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Sample records for administration staff medical

  1. Review of Medical School Administrative Staff Salaries, 1976-1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

    Results of the most recent Administrative Salary Survey of the Association of American Medical Colleges are analyzed. The data represent 94 U.S. medical schools, with the number of applicable staff positions ranging from two to 52 per institution. The positions considered included those in which at least 20 percent of the time was spent in…

  2. Consolidating medical staff and administrative requirements eliminates potential problems.

    PubMed

    Hershey, N

    1980-11-01

    If policies and procedures relative to a single function are scattered among hospital documents, the potential for conflict and inconsistency between administration and medical staff is enhanced. Incorporation in one reference source can help clarify responsibilities and facilitate conformity. PMID:10248580

  3. 78 FR 59038 - Mobile Medical Applications; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Mobile Medical Applications; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice.... In the Federal Register of July 21, 2011 (76 FR 43689), FDA announced the availability of the...

  4. 77 FR 63837 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability...

  5. 75 FR 28257 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Third Parties and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Administration Staff; Medical Device ISO 13485:2003 Voluntary Audit Report Submission Program; Availability... Voluntary Audit Report Submission Program.'' This draft guidance is intended to provide information on the... Voluntary Audit Report Submission Program'' to the Division of Small Manufacturers, International,...

  6. 77 FR 16036 - Guidance for Industry, Third Parties and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Device ISO...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ...--Requirements for regulatory purposes,'' (ISO 13485:2003) audit report provides FDA a degree of assurance of... Submission Program'' was published for comment in the Federal Register of May 20, 2010 (75 FR 28257... Administration Staff; Medical Device ISO 13485:2003 Voluntary Audit Report Submission Pilot Program;...

  7. 75 FR 44267 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... April 5, 2010 (75 FR 17093), FDA published a notice announcing the availability of draft special... for the notice that appeared in the Federal Register of April 5, 2010 (75 FR 17143). In the notice... Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological and Physical Medicine Device Guidance Document; Reopening...

  8. 75 FR 47604 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... July 28, 2010 (75 FR 44267). The document reopened the comment period for a notice of availability of..., Silver Spring, MD 20993, 301-796-9148. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR Doc. 2010-18406, appearing on... Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological and Physical Medicine Device Guidance Document; Reopening...

  9. 75 FR 17143 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ...) ``Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Powered Muscle Stimulator for Rehabilitation; Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff''; (9) ``Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Powered Muscle... II Special Controls Guidance Document: Powered Muscle Stimulator for Muscle Conditioning;...

  10. 76 FR 43689 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Mobile Medical Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... example, such an accessory would be similar to an infusion pump stand, which is currently classified as a class I device because it supports the intended use of an infusion pump (class II medical device)....

  11. 78 FR 102 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ..., Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg... CONTACT: Samie Allen, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and......

  12. 77 FR 41413 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices: The Pre...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ... the pre- Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) program) for medical devices reviewed in the Center... establishment in 1995, the pre-IDE program has been a successful resource for both medical device applicants and... feedback on future IDE applications prior to their submission. Over time, the pre-IDE program evolved...

  13. Measuring hospital medical staff organizational structure.

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, S M; Getzen, T E

    1979-01-01

    Based on organization theory and the work of Roemer and Friedman, seven dimensions of hospital medical staff organization structure are proposed and examined. The data are based on a 1973 nationwide survey of hospital medical staffs conducted by the American Hospital Association. Factor analysis yielded six relatively independent dimensions supporting a multidimensional view of medical staff organization structure. The six dimensions include 1) Resource Capability, 2) Generalist Physician Contractual Orientation, 3) Communication/Control, 4) Local Staff Orientation, 5) Participation in Decision Making, and 6) Hospital-Based Physician Contractual Orientation. It is suggested that these dimensions can be used to develop an empirical typology of hospital medical staff organization structure and to investigate the relationship between medical staff organization and public policy issues related to cost containment and quality assurance. PMID:511580

  14. Quality improvements in decreasing medication administration errors made by nursing staff in an academic medical center hospital: a trend analysis during the journey to Joint Commission International accreditation and in the post-accreditation era

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua-fen; Jin, Jing-fen; Feng, Xiu-qin; Huang, Xin; Zhu, Ling-ling; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Zhou, Quan

    2015-01-01

    (1.81% versus 0.24%, P<0.001). Conclusion A 3-and-a-half-year intervention program on MAEs was confirmed to be effective. MAEs made by nursing staff can be reduced, but cannot be eliminated. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of multidiscipline collaboration among physicians, pharmacists, nurses, information engineers, and hospital administrators are pivotal to safety in medication administration. JCI accreditation may help health systems enhance the awareness and ability to prevent MAEs and achieve successful quality improvements. PMID:25767393

  15. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  16. 42 CFR 401.112 - Availability of administrative staff manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Availability of administrative staff manuals. 401... § 401.112 Availability of administrative staff manuals. All CMS administrative staff manuals and... Rulings. These manuals are generally not printed in a sufficient quantity to permit sale or other...

  17. Computerized medication administration records decrease medication occurrences.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A L; Hill, J J; Wilson, R G; Nipper, K; Kwon, I W

    1997-04-01

    Studies have demonstrated that medication errors occur at a number of locations in the continuum between ordering of drug therapy and administration of the medication. Computer management of patient medication profiles offers the opportunity to enhance communication between pharmacists and nurses, and to decrease medication errors and delays in delivery of therapy. A number of authors have postulated that computerization of medication profiles would enhance medication delivery accuracy and timeliness, but no study has demonstrated this improvement. We report the results of a retrospective analysis undertaken to assess the improvements resulting from sharing a computerized medication record. We used a broader definition of medication occurrences that includes the more traditional definition, and averted errors, delays in delivery of medications and information, and disagreements between pharmacy and nursing medication profiles. We compared medication occurrences reported through an existing internal system between two periods; the first when separate pharmacy and nursing medication records were used, and the second period when a shared medication record was used by pharmacy and nursing. Average medication occurrences per admission decreased from 0.1084 to 0.0658 (p < 0.01). Medication occurrences per dose decreased from 0.0005 to 0.0003 (p < 0.01). The use of a shared medication record by pharmacy and nursing led to a statistically significant decrease in medication occurrences. Information shared between the two professions allowed timely resolution of discrepancies in medication orders, leading to better execution of drug therapy, decreased medication occurrences, and increased efficiency. PMID:10166241

  18. 76 FR 50484 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Food and Drug Administration Staff; Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for... and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Design... study design principles relevant to the development of medical device clinical studies that can be...

  19. 32 CFR 700.722 - Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.722 Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command. (a) When it is...

  20. Enrolled nurse medication administration.

    PubMed

    Kimberley, Anne; Myers, Helen; Davis, Sue; Keogh, Penny; Twigg, Di

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes an initiative undertaken at Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital in Perth, Western Australia to enhance the professional development of enrolled nurses to allow them to administer medications without the direct supervision of a registered nurse. This practice change proved to be a positive step for the hospital and for enrolled nurses. Benefits for patients were identified as greater continuity of care and increased timeliness of medication admiuistrqtion. The benefits for enrolled nurses were increased job satisfaction, improved morale and self esteem while the main benefit for registered nurses was decreased stres and workload. PMID:17929736

  1. Medical staff appointment and delineation of pediatric privileges in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Rauch, Daniel A

    2012-04-01

    The review and verification of credentials and the granting of clinical privileges are required of every hospital to ensure that members of the medical staff are competent and qualified to provide specified levels of patient care. The credentialing process involves the following: (1) assessment of the professional and personal background of each practitioner seeking privileges; (2) assignment of privileges appropriate for the clinician's training and experience; (3) ongoing monitoring of the professional activities of each staff member; and (4) periodic reappointment to the medical staff on the basis of objectively measured performance. We examine the essential elements of a credentials review for initial and renewed medical staff appointments along with suggested criteria for the delineation of clinical privileges. Sample forms for the delineation of privileges can be found on the American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Hospital Care Web site (http://www.aap.org/visit/cmte19.htm). Because of differences among individual hospitals, no 1 method for credentialing is universally applicable. The medical staff of each hospital must, therefore, establish its own process based on the general principles reviewed in this report. The issues of medical staff membership and credentialing have become very complex, and institutions and medical staffs are vulnerable to legal action. Consequently, it is advisable for hospitals and medical staffs to obtain expert legal advice when medical staff bylaws are constructed or revised. PMID:22451705

  2. Valuing Professional, Managerial and Administrative Staff in HE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, David

    2014-01-01

    The article explores the role of the Registrar (Chief Operating Officer) in a university, and the ways in which we value the contributions of professional, managerial and administrative (PMA) staff. It assesses the conditions in which PMA staff work and describes the professional development opportunities they enjoy. The article goes on to analyse…

  3. Technology Staff Development Programs. A Leadership Sourcebook for School Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Gerald D.; Lumley, Dan

    This sourcebook, designed for school administrators who want to create, implement, and evaluate a technology staff development program, combines technological skills development with strategies and ideas. Two themes are reflected throughout the manual: (1) creating a comprehensive technology staff development program; and (2) the leadership role…

  4. Use of Psychological Tests in an Administrative Staff Improvement Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Richard W.; North, Stewart D.

    All School Administrators and Nominees for administrative positions enrolled in an Administrative Staff Improvement Program at Green Bay, Wisconsin, completed a battery of psychological tests (Miller Analogies Test, Concept Mastery Test, and Strong Vocational Interest Blank). The enrollees scored above average on the MAT compared with graduate…

  5. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... medical staff must be composed of doctors of medicine or osteopathy and, in accordance with State law, may... the committee must be doctors of medicine or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility for organization and conduct of the medical staff must be assigned only to an individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy...

  6. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to medical staff. The medical staff must include doctors of medicine or osteopathy. In accordance... majority of the members of the committee must be doctors of medicine or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility...) An individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy. (ii) A doctor of dental surgery or dental...

  7. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... appointment to medical staff. The medical staff must be composed of doctors of medicine or osteopathy. In... the committee must be doctors of medicine or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility for organization and... medicine or osteopathy. (ii) A doctor of dental surgery or dental medicine, when permitted by State law...

  8. Alvin Community College Administrative and Professional Staff Development Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Troy

    The document presents a point-based administrative/professional staff development plan developed by Alvin Community College (Texas). A list of activities and their respective point values are utilized by administrators to document professional growth and development, with a thirty-point minimum per year necessary for advancement to the next…

  9. 20 CFR 633.313 - Administrative staff and personnel standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... for each position shall be justified and documented by the grantee to the satisfaction of the... written detailed job description identifying job functions and responsibilities for each administrative... and wages. (1) Administrative and staff employees in section 402 programs shall be paid at a rate...

  10. 28 CFR 345.64 - Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff. 345.64 Section 345.64 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits §...

  11. 28 CFR 345.64 - Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff. 345.64 Section 345.64 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits §...

  12. 28 CFR 345.64 - Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff. 345.64 Section 345.64 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits §...

  13. 28 CFR 345.64 - Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff. 345.64 Section 345.64 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits §...

  14. 77 FR 67379 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Highly Multiplexed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Highly Multiplexed Microbiological/Medical Countermeasure In Vitro Nucleic Acid Based Diagnostic Devices.'' This draft guidance is to provide industry and Agency staff with recommendations for studies to establish the analytical and clinical performance of highly multiplexed......

  15. 78 FR 15370 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Recommendations for Labeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance document entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Recommendations for Labeling Medical Products To Inform Users That the Product or Product Container Is Not Made With Natural Rubber Latex.'' The purpose of this draft guidance is to make recommendations on the appropriate language to include......

  16. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Section 482.22 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... staff that operates under bylaws approved by the governing body and is responsible for the quality of... also be composed of other practitioners appointed by the governing body. (1) The medical staff...

  17. Assisted living facility administrator and direct care staff views of resident mental health concerns and staff training needs.

    PubMed

    Dakin, Emily; Quijano, Louise M; McAlister, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    This community needs assessment surveyed 21 administrators and 75 direct care staff at 9 larger and 12 smaller assisted living facilities (ALFs) regarding perceptions of resident mental health concerns, direct care staff capacity to work with residents with mental illness, and direct care staff training needs. Group differences in these perceptions were also examined. Both administrators and directcare staff indicated that direct care staff would benefit from mental health-related training, and direct care staff perceived themselves as being more comfortable working with residents with mental illness than administrators perceived them to be. Implications for gerontological social work are discussed. PMID:21170779

  18. Administrative Staff Development: Addressing Organizational and Individual Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kowalski, Theodore J.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    The rising demand for administrative staff development is largely a product of external forces (political demands for reform). Many superintendents are exploring alternatives to meet the requirements of employee improvement. This article describes the efforts of three superintendents and a university professor to develop a meaningful database for…

  19. [Performance and remuneration of medical staff].

    PubMed

    Vázquez Vela Sánchez, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The creation of highly specialized hospitals projected by the Federal Ministry of Health, under an innovative financing model, offers the ideal place to implement a new project to fulfill medical management needs and characteristics. The goal is to improve the quality of health care through physician satisfaction. The committee's proposals are geared primarily to direct medical management to the satisfaction, desires, and needs of the medical team as an essential ingredient in the pursuit of quality and warmth in health services that should be granted to the population. PMID:22089675

  20. Trends in attrition among medical teaching staff at universities in Myanmar 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Nang Mie Mie Htun; Reyer, Joshua A; Yamamoto, Eiko; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although lack of human resources for health is becoming a global problem, there are few studies on human resources in Myanmar. This study was conducted to investigate the attrition rates of teaching staff from universities for medical professions in Myanmar from 2009 to 2013. The data were collected from administrative records from Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Health, Myanmar. Numbers of staff and those who permanently left work (attrition) from 2009 to 2013 were counted. The reasons were classified into two categories; involuntary attrition (death or retirement) and voluntary attrition (resignation or absenteeism). Official records of the attrited staff were reviewed for identifying demographic characteristics. The annual attrition rate for all kinds of health workers was about 4%. Among 494 attrited staff from 2009 to 2013, 357 staff (72.3%) left their work by involuntary attrition, while 137 staff (27.7%) left voluntarily. Doctors left their work with the highest annual rate (6.7%), while the rate for nurses was the lowest (1.1%). Male staff attrited with a higher rate (4.6%) than female staff (2.7%). Staff aged 46-60 years had the highest attrition rate. PhD degree holders had the highest rate (5.9%), while basic degree holders had the second highest rate (3.5%). Associate professors and above showed the highest attrition rate (8.1%). Teaching staff from non-clinical subjects had the higher rates (8.2%). Among 494 attrited staff, significant differences between involuntary attrition and voluntary attrition were observed in age, marital status, education, overseas degree, position, field of teaching, duration of services and duration of non-residential service. These findings indicated the need to develop appropriate policies such as educational reforms, local recruitment plans, transparent regulatory and administrative measures, and professional incentives to retain the job. PMID:27019526

  1. Trends in attrition among medical teaching staff at universities in Myanmar 2009–2013

    PubMed Central

    Nang Mie Mie Htun; Reyer, Joshua A.; Yamamoto, Eiko; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although lack of human resources for health is becoming a global problem, there are few studies on human resources in Myanmar. This study was conducted to investigate the attrition rates of teaching staff from universities for medical professions in Myanmar from 2009 to 2013. The data were collected from administrative records from Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Health, Myanmar. Numbers of staff and those who permanently left work (attrition) from 2009 to 2013 were counted. The reasons were classified into two categories; involuntary attrition (death or retirement) and voluntary attrition (resignation or absenteeism). Official records of the attrited staff were reviewed for identifying demographic characteristics. The annual attrition rate for all kinds of health workers was about 4%. Among 494 attrited staff from 2009 to 2013, 357 staff (72.3%) left their work by involuntary attrition, while 137 staff (27.7%) left voluntarily. Doctors left their work with the highest annual rate (6.7%), while the rate for nurses was the lowest (1.1%). Male staff attrited with a higher rate (4.6%) than female staff (2.7%). Staff aged 46–60 years had the highest attrition rate. PhD degree holders had the highest rate (5.9%), while basic degree holders had the second highest rate (3.5%). Associate professors and above showed the highest attrition rate (8.1%). Teaching staff from non-clinical subjects had the higher rates (8.2%). Among 494 attrited staff, significant differences between involuntary attrition and voluntary attrition were observed in age, marital status, education, overseas degree, position, field of teaching, duration of services and duration of non-residential service. These findings indicated the need to develop appropriate policies such as educational reforms, local recruitment plans, transparent regulatory and administrative measures, and professional incentives to retain the job. PMID:27019526

  2. Chronic Disease Medication Administration Rates in a Public School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Lawrence; Fredrickson, Doren D.; Burbach, Cindy; Molgaard, Craig A.; Ngong, Lolem

    2004-01-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest school nurses and staff treat increasing numbers of public school students with chronic diseases. However, professionals know little about actual disease burden in schools. This study measured prevalence of chronic disease medication administration rates in a large, urban midwestern school district. Data from daily…

  3. The Medical Staff Ride: an education tool for military medical leadership development.

    PubMed

    Bricknell, Martin C M

    2016-08-01

    This paper provides a description of the Medical Staff Ride as an educational tool for military medical leadership. It is based upon two Medical Staff Rides covering the Somme Campaign 1916 and the Normandy Campaign 1944. It describes the key educational activity 'The Stand' at which history and current issues are brought together through study of a particular location on the historical battlefield. The Medical Staff Ride can be divided into six distinct phases, each of which have common question sets for analysis by attendees. The Medical Staff Ride can be shown to have valuable educational outcomes that are efficient in time and cost, and effective in achieving personal learning. The supporting Readers for the two Medical Staff Rides covered by this paper are available as electronic supplement to this edition of the journal. PMID:26115999

  4. Medication Errors Involving the Intravenous Administration Route: Characteristics of Voluntarily Reported Medication Errors.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Zane Robinson

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of medication errors involving the intravenous (IV) route of administration were analyzed in reports from 1995 to 2013. This was accomplished through a voluntary medication error reporting program. A retrospective case study design analyzed reports by practitioners or consumers on IV-associated medication errors (N = 975) affecting patients. Patterns in error accounts reflected cultural changes in health care organizations. Equipment, labeling, incorrect route of administration, types of errors, patient outcomes, and causal agents represented major codes. Results point to health care provider and consumer knowledge, the need for ongoing education of nursing staff, and interdisciplinary strategies for preventing IV-associated medication errors. PMID:27379682

  5. [Patients' complaints against medical staff: a modern phenomenon?].

