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Sample records for administration significantly reversed

  1. Therapeutic reversal with benxtropine in schizophrenics. Practical and theoretical significance.

    PubMed

    Singh, M M; Kay, S R

    1975-04-01

    The effect of an anticholinergic antiparkinsonism drug, benztropine, on the therapeutic course of neuroleptic treatment in 18 schizophrenics was investigated in a double blind cross-over study involving haloperidol and chlorpromazine. Significant therapeutic reversal was observed with benztropine in terms of the social, affective,and cognitive dysfunctions chracteristically seen in schizophrenic psychosis. The hallucinatory behavior and disturbed attention were not so affected. The aspects of the clinical picture to show significant nontherapeutic change with benxtropine differed with the stage of treatment and seemed to be determined by the kinetics of the therapeutic process. The effect was one of exacerbation of the disorder and not a toxic confusional state sometimes associated with anticholinergic drugs. The practical and theoretical significance of these findings was discussed. It was suggested that the benztropine reversal of therapeutic changes provided a valuable pharmacological model for understanding the neurobiological basis of schizophrenic decompensation and its restitution with neuroleptics. The reported data were considered as indirect evidence suggesting that cholinergic neuronal mechnisms are involved in both of these processes. It was speculated that these mechanisms may well be the cholinergic suppressor systems, such as the periventricular catecholamine pathways in the limbic organization and bsal ganglia known to be affected by neuroleptics.

  2. Brown adipose tissue thermogenesis does not explain the intra-administration hyperthermic sign-reversal induced by serial administrations of 60% nitrous oxide to rats.

    PubMed

    Al-Noori, Salwa; Ramsay, Douglas S; Cimpan, Andreas; Maltzer, Zoe; Zou, Jessie; Kaiyala, Karl J

    2016-08-01

    Initial administration of ≥60% nitrous oxide (N2O) to rats promotes hypothermia primarily by increasing whole-body heat loss. We hypothesized that the drug promotes heat loss via the tail and might initially inhibit thermogenesis via brown adipose tissue (BAT), major organs of thermoregulation in rodents. Following repeated administrations, N2O inhalation evokes hyperthermia underlain by increased whole-body heat production. We hypothesized that elevated BAT thermogenesis plays a role in this thermoregulatory sign reversal. Using dual probe telemetric temperature implants and infrared (IR) thermography, we assessed the effects of nine repeated 60% N2O administrations compared to control (con) administrations on core temperature, BAT temperature, lumbar back temperature and tail temperature. Telemetric core temperature, telemetric BAT temperature, and IR BAT temperature were reduced significantly during initial 60% N2O inhalation (p≤0.001 compared to con). IR thermography revealed that acute N2O administration unexpectedly reduced tail temperature (p=0.0001) and also inhibited IR lumbar temperature (p<0.0001). In the 9th session, N2O inhalation significantly increased telemetric core temperature (p=0.007) indicative of a hyperthermic sign reversal, yet compared to control administrations, telemetric BAT temperature (p=0.86), IR BAT temperature (p=0.85) and tail temperature (p=0.47) did not differ significantly. Thus, an initial administration of 60% N2O at 21°C may promote hypothermia via reduced BAT thermogenesis accompanied by tail vasoconstriction as a compensatory mechanism to limit body heat loss. Following repeated N2O administrations rats exhibit a hyperthermic core temperature but a normalized BAT temperature, suggesting induction of a hyperthermia-promoting thermogenic adaptation of unknown origin. PMID:27503733

  3. Myocardial metabolic, hemodynamic, and electrocardiographic significance of reversible thallium-201 abnormalities in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, R.O. 3d.; Dilsizian, V.; O'Gara, P.T.; Udelson, J.E.; Schenke, W.H.; Quyyumi, A.; Fananapazir, L.; Bonow, R.O. )

    1991-05-01

    Exercise-induced abnormalities during thallium-201 scintigraphy that normalize at rest frequently occur in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, it is not known whether these abnormalities are indicative of myocardial ischemia. Fifty patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy underwent exercise {sup 201}Tl scintigraphy and, during the same week, measurement of myocardial lactate metabolism and hemodynamics during pacing stress. Thirty-seven patients (74%) had one or more {sup 201}Tl abnormalities that completely normalized after 3 hours of rest; 26 had regional myocardial {sup 201}Tl defects, and 26 had apparent left ventricular cavity dilatation with exercise, with 15 having coexistence of these abnormal findings. Of the 37 patients with reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, 27 (73%) had metabolic evidence of myocardial ischemia during rapid atrial pacing compared with four of 13 patients (31%) with normal {sup 201}Tl scans (p less than 0.01). Eleven patients had apparent cavity dilatation as their only {sup 201}Tl abnormality; their mean postpacing left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was significantly higher than that of the 13 patients with normal {sup 201}Tl studies (33 +/- 5 versus 21 +/- 10 mm Hg, p less than 0.001). There was no correlation between the angiographic presence of systolic septal or epicardial coronary arterial compression and the presence or distribution of {sup 201}Tl abnormalities. Patients with ischemic ST segment responses to exercise had an 80% prevalence rate of reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities and a 70% prevalence rate of pacing-induced ischemia. However, 69% of patients with nonischemic ST segment responses had reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities, and 55% had pacing-induced ischemia. Reversible {sup 201}Tl abnormalities during exercise stress are markers of myocardial ischemia in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and most likely identify relatively underperfused myocardium.

  4. 21 CFR 10.70 - Documentation of significant decisions in administrative file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Documentation of significant decisions in administrative file. 10.70 Section 10.70 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND... appropriate employees, and show all persons to whom copies were sent; (4) Avoid defamatory...

  5. Significance of the basin wide reverse polarity reflector in the Offshore Sydney Basin, East Australian Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman Talukder, Asrarur; Nadri, Dariush; Rajput, Sanjeev; Clennell, Ben; Griffiths, Cedric; Breeze, David

    2010-05-01

    The Offshore Sydney Basin is located between latitudes 32°30'S and 34°30'S between the coastal cities of Newcastle in the north and Wollongong in the south, covering a total area of ~15,000 squire km. The structural framework of the offshore portion of the basin comprises five principal elements: the Offshore Syncline, an extension of the New England Fold Belt, an offshore extension of the Newcastle Syncline, the Offshore Uplift and the Outer Continental Shelf. The present easterly extent of the basin is the result of Cretaceous rifting and commencement of seafloor spreading in the adjacent Tasman Sea. The continental shelf is approximately 50 km wide offshore Sydney and is edged by relatively steep continental slope. This study has been carried out with 2D multichannel seismic data covering the northern half of the offshore basin. The Cenozoic sedimentary cover of the basin is characterized by two regional unconformities: one at the base of Cenozoic and another intra-Cenozoic. The unconformity at the base of Cenozoic is known as the Top Sydney Basin unconformity. In places the surface is displaced by faults and also characterized by possible mounds producing an overall highly irregular topography. Though most of the faults remained buried beneath the surface some continued up to seafloor. They seem to have NW-SE direction with significant lateral extension. The intra-Cenozoic unconformity forms a prominent reflector at about 80 to 200 msbs (TWT). It is characterized by an angular unconformity with the reflectors terminating onto it from beneath. It is also associated with prograding sequences beneath, terminating with toplap geometry, suggesting that it forms the boundary between a transgressive and regressive phase. This is interpreted as a prograding carbonate dominated shelf-edge. The most interesting aspect of this seismic reflector is that the major part of it presents reverse polarity with respect to the seafloor reflection. The amplitude of the reflector

  6. Annual committee reports on significant legislative, judicial, and administrative developments in 1981: Environmental-Quality Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The committee found significant developments under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). There were no amendments to NEPA, but there were new rules affecting DOE defense-related nuclear facilities. Judicial developments continued a deference to agency discretion in environmental impact statement issues and conflicts with other laws. The administration's budget cuts effectively disabled the Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ). The report also outlines significant legislative, judicial, and administrative developments for the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act, the Endangered Species Act, and the Toxic Substances Act. 188 references. (DCK)

  7. Reversal of the sleep-wake cycle by heroin self-administration in rats.

    PubMed

    Coffey, Alissa A; Guan, Zhiwei; Grigson, Patricia S; Fang, Jidong

    2016-05-01

    The goal of this study was to examine how heroin self-administration, abstinence, and extinction/reinstatement affect circadian sleep-wake cycles and the associated sleep architecture. We used electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) to measure sleep patterns in male Sprague-Dawley rats over 16 trials of heroin self-administration (acquisition), 14 days of abstinence, and a single day of extinction and drug-induced reinstatement. Rats self-administering heroin showed evidence of reversed (diurnal) patterns of wakefulness, non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep throughout acquisition. During abstinence, their wake and NREM sleep patterns were immediately restored to the normal nocturnal distribution. REM patterns remained inverted for the first 3-6 days of abstinence in heroin self-administering rats. The single extinction/reinstatement test was without effect. These data suggest that heroin may have the ability to affect circadian distribution of sleep and wakefulness, either indirectly, where animals shift their sleep-wake cycle to allow for drug taking, or directly, through wake-promoting actions or actions at circadian oscillators in the brain.

  8. Reversals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center on Educational Media and Materials for the Handicapped, Columbus, OH.

    Selected from the National Instructional Materials Information System (NIMIS)--a computer based on-line interactive retrieval system on special education materials--the bibliography covers nine materials for remediating reversals in handicapped students at the early childhood and elementary levels. Entries are presented in order of NIMIS accession…

  9. Exogenous NAD(+) administration significantly protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat model.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Youjun; Wang, Ban; Fu, Xingli; Guan, Shaofeng; Han, Wenzheng; Zhang, Jie; Gan, Qian; Fang, Weiyi; Ying, Weihai; Qu, Xinkai

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes for death around the world. Although essential for successful interventional therapy, it is inevitably complicated by reperfusion injury. Thus effective approaches to reduce ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are still critically needed. To test our hypothesis that intravenous administration of NAD(+) can attenuate I/R injury by reducing apoptotic damage and enhancing antioxidant capacity, we used a rat mode of myocardial I/R. Our study found that administration of 10-20 mg/kg NAD(+) can dose dependently reduce myocardial infarct induced by I/R, with an approximately 85% reduction of the infarct at the dosage of 20 mg/kg NAD(+). We further found that the injection of NAD(+) can significantly decrease I/R-induced apoptotic damage in the heart: NAD(+) administration can both decrease the TUNEL signals, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 levels and increase the Bcl-XL levels in the rats that are subjected to myocardial I/R injury. NAD(+) administration can also significantly attenuate I/R-induced decreases in SOD activity and SOD-2 protein levels in the hearts. NAD(+) can profoundly decrease myocardial I/R injury at least partially by attenuating apoptotic damage and enhancing the antioxidant capacity, thus suggesting that NAD(+) may become a promising therapeutic agent for myocardial I/R injury. PMID:27648125

  10. Exogenous NAD+ administration significantly protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youjun; Wang, Ban; Fu, Xingli; Guan, Shaofeng; Han, Wenzheng; Zhang, Jie; Gan, Qian; Fang, Weiyi; Ying, Weihai; Qu, Xinkai

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes for death around the world. Although essential for successful interventional therapy, it is inevitably complicated by reperfusion injury. Thus effective approaches to reduce ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are still critically needed. To test our hypothesis that intravenous administration of NAD+ can attenuate I/R injury by reducing apoptotic damage and enhancing antioxidant capacity, we used a rat mode of myocardial I/R. Our study found that administration of 10-20 mg/kg NAD+ can dose dependently reduce myocardial infarct induced by I/R, with an approximately 85% reduction of the infarct at the dosage of 20 mg/kg NAD+. We further found that the injection of NAD+ can significantly decrease I/R-induced apoptotic damage in the heart: NAD+ administration can both decrease the TUNEL signals, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 levels and increase the Bcl-XL levels in the rats that are subjected to myocardial I/R injury. NAD+ administration can also significantly attenuate I/R-induced decreases in SOD activity and SOD-2 protein levels in the hearts. NAD+ can profoundly decrease myocardial I/R injury at least partially by attenuating apoptotic damage and enhancing the antioxidant capacity, thus suggesting that NAD+ may become a promising therapeutic agent for myocardial I/R injury. PMID:27648125

  11. Exogenous NAD+ administration significantly protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Youjun; Wang, Ban; Fu, Xingli; Guan, Shaofeng; Han, Wenzheng; Zhang, Jie; Gan, Qian; Fang, Weiyi; Ying, Weihai; Qu, Xinkai

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction is one of the leading causes for death around the world. Although essential for successful interventional therapy, it is inevitably complicated by reperfusion injury. Thus effective approaches to reduce ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury are still critically needed. To test our hypothesis that intravenous administration of NAD+ can attenuate I/R injury by reducing apoptotic damage and enhancing antioxidant capacity, we used a rat mode of myocardial I/R. Our study found that administration of 10-20 mg/kg NAD+ can dose dependently reduce myocardial infarct induced by I/R, with an approximately 85% reduction of the infarct at the dosage of 20 mg/kg NAD+. We further found that the injection of NAD+ can significantly decrease I/R-induced apoptotic damage in the heart: NAD+ administration can both decrease the TUNEL signals, Bax, cleaved caspase-3 levels and increase the Bcl-XL levels in the rats that are subjected to myocardial I/R injury. NAD+ administration can also significantly attenuate I/R-induced decreases in SOD activity and SOD-2 protein levels in the hearts. NAD+ can profoundly decrease myocardial I/R injury at least partially by attenuating apoptotic damage and enhancing the antioxidant capacity, thus suggesting that NAD+ may become a promising therapeutic agent for myocardial I/R injury.

  12. Spatial Discrimination Reversal Learning in Weanling Rats Is Impaired by Striatal Administration of an NMDA-Receptor Antagonist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Deborah J.; Stanton, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    The striatum plays a major role in both motor control and learning and memory, including executive function and "behavioral flexibility." Lesion, temporary inactivation, and infusion of an N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA)-receptor antagonist into the dorsomedial striatum (dmSTR) impair reversal learning in adult rats. Systemic administration of MK-801…

  13. Repeated administrations of carbon nanotubes in male mice cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Yuhong; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Jingping; Mu, Qingxin; Zhang, Weidong; Butch, Elizabeth R.; Snyder, Scott E.; Yan, Bing

    2010-09-01

    Soluble carbon nanotubes show promise as materials for in vivo delivery and imaging applications. Several reports have described the in vivo toxicity of carbon nanotubes, but their effects on male reproduction have not been examined. Here, we show that repeated intravenous injections of water-soluble multiwalled carbon nanotubes into male mice can cause reversible testis damage without affecting fertility. Nanotubes accumulated in the testes, generated oxidative stress and decreased the thickness of the seminiferous epithelium in the testis at day 15, but the damage was repaired at 60 and 90 days. The quantity, quality and integrity of the sperm and the levels of three major sex hormones were not significantly affected throughout the 90-day period. The fertility of treated male mice was unaffected; the pregnancy rate and delivery success of female mice that mated with the treated male mice did not differ from those that mated with untreated male mice.

  14. Antibiotic Administration Routes Significantly Influence the Levels of Antibiotic Resistance in Gut Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Huang, Ying; Zhou, Yang; Buckley, Timothy

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the impact of oral exposure to antibiotic-resistant bacteria and antibiotic administration methods on antibiotic resistance (AR) gene pools and the profile of resistant bacteria in host gastrointestinal (GI) tracts using C57BL/6J mice with natural gut microbiota. Mice inoculated with a mixture of tet(M)-carrying Enterococcus spp. or blaCMY-2-carrying Escherichia coli were treated with different doses of tetracycline hydrochloride (Tet) or ampicillin sodium (Amp) and delivered via either feed or intravenous (i.v.) injection. Quantitative PCR assessment of mouse fecal samples revealed that (i) AR gene pools were below the detection limit in mice without prior inoculation of AR gene carriers regardless of subsequent exposure to corresponding antibiotics; (ii) oral exposure to high doses of Tet and Amp in mice inoculated with AR gene carriers led to rapid enrichment of corresponding AR gene pools in feces; (iii) significantly less or delayed development of AR in the GI tract of the AR carrier-inoculated mice was observed when the same doses of antibiotics were administered via i.v. injection rather than oral administration; and (iv) antibiotic dosage, and maybe the excretion route, affected AR in the GI tract. The shift of dominant AR bacterial populations in the gut microbiota was consistent with the dynamics of AR gene pools. The emergence of endogenous resistant bacteria in the gut microbiota corresponding to drug exposure was also observed. Together, these data suggest that oral administration of antibiotics has a prominent effect on AR amplification and development in gut microbiota, which may be minimized by alternative drug administration approaches, as illustrated by i.v. injection in this study and proper drug selection. PMID:23689712

  15. Red/violet contrast reversal on Mars - Significance for eolian sediments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, P.; Veverka, J.

    1986-01-01

    Viking Orbiter images of Mars are analyzed to define relationships between the observed contrast reversals (CR) and specific surface features. The link between CR phenomena and surface composition was first detected in contrast comparisons between UV and visible wavelength Mariner 9 data. Viking data, taken through red and violet filters, showed that the CRs occurred only with crater splotches and splotch-related streaks and in bright depositional and dark erosional streaks, both being low-albedo markings presumably caused by eolian forces. The splotch phenomena is confined mainly to the Oxia Palus region, although there are other regions where splotches and streaks commingle. Laboratory tests to mimic the CR characteristics showed that CRs are a common phenomena of different size fractions of iron oxides, e.g., goethite, where particles under 5 microns have been removed. The splotches, including dune formations, are therefore believed to indicate the presence of particles in the 100-800 microns diam range. Finer particles ride on the tops of the dust storms, and are continually removed from the surface by saltation.

  16. Sanitization of an automatic reverse-osmosis watering system: removal of a clinically significant biofilm.

    PubMed

    Molk, Denise M; Karr-May, Charlene L; Trang, Elaine D; Sanders, George E

    2013-03-01

    During environmental monitoring of our institution's rodent watering systems, one vivarium was found to have high bacterial loads in the reverse-osmosis (RO) automatic water system. These findings prompted evaluation of the entire RO water production and distribution system. Investigation revealed insufficient rack and RO system sanitization, leading to heavy biofilm accumulation within the system. Approximately 2 wk after discovery in the water system, one of the bacterial organisms isolated in the water supply, Sphingomonas paucimobilis, was isolated from a peritoneal abscess of a severely immunodeficient B6. Cg-Slc11a1(r) Rag1(tm1Mom)/Cwi mouse housed in the same vivarium, suggesting that rodents drinking from this system were being exposed randomly to fragments of biofilm. Plans were developed to sanitize the entire system. Hypercholorination was used first, followed by treatment with a combination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Between system sanitizations, a low-level chlorine infusion was added to the system as a biocide. Heterotrophic plate counts and bacterial isolation were performed on water samples obtained before and after sanitization procedures. We here discuss the process of identifying and correcting this important water-quality issue. PMID:23562105

  17. Sanitization of an Automatic Reverse-Osmosis Watering System: Removal of a Clinically Significant Biofilm

    PubMed Central

    Molk, Denise M; Karr-May, Charlene L; Trang, Elaine D; Sanders, George E

    2013-01-01

    During environmental monitoring of our institution's rodent watering systems, one vivarium was found to have high bacterial loads in the reverse-osmosis (RO) automatic water system. These findings prompted evaluation of the entire RO water production and distribution system. Investigation revealed insufficient rack and RO system sanitization, leading to heavy biofilm accumulation within the system. Approximately 2 wk after discovery in the water system, one of the bacterial organisms isolated in the water supply, Sphingomonas paucimobilis, was isolated from a peritoneal abscess of a severely immunodeficient B6.Cg-Slc11a1r Rag1tm1Mom/Cwi mouse housed in the same vivarium, suggesting that rodents drinking from this system were being exposed randomly to fragments of biofilm. Plans were developed to sanitize the entire system. Hypercholorination was used first, followed by treatment with a combination of peracetic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Between system sanitizations, a low-level chlorine infusion was added to the system as a biocide. Heterotrophic plate counts and bacterial isolation were performed on water samples obtained before and after sanitization procedures. We here discuss the process of identifying and correcting this important water-quality issue. PMID:23562105

  18. Systemic Administration of Propentofylline, Ibudilast, and (+)-Naltrexone Each Reverses Mechanical Allodynia in a Novel Rat Model of Central Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, Amanda; Wieseler, Julie; Favret, Jacob; Johnson, Kirk W.; Rice, Kenner C.; Maier, Steven F.; Falci, Scott; Watkins, Linda R.

    2014-01-01

    Central neuropathic pain (CNP) is a debilitating consequence of central nervous system (CNS) damage for which current treatments are ineffective. To explore mechanisms underlying CNP, we developed a rat model involving T13/L1 dorsal root avulsion. The resultant dorsal horn damage creates bilateral below-level (L4-6) mechanical allodynia. This allodynia, termed spinal neuropathic avulsion pain (SNAP), occurs in the absence of confounding paralysis. To characterize this model, we undertook a series of studies aimed at defining whether SNAP could be reversed by any of 3 putative glial activation inhibitors, each with distinct mechanisms of action. Indeed, the phosphodiesterase inhibitor propentofylline, the macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) inhibitor ibudilast, and the toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) antagonist (+)-naltrexone each reversed below-level allodynia bilaterally. Strikingly, none of these impacted SNAP upon first administration but required 1–2 wk of daily administration before pain reversal was obtained. Given reversal of CNP by each of these glial modulatory agents, these results suggest that glia contribute to the maintenance of such pain and enduring release of MIF and endogenous agonists of TLR4 is important for sustaining CNP. The markedly delayed efficacy of all 3 glial modulatory drugs may prove instructive for interpretation of apparent drug failures after shorter dosing regimens. PMID:24412802

  19. Functional significance of the discordance between transcriptional profile and left ventricular structure/function during reverse remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Topkara, Veli K.; Chambers, Kari T.; Yang, Kai-Chien; Tzeng, Huei-Ping; Evans, Sarah; Weinheimer, Carla; Kovacs, Attila; Robbins, Jeffrey; Barger, Philip; Mann, Douglas L.

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the mechanisms for reverse LV remodeling, we generated a conditional (doxycycline [dox] off) transgenic mouse tetracycline transactivating factor–TRAF2 (tTA-TRAF2) that develops a dilated heart failure (HF) phenotype upon expression of a proinflammatory transgene, TNF receptor–associated factor 2 (TRAF2), and complete normalization of LV structure and function when the transgene is suppressed. tTA-TRAF2 mice developed a significant increase in LV dimension with decreased contractile function, which was completely normalized in the tTA-TRAF2 mice fed dox for 4 weeks (tTA-TRAF2dox4W). Normalization of LV structure and function was accompanied by partial normalization (~60%) of gene expression associated with incident HF. Similar findings were observed in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy who underwent reverse LV remodeling following mechanical circulatory support. Persistence of the HF gene program was associated with an exaggerated hypertrophic response and increased mortality in tTA-TRAF2dox4W mice following transaortic constriction (TAC). These effects were no longer observed following TAC in tTA-TRAF2dox8W, wherein there was a more complete (88%) reversal of the incident HF genes. These results demonstrate that reverse LV remodeling is associated with improvements in cardiac myocyte biology; however, the persistence of the abnormal HF gene program may be maladaptive following perturbations in hemodynamic loading conditions. PMID:27158672

  20. Can administrative data be used to ascertain clinically significant postoperative complications?

    PubMed

    Romano, Patrick S; Schembri, Michael E; Rainwater, Julie A

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess whether postoperative complications can be ascertained using administrative data. We randomly sampled 991 adults who underwent elective open diskectomies at 30 nonfederal acute care hospitals in California. Postoperative complications were specified by reviewing medical literature and by consulting clinical experts. We compared hospital-reported ICD-9-CM data and independently recoded ICD-9-CM data with complications abstracted by clinicians using detailed criteria. Recoded ICD-9-CM data were more likely than hospital-reported ICD-9-CM data to capture true complications, when they occurred, but they also mislabeled more patients who never experienced clinically significant complications. This finding was most evident for mild or ambiguous complications, such as atelectasis, posthemorrhagic anemia, and hypotension. Overall, recoded ICD-9-CM data captured 47% and 56% of all mild and severe complications, respectively, whereas hospital-reported ICD-9-CM data captured only 37% and 44%, respectively, of all mild and severe complications. These findings raise questions about the validity of using administrative data to ascertain postoperative complications, even if coders are carefully hired, trained, and supervised. ICD-9-CM complication codes are more promising as a tool to help providers identify their own adverse outcomes than as a tool for comparing performance.

  1. Mechanisms underlying benign and reversible unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia observed with faldaprevir administration in hepatitis C virus patients.

    PubMed

    Sane, Rucha S; Steinmann, Gerhard G; Huang, Qihong; Li, Yongmei; Podila, Lalitha; Mease, Kirsten; Olson, Stephen; Taub, Mitchell E; Stern, Jerry O; Nehmiz, Gerhard; Böcher, Wulf O; Asselah, Tarik; Tweedie, Donald

    2014-11-01

    Faldaprevir, an investigational agent for hepatitis C virus treatment, is well tolerated but associated with rapidly reversible, dose-dependent, clinically benign, unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia. Multidisciplinary preclinical and clinical studies were used to characterize mechanisms underlying this hyperbilirubinemia. In vitro, faldaprevir inhibited key processes involved in bilirubin clearance: UDP glucuronosyltransferase (UGT) 1A1 (UGT1A1) (IC50 0.45 µM), which conjugates bilirubin, and hepatic uptake and efflux transporters, organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1 (IC50 0.57 µM), OATP1B3 (IC50 0.18 µM), and multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP) 2 (IC50 6.2 µM), which transport bilirubin and its conjugates. In rat and human hepatocytes, uptake and biliary excretion of [(3)H]bilirubin and/or its glucuronides decreased on coincubation with faldaprevir. In monkeys, faldaprevir (≥20 mg/kg per day) caused reversible unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia, without hemolysis or hepatotoxicity. In clinical studies, faldaprevir-mediated hyperbilirubinemia was predominantly unconjugated, and levels of unconjugated bilirubin correlated with the UGT1A1*28 genotype. The reversible and dose-dependent nature of the clinical hyperbilirubinemia was consistent with competitive inhibition of bilirubin clearance by faldaprevir, and was not associated with liver toxicity or other adverse events. Overall, the reversible, unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia associated with faldaprevir may predominantly result from inhibition of bilirubin conjugation by UGT1A1, with inhibition of hepatic uptake of bilirubin also potentially playing a role. Since OATP1B1/1B3 are known to be involved in hepatic uptake of circulating bilirubin glucuronides, inhibition of OATP1B1/1B3 and MRP2 may underlie isolated increases in conjugated bilirubin. As such, faldaprevir-mediated hyperbilirubinemia is not associated with any liver injury or toxicity, and is considered to result from decreased

  2. Annual committee reports on significant legislative, judicial, and administrative developments in 1981: Water-Quality committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    This review of 1981 developments is divided into four basic parts. The first covers legislative, judicial, and administrative developments under the Clean Water Act (CWA); the second covers judicial and administrative developments under the Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA); the third covers judicial developments respecting private rights of action and the federal common law of nuisance. 109 references.

  3. Annual committee reports on significant legislative, judicial, and administrative developments in 1982: Environmental Quality Committee

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    Judicial developments during 1982 dominated activities involving the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide and Rotenticide Act, and Marine Sanctuaries, with some changes in administrative procedures and no legislative developments. The Endangered Species Act was amended to expedite changes to the lists and to alter exemption and international trade requirements. Several lawsuits challenged review standards and litigation claims. 231 references. (DCK)

  4. Clinical significance of reverse redistribution on technetium-99m tetrofosmin single-photon emission computed tomography: an 18-month follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    Swinkels, B.M.; Hooghoudt, T.E.H.; Schoenmakers, E.A.J.M.; Zinder, C.G.; de Boo, T.M.; Verheugt, F.W.A.

    2003-01-01

    Background The clinical and prognostic significance of reverse redistribution on technetium-99m (99mTc) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is unclear. Objectives To determine outcomes of chest pain patients showing reverse redistribution after 99mTc tetrofosmin SPECT versus SPECT showing no reverse redistribution. Methods Patient outcomes (death, nonfatal myocardial infarction, coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty) within 18 months after 99mTc tetrofosmin SPECT were determined in two populations of ambulatory patients, most of whom had been evaluated because of chest pain: a population of 57 patients whose SPECT images showed reverse redistribution without reversible or fixed defects, versus a control population of 98 patients whose SPECT images were normal (no reverse redistribution, no reversible defects, no fixed defects). Results Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that the population of patients with reverse redistribution did not have a worse 18-month outcome in comparison with the control population of patients without reverse redistribution (3.5% versus 9.2%, respectively; p=0.15 corrected for age and gender). Conclusion Reverse redistribution on 99mTc tetrofosmin SPECT does not appear to be an unfavourable prognostic factor in ambulatory chest pain patients. PMID:25696192

  5. Administration of 17β-estradiol to ovariectomized obese female mice reverses obesity-hypertension through an ACE2-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Shoemaker, Robin; Thatcher, Sean E; Batifoulier-Yiannikouris, Frederique; English, Victoria L; Cassis, Lisa A

    2015-06-15

    We recently demonstrated that female mice are resistant to the development of obesity-induced hypertension through a sex hormone-dependent mechanism that involved adipose angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). In this study, we hypothesized that provision of 17β-estradiol (E2) to ovariectomized (OVX) high-fat (HF)-fed female hypertensive mice would reverse obesity-hypertension through an ACE2-dependent mechanism. Pilot studies defined dose-dependent effects of E2 in OVX female mice on serum E2 concentrations and uterine weights. An E2 dose of 36 μg/ml restored normal serum E2 concentrations and uterine weights. Therefore, HF-fed OVX female Ace2(+/+) and Ace2(-/-) mice were administered vehicle or E2 (36 μg/ml) for 16 wk. E2 administration significantly decreased body weights of HF-fed OVX female Ace2(+/+) and Ace2(-/-) mice of either genotype. At 15 wk, E2 administration decreased systolic blood pressure (SBP) of OVX HF-fed Ace2(+/+) but not Ace2(-/-) females during the light but not the dark cycle. E2-mediated reductions in SBP in Ace2(+/+) females were associated with significant elevations in adipose ACE2 mRNA abundance and activity and reduced plasma ANG II concentrations. In contrast to females, E2 administration had no effect on any parameter quantified in HF-fed male hypertensive mice. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, E2 promoted ACE2 mRNA abundance through effects at estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and resulted in ERα-mediated binding at the ACE2 promoter. These results demonstrate that E2 administration to OVX females reduces obesity-induced elevations in SBP (light cycle) through an ACE2-dependent mechanism. Beneficial effects of E2 to decrease blood pressure in OVX obese females may result from stimulation of adipose ACE2.

  6. Post-trial administration of H1 histamine receptor blocker improves appetitive reversal learning and memory in goldfish, Carassius auratus.

    PubMed

    Spieler, R E; Nelson, C A; Huston, J P; Mattioli, R

    1999-12-17

    Based on the hypothesis that neuronal histamine exerts an inhibitory influence on learning and reinforcement, goldfish were tested for post-trial effects of the H1 receptor blocker chlorpheniramine (CPA) on learning the location of a food source in one of two compartments, one black the other white, with a feeder located in each compartment. Testing was carried out over 6 days. On the training day a food pellet was placed into the feeder of one of the compartments. After consumption of the food the fish were injected i.p. with either vehicle or CPA either immediately after training or 3 h later. Twenty-four-hours later, food was placed in the same compartment and the time to begin feeding was recorded. On the next day the location of the food pellet was reversed, and testing was continued for 4 days. On the first test day the time to begin feeding was significantly longer for the vehicle injected fish as compared with those injected with CPA. The vehicle group also took longer to begin feeding than the CPA group on the first reversal test day. The results of the 3-h delay groups indicated no significant differences between vehicle and drug for any experimental session. These results suggest that post-trial blockade of the H1 histamine receptor can affect appetitive learning in goldfish either by improving long-term memory consolidation and/or by the additive reinforcing effects of CPA (known from previous studies) on behavior.

  7. Administration of vaccinia virus complement control protein shows significant cognitive improvement in a mild injury model.

    PubMed

    Pillay, Nirvana S; Kellaway, Laurie A; Kotwal, Girish J

    2005-11-01

    Previous studies have shown that traumatic mild brain injury in a rat model is accompanied by breakdown of the blood brain barrier and the accumulation of inflammatory cells. A therapeutic agent, vaccinia virus complement control protein (VCP), inhibits both the classic and the alternative pathways of the complement system and, in so doing, prevents cell death and inflammation. With the use of a rat mild injury model, the effects of VCP on spatial learning and memory were tested. Training in a Morris water maze consisted of a total of 16 trials over a 2-day period before rats were anesthetized and subjected to mild (1.0-1.1 atm) lateral fluid percussion injury (FPI) 3.0 mm lateral to the sagittal suture and 4.5 mm posterior to bregma. Ten microl of VCP (1.7 mg/ml) was injected into the injury site immediately after FPI. Two weeks post-FPI the rats were assessed in the Morris water maze for spatial learning and memory. Neurologic motor function tests were carried out after FPI for 14 consecutive days and again after 28 days. The Morris water maze data show that FPI plus saline-injected rats spent a significantly (P <0.05) larger amount of time in one of the incorrect quadrants than did the FPI plus VCP-injected group. Neurologic evaluations 24 hours postinjury revealed differences in sensorimotor function between groups. The results suggest that in a mild injury model, VCP influences neurologic outcome and offers some enhancement in spatial memory and learning.

  8. Novel dual-reverse thermosensitive solid lipid nanoparticle-loaded hydrogel for rectal administration of flurbiprofen with improved bioavailability and reduced initial burst effect.

    PubMed

    Din, Fakhar Ud; Mustapha, Omer; Kim, Dong Wuk; Rashid, Rehmana; Park, Jong Hyuck; Choi, Ju Yeon; Ku, Sae Kwang; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN)-loaded dual-reverse thermosensitive hydrogel (DRTH) for rectal administration of flurbiprofen with improved bioavailability and reduced initial burst effect. The flurbiprofen-loaded SLNs were prepared by hot homogenisation technique, after optimising the amounts of lipid mixture (tricaprin and triethanolamine in 8:2 weight ratio), drug and surfactant. The flurbiprofen-loaded thermosensitive SLN composed of drug, lipid mixture and surfactant at a weight ratio of 10/15/1.3 was a solid at room temperature, and changed to liquid form at physiological temperature due to its melting point of about 32°C. This SLN gave the mean particle size of about 190nm and entrapment efficiency of around 90%. The DRTHs were prepared by adding this flurbiprofen-loaded thermosensitive SLN in various poloxamer solutions. Their rheological characterisation, release and stability were investigated while a morphological and pharmacokinetic study was performed after its rectal administration to rats compared with the drug and hydrogel. Poloxamer 188 and SLN decreased the gelation temperature and gelation time, but increased the viscosity at 25°C, gel strength and mucoadhesive force of DRTHs. In particular, the DRTH composed of [SLN/P 407/P 188 (10%/15%/25%)] with the gelation temperature of about 35°C existed as liquid at room temperature, but gelled at 30-36°C, leading to opposite reversible property of SLN. Thus, it was easy to administer rectally, and it gelled rapidly inside the body. This DRTH gave a significantly increased dissolution rate of the drug as compared to the flurbiprofen, but significantly retarded as compared to the hydrogel, including the initial dissolution rate. Moreover, this DRTH gave significantly higher plasma concentration and 7.5-fold AUC values compared to the drug, and lower initial plasma concentration and Cmax value compared to the hydrogel due to reduced initial burst effect. No

  9. Novel dual-reverse thermosensitive solid lipid nanoparticle-loaded hydrogel for rectal administration of flurbiprofen with improved bioavailability and reduced initial burst effect.

    PubMed

    Din, Fakhar Ud; Mustapha, Omer; Kim, Dong Wuk; Rashid, Rehmana; Park, Jong Hyuck; Choi, Ju Yeon; Ku, Sae Kwang; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh; Choi, Han-Gon

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel solid lipid nanoparticle (SLN)-loaded dual-reverse thermosensitive hydrogel (DRTH) for rectal administration of flurbiprofen with improved bioavailability and reduced initial burst effect. The flurbiprofen-loaded SLNs were prepared by hot homogenisation technique, after optimising the amounts of lipid mixture (tricaprin and triethanolamine in 8:2 weight ratio), drug and surfactant. The flurbiprofen-loaded thermosensitive SLN composed of drug, lipid mixture and surfactant at a weight ratio of 10/15/1.3 was a solid at room temperature, and changed to liquid form at physiological temperature due to its melting point of about 32°C. This SLN gave the mean particle size of about 190nm and entrapment efficiency of around 90%. The DRTHs were prepared by adding this flurbiprofen-loaded thermosensitive SLN in various poloxamer solutions. Their rheological characterisation, release and stability were investigated while a morphological and pharmacokinetic study was performed after its rectal administration to rats compared with the drug and hydrogel. Poloxamer 188 and SLN decreased the gelation temperature and gelation time, but increased the viscosity at 25°C, gel strength and mucoadhesive force of DRTHs. In particular, the DRTH composed of [SLN/P 407/P 188 (10%/15%/25%)] with the gelation temperature of about 35°C existed as liquid at room temperature, but gelled at 30-36°C, leading to opposite reversible property of SLN. Thus, it was easy to administer rectally, and it gelled rapidly inside the body. This DRTH gave a significantly increased dissolution rate of the drug as compared to the flurbiprofen, but significantly retarded as compared to the hydrogel, including the initial dissolution rate. Moreover, this DRTH gave significantly higher plasma concentration and 7.5-fold AUC values compared to the drug, and lower initial plasma concentration and Cmax value compared to the hydrogel due to reduced initial burst effect. No

  10. Reversed Scototaxis during Withdrawal after Daily-Moderate, but Not Weekly-Binge, Administration of Ethanol in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Holcombe, Adam; Howorko, Adam; Powell, Russell A.; Schalomon, Melike; Hamilton, Trevor J.

    2013-01-01

    Alcohol abuse can lead to severe psychological and physiological damage. Little is known, however, about the relative impact of a small, daily dose of alcohol (daily-moderate schedule) versus a large, once per week dose (weekly-binge schedule). In this study, we examined the effect of each of these schedules on behavioural measures of anxiety in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Adult wild-type zebrafish were administered either 0.2% ethanol on a daily-moderate schedule or 1.4% ethanol on a weekly-binge schedule for a period of 21 days, and then tested for scototaxis (preference for darkness) during withdrawal. Compared to a control group with no alcohol exposure, the daily-moderate group spent significantly more time on the light side of the arena (indicative of decreased anxiety) on day two of withdrawal, but not day 9 of withdrawal. The weekly-binge group was not significantly different from the control group on either day of withdrawal and showed no preference for either the light or dark zones. Our results indicate that even a small dose of alcohol on a daily basis can cause significant, though reversible, changes in behaviour. PMID:23675478

  11. Oral administration of PF-01247324, a subtype-selective Nav1.8 blocker, reverses cerebellar deficits in a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Shields, Shannon D; Butt, Richard P; Dib-Hajj, Sulayman D; Waxman, Stephen G

    2015-01-01

    Cerebellar symptoms significantly diminish quality of life in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). We previously showed that sodium channel Nav1.8, although normally restricted to peripheral somatosensory neurons, is upregulated in the cerebellum in MS, and that Nav1.8 expression is linked to ataxia and MS-like symptoms in mice. Furthermore, intracerebroventricular administration of the Nav1.8 blocker A-803467 temporarily reversed electrophysiological and behavioral manifestations of disease in a mouse MS model; unfortunately A-803467 is not orally bioavailable, diminishing the potential for translation to human patients. In the present study, we assessed the effect of per os (p.o.) dosing of a new orally bioavailable Nav1.8-selective blocker, PF-01247324, in transgenic mice expressing Nav1.8 in Purkinje neurons, and in wildtype mice in the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model. PF-01247324 was administered by oral gavage at 1000 mg/kg; control groups received an equal volume of vehicle. Behavioral assays of motor coordination, grip strength, and ataxia were performed. We observed significant improvements in motor coordination and cerebellar-like symptoms in mice that received PF-01247324 compared to control littermates that received vehicle. These preclinical proof-of-concept data suggest that PF-01247324, its derivatives, or other Nav1.8-selective blockers merit further study for providing symptomatic therapy for cerebellar dysfunction in MS and related disorders. PMID:25747279

  12. Withdrawal from Cocaine Self-Administration Produces Long-Lasting Deficits in Orbitofrontal-Dependent Reversal Learning in Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calu, Donna J.; Stalnaker, Thomas A.; Franz, Theresa M.; Singh, Teghpal; Shaham, Yavin; Schoenbaum, Geoffrey

    2007-01-01

    Drug addicts make poor decisions. These decision-making deficits have been modeled in addicts and laboratory animals using reversal-learning tasks. However, persistent reversal-learning impairments have been shown in rats and monkeys only after noncontingent cocaine injections. Current thinking holds that to represent the human condition…

  13. Reversing HOXA9 Oncogene Activation by PI3K Inhibition: Epigenetic Mechanism and Prognostic Significance in Human Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Bruno M.; Smith, Justin S.; Chen, Ying; Chen, Justin; Phillips, Heidi S.; Aldape, Kenneth D.; Zardo, Giuseppe; Nigro, Janice; James, C. David; Fridlyand, Jane; Reis, Rui M.; Costello, Joseph F.

    2010-01-01

    HOXA genes encode critical transcriptional regulators of embryonic development that have been implicated in cancer. In this study, we documented functional relevance and mechanism of activation of HOXA9 in glioblastoma (GBM), the most common malignant brain tumor. Expression of HOXA genes was investigated using RT-PCR in primary gliomas and glioblastoma cell lines and was validated in two sets of expression array data. In a subset of GBM, HOXA genes are aberrantly activated within confined chromosomal domains. Transcriptional activation of the HOXA cluster was reversible by a PI3K inhibitor through an epigenetic mechanism involving histone H3K27 trimethylation. Functional studies of HOXA9 showed its capacity to decrease apoptosis and increase cellular proliferation along with TRAIL resistance. Notably, aberrant expression of HOXA9 was independently predictive of shorter overall and progression-free survival in two GBM patient sets, and improved survival prediction by MGMT promoter methylation. Thus, HOXA9 activation is a novel, independent and negative prognostic marker in GBM that is reversible through a PI3K-associated epigenetic mechanism. Our findings suggest a transcriptional pathway through which PI3K activates oncogenic HOXA expression with implications for mTOR or PI3K targeted therapies. PMID:20068170

  14. Combined administration of oxalic acid, succimer and its analogue for the reversal of gallium arsenide-induced oxidative stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Flora, Swaran J S; Kannan, Gurusamy M; Pant, Bhagwat P; Jaiswal, Devendra K

    2002-06-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs), a group III-VA intermetallic semiconductor, possesses superior electronic and optical properties and has a wide application in the electronics industry. Exposure to GaAs in the semiconductor industry is a potential occupational hazard because cleaning and slicing GaAs ingots to yield the desired wafer could generate GaAs particles. The ability of GaAs to induce oxidative stress has not yet been reported. The present study reports the role of oxidative stress in GaAs-induced haematological and liver disorders and its possible reversal overturn by administration of meso-2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) and one of its analogue, monoisoamyl DMSA (MiADMSA), either individually or in combination with oxalic acid. While DMSA and MiADMSA are potential arsenic chelators, oxalic acid is reported to be an effective gallium chelator. Male rats were exposed to 10 mg/kg GaAs orally, 5 days a week for 8 weeks. GaAs exposure was then stopped and rats were given a 0.5 mmol/kg dose of succimers (DMSA or MiADMSA), oxalic acid or a combination of the two, intraperitoneally once daily for 5 consecutive days. We found a significant fall in blood delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) activity and blood glutathione (GSH) level, and an increased urinary excretion of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) level in erythrocytes of rats exposed to GaAs. Hepatic GSH levels decreased, whereas there was an increase in GSSG and MDA levels. The results suggest a role of oxidative stress in GaAs-induced haematological and hepatic damage. Administration of DMSA and MiADMSA produced effective recovery in most of the above variables. However, a greater effectiveness of the chelation treatment (i.e. removal of both gallium and arsenic from body organs) could be achieved by combined administration of succimer (DMSA) with oxalic acid since, after MiADMSA administration, a marked loss of essential metals (copper and zinc) is of concern.

  15. Lack of association between plasma levels of non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors & virological outcomes during rifampicin co-administration in HIV-infected TB patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Geetha; Kumar, A.K. Hemanth; Ponnuraja, C.; Ramesh, K.; Rajesh, Lakshmi; Chandrasekharan, C.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Among patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis (TB), reduced plasma non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTI) concentrations during rifampicin (RMP) co-administration could lead to HIV treatment failure. This study was undertaken to examine the association between plasma nevirapine (NVP) and efavirenz (EFV) concentrations and virological outcomes in patients infected with HIV-1 and TB. Methods: This was a nested study undertaken in a clinical trial of patients with HIV-1 and TB, randomized to two different once-daily antiretroviral treatment (ART) regimens along with anti-TB treatment (ATT). Trough concentrations of plasma NVP and EFV were estimated at months 1 (during ATT and ART) and 6 months (ART only) by HPLC. Plasma HIV-1 RNA level >400 copies/ml or death within 6 months of ART were considered as unfavourable outcomes. Genotyping of CYP2B6 516G>T polymorphism was performed. Results: Twenty nine per cent of patients in NVP arm had an unfavourable outcome at 6 months compared to 9 per cent in EFV arm (P<0.08). The mean NVP and EFV levels estimated at 1 and 6 months did not significantly differ between favourable and unfavourable responders. Logistic regression analysis showed CYP2B6 516G>T polymorphism significantly associated with virologic outcome in patients receiving EFV–based regimen. Interpretation & conclusions: Trough plasma concentrations of NVP and EFV did not show any association with response to ART in patients on ATT and once-daily ART. CYP2B6 516G>T polymorphism was associated with virologic outcome among patients on EFV. PMID:24521642

  16. Reversal of an aluminium induced alteration in redox status in different regions of rat brain by administration of centrophenoxine.

    PubMed

    Nehru, Bimla; Bhalla, Punita

    2006-10-01

    Aluminium is one of the most studied neurotoxin, and its effects on nervous system are both structural and functional, involving various regions of brain. Aluminium toxicity is known to have multiple mechanisms of action in the central nervous system. Affinity of aluminium for thiol substrates is considered a possible molecular mechanism involved in aluminium neurotoxicity. The reduced glutathione (GSH) is especially important for cellular defence against aluminium toxicity. This study pertains to the modulatory action of centrophenoxine on GSH status in aluminium exposed different brain regions of the female rats. Aluminium was administered orally at a dose of 40 mg/Kg x b x wt x /day for a period of eight weeks whereas, centrophenoxine was administered intraperitoneally at a dose of 100 mg/Kg x b x wt x /day for a period of six weeks. The study was carried out in different regions of brain namely cerebrum, cerebellum, medulla oblongata and hypothalamus. Animals exposed to aluminum, registered a significant decrease in the levels of reduced glutathione, and oxidized glutathione as well as in the activity of glutathione reductase in all the different regions studied when compared to normal control animals. Post-treatment with centrophenoxine, showed a significant improvement in the thiol levels in different regions. Centrophenoxine when administered alone also had a profound effect on the levels of reduced glutathione as well as on the activity of glutathione reductase. From the present results, it can be stated that centrophenoxine administration, as a thiol-antioxidant, arrests the aluminium induced cellular damage by improving the thiol status in brain regions.

  17. Reversal of high dietary fructose-induced PPARalpha suppression by oral administration of lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Glen L; Azhar, Salman

    2005-08-01

    High fructose feeding causes diet-induced alterations of lipid metabolism and decreased insulin sensitivity, hallmark of which is a rapid and profound hypertriglyceridemia. One of the mechanisms that contribute to serum hypertriglyceridemia in this model is suppression of hepatic PPARalpha. HMG-CoA inhibitors, which reduce serum triglycerides in these animals, also elevate/restore hepatic PPARalpha. Previously we demonstrated that two known lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase inhibitors reversed diet-induced hypertriglyceridemia in this model and that reversal of certain inflammatory markers in the liver correlated with the metabolic benefit. In this paper we extended these studies by examining the impact of these compounds on expression of PPARalpha, both at the level of transcription and expression. Our data show that diet-induced suppression of hepaic PPARalpha is reversed upon treatment with lipoxygenase/cyclooxygenase compounds. We then tested one of these compounds, BW-755c, over a range of doses from 10 mg/kg to 100 mg/kg to establish a dose-response relationship with the reduction of serum hypertriglyceridemia in this model. These experiments support the concept of using anti-inflammatory medications as one method to correct metabolic dysfunction. PMID:16091142

  18. Reversal of apixaban induced alterations in hemostasis by different coagulation factor concentrates: significance of studies in vitro with circulating human blood.

    PubMed

    Escolar, Gines; Fernandez-Gallego, Victor; Arellano-Rodrigo, Eduardo; Roquer, Jaume; Reverter, Joan Carles; Sanz, Victoria Veronica; Molina, Patricia; Lopez-Vilchez, Irene; Diaz-Ricart, Maribel; Galan, Ana Maria

    2013-01-01

    Apixaban is a new oral anticoagulant with a specific inhibitory action on FXa. No information is available on the reversal of the antihemostatic action of apixaban in experimental or clinical settings. We have evaluated the effectiveness of different factor concentrates at reversing modifications of hemostatic mechanisms induced by moderately elevated concentrations of apixaban (200 ng/ml) added in vitro to blood from healthy donors (n = 10). Effects on thrombin generation (TG) and thromboelastometry (TEM) parameters were assessed. Modifications in platelet adhesive, aggregating and procoagulant activities were evaluated in studies with blood circulating through damaged vascular surfaces, at a shear rate of 600 s(-1). The potential of prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs; 50 IU/kg), activated prothrombin complex concentrates (aPCCs; 75 IU/kg), or activated recombinant factor VII (rFVIIa; 270 μg/kg), at reversing the antihemostatic actions of apixaban, were investigated. Apixaban interfered with TG kinetics. Delayed lag phase, prolonged time to peak and reduced peak values, were improved by the different concentrates, though modifications in TG patterns were diversely affected depending on the activating reagents. Apixaban significantly prolonged clotting times (CTs) in TEM studies. Prolongations in CTs were corrected by the different concentrates with variable efficacies (rFVIIa≥aPCC>PCC). Apixaban significantly reduced fibrin and platelet interactions with damaged vascular surfaces in perfusion studies (p<0.05 and p<0.01, respectively). Impairments in fibrin formation were normalized by the different concentrates. Only rFVIIa significantly restored levels of platelet deposition. Alterations in hemostasis induced by apixaban were variably compensated by the different factor concentrates investigated. However, effects of these concentrates were not homogeneous in all the tests, with PCCs showing more efficacy in TG, and rFVIIa being more effective on TEM

  19. Dual learning processes underlying human decision-making in reversal learning tasks: functional significance and evidence from the model fit to human behavior.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yu; Katahira, Kentaro; Ohira, Hideki

    2014-01-01

    Humans are capable of correcting their actions based on actions performed in the past, and this ability enables them to adapt to a changing environment. The computational field of reinforcement learning (RL) has provided a powerful explanation for understanding such processes. Recently, the dual learning system, modeled as a hybrid model that incorporates value update based on reward-prediction error and learning rate modulation based on the surprise signal, has gained attention as a model for explaining various neural signals. However, the functional significance of the hybrid model has not been established. In the present study, we used computer simulation in a reversal learning task to address functional significance in a probabilistic reversal learning task. The hybrid model was found to perform better than the standard RL model in a large parameter setting. These results suggest that the hybrid model is more robust against the mistuning of parameters compared with the standard RL model when decision-makers continue to learn stimulus-reward contingencies, which can create abrupt changes. The parameter fitting results also indicated that the hybrid model fit better than the standard RL model for more than 50% of the participants, which suggests that the hybrid model has more explanatory power for the behavioral data than the standard RL model. PMID:25161635

  20. Long-term under-masculinization in male rabbits due to maternal stress is reversed by prenatal administration of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Bánszegi, Oxána; Szenczi, Péter; Dúcs, Anita; Hudson, Robyn; Altbäcker, Vilmos

    2015-06-01

    It is well established that in mammals prenatal exposure to exogenous testosterone has a masculinizing effect on female morphology and behavior. Fewer studies, however, have been conducted in males on this subject, and the results are controversial. In the present study, we investigated the long-term effect of administering extra prenatal testosterone (testosterone proprionate; TP) on adult male domestic rabbits' morphology and behavior using two different control groups, non-treated and vehicle injected mothers. Unexpectedly, administering the vehicle alone had a clear under-masculinizing effect on all morphological and behavioral measures; lower body mass, smaller anogenital distance and smaller chin glands, lower chin-marking activity and greater timidity. Administration of TP counteracted this effect in a dose-dependent manner such that animals exposed to the highest dose prenatally showed values on the morphological and behavioral measures equivalent to but not greater than the non-treated control group. We conclude (1) that additional testosterone beyond what male fetuses produce in utero does not result in increased masculinization, and thus, that male fetuses are less susceptible prenatally to hormonal effects than females, and (2) that presumably stress-related effects of administering the vehicle alone resulted in under-masculinization, which could be recovered by the prenatal administration of TP. These results may partly account for the contradictory findings of previous studies, and indicate the importance of including both non-treated and sham- (vehicle) treated controls in future experiments.

  1. Stimulators of the cAMP cascade reverse amnesia induced by intra-amygdala but not intrahippocampal KN-62 administration.

    PubMed

    Barros, D M; Izquierdo, L A; Sant'Anna, M K; Quevedo, J; Medina, J H; McGaugh, J L; Izquierdo, I

    1999-01-01

    Infusion of the calcium-calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) inhibitor KN-62 (3.5 ng/side) 0 h after training into rat hippocampus CA1 or amygdala has been known for years to cause retrograde amnesia for step-down inhibitory avoidance. On the other hand, drugs that indirectly stimulate protein kinase A (PKA) (8-Br-cAMP, 1.25 microg/side; norepinephrine, 0.3 microg/side; the dopamine D1 receptor agonist, SKF38393, 7.5 microg/side) infused 3 h posttraining into CA1 but not amygdala markedly facilitate retention of this task. Here we find that 8-Br-cAMP, norepinephrine, or SKF38393 given 3 h posttraining into rat CA1 reverses the amnestic effect of KN-62 given into the amygdala 0 h after training, but not that of KN-62 given into CA1 0 h posttraining. The findings bear on the participation of CaMKII and of the cAMP/PKA cascade in memory processes in the hippocampus and the amygdala. Both cascades have been proposed to play a role in memory: CaMKII in the early phase and PKA in the transition between the early phase and long-term memory. Clearly, in CA1, both cascades are involved and are crucial, and the CaMKII cascade must precede the PKA cascade. In contrast, in the amygdala, only the CaMKII cascade is active, and it does not play a central role in memory, inasmuch as its deleterious effect may be fully recovered by stimulation of the PKA cascade in the hippocampus. This further supports the contention that the hippocampus is essential for memory formation of this task, as it is for many others, whereas the amygdala appears to play instead an early modulatory role.

  2. Administrators' Perceptions of Factors Related to Student Retention at Colleges with a Significant Black Student Enrollment Affiliated with the Association for Biblical Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Wesley B.

