1.78 μg kg(-1), in cheese 14.5, 1.25, 428, 586, 1.68 μg kg(-1), in yoghurt 7.54, 0.99, 399, 431, 1.23 μg kg(-1) and in doogh 7.2, 0.84, 320, 369, 0.99 μg kg(-1), respectively. In nearly all cases the concentrations of the metals were below the international permissible limits and do not pose a health concern for the consumption of milk and dairy products in Iran. PMID:26304448

  13. Labor market effects of intrauterine exposure to nutritional deficiency: Evidence from administrative data on Muslim immigrants in Denmark.

    PubMed

    Schultz-Nielsen, Marie Louise; Tekin, Erdal; Greve, Jane

    2016-05-01

    This paper examines whether nutritional disruptions experienced during the stage of fetal development impair an individual's labor market productivity later in life. We consider intrauterine exposure to the month of Ramadan as a natural experiment that might cause shocks to the inflow of nutrients essential for fetal development. Specifically, we use administrative data from Denmark to investigate the impact of exposure to Ramadan in utero on labor market outcomes of adult Muslim males, including employment status, annual salary, hourly wage rate, and hours of work. Our findings indicate that potential exposure to nutritional disruptions during a critical stage of fetal development is likely to have scarring effects on the fetus expressed as poor labor market outcomes later in life. Specifically, exposure to Ramadan around the 7th month of gestation results in a lower likelihood of employment and, to a lesser extent, a lower salary, and reduced labor supply. For example, the 7th month intrauterine exposure to Ramadan is associated with a 2.6 percentage points reduction in the likelihood of employment among Muslim males. We do not find an impact on the wage rate. Finally, we also document suggestive evidence that these results may partially be driven by increased disability and to a lesser extent by poor educational attainment among those who were exposed to Ramadan during this particular period in utero. PMID:26954580

  14. Association between long-term exposure to traffic particles and blood pressure in the Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Joel; Alexeeff, Stacey E; Mordukhovich, Irina; Gryparis, Alexandros; Vokonas, Pantel; Suh, Helen; Coull, Brent A

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Particulate air pollution is associated with cardiovascular events, but the mechanisms are not fully understood. The main objective was to assess the relationship between long-term exposure to traffic-related air pollution and blood pressure (BP). Methods The authors used longitudinal data from 853 elderly men participating in the Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study, followed during 1996–2008. Long-term average exposures to traffic particles were created from daily predictions of black carbon (BC) exposure at the geocoded address of each subject, using a validated spatiotemporal model based on ambient monitoring at 82 Boston-area locations. The authors examined the association of these exposures with BP using a mixed model. The authors included the following covariates: age, body mass index, smoking, alcohol, fasting glucose, creatinine clearance, use of cardiovascular medication, education, census-level poverty, day of week and season of clinical visit. Results The authors found significant positive associations between 1-year average BC exposure and both systolic and diastolic blood pressure. An IQR increase in 1-year average BC exposure (0.32 µg/m3) was associated with a 2.64 mm Hg increase in systolic blood pressure (95% CI 1.47 to 3.80) and a 2.41 mm Hg increase in diastolic blood pressure (95% CI 1.77 to 3.05). Conclusions Long-term exposure to traffic particles is associated with increased BP, which may explain part of the association with myocardial infarctions and cardiovascular deaths reported in cohort studies. PMID:22383587

  15. Methamphetamine Self-Administration Causes Persistent Striatal Dopaminergic Alterations and Mitigates the Deficits Caused by a Subsequent Methamphetamine Exposure

    PubMed Central

    McFadden, Lisa M.; Hadlock, Greg C.; Allen, Scott C.; Vieira-Brock, Paula L.; Stout, Kristen A.; Ellis, Jonathan D.; Hoonakker, Amanda J.; Andrenyak, David M.; Nielsen, Shannon M.; Wilkins, Diana G.; Hanson, Glen R.

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical studies have demonstrated that repeated methamphetamine (METH) injections (referred to herein as a “binge” treatment) cause persistent dopaminergic deficits. A few studies have also examined the persistent neurochemical impact of METH self-administration in rats, but with variable results. These latter studies are important because: 1) they have relevance to the study of METH abuse; and 2) the effects of noncontingent METH treatment do not necessarily predict effects of contingent exposure. Accordingly, the present study investigated the impact of METH self-administration on dopaminergic neuronal function. Results revealed that self-administration of METH, given according to a regimen that produces brain METH levels comparable with those reported postmortem in human METH abusers (0.06 mg/infusion; 8-h sessions for 7 days), decreased striatal dopamine transporter (DAT) uptake and/or immunoreactivity as assessed 8 or 30 days after the last self-administration session. Increasing the METH dose per infusion did not exacerbate these deficits. These deficits were similar in magnitude to decreases in DAT densities reported in imaging studies of abstinent METH abusers. It is noteworthy that METH self-administration mitigated the persistent deficits in dopaminergic neuronal function, as well as the increases in glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity, caused by a subsequent binge METH exposure. This protection was independent of alterations in METH pharmacokinetics, but may have been attributable (at least in part) to a pretreatment-induced attenuation of binge-induced hyperthermia. Taken together, these results may provide insight into the neurochemical deficits reported in human METH abusers. PMID:22034657

  16. Adolescent Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Exposure Alters WIN55,212-2 Self-Administration in Adult Rats.

    PubMed

    Scherma, Maria; Dessì, Christian; Muntoni, Anna Lisa; Lecca, Salvatore; Satta, Valentina; Luchicchi, Antonio; Pistis, Marco; Panlilio, Leigh V; Fattore, Liana; Goldberg, Steven R; Fratta, Walter; Fadda, Paola

    2016-04-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit drug worldwide, and use is typically initiated during adolescence. The endocannabinoid system has an important role in formation of the nervous system, from very early development through adolescence. Cannabis exposure during this vulnerable period might lead to neurobiological changes that affect adult brain functions and increase the risk of cannabis use disorder. The aim of this study was to investigate whether exposure to Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) in adolescent rats might enhance reinforcing effects of cannabinoids in adulthood. Male adolescent rats were treated with increasing doses of THC (or its vehicle) twice/day for 11 consecutive days (PND 45-55). When the animals reached adulthood, they were tested by allowing them to intravenously self-administer the cannabinoid CB1-receptor agonist WIN55,212-2. In a separate set of animals given the same THC (or vehicle) treatment regimen, electrophysiological and neurochemical experiments were performed to assess possible modifications of the mesolimbic dopaminergic system, which is critically involved in cannabinoid-induced reward. Behavioral data showed that acquisition of WIN55,212-2 self-administration was enhanced in THC-exposed rats relative to vehicle-exposed controls. Neurophysiological data showed that THC-exposed rats displayed a reduced capacity for WIN55,212-2 to stimulate firing of dopamine neurons in the ventral tegmental area and to increase dopamine levels in the nucleus accumbens shell. These findings-that early, passive exposure to THC can produce lasting alterations of the reward system of the brain and subsequently increase cannabinoid self-administration in adulthood-suggest a mechanism by which adolescent cannabis exposure could increase the risk of subsequent cannabis dependence in humans. PMID:26388146

  17. 47 CFR 22.1025 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MOBILE SERVICES Offshore Radiotelephone Service § 22.1025 Permissible communications. Offshore central...). Offshore subscriber stations must normally communicate only with and through offshore central stations. Stations in the Offshore Radiotelephone Service may communicate through relay stations authorized in...

  18. 47 CFR 74.631 - Permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Television Broadcast Auxiliary Stations § 74.631 Permissible service. (a) The licensee of a television pickup station authorizes the... a television studio, to its associated television broadcast station, to an associated...

  19. 47 CFR 101.511 - Permissible services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.511 Permissible services. (a... authorization. (b) Stations may render any kind of digital communications service consistent with the...

  20. Comparative Plasma Exposure of Albendazole after Administration of Rapidly Disintegrating Tablets in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Silvina G.; Dib, Alicia; Suarez, Gonzalo; Allemandi, Daniel; Lanusse, Carlos; Sanchez Bruni, Sergio; Palma, Santiago D.

    2013-01-01

    The main objectives of this study were (a) to evaluate the in vitro performance of the rapid disintegration tablets as a way to improve the solid dispersions and (b) to study the in vivo pharmacokinetics of the albendazole modified formulation in dogs. Rapid disintegration of tablets seems to be a key factor for efficiency of solid dispersions with regard to improvement of the albendazole bioavailability. The in vivo assays performed on dogs showed a marked increase in drug plasma exposure when albendazole was given in solid dispersions incorporated into rapid disintegration tablets compared with conventional solid dosage form. PMID:24063016

  1. Efficacy of Post Exposure Administration of Doxycycline in a Murine Model of Inhalational Melioidosis

    PubMed Central

    Gelhaus, H. Carl; Anderson, Michael S.; Fisher, David A.; Flavin, Michael T.; Xu, Ze-Qi; Sanford, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the causative agent of melioidosis. Treatment of melioidosis is suboptimal and developing improved melioidosis therapies requires animal models. In this report, we exposed male BALB/c mice to various amounts of aerosolized B. pseudomallei 1026b to determine lethality. After establishing a median lethal dose (LD50) of 2,772 colony forming units (cfu)/animal, we tested the ability of doxycycline administered 6 hours after exposure to a uniformly lethal dose of ~20 LD50 to prevent death and eliminate bacteria from the lung and spleens. Tissue bacterial burdens were examined by PCR analysis. We found that 100% of mice treated with doxycycline survived and B. pseudomallei DNA was not amplified from the lungs or spleens of most surviving mice. We conclude the BALB/c mouse is a useful model of melioidosis. Furthermore, the data generated in this mouse model indicate that doxycycline is likely to be effective in post-exposure prophylaxis of melioidosis. PMID:23359492

  2. Effect of subchronic administration of antioxidants against cigarette smoke exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Sohn, H O; Lim, H B; Lee, Y G; Lee, D W; Kim, Y T

    1993-01-01

    Effects of subchronic administration of antioxidants against pulmonary damage mediated by cigarette smoke were investigated in rats. Rats were continuously received ascorbic acid, N-acetylcysteine and ginseng extract together drinking water from day 25 after birth. After 30 days of antioxidant supplementation, rats were exposed to cigarette smoke generated from six cigarettes (11 mg tar) for 20 min per day throughout 30 days, and then several biochemical markers related to the redox status in vivo were analyzed in the respiratory system. The cigarette smoke induced mild histological changes in trachea and lungs. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in the lung was significantly increased, and catalase and glutathione peroxidase activities were increased less than SOD, but total sulfhydryl compounds (Total-SH) content was decreased by cigarette smoking. In spite of the increase in activities of antioxidant enzymes, the inhibitory capacity of lung preparations on in vitro lipid peroxidation using ox brain homogenates was decreased and the change in the capacity was not related to the changes of these intracellular enzymes activities, but with the content of Total-SH. On the other hand, the content of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the ratio of elastase to anti-protease in the lung homogenates were significantly increased. Supplementation of antioxidants, however, effectively attenuated all of such alterations induced by cigarette smoke. These results indicate that although cigarette smoking induces antioxidant enzymes in the lung as a self defense mechanism, it seems to be not sufficient to protect the pulmonary system, and that chronic antioxidant feeding could be effective to reduce pulmonary damage induced by free radicals. PMID:8135656

  3. 21 CFR 1005.21 - Application for permission to bring product into compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Application for permission to bring product into compliance. 1005.21 Section 1005.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and...

  4. 21 CFR 1005.21 - Application for permission to bring product into compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Application for permission to bring product into compliance. 1005.21 Section 1005.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and...

  5. 21 CFR 1005.21 - Application for permission to bring product into compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Application for permission to bring product into compliance. 1005.21 Section 1005.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.21 Application...

  6. 21 CFR 1005.22 - Granting permission to bring product into compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Granting permission to bring product into compliance. 1005.22 Section 1005.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and...

  7. 21 CFR 1005.22 - Granting permission to bring product into compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Granting permission to bring product into compliance. 1005.22 Section 1005.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and...

  8. 21 CFR 1005.21 - Application for permission to bring product into compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Application for permission to bring product into compliance. 1005.21 Section 1005.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and...

  9. 21 CFR 1005.22 - Granting permission to bring product into compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Granting permission to bring product into compliance. 1005.22 Section 1005.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and...

  10. 21 CFR 1005.22 - Granting permission to bring product into compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Granting permission to bring product into compliance. 1005.22 Section 1005.22 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and...

  11. 21 CFR 1005.21 - Application for permission to bring product into compliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application for permission to bring product into compliance. 1005.21 Section 1005.21 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and...

  12. 30 CFR 75.506-1 - Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. 75.506-1 Section 75.506-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  13. 30 CFR 75.504 - Permissibility of new, replacement, used, reconditioned, additional, and rebuilt electric face...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissibility of new, replacement, used, reconditioned, additional, and rebuilt electric face equipment. 75.504 Section 75.504 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES...

  14. 30 CFR 75.505 - Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face equipment. 75.505 Section 75.505 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  15. 30 CFR 77.1902-1 - Permissible diesel-powered equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible diesel-powered equipment. 77.1902-1 Section 77.1902-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Slope and Shaft Sinking...

  16. 30 CFR 77.1902-1 - Permissible diesel-powered equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible diesel-powered equipment. 77.1902-1 Section 77.1902-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS, SURFACE COAL MINES AND SURFACE WORK AREAS OF UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Slope and Shaft Sinking...

  17. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... above water table. 75.501 Section 75.501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and after... entirely in coal seams located above the water table and which has not been classified under any...

  18. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... above water table. 75.501 Section 75.501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and after... entirely in coal seams located above the water table and which has not been classified under any...

  19. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... above water table. 75.501 Section 75.501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and after... entirely in coal seams located above the water table and which has not been classified under any...

  20. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... above water table. 75.501 Section 75.501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and after... entirely in coal seams located above the water table and which has not been classified under any...

  1. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... above water table. 75.501 Section 75.501 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION... Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and after... entirely in coal seams located above the water table and which has not been classified under any...

  2. 20 CFR 369.2 - Authority to grant written permission for use of the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... of the seal. 369.2 Section 369.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.2 Authority to grant written permission for use of the seal. The Board hereby delegates authority to grant written...

  3. 20 CFR 369.2 - Authority to grant written permission for use of the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... of the seal. 369.2 Section 369.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.2 Authority to grant written permission for use of the seal. The Board hereby delegates authority to grant written...

  4. 20 CFR 369.2 - Authority to grant written permission for use of the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... of the seal. 369.2 Section 369.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.2 Authority to grant written permission for use of the seal. The Board hereby delegates authority to grant written...

  5. 20 CFR 369.2 - Authority to grant written permission for use of the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of the seal. 369.2 Section 369.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.2 Authority to grant written permission for use of the seal. The Board hereby delegates authority to grant written...

  6. 20 CFR 369.2 - Authority to grant written permission for use of the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of the seal. 369.2 Section 369.2 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.2 Authority to grant written permission for use of the seal. The Board hereby delegates authority to grant written...

  7. 36 CFR 1254.110 - Does NARA ever rescind permission to microfilm?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Does NARA ever rescind permission to microfilm? 1254.110 Section 1254.110 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION PUBLIC AVAILABILITY AND USE USING RECORDS AND DONATED HISTORICAL...

  8. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Detectors, 30 CFR part 29 contained in the 30 CFR, parts 1-199, edition, revised as of July 1, 1999. ..., issued by the Bureau of Mines or the Mine Safety and Health Administration in accordance with schedule 2G... amends, modifies, or supersedes the permissibility requirements of schedule 2G, and (2) if they...

  9. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Detectors, 30 CFR part 29 contained in the 30 CFR, parts 1-199, edition, revised as of July 1, 1999. ..., issued by the Bureau of Mines or the Mine Safety and Health Administration in accordance with schedule 2G... amends, modifies, or supersedes the permissibility requirements of schedule 2G, and (2) if they...

  10. 47 CFR 90.1305 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1305 Section 90.1305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1305...

  11. 47 CFR 90.1305 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1305 Section 90.1305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1305...

  12. 47 CFR 90.1305 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1305 Section 90.1305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1305...

  13. 47 CFR 90.1305 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1305 Section 90.1305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1305...

  14. 47 CFR 90.1305 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1305 Section 90.1305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND MOBILE RADIO SERVICES Wireless Broadband Services in the 3650-3700 MHz Band § 90.1305...

  15. 47 CFR 95.1209 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1209 Permissible..., diagnostic and therapeutic information associated with a medical implant device or medical body-worn device... that is not included with a medical implant or medical body-worn device. Wireless retransmission...

  16. 47 CFR 95.1209 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1209 Permissible..., diagnostic and therapeutic information associated with a medical implant device or medical body-worn device... response to a non-radio frequency actuation signal generated by a device external to the body with...

  17. 12 CFR 703.14 - Permissible investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.14 Permissible investments. (a) Variable rate investment. A federal credit union may invest in a variable rate investment, as long as the index is tied to domestic interest rates. Except in the case of Treasury Inflation Protected Securities, the variable rate...

  18. 12 CFR 703.14 - Permissible investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.14 Permissible investments. (a) Variable rate investment. A Federal credit union may invest in a variable rate investment, as long as the index is tied to domestic interest... obligation/real estate mortgage investment conduit. A Federal credit union may invest in a fixed or...

  19. 7 CFR 1410.63 - Permissive uses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... are consistent with the soil, water, and wildlife conservation purposes of the program: (1) Managed... AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS CONSERVATION RESERVE PROGRAM § 1410.63 Permissive uses. (a... fish and wildlife agency or State department of natural resources; (2) The commercial shooting...

  20. 12 CFR 28.13 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible activities. 28.13 Section 28.13 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INTERNATIONAL BANKING... authorities, and other United States banking laws. However, United States procedural or...

  1. 12 CFR 28.4 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the FRB's Regulation K, 12 CFR part 211. (c) Foreign operations guarantees. A national bank may... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible activities. 28.4 Section 28.4 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY INTERNATIONAL BANKING...

  2. 47 CFR 101.1307 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.1307 Section 101.1307 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems General Provisions § 101.1307...

  3. 47 CFR 95.1307 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications. 95.1307 Section 95.1307 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Multi-Use Radio Service (MURS) General Provisions § 95.1307...

  4. 47 CFR 101.703 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.703 Section 101.703 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Common Carrier Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave Service § 101.703...

  5. 47 CFR 101.703 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.703 Section 101.703 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Common Carrier Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave Service § 101.703...

  6. Maximum permissible voltage of YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, J.; Lin, B.; Sheng, J.; Xu, J.; Jin, Z.; Hong, Z.; Wang, D.; Zhou, H.; Shen, X.; Shen, C.

    2014-06-01

    Superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) could reduce short circuit currents in electrical power system. One of the most important thing in developing SFCL is to find out the maximum permissible voltage of each limiting element. The maximum permissible voltage is defined as the maximum voltage per unit length at which the YBCO coated conductors (CC) do not suffer from critical current (Ic) degradation or burnout. In this research, the time of quenching process is changed and voltage is raised until the Ic degradation or burnout happens. YBCO coated conductors test in the experiment are from American superconductor (AMSC) and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU). Along with the quenching duration increasing, the maximum permissible voltage of CC decreases. When quenching duration is 100 ms, the maximum permissible of SJTU CC, 12 mm AMSC CC and 4 mm AMSC CC are 0.72 V/cm, 0.52 V/cm and 1.2 V/cm respectively. Based on the results of samples, the whole length of CCs used in the design of a SFCL can be determined.

  7. 46 CFR 520.14 - Special permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Special permission. 520.14 Section 520.14 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE CARRIER AUTOMATED..., except that in emergency situations, application may be made by telephone or facsimile if...

  8. 46 CFR 520.14 - Special permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Special permission. 520.14 Section 520.14 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE CARRIER AUTOMATED..., except that in emergency situations, application may be made by telephone or facsimile if...

  9. 46 CFR 520.14 - Special permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special permission. 520.14 Section 520.14 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE CARRIER AUTOMATED..., except that in emergency situations, application may be made by telephone or facsimile if...

  10. 46 CFR 520.14 - Special permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Special permission. 520.14 Section 520.14 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AFFECTING OCEAN SHIPPING IN FOREIGN COMMERCE CARRIER AUTOMATED..., except that in emergency situations, application may be made by telephone or facsimile if...

  11. 47 CFR 101.1307 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.1307 Section 101.1307 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems General Provisions § 101.1307...

  12. 47 CFR 101.703 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.703 Section 101.703 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Common Carrier Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave Service § 101.703...

  13. 47 CFR 101.703 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.703 Section 101.703 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Common Carrier Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave Service § 101.703...

  14. 47 CFR 101.703 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.703 Section 101.703 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Common Carrier Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave Service § 101.703...

  15. 47 CFR 101.1307 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.1307 Section 101.1307 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems General Provisions § 101.1307...

  16. 47 CFR 101.1307 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.1307 Section 101.1307 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems General Provisions § 101.1307...

  17. 47 CFR 90.1205 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1205 Section 90.1205 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... and video operations are permitted. (c) Aeronautical mobile operations are prohibited....

  18. 47 CFR 90.1205 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1205 Section 90.1205 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... and video operations are permitted. (c) Aeronautical mobile operations are prohibited....

  19. 47 CFR 90.1205 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1205 Section 90.1205 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... and video operations are permitted. (c) Aeronautical mobile operations are prohibited....

  20. 47 CFR 90.1205 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1205 Section 90.1205 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... and video operations are permitted. (c) Aeronautical mobile operations are prohibited....

  1. 25 CFR 169.4 - Permission to survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permission to survey. 169.4 Section 169.4 Indians BUREAU... Permission to survey. Anyone desiring to obtain permission to survey for a right-of-way across individually... to cover twice the estimated damages which may be sustained as a result of the survey. With...

  2. 25 CFR 169.4 - Permission to survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permission to survey. 169.4 Section 169.4 Indians BUREAU... Permission to survey. Anyone desiring to obtain permission to survey for a right-of-way across individually... to cover twice the estimated damages which may be sustained as a result of the survey. With...

  3. 25 CFR 169.4 - Permission to survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permission to survey. 169.4 Section 169.4 Indians BUREAU... Permission to survey. Anyone desiring to obtain permission to survey for a right-of-way across individually... to cover twice the estimated damages which may be sustained as a result of the survey. With...

  4. 33 CFR 401.68 - Explosives Permission Letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Explosives Permission Letter. 401..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.68 Explosives Permission Letter. (a) A Seaway Explosives Permission Letter is required for an explosive vessel in...

  5. 33 CFR 401.68 - Explosives Permission Letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives Permission Letter. 401..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.68 Explosives Permission Letter. (a) A Seaway Explosives Permission Letter is required for an explosive vessel in...

  6. 33 CFR 401.68 - Explosives Permission Letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Explosives Permission Letter. 401..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.68 Explosives Permission Letter. (a) A Seaway Explosives Permission Letter is required for an explosive vessel in...

  7. 33 CFR 401.68 - Explosives Permission Letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Explosives Permission Letter. 401..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.68 Explosives Permission Letter. (a) A Seaway Explosives Permission Letter is required for an explosive vessel in...

  8. 33 CFR 401.68 - Explosives permission letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Explosives permission letter. 401..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.68 Explosives permission letter. (a) A Seaway Explosives Permission Letter is required for an explosive vessel in...

  9. 25 CFR 169.4 - Permission to survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Permission to survey. 169.4 Section 169.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS § 169.4 Permission to survey. Anyone desiring to obtain permission to survey for a right-of-way across...

  10. 25 CFR 169.4 - Permission to survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permission to survey. 169.4 Section 169.4 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR LAND AND WATER RIGHTS-OF-WAY OVER INDIAN LANDS § 169.4 Permission to survey. Anyone desiring to obtain permission to survey for a right-of-way across...

  11. 30 CFR 75.503 - Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment...-General § 75.503 Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. The operator of each coal mine shall maintain in permissible condition all electric face equipment required by §§ 75.500, 75.501, 75.504 to...

  12. Risk analysis for worker exposure to benzene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallenbeck, William H.; Flowers, Roxanne E.

    1992-05-01

    Cancer risk factors (characterized by route, dose, dose rate per kilogram, fraction of lifetime exposed, species, and sex) were derived for workers exposed to benzene via inhalation or ingestion. Exposure at the current Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) and at leaking underground storage tank (LUST) sites were evaluated. At the current PEL of 1 ppm, the theoretical lifetime excess risk of cancer from benzene inhalation is ten per 1000. The theoretical lifetime excess risk for worker inhalation exposure at LUST sites ranged from 10 to 40 per 1000. These results indicate that personal protection should be required. The theoretical lifetime excess risk due to soil ingestion is five to seven orders of magnitude less than the inhalation risks.