    PubMed

    Cartier, Bernard

    2005-01-01

    According to the National Archives (Eure-et-Loir, France) which are prior to 1790, the study of legal medical cases does show complaints of patients against medical staff and particularly against surgeons. The three main complaints were negligence, carelessness, or simply ignorance. The grounds for complaining decreased as Medicine became more and more based on new scientific data available for common people. PMID:17162934

  6. Perinatal Staff Nurse Medical Device Use and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Edwina A.

    1998-01-01

    Survey responses from 48 perinatal nurses found that most learned about medical devices by reading manuals; 75% had received inservice training; and 95% learned from other staff. Inadequate knowledge was related to fear of causing patient harm. Initial learning method influenced what was learned, and hands-on experience was considered efficacious.…

  7. Forty project management strategies for the medical practice staff.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2010-01-01

    Most every medical practice will embark at one time or another on a large and complex new project. The practice may, for instance, undertake a project in office construction or renovation, practice expansion, new technology, or a new large-scale event. The medical practice staff may find itself creating the project plan, overseeing its execution, and working through the plan day to day until its completion. In short, the staff may find itself responsible for project management. This article contains 40 specific, easy-to-implement project management strategies medical practice employees can use to manage both the large and small projects they undertake on behalf of the practice. It suggests effective project management strategies the staff can use before the onset of a new project as well as strategies to help define the project, to deliver the project, and to close and review the project. This article also describes five reasons medical practices often fail at project management and suggests more effective approaches that will ensure that the projects the medical practice undertakes are completed well, on time, and within budget. PMID:20480774

  8. Medication Administration Practices of School Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Reed, David

    2000-01-01

    Assessed medication administration practices among school nurses, surveying members of the National Association of School Nurses. Respondents were extremely concerned about medication administration. Errors in administering medications were reported by 48.5 percent of respondents, with missed doses the most common error. Most nurses followed…

  9. 32 CFR 700.721 - Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff based... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.721 Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore. When a staff is based ashore, the enlisted persons serving with the...

  10. 76 FR 50740 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Procedures for Handling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Procedures for Handling Section 522 Postmarket Surveillance Studies; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  11. Nursing Home Medical Staff Organization: Correlates with Quality Indicators

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Paul R.; Karuza, Jurgis; Lima, Julie; Intrator, Orna

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Little is known about the relationship between how medical care is organized and delivered in nursing homes. Taking a lead from the acute care arena, we hypothesize that nursing home medical staff organization (NHMSO) is an important predictor of clinical outcomes in the nursing home. Methods A total of 202 usable surveys from a two-wave survey process using the Dillman Method were returned from medical directors who were randomly selected from the AMDA membership and were asked to fill out a survey on the structure of medical organization in their primary nursing home practice. Quality measures that are likely to be affected by physician practice patterns were culled from NH Compare and OSCAR data sets and matched to the physician surveys, i.e., long stay residents' prevalence of pain, restraint use, catheter use, pressure ulcers, pneumococcal vaccination, influenza vaccination, presence of advanced directives, prescription of antibiotics, and prevalence of depression. Results Using a series of hierarchical multiple regressions, significant R2 changes were found when the medical staff organization dimensions were added in the regressions after controlling for nursing home structural characteristics for the following outcomes: pneumococcal vaccination and restraint use. Near significant findings were noted for pain prevalence among long stay residents, catheter use and prevalence of pressure ulcers. Conclusions This study is the first to demonstrate a relationship between medical staff organizational dimensions and clinical outcomes in the nursing home setting and as such represents an initial “proof of concept.” NHMSO should be considered as a potentially important mediating or moderating variable in the quality of care equation for nursing homes. PMID:21450190

  12. Confirming delivery: understanding the role of the hospitalized patient in medication administration safety.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Marilyn T; Heilemann, MarySue V; MacKinnon, Neil J; Lang, Ariella; Gregory, David; Gurnham, Mary Ellen; Fillatre, Theresa

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to gain an understanding of current patient involvement in medication administration safety from the perspectives of both patients and nursing staff members. Administering medication is taken for granted and therefore suited to the development of theory to enhance its understanding. We conducted a constructivist, grounded theory study involving 24 patients and 26 nursing staff members and found that patients had the role of confirming delivery in the administration of medication. Confirming delivery was characterized by three interdependent subprocesses: engaging in the medication administration process, being "half out of it" (patient mental status), and perceiving time. We believe that ours is one of the first qualitative studies on the role of hospitalized patients in administering medication. Medication administration and nursing care systems, as well as patient mental status, impose limitations on patient involvement in safe medication administration. PMID:24598773

  13. Motivating Staff--A Problem for the School Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchler, Merv

    1981-01-01

    Examines the implications for educators of the "Motivation-Hygiene Theory" proposed by Frederick Herzberg. Suggests increasing staff opportunities for goal setting, decision making, and expanded professional competence as strategies for developing staff motivation. (Author/MLF)

  14. CEO must have authority to coordinate governance, management, medical staff.

    PubMed

    Johnson, R L

    1984-04-01

    As hospitals attempt to survive in today's new competitive environment, they will find that the traditional organizational structure does not work. This structure can be characterized as a three-legged stool. Governance, management, and medical staff existed in relative harmony, with each able to attend to its own distinct, separate responsibilities. The medical staff regulated itself, the governing board had no serious difficulties in coping with the institution's finances, and the CEO was concerned solely with the physical plant and hospital personnel. In a riskless economic environment, this three-legged stool could remain stable. In the coming years,however, a hospital will need a clear-cut, identifiable leader if it is to survive. To centralize authority primarily in the CEO's hands will be a difficult step for nonprofit hospitals, particularly those sponsored by religious institutions, because of their tradition of operating much as a charitable social agency rather than a business. But this step must be taken, even to the extent of naming the CEO as chairman of the board, for a leader is required who has the authority to make quick decisions in the competitive marketplace. Timeliness is of strategic importance in such an environment, and governing boards increasingly will find it impossible to make timely decisions on a collective basis. Moreover, CEOs will have to coordinate the activities of management, medical staff, and the governing board. They will need to play a strong role in ensuring that target levels in DRG costs are met, and they will need the authority to mediate in issues in which the hospital's economic interests are pitted against physicians'.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10265817

  15. National Disaster Medical System; medical manpower component establishment--Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. Notice.

    PubMed

    1988-04-20

    This notice announces the creation of the medical manpower component within the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), Department of Health and Human Services/Public Health Service (HHS/PHS) as a part of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS). The NDMS is an organized resource that may be activated to serve national needs in the event of disasters or other major emergencies requiring extraordinary medical services. The manpower component will contain volunteer medical response personnel and technical staff that will be made available in situations requiring substantial medical services from outside the area affected by the disaster or emergency. The manpower component of NDMS is being established by HRSA/HHS/PHS in cooperation with the Department of Defense (DoD), Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), and the Veterans Administration (VA). PMID:10287019

  16. Creating accountable care organizations: the extended hospital medical staff.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Elliott S; Staiger, Douglas O; Bynum, Julie P W; Gottlieb, Daniel J

    2007-01-01

    Many current policies and approaches to performance measurement and payment reform focus on individual providers; they risk reinforcing the fragmented care and lack of coordination experienced by patients with serious illness. In this paper we show that Medicare beneficiaries receive most of their care from relatively coherent local delivery systems comprising physicians and the hospitals where they work or admit their patients. Efforts to create accountable care organizations at this level--the extended hospital medical staff--deserve consideration as a potential means of improving the quality and lowering the cost of care. PMID:17148490

  17. Applying airline safety practices to medication administration.

    PubMed

    Pape, Theresa M

    2003-04-01

    Medication administration errors (MAE) continue as major problems for health care institutions, nurses, and patients. However, MAEs are often the result of system failures leading to patient injury, increased hospital costs, and blaming. Costs include those related to increased hospital length of stay and legal expenses. Contributing factors include distractions, lack of focus, poor communication, and failure to follow standard protocols during medication administration. PMID:12736927

  18. Medication Administration Technician. Update. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's edition contains curriculum materials for an upgrading course for medication administration technicians who have completed initial training. The course consists of six units of instruction that cover the following: (1) controlling infection; (2) administering medication; (3) obtaining vital signs; (4) discussing legal issues and…

  19. Workplace Information Literacy for Administrative Staff in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepworth, Mark; Smith, Marian

    2008-01-01

    A joint project carried out by Leeds University and Loughborough University, funded by JISC, studied the information literacy of non academic staff in higher education. The in-depth, qualitative study deployed an information audit, interviews and focus groups with eleven staff in the Finance and Research Departments at Loughborough University. The…

  20. Job Satisfaction and Gender Factor of Administrative Staff in South West Nigeria Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olorunsola, E. O.

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the level of job satisfaction of male and female administrative staff in South West Nigeria Universities. The research design used was a descriptive survey type. The population consisted of all the senior administrative staff in the universities, out of which a sample of 400 respondents made up of 100 respondents from each…

  1. Job Performance and Gender Factors of Administrative Staff in South West Nigeria Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olorunsola, E. O.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the level of administrative staff job performance in South West Nigerian universities and also investigates whether the administrative staff job performance is related to their sexual characteristics. An instrument titled Job Performance Questionnaire (JPQ) was used to collect the data and was administered 400 subjects in…

  2. 18 CFR 12.4 - Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority. 12.4 Section 12.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT WORKS General Provisions § 12.4 Staff administrative responsibility...

  3. 18 CFR 12.4 - Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority. 12.4 Section 12.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT WORKS General Provisions § 12.4 Staff administrative responsibility...

  4. 18 CFR 12.4 - Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority. 12.4 Section 12.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT WORKS General Provisions § 12.4 Staff administrative responsibility...

  5. 18 CFR 12.4 - Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority. 12.4 Section 12.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT WORKS General Provisions § 12.4 Staff administrative responsibility...

  6. 18 CFR 12.4 - Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority. 12.4 Section 12.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT WORKS General Provisions § 12.4 Staff administrative responsibility...

  7. Views on Multilingualism and Internationalisation in Higher Education: Administrative Staff in the Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llurda, Enric; Cots, Josep M.; Armengol, Lurdes

    2014-01-01

    The key role of administrative staff in the implementation of specific institutional policies at university has often been ignored when analysing policies or attitudes related to higher education. Consequently, little is known about the administrative staff's attitudes and involvement relating to the processes of internationalisation and…

  8. Understanding Relationships between Academic Staff and Administrators: An Organisational Culture Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Hui-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to advance the understanding of relationships between university academic staff and administrators through information in interviews with 18 academic staff members and 18 administrators at a large public research university in the United States. Through exploring the first-hand insights and perceptions of interviewees from an…

  9. The Relationship between Organizational Climate and the Organizational Silence of Administrative Staff in Education Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pozveh, Asghar Zamani; Karimi, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between organizational climate and the organizational silence of administrative staff in Education Department in Isfahan. The research method was descriptive and correlational-type method. The study population was administrative staff of Education Department in Isfahan during the…

  10. The American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on School Health POLICY STATEMENT: Guidelines for the Administration of Medication in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of School Nursing, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Many children who take medications require them during the school day. This policy statement is designed to guide prescribing physicians as well as school administrators and health staff on the administration of medications to children at school. The statement addresses over-the-counter products, herbal medications, experimental drugs that are…

  11. 76 FR 789 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Section 905(j) Reports...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is... predicate tobacco product. Manufacturers of tobacco products first introduced or delivered for...

  12. Investigation of radiation protection of medical staff performing medical diagnostic examinations by using PET/CT technique.

    PubMed

    Wrzesień, Małgorzata; Napolska, Katarzyna

    2015-03-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is now one of the most important methods in the diagnosis of cancer diseases. Due to the rapid growth of PET/CT centres in Poland in less than a decade, radiation protection and, consequently, the assessment of worker exposure to ionising radiation, emitted mainly by the isotope (18)F, have become essential issues. The main aim of the study was to analyse the doses received by workers employed in the Medical Diagnostic Centre. The analysis comprises a physicist, three nurses, three physicians, three technicians, as well as two administrative staff employees. High-sensitivity thermoluminescent detectors (TLDs) were used to measure the doses for medical staff. The personnel was classified into categories, among them employees having direct contact with the 'source of radiation'-(18)FDG. The TLDs were placed on the fingertips of both hands and they were also attached at the level of eye lenses, thyroid and gonads depending on the assigned category. The highest dose of radiation was observed during the administration of the (18)FDG to the patients. In the case of the physicist, the highest dose was recorded during preparation of the radiopharmaceutical-(18)FDG. The body parts most exposed to ionizing radiation are the fingertips of the thumb, index and middle finger. PMID:25647828

  13. School Nurses' Experiences with Medication Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Michael W.; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Mordhorst, Matthew J.

    2003-01-01

    This article reports school nurses' experiences with medication administration through qualitative analyses of a written survey and focus groups. From a random sample of 1,000 members of the National Association of School Nurses, 649 (64.9%) school nurses completed the survey. The quantitative data from the survey were presented previously.…

  14. 78 FR 13070 - Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Financial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance entitled ``Guidance for Clinical Investigators, Industry, and FDA Staff: Financial Disclosure by Clinical Investigators.'' This guidance is intended to assist clinical investigators, industry, and FDA staff in interpreting and complying with the regulations governing financial disclosure by clinical......

  15. Administrative, Faculty, and Staff Perceptions of Organizational Climate and Commitment in Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John Charles

    2008-01-01

    Findings of 957 surveyed employees from four evangelical higher education institutions found a negative correlation for climate and commitment and staff members. Administrators were found to have a more favorable view of their institutional climate than staff. Employee age, tenure, and classification had predictive value for organizational…

  16. Professional Integrity in Higher Education: A Study of Administrative Staff Ethics in Student Affairs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reybold, L. Earle; Halx, Mark D.; Jimenez, Anne L.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined administrative staff perceptions of professional ethics in a student affairs division at one university. In-depth interviews were conducted with 12 staff members (six assistant/associate vice presidents and six directors) and analyzed using the constant comparative method. Participants described three dimensions of professional…

  17. 21 CFR 20.30 - Food and Drug Administration Freedom of Information Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration Freedom of Information Staff. 20.30 Section 20.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PUBLIC INFORMATION General Policy § 20.30 Food and Drug Administration Freedom...

  18. Partially Decentralizing Administrative Practices in Secondary Schools to Develop Collective Staff Efficacy and Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Karen D.; Kritsonis, William Allan

    2006-01-01

    Schools must have the capacity to change. School administrators must be able to find a balance in distributing administrative authority in schools. In an effort to evoke meaningful change within the organization of secondary school structures, administrators must be advocates of change and support their staff members by decentralizing key roles by…

  19. Medication administration errors for older people in long-term residential care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Older people in long-term residential care are at increased risk of medication prescribing and administration errors. The main aim of this study was to measure the incidence of medication administration errors in nursing and residential homes using a barcode medication administration (BCMA) system. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 13 care homes (9 residential and 4 nursing). Data on all medication administrations for a cohort of 345 older residents were recorded in real-time using a disguised observation technique. Every attempt by social care and nursing staff to administer medication over a 3-month observation period was analysed using BCMA records to determine the incidence and types of potential medication administration errors (MAEs) and whether errors were averted. Error classifications included attempts to administer medication at the wrong time, to the wrong person or discontinued medication. Further analysis compared data for residential and nursing homes. In addition, staff were surveyed prior to BCMA system implementation to assess their awareness of administration errors. Results A total of 188,249 medication administration attempts were analysed using BCMA data. Typically each resident was receiving nine different drugs and was exposed to 206 medication administration episodes every month. During the observation period, 2,289 potential MAEs were recorded for the 345 residents; 90% of residents were exposed to at least one error. The most common (n = 1,021, 45% of errors) was attempting to give medication at the wrong time. Over the 3-month observation period, half (52%) of residents were exposed to a serious error such as attempting to give medication to the wrong resident. Error incidence rates were 1.43 as high (95% CI 1.32-1.56 p < 0.001) in nursing homes as in residential homes. The level of non-compliance with system alerts was very low in both settings (0.075% of administrations). The pre-study survey revealed that only 12

  20. 20 CFR 633.313 - Administrative staff and personnel standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... LABOR MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures § 633.313... comparable positions under such merit system. However, in order to use this methodology, the section...

  1. Two Models of Integrating Buprenorphine Treatment and Medical Staff within Formerly "Drug-Free" Outpatient Programs.

    PubMed

    Monico, Laura; Schwartz, Robert P; Gryczynski, Jan; O'Grady, Kevin E; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin

    2016-01-01

    "Drug-free" outpatient programs deliver treatment to the largest number of patients of all treatment modalities in the U.S., providing a significant opportunity to expand access to medication treatments for substance use disorders. This analysis examined staff perceptions of organizational dynamics associated with the delivery of buprenorphine maintenance within three formerly "drug-free" outpatient treatment programs. Semi-structured interviews (N = 15) were conducted with counseling and medical staff, and respondents were predominantly African American (n = 11) and female (n = 12). Themes and concepts related to medical staff integration emerged through an inductive and iterative coding process using Atlas.ti qualitative analysis software. Two treatment clinics incorporated buprenorphine maintenance into their programs using a co-located model of care. Their staff generally reported greater intra-organizational discord regarding the best ways to combine medication and counseling compared to the clinic using an integrated model of care. Co-located program staff reported less communication between medical and clinical staff, which contributed to some uncertainty about proper dosing and concerns about the potential for medication diversion. Clinics that shift from "drug-free" to incorporating buprenorphine maintenance should consider which model of care they wish to adapt and how to train staff and structure staff communication. PMID:26940870

  2. Front office staff as medical educators, risk creators, and risk managers.

    PubMed

    Kapp, Marshall B

    2016-03-16

    The author describes his own negative series of encounters with the front office staff of a large specialty medical practice during a recent lengthy episode of significant medical distress. The author suggests several reasons, including legal risk management, that medical students should be exposed as part of their education to the interactions of patients with front office staffs (not just physicians) to get a fuller picture of patients' actual experiences with the health care system. PMID:27176757

  3. Intravenous Medication Administration in Intensive Care: Opportunities for Technological Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jacqueline; Berner, Eta; Bothe, Olaf; Rymarchuk, Irina

    2008-01-01

    Medication administration errors have been shown to be frequent and serious. Error is particularly prevalent in highly technical specialties such as critical care. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of intravenous medication administration in five intensive care units. These data were used within the context of a larger study to design information system decision support to decrease medication administration errors in these settings. Nurses were observed during the course of their work and their intravenous medication administration process, medication order source, references used, calculation method, number of medications prepared simultaneously, and any interruptions occurring during the preparation and delivery phases of the administration event were recorded. In addition, chart reviews of medication administration records were completed and nurses were asked to complete an anonymous drop-box questionnaire regarding their experiences with medication administration error. The results of this study are discussed in terms of potential informatics solutions for reducing medication administration error. PMID:18998790

  4. Staff Satisfaction with Administration as a Measure of Consumer Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanguma, Jesus; Luster, Jane Nell

    The school district in this study, "Special School District" (SSD), is under the administration of the Louisiana State Department of education and thus classified as a Louisiana state agency required to conform to the mandate that state agencies have performance indicators, including one for customer satisfaction. For the SSD, customer…

  5. Improving Administrative-Related Staff Behaviors at a State Institution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Deitz, Diane E. D.; Repp, Alan C.