    2013-01-01

    This study described and explored the factors perceived as relevant to student retention by administrators at colleges and universities with significant Black student populations. The sample was 31 institutions affiliated with the Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE) that had Black student enrollment of 20% or more. The study sought to…

  3. From 9/11 to Recession: Historically Significant Events in America and Their Impact on Research Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnema, Linnea

    2011-01-01

    Federally sponsored research funding sources are not stagnant programs. Many things influence the nature of research, not all of them purely scientific. Historically significant events draw public attention to causes, and in the age of immediate information those events can have a powerful and lasting impact on research funding. September 11, 2001…

  4. Reoxygenation of Asphyxiated Newborn Piglets: Administration of 100% Oxygen Causes Significantly Higher Apoptosis in Cortical Neurons, as Compared to 21%

    PubMed Central

    Faa, G.; Fanos, V.; Fanni, D.; Gerosa, C.; Faa, A.; Fraschini, M.; Pais, M. E.; Di Felice, E.; Papalois, A.; Varsami, M.; Xanthos, T.; Iacovidou, N.

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Evaluation of neuronal changes in an animal experimental model of normocapnic hypoxia- reoxygenation. Materials and Methods. Fifty male piglets were the study subjects; normocapnic hypoxia was induced in 40 piglets and ten were sham-operated (controls). When bradycardia and/or severe hypotension occurred, reoxygenation was initiated. Animals were allocated in 4 groups according to the oxygen concentration, they were resuscitated with 18%, 21%, 40%, and 100% O2. Persisting asystole despite 10 minutes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation and return of spontaneous circulation were the endpoints of the experiment. Surviving animals were euthanized and brain cortex samples were collected, hematoxylin and eosin-stained, and examined for apoptotic bodies observing 10 consecutive high power fields. Results. Histological examination of the control group did not show any pathological change. On the contrary, apoptosis of neurons was found in 87.5% of treated animals. When specimens were examined according to the oxygen concentration used for resuscitation, we found marked intergroup variability; a higher percentage of apoptotic neurons was observed in piglets of group 4 (100% oxygen) compared to the others (P = 0.001). Conclusions. This preliminary data shows that normocapnic hypoxia and reoxygenation in Landrace/Large White piglets resulted in significant histological changes in the brain cortex. The degree of pathological changes in cortical neurons was significantly associated with the oxygen concentration used for reoxygenation, with a higher percentage of apoptotic neurons being observed in piglets reoxygenated with 100% compared to 18% O2 and to 21% O2. PMID:24783208

  5. The incidence and significance of acute kidney injury following emergent contrast administration in patients with STEMI and stroke.

    PubMed

    Marchick, Michael Robert; Allen, Brandon Russell; Weeks, Emily Cassin; Shuster, Jonathan Jacob; Elie, Marie-Carmelle

    2016-09-01

    The authors have investigated the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and short-term mortality following an activated STEMI and stroke alert at a tertiary referral and academic center. A single center, retrospective chart review of STEMI and stroke activation patients from January 2010 to March 2012. Data was collected and reviewed from an institutional database following IRB-approval. Inclusion criteria were STEMI patients taken for cardiac catheterization, excluding patients receiving hemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Primary outcome measures were the incidence of AKI using the RIFLE criteria and short-term mortality. 745 patients were included (488 stroke, 257 STEMI). The median age was 65, and 39 % were female. Overall inpatient mortality was 7.0 %. 5.4 % (40/745) of patients experienced some degree of AKI (8.6 % of STEMI, 3.7 % of stroke patients). Overall, 30 % of patients with AKI died during their hospitalization. AKI was associated with a 7.1-fold (95 % CI 3.4-15.1) increase in mortality in the entire cohort. Among STEMI patients, AKI was associated with a 66.6-fold (95 % CI 12.9-343.4) increase in mortality. These findings follow similar trends published among critically ill patients with AKI. The risk of death with concomitant AKI in this hospital population is significant and deserves future study. Early recognition and awareness in the emergency department is paramount to the patient's survival. Future studies should focus on modalities to improve early recognition and preventative therapies. PMID:26910240

  6. Delayed Administration of Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Conditioned Medium Significantly Improves Outcome After Retinal Ischemia in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Dreixler, John C.; Poston, Jacqueline N.; Balyasnikova, Irina; Shaikh, Afzhal R.; Tupper, Kelsey Y.; Conway, Sineadh; Boddapati, Venkat; Marcet, Marcus M.; Lesniak, Maciej S.; Roth, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. Delayed treatment after ischemia is often unsatisfactory. We hypothesized that injection of bone marrow stem cell (BMSC) conditioned medium after ischemia could rescue ischemic retina, and in this study we characterized the functional and histological outcomes and mechanisms of this neuroprotection. Methods. Retinal ischemia was produced in adult Wistar rats by increasing intraocular pressure for 55 minutes. Conditioned medium (CM) from rat BMSCs or unconditioned medium (uCM) was injected into the vitreous 24 hours after the end of ischemia. Recovery was assessed 7 days after ischemia using electroretinography, at which time we euthanized the animals and then prepared 4-μm-thick paraffin-embedded retinal sections. TUNEL and Western blot were used to identify apoptotic cells and apoptosis-related gene expression 24 hours after injections; that is, 48 hours after ischemia. Protein content in CM versus uCM was studied using tandem mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics methods were used to model protein interactions. Results. Intravitreal injection of CM 24 hours after ischemia significantly improved retinal function and attenuated cell loss in the retinal ganglion cell layer. CM attenuated postischemic apoptosis and apoptosis-related gene expression. By spectral counting, 19 proteins that met stringent identification criteria were increased in the CM compared to uCM; the majority were extracellular matrix proteins that mapped into an interactional network together with other proteins involved in cell growth and adhesion. Conclusions. By restoring retinal function, attenuating apoptosis, and preventing retinal cell loss after ischemia, CM is a robust means of delayed postischemic intervention. We identified some potential candidate proteins for this effect. PMID:24699381

  7. The incidence and significance of acute kidney injury following emergent contrast administration in patients with STEMI and stroke.

    PubMed

    Marchick, Michael Robert; Allen, Brandon Russell; Weeks, Emily Cassin; Shuster, Jonathan Jacob; Elie, Marie-Carmelle

    2016-09-01

    The authors have investigated the incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) and short-term mortality following an activated STEMI and stroke alert at a tertiary referral and academic center. A single center, retrospective chart review of STEMI and stroke activation patients from January 2010 to March 2012. Data was collected and reviewed from an institutional database following IRB-approval. Inclusion criteria were STEMI patients taken for cardiac catheterization, excluding patients receiving hemodialysis due to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Primary outcome measures were the incidence of AKI using the RIFLE criteria and short-term mortality. 745 patients were included (488 stroke, 257 STEMI). The median age was 65, and 39 % were female. Overall inpatient mortality was 7.0 %. 5.4 % (40/745) of patients experienced some degree of AKI (8.6 % of STEMI, 3.7 % of stroke patients). Overall, 30 % of patients with AKI died during their hospitalization. AKI was associated with a 7.1-fold (95 % CI 3.4-15.1) increase in mortality in the entire cohort. Among STEMI patients, AKI was associated with a 66.6-fold (95 % CI 12.9-343.4) increase in mortality. These findings follow similar trends published among critically ill patients with AKI. The risk of death with concomitant AKI in this hospital population is significant and deserves future study. Early recognition and awareness in the emergency department is paramount to the patient's survival. Future studies should focus on modalities to improve early recognition and preventative therapies.

  8. Significant increase of salivary testosterone levels after single therapeutic transdermal administration of testosterone: suitability as a potential screening parameter in doping control.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Detlef; Rautenberg, Claudia; Grosse, Joachim; Schoenfelder, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The legally defensible proof of the abuse of endogenous steroids in sports is currently based on carbon isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), i.e. a comparison between (13)C/(12)C ratios of diagnostic precursors and metabolites of testosterone. The application of this technique requires a chromatographic baseline separation of respective steroids prior to IRMS detection and hence laborious sample pre-processing of the urinary steroid extracts including clean up by solid-phase extraction and/or liquid chromatography. Consequently, an efficient pre-selection of suspicious control urine samples is essential for appropriate follow up confirmation by IRMS and effective doping control. Two single transdermal administration studies of testosterone (50 mg Testogel® and Testopatch® at 3.8 mg in 16 h, respectively) were conducted and resulting profiles of salivary testosterone and urinary steroid profiles and corresponding carbon isotope ratios were determined. Conventional doping control markers (testosterone/epitestosterone ratio, threshold concentrations of androsterone, etiocholanolone, or androstanediols) did not approach or exceed critical thresholds. In contrast to these moderate variations, the testosterone concentration in oral fluid increased from basal values (30-142 pg/mg) to peak concentrations above 1000 pg/mg. It is likely that this significant increase in oral fluid is due to a pulsatile elevation of free (protein unbound) circulating testosterone after transdermal administration and may be assumed to represent a more diagnostic marker for transdermal testosterone administration.

  9. Reversible lesions in the brain parenchyma in Wilson's disease confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging: earlier administration of chelating therapy can reduce the damage to the brain

    PubMed Central

    Kozić, Duško B.; Petrović, Igor; Svetel, Marina; Pekmezović, Tatjana; Ragaji, Aleksandar; Kostić, Vladimir S.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resolution of brain lesions in patients with Wilson's disease during the long-term chelating therapy using magnetic resonance imaging and a possible significance of the time latency between the initial symptoms of the disease and the introduction of this therapy. Initial magnetic resonance examination was performed in 37 patients with proven neurological form of Wilson's disease with cerebellar, parkinsonian and dystonic presentation. Magnetic resonance reexamination was done 5.7 ± 1.3 years later in 14 patients. Patients were divided into: group A, where chelating therapy was initiated < 24 months from the first symptoms and group B, where the therapy started ≥ 24 months after the initial symptoms. Symmetry of the lesions was seen in 100% of patients. There was a significant difference between groups A and B regarding complete resolution of brain stem and putaminal lesions (P = 0.005 and P = 0.024, respectively). If the correct diagnosis and adequate treatment are not established less than 24 months after onset of the symptoms, irreversible lesions in the brain parenchyma could be expected. Signal abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging might therefore, at least in the early stages, represent reversible myelinolisis or cytotoxic edema associated with copper toxicity. PMID:25558242

  10. Reversible lesions in the brain parenchyma in Wilson's disease confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging: earlier administration of chelating therapy can reduce the damage to the brain.

    PubMed

    Kozić, Duško B; Petrović, Igor; Svetel, Marina; Pekmezović, Tatjana; Ragaji, Aleksandar; Kostić, Vladimir S

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the resolution of brain lesions in patients with Wilson's disease during the long-term chelating therapy using magnetic resonance imaging and a possible significance of the time latency between the initial symptoms of the disease and the introduction of this therapy. Initial magnetic resonance examination was performed in 37 patients with proven neurological form of Wilson's disease with cerebellar, parkinsonian and dystonic presentation. Magnetic resonance reexamination was done 5.7 ± 1.3 years later in 14 patients. Patients were divided into: group A, where chelating therapy was initiated < 24 months from the first symptoms and group B, where the therapy started ≥ 24 months after the initial symptoms. Symmetry of the lesions was seen in 100% of patients. There was a significant difference between groups A and B regarding complete resolution of brain stem and putaminal lesions (P = 0.005 and P = 0.024, respectively). If the correct diagnosis and adequate treatment are not established less than 24 months after onset of the symptoms, irreversible lesions in the brain parenchyma could be expected. Signal abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging might therefore, at least in the early stages, represent reversible myelinolisis or cytotoxic edema associated with copper toxicity.

  11. Significant mucosal sIgA production after a single oral or parenteral administration using in vivo CD40 targeting in the chicken.

    PubMed

    Chou, Wen-Ko; Chen, Chang-Hsin; Vuong, Christine N; Abi-Ghanem, Daad; Waghela, Suryakant D; Mwangi, Waithaka; Bielke, Lisa R; Hargis, Billy M; Berghman, Luc R

    2016-10-01

    Many pathogens enter the host through mucosal surfaces and spread rapidly via the circulation. The most effective way to prevent disease is to establish mucosal and systemic immunity against the pathogen. However, current vaccination programs in poultry industry require repeated administrations of live-attenuated virus or large amounts (10 to 100μg) of antigen together with adjuvant to induce specific secretory IgA immune responses at the mucosal effector sites. In the present study, we show that a single administration of 0.4μg of oligopeptide complexed with an agonistic anti-chicken CD40 (chCD40) monoclonal antibody (Mab) effectively targets antigen-presenting cells of the bird's mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue in vivo, and induces peptide-specific secretory IgA (sIgA) in the trachea 7days post administration. Anti-chCD40 Mab-peptide complex was administered once to four-week old male Leghorns via various mucosal routes (orally, via cloacal drinking, or oculo-nasally) or via subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization. Immunization through any of the three mucosal induction routes induced significant peptide-specific mucosal sIgA responses 7 and 14days after immunization. Interestingly, s.c. injection of the complex also induced mucosal sIgA. Our data suggest in vivo targeting of CD40 as a potential adjuvant platform, particularly for the purpose of enhancing and speeding up mucosal vaccine responses in chickens, and potentially other food animals. This is the first study able to elicit specific sIgA immune responses in remote mucosal sites with a single administration of only 0.4μg of antigen. PMID:27663378

  12. Chronic administration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus reverses obesity induced by high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Godar, Rebecca J.; Billington, Charles J.; Kotz, Catherine M.

    2010-01-01

    An acute injection of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus (PVN) reduces body weight by decreasing feeding and increasing energy expenditure (EE), in animals on standard laboratory chow. Animals have divergent responses to a high-fat diet (HFD) exposure, with some developing obesity and others remaining lean. In the current study, we tested two hypotheses: 1) BDNF in the PVN reverses HFD-induced obesity, and 2) animals with higher body fat have a greater physiological response to BDNF than those with less body fat. Eighty-four 10-wk old rats were allowed HFD ad libitum for 9 wk and then prepared with bilateral PVN cannulas. Animals were then divided into tertiles based on their body fat rank: high, intermediate, and low (H, I, and L). Each group was further divided into 2 subgroups and then PVN injected with BDNF or control (artificial cerebrospinal fluid, aCSF) every other day for 3 wk. Energy intake (EI), body weight, and body composition were measured. At study's end, rats were killed to allow measurement of other metabolic indices. In parallel, another 12 rats were fed control diet (CD), PVN-cannulated and injected with aCSF. HFD exposure induced obesity, particularly in the H body fat group, with a significant increase in EI, body weight, fat mass, liver size, and serum glucose, triglycerides, insulin, and leptin. BDNF significantly reduced EI, body weight, body fat, lean mass, and serum metabolic indices. These BDNF effects were greatest in the H body fat group. These data indicate that BDNF reduced HFD-induced obesity and metabolic syndrome-like measures, and the animals with the most body fat had the most significant response to BDNF. PMID:20164202

  13. Depressive-like behavior observed with a minimal loss of locus coeruleus (LC) neurons following administration of 6-hydroxydopamine is associated with electrophysiological changes and reversed with precursors of norepinephrine.

    PubMed

    Szot, Patricia; Franklin, Allyn; Miguelez, Cristina; Wang, Yangqing; Vidaurrazaga, Igor; Ugedo, Luisa; Sikkema, Carl; Wilkinson, Charles W; Raskind, Murray A

    2016-02-01

    Depression is a common co-morbid condition most often observed in subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and during the early stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Dysfunction of the central noradrenergic nervous system is an important component in depression. In AD, locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenergic neurons are significantly reduced pathologically and the reduction of LC neurons is hypothesized to begin very early in the progression of the disorder; however, it is not known if dysfunction of the noradrenergic system due to early LC neuronal loss is involved in mediating depression in early AD. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine in an animal model if a loss of noradrenergic LC neurons results in depressive-like behavior. The LC noradrenergic neuronal population was reduced by the bilateral administration of the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) directly into the LC. Forced swim test (FST) was performed three weeks after the administration of 6-OHDA (5, 10 and 14 μg/μl), animals administered the 5 μg/μl of 6-OHDA demonstrated a significant increase in immobility, indicating depressive-like behavior. This increase in immobility at the 5 μg/μl dose was observed with a minimal loss of LC noradrenergic neurons as compared to LC neuronal loss observed at 10 and 14 μg/μl dose. A significant positive correlation between the number of surviving LC neurons after 6-OHDA and FST immobile time was observed, suggesting that in animals with a minimal loss of LC neurons (or a greater number of surviving LC neurons) following 6-OHDA demonstrated depressive-like behavior. As the 6-OHDA-induced loss of LC neurons is increased, the time spent immobile is reduced. Depressive-like behavior was also observed with the 5 μg/μl dose of 6-OHDA with a second behavior test, sucrose consumption. FST increased immobility following 6-OHDA (5 μg/μl) was reversed by the administration of a single dose of L-1-3-4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) or l-threo-3

  14. Bacteriophage administration significantly reduces Shigella colonization and shedding by Shigella-challenged mice without deleterious side effects and distortions in the gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Mai, Volker; Ukhanova, Maria; Reinhard, Mary K; Li, Manrong; Sulakvelidze, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We used a mouse model to establish safety and efficacy of a bacteriophage cocktail, ShigActive™, in reducing fecal Shigella counts after oral challenge with a susceptible strain. Groups of inbred C57BL/6J mice challenged with Shigella sonnei strain S43-NalAcR were treated with a phage cocktail (ShigActive™) composed of 5 lytic Shigella bacteriophages and ampicillin. The treatments were administered (i) 1 h after, (ii) 3 h after, (iii) 1 h before and after, and (iv) 1 h before bacterial challenge. The treatment regimens elicited a 10- to 100-fold reduction in the CFU's of the challenge strain in fecal and cecum specimens compared to untreated control mice, (P < 0.05). ShigActiveTM treatment was at least as effective as treatment with ampicillin but had a significantly less impact on the gut microbiota. Long-term safety studies did not identify any side effects or distortions in overall gut microbiota associated with bacteriophage administration. Shigella phages may be therapeutically effective in a “classical phage therapy” approach, at least during the early stages after Shigella ingestion. Oral prophylactic “phagebiotic” administration of lytic bacteriophages may help to maintain a healthy gut microbiota by killing specifically targeted bacterial pathogens in the GI tract, without deleterious side effects and without altering the normal gut microbiota. PMID:26909243

  15. [Reverse-tolerance phenomenon in methamphetamine-induced behavioral stereotypy and impairment of cliff avoidance reaction after subchronic methamphetamine administration in rats].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, S; Numachi, Y; Matsuoka, H; Fuse, Y; Sato, M

    1995-10-01

    Clinical evidence of methamphetamine (MAP)-induced reverse-tolerance phenomenon is available in studies of methamphetamine psychosis. To examine the clinical relevance of the reverse-tolerance phenomenon as a model of this psychosis, two experiments were conducted using rats. In the first experiment, we examined the relationship of MAP (4 mg/kg/day)-induced reverse tolerance in behavioral stereotypy to impairment of the cliff avoidance reaction (CAR). The stereotypy scores by the method of Creese and Iversen reached a maximum at day 14, and were unchanged thereafter. Impairment of CAR appeared in 3 of 6 rats at day 21 or 28 without motor ataxia, as rated by the scoring system of Hiramatsu et al. This suggested that cognitive dysfunction reflected by CAR impairment may develop after MAP-induced reverse-tolerance phenomenon, as evaluated by the behavioral stereotyping rating scale. In the second experiment, the effect of PCP (1 mg/kg) on CAR was examined in rats pretreated with MAP (4 mg/kg/day) for 30 days. No behavioral stereotypy or CAR impairment was found in these rats for 1 hour after PCP challenge. This showed that MAP-induced reverse-tolerance did not alter sensitivity to PCP in producing behavioral stereotypy or CAR impairment.

  16. Detection and clinical significance of lymph node micrometastasis determined by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction in patients with esophageal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kijima, F; Natsugoe, S; Takao, S; Aridome, K; Baba, M; Yoshifumi, M; Eizuru, Y; Aikou, T

    2000-01-01

    We investigated micrometastasis in lymph nodes by detecting carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) mRNA. A total of 400 lymph nodes obtained from 21 patients with esophageal carcinoma were examined by CEA-specific reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Serial sections of positive lymph nodes were reexamined histologically and immunohistologically. Twenty-seven lymph nodes of 11 patients were diagnosed as being positive by conventional histologic examination. CEA-mRNA positivity was found in 18 of 21 patients. Among 373 histologically negative nodes, 79 (21.2%) were positive for CEA mRNA. Of these, micrometastasis was detected in 2 by histological reexamination and in 11 by immunohistochemical staining using cytokeratin antibody. Two of 6 RT-PCR-positive patients (33.3%) had recurrent disease. Four of 11 patients (36.4%) whose nodal involvement was discovered by routine histological examination also had recurrent cancer. CEA-specific RT-PCR detected micrometastasis in lymph nodes at a higher rate than histological or immunohistochemical analysis of serial sections. Since the incidence of CEA-mRNA positivity is high in the lymph nodes of esophageal cancer patients except for those with early cancer, these patients should be treated with adjuvant therapy.

  17. Design, Synthesis, and Evaluation of Thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine Derivatives as HIV-1 Non-nucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitors with Significantly Improved Drug Resistance Profiles.

    PubMed

    Kang, Dongwei; Fang, Zengjun; Li, Zhenyu; Huang, Boshi; Zhang, Heng; Lu, Xueyi; Xu, Haoran; Zhou, Zhongxia; Ding, Xiao; Daelemans, Dirk; De Clercq, Erik; Pannecouque, Christophe; Zhan, Peng; Liu, Xinyong

    2016-09-01

    We designed and synthesized a series of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs) with a piperidine-substituted thiophene[3,2-d]pyrimidine scaffold, employing a strategy of structure-based molecular hybridization and substituent decorating. Most of the synthesized compounds exhibited broad-spectrum activity with low (single-digit) nanomolar EC50 values toward a panel of wild-type (WT), single-mutant, and double-mutant HIV-1 strains. Compound 27 was the most potent; compared with ETV, its antiviral efficacy was 3-fold greater against WT, 5-7-fold greater against Y181C, Y188L, E138K, and F227L+V106A, and nearly equipotent against L100I and K103N, though somewhat weaker against K103N+Y181C. Importantly, 27 has lower cytotoxicity (CC50 > 227 μM) and a huge selectivity index (SI) value (ratio of CC50/EC50) of >159101. 27 also showed favorable, drug-like pharmacokinetic and safety properties in rats in vivo. Molecular docking studies and the structure-activity relationships provide important clues for further molecular elaboration. PMID:27541578

  18. Repeated dose (28-day) administration of silver nanoparticles of varied size and coating does not significantly alter the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

    PubMed

    Wilding, Laura A; Bassis, Christine M; Walacavage, Kim; Hashway, Sara; Leroueil, Pascale R; Morishita, Masako; Maynard, Andrew D; Philbert, Martin A; Bergin, Ingrid L

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been used as antimicrobials in a number of applications, including topical wound dressings and coatings for consumer products and biomedical devices. Ingestion is a relevant route of exposure for AgNPs, whether occurring unintentionally via Ag dissolution from consumer products, or intentionally from dietary supplements. AgNP have also been proposed as substitutes for antibiotics in animal feeds. While oral antibiotics are known to have significant effects on gut bacteria, the antimicrobial effects of ingested AgNPs on the indigenous microbiome or on gut pathogens are unknown. In addition, AgNP size and coating have been postulated as significantly influential towards their biochemical properties and the influence of these properties on antimicrobial efficacy is unknown. We evaluated murine gut microbial communities using culture-independent sequencing of 16S rRNA gene fragments following 28 days of repeated oral dosing of well-characterized AgNPs of two different sizes (20 and 110 nm) and coatings (PVP and Citrate). Irrespective of size or coating, oral administration of AgNPs at 10 mg/kg body weight/day did not alter the membership, structure or diversity of the murine gut microbiome. Thus, in contrast to effects of broad-spectrum antibiotics, repeat dosing of AgNP, at doses equivalent to 2000 times the oral reference dose and 100-400 times the effective in vitro anti-microbial concentration, does not affect the indigenous murine gut microbiome.

  19. Mass Administration of Ivermectin for the Elimination of Onchocerciasis Significantly Reduced and Maintained Low the Prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis in Esmeraldas, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Anselmi, Mariella; Buonfrate, Dora; Guevara Espinoza, Angel; Prandi, Rosanna; Marquez, Monica; Gobbo, Maria; Montresor, Antonio; Albonico, Marco; Racines Orbe, Marcia; Bisoffi, Zeno

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of ivermectin mass drug administration on strongyloidiasis and other soil transmitted helminthiases. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of data collected in Esmeraldas (Ecuador) during surveys conducted in areas where ivermectin was annually administered to the entire population for the control of onchocerciasis. Data from 5 surveys, conducted between 1990 (before the start of the distribution of ivermectin) and 2013 (six years after the interruption of the intervention) were analyzed. The surveys also comprised areas where ivermectin was not distributed because onchocerciasis was not endemic. Different laboratory techniques were used in the different surveys (direct fecal smear, formol-ether concentration, IFAT and IVD ELISA for Strongyloides stercoralis). Results In the areas where ivermectin was distributed the strongyloidiasis prevalence fell from 6.8% in 1990 to zero in 1996 and 1999. In 2013 prevalence in children was zero with stool examination and 1.3% with serology, in adult 0.7% and 2.7%. In areas not covered by ivermectin distribution the prevalence was 23.5% and 16.1% in 1996 and 1999, respectively. In 2013 the prevalence was 0.6% with fecal exam and 9.3% with serology in children and 2.3% and 17.9% in adults. Regarding other soil transmitted helminthiases: in areas where ivermectin was distributed the prevalence of T. trichiura was significantly reduced, while A. lumbricoides and hookworms were seemingly unaffected. Conclusions Periodic mass distribution of ivermectin had a significant impact on the prevalence of strongyloidiasis, less on trichuriasis and apparently no effect on ascariasis and hookworm infections. PMID:26540412

  20. Chronic Trichuris muris Infection in C57BL/6 Mice Causes Significant Changes in Host Microbiota and Metabolome: Effects Reversed by Pathogen Clearance

    PubMed Central

    Houlden, Ashley; Hayes, Kelly S.; Bancroft, Allison J.; Worthington, John J.; Wang, Ping; Grencis, Richard K.; Roberts, Ian S.

    2015-01-01

    Trichuris species are a globally important and prevalent group of intestinal helminth parasites, in which Trichuris muris (mouse whipworm) is an ideal model for this disease. This paper describes the first ever highly controlled and comprehensive investigation into the effects of T. muris infection on the faecal microbiota of mice and the effects on the microbiota following successful clearance of the infection. Communities were profiled using DGGE, 454 pyrosequencing, and metabolomics. Changes in microbial composition occurred between 14 and 28 days post infection, resulting in significant changes in α and β- diversity. This impact was dominated by a reduction in the diversity and abundance of Bacteroidetes, specifically Prevotella and Parabacteroides. Metabolomic analysis of stool samples of infected mice at day 41 showed significant differences to uninfected controls with a significant increase in the levels of a number of essential amino acids and a reduction in breakdown of dietary plant derived carbohydrates. The significant reduction in weight gain by infected mice probably reflects these metabolic changes and the incomplete digestion of dietary polysaccharides. Following clearance of infection the intestinal microbiota underwent additional changes gradually transitioning by day 91 towards a microbiota of an uninfected animal. These data indicate that the changes in microbiota as a consequence of infection were transitory requiring the presence of the pathogen for maintenance. Interestingly this was not observed for all of the key immune cell populations associated with chronic T. muris infection. This reflects the highly regulated chronic response and potential lasting immunological consequences of dysbiosis in the microbiota. Thus infection of T. muris causes a significant and substantial impact on intestinal microbiota and digestive function of mice with affects in long term immune regulation. PMID:25938477

  1. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. Final report, February 24, 1992--September 18, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Law, V.J.

    1995-09-18

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate the utility of a device called the {open_quotes}beach cone{close_quotes} in combating coastal erosion. Seven initial sites were selected for testing beach cones in a variety of geometric configurations. Permits were obtained from the State of Louisiana and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to perform the work associated with this study. Six hundred beach cones were actually installed at six of the sites in late July and early August, 1992. Findings indicate that beach cones accreted significant amounts of materials along the beach of a barrier island, and they might have been instrumental in repairing an approximately 200 meter gap in the island. At the eighth installation the amount of accreted material was measured by surveys to be 2200 cubic meters (2900 cubic yards) in February of 1993, when the cones were found to have been completely covered by the material. At other test sites, accretion rates have been less dramatic but importantly, no significant additional erosion has occurred, which is a positive result. The cost of sediment accretion using beach cones was found to be about $13.72 per cubic yard, which would be much lower if the cones were mass produced (on the order of $3.00 per cubic yard). The survival of the cones through the fringes of Hurricane Andrew indicates that they can be anchored sufficiently to survive significant storms. The measurements of the cones settling rates indicate that this effect is not significant enough to hinder their effectiveness. A subcontract to Xavier University to assess the ecological quality of the experimental sites involved the study of the biogeochemical cycle of trace metals. The highest concentration of heavy metals were near a fishing camp while the lowest levels were in the beach sand of a barrier island. This suggests that the metals do not occur naturally in these areas, but have been placed in the sediments by man`s activities.

  2. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. Annual report, February 24, 1993--February 23, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Law, V.J.

    1994-07-07

    The primary objective of this project was to evaluate the utility of a device called the ``beach cone`` in combating coastal erosion. Seven initial sites were selected for testing beach cones in a variety of geometric configurations, and six sites were actually used. Six hundred beach cones were installed at the six sites in late July and early August, 1992. An additional 109 cones were installed at an eighth site in December of 1992. Findings indicate that beach cones accreted significant amounts of materials along the beach of a barrier island. At the eighth installation the amount of accreted material was measured by surveys to be 2200 cubic meters (2900 cubic yards) in February of 1993, when the cones were found to have been completely covered by the material. The average increase in elevation was about 7 inches (0. 18 in) with a maximum buildup of 3 ft. (I in). At other test sites, accretion rates have been less dramatic but importantly, no significant additional erosion has occurred, which is a positive result. The cost of sediment accretion using beach cones was found to be about $13.72 per cubic yard of sand or approximately $500,000 per mile of beach, which would be much lower if the cones were mass produced. The survival of the cones through the fringes of Hurricane Andrew indicates that they can be anchored sufficiently to survive significant storms. The measurements of the cones settling rates indicate that this effect is negligible, does not hinder their effectiveness. We do not yet have sufficient data to state the categorical success of the beach cones, but results to date are encouraging.

  3. Field studies of beach cones as coastal erosion control/reversal devices for areas with significant oil and gas activities. [Annual report], February 24, 1992--February 23, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Law, V.J.

    1993-03-15

    The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the utility of a device called the ``beach cone`` in combating coastal erosion. Seven initial sites were selected for testing beach cones in a variety of geometric configurations. Permits were obtained from the State of Louisiana and the US Army Corps of Engineers to perform the work associated with this study. Six hundred beach cones were actually installed at six of the sites in late July and early August, 1992. One of the initial sites was abandoned because it was found to be unsuitable for beach cone placement. The test sites have been observed for six months and preliminary findings indicate that beach cones accreted significant amounts of materials along the beach of a barrier island. At other test sites, accretion rates have been less dramatic but importantly, no significant additional erosion has occurred, which is a positive result. It is too soon to state the categorical success of the beach cones, but results to date are encouraging.

  4. How Much Calcium Is in Your Drinking Water? A Survey of Calcium Concentrations in Bottled and Tap Water and Their Significance for Medical Treatment and Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Morr, Simon; Cuartas, Esteban; Alwattar, Basil

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Different forms of water vary in calcium content. High divalent ion (i.e., Ca2+, Mg2+, etc.) concentration is deleterious to the absorption and efficacy of the bisphosphonate group of drugs in osteoporosis treatment. Water with high calcium concentration may also present an alternate pathway of calcium administration. In either case, knowing the actual concentration is critical. Hypothesis The current paper is a surveillance study. We hypothesize that there is considerable variation in the calcium concentrations in the various water sources: tap water from US and Canadian cities of different regions and purified, spring, and mineral bottled waters. In addition, we hypothesize that the water filter removes a significant amount of minerals including calcium from the water. Methodology Calcium concentrations in various city tap waters, as well as an assorted number of bottled waters, were determined through the direct inspection of scientific data. The effect of filtering was also determined by mineral analysis of mineral water directly before and after filtration. Result The calcium concentration of water varies from 1 to 135 mg/L across the USA and Canada. Most spring waters were found to have a relatively low calcium concentration, with an average of 21.8 mg/L. Purified waters contain a negligible calcium concentration. Mineral waters, on the other hand, were generally found to contain higher calcium concentrations, an average of 208 mg/L of calcium. Filtration was found to remove a considerable amount of calcium from the water, removing 89% on average. Conclusion Calcium concentration in water varied substantially from different sources in the USA and Canada. Bottled waters presented with concentrations of calcium covering a very large range. Certain tap and bottled waters present with concentrations of calcium sufficient to exhibit a deleterious effect on bisphosphonate treatment. Alternatively, certain waters may be used as a source of calcium

  5. Generation of antigen-specific Foxp3+ regulatory T-cells in vivo following administration of diabetes-reversing tolerogenic microspheres does not require provision of antigen in the formulation.

    PubMed

    Engman, Carl; Wen, Yi; Meng, Wilson S; Bottino, Rita; Trucco, Massimo; Giannoukakis, Nick

    2015-09-01

    We have developed novel antisense oligonucleotide-formulated microspheres that can reverse hyperglycemia in newly-onset diabetic mice. Dendritic cells taking up the microspheres adopt a restrained co-stimulation ability and migrate to the pancreatic lymph nodes when injected into an abdominal region that is drained by those lymph nodes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the absolute numbers of antigen-specific Foxp3+ T regulatory cells are increased only in the lymph nodes draining the site of administration and that these T-cells proliferate independently of antigen supply in the microspheres. Taken together, our data add to the emerging model where antigen supply may not be a requirement in "vaccines" for autoimmune disease, but the site of administration - subserved by lymph nodes draining the target organ - is in fact critical to foster the generation of antigen-specific regulatory cells. The implications of these observations on "vaccine" design for autoimmunity are discussed and summarized.

  6. A Single Amphetamine Infusion Reverses Deficits in Dopamine Nerve-Terminal Function Caused by a History of Cocaine Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, Mark J; Calipari, Erin S; Rose, Jamie H; Siciliano, Cody A; Sun, Haiguo; Chen, Rong; Jones, Sara R

    2015-01-01

    There are ∼1.6 million people who meet the criteria for cocaine addiction in the United States, and there are currently no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies. Amphetamine-based dopamine-releasing drugs have shown efficacy in reducing the motivation to self-administer cocaine and reducing intake in animals and humans. It is hypothesized that amphetamine acts as a replacement therapy for cocaine through elevation of extracellular dopamine levels. Using voltammetry in brain slices, we tested the ability of a single amphetamine infusion in vivo to modulate dopamine release, uptake kinetics, and cocaine potency in cocaine-naive animals and after a history of cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/infusion, fixed-ratio 1, 40 injections/day × 5 days). Dopamine kinetics were measured 1 and 24 h after amphetamine infusion (0.56 mg/kg, i.v.). Following cocaine self-administration, dopamine release, maximal rate of uptake (Vmax), and membrane-associated dopamine transporter (DAT) levels were reduced, and the DAT was less sensitive to cocaine. A single amphetamine infusion reduced Vmax and membrane DAT levels in cocaine-naive animals, but fully restored all aspects of dopamine terminal function in cocaine self-administering animals. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate pharmacologically induced, immediate rescue of deficits in dopamine nerve-terminal function in animals with a history of high-dose cocaine self-administration. This observation supports the notion that the DAT expression and function can be modulated on a rapid timescale and also suggests that the pharmacotherapeutic actions of amphetamine for cocaine addiction go beyond that of replacement therapy. PMID:25689882

  7. A Single Amphetamine Infusion Reverses Deficits in Dopamine Nerve-Terminal Function Caused by a History of Cocaine Self-Administration.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Mark J; Calipari, Erin S; Rose, Jamie H; Siciliano, Cody A; Sun, Haiguo; Chen, Rong; Jones, Sara R

    2015-07-01

    There are ∼ 1.6 million people who meet the criteria for cocaine addiction in the United States, and there are currently no FDA-approved pharmacotherapies. Amphetamine-based dopamine-releasing drugs have shown efficacy in reducing the motivation to self-administer cocaine and reducing intake in animals and humans. It is hypothesized that amphetamine acts as a replacement therapy for cocaine through elevation of extracellular dopamine levels. Using voltammetry in brain slices, we tested the ability of a single amphetamine infusion in vivo to modulate dopamine release, uptake kinetics, and cocaine potency in cocaine-naive animals and after a history of cocaine self-administration (1.5 mg/kg/infusion, fixed-ratio 1, 40 injections/day × 5 days). Dopamine kinetics were measured 1 and 24 h after amphetamine infusion (0.56 mg/kg, i.v.). Following cocaine self-administration, dopamine release, maximal rate of uptake (Vmax), and membrane-associated dopamine transporter (DAT) levels were reduced, and the DAT was less sensitive to cocaine. A single amphetamine infusion reduced Vmax and membrane DAT levels in cocaine-naive animals, but fully restored all aspects of dopamine terminal function in cocaine self-administering animals. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate pharmacologically induced, immediate rescue of deficits in dopamine nerve-terminal function in animals with a history of high-dose cocaine self-administration. This observation supports the notion that the DAT expression and function can be modulated on a rapid timescale and also suggests that the pharmacotherapeutic actions of amphetamine for cocaine addiction go beyond that of replacement therapy. PMID:25689882

  8. Acute fasting-induced repression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is reversed by RF-9 administration in the adult male macaque.

    PubMed

    Batool, A; Naz, R; Wazir, M; Azam, A; Ullah, R; Wahab, F; Shahab, M

    2014-12-01

    Recently, hypothalamic RFRP-3 (a mammalian ortholog of avian GnIH) signaling has been proposed as an important negative modulator of the reproductive axis. The current study examined whether repression of reproductive hormonal expression during short-term fasting conditions in higher-order primate is influenced by altered RFRP-3 signaling. Eight intact postpubertal male macaques (Macaca mulatta) were administered a single intravenous bolus of RF-9 (n = 4), a potent and putative RFRP-3 receptor antagonist, or vehicle (n = 4) following a 48-h fasting condition. Intermittent blood samples were collected every 30 min during the 4-h post-bolus period, and blood glucose, plasma cortisol, and testosterone concentrations were measured. Relative to fed conditions, fasting reduced glucose and testosterone levels (p < 0.005) and increased cortisol levels (p < 0.05). Relative to baseline, mean testosterone levels were elevated 150 min after RF-9 (p < 0.05) but not vehicle administration. In addition, elevated mean plasma testosterone levels following RF-9 administration were equivalent to levels observed in normal fed monkeys. These results suggest an important role for RFRP-3 signaling in conveying metabolic state information to the reproductive axis in higher primates.

  9. Acute fasting-induced repression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis is reversed by RF-9 administration in the adult male macaque.

    PubMed

    Batool, A; Naz, R; Wazir, M; Azam, A; Ullah, R; Wahab, F; Shahab, M

    2014-12-01

    Recently, hypothalamic RFRP-3 (a mammalian ortholog of avian GnIH) signaling has been proposed as an important negative modulator of the reproductive axis. The current study examined whether repression of reproductive hormonal expression during short-term fasting conditions in higher-order primate is influenced by altered RFRP-3 signaling. Eight intact postpubertal male macaques (Macaca mulatta) were administered a single intravenous bolus of RF-9 (n = 4), a potent and putative RFRP-3 receptor antagonist, or vehicle (n = 4) following a 48-h fasting condition. Intermittent blood samples were collected every 30 min during the 4-h post-bolus period, and blood glucose, plasma cortisol, and testosterone concentrations were measured. Relative to fed conditions, fasting reduced glucose and testosterone levels (p < 0.005) and increased cortisol levels (p < 0.05). Relative to baseline, mean testosterone levels were elevated 150 min after RF-9 (p < 0.05) but not vehicle administration. In addition, elevated mean plasma testosterone levels following RF-9 administration were equivalent to levels observed in normal fed monkeys. These results suggest an important role for RFRP-3 signaling in conveying metabolic state information to the reproductive axis in higher primates. PMID:25181419

  10. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Block Tests; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.97 Thrust reversers. (a) If the engine incorporates a reverser, the endurance calibration, operation, and vibration tests prescribed...

  11. Vasectomy reversal in humans.

    PubMed

    Bernie, Aaron M; Osterberg, E Charles; Stahl, Peter J; Ramasamy, Ranjith; Goldstein, Marc

    2012-10-01

    Vasectomy is the most common urological procedure in the United States with 18% of men having a vasectomy before age 45. A significant proportion of vasectomized men ultimately request vasectomy reversal, usually due to divorce and/or remarriage. Vasectomy reversal is a commonly practiced but technically demanding microsurgical procedure that restores patency of the male excurrent ductal system in 80-99.5% of cases and enables unassisted pregnancy in 40-80% of couples. The discrepancy between the anastomotic patency rates and clinical pregnancy rates following vasectomy reversal suggests that some of the biological consequences of vasectomy may not be entirely reversible in all men. Herein we review what is known about the biological sequelae of vasectomy and vasectomy reversal in humans, and provide a succinct overview of the evaluation and surgical management of men desiring vasectomy reversal.

  12. Reversible dementias

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Manjari; Vibha, Deepti

    2009-01-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to the early diagnostic evaluation of patients with dementia which is essential to identify patients with cognitive symptoms who may have treatable conditions. Guidelines suggest that all patients presenting with dementia or cognitive symptoms should be evaluated with a range of laboratory tests, and with structural brain imaging with computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). While many of the disorders reported as ‘reversible dementias’ are conditions that may well be associated with cognitive or behavioral symptoms, these symptoms are not always sufficiently severe to fulfill the clinical criteria for dementia. Thus, while the etiology of a condition may be treatable it should not be assumed that the associated dementia is fully reversible. Potentially reversible dementias should be identified and treatment considered, even if the symptoms are not sufficiently severe to meet the clinical criteria for dementia, and even if partial or full reversal of the cognitive symptoms cannot be guaranteed. In the literature, the most frequently observed potentially reversible conditions identified in patients with cognitive impairment or dementia are depression, adverse effects of drugs, drug or alcohol abuse, space-occupying lesions, normal pressure hydrocephalus, and metabolic conditions land endocrinal conditions like hypothyroidism and nutritional conditions like vitamin B-12 deficiency. Depression is by far the most common of the potentially reversible conditions. The review, hence addresses the common causes of reversible dementia and the studies published so far. PMID:21416018

  13. Clinical significance of the administration of cytarabine or thiotepa in addition to total body irradiation and cyclophosphamide for allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in patients with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Takayoshi; Tanaka, Masatsugu; Hagihara, Maki; Kawasaki, Rika; Yamazaki, Etsuko; Koharazawa, Hideyuki; Taguchi, Jun; Tomita, Naoto; Fujimaki, Katsumichi; Sakai, Rika; Fujita, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Shin; Maruta, Atsuo; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Kanamori, Heiwa

    2015-10-01

    A multicenter retrospective study was performed to determine the significance of adding cytarabine (CA) or thiotepa (TT) in the context of total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide (CY). A total of 322 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) were distributed to the following three groups: TBI/CY (n = 75), TBI/CY/CA (n = 77), and TBI/CY/TT (n = 170). In the TBI/CY/TT group, 164 of patients (96 %) received HCT during the previous year (2000-2005). Multivariate analysis revealed that the TBI/CY/TT group demonstrated a trend of poorer survival rate than the TBI/CY group, [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.49, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.99-2.24, P = 0.055] with a higher non-relapse mortality (NRM) (HR = 2.34, 95 % CI 1.35-4.06, P = 0.002) rates, while TBI/CY/CA group demonstrated similar outcomes. Even in the subgroup analyses of disease type or disease risk, the outcomes with intensified conditioning regimens were not superior to those with TBI/CY. In conclusion, although the significant bias has to be carefully considered, the clinical benefit of adding CA or TT to the TBI/CY regimen was not demonstrated.

  14. Reversible Sterilization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Largey, Gale

    1977-01-01

    Notes that difficult questions arise concerning the use of sterilization for alleged eugenic and euthenic purposes. Thus, how reversible sterilization will be used with relation to the poor, mentally ill, mentally retarded, criminals, and minors, is questioned. (Author/AM)

  15. Reversible Cardiomyopathies

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Harsh; Madanieh, Raef; Kosmas, Constantine E; Vatti, Satya K; Vittorio, Timothy J

    2015-01-01

    Cardiomyopathies (CMs) have many etiological factors that can result in severe structural and functional dysregulation. Fortunately, there are several potentially reversible CMs that are known to improve when the root etiological factor is addressed. In this article, we discuss several of these reversible CMs, including tachycardia-induced, peripartum, inflammatory, hyperthyroidism, Takotsubo, and chronic illness–induced CMs. Our discussion also includes a review on their respective pathophysiology, as well as possible management solutions. PMID:26052233

  16. Bronchial reversibility with a short-acting β2-agonist predicts the FEV1 response to administration of a long-acting β2-agonist with inhaled corticosteroids in patients with bronchial asthma.

    PubMed

    Ohwada, Akihiko; Inami, Kei; Onuma, Emi; Matsumoto-Yamazaki, Mariko; Atsuta, Ryo; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2011-07-01

    A long-acting β2-agonist (LABA) combined with an inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) is frequently prescribed as initial therapy in steroid-naïve asthma patients because of its effective control of symptoms and improvement of pulmonary function. However, it is unclear which patients will be responsive to LABAs and whether bronchial responsiveness to LABAs is similar to that to short-acting β2-agonists (SABAs) in a clinical setting. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to compare the changes in spirometric parameters after SABA (salbutamol) inhalation to those after 1-month LABA/ICS (salmeterol/fluticasone propionate) therapy. Spirometric changes were evaluated as absolute values, as the percentage of predicted normal values and as the percentage of baseline values after salbutamol inhalation or 1-month LABA/ICS therapy in 45 patients with asthma. Compared to SABA inhalation, LABA/ICS therapy produced significant improvements in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec (FEV1), peak expiratory flow (PEF), forced expiratory flow at 50% of vital capacity expired (FEF50%) from baseline (expressed as the percentage predicted) in all patients. FEV1 and the FEV1/forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio after SABA or LABA/ICS therapy were inversely related to the corresponding baseline values. Analysis of spirometric changes after SABA inhalation showed that FEV1 was the best among spirometric parameters, such as PEF, correlated with responsiveness to LABA/ICS therapy. Reversibility of FEV1 with SABA inhalation predicts the spirometric response to LABA/ICS as initial therapy in patients with bronchial asthma. LABA/ICS therapy had a greater effect on bronchial reversibility in asthmatic patients, compared to SABA inhalation. This suggested that evaluation of bronchial reversibility after LABA/ICS therapy would be superior to that after SABA inhalation.

  17. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures. PMID:3811050

  18. Vasectomy reversal.

    PubMed

    Belker, A M

    1987-02-01

    A vasovasostomy may be performed on an outpatient basis with local anesthesia, but also may be performed on an outpatient basis with epidural or general anesthesia. Local anesthesia is preferred by most of my patients, the majority of whom choose this technique. With proper preoperative and intraoperative sedation, patients sleep lightly through most of the procedure. Because of the length of time often required for bilateral microsurgical vasoepididymostomy, epidural or general anesthesia and overnight hospitalization are usually necessary. Factors influencing the preoperative choice for vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy in patients undergoing vasectomy reversal are considered. The preoperative planned choice of vasovasostomy or vasoepididymostomy for patients having vasectomy reversal described herein does not have the support of all urologists who regularly perform these procedures. My present approach has evolved as the data reported in Tables 1 and 2 have become available, but it may change as new information is evaluated. However, it offers a logical method for planning choices of anesthesia and inpatient or outpatient status for patients undergoing vasectomy reversal procedures.

  19. Reversal of age-related increase in brain protein oxidation, decrease in enzyme activity, and loss in temporal and spatial memory by chronic administration of the spin-trapping compound N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone

    SciTech Connect

    Carney, J.M.; Starke-Reed, P.E.; Oliver, C.N.; Landum, R.W.; Cheng, M.S.; Wu, J.F.; Floyd, R.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Oxygen free radicals and oxidative events have been implicated as playing a role in bringing about the changes in cellular function that occur during aging. Brain readily undergoes oxidative damage, so it is important to determine if aging-induced changes in brain may be associated with oxidative events. Previously we demonstrated that brain damage caused by an ischemia/reperfusion insult involved oxidative events. In addition, pretreatment with the spin-trapping compound N-tert-butyl-alpha-phenylnitrone (PBN) diminished the increase in oxidized protein and the loss of glutamine synthetase (GS) activity that accompanied ischemia/reperfusion injury in brain. We report here that aged gerbils had a significantly higher level of oxidized protein as assessed by carbonyl residues and decreased GS and neutral protease activities as compared to young adult gerbils. We also found that chronic treatment with the spin-trapping compound PBN caused a decrease in the level of oxidized protein and an increase in both GS and neutral protease activity in aged Mongolian gerbil brain. In contrast to aged gerbils, PBN treatment of young adult gerbils had no significant effect on brain oxidized protein content or GS activity. Male gerbils, young adults (3 months of age) and retired breeders (15-18 months of age), were treated with PBN for 14 days with twice daily dosages of 32 mg/kg. If PBN administration was ceased after 2 weeks, the significantly decreased level of oxidized protein and increased GS and neutral protease activities in old gerbils changed in a monotonic fashion back to the levels observed in aged gerbils prior to PBN administration. We also report that old gerbils make more errors than young animals and that older gerbils treated with PBN made fewer errors in a radial arm maze test for temporal and spatial memory than the untreated aged controls.

  20. 78 FR 38450 - Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection Renewal; Reverse Mortgage...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... ADMINISTRATION Agency Information Collection Activities; Information Collection Renewal; Reverse Mortgage..., ``Reverse Mortgage Products Guidance.'' Comments may be submitted by any of the following methods: http... ``Reverse Mortgage Products: Guidance for Managing Compliance and Reputation Risks.'' With respect...

  1. Interventions delivered in clinical settings are effective in reducing risk of HIV transmission among people living with HIV: results from the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)'s Special Projects of National Significance initiative.

    PubMed

    Myers, Janet J; Shade, Starley B; Rose, Carol Dawson; Koester, Kimberly; Maiorana, Andre; Malitz, Faye E; Bie, Jennifer; Kang-Dufour, Mi-Suk; Morin, Stephen F

    2010-06-01

    To support expanded prevention services for people living with HIV, the US Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) sponsored a 5-year initiative to test whether interventions delivered in clinical settings were effective in reducing HIV transmission risk among HIV-infected patients. Across 13 demonstration sites, patients were randomized to one of four conditions. All interventions were associated with reduced unprotected vaginal and/or anal intercourse with persons of HIV-uninfected or unknown status among the 3,556 participating patients. Compared to the standard of care, patients assigned to receive interventions from medical care providers reported a significant decrease in risk after 12 months of participation. Patients receiving prevention services from health educators, social workers or paraprofessional HIV-infected peers reported significant reduction in risk at 6 months, but not at 12 months. While clinics have a choice of effective models for implementing prevention programs for their HIV-infected patients, medical provider-delivered methods are comparatively robust.

  2. Reversing Readicide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    The "elephant in the room" when we talk about preparing critical thinkers for the 21st century, Gallagher believes, is U.S. students' lack of reading proficiency and their general disinclination to read. Gallagher's provocative argument is that a significant factor behind the decline of reading in young people is a set of practices schools engage…

  3. Inhaled magnesium fluoride reverse bronchospasma.

    PubMed

    Gandia, Fedoua; Rouatbi, Sonia; Latiri, Imed; Guénard, Hervé; Tabka, Zouhair

    2010-01-01

    Asthma is a global health problem. Asthma attacks are becoming more severe and more resistant to usual treatment by beta(2) agonists nebulisation. The search for a new product that could reduce the morbidity of asthmatic disease seems necessary. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of inhaled magnesium fluoride (MgF(2)) with that of magnesium sulphate (MgSO(4)) 15% alone and sodium fluoride (NaF) 0.5 M alone in rats pre-contracted by methacholine (MeCh). Fifty six adult male Wistar rats of medium weight 259 +/- 15 g were divided randomly into five groups. They inhaled respectively: MeCh, MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, MgF(2) + acetic acid, MgSO(4) 15% single and NaF (0.5 M) single. Airway resistances were measured after each dose of MeCh by pneumomultitest equipment. Results indicated that (1) MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, MgF(2) + acetic acid and MgSO(4) reversed significantly the methacholine-induced bronchial constriction in rats and had a bronchodilating effect at the moment of its administration (2) MgF(2) + acetic acid led to a greater decrease (P<0.05) of bronchial resistances when compared to that obtained from MgF(2) + NaCl 0.9%, NaF exclusively and MgSO(4) alone (3) inhaled NaF alone led to a significant bronchorelaxing effect (P<0.05) that starts at the sixth dose of MeCh (17 mg/L). As a matter of fact, MgF(2) dissolved in acetic acid and delivered in aerosol form reduces significantly bronchial spasm. In conclusion, MgF(2) can be used as a bronchodilator for diseases with bronchospasma such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  4. Administrative Synergy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Weckstein, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles to overcome in creating and sustaining an administrative professional learning community (PLC) is time. Administrators are constantly deluged by the tyranny of the urgent. It is a Herculean task to carve out time for PLCs, but it is imperative to do so. In this article, the authors describe how an administrative PLC…

  5. Reversal Agents for the Direct Oral Anticoagulants.

    PubMed

    Ansell, Jack E

    2016-10-01

    The vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) are associated with a significant rate of major and fatal bleeding complications. The new direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs), even though having a better bleeding profile than the VKAs, are still associated with serious bleeding. The anticoagulation induced by the VKAs can be reversed with both vitamin K and prothrombin complex concentrates, whereas the DOACs were developed without specific reversal agents. Although there is controversy around the necessity of a reversal agent, most clinicians agree that having a reversal agent for the DOACs would be beneficial. Three reversal agents are currently in development. PMID:27637309

  6. Ideal stability limits of reverse shear equilibria

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, M.W.; Hughes, M.H.

    1996-12-31

    The dependence on various plasma parameters of the ideal stability limit of reverse shear current profiles in TFTR and other tokamaks has been thoroughly explored. Profiles with reverse shear allow core access to the second ballooning stability region. In addition, for sufficient shear reversal, modes with n = 2 and greater are also stabilized. The n = 1 stability threshold is only slightly affected by reverse shear and becomes the limiting instability. The mode is predominately an infernal mode with a significant external contribution. Particular emphasis will be on analysis of recent experimental results of enhanced reverse shear (ERS) profiles in TFTR and a study of those profile characteristics which optimize TFTR performance.

  7. The Significance of National Association for the Education of Young Children Accreditation in Elevating Quality of Early Childhood Education: Administrators', Teachers', and Parents' Beliefs about Accreditation and Its Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vardanyan, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    The following is a doctoral dissertation that studied administrators', teachers', and parents' perceptions and attitudes related to an early childhood center/preschool accreditation experience. A qualitative case study of one preschool center focused on the influence that the decision to pursue accreditation and implement the National Association…

  8. Reversible Thermoset Adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mac Murray, Benjamin C. (Inventor); Tong, Tat H. (Inventor); Hreha, Richard D. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Embodiments of a reversible thermoset adhesive formed by incorporating thermally-reversible cross-linking units and a method for making the reversible thermoset adhesive are provided. One approach to formulating reversible thermoset adhesives includes incorporating dienes, such as furans, and dienophiles, such as maleimides, into a polymer network as reversible covalent cross-links using Diels Alder cross-link formation between the diene and dienophile. The chemical components may be selected based on their compatibility with adhesive chemistry as well as their ability to undergo controlled, reversible cross-linking chemistry.