  13. Lead in soil: Recommended maximum permissible levels

    SciTech Connect

    Madhavan, S.; Rosenman, K.D.; Shehata, T.

    1989-06-01

    Lead in soil has been recognized as a public health problem, particularly among children. In recent years, attention has been directed to cumulative adverse effects of lead at low levels of intake. Lead-contaminated soil and dust have been identified as important contributors to blood lead levels. Based on available data on blood lead and lead in soil, an approach has been developed to suggest a permissible level of lead in soil, below which there will be reasonable certainty that adverse health effects will not occur. An acceptable level of 600 ppm of lead in soil suggested as a ''safe'' level would contribute no more than 5 micrograms/dl to total blood lead of children under 12 years of age. Maximum permissible levels of lead in soil have been recommended based on the dose-response relationship of lead in soil and blood lead in children.

  14. Oral administration of pyridostigmine bromide and huperzine A protects human whole blood cholinesterases from ex vivo exposure to soman.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Richard K; Haigh, Julian R; Garcia, Gregory E; Feaster, Shawn R; Riel, Michael A; Lenz, David E; Aisen, Paul S; Doctor, Bhupendra P

    2005-12-15

    maximal inhibition of AChE (26.2%) and concentration of PB (17.1 ng/mL) occurred at 2.5 h post-PB dosing. AChE activity returned to almost 100% of pre-dose values by 6 h. A dose-dependent linear correlation was found between the amount of PB measured in the blood and the inhibition of AChE. Following soman (GD) exposure, recovered AChE activity was similar to levels that were reversibly protected by the PB administration. Therefore, the WRAIR ChE WB data clearly supports the conclusion that PB is an effective pre-treatment drug for nerve agent exposure (GD). In the second FDA human study for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, the WRAIR ChE WB assay was used to determine the RBC-AChE and serum BChE profile of healthy elderly volunteers receiving Huperzine A. Huperzine A is a plant-derived reversible and selective AChE inhibitor compared to BChE, and is a more potent inhibitor of AChE than PB. Huperzine A is available as a nutraceutical, a natural supplement reported to improve memory, and has a variety of neuroprotective effects. Individuals received an increasing dose regimen of huperzine A (final dose 200 microg after 4 weeks), which produced more than 50% inhibition of RBC-AChE. Huperzine A was well tolerated by these patients at doses that sequestered more RBC-AChE than PB, and thus warrants further study as a prophylaxis for OP poisoning in addition to Alzheimer's therapy. Due to the documented use of OPs by terrorists and in warfare around the globe, Federal, State, and local authorities need a reliable, fast, inexpensive, and standard method for confirming such an assault in order to initiate appropriate containment, decontamination, and treatment measures. This assay is ideal for prescreening military personnel for atypical ChE activities that would preclude their deployment to areas of potential CWA exposure. The WRAIR WB ChE assay will fulfill the requirement for rapid and reliable monitoring of such exposure in military and civilian populations. PMID:16256090

  15. Ethanol administration dampens the prolactin response to psychosocial stress exposure in sons of alcohol-dependent fathers.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Ulrich S; Buchmann, Arlette F; Spring, Constance; Uhr, Manfred; Holsboer, Florian; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2009-08-01

    Genetic predisposition and exposure to alcohol and stress increase the risk for alcoholism, possibly by forming a threefold interaction. This is suggested by various aspects of alcohol-induced stress response dampening in offspring of alcoholics. We tested whether such an interaction is also revealed by prolactin secretion, which is predominantly controlled by hypothalamic dopamine. Plasma prolactin was measured during four experimental days in 26 young males with a paternal history of alcoholism (PHA) and in 22 family history negative (FHN) controls. A public speaking stress paradigm was applied on the first 2 days, and a non-stress acoustic startle experiment on the others. Before the tests, subjects drank alcohol (0.6 g/kg) or placebo in a randomized, double-blind crossover design. During placebo experiments, prolactin levels significantly increased after stress, but not after startle, and did not differ between risk groups. Alcohol administration significantly increased prolactin before stress and during startle in both groups, did not alter stress-induced prolactin stimulation in FHN, but significantly attenuated the prolactin stress response in PHA subjects. The alcohol effects on prolactin, cortisol, and adrenocorticotropin stress response were positively interrelated with each other. These data confirm that alcohol specifically dampens the stress response in PHA but not FHN subjects. Since prolactin responses to stress alone and alcohol alone were normal in PHA, we conclude that this genetic effect is not related to altered physiology of the hypothalamic dopaminergic system, but to risk-group specific alcohol effects on hierarchically higher brain areas controlling the stress response in general. PMID:19243891

  16. Noise exposure among construction electricians.

    PubMed

    Seixas, N S; Ren, K; Neitzel, R; Camp, J; Yost, M

    2001-01-01

    Data-logging noise dosimetry was used to assess the exposure levels of electricians working for a major electrical subcontractor in Washington State at five sites using four types of construction methods. Subjects documented activities and work environment information throughout their work shift, resulting in an activity/exposure record for each of the 174 full-shift samples collected over the 4-month duration of the study. Over 24% of the TWA samples exceeded 85 dBA; 5.2% exceeded the federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limit of 90 dBA. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health exposure metric, which specifies a 3-dB ER, was also utilized; using this metric, 67.8% of the samples exceeded 85 dBA and 27% exceeded 90 dBA. Subjects were directly observed for a subset of 4469 min during which more detailed activity and environmental information was recorded. Linear and logistic regression models using this subset were used to identify the determinants of average exposure, and exposure exceedences, respectively. These models demonstrated the importance of multiple variable modeling in interpreting exposure assessments, and the feasibility and utility of modeling exposure exceedences using logistic regression. The results further showed that presumably quiet trades such as electrician are at risk of exposure to potentially harmful noise exposures, and that other workers' activities and the general environment contribute substantially to that risk. These results indicate that noise control strategies will have to address the construction work environment as an integrated system. PMID:11669388

  17. No Effect of Route of Exposure (Oral; Subcutaneous Injection) on Plasma Bisphenol A throughout 24 hr after Administration in Neonatal Female Mice

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Julia A.; Welshons, Wade V.; vom Saal, Frederick S.

    2008-01-01

    Route of administration of chemicals in adults is an important factor in pharmacokinetics of chemicals such as bisphenol A (BPA), the monomer with estrogenic activity used to make polycarbonate plastic products and to line food and beverage cans. Based on findings in adults it has been proposed (CERHR, 2007) that non-oral routes of administration in newborn rodents would also lead to high exposure relative to oral administration. However, in fetuses and neonates, the enzyme that conjugates BPA (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase) is expressed at low levels, suggesting that there may be no differences in pharmacokinetics between oral and non-oral dosing. We thus conducted an analysis of plasma concentrations of unconjugated 3H-BPA after HPLC separation in postnatal day 3 female mice throughout the 24 hr after administering 3H-BPA orally or via subcutaneous injection at doses above and below the current EPA reference dose. We found no significant difference in plasma BPA based on route of administration in neonatal mice at either dose. However, compared to data from other studies conducted with adults, there was a markedly higher plasma BPA level after oral administration of BPA in newborn mice. This finding sets aside the belief that non-oral administration of BPA renders data as not suitable for consideration of the hazard posed by low-dose exposure to BPA during neonatal life. Therefore the large numbers of BPA studies that used non-oral administration at very low doses during the neonatal period should not be dismissed by scientists or the regulatory community based on route of administration. PMID:18295446

  18. No effect of route of exposure (oral; subcutaneous injection) on plasma bisphenol A throughout 24h after administration in neonatal female mice.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Julia A; Welshons, Wade V; Vom Saal, Frederick S

    2008-02-01

    Route of administration of chemicals in adults is an important factor in pharmacokinetics of chemicals such as bisphenol A (BPA), the monomer with estrogenic activity used to make polycarbonate plastic products and to line food and beverage cans. Based on findings in adults it has been proposed (CERHR, 2007) that non-oral routes of administration in newborn rodents would also lead to high exposure relative to oral administration. However, in fetuses and neonates, the enzyme that conjugates BPA (UDP-glucuronosyltransferase) is expressed at low levels, suggesting that there may be no differences in pharmacokinetics between oral and non-oral dosing. We thus conducted an analysis of plasma concentrations of unconjugated 3H-BPA after HPLC separation in postnatal day 3 female mice throughout the 24h after administering 3H-BPA orally or via subcutaneous injection at doses above and below the current EPA reference dose. We found no significant difference in plasma BPA based on route of administration in neonatal mice at either dose. However, compared to data from other studies conducted with adults, there was a markedly higher plasma BPA level after oral administration of BPA in newborn mice. This finding sets aside the belief that non-oral administration of BPA renders data as not suitable for consideration of the hazard posed by low-dose exposure to BPA during neonatal life. Therefore the large numbers of BPA studies that used non-oral administration at very low doses during the neonatal period should not be dismissed by scientists or the regulatory community based on route of administration. PMID:18295446

  19. Prenatal exposure to ethanol during late gestation facilitates operant self-administration of the drug in 5-day-old rats

    PubMed Central

    Miranda-Morales, Roberto Sebastián; Nizhnikov, Michael E.; Spear, Norman E.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure modifies postnatal affinity to the drug, increasing the probability of ethanol use and abuse. The present study tested developing rats (5-day-old) in a novel operant technique to assess the degree of ethanol self-administration as a result of prenatal exposure to low ethanol doses during late gestation. On a single occasion during each of gestational days 17–20, pregnant rats were intragastrically administered ethanol 1 g/kg, or water (vehicle). On postnatal day 5, pups were tested on a novel operant conditioning procedure in which they learned to touch a sensor to obtain 0.1% saccharin, 3% ethanol, or 5% ethanol. Immediately after a 15-min training session, a 6-min extinction session was given in which operant behavior had no consequence. Pups were positioned on a smooth surface and had access to a touch-sensitive sensor. Physical contact with the sensor activated an infusion pump, which served to deliver an intraoral solution as reinforcement (Paired group). A Yoked control animal evaluated at the same time received the reinforcer when its corresponding Paired pup touched the sensor. Operant behavior to gain access to 3% ethanol was facilitated by prenatal exposure to ethanol during late gestation. In contrast, operant learning reflecting ethanol reinforcement did not occur in control animals prenatally exposed to water only. Similarly, saccharin reinforcement was not affected by prenatal ethanol exposure. These results suggest that in 5-day-old rats, prenatal exposure to a low ethanol dose facilitates operant learning reinforced by intraoral administration of a low-concentration ethanol solution. This emphasizes the importance of intrauterine experiences with ethanol in later susceptibility to drug reinforcement. The present operant conditioning technique represents an alternative tool to assess self-administration and seeking behavior during early stages of development. PMID:24355072

  20. A 26-Week Toxicity Assessment of AIR001 (Sodium Nitrite) by Inhalation Exposure in Rats and by Intravenous Administration in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Tepper, Jeffrey; Ochoa, Ricardo; Rix, Peter; Elliott, Gary; Hoglen, Niel; Poulin, Dominic; Parsley, Ed; Masamune, Hiroko

    2014-05-01

    Historically, nitrogen oxides (NOx) in food, drinking water, as well as in the atmosphere have been believed to be associated with adverse health consequences. More recently, NOx have been implicated in normal homeostatic regulation, and exogenous administration has been associated with health benefits. One such potential health benefit is the prospect that inhaled nitrite will lower pulmonary blood pressure (BP) in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a disease with poor prognosis due to the lack of effective treatment. To characterize potential chronic toxicity associated with inhaled AIR001 (sodium nitrite) for use in the treatment of PAH, 26-week exposures to AIR001 were carried out by inhalation administration in rats and by intravenous infusion in dogs. The studies revealed that methemoglobinemia was the primary adverse effect in both species. Methemoglobin levels less than 40% were well tolerated in both species, while levels greater than 50% methemoglobin caused death in some rats. Additionally, a decrease in systemic BP was also observed with inhaled AIR001 exposure in dogs. These acute secondary and exaggerated pharmacological effects occurred daily throughout the 26-week treatment period. Chronic exposure did not alter the magnitude of either methemoglobinemia or hypotension or result in additional toxicity or compensatory responses. Based on the exposure levels that produced these pharmacodynamic responses in animals, relative to those measured in early clinical studies, it appears that an adequate margin of safety exists to support the continued clinical development of inhaled AIR001. PMID:24801488

  1. Characterization of an inhaled toluene drug discrimination in mice: effect of exposure conditions and route of administration

    PubMed Central

    Shelton, Keith L.; Slavova-Hernandez, Galina

    2009-01-01

    The drug discrimination procedure in animals has been extensively utilized to model the abuse related, subjective effects of drugs in humans, but it has seldom been used to examine abused volatile inhalants like toluene. The present study sought to characterize the temporal aspects of toluene's discriminative stimulus as well assess toluene blood concentrations under identical exposure conditions. B6SJLF1/J mice were trained to discriminate 10 min of exposure to 6000 ppm inhaled toluene vapor from air. Toluene vapor concentration dependently substituted for the training exposure condition with longer exposures to equivalent concentrations producing greater substitution than shorter exposures. Toluene's discriminative stimulus effects dissipated completely by 60 min after the cessation of exposure. Injected liquid toluene dose-dependently substituted for toluene vapor as well as augmenting the discriminative stimulus effects of inhaled toluene. Toluene blood concentrations measured under several exposure conditions which produced full substitution were all nearly identical suggesting that the concentration of toluene in the animals tissues at the time of testing determined discriminative performance. These results indicate that the discriminative stimulus effects of inhaled toluene vapor are likely mediated by CNS effects rather than by it's pronounced peripheral stimulus effects. PMID:19268500

  2. Occupational Exposure to Respirable Crystalline Silica. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-03-25

    The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) is amending its existing standards for occupational exposure to respirable crystalline silica. OSHA has determined that employees exposed to respirable crystalline silica at the previous permissible exposure limits face a significant risk of material impairment to their health. The evidence in the record for this rulemaking indicates that workers exposed to respirable crystalline silica are at increased risk of developing silicosis and other non-malignant respiratory diseases, lung cancer, and kidney disease. This final rule establishes a new permissible exposure limit of 50 micrograms of respirable crystalline silica per cubic meter of air (50 [mu]g/m\\3\\) as an 8-hour time-weighted average in all industries covered by the rule. It also includes other provisions to protect employees, such as requirements for exposure assessment, methods for controlling exposure, respiratory protection, medical surveillance, hazard communication, and recordkeeping. OSHA is issuing two separate standards--one for general industry and maritime, and the other for construction--in order to tailor requirements to the circumstances found in these sectors. PMID:27017634

  3. Systemic exposure to parabens: pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, excretion balance and plasma metabolites of [14C]-methyl-, propyl- and butylparaben in rats after oral, topical or subcutaneous administration.

    PubMed

    Aubert, Nicolas; Ameller, Thibault; Legrand, Jean-Jacques

    2012-03-01

    Parabens (PB) are preservatives used in food, drugs and personal care products preventing microbial and fungal contamination. We investigated ADME profiles of [14C]-methyl-, propyl- or butylparaben (MP, PP, BP) following single oral, dermal or subcutaneous (BP) doses at 100 mg/kg to Sprague-Dawley rats. Plasma Cmax and AUC values after oral or subcutaneous doses were 4- to 10-fold higher relative to respective values after dermal administration. tmax ranged from 0.5, 2 or 8 h after oral, subcutaneous or dermal administration, respectively. MP produced higher blood Cmax and AUC levels relative to those after PP or BP. Following oral or subcutaneous administration, urinary excretion was predominant (>70%, mainly during the first 24 h), less than 4% were eliminated in the feces, 2% were retained in the tissues and carcasses. Following dermal application, >50% of the dose was unabsorbed, 14-27% or <2% were respectively excreted in the urine or feces, respectively. Overall, parabens were well absorbed after oral and subcutaneous, and partially absorbed after dermal administration. All administration routes produced a single peak in the plasma, corresponding to that of para-hydroxybenzoic acid (PHBA) suggesting that PB produce no significant systemic exposure of mammalian organisms after oral, topical or subcutaneous administration. PMID:22265941

  4. Patrol Officer Daily Noise Exposure.

    PubMed

    Gilbertson, Lynn R; Vosburgh, Donna J H

    2015-01-01

    Previous research shows that police officers are at a higher risk for noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). Little data exists on the occupational tasks, outside of the firing range, that might lead to the increased risk of NIHL. The current study collected noise dosimetry from patrol officers in a smaller department and a larger department in southern Wisconsin, United States. The noise dosimeters simultaneously measured noise in three virtual dosimeters that had different thresholds, criterion levels, and exchange rates. The virtual dosimeters were set to: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) hearing conservation criteria (OSHA-HC), the OSHA permissible exposure level criteria (OSHA-PEL), and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In addition to wearing a noise dosimeter during their respective work days, officers completed a log form documenting the type of task performed, the duration of that task, if the task involved the use of a siren, and officer characteristics that may have influenced their noise exposure, such as the type of dispatch radio unit worn. Analysis revealed that the normalized 8-hour time weighted averages (TWA) for all officers fell below the recommended OSHA and ACGIH exposure limits. The tasks involving the use of the siren had significantly higher levels than the tasks without (p = 0.005). The highest noise exposure levels were encountered when patrol officers were assisting other public safety agencies such as a fire department or emergency medical services (79 dBA). Canine officers had higher normalized 8-hr TWA noise exposure than regular patrol officers (p = 0.002). Officers with an evening work schedule had significantly higher noise exposure than the officers with a day or night work schedule (p = 0.023). There were no significant differences in exposure levels between the two departments (p = 0.22). Results suggest that this study population is unlikely to experience NIHL as

  5. 21 CFR 50.55 - Requirements for permission by parents or guardians and for assent by children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Requirements for permission by parents or guardians and for assent by children. 50.55 Section 50.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Safeguards for Children in Clinical Investigations §...

  6. 45 CFR 46.408 - Requirements for permission by parents or guardians and for assent by children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Requirements for permission by parents or guardians and for assent by children. 46.408 Section 46.408 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Protections for Children Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.408...

  7. 45 CFR 46.408 - Requirements for permission by parents or guardians and for assent by children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Requirements for permission by parents or guardians and for assent by children. 46.408 Section 46.408 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Protections for Children Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.408...

  8. 45 CFR 46.408 - Requirements for permission by parents or guardians and for assent by children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for permission by parents or guardians and for assent by children. 46.408 Section 46.408 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Protections for Children Involved as Subjects in Research § 46.408...

  9. 21 CFR 50.55 - Requirements for permission by parents or guardians and for assent by children.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requirements for permission by parents or guardians and for assent by children. 50.55 Section 50.55 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROTECTION OF HUMAN SUBJECTS Additional Safeguards for Children in Clinical Investigations §...

  10. Psychopathy Increases Perceived Moral Permissibility of Accidents

    PubMed Central

    Young, Liane; Koenigs, Michael; Kruepke, Michael; Newman, Joseph P.

    2015-01-01

    Psychopaths are notorious for their antisocial and immoral behavior, yet experimental studies have typically failed to identify deficits in their capacities for explicit moral judgment. We tested 20 criminal psychopaths and 25 criminal nonpsychopaths on a moral judgment task featuring hypothetical scenarios that systematically varied an actor’s intention and the action’s outcome. Participants were instructed to evaluate four classes of actions: accidental harms, attempted harms, intentional harms, and neutral acts. Psychopaths showed a selective difference, compared with nonpsychopaths, in judging accidents, where one person harmed another unintentionally. Specifically, psychopaths judged these actions to be more morally permissible. We suggest that this pattern reflects psychopaths’ failure to appreciate the emotional aspect of the victim’s experience of harm. These findings provide direct evidence of abnormal moral judgment in psychopathy. PMID:22390288

  11. Acute alcohol exposure, acidemia or glutamine administration impacts amino acid homeostasis in ovine maternal and fetal plasma

    PubMed Central

    Washburn, Shannon E.; Sawant, Onkar B.; Lunde, Emilie R.; Wu, Guoyao; Cudd, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    Fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) is a significant problem in human reproductive medicine. Maternal alcohol administration alters maternal amino acid homeostasis and results in acidemia in both mother and fetus, causing fetal growth restriction. We hypothesized that administration of glutamine, which increases renal ammoniagenesis to regulate acid-base balance, may provide an intervention strategy. This hypothesis was tested using sheep as an animal model. On day 115 of gestation, ewes were anesthetized and aseptic surgery was performed to insert catheters into the fetal abdominal aorta as well as the maternal abdominal aorta and vena cava. On day 128 of gestation, ewes received intravenous administration of saline, alcohol [1.75 g/kg body weight (BW)/h], a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 30 mg glutamine/kg BW, a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, alcohol + a bolus of 100 mg glutamine/kg BW, or received CO2 administration to induce acidemia independent of alcohol. Blood samples were obtained simultaneously from the mother and the fetus at times 0 and 60 min (the time of peak blood alcohol concentration) of the study. Administration of alcohol to pregnant ewes led to a reduction in concentrations of glutamine and related amino acids in plasma by 21–30%. An acute administration of glutamine to ewes, concurrent with alcohol administration, improved the profile of most amino acids (including citrulline and arginine) in maternal and fetal plasma. We suggest that glutamine may have a protective effect against alcohol-induced metabolic disorders and FAS in the ovine model. PMID:23315157

  12. Formaldehyde-exposure characterization in garment-manufacturing plants: a composite summary of three in-depth industrial-hygiene surveys

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, L.J.; Stayner, L.T.; Blade, L.M.; Halperin, W.; Keenlyside, R.

    1987-01-01

    The extent of exposure to formaldehyde was investigated at three garment manufacturing facilities using fabrics pretreated with a formaldehyde-based resin system. Two of the facilities (in Georgia) operated on a two-shift basis with approximately 1000 and 500 workers; one facility (in Pennsylvania) operated on a one-shift basis and had approximately 600 workers. The facilities cut and sewed men's dress shirts from treated fabric. Measured exposures to formaldehyde, respirable dust, and organic cleaning solvent vapors were all below the applicable American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Values and Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limits.

  13. 25 CFR 213.30 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 213.30 Section 213.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.30 Permission to...

  14. 25 CFR 213.30 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 213.30 Section 213.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.30 Permission to...

  15. 25 CFR 213.30 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 213.30 Section 213.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.30 Permission to...

  16. 25 CFR 213.30 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Permission to start operations. 213.30 Section 213.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.30 Permission to...

  17. 25 CFR 213.30 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 213.30 Section 213.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.30 Permission to...

  18. 42 CFR 433.66 - Permissible provider-related donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible provider-related donations. 433.66... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.66 Permissible provider-related donations. (a) General rule... provider-related donations without a reduction in FFP, only in accordance with the requirements of...

  19. 42 CFR 433.66 - Permissible provider-related donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible provider-related donations. 433.66... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.66 Permissible provider-related donations. (a) General rule... provider-related donations without a reduction in FFP, only in accordance with the requirements of...

  20. 42 CFR 433.66 - Permissible provider-related donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible provider-related donations. 433.66... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.66 Permissible provider-related donations. (a) General rule... provider-related donations without a reduction in FFP, only in accordance with the requirements of...

  1. 42 CFR 433.66 - Permissible provider-related donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible provider-related donations. 433.66... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.66 Permissible provider-related donations. (a) General rule... provider-related donations without a reduction in FFP, only in accordance with the requirements of...

  2. 42 CFR 433.66 - Permissible provider-related donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible provider-related donations. 433.66... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.66 Permissible provider-related donations. (a) General rule... provider-related donations without a reduction in FFP, only in accordance with the requirements of...

  3. 30 CFR 75.500 - Permissible electric equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permissible electric equipment. 75.500 Section... AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.500 Permissible electric equipment. On and after March 30, 1971: (a) All junction or distribution boxes used...

  4. 30 CFR 75.500 - Permissible electric equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permissible electric equipment. 75.500 Section... AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.500 Permissible electric equipment. On and after March 30, 1971: (a) All junction or distribution boxes used...

  5. 30 CFR 75.500 - Permissible electric equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible electric equipment. 75.500 Section... AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.500 Permissible electric equipment. On and after March 30, 1971: (a) All junction or distribution boxes used...

  6. 30 CFR 75.500 - Permissible electric equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permissible electric equipment. 75.500 Section... AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.500 Permissible electric equipment. On and after March 30, 1971: (a) All junction or distribution boxes used...

  7. 30 CFR 75.500 - Permissible electric equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible electric equipment. 75.500 Section... AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.500 Permissible electric equipment. On and after March 30, 1971: (a) All junction or distribution boxes used...

  8. 30 CFR 57.5039 - Maximum permissible concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum permissible concentration. 57.5039... Maximum permissible concentration. Except as provided by standard § 57.5005, persons shall not be exposed to air containing concentrations of radon daughters exceeding 1.0 WL in active workings....