    1979-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of indigenous contingencies in altering administratively related behaviors (including (1) completing federally required reports on student progress, (2) tardiness, and (3) completing weekly timesheets) with 87 employees at a residence for moderately or severely retarded individuals. (Author/PHR)

  6. 20 CFR 632.40 - Administrative staff and personnel standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Administrative Standards and Procedures § 632.... Native American grantees shall establish systems to enhance the recruitment and hiring of qualified... American grantee. (d) Bonding. Native American grantees shall comply with the bonding requirements at...

  7. 20 CFR 632.40 - Administrative staff and personnel standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... Native American grantees shall establish systems to enhance the recruitment and hiring of qualified Indian and Native Americans and to provide opportunities for their further occupational training and... INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Administrative Standards and Procedures §...

  8. Human Resource Management in Small Rural Districts: The Administrator's Role in Recruitment, Hiring and Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsell, Rhodena

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the rural area administrator's role in the areas of teacher recruitment, hiring and staff development. State and Regional Policies reveal that these areas are chief among the concerns of rural school leaders (Johnson, 2005). The rural school administrator's role often requires him/her to become involved in…

  9. Testing a Mediational Model of Communication Among Medical Staff and Families of Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gionta, Dana A.; Harlow, Lisa L.; Loitman, Jane E.; Leeman, Joanne M.

    2005-01-01

    Three structural equation models of communication between family members and medical staff were examined to understand relations among staff accessibility, inhibitory family attitudes, getting communication needs met, perceived stress, and satisfaction with communication. Compared to full and direct models, a mediational model fit best in which…

  10. Economic regulation and hospital behavior: the effects on medical staff organization and hospital-physician relationships.

    PubMed Central

    Shortell, S M; Morrisey, M A; Conrad, D A

    1985-01-01

    New forms of payment, growing competition, the continued evolution of multiunit hospital systems, and associated forces are redefining the fundamental relationship between hospitals and physicians. As part of a larger theory of organizational response to the environment, the effects of these external forces on hospital-medical staff organization were examined using both cross-sectional data and data collected at two points in time. Findings suggest that regulation and competition, at least up to 1982, have had relatively little direct effect on hospital medical staff organization. Rather, changes in medical staff organization are more strongly associated with hospital case mix and with structural characteristics involving membership in a multiunit system, size, ownership, and location. The pervasive effect of case mix and the consistent effect of multiunit system involvement support the need for policymakers to give these factors particular attention in considering how hospitals and their medical staffs might respond to future regulatory and/or competitive approaches. PMID:3936822

  11. Reflecting on the ethical administration of computerized medical records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collmann, Jeff R.

    1995-05-01

    This presentation examines the ethical issues raised by computerized image management and communication systems (IMAC), the ethical principals that should guide development of policies, procedures and practices for IMACS systems, and who should be involved in developing a hospital's approach to these issues. The ready access of computerized records creates special hazards of which hospitals must beware. Hospitals must maintain confidentiality of patient's records while making records available to authorized users as efficiently as possible. The general conditions of contemporary health care undermine protecting the confidentiality of patient record. Patients may not provide health care institutions with information about themselves under conditions of informed consent. The field of information science must design sophisticated systems of computer security that stratify access, create audit trails on data changes and system use, safeguard patient data from corruption, and protect the databases from outside invasion. Radiology professionals must both work with information science experts in their own hospitals to create institutional safeguards and include the adequacy of security measures as a criterion for evaluating PACS systems. New policies and procedures on maintaining computerized patient records must be developed that obligate all members of the health care staff, not just care givers. Patients must be informed about the existence of computerized medical records, the rules and practices that govern their dissemination and given the opportunity to give or withhold consent for their use. Departmental and hospital policies on confidentiality should be reviewed to determine if revisions are necessary to manage computer-based records. Well developed discussions of the ethical principles and administrative policies on confidentiality and informed consent and of the risks posed by computer-based patient records systems should be included in initial and continuing

  12. Administrative Staff Members' Job Competency and Their Job Satisfaction in a Korean Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jisun; Shin, Jung Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of administrative staff's job competency on their job satisfaction in a Korean research university. We conceptualized job satisfaction into three subcomponents: satisfaction in the job field, in the workplace, and with the actual task. In the regression analysis, we included demographics, inner…

  13. 32 CFR 700.721 - Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore. 700.721 Section 700.721 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS Commanders In Chief and Other...

  14. 32 CFR 700.721 - Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore. 700.721 Section 700.721 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS Commanders In Chief and Other...

  15. 76 FR 72951 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... (74 FR 46433), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance. Comments on the draft guidance... Differentiation of Human Papillomaviruses; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Differentiation of Human Papillomaviruses.'' This guidance document provides industry and Agency staff...

  16. 76 FR 46303 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Investigational New Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a document entitled ``Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Investigational New Drug Applications (INDs) for Minimally Manipulated, Unrelated Allogeneic Placental/Umbilical Cord Blood Intended for Hematopoietic Reconstitution for Specified Indications,'' dated June 2011. The guidance document provides advice to potential......

  17. 76 FR 41803 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... Differentiation of Influenza Viruses; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Differentiation of Influenza Viruses.'' FDA is issuing this guidance to inform industry and Agency staff of its... diagnostic devices intended for the detection or detection and differentiation of influenza viruses....

  18. The Improvement of Staff Development for General and Special Administration Through a New Partnership: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Council for Educational Administration, Columbus, OH.

    The Special and General Education Leadership (SAGE) Project was a 3 year effort focusing on inservice activities for administrators and other personnel geared toward implementation of P.L. 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act. The project involved three objectives: to design, implement, and evaluate a series of staff development…

  19. CCSF Survey on Using Technology: Administrators, Department Chairs, Classified Staff, and Student Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Coll. of San Francisco, CA. Office of Institutional Research, Planning and Grants.

    This document discusses the findings of a survey completed by all employees of City College of San Francisco in 2003. The employees surveyed include administrators, department chairs, classified staff, and student service faculty. The survey discovered that these employees differ from instructional faculty in the following ways: (1) they do their…

  20. All Together Now: Getting Faculty, Administrators, and Staff Engaged in Information Literacy Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakleaf, Megan; Millet, Michelle S.; Kraus, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Trinity University has established effective strategies for engaging faculty, administrators, and staff in information literacy instruction and assessment. Succeeding in an area in which many libraries struggle, the Coates Library at Trinity University offers a model for libraries seeking to actively engage their campuses through 1) establishing a…

  1. Friend or Foe? New Managerialism and Technical, Administrative and Clerical Support Staff in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pick, David; Teo, Stephen; Yeung, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess and conceptualise the effects of new managerialism-related organisational reforms in three Australian public universities on technical, administrative and clerical support staff job stressors and job satisfaction. Using a mixed method approach consisting of a quantitative core component and qualitative…

  2. Leadership Styles of Nursing Home Administrators and Their Association with Staff Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoghue, Christopher; Castle, Nicholas G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between nursing home administrator (NHA) leadership style and staff turnover. Design and Methods: We analyzed primary data from a survey of 2,900 NHAs conducted in 2005. The Online Survey Certification and Reporting database and the Area Resource File were utilized to extract…

  3. What We've Learned about Supporting Faculty, Administrator, and Staff Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadlec, Alison; Rowlett, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how colleges can increase faculty, administrator, and staff engagement in reform processes, with the message that large-scale change is not merely technical work; there is a powerful human dimension that can make or break a reform.

  4. What Research Has to Say to Administrators of Secondary Schools About Effective Teaching and Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stallings, Jane

    A review of research literature on the effective teaching of basic skills in secondary education and a description of a model staff development program provide guidelines for school administrators in improving teachers' skills. The literature identifies both classroom- and school-level factors influencing teacher effectiveness. Classroom factors…

  5. The Merchant Apprentices. A Guide to the Training and Administration of Staff in the Distributive Trades.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Denny, Elizabeth

    Intended as a guide to staff training and administration in the British distributive trades, this book begins by considering the special managerial needs and problems of retailers. It goes on to discuss job satisfaction and dissatisfaction, job analysis, recruitment and reception of new employees, management development (including the evaluation…

  6. Development of the Family Caregiver Medication Administration Hassles Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Shirley S.; Bernard, Marie A.; McAuley, William J.; Thornton, Megan; Kole, Tristen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: "Medication administration hassles" are the minor daily irritants that family caregivers experience when they assist a dependent family member with medication regimens. This study was designed to develop and test a multidimensional measure of the hassles in family caregiver medication administration. Design and Method: The authors…

  7. Guidelines for Medication Administration in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    These guidelines present standards for administering medication in Maryland schools, both prescribed and over-the-counter medications. In general, medication during school hours is discouraged unless necessary. The guidelines recommend that, whenever possible, children administer their own medication under appropriate supervision. Specifically,…

  8. Explaining Perceptions of Administrative Support among Prison Treatment Staff: A Spotlight on Deputy Wardens in Charge of Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Brett E.; McCarty, William P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores how perceptions of administrative support among 83 treatment staff working in a midwest prison system vary according to personal and work-related variables. It extends on previous literature by: (1) analyzing how perceptions of administrative support vary exclusively among prison treatment staff; (2) focusing on a single type…

  9. Injuries among medical laboratory housekeeping staff: incidence and worker perceptions.

    PubMed

    Sarri, C; Eng, E; Runyan, C

    1991-01-01

    Housekeepers' injury experiences in medical laboratories have not been reported previously. Review of injury incident reports for housekeepers assigned to medical research laboratories in a major university revealed an incidence rate of 46 injuries per 100 housekeepers per year from 1985 to 1988. Thirty-seven percent of the injuries were cuts and punctures, with 70% of these attributable to glass, needles, or cutting instruments. In a survey, 65% of housekeepers indicated that they do not always report their injuries, but the injury pattern they described paralleled those recorded in incident reports. Housekeepers identified behavioral and environmental factors that can contribute to laboratory injuries, including: lack of knowledge; failure to use protective equipment; carelessness; and, "sharps" (ie, sharp needles or glass) in the trash. PMID:1995802

  10. 76 FR 24494 - Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Processing/Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    .../ Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care Settings: Validation Methods and Labeling; Availability AGENCY... Staff: Processing/Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care Settings: Validation Methods and Labeling... ``Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Processing/Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health...

  11. Evaluation of medical staff and patient satisfaction of Chinese hospitals and measures for improvement.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Huang, Chengyu; Lu, Xiangchan; Chen, Siyuan; Zhao, Pan; Lu, Hongzhou

    2015-06-01

    Our goal is to establish criteria for evaluating satisfaction of medical staff and patients of Chinese hospitals and propose measures for improvement. A survey was conducted among medical staff and patients of infectious disease hospitals in three locations, i.e., Shanghai, Chongqing, and Nanning. The analyses included item analysis, factor analysis, reliability analysis, Pearson correlation and one-way analysis of variance. For the patient group, Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) = 0.973, Cronbach's α = 0.962 and the Pearson correlation coefficients among the five dimensions of satisfaction ranged from 0.583 to 0.795. For the medical staff group, KMO = 0.972, Cronbach's α = 0.970, and the Pearson correlation coefficients among the five dimensions of satisfaction ranged from 0.603 to 0.854. The means on the five dimensions of satisfaction for the patient group were 0.74 to 1.34, 0.81 to 1.17, 0.78 to 1.07, 0.89 to 1.34, and 0.71 to 1.10. The means on the five dimensions of satisfaction for the medical staff group were 0.17 to 1.03, ‒ 0.16 to 0.60, ‒ 0.18 to 0.74, 0.23 to 0.72, and ‒ 0.39 to 0.37. The clinicians were less satisfied with the hospitals than the patients. Medical staff and patients in Shanghai were relatively more satisfied. Improving the evaluation criteria and survey methods with respect to medical staff and patient satisfaction with Chinese hospitals may increase clinician and patient satisfaction and improve the health care environment in China. PMID:26166371

  12. Reflections on the role of medical staff governor in a foundation trust.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Sarah

    2011-10-01

    A foundation trust will usually elect one or more medical staff representatives to the board of governors. This person is likely to be the most influential member of that board through knowledge, experience and self-confidence. This paper outlines the experience of one medical staff governor and some of the ways in which it is possible to support colleagues as well as management. Most importantly the role can have a crucial watchdog function when major financial pressures impinge on resources. The role is ideally suited to a senior physician with reduced clinical commitments. It repays the time and trouble invested. PMID:22034698

  13. Longitudinal Examination of Medical Staff Utilization in Substance Use Disorder Treatment Organizations.

    PubMed

    Fields, Dail; Roman, Paul

    2015-12-01

    This study examined changes in utilization of medical staff within organizations specializing in treatment of patients with substance use disorder (SUD) at two points in time (2007 and 2010). Utilization was calculated as the number of hours paid weekly for psychiatrists, physicians, nurses, and other medical staff working as employees or on contract. Study data come from a longitudinal national sample of 274 substance use disorder treatment centers. Average utilization of medical staff by these SUD treatment organizations increased by 26% from 2007 to 2010. The results showed that growing SUD treatment centers that obtained more referrals from health care providers, used case managers to coordinate comprehensive approaches to patient care, provided medication assisted treatment (MAT), and that were connected more closely with hospitals made increased use of medical staff over the 2007-2010 period. In 2010, these organizations seem to have been moving in directions consistent with trends forecasted for the SUD treatment environment after implementation of the Affordable Care Act. PMID:26219681

  14. Secondary traumatic stress in attorneys and their administrative support staff working with trauma-exposed clients.

    PubMed

    Levin, Andrew P; Albert, Linda; Besser, Avi; Smith, Deborah; Zelenski, Alex; Rosenkranz, Stacey; Neria, Yuval

    2011-12-01

    Although secondary trauma has been assessed in various groups of mental health professionals, few studies, to date, have examined secondary trauma among attorneys exposed to clients' traumatic experiences. This study examined indicators of secondary trauma among attorneys (N = 238) and their administrative support staff (N = 109) in the Wisconsin State Public Defender Office. Attorney participants demonstrated significantly higher levels of posttraumatic stress disorder symptoms, depression, secondary traumatic stress, burnout, and functional impairment compared with the administrative support staff. This difference was mediated by attorneys' longer work hours and greater contact with clients who had experienced or had been directly involved with trauma. Sex, age, years on the job, office size, and personal history of trauma did not predict symptoms. These findings suggest a need to support attorneys experiencing these symptoms and to address high workloads as well as the intensity of contact with trauma-exposed clients. PMID:22134453

  15. 75 FR 22601 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g); Requests for Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability...

  16. Medication Administration in the School Setting. Position Statement. Amended

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharski, Susan; Kain, Carole A.; Fleming, Robin; Pontius, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that school districts develop written medication administration policies and procedures that focus on safe and efficient medication administration at school by a registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse). Policies should include prescription…

  17. Measurement of absorbed doses in organs of medical staff at (18)F-FDG pet examination.

    PubMed

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Iimori, Takashi; Isobe, Tomonori; Masuda, Yoshitada; Uchida, Yoshitaka; Matsubayashi, Fumiyasu; Sakae, Takeji

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the organ doses were measured using a human- body phantom simulating a medical staff member, and we considered an effective method for decreasing exposure to staff in positron emission tomography examinations. A fluorescence glass dosimeter was arranged for measurements in various organs. Regarding exposure, the average ratio of the dose at 100 cm from the source to the dose at 30 cm was 0.35. The ratio of the dose at 100 cm with a 3 cm lead shield to the dose at 100 cm with no shielding device was 0.01. To reduce the radiation exposure effectively, medical staff members should inform the patient of the details of the examination in advance, reduce the contact time with the patient during the examination, and maximize their distance from the patient when contact is necessary. PMID:20821099

  18. Medication Administration Practices in Pennsylvania Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficca, Michelle; Welk, Dorette

    2006-01-01

    As a result of various health concerns, children are receiving an increased number of medications while at school. In Pennsylvania, the School Code mandates a ratio of 1 certified school nurse to 1,500 students, which may mean that 1 school nurse is covering 3-5 buildings. This implies that unlicensed personnel are administering medications, a…

  19. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  20. Upgrading a ColdFusion-Based Academic Medical Library Staff Intranet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Hart, Robert; Ingrassia, Barbara; Mayotte, Kerry; Palmer, Lisa A.; Powell, Julia

    2010-01-01

    This article details the process of upgrading and expanding an existing academic medical library intranet to include a wiki, blog, discussion forum, and photo collection manager. The first version of the library's intranet from early 2002 was powered by ColdFusion software and existed primarily to allow staff members to author and store minutes of…

  1. Effective physician credentialing. Properly monitoring medical staffs can protect hospitals from liability.

    PubMed

    Blaes, S M; Knight, G E

    1990-11-01

    Healthcare facilities today are finding themselves increasingly liable in malpractice suits if they have hired incompetent physicians or allowed them to remain on the medical staff. Thus appropriate processes for physician credentialing are important. The hospital medical staff has the authority to evaluate medical staff membership status and clinical privileges and to take disciplinary and corrective action. If the medical staff fails to do its job, however, the hospital governing board is responsible for making sure the credentialing process is carried out properly. The same rules apply to the reapplication process. The hospital must associate its credentialing process with its prevailing concern for high-quality patient care and document that ideal. Preservation of market share and elimination of competition must never enter into the credentialing process. Well-framed hospital bylaws will help provide protection from liability, if they are followed correctly. If a hospital deviates from its bylaws when processing an application or granting clinical privileges, it risks a lawsuit. Congress has passed the Health Care Quality Improvement Act of 1986-an act that not only protects patients from incompetent practitioners but also can help limit facility's risk of liability by requiring facilities and third-party payers to report any adverse actions taken against physicians. The National Practitioner Data Bank is an information clearing-house opened in September 1990 that hospitals must use to report and obtain professional information about physicians. PMID:10107456

  2. Emergency Medical Services Program Administration Prototype Curriculum: Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (DOT), Washington, DC.