  9. Reverse Current in Solar Flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, J. W., III

    1978-01-01

    An idealized steady state model of a stream of energetic electrons neutralized by a reverse current in the pre-flare solar plasma was developed. These calculations indicate that, in some cases, a significant fraction of the beam energy may be dissipated by the reverse current. Joule heating by the reverse current is a more effective mechanism for heating the plasma than collisional losses from the energetic electrons because the Ohmic losses are caused by thermal electrons in the reverse current which have much shorter mean free paths than the energetic electrons. The heating due to reverse currents is calculated for two injected energetic electron fluxes. For the smaller injected flux, the temperature of the coronal plasma is raised by about a factor of two. The larger flux causes the reverse current drift velocity to exceed the critical velocity for the onset of ion cyclotron turbulence, producing anomalous resistivity and an order of magnitude increase in the temperature. The heating is so rapid that the lack of ionization equilibrium may produce a soft X-ray and EUV pulse from the corona.

  10. In-vivo administration of clozapine affects behaviour but does not reverse dendritic spine deficits in the 14-3-3ζ KO mouse model of schizophrenia-like disorders.

    PubMed

    Jaehne, Emily J; Ramshaw, Hayley; Xu, Xiangjun; Saleh, Eiman; Clark, Scott R; Schubert, Klaus Oliver; Lopez, Angel; Schwarz, Quenten; Baune, Bernhard T

    2015-11-01

    Clozapine is an atypical antipsychotic drug used in the treatment of schizophrenia, which has been shown to reverse behavioural and dendritic spine deficits in mice. It has recently been shown that deficiency of 14-3-3ζ has an association with schizophrenia, and that a mouse model lacking this protein displays several schizophrenia-like behavioural deficits. To test the effect of clozapine in this mouse model, 14-3-3ζ KO mice were administered clozapine (5mg/kg) for two weeks prior to being analysed in a test battery of cognition, anxiety, and despair (depression-like) behaviours. Following behavioural testing brain samples were collected for analysis of specific anatomical defects and dendritic spine formation. We found that clozapine reduced despair behaviour of 14-3-3ζ KO mice in the forced swim test (FST) and altered the behaviour of wild types and 14-3-3ζ KO mice in the Y-maze task. In contrast, clozapine had no effects on hippocampal laminar defects or decreased dendritic spine density observed in 14-3-3ζ KO mice. Our results suggest that clozapine may have beneficial effects on clinical behaviours associated with deficiencies in the 14-3-3ζ molecular pathway, despite having no effects on morphological defects. These findings may provide mechanistic insight to the action of this drug.

  11. Effects of acute restraint stress on set-shifting and reversal learning in male rats.

    PubMed

    Thai, Chester A; Zhang, Ying; Howland, John G

    2013-03-01

    Exposure to acute stress alters cognition; however, few studies have examined the effects of acute stress on executive functions such as behavioral flexibility. The goal of the present experiments was to determine the effects of acute periods of stress on two distinct forms of behavioral flexibility: set-shifting and reversal learning. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were trained and tested in an operant-chamber-based task. Some of the rats were exposed to acute restraint stress (30 min) immediately before either the set-shifting test day or the reversal learning test day. Acute stress had no effect on set-shifting, but it significantly facilitated reversal learning, as assessed by both trials to criterion and total errors. In a second experiment, the roles of glucocorticoid (GR) and mineralocorticoid receptors (MR) in the acute-stress-induced facilitation of reversal learning were examined. Systemic administration of the GR-selective antagonist RU38486 (10 mg/kg) or the MR-selective antagonist spironolactone (50 mg/kg) 30 min prior to acute stress failed to block the facilitation on reversal learning. The present results demonstrate a dissociable effect of acute stress on set-shifting and reversal learning and suggest that the facilitation of reversal learning by acute stress may be mediated by factors other than corticosterone.

  12. Administrative Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarity, Augustus C., III; Maulding, Wanda

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how all four facets of administrative ecology help dispel the claims about the "impossibility" of the superintendency. These are personal ecology, professional ecology, organizational ecology, and community ecology. Using today's superintendency as an administrative platform, current literature describes a preponderance of…

  13. Administrative Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doran, Dorothy; And Others

    This guide is intended to assist business education teachers in administrative support courses. The materials presented are based on the Arizona validated occupational competencies and tasks for the occupations of receptionist, secretary, and administrative assistant. Word processing skills have been infused into each of the three sections. The…

  14. Neural correlates of response reversal: considering acquisition.

    PubMed

    Budhani, S; Marsh, A A; Pine, D S; Blair, R J R

    2007-02-15

    Previous work on response reversal has typically used a single pair of stimuli that serially reverse. This conflation of acquisition and reversal processes has prevented an examination of the functional role of neural systems implicated in response reversal during acquisition despite the relevance of such data in evaluating accounts of response reversal. In the current study, participants encountered 16 independent reversing stimulus pairs in the context of a probabilistic response reversal paradigm. Functional regions of interest identified as involved in response reversal through a contrast used in the previous literature (punished errors made in the reversal phase versus rewarded correct responses), were interrogated across conditions. Consistent with suggestions that middle frontal cortex codes reward, this region showed significantly greater responses to rewarded rather than punished trials irrespective of accuracy or learning phase (acquisition or reversal). Consistent with the suggestion that this coding of the expectation of reinforcement is acquired via input from the amygdala, we observed significant positive connectivity between activity within the amygdala and a region of rostral anterior cingulate cortex highly proximal to this region of middle frontal/mesial prefrontal cortex. In contrast, inferior frontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and caudate showed greater responses to punished errors than to the rewarded correct responses. These three regions also showed significant activation to rewarded errors during acquisition, in contrast to positions suggesting that inferior frontal cortex represents punishment or suppresses previously rewarded responses. Moreover, a connectivity analysis with an anterior cingulate cortex seed revealed highly significant positive connectivity among them. The implications of these data for recent accounts of response reversal and of response reversal impairments in specific neuropsychiatric populations are discussed.

  15. Can luteal regression be reversed?

    PubMed Central

    Telleria, Carlos M

    2006-01-01

    The corpus luteum is an endocrine gland whose limited lifespan is hormonally programmed. This debate article summarizes findings of our research group that challenge the principle that the end of function of the corpus luteum or luteal regression, once triggered, cannot be reversed. Overturning luteal regression by pharmacological manipulations may be of critical significance in designing strategies to improve fertility efficacy. PMID:17074090

  16. Quantum Operation Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2008-03-25

    The dynamics of an open quantum system can be described by a quantum operation: A linear, complete positive map of operators. Here, I exhibit a compact expression for the time reversal of a quantum operation, which is closely analogous to the time reversal of a classical Markov transition matrix. Since open quantum dynamics are stochastic, and not, in general, deterministic, the time reversal is not, in general, an inversion of the dynamics. Rather, the system relaxes toward equilibrium in both the forward and reverse time directions. The probability of a quantum trajectory and the conjugate, time reversed trajectory are related by the heat exchanged with the environment.

  17. Critical factors for the reversal of methotrexate cytotoxicity by folinic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, S.; Etienne, M. C.; Fischel, J. L.; Formento, P.; Milano, G.

    1991-01-01

    The cytotoxicity of methotrexate (MTX) on representative human tumour cell lines (two cell lines from head and neck carcinomas, two from breast carcinomas, two from osteosarcomas and one lymphoblastoid cell line) was evaluated to: (1) examine the optimal time interval between MTX and folinic acid (FA) administration; (2) determine the critical FA/MTX concentration ratios; and (3) compare the relative effects of the equimolar mixture d,I-FA and I-FA. The cytotoxic effects of MTX were assessed by the MTT semi-automated test. For all of the cell lines tested, a significant inverse relationship was noted between the degree of MTX cytotoxicity reversal and the duration of the time interval between MTX and FA administration. Overall an 18-24 h interval between MTX and FA represented a time-threshold after which MTX effects could not efficiently be reversed by FA in most cell lines. With shorter time intervals between MTX and FA, MTX cytotoxicity could be partially on even totally reversed by FA; the intensity of reversal varied among the cell lines tested, and depended on the FA/MTX ratio. Regardless of the interval between MTX and FA, analysis of the various FA/MTX ratios revealed a significant direct relationship between this ratio and the percentage of recovery. Presence of the d-form had no influence on the MTX rescue capacity of the I-form; this suggests that the presence of the d-FA is unlikely to have any significant clinical consequences. PMID:1997110

  18. 14 CFR 25.507 - Reversed braking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reversed braking. 25.507 Section 25.507 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS... must be equal to 0.55 times the vertical load at each wheel or to the load developed by 1.2 times...

  19. Administrative IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Katherine, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    When it comes to Administrative IT solutions and processes, best practices range across the spectrum. Enterprise resource planning (ERP), student information systems (SIS), and tech support are prominent and continuing areas of focus. But widespread change can also be accomplished via the implementation of campuswide document imaging and sharing,…

  20. Database Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  1. ADMINISTRATIVE CLIMATE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRUCE, ROBERT L.; CARTER, G.L., JR.

    IN THE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, STYLES OF LEADERSHIP PROFOUNDLY AFFECT THE QUALITY OF THE SERVICE RENDERED. ACCORDINGLY, MAJOR INFLUENCES ON ADMINISTRATIVE CLIMATE AND EMPLOYEE PRODUCTIVITY ARE EXAMINED IN ESSAYS ON (1) SOURCES OF JOB SATISFACTION AND DISSATISFACTION, (2) MOTIVATIONAL THEORIES BASED ON JOB-RELATED SATISFACTIONS AND NEEDS,…

  2. Engineering Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    This book is intended to acquaint naval engineering officers with their duties in the engineering department. Standard shipboard organizations are analyzed in connection with personnel assignments, division operations, and watch systems. Detailed descriptions are included for the administration of directives, ship's bills, damage control, training…

  3. Justice and Reverse Discrimination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldman, Alan H.

    Defining reverse discrimination as hiring or admissions decisions based on normally irrelevant criteria, this book develops principles of rights, compensation, and equal opportunity applicable to the reverse discrimination issue. The introduction defines the issue and discusses deductive and inductive methodology as applied to reverse…

  4. Quantum reverse hypercontractivity

    SciTech Connect

    Cubitt, Toby; Kastoryano, Michael; Montanaro, Ashley; Temme, Kristan

    2015-10-15

    We develop reverse versions of hypercontractive inequalities for quantum channels. By generalizing classical techniques, we prove a reverse hypercontractive inequality for tensor products of qubit depolarizing channels. We apply this to obtain a rapid mixing result for depolarizing noise applied to large subspaces and to prove bounds on a quantum generalization of non-interactive correlation distillation.

  5. Reverse Discrimination: Recent Cases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhilber, August W.

    This paper discusses reverse discrimination cases with particular emphasis on Bakke v. Regents of University of California and those cases which preceded it. A brief history is given of court cases used by opponents and proponents in the discussion of reverse discrimination. Legal theory and a discussion of court cases that preceded Bakke follow.…

  6. Thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) reverses hyperglycemia in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Luguang Luo, John Z.Q. Jackson, Ivor M.D.

    2008-09-12

    Hyperglycemia in thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) null mice indicates that TRH is involved in the regulation of glucose homeostasis. Further, TRH levels in the pancreas peak during the stages of late embryonic and early neonatal {beta} cell development. These observations are consistent in linking TRH to islet cell proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we examined the effect of TRH administration in damaged pancreatic rat (streptozotocin, STZ) to determine whether TRH could improve damaged pancreatic {beta} cells function. We hypothesize that TRH is able to reverse STZ-induced hyperglycemia by increasing pancreatic islet insulin content, preventing apoptosis, and potentially induce islet regeneration. It was found that following intra-peritoneal (ip) injection, TRH (10 {mu}g/kg body weight (bwt)) reverses STZ (65 mg/kg bwt)-induced hyperglycemia (TRH given 3 days after STZ injection). Increased circulating insulin levels and insulin content in extracted pancreas suggests that TRH reversed STZ-induced hyperglycemia through improving pancreatic islet {beta} cell function. Further studies show a significantly lower level of apoptosis in islets treated with TRH as well as the presence of proliferation marker nestin and Brdu, suggesting that the TRH has the potential to prevent apoptosis and stimulate islet proliferation.

  7. Reverse thrust performance of the QCSEE variable pitch turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanich, N. E.; Reemsnyder, D. C.; Blodmer, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    Results of steady state reverse and forward to reverse thrust transient performance tests are presented. The original quiet, clean, short haul, experimental engine four segment variable fan nozzle was retested in reverse and compared with a continuous, 30 deg half angle conical exlet. Data indicated that the significantly more stable, higher pressure recovery flow with the fixed 30 deg exlet resulted in lower engine vibrations, lower fan blade stress, and approximately a 20 percent improvement in reverse thrust. Objective reverse thrust of 35 percent of takeoff thrust was reached. Thrust response of less than 1.5 sec was achieved for the approach and the takeoff to reverse thrust transients.

  8. Orthographic similarity: the case of "reversed anagrams".

    PubMed

    Morris, Alison L; Still, Mary L

    2012-07-01

    How orthographically similar are words such as paws and swap, flow and wolf, or live and evil? According to the letter position coding schemes used in models of visual word recognition, these reversed anagrams are considered to be less similar than words that share letters in the same absolute or relative positions (such as home and hose or plan and lane). Therefore, reversed anagrams should not produce the standard orthographic similarity effects found using substitution neighbors (e.g., home, hose). Simulations using the spatial coding model (Davis, Psychological Review 117, 713-758, 2010), for example, predict an inhibitory masked-priming effect for substitution neighbor word pairs but a null effect for reversed anagrams. Nevertheless, we obtained significant inhibitory priming using both stimulus types (Experiment 1). We also demonstrated that robust repetition blindness can be obtained for reversed anagrams (Experiment 2). Reversed anagrams therefore provide a new test for models of visual word recognition and orthographic similarity.

  9. Reversing the arms race

    SciTech Connect

    von Hippel, F. ); Sagdeev, R.Z. )

    1992-01-01

    This paper contains proceedings of Reversing The Arms Race. Topics covered include: Verifying Reductions of Nuclear Warheads; Verifying Limits on Nuclear-Armed Cruise Missiles; and The Technical Basis for Warhead Detection.

  10. Reversibility of antibiotic resistance

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Although theoretically attractive, the reversibility of resistance has proven difficult in practice, even though antibiotic resistance mechanisms induce a fitness cost to the bacterium. Associated resistance to other antibiotics and compensatory mutations seem to ameliorate the effect of antibiotic interventions in the community. In this paper the current understanding of the concepts of reversibility of antibiotic resistance and the interventions performed in hospitals and in the community are reviewed. PMID:24836051

  11. Adaptive Pairing Reversible Watermarking.

    PubMed

    Dragoi, Ioan-Catalin; Coltuc, Dinu

    2016-05-01

    This letter revisits the pairwise reversible watermarking scheme of Ou et al., 2013. An adaptive pixel pairing that considers only pixels with similar prediction errors is introduced. This adaptive approach provides an increased number of pixel pairs where both pixels are embedded and decreases the number of shifted pixels. The adaptive pairwise reversible watermarking outperforms the state-of-the-art low embedding bit-rate schemes proposed so far.

  12. A reversible nanoconfined chemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Thomas K; Bösenberg, Ulrike; Gosalawit, Rapee; Dornheim, Martin; Cerenius, Yngve; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2010-07-27

    Hydrogen is recognized as a potential, extremely interesting energy carrier system, which can facilitate efficient utilization of unevenly distributed renewable energy. A major challenge in a future "hydrogen economy" is the development of a safe, compact, robust, and efficient means of hydrogen storage, in particular, for mobile applications. Here we report on a new concept for hydrogen storage using nanoconfined reversible chemical reactions. LiBH4 and MgH2 nanoparticles are embedded in a nanoporous carbon aerogel scaffold with pore size Dmax approximately 21 nm and react during release of hydrogen and form MgB2. The hydrogen desorption kinetics is significantly improved compared to bulk conditions, and the nanoconfined system has a high degree of reversibility and stability and possibly also improved thermodynamic properties. This new scheme of nanoconfined chemistry may have a wide range of interesting applications in the future, for example, within the merging area of chemical storage of renewable energy.

  13. On thermodynamic and microscopic reversibility

    SciTech Connect

    Crooks, Gavin E.

    2011-07-12

    The word 'reversible' has two (apparently) distinct applications in statistical thermodynamics. A thermodynamically reversible process indicates an experimental protocol for which the entropy change is zero, whereas the principle of microscopic reversibility asserts that the probability of any trajectory of a system through phase space equals that of the time reversed trajectory. However, these two terms are actually synonymous: a thermodynamically reversible process is microscopically reversible, and vice versa.

  14. Reverse logistics in the Brazilian construction industry.

    PubMed

    Nunes, K R A; Mahler, C F; Valle, R A

    2009-09-01

    In Brazil most Construction and Demolition Waste (C&D waste) is not recycled. This situation is expected to change significantly, since new federal regulations oblige municipalities to create and implement sustainable C&D waste management plans which assign an important role to recycling activities. The recycling organizational network and its flows and components are fundamental to C&D waste recycling feasibility. Organizational networks, flows and components involve reverse logistics. The aim of this work is to introduce the concepts of reverse logistics and reverse distribution channel networks and to study the Brazilian C&D waste case. PMID:19481331

  15. Cheaper Adjoints by Reversing Address Computations

    DOE PAGES

    Hascoët, L.; Utke, J.; Naumann, U.

    2008-01-01

    The reverse mode of automatic differentiation is widely used in science and engineering. A severe bottleneck for the performance of the reverse mode, however, is the necessity to recover certain intermediate values of the program in reverse order. Among these values are computed addresses, which traditionally are recovered through forward recomputation and storage in memory. We propose an alternative approach for recovery that uses inverse computation based on dependency information. Address storage constitutes a significant portion of the overall storage requirements. An example illustrates substantial gains that the proposed approach yields, and we show use cases in practical applications.

  16. Imipramine attenuates neuroinflammatory signaling and reverses stress-induced social avoidance

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Karol; Shea, Daniel T.; McKim, Daniel B.; B.F., Reader; Sheridan, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Psychosocial stress is associated with altered immunity, anxiety and depression. Previously we showed that repeated social defeat (RSD) promoted microglia activation and social avoidance behavior that persisted for 24 days after cessation of RSD. The aim of the present study was to determine if imipramine (a tricyclic antidepressant) would reverse RSD-induced social avoidance and ameliorate neuroinflammatory responses. To test this, C57BL/6 mice were divided into treatment groups. One group from RSD and controls received daily injections of imipramine for 24 days, following 6 cycles of RSD. Two other groups were treated with saline. RSD mice spent significantly less time in the interaction zone when an aggressor was present in the cage. Administration of imipramine reversed social avoidance behavior, significantly increasing the interaction time, so that it was similar to that of control mice. Moreover, 24 days of imipramine treatment in RSD mice significantly decreased stress-induced mRNA levels for IL-6 in brain microglia. Following ex vivo LPS stimulation, microglia from mice exposed to RSD, had higher mRNA expression of IL-6, TNF-α, and IL-1β, and this was reversed by imipramine treatment. In a second experiment, imipramine was added to drinking water confirming the reversal of social avoidant behavior and decrease in mRNA expression of IL-6 in microglia. These data suggest that the antidepressant imipramine may exert its effect, in part, by down-regulating microglial activation. PMID:25701613

  17. Predicting trend reversals using market instantaneous state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bury, Thomas

    2014-06-01

    Collective behaviors taking place in financial markets reveal strongly correlated states especially during a crisis period. A natural hypothesis is that trend reversals are also driven by mutual influences between the different stock exchanges. Using a maximum entropy approach, we find coordinated behavior during trend reversals dominated by the pairwise component. In particular, these events are predicted with high significant accuracy by the ensemble's instantaneous state.

  18. Another look at children's symbol reversals.

    PubMed

    Patton, J E; Yarbrough, D B; Thursby, D

    2000-04-01

    In a previously reported longitudinal study of reversal errors for static and kinetic written symbols we found no compelling support for their academic importance in kindergarten (n = 201), Grade 1 (n = 156), or Grade 2 (n = 129); however, for Grade 3 (n = 105), kinetic reversals became a significant predictor of tested reading achievement. If reliable, this finding might have implications for the identification of children with long-term reading impairment. PMID:10833756

  19. Reversible digital images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, Keith T.

    1999-04-01

    A method has been developed to hide one image inside another with little loss in image quality. If the second image is a logo or watermark, then this method may be used to protect the ownership rights of the first image and to guarantee the authenticity of the image. The two images to be combined may be either black & white or color continuous tone images. A reversible image is created by incorporating the first image in the upper 4 bits and the second image in the lower 4 bits. When viewed normally, the reversible image appears to be the first image. To view the hidden image, the bits of the combined image are reversed, exchanging all of the lower and higher order bits. When viewed in the reversed mode, the image appears to be the second or hidden image. To maintain a high level of image quality for both images, two simultaneous error diffusion calculations are run to ensure that both views of the reversible image have the same visual appearance as the originals. Any alteration of one of the images locally destroys the other image at the site of the alterations. This provides a method to detect alterations of the original image.

  20. Reversible collisionless magnetic reconnection

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H.

    2013-10-15

    Reversible magnetic reconnection is demonstrated for the first time by means of gyrokinetic numerical simulations of a collisionless magnetized plasma. Growth of a current-driven instability in a sheared magnetic field is accompanied by magnetic reconnection due to electron inertia effects. Following the instability growth, the collisionless reconnection is accelerated with development of a cross-shaped structure of current density, and then all field lines are reconnected. The fully reconnected state is followed by the secondary reconnection resulting in a weakly turbulent state. A time-reversed simulation starting from the turbulent state manifests that the collisionless reconnection process proceeds inversely leading to the initial state. During the reversed reconnection, the kinetic energy is reconverted into the original magnetic field energy. In order to understand the stability of reversed process, an external perturbation is added to the fully reconnected state, and it is found that the accelerated reconnection is reversible when the deviation of the E × B streamlines due to the perturbation is comparable with or smaller than a current layer width.

  1. Verapamil reverses PTH- or CRF-induced abnormal fatty acid oxidation in muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Perna, A.F.; Smogorzewski, M.; Massry, S.G.

    1988-12-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) is associated with impaired long chain fatty acids (LCFA) oxidation by skeletal muscle mitochondria. This is due to reduced activity of carnitine palmitoyl transferase (CPT). These derangements were attributed to the secondary hyperparathyroidism of CRF, since prior parathyroidectomy in CRF rats reversed these abnormalities and PTH administration to normal rats reproduced them. It was proposed that these effects of PTH are mediated by its ionophoric property leading to increased entry of calcium into skeletal muscle. A calcium channel blocker may, therefore, correct these derangements. The present study examined the effects of verapamil on LCFA oxidation, CPT activity by skeletal muscle mitochondria, and /sup 45/Ca uptake by skeletal muscle obtained from CRF rats and normal animals treated with PTH with and without verapamil. Both four days of PTH administration and 21 days of CRF produced significant (P less than 0.01) reduction in LCFA oxidation and CPT activity of skeletal muscle mitochondria, and significant (P less than 0.01) increment in /sup 45/Ca uptake by skeletal muscle. Simultaneous treatment with verapamil corrected all these derangements. Administration of verapamil alone to normal rats did not cause a significant change in any of these parameters. The data are consistent with the proposition that the alterations in LCFA in CRF or after PTH treatment are related to the ionophoric action of the hormone and could be reversed by a calcium channel blocker.

  2. Novel Designs of Quantum Reversible Counters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Xuemei; Zhu, Haihong; Chen, Fulong; Zhu, Junru; Zhang, Ziyang

    2016-08-01

    Reversible logic, as an interesting and important issue, has been widely used in designing combinational and sequential circuits for low-power and high-speed computation. Though a significant number of works have been done on reversible combinational logic, the realization of reversible sequential circuit is still at premature stage. Reversible counter is not only an important part of the sequential circuit but also an essential part of the quantum circuit system. In this paper, we designed two kinds of novel reversible counters. In order to construct counter, the innovative reversible T Flip-flop Gate (TFG), T Flip-flop block (T_FF) and JK flip-flop block (JK_FF) are proposed. Based on the above blocks and some existing reversible gates, the 4-bit binary-coded decimal (BCD) counter and controlled Up/Down synchronous counter are designed. With the help of Verilog hardware description language (Verilog HDL), these counters above have been modeled and confirmed. According to the simulation results, our circuits' logic structures are validated. Compared to the existing ones in terms of quantum cost (QC), delay (DL) and garbage outputs (GBO), it can be concluded that our designs perform better than the others. There is no doubt that they can be used as a kind of important storage components to be applied in future low-power computing systems.

  3. Sequential Polarity-Reversing Circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaw, Clayton C.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed circuit reverses polarity of electric power supplied to bidirectional dc motor, reversible electro-mechanical actuator, or other device operating in direction depending on polarity. Circuit reverses polarity each time power turned on, without need for additional polarity-reversing or direction signals and circuitry to process them.

  4. Lysyl oxidase activity contributes to collagen stabilization during liver fibrosis progression and limits spontaneous fibrosis reversal in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Susan B; Ikenaga, Naoki; Peng, Zhen-Wei; Sverdlov, Deanna Y; Greenstein, Andrew; Smith, Victoria; Schuppan, Detlef; Popov, Yury

    2016-04-01

    Collagen stabilization through irreversible cross-linking is thought to promote hepatic fibrosis progression and limit its reversibility. However, the mechanism of this process remains poorly defined. We studied the functional contribution of lysyl oxidase (LOX) to collagen stabilization and hepatic fibrosis progression/reversalin vivousing chronic administration of irreversible LOX inhibitor β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN, or vehicle as control) in C57Bl/6J mice with carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced fibrosis. Fibrotic matrix stability was directly assessed using a stepwise collagen extraction assay and fibrotic septae morphometry. Liver cells and fibrosis were studied by histologic, biochemical methods and quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR. During fibrosis progression, BAPN administration suppressed accumulation of cross-linked collagens, and fibrotic septae showed widening and collagen fibrils splitting, reminiscent of remodeling signs observed during fibrosis reversal. LOX inhibition attenuated hepatic stellate cell activation markers and promoted F4/80-positive scar-associated macrophage infiltration without an increase in liver injury. In reversal experiments, BAPN-treated fibrotic mice demonstrated accelerated fibrosis reversal after CCl4withdrawal. Our findings demonstrate for the first time that LOX contributes significantly to collagen stabilization in liver fibrosis, promotes fibrogenic activation of attenuated hepatic stellate cells, and limits fibrosis reversal. Our data support the concept of pharmacologic targeting of LOX pathway to inhibit liver fibrosis and promote its resolution.-Liu, S. B., Ikenaga, N., Peng, Z.-W., Sverdlov, D. Y., Greenstein, A., Smith, V., Schuppan, D., Popov, Y. Lysyl oxidase activity contributes to collagen stabilization during liver fibrosis progression and limits spontaneous fibrosis reversal in mice.

  5. Reversibility of hyperhidrosis post axillary depilatory laser.

    PubMed

    Helou, Josiane; Habre, Maya; Soutou, Boutros; Maatouk, Ismael; Ibrahim, Tony; Tomb, Roland

    2014-03-01

    Hyperhidrosis and bromhidrosis were lately reported as novel side effects of laser-assisted removal of axillary hair. The goal of our study was to evaluate the reversibility of these two side effects. An observational, single-center cohort study included over a 30-month screening period 30 patients with newly reported hyperhidrosis and/or bromhidrosis related to axillary depilatory laser. After 26 weeks of follow-up, each patient was assessed for spontaneous reversibility. A 12-week duration treatment with topical aluminum chloride was evaluated in patients with persisting hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis was assessed using the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS). Spontaneous reversibility was observed in 20% of patients. In total, 23 out of 30 patients recovered normal axillary transpiration either spontaneously or after treatment. Mean HDSS score was significantly lower in the treated group. It appears that axillary hyperhidrosis and bromhidrosis, secondary to laser depilation, reverse either spontaneously or after using topical antiperspirant. PMID:23887660

  6. Reversibility of hyperhidrosis post axillary depilatory laser.

    PubMed

    Helou, Josiane; Habre, Maya; Soutou, Boutros; Maatouk, Ismael; Ibrahim, Tony; Tomb, Roland

    2014-03-01

    Hyperhidrosis and bromhidrosis were lately reported as novel side effects of laser-assisted removal of axillary hair. The goal of our study was to evaluate the reversibility of these two side effects. An observational, single-center cohort study included over a 30-month screening period 30 patients with newly reported hyperhidrosis and/or bromhidrosis related to axillary depilatory laser. After 26 weeks of follow-up, each patient was assessed for spontaneous reversibility. A 12-week duration treatment with topical aluminum chloride was evaluated in patients with persisting hyperhidrosis. Hyperhidrosis was assessed using the Hyperhidrosis Disease Severity Scale (HDSS). Spontaneous reversibility was observed in 20% of patients. In total, 23 out of 30 patients recovered normal axillary transpiration either spontaneously or after treatment. Mean HDSS score was significantly lower in the treated group. It appears that axillary hyperhidrosis and bromhidrosis, secondary to laser depilation, reverse either spontaneously or after using topical antiperspirant.

  7. Reversible Chemochromic Hydrogen Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC), affiliated with the University of Central Florida, has invented a reversible pigment that changes from light beige to blue when exposed to hydrogen and back to light beige when exposed to atmospheric oxygen. In laboratory and environmental studies, the FSEC pigment in its tape form failed to change color adequately when exposed to hydrogen after one day of exposure at Kennedy Space Center's Beach Corrosion Test Facility. The reversible hydrogen-detecting tape also lost its ability to change color after being placed in an environmental chamber at 45 C for one day. The first attempts at extruding the reversible pigment into various polymers were unsuccessful because of the pigment's poor thermal stability. The goal of this project was to formulate a pigment with improved thermal and environmental stability for extrusion into a variety of appropriate polymer matrices. The formulation of the reversible hydrogen-detecting pigment was modified by removing one reagent and chemically modifying the hydrogen sensitive ingredient. This was intended to improve the hydrophobicity of the pigment and alter the thermal degradation mechanism.

  8. Reversing Discrimination: A Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pati, Gopal; Reilly, Charles W.

    1977-01-01

    Examines the debate over affirmative action and reverse discrimination, and discusses how and why the present dilemma has developed. Suggests that organizations can best address the problem through an honest, in-depth analysis of their organizational structure and management practices. (JG)

  9. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-04-01

    We define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by classical feedback communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This protocol family leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted entanglement distribution capacity for some interesting channels.

  10. Reverse Coherent Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H.

    2009-05-01

    In this Letter we define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by feedback classical communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted capacity for some interesting channels.

  11. Time reversal communication system

    DOEpatents

    Candy, James V.; Meyer, Alan W.

    2008-12-02

    A system of transmitting a signal through a channel medium comprises digitizing the signal, time-reversing the digitized signal, and transmitting the signal through the channel medium. The channel medium may be air, earth, water, tissue, metal, and/or non-metal.

  12. Reversing Underachievement through Enrichment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renzulli, Joseph S.; Baum, Susan M.; Hebert, Thomas; McCluskey, Ken W.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses problems of underachievement, especially among potentially high ability students, and the difficulties inherent in reversing this process. Presents new perspective and strategies that promote success. Describes Type III enrichment experiences as a means to unleash students' potential. Speculates as to what causes turnaround within an…

  13. Reverse coherent information.

    PubMed

    García-Patrón, Raúl; Pirandola, Stefano; Lloyd, Seth; Shapiro, Jeffrey H

    2009-05-29

    In this Letter we define a family of entanglement distribution protocols assisted by feedback classical communication that gives an operational interpretation to reverse coherent information, i.e., the symmetric counterpart of the well-known coherent information. This leads to the definition of a new entanglement distribution capacity that exceeds the unassisted capacity for some interesting channels.

  14. Justice and Reverse Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strike, Kenneth A.

    1976-01-01

    Although this article does not necessarily recommend policies of reverse discrimination, arguments indicating that such policies are not contradictory to accepted concepts of justice are presented. The necessity of dispersing any consequent injury to society as a whole rather than to individuals is stressed. (RW)

  15. AKAP149 binds to HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and is involved in the reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Julie; Maidou-Peindara, Priscilla; Cancio, Reynel; Ennifar, Eric; Coadou, Gaël; Maga, Giovanni; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Benarous, Richard; Liu, Lang Xia

    2008-11-21

    Like all retroviruses, human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) undergoes reverse transcription during its replication cycle. The cellular cofactors potentially involved in this process still remain to be identified. We show here that A-kinase anchoring protein 149 (AKAP149) interacts with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) in both the yeast two-hybrid system and human cells. The AKAP149 binding site has been mapped to the RNase H domain of HIV-1 RT. AKAP149 silencing by RNA interference in HIV-1-infected cells inhibited viral replication at the reverse transcription step. We selected single-point mutants of RT defective for AKAP149 binding and demonstrated that mutant G462R, despite retaining significant intrinsic RT activity in vitro, failed to carry out HIV-1 reverse transcription correctly in infected cells. This suggests that the interaction between RT and AKAP149 in infected cells may play an important role in HIV-1 reverse transcription.

  16. Gridded electron reversal ionizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chutjian, Ara (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A gridded electron reversal ionizer forms a three dimensional cloud of zero or near-zero energy electrons in a cavity within a filament structure surrounding a central electrode having holes through which the sample gas, at reduced pressure, enters an elongated reversal volume. The resultant negative ion stream is applied to a mass analyzer. The reduced electron and ion space-charge limitations of this configuration enhances detection sensitivity for material to be detected by electron attachment, such as narcotic and explosive vapors. Positive ions may be generated by generating electrons having a higher energy, sufficient to ionize the target gas and pulsing the grid negative to stop the electron flow and pulsing the extraction aperture positive to draw out the positive ions.

  17. Reversed field pinch diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Weber, P.G.

    1986-01-01

    The Reversed Field Pinch (RFP) is a toroidal, axisymmetric magnetic confinement configuration characterized by a magnetic field configuration in which the toroidal magnetic field is of similar strength to the poloidal field, and is reversed at the edge compared to the center. The RFP routinely operates at high beta, and is a strong candidate for a compact fusion device. Relevant attributes of the configuration will be presented, together with an overview of present and planned experiments and their diagnostics. RFP diagnostics are in many ways similar to those of other magnetic confinement devices (such as tokamaks); these lectures will point out pertinent differences, and will present some diagnostics which provide special insights into unique attributes of the RFP.

  18. Reverse genetics of mononegavirales.

    PubMed

    Conzelmann, K K

    2004-01-01

    "Reverse genetics" or de novo synthesis of nonsegmented negative-sense RNA viruses (Mononegavirales) from cloned cDNA has become a reliable technique to study this group of medically important viruses. Since the first generation of a negative-sense RNA virus entirely from cDNA in 1994, reverse genetics systems have been established for members of most genera of the Rhabdo-, Paramyxo-, and Filoviridae families. These systems are based on intracellular transcription of viral full-length RNAs and simultaneous expression of viral proteins required to form the typical viral ribonucleoprotein complex (RNP). These systems are powerful tools to study all aspects of the virus life cycle as well as the roles of virus proteins in virus-host interplay and pathogenicity. In addition, recombinant viruses can be designed to have specific properties that make them attractive as biotechnological tools and live vaccines. PMID:15298166

  19. Reversible watermarking for images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leest, Arno J.; van der Veen, Michiel; Bruekers, Fons

    2004-06-01

    Reversible watermarking is a technique for embedding data in a digital host signal in such a manner that the original host signal can be restored in a bit-exact manner in the restoration process. In this paper, we present a general framework for reversible watermarking in multi-media signals. A mapping function, which is in general neither injective nor surjective, is used to map the input signal to a perceptually equivalent output signal. The resulting unused sample values of the output signal are used to encode additional (watermark) information and restoration data. At the 2003 SPIE conference, examples of this technique applied to digital audio were presented. In this paper we concentrate on color and gray-scale images. A particular challenge in this context is not only the optimization of rate-distortion, but also the measure of perceptual quality (i.e. the distortion). In literature distortion is often expressed in terms of PSNR, making comparison among different techniques relatively straightforward. We show that our general framework for reversible watermarking applies to digital images and that results can be presented in terms of PSNR rate-distortions. However, the framework allows for more subtle signal manipulations that are not easily expressed in terms of PSNR distortion. These changes involve manipulations of contrast and/or saturation.

  20. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  1. Affirmative Action, or Reverse Discrimination?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dansby, Ike

    1996-01-01

    Determines the impact of affirmative action programs in response to charges that they are policies of reverse discrimination. Reviewing affirmative action programs submitted by Michigan State departments, researchers determined no reverse discrimination was apparent based on low numbers of reverse discrimination complaints filed by whites. (GR)

  2. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  3. Senior Administrators Should Have Administrative Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Gary J.

    1987-01-01

    Recognizing that termination is viewed by the employee as the equivalent to capital punishment of a career, an administrative contract can reduce the emotional and financial entanglements that often result. Administrative contracts are described. (MLW)

  4. Neural Correlates of Letter Reversal in Children and Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Priya; Yee, Debbie; Sinha, Pawan; Gabrieli, John D. E.

    2014-01-01

    Children often make letter reversal errors when first learning to read and write, even for letters whose reversed forms do not appear in normal print. However, the brain basis of such letter reversal in children learning to read is unknown. The present study compared the neuroanatomical correlates (via functional magnetic resonance imaging) and the electrophysiological correlates (via event-related potentials or ERPs) of this phenomenon in children, ages 5–12, relative to young adults. When viewing reversed letters relative to typically oriented letters, adults exhibited widespread occipital, parietal, and temporal lobe activations, including activation in the functionally localized visual word form area (VWFA) in left occipito-temporal cortex. Adults exhibited significantly greater activation than children in all of these regions; children only exhibited such activation in a limited frontal region. Similarly, on the P1 and N170 ERP components, adults exhibited significantly greater differences between typical and reversed letters than children, who failed to exhibit significant differences between typical and reversed letters. These findings indicate that adults distinguish typical and reversed letters in the early stages of specialized brain processing of print, but that children do not recognize this distinction during the early stages of processing. Specialized brain processes responsible for early stages of letter perception that distinguish between typical and reversed letters may develop slowly and remain immature even in older children who no longer produce letter reversals in their writing. PMID:24859328

  5. Reversible Posterior Leukoencephalopathy Syndrome Induced by Pazopanib

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is a clinical/radiological syndrome characterized by headache, seizures, impaired vision, acute hypertension, and typical magnetic resonance imaging findings. There are several reports in the literature that depict its occurrence in cancer patients. The list of common anticancer and supportive care drugs that predispose to reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome is expanding and includes not only a large number of chemotherapeutic agents but also an increased number of new targeted drugs, particularly angiogenesis inhibitors such as bevacizumab,sorefenib and sunitinib. Pazopanib is an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, and c-Kit which after a positive phase III randomized clinical trial in patients with advanced renal cell cancer received FDA approval for the treatment of advanced renal cell carcinoma. Until now no cases of reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome induced by pazopanib have been reported. Case report We present the case of a 40 years old female patient with heavily pre-treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma who received pazopanib as salvage treatment. After 21 days of pazopanib therapy the patient referred to the emergency department with epileptic seizure, impaired vision at both eyes and headache. MRI of the brain revealed subcortical oedema at the occipital and parietal lobes bilaterally. She was treated with anticonvulsants, i.v. administration of mannitol and antihypertensives and she recovered completely from her symptoms and was discharged on the tenth hospital day. A brain MRI performed 3 weeks after showed that the subcortical oedema had been subsided. Conclusion In conclusion this is the first case of pazopanib induced reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome. Although usually reversible, this syndrome is a serious and potentially life threatening adverse

  6. Reversible optical doping of graphene

    PubMed Central

    Tiberj, A.; Rubio-Roy, M.; Paillet, M.; Huntzinger, J. -R.; Landois, P.; Mikolasek, M.; Contreras, S.; Sauvajol, J. -L.; Dujardin, E.; Zahab, A. -A.

    2013-01-01

    The ultimate surface exposure provided by graphene monolayer makes it the ideal sensor platform but also exposes its intrinsic properties to any environmental perturbations. In this work, we demonstrate that the charge carrier density of graphene exfoliated on a SiO2/Si substrate can be finely and reversibly tuned between hole and electron doping with visible photons. This photo-induced doping happens under moderate laser power conditions but is significantly affected by the substrate cleaning method. In particular, it requires hydrophilic substrates and vanishes for suspended graphene. These findings suggest that optically gated graphene devices operating with a sub-second time scale can be envisioned and that Raman spectroscopy is not always as non-invasive as generally assumed. PMID:23912707

  7. Factors influencing the algebra ``reversal error''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Elaine; Kanim, Stephen E.

    2005-11-01

    Given a written problem statement about a proportional relationship between two quantities, many students will place the constant of proportionality on the wrong side of the equals sign. Introductory physics is one of the first courses in which students encounter multiple-step problems that require algebraic (rather than numeric) solutions, and this "reversal error" is relatively common in student solutions to these types of problems. We describe an investigation into three possible influences on students who make this reversal error: variable symbol choice, sentence structure, and context familiarity. Our results, from a calculus-based physics course and an intermediate algebra course, show that sentence structure is the most significant of these three possibilities. However, sentence structure alone does not provide a complete explanation for the reversal error.

  8. 45 CFR 150.457 - Review by Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...) The ALJ has incorrectly assumed or denied jurisdiction or extended his or her authority to a degree..., reversal, or remand. (c) Within 30 days of the date of the initial agency decision, the Administrator will...) Within 30 days of receipt of a notice that the Administrator intends to review an initial agency...

  9. 45 CFR 150.457 - Review by Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...) The ALJ has incorrectly assumed or denied jurisdiction or extended his or her authority to a degree..., reversal, or remand. (c) Within 30 days of the date of the initial agency decision, the Administrator will...) Within 30 days of receipt of a notice that the Administrator intends to review an initial agency...

  10. 21 CFR 880.5450 - Patient care reverse isolation chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Patient care reverse isolation chamber. 880.5450 Section 880.5450 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... lacking a normal immunosuppressive defense due to therapy or congenital abnormality. The device...

  11. Biochemical Reversal of Aging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ely, John T. A.

    2006-03-01

    We cite our progress on biochemical reversal of aging. However, it may be circa 2 years before we have necessary substances at low cost. Meanwhile, without them, a number of measures can be adopted providing marked improvement for the problems of aging in modern societies. For example, enzymes are needed to excrete toxins that accelerate aging; Hg is the ultimate toxin that disables all enzymes (including those needed to excrete Hg itself). Low Hg level in the urine, due to loss of excretory ability, causes the diagnosis of Hg toxicity to almost always be missed. Hg sources must be removed from the body! Another example is excess sugar; hyperglycemia decreases intracellular ascorbic acid (AA) by competitively inhibiting the insulin- mediated active transport of AA into cells. Thus, immunity is impaired by low leucocyte AA. AA is needed for new proteins in aging tissues. Humans must supplement AA; their need same as in AA-synthesizing mammals.

  12. Reverse slapper detonator

    SciTech Connect

    Weingart, Richard C.

    1990-01-01

    A reverse slapper detonator (70), and methodology related thereto, are provided. The detonator (70) is adapted to be driven by a pulse of electric power from an external source (80). A conductor (20) is disposed along the top (14), side (18), and bottom (16) surfaces of a sheetlike insulator (12). Part of the conductor (20) comprises a bridge (28), and an aperture (30) is positioned within the conductor (20), with the bridge (28) and the aperture (30) located on opposite sides of the insulator (12). A barrel (40) and related explosive charge (50) are positioned adjacent to and in alignment with the aperture (30), and the bridge (28) is buttressed with a backing layer (60). When the electric power pulse vaporizes the bridge (28), a portion of the insulator (12) is propelled through the aperture (30) and barrel (40), and against the explosive charge (50), thereby detonating it.

  13. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2006-04-25

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  14. Multiple stimulus reversible hydrogels

    DOEpatents

    Gutowska, Anna; Krzyminski, Karol J.

    2003-12-09

    A polymeric solution capable of gelling upon exposure to a critical minimum value of a plurality of environmental stimuli is disclosed. The polymeric solution may be an aqueous solution utilized in vivo and capable of having the gelation reversed if at least one of the stimuli fall below, or outside the range of, the critical minimum value. The aqueous polymeric solution can be used either in industrial or pharmaceutical environments. In the medical environment, the aqueous polymeric solution is provided with either a chemical or radioisotopic therapeutic agent for delivery to a specific body part. The primary advantage of the process is that exposure to one environmental stimuli alone will not cause gelation, thereby enabling the therapeutic agent to be conducted through the body for relatively long distances without gelation occurring.

  15. Reversed-polarity regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, F.

    1982-01-01

    It is found by a statistical study of 58 reversed-polarity regions (RPRs) covering the 11-year period 1969-1979 that RPRs (1) have a lifespan comparable to normal active regions, (2) do not show a tendency to rotate toward a more normal alignment, and (3) have stable configurations that do not suggest stress due to their anomalous magnetic alignment. As in normal regions, RPR magnetic complexity is found to be the primary factor in flare productivity. Weak-field RPRs produce no flares, and regions with complex spots produce more flares than regions with non-complex spots by a factor of five. The main difference between RPRs and normal regions lies in complex spot frequency, with less that 17% of normal active regions having such spots and fewer than 1.8% having long-lived complex ones, while 41% of RPRs have complex spots and 24% have long-lived complex spots.

  16. Properly apply reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kucera, J.

    1997-02-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) is a water purification technique used to reduce the loading of dissolved solids in solution. The popularity of RO for treating boiler feedwater is growing because of the rising cost of ion-exchange-based demineralization as well as safety concerns associated with handling acid and caustic. A properly designed and operated RO-based boiler-feedwater-treatment system can reduce the load to, and costs associated with, ion exchange demineralization. This article discusses RO feedwater quality recommendations, pretreatment techniques, and system monitoring necessary to achieve optimum RO system performance in the most cost-effective manner. Regardless of the application--whether it is the treatment of boiler feedwater, industrial wastewater, or process water--the approach to pretreatment and the other design and operating guidance offered here remains the same.

  17. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Duan, Xiaoli; Wendel, Emily M.

    2013-08-26

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). ¬The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.¬

  18. Reverse Osmosis Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    2013-08-01

    This technology evaluation was prepared by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy’s Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The technology evaluation assesses techniques for optimizing reverse osmosis (RO) systems to increase RO system performance and water efficiency. This evaluation provides a general description of RO systems, the influence of RO systems on water use, and key areas where RO systems can be optimized to reduce water and energy consumption. The evaluation is intended to help facility managers at Federal sites understand the basic concepts of the RO process and system optimization options, enabling them to make informed decisions during the system design process for either new projects or recommissioning of existing equipment. This evaluation is focused on commercial-sized RO systems generally treating more than 80 gallons per hour.

  19. Reverse photoacoustic standoff spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Van Neste, Charles W.; Senesac, Lawrence R.; Thundat, Thomas G.

    2011-04-12

    A system and method are disclosed for generating a reversed photoacoustic spectrum at a greater distance. A source may emit a beam to a target and a detector measures signals generated as a result of the beam being emitted on the target. By emitting a chopped/pulsed light beam to the target, it may be possible to determine the target's optical absorbance by monitoring the intensity of light collected at the detector at different wavelengths. As the wavelength of light is changed, the target may absorb or reject each optical frequency. Rejection may increase the intensity at the sensing element and absorption may decrease the intensity. Accordingly, an identifying spectrum of the target may be made with the intensity variation of the detector as a function of illuminating wavelength.

  20. High Performance Field Reversed Configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binderbauer, Michl

    2014-10-01

    The field-reversed configuration (FRC) is a prolate compact toroid with poloidal magnetic fields. FRCs could lead to economic fusion reactors with high power density, simple geometry, natural divertor, ease of translation, and possibly capable of burning aneutronic fuels. However, as in other high-beta plasmas, there are stability and confinement concerns. These concerns can be addressed by introducing and maintaining a significant fast ion population in the system. This is the approach adopted by TAE and implemented for the first time in the C-2 device. Studying the physics of FRCs driven by Neutral Beam (NB) injection, significant improvements were made in confinement and stability. Early C-2 discharges had relatively good confinement, but global power losses exceeded the available NB input power. The addition of axially streaming plasma guns, magnetic end plugs as well as advanced surface conditioning leads to dramatic reductions in turbulence driven losses and greatly improved stability. As a result, fast ion confinement significantly improved and allowed for build-up of a dominant fast particle population. Under such appropriate conditions we achieved highly reproducible, long-lived, macroscopically stable FRCs with record lifetimes. This demonstrated many beneficial effects of large orbit particles and their performance impact on FRCs Together these achievements point to the prospect of beam-driven FRCs as a path toward fusion reactors. This presentation will review and expand on key results and present context for their interpretation.

  1. The effect of lithium administration in animal models of depression: a short review.

    PubMed

    Redrobe, J P; Bourin, M

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this short review was to collate the data involving the effects of lithium alone, or in combination, with antidepressant drugs in several animal models of depression. It has been shown that lithium administration reduced immobility in the mouse forced swimming test when given 30 min, but not 45 min, before testing. Further studies indicated that this activity was probably a result of an activity on serotonin (5-HT) 1A and 1B receptor subtypes. Lithium treatment has been shown to reverse helpless behaviour in the learned helplessness model of depression after chronic treatment (30 days), where lithium was administered in the drinking water. Further studies showed that acute (5 days) administration of lithium failed to reverse behavioural deficits. In the olfactory bulbectomised rat model of depression, several immunological and enzymatic functions have been shown to be altered and these changes are regularised by antidepressant treatment as well as lithium administration for 15 days. Hypokinesia (reduced locomotor activity) is a phenomenon observed following immobilisation stress in rats. This behavioural deficit was attenuated by lithium together with a wide range of antidepressant drugs used in the treatment of unipolar depression at non-stimulant doses. In addition, a single administration of lithium slightly inhibited midbrain raphe lesion-induced muricidal behaviour (25%); however, repeated treatment (5 days) significantly attenuated this behavioural deficit. Lithium treatment has also been shown to reverse behavioural and biochemical deficits induced by reserpine together with those induced by acute administration of single intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) dose of the Na, K-ATPase-inhibiting compound, ouabain. Long-term studies of lithium augmentation have not been performed, so that no clear recommendations for the duration of this therapy can be made. The points raised in this short review endorse the commencement of such studies.

  2. Defining the Polar Field Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upton, Lisa; Hathaway, David H.

    2013-01-01

    The polar fields on the Sun are directly related to solar cycle variability. Recently there has been interest in studying an important characteristic of the polar fields: the timing of the polar field reversals. However this characteristic has been poorly defined, mostly due to the limitations of early observations. In the past, the reversals have been calculated by averaging the flux above some latitude (i.e. 55deg or 75deg). Alternatively, the reversal could be defined by the time in which the previous polarity is completely canceled and replaced by the new polarity at 90de, precisely at the pole. We will use a surface flux transport model to illustrate the differences in the timing of the polar field reversal based on each of these definitions and propose standardization in the definition of the polar field reversal. The ability to predict the timing of the polar field reversal using a surface flux transport model will also be discussed.

  3. Geomagnetic Reversals during the Phanerozoic.

    PubMed

    McElhinny, M W

    1971-04-01

    An antalysis of worldwide paleomagnetic measurements suggests a periodicity of 350 x 10(6) years in the polarity of the geomagnetic field. During the Mesozoic it is predominantly normal, whereas during the Upper Paleozoic it is predominantly reversed. Although geomagnetic reversals occur at different rates throughout the Phanerozoic, there appeaars to be no clear correlation between biological evolutionary rates and reversal frequency. PMID:17735224

  4. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-07-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We summarize the published evidence from observation and modeling of the influence of meridional flow variations and decaying active region flux's spatial distribution, such as the Joy's law tilt angle. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms covering cycles 21-24, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed trailing-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with trailing-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. The activity complexes of the cycle 21 and 22 maxima were larger and longer-lived than those of the cycle 23 and 24 maxima, and the poleward surges were stronger and more unipolar and the polar field changes larger and faster. The cycle 21 and 22 polar reversals were dominated by only a few long-lived complexes whereas the cycle 23 and 24 reversals were the cumulative effects of more numerous, shorter-lived regions. We conclude that sizes and lifetimes of activity complexes are key to

  5. Resolution of liver fibrosis in chronic CCl4 administration in the rat after discontinuation of treatment: effect of silymarin, silibinin, colchicine and trimethylcolchicinic acid.

    PubMed

    Muriel, Pablo; Moreno, Mario G; Hernández, María Del C; Chávez, Enrique; Alcantar, Lidia K

    2005-05-01

    The purpose of this work was to obtain a suitable model of fibrosis, in which spontaneous reversion was minimal, to study the ability of silymarin, silibinin, colchicine and trimethylcolchicinic acid (TMCA) to reverse it. Reversal of liver fibrosis was studied in male Wistar rats after one, two or three months of CCl(4) administration (0.4 g/kg intraperitoneally, three times per week), by discontinuation of the toxin for 2 months. Silymarin (50 mg/kg), silibinin (50 mg/kg), colchicine (10 microg/rat) and trimethylcolchicinic acid (100 microg/rat) were administered daily, by gavage, after 3 months of CCl(4) administration. Collagen content was determined by measuring hydroxyproline in liver samples; glycogen, was determined utilizing the anthrone reagent; Mallory's trichromic stains of liver sections were performed. The best scheme of treatment was obtained when CCl(4) was administered during three months (collagen increased 6 times). Discontinuation of the toxin for two months produced a significant but relative small reduction of fibrosis (collagen was still 4.5 times over control). Colchicine, TMCA, silymarin or silibinin treatment showed no significant fibrolitic effect. This scheme of treatment may be an excellent tool to study the ability of drugs to reverse fibrosis. The hepatoprotective properties of silymarin, silibinin, colchicine and trimethylcolchinic acid may be irrelevant to reverse established cirrhosis. PMID:15853930

  6. Impact of an electronic medication administration record on medication administration efficiency and errors.

    PubMed

    McComas, Jeffery; Riingen, Michelle; Chae Kim, Son

    2014-12-01

    The study aims were to evaluate the impact of electronic medication administration record implementation on medication administration efficiency and occurrence of medication errors as well as to identify the predictors of medication administration efficiency in an acute care setting. A prospective, observational study utilizing time-and-motion technique was conducted before and after electronic medication administration record implementation in November 2011. A total of 156 cases of medication administration activities (78 pre- and 78 post-electronic medication administration record) involving 38 nurses were observed at the point of care. A separate retrospective review of the hospital Midas+ medication error database was also performed to collect the rates and origin of medication errors for 6 months before and after electronic medication administration record implementation. The mean medication administration time actually increased from 11.3 to 14.4 minutes post-electronic medication administration record (P = .039). In a multivariate analysis, electronic medication administration record was not a predictor of medication administration time, but the distractions/interruptions during medication administration process were significant predictors. The mean hospital-wide medication errors significantly decreased from 11.0 to 5.3 events per month post-electronic medication administration record (P = .034). Although no improvement in medication administration efficiency was observed, electronic medication administration record improved the quality of care with a significant decrease in medication errors.