  9. 30 CFR 57.5039 - Maximum permissible concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum permissible concentration. 57.5039... Maximum permissible concentration. Except as provided by standard § 57.5005, persons shall not be exposed to air containing concentrations of radon daughters exceeding 1.0 WL in active workings....

  10. 30 CFR 57.5039 - Maximum permissible concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum permissible concentration. 57.5039... Maximum permissible concentration. Except as provided by standard § 57.5005, persons shall not be exposed to air containing concentrations of radon daughters exceeding 1.0 WL in active workings....

  11. 26 CFR 1.409A-3 - Permissible payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permissible payments. 1.409A-3 Section 1.409A-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.409A-3 Permissible payments. (a) In general. The requirements...

  12. 49 CFR 835.3 - Scope of permissible testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope of permissible testimony. 835.3 Section 835... SAFETY BOARD TESTIMONY OF BOARD EMPLOYEES § 835.3 Scope of permissible testimony. (a) Section 701(e) of... litigation. The purposes of these sections would be defeated if expert opinion testimony of Board...

  13. 47 CFR 22.515 - Permissible communications paths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible communications paths. 22.515 Section 22.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.515 Permissible communications...

  14. 47 CFR 22.515 - Permissible communications paths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications paths. 22.515 Section 22.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.515 Permissible communications...

  15. 47 CFR 22.515 - Permissible communications paths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible communications paths. 22.515 Section 22.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.515 Permissible communications...

  16. 47 CFR 22.515 - Permissible communications paths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible communications paths. 22.515 Section 22.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.515 Permissible communications...

  17. 47 CFR 22.515 - Permissible communications paths.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible communications paths. 22.515 Section 22.515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Paging and Radiotelephone Service § 22.515 Permissible communications...

  18. 30 CFR 57.5039 - Maximum permissible concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum permissible concentration. 57.5039... Maximum permissible concentration. Except as provided by standard § 57.5005, persons shall not be exposed to air containing concentrations of radon daughters exceeding 1.0 WL in active workings....

  19. 30 CFR 57.5039 - Maximum permissible concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum permissible concentration. 57.5039... Maximum permissible concentration. Except as provided by standard § 57.5005, persons shall not be exposed to air containing concentrations of radon daughters exceeding 1.0 WL in active workings....

  20. 46 CFR 176.700 - Permission for repairs and alterations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permission for repairs and alterations. 176.700 Section 176.700 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) SMALL PASSENGER VESSELS (UNDER 100 GROSS TONS) INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Repairs and Alterations § 176.700 Permission for repairs and alterations. (a) Repairs or...

  1. 25 CFR 227.20 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 227.20 Section 227.20 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.20 Permission...

  2. 25 CFR 227.20 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Permission to start operations. 227.20 Section 227.20 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.20 Permission...

  3. 25 CFR 227.20 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 227.20 Section 227.20 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.20 Permission...

  4. 25 CFR 227.20 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 227.20 Section 227.20 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.20 Permission...

  5. 25 CFR 227.20 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 227.20 Section 227.20 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.20 Permission...

  6. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2...-2 Permissible electric face equipment. (a) On and after March 30, 1971, in mines operated...

  7. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2...-2 Permissible electric face equipment. (a) On and after March 30, 1971, in mines operated...

  8. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2...-2 Permissible electric face equipment. (a) On and after March 30, 1971, in mines operated...

  9. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2...-2 Permissible electric face equipment. (a) On and after March 30, 1971, in mines operated...

  10. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2...-2 Permissible electric face equipment. (a) On and after March 30, 1971, in mines operated...

  11. 40 CFR 1611.3 - Scope of permissible testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Scope of permissible testimony. 1611.3 Section 1611.3 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD TESTIMONY BY EMPLOYEES IN LEGAL PROCEEDINGS § 1611.3 Scope of permissible testimony. (a) The statute creating the CSB,...

  12. 49 CFR 835.3 - Scope of permissible testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope of permissible testimony. 835.3 Section 835.3 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) NATIONAL TRANSPORTATION SAFETY BOARD TESTIMONY OF BOARD EMPLOYEES § 835.3 Scope of permissible testimony. (a) Section 701(e)...

  13. 47 CFR 15.707 - Permissible channels of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible channels of operation. 15.707 Section 15.707 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Television Band Devices § 15.707 Permissible channels of operation. (a) All TVBDs are permitted to operate...

  14. Sexual Permissiveness and Correlates as Determined Through Interaction Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Alan E.

    1977-01-01

    Bivariate analyses, based on a national cross-sectional sample of college students, demonstrate weak relationships between socioeconomic background measures and two indicators of sexual permissiveness. Salient predictors of permissiveness are political preference, religion, and region of location for women or cognitive achievement for men. (Author)

  15. 12 CFR 703.13 - Permissible investment activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible investment activities. 703.13... INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.13 Permissible investment activities. (a) Regular way settlement and... funds transactions. (c) Investment repurchase transaction. A Federal credit union may enter into...

  16. 12 CFR 703.13 - Permissible investment activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible investment activities. 703.13... INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.13 Permissible investment activities. (a) Regular way settlement and... funds transactions. (c) Investment repurchase transaction. A Federal credit union may enter into...

  17. 12 CFR 703.13 - Permissible investment activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible investment activities. 703.13... INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.13 Permissible investment activities. (a) Regular way settlement and... funds transactions. (c) Investment repurchase transaction. A Federal credit union may enter into...

  18. Premarital Sexual Permissiveness: Some Methodological and Substantive Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vandiver, Richard

    The variable of permissiveness developed and measured by Ira Reiss in the form of a Guttman scale of premarital sexual permissiveness was subjected to critical analysis. Both conceptual analysis and testing of questions regarding methodology and interpretation of the scale were used. Several questions were raised about the Reiss scale including:…

  19. 50 CFR 216.252 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MAMMALS Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Conducting Precision Strike Weapon Missions in the Gulf of Mexico § 216.252 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of Authorization issued pursuant to... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking....

  20. 50 CFR 216.252 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MAMMALS Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Conducting Precision Strike Weapon Missions in the Gulf of Mexico § 216.252 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of Authorization issued pursuant to... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking....

  1. 47 CFR 1.772 - Application for special tariff permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application for special tariff permission. 1... Complaints, Applications, Tariffs, and Reports Involving Common Carriers Tariffs § 1.772 Application for special tariff permission. Applications under section 203 of the Communications Act for special...

  2. 14 CFR 399.35 - Special tariff permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special tariff permission. 399.35 Section... PROCEEDINGS) POLICY STATEMENTS STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY Policies Relating to Rates and Tariffs § 399.35 Special tariff permission. (a) Definition. As used in this section, to grant STP means to approve...

  3. 14 CFR 221.212 - Special tariff permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special tariff permission. 221.212 Section... PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Electronically Filed Tariffs § 221.212 Special tariff permission. (a) When a filer submits an electronic tariff or an amendment to an electronic tariff for which...

  4. 50 CFR 217.13 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 217.13 Section 217.13 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... at Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, CA § 217.13 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under...

  5. 50 CFR 217.82 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 217.82 Section 217.82 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... School (NEODS) Training Operations § 217.82 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters...

  6. 50 CFR 217.82 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 217.82 Section 217.82 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... School (NEODS) Training Operations § 217.82 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters...

  7. 50 CFR 216.122 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 216.122 Section 216.122 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of Authorization issued pursuant to § 216.106 and...

  8. 50 CFR 217.72 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 217.72 Section 217.72 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Kodiak Launch Complex, Alaska § 217.72 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under a Letter of...

  9. 50 CFR 216.152 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 216.152 Section 216.152 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC....152 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of Authorization issued pursuant to §§...

  10. 50 CFR 216.152 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 216.152 Section 216.152 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC....152 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of Authorization issued pursuant to §§...

  11. 50 CFR 216.122 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 216.122 Section 216.122 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of Authorization issued pursuant to § 216.106 and...

  12. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class 2 doors; permissible locations. 170.260 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.260 Class 2 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, a Class 2 door...

  13. 46 CFR 170.255 - Class 1 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class 1 doors; permissible locations. 170.255 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.255 Class 1 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, Class 1 doors...

  14. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class 2 doors; permissible locations. 170.260 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.260 Class 2 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, a Class 2 door...

  15. 46 CFR 170.255 - Class 1 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Class 1 doors; permissible locations. 170.255 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.255 Class 1 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, Class 1 doors...

  16. 46 CFR 170.255 - Class 1 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Class 1 doors; permissible locations. 170.255 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.255 Class 1 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, Class 1 doors...

  17. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Class 2 doors; permissible locations. 170.260 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.260 Class 2 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, a Class 2 door...

  18. 12 CFR 359.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 359.4... GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.4 Permissible golden parachute payments... may make a golden parachute payment if and to the extent that: (1) The appropriate federal...

  19. 12 CFR 1412.5 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 1412.5 Section 1412.5 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.5 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A System institution may agree...

  20. 12 CFR 1412.5 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 1412.5 Section 1412.5 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.5 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A System institution may agree...

  1. 12 CFR 359.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 359.5 Section 359.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.5 Permissible indemnification...

  2. 12 CFR 359.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 359.5 Section 359.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.5 Permissible indemnification...

  3. 12 CFR 750.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 750.4... GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.4 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A Federally insured credit union may agree to make or may make a golden parachute payment if: (1) NCUA,...

  4. 12 CFR 359.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 359.5 Section 359.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.5 Permissible indemnification...

  5. 12 CFR 359.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 359.4... GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.4 Permissible golden parachute payments... may make a golden parachute payment if and to the extent that: (1) The appropriate federal...

  6. 12 CFR 359.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 359.4... GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.4 Permissible golden parachute payments... may make a golden parachute payment if and to the extent that: (1) The appropriate federal...

  7. 12 CFR 1412.6 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 1412.6 Section 1412.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.6 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A System institution may make or...

  8. 12 CFR 359.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 359.4... GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.4 Permissible golden parachute payments... may make a golden parachute payment if and to the extent that: (1) The appropriate federal...

  9. 12 CFR 1412.6 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 1412.6 Section 1412.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.6 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A System institution may make or...

  10. 12 CFR 750.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 750.4... GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.4 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A Federally insured credit union may agree to make or may make a golden parachute payment if: (1) NCUA,...

  11. 12 CFR 1412.5 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 1412.5 Section 1412.5 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.5 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A System institution may agree...

  12. 12 CFR 359.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 359.4... GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.4 Permissible golden parachute payments... may make a golden parachute payment if and to the extent that: (1) The appropriate federal...

  13. 12 CFR 750.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 750.4... GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.4 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A Federally insured credit union may agree to make or may make a golden parachute payment if: (1) NCUA,...

  14. 12 CFR 1412.6 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 1412.6 Section 1412.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.6 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A System institution may make or...

  15. 12 CFR 1412.6 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 1412.6 Section 1412.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.6 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A System institution may make or...

  16. 12 CFR 359.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 359.5 Section 359.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.5 Permissible indemnification...

  17. 12 CFR 1412.5 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 1412.5 Section 1412.5 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.5 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A System institution may agree...

  18. 12 CFR 1412.6 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 1412.6 Section 1412.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.6 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A System institution may make or...

  19. 12 CFR 359.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 359.5 Section 359.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.5 Permissible indemnification...

  20. 12 CFR 1412.5 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 1412.5 Section 1412.5 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.5 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A System institution may agree...

  1. 45 CFR 1639.4 - Permissible representation of eligible clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible representation of eligible clients... CORPORATION WELFARE REFORM § 1639.4 Permissible representation of eligible clients. Recipients may represent an individual eligible client who is seeking specific relief from a welfare agency....

  2. 50 CFR 216.182 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible methods of taking. 216.182 Section 216.182 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA sonar) Sonar § 216.182 Permissible methods of taking. (a)...

  3. Controlled Administration of Penicillamine Reduces Radiation Exposure in Critical Organs during 64Cu-ATSM Internal Radiotherapy: A Novel Strategy for Liver Protection

    PubMed Central

    Yoshii, Yukie; Matsumoto, Hiroki; Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Furukawa, Takako; Morokoshi, Yukie; Sogawa, Chizuru; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Wakizaka, Hidekatsu; Yoshii, Hiroshi; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose 64Cu-diacetyl-bis (N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (64Cu-ATSM) is a promising theranostic agent that targets hypoxic regions in tumors related to malignant characteristics. Its diagnostic usefulness has been recognized in clinical studies. Internal radiotherapy (IRT) with 64Cu-ATSM is reportedly effective in preclinical studies; however, for clinical applications, improvements to reduce radiation exposure in non-target organs, particularly the liver, are required. We developed a strategy to reduce radiation doses to critical organs while preserving tumor radiation doses by controlled administration of copper chelator penicillamine during 64Cu-ATSM IRT. Methods Biodistribution was evaluated in HT-29 tumor-bearing mice injected with 64Cu-ATSM (185 kBq) with or without oral penicillamine administration. The appropriate injection interval between 64Cu-ATSM and penicillamine was determined. Then, the optimal penicillamine administration schedule was selected from single (100, 300, and 500 mg/kg) and fractionated doses (100 mg/kg×3 at 1- or 2-h intervals from 1 h after 64Cu-ATSM injection). PET imaging was performed to confirm the effect of penicillamine with a therapeutic 64Cu-ATSM dose (37 MBq). Dosimetry analysis was performed to estimate human absorbed doses. Results Penicillamine reduced 64Cu accumulation in the liver and small intestine. Tumor uptake was not affected by penicillamine administration at 1 h after 64Cu-ATSM injection, when radioactivity was almost cleared from the blood and tumor uptake had plateaued. Of the single doses, 300 mg/kg was most effective. Fractionated administration at 2-h intervals further decreased liver accumulation at later time points. PET indicated that penicillamine acts similarly with the therapeutic 64Cu-ATSM dose. Dosimetry demonstrated that appropriately scheduled penicillamine administration reduced radiation doses to critical organs (liver, ovaries, and red marrow) below tolerance levels. Laxatives reduced radiation

  4. A concept of dynamic permission mechanism on android

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, Lukas; Hanacek, Petr

    2016-02-01

    This paper discuss the main security topic in mobile security area and this topic is protect user against the leakage of data. This work primarily contains the proposal of concept of dynamic permission mechanism for Android operating system. This mechanism deals with assignment or enforcement permissions to the application according to files that the application works with. Application has set of permissions that can use, but if the user opens confident files the application permissions should change its permission set and there should not be possible leakage of this secret data. The permissions set should be stricter according to opened confidential file or more open (without restriction) if the file is not secret file. The concept proposes the solution for protecting this data leakage. Idea covers rule that user should be avoided of change this permissions himself, but this behavior should be dynamic, automatic and independent. This proposal is mainly aimed to Android operating system, but the concept can be applied to other mobile platforms with some implementation changes.

  5. Long-term methamphetamine administration in the vervet monkey models aspects of a human exposure: brain neurotoxicity and behavioral profiles.

    PubMed

    Melega, William P; Jorgensen, Matthew J; Laćan, Goran; Way, Baldwin M; Pham, Jamie; Morton, Grenvill; Cho, Arthur K; Fairbanks, Lynn A

    2008-05-01

    Methamphetamine (METH)-associated alterations in the human striatal dopamine (DA) system have been identified with positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and post-mortem studies but have not been well correlated with behavioral changes or cumulative METH intake. Animal studies that model some aspects of human long-term METH abuse can establish dose-dependency profiles of both behavioral changes and potential brain neurotoxicities for identifying consequences of particular cumulative exposures. Based on parameters from human and our monkey pharmacokinetic studies, we modeled a prevalent human METH exposure of daily multiple doses in socially housed vervet monkeys. METH doses were escalated over 33 weeks, with final dosages resulting in estimated peak plasma METH concentrations of 1-3 microM, a range measured in human abusers. With larger METH doses, progressive increases in abnormal behavior and decreases in social behavior were observed on 'injection' days. Anxiety increased on 'no injection' days while aggression decreased throughout the study. Thereafter, during 3 weeks abstinence, differences in baseline vs post-METH behaviors were not observed. Post-mortem analysis of METH brains showed 20% lower striatal DA content while autoradiography studies of precommissural striatum showed 35% lower [3H]WIN35428 binding to the DA transporter. No statistically significant changes were detected for [3H]dihydrotetrabenazine binding to the vesicular monoamine transporter (METH-lower by 10%) or for [3H]SCH 23390 and [3H]raclopride binding to DA D1 and D2 receptors, respectively. Collectively, this long-term, escalating dose METH exposure modeling a human abuse pattern, not associated with high-dose binges, resulted in dose-dependent behavioral effects and caused persistent changes in presynaptic striatal DA system integrity. PMID:17625500

  6. The effects of intraperitoneal administration of gold nanoparticles size and exposure duration on oxidative and antioxidants levels in various rat organs.

    PubMed

    Abdelhalim, Mohamed A Anwar-Kassem; Al-Ayed, Mohammed Suliman; Moussa, Sherif Abdelmottaleb

    2015-03-01

    As one of the toxic mechanism of nanoparticles (NPs), the reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation which has been widely studied. Nevertheless, the link between GNPs and antioxidant and oxidative stress markers has not been well established. The effects of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) size and exposure duration on antioxidant and oxidative stress markers including reduced glutathione (GSH), super oxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), glutathione reductase (GR), total antioxidant capacity and malondialdehyde (MDA) were evaluated in different rat organs. Adult male Wistar-Kyoto rats were randomly divided into 6 groups of 5 animals each. One group served as control and received vehicle only. The 10 nm GNPs were used in this study. The GNPs electron density and homogeneity in shape and size was evaluated. Dose of 50 μl of 10 nm GNPs in aqueous solution were administered to animals via intraperitoneal administration daily for exposure duration of 3 or 7 days. The rats were sacrificed 24 h after the last injection of GNPs. The specimens of liver, lung, kidney and heart were collected for biochemical analyses. The GPx, total antioxidant capacity, GSH and MDA levels significantly increased after administration of 10 nm GNPs for exposure duration of 3 and 7 days in the organs of rats compared with the control while the GR and SOD levels significantly decreased. The GNPs have the potential to interact with the biological system and cause undesirable effects. One of these damaging effects could be the disturbance in the natural balance between oxidative stress and antioxidant defense indices, which in turn can lead to various pathological effects. The changes in antioxidant and oxidative stress markers might be attributed to the production of ROS. PMID:25796162

  7. Accumulation of PCBs and Hg by fish and earthworms during field and laboratory exposures to Green Bay sediments. Administrative report

    SciTech Connect

    Mac, M.J.; Edsall, C.C.; Hesselberg, R.J.

    1985-11-01

    To determine whether the laboratory bioassay of Mac et al. (1984) was indeed predictive of the potential accumulation in an area with contaminated sediments, the authors conducted a field exposure of caged test organisms in lower Green Bay and a laboratory bioassay of sediments collected from the same area. The authors believe the results of this study provides an initial indication that the levels of bioaccumulation of contaminants from sediments in the laboratory are similar to what may be found in the natural environment, thus indicating potential predictive capability of the laboratory bioassay. The study further demonstrated the importance of sediment contact to the bioaccumulation process, even under conditions where significant bioaccumulation from water alone occurred.

  8. 50 CFR 218.232 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) Sonar § 218.232 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of.... This annual per-stock cap of 12 percent applies regardless of the number of SURTASS LFA sonar...

  9. 50 CFR 218.232 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) Sonar § 218.232 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of.... This annual per-stock cap of 12 percent applies regardless of the number of SURTASS LFA sonar...

  10. 50 CFR 218.232 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) Sonar § 218.232 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of.... This annual per-stock cap of 12 percent applies regardless of the number of SURTASS LFA sonar...

  11. A Biomedical Research Permissions Ontology: Cognitive and Knowledge Representation Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Obeid, Jihad; Gabriel, Davera; Sanderson, Iain

    2015-01-01

    In designing a comprehensive mechanism for managing informed consents and permissions for biomedical research involving human participants, a significant effort is dedicated to the development of standardized classification of these consents and permissions. In this paper, we describe the considerations and implications of this effort that should be addressed during the development of a Biomedical Research Permissions Ontology (RPO). It is hoped that this standardization will allow disparate research institutions to pool research data and associated consents and permissions in order to facilitate collaborative translational research projects across multiple institutions and subsequent new breakthroughs in medicine while providing: 1) essential built in protections for privacy and confidentiality of research participants and 2) a mechanism for insuring that researchers adhere to patient’s intent whether to participate in research or not. PMID:26640828

  12. Effects of adolescent nicotine exposure and withdrawal on intravenous cocaine self-administration during adulthood in male C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Price E; Miller, Mellessa M; Rogers, Tiffany D; Blaha, Charles D; Mittleman, Guy

    2014-01-01

    Studies of adolescent drug use show (1) a pattern in which the use of tobacco precedes the use of other drugs and (2) a positive relationship between adolescent tobacco use and later drug use. These observations have led to the hypothesis that a causal relationship exists between early exposure to nicotine and the later use of hard drugs such as cocaine. Using male C57BL/6J mice, we tested the hypothesis that nicotine exposure in adolescence leads to increased intravenous self-administration (IVSA) of cocaine in adulthood. Using miniature osmotic pumps, we exposed mice and their littermate controls to nicotine (24 mg/kg/day) or vehicle, respectively, over the entire course of adolescence [postnatal days (P) 28-56]. Nicotine exposure was terminated on P56 and mice were not exposed to nicotine again during the experiment. On P73, mice were allowed to acquire cocaine IVSA (1.0 mg/kg/infusion) and a dose-response curve was generated (0.18, 0.32, 0.56, 1.0, 1.8 mg/kg/infusion). Lever pressing during extinction conditions was also evaluated. All mice rapidly learned to lever press for the combination of cocaine infusions and non-drug stimuli. Analysis of the dose-response curve revealed that adolescent nicotine-exposed mice self-administered significantly more (P < 0.05) cocaine than controls at all but the highest dose. No significant differences were observed between adolescent nicotine-exposed and control mice during the acquisition or extinction stages. These results indicate that adolescent nicotine exposure can increase cocaine IVSA in mice, which suggests the possibility of a causal link between adolescent tobacco use and later cocaine use in humans. PMID:22978678

  13. Morphological Aspects of the Uptake of Simian Virus 40 by Permissive Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hummeler, Klaus; Tomassini, Natale; Sokol, Frantisek

    1970-01-01

    After exposure of permissive cells to simian virus 40 (SV40), single particles were engulfed by the cell membrane and transported to the nucleus. The cell membrane closed tightly around the particles, increasing their diameter from 40 to 55 nm. The cell membrane was lost during interaction with the nuclear membranes, and particles of the original size were found in the nucleus 1 hr after infection. Uncoating of these nuclear particles occurred rapidly, and none could be found 4 hr after infection. Viral progeny appeared 24 hr after infection. Images PMID:4097233

  14. 40 CFR 1611.3 - Scope of permissible testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Scope of permissible testimony. 1611.3 Section 1611.3 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD TESTIMONY BY EMPLOYEES IN LEGAL PROCEEDINGS § 1611.3 Scope of permissible testimony. (a) The statute creating the CSB, 42 U.S.C. 7412(r)(6)(G), precludes the...

  15. The Pharmacokinetic Exposure to Fexofenadine is Volume-Dependently Reduced in Healthy Subjects Following Oral Administration With Apple Juice.

    PubMed

    Luo, J; Imai, H; Ohyama, T; Hashimoto, S; Hasunuma, T; Inoue, Y; Kotegawa, T; Ohashi, K; Uemura, N

    2016-08-01

    Pharmacokinetic exposures to fexofenadine (FEX) are reduced by apple juice (AJ); however, the relationship between the AJ volume and the degree of AJ-FEX interaction has not been understood. In this crossover study, 10 healthy subjects received single doses of FEX 60 mg with different volumes (150, 300, and 600 mL) of AJ or water (control). To identify an AJ volume lacking clinically meaningful interaction, we tested a hypothesis that the 90% confidence interval (CI) for geometric mean ratio (GMR) of FEX AUCAJ /AUCwater is contained within a biocomparability bound of 0.5-2.0, with at least one tested volume of AJ. GMR (90% CI) of AUCAJ 150mL /AUCwater , AUCAJ 300mL /AUCwater , and AUCAJ 600mL /AUCwater were 0.903 (0.752-1.085), 0.593 (0.494-0.712), and 0.385 (0.321-0.462), respectively. While a moderate to large AJ-FEX interaction is caused by a larger volumes of AJ (e.g., 300 to 600 mL), the effect of a small volume (e.g., 150 mL) appears to be not meaningful. PMID:27197662

  16. Effects of combined ferrous sulfate administration and exposure to static magnetic field on brain oxidative stress and emotional behavior.