    The curriculum guide was developed for training administrators (new entrants and incumbents), at the college level, in Emergency Medical Services (EMS) program administration. It is designed to be comprehensive and to include all knowledge and skills needed to perform the functions and tasks involved in EMS administration and management. The brief…

  3. 76 FR 36543 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Applying Human Factors and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Staff: Applying Human Factors and Usability Engineering To Optimize Medical Device Design; Availability... Medical Device Design.'' The recommendations in this guidance are intended to improve the safety and... Factors and Usability Engineering to Optimize Medical Device Design'' to the Division of...

  4. Evaluation of radiation doses in patient and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography procedures.

    PubMed

    Seo, Deoknam; Kim, Kie Hwan; Kim, Jung-Su; Han, Seonggyu; Park, Kyung; Kim, Jungmin

    2016-03-01

    The radiation exposure dose must be optimised because the hazard resulting from an interventional radiology procedure is long term depending on the patient. The aim of this study was to measure the radiation doses received by the patients and medical staff during endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) procedures. Data were collected during 126 ERCP procedures, including the dose-area product (DAP), entrance dose (ED), effective dose (E), fluoroscopy time (T) and number of digital radiographs (F). The medical staff members each wore a personal thermoluminescence dosemeter to monitor exposure during ERCP procedures. The mean DAP, ED, E and T were 47.06 Gy cm(2), 196.06 mGy, 8.93 mSv, 7.65 min and 9.21 images, respectively. The mean dose to the staff was 0.175 mSv and that to the assistant was 0.069 mSv. The dose to the medical staff was minimal when appropriate protective measures were used. The large variation in the patient doses must be further investigated. PMID:26269518

  5. Medical student and academic staff perceptions of role models: an analytical cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Haghdoost, Ali A; Shakibi, Mohammad R

    2006-01-01

    Background This study explored the associations between the perceptions of students and the perceptions of academic staff about the characteristics of clinical lecturers at the Department of Internal Medicine at Kerman University of Medical Sciences (KUMS). It also assessed what characteristics constitute a 'role model' from the point of view of students and staff. Methods Staff and students were questioned about the characteristics of their colleagues and lecturers, respectively. They were asked about 15 characteristics under four headings: personality, teaching skill, group working and overall performance as a role model. Associations between lecturers' characteristics were explored using Pearson correlation and characteristics were allocated into groups by partition cluster method. In addition, predictors of being a valuable lecturer were assessed using logistic regression analysis. Results Based on staff responses, the strongest association observed was between honesty and being respectful (r = 0.93, p < 0.0001). Based on student responses, the strongest association observed was between being professional and honesty (r = 0.98, p < 0.0001). None of the correlations between student and staff perceptions were significant for any characteristic. Two groups were recognized among the characteristics. group one contained those characteristics which were related to the lecturer's activity; while the second group contained characteristics that were related to the personality or teaching performance of the lecturer. The predictors of lecturer as 'role model' (i.e., perceptions of students) consisted mostly of characteristics from the first group, while the predictors of a 'role model' by fellow academic staff consisted of characteristics that were in both groups. Conclusion These findings showed considerable differences between the perceptions of students about their lecturers when compared with perceptions of staff about their colleagues. Students were more concerned

  6. The Impact of Occupational Stress on Academic and Administrative Staff, and on Students: An Empirical Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ablanedo-Rosas, Jose Humberto; Blevins, Randall C.; Gao, Hongman; Teng, Wen-Yuan; White, Joann

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of occupational stress among academic staff, administrative staff, and students in a well-established US university environment. The results show that there are different correlations associated with stress such as organisational demand, health issues, and stress management. Findings suggest that occupational…

  7. 41 CFR 105-54.309 - Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators. 105-54.309 Section 105-54.309 Public... 54.3-Advisory Committee Procedures § 105-54.309 Added responsibilities of service and staff...

  8. 41 CFR 105-54.309 - Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators. 105-54.309 Section 105-54.309 Public... 54.3-Advisory Committee Procedures § 105-54.309 Added responsibilities of service and staff...

  9. 41 CFR 105-54.309 - Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators. 105-54.309 Section 105-54.309 Public... 54.3-Advisory Committee Procedures § 105-54.309 Added responsibilities of service and staff...

  10. 41 CFR 105-54.309 - Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators. 105-54.309 Section 105-54.309 Public... 54.3-Advisory Committee Procedures § 105-54.309 Added responsibilities of service and staff...

  11. 41 CFR 105-54.309 - Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators. 105-54.309 Section 105-54.309 Public... 54.3-Advisory Committee Procedures § 105-54.309 Added responsibilities of service and staff...

  12. Modeling the acceptance of clinical information systems among hospital medical staff: an extended TAM model.

    PubMed

    Melas, Christos D; Zampetakis, Leonidas A; Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Moustakis, Vassilis

    2011-08-01

    Recent empirical research has utilized the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to advance the understanding of doctors' and nurses' technology acceptance in the workplace. However, the majority of the reported studies are either qualitative in nature or use small convenience samples of medical staff. Additionally, in very few studies moderators are either used or assessed despite their importance in TAM based research. The present study focuses on the application of TAM in order to explain the intention to use clinical information systems, in a random sample of 604 medical staff (534 physicians) working in 14 hospitals in Greece. We introduce physicians' specialty as a moderator in TAM and test medical staff's information and communication technology (ICT) knowledge and ICT feature demands, as external variables. The results show that TAM predicts a substantial proportion of the intention to use clinical information systems. Findings make a contribution to the literature by replicating, explaining and advancing the TAM, whereas theory is benefited by the addition of external variables and medical specialty as a moderator. Recommendations for further research are discussed. PMID:21292029

  13. Identifying medical-surgical nursing staff perceptions of the drug-abusing patient.

    PubMed

    Nilsen, Stacy L; Stone, Wendy L; Burleson, Stephanie L

    2013-01-01

    Nurses report a negative, stereotypical, and moralistic view of substance-abusing patients. Unaddressed bias may impede delivery of quality care. There is limited research of the needs specific to medical-surgical nursing staff interacting with substance-abusing patients. Nursing therapeutic commitment refers to the degree the nurse feels prepared with an adequate knowledge base, professional support, and personal ownership of a patient condition. Low therapeutic commitment correlates with job dissatisfaction. The Drug and Drug Problems Perceptions Questionnaire assesses healthcare provider attitude and therapeutic commitment to patients using or abusing medication or illicit substances. This therapeutic commitment survey serves as a staff needs assessment for a targeted educational innovation. The results show that the medical and surgical nursing staff has a constructive attitude and a moderately high degree of therapeutic commitment to the drug-abusing patient population, similar to more specialized multidisciplinary, mental healthcare workers. This study showed that medical-surgical nurses feel professionally responsible and clinically supported with patients with primary or comorbid drug abuse. Consistent with established results, focused and ongoing education on the risk factors, outcomes, and physical and psychological effects of illicit substances is necessary to improve therapeutic commitment to drug-dependent patients. PMID:24621546

  14. 78 FR 11654 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Providing Information About...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Pediatric Uses of Medical Devices Under Section 515A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' FDA is... information required under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act). This draft guidance is...

  15. Special report on medical staff relationships. Ninth Circuit buttresses peer review immunities.

    PubMed

    Penner, I

    1994-11-01

    Following on the heels of Austin, the Fobbs and Smith decisions may result in a significant reduction in the number of federal antitrust claims filed by aggrieved physicians in the context of peer review actions. However, by permitting claims of discrimination and conspiracy to go forward in the Fobbs case, the Ninth Circuit may have encouraged the filing of more suits against peer reviewers based on these types of claims, rather than on antitrust theories. In order to benefit from HCQIA's immunities, medical staffs are once again admonished to review, and revise when necessary their medical staff bylaws and peer review policies to provide for adequate notice and hearing, and to assure that peer review participants are well informed about and carefully comply with all of HCQIA's requirements. PMID:10137766

  16. Introduction of Ambulatory Medical Training in a Veterans Administration Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casciato, Dennis A.

    1979-01-01

    The implementation of a continuity of a care clinic in a highly subspecialized Veterans Administration internal medicine training program for postgraduate medical students is described, with focus on resolving problems created by the idiosyncratic administrative features and resource limitations of the hospital. (Author/JMD)

  17. Resiliency Improvements in Medical Emergency Staff in Burn Missions: A Qualitative Study in an Iranian Context

    PubMed Central

    Froutan, Razieh; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Fallahi, Masoud; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Norouzi, Kian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medical emergency staff complete understanding of the nature of resiliency in burn events is a prerequisite for improving the quality of clinical service delivery in pre-hospital burn events. Objectives: The present study aimed to describe resiliency in view of medical emergency staff in burn events. Materials and Methods: The present qualitative study was performed using a content analysis method. In total, 18 Iranian emergency care personnel participated in the study. A purposeful sampling method was applied until reaching data saturation. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews and field observations. Afterwards, data was analyzed by face content analysis. Results: By analyzing 456 primary codes, four main concepts including: 1) scene safety/security, 2) effective clinical decision making, 3) self-efficacy and 4) religious support were extracted through content analysis from experiences of pre-hospital emergency personnel during burn care. Conclusions: Different factors affect resiliency improvements in medical emergency staff and consequently the quality of pre-hospital burn care. This study showed that various factors such as scene security/safety, effective decision making, self-efficacy and religious support are effective in the improvement of resiliency and the quality of pre-hospital emergency care. PMID:26421172

  18. The Impact of Bar Code Medication Administration Technology on Reported Medication Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holecek, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The use of bar-code medication administration technology is on the rise in acute care facilities in the United States. The technology is purported to decrease medication errors that occur at the point of administration. How significantly this technology affects actual rate and severity of error is unknown. This descriptive, longitudinal research…

  19. 76 FR 78670 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Evaluation of Sex Differences...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... Staff; Evaluation of Sex Differences in Medical Device Clinical Studies; Availability AGENCY: Food and... the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Evaluation of Sex Differences in Medical Device Clinical Studies.'' This document provides guidance on the study and evaluation of sex differences...

  20. What are incident reports telling us? A comparative study at two Australian hospitals of medication errors identified at audit, detected by staff and reported to an incident system

    PubMed Central

    Westbrook, Johanna I.; Li, Ling; Lehnbom, Elin C.; Baysari, Melissa T.; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Burke, Rosemary; Conn, Chris; Day, Richard O.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To (i) compare medication errors identified at audit and observation with medication incident reports; (ii) identify differences between two hospitals in incident report frequency and medication error rates; (iii) identify prescribing error detection rates by staff. Design Audit of 3291patient records at two hospitals to identify prescribing errors and evidence of their detection by staff. Medication administration errors were identified from a direct observational study of 180 nurses administering 7451 medications. Severity of errors was classified. Those likely to lead to patient harm were categorized as ‘clinically important’. Setting Two major academic teaching hospitals in Sydney, Australia. Main Outcome Measures Rates of medication errors identified from audit and from direct observation were compared with reported medication incident reports. Results A total of 12 567 prescribing errors were identified at audit. Of these 1.2/1000 errors (95% CI: 0.6–1.8) had incident reports. Clinically important prescribing errors (n = 539) were detected by staff at a rate of 218.9/1000 (95% CI: 184.0–253.8), but only 13.0/1000 (95% CI: 3.4–22.5) were reported. 78.1% (n = 421) of clinically important prescribing errors were not detected. A total of 2043 drug administrations (27.4%; 95% CI: 26.4–28.4%) contained ≥1 errors; none had an incident report. Hospital A had a higher frequency of incident reports than Hospital B, but a lower rate of errors at audit. Conclusions Prescribing errors with the potential to cause harm frequently go undetected. Reported incidents do not reflect the profile of medication errors which occur in hospitals or the underlying rates. This demonstrates the inaccuracy of using incident frequency to compare patient risk or quality performance within or across hospitals. New approaches including data mining of electronic clinical information systems are required to support more effective medication error detection and

  1. Negative Impact of Employment on Engineering Student Time Management, Time to Degree, and Retention: Faculty, Administrator, and Staff Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Will

    2012-01-01

    Interviews with faculty, administrators, staff, and students at four engineering programs reveal the role of undergraduate student employment on retention and timely degree completion among engineering students. Dueling narratives reveal how student approaches to earning an engineering degree differ greatly from faculty, administrator, and staff…

  2. 77 FR 20825 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... classification information.'' In the Federal Register of April 29, 2010 (75 FR 22601), FDA announced the...; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for...

  3. 77 FR 48159 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Refuse To Accept Policy for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Staff; Refuse To Accept Policy for 510(k)s; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... draft guidance entitled ``Refuse to Accept Policy for 510(k)s.'' The purpose of this document is to... (510(k)) submission is administratively complete, which determines whether it should be accepted...

  4. Descriptive study of stress and satisfaction at work in the Saragossa university services and administration staff

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The notion of stress in connection with the work environment became an important topic during the 1970's, when the first studies on the subject were published and the term of work stress was first coined. In 1974, Freudenberger proposed the term burnout to refer to the condition of physical and emotional exhaustion, as well as the associated negative attitudes, resulting from the intense interaction in working with people. The aim of our study is to examine burnout and job satisfaction in Saragossa University Services and Administration Staff (SAS) and detect the main factors which could contribute to too much stress, because job stress has emerged as a major psychosocial influence on mental health, associated with burnout. Methods 24 people from the Services and Administration Staff in the University of Saragossa participated in the study. The research was carried out during the implementation of a module on Stress Management organised by the University of Saragossa and commissioned to the Unit for Research in Physical Therapy (University School of Health Sciences) from that University. This research is an exploratory research to improve the stress management program. A personal interview was carried out and additionally, participants were given the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Scale of Satisfaction at Work of Warr, Cook & Wall. Results However using small sample this is worth to state that participants present most of them low burnout levels in the burnout scale. Only in one person high exhaustion level was reflected, even though other seven showed mean levels; in the professional self-esteem section, most of them showed high self-esteem, with two cases of low self-esteem and five with mean level. With regard to satisfaction people participating in the study show mean levels in intrinsic as much as in extrinsic factors and general satisfaction. Conclusions Services and Administration Staff from the University of Saragossa shows low burnout levels

  5. Building Faculty Community: Fellowship in Graduate Medical Education Administration

    PubMed Central

    Edler, Alice A.; Dohn, Ann; Davidson, Heather A.; Grewal, Daisy; Behravesh, Bardia; Piro, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The Department of Graduate Medical Education at Stanford Hospital and Clinics has developed a professional training program for program directors. This paper outlines the goals, structure, and expected outcomes for the one-year Fellowship in Graduate Medical Education Administration program. Background The skills necessary for leading a successful Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) training program require an increased level of curricular and administrative expertise. To meet the ACGME Outcome Project goals, program directors must demonstrate not only sophisticated understanding of curricular design but also competency-based performance assessment, resource management, and employment law. Few faculty-development efforts adequately address the complexities of educational administration. As part of an institutional-needs assessment, 41% of Stanford program directors indicated that they wanted more training from the Department of Graduate Medical Education. Intervention To address this need, the Fellowship in Graduate Medical Education Administration program will provide a curriculum that includes (1) readings and discussions in 9 topic areas, (2) regular mentoring by the director of Graduate Medical Education (GME), (3) completion of a service project that helps improve GME across the institution, and (4) completion of an individual scholarly project that focuses on education. Results The first fellow was accepted during the 2008–2009 academic year. Outcomes for the project include presentation of a project at a national meeting, internal workshops geared towards disseminating learning to peer program directors, and the completion of a GME service project. The paper also discusses lessons learned for improving the program. PMID:21975722

  6. Suicidality among medical students - a practical guide for staff members in medical schools.

    PubMed

    Rau, Thea; Plener, Paul; Kliemann, Andrea; Fegert, Jörg M; Allroggen, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Although suicidality in medical students is important, few studies dealt with this issue regarding German universities. Our aims were to describe the epidemiology as well as factors leading to suicidality in medical students. Furthermore we wanted to raise awareness for this topic among university employees and show options for handling suicidal crises in students. This manuscript especially aims to address university employees working in direct contact with students (such as student counselors or teachers). PMID:24282451

  7. Suicidality among medical students – A practical guide for staff members in medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Thea; Plener, Paul; Kliemann, Andrea; Fegert, Jörg M.; Allroggen, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Although suicidality in medical students is important, few studies dealt with this issue regarding German universities. Our aims were to describe the epidemiology as well as factors leading to suicidality in medical students. Furthermore we wanted to raise awareness for this topic among university employees and show options for handling suicidal crises in students. This manuscript especially aims to address university employees working in direct contact with students (such as student counselors or teachers). PMID:24282451

  8. Telephone survey of hospital staff knowledge of medical device surveillance in a Paris hospital.

    PubMed

    Mazeau, Valérie; Grenier-Sennelier, Catherine; Paturel, Denys Xavier; Mokhtari, Mostafa; Vidal-Trecan, Gwenaëlle

    2004-12-01

    Reporting of incidents or near incidents because of medical devices in French hospitals relies on procedures following European and national guidelines. The authors intend to evaluate hospital staff knowledge on these surveillance procedures as a marker of appropriate application. A telephone survey is conducted on a sample of Paris University hospital staff (n = 327) using a structured questionnaire. Two-hundred sixteen persons completed the questionnaire. The response rate was lower among physicians, especially surgeons paid on an hourly basis. Rates of correct answers were different according to age, seniority, job, and department categories. Physicians and nurses correctly answered questions on theoretical knowledge more often than the other job categories. However, on questions dealing with actual practice conditions, correct answers depended more on age and seniority with a U-shaped distribution (minimum rates in intermediate categories of age and seniority). PMID:15492050

  9. Patterns of Medical and Nursing Staff Communication in Nursing Homes: Implications and Insights From Complexity Science

    PubMed Central

    Colón-Emeric, Cathleen S.; Ammarell, Natalie; Bailey, Donald; Corazzini, Kirsten; Utley-Smith, Queen; Lekan-Rutledge, Deborah; Anderson, Ruth A.; Piven, Mary L.