  7. Time-Reversal Violation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernabéu, José; Martínez-Vidal, Fernando

    2015-10-01

    The violation of CP symmetry between matter and antimatter in the neutral K and B meson systems is well established, with a high degree of consistency between all available experimental measurements and with the Standard Model of particle physics. On the basis of the up-to-now-unbroken CPT symmetry, the violation of CP symmetry strongly suggests that the behavior of these particles under weak interactions must also be asymmetric under time reversal T. Many searches for T violation have been performed and proposed using different observables and experimental approaches. These include T-odd observables, such as triple products in weak decays, and genuine observables, such as permanent electric dipole moments of nondegenerate stationary states and the breaking of the reciprocity relation. We discuss the conceptual basis of the required exchange of initial and final states with unstable particles, using quantum entanglement and the decay as a filtering measurement, for the case of neutral B and K mesons. Using this method, the BaBar experiment at SLAC has clearly observed T violation in B mesons.

  8. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, Leander J.; Foreman, Larry R.

    1999-01-01

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved.

  9. Reversible micromachining locator

    DOEpatents

    Salzer, L.J.; Foreman, L.R.

    1999-08-31

    This invention provides a device which includes a locator, a kinematic mount positioned on a conventional tooling machine, a part carrier disposed on the locator and a retainer ring. The locator has disposed therein a plurality of steel balls, placed in an equidistant position circumferentially around the locator. The kinematic mount includes a plurality of magnets which are in registry with the steel balls on the locator. In operation, a blank part to be machined is placed between a surface of a locator and the retainer ring (fitting within the part carrier). When the locator (with a blank part to be machined) is coupled to the kinematic mount, the part is thus exposed for the desired machining process. Because the locator is removably attachable to the kinematic mount, it can easily be removed from the mount, reversed, and reinserted onto the mount for additional machining. Further, the locator can likewise be removed from the mount and placed onto another tooling machine having a properly aligned kinematic mount. Because of the unique design and use of magnetic forces of the present invention, positioning errors of less than 0.25 micrometer for each machining process can be achieved. 7 figs.

  10. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  11. Reverse hierarchical PIV processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohály, J.; Frigerio, F.; Hart, D. P.

    2002-07-01

    A novel hierarchical processing scheme is proposed to efficiently increase the spatial resolution and dynamic range of detecting particle image displacements in PIV images. The technique takes full advantage of the multi-resolution characteristic of the discrete correlation function by starting the processing at the smallest scale and, if necessary, gradually building correlation planes into larger interrogation areas based on the result of inter-level correlation correction and validation. It is shown that the algorithm can be implemented in both direct and FFT based correlation algorithms with greatly reduced computational complexity. The technique opens new perspectives for locally adaptive super-resolution processing taking flow field, seeding, and imaging anomalies into account. Processing at the lowest scale (e.g. pixel or particle image size) allows the combination of correlation planes on any shape. Hence the proposed reverse hierarchical processing represents interrogation area optimization both in size and shape in order to maximize the correlation plane signal-to-noise ratio. The method is successfully demonstrated on experimentally obtained images.

  12. Reverse Transfer Project, Summer 1986.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Elizabeth

    In 1986, a Reverse Transfer Project was initiated at Moraine Valley Community College (MVCC) in order to promote the summer school attendance at MVCC of "reverse transfer" students (i.e., students who attended another institution during the regular academic year). A mailing, containing a cover letter, informational brochure, summer catalog, and…

  13. Preference Reversal in Multiattribute Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-01-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity…

  14. Reversal and Rotation Errors by Normal and Retarded Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, F. William

    1973-01-01

    Reports an investigation of the incidence of and relationships among word and letter reversals in writing and Bender-Gestalt rotation errors in matched samples of normal and retarded readers. No significant diffenences were found in the two groups. (TO)

  15. Atipamezole reverses ketamine-dexmedetomidine anesthesia without altering the antinociceptive effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice.

    PubMed

    Izer, Jenelle M; Whitcomb, Tiffany L; Wilson, Ronald P

    2014-11-01

    Butorphanol and buprenorphine are common analgesics used in laboratory mice. Inadvertent attenuation of the antinociceptive effects of these analgesics via the administration of an anesthetic reversal agent could result in postprocedural pain and distress, with subsequent negative effects on animal welfare, study outcomes, and regulatory compliance. This study was undertaken to determine whether atipamezole reverses ketamine-dexmedetomidine anesthesia and alters the antinociceptive effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice. Atipamezole reliably reversed the anesthetic effects of ketamine-dexmedetomidine, and mice were ambulatory 17.4 ± 30.6 min after administration of the α2-adrenoreceptor antagonist. Atipamezole alone had no significant effect on tail-flick latency and did not alter the antinociceptive properties of butorphanol or low-dose (0.05 mg/kg) or high-dose (0.1 mg/kg) buprenorphine in female C57BL/6J mice. After reversal of ketamine-dexmedetomidine anesthesia, tail-flick latency at 30, 60, and 150 min after analgesic treatment differed significantly between mice treated with atipamezole alone and those given atipamezole followed by butorphanol or high-dose buprenorphine. These results suggest that the analgesic effects of butorphanol and buprenorphine are not affected by atipamezole. Buprenorphine (0.1 mg/kg) administered 30 min prior to or at the time of anesthesia resulted in a greater magnitude of antinociception after antagonism of anesthesia than when given at the time of reversal. Given these results, we recommend the use of ketamine-dexmedetomidine anesthesia with buprenorphine administered either preemptively or at the time of anesthetic induction to provide a defined period of surgical anesthesia that is effectively reversed by atipamezole. PMID:25650975

  16. Classical Analog to Entanglement Reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitambar, Eric; Fortescue, Ben; Hsieh, Min-Hsiu

    2015-08-01

    In this Letter we study the problem of secrecy reversibility. This asks when two honest parties can distill secret bits from some tripartite distribution pX Y Z and transform secret bits back into pX Y Z at equal rates using local operation and public communication. This is the classical analog to the well-studied problem of reversibly concentrating and diluting entanglement in a quantum state. We identify the structure of distributions possessing reversible secrecy when one of the honest parties holds a binary distribution, and it is possible that all reversible distributions have this form. These distributions are more general than what is obtained by simply constructing a classical analog to the family of quantum states known to have reversible entanglement. An indispensable tool used in our analysis is a conditional form of the Gács-Körner common information.

  17. The Geomagnetic Field During a Reversal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heirtzler, James R.

    2003-01-01

    By modifying the IGRF it is possible to learn what may happen to the geomagnetic field during a geomagnetic reversal. If the entire IGRF reverses then the declination and inclination only reverse when the field strength is zero. If only the dipole component of the IGRF reverses a large geomagnetic field remains when the dipole component is zero and he direction of the field at the end of the reversal is not exactly reversed from the directions at the beginning of the reversal.

  18. Reverse osmosis reverses conventional wisdom with Superfund cleanup success

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, M. ); Miller, K. )

    1994-09-01

    Although widely recognized as the most efficient means of water purification, reverse osmosis has not been considered effective for remediating hazardous wastewater. Scaling and fouling, which can cause overruns and downtime, and require membrane replacement, have inhibited success in high-volume wastewater applications. Despite this background, a reverse osmosis technology developed in Europe recently was used successfully to treat large volumes of contaminated water at a major Superfund site in Texas. The technology's success there may increase the chances for reverse osmosis to find wider use in future cleanups and other waste treatment applications.

  19. Repeated paroxetine treatment reverses anhedonia induced in rats by chronic mild stress or dexamethasone.

    PubMed

    Casarotto, P C; Andreatini, R

    2007-11-01

    The present study was designed to assess the effect of dexamethasone, a synthetic glucocorticoid receptor agonist, in the sucrose preference test in rats. Rats treated acutely with dexamethasone (5-10 mg/kg) showed a significant decrease in sucrose preference (anhedonia) in comparison to vehicle treated rats, although 1 mg/kg dexamethasone did not alter the sucrose preference. Daily paroxetine treatment (10 g/kg, i.p., 14 days) reversed the anhedonic effect of acute dexamethasone (5 mg/kg), while causing no increased sucrose preference in rats that received dexamethasone vehicle. The paroxetine vehicle treated rats showed anhedonia even 14 days after acute dexamethasone administration. Paroxetine (10 mk/kg, i.p. for 28 days) also reversed anhedonia induced by chronic mild stress (8 weeks). In conclusion, acute dexamethasone induced an enduring anhedonic state that was reversed by repeated paroxetine treatment. Thus, the present study adds new data to the evidence supporting an important role for glucocorticoid in depression.

  20. Impairments of Probabilistic Response Reversal and Passive Avoidance Following Catecholamine Depletion

    PubMed Central

    Hasler, Gregor; Mondillo, Krystal; Drevets, Wayne C.; Blair, R. James R.

    2009-01-01

    Catecholamines, particularly dopamine, have been implicated in various aspects of the reward function including the ability to learn through reinforcement and to modify flexibly responses to changing reinforcement contingencies. We examined the impact of catecholamine depletion (CD) achieved by oral administration of alpha-methyl-paratyrosine (AMPT) on probabilistic reversal learning and passive avoidance in 15 female subjects with major depressive disorder in full remission (RMDD) and 12 healthy female controls. The CD did not affect significantly the acquisition phase of the reversal learning task. However, CD selectively impaired reversal of the 80-20 contingency pair. In the passive avoidance learning task, CD was associated with reduced responding towards rewarding stimuli, although the RMDD and control subjects did not differ regarding these CD-induced changes in reward processing. Interestingly, the performance decrement produced by AMPT on both of these tasks was associated with the level of decreased metabolism in the perigenual anterior cingulate cortex. In an additional examination using the affective Stroop task we found evidence for impaired executive attention as a trait abnormality in MDD. In conclusion, this study showed specific effects of catecholamine depletion on the processing of reward-related stimuli in humans and confirms previous investigations that demonstrate impairments of executive attention as a neuropsychological trait in affective illness. PMID:19675538

  1. Use of naloxone to reverse carfentanil citrate-induced hypoxemia and cardiopulmonary depression in Rocky Mountain wapiti (Cervus elaphus nelsoni).

    PubMed

    Moresco, A; Larsen, R S; Sleeman, J M; Wild, M A; Gaynor, J S

    2001-03-01

    With the use of a crossover study design, we investigated the respiratory and cardiovascular effects of naloxone administration in eight healthy Rocky Mountain wapiti (Cervus elaphus nelsoni) anesthetized with carfentanil (10 microg/kg i.m.) and xylazine (0.1 mg/kg). Anesthetized animals showed profound hypoxemia with mild hypercapnia, tachycardia, hypertension, and acidosis prior to naloxone administration. After monitoring equipment was placed, animals were administered either naloxone (2 microg/microg carfentanil i.v.) or an equivalent volume of normal saline. Mean values for PaO2, PaCO2, heart rate, and respiratory rate were significantly different between naloxone- and saline-treated groups, but mean blood pressure, hematocrit, and serum electrolyte concentrations were not. Mean PaO2 was 23.0 +/- 4.1 mm Hg prior to administration of naloxone or saline and increased to 50.2 +/- 7.3 mm Hg after naloxone administration. Mean PaO2 of saline-treated animals did not change significantly. Electrocardiograms of three saline-treated animals suggested myocardial hypoxia. Hypoxemia appeared to be caused by respiratory depression, hemodynamic alterations, and lateral recumbency. All but one animal remained anesthetized after naloxone administration. Anesthesia in all animals was reversed in < or = 4 min with naltrexone (100 mg/mg carfentanil i.v. s.c.) and yohimbine (0.1 mg/kg i.v.). One bolus of naloxone improved oxygenation in carfentanil-xylazine-anesthetized wapiti. PMID:12790400

  2. Reversal of a Suspected Paradoxical Reaction to Zopiclone with Flumazenil

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Cheme; Roust Aaberg, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    We describe the care for an elderly woman who was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) to receive noninvasive ventilation for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. After administration of the sleeping pill zopiclone, a nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonist (NBRA), the patient became agitated and was confused, a possible paradoxical reaction to benzodiazepines. These symptoms were immediately resolved after treatment with flumazenil, usually used to reverse the adverse effects of benzodiazepines or NBRAs and to reverse paradoxical reactions to benzodiazepines. This case indicates that zopiclone induced behavioral changes resembling a paradoxical reaction to benzodiazepines and these symptoms may be treated with flumazenil.

  3. Reversal of a Suspected Paradoxical Reaction to Zopiclone with Flumazenil

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Cheme; Roust Aaberg, Anne Marie

    2016-01-01

    We describe the care for an elderly woman who was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) to receive noninvasive ventilation for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. After administration of the sleeping pill zopiclone, a nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonist (NBRA), the patient became agitated and was confused, a possible paradoxical reaction to benzodiazepines. These symptoms were immediately resolved after treatment with flumazenil, usually used to reverse the adverse effects of benzodiazepines or NBRAs and to reverse paradoxical reactions to benzodiazepines. This case indicates that zopiclone induced behavioral changes resembling a paradoxical reaction to benzodiazepines and these symptoms may be treated with flumazenil. PMID:27672456

  4. Reversal of a Suspected Paradoxical Reaction to Zopiclone with Flumazenil.

    PubMed

    Jordahn, Zarah; Andersen, Cheme; Roust Aaberg, Anne Marie; Christian Pott, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We describe the care for an elderly woman who was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) to receive noninvasive ventilation for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. After administration of the sleeping pill zopiclone, a nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonist (NBRA), the patient became agitated and was confused, a possible paradoxical reaction to benzodiazepines. These symptoms were immediately resolved after treatment with flumazenil, usually used to reverse the adverse effects of benzodiazepines or NBRAs and to reverse paradoxical reactions to benzodiazepines. This case indicates that zopiclone induced behavioral changes resembling a paradoxical reaction to benzodiazepines and these symptoms may be treated with flumazenil. PMID:27672456

  5. Reversal of a Suspected Paradoxical Reaction to Zopiclone with Flumazenil.

    PubMed

    Jordahn, Zarah; Andersen, Cheme; Roust Aaberg, Anne Marie; Christian Pott, Frank

    2016-01-01

    We describe the care for an elderly woman who was admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) to receive noninvasive ventilation for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. After administration of the sleeping pill zopiclone, a nonbenzodiazepine receptor agonist (NBRA), the patient became agitated and was confused, a possible paradoxical reaction to benzodiazepines. These symptoms were immediately resolved after treatment with flumazenil, usually used to reverse the adverse effects of benzodiazepines or NBRAs and to reverse paradoxical reactions to benzodiazepines. This case indicates that zopiclone induced behavioral changes resembling a paradoxical reaction to benzodiazepines and these symptoms may be treated with flumazenil.

  6. The alpha-2A noradrenergic receptor agonist guanfacine improves visual object discrimination reversal performance in aged rhesus monkeys.

    PubMed

    Steere, J C; Arnsten, A F

    1997-10-01

    Administration of either low or high doses of the alpha-2A adrenergic agonist guanfacine (GFC) to aged monkeys has been shown to improve performance of the delayed-response task, a task linked to the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC). Monkeys treated with higher guanfacine doses also appeared less disinhibited, suggesting enhanced ventromedial-orbital PFC (vmPFC) function. To test this hypothesis, the current study examined the effects of low versus high doses of GFC on reversal of a visual object discrimination task, a task particularly sensitive to vmPFC lesions. The results of this study showed that high (0.1 mg/kg) but not low (0.00001-0.001 mg/kg) doses of GFC significantly improved reversal performance in aged monkeys. These results may be relevant to GFC's calming effects in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. PMID:9383511

  7. Reverse Genetics in Ecological Research

    PubMed Central

    Schwachtje, Jens; Kutschbach, Susan; Baldwin, Ian T.

    2008-01-01

    By precisely manipulating the expression of individual genetic elements thought to be important for ecological performance, reverse genetics has the potential to revolutionize plant ecology. However, untested concerns about possible side-effects of the transformation technique, caused by Agrobacterium infection and tissue culture, on plant performance have stymied research by requiring onerous sample sizes. We compare 5 independently transformed Nicotiana attenuata lines harboring empty vector control (EVC) T-DNA lacking silencing information with isogenic wild types (WT), and measured a battery of ecologically relevant traits, known to be important in plant-herbivore interactions: phytohormones, secondary metabolites, growth and fitness parameters under stringent competitive conditions, and transcriptional regulation with microarrays. As a positive control, we included a line silenced in trypsin proteinase inhibitor gene (TPI) expression, a potent anti-herbivore defense known to exact fitness costs in its expression, in the analysis. The experiment was conducted twice, with 10 and 20 biological replicates per genotype. For all parameters, we detected no difference between any EVC and WT lines, but could readily detect a fitness benefit of silencing TPI production. A statistical power analyses revealed that the minimum sample sizes required for detecting significant fitness differences between EVC and WT was 2–3 orders of magnitude larger than the 10 replicates required to detect a fitness effect of TPI silencing. We conclude that possible side-effects of transformation are far too low to obfuscate the study of ecologically relevant phenotypes. PMID:18253491

  8. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.

    1993-01-01

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

  9. Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation

    DOEpatents

    Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

    1993-11-30

    A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

  10. Lanczos iterated time-reversal.

    PubMed

    Oberai, Assad A; Feijóo, Gonzalo R; Barbone, Paul E

    2009-02-01

    A new iterative time-reversal algorithm capable of identifying and focusing on multiple scatterers in a relatively small number of iterations is developed. It is recognized that the traditional iterated time-reversal method is based on utilizing power iterations to determine the dominant eigenpairs of the time-reversal operator. The convergence properties of these iterations are known to be suboptimal. Motivated by this, a new method based on Lanczos iterations is developed. In several illustrative examples it is demonstrated that for the same number of transmitted and received signals, the Lanczos iterations based approach is substantially more accurate. PMID:19206835

  11. Reverse mortgage decision-making.

    PubMed

    Leviton, R

    2001-01-01

    Reverse mortgages have been suggested as a promising financial tool to help low-income older homeowners who want to remain in their houses. However, actual use of this option has been much below early estimates of potential demand. This study explored response to the new option through open-ended interviews of homeowners who had received reverse mortgage counseling. Decision-making was influenced by attachment to home, family input, and financial attitudes, including desire to leave a legacy. In general, homeowners took reverse mortgages only as a "last resort" that enabled them to maintain their independence.

  12. An algorithm to enumerate sorting reversals for signed permutations.

    PubMed

    Siepel, Adam C

    2003-01-01

    The rearrangement distance between single-chromosome genomes can be estimated as the minimum number of inversions required to transform the gene ordering observed in one into that observed in the other. This measure, known as "inversion distance," can be computed as the reversal distance between signed permutations. During the past decade, much progress has been made both on the problem of computing reversal distance and on the related problem of finding a minimum-length sequence of reversals, which is known as "sorting by reversals." For most problem instances, however, many minimum-length sequences of reversals exist, and in the absence of auxiliary information, no one is of greater value than the others. The problem of finding all minimum-length sequences of reversals is thus a natural generalization of sorting by reversals, yet it has received little attention. This problem reduces easily to the problem of finding all "sorting reversals" of one permutation with respect to another - that is, all reversals rho such that, if rho is applied to one permutation, then the reversal distance of that permutation from the other is decreased. In this paper, an efficient algorithm is derived to solve the problem of finding all sorting reversals, and experimental results are presented indicating that, while the new algorithm does not represent a significant improvement in asymptotic terms (it takes O(n(3)) time, for permutations of size n; the problem can now be solved by brute force in Theta(n(3)) time), it performs dramatically better in practice than the best known alternative. An implementation of the algorithm is available at www.cse.ucsc.edu/~acs.

  13. 23 CFR 630.1010 - Significant projects.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Significant projects. 630.1010 Section 630.1010 Highways FEDERAL HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING AND TRAFFIC OPERATIONS PRECONSTRUCTION PROCEDURES Work Zone Safety and Mobility § 630.1010 Significant projects. (a) A...

  14. Time Reversal Experiments in Chaotic Cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Bo; Ott, Edwart; Antonsen, Thomas; Anlage, Steven

    2013-03-01

    Wave focusing through a strongly scattering medium has been an intriguing topic in the fields of optics, acoustics and electromagnetics. By introducing the time reversal technique, prior knowledge about each transmission channel is no longer needed since the step of sending waves through the medium measures this information. Many approaches have been explored to achieve better focusing quality, which is influenced by several factors, such as the propagation loss. We present two methods to conduct time reversal experiments in ray-chaotic billiards or cavities. The first method uses a ray-tracing algorithm to calculate orbit information from knowledge of the cavity geometry. We then use this information to generate a synthetic signal, which is then sent into the cavity as if it's the time reversed signal in the traditional time-reversal scheme. This method tries to obtain channel information numerically but has limited accuracy due to the chaotic properties of the cavity. Another method is to utilize the transmission scattering parameter, obtained from the time domain response of the cavity between two ports. We amplify the time-reversed signal for each frequency channel in proportion to the loss it experiences during the transmission. The experimental results show that the amplitude of side lobes around the reconstructed signal is reduced significantly and the correlation between the reconstruction and the initial signal is improved from 0.8 to 0.98 in a low-mode density cavity. This work is funded by the ONR/Maryland AppEl Center, the AFOSR, and Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials (CNAM).

  15. Transportation Security Administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... content Official website of the Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration A - Z Index What Can I Bring? Search form Apples Main menu Administrator Travel Security Screening Special Procedures TSA Pre✓® Passenger Support Travel ...

  16. NASA, NOAA administrators nominated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan recently said he intended to nominate James Montgomery Beggs as NASA Administrator and John V. Byrne as NOAA Administrator. These two positions are key scientific posts that have been vacant since the start of the Reagan administration on January 20. The President also said he intends to nominate Hans Mark as NASA Deputy Administrator. At press time, Reagan had not designated his nominee for the director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

  17. The Reagan Administration's EEO Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, William Bradford

    The Reagan administration is committed to the principle of equal employment opportunity (EEO). No policy shift has occurred in the treatment of "class action" litigation, or in the "pattern or practice" suits in the Justice Department's Title VII enforcement activities. Significant money settlements have been obtained in "pattern and practice"…

  18. A gaussian model for simulated geomagnetic field reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wicht, Johannes; Meduri, Domenico G.

    2016-10-01

    Field reversals are the most spectacular events in the geomagnetic history but remain little understood. Here we explore the dipole behaviour in particularly long numerical dynamo simulations to reveal statistically significant conditions required for reversals and excursions to happen. We find that changes in the axial dipole moment behaviour are crucial while the equatorial dipole moment plays a negligible role. For small Rayleigh numbers, the axial dipole always remains strong and stable and obeys a clearly Gaussian probability distribution. Only when the Rayleigh number is increased sufficiently the axial dipole can reverse and its distribution becomes decisively non-Gaussian. Increased likelihoods around zero indicate a pronounced lingering in a new low dipole moment state. Reversals and excursions can only happen when axial dipole fluctuations are large enough to drive the system from the high dipole moment state assumed during stable polarity epochs into the low dipole moment state. Since it is just a matter of chance which polarity is amplified during dipole recovery, reversals and grand excursions, i.e. excursions during which the dipole assumes reverse polarity, are equally likely. While the overall reversal behaviour seems Earth-like, a closer comparison to palaeomagnetic findings suggests that the simulated events last too long and that grand excursions are too rare. For a particularly large Ekman number we find a second but less Earth-like type of reversals where the total field decays and recovers after a certain time.

  19. 78 FR 42787 - Anneri Izurieta; Conviction Reversal; Final Order Withdrawing Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Anneri Izurieta; Conviction Reversal; Final Order Withdrawing Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S....

  20. 78 FR 42787 - Yuri Izurieta; Conviction Reversal; Final Order Withdrawing Debarment Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Yuri Izurieta; Conviction Reversal; Final Order Withdrawing Debarment Order AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Food and...

  1. A Philosophy of Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruening, William H.

    Justification is given for paying relatively large salaries to college administrators, specifically the president or chancellor and the chief academic officer. Three administrative task areas are discussed as criteria: management, administration per se, and leadership. It is contended that only leadership can be used as a criterion for…

  2. Reverse Discrimination and Aggressive Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Stephen D.

    1980-01-01

    White subjects were aggressive toward Black opponents when contest results appeared to reflect elements of reverse discrimination; but they showed less aggressive behavior toward Black opponents when they thought their loss was due to their opponents' superior ability. (RL)

  3. Deciphering records of geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, Jean-Pierre; Fournier, Alexandre

    2016-06-01

    Polarity reversals of the geomagnetic field are a major feature of the Earth's dynamo. Questions remain regarding the dynamical processes that give rise to reversals and the properties of the geomagnetic field during a polarity transition. A large number of paleomagnetic reversal records have been acquired during the past 50 years in order to better constrain the structure and geometry of the transitional field. In addition, over the past two decades, numerical dynamo simulations have also provided insights into the reversal mechanism. Yet despite the large paleomagnetic database, controversial interpretations of records of the transitional field persist; they result from two characteristics inherent to all reversals, both of which are detrimental to an ambiguous analysis. On the one hand, the reversal process is rapid and requires adequate temporal resolution. On the other hand, weak field intensities during a reversal can affect the fidelity of magnetic recording in sedimentary records. This paper is aimed at reviewing critically the main reversal features derived from paleomagnetic records and at analyzing some of these features in light of numerical simulations. We discuss in detail the fidelity of the signal extracted from paleomagnetic records and pay special attention to their resolution with respect to the timing and mechanisms involved in the magnetization process. Records from marine sediments dominate the database. They give rise to transitional field models that often lead to overinterpret the data. Consequently, we attempt to separate robust results (and their subsequent interpretations) from those that do not stand on a strong observational footing. Finally, we discuss new avenues that should favor progress to better characterize and understand transitional field behavior.

  4. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  5. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  6. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  7. 14 CFR 33.97 - Thrust reversers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... This test may be scheduled as part of the endurance run. (b) 175 reversals must be made from flight-idle forward thrust to maximum reverse thrust and 25 reversals must be made from rated takeoff...

  8. Anomalous spontaneous reversal in magnetic heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Pan; Eisenmenger, Johannes; Miller, Casey W; Schuller, Ivan K

    2006-04-01

    We observe a thermally induced spontaneous magnetization reversal of epitaxial ferromagnet/antiferromagnet heterostructures under a constant applied magnetic field. Unlike any other magnetic system, the magnetization spontaneously reverses, aligning antiparallel to an applied field with decreasing temperature. We show that this unusual phenomenon is caused by the interfacial antiferromagnetic coupling overcoming the Zeeman energy of the ferromagnet. A significant temperature hysteresis exists, whose height and width can be tuned by the field applied during thermal cycling. The hysteresis originates from the intrinsic magnetic anisotropy in the system. The observation of this phenomenon leads to open questions in the general understanding of magnetic heterostructures. Moreover, this shows that in general heterogeneous nanostructured materials may exhibit unexpected phenomena absent in the bulk.

  9. Auraptene consolidates memory, reverses scopolamine-disrupted memory in passive avoidance task, and ameliorates retention deficits in mice

    PubMed Central

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Yaghoobi, Najmeh Sadat; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Shahraki, Jafar; Rezaee, Ramin; Hashemzaei, Mahmoud

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Auraptene (7-geranyloxycoumarin) (AUR), from Citrus species has shown anti-inflammatory, neuroprotective, and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and beta-secretase inhibitory effects. Scopolamine is a nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist which causes short-term memory impairments and is used for inducing animal model of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This research aimed to investigate the effect of AUR on scopolamine-induced avoidance memory retention deficits in step-through task in mice. Materials and Methods: The effect of four-day pre-training injections of AUR (50, 75, and 100 mg/kg, subcutaneous (SC)) and scopolamine (1 mg/kg, IP), and their co-administration on avoidance memory retention in step-through passive avoidance task, was investigated by measuring the latency to enter to the dark chamber. Results: Pre-training administration of AUR caused significant increase in step-through latency in comparison with control group, 48, 96, and 168 hr after training trial. The findings of this study showed that scopolamine (1 mg/kg, IP, for four consecutive days) impaired passive avoidance memory retention compared to saline-treated animals. Step-through passive avoidance task results showed that AUR markedly reversed scopolamine-induced avoidance memory retention impairments, 24 and 168 hr after training trial in step-through task. Conclusion: Results from co-administration of AUR and scopolamine showed that AUR reversed scopolamine-induced passive avoidance memory retention impairments. PMID:26730337

  10. Targeted metabolomic study indicating glycyrrhizin’s protection against acetaminophen-induced liver damage through reversing fatty acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian; Jiang, Yang-Shen; Jiang, Yuan; Peng, Yan-Fang; Sun, Zhuang; Dai, Xiao-Nan; Cao, Qiu-Ting; Sun, Ying-Ming; Han, Jing-Chun; Gao, Ya-Jie

    2014-06-01

    The present study aimed to give a short report on a possible mechanism of glycyrrhizin to acetaminophen-induced liver toxicity. Seven-day intraperitoneal administration of glycyrrhizin (400 mg/kg/day) to 2- to 3-month-old male C57BL/6N mice (mean weight 27 g) significantly prevents acetaminophen-induced liver damage, as indicated by the activity of alanine transaminase and aspartate aminotransferase. Metabolomics analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) using ultra-fast liquid chromatography coupled to triple time-of-flight mass spectrometer were performed. PCA separated well the control, glycyrrhizin-treated, acetaminophen-treated, and glycyrrhizin+acetaminophen-treated groups. Long-chain acylcarnitines were listed as the top ions that contribute to this good separation, which include oleoylcarnitine, palmitoylcarnitine, palmitoleoylcarnitine, and myristoylcarnitine. The treatment of glycyrrhizin significantly reversed the increased levels of long-chain acylcarnitines induced by acetaminophen administration. In conclusion, this metabolomic study indicates a significant glycyrrhizin protection effect against acetaminophen-induced liver damage through reversing fatty acid metabolism.

  11. Intravenous use of illicit buprenorphine/naloxone to reverse an acute heroin overdose.

    PubMed

    Yokell, Michael A; Zaller, Nickolas D; Green, Traci C; McKenzie, Michelle; Rich, Josiah D

    2012-01-01

    A case of heroin overdose reversed through the intravenous (IV) administration of a crushed sublingual tablet of buprenorphine/naloxone (Suboxone) by a lay responder is described. Although the sublingual administration of buprenorphine/naloxone to reverse an overdose has been reported elsewhere, this is the first report of IV administration. Healthcare professionals should be aware that injection drug users may respond to an opioid overdose by injecting buprenorphine/naloxone and should consequently counsel all opioid-using patients on the proper response to an overdose. Physicians should also consider prescribing naloxone to at-risk patients. The work of community-based naloxone distribution programs should be expanded. PMID:22479887

  12. Dissociative detachment and memory impairment: reversible amnesia or encoding failure?

    PubMed

    Allen, J G; Console, D A; Lewis, L

    1999-01-01

    The authors propose that clinicians endeavor to differentiate between reversible and irreversible memory failures in patients with dissociative symptoms who report "memory gaps" and "lost time." The classic dissociative disorders, such as dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder, entail reversible memory failures associated with encoding experience in altered states. The authors propose another realm of memory failures associated with severe dissociative detachment that may preclude the level of encoding of ongoing experience needed to support durable autobiographical memories. They describe how dissociative detachment may be intertwined with neurobiological factors that impair memory, and they spell out the significance of distinguishing reversible and irreversible memory impairment for diagnosis, patient education, psychotherapy, and research.

  13. Reversal of profound vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block under sevoflurane anesthesia: sugammadex versus neostigmine.

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors cannot rapidly reverse profound neuromuscular block. Sugammadex, a selective relaxant binding agent, reverses the effects of rocuronium and vecuronium by encapsulation. This study assessed the efficacy of sugammadex compared with neostigmine in reversal of profound vecuronium-induced neuromuscular block under sevoflurane anesthesia. Methods Patients aged ≥18 years, American Society of Anesthesiologists class 1-4, scheduled to undergo surgery under general anesthesia were enrolled in this phase III, multicenter, randomized, safety-assessor blinded study. Sevoflurane anesthetized patients received vecuronium 0.1 mg/kg for intubation, with maintenance doses of 0.015 mg/kg as required. Patients were randomized to receive sugammadex 4 mg/kg or neostigmine 70 μg/kg with glycopyrrolate 14 μg/kg at 1-2 post-tetanic counts. The primary efficacy variable was time from start of study drug administration to recovery of the train-of-four ratio to 0.9. Safety assessments included physical examination, laboratory data, vital signs, and adverse events. Results Eighty three patients were included in the intent-to-treat population (sugammadex, n = 47; neostigmine, n = 36). Geometric mean time to recovery of the train-of-four ratio to 0.9 was 15-fold faster with sugammadex (4.5 minutes) compared with neostigmine (66.2 minutes; p < 0.0001) (median, 3.3 minutes with sugammadex versus 49.9 minutes with neostigmine). No serious drug-related adverse events occurred in either group. Conclusions Recovery from profound vecuronium-induced block is significantly faster with sugammadex, compared with neostigmine. Neostigmine did not rapidly reverse profound neuromuscular block (Trial registration number: NCT00473694). PMID:20809967

  14. Local anesthesia reversal.

    PubMed

    Malamed, Stanley F

    2010-03-01

    PM (OraVerse) enables the dentist or dental hygienist (where permitted) to significantly decrease the duration of residual STA in patients where such numbness may prove to be potentially injurious (children, geriatric, and special needs patients), or a negative influence on their quality of life (speaking, eating, negative body image). (Note: As of August 3, 2009, dental hygienists are permitted to administer PM in the following states: Alaska, Arkansas, Hawaii, Idaho, Iowa, Louisiana, Montana, Nevada, New York, North Dakota, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, and Wisconsin.)

  15. The significance of research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-02-01

    When promoting the value of their research or procuring funding, researchers often need to explain the significance of their work to the community -- something that can be just as tricky as the research itself.

  16. Reverse mortgages and the economic status of elderly women.

    PubMed

    Morgan, B A; Megbolugbe, I F; Rasmussen, D W

    1996-06-01

    Data from the 1990 Census of Population and Housing are used to estimate the potential demand for reverse mortgages among elderly women householders. A reverse mortgage product is simulated using parameters based on the Home Equity Conversion Mortgage insurance demonstration, and its effect on poverty and income distribution among this group is calculated. Approximately 1.8 million women with low incomes and home equity of $40,000 and above could see a significant increase in income under such a program.

  17. The sources of foreign policy: The Carter administration and NATO nuclear forces, 1977-80

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, V.A.

    1990-01-01

    The Carter administration entered office committed to the goal of reducing the United States; dependence on nuclear weaponry. This was especially clear in the administration's initial policy towards NATO and the defense of Western Europe. In retrospect, however, what is striking is the degree to which nuclear forces and strategy dominated the Carter administration's policymaking efforts regarding NATO. Decisions about enhanced radiation warheads (or neutron bombs) and long-range theater nuclear forces (ground-launched cruise missiles and Pershing 2 ballistic missiles) created divisions within the alliance and complicated the administration's attempts to control domestic debate over its foreign and defense policies. How did this reversal of emphasis occur Most examinations of this policy change have focused on the existence of a new Soviet threat to Europe or the alliance politics of NATO to explain the dramatic turnabout in American policy. This thesis argues that a close examination of US domestic political factors significantly enhances our understanding of why the Carter administration arrived at the policy decisions it made concerning US theater nuclear forces in Europe.

  18. Reverse shift mechanism for automotive manual transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Inui, M.; Ogawa, S.

    1987-03-03

    A reverse shift mechanism is described for an automotive manual transmission of a type having a reverse idler gear which is movable to selectively complete a reverse gear train, the reverse shift mechanism comprising: a reverse shift arm having a portion disposed adjacent the reverse idler gear and pivotally carried with respect to a transmission casing so that the portion rocks along a direction of axis of the reverse idler gear in response to shifting operation. The portion of the reverse shift arm is provided with a blind hole which is open at a first end toward the reverse idler gear and is closed at a second end away from the reverse idler gear; and a shift arm shoe carried by the portion of the reverse shift arm adjacent the reverse idler gear for pushing the reverse idler gear. The shift arm shoe has an end adapted to engage with a circumferential groove formed in the reverse idler gear and an opposing end shaped to fit in the blind hole of the reverse shift arm; whereby the shift arm shoe is prevented from coming off during assembly by virtue of a vacuum effect created by air confined in the blind hole by fitting engagement between the opposing end and the blind hole, and is held in place after assembly by being clamped between the groove of the reverse idler gear and the blind hole of the reverse shift arm.

  19. Dynamics and timing of reversals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J.-P.; Fournier, A.

    2012-04-01

    Information provided by records of geomagnetic reversals from lava sequences is constrained by irregular volcanic activity. We show that, despite different resolution, the ten most detailed volcanic records match surprisingly well and display the same dynamical characteristics after tuning to a common eruption rate. We thus infer that the reversal process has remained unchanged over the past 180Ma with the same time constants and duration. The reversing field is characterized by 3 successive episodes, a precursory event, a 180° polarity switch and a rebound. The first and third phases depict a large amplitude directional change which, by comparison with the archeological record, is estimated to last between 2 and 2.5 kyr. The transit between the two polarities does not exceed 1ka and is thus too fast for being properly recorded by most sediments. Similar results are obtained after reducing the directional clusters that are present at different periods in each record. These features and time constants are compatible with models that do not require any mantle control on reversals processes, which is also supported by the absence of preferred longitude of the pole. Lastly, based on the chronology of the successive reversal phases, the eruption rates are found to be at least twice larger for hot spots (<1flow/100yr) than for large flood basaltic provinces.

  20. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update.

    PubMed

    Patel, Abhishek P; Smith, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42-60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%-6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery. PMID:26975488

  1. Vasectomy reversal: a clinical update

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Abhishek P; Smith, Ryan P

    2016-01-01

    Vasectomy is a safe and effective method of contraception used by 42–60 million men worldwide. Approximately 3%–6% of men opt for a vasectomy reversal due to the death of a child or divorce and remarriage, change in financial situation, desire for more children within the same marriage, or to alleviate the dreaded postvasectomy pain syndrome. Unlike vasectomy, vasectomy reversal is a much more technically challenging procedure that is performed only by a minority of urologists and places a larger financial strain on the patient since it is usually not covered by insurance. Interest in this procedure has increased since the operating microscope became available in the 1970s, which consequently led to improved patency and pregnancy rates following the procedure. In this clinical update, we discuss patient evaluation, variables that may influence reversal success rates, factors to consider in choosing to perform vasovasostomy versus vasoepididymostomy, and the usefulness of vasectomy reversal to alleviate postvasectomy pain syndrome. We also review the use of robotics for vasectomy reversal and other novel techniques and instrumentation that have emerged in recent years to aid in the success of this surgery. PMID:26975488

  2. Crossed reflex reversal during human locomotion.

    PubMed

    Gervasio, Sabata; Farina, Dario; Sinkjær, Thomas; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie

    2013-05-01

    During human walking, precise coordination between the two legs is required in order to react promptly to any sudden hazard that could threaten stability. The networks involved in this coordination are not yet completely known, but a direct spinal connection between soleus (SOL) muscles has recently been revealed. For this response to be functional, as previously suggested, we hypothesize that it will be accompanied by a reaction in synergistic muscles, such as gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), and that a reversal of the response would occur when an opposite reaction is required. In the present study, surface EMGs of contralateral SOL and GL were analyzed after tibial nerve (TN), sural nerve (SuN), and medial plantar nerve (MpN) stimulation during two tasks in which opposite reactions are functionally expected: normal walking (NW), just before ipsilateral heel strike, and hybrid walking (HW) (legs walking in opposite directions), at ipsilateral push off and contralateral touchdown. Early crossed facilitations were observed in the contralateral GL after TN stimulation during NW, and a reversal of such responses occurred during HW. These results underline the functional significance of short-latency crossed responses and represent the first evidence for short-latency reflex reversal in the contralateral limb for humans. Muscle afferents seem to mediate the response during NW, while during HW cutaneous afferents are likely involved. It is thus possible that different afferents mediate the crossed response during different tasks.

  3. Polar Field Reversals and Active Region Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrie, Gordon; Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. Using NSO Kitt Peak synoptic magnetograms, we investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of the synoptic magnetograms, the dispersal of flux from low to high latitudes is tracked, and the timing of this dispersal is compared to the polar field changes. In the most abrupt cases of polar field reversal, a few activity complexes (systems of active regions) are identified as the main cause. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes is found to correlate well in time with the abrupt polar field changes. In each case, significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  4. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring By Reverse Iontophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Anroop B; Goel, Ankit; Prakash, Shashi; Kumar, Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic molecules possessing distinct pharmacokinetic variation, narrow therapeutic index and concentration dependent therapeutic/adverse effects demand constant monitoring. The current methods for blood sampling are invasive and possess low patient compliance. Human skin, selective and effective membrane to chemical permeation, offers an alternative route for the extraction of endogenous molecules in the body. Significant attention has been received in the application of reverse iontophoresis in extracting drugs/biomaterials from the subdermal region. This technique involves transiting of a low electric current across the skin usually with couple of skin electrodes to extract charged as well as neutral molecules. Electromigration and electroosmosis are the two basic mechanisms involved in transport of molecules. Several in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated the potential of reverse iontophoresis as a noninvasive tool in clinical chemistry and therapeutic drug monitoring. This technology is currently being used in device such as Glucowatch Biogrpaher which allows blood glucose detection across skin layers. Advances in technology and rapid progress in research has widely improved the opportunity of this system, and the recent trend indicates that several products are likely to be developed very soon. This review provides an overview about the recent developments in reverse iontophoresis for therapeutic drug monitoring. PMID:24826025

  5. Significant lexical relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersen, T.; Kayaalp, M.; Bruce, R.

    1996-12-31

    Statistical NLP inevitably deals with a large number of rare events. As a consequence, NLP data often violates the assumptions implicit in traditional statistical procedures such as significance testing. We describe a significance test, an exact conditional test, that is appropriate for NLP data and can be performed using freely available software. We apply this test to the study of lexical relationships and demonstrate that the results obtained using this test are both theoretically more reliable and different from the results obtained using previously applied tests.

  6. Idarucizumab: A Review as a Reversal Agent for Dabigatran.

    PubMed

    Syed, Yahiya Y

    2016-08-01

    Idarucizumab (Praxbind(®)), a humanized monoclonal antibody, is a specific reversal agent for the direct oral thrombin inhibitor dabigatran, available as its prodrug dabigatran etexilate (Pradaxa(®)). Idarucizumab is approved in several countries (including the USA, the EU, Canada and Australia) for use in adult patients on dabigatran when the reversal of its anticoagulant effects is required for emergency surgery/procedures or in the event of life-threatening or uncontrolled bleeding. In the ongoing pivotal RE-VERSE AD trial in these populations (n = 90), intravenous idarucizumab 5 g reversed dabigatran-induced prolongation of dilute thrombin time (dTT) and ecarin clotting time (ECT) within minutes. The median maximum percentage reversal was 100 % for both assays (primary endpoint). Idarucizumab normalized dTT and ECT in 88-98 % of patients who had elevated levels at baseline. After idarucizumab administration, bleeding stopped in 97 % of evaluable patients in the bleeding cohort within 24 h (median time to cessation of bleeding was 11.4 h), and the rate of normal intraoperative haemostasis was 92 % in the surgical cohort. Idarucizumab was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, idarucizumab is a unique and specific treatment option for the reversal of the anticoagulant effects of dabigatran in adult patients requiring emergency procedures or in the event of life-threatening or uncontrolled bleeding. PMID:27388764

  7. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T.

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed—for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants’ responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants’ performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse’s approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks. PMID:27199881

  8. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed-for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants' responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants' performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse's approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks. PMID:27199881

  9. A Reverse Stroop Task with Mouse Tracking.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Naohide; Incera, Sara; McLennan, Conor T

    2016-01-01

    In a reverse Stroop task, observers respond to the meaning of a color word irrespective of the color in which the word is printed-for example, the word red may be printed in the congruent color (red), an incongruent color (e.g., blue), or a neutral color (e.g., white). Although reading of color words in this task is often thought to be neither facilitated by congruent print colors nor interfered with incongruent print colors, this interference has been detected by using a response method that does not give any bias in favor of processing of word meanings or processing of print colors. On the other hand, evidence for the presence of facilitation in this task has been scarce, even though this facilitation is theoretically possible. By modifying the task such that participants respond to a stimulus color word by pointing to a corresponding response word on a computer screen with a mouse, the present study investigated the possibility that not only interference but also facilitation would take place in a reverse Stroop task. Importantly, in this study, participants' responses were dynamically tracked by recording the entire trajectories of the mouse. Arguably, this method provided richer information about participants' performance than traditional measures such as reaction time and accuracy, allowing for more detailed (and thus potentially more sensitive) investigation of facilitation and interference in the reverse Stroop task. These trajectories showed that the mouse's approach toward correct response words was significantly delayed by incongruent print colors but not affected by congruent print colors, demonstrating that only interference, not facilitation, was present in the current task. Implications of these findings are discussed within a theoretical framework in which the strength of association between a task and its response method plays a critical role in determining how word meanings and print colors interact in reverse Stroop tasks.

  10. Ice ages and geomagnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Patrick

    1992-01-01

    There have been speculations on the relationship between climatic cooling and polarity reversals of the earth's magnetic field during the Pleistocene. Two of the common criticisms on this relationship have been the reality of these short duration geomagnetic events and the accuracy of their dates. Champion et al. (1988) have reviewed recent progress in this area. They identified a total of 10 short-duration polarity events in the last 1 Ma and 6 of these events have been found in volcanic rocks, which also have K-Ar dates. Supposing that the speculated relationship between climatic cooling and geomagnetic reversals actually exist, two mechanisms that assume climatic cooling causes short period magnetic reversals will be investigated. These two methods are core-mantle boundary topography and transfer of the rotational energy to the core.

  11. Significance of brown dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, D. C.

    1986-01-01

    The significance of brown dwarfs for resolving some major problems in astronomy is discussed. The importance of brown dwarfs for models of star formation by fragmentation of molecular clouds and for obtaining independent measurements of the ages of stars in binary systems is addressed. The relationship of brown dwarfs to planets is considered.

  12. Statistical Significance Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLean, James E., Ed.; Kaufman, Alan S., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    The controversy about the use or misuse of statistical significance testing has become the major methodological issue in educational research. This special issue contains three articles that explore the controversy, three commentaries on these articles, an overall response, and three rejoinders by the first three authors. They are: (1)…

  13. Veterans Administration Databases

    Cancer.gov

    The Veterans Administration Information Resource Center provides database and informatics experts, customer service, expert advice, information products, and web technology to VA researchers and others.

  14. Reverse osmosis desalination: water sources, technology, and today's challenges.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Lauren F; Lawler, Desmond F; Freeman, Benny D; Marrot, Benoit; Moulin, Philippe

    2009-05-01

    Reverse osmosis membrane technology has developed over the past 40 years to a 44% share in world desalting production capacity, and an 80% share in the total number of desalination plants installed worldwide. The use of membrane desalination has increased as materials have improved and costs have decreased. Today, reverse osmosis membranes are the leading technology for new desalination installations, and they are applied to a variety of salt water resources using tailored pretreatment and membrane system design. Two distinct branches of reverse osmosis desalination have emerged: seawater reverse osmosis and brackish water reverse osmosis. Differences between the two water sources, including foulants, salinity, waste brine (concentrate) disposal options, and plant location, have created significant differences in process development, implementation, and key technical problems. Pretreatment options are similar for both types of reverse osmosis and depend on the specific components of the water source. Both brackish water and seawater reverse osmosis (RO) will continue to be used worldwide; new technology in energy recovery and renewable energy, as well as innovative plant design, will allow greater use of desalination for inland and rural communities, while providing more affordable water for large coastal cities. A wide variety of research and general information on RO desalination is available; however, a direct comparison of seawater and brackish water RO systems is necessary to highlight similarities and differences in process development. This article brings to light key parameters of an RO process and process modifications due to feed water characteristics. PMID:19371922

  15. Reverse osmosis desalination: water sources, technology, and today's challenges.

    PubMed

    Greenlee, Lauren F; Lawler, Desmond F; Freeman, Benny D; Marrot, Benoit; Moulin, Philippe

    2009-05-01

    Reverse osmosis membrane technology has developed over the past 40 years to a 44% share in world desalting production capacity, and an 80% share in the total number of desalination plants installed worldwide. The use of membrane desalination has increased as materials have improved and costs have decreased. Today, reverse osmosis membranes are the leading technology for new desalination installations, and they are applied to a variety of salt water resources using tailored pretreatment and membrane system design. Two distinct branches of reverse osmosis desalination have emerged: seawater reverse osmosis and brackish water reverse osmosis. Differences between the two water sources, including foulants, salinity, waste brine (concentrate) disposal options, and plant location, have created significant differences in process development, implementation, and key technical problems. Pretreatment options are similar for both types of reverse osmosis and depend on the specific components of the water source. Both brackish water and seawater reverse osmosis (RO) will continue to be used worldwide; new technology in energy recovery and renewable energy, as well as innovative plant design, will allow greater use of desalination for inland and rural communities, while providing more affordable water for large coastal cities. A wide variety of research and general information on RO desalination is available; however, a direct comparison of seawater and brackish water RO systems is necessary to highlight similarities and differences in process development. This article brings to light key parameters of an RO process and process modifications due to feed water characteristics.

  16. Nitric oxide suppression reversibly attenuates mitochondrial dysfunction and cholestasis in endotoxemic rat liver.

    PubMed

    Shiomi, M; Wakabayashi, Y; Sano, T; Shinoda, Y; Nimura, Y; Ishimura, Y; Suematsu, M

    1998-01-01

    This study aimed to examine whether nitric oxide (NO) plays a causal role in endotoxin-induced dysfunction of biliary transport. Rats were treated with intraperitoneal injection of endotoxin (O111B4, 4 mg/kg). At 2 hours, the liver was excised and perfused ex vivo with taurocholate (TC)-containing Krebs-Ringer solution under monitoring bile output and NO2 in the perfusate and tissue cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels as indices of NO production. The endotoxin treatment evoked a marked decrease in the bile acid-dependent bile formation concurrent with the increasing NO2 output, cGMP elevation, and a reduction of hepatic adenosine triphosphate (ATP) contents and oxygen consumption. Perfusion with 1 mmol/L aminoguanidine (AG), an inhibitor of inducible NO synthase, but not with L-nitroarginine methyl ester, an inhibitor of the constitutive form of the enzyme, significantly reversed the endotoxin-induced increment of the bile formation in concert with the recovery of oxygen consumption and ATP levels. Laser confocal microfluorography of the liver lobules using rhodamine 123 (Rh), a fluoroprobe sensitive to mitochondrial membrane potential, revealed that endotoxin elicited a significant mitochondrial dysfunction panlobularly. The AG administration reversed the endotoxin-induced decrease in mitochondrial membrane potential. Collectively, up-regulation of NO by inducible NO synthase accounts for a mechanism through which endotoxin impairs the bile formation, and its suppression serves as a therapeutic strategy for improvement of hepatobiliary function. PMID:9425925

  17. Opposite effects of the same drug: reversal of topical analgesia by nocebo information.

    PubMed

    Aslaksen, Per Matti; Zwarg, Maria Lorentze; Eilertsen, Hans-Ingvald Hage; Gorecka, Marta Maria; Bjørkedal, Espen

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have shown that psychological factors such as learning, expectation, and emotions can affect pharmacological treatment and shape both favorable and adverse effects of drugs. This study investigated whether nocebo information provided during administration of an analgesic cream could reverse topical analgesia to hyperalgesia. Furthermore, we tested whether nocebo effects were mediated by negative emotional activation. A total of 142 healthy volunteers (73 women) were randomized into 6 groups. A topical analgesic cream (Emla) was administered together with suggestions of analgesia in 1 group, whereas another group received Emla with suggestions of hyperalgesia. Two other groups received a placebo cream together with the same information as the groups receiving Emla. A fifth group received Emla with no specific information about the effect, and the sixth group received no treatment but the same pain induction as the other groups. Heat pain stimulation (48°C) was administered during a pretest and 2 posttests. Pain was continuously recorded during stimulation, and measures of subjective stress and blood pressure were obtained before the pretest, after the application of cream, and after the posttests. The results revealed that pain was significantly lower in the group receiving Emla with positive information and highest in the groups receiving suggestions of hyperalgesia, regardless of whether Emla or the placebo was administered. Mediation analyses showed that stress and blood pressure mediated hyperalgesia after nocebo suggestions. These results suggest that nocebo information can reverse topical analgesia and that emotional factors can explain a significant proportion of variance in nocebo hyperalgesia.

  18. Reversal of negative pressure ventilation-induced lower esophageal sphincter dysfunction with metoclopramide.

    PubMed

    Marino, W D; Pitchumoni, C S

    1992-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated that lower esophageal sphincter (LES) dysfunction is induced in healthy volunteers placed in negative pressure body ventilators. This is important, because regurgitation of gastric contents and peptic esophagitis are frequent complications of the use of such ventilators. The present study was conducted to determine whether LES dysfunction during the use of these ventilators also occurs in patients with chronic respiratory failure, and whether this dysfunction can be pharmacologically reversed. Seven patients with documented chronic respiratory failure due to COPD were studied. After an overnight fast, esophageal, LES, and gastric pressures were simultaneously recorded in the unassisted state and during mechanically assisted ventilation, after which 10 mg iv metoclopramide were administered to each patient, and pressure recordings were continued for 1 h more. In all seven patients, baseline LES pressures were in the normal range. During the inspiratory cycle of mechanical ventilation, five of the seven patients demonstrated a significant reduction in LES pressure, whereas it was unchanged in the other two. Within 15 min of metoclopramide administration, there was an increase in LES pressure to baseline levels in the five patients in which a significant decrease in LES pressure had occurred. Metoclopramide did not have any effect on the LES pressure of the other two patients. Thus, we conclude that in patients with chronic respiratory failure, as in normals, there is a subset of individuals in whom negative pressure mechanical ventilatory assistance induces dysfunction of the LES, and that this dysfunction is reversible with metoclopramide.

  19. Time-reversed, flow-reversed ballistics simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Zernow, L.; Chapyak, E. J.; Scheffler, D. R.

    2001-01-01

    Two-dimensional simulations of planar sheet jet formation are studied to examine the hydrodynamic issues involved when simulations are carried out in the inverse direction, that is, with reversed time and flow. Both a realistic copper equation of state and a shockless equation of state were used. These studies are an initial step in evaluating this technique as a ballistics design tool.