    PubMed

    Elferchichi, Miryam; Maaroufi, Karima; Ammari, Mohamed; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2015-03-01

    The present study was done to investigate behavioral effects and oxidative stress in iron- treated and co-exposed static magnetic field (SMF)-iron rats. Anxiety in the elevated plus- maze test, and motor skills were also assessed in the stationary beam and suspended string tests. After behavioral tests, the rats were anesthetized and their brains were removed for biochemical analysis. The co-exposure to iron and SMF induced a significant difference in elevated plus-maze test in rats. The frequency of entries and time spent in the open arms was significantly reduced (p<0.05) in the iron- and SMF-exposed group compared with the group treated with iron alone and in the control group. However, no significant difference was noticed for the motor skill test between the three groups. The biochemical investigation showed that malondialdehyde level increased (p<0.001) and that glutathione level and catalase enzyme activity decreased (p<0.001) in brain of iron- and SMF-exposed group. The dose of iron alone used in present study, was unable to induce any effect. However, the 128 mT SMF in the presence of iron ions in the body can induce disruption in the emotional behavior and can produce oxidative stress in brain tissue of rats. PMID:26441366

  17. Circadian characteristics of permissive and suppressive effects of cortisol and their role in homeostasis and the acute inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Mavroudis, Panteleimon D; Corbett, Siobhan A; Calvano, Steven E; Androulakis, Ioannis P

    2015-02-01

    In this work we explore a semi-mechanistic model that considers cortisol's permissive and suppressive effects through the regulation of cytokine receptors and cytokines respectively. Our model reveals the proactive role of cortisol during the resting period and its reactive character during the body's activity phase. Administration of an acute LPS dose during the night, when cortisol's permissive effects are higher than suppressive, leads to increased cytokine levels compared to LPS administration at morning when cortisol's suppressive effects are higher. Interestingly, our model presents a hysteretic behavior where the relative predominance of permissive or suppressive effects results not only from cortisol levels but also from the previous states of the model. Therefore, for the same cortisol levels, administration of an inflammatory stimulus at cortisol's ascending phase, that follows a time period where cytokine receptor expression is elevated ultimately sensitizing the body for the impending stimulus, leads to higher cytokine expression compared to administration of the same stimulus at cortisol's descending phase. PMID:25445574

  18. Long-Term Exposure to Ambient Fine Particulate Matter and Renal Function in Older Men: The Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Amar J.; Zanobetti, Antonella; Bind, Marie-Abele C.; Kloog, Itai; Koutrakis, Petros; Sparrow, David; Vokonas, Pantel S.; Schwartz, Joel D.

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is unknown if ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is associated with lower renal function, a cardiovascular risk factor. Objective: We investigated whether long-term PM2.5 exposure was associated with estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) in a cohort of older men living in the Boston Metropolitan area. Methods: This longitudinal analysis included 669 participants from the Veterans Administration Normative Aging Study with up to four visits between 2000 and 2011 (n = 1,715 visits). Serum creatinine was measured at each visit, and eGFR was calculated according to the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation. One-year exposure to PM2.5 prior to each visit was assessed using a validated spatiotemporal model that utilized satellite remote-sensing aerosol optical depth data. eGFR was modeled in a time-varying linear mixed-effects regression model as a continuous function of 1-year PM2.5, adjusting for important covariates. Results: One-year PM2.5 exposure was associated with lower eGFRs; a 2.1-μg/m3 interquartile range higher 1-year PM2.5 was associated with a 1.87 mL/min/1.73 m2 lower eGFR [95% confidence interval (CI): –2.99, –0.76]. A 2.1 μg/m3-higher 1-year PM2.5 was also associated with an additional annual decrease in eGFR of 0.60 mL/min/1.73 m2 per year (95% CI: –0.79, –0.40). Conclusions: In this longitudinal sample of older men, the findings supported the hypothesis that long-term PM2.5 exposure negatively affects renal function and increases renal function decline. Citation: Mehta AJ, Zanobetti A, Bind MC, Kloog I, Koutrakis P, Sparrow D, Vokonas PS, Schwartz JD. 2016. Long-term exposure to ambient fine particulate matter and renal function in older men: the VA Normative Aging Study. Environ Health Perspect 124:1353–1360; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/ehp.1510269 PMID:26955062

  19. U.S. Food and Drug Administration perspective of the inclusion of effects of low-level exposures in safety and risk assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Gaylor, D W; Bolger, P M; Schwetz, B A

    1998-01-01

    A brief overview is provided of some of the general safety and risk assessment procedures used by the different centers of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (U.S. FDA) to evaluate low-level exposures. The U.S. FDA protects public health by regulating a wide variety of consumer products including foods, human and animal drugs, biologics, and medical devices under the federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act. The diverse legal and regulatory standards in the act allow for the consideration of benefits for some products (e.g., drugs) but preclude them from others (e.g., food additives). When not precluded by statutory mandates (e.g., Delaney prohibition), the U.S. FDA considers both physiologic adaptive responses and beneficial effects. For the basic safety assessment paradigm as presently used, for example in the premarket approval of food additives, the emphasis is on the identification of adverse effects and no observed adverse effect level(s) (NOAEL). Generally, the NOAEL is divided by safety factors to establish an acceptable exposure level. This safety assessment paradigm does not preclude the consideration of effects whether they are biologically adaptive or beneficial at lower dose levels. The flexibility to consider issues such as mechanisms of action and adaptive and beneficial responses depends on the product under consideration. For carcinogenic contaminants and radiation from medical devices, the U.S. FDA considers the potential cancer risk at low exposure levels. This generally involves downward extrapolation from the observed dose-response range. The consideration of adverse effects of other toxicologic end points (e.g., reproductive, immunologic, neurologic, developmental) associated with low exposure levels is also becoming more of a reality (e.g., endocrine disrupters). The evaluation of the biologic effects of low-level exposures to toxic substances must include whether the effect is adverse or a normal physiologic adaptive response and also

  20. Benzene metabolite levels in blood and bone marrow of B6C3F{sub 1} mice after low-level exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Bechtold, W.E.; Strunk, M.R.; Thornton-Manning, J.R.

    1995-12-01

    Studies at the Inhalation Toxicology Research Institute (ITRI) have explored the species-specific uptake and metabolism of benzene. Results have shown that metabolism is dependent on both dose and route of administration. Of particular interest were shifts in the major metabolic pathways as a function of exposure concentration. In these studies, B6C3F{sub 1} mice were exposed to increasing levels of benzene by either gavage or inhalation. As benzene internal dose increased, the relative amounts of muconic acid and hydroquinone decreased. In contrast, the relative amount of catechol increased with increasing exposure. These results show that the relative levels of toxic metabolites are a function of exposure level. Based on these results and assuming a linear relationship between exposure concentration and levels of bone marrow metabolites, it would be difficult to detect an elevation of any phenolic metabolites above background after occupational exposures to the OSHA Permissible Exposure Limit of 1 ppm benzene.

  1. Repeated systemic administration of the nutraceutical alpha-linolenic acid exerts neuroprotective efficacy, an antidepressant effect and improves cognitive performance when given after soman exposure.

    PubMed

    Pan, Hongna; Piermartiri, Tetsade C B; Chen, Jun; McDonough, John; Oppel, Craig; Driwech, Wafae; Winter, Kristin; McFarland, Emylee; Black, Katelyn; Figueiredo, Taiza; Grunberg, Neil; Marini, Ann M

    2015-12-01

    Exposure to nerve agents results in severe seizures or status epilepticus caused by the inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, a critical enzyme that breaks down acetylcholine to terminate neurotransmission. Prolonged seizures cause brain damage and can lead to long-term consequences. Current countermeasures are only modestly effective against the brain damage supporting interest in the evaluation of new and efficacious therapies. The nutraceutical alpha-linolenic acid (LIN) is an essential omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid that has a wide safety margin. Previous work showed that a single intravenous injection of alpha-linolenic acid (500 nmol/kg) administered before or after soman significantly protected against soman-induced brain damage when analyzed 24h after exposure. Here, we show that administration of three intravenous injections of alpha-linolenic acid over a 7 day period after soman significantly improved motor performance on the rotarod, enhanced memory retention, exerted an anti-depressant-like activity and increased animal survival. This dosing schedule significantly reduced soman-induced neuronal degeneration in four major vulnerable brain regions up to 21 days. Taken together, alpha-linolenic acid reduces the profound behavioral deficits induced by soman possibly by decreasing neuronal cell death, and increases animal survival. PMID:26386148

  2. 12 CFR 703.14 - Permissible investments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... less than 5 years. (g) European financial options contract. A Federal credit union may purchase a... Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS INVESTMENT... credit union may invest in a variable rate investment, as long as the index is tied to domestic...

  3. 5 CFR 151.111 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., including candidacy for office in a nonpartisan election and candidacy for political party office... 151.111 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS POLITICAL.... (a) All State or local officers or employees are free to engage in political activity to the...

  4. 5 CFR 151.111 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., including candidacy for office in a nonpartisan election and candidacy for political party office... 151.111 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS POLITICAL.... (a) All State or local officers or employees are free to engage in political activity to the...

  5. CIRRPC Science Panel report No. 6: Use of probability of causation by the veterans administration in the adjudication of claims of injury due to exposure to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    1988-08-01

    The report was prepared in response to a request from the Administrator of Veterans Affairs, Veterans Administration (VA) Coordination (CIRRPC) to provide guidelines to the VA with respect to the questions ``...for what levels of radiation exposure, if any, the radioepidemiological tables can be used credibly in the rule-making we are conducting pursuant to Public Law 98-542`` and ``...whether CIRRPC`s views in this regard vary with the type of cancer involved and whether use of the NIH tables for certain cancers may be more justifiable than for other cancers.`` The report prepared by the Science Subpanel on Radioepidemiological Tables and approved by the CIRRPC Science Panel answers these questions by listing those cancers both considered to be radiogenic in the NIH Report and to be applicable to veterans and by providing, for these cancers, radiation doses that allow the VA to exclude from further consideration those claims having ``no reasonable possibility`` (a VA stated criteria) of merit. The report provides important scientific information which can be used as part of the evidence for evaluating, along with other evidence, claims not eliminated by the screening procedure.

  6. Role of cannabinoidergic mechanisms in ethanol self-administration and ethanol seeking in rat adult offspring following perinatal exposure to {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol

    SciTech Connect

    Economidou, Daina; Mattioli, Laura; Ubaldi, Massimo; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Soverchia, Laura; Hardiman, Gary; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Ciccocioppo, Roberto

    2007-08-15

    The present study evaluated the consequences of perinatal {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol ({delta}{sup 9}-THC) treatment (5 mg/kg/day by gavage), either alone or combined with ethanol (3% v/v as the only fluid available), on ethanol self-administration and alcohol-seeking behavior in rat adult offspring. Furthermore, the effect of the selective cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonist, SR-141716A, on ethanol self-administration and on reinstatement of ethanol-seeking behavior induced either by stress or conditioned drug-paired cues was evaluated in adult offspring of rats exposed to the same perinatal treatment. Lastly, microarray experiments were conducted to evaluate if perinatal treatment with {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol, ethanol or their combination causes long-term changes in brain gene expression profile in rats. The results of microarray data analysis showed that 139, 112 and 170 genes were differentially expressed in the EtOH, {delta}{sup 9}-THC, or EtOH + {delta}{sup 9}-THC group, respectively. No differences in alcohol self-administration and alcohol seeking were observed between rat groups. Intraperitoneal (IP) administration of SR-141716A (0.3-3.0 mg/kg) significantly reduced lever pressing for ethanol and blocked conditioned reinstatement of alcohol seeking. At the same doses SR-141716A failed to block foot-shock stress-induced reinstatement of alcohol seeking. The results reveal that perinatal exposure to {delta}{sup 9}-THC ethanol or their combination results in evident changes in gene expression patterns. However, these treatments do not significantly affect vulnerability to ethanol abuse in adult offspring. On the other hand, the results obtained with SR-141716A emphasize that endocannabinoid mechanisms play a major role in ethanol self-administration, as well as in the reinstatement of ethanol-seeking behavior induced by conditioned cues, supporting the idea that cannabinoid CB{sub 1} receptor antagonists may represent interesting

  7. Early administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril, prevents the development of hypertension programmed by intrauterine exposure to a maternal low-protein diet in the rat.

    PubMed

    Sherman, R C; Langley-Evans, S C

    1998-04-01

    1. Associations of intrauterine exposure to maternal undernutrition with later hypertension and coronary heart disease in the human population have been duplicated in the rat. Fetal exposure to low protein diets produces offspring that develop raised systolic blood pressure by the age of weaning. This animal model of 'programmed' hypertension was used to investigate the role of the renin-angiotensin system in the initiation and maintenance of high blood pressure. 2. Pregnant rats were fed diets containing 18 or 9% casein from conception until littering. The offspring from these pregnancies were administered captopril either between 2 and 4 weeks of age, or from 10 to 12 weeks of age. 3. The feeding of low protein diets in pregnancy had no effect upon the reproductive ability of female rats and the offspring generated were of normal birthweight. By 4 weeks of age the male and female offspring of low-protein-fed dams had systolic blood pressures that were 24-25 mmHg higher than those of rats exposed to a control diet in utero. 4. Treatment of 10-week-old female offspring with captopril for 2 weeks indicated that angiotensin II formation may play a role in the maintenance of high blood pressure in low-protein-exposed rats. While captopril had no significant effect upon systolic pressures of rats exposed to the control diet in intrauterine life, the systolic blood pressures of low-protein animals rapidly declined by 31 mmHg. 5. Administration of captopril to male and female offspring between 2 and 4 weeks of age exerted long-term effects upon systolic blood pressure. Eight weeks after cessation of treatment, at an age where maximal blood pressures are achieved, captopril-treated, low-protein-exposed rats had similar blood pressures to normotensive rats exposed to the protein-replete diet in utero. 6. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that the elevation of adult blood pressure associated with fetal exposure to a maternal low-protein diet, is prevented by early

  8. 30 CFR 57.5042 - Revised exposure levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Revised exposure levels. 57.5042 Section 57... exposure levels. If levels of permissible exposures to concentrations of radon daughters different from... President, no employee shall be permitted to receive exposures in excess of those levels after the...

  9. Permissive nicotine regulation as a complement to traditional tobacco control

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Walton

    2005-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking takes a staggering toll on human health and attracts considerable public health attention, yet real solutions seem distant. The 2004 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (US Senate bill S2461) would have given the US Food and Drug Administration limited authority to regulate cigarettes to "protect the public health." However, such legislation is unlikely to substantially reduce smoking or related deaths. Discussion The past 500 years of tobacco control efforts demonstrate that nicotine prohibition is a practical impossibility for numerous reasons, state revenue being one of the most ominous. The FDA already has regulatory authority over pharmaceutical grade nicotine products, and requires pharmacists to dispense the most addictive of these only with prescriptions. Meanwhile, every corner store can sell far more addictive and dangerous cigarettes to any adult. The FDA could immediately increase competition between cigarettes and clean nicotine products by approving available nicotine products for over-the-counter sales to adults. Similarly permissive regulation of cigarettes and addictive nicotine products will reduce tobacco use and improve smokers' health, but increase nicotine use in the population. Fortunately, restricted youth access and accurate labeling of nicotine's absolute risks will dissuade many non-smokers from experimenting with it, while accurate depiction of its risks relative to cigarette smoking will encourage many smokers to switch. The FDA could take a series of small steps that might ultimately replace a large proportion of cigarette smoking with equally addictive nicotine products, without risking serious public health setbacks. Vaccine, methadone, and injury prevention policies establish relevant public health precedents. Summary Cigarettes, or an equally addictive alternative, will be a permanent and common product in most societies. Regulations restricting only the safest addictive nicotine products

  10. Formaldehyde Exposures in a University Anatomy Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, Kyle William

    Air sampling studies were conducted within a university anatomical laboratory during the embalmment of a cadaver in order to determine if dangerous concentrations of formaldehyde existed. Three air sampling studies were conducted in the anatomical laboratory on three separate days that a cadaver was being embalmed. Samples were collected and analyzed using the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Sampling and Analytical Methods: Method 52. Each air sampling study sampled for short term exposure limit (STEL) and time weighted mean (TWA) breathing zone formaldehyde concentrations as well as area TWA formaldehyde concentrations. A personal aldehyde monitor was also used in each air sampling study to sample for breathing zone formaldehyde concentrations. Measured TWA mean exposures to formaldehyde ranged from 0.15--1.3 parts per million (ppm), STEL formaldehyde exposures ranged from 0.019--0.64 ppm, and eight-hour TWAs ranged from 0.03 to 3.6 ppm. All 8-hour TWA formaldehyde concentrations sampled in the anatomy laboratory during an embalmment were less than the permissible exposure limit (PEL) required by OSHA.

  11. Permissive hypercapnia and risk for brain injury and developmental impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hagen, Erika W.; Sadek-Badawi, Mona; Carlton, David P.; Palta, Mari

    2008-01-01

    Objective Permissive hypercapnia is a respiratory care strategy used to reduce the risk of lung injury. The goal of this study was to evaluate whether permissive hypercapnia is associated with higher risk for intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and early childhood behavioral and functional problems than normocapnia among very low birthweight (VLBW) infants. Patients and Methods VLBW infants from a statewide cohort were eligible for this study if they were born <32 weeks gestational age and survived at least 24 hours. Infants were classified as receiving a permissive hypercapnia (N=122), normocapnia (N=235), or unclassifiable (N=791) respiratory strategy during the first 24 hours after birth according to an algorithm based on PCO2 values and respiratory treatment decisions abstracted from medical records. IVH diagnosis was also abstracted from the medical record. Behavioral and functional outcomes were assessed by parent interview at 2-3 years. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the relationship between IVH and respiratory strategy; ordinary linear regression was used to evaluate differences in behavior and function scores between children by respiratory strategy. Results Infants who received a permissive hypercapnia strategy were not more likely to have IVH than those with normocapnia (odds ratio=1.0, 95% confidence interval: 0.59, 1.8). There were no differences in any of the behavioral or functional scores between children by respiratory strategy. There was a significant interaction between care strategy and one-minute Apgar score, indicating that infants with lower Apgar scores may be at higher risk for IVH with permissive hypercapnia. Conclusion This study suggests permissive hypercapnia does not increase risk for brain injury and impairment among VLBW children. The interaction between respiratory strategy and Apgar score is a potential worrisome exception to this conclusion. Future research should further evaluate the effect of elevated PCO2 levels among

  12. Self-reported narcissism and perceived parental permissiveness and authoritarianism.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, A; Watson, P J; Biderman, M D; Reeves, A L

    1996-06-01

    The hypothesis that inadequate parenting promotes the development of pathological narcissism was tested in a sample of 370 undergraduate students. They responded to the O'Brien (1987) Multiphasic Narcissism Inventory (OMNI) and to measures of parental permissiveness, authoritarianism, and authoritativeness. Perceived parental permissiveness and authoritarianism served as independent predictors of greater narcissistic tendencies. The students who scored high on the OMNI were also less likely to evaluate both of their parents as having been especially strong in their use of the adjustment-promoting authoritative style. Theoretical efforts to link narcissism with inadequate parenting therefore may have merit and may deserve additional research attention. PMID:8656207

  13. Comparison of the Risk of Gastrointestinal Bleeding among Different Statin Exposures with Concomitant Administration of Warfarin: Electronic Health Record-Based Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sun Gyo; Hong, Ji Man; Park, Rae Woong; Lee, Jin Soo

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Patients who should be treated with both warfarin and a statin are frequently seen in vascular clinics. The risk for bleeding and potential drug interactions should be considered when prescribing both medications together. This study aimed to compare the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding among different statin exposures with concomitant administration of warfarin. Materials and Methods This is a single-hospital retrospective cohort study. We included patients who were concomitantly exposed to one of four statins (pravastatin, simvastatin, atorvastatin, and rosuvastatin) and warfarin for up to 2 years (730 days). The observation period ended when a gastrointestinal bleeding event occurred or the observation was censored. Within-class comparisons were used, and 1:1 matching using a propensity score was performed for comparisons between each statin and all of the other statins. Kaplan-Meier analyses with log-rank tests and Cox proportional hazard regression analyses were conducted to determine associations with the risk of gastrointestinal bleeding. Results Data were analyzed for 1,686 patients who were concomitantly administered a statin and warfarin. Log-rank tests for the gastrointestinal bleeding-free survival rate showed that the risk for gastrointestinal bleeding was significantly lower in the pravastatin group (p = 0.0499) and higher in the rosuvastatin group (p = 0.009). In the Cox proportional hazard regression analysis, the hazard ratio of 5.394 for gastrointestinal bleeding based on statin exposure in the rosuvastatin group was significant (95% confidence interval, 1.168–24.916). Conclusions There was a relatively high risk of gastrointestinal bleeding with rosuvastatin when administered concomitantly with warfarin. PMID:27386858

  14. Occupational exposures to respirable crystalline silica during hydraulic fracturing.

    PubMed

    Esswein, Eric J; Breitenstein, Michael; Snawder, John; Kiefer, Max; Sieber, W Karl

    2013-01-01

    This report describes a previously uncharacterized occupational health hazard: work crew exposures to respirable crystalline silica during hydraulic fracturing. Hydraulic fracturing involves high pressure injection of large volumes of water and sand, and smaller quantities of well treatment chemicals, into a gas or oil well to fracture shale or other rock formations, allowing more efficient recovery of hydrocarbons from a petroleum-bearing reservoir. Crystalline silica ("frac sand") is commonly used as a proppant to hold open cracks and fissures created by hydraulic pressure. Each stage of the process requires hundreds of thousands of pounds of quartz-containing sand; millions of pounds may be needed for all zones of a well. Mechanical handling of frac sand creates respirable crystalline silica dust, a potential exposure hazard for workers. Researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health collected 111 personal breathing zone samples at 11 sites in five states to evaluate worker exposures to respirable crystalline silica during hydraulic fracturing. At each of the 11 sites, full-shift samples exceeded occupational health criteria (e.g., the Occupational Safety and Health Administration calculated permissible exposure limit, the NIOSH recommended exposure limit, or the ACGIH threshold limit value), in some cases, by 10 or more times the occupational health criteria. Based on these evaluations, an occupational health hazard was determined to exist for workplace exposures to crystalline silica. Seven points of dust generation were identified, including sand handling machinery and dust generated from the work site itself. Recommendations to control exposures include product substitution (when feasible), engineering controls or modifications to sand handling machinery, administrative controls, and use of personal protective equipment. To our knowledge, this represents the first systematic study of work crew exposures to crystalline silica during

  15. To the question of maximal permissible load with chemical substances in man.

    PubMed

    Rosíval, L; Vargová, M

    1984-01-01

    The authors introduce an over-all evaluation of a maximum admissible drug load in man, as related to professional exposure, environmental atmosphere, water, soil, and foodstuffs. To minimize the occurrence of lesions, it is necessary to disclose and classify the environmental factors responsible for homeostasis of the human organism. Moreover, it is desirable to establish the limits of biologically adverse changes of the medium. A real adaptation is possible provided the above changes are sufficiently slow and enable development of optimum mechanisms of reactions within the biological homeostasis. The establishment of an effective system for optimalization of man's environment necessitates further advancement and improvement of methods and their more adequate selection. This adequacy should respond to the real conditions of evaluation of relationships of man and populations with dynamically changing environment. The understanding of general regularities and mechanisms of this complex action will be indispensable. The to-date experience implies that the criteria for determination of the maximum permissible load of environment and man with chemical compounds are quantitative relationships between intensity, frequency and duration of exposure to chemicals in the atmosphere, and the magnitude of undesirable changes in man and his environment. The classification of acceptable or permissible limits of concentration (or other index of exposure) of chemical substances in the atmosphere pursues the protection of the population from undesirable effects under variable conditions of exposure (chemical compounds in working places, atmosphere, alien foreign substances in food, water or soil). The number of potentially toxic substances to be evaluated both hygienically and toxicologically, amounts to about 25 000. Newly introduced chemical compounds annually make about 1000-5000, of which approximately 10% need a thorough examination. The limits can be divided into several groups

  16. Post-exposure administration of diazepam combined with soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition stops seizures and modulates neuroinflammation in a murine model of acute TETS intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Vito, Stephen T.; Austin, Adam T.; Banks, Christopher N.; Inceoglu, Bora; Bruun, Donald A.; Zolkowska, Dorota; Tancredi, Daniel J.; Rogawski, Michael A.; Hammock, Bruce D.; Lein, Pamela J.