    2006-01-01

    Complexity science teaches that relationships among health care providers are key to our understanding of how quality care emerges. The authors sought to compare the effects of differing patterns of medicine-nursing communication on the quality of information flow, cognitive diversity, self-organization, and innovation in nursing homes. Two facilities participated in 6-month case studies using field observations, shadowing, and depth interviews. In one facility, the dominant pattern of communication was a vertical “chain of command” between care providers, characterized by thin connections and limited information exchange. This pattern limited cognitive diversity and innovation in clinical problem solving. The second facility used an open communication pattern between medical and frontline staff. The authors saw higher levels of information flow, cognitive diversity, innovation, and self-organization, although tempered by staff turnover. The patterns of communication between care providers in nursing facilities have an important impact on their ability to provide quality, innovative care. PMID:16394208

  10. Prevalence and Causes of Medical Absenteeism Among Staff (Case Study at Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences: 2009-2010)

    PubMed Central

    Mohseni Saravi, Beyamin; Kabirzadeh, Azar; Rezazadeh, Esmaiel; Khariki, Mohammad Fallah; Asgari, Zolaykha; Bagherian Farahabadi, Ebrahim; Motamed, Nima; Siamian, Hasan

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Work absenteeism is a significant issue and can be observed in terms of human resources management. Given the importance of staff practices, which are anticipated in every organization, the role of each employee in this system and the implications of their absence as well as the importance of recovery time rest in fast recovery of staff and anticipated costs for their lost work days, thus this study is aimed to determine the extent and causes of medical absenteeism (sickness absence) of head staff of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. Methods and Materials: This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted using medical absenteeism (sickness absence) persons happened in 2010. Research population was included all records of staff working in central departments of Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences. There was no sampling due to the importance of the issue. Studied variables were included age, gender, employment status, employees’ education, name of the disease, physician specialty in issuing the medical absence paper, leave issuing reference and department, position of the employee, number of absence days, number of absences, number of annual leave days. Also, data were gathered using a checklist, then were entered into the SPSS software and got analyzed using descriptive statistics. In order to respect the confidentiality, name of the doctors and employees weren’t mentioned publicly. Results: Based on the results, 1200 employees were leaved the organization due to the sickness issue, which 957 (79.7%) of them were studied. The mean age for those employees was 39±7. Also, total average sick leave days and total sick leave days were 2±1 and 2571, respectively. 40.8 % ( 390 employees) were male and the rest were female. Moreover, 18.3% of sick leaves were issued for singles and the remained were for married employees. Regarding the employees’ education, 2% under diploma, 11.3% diploma, 7.8% upper diploma, 47.6% B.Sc., 14

  11. Motivation and job satisfaction among medical and nursing staff in a Cyprus public general hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate how medical and nursing staff of the Nicosia General Hospital is affected by specific motivation factors, and the association between job satisfaction and motivation. Furthermore, to determine the motivational drive of socio-demographic and job related factors in terms of improving work performance. Methods A previously developed and validated instrument addressing four work-related motivators (job attributes, remuneration, co-workers and achievements) was used. Two categories of health care professionals, medical doctors and dentists (N = 67) and nurses (N = 219) participated and motivation and job satisfaction was compared across socio-demographic and occupational variables. Results The survey revealed that achievements was ranked first among the four main motivators, followed by remuneration, co-workers and job attributes. The factor remuneration revealed statistically significant differences according to gender, and hospital sector, with female doctors and nurses and accident and emergency (A+E) outpatient doctors reporting greater mean scores (p < 0.005). The medical staff showed statistically significantly lower job satisfaction compared to the nursing staff. Surgical sector nurses and those >55 years of age reported higher job satisfaction when compared to the other groups. Conclusions The results are in agreement with the literature which focuses attention to management approaches employing both monetary and non-monetary incentives to motivate health care professionals. Health care professionals tend to be motivated more by intrinsic factors, implying that this should be a target for effective employee motivation. Strategies based on the survey's results to enhance employee motivation are suggested. PMID:21080954

  12. Prevalence of medication administration errors in two medical units with automated prescription and dispensing

    PubMed Central

    Herranz-Alonso, Ana; Martin-Barbero, Maria Luisa; Duran-Garcia, Esther; Durango-Limarquez, Maria Isabel; Hernández-Sampelayo, Paloma; Sanjurjo-Saez, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Objective To identify the frequency of medication administration errors and their potential risk factors in units using a computerized prescription order entry program and profiled automated dispensing cabinets. Design Prospective observational study conducted within two clinical units of the Gastroenterology Department in a 1537-bed tertiary teaching hospital in Madrid (Spain). Measurements Medication errors were measured using the disguised observation technique. Types of medication errors and their potential severity were described. The correlation between potential risk factors and medication errors was studied to identify potential causes. Results In total, 2314 medication administrations to 73 patients were observed: 509 errors were recorded (22.0%)—68 (13.4%) in preparation and 441 (86.6%) in administration. The most frequent errors were use of wrong administration techniques (especially concerning food intake (13.9%)), wrong reconstitution/dilution (1.7%), omission (1.4%), and wrong infusion speed (1.2%). Errors were classified as no damage (95.7%), no damage but monitoring required (2.3%), and temporary damage (0.4%). Potential clinical severity could not be assessed in 1.6% of cases. The potential risk factors morning shift, evening shift, Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical medication class antacids, prokinetics, antibiotics and immunosuppressants, oral administration, and intravenous administration were associated with a higher risk of administration errors. No association was found with variables related to understaffing or nurse's experience. Conclusions Medication administration errors persist in units with automated prescription and dispensing. We identified a need to improve nurses' working procedures and to implement a Clinical Decision Support tool that generates recommendations about scheduling according to dietary restrictions, preparation of medication before parenteral administration, and adequate infusion rates. PMID:21890872

  13. Who administers? Who cares? Medical administrative and clinical employment in the United States and Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Himmelstein, D U; Lewontin, J P; Woolhandler, S

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES. We compared US and Canadian health administration costs using national medical care employment data for both countries. METHODS. Data from census surveys on hospital, nursing home, and outpatient employment in the United States (1968 to 1993) and Canada (1971 and 1986) were analyzed. RESULTS. Between 1968 and 1993, US medical care employment grew from 3.976 to 10.308 million full-time equivalents. Administration grew from 0.719 to 2.792 million full-time equivalents, or from 18.1% to 27.1% of the total employment. In 1986, the United States deployed 33,666 health care full-time equivalent personnel per million population, and Canada deployed 31,529. The US excess was all administrative; Canada employed more clinical personnel, especially registered nurses. Between 1971 and 1986, hospital employment per capita grew 29% in the United States (mostly because of administrative growth) and fell 14% in Canada. In 1986, Canadian hospitals still employed more clinical staff per million. Outpatient employment was larger and grew faster in the United States. Per capita nursing home employment was substantially higher in Canada. CONCLUSIONS. If US hospitals and outpatient facilities adopted Canada's staffing patterns, 1,407,000 fewer managers and clerks would be necessary. Despite lower medical spending, Canadians receive slightly more nursing and other clinical care than Americans, as measured by labor inputs. PMID:8633732

  14. Academic Staff Quality in Higher Education: An Empirical Analysis of Portuguese Public Administration Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarrico, Cláudia S.; Alves, André A.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education accreditation frameworks typically consider academic staff quality a key element. This article embarks on an empirical study of what academic staff quality means, how it is measured, and how different aspects of staff quality relate to each other. It draws on the relatively nascent Portuguese experience with study programme…

  15. [The training of administration personnel for private medical organizations].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The training of administration personnel for medical institutions is an integral part of the restructuring of health care. The authors proposed a system approach during the development of business-competences needed for modem medicine to provide the corresponding level of activity in the conditions of market economy and modernization of health care system. PMID:23033577

  16. Monte Carlo calculations on extremity and eye lens dosimetry for medical staff at interventional radiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Carinou, E; Ferrari, P; Koukorava, C; Krim, S; Struelens, L

    2011-03-01

    There are many factors that can influence the extremity and eye lens doses of the medical staff during interventional radiology and cardiology procedures. Numerical simulations can play an important role in evaluating extremity and eye lens doses in correlation with many different parameters. In the present study, the first results of the ORAMED (Optimisation of Radiation protection of MEDical staff) simulation campaign are presented. The parameters investigated for their influence on eye lens, hand, wrist and leg doses are: tube voltage, filtration, beam projection, field size and irradiated part of the patient's body. The tube voltage ranged from 60 to 110 kV(p), filtration from 3 to 6 mm Al and from 0 to 0.9 mm Cu. For all projections, the results showed that doses received by the operator decreased with increasing tube voltage and filtration. The magnitude of the influence of the tube voltage and the filtration on the doses depends on the beam projection and the irradiated part of the patient's body. Finally, the influence of the field size is significant in decreasing the doses. PMID:21212075

  17. Radiation exposure to patients and medical staff in hepatic chemoembolisation interventional procedures in Recife, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Khoury, H J; Garzon, W J; Andrade, G; Lunelli, N; Kramer, R; de Barros, V S M; Huda, A

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate patient and medical staff absorbed doses received from transarterial chemoembolisation of hepatocellular carcinoma, which is the most common primary liver tumour worldwide. The study was performed in three hospitals in Recife, capital of the state of Pernambuco, located in the Brazilian Northeastern region. Two are public hospitals (A and B), and one is private (C). For each procedure, the number of images, irradiation parameters (kV, mA and fluoroscopy time), the air kerma-area product (PKA) and the cumulative air kerma (Ka,r) at the reference point were registered. The maximum skin dose (MSD) of the patient was estimated using radiochromic film. For the medical staff dosimetry, thermoluminescence dosemeters (TLD-100) were attached next to the eyes, close to the thyroid (above the shielding), on the thorax under the apron, on the wrist and on the feet. The effective dose to the staff was estimated using the algorithm of von Boetticher. The results showed that the mean value of the total PKA was 267.49, 403.83 and 479.74 Gy cm(2) for Hospitals A, B and C, respectively. With regard to the physicians, the average effective dose per procedure was 17 µSv, and the minimum and maximum values recorded were 1 and 41 µSy, respectively. The results showed that the feet received the highest doses followed by the hands and lens of the eye, since the physicians did not use leaded glasses and the equipment had no lead curtain. PMID:25870436

  18. Perspectives concerning living wills in medical staff of a main regional hospital in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Yoshitaka; Shintani, Shuzo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Living wills, written types of advanced directives, are now widespread in western countries, but in Japan, their recognition still remains restricted to a small part of the population. As an initial step to introduction of such patient-oriented medicine, we surveyed present recognition and acceptance patterns concerning living wills in a main regional hospital located in a suburban area of Tokyo. Methods: Without any preceding guidance on living wills, the questionnaire on living wills was distributed to all the staff working at JA Toride Medical Center in September 2013, and their responses were collected for analysis within one month. Results: Questionnaires were distributed to all hospital staff, 843 in total, and 674 responses (80.0% of distributed) were obtained. The term of living will was known by 304 (45.1%) of the respondents, and introduction of living wills to patients was accepted in 373 (55.3%) of the respondents, meanwhile, 286 (42.4%) respondents did not indicate their attitude toward living wills. As to styles of document form, 332 respondents (49.3%) supported selection of wanted or unwanted medical treatments and care from a prepared list, and 102 respondents (15.1%) supported description of living wills in free form. As preferred treatment options that should be provided as a checklist, cardiac massage (chest compression) and a ventilator were selected by more than half of the respondents. Based on their responses, we developed an original type of living wills available to patients visiting the hospital. Conclusions: Although not all the respondents were aware of living wills even in this main regional hospital, introduction of living wills to patients was accepted by many of the hospital staff. Awareness programs or information campaigns are needed to introduce living wills to support patient-centered medicine. PMID:26380588

  19. Assessment of annual average effective dose status in the cohort of medical staff in Lithuania during 1991-2013.

    PubMed

    Samerdokiene, Vitalija; Mastauskas, Albinas; Atkocius, Vydmantas

    2015-12-01

    The use of radiation sources for various medical purposes is closely related to irradiation of the medical staff, which causes harmful effects to health and an increased risk of cancer. In total, 1463 medical staff who have been occupationally exposed to sources of ionising radiation (IR) had been monitored. Records with annual dose measurements (N = 19 157) were collected and regularly analysed for a 23-y period: from 01 January 1991 to 31 December 2013. The collected annual average effective dose (AAED) data have been analysed according to different socio-demographic parameters and will be used in future investigation in order to assess cancer risk among medical staff occupationally exposed to sources of IR. A thorough analysis of data extracted from medical staff's dose records allows one to conclude that the average annual effective dose of Lithuanian medical staff occupationally exposed to sources of IR was consistently decreased from 1991 (1.75 mSv) to 2013 (0.27 mSv) (p < 0.0001). PMID:25614631

  20. Identification and analysis of labor productivity components based on ACHIEVE model (case study: staff of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences).

    PubMed

    Ziapour, Arash; Khatony, Alireza; Kianipour, Neda; Jafary, Faranak

    2015-01-01

    Identification and analysis of the components of labor productivity based on ACHIEVE model was performed among employees in different parts of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2014. This was a descriptive correlational study in which the population consisted of 270 working personnel in different administrative groups (contractual, fixed- term and regular) at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (872 people) that were selected among 872 people through stratified random sampling method based on Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The survey tool included labor productivity questionnaire of ACHIEVE. Questionnaires were confirmed in terms of content and face validity, and their reliability was calculated using Cronbach's alpha coefficient. The data were analyzed by SPSS-18 software using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean scores for labor productivity dimensions of the employees, including environment (environmental fit), evaluation (training and performance feedback), validity (valid and legal exercise of personnel), incentive (motivation or desire), help (organizational support), clarity (role perception or understanding), ability (knowledge and skills) variables and total labor productivity were 4.10±0.630, 3.99±0.568, 3.97±0.607, 3.76±0.701, 3.63±0.746, 3.59±0.777, 3.49±0.882 and 26.54±4.347, respectively. Also, the results indicated that the seven factors of environment, performance assessment, validity, motivation, organizational support, clarity, and ability were effective in increasing labor productivity. The analysis of the current status of university staff in the employees' viewpoint suggested that the two factors of environment and evaluation, which had the greatest impact on labor productivity in the viewpoint of the staff, were in a favorable condition and needed to be further taken into consideration by authorities. PMID:25560364

  1. Identification and Analysis of Labor Productivity Components Based on ACHIEVE Model (Case Study: Staff of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences)

    PubMed Central

    Ziapour, Arash; Khatony, Alireza; Kianipour, Neda; Jafary, Faranak

    2015-01-01

    Identification and analysis of the components of labor productivity based on ACHIEVE model was performed among employees in different parts of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2014. This was a descriptive correlational study in which the population consisted of 270 working personnel in different administrative groups (contractual, fixed- term and regular) at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (872 people) that were selected among 872 people through stratified random sampling method based on Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The survey tool included labor productivity questionnaire of ACHIEVE. Questionnaires were confirmed in terms of content and face validity, and their reliability was calculated using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. The data were analyzed by SPSS-18 software using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean scores for labor productivity dimensions of the employees, including environment (environmental fit), evaluation (training and performance feedback), validity (valid and legal exercise of personnel), incentive (motivation or desire), help (organizational support), clarity (role perception or understanding), ability (knowledge and skills) variables and total labor productivity were 4.10±0.630, 3.99±0.568, 3.97±0.607, 3.76±0.701, 3.63±0.746, 3.59±0.777, 3.49±0.882 and 26.54±4.347, respectively. Also, the results indicated that the seven factors of environment, performance assessment, validity, motivation, organizational support, clarity, and ability were effective in increasing labor productivity. The analysis of the current status of university staff in the employees’ viewpoint suggested that the two factors of environment and evaluation, which had the greatest impact on labor productivity in the viewpoint of the staff, were in a favorable condition and needed to be further taken into consideration by authorities. PMID:25560364

  2. Use of mobile phones by medical staff at Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Barbados: evidence for both benefit and harm.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, J; Carter, A O; Campbell, M H; Gibbons, N; Powlett, C; Moseley, H; Lewis, D; Carter, T

    2008-10-01

    All members of medical staff, including students, were asked to participate in a self-administered questionnaire concerning patterns of mobile phone use and care. Participants' phones were cultured for micro-organisms. Healthcare professionals working in close proximity to sensitive equipment were surveyed concerning adverse events associated with mobile phones. Telephone operators were asked to monitor time elapsed as they attempted to contact medical staff by various methods. Of 266 medical staff and students at the time of the study, 116 completed questionnaires (response rate=44%). Almost all (98%) used mobile phones: 67% used their mobile phones for hospital-related matters; 47% reported using their phone while attending patients. Only 3% reported washing their hands after use and 53% reported never cleaning their phone. In total, 101 mobile phones were cultured for micro-organisms; 45% were culture-positive and 15% grew Gram-negative pathogens. The survey of staff working in close proximity to sensitive equipment revealed only one report of minor interference with life-saving equipment. Telephone operators were able to contact medical staff within 2 min most easily by mobile phone. Mobile phones were used widely by staff and were considered by most participants as a more efficient means of communication. However, microbial contamination is a risk associated with the infrequent cleaning of phones. Hospitals should develop policies to address the hygiene of mobile phones. PMID:18701190

  3. [How does recruit successfully recruit staff? An investigation of recruitment in the medical service].

    PubMed

    Putzhammer, A; Hajak, G; Kestler, A; Klein, H E

    2006-01-01

    In Germany, an increasing shortage of medical doctors has developed in recent years. Today, many clinics must compete to attract qualified MDs. In this study, 60 medical students, 60 doctors working in psychiatry, and 60 doctors working in somatic fields of clinical medicine were interviewed in order to analyse the importance that potential applicants place on the information and offers contained in advertisements seeking medical doctors. In this regard, good working atmosphere in the ward, excellent opportunities for further education, and assistance from nonmedical personnel in documentation and administration got the highest ratings. There were significant differences between psychiatrists and other doctors rating the items "own office" and "permission to take additional nonhospital jobs" such as providing medical opinions. The study shows how advertisements can be improved. PMID:16244889

  4. A Case Study of Two Regional State Universities Qualifying as Learning Organizations Based on Administration and Staff Viewpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Tammy Morrison

    2011-01-01

    This case study of 2 state universities qualifying as learning organizations, based on administration and staff viewpoints, was completed using a qualitative methodology. The idea of what a learning organization is can be different depending on who or what is being analyzed. For this study, the work of theorists including W. Edwards Deming,…

  5. 78 FR 9396 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Civil Money Penalties for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... Tobacco to Protect Children and Adolescents'' (75 FR 13225, March 19, 2010, codified at 21 CFR part 1140... Staff; Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco Retailers: Responses to Frequently Asked Questions... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Civil...

  6. 76 FR 28688 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for... entitled ``Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for Bacillus spp. Detection.'' This draft guidance document describes means by which in vitro diagnostic devices for...

  7. 76 FR 44935 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; 510(k) Device Modifications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... Staff; 510(k) Device Modifications: Deciding When To Submit a 510(k) for a Change to an Existing Device... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``510(k) Device Modifications: Deciding When To Submit a 510(k) for a Change to an Existing Device.'' The recommendations in this...