  20. Administration of nitrite after chlorine gas exposure prevents lung injury: effect of administration modality.

    PubMed

    Samal, Andrey A; Honavar, Jaideep; Brandon, Angela; Bradley, Kelley M; Doran, Stephen; Liu, Yanping; Dunaway, Chad; Steele, Chad; Postlethwait, Edward M; Squadrito, Giuseppe L; Fanucchi, Michelle V; Matalon, Sadis; Patel, Rakesh P

    2012-10-01

    Cl(2) gas toxicity is complex and occurs during and after exposure, leading to acute lung injury (ALI) and reactive airway syndrome (RAS). Moreover, Cl(2) exposure can occur in diverse situations encompassing mass casualty scenarios, highlighting the need for postexposure therapies that are efficacious and amenable to rapid and easy administration. In this study, we assessed the efficacy of a single dose of nitrite (1 mg/kg) to decrease ALI when administered to rats via intraperitoneal (ip) or intramuscular (im) injection 30 min after Cl(2) exposure. Exposure of rats to Cl(2) gas (400 ppm, 30 min) significantly increased ALI and caused RAS 6-24h postexposure as indexed by BAL sampling of lung surface protein and polymorphonucleocytes (PMNs) and increased airway resistance and elastance before and after methacholine challenge. Intraperitoneal nitrite decreased Cl(2)-dependent increases in BAL protein but not PMNs. In contrast im nitrite decreased BAL PMN levels without decreasing BAL protein in a xanthine oxidoreductase-dependent manner. Histological evaluation of airways 6h postexposure showed significant bronchial epithelium exfoliation and inflammatory injury in Cl(2)-exposed rats. Both ip and im nitrite improved airway histology compared to Cl(2) gas alone, but more coverage of the airway by cuboidal or columnar epithelium was observed with im compared to ip nitrite. Airways were rendered more sensitive to methacholine-induced resistance and elastance after Cl(2) gas exposure. Interestingly, im nitrite, but not ip nitrite, significantly decreased airway sensitivity to methacholine challenge. Further evaluation and comparison of im and ip therapy showed a twofold increase in circulating nitrite levels with the former, which was associated with reversal of post-Cl(2) exposure-dependent increases in circulating leukocytes. Halving the im nitrite dose resulted in no effect in PMN accumulation but significant reduction of BAL protein levels, indicating a distinct

  1. Marburg Virus Reverse Genetics Systems

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Kristina Maria; Mühlberger, Elke

    2016-01-01

    The highly pathogenic Marburg virus (MARV) is a member of the Filoviridae family and belongs to the group of nonsegmented negative-strand RNA viruses. Reverse genetics systems established for MARV have been used to study various aspects of the viral replication cycle, analyze host responses, image viral infection, and screen for antivirals. This article provides an overview of the currently established MARV reverse genetic systems based on minigenomes, infectious virus-like particles and full-length clones, and the research that has been conducted using these systems. PMID:27338448

  2. Stagnation point reverse flow combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinn, Ben T. (Inventor); Neumeier, Yedidia (Inventor); Seitzman, Jerry M. (Inventor); Jagoda, Jechiel (Inventor); Weksler, Yoav (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A method for combusting a combustible fuel includes providing a vessel having an opening near a proximate end and a closed distal end defining a combustion chamber. A combustible reactants mixture is presented into the combustion chamber. The combustible reactants mixture is ignited creating a flame and combustion products. The closed end of the combustion chamber is utilized for directing combustion products toward the opening of the combustion chamber creating a reverse flow of combustion products within the combustion chamber. The reverse flow of combustion products is intermixed with combustible reactants mixture to maintain the flame.

  3. Reversing: A Fundamental Idea in Computer Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armoni, Michal; Ginat, David

    2008-01-01

    Reversing is the notion of thinking or working in reverse. Computer science textbooks and tutors recognize it primarily in the form of recursion. However, recursion is only one form of reversing. Reversing appears in the computer science curriculum in many other forms, at various intellectual levels, in a variety of fundamental courses. As such,…

  4. Thyroxine administration prevents matrilineal intergenerational consequences of in utero ethanol exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Tunc-Ozcan, Elif; Harper, Kathryn M; Graf, Evan N; Redei, Eva E

    2016-06-01

    The neurodevelopmental fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is characterized by cognitive and behavioral deficits in the offspring. Conferring the deficits to the next generation would increase overall FASD disease burden and prevention of this transmission could be highly significant. Prior studies showed the reversal of these behavioral deficits by low dose thyroxine (T4) supplementation to the ethanol-consuming mothers. Here we aim to identify whether prenatal ethanol (PE) exposure impairs hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in the second-generation (F2) progeny, and whether T4 administration to the ethanol-consuming dam can prevent it. Sprague-Dawley (S) dams received control diets (ad libitum and nutritional control) or ethanol containing liquid diet with and without simultaneous T4 (0.3mg/L diet) administration. Their offspring (SS F1) were mated with naive Brown Norway (B) males and females generating the SB F2 and BS F2 progeny. Hippocampus-dependent contextual fear memory and hippocampal expression of the thyroid hormone-regulated type 3 deiodinase, (Dio3) and neurogranin (Nrgn) were assessed. SS F1 PE-exposed females and their SB F2 progeny exhibited fear memory deficits. T4 administration to the mothers of F1 females reversed these deficits. Although SS F1 PE-exposed males also experienced fear memory deficit, this was neither transmitted to their BS F2 offspring nor reversed by prenatal T4 treatment. Hippocampal Dio3 and Nrgn expression showed similar pattern of changes. Grandmaternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy affects fear memory of the matrilineal second-generation progeny. Low dose T4 supplementation prevents this process likely via altering allele-specific and total expression of Dio3 in the hippocampus. PMID:27090562

  5. Thyroxine administration prevents matrilineal intergenerational consequences of in utero ethanol exposure in rats.

    PubMed

    Tunc-Ozcan, Elif; Harper, Kathryn M; Graf, Evan N; Redei, Eva E

    2016-06-01

    The neurodevelopmental fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) is characterized by cognitive and behavioral deficits in the offspring. Conferring the deficits to the next generation would increase overall FASD disease burden and prevention of this transmission could be highly significant. Prior studies showed the reversal of these behavioral deficits by low dose thyroxine (T4) supplementation to the ethanol-consuming mothers. Here we aim to identify whether prenatal ethanol (PE) exposure impairs hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in the second-generation (F2) progeny, and whether T4 administration to the ethanol-consuming dam can prevent it. Sprague-Dawley (S) dams received control diets (ad libitum and nutritional control) or ethanol containing liquid diet with and without simultaneous T4 (0.3mg/L diet) administration. Their offspring (SS F1) were mated with naive Brown Norway (B) males and females generating the SB F2 and BS F2 progeny. Hippocampus-dependent contextual fear memory and hippocampal expression of the thyroid hormone-regulated type 3 deiodinase, (Dio3) and neurogranin (Nrgn) were assessed. SS F1 PE-exposed females and their SB F2 progeny exhibited fear memory deficits. T4 administration to the mothers of F1 females reversed these deficits. Although SS F1 PE-exposed males also experienced fear memory deficit, this was neither transmitted to their BS F2 offspring nor reversed by prenatal T4 treatment. Hippocampal Dio3 and Nrgn expression showed similar pattern of changes. Grandmaternal ethanol consumption during pregnancy affects fear memory of the matrilineal second-generation progeny. Low dose T4 supplementation prevents this process likely via altering allele-specific and total expression of Dio3 in the hippocampus.

  6. Magnetic flux trapping during field reversal in the formation of a field-reversed configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinhauer, Loren C.

    1985-11-01

    The flow of plasma and magnetic flux toward a wall is examined in a slab geometry where the magnetic field is parallel to the wall. Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) flow with a quasisteady approximation is assumed that reduces the problem to three coupled ordinary differential equations. The calculated behavior shows that a thin current sheath is established at the wall in which a variety of phenomena appear, including significant resistive heating and rapid deceleration of the plasma flow. The sheath physics determines the speed at which flux and plasma flow toward the wall. The model has been applied to the field-reversal phase of a field-reversed theta pinch, during which the reduced magnetic field near the wall drives an outward flow of plasma and magnetic flux. The analysis leads to approximate expressions for the instantaneous flow speed, the loss of magnetic flux during the field reversal phase, the integrated heat flow to the wall, and the highest possible magnetic flux retained after reversal. Predictions from this model are compared with previous time-dependent MHD calculations and with experimental results from the TRX-1 [Proceedings of the 4th Symposium on the Physics and Technology of Compact Toroids, 27-29 October 1981 (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, 1982), p. 61] and TRX-2 [Proceedings of the 6th U.S. Symposium on Compact Toroid Research, 20-23 February, 1984 (Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ, 1984), p. 154] experiments.

  7. Significant Tsunami Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunbar, P. K.; Furtney, M.; McLean, S. J.; Sweeney, A. D.

    2014-12-01

    Tsunamis have inflicted death and destruction on the coastlines of the world throughout history. The occurrence of tsunamis and the resulting effects have been collected and studied as far back as the second millennium B.C. The knowledge gained from cataloging and examining these events has led to significant changes in our understanding of tsunamis, tsunami sources, and methods to mitigate the effects of tsunamis. The most significant, not surprisingly, are often the most devastating, such as the 2011 Tohoku, Japan earthquake and tsunami. The goal of this poster is to give a brief overview of the occurrence of tsunamis and then focus specifically on several significant tsunamis. There are various criteria to determine the most significant tsunamis: the number of deaths, amount of damage, maximum runup height, had a major impact on tsunami science or policy, etc. As a result, descriptions will include some of the most costly (2011 Tohoku, Japan), the most deadly (2004 Sumatra, 1883 Krakatau), and the highest runup ever observed (1958 Lituya Bay, Alaska). The discovery of the Cascadia subduction zone as the source of the 1700 Japanese "Orphan" tsunami and a future tsunami threat to the U.S. northwest coast, contributed to the decision to form the U.S. National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program. The great Lisbon earthquake of 1755 marked the beginning of the modern era of seismology. Knowledge gained from the 1964 Alaska earthquake and tsunami helped confirm the theory of plate tectonics. The 1946 Alaska, 1952 Kuril Islands, 1960 Chile, 1964 Alaska, and the 2004 Banda Aceh, tsunamis all resulted in warning centers or systems being established.The data descriptions on this poster were extracted from NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) global historical tsunami database. Additional information about these tsunamis, as well as water level data can be found by accessing the NGDC website www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/

  8. Reverse genetics: Its origins and prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, P. )

    1991-04-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a gene and its flanking segments alone will not tell us how its expression is regulated during development and differentiation, or in response to environmental changes. To comprehend the physiological significance of the molecular details requires biological analysis. Recombinant DNA techniques provide a powerful experimental approach. A strategy termed reverse genetics' utilizes the analysis of the activities of mutant and normal genes and experimentally constructed mutants to explore the relationship between gene structure and function thereby helping elucidate the relationship between genotype and phenotype.

  9. Sugammadex: A Review of Neuromuscular Blockade Reversal.

    PubMed

    Keating, Gillian M

    2016-07-01

    Sugammadex (Bridion(®)) is a modified γ-cyclodextrin that reverses the effect of the steroidal nondepolarizing neuromuscular blocking agents rocuronium and vecuronium. Intravenous sugammadex resulted in rapid, predictable recovery from moderate and deep neuromuscular blockade in patients undergoing surgery who received rocuronium or vecuronium. Recovery from moderate neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 2 mg/kg than with neostigmine, and recovery from deep neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster with sugammadex 4 mg/kg than with neostigmine or spontaneous recovery. In addition, recovery from neuromuscular blockade was significantly faster when sugammadex 16 mg/kg was administered 3 min after rocuronium than when patients spontaneously recovered from succinylcholine. Sugammadex also demonstrated efficacy in various special patient populations, including patients with pulmonary disease, cardiac disease, hepatic dysfunction or myasthenia gravis and morbidly obese patients. Intravenous sugammadex was generally well tolerated. In conclusion, sugammadex is an important option for the rapid reversal of rocuronium- or vecuronium-induced neuromuscular blockade. PMID:27324403

  10. The Administrative Power Grab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Administrative power for some school teachers can be an aphrodisiac that can be applied negatively, especially when a leader has devastating instinct for the weaknesses of others. A leader's intellect and heart closes shop and ceases to function when drunk on power. In this article, the author describes how the use of administrative power can be…

  11. Innovation in Administrator Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Don

    An innovative administrator preparation program based on guidelines established by national boards and commissions is described in this paper. The California State University, Fresno, administrator education curriculum was reorganized by faculty and an advisory committee of 11 superintendents to meet the needs of local school districts. The…

  12. Migrant Education Administrative Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Compensatory Education.

    Relating specifically to the North Carolina migrant education program's administrative responsibilities, this guide is designed to aid administrators in program management, monitoring project activities, project evaluation, self-assessment, determining needs for training and staff development, site-visit preparation, policy development, and…

  13. Administration of Computer Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Gene F.

    Computing at Stanford University has, until recently, been performed at one of five facilities. The Stanford hospital operates an IBM 370/135 mainly for administrative use. The university business office has an IBM 370/145 for its administrative needs and support of the medical clinic. Under the supervision of the Stanford Computation Center are…

  14. Issues in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    School administrators need to study and analyze the pros and cons of issues before making decisions. Ultimately, decisions need to be made by administrators as to which philosophies of education to implement in resolving conflicting points of view. More research studies would lead to an increased number of syntheses of the pros and cons of certain…

  15. Justifying Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Colin; Lakomski, Gabriele

    1993-01-01

    The traditional conceptions of science dominating educational administration are mistaken. Unacceptable epistemologies, like those implicit in logical positivism, justify knowledge solely in terms of empirical adequacy. An improved science of educational administration embraces a coherent global theory accounting for all the phenomena of human…

  16. Test Administration Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kirk A.; Bergstrom, Betty A.

    2013-01-01

    The need for increased exam security, improved test formats, more flexible scheduling, better measurement, and more efficient administrative processes has caused testing agencies to consider converting the administration of their exams from paper-and-pencil to computer-based testing (CBT). Many decisions must be made in order to provide an optimal…

  17. Champions of Children. Administrators . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, John; Olds, H. Robert

    Today, in an era of taxpayer revolts, lack of clarity in values, and changing family structure, children need advocates in the political arena as well as in the schools. This pamphlet suggests that administrators are in an excellent position to defend the rights of children on all fronts. It focuses on what administrators have done and specific…

  18. The School Personnel Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Rodney F.

    This paper provides an overview of the development of the school-personnel administrator role. It first describes the influence of the science-management and human-relations movements and the behavioral sciences on personnel administration and human resource management. It next discusses the role of the personnel-performance-appraisal system and…

  19. Tenure for Administrators?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyer, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The practice of granting tenure to academic administrators, especially presidents and academic deans, seems fairly prevalent. However, it is important to consider the possible advantages and disadvantages carefully before making such an offer. Boards interested in attracting talented administrators empowered to do what is in the best interest of…

  20. 47 CFR 54.715 - Administrative expenses of the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Administrative expenses of the Administrator. 54.715 Section 54.715 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.715 Administrative expenses of the Administrator. (a) The annual administrative expenses...

  1. Time-forward speech intelligibility in time-reversed rooms

    PubMed Central

    Longworth-Reed, Laricia; Brandewie, Eugene; Zahorik, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    The effects of time-reversed room acoustics on word recognition abilities were examined using virtual auditory space techniques, which allowed for temporal manipulation of the room acoustics independent of the speech source signals. Two acoustical conditions were tested: one in which room acoustics were simulated in a realistic time-forward fashion and one in which the room acoustics were reversed in time, causing reverberation and acoustic reflections to precede the direct-path energy. Significant decreases in speech intelligibility—from 89% on average to less than 25%—were observed between the time-forward and time-reversed rooms. This result is not predictable using standard methods for estimating speech intelligibility based on the modulation transfer function of the room. It may instead be due to increased degradation of onset information in the speech signals when room acoustics are time-reversed. PMID:19173377

  2. Tales of significance.

    PubMed

    Bell, Graham

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment, the authors were interested in testing the effect of a small molecule inhibitor on the ratio of males and females in the offspring of their model Dipteran species. The authors report that in a wild-type population, ~50 % of offspring are male. They then test the effect of treating females with the chemical, which they think might affect the male:female ratio compared with the untreated group. They claim that there is a statistically significant increase in the percentage of males produced and conclude that the drug affects sex ratios. PMID:27338560

  3. A Note on Reverse Derivations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samman, M.

    2005-01-01

    In this note, the notion of reverse derivation is studied. It is shown that in the class of semiprime rings, this notion coincides with the usual derivation when it maps a semiprime ring into its centre. However, we provide some examples to show that it is not the case in general.

  4. CAPSULE REPORT: REVERSE OSMOSIS PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A failure analysis has been completed for the reverse osmosis (RO) process. The focus was on process failures that result in releases of liquids and vapors to the environment. The report includes the following: 1) A description of RO and coverage of the principles behind the proc...

  5. Reversible colour change in Arthropoda.

    PubMed

    Umbers, Kate D L; Fabricant, Scott A; Gawryszewski, Felipe M; Seago, Ainsley E; Herberstein, Marie E

    2014-11-01

    The mechanisms and functions of reversible colour change in arthropods are highly diverse despite, or perhaps due to, the presence of an exoskeleton. Physiological colour changes, which have been recorded in 90 arthropod species, are rapid and are the result of changes in the positioning of microstructures or pigments, or in the refractive index of layers in the integument. By contrast, morphological colour changes, documented in 31 species, involve the anabolism or catabolism of components (e.g. pigments) directly related to the observable colour. In this review we highlight the diversity of mechanisms by which reversible colour change occurs and the evolutionary context and diversity of arthropod taxa in which it has been observed. Further, we discuss the functions of reversible colour change so far proposed, review the limited behavioural and ecological data, and argue that the field requires phylogenetically controlled approaches to understanding the evolution of reversible colour change. Finally, we encourage biologists to explore new model systems for colour change and to engage scientists from other disciplines; continued cross-disciplinary collaboration is the most promising approach to this nexus of biology, physics, and chemistry.

  6. Law: Reverse Discrimination, Legal Briefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nation's Schools and Colleges, 1974

    1974-01-01

    Just as schools and colleges are starting to hire more black and female faculty members through affirmative action programs, there is a new battle cry on the civil rights front: "reverse discrimination." Qualified whites claim they are being shoved aside in the scramble for less-qualified blacks, Chicanos, American Indians, and members of other…

  7. Quotas Are Not Reverse Discrimination

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonald, Gabrielle K.

    1975-01-01

    The findings of the Morrow v. Crisler and NAACP v. Allen civil rights cases are discussed. It is concluded from these employment discrimination cases that quotas are not reverse discrimination because no one has the right to continue to receive the benefits of racial discrimination at the expense of others. (LBH)

  8. Vasectomy: clinical aspects and reversibility.

    PubMed

    Muangman, V

    1979-12-01

    studies involved 185 men who had a vasectomy performed at Ramathibodi Hospital. The postvasectomized man usually feels scrotal ache or discomfort for a few days. The testicular size will not change. Approximately 50% of vasectomized men showed sperm antibodies in their serum after 6 months to 1 year, which gradually diminished at 1 1/2-2 years. The studies did not reveal any significant changes in psychosexual behavior. With the standard method of vasovasostomy the rate of pregnancy of 30% is acceptable by many. Microsurgery is introduced into this field as there is a high rate of pregnancy requirement after vasectomy reversal.

  9. Geomagnetic Dipole Strength and Reversal Rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valet, J.; Meynadier, L.; Guyodo, Y.

    2004-12-01

    We present a first 2 million years long composite curve obtained after stacking records of relative paleointensity from a selection of sedimentary sequences. The composite Sint-2000 record was calibrated using the virtual dipole moments (VDMs) of the 2004 updated volcanic database of absolute paleointensity over 0.1 Myr long intervals. The value of the time-averaged VDM (7.46+/-1.16 x 1022 Am2) for the past 0.8Myr was used for calibration and the mean values of the successive 0.1 Myr intervals were found in very good agreement with the relative paleointensity for the same periods. A striking characteristic of this Sint-2000 curve is the succession of periods with different mean values of paleointensity. During the Brunhes chron the dipole oscillated around a value of 7.51+/-1.66 x 1022 Am2, which was significantly larger than during the previous 400 kyrs (5.3 +/- 1.5 x 1022 Am2). To provide a more quantitative picture of field strength as a function of reversal frequency, we calculated successive running averages of the field intensity over 100 kyrs long intervals and found that the time-averaged field was higher during periods without reversals. We also observe that the amplitude of the short-term oscillations remained the same. As a consequence, less intervals of very low intensity are expected during periods associated with a strong average dipole moment, whereas more excursions or other instabilities are produced during periods of weak field intensity. The relation between the mean dipole strength and the frequency of reversals suggests also the existence of a large field during long periods without reversals, under the assumption that they would be governed by the same processes. Prior to reversals, the axial dipole decays during 60 to 80 kyrs, but rebuilds itself in the opposite direction much more rapidly, in a few thousand years at most. These time constants suggest that the decay phase is caused by diffusion while advection would dominate the dipole

  10. Time reversal invariance in polarized neutron decay

    SciTech Connect

    Wasserman, E.G.

    1994-03-01

    An experiment to measure the time reversal invariance violating (T-violating) triple correlation (D) in the decay of free polarized neutrons has been developed. The detector design incorporates a detector geometry that provides a significant improvement in the sensitivity over that used in the most sensitive of previous experiments. A prototype detector was tested in measurements with a cold neutron beam. Data resulting from the tests are presented. A detailed calculation of systematic effects has been performed and new diagnostic techniques that allow these effects to be measured have been developed. As the result of this work, a new experiment is under way that will improve the sensitivity to D to 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} or better. With higher neutron flux a statistical sensitivity of the order 3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} is ultimately expected. The decay of free polarized neutrons (n {yields} p + e + {bar v}{sub e}) is used to search for T-violation by measuring the triple correlation of the neutron spin polarization, and the electron and proton momenta ({sigma}{sub n} {center_dot} p{sub p} {times} p{sub e}). This correlation changes sign under reversal of the motion. Since final state effects in neutron decay are small, a nonzero coefficient, D, of this correlation indicates the violation of time reversal invariance. D is measured by comparing the numbers of coincidences in electron and proton detectors arranged symmetrically about a longitudinally polarized neutron beam. Particular care must be taken to eliminate residual asymmetries in the detectors or beam as these can lead to significant false effects. The Standard Model predicts negligible T-violating effects in neutron decay. Extensions to the Standard Model include new interactions some of which include CP-violating components. Some of these make first order contributions to D.

  11. Statistical or biological significance?

    PubMed

    Saxon, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Oat plants grown at an agricultural research facility produce higher yields in Field 1 than in Field 2, under well fertilised conditions and with similar weather exposure; all oat plants in both fields are healthy and show no sign of disease. In this study, the authors hypothesised that the soil microbial community might be different in each field, and these differences might explain the difference in oat plant growth. They carried out a metagenomic analysis of the 16 s ribosomal 'signature' sequences from bacteria in 50 randomly located soil samples in each field to determine the composition of the bacterial community. The study identified >1000 species, most of which were present in both fields. The authors identified two plant growth-promoting species that were significantly reduced in soil from Field 2 (Student's t-test P < 0.05), and concluded that these species might have contributed to reduced yield. PMID:26541972

  12. Anthropological significance of phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Saugstad, L F

    1975-01-01

    The highest incidence rates of phenylketonuria (PKU) have been observed in Ireland and Scotlant. Parents heterozygous for PKU in Norway differ significantly from the general population in the Rhesus, Kell and PGM systems. The parents investigated showed an excess of Rh negative, Kell plus and PGM type 1 individuals, which makes them similar to the present populations in Ireland and Scotlant. It is postulated that the heterozygotes for PKU in Norway are descended from a completely assimilated sub-population of Celtic origin, who came or were brought here, 1ooo years ago. Bronze objects of Western European (Scottish, Irish) origin, found in Viking graves widely distributed in Norway, have been taken as evidence of Vikings returning with loot (including a number of Celts) from Western Viking settlements. The continuity of residence since the Viking age in most habitable parts of Norway, and what seems to be a nearly complete regional relationship between the sites where Viking graves contain western imported objects and the birthplaces of grandparents of PKUs identified in Norway, lend further support to the hypothesis that the heterozygotes for PKU in Norway are descended from a completely assimilated subpopulation. The remarkable resemblance between Iceland and Ireland, in respect of several genetic markers (including the Rhesus, PGM and Kell systems), is considered to be an expression of a similar proportion of people of Celtic origin in each of the two countries. Their identical, high incidence rates of PKU are regarded as further evidence of this. The significant decline in the incidence of PKU when one passes from Ireland, Scotland and Iceland, to Denmark and on to Norway and Sweden, is therefore explained as being related to a reduction in the proportion of inhabitants of Celtic extraction in the respective populations.

  13. Reversion phenomena of Cu-Cr alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, S.; Nagata, K.; Kobayashi, S.

    1985-01-01

    Cu-Cr alloys which were given various aging and reversion treatments were investigated in terms of electrical resistivity and hardness. Transmission electron microscopy was one technique employed. Some results obtained are as follows: the increment of electrical resistivity after the reversion at a constant temperature decreases as the aging temperature rises. In a constant aging condition, the increment of electrical resistivity after the reversion increases, and the time required for a maximum reversion becomes shorter as the reversion temperature rises. The reversion phenomena can be repeated, but its amount decreases rapidly by repetition. At first, the amount of reversion increases with aging time and reaches its maximum, and then tends to decrease again. Hardness changes by the reversion are very small, but the hardness tends to soften slightly. Any changes in transmission electron micrographs by the reversion treatment cannot be detected.

  14. L-tyrosine administration increases acetylcholinesterase activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Vieira, Júlia S; Scaini, Giselli; Ghedim, Fernando V; Deroza, Pedro F; Zugno, Alexandra I; Pereira, Talita C B; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Bogo, Maurício R; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L

    2012-12-01

    Tyrosinemia is a rare genetic disease caused by mutations on genes that codify enzymes responsible for tyrosine metabolism. Considering that tyrosinemics patients usually present symptoms associated with central nervous system alterations that ranges from slight decreases in intelligence to severe mental retardation, we decided to investigate whether acute and chronic administration of L-tyrosine in rats would affect acetylcholinesterase mRNA expression and enzymatic activity during their development. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (10 and 30 days old) were killed one hour after a single intraperitoneal L-tyrosine injection (500 mg/kg) or saline. Chronic administration consisted of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline injections 12 h apart for 24 days in Wistar rats (7 days old) and rats were killed 12 h after last injection. Acetylcholinesterase activity was measured by Ellman's method and acetylcholinesterase expression was carried out by a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. We observed that acute (10 and 30 days old rats) and chronic L-tyrosine administration increased acetylcholinesterase activity in serum and all tested brain areas (hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex) when compared to control group. Moreover, there was a significant decrease in mRNA levels of acetylcholinesterase in hippocampus was observed after acute protocol (10 and 30 days old rats) and in striatum after chronic protocol. In case these alterations also occur in the brain of the patients, our results may explain, at least in part, the neurological sequelae associated with high plasma concentrations of tyrosine seen in patients affected by tyrosinemia type II. PMID:23046746

  15. L-tyrosine administration increases acetylcholinesterase activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Gabriela K; Carvalho-Silva, Milena; Gonçalves, Cinara L; Vieira, Júlia S; Scaini, Giselli; Ghedim, Fernando V; Deroza, Pedro F; Zugno, Alexandra I; Pereira, Talita C B; Oliveira, Giovanna M T; Kist, Luiza W; Bogo, Maurício R; Schuck, Patrícia F; Ferreira, Gustavo C; Streck, Emilio L

    2012-12-01

    Tyrosinemia is a rare genetic disease caused by mutations on genes that codify enzymes responsible for tyrosine metabolism. Considering that tyrosinemics patients usually present symptoms associated with central nervous system alterations that ranges from slight decreases in intelligence to severe mental retardation, we decided to investigate whether acute and chronic administration of L-tyrosine in rats would affect acetylcholinesterase mRNA expression and enzymatic activity during their development. In our acute protocol, Wistar rats (10 and 30 days old) were killed one hour after a single intraperitoneal L-tyrosine injection (500 mg/kg) or saline. Chronic administration consisted of L-tyrosine (500 mg/kg) or saline injections 12 h apart for 24 days in Wistar rats (7 days old) and rats were killed 12 h after last injection. Acetylcholinesterase activity was measured by Ellman's method and acetylcholinesterase expression was carried out by a semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay. We observed that acute (10 and 30 days old rats) and chronic L-tyrosine administration increased acetylcholinesterase activity in serum and all tested brain areas (hippocampus, striatum and cerebral cortex) when compared to control group. Moreover, there was a significant decrease in mRNA levels of acetylcholinesterase in hippocampus was observed after acute protocol (10 and 30 days old rats) and in striatum after chronic protocol. In case these alterations also occur in the brain of the patients, our results may explain, at least in part, the neurological sequelae associated with high plasma concentrations of tyrosine seen in patients affected by tyrosinemia type II.

  16. Fungi producing significant mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of microfungi that are known to cause sickness or death in humans or animals. Although many such toxic metabolites are known, it is generally agreed that only a few are significant in causing disease: aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, and ergot alkaloids. These toxins are produced by just a few species from the common genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, and Claviceps. All Aspergillus and Penicillium species either are commensals, growing in crops without obvious signs of pathogenicity, or invade crops after harvest and produce toxins during drying and storage. In contrast, the important Fusarium and Claviceps species infect crops before harvest. The most important Aspergillus species, occurring in warmer climates, are A. flavus and A. parasiticus, which produce aflatoxins in maize, groundnuts, tree nuts, and, less frequently, other commodities. The main ochratoxin A producers, A. ochraceus and A. carbonarius, commonly occur in grapes, dried vine fruits, wine, and coffee. Penicillium verrucosum also produces ochratoxin A but occurs only in cool temperate climates, where it infects small grains. F. verticillioides is ubiquitous in maize, with an endophytic nature, and produces fumonisins, which are generally more prevalent when crops are under drought stress or suffer excessive insect damage. It has recently been shown that Aspergillus niger also produces fumonisins, and several commodities may be affected. F. graminearum, which is the major producer of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone, is pathogenic on maize, wheat, and barley and produces these toxins whenever it infects these grains before harvest. Also included is a short section on Claviceps purpurea, which produces sclerotia among the seeds in grasses, including wheat, barley, and triticale. The main thrust of the chapter contains information on the identification of these fungi and their morphological characteristics, as well as factors

  17. Thoughts for New Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCrosse, E. Robert

    1977-01-01

    Discusses issues in program administration, with specific reference to preschool programs. Some of the issues discussed include coping with conflict, leadership, the sharing of power, and honesty. A short annotated bibliography is included. (BD)

  18. Evaluation of Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Edmund G.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines are presented for the evaluation of college administrators: (1) purposes of the evaluation; (2) approaches to evaluation; (3) criteria for evaluation; (4) participants or evaluators in the process; and (5) evaluation results and use of results. (GDC)

  19. Serving the Space Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jack E.; Thompson, Arthur W.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the current program was to establish an upward mobility program that afforded employees an opportunity to improve their credibility in job opportunity selection under the directives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. (Author/RK)

  20. Goldstone (GDSCC) administrative computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, H.

    1981-01-01

    The GDSCC Data Processing Unit provides various administrative computing services for Goldstone. Those activities, including finance, manpower and station utilization, deep-space station scheduling and engineering change order (ECO) control are discussed.

  1. Administrators Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Fred V.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is presented of the issues and concerns discussed and the recommendations made by the American Vocational Association's (AVA) Administration Policy Committee during its meeting at the 1975 AVA Convention. (AJ)

  2. Reversal agents in anaesthesia and critical care

    PubMed Central

    Pani, Nibedita; Dongare, Pradeep A; Mishra, Rajeeb Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Despite the advent of short and ultra-short acting drugs, an in-depth knowledge of the reversal agents used is a necessity for any anaesthesiologist. Reversal agents are defined as any drug used to reverse the effects of anaesthetics, narcotics or potentially toxic agents. The controversy on the routine reversal of neuromuscular blockade still exists. The advent of newer reversal agents like sugammadex have made the use of steroidal neuromuscular blockers like rocuronium feasible in rapid sequence induction situations. We made a review of the older reversal agents and those still under investigation for drugs that are regularly used in our anaesthesia practice. PMID:26644615

  3. [Reverse genetics and prenatal diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Plauchu, H

    1988-05-01

    "Reverse" genetics is a research process consisting in finding the gene of a disease, then in "descending" toward the final product that it codes. This reasoning is the reverse of the one normally used which "ascends from the protein to the gene" and can be applied to the discovery of the pathogenic mechanism of a disease. There are numerous spin-offs of this new type of approach for prenatal diagnosis (PND). Thus, the discovery of polymorphic tracers surrounding the gene enables an indirect PND in informative families. Reliability is great if we have many probes at our disposal. Then, discovery of the gene itself permits a direct PND with the use of intragenic probes and synthetic oligonucleotides.

  4. Reverse osmosis water purification system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlstrom, H. G.; Hames, P. S.; Menninger, F. J.

    1986-01-01

    A reverse osmosis water purification system, which uses a programmable controller (PC) as the control system, was designed and built to maintain the cleanliness and level of water for various systems of a 64-m antenna. The installation operates with other equipment of the antenna at the Goldstone Deep Space Communication Complex. The reverse osmosis system was designed to be fully automatic; with the PC, many complex sequential and timed logic networks were easily implemented and are modified. The PC monitors water levels, pressures, flows, control panel requests, and set points on analog meters; with this information various processes are initiated, monitored, modified, halted, or eliminated as required by the equipment being supplied pure water.

  5. Reversing the Brazil Nut Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewig, F.; Vandewalle, N.

    2005-12-01

    We propose a lattice model for studying the Brazil Nut Effect (BNE), i.e. the phase segregation occuring when a granular material is vertically shaked. The model considers the tap intensity and the mobility μ of the grains as the main physical parameters. Different mobilities for different grain species lead to segregation (BNE) patterns, reverse segregation (RBNE) patterns, “sandwhich" layered structures or vertical domains. A phase diagram (decompaction χ, mobility difference between both species Δ μ) is obtained in which the different phases are emphasized. In a narrow region of the diagram, different phases coexist. It is shown that the BNE segregation could be reversed by increasing the tap intensity or the characteristics of the grains. Numerical results are compared with earlier experimental works.

  6. Fronto-temporal white matter connectivity predicts reversal learning errors

    PubMed Central

    Alm, Kylie H.; Rolheiser, Tyler; Mohamed, Feroze B.; Olson, Ingrid R.

    2015-01-01

    Each day, we make hundreds of decisions. In some instances, these decisions are guided by our innate needs; in other instances they are guided by memory. Probabilistic reversal learning tasks exemplify the close relationship between decision making and memory, as subjects are exposed to repeated pairings of a stimulus choice with a reward or punishment outcome. After stimulus–outcome associations have been learned, the associated reward contingencies are reversed, and participants are not immediately aware of this reversal. Individual differences in the tendency to choose the previously rewarded stimulus reveal differences in the tendency to make poorly considered, inflexible choices. Lesion studies have strongly linked reversal learning performance to the functioning of the orbitofrontal cortex, the hippocampus, and in some instances, the amygdala. Here, we asked whether individual differences in the microstructure of the uncinate fasciculus, a white matter tract that connects anterior and medial temporal lobe regions to the orbitofrontal cortex, predict reversal learning performance. Diffusion tensor imaging and behavioral paradigms were used to examine this relationship in 33 healthy young adults. The results of tractography revealed a significant negative relationship between reversal learning performance and uncinate axial diffusivity, but no such relationship was demonstrated in a control tract, the inferior longitudinal fasciculus. Our findings suggest that the uncinate might serve to integrate associations stored in the anterior and medial temporal lobes with expectations about expected value based on feedback history, computed in the orbitofrontal cortex. PMID:26150776

  7. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-04-26

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols.

  8. Folding and Stabilization of Native-Sequence-Reversed Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuanzhao; Weber, Jeffrey K; Zhou, Ruhong

    2016-01-01

    Though the problem of sequence-reversed protein folding is largely unexplored, one might speculate that reversed native protein sequences should be significantly more foldable than purely random heteropolymer sequences. In this article, we investigate how the reverse-sequences of native proteins might fold by examining a series of small proteins of increasing structural complexity (α-helix, β-hairpin, α-helix bundle, and α/β-protein). Employing a tandem protein structure prediction algorithmic and molecular dynamics simulation approach, we find that the ability of reverse sequences to adopt native-like folds is strongly influenced by protein size and the flexibility of the native hydrophobic core. For β-hairpins with reverse-sequences that fail to fold, we employ a simple mutational strategy for guiding stable hairpin formation that involves the insertion of amino acids into the β-turn region. This systematic look at reverse sequence duality sheds new light on the problem of protein sequence-structure mapping and may serve to inspire new protein design and protein structure prediction protocols. PMID:27113844

  9. Magnolol treatment reversed the glial pathology in an unpredictable chronic mild stress-induced rat model of depression.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu-Fan; Yang, Jie; Ma, Shi-Ping; Qu, Rong

    2013-07-01

    Growing evidence indicates that glia atrophy contributes to the pathophysiology and the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder. Magnolol is the main constituent identified in the bark of Magnolia officinalis, which has been used for the treatment of mental disorders, including depression, in Asian countries. In this study, we investigated the antidepressant-like effect and the possible mechanisms of magnolol in rats subjected to unpredictable chronic mild stress (UCMS). The ameliorative effect of magnolol on depression symptoms was investigated through behavior tests, including sucrose preference test, open-field test and forced-swimming test. In addition, the levels of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), an astrocyte marker, in the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex were determined by immunohistochemistry, Western blot, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Exposure to UCMS resulted in a decrease of behavioral activity, whereas magnolol (20, 40 mg/kg) and fluoxetine (20mg/kg) administration significantly reversed the depressive-like behaviors (P<0.05).Moreover, treatment with magnolol effectively increased GFAP mRNA and protein levels in UCMS rats. These results confirmed the antidepressant-like effect of magnolol, which maybe primarily mediated by reversing the glial atrophy in the UCMS rat brain. PMID:23632393

  10. Preliminary experiments on the noise generated by target-type thrust reverser models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutierrez, O. A.; Stone, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    Experiments are reported on the noise generated by model V-gutter and semicylindrical target-type reversers with circular nozzles. Nozzles were 5.24 and 7.78 cm in diameter. Nozzle pressure ratio ranged from 1.25 to 1.72. The spacing between reversers and nozzle, as well as the reverser orientation, was also varied. More noise was generated with reversers than with the nozzle alone. The measured maximum overall sound pressure level varied with the sixth power of the nozzle exit velocity. Noise levels were more uniform in regard to directivity with reversers than with the nozzle alone. It is concluded that thrust reversers, can be a significant noise problem, especially for STOL aircraft using thrust reversers during approach.

  11. Thrombolysis, Complete Recanalization, Diffusion Reversal, and Luxury Perfusion in Hyperacute Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Yuki; Ouchi, Takahiro; Okubo, Seiji; Abe, Arata; Aoki, Junya; Nogami, Akane; Sato, Takahiro; Hokama, Hiroyuki; Ogawa, Yutaro; Suzuki, Shizuka; Mishina, Masahiro; Kimura, Kazumi

    2016-01-01

    A 59-year old man was admitted to our stroke care unit 1.8 hours after onset of cardioembolic stroke. Administration of issue-plasminogen activator achieved complete recanalization, and his lesion on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) disappeared and single photon emission computed tomography showed luxury perfusion. DWI reversal and luxury perfusion were sometimes observed in hyperacute stroke patients, especially timely reperfusion was achieved. However, the relationships between DWI reversal and luxury perfusion were not well known. Transient DWI reversal may be associated with luxury perfusion in patients treated with t-PA, via early complete recanalization achieved by thrombolysis. PMID:26521167

  12. Eyespots in a reversible setting.

    PubMed

    Deregowski, Jan B; Gray, Colin D

    2013-01-01

    When eyespots were presented on a reversible figure, the total duration for which elements bearing the eyespots were seen as closer to the observer was found to be greater than the total for counterpart elements. It is speculated that the tendency to see eyespots as nearer than they really are is related to the manner in which they are responded to in nature. PMID:23700964

  13. Reverse engineering of integrated circuits

    DOEpatents

    Chisholm, Gregory H.; Eckmann, Steven T.; Lain, Christopher M.; Veroff, Robert L.

    2003-01-01

    Software and a method therein to analyze circuits. The software comprises several tools, each of which perform particular functions in the Reverse Engineering process. The analyst, through a standard interface, directs each tool to the portion of the task to which it is most well suited, rendering previously intractable problems solvable. The tools are generally used iteratively to produce a successively more abstract picture of a circuit, about which incomplete a priori knowledge exists.

  14. Torsional stress in DNA limits collaboration among reverse gyrase molecules.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Taisaku; Sutoh, Kazuo; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kinosita, Kazuhiko

    2016-04-01

    Reverse gyrase is an enzyme that can overwind (introduce positive supercoils into) DNA using the energy obtained from ATP hydrolysis. The enzyme is found in hyperthermophiles, and the overwinding reaction generally requires a temperature above 70 °C. In a previous study using microscopy, we have shown that 30 consecutive mismatched base pairs (a bubble) in DNA serve as a well-defined substrate site for reverse gyrase, warranting the processive overwinding activity down to 50 °C. Here, we inquire how multiple reverse gyrase molecules may collaborate with each other in overwinding one DNA molecule. We introduced one, two, or four bubbles in a linear DNA that tethered a magnetic bead to a coverslip surface. At 40-71 °C in the presence of reverse gyrase, the bead rotated clockwise as viewed from above, to relax the DNA twisted by reverse gyrase. Dependence on the enzyme concentration indicated that each bubble binds reverse gyrase tightly (dissociation constant < 0.1 nm) and that bound enzyme continuously overwinds DNA for > 5 min. Rotation with two bubbles was significantly faster compared with one bubble, indicating that overwinding actions are basically additive, but four bubbles did not show further acceleration except at 40 °C where the activity was very low. The apparent saturation is due to the hydrodynamic friction against the rotating bead, as confirmed by increasing the medium viscosity. When torsional stress in the DNA, determined by the friction, approaches ~ 7 pN·nm (at 71 °C), the overwinding activity of reverse gyrase drops sharply. Multiple molecules of reverse gyrase collaborate additively within this limit.

  15. The “van Zijl” Jurassic geomagnetic reversal revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulin, Maud; Courtillot, Vincent; Fluteau, FréDéRic; Valet, Jean-Pierre

    2012-03-01

    We have collected two new detailed records of what could be the second oldest well documented reversal, the "van Zijl" Jurassic (˜180 Ma) reversal recorded in the thick basalt sequences of the Karoo large igneous province in Lesotho and South Africa. Sections yielded 10 and 8 independent transitional paleomagnetic directions respectively over two continuous 130 m and 160 m sequences. The corresponding VGP reversing paths share a number of consistent features and are integrated with a third record at Bushmen's Pass from Prévot et al. (2003) to yield a single reversal path with: 1- a large directional jump with no transitional poles between 45°S and 45°N in the first, main phase of the reversal, 2- a large elongated loop (multiple hairpin) to the SE with poles going down to ˜20° latitudes in the second phase of the reversal, and 3- a rebound before finally settling in normal polarity. We have measured relative paleo-intensities on a set of carefully selected samples. Intensity was low prior to the directional changes and recovery to the following normal polarity was progressive. Transitional intensity is 80 to 90% lower than full polarity values. There is no significant increase in intensity at the time of transitional directional clusters. Our results are consistent with a weak non-dipolar reversing field, with faster and larger directional secular variation as the equator is crossed by VGPs. They tend to vindicate the notion of a short duration of the directional reversal, though one cannot draw global conclusions from a record limited to essentially a single location.

  16. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

  17. Reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA.

    PubMed

    Smith, Darren A; Holliger, Philipp; Flors, Cristina

    2012-08-30

    We describe the engineering of reversible fluorescence photoswitching in DNA with high-density substitution, and its applications in advanced fluorescence microscopy methods. High-density labeling of DNA with cyanine dyes can be achieved by polymerase chain reaction using a modified DNA polymerase that has been evolved to efficiently incorporate Cy3- and Cy5-labeled cytosine base analogues into double-stranded DNA. The resulting biopolymer, "CyDNA", displays hundreds of fluorophores per DNA strand and is strongly colored and highly fluorescent, although previous observations suggest that fluorescence quenching at such high density might be a concern, especially for Cy5. Herein, we first investigate the mechanisms of fluorescence quenching in CyDNA and we suggest that two different mechanisms, aggregate formation and resonance energy transfer, are responsible for fluorescence quenching at high labeling densities. Moreover, we have been able to re-engineer CyDNA into a reversible fluorescence photoswitchable biopolymer by using the properties of the Cy3-Cy5 pair. This novel biopolymer constitutes a new class of photoactive DNA-based nanomaterial and is of great interest for advanced microscopy applications. We show that reversible fluorescence photoswitching in CyDNA can be exploited in optical lock-in detection imaging. It also lays the foundations for improved and sequence-specific super-resolution fluorescence microscopy of DNA. PMID:22861666

  18. Three distinct reversing modes in the geodynamo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Pavlov, V. E.

    2016-03-01

    The data that describe the long-term reversing behavior of the geodynamo show strong and sudden changes in magnetic reversal frequency. This concerns both the onset and the end of superchrons and most probably the occurrence of episodes characterized by extreme geomagnetic reversal frequency (>10-15 rev./Myr). To account for the complexity observed in geomagnetic reversal frequency evolution, we propose a simple scenario in which the geodynamo operates in three distinct reversing modes: i—a "normal" reversing mode generating geomagnetic polarity reversals according to a stationary random process, with on average a reversal rate of ˜3 rev./Myr; ii—a non-reversing "superchron" mode characterizing long time intervals without reversal; iii—a hyper-active reversing mode characterized by an extreme geomagnetic reversal frequency. The transitions between the different reversing modes would be sudden, i.e., on the Myr time scale. Following previous studies, we suggest that in the past, the occurrence of these transitions has been modulated by thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary governed by mantle dynamics. It might also be possible that they were more frequent during the Precambrian, before the nucleation of the inner core, because of a stronger influence on geodynamo activity of the thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary.

  19. Effects of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists on cognition in rhesus monkeys with a chronic cocaine self-administration history.

    PubMed

    Gould, Robert W; Garg, Pradeep K; Garg, Sudha; Nader, Michael A

    2013-01-01

    Cocaine use is associated with impaired cognitive function, which may negatively impact treatment outcomes. One pharmacological strategy to improve cognition involves nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) stimulation. However, the effects of chronic cocaine exposure on nAChR distribution and function have not been characterized. Thus, one goal of this study was to examine nAChR availability in rhesus monkeys with an extensive cocaine self-administration history (n = 4; ~6 years, mean intake, 1463 mg/kg) compared to age-matched cocaine-naive control monkeys (n = 5). Using [¹¹C]-nicotine and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging, cocaine-experienced monkeys showed significantly higher receptor availability in the hippocampus compared to cocaine-naive monkeys. A second goal was to examine the effects of nAChR agonists on multiple domains of cognitive performance in these same monkeys. For these studies, working memory was assessed using a delayed match-to-sample (DMS) task, associative learning and behavioral flexibility using stimulus discrimination and reversal learning tasks. When administered acutely, the nonselective high-efficacy agonist nicotine, the low-efficacy α4β2* subtype-selective agonist varenicline and the high-efficacy α7 subtype-selective agonist, PNU-282987 significantly improved DMS performance in both cocaine-naive and cocaine-experienced monkeys. Individual doses of nicotine and varenicline that engendered maximum cognitive enhancing effects on working memory did not affect discrimination or reversal learning, while PNU-282987 disrupted reversal learning in the cocaine-naive monkeys. These findings indicate that a cocaine self-administration history influenced nAChR distribution and the effects of nAChR agonists on cognitive performance, including a reduced sensitivity to the disrupting effects on reversal learning. The cognitive enhancing effects of nAChR agonists may be beneficial in combination with behavioral treatments for

  20. Brief reversible bronchospasm resulting from bichromate exposure.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, T; Morimoto, K

    1996-01-01

    A 50-y-old male worker developed an asthmatic reaction after exposure to bichromate in a metal-plating plant. Evaluation included skin tests, bronchial provocation tests, and specific radioallergosorbent tests with metal salts. A 49-y-old worker who suffered from hard metal asthma was the control. These workers were not atopic, and they exhibited similar bronchial hyperresponsiveness in methacholine-PC20 (74 mg/ml versus 81 mg/ml, respectively) and IgE titers (129 IU/ml versus 130 IU/ml). Positive intradermal and patch tests to bichromate were found in the subject. A bronchial provocation test with inhalation of .01 % bichromate produced an immediate decrease in forced vital capacity in 1 s, followed by a rapid recovery within 5 min absent any treatment. There was no reaction to cobalt (1% cobalt chloride) or to nickel (2% nickel sulfate) salts. In the control, a positive bronchial provocation occurred (absent chromium) with cobalt and nickel. Administration of a subcutaneous preparation of 1 mg atropine sulfate or of 1 puff of disodium cromoglycate or beta-stimulant reduced bronchial responsiveness to methacholine-PC20, and no asthmatic reaction occurred following inhalation of 1% bichromate. No blocking of asthmatic reaction occurred after pretreatment with beclomethasone dipropionate inhalation. Administration of propranolol, however, potentiated the acute bronchoconstriction induced by bichromate. The 50-y-old worker had evidence of IgE antibody to chromium-conjugated human serum albumin and to chromium-conjugated exchange resin. His serum selectively bound 51Cr, but antibodies specific to cobalt and nickel were absent. These results, if viewed collectively, suggest that bichromate exposure causes brief reversible bronchospasm via alteration of autonomic balance and increased vagal activation.

  1. Modification of Encapsulation Pressure of Reverse Micelles in Liquid Ethane

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Ronald W.; Nucci, Nathaniel V.; Wand, A. Joshua

    2011-01-01

    Encapsulation of within reverse micelles dissolved in low viscosity fluids offers a potential solution to the slow tumbling problem presented by large soluble macromolecules to solution NMR spectroscopy. The reduction in effective macromolecular tumbling is directly dependent upon the viscosity of the solvent. Liquid ethane is of sufficiently low viscosity at pressures below 5,000 p.s.i. to offer a significant advantage. Unfortunately, the viscosity of liquid ethane shows appreciable pressure dependence. Reverse micelle encapsulation in liquid ethane often requires significantly higher pressures, which obviates the potential advantages offered by liquid ethane over liquid propane. Addition of co-surfactants or co-solvents can be used to manipulate the minimum pressure required to obtain stable, well-behaved solutions of reverse micelles prepared in liquid ethane. A library of potential additives is examined and several candidates suitable for use with encapsulated proteins are described. PMID:21764613

  2. Reverse-flow strategy in biofilters treating CS₂ emissions.

    PubMed

    Rojo, Naiara; Gallastegui, Gorka; Gurtubay, Luis; Barona, Astrid; Elías, Ana

    2013-04-01

    The bacteriostatic properties of carbon disulphide (CS₂) hamper its biodegradation in conventional biofilters. The response of four biofilters operating in downflow mode and reverse-flow mode was compared in a laboratory-scale plant treating CS₂ under sudden short-term changes in operating conditions. A process shutdown for 24 h, an inlet concentration increase and an interruption of the inlet air humidification for 48 h at an empty bed residence time (EBRT) of 240 s did not impact significantly on biodegradation performance, regardless of flow mode. Nevertheless, a reduction in the EBRT to 60 s resulted in a significant decrease in removal efficiency in all the biofilters. The CS₂ degradation profile showed that the reverse-flow mode strategy rendered a more homogenous distribution of biomass along the bed height. The benefits of the reverse-flow mode were demonstrated even when the unidirectional flow mode was re-established.

  3. Nigella Sativa reverses osteoporosis in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Osteoporosis poses a significant public health issue. It is a skeletal disorder characterized by compromised bone strength that predisposes to increased risk of fracture. There is a direct relationship between the lack of estrogen after menopause and the development of osteoporosis. About 33% of women over 50 will experience bone fractures as a result of osteoporosis. Nigella Sativa (NS) has been shown to have beneficial effects on bone and joint diseases. The present study was conducted to elucidate the protective effect of Nigella Sativa on osteoporosis produced by ovariectomy in rats. Methods Female Wistar rats aged 12–14 months were divided into three groups: sham-operated control (SHAM), ovariectomized (OVX), and ovariectomized supplemented with nigella sativa (OVX-NS) orally for 12 weeks; 4 weeks before ovariectomy and 8 weeks after. After 12 weeks, plasma levels of calcium (Ca+2), phosphorous (Pi), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), amino terminal collagen type 1 telopeptide, malondialdehyde (MDA), nitrates, nitric oxide surrogate, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6) were measured. Histological examination of the liver and the tibia was conducted. Histomorphometric analysis of the tibia was also performed. Results OVX rats showed significant decrease in plasma Ca+2, accompanied by a significant increase in plasma ALP, amino terminal collagen type 1 telopeptide, MDA, nitrates, TNF-α and IL-6. These changes were reversed by NS supplementation in OVX-NS group to be near SHAM levels. Histological examination of the tibias revealed discontinuous eroded bone trabeculae with widened bone marrow spaces in OVX rats accompanied by a significant decrease in both cortical and trabecular bone thickness compared to Sham rats. These parameters were markedly reversed in OVX-NS rats. Histological examination of the liver showed mononuclear cellular infiltration and congestion of blood vessels at the portal area in OVX rats which were not found

  4. Rapid evaluation of reverse-osmosis membranes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Simultaneous reverse-osmosis tests conducted with centrifuges having multiple compartment heads are discussed. Equipment for retaining reverse-osmosis membrane is illustrated. Method of conducting tests is described.

  5. A Reverse Shock in GRB 160509A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskar, T.; Alexander, K. D.; Berger, E.

    2016-10-01

    Through detailed multi-wavelength observations and modeling, we present the discovery and characterization a reverse shock in GRB 160509A. This result highlights the unique power of radio observations in the study of GRB reverse shocks.