    2014-12-01

    Tetramethylenedisulfotetramine (TETS) is a potent convulsant poison for which there is currently no approved antidote. The convulsant action of TETS is thought to be mediated by inhibition of type A gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor (GABA{sub A}R) function. We, therefore, investigated the effects of post-exposure administration of diazepam, a GABA{sub A}R positive allosteric modulator, on seizure activity, death and neuroinflammation in adult male Swiss mice injected with a lethal dose of TETS (0.15 mg/kg, ip). Administration of a high dose of diazepam (5 mg/kg, ip) immediately following the second clonic seizure (approximately 20 min post-TETS injection) effectively prevented progression to tonic seizures and death. However, this treatment did not prevent persistent reactive astrogliosis and microglial activation, as determined by GFAP and Iba-1 immunoreactivity and microglial cell morphology. Inhibition of soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) has been shown to exert potent anti-inflammatory effects and to increase survival in mice intoxicated with other GABA{sub A}R antagonists. The sEH inhibitor TUPS (1 mg/kg, ip) administered immediately after the second clonic seizure did not protect TETS-intoxicated animals from tonic seizures or death. Combined administration of diazepam (5 mg/kg, ip) and TUPS (1 mg/kg, ip, starting 1 h after diazepam and repeated every 24 h) prevented TETS-induced lethality and influenced signs of neuroinflammation in some brain regions. Significantly decreased microglial activation and enhanced reactive astrogliosis were observed in the hippocampus, with no changes in the cortex. Combining an agent that targets specific anti-inflammatory mechanisms with a traditional antiseizure drug may enhance treatment outcome in TETS intoxication. - Highlights: • Acute TETS intoxication causes delayed and persistent neuroinflammation. • Diazepam given post-TETS prevents lethal tonic seizures but not neuroinflammation. • A soluble epoxide hydrolase

  17. Effects of acute ethanol administration and chronic stress exposure on social investigation and 50kHz ultrasonic vocalizations in adolescent and adult male Sprague-Dawley rats.

    PubMed

    Willey, Amanda R; Spear, Linda P

    2013-04-01

    Adolescents drink largely in social situations, likely in an attempt to facilitate social interactions. This study sought to examine alterations in the incentive salience of a social stimulus following repeated stress exposure and acute ethanol administration in adolescent and adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Subjects were either exposed to 5days of restraint stress, chronic variable stress (CVS), which consisted of a different stressor every day, or non-stressed. On test day, the animals were injected with 0, 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75g/kg ethanol and placed in a social approach test in which they could see, hear, and smell a social conspecific, but could not physically interact with it. All the animals showed an interest in the social stimulus, with adolescents engaging in more social investigation than adults. Restraint stressed adults showed ethanol-induced increases in social investigation, while ethanol effects were not seen in any other group. An ethanol-associated increase in 50kHz ultrasonic vocalization (USV) production was only evident in restraint stressed adolescents following 0.75g/kg ethanol. 50kHz USVs were not correlated with time spent investigating the social stimulus in any test condition. These results show that age differences in the facilitatory effects of ethanol on incentive salience of social stimuli are moderated by stress, with the facilitation of social approach by ethanol only evident in restraint stressed adults. PMID:23360955

  18. 24 CFR 4.26 - Permissible and impermissible disclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permissible and impermissible disclosures. 4.26 Section 4.26 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD REFORM ACT Prohibition of Advance Disclosure of Funding Decisions §...

  19. 47 CFR 74.1231 - Purpose and permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Purpose and permissible service. 74.1231 Section 74.1231 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES FM Broadcast Translator Stations and FM Broadcast...

  20. 12 CFR 713.6 - What is the permissible deductible?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What is the permissible deductible? 713.6... based on it having assets in excess of $1 million as reflected in its most recent year-end 5300 call report and, as of that same year-end, qualifying for NCUA's Regulatory Flexibility Program under part...

  1. 12 CFR 713.6 - What is the permissible deductible?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is the permissible deductible? 713.6... based on it having assets in excess of $1 million as reflected in its most recent year-end 5300 call report and, as of that same year-end, qualifying for NCUA's Regulatory Flexibility Program under part...

  2. 47 CFR 74.731 - Purpose and permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.731 Purpose and permissible service. (a) Television broadcast... locally generated radio frequency signal similar to that of a TV broadcast station and modulated...

  3. 47 CFR 74.731 - Purpose and permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.731 Purpose and permissible service. (a) Television broadcast... locally generated radio frequency signal similar to that of a TV broadcast station and modulated...

  4. 47 CFR 74.731 - Purpose and permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.731 Purpose and permissible service. (a) Television broadcast... locally generated radio frequency signal similar to that of a TV broadcast station and modulated...

  5. 47 CFR 74.731 - Purpose and permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.731 Purpose and permissible service. (a) Television broadcast... locally generated radio frequency signal similar to that of a TV broadcast station and modulated...

  6. 47 CFR 74.731 - Purpose and permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.731 Purpose and permissible service. (a) Television broadcast... locally generated radio frequency signal similar to that of a TV broadcast station and modulated...

  7. 5 CFR 351.608 - Permissive temporary exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... REDUCTION IN FORCE Release From Competitive Level § 351.608 Permissive temporary exceptions. (a) General. (1... effective date of a reduction in force. Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (c) and (e) of this... of a reduction in force action, an agency may not amend or cancel the reduction in force notice of...

  8. 34 CFR 300.208 - Permissive use of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Local Educational Agency Eligibility § 300.208 Permissive use of funds. (a) Uses... intervening services. To develop and implement coordinated, early intervening educational services in... technology for recordkeeping, data collection, and related case management activities of teachers and...

  9. Permissiveness and Premarital Sexual Activity: Behavioral Correlates of Attitudinal Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dignan, Mark; Anspaugh, David

    1978-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether undergraduates classified as high or low in sexual permissiveness could be differentiated using variables reflecting socioeconomic status, religious background, sexual behavior, and sexual knowledge. The derived discriminant functions were found to correctly classify 97.1 percent of the subjects.…

  10. 12 CFR 543.2 - Application for permission to organize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Application for permission to organize. 543.2 Section 543.2 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL... information is exempt from public disclosure. (e) Submission of comments. Commenters may submit comments...

  11. 12 CFR 543.2 - Application for permission to organize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Application for permission to organize. 543.2 Section 543.2 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL... information is exempt from public disclosure. (e) Submission of comments. Commenters may submit comments...

  12. 12 CFR 543.2 - Application for permission to organize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Application for permission to organize. 543.2 Section 543.2 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL... information is exempt from public disclosure. (e) Submission of comments. Commenters may submit comments...

  13. 12 CFR 543.2 - Application for permission to organize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Application for permission to organize. 543.2 Section 543.2 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL... information is exempt from public disclosure. (e) Submission of comments. Commenters may submit comments...

  14. 12 CFR 543.2 - Application for permission to organize.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2013-01-01 2012-01-01 true Application for permission to organize. 543.2 Section 543.2 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF THRIFT SUPERVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FEDERAL MUTUAL... information is exempt from public disclosure. (e) Submission of comments. Commenters may submit comments...

  15. 47 CFR 101.1013 - Permissible communications services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible communications services. 101.1013 Section 101.1013 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1013...

  16. 47 CFR 101.1013 - Permissible communications services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications services. 101.1013 Section 101.1013 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1013...

  17. 47 CFR 101.1407 - Permissible operations for MVDDS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible operations for MVDDS. 101.1407 Section 101.1407 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multichannel Video Distribution and Data Service Rules for the 12.2-12.7 GHz Band § 101.1407...

  18. 47 CFR 101.1407 - Permissible operations for MVDDS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multichannel Video Distribution and Data Service Rules for the 12.2-12.7 GHz Band § 101.1407 Permissible operations for MVDDS. MVDDS licensees must use spectrum in the 12.2-12... using other spectrum or media for the return or upstream path....

  19. 47 CFR 101.1407 - Permissible operations for MVDDS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible operations for MVDDS. 101.1407 Section 101.1407 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multichannel Video Distribution and Data Service Rules for the 12.2-12.7 GHz Band § 101.1407...

  20. 47 CFR 101.1407 - Permissible operations for MVDDS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multichannel Video Distribution and Data Service Rules for the 12.2-12.7 GHz Band § 101.1407 Permissible operations for MVDDS. MVDDS licensees must use spectrum in the 12.2-12... using other spectrum or media for the return or upstream path....

  1. 47 CFR 101.1407 - Permissible operations for MVDDS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multichannel Video Distribution and Data Service Rules for the 12.2-12.7 GHz Band § 101.1407 Permissible operations for MVDDS. MVDDS licensees must use spectrum in the 12.2-12... using other spectrum or media for the return or upstream path....

  2. 5 CFR 351.608 - Permissive temporary exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... REDUCTION IN FORCE Release From Competitive Level § 351.608 Permissive temporary exceptions. (a) General. (1... effective date of a reduction in force. Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (c) and (e) of this... of a reduction in force action, an agency may not amend or cancel the reduction in force notice of...

  3. 36 CFR 264.12 - Use without permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use without permission. 264.12 Section 264.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Symbol § 264.12 Use without...

  4. 36 CFR 264.12 - Use without permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use without permission. 264.12 Section 264.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Symbol § 264.12 Use without...

  5. 36 CFR 264.12 - Use without permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use without permission. 264.12 Section 264.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Symbol § 264.12 Use without...

  6. 36 CFR 264.12 - Use without permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use without permission. 264.12 Section 264.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Symbol § 264.12 Use without...

  7. 36 CFR 264.12 - Use without permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Use without permission. 264.12 Section 264.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Symbol § 264.12 Use without...

  8. 47 CFR 101.1013 - Permissible communications services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible communications services. 101.1013 Section 101.1013 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1013...

  9. 47 CFR 101.1013 - Permissible communications services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible communications services. 101.1013 Section 101.1013 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1013...

  10. 47 CFR 101.1013 - Permissible communications services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible communications services. 101.1013 Section 101.1013 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1013...

  11. 19 CFR 122.66 - Clearance or permission to depart denied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Clearance of Aircraft and Permission To Depart § 122.66 Clearance or permission to depart denied. If advance electronic air cargo information is not received...

  12. 30 CFR 57.5042 - Revised exposure levels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Revised exposure levels. 57.5042 Section 57..., Radiation, Physical Agents, and Diesel Particulate Matter Radiation-Underground Only § 57.5042 Revised exposure levels. If levels of permissible exposures to concentrations of radon daughters different...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1002 - Installation of electric equipment and conductors; permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Installation of electric equipment and... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1002 Installation of electric equipment and conductors; permissibility. (a) Electric equipment must be permissible and maintained in a permissible condition when...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1002 - Installation of electric equipment and conductors; permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Installation of electric equipment and... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1002 Installation of electric equipment and conductors; permissibility. (a) Electric equipment must be permissible and maintained in a permissible condition when...

  15. 30 CFR 75.1002 - Installation of electric equipment and conductors; permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Installation of electric equipment and... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1002 Installation of electric equipment and conductors; permissibility. (a) Electric equipment must be permissible and maintained in a permissible condition when...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1002 - Installation of electric equipment and conductors; permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Installation of electric equipment and... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1002 Installation of electric equipment and conductors; permissibility. (a) Electric equipment must be permissible and maintained in a permissible condition when...

  17. 30 CFR 75.1002 - Installation of electric equipment and conductors; permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Installation of electric equipment and... Wires and Trolley Feeder Wires § 75.1002 Installation of electric equipment and conductors; permissibility. (a) Electric equipment must be permissible and maintained in a permissible condition when...

  18. 30 CFR 75.505 - Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... permissible electric face equipment. 75.505 Section 75.505 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.505 Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face... was required to use permissible electric face equipment and to maintain such equipment in...

  19. 30 CFR 75.505 - Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... permissible electric face equipment. 75.505 Section 75.505 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.505 Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face... was required to use permissible electric face equipment and to maintain such equipment in...

  20. 30 CFR 75.505 - Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... permissible electric face equipment. 75.505 Section 75.505 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.505 Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face... was required to use permissible electric face equipment and to maintain such equipment in...

  1. 30 CFR 75.505 - Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... permissible electric face equipment. 75.505 Section 75.505 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.505 Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face... was required to use permissible electric face equipment and to maintain such equipment in...

  2. Occupational exposures during the World Trade Center disaster response.

    PubMed

    Wallingford, K M; Snyder, E M

    2001-06-01

    Upon the request of the New York City Department of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) monitored occupational exposures among emergency response workers during the rescue and recovery activities at the World Trade Center disaster site from September 18 through 4 October 2001. During this period, over 1,200 bulk and air samples were collected to estimate or characterize workers' occupational exposures. Samples were collected and analyzed for asbestos, carbon monoxide (CO), chlorodifluoromethane (Freon 22), diesel exhaust, hydrogen sulfide, inorganic acids, mercury and other metals, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, respirable particulate not otherwise regulated (PNOR), respirable crystalline silica, total PNOR, and volatile organic compounds. Exposures to most of these potential hazards did not exceed NIOSH Recommended Exposure Limits or Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Limits. However, one torch cutter was overexposed to cadmium and another worker (and possibly three others) was overexposed to CO. The elevated cadmium and CO levels were the result of workers using oxy-acetylene cutting torches and gasoline-powered cutting saws. Recommendations were made to ensure adequate ventilation and worker understanding when using these tools and, where possible, to substitute rechargeable, battery-powered cutting saws for gasoline-powered ones. Toxicology PMID:12539869

  3. Successful reduction of silica exposures at a sanitary ware pottery.

    PubMed

    Cooper, T C; Gressel, M G; Froehlich, P A; Caplan, P E; Mickelsen, R L; Valiante, D; Bost, P

    1993-10-01

    Researchers from the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a joint survey with the New Jersey Department of Health (NJDOH) to measure crystalline silica exposures and evaluate the adequacy of the existing control measures for reducing these exposures at a sanitary ware pottery. This survey found that 95% of the personal and area samples from the Slip House, Casting, Glaze Spray, and Glaze Preparation Departments exceeded the NIOSH Recommended Exposure Level (87% exceeded the Occupational Safety and Health Administration Permissible Exposure Level) for crystalline silica. Three years later, a follow-up survey found statistically significant reductions in respirable crystalline silica exposures in two of four plant departments, and statistically significant reductions in area concentrations in all four plant departments. These reductions were accomplished through a combination of automating and enclosing the batching system in the Slip House and by replacing the mold parting compound with a nonsilica material, altering the method of dry sweeping, cleaning of castings while damp, improving exhaust ventilation at the spray booths, and improved housekeeping. PMID:8237793

  4. Ototoxic occupational exposures for a stock car racing team: II. chemical surveys.

    PubMed

    Gwin, Kristin K; Wallingford, Kenneth M; Morata, Thais C; Van Campen, Luann E; Dallaire, Jacques; Alvarez, Frank J

    2005-08-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted a series of surveys to evaluate occupational exposure to noise and potentially ototoxic chemical agents among members of a professional stock car racing team. Exposure assessments included site visits to the team's race shop and a worst-case scenario racetrack. During site visits to the race team's shop, area samples were collected to measure exposures to potentially ototoxic chemicals, including, organic compounds (typical of solvents), metals, and carbon monoxide (CO). Exposures to these chemicals were all below their corresponding Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limits (PELs), NIOSH recommended exposure limits (RELs), and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) threshold limit values (TLVs). During site visits to the racetrack, area and personal samples were collected for organic compounds, lead, and CO in and around the "pit" area where the cars undergo race preparation and service during the race. Exposures to organic compounds and lead were either nondetectable or too low to quantify. Twenty-five percent of the CO time-weighted average concentrations exceeded the OSHA PEL, NIOSH REL, and ACGIH TLV after being adjusted for a 10-hour workday. Peak CO measurements exceeded the NIOSH recommended ceiling limit of 200 ppm. Based on these data, exposures to potentially ototoxic chemicals are probably not high enough to produce an adverse effect greater than that produced by the high sound pressure levels alone. However, carbon monoxide levels occasionally exceeded all evaluation criteria at the racetrack. PMID:16009649

  5. 24 CFR 58.75 - Permissible bases for objections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pursuant to § 58.40 or to make the written determination required by §§ 58.35, 58.47 or 58.53 for the.... 58.75 Section 58.75 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... RESPONSIBILITIES Release of Funds for Particular Projects § 58.75 Permissible bases for objections. HUD (or...

  6. 24 CFR 58.75 - Permissible bases for objections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pursuant to § 58.40 or to make the written determination required by §§ 58.35, 58.47 or 58.53 for the.... 58.75 Section 58.75 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... RESPONSIBILITIES Release of Funds for Particular Projects § 58.75 Permissible bases for objections. HUD (or...

  7. 24 CFR 58.75 - Permissible bases for objections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pursuant to § 58.40 or to make the written determination required by §§ 58.35, 58.47 or 58.53 for the.... 58.75 Section 58.75 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... RESPONSIBILITIES Release of Funds for Particular Projects § 58.75 Permissible bases for objections. HUD (or...

  8. 24 CFR 58.75 - Permissible bases for objections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pursuant to § 58.40 or to make the written determination required by §§ 58.35, 58.47 or 58.53 for the.... 58.75 Section 58.75 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... RESPONSIBILITIES Release of Funds for Particular Projects § 58.75 Permissible bases for objections. HUD (or...

  9. 24 CFR 58.75 - Permissible bases for objections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pursuant to § 58.40 or to make the written determination required by §§ 58.35, 58.47 or 58.53 for the.... 58.75 Section 58.75 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... RESPONSIBILITIES Release of Funds for Particular Projects § 58.75 Permissible bases for objections. HUD (or...

  10. Influence of Permissive Parenting on Youth Farm Risk Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Jinnah, Hamida A; Stoneman, Zolinda

    2016-01-01

    Farm youth continue to experience high rates of injuries and premature deaths as a result of agricultural activities. Increased parental permissiveness is positively associated with many different types of high-risk behaviors in youth. This study explored whether permissive parenting (fathering and mothering) predicts youth unsafe behaviors on the farm. Data were analyzed for 67 youth and their parents. Families were recruited from a statewide farm publication, through youth organizations (i.e., FFA [Future Farmers of America]), local newspapers, farmer referrals, and through the Cooperative Extension Network. Hierarchical multiple regression was completed. Results revealed that fathers and mothers who practiced lax-inconsistent disciplining were more likely to have youth who indulged in unsafe farm behaviors. Key hypotheses confirmed that permissive parenting (lax-inconsistent disciplining) by parents continued to predict youth unsafe farm behaviors, even after youth age, youth gender, youth personality factor of risk-taking, and father's unsafe behaviors (a measure associated with modeling) were all taken into account. A key implication is that parents may play an important role in influencing youth farm safety behaviors. Parents (especially fathers) need to devote time to discuss farm safety with their youth. Farm safety interventions need to involve parents as well as address and respect the culture and values of families. Interventions need to focus not only on safe farm practices, but also promote positive parenting practices, including increased parent-youth communication about safety, consistent disciplining strategies, and increased monitoring and modeling of safe farm behaviors by parents. PMID:27135252

  11. Polycomb Repressed Genes have Permissive Enhancers that Initiate Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Taberlay, Phillippa C.; Kelly, Theresa K.; Liu, Chun-Chi; You, Jueng Soo; de Carvalho, Daniel D.; Miranda, Tina B.; Zhou, Xianghong J.; Liang, Gangning; Jones, Peter A.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Key regulatory genes, suppressed by Polycomb and H3K27me3, become active during normal differentiation and induced reprogramming. Using the well-characterized enhancer/promoter pair of MYOD1 as a model, we have identified a critical role for enhancers in reprogramming. We observed an unexpected nucleosome depleted region (NDR) at the H3K4me1-enriched enhancer at which transcriptional regulators initially bind, leading to subsequent changes in the chromatin at the cognate promoter. Exogenous Myod1 activates its own transcription by binding first at the enhancer leading to an NDR and transcription-permissive chromatin at the associated MYOD1 promoter. Exogenous OCT4 also binds first to the permissive MYOD1 enhancer, but has a different effect on the cognate promoter, where the monovalent H3K27me3-marks are converted to the bivalent state characteristic of stem cells. Genome-wide, a high percentage of Polycomb targets are associated with putative enhancers in permissive states, suggesting they may provide a widespread avenue for the initiation of cell-fate reprogramming. PMID:22153073

  12. Spacecraft Water Exposure Guidelines for Selected Contaminants. Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    To protect space crews from contaminants in potable and hygiene water. the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide guidance on how to develop water exposure guidelines and subsequently review NASA's development of exposure guidelines for specific chemicals. The exposure guidelines are to be similar to those established by the NRC for airborne contaminants (NRC 1992; 1994; 1996a,b; 2000a). The NRC was asked to consider only chemical contaminants, and not microbial agents. The NRC convened the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Water Exposure Guidelines to address this task, and the subcommittee's first report, Methods for Developing Spacecraft Water Exposure Guidelines, was published in 2000 (NRC 2000b). A summary of that report is provided. Spacecraft water exposure guidelines (SWEGs) are to he established for exposures of l, 10, 100, and 1,000 days (d). The 1-d SWEG is the concentration of a substance in water that is judged acceptable for the performance of specific tasks during rare emergency conditions lasting for periods up to 24 hours (h). The 1-d SWEG is intended to prevent irreversible harm and degradation in crew performance. Temporary discomfort is permissible as long as there is no effect on judgment, performance, or ability to respond to an emergency. Longer-term SWEGs are intended to prevent adverse health effects (either immediate or delayed) and degradation in crew performance that could result from continuous exposure in closed spacecraft for as long as 1,000 d. In contrast with the 1-d SWEG, longer-term SWEGs are intended to provide guidance for exposure under the expected normal operating conditions in spacecraft.

  13. Extensive transcription analysis of the Hyposoter didymator Ichnovirus genome in permissive and non-permissive lepidopteran host species.

    PubMed

    Dorémus, Tristan; Cousserans, François; Gyapay, Gabor; Jouan, Véronique; Milano, Patricia; Wajnberg, Eric; Darboux, Isabelle; Cônsoli, Fernando Luis; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Ichnoviruses are large dsDNA viruses that belong to the Polydnaviridae family. They are specifically associated with endoparasitic wasps of the family Ichneumonidae and essential for host parasitization by these wasps. We sequenced the Hyposoter didymator Ichnovirus (HdIV) encapsidated genome for further analysis of the transcription pattern of the entire set of HdIV genes following the parasitization of four different lepidopteran host species. The HdIV genome was found to consist of at least 50 circular dsDNA molecules, carrying 135 genes, 98 of which formed 18 gene families. The HdIV genome had general features typical of Ichnovirus (IV) genomes and closely resembled that of the IV carried by Hyposoter fugitivus. Subsequent transcriptomic analysis with Illumina technology during the course of Spodoptera frugiperda parasitization led to the identification of a small subset of less than 30 genes with high RPKM values in permissive hosts, consisting with these genes encoding crucial virulence proteins. Comparisons of HdIV expression profiles between host species revealed differences in transcript levels for given HdIV genes between two permissive hosts, S. frugiperda and Pseudoplusia includens. However, we found no evident intrafamily gene-specific transcription pattern consistent with the presence of multigenic families within IV genomes reflecting an ability of the wasps concerned to exploit different host species. Interestingly, in two non-permissive hosts, Mamestra brassiccae and Anticarsia gemmatalis (most of the parasitoid eggs were eliminated by the host cellular immune response), HdIV genes were generally less strongly transcribed than in permissive hosts. This suggests that successful parasitism is dependent on the expression of given HdIV genes exceeding a particular threshold value. These results raise questions about the mecanisms involved in regulating IV gene expression according to the nature of the lepidopteran host species encountered. PMID

  14. Extensive Transcription Analysis of the Hyposoter didymator Ichnovirus Genome in Permissive and Non-Permissive Lepidopteran Host Species

    PubMed Central

    Dorémus, Tristan; Cousserans, François; Gyapay, Gabor; Jouan, Véronique; Milano, Patricia; Wajnberg, Eric; Darboux, Isabelle; Cônsoli, Fernando Luis; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Ichnoviruses are large dsDNA viruses that belong to the Polydnaviridae family. They are specifically associated with endoparasitic wasps of the family Ichneumonidae and essential for host parasitization by these wasps. We sequenced the Hyposoter didymator Ichnovirus (HdIV) encapsidated genome for further analysis of the transcription pattern of the entire set of HdIV genes following the parasitization of four different lepidopteran host species. The HdIV genome was found to consist of at least 50 circular dsDNA molecules, carrying 135 genes, 98 of which formed 18 gene families. The HdIV genome had general features typical of Ichnovirus (IV) genomes and closely resembled that of the IV carried by Hyposoter fugitivus. Subsequent transcriptomic analysis with Illumina technology during the course of Spodoptera frugiperda parasitization led to the identification of a small subset of less than 30 genes with high RPKM values in permissive hosts, consisting with these genes encoding crucial virulence proteins. Comparisons of HdIV expression profiles between host species revealed differences in transcript levels for given HdIV genes between two permissive hosts, S. frugiperda and Pseudoplusia includens. However, we found no evident intrafamily gene-specific transcription pattern consistent with the presence of multigenic families within IV genomes reflecting an ability of the wasps concerned to exploit different host species. Interestingly, in two non-permissive hosts, Mamestra brassiccae and Anticarsia gemmatalis (most of the parasitoid eggs were eliminated by the host cellular immune response), HdIV genes were generally less strongly transcribed than in permissive hosts. This suggests that successful parasitism is dependent on the expression of given HdIV genes exceeding a particular threshold value. These results raise questions about the mecanisms involved in regulating IV gene expression according to the nature of the lepidopteran host species encountered. PMID

  15. Occupational exposures during routine activities in coal-fueled power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bird, M.J.; MacIntosh, D.L.; Williams, P.L.