  8. Appropriateness of administration of nasogastric medication and preliminary intervention

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Xu, Ling-Cheng; Wang, Hui-Qin; Jin, Jing-Fen; Wang, Hua-Fen; Zhou, Quan

    2012-01-01

    A utilization study was performed in a 2200-bed tertiary care teaching hospital. Data mining was performed on all nasogastric medication prescriptions for patients hospitalized in 2011. Nurses were interviewed by questionnaire. A PDCA (Plan-Do-Check-Act) cycle was used for continuous quality improvement. The proportion of patients with nasogastric tubes (NGT) was 3.2%. A large number of medical orders (n = 6261) involved nasogastric medications with a package insert particularly noting that they should not be crushed or opened (group 1) or medications without a specific formulation recommendation in the package insert but having evidence discouraging NGT dosing (group 2). Of the nasogastrically administered sustained-release or controlled-release formulations, a sustained-release sodium valproate tablet formulation was the most prescribed drug and a sustained-release 2.5 mg felodipine tablet was prescribed with the highest proportion of NGT dosing [NGT/(NGT + oral) = 12.3%]. Among the nasogastrically administered enteric-coated formulations, a myrtol-standardized enteric-coated capsule formulation was the most prescribed drug and a pantoprazole tablet formulation was prescribed with the highest proportion of NGT dosing [NGT/(NGT + oral) = 19.3%]. Proportions of NGT dosing for amiodarone and carbamazepine (group 2) were 4.8% and 6.3%, respectively. The percentage of nurses with adequate knowledge about pharmaceutical dosage formulations was 60%. The rate of answering correctly as to whether medications in group 1 could be crushed or opened was only 30%. Awareness of evidence discouraging NGT dosing of medications in group 2 was zero. Most nurses (90%) left physicians and pharmacists with the entire responsibility for knowledge and decision-making concerning route of drug administration. After a 3-month preliminary intervention, irrational medical orders involving nasogastric administration of medications in group 1 were successfully abolished. The rate of answering

  9. Factors influencing the perception of medical staff and outpatients of dual practice in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiping; Li, Meina; Dai, Zhixin; Deng, Qiangyu; Zhang, Lulu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dual practice is defined as a physician’s performance of medical activities in different health care institutions (two or more) simultaneously. This study aimed to examine the perception and acceptance of medical staff and outpatients of dual practice and explore the possible factors affecting people’s perception. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 13 public hospitals in Shanghai. Participants included medical staff and outpatients. We distributed 1,000 questionnaires to each participant group, and the response rates were 66.7% and 69.4%, respectively. Statistical differences in variables were tested, and multinomial logistic regression methods were employed for statistical analysis. Results The study included two parts: medical staff survey and outpatient survey. The results of medical staff survey showed that 63.0% of the respondents supported dual practice. Medical staff who belonged to the surgical department or held positive belief of dual practice were more willing to participate in dual practice. Moreover, the publicity activities of dual practice and hospitals’ human resource management system were important factors affecting the willingness of the medical staff. The results of outpatient survey showed that 44.5% of respondents believed that dual practice could reduce difficulty in consulting a doctor. Regarding the perceived benefits of dual practice, the proportion of outpatients who believed that dual practice could meet the demand for health convenience, minor illness, and chronic disease were 45.4%, 42.4%, and 53.7%, respectively. Additionally, demographic characteristics significantly influenced the perception of outpatients. Conclusion This study confirmed that both medical staff and outpatients generally held positive attitudes toward dual practice. Medical staff who belonged to the surgical department or held positive belief of dual practice were more willing to participate in dual practice. Moreover, the existence of

  10. Benefits and Barriers of E-Learning for Staff Training in a Medical University.

    PubMed

    Franz, Stefan; Behrends, Marianne; Haack, Claudia; Marschollek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Learning Management Systems (LMS) are a feasible solution to fulfill the various requirements for e-learning based training in a medical university. Using the LMS ILIAS, the Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology has designed an e-learning unit about data protection, which has been used by 73% of the department's employees in the first three months. To increase the use of e-learning for staff training, it is necessary to identify barriers and benefits, which encourage the use of e-learning. Therefore, we started an online survey to examine how the employees evaluate this learning opportunity. The results show that 87% of the employees had no technical problems and also competence of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) was no barrier. If anything, reported issues were time shortages and tight schedules. Therefore, short learning modules (less than 20 minutes) are preferred. Furthermore, temporal flexibility for learning is important for 83% of employees. PMID:26152964

  11. 76 FR 61103 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-03

    ... Staff; De Novo Classification Process (Evaluation of Automatic Class III Designation); Availability...) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``De Novo Classification Process... staff and industry on the process for the submission and review of petitions submitted under the...

  12. 75 FR 47603 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Recommendations for Premarket...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... Staff; Recommendations for Premarket Notifications for Lamotrigine and Zonisamide Assays; Availability... Staff; Recommendations for Premarket Notifications for Lamotrigine and Zonisamide Assays.'' This draft... zonisamide assays. This draft guidance is not final nor is it in effect at this time. DATES: Although you...

  13. Medication error report: Intrathecal administration of labetalol during obstetric anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Laha, Baisakhi; Hazra, Avijit

    2015-01-01

    Labetalol, a combined alfa and beta-adrenergic receptor antagonist, is used as an antihypertensive drug. We report a case of an acute rise in blood pressure and lower limb pain due to the inadvertent intrathecal administration of labetalol, mistaking it for bupivacaine, during obstetric anesthesia. The situation was rescued by converting to general anesthesia. The cesarean delivery was uneventful, and mother as well as newborn child showed no ill-effect. This particular medication error was attributable to a failure on the part of the doctors administering the injection to read and cross-check medication labels and the practice of keeping multiple injections together. In the absence of an organized medication error reporting system and action on that basis, such events may recur in future. PMID:26288484

  14. Integration of foreign and local medical staff in a disaster area: the Honduras and El Salvador experiences.

    PubMed

    Waisman, Yehezkel

    2003-06-01

    International medical aid after natural disasters may take various forms, ranging from self-sufficient military forces to single experts or specialists who function primarily as advisers. A model integrating foreign and local medical staff has not previously been reported. In response to the call for international aid by the Honduran and El Salvadorian governments in the wake of Hurricane Mitch in November 1998 and the San Salvador earthquake in January 2001, Israel sent medical supplies and 10 member teams of medical professionals to each country. The aim of the present paper is to describe the unique Israeli approach to providing healthcare in disaster areas by integrating foreign and local medical staff, and to discuss its advantages and disadvantages. The paper focuses on the experience of the two emergency medicine physicians on the team who were assigned to the Atlantida General Hospital in La Ceiba, Honduras. The same team in San Salvador subsequently applied the same approach. PMID:12789069

  15. 77 FR 74195 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Design Considerations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Staff; Design Considerations for Devices Intended for Home Use; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Design Considerations for Devices Intended for Home Use.'' This... should consider, especially during device design and development, and provides recommendations...

  16. The optimal choice of medication administration route regarding intravenous, intramuscular, and subcutaneous injection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jing-fen; Zhu, Ling-ling; Chen, Meng; Xu, Hui-min; Wang, Hua-fen; Feng, Xiu-qin; Zhu, Xiu-ping; Zhou, Quan

    2015-01-01

    pharmacoeconomics because patient preference will ensure optimal treatment adherence and ultimately improve patient experience or satisfaction, while pharmacoeconomic concern will help alleviate nurse shortages and reduce overall health care costs. Besides the principles, the following detailed factors might affect the decision: patient characteristics-related factors (body mass index, age, sex, medical status [eg, renal impairment, comorbidities], personal attitudes toward safety and convenience, past experience, perception of current disease status, health literacy, and socioeconomic status), medication administration-related factors (anatomical site of injection, dose, frequency, formulation characteristics, administration time, indication, flexibility in the route of administration), and health care staff/institution-related factors (knowledge, human resources). Conclusion This updated review of findings of comparative studies of different injection routes will enrich the knowledge of safe, efficacious, economic, and patient preference-oriented medication administration as well as catching research opportunities in clinical nursing practice. PMID:26170642

  17. 78 FR 14305 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Types of Communication During...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Types of Communication During the Review of Medical Device Submissions.'' The purpose of this guidance is to update the Agency's approach to Interactive Review to reflect FDA's implementation of the Medical Device User Fee Act of 2007 (MDUFA II) Commitment Letters and of undertakings agreed......

  18. Education of hand rubbing technique to prospective medical staff, employing UV-based digital imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Lehotsky, Ákos; Szilágyi, László; Demeter-Iclănzan, Annamária; Haidegger, Tamás; Wéber, György

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively assess the hand hygiene performance of medical students. Hand rubbing technique was evaluated by employing innovative UV-light-based imaging technology, identifying patterns and trends in missed areas after applying WHO's six-step protocol. This specially designed hand hygiene education and assessment program targeted 1,344 medical students at two distant sites in Central Europe. Students were introduced to a short video, presenting the basics of hand hygiene, and then received further demonstration from professional trainers, focusing on the correct execution of WHO's six-step technique. To verify the acquired skill, participants rubbed their hands with UV-marked alcohol-based solution. Digital images of the hands were recorded under UV light, followed by computer evaluation and assessment. Immediate objective visual feedback was given to the participants showing missed areas on their hands. The statistical analysis of missed spots was based on retrospective expert-driven manual evaluation. Significant difference in rubbing quality was found between female and male participants [35.3% (CI 95%: 33-38%) versus 29.0% (CI 95%: 27-31%), p < 0.001], dominant and non-dominant hands [43.4% (CI 95%: 39-48%) versus 34.9% (CI 95%: 32-38%), p = 0.002], and various zones of the hands' dorsal side. Based on the participants' feedback and the evaluation of the infection control specialists, it can be stated that the identification of typically missed patterns and the instant visual feedback have a vital role in improving the hand hygiene technique of prospective medical staff. PMID:27352974

  19. [An analysis of the medical administration pattern of the Yuan Dynasty as interpreted from the Guan yi ti ju si (Department of Official Medical Administration)].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaowen; Yu, Hong; Zhang, Qicheng

    2015-07-01

    The Imperial Academy of Medicine of the Yuan Dynasty established an institution called Guan yi ti ju si (Department of Official Medical Administration). Through its central to local network, the Department carried out its medical administration throughout the nation. The responsibilities of Guan yi ti ju si included 5 aspects, viz., the selection of local medical professionals and talents; the dispatch of prison doctors; the examination and administration of local medical workers; the revision and publication of medical works and the inspection and identification of local herbs. Guan yi ti ju si played an important role in medical education and the publication of medical books which were generally considered as the work of Yi xue ti ju si (Department of General Medical Administration ). In terms of administrative pattern, there were two specialties, the government focused its work on the rational allocation and governing of local medical professionals and resources, with medical administration and medical education belonged to two separate systems, which, at the same time, supervised and controlled mutually. These noticeable features of medical administration of the Yuan Dynasty are still revealing its reference value today. PMID:26815020

  20. Barcode Medication Administration: Supporting Transitions in Articulation Work

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Laurie L.; Lorenzi, Nancy M.

    2008-01-01

    Articulation work is that which enables coordinated activity among colleagues distributed in time and space. Despite its important role in clinical settings, this work remains largely invisible in process flowcharts. When process-oriented information systems are implemented, the informal, flexible, contingent activities of participants that enable coordinated work are suddenly placed in a new context. Articulation work must adapt to new contexts of automation, and there are opportunities for clinical systems to better support coordination activities. This research explores the articulation work involved in medication administration, how it is affected by the implementation of barcoding, and strategies for support and problem resolution in this arena. PMID:18999121

  1. The Automated Alert System for the Hospital Infection Control and the Safety of Medical Staff Based on EMR Data.

    PubMed

    Jo, Eunmi

    2016-01-01

    This report is about planning, developing, and implementing the automated alert system for the Hospital infection control and the safety of medical staffs about information on patients exposed to infection based on EMR Data in a tertiary hospital in Korea. PMID:27332375

  2. Predicting medical staff intention to use an online reporting system with modified unified theory of acceptance and use of technology.

    PubMed

    Chang, I-Chiu; Hsu, Hui-Mei

    2012-01-01

    Barriers to report incident events using an online information system (IS) may be different from those of a paper-based reporting system. The nationwide online Patient-Safety Reporting System (PSRS) contains a value judgment behind use of the system, similar to the Value of Perceived Consequence (VPC), which is seldom discussed in ISs applications of other disciplines. This study developed a more adequate research framework by integrating the VPC construct into the well-known Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT) model as a theoretical base to explore the predictors of medical staff's intention to use online PSRS. The results showed that management support was an important factor to influence medical staff's intention of using PSRS. The effects of factors such as performance expectancy, perceived positive, and perceived negative consequence on medical staff's intention of using PSRS were moderated by gender, age, experience, and occupation. The results proved that the modified UTAUT model is significant and useful in predicting medical staff's intention of using the nationwide online PSRS. PMID:22150638

  3. Analysis of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach

    PubMed Central

    Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Sohrabi, Mozaffar Cheshmeh; Zare, Firoozeh; Hassnazadeh, Akbar; Malekahmadi, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Numerous researches conducted on about the quality of perception of media messages shows that the people are not passive receivers but they have the ability of understanding, interpreting and accepting or rejecting messages. In order to make clear the relationship of information and communication technologies with social changes and to gain a broader vision from this scope, sociological theories about information and communication technologies’ usage, especially appropriation approach can be very useful. So, keeping in mind the important role of Databases in the qualitative expansion of education, research, diagnosis, remedy and medical services presentation, this research was carried out with the aim of status determination of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach in 2012. Materials and Methods: This is an applicative research of an analytical-descriptive type, which was carried out by measurement approach. The statistical society of this research was composed of the academic staffs of the Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences in 2012 and finally 390 academic staffs were selected according to the Cochran's formula were selected. The research tool are searcher's made questionnaire, which was composed of nine separate parts. Its validity was accepted by the specialists and its reliability was calculated and found to be 0.961 by Cronbakh's alpha. Results: Database appropriation score in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences with 65.020% was in a good status and data bases dis appropriation score with 71.484 was in a high status. Conclusion: According to the findings of this research, Librarians and politicians in this scope-with determination of the academic staff's positive and negative points in usage and appropriation would be capable of accurately diagnozing and analyzing the chances and challenges of the academic staffs

  4. Challenges implementing bar-coded medication administration in the emergency room in comparison to medical surgical units.

    PubMed

    Glover, Nancy

    2013-03-01

    Bar-coded medication administration has been successfully implemented and utilized to decrease medication errors at a number of hospitals in recent years. The purpose of this article was to discuss the varying success in utilization of bar-coded medication administration on medical-surgical units and in the emergency department. Utilization reports were analyzed to better understand the challenges between the units. Many factors negatively impacted utilization in the emergency department, including the inability to use bar-coded medication administration for verbal orders or to document medications distributed by the prescribing providers, unique aspects of emergency department nursing workflow, additional steps to chart when using bar-coded medication administration, and alert fatigue. Hardware problems affected all users. Bar-coded medication administration in its current form is more suitable for use on medical-surgical floors than in the emergency department. New solutions should be developed for bar-coded medication administration in the emergency department, keeping in mind requirements to chart medications when there is no order in the system, document medications distributed by prescribing providers, adapt to unpredictable nursing workflow, minimize steps to chart with bar-coded medication administration, limit alerts to those that are clinically meaningful, and choose reliable hardware with adequate bar-code scanning capability. PMID:23321481

  5. 75 FR 73106 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Clostridium difficile; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance...

  6. 76 FR 55927 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Demonstrating the Substantial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Questions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled...

  7. A Survey of the Knowledge of Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis among the Medical Staff of Intensive Care Units in North China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao; Sun, Bing; Yang, Yuanhua; Tong, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Background Guideline concordance for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs) varies across different countries. Objective To explore how the medical staff of ICUs in China comprehend and practice VTE prophylaxis. Method Questionnaires comprising 39 questions and including 4 dimensions of thromboprophylaxis were administered in ICUs in North China. Results In all, 52 ICUs at 23 tertiary hospitals in 7 Chinese provinces and municipalities were surveyed. A total of 2500 questionnaires were sent, and 1861 were returned, corresponding to a response rate of approximately 74.4%. Of all surveyed medical staff, 36.5% of physicians and 22.2% of nurses were aware of the guidelines in China, and 19.0% of physicians and 9.5% of nurses comprehended the 9th edition of the guidelines of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP). Additionally, 37.6% of the medical staff chose a prophylaxis method based on the related guidelines, and 10.3% could demonstrate the exact indication for mechanical pattern application. Worries about skin injury, difficulty with removal and discomfort during mechanical thromboprophylaxis were cited by more than 30% of nurses, which was significantly more frequent than for physicians (graduated compression stockings: 54.3% VS 34.1%, 60.7% VS 49%, and 59.4% VS 54%, p = 0.000; intermittent pneumatic compression: 31% VS 22.2%, 19.2% VS 13.9%, and 37.8% VS 27.2%, p = 0.000). Conclusions and Relevance The knowledge of VTE prophylaxis among the medical staff of ICUs in North China remains limited, which may lead to a lack of standardization of VTE prophylaxis. Strengthened, standardized training may help medical staff to improve their comprehension of the relevant guidelines and may finally reduce the occurrence of VTE in ICUs and improve the prognosis of critically ill patients with VTE. PMID:26418162

  8. Indiana Health Occupations Education: Student Modules for Administration of Medications for Unlicensed Nursing Personnel. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilger, Phyllis; And Others

    These learning modules are designed to provide health care workers involved with medications with basic information about the nature and administration of medications. The 30 modules are organized into six units. An overview of preparation and administration of medicines, principles of medication therapy, and medication fundamentals are presented…

  9. Preparation and medical outcomes of Nepalese staff and porters compared with foreign nationals on the Annapurna trekking circuit.