  6. Ancient Magnetic Reversals: Clues to the Geodynamo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Kenneth A.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the question posed by some that the earth's magnetic field may reverse. States that rocks magnetized by ancient fields may offer clues to the underlying reversal mechanism in the earth's core. (TW)

  7. High pressure rotating reverse osmosis for long term space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen Pederson, Cynthia Lynn

    Rotating reverse osmosis, which uses reverse osmosis to purify water and rotating filtration to improve the efficacy of filtration, has great potential for wastewater recycling on a long term space mission. Previous investigations of a proof-of-concept device indicated that the most efficient method to improve rotating reverse osmosis performance is to increase the operational pressure. Thus, a second generation device and fluid circuit were designed, fabricated, and tested to permit high pressure operation for long time periods. The design overcame several obstacles including membrane attachment, rotating seal design, and fluid and pressure management. A theoretical model of rotating reverse osmosis was modified to properly account for the flow conditions in the new design. Tests lasting a week were conducted with a variety of model wastewaters. Significant fouling and a decrease in flux were observed after three days of testing regardless of the operational parameters. A semi-empirical model, the fouling potential, was added to the theoretical model to account for the fouling. This allowed the simulation of 48 hour cleaning cycles that significantly increased the flux of the device. Experimental investigation of the rotational speed and concentrate flow rate indicated that an increase in either parameter decreased the fouling slightly. A week long test of a wastewater ersatz with a biocide did not exhibit a decrease in flux around day three that otherwise occurred. Therefore, biofouling was identified as the primary mechanism of fouling. Rotating reverse osmosis was compared with conventional spiral wound reverse osmosis and displayed increased rejection under dead end filtration conditions. The rotating device exhibited similar rejection and increased flux compared to a tubular reverse osmosis device previously used in a NASA wastewater recovery system. The integration of the rotating device into a NASA water recovery management system was evaluated. Lastly, a

  8. HuR interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase, and modulates reverse transcription in infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Lemay, Julie; Maidou-Peindara, Priscilla; Bader, Thomas; Ennifar, Eric; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Benarous, Richard; Liu, Lang Xia

    2008-01-01

    Reverse transcription of the genetic material of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is a critical step in the replication cycle of this virus. This process, catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT), is well characterized at the biochemical level. However, in infected cells, reverse transcription occurs in a multiprotein complex – the reverse transcription complex (RTC) – consisting of viral genomic RNA associated with viral proteins (including RT) and, presumably, as yet uncharacterized cellular proteins. Very little is known about the cellular proteins interacting with the RTC, and with reverse transcriptase in particular. We report here that HIV-1 reverse transcription is affected by the levels of a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein – the RNA-binding protein HuR. A direct protein-protein interaction between RT and HuR was observed in a yeast two-hybrid screen and confirmed in vitro by homogenous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF). We mapped the domain interacting with HuR to the RNAse H domain of RT, and the binding domain for RT to the C-terminus of HuR, partially overlapping the third RRM RNA-binding domain of HuR. HuR silencing with specific siRNAs greatly impaired early and late steps of reverse transcription, significantly inhibiting HIV-1 infection. Moreover, by mutagenesis and immunoprecipitation studies, we could not detect the binding of HuR to the viral RNA. These results suggest that HuR may be involved in and may modulate the reverse transcription reaction of HIV-1, by an as yet unknown mechanism involving a protein-protein interaction with HIV-1 RT. PMID:18544151

  9. The development of a radioimmunoassay for reverse triiodothyronine sulfate in human serum and amniotic fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Sing-Yung ); Huang, Wen-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Lian ); Polk, D.; Reviczky, A.; Williams, J. III; Chopra, I.J.; Fisher, D.A. )

    1993-06-01

    Sulfated iodothyronines including T[sub 4]-sulfate (T[sub 4]S) and T[sub 3]-sulfate (T[sub 3]S) have been identified in human serum and amniotic fluid. Little is know, however, about the existence of sulfate conjugation of reverse T[sub 3] (rT[sub 3]S) in man. In this report, the authors employed a novel, sensitive, and specific rT[sub 3]S RIA to address this question. The rabbit antiserum to rT[sub 3]S was highly specific; T[sub 4], T[sub 3], rT[sub 3], and 3,3'-T[sub 2] showed less than 0.002% cross-reaction with the antiserum. Only T[sub 4]S and T[sub 3]S cross-reacted significantly (0.3% and 0.01%, respectively); other analogs cross-reacted less than 0.0001%. The detection threshold of the RIA was 14 pmol/L (1.0 ng/dL). The mean serum rT[sub 3]S concentration (pmol/L) was 40 in euthyroid subjects. Values were similar in hypothyroid patients (38) and pregnant women (52) but significantly (P < 0.01) elevated to 176 in hyperthyroid patient, 74 in patients with nonthyroid illnesses, and 684 in cord sera of newborns. Serum rT[sub 3]S increased significantly in hyperthyroid patients 1 day after administration of 1 g sodium ipodate orally. Reverse T[sub 3]S was detected consistently in amniotic fluid at 14 to 22 weeks of gestation and showed a marked rise 1-3 weeks after intraamniotic administration of 500-1000 [mu]g T[sub 4]. The various data suggest that : (1) rT[sub 3]S is a normal component of human serum and amniotic fluid; (2) it is derived from metabolism of T[sub 4] or rT[sub 3]; (3) circulating rT[sub 3]S increases in hyperthyroidism and in circumstances where type I 5'-monodeiodinating activity is low, e.g. nonthyroid illnesses, fetal life, and after administration of ipodate. 20 refs., 4 figs.

  10. Persistence of a hyperthermic sign-reversal during nitrous oxide inhalation despite cue-exposure treatment with and without a drug-onset cue

    PubMed Central

    Kaiyala, Karl J; Woods, Stephen C; Ramsay, Douglas S

    2014-01-01

    We asked whether chronic tolerance and the hyperthermic sign-reversal induced by repeated 60% N2O exposures could be extinguished using a cue-exposure paradigm. Rats received 18 N2O administrations in a total calorimetry system that simultaneously measures core temperature (Tc), metabolic heat production (HP), and body heat loss (HL). Each exposure entailed a 2-h baseline period followed by a 1.5-h N2O exposure. The 18 drug exposures induced a robust intra-administration hyperthermia in which the initial hypothermic effect of N2O inverted to a significant hyperthermic sign-reversal during N2O inhalation due primarily to an acquired robust increase in HP. The rats were then randomized to one of 3 extinction procedures (n = 8/procedure) over a 20-d interval: 1) a N2O-abstinent home-cage group (HC) that received only the usual animal care; 2) a cue-exposure group (CEXP) in which the animals were placed in the calorimeter 8 times but received no N2O; and 3) a drug-onset-cue group (DOC) in which animals received a brief N2O exposure in the calorimeter that mimicked the first 3 min of an actual 60% N2O trial. Following the extinction sessions, all rats received a 60% N2O test trial and Tc, HP and HL were assessed. The hyperthermic sign-reversal remained fully intact during the test trial, with no significant differences observed among groups in any post-baseline change in any thermal outcome. These data suggest that cue exposure may not be an efficacious strategy to reduce sign-reversals that develop with chronic drug use. PMID:25938128

  11. Reverse transcriptase: mediator of genomic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Brosius, J; Tiedge, H

    1995-01-01

    Reverse transcription has been an important mediator of genomic change. This influence dates back more than three billion years, when the RNA genome was converted into the DNA genome. While the current cellular role(s) of reverse transcriptase are not yet completely understood, it has become clear over the last few years that this enzyme is still responsible for generating significant genomic change and that its activities are one of the driving forces of evolution. Reverse transcriptase generates, for example, extra gene copies (retrogenes), using as a template mature messenger RNAs. Such retrogenes do not always end up as nonfunctional pseudogenes but form, after reinsertion into the genome, new unions with resident promoter elements that may alter the gene's temporal and/or spatial expression levels. More frequently, reverse transcriptase produces copies of nonmessenger RNAs, such as small nuclear or cytoplasmic RNAs. Extremely high copy numbers can be generated by this process. The resulting reinserted DNA copies are therefore referred to as short interspersed repetitive elements (SINEs). SINEs have long been considered selfish DNA, littering the genome via exponential propagation but not contributing to the host's fitness. Many SINEs, however, can give rise to novel genes encoding small RNAs, and are the migrant carriers of numerous control elements and sequence motifs that can equip resident genes with novel regulatory elements [Brosius J. and Gould S.J., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 89, 10706-10710, 1992]. Retrosequences, such as SINEs and portions of retroelements (e.g., long terminal repeats, LTRs), are capable of donating sequence motifs for nucleosome positioning, DNA methylation, transcriptional enhancers and silencers, poly(A) addition sequences, determinants of RNA stability or transport, splice sites, and even amino acid codons for incorporation into open reading frames as novel protein domains. Retroposition can therefore be considered as a major

  12. Least-squares reverse-time migration of Cranfield VSP data for monitoring CO2 injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    TAN, S.; Huang, L.

    2012-12-01

    Cost-effective monitoring for carbon utilization and sequestration requires high-resolution imaging with a minimal amount of data. Least-squares reverse-time migration is a promising imaging method for this purpose. We apply least-squares reverse-time migration to a portion of the 3D vertical seismic profile data acquired at the Cranfield enhanced oil recovery field in Mississippi for monitoring CO2 injection. Conventional reverse-time migration of limited data suffers from significant image artifacts and a poor image resolution. Lease-squares reverse-time migration can reduce image artifacts and improves the image resolution. We demonstrate the significant improvements of least-squares reverse-time migration by comparing its migration images of the Cranfield VSP data with that obtained using the conventional reverse-time migration.

  13. Cleaning Our World through Reverse Graffiti

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Randazzo, Gabe; LaJevic, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade artists have begun to experiment with "reverse pollution" techniques, such as reverse graffiti, which focuses on cleaning environmental surfaces. Having recently been introduced to the works of Moose, the artist known for inventing the reverse graffiti technique, the authors decided to design a curriculum to increase…

  14. Statistical Learning, Letter Reversals, and Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treiman, Rebecca; Gordon, Jessica; Boada, Richard; Peterson, Robin L.; Pennington, Bruce F.

    2014-01-01

    Reversal errors play a prominent role in theories of reading disability. We examined reversal errors in the writing of letters by 5- to 6-year-old children. Of the 130 children, 92 had a history of difficulty in producing speech sounds, a risk factor for reading problems. Children were more likely to reverse letter forms that face left, such as…

  15. Categorizing and Promoting Reversibility of Mathematical Concepts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Martin A.; Kara, Melike; Placa, Nicora; Sandir, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    Reversibility of concepts, a key aspect of mathematical development, is often problematic for learners. In this theoretical paper, we present a typology we have developed for categorizing the different reverse concepts that can be related to a particular initial concept and explicate the relationship among these different reverse concepts. We…

  16. Reverse-Time Migration Based Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Ding, Hao; Lu, Guijin; Bi, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrated a new optical imaging technique based on reverse-time migration (RTM) for reconstructing optical structures in homogeneous media for the first time. RTM is a powerful wave-equation-based method to reconstruct the image of the structure by modeling the wave propagation inside the media with both forward modeling and reverse-time extrapolation. While RTM is commonly used with acoustic seismic waves, this paper represents the first effort to develop optical RTM imaging method for biomedical research. To refine the image quality, we further developed new methods to suppress the low-wavenumber artifact (LWA). When compared with the conventional means for LWA suppression such as Laplacian filtering, illumination normalization, and the ratio method, our new derivative-based and power-image methods are able to significantly reduce LWA, resulting in high-quality reconstructed images with sufficient contrasts and spatial resolutions for structure identification. The optical RTM imaging technique may provide a new platform for non-invasive optical imaging of structures in deep layers of tissues for biomedical applications. PMID:26292337

  17. Reverse-Time Migration Based Optical Imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiyong; Ding, Hao; Lu, Guijin; Bi, Xiaohong

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically demonstrated a new optical imaging technique based on reverse-time migration (RTM) for reconstructing optical structures in homogeneous media for the first time. RTM is a powerful wave-equation-based method to reconstruct the image of the structure by modeling the wave propagation inside the media with both forward modeling and reverse-time extrapolation. While RTM is commonly used with acoustic seismic waves, this paper represents the first effort to develop optical RTM imaging method for biomedical research. To refine the image quality, we further developed new methods to suppress the low-wavenumber artifact (LWA). When compared with the conventional means for LWA suppression such as Laplacian filtering, illumination normalization, and the ratio method, our new derivative-based and power-image methods are able to significantly reduce LWA, resulting in high-quality reconstructed images with sufficient contrasts and spatial resolutions for structure identification. The optical RTM imaging technique may provide a new platform for non-invasive optical imaging of structures in deep layers of tissues for biomedical applications.

  18. Plasma disposition of enrofloxacin following intravenous and intramuscular administration in donkeys.

    PubMed

    Sekkin, S; Gokbulut, C; Kum, C; Karademir, U

    2012-11-01

    This study was designed to investigate the plasma disposition and systemic availability of enrofloxacin (ENR) following intramuscular and intravenous administrations. Six donkeys (Equus asinus) were used in this study. The animals were allocated into two groups (intramuscular and intravenous groups). After a 2-week washout period, the experiment was repeated with the groups reversed according to a two-phase crossover design. In phase I, group I received intravenously the commercially available injectable solution of ENR at the dose of 5 mg/kg and group II received intramuscularly the same ENR formulation at the same dose rate. Blood samples were collected 1 hour prior to drug administration and various times between 5 minutes and 48 hours post-treatments. The samples were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector. The half-life and mean residence time of ENR (12.08 hours and 17.85 hours) after intramuscular route were significantly longer compared with intravenous administration (9.54 hours and 7.46 hours, respectively) and these were associated with a flip-flop phenomenon. A marked proportion of ENR (20-21 per cent) was metabolised to ciprofloxacin (CPR) following both administration routes and the half-life of CPR paralleled that of the parent drug after intramuscular administration. Mean absorption time was relatively long (10.39 hours), and the bioavailability of ENR was 76.56 per cent after intramuscular route in the donkeys. The plasma concentration is lower after intramuscular administration at a dose rate of 5 mg/kg, and may need a higher dose to provide sufficient plasma concentration in donkeys compared with horses.

  19. Evaluating Reverse Speech as a Control Task with Language-Related Gamma Activity on Electrocorticography

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Erik C; Muzik, Otto; Rothermel, Robert; Matsuzaki, Naoyuki; Juhász, Csaba; Shah, Aashit K; Atkinson, Marie D; Fuerst, Darren; Mittal, Sandeep; Sood, Sandeep; Diwadkar, Vaibhav A; Asano, Eishi

    2012-01-01

    Reverse speech has often been used as a control task in brain-mapping studies of language utilizing various non-invasive modalities. The rationale is that reverse speech is comparable to forward speech in terms of auditory characteristics, while omitting the linguistic components. Thus, it may control for non-language auditory functions. This finds some support in fMRI studies indicating that reverse speech resulted in less blood-oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal intensity in perisylvian regions than forward speech. We attempted to externally validate a reverse speech control task using intracranial electrocorticography (ECoG) in eight patients with intractable focal epilepsy. We studied adolescent and adult patients who underwent extraoperative ECoG prior to resective epilepsy surgery. All patients received an auditory language task during ECoG recording. Patients were presented 115 audible question stimuli, including 30 reverse speech trials. Reverse speech trials more strongly engaged bilateral superior temporal sites than did the corresponding forward speech trials. Forward speech trials elicited larger gamma-augmentation at frontal lobe sites not attributable to sensorimotor function. Other temporal and frontal sites of significant augmentation showed no significant difference between reverse and forward speech. Thus, we failed to validate reported evidence of weaker activation of temporal neocortices during reverse compared to forward speech. Superior temporal lobe engagement may indicate increased attention to reverse speech. Reverse speech does not appear to be a suitable task for the control of non-language auditory functions on ECoG. PMID:22387167

  20. Periodic feedwater reversal and air sparging as antifouling strategies in reverse electrodialysis.

    PubMed

    Vermaas, David A; Kunteng, Damnearn; Veerman, Joost; Saakes, Michel; Nijmeijer, Kitty

    2014-01-01

    Renewable energy can be generated using natural streams of seawater and river water in reverse electrodialysis (RED). The potential for electricity production of this technology is huge, but fouling of the membranes and the membrane stack reduces the potential for large scale applications. This research shows that, without any specific antifouling strategies, the power density decreases in the first 4 h of operation to 40% of the originally obtained power density. It slowly decreases further in the remaining 67 days of operation. Using antifouling strategies, a significantly higher power density can be maintained. Periodically switching the feedwaters (i.e., changing seawater for river water and vice versa) generates the highest power density in the first hours of operation, probably due to a removal of multivalent ions and organic foulants from the membrane when the electrical current reverses. In the long term, colloidal fouling is observed in the stack without treatment and the stack with periodic feedwater switching, and preferential channeling is observed in the latter. This decreases the power density further. This decrease in power density is partly reversible. Only a stack with periodic air sparging has a minimum of colloidal fouling, resulting in a higher power density in the long term. A combination of the discussed antifouling strategies, together with the use of monovalent selective membranes, is recommended to maintain a high power density in RED in short-term and long-term operations.

  1. Reversibly enhanced aqueous solubilization of volatile organic compounds using a redox-reversible surfactant.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingjie; Tian, Senlin; Mo, Hong; Ning, Ping

    2011-01-01

    Surfactant-enhanced remediation (SER) is an effective method for the removal of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated soils and groundwater. To reuse the surfactant the VOCs must be separated from the surfactant solutions. The water solubility of VOCs can be enhanced using reversible surfactants with a redox-acive group, (ferrocenylmethyl)dodecyldimethylammonium bromide (Fc12) and (ferrocenylmethyl)tetradecanedimethylammonium bromide (Fc14), above and below their critical micelle concentrations (CMC) under reducing (I+) and oxidative (I2+) conditions. The CMC values of Fc12 and Fc14 in I+ are 0.94 and 0.56 mmol/L and the solubilization of toluene by Fc12 and Fc14 in I+ for toluene is higher than the solubilization achieved with sodium dodecyl sulfate, cetyltrimethylammonium bromide and Trition X-114. The solubilization capacity of the ferrocenyl surfactants for each tested VOCs ranked as follows: ethylbenzene > toluene > benzene. The solubilities of VOCs by reversible surfactant in I+ were 30% higher than those in I2+ at comparable surfactant concentrations. The effects of Fc14 concentrations on VOCs removal efficiency were as follows: benzene > toluene > ethylbenzene. However, an improved removal efficiency was achieved at low ferrocenyl surfactant concentrations. Furthermore, the reversible surfactant could be recycled through chemical approaches to remove organic pollutants, which could significantly reduce the operating costs of SER technology.

  2. MCS Systems Administration Toolkit

    2001-09-30

    This package contains a number of systems administration utilities to assist a team of system administrators in managing a computer environment by automating routine tasks and centralizing information. Included are utilities to help install software on a network of computers and programs to make an image of a disk drive, to manage and distribute configuration files for a number of systems, and to run self-testss on systems, as well as an example of using amore » database to manage host information and various utilities.« less

  3. Computer hardware fault administration

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  4. River basin administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Management of international rivers and their basins is the focus of the Centre for Comparative Studies on (International) River Basin Administration, recently established at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. Water pollution, sludge, and conflicting interests in the use of water in upstream and downstream parts of a river basin will be addressed by studying groundwater and consumption of water in the whole catchment area of a river.Important aspects of river management are administrative and policy aspects. The Centre will focus on policy, law, planning, and organization, including transboundary cooperation, posing standards, integrated environmental planning on regional scale and environmental impact assessments.

  5. Remote Whispering Applying Time Reversal

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian Eric

    2015-07-16

    The purpose of this project was to explore the use of time reversal technologies as a means for communication to a targeted individual or location. The idea is to have the privacy of whispering in one’s ear, but to do this remotely from loudspeakers not located near the target. Applications of this work include communicating with hostages and survivors in rescue operations, communicating imaging and operational conditions in deep drilling operations, monitoring storage of spent nuclear fuel in storage casks without wires, or clandestine activities requiring signaling between specific points. This technology provides a solution in any application where wires and radio communications are not possible or not desired. It also may be configured to self calibrate on a regular basis to adjust for changing conditions. These communications allow two people to converse with one another in real time, converse in an inaudible frequency range or medium (i.e. using ultrasonic frequencies and/or sending vibrations through a structure), or send information for a system to interpret (even allowing remote control of a system using sound). The time reversal process allows one to focus energy to a specific location in space and to send a clean transmission of a selected signal only to that location. In order for the time reversal process to work, a calibration signal must be obtained. This signal may be obtained experimentally using an impulsive sound, a known chirp signal, or other known signals. It may also be determined from a numerical model of a known environment in which the focusing is desired or from passive listening over time to ambient noise.

  6. Retroviral recombination during reverse transcription.

    PubMed

    Goodrich, D W; Duesberg, P H

    1990-03-01

    After mixed infection, up to half of related retroviruses are recombinants. During infection, retroviral RNA genomes are first converted to complementary DNA (cDNA) and then to double-stranded DNA. Thus recombination could occur during reverse transcription, by RNA template switching, or after reverse transcription, by breakage and reunion of DNA. It has not been possible to distinguish between these two potential mechanisms of recombination because both single-stranded cDNA and double-stranded proviral DNA exist in infected cells during the eclipse period. Therefore we have analyzed for recombinant molecules among cDNA products transcribed in vitro from RNA of disrupted virions. Since recombinants from allelic parents can only be distinguished from parental genomes by point mutations, we have examined the cDNAs from virions with distinct genetic structures for recombinant-specific size and sequence markers. The parents share a common internal allele that allows homology-directed recombination, but each contains specific flanking sequences. One parent is a synthetically altered Harvey murine sarcoma virus RNA that lacks a retroviral 3' terminus but carries a Moloney murine retrovirus-derived envelope gene (env) fragment 3' of its transforming ras gene. The other parent is intact Moloney virus. Using a Harvey-specific 5' primer and a Moloney-specific 3' primer, we have found recombinant cDNAs with the polymerase chain reaction, proving directly that retroviruses can recombine during reverse transcription unassisted by cellular enzymes, probably by template switching during cDNA synthesis. The recombinants that were obtained in vitro were identical with those obtained in parallel experiments in vivo.

  7. Reversible Photoswitching of Carbon Dots

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Syamantak; Verma, Navneet Chandra; Gupta, Abhishek; Nandi, Chayan Kanti

    2015-01-01

    We present a method of reversible photoswitching in carbon nanodots with red emission. A mechanism of electron transfer is proposed. The cationic dark state, formed by the exposure of red light, is revived back to the bright state with the very short exposure of blue light. Additionally, the natural on-off state of carbon dot fluorescence was tuned using an electron acceptor molecule. Our observation can make the carbon dots as an excellent candidate for the super-resolution imaging of nanoscale biomolecules within the cell. PMID:26078266

  8. Time reversal of water waves.

    PubMed

    Przadka, A; Feat, S; Petitjeans, P; Pagneux, V; Maurel, A; Fink, M

    2012-08-10

    We present time reversal experiments demonstrating refocusing of gravity-capillary waves in a water tank cavity. Owing to the reverberating effect of the cavity, only a few channels are sufficient to reconstruct the surface wave at the point source, even if the absorption is not negligible. Space-time-resolved measurements of the waves during the refocusing allow us to quantitatively demonstrate that the quality of the refocusing increases linearly with the number of reemitting channels. Numerical simulations corresponding to water waves at larger scales, with negligible damping, indicate the possibility of very high quality refocusing.

  9. Reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome in a child treated with bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Levy, Carolyn Fein; Oo, Khine Zin; Fireman, Fernando; Pierre, Louisdon; Bania, Marita A; Sadanandan, Swayamprabha; Yamashiro, Darrell J; Glade Bender, Julia L

    2009-05-01

    Bevacizumab is a monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Hypertension is a well-recognized, common side effect of VEGF blocking agents. The reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome (RPLS) has been described as a rare but serious consequence of bevacizumab administration. We present a case of a 6-year-old child with refractory hepatoblastoma who developed hypertensive crisis, seizures and MRI changes consistent with RPLS while receiving bevacizumab with gemcitabine and oxaliplatin. Findings completely resolved without neurologic sequelae with stringent blood-pressure control. Better understanding of risk for RPLS, prompt recognition and aggressive management will be required as bevacizumab gains wider use in pediatrics.

  10. Urban School Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, Troy V., Ed.; Swanson, Austin D., Ed.

    This document contains 12 papers presented at an institute for urban school administrators designed to deal with the contemporary urban educational problems incident to school desegregation, social integration, and the equality of educational opportunity. The authors of the papers relate recent research findings to practical field experience, and…

  11. Telecommunications administration standard

    SciTech Connect

    Gustwiller, K.D.

    1996-05-01

    The administration of telecommunications is critical to proper maintenance and operation. The intent is to be able to properly support telecommunications for the distribution of all information within a building/campus. This standard will provide a uniform administration scheme that is independent of applications, and will establish guidelines for owners, installers, designers and contractors. This standard will accommodate existing building wiring, new building wiring and outside plant wiring. Existing buildings may not readily adapt to all applications of this standard, but the requirement for telecommunications administration is applicable to all buildings. Administration of the telecommunications infrastructure includes documentation (labels, records, drawings, reports, and work orders) of cables, termination hardware, patching and cross-connect facilities, telecommunications rooms, and other telecommunications spaces (conduits, grounding, and cable pathways are documented by Facilities Engineering). The investment in properly documenting telecommunications is a worthwhile effort. It is necessary to adhere to these standards to ensure quality and efficiency for the operation and maintenance of the telecommunications infrastructure for Sandia National Laboratories.

  12. Hospital Library Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    The objectives of a hospital are to improve patient care, while the objectives of a hospital library are to improve services to the staff which will support their efforts. This handbook dealing with hospital administration is designed to aid the librarian in either implementing a hospital library, or improving services in an existing medical…

  13. Administrative Salary Summary Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Commission on Higher Education, Denver.

    This report presents salary data on selected administrative positions from all public higher education institutions, governing boards, and other higher education state-level agencies in Colorado. Table 1 presents, by institutional type, the median and mean salaries for 1994-95, as well as the frequency and range of salaries, for the following…

  14. A Treatise on Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Thomas R.

    1988-01-01

    Expands Henri Fayol's definition of the administrative process to include a humanistic approach involving planning, organizing, implementing, controlling, evaluating, and satisfying functions. This empirical definition differs from some theoretical approaches by looking beyond resource consumption to consider ecological effects on the environment…

  15. Guidebook for School Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Fritz, Ed.

    To provide guidance and advice regarding day-to-day responsibilities of new and experienced school administrators and superintendents in New York State, this compendium of knowledge and advice submitted by practitioners is presented with emphasis on all major aspects of superintendency. The section on general aspects of superintendency includes…

  16. Administrators Confront Student "Sexting"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manzo, Kathleen Kennedy

    2009-01-01

    Cellphone-savvy students have created instructional and disciplinary challenges for educators for years. But the recent emergence of "sexting" by adolescents over their mobile phones caught many school administrators off guard, and the practice is prompting efforts around the country to craft policy responses. Students' sharing of nude or…

  17. IVA: Improving Vocational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EPD Consortium D, Richardson, TX.

    These six instructional units are intended to provide instructors of vocational education administration with a systematic package of materials for their programs of preservice and/or inservice instruction and to provide materials which could be reproduced for learner use. These units cover the following subject matter: (1) federal legislation…

  18. Administrative Utility Analysis: Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peat, Marwick, Mitchell and Co., San Juan, Puerto Rico.

    Appendixes to a study on administrative utility analysis and vocational education programs for the Area of Vocational and Technical Education (AVTE) in the Puerto Rico Department of Education contain the planning and budgeting system elements, position descriptions, and information on the growth of vocational education in Puerto Rico. The elements…

  19. Standards and Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, S. P.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of water quality standards and administration, covering publications of 1976-77. Consideration is given to municipal facilities, National Pollutant Discharge Elimination Systems, regional and international water quality management, and effluent standards. A list of 99 references is also presented. (HM)

  20. Research Administration: Lessons Learned.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dummer, George H.

    1995-01-01

    The ways in which accountability issues have affected federal-university relationships, particularly in the area of academic research, are examined. Lessons university administrators have learned since issuance of Office of Management and Budget Circular A-21 in 1958, Congressional hearings on the operations of the National Institutes of Health…

  1. Educational Administration's Weber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gronn, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Discusses Max Weber's importance in Greenfield's work, particularly in Greenfield and Ribbins'"Greenfield on Educational Administration" (1993). In concentrating on human actors' subjective understanding, Greenfield was a faithful Weberian. However, he deviated from Weber by disavowing structural explanations of social and organizational…

  2. Administrative Uses of Microcomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Chase

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the administrative uses of the microcomputer, stating that high performance educational managers are likely to have microcomputers in their organizations. Four situations that would justify the use of a computer are: (1) when massive amounts of data are processed through well-defined operations; (2) when data processing is…

  3. Educator Effectiveness Administrative Manual

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennsylvania Department of Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this manual is to provide guidance in the evaluation of educators, highlight critical components of effectiveness training, and offer opportunities for professional growth. The term "educator" includes teachers, all professional and temporary professional employees, education specialists, and school administrators/principals.…

  4. Discretionary Grants Administration Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Human Development Services (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    This manual sets forth applicable administrative policies and procedures to recipients of discretionary project grants or cooperative agreements awarded by program offices in the Office of Human Development Services (HDS). It is intended to serve as a basic reference for project directors and business officers of recipient organizations who are…

  5. Study Shows Administrative Shortage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, John R., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Summarizes "Administrative Shortage in New England: The Evidence, the Causes, the Recommendations." High pressure, long hours, low salaries, and high housing costs are among the reasons cited for the shortage. Recommendations are centered on role identity, staff support, training, and recruitment. (SI)

  6. Professionalism in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silver, Paula F.

    That the quest for a general theory of educational administration has been a misdirection of effort and that the advancement of professionalism within this field would represent a more sensible endeavor for the production of useful knowledge is the focus of this essay. The advancement of professionalism would entail a reorientation of research…

  7. Public Relations for Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bagin, Don; And Others

    This volume provides information and recommendations about public relations to assist school administrators in developing effective communication. The document contains 15 chapters. "The Scope of Public Relations," chapter 1, specifies characteristics of and individuals responsible for an effective program. Chapter 2, "Personal Public Relations,"…

  8. Championing the Latino Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garcia, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    When the author worked as a vice principal at a K-8 school in Watsonville, California, a school predominantly filled with migrant workers' children, he felt a lack of support as a Latino as he began moving up into school administration. He also continued to see what he had seen as a teacher--which was how underserved minority students were. These…

  9. Indicators of Administrative Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skipper, Charles E.; Hofmann, Richard J.

    Ten personal characteristics and seven administrative skills that differentiated effective from ineffective university leaders were assessed by multiple discriminate analysis. The personal characteristics identified by previous research (Skipper, 1975, 1977) are: responsibility, integrity, self-control, intellectual efficiency, flexibility,…

  10. Migrant Education Administrative Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Louisiana State Dept. of Education, Baton Rouge. Bureau of Migrant Education.

    Intended to provide information pertaining to the administration of migrant education projects in Louisiana, the handbook is divided into two sections: basic guidelines for program operations and support services--nursing. Section I covers the Federal and State migrant program, local migrant projects, project personnel and staff development, and…

  11. Redis database administration tool

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, J. J.

    2013-02-13

    MyRedis is a product of the Lorenz subproject under the ASC Scirntific Data Management effort. MyRedis is a web based utility designed to allow easy administration of instances of Redis databases. It can be usedd to view and manipulate data as well as run commands directly against a variety of different Redis hosts.

  12. Renaissance Administrator, Spring 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowdy, June P., Ed.

    1998-01-01

    This spring 1998 issue of Renaissance Administrator features the following articles: (1) "Servant Leadership and Higher Education--What is Leadership?" (Richard E. Hasselbach); (2) "Teaching Writing in the 90's--Carnivorous Printers and Dying Grandmothers" (Helen Ruggieri); (3) Assignment--Journal Writing" (Lynn Muscato); and (4) "A Business…

  13. Quantifying nursing workflow in medication administration.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Carol A; Bane, Anne D; Featherstone, Erica; Hayes, Judy; Woolf, Seth; Hurley, Ann; Bates, David W; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2008-01-01

    New medication administration systems are showing promise in improving patient safety at the point of care, but adoption of these systems requires significant changes in nursing workflow. To prepare for these changes, the authors report on a time-motion study that measured the proportion of time that nurses spend on various patient care activities, focusing on medication administration-related activities. Implications of their findings are discussed.

  14. Gastrodin reversed the traumatic stress-induced depressed-like symptoms in rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bombi; Sur, Bongjun; Yeom, Mijung; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung; Hahm, Dae-Hyun

    2016-10-01

    Exposure to severe stress can lead to the development of neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in at-risk individuals. Gastrodin (GAS), a primary constituent of an Oriental herbal medicine, has been shown to effectively treat various mood disorders. Thus, the present study aimed to determine whether GAS would ameliorate stress-associated depression-like behaviors in a rat model of single prolonged stress (SPS)-induced PTSD. Following the SPS procedure, rats received intraperitoneal administration of GAS (20, 50, or 100 mg/kg) once daily for 2 weeks. Subsequently, the rats performed the forced swimming test, and norepinephrine (NE) levels in the hippocampus were measured. Daily GAS (100 mg/kg) significantly reversed depression-like behaviors and restored SPS-induced increases in hippocampal NE concentrations as well as tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the locus coeruleus. Furthermore, the administration of GAS attenuated SPS-induced decreases in the hypothalamic expression of neuropeptide Y and the hippocampal mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor. These findings indicate that GAS possesses antidepressant effects in the PTSD and may be an effective herbal preparation for the treatment of PTSD. PMID:27417451

  15. Reversible cardiac hypertrophy induced by PEG-coated gold nanoparticles in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chengzhi; Tian, Aiju; Li, Zijian

    2016-01-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) are attracting more and more attention for their great potential value in biomedical application. Currently, no study has been reported on the chronic cardiac toxicity of GNPs after repeated administration. Here we carried out a comprehensive evaluation of the chronic cardiac toxicity of GNPs to the heart. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) -coated GNPs at three different sizes (10, 30 and 50 nm) or PBS was administrated to mice via tail vein for 14 consecutive days. Then the mice were euthanized at 2 weeks, 4 weeks or 12 weeks after the first injection. The accumulation of GNPs in the mouse heart and their effects on cardiac function, structure, fibrosis and inflammation were analysized. GNPs with smaller size showed higher accumulation and faster elimination. None of the three sizes of GNPs affected cardiac systolic function. The LVIDd (left ventricular end-diastolicinner-dimension), LVMass (left ventricular mass) and HW/BW (heart weight/body weight) were significantly increased in the mice receiving 10 nm PEG-GNPs for 2 weeks, but not for 4 weeks or 12 weeks. These results indicated that the accumulation of small size GNPs can induce reversible cardiac hypertrophy. Our results provide the basis for the further biomedical applications of GNPs in cardiac diseases. PMID:26830764

  16. Reversal-specific learning impairments after a binge regimen of methamphetamine in rats: possible involvement of striatal dopamine.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, Alicia; Belcher, Annabelle M; Scott, Lori; Cazares, Victor A; Chen, Jack; O'Dell, Steven J; Malvaez, Melissa; Wu, Tiffany; Marshall, John F

    2010-01-01

    A growing body of evidence indicates that protracted use of methamphetamine (mAMPH) causes long-term impairments in cognitive function in humans. Aside from the widely reported problems with attention, mAMPH users exhibit learning and memory deficits, particularly on tasks requiring response control. Although binge mAMPH administration to animals results in cognitive deficits, few studies have attempted to test behavioral flexibility in animals after mAMPH exposure. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether mAMPH would produce impairments in two tasks assessing flexible responding in rats: a touchscreen-based discrimination-reversal learning task and an attentional set shift task (ASST) based on a hallmark test of executive function in humans, the Wisconsin Card Sort. We treated male Long-Evans rats with a regimen of four injections of 2 mg/kg mAMPH (or vehicle) within a single day, a dosing regimen shown earlier to produce object recognition impairments. We then tested them on (1) reversal learning after pretreatment discrimination learning or (2) the ASST. Early reversal learning accuracy was impaired in mAMPH-treated rats. MAMPH pretreatment also selectively impaired reversal performance during ASST testing, leaving set-shifting performance intact. Postmortem analysis of [(125)I]RTI-55 binding revealed small (10-20%) but significant reductions in striatal dopamine transporters produced by this mAMPH regimen. Together, these results lend new information to the growing field documenting impaired cognition after mAMPH exposure, and constitute a rat model of the widely reported decision-making deficits resulting from mAMPH abuse seen in humans.

  17. Steganography using reversible texture synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kuo-Chen; Wang, Chung-Ming

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel approach for steganography using a reversible texture synthesis. A texture synthesis process resamples a smaller texture image, which synthesizes a new texture image with a similar local appearance and an arbitrary size. We weave the texture synthesis process into steganography to conceal secret messages. In contrast to using an existing cover image to hide messages, our algorithm conceals the source texture image and embeds secret messages through the process of texture synthesis. This allows us to extract the secret messages and source texture from a stego synthetic texture. Our approach offers three distinct advantages. First, our scheme offers the embedding capacity that is proportional to the size of the stego texture image. Second, a steganalytic algorithm is not likely to defeat our steganographic approach. Third, the reversible capability inherited from our scheme provides functionality, which allows recovery of the source texture. Experimental results have verified that our proposed algorithm can provide various numbers of embedding capacities, produce a visually plausible texture images, and recover the source texture.

  18. Preference reversal in multiattribute choice.

    PubMed

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Usher, Marius; Chater, Nick

    2010-10-01

    A central puzzle for theories of choice is that people's preferences between options can be reversed by the presence of decoy options (that are not chosen) or by the presence of other irrelevant options added to the choice set. Three types of reversal effect reported in the decision-making literature, the attraction, compromise, and similarity effects, have been explained by a number of theoretical proposals. Yet a major theoretical challenge is capturing all 3 effects simultaneously. We review the range of mechanisms that have been proposed to account for decoy effects and analyze in detail 2 computational models, decision field theory (Roe, Busemeyer, & Townsend, 2001) and leaky competing accumulators (Usher & McClelland, 2004), that aim to combine several such mechanisms into an integrated account. By simulating the models, we examine differences in the ways the decoy effects are predicted. We argue that the LCA framework, which follows on Tversky's relational evaluation with loss aversion (Tversky & Kahneman, 1991), provides a more robust account, suggesting that common mechanisms are involved in both high-level decision making and perceptual choice, for which LCA was originally developed.

  19. Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty Prosthesis Design Classification System.

    PubMed

    Routman, Howard D; Flurin, Pierre-Henri; Wright, Thomas W; Zuckerman, Joseph D; Hamilton, Matthew A; Roche, Christopher P

    2015-12-01

    Multiple different reverse total shoulder arthroplasty (rTSA) prosthesis designs are available in the global marketplace for surgeons to perform this growing procedure. Subtle differences in rTSA prosthesis design parameters have been shown to have significant biomechanical impact and clinical consequences. We propose an rTSA prosthesis design classification system to objectively identify and categorize different designs based upon their specific glenoid and humeral prosthetic characteristics for the purpose of standardizing nomenclature that will help the orthopaedic surgeon determine which combination of design configurations best suit a given clinical scenario. The impact of each prosthesis classification type on shoulder muscle length and deltoid wrapping are also described to illustrate how each prosthesis classification type impacts these biomechanical parameters. PMID:26631189

  20. Direct observation of time reversal violation

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, J.

    2013-06-12

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of 'in' and 'out' states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

  1. Gonadal steroid replacement reverses gonadectomy-induced changes in the corticosterone pulse profile and stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Seale, J V; Wood, S A; Atkinson, H C; Harbuz, M S; Lightman, S L

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the effects of gonadal hormone replacement on the pulsatile parameters underlying basal circadian corticosterone secretion in castrated male and ovariectomized female rats using an automated sampling system. Blood was collected from freely moving, unanaesthetized rats every 10 min over a 24-h period and sampling was continued during a noise stress and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Castrated male rats had markedly higher corticosterone levels than intact controls. This was reflected by increased number and frequency of pulses in addition to an increase in the pulse height and amplitude under both basal circadian and stress conditions. Hormone replacement with either testosterone or dihydrotestosterone returned these corticosterone levels and circadian profile to those found in intact males, confirming an androgen-mediated effect. Ovariectomized females had significantly lower basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels with lower frequency and amplitude of corticosterone pulses than intact females. 17beta-oestradiol replacement returned basal levels, pulsatile measurements and stress-induced corticosterone levels to those found in intact females. Three hours post-LPS administration, castrated males demonstrated significantly higher values of parvocellular paraventricular nucleus (PVN) arginine vasopressin and corticotrophin-releasing factor and anterior pituitary pro-opiomelanocortin mRNA while ovariectomized females showed significantly lower levels of all three transcripts compared to intact controls. PVN glucocorticoid receptor mRNA levels 3 h post-LPS administration were significantly decreased in castrated males and significantly increased in ovariectomized female rats. Replacement of gonadal steroids resulted in a return to the levels found in intact controls after LPS. Gonadal steroid replacement is sufficient to reverse changes in the pulsatile characteristics of corticosterone release after gonadectomy. In addition

  2. Impact of timely antibiotic administration on outcomes in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Young Min; Chae, Minjung Kathy; Hwang, Sung Yeon; Jin, Sang-Chan; Lee, Tae Rim; Cha, Won Chul; Jo, Ik Joon; Sim, Min Seob; Song, Keun Jeong; Jeong, Yeon Kwon; Shin, Tae Gun

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate the effect of timely antibiotic administration on outcomes in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. Methods We analyzed data from a sepsis registry that included adult patients who initially presented to the emergency department (ED) and met criteria for severe sepsis or septic shock. Timely antibiotic use was defined as administration of a broad-spectrum antibiotic within three hours from the time of ED arrival. Multivariable logistic and linear regression analyses were performed to assess associations between timely administration of antibiotics and outcomes, including hospital mortality, 48-hour change in Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (delta SOFA), and hospital length of stay (LOS). Results A total of 591 patients were included in the study. In-hospital mortality was 16.9% for patients receiving timely antibiotics (n=377) and 22.9% for patients receiving delayed antibiotics (n=214; P=0.04). The adjusted odds ratio for in-hospital survival was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.34 to 0.87; P=0.01) in patients who received timely antibiotics. Timely antibiotic administration was also significantly associated with higher delta SOFA (2 vs. 1) and shorter hospital LOS among survivors (11 days vs. 15 days). Multivariable linear regression analyses showed that timely antibiotic administration was significantly associated with increased delta SOFA and decreased hospital LOS. Conclusion Antibiotic administration within three hours from the time of ED arrival was significantly associated with improved outcomes, including in-hospital survival, reversal of organ failure, and shorter hospital LOS, in patients with severe sepsis and septic shock. PMID:27752550

  3. The cerebellum is involved in reward-based reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Thoma, Patrizia; Bellebaum, Christian; Koch, Benno; Schwarz, Michael; Daum, Irene

    2008-01-01

    The cerebellum has recently been discussed in terms of a possible involvement in reward-based associative learning. To clarify the cerebellar contribution, eight patients with focal vascular lesions of the cerebellum and a group of 24 healthy subjects matched for age and IQ were compared on a range of different probabilistic outcome-based associative learning tasks, assessing acquisition, reversal, cognitive transfer, and generalization as well as the effect of reward magnitude. Cerebellar patients showed intact acquisition of stimulus contingencies, while reward-based reversal learning was significantly impaired. In addition, the patients showed slower acquisition of new stimulus contingencies in a second reward-based learning task, which might reflect reduced carry-over effects. Reward magnitude affected learning only during initial acquisition, with better learning on trials with high rewards in patients and control subjects. Overall, the findings suggest that the cerebellum is implicated in reversal learning as a dissociable component of reward-based learning. PMID:18592331

  4. Mitochondrial ROS Produced via Reverse Electron Transport Extend Animal Lifespan

    PubMed Central

    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel; Gubina, Nina; Lõhmus, Madis; Nelson, Glyn; Logan, Angela; Cooper, Helen M.; Navas, Plácido; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Murphy, Michael P.; Sanz, Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Summary Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has long been considered a cause of aging. However, recent studies have implicated ROS as essential secondary messengers. Here we show that the site of ROS production significantly contributes to their apparent dual nature. We report that ROS increase with age as mitochondrial function deteriorates. However, we also demonstrate that increasing ROS production specifically through respiratory complex I reverse electron transport extends Drosophila lifespan. Reverse electron transport rescued pathogenesis induced by severe oxidative stress, highlighting the importance of the site of ROS production in signaling. Furthermore, preventing ubiquinone reduction, through knockdown of PINK1, shortens lifespan and accelerates aging; phenotypes that are rescued by increasing reverse electron transport. These results illustrate that the source of a ROS signal is vital in determining its effects on cellular physiology and establish that manipulation of ubiquinone redox state is a valid strategy to delay aging. PMID:27076081

  5. Mitochondrial ROS Produced via Reverse Electron Transport Extend Animal Lifespan.

    PubMed

    Scialò, Filippo; Sriram, Ashwin; Fernández-Ayala, Daniel; Gubina, Nina; Lõhmus, Madis; Nelson, Glyn; Logan, Angela; Cooper, Helen M; Navas, Plácido; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Murphy, Michael P; Sanz, Alberto

    2016-04-12

    Increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has long been considered a cause of aging. However, recent studies have implicated ROS as essential secondary messengers. Here we show that the site of ROS production significantly contributes to their apparent dual nature. We report that ROS increase with age as mitochondrial function deteriorates. However, we also demonstrate that increasing ROS production specifically through respiratory complex I reverse electron transport extends Drosophila lifespan. Reverse electron transport rescued pathogenesis induced by severe oxidative stress, highlighting the importance of the site of ROS production in signaling. Furthermore, preventing ubiquinone reduction, through knockdown of PINK1, shortens lifespan and accelerates aging; phenotypes that are rescued by increasing reverse electron transport. These results illustrate that the source of a ROS signal is vital in determining its effects on cellular physiology and establish that manipulation of ubiquinone redox state is a valid strategy to delay aging.

  6. Nickel-cadmium Battery Cell Reversal from Resistive Network Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    During the individual cell short-down procedures often used for storing or reconditioning nickel-cadmium (Ni-Cd) batteries, it is possible for significant reversal of the lowest capacity cells to occur. The reversal is caused by the finite resistance of the common current-carrying leads in the resistive network that is generally used during short-down. A model is developed to evaluate the extent of such a reversal in any specific battery, and the model is verified by means of data from the short-down of a f-cell, 3.5-Ah battery. Computer simulations of short-down on a variety of battery configurations indicate the desirability of controlling capacity imbalances arising from cell configuration and battery management, limiting variability in the short-down resistors, minimizing lead resistances, and optimizing lead configurations.

  7. Charge-reversal nanoparticles: novel targeted drug delivery carriers.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinli; Liu, Lisha; Jiang, Chen

    2016-07-01

    Spurred by significant progress in materials chemistry and drug delivery, charge-reversal nanocarriers are being developed to deliver anticancer formulations in spatial-, temporal- and dosage-controlled approaches. Charge-reversal nanoparticles can release their drug payload in response to specific stimuli that alter the charge on their surface. They can elude clearance from the circulation and be activated by protonation, enzymatic cleavage, or a molecular conformational change. In this review, we discuss the physiological basis for, and recent advances in the design of charge-reversal nanoparticles that are able to control drug biodistribution in response to specific stimuli, endogenous factors (changes in pH, redox gradients, or enzyme concentration) or exogenous factors (light or thermos-stimulation). PMID:27471667

  8. Role of Reverse Divalent Cation Diffusion in Forward Osmosis Biofouling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Bar-Zeev, Edo; Hashmi, Sara M; Nghiem, Long D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-11-17

    We investigated the role of reverse divalent cation diffusion in forward osmosis (FO) biofouling. FO biofouling by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was simulated using pristine and chlorine-treated thin-film composite polyamide membranes with either MgCl2 or CaCl2 draw solution. We related FO biofouling behavior-water flux decline, biofilm architecture, and biofilm composition-to reverse cation diffusion. Experimental results demonstrated that reverse calcium diffusion led to significantly more severe water flux decline in comparison with reverse magnesium permeation. Unlike magnesium, reverse calcium permeation dramatically altered the biofilm architecture and composition, where extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formed a thicker, denser, and more stable biofilm. We propose that FO biofouling was enhanced by complexation of calcium ions to bacterial EPS. This hypothesis was confirmed by dynamic and static light scattering measurements using extracted bacterial EPS with the addition of either MgCl2 or CaCl2 solution. We observed a dramatic increase in the hydrodynamic radius of bacterial EPS with the addition of CaCl2, but no change was observed after addition of MgCl2. Static light scattering revealed that the radius of gyration of bacterial EPS with addition of CaCl2 was 20 times larger than that with the addition of MgCl2. These observations were further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy imaging, where bacterial EPS in the presence of calcium ions was globular, while that with magnesium ions was rod-shaped.

  9. Advancing Reversible Shape Memory by Tuning Network Architecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qiaoxi; Zhou, Jing; Vatankhah Varnosfaderani, Mohammad; Nykypanchuk, Dmytro; Gang, Oleg; Sheiko, Sergei; University of north carolina at chapel hill Collaboration; Brookhaven National Lab-CFN Collaboration

    Recently, reversible shape memory (RSM) has been realized in conventional semi-crystalline elastomers without applying any external force and synthetic programming. The mechanism is ascribed to counteraction between thermodynamically driven relaxation of a strained polymer network and kinetically preferred self-seeding recrystallization of constrained network strands. In order to maximize RSM's performance in terms of (i) range of reversible strain, (ii) rate of strain recovery, and (iii) relaxation time of reversibility, we have designed a systematic series of networks with different topologies and crosslinking densities, including purposely introduced dangling chains and irregular meshes. Within a broad range of crosslink density ca. 50-1000 mol/m3, we have demonstrated that the RSM's properties improve significantly with increasing crosslink density, regardless of network topology. Actually, one of the most irregular networks with densest crosslinking allowed achieving up to 80% of the programmed strain being fully reversible, fast recovery rate up to 0.05 K-1, and less than 15% decrease of reversibility after hours of annealing at partial melt state. With this understanding and optimization of RSM, we pursue an idea of shape control through self-assembly of shape-memory particles. For this purpose, 3D printing has been employed to prepare large assemblies of particles possessing specific shapes and morphologies.

  10. Characterization of the fouling phenomenon in reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, M.

    1989-01-01

    This dissertation explores the application of a bench scale reverse osmosis test cell apparatus as a research tool. This versatile system was used to explore the response of a reverse osmosis membrane to various types of feedwaters. As a result of this research, an easy, accurate experimental method for predicting the rejection in any reverse osmosis system has been developed and demonstrated. The dissertation illustrates a simple procedure to identify if a precipitating feedwater solution will foul a reverse osmosis membrane. The research also presents evidence that suggests that the common practice of increasing feed flow rates to clean a membrane may not always be an acceptable method to revive a system. In addition to this information about the RO systems, the dissertation provides insight into the environment around the membrane surface. Statistically significant information about the nature and behavior of the membrane permeation coefficient is presented. Evidence is provided to demonstrate the negative effects on membrane performance of small amounts of grease contamination from the process equipment. Insight into the resistive nature of membranes, boundary layers, and fouling deposits is also presented. Throughout the course of this research, the relationship between concentration polarization and the permeate flux is illustrated. This is done first in the traditional terms of wall concentration, and later in terms of flow resistance. This dissertation also provides an experimental demonstration of both the detachment of a boundary layer from a membrane and the resistive nature of a precipitated fouling layer in a reverse osmosis system.

  11. Analysis of Polar Reversals of Solar Cycle 22 and 23

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettinger, Sophie

    2015-01-01

    We study the relationship between polar field reversals and decayed active region magnetic flux. Photospheric active region flux is dispersed by differential rotation and turbulent diffusion, and is transported poleward by meridional flows and diffusion. We investigate in detail the relationship between the transport of decayed active region flux to high latitudes and changes in the polar field strength, including reversals in the magnetic polarity at the poles. By means of stack plots of low- and high-latitude slices of synoptic magnetograms, one to three activity complexes (systems of active regions) were identified in each reversal as the main cause of polar field reversals in each cycle. The poleward transport of large quantities of decayed lagging-polarity flux from these complexes was found to correlate well in time with the polar field changes. In each case significant latitudinal displacements were found between the positive and negative flux centroids of the complexes, consistent with Joy's law bipole tilt with lagging-polarity flux located poleward of leading-polarity flux. This result indicates the importance of the Joy's law tilt and consequent high-latitude polarity bias in polar reversals.This work is carried out through the National Solar Observatory Summer Research Assistantship (SRA) Program. The National Solar Observatory is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc. (AURA) under cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  12. Role of Reverse Divalent Cation Diffusion in Forward Osmosis Biofouling.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ming; Bar-Zeev, Edo; Hashmi, Sara M; Nghiem, Long D; Elimelech, Menachem

    2015-11-17

    We investigated the role of reverse divalent cation diffusion in forward osmosis (FO) biofouling. FO biofouling by Pseudomonas aeruginosa was simulated using pristine and chlorine-treated thin-film composite polyamide membranes with either MgCl2 or CaCl2 draw solution. We related FO biofouling behavior-water flux decline, biofilm architecture, and biofilm composition-to reverse cation diffusion. Experimental results demonstrated that reverse calcium diffusion led to significantly more severe water flux decline in comparison with reverse magnesium permeation. Unlike magnesium, reverse calcium permeation dramatically altered the biofilm architecture and composition, where extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) formed a thicker, denser, and more stable biofilm. We propose that FO biofouling was enhanced by complexation of calcium ions to bacterial EPS. This hypothesis was confirmed by dynamic and static light scattering measurements using extracted bacterial EPS with the addition of either MgCl2 or CaCl2 solution. We observed a dramatic increase in the hydrodynamic radius of bacterial EPS with the addition of CaCl2, but no change was observed after addition of MgCl2. Static light scattering revealed that the radius of gyration of bacterial EPS with addition of CaCl2 was 20 times larger than that with the addition of MgCl2. These observations were further confirmed by transmission electron microscopy imaging, where bacterial EPS in the presence of calcium ions was globular, while that with magnesium ions was rod-shaped. PMID:26503882

  13. Acute stress impairs set-shifting but not reversal learning.

    PubMed

    Butts, K A; Floresco, S B; Phillips, A G

    2013-09-01

    The ability to update and modify previously learned behavioral responses in a changing environment is essential for successful utilization of promising opportunities and for coping with adverse events. Valid models of cognitive flexibility that contribute to behavioral flexibility include set-shifting and reversal learning. One immediate effect of acute stress is the selective impairment of performance on higher-order cognitive control tasks mediated by the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) but not the hippocampus. Previous studies show that the mPFC is required for set-shifting but not for reversal learning, therefore the aim of the present experiment is to assess whether exposure to acute stress (15 min of mild tail-pinch stress) given immediately before testing on either a set-shifting or reversal learning tasks would impair performance selectively on the set-shifting task. An automated operant chamber-based task, confirmed that exposure to acute stress significantly disrupts set-shifting but has no effect on reversal learning. Rats exposed to an acute stressor require significantly more trials to reach criterion and make significantly more perseverative errors. Thus, these data reveal that an immediate effect of acute stress is to impair mPFC-dependent cognition selectively by disrupting the ability to inhibit the use of a previously relevant cognitive strategy.

  14. Conversion to Reverse Shoulder Arthroplasty: Humeral Stem Retention Versus Revision.

    PubMed

    Dilisio, Matthew F; Miller, Lindsay R; Siegel, Elana J; Higgins, Laurence D

    2015-09-01

    As the volume of shoulder arthroplasty procedures performed in the United States continues to increase, the predicted number of revision shoulder arthroplasties grows even higher. Conversion of failed shoulder arthroplasty to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty has become common. Many commercially available shoulder arthroplasty systems now offer a platform humeral stem that is used for both anatomic shoulder arthroplasty and reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. This study investigated whether retaining the humeral stem offers advantages over revising the humeral stem in conversion of failed shoulder arthroplasty to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The study included 26 patients (mean age, 68.46 years) with failed shoulder arthroplasty who underwent conversion to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty with a minimum 2-year follow-up (mean, 34.38 months). Patients who had retention of the humeral stem were compared with those who had stem revision. Humeral stem retention was associated with a significantly shorter operative time (178.92 vs 237 minutes, P=.02). Decreases in blood loss, complications, and length of hospitalization were observed, but the differences were not statistically significant. Minimal differences were observed for patient-reported outcomes. Of patients undergoing humeral stem removal, 21.4% had an intraoperative humeral shaft or tuberosity fracture compared with none in the stem retention group. Humeral stem retention was associated with decreased operative time compared with humeral stem revision in the conversion of failed shoulder arthroplasty to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty. The use of a platform shoulder arthroplasty system may benefit patients with failed shoulder arthroplasty undergoing conversion to reverse total shoulder arthroplasty by avoiding humeral stem revision. PMID:26375534

  15. Activity and stability of catalase in nonionic micellar and reverse micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Gebicka, Lidia; Jurgas-Grudzinska, Monika

    2004-01-01

    Catalase activity and stability in the presence of simple micelles of Brij 35 and entrapped in reverse micelles of Brij 30 have been studied. The enzyme retains full activity in aqueous micellar solution of Brij 35. Catalase exhibits "superactivity" in reverse micelles composed of 0.1 M Brij 30 in dodecane, n-heptane or isooctane, and significantly lowers the activity in decaline. The incorporation of catalase into Brij 30 reverse micelles enhances its stability at 50 degrees C. However, the stability of catalase incubated at 37 degrees C in micellar and reverse micellar solutions is lower than that in homogeneous aqueous solution. PMID:15666551

  16. Propagation of time-reversed Lamb waves in bovine cortical bone in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Il; Yoon, Suk Wang

    2015-01-01

    The present study aims to investigate the propagation of time-reversed Lamb waves in bovine cortical bone in vitro. The time-reversed Lamb waves were successfully launched at 200 kHz in 18 bovine tibiae through a time reversal process of Lamb waves. The group velocities of the time-reversed Lamb waves in the bovine tibiae were measured using the axial transmission technique. They showed a significant correlation with the cortical thickness and tended to follow the theoretical group velocity of the lowest order antisymmetrical Lamb wave fairly well, consistent with the behavior of the slow guided wave in long cortical bones.