    2004-06-15

    Limited information is available on occupational exposures during routine, nonoutage work activities in coal-fueled power plants. This study evaluated occupational exposures to the principal contaminants in the facilities, including respirable dust (coal dust), arsenic, noise, asbestos, and heat stress. The data were collected over a 3-month period, during the summer of 2001. Each of the 5 facilities was divided into 5 similar exposure groups based on previous exposure assessments and job tasks performed. Of the nearly 400 air samples collected, only 1 exceeded the allowable occupational exposure value. For the noise samples, 55 (about 18%) were equal to or greater than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 8-hour hearing conservation program level of 85 dBA, and 12 (about 4%) were equal to or greater than the OSHA 8-hour permissible exposure level of 90 dBA. Heat stress monitoring at the facilities indicates that 26% of the 1-hour TWAs were exceeded for one or all of the recommended heat stress limits. The data also concluded that some work sites were above the heat stress ceiling values recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Four of the 20 employees personally monitored exceeded the recommended limits for heart rate or body core temperature. This suggests there is a potential for heat strain if signs and symptoms are ignored. Recommendations are made to better control the heat stress exposure.

  16. The Acute Exposure Effects of Inhaled Nickel Nanoparticles on Murine Endothelial Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liberda, Eric N; Cuevas, Azita K; Qu, Qingshan; Chen, Lung Chi

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The discovery of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) may help to explain observed cardiovascular effects associated with inhaled nickel nanoparticle exposures such as increases in vascular inflammation, generate reactive oxygen species, alter vasomotor tone, and potentiated atherosclerosis in murine species. Methods Following an acute whole body inhalation exposure to 500μg/m3 of nickel nanoparticles for 5 hrs, bone marrow EPCs from C57BL/6 mice were isolated. EPCs were harvested for their RNA or used in a variety of assays including chemotaxis, tube formation, and proliferation. Gene expression was assessed for important receptors involved in EPC mobilization and homing using RT-PCR methods. EPCs, circulating endothelial progenitor cells (CEPCs), circulating endothelial cells (CECs), and endothelial microparticles (EMPs) were quantified on a BD FACSCalibur to examine endothelial damage and repair associated with the exposure. Results and Conclusions Acute exposure to inhaled nickel nanoparticles significantly increased both bone marrow EPCs as well as their levels in circulation (CEPCs). CECs were significantly elevated indicating that endothelial damage occurred due to the exposure. There was no significant difference in EMPs between the two groups. Tube formation and chemotaxis, but not proliferation, of bone marrow EPCs was impaired in the nickel nanoparticle exposed group. These results coincided with a decrease in the mRNA of receptors involved in EPC mobilization and homing. This data provides new insight into how an acute nickel nanoparticle exposure to half of the current Occupational Safety & Health Administration permissible exposure limit may adversely affect EPCs. PMID:25144474

  17. The efficacy of local exhaust ventilation for controlling dust exposures during concrete surface grinding.

    PubMed

    Croteau, Gerry A; Flanagan, Mary Ellen; Camp, Janice E; Seixas, Noah S

    2004-08-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of a commercially available local exhaust ventilation (LEV) system for controlling respirable dust and crystalline silica exposures during concrete grinding activities. Surface grinding was conducted at six commercial building construction sites in Seattle, WA, by cement masons. Time-integrated filter samples and direct reading respirable dust concentrations were collected using a cyclone in line with a direct reading respirable dust monitor. Personal exposure levels were determined with and without LEV, one sample directly after the other. A total of 28 paired samples were collected in which three different dust collection shroud configurations were tested. Data obtained with a direct reading respirable dust monitor were adjusted to remove non-work task-associated dust exposures and was subsequently used to calculate the exposure reduction achieved. The application of LEV resulted in a reduction in the overall geometric mean respirable dust exposure from 4.5 to 0.14 mg/m(3), a mean exposure reduction of 92%. Despite the effective control of dust generated during surface grinding, 22 and 26% of the samples collected while LEV was being used were greater than the 8 h time-weighted average permissible exposure limit (Occupational Safety and Health Administration) and threshold limit value (American Congress of Governmental Industrial Hygienists) for respirable crystalline silica, respectively. PMID:15298850

  18. NIOSH testimony to DOL on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's proposed rule on occupational exposure to cadmium by R. A. Lemen, July 17, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-17

    The testimony summarizes the position of NIOSH in support of the proposed rule on cadmium (7440439). NIOSH supports the position of OSHA that exposure to cadmium is associated with increased incidence of lung cancer, emphysema, and kidney dysfunction. Because cadmium is a potential occupational carcinogen, occupational exposures to cadmium should be reduced to the lowest feasible level. NIOSH strongly recommends the use of engineering controls and work practices instead of personal protective equipment, including respiratory protection, for controlling exposures to cadmium. NIOSH responds in this testimony to specific areas covered in the proposed rule including respiratory protection, medical surveillance, medical screening requirements, and exposure monitoring frequency. Use of specific control methods is considered for cadmium plating operations, stabilizer production, and pigment production.

  19. Permissive sites and topology of an outer membrane protein with a reporter epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Charbit, A; Ronco, J; Michel, V; Werts, C; Hofnung, M

    1991-01-01

    We are developing a genetic approach to study with a single antibody the folding and topology of LamB, an integral outer membrane protein from Escherichia coli K-12. This approach consists of inserting the same reporter foreign antigenic determinant (the C3 epitope from poliovirus) at different sites of LamB so that the resulting hybrid proteins have essentially kept the in vivo biological properties of LamB and therefore its cellular location and structure; the corresponding sites are called permissive sites. A specific monoclonal antibody can then be used to examine the position of the reporter epitope with respect to the protein and the membrane. We present an improved and efficient procedure that led us to identify eight new permissive sites in LamB. These sites appear to be distributed on both sides of the membrane. At one of them (after residue 253), the C3 epitope was detected on intact bacteria, providing the first direct argument for exposure of the corresponding LamB region at the cell surface. At this site as well as at four others (after residues 183, 219, 236, and 352), the C3 epitope could be detected with the C3 monoclonal antibody at the surface of the extracted trimeric LamB-C3 hybrid proteins. We provide a number of convergent arguments showing that the hybrid proteins are not strongly distorted with respect to the wild-type protein so that the conclusions drawn are also valid for this protein. These conclusions are essentially in agreement with the proposed folding model for the LamB protein. They agree, in particular, with the idea that regions 183 and 352 are exposed to the periplasm. In addition, they suggest that region 236 is buried at the external face of the outer membrane and that region 219 is exposed to the periplasm. Including the 3 sites previously determined, 11 permissive sites are now available in LamB, including 3 at the cell surface and most probably at least 3 in the periplasm. We discuss the nature of such sites, the

  20. Permissiveness of human hepatoma cell lines for HCV infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although primary and established human hepatoma cell lines have been evaluated for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in vitro, thus far only Huh7 cells have been found to be highly permissive for infectious HCV. Since our understanding of the HCV lifecycle would benefit from the identification of additional permissive cell lines, we assembled a panel of hepatic and non-hepatic cell lines and assessed their ability to support HCV infection. Here we show infection of the human hepatoma cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and Hep3B with cell culture-derived HCV (HCVcc), albeit to lower levels than that achieved in Huh7 cells. To better understand the reduced permissiveness of PLC and Hep3B cells for HCVcc infection, we performed studies to evaluate the ability of each cell line to support specific steps of the viral lifecycle (i.e. entry, replication, egress and spread). Results We found that while the early events in HCV infection (i.e. entry plus replication initiation) are cumulatively equivalent or only marginally reduced in PLC and Hep3B cells, later steps of the viral life cycle such as steady-state replication, de novo virus production and/or spread are impaired to different degrees in PLC and Hep3B cultures compared to Huh7 cell cultures. Interestingly, we also observed that interferon stimulated gene (i.e. ISG56) expression was significantly and differentially up-regulated in PLC and Hep3B cells following viral infection. Conclusions We conclude that the restrictions observed later during HCV infection in these cell lines could in part be attributed to HCV-induced innate signaling. Nevertheless, the identification of two new cell lines capable of supporting authentic HCVcc infection, even at reduced levels, expands the current repertoire of cell lines amendable for the study of HCV in vitro and should aid in further elucidating HCV biology and the cellular determinants that modulate HCV infection. PMID:22273112

  1. EPQ Models under Permissible Payment Delay: An Algebraic Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yung-Fu; Hsu, Kuang-Hua

    The purpose of this research is to relax this assumption and establish the retailer`s inventory system as a cost minimization problem to determine the retailer`s optimal inventory cycle time. Then, an algebraic approach is provided and an easy-to-use theorem is derived to efficiently determine the optimal cycle time. From the final numerical examples, result implies that the retailer will order less quantity to take the benefits of the permissible delay in payments more frequently when the larger the differences between the unit selling price per item and the unit purchasing price per item.

  2. Canada on course to introduce permissive assisted dying regime.

    PubMed

    Schuklenk, Udo

    2016-08-01

    Canada's Supreme Court decided in February 2015 that the criminalisation of assisted dying in the country violates the country's citizens and residents constitutional rights. This paper reviews policy recommendations produced by a special expert advisory panel appointed by Canada's provinces and territories, where the responsibility for the provision of health care lies. It also reviews a similar document produced by a special federal parliamentary committee. Based on the review of these two milestone documents it is argued that a Canadian consensus seems to emerge that foreshadows a permissive regulatory regime in that country. PMID:27009981

  3. Automated Verification of Specifications with Typestates and Access Permissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siminiceanu, Radu I.; Catano, Nestor

    2011-01-01

    We propose an approach to formally verify Plural specifications based on access permissions and typestates, by model-checking automatically generated abstract state-machines. Our exhaustive approach captures all the possible behaviors of abstract concurrent programs implementing the specification. We describe the formal methodology employed by our technique and provide an example as proof of concept for the state-machine construction rules. The implementation of a fully automated algorithm to generate and verify models, currently underway, provides model checking support for the Plural tool, which currently supports only program verification via data flow analysis (DFA).

  4. Histone acetylation: a switch between repressive and permissive chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Eberharter, Anton; Becker, Peter B.

    2002-01-01

    The organization of eukaryotic chromatin has a major impact on all nuclear processes involving DNA substrates. Gene expression is affected by the positioning of individual nucleosomes relative to regulatory sequence elements, by the folding of the nucleosomal fiber into higher-order structures and by the compartmentalization of functional domains within the nucleus. Because site-specific acetylation of nucleosomal histones influences all three aspects of chromatin organization, it is central to the switch between permissive and repressive chromatin structure. The targeting of enzymes that modulate the histone acetylation status of chromatin, in synergy with the effects mediated by other chromatin remodeling factors, is central to gene regulation. PMID:11882541

  5. Safety evaluation of disposable diesel exhaust filters for permissible mining equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Ambs, J.L.; Setren, R.S. |

    1995-12-31

    The disposable diesel exhaust filter (DDEF) system developed by the U.S. Bureau of Mines and Industry cooperators for heavy-duty permissible, diesel-powered haulage vehicles, effectively reduces in-mine diesel particulate matter concentrations up to 95%. However, there are concerns about the hazards that exist when the filter is used in situations for which it was not designed. This work investigates the exhaust gas temperature limits to which the filter elements can be exposed without posing a safety or health hazard, such as fire or off-gassing toxic compounds. A filter approved by the Mine Safety and Health administration and after-market filters were evaluated under varying engine exhaust conditions to determine if after-market filters pose an unacceptable hazard when used in a DDEF system. Filters were laboratory tested at engine exhaust temperatures ranging from 77{degrees}C to 290{degrees}C. Of the seven filter types tested, six appeared suitable for use on water scrubber-based cooling systems and two appeared suitable for use on dry heat exchanger type exhaust cooling systems with exhaust temperatures up to 150{degrees}C. Any filter elements used as exhaust filters on permissible diesel machines must be approved by MSHA for that application Mine operators who wish to use an after-market filter element should request an MSHA field modification. MSHA will work with the mine and filter manufacturer to ensure its use in this exhaust system application does not pose a health or safety hazard.

  6. Is pharmacologic research on pregnant women with psychoses ethically permissible?

    PubMed

    McCullough, Laurence B; Coverdale, John H; Chervenak, Frank A

    2015-07-01

    There is a consistent view in the literature that research on pregnant woman with psychoses is ethically questionable or impermissible. This paper provides a critical appraisal of these views by asking whether pharmacologic research on pregnant women with psychosis for maternal, fetal, and newborn benefit is ethically permissible. We examine separately the documented clinical benefits and risks to the pregnant patient, the fetal patient, and the neonatal and pediatric patient. The outcomes reported in the pertinent literature do not support the conclusion that pharmacologic management of psychosis during pregnancy results in documented, unacceptable risk to the pregnant, fetal, or neonatal patient and is therefore ethically ruled out. Claims that research on the pharmacologic management of psychosis during pregnancy is ethically impermissible because of unacceptable risk of harm to pregnant, fetal, neonatal, or pediatric patients cannot therefore be supported. Having shown that such research is permissible, we then ask what ethical considerations should guide study design. We show that Phase I studies are appropriate and can meet the requirements of the Common Rule, which are more specific than international guidance. As a matter of professionally responsible obstetric practice, pregnant women with psychoses should be included, and not be neglected, in research for both maternal and fetal benefit. PMID:25389981

  7. Integrated polyoma genomes in inducible permissive transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chartrand, P; Gusew-Chartrand, N; Bourgaux, P

    1981-01-01

    Using the approach described by Botchan, Topp, and Sambrook (Cell 9:269-287, 1976), we analyzed the organization of the integrated viral sequences in five clonal isolates from the same permissive, inducible cell line (Cyp line) transformed by the tsP155 mutant of polyoma virus. In all five clones, viral sequences were found that could be assigned to a common integration site, as they were joined to the cellular DNA in the same fashion in every instance. However, the sequences comprised between these points differed markedly from clone to clone, as if cell propagation had been accompanied by amplification or recombination or both within the viral insertion. When the clones were compared, no correlation could be found between the abundance, or the organization, of the integrated viral sequences and the amount, or the nature, of the free viral DNA molecules produced during induction. Altogether, our findings suggest that specific events, occurring during either the excision or the subsequent replication of the integrated viral sequences, are responsible for the predominant production of nondefective viral DNA molecules by permissive transformed cells, such as Cyp cells. Images PMID:6268808

  8. NIOSH comments to DOL on the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's proposed rule on occupational exposure to formaldehyde by R. A. Lemen, June 27, 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-06-27

    NIOSH presented posthearing comments on formaldehyde (50000) including materials which NIOSH indicated it would supply during the testimony, answers to questions which were addressed to the NIOSH panel members at the hearing, and related issues on which NIOSH wanted to expand. Topics included: epidemiologic and industrial hygiene studies of workers exposed to formaldehyde; the percentage of garment manufacturing locations sampled; the facilities studied in the SMR and PMR studies; data from the NIOSH garment manufacturing study; quantitative trend analysis of exposure level and latency; an evaluation conducted by Nelson Leidel; the effects of mixed exposure to formaldehyde and wood dust on cancer incidence; the most recent lists of approved respirators and field test methods for chemical protective clothing; the deposition of radiolabeled formaldehyde; formaldehyde exposure values in other industries; malignant neoplasms of the nervous system; the NIOSH carcinogenesis policy; hyposmia; variations in expected cancer patterns; and the observed pattern of excess lung cancer mortality.

  9. Encephalopathy and vestibulopathy following short-term hydrocarbon exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgson, M.J.; Furman, J.; Ryan, C.; Durrant, J.; Kern, E.

    1989-01-01

    Dizziness, headaches, and weakness occurred among three men after short-term hydrocarbon exposure during improper welding procedures in a closed container. Symptoms were related to objective evidence of vestibular and cognitive dysfunction. Symptoms and abnormal test results persisted for 6 to 18 months. Simulation of the accident failed to demonstrate likely exposures except aliphatic hydrocarbons, well within the permissible exposure levels. Short-term exposures to neurotoxins may lead to long-term central nervous system abnormalities.

  10. PEGylation of interferon α2 improves lymphatic exposure after subcutaneous and intravenous administration and improves antitumour efficacy against lymphatic breast cancer metastases

    PubMed Central

    Kaminskas, Lisa M; Ascher, David B; McLeod, Victoria M; Herold, Marco J; Le, Caroline P; Sloan, Erica K; Porter, Christopher JH

    2014-01-01

    The efficacy of protein-based therapeutics with indications in the treatment of lymphatic diseases is expected to be improved by enhancing lymphatic disposition. This study was therefore aimed at examining whether PEGylation can usefully be applied to improve the lymphatic uptake of interferon α2 and whether this ultimately translates into improved therapeutic efficacy against lymph-resident cancer. The lymphatic pharmacokinetics of interferon α2b (IFN, 19 kDa) and PEGylated interferon α2b (IFN-PEG12, 31 kDa) or α2a (IFN-PEG40, 60 kDa) was examined in thoracic lymph duct cannulated rats. IFN was poorly absorbed from the SC injection site (Fabs 36%) and showed little uptake into lymph after SC or IV administration (≤1%). In contrast, IFN-PEG12 was efficiently absorbed from the SC injection site (Fabs 82%) and approximately 20% and 8% of the injected dose was recovered in thoracic lymph over 30 hours after SC or IV administration respectively. IFN-PEG40, however, was incompletely absorbed from the SC injection site (Fabs 23%) and showed similar lymphatic access after SC administration to IFN-PEG12 (21%). The recovery of IFN-PEG40 in thoracic lymph after IV administration, however, was significantly greater (29%) when compared to IV IFN-PEG12. The anti-tumour efficacy of interferon against axillary metastases of a highly lymph-metastatic variant of human breast MDA-MB-231 carcinoma was significantly increased by SC administration of lymph-targeted IFN-PEG12 when compared to the administration of IFN on the ipsilateral side to the axillary metastasis. Optimal PEGylation may therefore represent a viable approach to improving the lymphatic disposition and efficacy of therapeutic proteins against lymphatic diseases. PMID:23499718

  11. The effects of exercise on cocaine self-administration, food-maintained responding, and locomotor activity in female rats: importance of the temporal relationship between physical activity and initial drug exposure.

    PubMed

    Smith, Mark A; Witte, Maryam A

    2012-12-01

    Previous studies have reported that exercise decreases cocaine self-administration in rats with long-term access (8+ weeks) to activity wheels in the home cage. The purpose of this study was to (a) examine the importance of the temporal relationship between physical activity and initial drug exposure, (b) determine the effects of exercise on responding maintained by a nondrug reinforcer (i.e., food), and (c) investigate the effects of exercise on cocaine-induced increases in locomotor activity. To this end, female rats were obtained at weaning and divided into 4 groups: (a) EXE-SED rats were housed in exercise cages for 6 weeks and then transferred to sedentary cages after the first day of behavioral testing; (b) SED-EXE rats were housed in sedentary cages for 6 weeks and then transferred to exercise cages after the first day of behavioral testing; (c) SED-SED rats remained in sedentary cages for the duration of the study; and (d) EXE-EXE rats remained in exercise cages for the duration of the study. Relative to the sedentary group (SED-SED), exercise reduced cocaine self-administration in both groups with access to activity wheels after initial drug exposure (EXE-EXE, SED-EXE) but did not reduce cocaine self-administration in the group with access to activity wheels only before drug exposure (EXE-SED). Exercise also decreased the effects of cocaine on locomotor activity but did not reduce responding maintained by food. These data suggest that exercise may reduce cocaine use in drug-experienced individuals with no prior history of aerobic activity without decreasing other types of positively reinforced behaviors. PMID:22924703

  12. Robot Lies in Health Care: When Is Deception Morally Permissible?

    PubMed

    Matthias, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Autonomous robots are increasingly interacting with users who have limited knowledge of robotics and are likely to have an erroneous mental model of the robot's workings, capabilities, and internal structure. The robot's real capabilities may diverge from this mental model to the extent that one might accuse the robot's manufacturer of deceiving the user, especially in cases where the user naturally tends to ascribe exaggerated capabilities to the machine (e.g. conversational systems in elder-care contexts, or toy robots in child care). This poses the question, whether misleading or even actively deceiving the user of an autonomous artifact about the capabilities of the machine is morally bad and why. By analyzing trust, autonomy, and the erosion of trust in communicative acts as consequences of deceptive robot behavior, we formulate four criteria that must be fulfilled in order for robot deception to be morally permissible, and in some cases even morally indicated. PMID:26144538

  13. Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Illustrated Permission/Assent Form.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Rahman, Susan M

    2015-10-01

    Issues of language and literacy represent a significant barrier to participation in clinical research. This study was designed to explore whether illustrating the permission/assent (P/A) document offers an alternative strategy for communicating study related information to underserved populations. Participants were verbally introduced to a mock study and asked to review the corresponding P/A form with companion pictorials. Questionnaires were used to examine whether the form addressed essential elements of a P/A (as defined under the Code of Federal Regulations) and evaluate the effectiveness of the companion pictures. Over 93% of participants agreed that the form addressed the required basic elements of a P/A. Pictures depicting study procedures were highly effective while images depicting nebulous concepts such as research and voluntariness were deemed less effective. The medical research community can expand enrollment opportunities to underserved populations by using visual aids to complement the informed consent process. PMID:25274022

  14. Private nurses and playboy bunnies: explaining permissible sex discrimination.

    PubMed

    Yuracko, Kimberly A

    2004-01-01

    Discrimination on the basis of sex in employment is illegal--usually. In cases in which employers contend that sex-based hiring is necessary to protect the privacy interests of their customer, however, and in cases in which employers contend that sex-based hiring is necessary to provide a particular type of sexual titillation for their customers, courts sometimes do allow employers to discriminate. Courts say that they allow sex discrimination in employment when it is necessary to preserve the "essence of the business." This Article shows, however, that there is no plausible conception of business "essence" that can explain and make sense of the existing case law. The Article therefore looks beyond the courts' rhetoric to explain and defend why courts distinguish in the ways they do between permissible and impermissible sex discrimination in employment. PMID:15046068

  15. Permissiveness toward tobacco sponsorship undermines tobacco control support in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ayo-Yusuf, Olalekan A; Olutola, Bukola G; Agaku, Israel T

    2016-06-01

    School personnel, who are respected members of the community, may exert significant influence on policy adoption. This study assessed the impact of school personnel's permissiveness toward tobacco industry sponsorship activities on their support for complete bans on tobacco advertisements, comprehensive smoke-free laws and increased tobacco prices. Representative data were obtained from the Global School Personnel Survey for 29 African countries (n = 17 929). Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were calculated using multi-variable Poisson regression models to assess the impact of permissiveness toward tobacco sponsorship activities on support for tobacco control policies (p < 0.05). The median of prevalence of support for different tobacco control policies among all countries was as follows: complete ban on tobacco advertisements (84.9%); comprehensive smoke-free laws (92.4%) and tobacco price increases (80.8%). School personnel who believed that the tobacco industry should be allowed to sponsor school events were significantly less likely to support complete bans on tobacco advertisements [aPR = 0.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.84-0.95] and comprehensive smoke-free laws (aPR = 0.95; 95% CI 0.92-0.98). In contrast, support for complete tobacco advertisement bans was more likely among those who believed that the tobacco industry encourages youths to smoke (aPR = 1.27; 95% CI 1.17-1.37), and among those who taught about health sometimes (aPR = 1.06; 95% CI 1.01-1.11) or a lot (aPR = 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.10) compared with those who did not teach about health at all. These findings underscore the need to educate school personnel on tobacco industry's strategies to undermine tobacco control policies. This may help to build school personnel support for laws intended to reduce youth susceptibility, experimentation and established use of tobacco products. PMID:25524474

  16. Occupational Exposure to Crystalline Silica Dust in the United States, 1988–2003

    PubMed Central

    Yassin, Abdiaziz; Yebesi, Francis; Tingle, Rex

    2005-01-01

    The purposes of this study were a) to summarize measurements of airborne (respirable) crystalline silica dust exposure levels among U.S. workers, b) to provide an update of the 1990 Stewart and Rice report on airborne silica exposure levels in high-risk industries and occupations with data for the time period 1988–2003, c) to estimate the number of workers potentially exposed to silica in industries that the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) inspected for high exposure levels, and d) to conduct time trend analyses on airborne silica dust exposure levels for time-weighted average (TWA) measurements. Compliance inspection data that were taken from the OSHA Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) for 1988–2003 (n = 7,209) were used to measure the airborne crystalline silica dust exposure levels among U.S. workers. A second-order autoregressive model was applied to assess the change in the mean silica exposure measurements over time. The overall geometric mean of silica exposure levels for 8-hr personal TWA samples collected during programmed inspections was 0.077 mg/m3, well above the applicable American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists threshold limit value of 0.05 mg/m3. Surgical appliances supplies industry [Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) 3842] had the lowest geometric mean silica exposure level of 0.017 mg/m3, compared with the highest level, 0.166 mg/m3, for the metal valves and pipe fitting industry (SIC 3494), for an 8-hr TWA measurement. Although a downward trend in the airborne silica exposure levels was observed during 1988–2003, the results showed that 3.6% of the sampled workers were exposed above the OSHA-calculated permissible exposure limit. PMID:15743711

  17. 32 CFR 643.115 - Contractors-Permission to erect structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Contractors-Permission to erect structures. 643.115 Section 643.115 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.115 Contractors—Permission to erect structures. Installation commanders...