    PubMed

    Drew, Christian M; Colleran, Shane; Zijp, Maarten; Lama, Lama Phuri; Sherpa, Nuru J; Kelly, Julia L; Sulzbach, Nina; Prior, Denise; Currin, Sally A; Currin, Simon; Nickol, Annabel H; Morrell, Mary J

    2011-01-01

    This cross-sectional study investigates preparedness and medical problems in Nepalese staff and porters compared with foreign nationals trekking at altitude in the Nepal Himalaya. 331 Nepalese and 338 foreign nationals in 61 trekking groups were surveyed over 4 weeks on the Annapurna trekking circuit. Foreign nationals reported that 92% of trekking groups received altitude illness information and carried a medical kit. However, fewer than 30% knew the evacuation insurance status of the Nepalese staff and porters on their trek, 39% would not pay for an ill Nepalese national's helicopter evacuation, and 41% reported insufficient resources to carry an individual. Medical problems occurred in 44% of groups. A significantly higher proportion of Nepalese staff and porters were evacuated compared with foreign nationals. No significant differences in Nepalese and foreign national preparation were found between groups with and without medical problems. Medical problems were commonly encountered, yet many groups lacked resources to evacuate someone dangerously ill. Foreign and Nepalese nationals have a duty of care towards each other; recognizing that preparedness relies not only on a first aid kit, but also on knowledge of acclimatization and individuals' insurance is an important part of health and safety for individuals trekking at altitude. PMID:22206561

  10. Radiation exposure of medical staff from interventional x-ray procedures: a multicentre study.

    PubMed

    Häusler, Uwe; Czarwinski, Renate; Brix, Gunnar

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyse the radiation exposure of medical staff from interventional x-ray procedures. Partial-body dose measurements were performed with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD) in 39 physicians and nine assistants conducting 73 interventional procedures of nine different types in 14 hospitals in Germany. Fluoroscopy time and the dose-area product (DAP) were recorded too. The median (maximum) equivalent body dose per procedure was 16 (2,500) microSv for an unshielded person; the partial-body dose per procedure was 2.8 (240) microSv to the eye lens, 4.1 (730) microSv to the thyroid, 44 (1,800) microSv to one of the feet and 75 (13,000) microSv to one of the hands. A weak correlation between fluoroscopy time or DAP and the mean TLD dose was observed. Generally, the doses were within an acceptable range from a radiation hygiene point of view. However, relatively high exposures were measured to the hand in some cases and could cause a partial-body dose above the annual dose limit of 500 mSv. Thus, the use of finger dosimeters is strongly recommended. PMID:19350250

  11. Ineffective Staff, Ineffective Supervision, or Ineffective Administration? Why Some Nursing Homes Fail to Provide Adequate Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, John E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study involved 530 nursing staff working in 25 for-profit and nonprofit nursing homes, 2 of which failed to meet residential care standards. Nursing home climate in failed homes was perceived as being significantly lower in human relations and higher in laissez-faire and status orientation dimensions that the climate in the successful homes.…

  12. 78 FR 4417 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Submissions for Postapproval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... Under a BLA, NDA, or PMA.'' This draft guidance intends to provide the underlying principles to... new drug application (NDA), or a device premarket approval application (PMA). DATES: Although you can..., or PMA.'' This document provides guidance to industry and FDA staff on the underlying principles...

  13. 76 FR 76166 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; the Content of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ..., including CTR, CTT, and Low Glucose Suspend systems. On June 22, 2011 (76 FR 36542), FDA announced the... Exemption (IDE) and Premarket Approval (PMA) Applications for Artificial Pancreas Device Systems.'' This... and FDA Staff: The Content of Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) and Premarket Approval...

  14. 75 FR 3238 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Heart Valves...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... guidance practices regulation. FDA withdrew the 1994 draft on January 5, 2005 (70 FR 824) and is now... Staff; Heart Valves -- Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) and Premarket Approval (PMA) Applications... -- Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) and Premarket Approval (PMA) Applications.'' This draft guidance...

  15. 76 FR 36542 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: The Content of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) and Premarket Approval (PMA) Applications for Low Glucose Suspend (LGS... Staff: The Content of Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) and Premarket Approval (PMA) Applications... included in IDE and PMA applications, focusing on critical elements of safety and effectiveness...

  16. 76 FR 36133 - Draft Guidances for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Classification of Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... if: ``through either chemical reaction or intermolecular forces or both, the product mediates a... Issues; and Interpretation of the Term ``Chemical Action'' in the Definition of Device Under Section 201...'' and ``Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Interpretation of the Term 'Chemical Action' in...

  17. 76 FR 6685 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Recommended Warning for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ... of January 13, 1989 (54 FR 1602), FDA revoked the exemption for patient examination gloves from... requirements for patient examination gloves. On December 12, 1990 (55 FR 51254), FDA published regulations... Staff; Recommended Warning for Surgeon's Gloves and Patient Examination Gloves That Use...

  18. 75 FR 57963 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... Staff; Establishing the Performance Characteristics of In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for the Detection of... ``Establishing the Performance Characteristics of In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for the Detection of Helicobacter... concerning 510(k) submissions for various types of in vitro diagnostic devices (IVDs) intended to be used...

  19. Beyond Administration and Management: Reconstructing the Identities of Professional Staff in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitchurch, Celia

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical study associated with earlier reviews of the changing roles and identities of contemporary professional staff in UK higher education (Whitchurch, 2004; 2006a; 2006b). The study draws on the narratives of 24 individuals to illustrate that identity movements cannot be captured solely in terms of a shift from…

  20. Use of Electronic Medication Administration Records to Reduce Perceived Stress and Risk of Medication Errors in Nursing Homes.

    PubMed

    Alenius, Malin; Graf, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Concerns have been raised about the effects of current medication administration processes on the safety of many of the aspects of medication administration. Keeping electronic medication administration records could decrease many of these problems. Unfortunately, there has not been much research on this topic, especially in nursing homes. A prospective case-control survey was consequently performed at two nursing homes; the electronic record system was introduced in one, whereas the other continued to use paper records. The personnel were asked to fill in a questionnaire of their perceptions of stress and risk of medication errors at baseline (n = 66) and 20 weeks after the intervention group had started recording medication administration electronically (n = 59). There were statistically significant decreases in the perceived risk of omitting a medication, of medication errors occurring because of communication problems, and of medication errors occurring because of inaccurate medication administration records in the intervention group (all P < .01 vs the control group). The perceived overall daily stress levels were also reduced in the intervention group (P < .05). These results indicate that the utilization of electronic medication administration records will reduce many of the concerns regarding the medication administration process. PMID:27270628

  1. Serving two masters? Recent legal developments regarding the professional obligations of medical administrators in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bradfield, Owen

    2011-03-01

    Medical administration is a recognised medical specialty in Australia. Historically, medical administrators have rarely been subjected to litigation or disciplinary hearings relating specifically to their administrative functions. However, the legal landscape for medical administrators in Australia appears to be shifting. In 2009, the Queensland Health Practitioners Tribunal heard two separate cases involving the professional conduct of medical administrators who were implicated in the scandal surrounding Dr. Jayant Patel at Bundaberg Hospital. In September 2010, judgment in one of those cases was delivered. This article reviews the tribunal's decision through the lens of relevant United Kingdom authorities and recent legislative changes in Australia regulating the health professions. PMID:21528739

  2. Impact of School Sense of Community within a Faith-Based University: Administrative and Academic Staff Perceptions on Institutional Mission and Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Cowman, Shaun E.; Milner, Lauren A.; Gutierrez, Robert E.; Drake, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Academic staff (n = 305) and administrative staff (n = 595) at a large urban, Catholic, and religious order teaching university completed on-line school sense of community, social desirability, and mission-identity plus mission-driven activity measures. Partial correlates (controlling for social desirability) indicated that for both faculty and…

  3. Medical staff extremity dosimetry in CT fluoroscopy: an anthropomorphic hand voxel phantom study.

    PubMed

    Figueira, C; Becker, F; Blunck, C; DiMaria, S; Baptista, M; Esteves, B; Paulo, G; Santos, J; Teles, P; Vaz, P

    2013-08-21

    This work aims to contribute to the study of the radiation dose distribution delivered to the hands of medical staff members during a general computed tomographic (CT) fluoroscopic guided procedure. In this study, both Monte Carlo simulations and measurements were performed. For free-in-air and computed tomography dose index (CTDI) body phantom measurements, a standard pencil ionization chamber (IC) 100 mm long was used. The CT scanner model was implemented using MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) and was successfully validated by comparing the simulated results with measurements. Subsequently, CT images of a hand, together with an anthropomorphic phantom, were voxelized and used with the MCNPX code for dose calculations. The hand dose distribution study was performed both by using thermo-luminescent detector measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The validated simulation tool provides a new perspective for detailed investigations of CT-irradiation scenarios. Simulations show that there is a strong dose gradient, namely the even zones of the hand that are in precise vicinity to the x-ray beam only receive about 4% of the maximum dose delivered to adjacent areas which are directly exposed to the primary x-ray beam. Finally, the scatter contribution of the patient was also studied through MC simulations. The results show that for directly exposed parts of the hand surface, the dose is reduced by the body of the patient (due to the shielding), whereas the dose is increased by scattered radiation from the patient for parts of the skin that receive scattered radiation only. PMID:23877320

  4. Medical staff extremity dosimetry in CT fluoroscopy: an anthropomorphic hand voxel phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, C.; Becker, F.; Blunck, C.; DiMaria, S.; Baptista, M.; Esteves, B.; Paulo, G.; Santos, J.; Teles, P.; Vaz, P.

    2013-08-01

    This work aims to contribute to the study of the radiation dose distribution delivered to the hands of medical staff members during a general computed tomographic (CT) fluoroscopic guided procedure. In this study, both Monte Carlo simulations and measurements were performed. For free-in-air and computed tomography dose index (CTDI) body phantom measurements, a standard pencil ionization chamber (IC) 100 mm long was used. The CT scanner model was implemented using MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) and was successfully validated by comparing the simulated results with measurements. Subsequently, CT images of a hand, together with an anthropomorphic phantom, were voxelized and used with the MCNPX code for dose calculations. The hand dose distribution study was performed both by using thermo-luminescent detector measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The validated simulation tool provides a new perspective for detailed investigations of CT-irradiation scenarios. Simulations show that there is a strong dose gradient, namely the even zones of the hand that are in precise vicinity to the x-ray beam only receive about 4% of the maximum dose delivered to adjacent areas which are directly exposed to the primary x-ray beam. Finally, the scatter contribution of the patient was also studied through MC simulations. The results show that for directly exposed parts of the hand surface, the dose is reduced by the body of the patient (due to the shielding), whereas the dose is increased by scattered radiation from the patient for parts of the skin that receive scattered radiation only.

  5. 75 FR 22599 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice...) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance is not final...) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act'' to the Division of...

  6. 77 FR 20826 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 22599), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance. Comments on the draft... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.''...

  7. Effect of an Organizational Linkage Intervention on Staff Perceptions of Medication-Assisted Treatment and Referral Intentions in Community Corrections

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Peter D.; Wilson, Donna; Knudsen, Hannah; Ducharme, Lori; Welsh, Wayne; Frisman, Linda; Knight, Kevin; Lin, Hsiu-Ju; James, Amy; Albizu-Garcia, Carmen; Pankow, Jennifer; Hall, Elizabeth; Urbine, Terry; Abdel-Salam, Sami; Duvall, Jamieson; Vocci, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is effective for alcohol and opioid use disorders but it is stigmatized and underutilized in criminal justice settings. Methods This study cluster-randomized 20 community corrections sites to determine whether an experimental implementation strategy of training and an organizational linkage intervention improved staff perceptions of MAT and referral intentions more than training alone. The 3-hour training was designed to address deficits in knowledge, perceptions and referral information, and the organizational linkage intervention brought together community corrections and addiction treatment agencies in an interagency strategic planning and implementation process over 12 months. Results Although training alone was associated with increases in familiarity with pharmacotherapy and knowledge of where to refer clients, the experimental intervention produced significantly greater improvements in functional attitudes (e.g. that MAT is helpful to clients) and referral intentions. Corrections staff demonstrated greater improvements in functional perceptions and intent to refer opioid dependent clients for MAT than did treatment staff. Conclusion Knowledge, perceptions and information training plus interorganizational strategic planning intervention is an effective means to change attitudes and intent to refer clients for medication assisted treatment in community corrections settings, especially among corrections staff. PMID:25456091

  8. [EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE EQ--A NECESSARY SKILL FOR SUCCESS OF MEDICAL STAFF IN THE 21ST CENTURY].

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Tamar; Dolev, Niva; Attias, Dina; Reuven-Lelong, Ayalla; Rofe, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, medical organizations have undergone major changes worldwide and these continue to evolve at a rapid pace. Today the medical profession faces many new challenges that will eventually have an impact on almost every aspect of daily hospital routine. To a large extent, these issues arise from emerging new technologies, the entry of a new generation of trained workers who have different views and characteristics than previous generations, and the introduction of stricter regulations and accreditation procedures in recent years. In addition, the various hospital staff members now have different professional expectations and demands; there is also an important need to reduce costs, accompanied by a shift towards the concept of patients perceiving themselves as clients rather than only as people needing medical assistance. Facing all these challenges, undoubtedly, medical teams will need to acquire a more comprehensive set of professional skills critical for their continued success in the 21st century. These skills will have to include the ability to be more flexible, so as to be able to adapt to changing environments, to remain effective at work under stress, to develop positive personal interactive working relationships, while providing excellent service to patients, and to maintain the ability to guide and lead others in a changing medical environment. People with the above skills reflect the positive attributes of high emotional intelligence. Recent studies show that emotional intelligence plays an important role in the success of the entire medical staff and particularly for those in management roles. Hospitals will have to take into consideration all the necessary characteristics, if they wish to maintain and further consolidate their previous achievements in the 21st century. In particular, they will need to pay attention to the EQ of both new and existing staff, using it as a meaningful parameter for new recruits and for the further

  9. An Audit of Medication Administration: A Glimpse into School Health Offices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canham, Daryl L.; Bauer, Laurie; Concepcion, Michelle; Luong, June; Peters, Jill; Wilde, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Many students require prescription and nonprescription medication to be administered during the school day for chronic and acute illnesses. School office staff members are typically delegated this task, yet these individuals are unlicensed assistive personnel without medical training. Five school nurses developed and participated in a medication…

  10. Study of nurse workarounds in a hospital using bar code medication administration system.

    PubMed

    Rack, Laurie L; Dudjak, Linda A; Wolf, Gail A

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzed registered nurse workarounds in an academic medical center using bar code medication administration technology. Nurse focus groups and a survey were used to determine the frequency and potential causes of workarounds. More than half of the nurses surveyed indicated that they administered medications without scanning the patient or medications during the last shift worked. Benefits of this study include considerations when implementing bar code medication administration technology that may minimize the development of these workarounds in practice. PMID:22202186

  11. 76 FR 68767 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave. Bldg. 66, Rm. 1646, Silver Spring... the Internet. A search capability for all Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) guidance... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and......

  12. Staff Personnel Administration: Selected Practices and Issues. Bulletin, 1963, No. 6. OE-23027

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steffensen, James P.

    1963-01-01

    The purpose of this publication is to focus attention upon a rapidly growing development in public school administration--the increasing interest in personnel administration as a process which can be identified through a description of certain formal functions which every school district must perform. The existence of adequate personnel policies…

  13. 76 FR 70150 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Investigational Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... guidance entitled ``Investigational Device Exemptions (IDE) for Early Feasibility Medical Device Clinical... mitigation strategies, under the IDE requirements. Early feasibility studies allow for limited early clinical... of an early feasibility study IDE application and explains the requirements applicable...

  14. 76 FR 12742 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Clinical Investigations of Devices...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ...; Clinical Investigations of Devices Indicated for the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence; Availability AGENCY... Treatment of Urinary Incontinence.'' This guidance document describes FDA's recommendations for clinical investigations of medical devices indicated for the treatment of urinary incontinence. DATES: Submit...

  15. Marital Satisfaction: The Differential Impact of Social Support Dependent on Situation and Gender in Medical Staff in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Arian; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Richter, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Stress is unavoidable in everyday life and it can effect on marital relationship. Social support especially from emotionally closed persons as a protective factor can help individuals to deal with stress and buffers the negative effects of life stress on marital satisfaction. In the present cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between social and spousal support and marital satisfaction in medical staff in Iran. Data collection was performed in 653 medical staff using socio-demographic questions, the ENRICH Marital Satisfaction Inventory, and the Social Support Questionnaire. Women and men did not differ in total social support satisfaction and the total number of supporting people; but, women were more often support providers for their husbands than men were for their wives. Spouse support was a more important indicator of marital satisfaction for women than for men. Also results revealed that spouse support is more important than social support from other resources to explain marital satisfaction. Job satisfaction had an explanatory effect on marital satisfaction especially in men. Furthermore, the findings showed that social support could decrease the explanatory impact of job satisfaction on scales of marital satisfaction. Therefore, focusing on social support, especially spouse support could be an effective approach in family counseling or family education programs to improve marital satisfaction in medical staff. PMID:23777731

  16. Marital satisfaction: the differential impact of social support dependent on situation and gender in medical staff in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rostami, Arian; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Richter, Jörg

    2013-07-01

    Stress is unavoidable in everyday life and it can effect on marital relationship. Social support especially from emotionally closed persons as a protective factor can help individuals to deal with stress and buffers the negative effects of life stress on marital satisfaction. In the present cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between social and spousal support and marital satisfaction in medical staff in Iran. Data collection was performed in 653 medical staff using socio-demographic questions, the ENRICH Marital Satisfaction Inventory, and the Social Support Questionnaire. Women and men did not differ in total social support satisfaction and the total number of supporting people; but, women were more often support providers for their husbands than men were for their wives. Spouse support was a more important indicator of marital satisfaction for women than for men. Also results revealed that spouse support is more important than social support from other resources to explain marital satisfaction. Job satisfaction had an explanatory effect on marital satisfaction especially in men. Furthermore, the findings showed that social support could decrease the explanatory impact of job satisfaction on scales of marital satisfaction. Therefore, focusing on social support, especially spouse support could be an effective approach in family counseling or family education programs to improve marital satisfaction in medical staff. PMID:23777731

  17. Family Perceptions of Medication Administration at School: Errors, Risk Factors, and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Daniel; Farris, Karen; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Howarth, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    Medications are administered every day in schools across the country. Researchers and clinicians have studied school nurses' and educators' experiences with medication administration, but not the experiences of children or their parents. This study examined medication administration from the child and parent perspectives to (a) determine problems…

  18. Task Analysis of Medical Technology Administration and Supervision as a Foundation to a Curriculum Ladder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becan-McBride, Kathleen Elizabeth

    The administrative and supervisory competencies that a medical technology student should acquire before graduation were investigated. Selected medical technology laboratory supervisors and administrative technologists in the Houston-Galveston, Texas area were surveyed to determine the tasks performed by the medical technology laboratory…

  19. Building Trusting Relationships in the Medical Practice Team: Thirty Rules to Live By for You and Your Staff.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2015-01-01

    A medical practice team without trust isn't really a team; it's just a group of individuals who work together in a medical practice, often making disappointing progress. This is true no matter how capable or talented the individuals are. Your staff may never reach its full potential if trust is not present. This article offers medical practice managers 30 rules for building trust in their practices: 15 rules that will help them in their leadership roles, and 15 rules to teach and discuss with their employees. It suggests a trust-building screening question to include in job interviews to determine if applicants have a high capacity for trust. It also describes Reina and Reina's "Three C's of Trust," a model that practice managers may find useful as they develop trust competencies in their staffs. This article also includes 10 inspiring quotes that will help medical practice employees build trust and five easy-to-facilitate trust-building exercises that managers can use with the medical practice team. PMID:26399036

  20. [The assessment of knowledge about recent tobacco law number 5727 among our university students, academic and administrative staff].