  17. 14 CFR 93.26 - Reversion and withdrawal of Arrival Authorizations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reversion and withdrawal of Arrival Authorizations. 93.26 Section 93.26 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIR TRAFFIC AND GENERAL OPERATING RULES SPECIAL AIR TRAFFIC RULES Congestion and...

  18. Sugammadex for reversal of neuromuscular blockade: a retrospective analysis of clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness in a single center

    PubMed Central

    Carron, Michele; Baratto, Fabio; Zarantonello, Francesco; Ori, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study is to evaluate the clinical and economic impact of introducing a rocuronium–neostigmine–sugammadex strategy into a cisatracurium–neostigmine regimen for neuromuscular block (NMB) management. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis of clinical outcomes and cost-effectiveness in five operating rooms at University Hospital of Padova. A clinical outcome evaluation after sugammadex administration as first-choice reversal drug in selected patients (rocuronium–sugammadex) and as rescue therapy after neostigmine reversal (rocuronium–neostigmine–sugammadex) compared to control was performed. A cost-analysis of NMB management accompanying the introduction of a rocuronium–neostigmine–sugammadex strategy into a cisatracurium–neostigmine regimen was carried out. To such purpose, two periods were compared: 2011–2012, without sugammadex available; 2013–2014, with sugammadex available. A subsequent analysis was performed to evaluate if sugammadex replacing neostigmine as first choice reversal drug is cost-effective. Results The introduction of a rocuronium–neostigmine–sugammadex strategy into a cisatracurium–neostigmine regimen reduced the average cost of NMB management by 36%, from €20.8/case to €13.3/case. Patients receiving sugammadex as a first-choice reversal drug (3%) exhibited significantly better train-of-four ratios at extubation (P<0.001) and were discharged to the surgical ward (P<0.001) more rapidly than controls. The cost-saving of sugammadex as first-choice reversal drug has been estimated to be €2.9/case. Patients receiving sugammadex as rescue therapy after neostigmine reversal (3.2%) showed no difference in time to discharge to the surgical ward (P=0.44) compared to controls. No unplanned intensive care unit (ICU) admissions with rocuronium–neostigmine–sugammadex strategy were observed. The potential economic benefit in avoiding postoperative residual curarization (PORC)-related ICU

  19. Reversibly assembled cellular composite materials.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Kenneth C; Gershenfeld, Neil

    2013-09-13

    We introduce composite materials made by reversibly assembling a three-dimensional lattice of mass-produced carbon fiber-reinforced polymer composite parts with integrated mechanical interlocking connections. The resulting cellular composite materials can respond as an elastic solid with an extremely large measured modulus for an ultralight material (12.3 megapascals at a density of 7.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter). These materials offer a hierarchical decomposition in modeling, with bulk properties that can be predicted from component measurements and deformation modes that can be determined by the placement of part types. Because site locations are locally constrained, structures can be produced in a relative assembly process that merges desirable features of fiber composites, cellular materials, and additive manufacturing.

  20. 7. Administrative structures.

    PubMed

    2014-05-01

    The basic systems of any society rarely can operate independently. Instead, they are dependent and often interdependent upon other entities. Such entities control the resources within their respective systems. Thus, coordination and control agencies require contracts or memoranda of understanding with these entities in order to assure access to the resources required during a crisis. These administrative structures include: (1) governmental institutions and agencies, including the military; (2) intergovernmental organisations; (3) nongovernmental organisations; (4) commercial private sector organisations; and (5) academic institutions. These dependencies create potential barriers to the provision of coordination and control including: (1) the complexity of the administrative structures with which coordination and control must interact; (2) the location of resources; (3) finding responsible person(s); (4) the competence and compatibility; (5) methods of access; (6) payment; (7) contracts and memoranda of understanding; (8) inventories of accessible resources; (9) competition for the mandate, power, and resources; and (10) jealousy. The need for potential interactions between administrative structures requires that agreements for the sharing of resources during crises be reached as part of planning and preparedness. Gaining an understanding of these relationships is an important area for research.

  1. Process of forming compounds using reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion systems

    DOEpatents

    Linehan, John C.; Fulton, John L.; Bean, Roger M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a process for producing a nanometer-sized metal compound. The process comprises forming a reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system comprising a polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. A first reactant comprising a multi-component, water-soluble metal compound is introduced into the polar fluid in a non-polar or low-polarity fluid. This first reactant can be introduced into the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system during formation thereof or subsequent to the formation of the reverse micelle or microemulsion system. The water-soluble metal compound is then reacted in the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system to form the nanometer-sized metal compound. The nanometer-sized metal compound is then precipitated from the reverse micelle or reverse microemulsion system.

  2. Vortioxetine restores reversal learning impaired by 5-HT depletion or chronic intermittent cold stress in rats.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Ashley; Pehrson, Alan L; Sánchez, Connie; Morilak, David A

    2014-10-01

    Current treatments for depression, including serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), are only partially effective, with a high incidence of residual symptoms, relapse, and treatment resistance. Loss of cognitive flexibility, a component of depression, is associated with dysregulation of the prefrontal cortex. Reversal learning, a form of cognitive flexibility, is impaired by chronic stress, a risk factor for depression, and the stress-induced impairment in reversal learning is sensitive to chronic SSRI treatment, and is mimicked by serotonin (5-HT) depletion. Vortioxetine, a novel, multimodal-acting antidepressant, is a 5-HT3, 5-HT7 and 5-HT1D receptor antagonist, a 5-HT1B receptor partial agonist, a 5-HT1A receptor agonist, and inhibits the 5-HT transporter. Using adult male rats, we first investigated the direct effects of vortioxetine, acting at post-synaptic 5-HT receptors, on reversal learning that was compromised by 5-HT depletion using 4-chloro-DL-phenylalanine methyl ester hydrochloride (PCPA), effectively eliminating any contribution of 5-HT reuptake blockade. PCPA induced a reversal learning impairment that was alleviated by acute or sub-chronic vortioxetine administration, suggesting that post-synaptic 5-HT receptor activation contributes to the effects of vortioxetine. We then investigated the effects of chronic dietary administration of vortioxetine on reversal learning that had been compromised in intact animals exposed to chronic intermittent cold (CIC) stress, to assess vortioxetine's total pharmacological effect. CIC stress impaired reversal learning, and chronic vortioxetine administration prevented the reversal-learning deficit. Together, these results suggest that the direct effect of vortioxetine at 5-HT receptors may contribute to positive effects on cognitive flexibility deficits, and may enhance the effect of 5-HT reuptake blockade.

  3. Removal of radionuclides in drinking water by membrane treatment using ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis and electrodialysis reversal.

    PubMed

    Montaña, M; Camacho, A; Serrano, I; Devesa, R; Matia, L; Vallés, I

    2013-11-01

    A pilot plant had been built to test the behaviour of ultrafiltration (UF), reverse osmosis (RO), and electrodialysis reversal (EDR) in order to improve the quality of the water supplied to Barcelona metropolitan area from the Llobregat River. This paper presents results from two studies to reduce natural radioactivity. The results from the pilot plant with four different scenarios were used to design the full-scale treatment plant built (SJD WTP). The samples taken at different steps of the treatment were analysed to determine gross alpha, gross beta and uranium activity. The results obtained revealed a significant improvement in the radiological water quality provided by both membrane techniques (RO and EDR showed removal rates higher than 60%). However, UF did not show any significant removal capacity for gross alpha, gross beta or uranium activities. RO was better at reducing the radiological parameters studied and this treatment was selected and applied at the full scale treatment plant. The RO treatment used at the SJD WTP reduced the concentration of both gross alpha and gross beta activities and also produced water of high quality with an average removal of 95% for gross alpha activity and almost 93% for gross beta activity at the treatment plant.

  4. Why do airlines want and use thrust reversers? A compilation of airline industry responses to a survey regarding the use of thrust reversers on commercial transport airplanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, Jeffrey A.

    1995-01-01

    Although thrust reversers are used for only a fraction of the airplane operating time, their impact on nacelle design, weight, airplane cruise performance, and overall airplane operating and maintenance expenses is significant. Why then do the airlines want and use thrust reversers? In an effort to understand the airlines need for thrust reversers, a survey of the airline industry was made to determine why and under what situations thrust reversers are currently used or thought to be needed. The survey was intended to help establish the cost/benefits trades for the use of thrust reversers and airline opinion regarding alternative deceleration devices. A compilation and summary of the responses given to the survey questionnaire is presented.

  5. Periodicity of the earth's magnetic reversals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, R. B.

    1986-01-01

    Results are presented from an attempt to perform a relatively comprehensive analysis of the evidence for a periodicity, with harmonics, of the observed regular reversals of the earth's magnetic field. The database considered covers 296 reversals over the past 165 Myr. Histograms with bins 1 Myr apart reveal only 30 Myr reversal patterns. The reversal dates are fitted to a linear periodic function and a spectrum is computed for the residuals at the adopted dates. The possible presence of multiple periodicities is evaluated and over various time intervals. The analysis shows that a recently observed 15 Myr periodicity is probably a harmonic of the 29.5-30.5 Myr period. The calculations do not confirm an inherent magnetic reversal property of the earth. The reversals may arise from tectonic events or from impacts from extraterrestrial objects.

  6. Reversible hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism in a patient with tetraplegia.

    PubMed

    Inaba, M; Katayama, S; Omoto, A; Maruno, Y; Itabashi, A; Ishii, J; Morimoto, S

    1989-02-01

    A 66-year-old man with tetraplegia developed hyperkalemia. Hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism was disclosed on the basis of a lack of response of plasma renin activity to furosemide administration or tilting with marked hypotension and a subnormal response of aldosterone to furosemide stimulation, tilting, angiotensin II infusion and ACTH administration, as well as increased vascular responsiveness to angiotensin II infusion. Of interest was the finding that urinary excretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine was markedly reduced, indicating that hyporeninemia may possibly be due to a chronic lack of sympathetic nervous stimuli. The patient was treated with sodium polystyrene sulfonate resin and/or 9-alpha-fluorohydrocortisone, and wheelchair rehabilitation. However, even after stopping 8-month-mineralcorticoid replacement, normokalemia was maintained. Reexamination of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system revealed a normalized response to tilting or ACTH administration along with the normal catecholamine excretion. One more point to be noted is that ACTH administration resulted in a rise in the plasma levels of cortisol, corticosterone and 18-OH-corticosterone, but not aldosterone. This may be attributed to ACTH-stimulated 18-OH-corticosterone derived from the zona fasciculata or alternatively to a partial defect of corticosterone methyl oxidase type II (18-dehydrogenase) in the adrenal glomerulosa cells. These results suggested that hyporeninemic hypoaldosteronism may have been attributable to a decrease in systemic nervous stimuli and that such abnormalities were reversible.

  7. Antisense against Amyloid-β Protein Precursor Reverses Memory Deficits and Alters Gene Expression in Neurotropic and Insulin-Signaling Pathways in SAMP8 Mice.

    PubMed

    Armbrecht, Harvey J; Siddiqui, Akbar M; Green, Michael; Farr, Susan A; Kumar, Vijaya B; Banks, William A; Patrick, Ping; Shah, Gul N; Morley, John E

    2015-01-01

    The senescence-accelerated mouse (SAMP8) strain exhibits an age-related decrease in memory accompanied by an increase in hippocampal amyloid-β protein precursor (AβPP) and amyloid-β peptide (Aβ). We have shown that administration of an antisense oligonucleotide against the Aβ region of AβPP (AβPP antisense) reverses the memory deficits. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of peripheral (IV) administration of AβPP antisense on hippocampal gene expression. The AβPP antisense reversed the memory deficits and altered expression of 944 hippocampal genes. Pathway analysis showed significant gene expression changes in nine pathways. These include the MAPK signaling pathway (p = 0.0078) and the phosphatidylinositol signaling pathway (p = 0.043), which we have previously shown to be altered in SAMP8 mice. The changes in these pathways contributed to significant changes in the neurotropin (p = 0.0083) and insulin signaling (p = 0.015) pathways, which are known to be important in learning and memory. Changes in these pathways were accompanied by phosphorylation changes in the downstream target proteins p70S6K, GSK3β, ERK, and CREB. These changes in hippocampal gene expression and protein phosphorylation may suggest specific new targets for antisense therapy aimed at improving memory.

  8. Women: A Significant National Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council of Administrative Women in Education, Washington, DC.

    Believing that society, including children, suffers from the underutilization of more than half the talents available to educational administration, an annual meeting was devoted to a workshop designed to present and provide study of the pertinent facts. Keynote addresses by Congresswoman Edith Green, Wayne O. Reed, Earl C. Funderburk, Dorothy…

  9. Evidence of thyroxine formation following iodine administration in Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thrall, K. D.; Sauer, R. L.; Bull, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    Iodine (I2) has been proposed to be used as a water disinfectant on the manned space station. Previous work has shown that subchronic administration of I2 to Sprague-Dawley rats in drinking water significantly increases plasma thyroxine/triiodothyronine (T4/T3) levels. This is not observed with iodide (I-) treatment. The present study addresses the possibility that I2 reacts with deiodinated T4 metabolites in the gastrointestinal tract to resynthesize T4. Incubation of diiodothyronine (T2), T3, or reverse T3 with I2 in phosphate-buffered saline resulted in the formation of T4 as measured by radioimmunoassay. Washes from the initial segments of the small intestine of the rat show that substrates are present that react with I2 to produce T4. Single oral doses of I2 to rats produced significant dose-related increases in serum T4 and decreases in T3 concentrations after 2 h. Administration of an equivalent dose of I- did not alter significantly plasma T4 concentrations. Higher concentrations of a radioactive substance that bound a T4-specific antibody are present in plasma of animals treated with 125I2 compared to 125I-. These data support the hypothesis that I2 reacts with metabolites of thyroid hormone in the gastrointestinal tract to resynthesize T4 and elevate its levels in blood.

  10. Characteristics of reversible absorption-enhancing effect of sodium nitroprusside in rat small intestine.

    PubMed

    Takizawa, Yusuke; Kishimoto, Hisanao; Kitazato, Takuya; Ishizaka, Haruka; Kamiya, Naomi; Ito, Yasuhiko; Tomita, Mikio; Hayashi, Masahiro

    2013-07-16

    Nitric oxide (NO) donors increase the permeability of water-soluble compounds with neither loss of cell viability nor lactate dehydrogenase release. In addition, the rectal absorption of insulin has been reported to be remarkably enhanced in the presence of NO donors such as 1-Hydroxy-3-(3-aminopropyl)-3-isopropyltriazene 2-oxide (NOC5) and N-Ethyl-2-(1-ethyl-2-hydroxy-2-nitrosohydrazino) ethanamine (NOC12). In this study, we examined the effect of sodium nitroprusside (SNP), which is used in clinical situations as a vasodilator, as a model NO donor on the ileal mucosa of rats. We used an in situ closed loop method in rat ileum to study changes in the permeability of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran 4000 (FD-4) as a paracellular marker. The effect of SNP (1 and 10mg/kg) on the protein expression level of the claudin family was examined by Western blotting. The membrane permeation of FD-4 was increased but no mucosal lesion was observed upon the administration of SNP. Moreover, the protein expression level of the claudin family was not changed by the administration of SNP. When SNP was removed 2h after its administration, no significant change in the membrane permeation of FD-4 was observed. Moreover, no decrease of ileal membrane resistance or disruption of membrane structure was observed. The absorption-enhancing effect of SNP was associated with low injury and low toxicity. The reversibility of the effect of SNP was observed. Consequently, it was shown that SNP can be a useful absorption enhancer.

  11. Gravity controlled anti-reverse rotation device

    DOEpatents

    Dickinson, Robert J.; Wetherill, Todd M.

    1983-01-01

    A gravity assisted anti-reverse rotation device for preventing reverse rotation of pumps and the like. A horizontally mounted pawl is disposed to mesh with a fixed ratchet preventing reverse rotation when the pawl is advanced into intercourse with the ratchet by a vertically mounted lever having a lumped mass. Gravitation action on the lumped mass urges the pawl into mesh with the ratchet, while centrifugal force on the lumped mass during forward, allowed rotation retracts the pawl away from the ratchet.

  12. Annealed Importance Sampling Reversible Jump MCMC algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Karagiannis, Georgios; Andrieu, Christophe

    2013-03-20

    It will soon be 20 years since reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJ-MCMC) algorithms have been proposed. They have significantly extended the scope of Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation methods, offering the promise to be able to routinely tackle transdimensional sampling problems, as encountered in Bayesian model selection problems for example, in a principled and flexible fashion. Their practical efficient implementation, however, still remains a challenge. A particular difficulty encountered in practice is in the choice of the dimension matching variables (both their nature and their distribution) and the reversible transformations which allow one to define the one-to-one mappings underpinning the design of these algorithms. Indeed, even seemingly sensible choices can lead to algorithms with very poor performance. The focus of this paper is the development and performance evaluation of a method, annealed importance sampling RJ-MCMC (aisRJ), which addresses this problem by mitigating the sensitivity of RJ-MCMC algorithms to the aforementioned poor design. As we shall see the algorithm can be understood as being an “exact approximation” of an idealized MCMC algorithm that would sample from the model probabilities directly in a model selection set-up. Such an idealized algorithm may have good theoretical convergence properties, but typically cannot be implemented, and our algorithms can approximate the performance of such idealized algorithms to an arbitrary degree while not introducing any bias for any degree of approximation. Our approach combines the dimension matching ideas of RJ-MCMC with annealed importance sampling and its Markov chain Monte Carlo implementation. We illustrate the performance of the algorithm with numerical simulations which indicate that, although the approach may at first appear computationally involved, it is in fact competitive.

  13. Serial reversal learning in bumblebees (Bombus impatiens).

    PubMed

    Strang, Caroline G; Sherry, David F

    2014-05-01

    Bumblebees are capable of rapidly learning discriminations, but flexibility in bumblebee learning is less well understood. We tested bumblebees (Bombus impatiens) on a serial reversal learning task. A serial reversal task requires learning of an initial discrimination between two differentially rewarded stimuli, followed by multiple reversals of the reward contingency between stimuli. A reduction in errors with repeated reversals in a serial reversal task is an indicator of behavioural flexibility. Bees were housed in a large indoor environment and tested during foraging flights. Testing free-flying bees allowed for large numbers of trials and reversals. All bees were trained to perform a simultaneous discrimination between two colours for a nectar reward, followed by nine reversals of this discrimination. Results showed that bumblebees reduced errors and improved their performance across successive reversals. A reduction in perseverative errors was the major cause of the improvement in performance. Bees showed a slight increase in error rate in their final trials, perhaps as a consequence of increasing proactive interference, but proactive interference may also have contributed to the overall improvement in performance across reversals. Bumblebees are thus capable of behavioural flexibility comparable to that of other animals and may use proactive interference as a mechanism of behavioural flexibility in varying environments.

  14. Utility of methylene blue for the reversal of excessive levels of methemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Vick, J.; Von Bredow, J.; Brown, L.; Kaminskis, A.; Bossone, C.

    1993-05-13

    Many new prophylactic and therapeutic compounds are being studied as potential sources of methemoglobin useful in counteracting the lethal effects of cyanide intoxication. The formation of methemoglobin also leads to a reduction in the blood oxygen carrying capacity which may, in extreme cases, lead to lethal consequences. The i.v. administration of Methylene blue rapidly reverses methemoglobin to hemoglobin. Unanticipated high levels of methemoglobin (65 - 85%) in three sheep exposed to propiophenone derivatives led to a lethal outcome in one untreated sheep and complete recovery in two sheep which were treated with 3.0 mg/kg methylene blue i.v. methemoglobin was reduced to safe levels within minutes following administration. A similar exposure of dogs to propriophenone derivatives led to high levels (77 - 78%) of methemoglobin which were readily reversed following the intravenous administration of the same dose of methylene blue.

  15. Active Lactobacillus rhamnosus LA68 or Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 administration positively influences liver fatty acid composition in mice on a HFD regime.

    PubMed

    Ivanovic, Nevena; Minic, Rajna; Djuricic, Ivana; Radojevic Skodric, Sanja; Zivkovic, Irena; Sobajic, Sladjana; Djordjevic, Brizita

    2016-06-15

    Western life style, and high calorie diet in particular is causing major health problems such as insulin resistance, hepatic steatosis and heart disease in the modern age. High fat diet (HFD) induces similar changes in mice, such as increased body weight, hypercholesterolemia and accumulation of triglycerides in the liver. These changes can be ameliorated by the administration of some Lactobacillus species. The focus of this study was to analyze the fatty acid content of liver, heart and brain tissues of mice fed HFD and administered with either Lactobacillus plantarum WCFS1 or Lactobacillus rhamnosus LA68, and to analyze the fatty acid content of these organs after a two months washout period. The fatty acid composition of mouse liver tissue changed significantly due to probiotic administration during a 12 weeks HFD regime and active Lactobacillus administration had a slightly reversing effect toward the standard mouse diet group, but after the washout period these changes disappeared. The fatty acid composition of the heart and brain tissues was significantly changed in the HFD regime but probiotic administration had no significant influence on the fatty acid profile of these two organs. Upon the 8 weeks washout period the only remaining beneficial effect was the significantly lower mouse weight in the supplemented groups compared to the HFD group. PMID:27231730

  16. Laboratory assessment of warfarin reversal with global coagulation tests versus international normalized ratio in patients with intracranial bleeding.

    PubMed

    Voils, Stacy A; Martin, Erika J; Mohammed, Bassem M; Bayrlee, Ahmad; Brophy, Donald F

    2015-06-01

    We assess the in-vivo relationship between international normalized ratio (INR) and global coagulation tests in patients with life-threatening bleeding who received prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC) for warfarin reversal. This was a prospective pilot study in adult patients with intracranial bleeding related to anticoagulation with warfarin. Thromboelastography (TEG), thrombin generation parameters and INR were assessed at baseline, 30  min, 2 and 24  h after PCC. Changes in laboratory parameters and relationship between INR and global coagulation tests were assessed over time. Eight patients mean [standard deviation (SD)] age 72 (16) were included and received mean (SD) dose of PCC 24 (5) units/kg. Four patients died during the study, all with INR values more than 1.5 thirty minutes after PCC. Mean (SD) INR was 3.0 (1.3) and decreased significantly to 1.8 (0.48) thirty minutes after PCC (P < 0.01). Baseline endogenous thrombin potential and thrombin peak were 890  nmol/min and 123  nmol and increased significantly to 1943  nmol/min (P < 0.01) and 301  nmol (P < 0.01) 30  min after PCC administration. Reaction (R)-time decreased significantly (P = 0.02), and maximum amplitude and overall coagulation index (CI) significantly increased during treatment (P < 0.01, respectively). Thrombin generation and TEG values corrected after PCC administration; however, INR did not fully correct. Patients that died tended to be older with prolonged INR values across the study period. INR and TEG values correlated well with thrombin generation before administration of PCC, but this relationship was lost afterward.

  17. Selective Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Inhibitor Reversed Zinc Chloride-Induced Spatial Memory Impairment via Increasing Cholinergic Marker Expression.

    PubMed

    Tabrizian, Kaveh; Azami, Kian; Belaran, Maryam; Soodi, Maliheh; Abdi, Khosrou; Fanoudi, Sahar; Sanati, Mehdi; Mottaghi Dastjerdi, Negar; Soltany Rezaee-Rad, Mohammad; Sharifzadeh, Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Zinc, an essential micronutrient and biochemical element of the human body, plays structural, catalytic, and regulatory roles in numerous physiological functions. In the current study, the effects of a pretraining oral administration of zinc chloride (10, 25, and 50 mg/kg) for 14 consecutive days and post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W as a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor (10, 50, and 100 μM/side), alone and in combination, on the spatial memory retention in Morris water maze (MWM) were investigated. Animals were trained for 4 days and tested 48 h after completion of training. Also, the molecular effects of these compounds on the expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), as a cholinergic marker in the CA1 region of the hippocampus and medial septal area (MSA), were evaluated. Behavioral and molecular findings of this study showed that a 2-week oral administration of zinc chloride (50 mg/kg) impaired spatial memory retention in MWM and decreased ChAT expression. Immunohistochemical analysis of post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W revealed a significant increase in ChAT immunoreactivity. Furthermore, post-training bilateral intra-hippocampal infusion of 1400W into the CA1 region of the hippocampus reversed zinc chloride-induced spatial memory impairment in MWM and significantly increased ChAT expression in comparison with zinc chloride-treated animals. Taken together, these results emphasize the role of selective iNOS inhibitors in reversing zinc chloride-induced spatial memory deficits via modulation of cholinergic marker expression.

  18. Long-Term Administration of Artesunate Induces Reproductive Toxicity in Male Rats

    PubMed Central

    Olumide, Stephen Akinsomisoye; Raji, Yinusa

    2011-01-01

    Background Artesunate is commonly used in malaria therapy. Many antimalarial drugs have been associated with male reproductive dysfunction. The effect of artesunate on male reproductive activities was studied using in–vivo and in-vitro experimental models. Methods Adult male rats (n=6) were orally given artesunate (2.9 mg/kg body weight) on daily basis for five days. Artesunate (2.9 mg/kg body weight) was administered to another group of rats daily for six weeks, while there was a recovery group of rats too. The control animals received the vehicle only. At the end of the treatment, sperm characteristics, serum follicle stimulating hormone, luteinizing hormone and testosterone levels, testicular and epididymal histology and fertility were assessed. Cultured Sertoli cells were treated with 0.3 µM to 10 µM artesunate for five days after which Sertoli cell viability, double-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ds-DNA) integrity and genetic expression of Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) and transferrin were assessed. The data were analyzed using Graphpad Instat Statistical software. A probability value of p <0.05 was considered significant. Results Artesunate did not cause any significant effects in short-term administration but significantly reduced the aforesaid parameters in long-term administration. There were visible lesions in the testicular and epididymal histological studies, although fertility was not significantly reduced. These changes were restored in the recovery experiment. In-vitro studies showed dose and duration dependent changes in Sertoli cell viability and ds-DNA integrity. However, transferrin and GDNF gene expressions were normal. Conclusion The results suggest that long-term administration of artesunate could induce reversible infertility in rats which may act via distortion of blood–testis barrier formed by Sertoli cells. PMID:23926511

  19. Durability Evaluation of Reversible Solid Oxide Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Xiaoyu Zhang; James E. O'Brien; Robert C. O'Brien; Gregory K. Housley

    2013-11-01

    An experimental investigation on the performance and durability of single solid oxide cells (SOCs) is under way at the Idaho National Laboratory. Reversible operation of SOCs includes electricity generation in the fuel cell mode and hydrogen generation in the electrolysis mode. Degradation is a more significant issue when operating SOCs in the electrolysis mode. In order to understand and mitigate the degradation issues in high temperature electrolysis, single SOCs with different configurations from several manufacturers have been evaluated for initial performance and long-term durability. A new test apparatus for single cell and small stack tests has been developed for this purpose. Cells were obtained from four industrial partners. Cells from Ceramatec Inc. and Materials and Systems Research Inc. (MSRI) showed improved durability in electrolysis mode compared to previous stack tests. Cells from Saint Gobain Advanced Materials Inc. (St. Gobain) and SOFCPower Inc. demonstrated stable performance in the fuel cell mode, but rapid degradation in the electrolysis mode, especially at high current density. Electrolyte-electrode delamination was found to have a significant impact on degradation in some cases. Enhanced bonding between electrolyte and electrode and modification of the electrode microstructure helped to mitigate degradation. Polarization scans and AC impedance measurements were performed during the tests to characterize cell performance and degradation.

  20. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, Edward; Chipman, J.K.; Edwards, Stephen; Habib, Tanwir; Falciani, Francesco; Taylor, Ronald C.; Van Aggelen, Graham; Vulpe, Chris; Antczak, Philipp; Loguinov, Alexandre

    2011-01-30

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or poorly characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, metabolic, signaling) to characterize adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) for chemicals that disrupt the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal endocrine axis in fathead minnows. Gene expression changes in fathead minnow ovaries in response to 7 different chemicals, over different times, doses, and in vivo versus in vitro conditions were captured in a large data set of 868 arrays. We examined potential AOPs of the antiandrogen flutamide using two mutual information theory methods, ARACNE and CLR to infer gene regulatory networks and potential adverse outcome pathways. Representative networks from these studies were used to predict a network path from stressor to adverse outcome as a candidate AOP. The relationship of individual chemicals to an adverse outcome can be determined by following perturbations through the network in response to chemical treatment leading to the nodes associated with the adverse outcome. Identification of candidate pathways allows for formation of testable hypotheses about key biologic processes, biomarkers or alternative endpoints, which could be used to monitor an adverse outcome pathway. Finally, we identify the unique challenges facing the application of this approach in ecotoxicology, and attempt to provide a road map for the utilization of these tools. Key Words: mechanism of action, toxicology, microarray, network inference

  1. Reversing expectations during discourse comprehension

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Ming; Kuperberg, Gina

    2014-01-01

    In two ERP experiments, we asked whether comprehenders used the concessive connective, even so, to predict upcoming events. Participants read coherent and incoherent scenarios, with and without even so, e.g. “Elizabeth had a history exam on Monday. She took the test and aced/failed it. (Even so), she went home and celebrated wildly.”, as they rated coherence (Experiment 1) or simply answered intermittent comprehension questions (Experiment 2). The semantic function of even so was used to reverse real-world knowledge predictions, leading to an attenuated N400 to coherent versus incoherent target words (“celebrated”). Moreover, its pragmatic communicative function enhanced predictive processing, leading to more N400 attenuation to coherent targets in scenarios with than without even so. This benefit however, did not come for free: the detection of failed event predictions triggered a later posterior positivity and/or an anterior negativity effect, and costs of maintaining alternative likelihood relations manifest as a sustained negativity effect on sentence-final words. PMID:25914891

  2. Entropic uncertainty and measurement reversibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berta, Mario; Wehner, Stephanie; Wilde, Mark M.

    2016-07-01

    The entropic uncertainty relation with quantum side information (EUR-QSI) from (Berta et al 2010 Nat. Phys. 6 659) is a unifying principle relating two distinctive features of quantum mechanics: quantum uncertainty due to measurement incompatibility, and entanglement. In these relations, quantum uncertainty takes the form of preparation uncertainty where one of two incompatible measurements is applied. In particular, the ‘uncertainty witness’ lower bound in the EUR-QSI is not a function of a post-measurement state. An insightful proof of the EUR-QSI from (Coles et al 2012 Phys. Rev. Lett. 108 210405) makes use of a fundamental mathematical consequence of the postulates of quantum mechanics known as the non-increase of quantum relative entropy under quantum channels. Here, we exploit this perspective to establish a tightening of the EUR-QSI which adds a new state-dependent term in the lower bound, related to how well one can reverse the action of a quantum measurement. As such, this new term is a direct function of the post-measurement state and can be thought of as quantifying how much disturbance a given measurement causes. Our result thus quantitatively unifies this feature of quantum mechanics with the others mentioned above. We have experimentally tested our theoretical predictions on the IBM quantum experience and find reasonable agreement between our predictions and experimental outcomes.

  3. Characterization of the Bauschinger effect in sheet metal undergoing large strain reversals in bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanzon, Drew Wyatt

    This work consists on the quantification of sheet metal uniaxial stress-strain reversals from pure bending tests. Bending strains to approximately 10% were measured by strain gages and interferometry. Bending-unbending moments and strains were modeled and compared closely to the experimental data. The reverse uniaxial stress-strains curves were determined from the optimal fit of the model. Bauschinger effects were described by the reverse uniaxial response at the elasto-plastic range, between the elastic and the large strain, power fit ranges. Arc and straight line fittings on the lnsigma-lnepsilon scale proved accurate to describe the elasto-plastic behavior. Reverse uniaxial data determined for DP590 and DP780 steels and two Aluminum alloys showed significant Bauschinger effects with distinct features. For the DP steels the magnitudes of the reverse compressive sigma-epsilon curves compared moderately higher, and merging to a power curve with parameters K, n previously defined by tension testing. Bauschinger effects at small reversed strains were less pronounced for the aluminum alloys. However, at higher strains the reverse elasto-plastic response softened considerably, and during the unbending span the magnitudes of the reverse compressive strains remained below the corresponding K, n tensile values. The results showed pure bending as an efficient, simple to use technique to generate sigma-epsilon data for sheet metal at large reverse strains without the complicating restraining hardware required by direct compression methods.

  4. Plasma dopamine: regulation and significance.

    PubMed

    Van Loon, G R

    1983-10-01

    Dopamine (DA) normally circulates in plasma. The plasma concentration of the free form of DA is approximately equivalent to that of epinephrine (E) and 20% that of norepinephrine (NE). The free form constitutes less than 2% of total plasma DA, and the remainder exists predominantly as sulfate or glucuronide conjugates. DA is found in adrenal medulla and cortex, peripheral nerves, sympathetic ganglia, carotid body, and kidney, but quantitatively the origin of circulating DA remains poorly understood. Plasma concentrations of free DA increase in association with events that increase sympathetic tone, although to a much lesser degree than seen for NE or E. Thus, upright posture, bicycle exercise, a variety of emotional and physical stresses, and hypoglycemia may be associated with increases in plasma free DA. Plasma DA decreases during the course of dietary sodium depletion in humans, in contrast to the plasma NE response, and consistent with a physiological role for DA in the regulation of aldosterone secretion. Plasma DA increases after administration of its precursor L-dihydroxyphenylalanine, together with the decarboxylase inhibitor carbidopa. Plasma NE and (in some studies) plasma DA decrease after administration of the DA receptor agonist bromocriptine. In contrast, plasma DA and one of its major metabolites, homovanillic acid, increase after administration of the DA receptor antagonist haloperidol. Administration of the endogenous opioid peptide beta-endorphin into the brain increases central sympathetic outflow, thus increasing plasma DA concentration, although to a lesser extent than for NE or E. Disordered basal concentrations of DA in plasma or disordered responses of plasma DA have been reported in a number of disease states. Clear understanding of physiological roles of DA in plasma and of its pathophysiology awaits definition. PMID:6413258

  5. Administration of Educational Services: A Glossary of Basic Administration Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheelbarger, J. J.

    From "achievement motivation" and "administration" to "Theory Z" and "viscidity and hedonic tone," this glossary defines 87 terms as they are used in educational administration. The terms include philosophical, psychological, organizational, and social concepts, but they all are employed in the theory and practice of administration. A short…

  6. The Efficacy of Administrator Preparation Programs: Private School Administrators' Attitudes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, H. Woodrow; Johnson, Ruth N.; Madjidi, Farzin

    This report examines divergent views that may exist among administrators based on administrators' demographic characteristics and how these differences affect curriculum design for this group. It looks at factors, such as the person's age, gender, and ethnicity, that might have influenced whether or not an administrator completed a…

  7. A Review of the Literature on College Administrators and Administrations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, George; Uhse, Stefan

    A review of the extensive literature on college administration and college administrators reveals there are relatively few empirical studies in the field. It was also observed that: there is widespread agreement on a few broad principles; there has been a heavy emphasis on human relations and proper administrative procedures; there are fundamental…

  8. 42 CFR 137.22 - May the Secretary consider uncorrected significant and material audit exceptions identified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... financial and administrative functions, such as personnel, payroll, property management, etc., the Secretary... and material audit exceptions identified regarding centralized financial and administrative functions... uncorrected significant and material audit exceptions identified regarding centralized financial...

  9. 42 CFR 137.22 - May the Secretary consider uncorrected significant and material audit exceptions identified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... financial and administrative functions, such as personnel, payroll, property management, etc., the Secretary... and material audit exceptions identified regarding centralized financial and administrative functions... uncorrected significant and material audit exceptions identified regarding centralized financial...

  10. 42 CFR 137.22 - May the Secretary consider uncorrected significant and material audit exceptions identified...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... financial and administrative functions, such as personnel, payroll, property management, etc., the Secretary... and material audit exceptions identified regarding centralized financial and administrative functions... uncorrected significant and material audit exceptions identified regarding centralized financial...

  11. 14 CFR 25.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... reversal in flight the engine will produce no more than flight idle thrust. In addition, it must be shown by analysis or test, or both, that— (i) Each operable reverser can be restored to the forward thrust position; and (ii) The airplane is capable of continued safe flight and landing under any possible...

  12. 14 CFR 25.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... reversal in flight the engine will produce no more than flight idle thrust. In addition, it must be shown by analysis or test, or both, that— (i) Each operable reverser can be restored to the forward thrust position; and (ii) The airplane is capable of continued safe flight and landing under any possible...

  13. 14 CFR 25.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... reversal in flight the engine will produce no more than flight idle thrust. In addition, it must be shown by analysis or test, or both, that— (i) Each operable reverser can be restored to the forward thrust position; and (ii) The airplane is capable of continued safe flight and landing under any possible...

  14. 14 CFR 25.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... reversal in flight the engine will produce no more than flight idle thrust. In addition, it must be shown by analysis or test, or both, that— (i) Each operable reverser can be restored to the forward thrust position; and (ii) The airplane is capable of continued safe flight and landing under any possible...

  15. 14 CFR 25.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... reversal in flight the engine will produce no more than flight idle thrust. In addition, it must be shown by analysis or test, or both, that— (i) Each operable reverser can be restored to the forward thrust position; and (ii) The airplane is capable of continued safe flight and landing under any possible...

  16. The Rate Laws for Reversible Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Edward L.

    1986-01-01

    Provides background information for teachers on the rate laws for reversible reactions. Indicates that although prediction of the form of the rate law for a reverse reaction given the rate law for the forward reaction is not certain, the number of possibilities is limited because of relationships described. (JN)

  17. Empirical Evidence for Reversibility by Inversion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gladstone, Roy; Palazzo, Richard

    1974-01-01

    This study demonstrates that, given the assumption that the child does have some understanding of both height and amount, many nonconservers do give correct reversal judgments for both. Also, reversibility data from this study do not support the theory that a new stage appears when water conservation judgments appear. (Author/ED)

  18. Neuronal Activation for Semantically Reversible Sentences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Fiona M.; Thomas, Michael S. C.; Price, Cathy J.

    2010-01-01

    Semantically reversible sentences are prone to misinterpretation and take longer for typically developing children and adults to comprehend; they are also particularly problematic for those with language difficulties such as aphasia or Specific Language Impairment. In our study, we used fMRI to compare the processing of semantically reversible and…

  19. 14 CFR 23.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... testing, or both, for propeller systems that allow the propeller blades to move from the flight low-pitch... systems. (a) For turbojet and turbofan reversing systems. (1) Each system intended for ground operation only must be designed so that, during any reversal in flight, the engine will produce no more...

  20. 14 CFR 23.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... testing, or both, for propeller systems that allow the propeller blades to move from the flight low-pitch... systems. (a) For turbojet and turbofan reversing systems. (1) Each system intended for ground operation only must be designed so that, during any reversal in flight, the engine will produce no more...

  1. 14 CFR 23.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... testing, or both, for propeller systems that allow the propeller blades to move from the flight low-pitch... systems. (a) For turbojet and turbofan reversing systems. (1) Each system intended for ground operation only must be designed so that, during any reversal in flight, the engine will produce no more...

  2. 14 CFR 23.933 - Reversing systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... testing, or both, for propeller systems that allow the propeller blades to move from the flight low-pitch... systems. (a) For turbojet and turbofan reversing systems. (1) Each system intended for ground operation only must be designed so that, during any reversal in flight, the engine will produce no more...

  3. Reversible logic gates on Physarum Polycephalum

    SciTech Connect

    Schumann, Andrew

    2015-03-10

    In this paper, we consider possibilities how to implement asynchronous sequential logic gates and quantum-style reversible logic gates on Physarum polycephalum motions. We show that in asynchronous sequential logic gates we can erase information because of uncertainty in the direction of plasmodium propagation. Therefore quantum-style reversible logic gates are more preferable for designing logic circuits on Physarum polycephalum.

  4. Nonidentified Kikuchi lines with reverse contrast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karakhanyan, K. R.

    2009-03-01

    Electron diffraction patterns of silicon in transmission with contrast reversal from bright to dark for an unidentified Kikuchi line along its length have been obtained. The contrast reversal of an unidentified line is explained within the elementary mechanism of Kikuchi pattern formation taking into account the Kikuchi electron double diffraction.

  5. The New Reverse Transfer: A National Landscape

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedel, Janice Nahra; Wilson, Sarah L.

    2015-01-01

    For decades, higher education professionals and researchers have used the term reverse transfer to describe a specific group of students. A current review of community college literature and higher education policy reflects a contextual change of the term, and today reverse transfer has grown to include students who transfer from a two-year…

  6. Reverse Transfer Students: Characteristics, Motivations, and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowrey, Kathryn Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    The reverse transfer literature contains studies investigating the demographic characteristics of postsecondary students that attended a community college after attending a four-year institution, and their proportion in the community college student population. A few researchers have investigated reverse transfer student motives for enrolling in…

  7. Faculty Salaries: The Battle between Affirmative Action and Reverse Discrimination in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flygare, Thomas J.

    1984-01-01

    Summarizes the case of "Winkes vs. Brown University" and interprets its significance in the controversy over whether granting salary increases to women faculty under affirmative action constitutes reverse discrimination against male faculty. (JW)

  8. Lessons from the Top: Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rude, Ron

    1999-01-01

    A superintendent with 20-plus years' teaching experience in the district discusses with a "both sides of the fence" perspective issues of standards, teacher pay, training and compensation for board members, teacher/administrator relationship, and the administrator role. (MLF)

  9. Administrative Aspects of Human Experimentation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irvine, George W.

    1992-01-01

    The following administrative aspects of scientific experimentation with human subjects are discussed: the definition of human experimentation; the distinction between experimentation and treatment; investigator responsibility; documentation; the elements and principles of informed consent; and the administrator's role in establishing and…

  10. Three component vibrational time reversal communication

    DOE PAGES

    Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, Timothy J.; Ten Cate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Time reversal provides an optimal prefilter matched signal to apply to a communication signal before signal transmission. Time reversal allows compensation for wave speed dispersion and can function well in reverberant environments. Time reversal can be used to focus elastic energy to each of the three components of motion independently. A pipe encased in concrete was used to demonstrate the ability to conduct communications of information using three component time reversal. Furthermore, the ability of time reversal to compensate for multi-path distortion (overcoming reverberation) will be demonstrated and the rate of signal communication will be presented. [The U.S. Department ofmore » Energy, through the LANL/LDRD Program, is gratefully acknowledged for supporting this work.]« less

  11. Improving the Convergence of Reversible Samplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rey-Bellet, Luc; Spiliopoulos, Konstantinos

    2016-08-01

    In Monte-Carlo methods the Markov processes used to sample a given target distribution usually satisfy detailed balance, i.e. they are time-reversible. However, relatively recent results have demonstrated that appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations can accelerate convergence to equilibrium. In this paper we present some general design principles which apply to general Markov processes. Working with the generator of Markov processes, we prove that for some of the most commonly used performance criteria, i.e., spectral gap, asymptotic variance and large deviation functionals, sampling is improved for appropriate reversible and irreversible perturbations of some initially given reversible sampler. Moreover we provide specific constructions for such reversible and irreversible perturbations for various commonly used Markov processes, such as Markov chains and diffusions. In the case of diffusions, we make the discussion more specific using the large deviations rate function as a measure of performance.

  12. Parkinson’s disease managing reversible neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hinz, Marty; Stein, Alvin; Cole, Ted; McDougall, Beth; Westaway, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, the Parkinson’s disease (PD) symptom course has been classified as an irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease. This paper documents 29 PD and treatment-induced systemic depletion etiologies which cause and/or exacerbate the seven novel primary relative nutritional deficiencies associated with PD. These reversible relative nutritional deficiencies (RNDs) may facilitate and accelerate irreversible progressive neurodegeneration, while other reversible RNDs may induce previously undocumented reversible pseudo-neurodegeneration that is hiding in plain sight since the symptoms are identical to the symptoms being experienced by the PD patient. Documented herein is a novel nutritional approach for reversible processes management which may slow or halt irreversible progressive neurodegenerative disease and correct reversible RNDs whose symptoms are identical to the patient’s PD symptoms. PMID:27103805

  13. Estimation and uncertainty of reversible Markov models.

    PubMed

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Reversibility is a key concept in Markov models and master-equation models of molecular kinetics. The analysis and interpretation of the transition matrix encoding the kinetic properties of the model rely heavily on the reversibility property. The estimation of a reversible transition matrix from simulation data is, therefore, crucial to the successful application of the previously developed theory. In this work, we discuss methods for the maximum likelihood estimation of transition matrices from finite simulation data and present a new algorithm for the estimation if reversibility with respect to a given stationary vector is desired. We also develop new methods for the Bayesian posterior inference of reversible transition matrices with and without given stationary vector taking into account the need for a suitable prior distribution preserving the meta-stable features of the observed process during posterior inference. All algorithms here are implemented in the PyEMMA software--http://pyemma.org--as of version 2.0. PMID:26547152

  14. Three component vibrational time reversal communication

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Brian E.; Ulrich, Timothy J.; Ten Cate, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Time reversal provides an optimal prefilter matched signal to apply to a communication signal before signal transmission. Time reversal allows compensation for wave speed dispersion and can function well in reverberant environments. Time reversal can be used to focus elastic energy to each of the three components of motion independently. A pipe encased in concrete was used to demonstrate the ability to conduct communications of information using three component time reversal. Furthermore, the ability of time reversal to compensate for multi-path distortion (overcoming reverberation) will be demonstrated and the rate of signal communication will be presented. [The U.S. Department of Energy, through the LANL/LDRD Program, is gratefully acknowledged for supporting this work.

  15. Estimation and uncertainty of reversible Markov models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trendelkamp-Schroer, Benjamin; Wu, Hao; Paul, Fabian; Noé, Frank

    2015-11-01

    Reversibility is a key concept in Markov models and master-equation models of molecular kinetics. The analysis and interpretation of the transition matrix encoding the kinetic properties of the model rely heavily on the reversibility property. The estimation of a reversible transition matrix from simulation data is, therefore, crucial to the successful application of the previously developed theory. In this work, we discuss methods for the maximum likelihood estimation of transition matrices from finite simulation data and present a new algorithm for the estimation if reversibility with respect to a given stationary vector is desired. We also develop new methods for the Bayesian posterior inference of reversible transition matrices with and without given stationary vector taking into account the need for a suitable prior distribution preserving the meta-stable features of the observed process during posterior inference. All algorithms here are implemented in the PyEMMA software — http://pyemma.org — as of version 2.0.

  16. Linalool reverses neuropathological and behavioral impairments in old triple transgenic Alzheimer's mice.

    PubMed

    Sabogal-Guáqueta, Angélica Maria; Osorio, Edison; Cardona-Gómez, Gloria Patricia

    2016-03-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an age-related progressive neurodegenerative disorder. Several types of treatments have been tested to block or delay the onset of the disease, but none have been completely successful. Diet, lifestyle and natural products are currently the main scientific focuses. Here, we evaluate the effects of oral administration of the monoterpene linalool (25 mg/kg), every 48 h for 3 months, on aged (21-24 months old) mice with a triple transgenic model of AD (3xTg-AD) mice. Linalool-treated 3xTg-AD mice showed improved learning and spatial memory and greater risk assessment behavior during the elevated plus maze. Hippocampi and amygdalae from linalool-treated 3xTg-AD mice exhibited a significant reduction in extracellular β-amyloidosis, tauopathy, astrogliosis and microgliosis as well as a significant reduction in the levels of the pro-inflammatory markers p38 MAPK, NOS2, COX2 and IL-1β. Together, our findings suggest that linalool reverses the histopathological hallmarks of AD and restores cognitive and emotional functions via an anti-inflammatory effect. Thus, linalool may be an AD prevention candidate for preclinical studies.

  17. Effect and mechanism of siderite on reverse flotation of hematite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Wan-zhong; Li, Dong; Luo, Xi-mei; Yao, Jin; Sun, Qian-yu

    2016-04-01

    The effects of siderite on reverse flotation of hematite were investigated using micro flotation, adsorption tests, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The flotation results show that interactions between siderite and quartz are the main reasons that siderite significantly influences the floatability. The interactions are attributed to dissolved siderite species and fine siderite particles. The interaction due to the dissolved species is, however, dominant. Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theoretical calculations reveal that adhesion on quartz increases when the siderite particle size decreases and that fine particles partly influence quartz floatability. Chemical solution calculations indicate that the dissolved species of siderite might convert the surface of active quartz to CaCO3 precipitates that can be depressed by starch. The theoretical calculations are in good agreement with the results of adsorption tests and FTIR spectroscopy and explain the reasons why siderite significantly influences reverse flotation of hematite.

  18. Laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure.

    PubMed

    Fiscon, Valentino; Portale, Giuseppe; Mazzeo, Antonio; Migliorini, Giovanni; Frigo, Flavio

    2014-12-01

    Reestablishing continuity after a Hartmann's procedure is considered a major surgical procedure with high morbidity/mortality. The aim of this study was to assess the short-/long-term outcome of laparoscopic restoration of bowel continuity after HP. A prospectively collected database of colorectal laparoscopic procedures (>800) performed between June 2005 and June 2013 was used to identify 20 consecutive patients who had undergone laparoscopic reversal of Hartmann's procedure (LHR). Median age was 65.4. Ten patients (50 %) had undergone surgery for perforated diverticulitis, 3 (15 %) for cancer, and 7 (35 %) for other reasons (volvulus, posttraumatic perforation, and sigmoid perforation from foreign body). Previous HP had been performed laparoscopically in only 3 patients. Median operative time was 162.5 min. All the procedures were completed laparoscopically. Intraoperative complication rate was nil. Post-operative mortality and morbidity were respectively 0 and 10 % (1 pneumonia, 1 bowel obstruction from post-anastomotic stenosis which required resection and redo of the anastomosis). Median time to first flatus was 3 days, to normal diet 5 days. Median hospital stay was 9 days without readmissions. We followed up the patients for a median of 44 months: when asked, all 20 (100 %) said they would undergo the operation (LHR) again; 3 (15 %) had been re-operated of laparoscopic mesh repair for incisional hernia. When performed by experienced surgeons, LHR is a feasible, safe, reproducible operation, which allows early return of bowel function, early discharge and fast return to work for the patient. It has a low morbidity rate.

  19. Adaptive spatial combining for passive time-reversed communications.

    PubMed

    Gomes, João; Silva, António; Jesus, Sérgio

    2008-08-01

    Passive time reversal has aroused considerable interest in underwater communications as a computationally inexpensive means of mitigating the intersymbol interference introduced by the channel using a receiver array. In this paper the basic technique is extended by adaptively weighting sensor contributions to partially compensate for degraded focusing due to mismatch between the assumed and actual medium impulse responses. Two algorithms are proposed, one of which restores constructive interference between sensors, and the other one minimizes the output residual as in widely used equalization schemes. These are compared with plain time reversal and variants that employ postequalization and channel tracking. They are shown to improve the residual error and temporal stability of basic time reversal with very little added complexity. Results are presented for data collected in a passive time-reversal experiment that was conducted during the MREA'04 sea trial. In that experiment a single acoustic projector generated a 24-PSK (phase-shift keyed) stream at 200400 baud, modulated at 3.6 kHz, and received at a range of about 2 km on a sparse vertical array with eight hydrophones. The data were found to exhibit significant Doppler scaling, and a resampling-based preprocessing method is also proposed here to compensate for that scaling.

  20. Preoperative prediction of reversible myocardial asynergy by postexercise radionuclide ventriculography

    SciTech Connect

    Rozanski, A.; Berman, D.; Gray, R.; Diamond, G.; Raymond, M.; Prause, J.; Maddahi, J.; Swan, H.J.; Matloff, J.

    1982-07-22

    Myocardial asynergy is sometimes reversed by coronary bypass, and a noninvasive method of predicting which assess are reversible would be desirable. To assess whether changes in myocardial wall motion observed immediately after exercise can differentiate reversible from nonreversible myocardial asynergy, we evaluated 53 patients by radionuclide ventriculography before and after exercise and again at rest after coronary bypass surgery. Preoperative improvement in wall motion immediately after exercise was highly predictive of the surgical outcome (average chance-corrected agreement, 91 per cent). At surgery the asynergic segments that had improved after exercise were free of grossly apparent epicardial scarring. The accuracy of these predictions for postoperative improvement was significantly greater (P less than 0.01) than that of analysis of Q waves on resting electrocardiography (average chance-corrected agreement, 40 per cent). In contrast, preoperative changes in left ventricular ejection fraction after exercise were not predictive of postoperative resting ejection fraction. We conclude that postexercise radionuclide ventriculography can be used to identify reversible resting myocardial asynergy. This test should prove effective in predicting which patients with myocardial asynergy are most likely to benefit from aortocoronary revascularization.

  1. Reversible Experiments: Putting Geological Disposal to the Test.

    PubMed

    Bergen, Jan Peter

    2016-06-01

    Conceiving of nuclear energy as a social experiment gives rise to the question of what to do when the experiment is no longer responsible or desirable. To be able to appropriately respond to such a situation, the nuclear energy technology in question should be reversible, i.e. it must be possible to stop its further development and implementation in society, and it must be possible to undo its undesirable consequences. This paper explores these two conditions by applying them to geological disposal of high-level radioactive waste (GD). Despite the fact that considerations of reversibility and retrievability have received increased attention in GD, the analysis in this paper concludes that GD cannot be considered reversible. Firstly, it would be difficult to stop its further development and implementation, since its historical development has led to a point where GD is significantly locked-in. Secondly, the strategy it employs for undoing undesirable consequences is less-than-ideal: it relies on containment of severely radiotoxic waste rather than attempting to eliminate this waste or its radioactivity. And while it may currently be technologically impossible to turn high-level waste into benign substances, GD's containment strategy makes it difficult to eliminate this waste's radioactivity when the possibility would arise. In all, GD should be critically reconsidered if the inclusion of reversibility considerations in radioactive waste management has indeed become as important as is sometimes claimed.