  18. 32 CFR 643.115 - Contractors-Permission to erect structures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Contractors-Permission to erect structures. 643.115 Section 643.115 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL ESTATE Additional Authority of Commanders § 643.115 Contractors—Permission to erect structures. Installation commanders...

  19. 36 CFR 223.12 - Permission to cut, damage, or destroy trees without advertisement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permission to cut, damage, or destroy trees without advertisement. 223.12 Section 223.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER General Provisions § 223.12 Permission to cut, damage,...

  20. Building and evaluating an ontology-based tool for reasoning about consent permission

    PubMed Central

    Grando, Adela; Schwab, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Given the lack of mechanisms for specifying, sharing and checking the compliance of consent permissions, we focus on building and testing novel approaches to address this gap. In our previous work, we introduced a “permission ontology” to capture in a precise, machine-interpretable form informed consent permissions in research studies. Here we explain how we built and evaluated a framework for specifying subject’s permissions and checking researcher’s resource request in compliance with those permissions. The framework is proposed as an extension of an existing policy engine based on the eXtensible Access Control Markup Language (XACML), incorporating ontology-based reasoning. The framework is evaluated in the context of the UCSD Moores Cancer Center biorepository, modeling permissions from an informed consent and a HIPAA form. The resulting permission ontology and mechanisms to check subject’s permission are implementation and institution independent, and therefore offer the potential to be reusable in other biorepositories and data warehouses. PMID:24551354

  1. 77 FR 74861 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Application for Advance Permission To Enter as...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... for Advance Permission To Enter as Nonimmigrant, Form I-192; Extension, Without Change, of a Currently... appropriate automated, electronic, mechanical, or other technological collection techniques or other forms of.... (2) Title of the Form/Collection: Application for Advance Permission to Enter as...

  2. 47 CFR 74.790 - Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible service of digital TV translator... DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.790 Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations. (a) Digital TV translator stations provide a means whereby...

  3. 47 CFR 74.790 - Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible service of digital TV translator... DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.790 Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations. (a) Digital TV translator stations provide a means whereby...

  4. 47 CFR 74.790 - Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible service of digital TV translator... DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.790 Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations. (a) Digital TV translator stations provide a means whereby...

  5. 47 CFR 74.790 - Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible service of digital TV translator... DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.790 Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations. (a) Digital TV translator stations provide a means whereby...

  6. 47 CFR 74.790 - Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible service of digital TV translator... DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.790 Permissible service of digital TV translator and LPTV stations. (a) Digital TV translator stations provide a means whereby...

  7. Optimal Inventory Planning under Permissible Delay in Payments When a Larger Order Quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Kuang-Hua; Huang, Hung-Fu; Tu, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Yung-Fu

    In the previous related studies, the inventory replenishment problems under permissible delay in payments are independent of the order quantity. In this study, the restrictive assumption of the trade credit independent of the order quantity is relaxed. This study discusses the inventory policies under permissible delay in payments when a larger order quantity.

  8. The Impact of the Shared Permissive Feeding Environment on Low-income Preschool Children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To gain insight into parental feeding problems and strategies, this study investigated the impact of permissive feeding styles (FS) on overweight status of low-income preschool children and described the shared permissive feeding environment by examining characteristics of the parent (emotional affe...

  9. 30 CFR 75.506-1 - Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric face equipment; permissible condition... Equipment-General § 75.506-1 Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, electric face equipment which meets the...

  10. 30 CFR 75.506-1 - Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric face equipment; permissible condition... Equipment-General § 75.506-1 Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, electric face equipment which meets the...

  11. 30 CFR 75.506-1 - Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric face equipment; permissible condition... Equipment-General § 75.506-1 Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, electric face equipment which meets the...

  12. 30 CFR 75.506-1 - Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric face equipment; permissible condition... Equipment-General § 75.506-1 Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, electric face equipment which meets the...

  13. 20 CFR 416.207 - You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Eligibility Reasons Why You May Not Get Ssi... institutions. (a) To be eligible for SSI payments you must give us permission to contact any financial... this permission when you apply for SSI payments or when we ask for it at a later time. You must...

  14. 42 CFR 433.68 - Permissible health care-related taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible health care-related taxes. 433.68 Section 433.68 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.68 Permissible health care-related taxes. (a) General rule....

  15. 42 CFR 433.68 - Permissible health care-related taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible health care-related taxes. 433.68 Section 433.68 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.68 Permissible health care-related taxes. (a) General rule....

  16. E-Reserves Permissions and the Copyright Clearance Center: Process, Efficiency, and Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holobar, J. Christopher; Marshall, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the process of requesting copyright permissions through the Copyright Clearance Center's (CCC) pay-per-use service for electronic course reserves at the Penn State University Libraries in 2008. The authors investigate the efficiency of this process as a function of the percentage of permission requests successfully mediated by…

  17. Permissive Parenting and Mental Health in College Students: Mediating Effects of Academic Entitlement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Alison L.; Hirsch, Jameson K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Student mental health may suffer due to unreasonable expectations associated with academic entitlement; permissive parenting may be one source of these expectations. The authors examined the role of academic entitlement as a mediator of the relationship between permissive parenting and psychological functioning. Participants:…

  18. 12 CFR 714.2 - What are the permissible leasing arrangements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the permissible leasing arrangements... CREDIT UNIONS LEASING § 714.2 What are the permissible leasing arrangements? (a) You may engage in direct leasing. In direct leasing, you purchase personal property from a vendor, becoming the owner of...

  19. 43 CFR 30.216 - How do I obtain permission to take depositions?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How do I obtain permission to take... § 30.216 How do I obtain permission to take depositions? (a) You may take the sworn testimony of any... of the person qualified under § 30.217(a) to take depositions; and (4) The proposed time and place...

  20. 34 CFR 682.202 - Permissible charges by lenders to borrowers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible charges by lenders to borrowers. 682.202 Section 682.202 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION FEDERAL FAMILY EDUCATION LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM General Provisions § 682.202 Permissible charges...

  1. 47 CFR 74.831 - Scope of service and permissible transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope of service and permissible transmissions... Power Auxiliary Stations § 74.831 Scope of service and permissible transmissions. The license for a low power auxiliary station authorizes the transmission of cues and orders to production personnel...

  2. 14 CFR 221.123 - Re-use of Special Tariff Permission when tariff is rejected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Re-use of Special Tariff Permission when... Statutory Notice § 221.123 Re-use of Special Tariff Permission when tariff is rejected. If a tariff... be used in a tariff issued in lieu of such rejected tariff provided that such re-use is not...

  3. Impact of the Shared Permissive Feeding Environment on Head Start Children

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A permissive feeding environment can be described as one in which excess energy intake is allowed or encouraged. Broad patterns of feeding that could tap into permissive feeding environments have been neglected. Using a parenting methodology, a feeding questionnaire was developed to measure general ...

  4. 14 CFR 221.123 - Re-use of Special Tariff Permission when tariff is rejected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Re-use of Special Tariff Permission when tariff is rejected. 221.123 Section 221.123 Aeronautics and Space OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Special Tariff Permission To File on Less...

  5. 10 CFR 707.17 - Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. 707.17 Section 707.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.17 Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. Actions available to DOE...

  6. 10 CFR 707.17 - Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. 707.17 Section 707.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.17 Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. Actions available to DOE...

  7. 10 CFR 707.17 - Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. 707.17 Section 707.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.17 Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. Actions available to DOE...

  8. 10 CFR 707.17 - Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. 707.17 Section 707.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.17 Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. Actions available to DOE...

  9. 10 CFR 707.17 - Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. 707.17 Section 707.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.17 Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. Actions available to DOE...

  10. 17 CFR 230.433 - Conditions to permissible post-filing free writing prospectuses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Conditions to permissible post... Prospectuses § 230.433 Conditions to permissible post-filing free writing prospectuses. (a) Scope of section... restriction is made available no later than the other versions). Note to paragraph (d)(8): A...

  11. 17 CFR 230.433 - Conditions to permissible post-filing free writing prospectuses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Conditions to permissible post... Prospectuses § 230.433 Conditions to permissible post-filing free writing prospectuses. (a) Scope of section... restriction is made available no later than the other versions). Note to paragraph (d)(8): A...

  12. 20 CFR 416.207 - You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... institution and request any financial records that financial institution may have about you. You must give us... permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about you when we think it....1204) doesn't give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial...

  13. 20 CFR 416.207 - You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... institution and request any financial records that financial institution may have about you. You must give us... permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about you when we think it....1204) doesn't give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial...

  14. 20 CFR 416.207 - You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... institution and request any financial records that financial institution may have about you. You must give us... permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about you when we think it....1204) doesn't give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial...

  15. 20 CFR 416.207 - You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... institution and request any financial records that financial institution may have about you. You must give us... permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about you when we think it....1204) doesn't give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial...

  16. 36 CFR 223.7 - Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas. 223.7 Section 223.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas. Similar material may be cut outside of a...

  17. 36 CFR 223.7 - Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas. 223.7 Section 223.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS General Provisions § 223.7 Permission for free use of timber outside...

  18. 36 CFR 223.7 - Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas. 223.7 Section 223.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS General Provisions § 223.7 Permission for free use of timber outside...

  19. 36 CFR 223.7 - Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas. 223.7 Section 223.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS General Provisions § 223.7 Permission for free use of timber outside...

  20. 29 CFR 3.6 - Payroll deductions permissible with the approval of the Secretary of Labor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Payroll deductions permissible with the approval of the Secretary of Labor. 3.6 Section 3.6 Labor Office of the Secretary of Labor CONTRACTORS AND SUBCONTRACTORS ON....6 Payroll deductions permissible with the approval of the Secretary of Labor. Any contractor...

  1. Permissiveness of lepidopteran hosts is linked to differential expression of bracovirus genes.

    PubMed

    Bitra, Kavita; Burke, Gaelen R; Strand, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    Polydnaviruses in the genus Bracovirus (BV) are associated with parasitoid wasps in the family Braconidae. BV-carrying wasps rely on their associated viruses to parasitize permissive hosts but also occasionally oviposit into host species that are non-permissive. Here, we studied Microplitis demolitor and M. demolitor bracovirus (MdBV) in Chrysodeixis includens, a permissive host, and Trichoplusia ni, which is usually non-permissive. M. demolitor laid eggs and injected MdBV into both hosts but almost no wasp offspring developed in T. ni. MdBV DNA similarly persisted in both host species, but deep sequencing data showed that transcript abundance for most viral genes was higher in C. includens than T. ni. Overall, our results identify lower expression of MdBV genes as an important factor in the non-permissiveness of T. ni. However, certain genes with functions in immunosuppression were sufficiently expressed to have similar effect in T. ni and C. includens. PMID:27011224

  2. Temporal-spatial pathological changes in the brains of permissive and non-permissive hosts experimentally infected with Angiostrongylus cantonensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lian-Chen; Jung, Shih-Ming; Chen, Kuang-Yao; Wang, Tzu-Yi; Li, Chung-Han

    2015-10-01

    Human cerebral angiostrongyliasis becomes an emerging disease in many parts of the world. By postmortem examination, Angiostrongylus cantonensis have been reported to cause severe pathological changes in the central nervous system. The present study was designed to determine the temporal-spatial pathological changes through experimental infections and histopathological examination of permissive (SD rats) and non-permissive (ICR mice) hosts. After infecting SD rats with 25, 50, or 100 third-stage larvae (L3) and ICR mice with 25 L3, one animal from each group was sacrificed daily from day 1 to day 30 post-infection. Each rat brain was cut into six sections and mouse brain into five sections. These sections were stained with haematoxylin and eosin and examined microscopically. Eosinophilic meningitis was found to be the most commonly pathological change and occurred on day 17 post-infection in rats with 25 L3, day 9 in the 50- or 100-L3 groups, and day 12 in infected mice. Thickness of the meninges increased 9-24 folds in infected rats and 89 folds in an infected mouse on day 28. Encephalitis, congestion, perivascular cuffing, and haemorrhage were revealed in infected mice and rats with 100 L3. Fifth-stage larvae were frequently observed in the meninges but occasionally in the parenchyma. Significant correlations between meningitis and presence of larvae in the meninges were found in the three infected rat groups but not in the infected mice. The results indicate that the clinical course of A. cantonensis infection is not self-limited but becomes more severe with the intensity of infection. PMID:26299243

  3. Heat exposure in the Canadian workplace.

    PubMed

    Jay, Ollie; Kenny, Glen P

    2010-08-01

    Exposure to excessive heat is a physical hazard that threatens Canadian workers. As patterns of global climate change suggest an increased frequency of heat waves, the potential impact of these extreme climate events on the health and well-being of the Canadian workforce is a new and growing challenge. Increasingly, industries rely on available technology and information to ensure the safety of their workers. Current Canadian labor codes in all provinces employ the guidelines recommended by the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) that are Threshold Limit Values (TLVs) based upon Wet Bulb Globe Temperature (WBGT). The TLVs are set so that core body temperature of the workers supposedly does not exceed 38.0 degrees C. Legislation in most Canadian provinces also requires employers to install engineering and administrative controls to reduce the heat stress risk of their working environment should it exceed the levels permissible under the WBGT system. There are however severe limitations using the WGBT system because it only directly evaluates the environmental parameters and merely incorporates personal factors such as clothing insulation and metabolic heat production through simple correction factors for broadly generalized groups. An improved awareness of the strengths and limitations of TLVs and the WGBT index can minimize preventable measurement errors and improve their utilization in workplaces. Work is on-going, particularly in the European Union to develop an improved individualized heat stress risk assessment tool. More work is required to improve the predictive capacity of these indices. PMID:20623643

  4. Noise exposure and hearing conservation in U.S. coal mines - A surveillance report

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, G.J.; Middendorf, P.J.

    2007-01-15

    This study examines the patterns and trends in noise exposure documented in data collected by Mine Safety and Health Administration inspectors at U. S. coal mines from 1987 through 2004. During this period, MSHA issued a new regulation on occupational noise exposure that changed the regulatory requirements and enforcement policies. The data were examined to identify potential impacts from these changes. The overall annual median noise dose declined 67% for surface coal mining and 24% for underground coal mining, and the reduction in each group accelerated after promulgation of the new noise rule. However, not all mining occupations experienced a decrease. The exposure reduction was accompanied by an increase of shift length as represented by dosimeter sample duration. For coal miners exposed above the permissible exposure level, use of hearing protection devices increased from 61% to 89% during this period. Participation of miners exposed at or above the action level in hearing conservation programs rapidly reached 86% following the effective date of the noise rule. Based on inspection data, the occupational noise regulation appears to be having a strong positive impact on hearing conservation by reducing exposures and increasing the use of hearing protection devices and medical surveillance. However, the increase in shift duration and resulting reduction in recovery time may mitigate the gains somewhat.

  5. Observational research with adolescents: a framework for the management of the parental permission

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Waiving parent permission can be an option in some epidemiological and social research with adolescents. However, exemptions have not been uniformly considered or applied. Our aim is to critically assess the different factors that could be taken into account when making decisions about waiving active parental permission in observational research with adolescents. Discussion In some cases alternatives to parental permission could be applied to protect the rights of both adolescents and parents and also to assure the benefits to adolescents as a group that can come from appropriately conducted studies. However, the criteria of ensuring minimal risk can be difficult to define and apply and a distinction between harm and discomfort is reviewed. Waiving active parental permission could be acceptable when the risk of harm is minimal; when the research questions are related to an activity for which adolescents are not legally considered to be children; when the risk of harm or discomfort may increase if parental permission is required; and when risk of discomfort is low because the questionnaire is not potentially offensive for some adolescents and/or for some parents. Summary Stringent rules concerning parental permission in some studies could be detrimental to adolescents. A framework and a decision tree guide are proposed to help researchers and Research Ethics Committees in their decisions on whether active parental permission must be obtained. PMID:23286743

  6. Permissive and protective roles for neutrophils in leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, E D; Liang, Y; Shelite, T R; Walker, D H; Melby, P C; Soong, L

    2015-11-01

    Leishmania parasites are the causative agents of leishmaniasis, a neglected tropical disease that causes substantial morbidity and considerable mortality in many developing areas of the world. Recent estimates suggest that roughly 10 million people suffer from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL), and approximately 76,000 are afflicted with visceral leishmaniasis (VL), which is universally fatal without treatment. Efforts to develop therapeutics and vaccines have been greatly hampered by an incomplete understanding of the parasite's biology and a lack of clear protective correlates that must be met in order to achieve immunity. Although parasites grow and divide preferentially in macrophages, a number of other cell types interact with and internalize Leishmania parasites, including monocytes, dendritic cells and neutrophils. Neutrophils appear to be especially important shortly after parasites are introduced into the skin, and may serve a dual protective and permissive role during the establishment of infection. Curiously, neutrophil recruitment to the site of infection appears to continue into the chronic phase of disease, which may persist for many years. The immunological impact of these cells during chronic leishmaniasis is unclear at this time. In this review we discuss the ways in which neutrophils have been observed to prevent and promote the establishment of infection, examine the role of anti-neutrophil antibodies in mouse models of leishmaniasis and consider recent findings that neutrophils may play a previously unrecognized role in influencing chronic parasite persistence. PMID:26126690

  7. Macrophage permissiveness for Legionella pneumophila growth modulated by iron.

    PubMed Central

    Gebran, S J; Newton, C; Yamamoto, Y; Widen, R; Klein, T W; Friedman, H

    1994-01-01

    We have investigated the modulation of iron in two populations of macrophages which differ in susceptibility to Legionella pneumophila intracellular proliferation. Previously, we reported that thioglycolate-elicited peritoneal macrophages obtained from the inbred A/J mouse strain readily support the intracellular growth of L. pneumophila, while resident macrophages from the same strain do not. In this study, we show that A/J elicited macrophages exhibit markedly higher expression of transferrin receptor and intracellular iron content than A/J resident macrophages. Furthermore, apotransferrin and desferrioxamine inhibited the intracellular proliferation of L. pneumophila in elicited macrophages, and this suppression was reversed by the additions of Fe-transferrin or ferric nitrilotriacetate. Fe-transferrin and ferric nitrilotriacetate did not further increase the intracellular proliferation of L. pneumophila in thioglycolate-elicited macrophages. However, ferric citrate and ferric nitrilotriacetate stimulated in a dose-dependent manner the growth of L. pneumophila in resident macrophages. Furthermore, equimolar concentrations of desferrioxamine reversed the stimulatory effect of iron in these resident cells. These data provide evidence supporting the hypothesis that differences in susceptibility to L. pneumophila growth between permissive elicited macrophages and nonpermissive resident macrophages from the A/J mouse strain are due to intracellular availability of iron. PMID:8300214

  8. Follicle Depletion Provides a Permissive Environment for Ovarian Carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Cai, Kathy Qi; Smith, Elizabeth R; Yeasky, Toni M; Moore, Robert; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Klein-Szanto, Andres J; Godwin, Andrew K; Hamilton, Thomas C; Xu, Xiang-Xi

    2016-09-15

    We modeled the etiology of postmenopausal biology on ovarian cancer risk using germ cell-deficient white-spotting variant (Wv) mice, incorporating oncogenic mutations. Ovarian cancer incidence is highest in peri- and postmenopausal women, and epidemiological studies have established the impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk. Menopause as a result of ovarian follicle depletion is thought to contribute to higher cancer risk. As a consequence of follicle depletion, female Wv mice develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis frequently found in postmenopausal human ovaries. Lineage tracing using MISR2-Cre indicated that the tubular adenomas that developed in Wv mice were largely derived from the MISR2 lineage, which marked only a fraction of ovarian surface and oviduct epithelial cells in wild-type tissues. Deletion of p27, either heterozygous or homozygous, was able to convert the benign tubular adenomas into more proliferative tumors. Restricted deletion of p53 in Wv/Wv mice by either intrabursal injection of adenoviral Cre or inclusion of the MISR2-Cre transgene also resulted in augmented tumor growth. This finding suggests that follicle depletion provides a permissive ovarian environment for oncogenic transformation of epithelial cells, presenting a mechanism for the increased ovarian cancer risk in postmenopausal women. PMID:27354067

  9. Smoking as a Permissive Factor of Periodontal Disease in Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Mattheos, Nikos; Gyulai, Rolland; Nagy, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Background Population-based studies have identified smoking as a pathogenetic factor in chronic periodontitis. At the same time, chronic periodontal disease has also been found to occur more often in persons suffering from psoriasis than in controls with no psoriasis. It is known that smoking aggravates both periodontal disease and psoriasis, but so far it has not been investigated how smoking influences the occurrence and severity of periodontal disease in psoriasis. Methods A hospital-based study was conducted to investigate this question. The study population consisted of 82 psoriasis patients and 89 controls. All patients received a full-mouth periodontal examination, and a published classification based on bleeding on probing, clinical attachment level and probing depth was utilized for staging. Both patients and controls were divided into smoker and non-smoker groups, and the resulting groups were compared in terms of periodontal status. Beyond the descriptive statistics, odds ratios were computed. Results Psoriasis in itself increased the likelihood of severe periodontal disease to 4.373 (OR, as compared to non-smoker controls, p<0.05), while smoking increased it to 24.278 (OR, as compared to non-smoker controls, p<0.001) in the studied population. In other words, the risk of severe periodontal disease in psoriasis turned out to be six times higher in smokers than in non-smokers. Conclusions The results of this study corroborate those of other studies regarding the link between psoriasis and periodontal disease, but they also seem to reveal a powerful detrimental effect of smoking on the periodontal health of psoriasis patients, whereby the authors propose that smoking may have a permissive effect on the development of severe periodontal disease in psoriasis. PMID:24651659

  10. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey; Kellam, Paul

    2012-10-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA 'off-target' effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host-pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host-virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host-virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  11. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J.; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA ‘off-target’ effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host–pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host–virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host–virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  12. Exposure to airborne asbestos in buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, R.J.; Van Orden, D.R.; Corn, M.; Crump, K.S. )

    1992-08-01

    The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings and its implication for the health of building occupants is a major public health issue. A total of 2892 air samples from 315 public, commercial, residential, school, and university buildings has been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result of exposure to the presence of asbestos containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all asbestos structures was 0.02 structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of asbestos greater than or equal to 5 microns long was 0.00013 fibers/ml (f/ml). The concentration of asbestos was higher in schools than in other buildings. In 48% of indoor samples and 75% of outdoor samples, no asbestos fibers were detected. The observed airborne concentration in 74% of the indoor samples and 96% of the outdoor samples is below the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act clearance level of 0.01 s/ml. Finally, using those fibers which could be seen optically, all indoor samples and all outdoor samples are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure level of 0.1 f/ml for fibers greater than or equal to 5 microns in length. These results provide substantive verification of the findings of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency public building study which found very low ambient concentrations of asbestos fibers in buildings with ACM, irrespective of the condition of the material in the buildings.

  13. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  14. 14 CFR 221.120 - Grounds for approving or denying Special Tariff Permission applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (AVIATION PROCEEDINGS) ECONOMIC REGULATIONS TARIFFS Special Tariff Permission To... forth in § 399.35 of this chapter. (5) Lowered fares and charges. The prospective lowering of fares...

  15. [Environmental exposure to silver and its health effects].