  2. Silicon-induced reversibility of cadmium toxicity in rice.

    PubMed

    Farooq, Muhammad Ansar; Detterbeck, Amelie; Clemens, Stephan; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-05-01

    Silicon (Si) modulates tolerance to abiotic stresses, but little is known about the reversibility of stress effects by supplementing previously stressed plants with Si. This is surprising since recovery experiments might allow mechanisms of Si-mediated amelioration to be addressed. Rice was exposed to 10 µM CdCl2 for 4 d in hydroponics, followed by 0.6mM Si(OH)4 supplementation for 4 d. Si reversed the effects of Cd, as reflected in plant growth, photosynthesis, elemental composition, and some biochemical parameters. Cd-dependent deregulation of nutrient homeostasis was partially reversed by Si supply. Photosynthetic recovery within 48h following Si supply, coupled with strong stimulation of the ascorbate-glutathione system, indicates efficient activation of defense. The response was further verified by transcript analyses with emphasis on genes encoding members of the stress-associated protein (SAP) family. The transcriptional response to Cd was mostly reversed following Si supply. Reprogramming of the Cd response was obvious for Phytochelatin synthase 1, SAP1 , SAP14, and the transcription factor genes AP2/Erf020, Hsf31, and NAC6 whose transcript levels were strongly activated in roots of Cd-stressed rice, but down-regulated in the presence of Si. These findings, together with changes in biochemical parameters, highlight the significance of Si in growth recovery of Cd-stressed rice and indicate a decisive role for readjusting cell redox homeostasis. PMID:27122572

  3. Concentration of synfuel process condensates by reverse osmosis

    SciTech Connect

    McCray, S.B.; Ray, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper the authors will discuss the use of a novel, fouling-resistant, inside-skinned hollow-fiber membrane configuration as an energy-efficient and cost-effective alternative to conventional treatment of synfuel process condensate waters. Reverse osmosis has been used in the past only to polish condensate waters that were first treated by conventional means. In the work described in this paper, a reverse-osmosis system actually replaces traditional biotreatment of condensate waters or replaces the solvent-extraction process in the treatment train. The membranes used in this reverse-osmosis system are capable of rejecting at least 90% of the phenols as well as high percentages of other organics contained in actual process condensate waters. Furthermore, these membranes have operated for several months on synfuel condensate waters and showed no significant decrease in performance. Energy and cost estimates of a reverse-osmosis system based on such membranes will be discussed in detail, including a comparison of operating costs of this system with the operating costs of conventional treatment systems.

  4. The spatial extent and dynamics of the Antarctic Cold Reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedro, Joel B.; Bostock, Helen C.; Bitz, Cecilia M.; He, Feng; Vandergoes, Marcus J.; Steig, Eric J.; Chase, Brian M.; Krause, Claire E.; Rasmussen, Sune O.; Markle, Bradley R.; Cortese, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Antarctic ice cores show that a millennial-scale cooling event, the Antarctic Cold Reversal (14,700 to 13,000 years ago), interrupted the last deglaciation. The Antarctic Cold Reversal coincides with the Bølling-Allerød warm stage in the North Atlantic, providing an example of the inter-hemispheric coupling of abrupt climate change generally referred to as the bipolar seesaw. However, the ocean-atmosphere dynamics governing this coupling are debated. Here we examine the extent and expression of the Antarctic Cold Reversal in the Southern Hemisphere using a synthesis of 84 palaeoclimate records. We find that the cooling is strongest in the South Atlantic and all regions south of 40° S. At the same time, the terrestrial tropics and subtropics show abrupt hydrologic variations that are significantly correlated with North Atlantic climate changes. Our transient global climate model simulations indicate that the observed extent of Antarctic Cold Reversal cooling can be explained by enhanced northward ocean heat transport from the South to North Atlantic, amplified by the expansion and thickening of sea ice in the Southern Ocean. The hydrologic variations at lower latitudes result from an opposing enhancement of southward heat transport in the atmosphere mediated by the Hadley circulation. Our findings reconcile previous arguments about the relative dominance of ocean and atmospheric heat transports in inter-hemispheric coupling, demonstrating that the spatial pattern of past millennial-scale climate change reflects the superposition of both.

  5. Silicon-induced reversibility of cadmium toxicity in rice

    PubMed Central

    Farooq, Muhammad Ansar; Detterbeck, Amelie; Clemens, Stephan; Dietz, Karl-Josef

    2016-01-01

    Silicon (Si) modulates tolerance to abiotic stresses, but little is known about the reversibility of stress effects by supplementing previously stressed plants with Si. This is surprising since recovery experiments might allow mechanisms of Si-mediated amelioration to be addressed. Rice was exposed to 10 µM CdCl2 for 4 d in hydroponics, followed by 0.6mM Si(OH)4 supplementation for 4 d. Si reversed the effects of Cd, as reflected in plant growth, photosynthesis, elemental composition, and some biochemical parameters. Cd-dependent deregulation of nutrient homeostasis was partially reversed by Si supply. Photosynthetic recovery within 48h following Si supply, coupled with strong stimulation of the ascorbate–glutathione system, indicates efficient activation of defense. The response was further verified by transcript analyses with emphasis on genes encoding members of the stress-associated protein (SAP) family. The transcriptional response to Cd was mostly reversed following Si supply. Reprogramming of the Cd response was obvious for Phytochelatin synthase 1, SAP1 , SAP14, and the transcription factor genes AP2/Erf020, Hsf31, and NAC6 whose transcript levels were strongly activated in roots of Cd-stressed rice, but down-regulated in the presence of Si. These findings, together with changes in biochemical parameters, highlight the significance of Si in growth recovery of Cd-stressed rice and indicate a decisive role for readjusting cell redox homeostasis. PMID:27122572

  6. Reversing storm hotspots on sandy beaches: Spatial and temporal characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    List, J.H.; Farris, A.S.; Sullivan, C.

    2006-01-01

    Coastal erosion hotspots are defined as sections of coast that exhibit significantly higher rates of erosion than adjacent areas. This paper describes the spatial and temporal characteristics of a recently identified type of coastal erosion hotspot, which forms in response to storms on uninterrupted sandy coasts largely free from human intervention. These are referred to here as reversing storm hotspots because the erosion is reversed by accretion of a similar magnitude to the storm-induced erosion. The accretion occurs within a few days or weeks of fair weather after the storm. Reversing storm hotspots observed here, on two US east coast beaches, have a longshore length averaging 3.86 km, a cross-shore excursion (magnitude of erosion or accretion) averaging 15.4 m, and a time scale of days to weeks associated with individual storm events. These spatial and temporal scales clearly distinguish reversing storm hotspots from previously described forms of longshore variability in erosion, including those attributed to several types of shoreline undulations and hotspots associated with long-term shoreline change. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Three Generations of Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sharpe, F. G.

    This paper compares two Australian educational administration texts published in 1963 to reflect critically on the radical changes that have occurred in educational administration in Australia since then. The books are "Headmasters for Better Schools," by Bassett, Crane, and Walker; and "Training the Administrator," by Cunningham and Radford. The…

  8. Straight Talk about School Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of California School Administrators.

    In this report, the Association of California School Administrators examined some of the myths and misrepresentations about administration in California's public schools. Specifically, it examined the following five myths: (1) A lot of money that could be better spent in the classroom is being wasted on administration. (2) There are too many…

  9. Special Education Administration Training Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watherman, Richard F.; Hollingsworth, Sue Ann

    Presented are course materials from a competency based education program in special education administration. It is explained that the Special Education Administration Training Program (SEATP) is designed for continuing education of administrators. Materials are divided into three self contained curriculum areas: fiscal management, personnel…

  10. Administrators' Decisions about Resource Allocation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, William E.; Folkins, John W.; Hakel, Milton D.; Kennell, Richard P.

    2011-01-01

    Do academic administrators make decisions about resource allocation differently depending on the discipline receiving the funding? Does an administrator's academic identity influence these decisions? This study explored those questions with a sample of 1,690 academic administrators at doctoral-research universities. Participants used fictional…

  11. Certification of Financial Aid Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Stacey A.

    2011-01-01

    The certification of financial aid administrators has been debated for over 37 years. A job satisfaction survey conducted by the National Association of Student Financial Aid Administrators (NASFAA, 2008a) revealed that college and university administrators' perceptions of the efficiency, effectiveness, and quality of the services provided by the…

  12. Hedgehog Signaling Regulates Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase in Human Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mazumdar, Tapati; Sandhu, Ranjodh; Qadan, Maha; DeVecchio, Jennifer; Magloire, Victoria; Agyeman, Akwasi; Li, Bibo; Houghton, Janet A.

    2013-01-01

    The Hedgehog (HH) signaling pathway is critical for normal embryonic development, tissue patterning and cell differentiation. Aberrant HH signaling is involved in multiple human cancers. HH signaling involves a multi-protein cascade activating the GLI proteins that transcriptionally regulate HH target genes. We have previously reported that HH signaling is essential for human colon cancer cell survival and inhibition of this signal induces DNA damage and extensive cell death. Here we report that the HH/GLI axis regulates human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), which determines the replication potential of cancer cells. Suppression of GLI1/GLI2 functions by a C-terminus truncated GLI3 repressor mutant (GLI3R), or by GANT61, a pharmacological inhibitor of GLI1/GLI2, reduced hTERT protein expression in human colon cancer, prostate cancer and Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cell lines. Expression of an N-terminus deleted constitutively active mutant of GLI2 (GLI2ΔN) increased hTERT mRNA and protein expression and hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity in human colon cancer cells while GANT61 inhibited hTERT mRNA expression and hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation with GLI1 or GLI2 antibodies precipitated fragments of the hTERT promoter in human colon cancer cells, which was reduced upon exposure to GANT61. In contrast, expression of GLI1 or GLI2ΔN in non-malignant 293T cells failed to alter the levels of hTERT mRNA and protein, or hTERT promoter driven luciferase activity. Further, expression of GLI2ΔN increased the telomerase enzyme activity, which was reduced by GANT61 administration in human colon cancer, prostate cancer, and GBM cells. These results identify hTERT as a direct target of the HH signaling pathway, and reveal a previously unknown role of the HH/GLI axis in regulating the replication potential of cancer cells. These findings are of significance in understanding the important regulatory mechanisms that

  13. Reversals in Direct Numerical Simulations of the Geodynamo: a Statistical Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meduri, D.; Wicht, J.; Schmitt, D.

    2013-12-01

    Paleomagnetic studies recorded several hundreds of sudden and occasional global polarity reversals of the past Earth's dipolar magnetic field. Self-consistent 3D numerical dynamo models succeeded in reproducing many features of the Earth's magnetic field, including reversals. The statistical study of reversals, in both paleomagnetic data and geodynamo simulations, is necessary to assess the validity of such models and to acquire information about the possible physical processes involved. In this context, we tested several alternative probability distributions by fitting them to reversal sequences from two geodynamo models, in different parameter regimes, having more than one thousand reversals each. Reversals and excursions of the field in our numerical simulations are identified using the paleomagnetic constraint that the dipole moment significantly lower during such periods. Intervals of stable field polarity, defined as time lapses between consecutive reversals, are found to be exponentially distributed. A Poisson process can therefore model the occurrence of reversals in both our geodynamo simulations. On the other hand, a Log-normal distribution fits reversal and excursion durations. Reversals and excursions show also very similar statistical properties such as the total number of events identified over the simulation runs and the distribution parameters of their Log-normal fits. This suggests that reversals and excursions can be regarded as manifestations of similar dynamo processes within the core. The comparison with the observed distribution of geomagnetic polarity intervals is also discussed. In order to mimic the two-states sequences of field polarities from paleomagnetic time-scales, unable to resolve reversal transitions, we constructed a data-set from our numerical stable polarity intervals which includes reversal durations. The finite time required by the dipole to build up in the opposite polarity (reversal transition) significantly modify the

  14. "Clinical" Significance: "Clinical" Significance and "Practical" Significance are NOT the Same Things

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Lisa S.

    2008-01-01

    Clinical significance is an important concept in research, particularly in education and the social sciences. The present article first compares clinical significance to other measures of "significance" in statistics. The major methods used to determine clinical significance are explained and the strengths and weaknesses of clinical significance…

  15. Amitriptyline reverses hyperalgesia and improves associated mood-like disorders in a model of experimental monoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Amorim, D; David-Pereira, A; Pertovaara, A; Almeida, A; Pinto-Ribeiro, F

    2014-05-15

    Affective disorders are common comorbidities of chronic inflammatory pain that are often overlooked in primary care. As the impact of inflammatory pain upon mood-like disorders in animal models is not well known, our objective was to assess whether prolonged experimental monoarthritis (ARTH) induced the development of anxiety and depressive-like behaviours in rodents and if amitriptyline, an antidepressant commonly used in the treatment of chronic pain, could reverse both nociceptive and mood-like impairments. Experimental ARTH was induced through an injection of kaolin/carrageenan into the right knee joint with control (SHAM) animals injected with saline. Four weeks after induction, ARTH animals displayed mechanical hyperalgesia and a depressive-like phenotype as they showed a significant increase in immobility and a decrease in the latency to immobility in the forced-swimming test at the expense of the time spent climbing/swimming. ARTH animals also displayed a decreased sucrose preference, an index of anhedonia and anxiety-like behaviour as time spent exploring the open arms of the elevated-plus-maze was decreased when compared to controls. The anxiety-like phenotype was also supported by an increase in the number of fecal boli left in the open field. In ARTH animals, the administration of amitriptyline decreased mechanical hyperalgesia and increased sucrose preference and the time spent climbing, although it had a deleterious effect in the performance of control animals. Our data show that this model of ARTH can be useful for the study of chronic pain-mood disorders comorbidities and that amitriptyline is able to partly reverse the associated nociceptive and emotional impairments.

  16. Key Obama officials leave administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar is one of the latest members of the Obama administration to announce that he is leaving his position near the start of President Obama's second term in office. Salazar, who has served as interior secretary since January 2009, intends to leave the department by the end of March, the department noted on 16 January. Salazar joins a number of other key officials who are planning to leave the administration. They include Environmental Protection Agency administrator Lisa Jackson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration administrator Jane Lubchenco, and U.S. Geological Survey director Marcia McNutt.

  17. Linear and Nonlinear Time Reverse Acoustics in Geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutin, A.; Johnson, P. A.; Tencate, J.

    2004-12-01

    Linear and Nonlinear Time Reverse Acoustics in Geomaterials P. A. Johnson, A.Sutin and J. TenCate Time Reversal Acoustics (TRA) is one of the most interesting topics to have emerged in modern acoustics in the last 40 years. Much of the seminal research in this area has been carried out by the group at the Laboratoire Ondes et Acoustique at the University of Paris 7, who have demonstrated the ability and robustness of TRA (using Time Reversal Mirrors) to provide spatial control and focusing of an ultrasonic beam (e.g. Fink, 1999). The ability to obtain highly focused signals with TRA has numerous applications, including lithotripsy, ultrasonic brain surgery, nondestructive evaluation and underwater acoustic communication. Notably, the study of time reversal in solids and in the earth is still relatively new. The problem is fundamentally different from the purely acoustic one due to the excitation and propagation of both compressional (bulk) and shear waves as well as the scattering and potentially high dissipation of the medium. We conducted series of TRA experiments in different solids using direct-coupled transducers on solids in tandem with a large bandwidth laser vibrometer detector. A typical time reversal experiment was carried out using the following steps (Sutin et al. 2004a). Laboratory experiments were conducted in different geomaterials of different shapes and sizes, including Carrera marble, granite and Berea sandstone. We observed that, in spite of potentially huge numbers of wave conversions (e.g., compressional to shear, shear to compressional, compressional/shear to surface waves, etc.) for each reflection at each free surface, time reversal still provides significant spatial and temporal focusing in these different geophysical materials. The typical size of the focal area is approximately equivalent to the shear wavelength and the focal area, but becomes larger with increasing wave attenuation (Sutin et al. 2004a; Delsanto et al., 2003)). The TR

  18. Chemical reactions in reverse micelle systems

    DOEpatents

    Matson, Dean W.; Fulton, John L.; Smith, Richard D.; Consani, Keith A.

    1993-08-24

    This invention is directed to conducting chemical reactions in reverse micelle or microemulsion systems comprising a substantially discontinuous phase including a polar fluid, typically an aqueous fluid, and a microemulsion promoter, typically a surfactant, for facilitating the formation of reverse micelles in the system. The system further includes a substantially continuous phase including a non-polar or low-polarity fluid material which is a gas under standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and which is generally a water-insoluble fluid in a near critical or supercritical state. Thus, the microemulsion system is maintained at a pressure and temperature such that the density of the non-polar or low-polarity fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. The method of carrying out chemical reactions generally comprises forming a first reverse micelle system including an aqueous fluid including reverse micelles in a water-insoluble fluid in the supercritical state. Then, a first reactant is introduced into the first reverse micelle system, and a chemical reaction is carried out with the first reactant to form a reaction product. In general, the first reactant can be incorporated into, and the product formed in, the reverse micelles. A second reactant can also be incorporated in the first reverse micelle system which is capable of reacting with the first reactant to form a product.

  19. Why Contextual Preference Reversals Maximize Expected Value

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Contextual preference reversals occur when a preference for one option over another is reversed by the addition of further options. It has been argued that the occurrence of preference reversals in human behavior shows that people violate the axioms of rational choice and that people are not, therefore, expected value maximizers. In contrast, we demonstrate that if a person is only able to make noisy calculations of expected value and noisy observations of the ordinal relations among option features, then the expected value maximizing choice is influenced by the addition of new options and does give rise to apparent preference reversals. We explore the implications of expected value maximizing choice, conditioned on noisy observations, for a range of contextual preference reversal types—including attraction, compromise, similarity, and phantom effects. These preference reversal types have played a key role in the development of models of human choice. We conclude that experiments demonstrating contextual preference reversals are not evidence for irrationality. They are, however, a consequence of expected value maximization given noisy observations. PMID:27337391

  20. Why contextual preference reversals maximize expected value.

    PubMed

    Howes, Andrew; Warren, Paul A; Farmer, George; El-Deredy, Wael; Lewis, Richard L

    2016-07-01

    Contextual preference reversals occur when a preference for one option over another is reversed by the addition of further options. It has been argued that the occurrence of preference reversals in human behavior shows that people violate the axioms of rational choice and that people are not, therefore, expected value maximizers. In contrast, we demonstrate that if a person is only able to make noisy calculations of expected value and noisy observations of the ordinal relations among option features, then the expected value maximizing choice is influenced by the addition of new options and does give rise to apparent preference reversals. We explore the implications of expected value maximizing choice, conditioned on noisy observations, for a range of contextual preference reversal types-including attraction, compromise, similarity, and phantom effects. These preference reversal types have played a key role in the development of models of human choice. We conclude that experiments demonstrating contextual preference reversals are not evidence for irrationality. They are, however, a consequence of expected value maximization given noisy observations. (PsycINFO Database Record

  1. Why contextual preference reversals maximize expected value.

    PubMed

    Howes, Andrew; Warren, Paul A; Farmer, George; El-Deredy, Wael; Lewis, Richard L

    2016-07-01

    Contextual preference reversals occur when a preference for one option over another is reversed by the addition of further options. It has been argued that the occurrence of preference reversals in human behavior shows that people violate the axioms of rational choice and that people are not, therefore, expected value maximizers. In contrast, we demonstrate that if a person is only able to make noisy calculations of expected value and noisy observations of the ordinal relations among option features, then the expected value maximizing choice is influenced by the addition of new options and does give rise to apparent preference reversals. We explore the implications of expected value maximizing choice, conditioned on noisy observations, for a range of contextual preference reversal types-including attraction, compromise, similarity, and phantom effects. These preference reversal types have played a key role in the development of models of human choice. We conclude that experiments demonstrating contextual preference reversals are not evidence for irrationality. They are, however, a consequence of expected value maximization given noisy observations. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27337391

  2. Probabilistic Choice, Reversibility, Loops, and Miracles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoddart, Bill; Bell, Pete

    We consider an addition of probabilistic choice to Abrial's Generalised Substitution Language (GSL) in a form that accommodates the backtracking interpretation of non-deterministic choice. Our formulation is introduced as an extension of the Prospective Values formalism we have developed to describe the results from a backtracking search. Significant features are that probabilistic choice is governed by feasibility, and non-termination is strict. The former property allows us to use probabilistic choice to generate search heuristics. In this paper we are particularly interested in iteration. By demonstrating sub-conjunctivity and monotonicity properties of expectations we give the basis for a fixed point semantics of iterative constructs, and we consider the practical proof treatment of probabilistic loops. We discuss loop invariants, loops with probabilistic behaviour, and probabilistic termination in the context of a formalism in which a small probability of non-termination can dominate our calculations, proposing a method of limits to avoid this problem. The formal programming constructs described have been implemented in a reversible virtual machine (RVM).

  3. Time reversal violation for entangled neutral mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Bernabeu, J.

    2014-07-23

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique solution for the test of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and φ, Factories. The two quantum effects of the decays as filtering measurements of the meson states and the transfer of information of the first decay to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of “in” and “out” states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system. The perspectives for future additional studies of TRV are discussed.

  4. A high performance field-reversed configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Garate, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Smirnov, A.; Gota, H.; Barnes, D.; Deng, B. H.; Thompson, M. C.; Trask, E.; Yang, X.; Putvinski, S.; Rostoker, N.; Andow, R.; Aefsky, S.; Bolte, N.; Bui, D. Q.; Ceccherini, F.; Clary, R.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Conventional field-reversed configurations (FRCs), high-beta, prolate compact toroids embedded in poloidal magnetic fields, face notable stability and confinement concerns. These can be ameliorated by various control techniques, such as introducing a significant fast ion population. Indeed, adding neutral beam injection into the FRC over the past half-decade has contributed to striking improvements in confinement and stability. Further, the addition of electrically biased plasma guns at the ends, magnetic end plugs, and advanced surface conditioning led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses and greatly improved stability. Together, these enabled the build-up of a well-confined and dominant fast-ion population. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, macroscopically stable hot FRCs (with total plasma temperature of ∼1 keV) with record lifetimes were achieved. These accomplishments point to the prospect of advanced, beam-driven FRCs as an intriguing path toward fusion reactors. This paper reviews key results and presents context for further interpretation.

  5. A high performance field-reversed configurationa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binderbauer, M. W.; Tajima, T.; Steinhauer, L. C.; Garate, E.; Tuszewski, M.; Schmitz, L.; Guo, H. Y.; Smirnov, A.; Gota, H.; Barnes, D.; Deng, B. H.; Thompson, M. C.; Trask, E.; Yang, X.; Putvinski, S.; Rostoker, N.; Andow, R.; Aefsky, S.; Bolte, N.; Bui, D. Q.; Ceccherini, F.; Clary, R.; Cheung, A. H.; Conroy, K. D.; Dettrick, S. A.; Douglass, J. D.; Feng, P.; Galeotti, L.; Giammanco, F.; Granstedt, E.; Gupta, D.; Gupta, S.; Ivanov, A. A.; Kinley, J. S.; Knapp, K.; Korepanov, S.; Hollins, M.; Magee, R.; Mendoza, R.; Mok, Y.; Necas, A.; Primavera, S.; Onofri, M.; Osin, D.; Rath, N.; Roche, T.; Romero, J.; Schroeder, J. H.; Sevier, L.; Sibley, A.; Song, Y.; Van Drie, A. D.; Walters, J. K.; Waggoner, W.; Yushmanov, P.; Zhai, K.

    2015-05-01

    Conventional field-reversed configurations (FRCs), high-beta, prolate compact toroids embedded in poloidal magnetic fields, face notable stability and confinement concerns. These can be ameliorated by various control techniques, such as introducing a significant fast ion population. Indeed, adding neutral beam injection into the FRC over the past half-decade has contributed to striking improvements in confinement and stability. Further, the addition of electrically biased plasma guns at the ends, magnetic end plugs, and advanced surface conditioning led to dramatic reductions in turbulence-driven losses and greatly improved stability. Together, these enabled the build-up of a well-confined and dominant fast-ion population. Under such conditions, highly reproducible, macroscopically stable hot FRCs (with total plasma temperature of ˜1 keV) with record lifetimes were achieved. These accomplishments point to the prospect of advanced, beam-driven FRCs as an intriguing path toward fusion reactors. This paper reviews key results and presents context for further interpretation.

  6. Reversal of cognitive decline in Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Bredesen, Dale E.; Amos, Edwin C.; Canick, Jonathan; Ackerley, Mary; Raji, Cyrus; Fiala, Milan; Ahdidan, Jamila

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease is one of the most significant healthcare problems nationally and globally. Recently, the first description of the reversal of cognitive decline in patients with early Alzheimer's disease or its precursors, MCI (mild cognitive impairment) and SCI (subjective cognitive impairment), was published [1]. The therapeutic approach used was programmatic and personalized rather than monotherapeutic and invariant, and was dubbed metabolic enhancement for neurodegeneration (MEND). Patients who had had to discontinue work were able to return to work, and those struggling at work were able to improve their performance. The patients, their spouses, and their co-workers all reported clear improvements. Here we report the results from quantitative MRI and neuropsychological testing in ten patients with cognitive decline, nine ApoE4+ (five homozygous and four heterozygous) and one ApoE4−, who were treated with the MEND protocol for 5-24 months. The magnitude of the improvement is unprecedented, providing additional objective evidence that this programmatic approach to cognitive decline is highly effective. These results have far-reaching implications for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease, MCI, and SCI; for personalized programs that may enhance pharmaceutical efficacy; and for personal identification of ApoE genotype. PMID:27294343

  7. 21 CFR 201.18 - Drugs; significance of control numbers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Drugs; significance of control numbers. 201.18 Section 201.18 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS: GENERAL LABELING General Labeling Provisions § 201.18 Drugs; significance of...

  8. 21 CFR 10.70 - Documentation of significant decisions in administrative file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... the author; (3) Be directed to the file, to appropriate supervisory personnel, and to other... records the views, analyses, recommendations, or decisions of an agency employee in addition to the...

  9. 21 CFR 10.70 - Documentation of significant decisions in administrative file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the author; (3) Be directed to the file, to appropriate supervisory personnel, and to other... records the views, analyses, recommendations, or decisions of an agency employee in addition to the...

  10. 21 CFR 10.70 - Documentation of significant decisions in administrative file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the author; (3) Be directed to the file, to appropriate supervisory personnel, and to other... records the views, analyses, recommendations, or decisions of an agency employee in addition to the...

  11. 21 CFR 10.70 - Documentation of significant decisions in administrative file.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the author; (3) Be directed to the file, to appropriate supervisory personnel, and to other... records the views, analyses, recommendations, or decisions of an agency employee in addition to the...

  12. Reversibility and efficiency in coding protein information.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Boaz; Priel, Avner

    2010-12-21

    Why the genetic code has a fixed length? Protein information is transferred by coding each amino acid using codons whose length equals 3 for all amino acids. Hence the most probable and the least probable amino acid get a codeword with an equal length. Moreover, the distributions of amino acids found in nature are not uniform and therefore the efficiency of such codes is sub-optimal. The origins of these apparently non-efficient codes are yet unclear. In this paper we propose an a priori argument for the energy efficiency of such codes resulting from their reversibility, in contrast to their time inefficiency. Such codes are reversible in the sense that a primitive processor, reading three letters in each step, can always reverse its operation, undoing its process. We examine the codes for the distributions of amino acids that exist in nature and show that they could not be both time efficient and reversible. We investigate a family of Zipf-type distributions and present their efficient (non-fixed length) prefix code, their graphs, and the condition for their reversibility. We prove that for a large family of such distributions, if the code is time efficient, it could not be reversible. In other words, if pre-biotic processes demand reversibility, the protein code could not be time efficient. The benefits of reversibility are clear: reversible processes are adiabatic, namely, they dissipate a very small amount of energy. Such processes must be done slowly enough; therefore time efficiency is non-important. It is reasonable to assume that early biochemical complexes were more prone towards energy efficiency, where forward and backward processes were almost symmetrical. PMID:20868696

  13. Stretching the threshold of reversible dynamics in silicon clusters: A case of carbon alloyed Si6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazrulla, Mohammed Azeezulla; Krishnamurty, Sailaja

    2016-09-01

    Silicon clusters with 3-50 atoms undergo isomerization/reversible dynamics or structural deformation at significantly lower temperatures of 350 K-500 K. Through Born Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamical (BOMD) simulations, the current study demonstrates that carbon alloying enhances the thermal stability of a silicon cluster. The study is carried out on a Si6 cluster which has been recently reported to undergo reversible dynamical movements using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy. Present BOMD simulations validate the experimentally observed reversible atomic displacements (reversible dynamical movements) at finite temperatures which are seen to persist nearly up to 2000 K. Carbon alloying of Si6 is seen to stretch the threshold of reversible dynamics from 200 K to 600 K depending upon the alloying concentration of carbon in the cluster.

  14. Basic Research on Time-Reversal Waves in Deep Ocean for Long Acoustic Communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimura, Takuya; Watanabe, Yoshitaka; Ochi, Hiroshi

    2005-06-01

    We have studied the focusing property of time-reversal waves and its application to acoustic communication in shallow water. In this study, this focusing property in the deep ocean and its application to long horizontal acoustic communication are discussed. The results are as follows. Even if a time-reversal array (TRA) does not expand from the sea surface to the seabed, time-reversal signals converge, and the focusing property is not significantly affected by the depths of the focus and TRA. Then, it is revealed that by using time reversal, it is possible to enssure communication channel over a long range, through the simulation. In phase modulation, time reversal can demodulate almost only by itself, while in amplitude and phase modulation, an adaptive filter to compensates further.

  15. Administration of dried Aloe vera gel powder reduced body fat mass in diet-induced obesity (DIO) rats.

    PubMed

    Misawa, Eriko; Tanaka, Miyuki; Nabeshima, Kazumi; Nomaguchi, Kouji; Yamada, Muneo; Toida, Tomohiro; Iwatsuki, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the anti-obesity effects of Aloe vera gel administration in male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats with diet-induced obesity (DIO). SD rats at 7 wk of age were fed either a standard diet (10 kcal% fat) (StdD) or high-fat (60 kcal% fat) diet (HFD) during the experimental period. Four weeks after of HFD-feeding, DIO rats (11 wk of age) were orally administered with two doses of Aloe vera gel powder (20 and 200 mg/kg/d) for 90 d. Body weights (g) and body fat (%) of HFD fed rats were significantly higher than those of StdD-fed rats. Although a modest decrease of body weight (g) was observed with the administration of dried Aloe vera gel powder, both subcutaneous and visceral fat weight (g) and body fat (%) were reduced significantly in Aloe vera gel-treated rats. Serum lipid parameters elevated by HFD were also improved by the Aloe vera gel treatment. The oxygen consumption (VO(2)), an index of energy expenditure, was decreased in HFD-fed rats compared with that in StdD-fed rats. Administration of Aloe vera gel reversed the change in VO(2) in the HFD-fed rats. These results suggest that intake of Aloe vera gel reduced body fat accumulation, in part, by stimulation of energy expenditure. Aloe vera gel might be beneficial for the prevention and improvement of diet-induced obesity.

  16. Efficacy of prothrombin complex concentrates for the emergency reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation.

    PubMed

    Grottke, Oliver; Aisenberg, James; Bernstein, Richard; Goldstein, Patrick; Huisman, Menno V; Jamieson, Dara G; Levy, Jerrold H; Pollack, Charles V; Spyropoulos, Alex C; Steiner, Thorsten; Del Zoppo, Gregory J; Eikelboom, John

    2016-01-01

    Dabigatran is effective in decreasing the risk of ischaemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation. However, like all anticoagulants, it is associated with a risk of bleeding. In cases of trauma or emergency surgery, emergency reversal of dabigatran-induced anticoagulation may be required. A specific reversal agent for dabigatran, idarucizumab, has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Alternative reversal agents are available, such as prothrombin complex concentrates (PCCs) and activated PCCs (aPCCs). In this review we evaluate the role of PCCs and aPCCs in the reversal of dabigatran anticoagulation and consider which tests are appropriate for monitoring coagulation in this setting. Pre-clinical studies, small clinical studies and case reports indicate that PCCs and aPCCs may be able to reverse dabigatran-induced anticoagulation in a dose-dependent manner. However, dosing based on coagulation parameters can be difficult because available assays may not provide adequate sensitivity and specificity for measuring anticoagulation induced by dabigatran or the countering effects of PCCs/aPCCs. In addition, PCCs or aPCCs can potentially provoke thromboembolic complications. Despite these limitations and the fact that PCCs and aPCCs are not yet licensed for dabigatran reversal, their use appears to be warranted in patients with life-threatening haemorrhage if idarucizumab is not available. PMID:27125504

  17. Withania somnifera reverses Alzheimer's disease pathology by enhancing low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein in liver

    PubMed Central

    Sehgal, Neha; Gupta, Alok; Valli, Rupanagudi Khader; Joshi, Shanker Datt; Mills, Jessica T.; Hamel, Edith; Khanna, Pankaj; Jain, Subhash Chand; Thakur, Suman S.; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2012-01-01

    A 30-d course of oral administration of a semipurified extract of the root of Withania somnifera consisting predominantly of withanolides and withanosides reversed behavioral deficits, plaque pathology, accumulation of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) and oligomers in the brains of middle-aged and old APP/PS1 Alzheimer's disease transgenic mice. It was similarly effective in reversing behavioral deficits and plaque load in APPSwInd mice (line J20). The temporal sequence involved an increase in plasma Aβ and a decrease in brain Aβ monomer after 7 d, indicating increased transport of Aβ from the brain to the periphery. Enhanced expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP) in brain microvessels and the Aβ-degrading protease neprilysin (NEP) occurred 14–21 d after a substantial decrease in brain Aβ levels. However, significant increase in liver LRP and NEP occurred much earlier, at 7 d, and were accompanied by a rise in plasma sLRP, a peripheral sink for brain Aβ. In WT mice, the extract induced liver, but not brain, LRP and NEP and decreased plasma and brain Aβ, indicating that increase in liver LRP and sLRP occurring independent of Aβ concentration could result in clearance of Aβ. Selective down-regulation of liver LRP, but not NEP, abrogated the therapeutic effects of the extract. The remarkable therapeutic effect of W. somnifera mediated through up-regulation of liver LRP indicates that targeting the periphery offers a unique mechanism for Aβ clearance and reverses the behavioral deficits and pathology seen in Alzheimer's disease models. PMID:22308347

  18. Centrally Delivered BACE1 Inhibitor Activates Microglia, and Reverses Amyloid Pathology and Cognitive Deficit in Aged Tg2576 Mice.

    PubMed

    Thakker, Deepak R; Sankaranarayanan, Sethu; Weatherspoon, Marcy R; Harrison, Jonathan; Pierdomenico, Maria; Heisel, Jennifer M; Thompson, Lorin A; Haskell, Roy; Grace, James E; Taylor, Sarah J; Albright, Charles F; Shafer, Lisa L

    2015-04-29

    Multiple small-molecule inhibitors of the β-secretase enzyme (BACE1) are under preclinical or clinical investigation for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Prior work has illustrated robust lowering of central amyloid β (Aβ) after acute administration of BACE1 inhibitors. However, very few studies have assessed the overall impact of chronically administered BACE1 inhibitors on brain amyloid burden, neuropathology, and behavioral function in aged preclinical models. We investigated the effects of a potent nonbrain-penetrant BACE1 inhibitor, delivered directly to the brain using intracerebroventricular infusion in an aged transgenic mouse model. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the BACE1 inhibitor (0.3-23.5 μg/d) for 8 weeks, initiated in 17-month-old Tg2576 mice, produced dose-dependent increases in brain inhibitor concentrations (0.2-13 μm). BACE1 inhibition significantly reversed the behavioral deficit in contextual fear conditioning, and reduced brain Aβ levels, plaque burden, and associated pathology (e.g., dystrophic neurites), with maximal effects attained with ∼1 μg/d dose. Strikingly, the BACE1 inhibitor also reversed amyloid pathology below baseline levels (amyloid burden at the start of treatment), without adversely affecting cerebral amyloid angiopathy, microhemorrhages, myelination, or neuromuscular function. Inhibitor-mediated decline in brain amyloid pathology was associated with an increase in microglial ramification. This is the first demonstration of chronically administered BACE1 inhibitor to activate microglia, reverse brain amyloid pathology, and elicit functional improvement in an aged transgenic mouse model. Thus, engagement of novel glial-mediated clearance mechanisms may drive disease-modifying therapeutic benefit with BACE1 inhibition in AD. PMID:25926467

  19. An insightful approach for understanding solvatochromic reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manzoni, Vinicius; Coutinho, Kaline; Canuto, Sylvio

    2016-07-01

    Several studies have shown that organic dyes may show solvatochromic reversal with respect to the solvent polarity. This controversial non-monotonic behavior is still not well understood. This has been analyzed here using the merocyanine of Brooker as the working example. Associating a continuous variable to model the solvent polarity a solvatochromic reversal is obtained with a single solute without aggregation. This reversal is in excellent agreement with the experimental results and is shown to be the outcome of a competition between structural change and intramolecular charge transfer.

  20. Time reversibility in the quantum frame

    SciTech Connect

    Masot-Conde, Fátima

    2014-12-04

    Classic Mechanics and Electromagnetism, conventionally taken as time-reversible, share the same concept of motion (either of mass or charge) as the basis of the time reversibility in their own fields. This paper focuses on the relationship between mobile geometry and motion reversibility. The goal is to extrapolate the conclusions to the quantum frame, where matter and radiation behave just as elementary mobiles. The possibility that the asymmetry of Time (Time’s arrow) is an effect of a fundamental quantum asymmetry of elementary particles, turns out to be a consequence of the discussion.

  1. Methane Screening in JET Reverse Field Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    J.D. Strachan; B. Alper; G. Corrigan; S.K. Erents; C. Giroud; A. Korotkov; H. Leggate; G.F. Mathews; R.A. Pitts; M. Stamp; J. Spence

    2004-05-17

    JET plasmas with reverse magnetic field feature a different SOL flow than those with normal field. The observed carbon fueling efficiency from injecting methane gas was similar in reverse and normal field. EDGE2D modeling used an externally applied force to create the SOL flows, without specifying the origin of the force. The resulting flow agreed reasonably with the experimental values between the separatrix and 4 cm mid-plane depth in the SOL. The effect of the flow on the calculated carbon screening was 5 to 15% higher carbon fueling efficiency for the low flow velocity with reverse field.

  2. Extending the boundaries of reverse engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrie, Chris

    2002-04-01

    In today's market place the potential of Reverse Engineering as a time compression tool is commonly lost under its traditional definition. The term Reverse Engineering was coined way back at the advent of CMM machines and 3D CAD systems to describe the process of fitting surfaces to captured point data. Since these early beginnings, downstream hardware scanning and digitising systems have evolved in parallel with an upstream demand, greatly increasing the potential of a point cloud data set within engineering design and manufacturing processes. The paper will discuss the issues surrounding Reverse Engineering at the turn of the millennium.

  3. THE STABILITY AND REVERSIBILITY OF METALLIC BOROHYDRIDES

    SciTech Connect

    Au, M

    2007-07-27

    In effort to develop reversible metallic borohydrides with high hydrogen storage capacity and low dehydriding temperature, several new materials have been synthesized by modifying LiBH{sub 4} with various metal halides and hydrides. The investigation shows that the halide modification effectively reduced the dehydriding temperature through ion exchange interaction. The effective halides are TiCl{sub 3}, TiF{sub 3}, ZnF{sub 2} and AlF{sub 3}. The material LiBH{sub 4}+0.1TiF{sub 3} desorbs 3.5wt% and 8.5wt% hydrogen at 150 C and 450 C respectively. It re-absorbed 6wt% hydrogen at 500 C and 70 bar after dehydrogenation. The XRD of the rehydrided samples confirmed the formation of LiBH{sub 4}. It indicates that the materials are reversible at the conditions given. However, a number of other halides: MgF{sub 2}, MgCl{sub 2}, CaCl{sub 2}, SrCl{sub 2} and FeCl{sub 3}, did not reduce dehydriding temperature of LiBH{sub 4} significantly. TGA-RGA analysis indicated that some halide modified lithium borohydrides such as LiBH{sub 4}+0.1ZnF{sub 2} evolved diborane during dehydrogenation, but some did not such as LiBH{sub 4}+0.1TiCl{sub 3}. The formation of diborane caused unrecoverable capacity loss resulting in irreversibility. It is suggested that the lithium borohydrides modified by the halides containing the metals that can not form metal borides with boron are likely to evolve diborane during dehydriding. It was discovered that halide modification reduces sensitivity of LiBH{sub 4}. The materials such as LiBH{sub 4}+0.1TiCl{sub 3} and LiBH{sub 4}+0.5TiCl{sub 3} can be handled in open air without visible reaction.

  4. Effects of 17α-Methyltestosterone and Aromatase Inhibitor Letrozole on Sex Reversal, Gonadal Structure, and Growth in Yellow Catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhi-Gang; Fan, Qi-Xue; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Yun-Long; Wang, Han-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Monosex populations are in demand in many fish species with sexual dimorphism, e.g., better growth performance, higher gonad value, superior ornamental value. From the point of view of research, a monosex population is one of the best materials for investigating sex-determining mechanisms, sex differentiation, and sex-linked markers. Sex reversal of females (phenotypic reversal from XX female to XX male) is the first step in all-female production in species with an XX/XY system for sex determination. In the present study, masculinization of yellow catfish, a species with XX/XY sex determination, was investigated by oral administration of various doses of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) or an aromatase inhibitor (AI) letrozole (LZ); effects on survival, growth performance, sex ratio, and changes in gonadal structure were evaluated. Three doses (20, 50, and 100 mg kg(-1) diet) of oral MT or LZ were administered to fry from 10 days post-hatching (DPH) to 59 DPH. Oral administration of MT at all doses did not significantly change the ratio of males (45.8%, 33.3%, and 50.0% respectively) compared to the control group (37.5%), while yielding intersex fish at all doses (4.2% to 8.3%). Oral administration of LZ produced a significantly higher proportion of males in all doses (75.5%, 83.3%, and 75.0%, respectively). Additionally, the lowest dose of LZ improved the growth of treated fish compared to the control, and all doses of LZ enhanced spermatogenesis in treated males.

  5. Effects of 17α-Methyltestosterone and Aromatase Inhibitor Letrozole on Sex Reversal, Gonadal Structure, and Growth in Yellow Catfish Pelteobagrus fulvidraco.

    PubMed

    Shen, Zhi-Gang; Fan, Qi-Xue; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Yun-Long; Wang, Han-Ping

    2015-04-01

    Monosex populations are in demand in many fish species with sexual dimorphism, e.g., better growth performance, higher gonad value, superior ornamental value. From the point of view of research, a monosex population is one of the best materials for investigating sex-determining mechanisms, sex differentiation, and sex-linked markers. Sex reversal of females (phenotypic reversal from XX female to XX male) is the first step in all-female production in species with an XX/XY system for sex determination. In the present study, masculinization of yellow catfish, a species with XX/XY sex determination, was investigated by oral administration of various doses of 17α-methyltestosterone (MT) or an aromatase inhibitor (AI) letrozole (LZ); effects on survival, growth performance, sex ratio, and changes in gonadal structure were evaluated. Three doses (20, 50, and 100 mg kg(-1) diet) of oral MT or LZ were administered to fry from 10 days post-hatching (DPH) to 59 DPH. Oral administration of MT at all doses did not significantly change the ratio of males (45.8%, 33.3%, and 50.0% respectively) compared to the control group (37.5%), while yielding intersex fish at all doses (4.2% to 8.3%). Oral administration of LZ produced a significantly higher proportion of males in all doses (75.5%, 83.3%, and 75.0%, respectively). Additionally, the lowest dose of LZ improved the growth of treated fish compared to the control, and all doses of LZ enhanced spermatogenesis in treated males. PMID:25920714

  6. Aspect-ratio dependence of magnetization reversal in cylindrical ferromagnetic nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultan, Musaab S.; Atkinson, Del

    2016-05-01

    The magnetization reversal behavior in isolated cylindrical and square cross-section Ni81Fe19 nanowires was systematically studied as a function of nanowire cross-section dimensions from 10 up to 200 nm using micromagnetic simulations. This approach provides access to the switching field, remanence ratio and most significantly the magnetization structures during reversal, which allows the evolution of magnetization processes to be studied with scaling of the cross-sectional dimensions. The dimensional trends in reversal behavior for both square and circular cross-section were comparable throughout the range of dimensions studied. The thinnest nanowires showed simple square switching and 100% remanence. With increasing diameter the switching field reduces and above 40 nm the reversal behavior shows an increasing rotational component prior to sharp switching of the magnetization. The magnitude of the reversible component increases with increasing dimensions up to 150 nm, above which the magnetization reversal process is more complicated and the hysteresis loops are no longer bistable. The micromagnetic structures evolve from simple uniform parallel single domain states in the thinnest wires through the formation of vortex-like end states in thicker wires to complex multidomain structures during the reversal of the thickest wires. In the later cases the reversal is not simple curling-like behavior, although the angular switching field dependence was comparable with curling.

  7. Structural and temporal requirements for geomagnetic field reversal deduced from lava flows.

    PubMed

    Singer, Brad S; Hoffman, Kenneth A; Coe, Robert S; Brown, Laurie L; Jicha, Brian R; Pringle, Malcolm S; Chauvin, Annick

    2005-03-31

    Reversals of the Earth's magnetic field reflect changes in the geodynamo--flow within the outer core--that generates the field. Constraining core processes or mantle properties that induce or modulate reversals requires knowing the timing and morphology of field changes that precede and accompany these reversals. But the short duration of transitional field states and fragmentary nature of even the best palaeomagnetic records make it difficult to provide a timeline for the reversal process. 40Ar/39Ar dating of lavas on Tahiti, long thought to record the primary part of the most recent 'Matuyama-Brunhes' reversal, gives an age of 795 +/- 7 kyr, indistinguishable from that of lavas in Chile and La Palma that record a transition in the Earth's magnetic field, but older than the accepted age for the reversal. Only the 'transitional' lavas on Maui and one from La Palma (dated at 776 +/- 2 kyr), agree with the astronomical age for the reversal. Here we propose that the older lavas record the onset of a geodynamo process, which only on occasion would result in polarity change. This initial instability, associated with the first of two decreases in field intensity, began approximately 18 kyr before the actual polarity switch. These data support the claim that complete reversals require a significant period for magnetic flux to escape from the solid inner core and sufficiently weaken its stabilizing effect. PMID:15800621

  8. Constraining the reversing and non-reversing modes of the geodynamo. New insights from magnetostratigraphy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallet, Y.; Pavlov, V.; Shatsillo, A.; Hulot, G.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the evolution in the geomagnetic reversal frequency over hundreds of million years is not a trivial matter. Beyond the fact that there are long periods without reversals, known as superchrons, and periods with many reversals, the way the reversal frequency changes through time during reversing periods is still debated. A smooth evolution or a succession of stationary segments have both been suggested to account for the geomagnetic polarity time scale since the Middle-Late Jurassic. Sudden changes from a reversing mode to a non-reversing mode of the geodynamo may also well have happened, the switch between the two modes having then possibly been controlled by the thermal conditions at the core-mantle boundary. There is, nevertheless, a growing set of magnetostratigraphic data, which could help decipher a proper interpretation of the reversal history, in particular in the early Paleozoic and even during the Precambrian. Although yielding a fragmentary record, these data reveal the occurrence of both additional superchrons and periods characterized by extremely high, not to say extraordinary, magnetic reversal frequencies. In this talk, we will present a synthesis of these data, mainly obtained from Siberia, and discuss their implication for the magnetic reversal behavior over the past billion years.

  9. Reverse Engineering Adverse Outcome Pathways in Ecotoxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The toxicological effects of many stressors are mediated through unknown, or incompletely characterized, mechanisms of action. We describe the application of reverse engineering complex interaction networks from high dimensional omics data (gene, protein, meabolic, signaling) t...

  10. The reverse laser drilling of transparent materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anthony, T. R.; Lindner, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    Within a limited range of incident laser-beam intensities, laser drilling of a sapphire wafer initiates on the surface of the wafer where the laser beam exits and proceeds upstream in the laser beam to the surface where the laser beam enters the wafer. This reverse laser drilling is the result of the constructive interference between the laser beam and its reflected component on the exit face of the wafer. Constructive interference occurs only at the exit face of the sapphire wafer because the internally reflected laser beam suffers no phase change there. A model describing reverse laser drilling predicts the ranges of incident laser-beam intensity where no drilling, reverse laser drilling, and forward laser drilling can be expected in various materials. The application of reverse laser drilling in fabricating feed-through conductors in silicon-on-sapphire wafers for a massively parallel processer is described.

  11. Reverse-osmosis membranes by plasma polymerization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollahan, J. R.; Wydeven, T.

    1972-01-01

    Thin allyl amine polymer films were developed using plasma polymerization. Resulting dry composite membranes effectively reject sodium chloride during reverse osmosis. Films are 98% sodium chloride rejective, and 46% urea rejective.

  12. Galen: developer of the reversal design?

    PubMed

    Brown, Robert T

    2007-01-01

    Galen, known to psychologists largely for his personality theory of the four temperaments, diagnosed the cause of a patient's symptoms with a form of reversal design long before its formal description (e.g., Sidman, 1960).

  13. Flow reversal power limit for the HFBR

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Tichler, P.R.

    1995-10-01

    The High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) undergoes a buoyancy-driven reversal of flow in the reactor core following certain postulated accidents. Uncertainties about the afterheat removal capability during the flow reversal has limited the reactor operating power to 30 MW. An experimental and analytical program to address these uncertainties is described in this report. The experiments were single channel flow reversal tests under a range of conditions. The analytical phase involved simulations of the tests to benchmark the physical models and development of a criterion for dryout. The criterion is then used in simulations of reactor accidents to determine a safe operating power level. It is concluded that the limit on the HFBR operating power with respect to the issue of flow reversal is in excess of 60 MW.

  14. Galen: Developer of the Reversal Design?

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Robert T

    2007-01-01

    Galen, known to psychologists largely for his personality theory of the four temperaments, diagnosed the cause of a patient's symptoms with a form of reversal design long before its formal description (e.g., Sidman, 1960). PMID:22478486

  15. Reversible Oxygenation of Oxygen Transport Proteins.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drain, C. M.; Corden, Barry B.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration which illustrates changes in the visible spectra of oxygen transport proteins upon reversible oxygen binding. Provides a comparison of the physical characteristics of oxygen storage and transport proteins. Reviews essentials for preparation of the materials. (ML)

  16. Optical reversible programmable Boolean logic unit.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Tanay

    2012-07-20

    Computing with reversibility is the only way to avoid dissipation of energy associated with bit erase. So, a reversible microprocessor is required for future computing. In this paper, a design of a simple all-optical reversible programmable processor is proposed using a polarizing beam splitter, liquid crystal-phase spatial light modulators, a half-wave plate, and plane mirrors. This circuit can perform 16 logical operations according to three programming inputs. Also, inputs can be easily recovered from the outputs. It is named the "reversible programmable Boolean logic unit (RPBLU)." The logic unit is the basic building block of many complex computational operations. Hence the design is important in sense. Two orthogonally polarized lights are defined here as two logical states, respectively.

  17. Local heating realization by reverse thermal cloak

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Run; Wei, Xuli; Hu, Jinyan; Luo, Xiaobing

    2014-01-01

    Transformation thermodynamics, as one of the important branches among the extensions of transformation optics, has attracted plentiful attentions and interests recently. The result of transformation thermodynamics, or called as “thermal cloak”, can realize isothermal region and hide objects from heat. In this paper, we presented the concept of “reverse thermal cloak” to correspond to the thermal cloak and made a simple engineering definition to identify them. By full-wave simulations, we verified that the reverse thermal cloak can concentrate heat and realize local heating. The performance of local heating depends on the anisotropic dispersion of the cloaking layer's thermal conductivity. Three-dimensional finite element simulations demonstrated that the reverse thermal cloak can be used to heat up objects. Besides pre-engineered metamaterials, such reverse thermal cloak can even be realized with homogenous materials by alternating spoke-like structure or Hashin coated-sphere structure. PMID:24398592

  18. Osteoporotic cytokines and bone metabolism on rats with induced hyperthyroidism; changes as a result of reversal to euthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Gönül; Karter, Yesari; Aydin, Seval; Uzun, Hafize

    2003-12-31

    Hyperthyroidism is characterized by increased bone turnover and resorptive activity. Raised levels of serum osteoporotic cytokines, such as interleukin (IL) -1beta, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha have been demonstrated previously in hyperthyroidism. These elevations are controversial and it is difficult to differentiate the contribution of thyroid hormones to the elevation of cytokines from that of the autoimmune inflammation in Graves' disease (GD) and follicular cell damage in thyroiditis. Therefore, we investigated the effect of thyroid hormones on serum IL-1beta, IL-6, TNF-alpha levels and bone metabolism on L-thyroxine induced hyperthyroid rats and changes in cytokine levels and bone metabolism on the same rats after reversal to euthyroidism. Rats were treated with L-thyroxine for 5 weeks (0.4 mg/ 100 g food). Plasma T3, T4, TSH and serum IL-1beta, IL-6, TNFalpha, Calcium (Ca), phosphorous (P), parathyroid hormone (PTH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), bone alkaline phosphatase (B-ALP) levels were measured and differential leucocyte counts were made initially, at the 5th week of the experiment (hyperthyroid state) and 5 weeks after quitting the administration of L-thyroxine (euthyroid state). Significant rises in serum IL-1beta, IL-6 and TNFalpha were noted in hyperthyroidism (P < 0.001). In euthyroid state, IL-15, IL-6 and TNFalpha decreased significantly, but IL-beta and TNFalpha were significantly higher than the baseline values (P < 0.05) while IL-6 levels turned back to the baseline values. Plasma T3 and T4 levels were significantly correlated with serum cytokines in hyperthyroid state while there was no correlation in euthyroid states. Ca and P levels did not differ significantly while PTH levels declined significantly in the hyperthyroid state (P < 0.05). After the reversal to the euthyroidism, there was no significant change in Ca, P and PTH levels. ALP and B-ALP increased significantly in hyperthyroidism (P < 0.001, P < 0.01) and they did not

  19. Reversing the conventional leather processing sequence for cleaner leather production.

    PubMed

    Saravanabhavan, Subramani; Thanikaivelan, Palanisamy; Rao, Jonnalagadda Raghava; Nair, Balachandran Unni; Ramasami, Thirumalachari

    2006-02-01

    Conventional leather processing generally involves a combination of single and multistep processes that employs as well as expels various biological, inorganic, and organic materials. It involves nearly 14-15 steps and discharges a huge amount of pollutants. This is primarily due to the fact that conventional leather processing employs a "do-undo" process logic. In this study, the conventional leather processing steps have been reversed to overcome the problems associated with the conventional method. The charges of the skin matrix and of the chemicals and pH profiles of the process have been judiciously used for reversing the process steps. This reversed process eventually avoids several acidification and basification/neutralization steps used in conventional leather processing. The developed process has been validated through various analyses such as chromium content, shrinkage temperature, softness measurements, scanning electron microscopy, and physical testing of the leathers. Further, the performance of the leathers is shown to be on par with conventionally processed leathers through bulk property evaluation. The process enjoys a significant reduction in COD and TS by 53 and 79%, respectively. Water consumption and discharge is reduced by 65 and 64%, respectively. Also, the process benefits from significant reduction in chemicals, time, power, and cost compared to the conventional process.

  20. Reversible Michael additions: covalent inhibitors and prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Martin H

    2012-11-01

    Covalent inhibition is an efficient molecular mechanism for inhibiting enzymes or modulating the function of proteins and is found in the action of many drugs and biologically active natural products. However, it is has been less appreciated that the formation of covalent bonds can be reversible or irreversible. This review focuses on biologically active compounds that are Michael acceptors and how the reversible nature of the Michael addition reaction influences biological activity and how this can be exploited in designing prodrugs.