    PubMed

    Miyayama, Takamitsu; Arai, Yuta; Hirano, Seishiro

    2012-05-01

    Silver (Ag) possesses a well-known antibacterial activity and has been used for medical treatment and cosmetics such as wound dressing and deodorant powders. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) proposed that the permissible exposure limit (PEL) for both metallic and most soluble Ag compounds should be 0.01 mg/m3. Argyria and argyrosis are known to be caused by deposition of insoluble Ag in the dermis and cornea/conjunctiva. However, the metabolic behavior and biological roles of Ag have not been well characterized in mammals. Ag can be absorbed into the systemic circulation from drinking water, and also through parenteral routes such as inhalation and dermal exposure. Experimental studies have demonstrated that Ag+ induces and binds to metallothionein I and II (MTs), which are cysteine-rich proteins, in cells. MTs are major cytoplasmic metal binding proteins and thereby reduce cellular damage caused by toxic heavy metals including Ag. Profiles of Ag distribution in MTs and other Ag-binding proteins can be determined using high performance liquid chromatography-inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (HPLC-ICP-MS). This technique directly provides information on the intracellular behavior of Ag, which is important for elucidating the mechanism underlying Ag toxicity. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) are also commercially used mainly as antimicrobial agents. Despite the widespread use of AgNPs, relatively few studies have been undertaken to evaluate the health effects of AgNP exposure. In the present paper, we discuss the absorption, toxicodynamics, and metabolism of both Ag and AgNPs in mammals and their health effects. PMID:22781012

  16. Occupational exposures during routine activities in coal-fueled power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Mona J. Bird; David L. MacIntosh; Phillip L. Williams

    2004-06-15

    Limited information is available on occupational exposures during routine, nonoutage work activities in coal-fueled power plants. This study evaluated occupational exposures to the principal contaminants in the facilities, including respirable dust (coal dust), arsenic, noise, asbestos, and heat stress. The data were collected over a 3-month period, during the summer of 2001, in 5 representative power plants of a large southeastern power-generating company. From 4 of the 5 facilities, 392 air samples and 302 noise samples were collected with approximately 50 respirable coal dust, 32 arsenic, 15 asbestos, and 70 noise samples from each of the 4 plants. One of the previously surveyed facilities was also evaluated for heat stress, and 1 additional coal-fueled power plant was surveyed for a total of 20 personal heat stress samples. Of the nearly 400 air samples collected, only 1 exceeded the allowable occupational exposure value. For the noise samples, 55 were equal to or greater than the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) 8-hour hearing conservation program level of 85 dBA, and 12 were equal to or greater than the OSHA 8-hour permissible exposure level of 90 dBA. The data concluded that some work sites were above the heat stress ceiling values recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). Four of the 20 employees personally monitored exceeded the recommended limits for heart rate or body core temperature.

  17. 34 CFR 303.501 - Permissive use of funds by the lead agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permissive use of funds by the lead agency. 303.501... Permissive use of funds by the lead agency. Consistent with §§ 303.120 through 303.122 and §§ 303.220 through 303.226, a lead agency may use funds under this part for activities or expenses that are...

  18. 34 CFR 303.501 - Permissive use of funds by the lead agency.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Permissive use of funds by the lead agency. 303.501... Permissive use of funds by the lead agency. Consistent with §§ 303.120 through 303.122 and §§ 303.220 through 303.226, a lead agency may use funds under this part for activities or expenses that are...

  19. Drug evaluation and the permissive principle: continuities and contradictions between standards and practices in antidepressant regulation.

    PubMed

    Abraham, John; Davis, Courtney

    2009-08-01

    Pharmaceuticals are not permitted on to the market unless they are granted regulatory approval. The regulatory process is, therefore, crucial in whether or not a drug is widely prescribed. Regulatory agencies have developed standards of performance that pharmaceuticals are supposed to meet before entering the market. Regulation of technologies is often discussed by reference to the precautionary principle. In contrast, this paper develops the concept of the 'permissive principle' as a way of understanding the departure of regulators' practices from standards of drug efficacy to which regulatory agencies themselves subscribe. By taking a case study of antidepressant regulation in the UK and the USA, the mechanisms of permissive regulatory practices are examined. An STS methodology of both spatial (international) and temporal comparisons of regulatory practices with regulatory standards is employed to identify the nature and extent of the permissive regulation. It is found that the permissive principle was adopted by drug regulators in the UK and the USA, but more so by the former than the latter. Evidently, permissive regulation, which favours the commercial interests of the drug manufacturer, but is contrary to the interests of patients, may penetrate to the heart of regulatory science. On the other hand, permissive regulation of specific drugs should not be regarded as an inevitable result of marketing strategies and concomitant networks deployed by powerful pharmaceutical companies, because the extent of permissive regulation may vary according to the intra-institutional normative commitments of regulators to uphold their technical standards against the commercial interests of the manufacturer. Likely sociological factors that can account for such permissive regulatory practices are 'corporate bias', secrecy and excessive regulatory trust in the pharmaceutical industry in the UK, political expediency and ideological capture in the USA, combined in both countries

  20. Analysis of workplace compliance measurements of asbestos by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (1984-2011).

    PubMed

    Cowan, Dallas M; Cheng, Thales J; Ground, Matthew; Sahmel, Jennifer; Varughese, Allysha; Madl, Amy K

    2015-08-01

    The United States Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) maintains the Chemical Exposure Health Data (CEHD) and the Integrated Management Information System (IMIS) databases, which contain quantitative and qualitative data resulting from compliance inspections conducted from 1984 to 2011. This analysis aimed to evaluate trends in workplace asbestos concentrations over time and across industries by combining the samples from these two databases. From 1984 to 2011, personal air samples ranged from 0.001 to 175 f/cc. Asbestos compliance sampling data associated with the construction, automotive repair, manufacturing, and chemical/petroleum/rubber industries included measurements in excess of 10 f/cc, and were above the permissible exposure limit from 2001 to 2011. The utility of combining the databases was limited by the completeness and accuracy of the data recorded. In this analysis, 40% of the data overlapped between the two databases. Other limitations included sampling bias associated with compliance sampling and errors occurring from user-entered data. A clear decreasing trend in both airborne fiber concentrations and the numbers of asbestos samples collected parallels historically decreasing trends in the consumption of asbestos, and declining mesothelioma incidence rates. Although air sampling data indicated that airborne fiber exposure potential was high (>10 f/cc for short and long-term samples) in some industries (e.g., construction, manufacturing), airborne concentrations have significantly declined over the past 30 years. Recommendations for improving the existing exposure OSHA databases are provided. PMID:25985714

  1. Occupational Noise Exposure of Employees at Locally-Owned Restaurants in a College Town

    PubMed Central

    Green, Deirdre R.; Anthony, T. Renée

    2016-01-01

    While many restaurant employees work in loud environments, in both dining and food preparation areas, little is known about worker exposures to noise. The risk of hearing loss to millions of food service workers around the country is unknown. This study evaluated full-shift noise exposure to workers at six locally-owned restaurants to examine risk factors associated with noise exposures during the day shift. Participants included cooks, counter attendants, bartenders, and waiters at full-service restaurants with bar service and at limited-service restaurants that provided counter service only. Assessments were made on weekdays and weekends, both during the summer and the fall (with a local university in session) to examine whether the time of week or year affects noise exposures to this population in a college town. In addition, the relationships between noise exposures and the type of restaurant and job classification were assessed. One-hundred eighty full-shift time-weighted average (TWA) exposures were assessed, using both Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) criteria. No TWA measurements exceeded the 90 dBA OSHA 8 hr permissible exposure limit, although six projected TWAs exceeded the 85 dBA OSHA hearing conservation action limit. Using NIOSH criteria, TWAs ranged from 69–90 dBA with a mean of 80 dBA (SD = 4 dBA). Nearly 8% (14) of the exposures exceeded the NIOSH 8-hr 85 dBA. Full-shift exposures were larger for all workers in full-service restaurants (p < 0.001) and for cooks (p = 0.003), regardless of restaurant type. The fall semester (p = 0.003) and weekend (p = 0.048) exposures were louder than summer and weekdays. Multiple linear regression analysis suggested that the combination of restaurant type, job classification, and season had a significant effect on restaurant worker noise exposures (p < 0.001) in this college town. While evening/night shift exposures, where noise

  2. Occupational Noise Exposure of Employees at Locally-Owned Restaurants in a College Town.

    PubMed

    Green, Deirdre R; Anthony, T Renée

    2015-01-01

    While many restaurant employees work in loud environments, in both dining and food preparation areas, little is known about worker exposures to noise. The risk of hearing loss to millions of food service workers around the country is unknown. This study evaluated full-shift noise exposure to workers at six locally-owned restaurants to examine risk factors associated with noise exposures during the day shift. Participants included cooks, counter attendants, bartenders, and waiters at full-service restaurants with bar service and at limited-service restaurants that provided counter service only. Assessments were made on weekdays and weekends, both during the summer and the fall (with a local university in session) to examine whether the time of week or year affects noise exposures to this population in a college town. In addition, the relationships between noise exposures and the type of restaurant and job classification were assessed. One-hundred eighty full-shift time-weighted average (TWA) exposures were assessed, using both Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) criteria. No TWA measurements exceeded the 90 dBA OSHA 8 hr permissible exposure limit, although six projected TWAs exceeded the 85 dBA OSHA hearing conservation action limit. Using NIOSH criteria, TWAs ranged from 69-90 dBA with a mean of 80 dBA (SD = 4 dBA). Nearly 8% (14) of the exposures exceeded the NIOSH 8-hr 85 dBA. Full-shift exposures were larger for all workers in full-service restaurants (p < 0.001) and for cooks (p = 0.003), regardless of restaurant type. The fall semester (p = 0.003) and weekend (p = 0.048) exposures were louder than summer and weekdays. Multiple linear regression analysis suggested that the combination of restaurant type, job classification, and season had a significant effect on restaurant worker noise exposures (p < 0.001) in this college town. While evening/night shift exposures

  3. Administrative Synergy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Weckstein, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles to overcome in creating and sustaining an administrative professional learning community (PLC) is time. Administrators are constantly deluged by the tyranny of the urgent. It is a Herculean task to carve out time for PLCs, but it is imperative to do so. In this article, the authors describe how an administrative PLC…

  4. 50 CFR 217.13 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKE OF MARINE MAMMALS INCIDENTAL TO SPECIFIED ACTIVITIES Taking of Marine Mammals Incidental to Coastal Commercial Fireworks Displays... incidentally, but not intentionally, take marine mammals within the area described in § 217.11(b) of...

  5. 50 CFR 216.152 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Taking Of Marine Mammals Incidental To Missile Launch Activities from San Nicolas Island, CA § 216..., take marine mammals by harassment, within the area described in § 216.150, provided the activity is...

  6. 50 CFR 216.112 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Coastal Commercial Fireworks Displays at Monterey Bay National... MBNMS) may incidentally, but not intentionally, take marine mammals by Level B harassment only,...

  7. 50 CFR 216.122 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Taking Of Marine Mammals Incidental To Space Vehicle And Test Flight Activities § 216.122... intentionally, take marine mammals by harassment, within the area described in § 216.120, provided the...

  8. 50 CFR 216.122 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MARINE MAMMALS REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE TAKING AND IMPORTING OF MARINE MAMMALS Taking Of Marine Mammals Incidental To Space Vehicle And Test Flight Activities § 216.122... intentionally, take marine mammals by harassment, within the area described in § 216.120, provided the...

  9. Statistical Modeling of Occupational Exposure to Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons Using OSHA Data.

    PubMed

    Lee, Derrick G; Lavoué, Jérôme; Spinelli, John J; Burstyn, Igor

    2015-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a group of pollutants with multiple variants classified as carcinogenic. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) provided access to two PAH exposure databanks of United States workplace compliance testing data collected between 1979 and 2010. Mixed-effects logistic models were used to predict the exceedance fraction (EF), i.e., the probability of exceeding OSHA's Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL = 0.2 mg/m3) for PAHs based on industry and occupation. Measurements of coal tar pitch volatiles were used as a surrogate for PAHs. Time, databank, occupation, and industry were included as fixed-effects while an identifier for the compliance inspection number was included as a random effect. Analyses involved 2,509 full-shift personal measurements. Results showed that the majority of industries had an estimated EF < 0.5, although several industries, including Standardized Industry Classification codes 1623 (Water, Sewer, Pipeline, and Communication and Powerline Construction), 1711 (Plumbing, Heating, and Air-Conditioning), 2824 (Manmade Organic Fibres), 3496 (Misc. Fabricated Wire products), and 5812 (Eating Places), and Major group's 13 (Oil and Gas Extraction) and 30 (Rubber and Miscellaneous Plastic Products), were estimated to have more than an 80% likelihood of exceeding the PEL. There was an inverse temporal trend of exceeding the PEL, with lower risk in most recent years, albeit not statistically significant. Similar results were shown when incorporating occupation, but varied depending on the occupation as the majority of industries predicted at the administrative level, e.g., managers, had an estimated EF < 0.5 while at the minimally skilled/laborer level there was a substantial increase in the estimated EF. These statistical models allow the prediction of PAH exposure risk through individual occupational histories and will be used to create a job-exposure matrix for use in a population-based case

  10. Exposure levels of anti-LINGO-1 Li81 antibody in the central nervous system and dose-efficacy relationships in rat spinal cord remyelination models after systemic administration.

    PubMed

    Pepinsky, R Blake; Shao, Zhaohui; Ji, Benxiu; Wang, Qin; Meng, Gym; Walus, Lee; Lee, Xinhua; Hu, Yinghui; Graff, Christilyn; Garber, Ellen; Meier, Werner; Mi, Sha

    2011-11-01

    LINGO-1 (leucine-rich repeat and Ig domain containing NOGO receptor interacting protein-1) is a negative regulator of myelination and repair of damaged axons in the central nervous system (CNS). Blocking LINGO-1 function leads to robust remyelination. The anti-LINGO-1 Li81 antibody is currently being evaluated in clinical trials for multiple sclerosis (MS) and is the first MS therapy that directly targets myelin repair. LINGO-1 is selectively expressed in brain and spinal cord but not in peripheral tissues. Perhaps the greatest concern for Li81 therapy is the limited access of the drug to the CNS. Here, we measured Li81 concentrations in brain, spinal cord, and cerebral spinal fluid in rats after systemic administration and correlated them with dose-efficacy responses in rat lysolecithin and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis spinal cord models of remyelination. Remyelination was dose-dependent, and levels of Li81 in spinal cord that promoted myelination correlated well with affinity measurements for the binding of Li81 to LINGO-1. Observed Li81 concentrations in the CNS of 0.1 to 0.4% of blood levels are consistent with values reported for other antibodies. To understand the features of the antibody that affect CNS penetration, we also evaluated the pharmacokinetics of Li81 Fab2, Fab, and poly(ethylene glycol)-modified Fab. The reagents all showed similar CNS exposure despite large differences in their sizes, serum half-lives, and volumes of distribution, and area under the curve (AUC) measurements in the CNS directly correlated with AUC measurements in serum. These studies demonstrate that exposure levels achieved by passive diffusion of the Li81 monoclonal antibody into the CNS are sufficient and lead to robust remyelination. PMID:21807883

  11. Mitochondrial DNA, RNA and protein synthesis in normal, hypothyroid and mildly hyperthyroid rat liver during cold exposure.

    PubMed

    Goglia, F; Liverini, G; Lanni, A; Barletta, A

    1988-02-01

    We have examined in isolated liver mitochondria the effect of cold exposure on DNA, RNA and protein synthesis in normal, hypothyroid and mildly hyperthyroid rats. In normal rats DNA polymerase activity increased from the first day of cold exposure remaining high up to the fifteenth day. RNA polymerase and protein synthesis were stimulated from the fifth day of cold exposure, maintaining a high level up to the fifteenth day. These activities were related to serum triiodothyronine (T3) levels. Indeed propylthiouracil (PTU) administration to cold-exposed rats drastically depressed the above activities, whereas T3 administration to PTU-treated cold-exposed rats restored them to about the values prevalent in normal cold-exposed rats. The translation products analyzed by gel electrophoresis showed that different effects may be exerted by T3 depending on whether its circulating levels are physiologically or pharmacologically modified. These findings suggest that T3 may be involved in the regulation of the acclimation process by acting, presumably with a permissive role, on those activities which determine a modification of the mitochondrial morphometric features and an increase in mitochondria number and turnover. PMID:2451625

  12. Bloodborne Pathogens Exposure Control Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Child Care Association, Atlanta, GA.

    This sample exposure control plan is a guide to assist child care providers in complying with the blood-borne pathogens standard issued by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). The standard requires employers to establish a written exposure control plan by May 5, 1992 (for exposure to microorganisms in human blood that cause…

  13. Transformation of human cells by oncogenic viruses supports permissiveness for parvovirus H-1 propagation.

    PubMed Central

    Faisst, S; Schlehofer, J R; zur Hausen, H

    1989-01-01

    Parvovirus H-1 has been shown to suppress spontaneous and chemically or virally induced tumorigenesis in hamsters. In human cell culture systems propagation of H-1 is restricted to transformed cells, which are killed by H-1 infection, in contrast to normal diploid cells, which are nonpermissive for H-1. By analyzing the permissiveness of a variety of human cells for H-1, it was determined that the majority of tested transformed or immortalized cells which were permissive for H-1 contained the DNA of oncogenic viruses (human papillomavirus, simian virus 40, adenovirus, hepatitis B virus, Epstein-Barr virus, and human T-cell lymphotropic virus type I). Of six transformed cell lines negative for persisting tumor virus DNA, only two were permissive for H-1, while two were semipermissive and two were nonpermissive. Thus, persistence and expression of tumor virus functions appears to promote full permissiveness for H-1 in human cells. However, neither expression of genes of specific viral genomes nor the transformed state of apparently virus-free cells alone was sufficient to render human cells permissive for H-1. Therefore, the effect of tumor virus functions on H-1 in transformed cells seems to be indirect, probably mediated by cellular factors which are induced or switched off during the transformation process. It appears that similar factors are induced or switched off by 5-azacytidine or calcium phosphate, both known inducers of cellular gene expression. Images PMID:2495371

  14. Modernizing Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lombardi, Vincent L.; Hildebrand, Verna

    1981-01-01

    Suggests assignment of research duties and rotation of teaching and management roles for college administrators, to increase their effectiveness and diminish the negative effects of declining enrollments. (JD)

  15. A highly sensitive LC-MS/MS method for determination of ketoconazole in human plasma: Application to a clinical study of the exposure to ketoconazole in patients after topical administration.

    PubMed

    Wang, Keli; Wu, Yao; Chi, Zhiyan; Shu, Chang; Li, Lingjun; Wei, Jun; Tao, Lei; Ma, Pengcheng; Ding, Li

    2016-09-01

    A simple, rapid and highly sensitive LC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for the determination of ketoconazole in human plasma. Sample preparation was accomplished through a single step liquid-liquid extraction by ethyl acetate. The chromatography separation was carried out on a Hedera CN (150mm×2.1mm, 5μm) column with isocratic elution using acetonitrile and 10mM ammonium acetate containing 0.1% formic acid (45:55, v/v) as the mobile phase. The flow rate was 0.5mL/min. Detection was performed in the positive ion electrospray ionization mode using multiple reaction monitoring of the transitions of 531.2→489.3 and 286.1→217.1 for ketoconazole and letrozole (the internal standard), respectively. The method exhibited good linearity over the concentration range of 0.01-12ng/mL for ketoconazole. The intra- and inter-batch precision and accuracy of ketoconazole were all within the acceptable criteria. The method was successfully applied to a clinical study of the exposure to ketoconazole in Chinese seborrheic dermatitis patients after topical administration of two ketoconazole formulations of foam and lotion, respectively. The study results showed that there was little systemic absorption of ketoconazole in patients for the two formulations, and the ketoconazole foam and lotion are safe therapeutic drugs for seborrheic dermatitis patients. PMID:27379747

  16. 77 FR 74191 - Notice of Proposals To Engage in Permissible Nonbanking Activities or To Acquire Companies That...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Engaged in Permissible Nonbanking Activities; Correction This notice corrects a notice (FR Doc. 2012-29742... engage in providing support services in connection with the settlement, accounting, and...

  17. Assessment of Occupational Exposure to Dust and Crystalline Silica in Foundries

    PubMed Central

    Omidianidost, Ali; Azari, Mansour R.; Golbabaei, Farideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: The term “crystalline silica” refers to crystallized form of SiO2 and quartz, as the most abundant compound on the earth’s crust; it is capable of causing silicosis and lung cancer upon inhaling large doses in the course of occupational exposure. The aim of this study was to assess occupational exposure to dust and crystalline silica in foundries in Pakdasht, Iran. Materials and Methods: In this study, airborne dust samples were collected on PVC filters (37 mm diameter, 0.8 mm pore size), by using a sampling pump and open face cyclone at a flow rate of 2.2 l/min for a maximum volume of 800 liters. For determining crystalline silica spectrometry was used according to the National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) method No. 7601 for analysis of samples. Results: Results showed that crystalline silica concentration was higher than NIOSH and the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienist (ACGIH) allowed extent (0.025 mg/m3). Concentration of crystalline silica was 0.02–0.1 mg/m3. Total dust concentration average was higher than the allowed extent by Permissible Exposure Limit (PEL) of the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA). Conclusion: It is essential to take necessary measures to control crystalline silica dust regarding the fact that 50% of workers are exposed to higher than the allowed extent. PMID:26858767

  18. Ototoxic occupational exposures for a stock car racing team: I. Noise surveys.

    PubMed

    Van Campen, Luann E; Morata, Thais; Kardous, Chucri A; Gwin, Kristin; Wallingford, Kenneth M; Dallaire, Jacques; Alvarez, Frank J

    2005-08-01

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) surveyed noise exposure for a professional stock car team at their race shop and during two races at one racetrack. At the team's shop, area sound pressure levels (SPLs) were measured for various work tasks. Equivalent levels (Leqs) ranged from 58 to 104 decibels, A-weighted (dBA). Personal noise dosimetry was conducted for at least one employee for each job description in race car assembly (n = 9). The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) permissible exposure limit (PEL) of 90 dBA for an 8-hour, 5-dB exchange rate time-weighted average (TWA) was never exceeded, but in two instances values exceeded OSHA's action level of 85 dBA for hearing conservation implementation. The NIOSH recommended exposure limit (REL) of 85 dBA for a 3-dB exchange rate Leq was exceeded for five of the measured jobs. During the races, SPLs averaged above 100 dBA in the pit area where cars undergo adjustments/refueling, both before and during the race. Peak levels reached 140 dB SPL. NIOSH REL was exceeded for every personal noise dosimetry measurement. Recommendations for hearing protection and communication are presented. PMID:16080260

  19. Parental permission for pilot newborn screening research: guidelines from the NBSTRN.

    PubMed

    Botkin, Jeffrey R; Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Watson, Michael S; Swoboda, Kathryn J; Anderson, Rebecca; Berry, Susan A; Bonhomme, Natasha; Brosco, Jeffrey P; Comeau, Anne M; Goldenberg, Aaron; Goldman, Edward; Therrell, Bradford; Levy-Fisch, Jill; Tarini, Beth; Wilfond, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    There is broad recognition of the need for population-based research to assess the safety and efficacy of newborn screening (NBS) for conditions that are not on current panels. However, prospective population-based research poses significant ethical, regulatory, and logistical challenges. In the context of NBS, there have been a variety of approaches that address parental decision-making in pilot studies of new screening tests or conditions. This article presents an ethical and legal analysis of the role of parental permission by the Bioethics and Legal Work Group of the Newborn Screening Translational Research Network created under a contract from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Circumstances are outlined in which a waiver of documentation of permission or a waiver of permission may be ethically and legally appropriate in the NBS context. These guidelines do not constitute American Academy of Pediatrics policy. PMID:24394680

  20. Parental Permission for Pilot Newborn Screening Research: Guidelines From the NBSTRN

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Michelle Huckaby; Watson, Michael S.; Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Anderson, Rebecca; Berry, Susan A.; Bonhomme, Natasha; Brosco, Jeffrey P.; Comeau, Anne M.; Goldenberg, Aaron; Goldman, Edward; Therrell, Bradford; Levy-Fisch, Jill; Tarini, Beth; Wilfond, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    There is broad recognition of the need for population-based research to assess the safety and efficacy of newborn screening (NBS) for conditions that are not on current panels. However, prospective population-based research poses significant ethical, regulatory, and logistical challenges. In the context of NBS, there have been a variety of approaches that address parental decision-making in pilot studies of new screening tests or conditions. This article presents an ethical and legal analysis of the role of parental permission by the Bioethics and Legal Work Group of the Newborn Screening Translational Research Network created under a contract from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development to the American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics. Circumstances are outlined in which a waiver of documentation of permission or a waiver of permission may be ethically and legally appropriate in the NBS context. These guidelines do not constitute American Academy of Pediatrics policy. PMID:24394680