    PubMed

    Gelen, Mehmet Emin; Köksal, Nurhan; Ozer, Ali; Atilla, Nurhan; Cinkara, Müge; Kahraman, Hasan; Ekerbiçer, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    In this study we investigated the level of knowledge and ideas of the university students and staff, about the last stage of Tobacco Law No. 5727, which came into force on 19 July 2009 in our country. This is descriptive questionnaire survey. Study's universe was consisting of the students 2009-2010 academic year studying in our universities and academic and administrative staff. A total of 2271 people were included the study. In our study, smoking prevalence was 21.3%. The prevalence for narghile smoking as 4.8% was the highest among students. 94.9% of participants thought that passive smoking increased the risk for human health. Asked whether the banned places, the most correct answers were; the school (97.0%), bank branches (96.3%) and hospitals (96.2%) as the most incorrect answers were; in the garden of hospital (55.7%), garden of private education (53.4%) and the school playground (46.1%). 87.6% of the participants were supporting the new tobacco law. 61.3% of smokers were supporting the law (p= 0.000). 54.3% of narghile-smokers support the law, and this rate was lower than cigarette smokers. Overall, tobacco law is known and supported between our students and staff. More information and supervision should be given about the banned places like school garden and private course gardens which were the high rate of false knowledge. The support to law among students is lower than staff. Similarly narghile use among students is often more. The community should be informed also about the other tobacco products. PMID:21740387

  1. Role of the mental health professional in education and support of the medical staff.

    PubMed

    Grill, Elizabeth

    2015-08-01

    This review argues that mental health professionals are underutilized in the reproductive health care system. Counselors in the field of reproductive medicine could broaden their care from a strictly one-on-one patient care perspective to a more integrated and collaborative approach that also involves education, training, and support of the fertility clinic staff. The literature has shed light on reasons for patient discontinuation, but little is known about staff burnout in reproductive health care, and even less has been done to address work-related stress, job dissatisfaction, and poor emotional and physical health among fertility clinic staff. Specific educational strategies and training techniques are addressed to help reduce staff stress, prevent burnout, and improve overall patient care. PMID:26056926

  2. Development and assessment of learning objects about intramuscular medication administration

    PubMed Central

    Tamashiro, Lilian Mayumi Chinen; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to develop and assess a learning object about intramuscular medication administration for nursing undergraduates and nurses. METHOD: a random, intentional and non-probabilistic sample was selected of nurses from a Brazilian social network of nursing and students from the Undergraduate Program at the University of São Paulo School of Nursing to serve as research subjects and assess the object. RESULTS: the participants, 8 nurses and 8 students, studied the object and answered an assessment instrument that included the following criteria: educational aspects (relevance of the theme, objectives and texts/hypertexts), interface of the environment (navigation, accessibility and screen design) and didactic resources (interactivity and presentation of resources). In total, 128 significant answers were obtained, 124 (97%) of which were positive, assessed as excellent and satisfactory, considered as a flexible, dynamic, objective resources that is appropriate to the nursing learning process. CONCLUSION: the educational technology shows a clear and easily understandable language and the teaching method could be applied in other themes, contributing to the education and training of nursing professionals, positively affecting nursing teaching, stimulating the knowledge, autonomous and independent learning, aligned with the new professional education requirements. PMID:25493665

  3. Physicians’ leadership styles in rural primary medical care: How are they perceived by staff?

    PubMed Central

    Kirkhaug, Rudi

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Aim. This study investigates which leadership styles can be identified among general practice lead physicians and how they are associated with and predicted by staff and context characteristics like profession, gender, age, work experience, and team size. Method/material. In a cross-sectional study self-administered questionnaires were distributed to staff physicians (42% females) and support staff (98% females) at 101 primary health care centres in North Norway. A total of 127 and 222, respectively, responded (response rate 59%). Items were ranked on Likert scales (range 1–5). Results. Analysis revealed three significantly different styles (mean scores/Cronbach's alpha): change style (3.36/0.898), task style (3.17/0.885), and relation style (2.88/0.900). The lead physicians were perceived as practising change style the most and relation style the least. Males experienced significantly more of all three styles. Support staff scored lowest for all styles. Age was negatively correlated with relation style and change style, while work experience was negatively correlated with change style. No significant association was found between styles and team size. Conclusion. Leadership in rural general practice can be identified in terms of task, relation, and change styles. Change style is the most perceived style. Males seem to be most attentive to leadership styles. However, within the staff physician group, there is less difference between genders. Support staff scores lowest for all styles; this might indicate either less need for leadership or dissatisfaction with leadership. Age and work experience seem to reduce employees’ attention to relation and change styles, indicating that maturity reduces needs for these leadership styles. Due to growing demands for leaders to take care of efficiency and change in general practice, more young female physicians, and more diverse staff groups, these findings may be useful to understand leadership and leadership

  4. Factors Influencing Staff Perceptions of Administrator Support for Tier 2 and 3 Interventions: A Multilevel Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnam, Katrina J.; Pas, Elise T.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2013-01-01

    Although the number of schools implementing School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) is increasing, and there is great demand for evidence-based Tier 2 and 3 interventions for students requiring additional support, little systematic research has examined administrator support for such programming. This article examines…

  5. Staff Reductions and Performance Evaluations: Teacher Views on the Roles of Administrators and Colleagues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phelan, William T.

    As part of an ongoing three-year investigation into the effects of declining enrollment and reduction in force (RIF) on teachers, this paper explores: (1) teacher acceptance of exclusive administrative control over performance evaluations, and (2) teacher preferences for colleague input into the evaluation process. A sample of 85 schools was drawn…

  6. When Grief Visits School: Organizing a Successful Response. A Resource for Administrators, Counselors, and Other Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, John

    Each week the equivalent of fifty 48-passenger bus loads of students do not return to school because they have died. Created to foster successful responses to crisis situations, this book serves as a step by step reference guide for school administrators, counselors, and other faculty. Techniques are presented for dealing with: (1) murders; (2)…

  7. 78 FR 5185 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Humanitarian Use Device (HUD...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-24

    ... approval of the HDE application. In the Federal Register of December 13, 2011 (76 FR 77542), FDA issued for... guidance to the Office of Orphan Products (OOPD), Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave..., MD 20852. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Eric Chen, Office of Orphan Products Development...

  8. 76 FR 40921 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Enforcement Policy for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Radiology Devices; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food... ``Enforcement Policy for Premarket Notification Requirements for Certain In Vitro Diagnostic and Radiology...(k)) requirements for certain in vitro diagnostic and radiology devices under the regulations....

  9. The Effect of the Elementary School Principal's Rule Administration on Staff Militancy and Leadership Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lutz, Frank W.; McDannel, John A.

    The authors discuss the trend emerging from organizational research which shows in part that administrators are more effective as they are perceived to be considerate of their subordinates. Based on field observations and on the contention that (in an era of increasing collective behavior on the part of teachers) hostility might take the form of…

  10. Divisions among Us: Women Administrators, Faculty, and Staff on the Complicated Realities of Support and Sisterhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Although Robin Morgan argued that sisterhood is powerful (1970) and forever (2003), results from this case study show that sisterhood is not easily achieved, even in women's groups in which support for women was a formal goal. Narratives of eight women faculty, middle managers, and top administrators reveal that organizational sexism and women's…

  11. A Mixed Method Study Measuring the Perceptions of Administrators, Classroom Teachers and Professional Staff on the Use of iPads in a Midwest School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckerle, Andrea Laux

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to assess the perceptions of classroom teachers, administrators and professional support staff in one Midwest school district regarding the usefulness and effectiveness of the iPad device as an instructional and support tool within the classroom. The need to address classroom teacher, administrator and…

  12. Evaluating the Imbalance Between Increasing Hemodialysis Patients and Medical Staff Shortage After the Great East Japan Earthquake: Report From a Hemodialysis Center Near the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Takaaki; Nishiuchi, Takamitsu; Akaihata, Hidenori; Haga, Nobuhiro; Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Kubo, Hajime; Kasahara, Masato; Hayashi, Masayuki

    2016-04-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 caused an unprecedented imbalance between an increasing number of hemodialysis patients and medical staff shortage in the Sousou area, the site of the Fukushima nuclear power plants. In 2014, capacity of our hemodialysis center reached a critical limit due to such an imbalance. We attempted to evaluate the effort of medical staff to clarify to what extent their burden had increased post-disaster. The ratio of total dialysis sessions over total working days of medical staff was determined as an approximate indicator of effort per month. The mean value of each year was compared. Despite fluctuations of the ratio, the mean value did not differ from 2010 to 2013. However, the ratio steadily increased in 2014, and there was a significant increase in the mean value. This proposed indicator of the effort of medical staff appears to reflect what we experienced, although its validity must be carefully examined in future studies. PMID:26935477

  13. 75 FR 74063 - Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration's Convener of Active Medical Product...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration... Supplemental Application AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of intent. SUMMARY: The Food... Medical Policy, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave, Bldg. 51, rm. 6360, Silver...

  14. Medication safety issue brief. Series II, Part 6: Tapping into your staff's energy.

    PubMed

    2003-11-01

    The front-line workers in a hospital are its greatest resources, particularly when it comes to improving safety. After all, they know the crucial details about day-to-day operations and can offer innovative solutions to problems. But staff members don't always feel comfortable getting involved in change. To tap this hidden well of talent, hospitals leaders should train staff in systems thinking, cultivate a culture of safety and make it easy for employees to contribute their ideas. PMID:14689965

  15. [Conditions of professional activity of the staff of units and formations of special support and its medical and psychological support].

    PubMed

    Poluboyarinov, V N; Grabskii, Yu V; Zemlyannikov, D A; Kushchev, G G

    2016-02-01

    In the field of special support of nuclear- and radiation-dangerous objects "human factor" is highlighted, which means that psychological status of crew is at the first place. The authors analysed conditions of professional activity, determined morbidity rates and psychologically important labour characteristics for military specialists working at nuclear- and radiation-dangerous objects. The staff working at these objects undergoes irradiation, hostility of inhabitation and high psychological pressure. The authors presented data on peculiarities of health status and morbidity rate among military servicemen of the given category: the frequency of digestive apparatus diseases, diseases of nervous and circulatory systems is higher than in auxiliary subunits of the same military units. The authors determined the main principles and structure of measures of medical and psychological support of professional activity of the staff of military units of special support. PMID:27263211

  16. Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reusswig, James, Ed.; Ponzio, Richard, Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Eight essays are presented which reflect current problems, issues, and practices related to the development of teacher and administrator expertise. The authors are school district and public school administrators, faculty of schools of education, and a director of staff development in a state department of education. The topics treated are: (1)…

  17. Facilitators and Barriers to Safe Medication Administration to Hospital Inpatients: A Mixed Methods Study of Nurses’ Medication Administration Processes and Systems (the MAPS Study)

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Monsey; Barber, Nicholas; Franklin, Bryony Dean

    2015-01-01

    Context Research has documented the problem of medication administration errors and their causes. However, little is known about how nurses administer medications safely or how existing systems facilitate or hinder medication administration; this represents a missed opportunity for implementation of practical, effective, and low-cost strategies to increase safety. Aim To identify system factors that facilitate and/or hinder successful medication administration focused on three inter-related areas: nurse practices and workarounds, workflow, and interruptions and distractions. Methods We used a mixed-methods ethnographic approach involving observational fieldwork, field notes, participant narratives, photographs, and spaghetti diagrams to identify system factors that facilitate and/or hinder successful medication administration in three inpatient wards, each from a different English NHS trust. We supplemented this with quantitative data on interruptions and distractions among other established medication safety measures. Findings Overall, 43 nurses on 56 drug rounds were observed. We identified a median of 5.5 interruptions and 9.6 distractions per hour. We identified three interlinked themes that facilitated successful medication administration in some situations but which also acted as barriers in others: (1) system configurations and features, (2) behaviour types among nurses, and (3) patient interactions. Some system configurations and features acted as a physical constraint for parts of the drug round, however some system effects were partly dependent on nurses’ inherent behaviour; we grouped these behaviours into ‘task focused’, and ‘patient-interaction focused’. The former contributed to a more streamlined workflow with fewer interruptions while the latter seemed to empower patients to act as a defence barrier against medication errors by being: (1) an active resource of information, (2) a passive information resource, and/or (3) a

  18. A prevalence study of bestiality (zoophilia) in psychiatric in-patients, medical in-patients, and psychiatric staff.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, W A; Freinhar, J P

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of bestiality (both actual sexual contacts and sexual fantasy) was investigated in an experimental group (psychiatric in-patients) and two control populations (medical in-patients and psychiatric staff). Psychiatric patients were found to have a statistically significant higher prevalence rate (55%) of bestiality than the control groups (10% and 15% respectively). Implications of these findings are discussed. It is recommended that due to the obvious prevalence of this condition, questions exploring this previously ignored topic should be routinely included in the psychiatric interview. PMID:1778686

  19. Insulin Administration in Catholic Schools: A New Look at Legal and Medical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence indicates that more students with type 1 diabetes are enrolling in Catholic schools across the United States. Meeting the medical needs of these students appears to be a significant challenge--legally and logistically--for many Catholic schools. District officials, school leaders, and school staff need support to understand the…

  20. Ensuring Safe Medication Administration to Children in New Jersey's Child Care Programs. ACNJ Special Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdette, Dianne S.; Coogan, Mary E.; Giosa, Ritamarie; Lucarelli, Patti; Pavignano, Debra

    2006-01-01

    Modern medications allow children with a variety of acute and chronic health conditions to participate in daily activities. However, parents and child care providers may not realize that there are different dosage strengths available on the market. The parent or staff may not fully understand the dosage or a miscommunication may occur. These…

  1. An Assessment of Psychological Need in Emergency Medical Staff in the Northern Health and Social Care Trust Area

    PubMed Central

    Aisling, Diamond; David, Curran

    2016-01-01

    Setting Psychological stress is increasingly recognised within emergency medicine, given the environmental and clinical stressors associated with the specialism. The current study assessed whether psychological distress is experienced by emergency medical staff and if so, what is the expressed need within this population? Participants Participants included ambulance personnel, nursing staff, doctors and ancillary support staff within two Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments and twelve ambulance bases within one Trust locality in NI (N = 107). Primary and secondary outcome measures The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1972, 1978), Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS, Bride, 2004) and an assessment of need questionnaire were completed and explored using mixed method analysis. Results Results showed elevated levels of psychological distress within each profession except ambulance service clinical support officers (CSOs). Elevated levels of secondary trauma symptomatology were also found; the highest were within some nursing grades and junior doctors. Decreased enjoyment in job over time was significantly associated with higher scores. Analysis of qualitative data identified sources of stress to include low morale. A total of 65% of participants thought that work related stressors had negatively affected their mental health. Participants explored what they felt could decrease psychological distress including improved resources and psychoeducation. Conclusion There were elevated levels of distress and secondary traumatic stress within this population as well as an expressed level of need, on both systemic and support levels. PMID:27601762

  2. What Determines the Surgical Patient Experience? Exploring the Patient, Clinical Staff, and Administration Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mazurenko, Olena; Zemke, Dina; Lefforge, Noelle; Shoemaker, Stowe; Menachemi, Nir

    2015-01-01

    Hospitals are increasingly concerned with enhancing surgical patient experience given that Medicare reimbursements are now tied in part to patient satisfaction. Surgical patients' experience may be influenced by several factors (e.g., integration of care, technical aspects of care), which are ranked differently in importance by clinicians and patients. Strategies designed to improve patient experience can be informed by our research, which examines the determinants of the surgical patient experience from the perspective of multiple healthcare team members. We conducted 12 focus groups with surgical patients, family members, physicians, nurses, and hospital administrators at one acute care, for-profit hospital in a western state and analyzed the content for determinants of the overall surgical patient experience. Specifically, we analyzed the content of the conversations to determine how frequently participants discussed the determinants of the surgical patient experience and how positive, negative, or neutral the comments were. The study's findings suggest that surgical patients and members of the healthcare team have similar views regarding the most important factors in the patient experience-namely, interdisciplinary relationships, technical infrastructure, and staffing. The study results will be used to improve care in this facility and can inform the development of initiatives aimed at improving the surgical patient experience elsewhere. Our study could serve as a model for how other facilities can analyze the surgical patient experience from the perspectives of different stakeholders and improve their performance on the basis of data directly relevant to their organization. PMID:26554144

  3. The Design & Implementation of a Curriculum Ladder in Medical Record Administration 1970-1973.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Kathleen A.; Hanken, Mary Alice

    Objectives of a 3-year articulation project were (1) to design and put into effect a curriculum for medical record personnel which would provide educational progression for associate arts degree medical record technicians to baccalaureate degree medical record administration programs, (2) to research, classify, and compare curriculum content of…

  4. Establishing Compliance with Liquid Medication Administration in a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiff, Averil; Tarbox, Jonathan; Lanagan, Taira; Farag, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Children with autism often display difficulty with swallowing pills and liquid medications. In the current study, stimulus fading and positive reinforcement established compliance with liquid medication administration in a young boy with autism. The boy's mother eventually administered liquid medication on her own. (Contains 1 figure.)

  5. 76 FR 9027 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Best Practices for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... Staff on Best Practices for Conducting and Reporting Pharmacoepidemiologic Safety Studies Using... industry and FDA staff entitled ``Best Practices for Conducting and Reporting Pharmacoepidemiologic Safety Studies Using Electronic Healthcare Data Sets.'' The draft guidance is intended to describe best...

  6. Staff eye doses in a large medical centre in Saudi Arabia: are they meeting the new ICRP recommendations?

    PubMed

    Al-Haj, Abdalla N; Lobriguito, Aida M; Al-Gain, Ibrahim

    2015-07-01

    A 5-y retrospective analysis of the cardiology staff eye doses was performed on 34 staff from different categories (cardiologists, nurses and technologists) at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSHRC) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. KFSHRC is a tertiary medical centre with 800-bed capacity having more than 5000 cardiac catheterisation procedures performed annually. The aim of the study is to derive staff doses to the lens of the eyes using the personal dose equivalent Hp(0.07) values from the annual TLD dose report for the years 2008-2012 and determine the category of staff with high estimated eye doses. The study also aims to investigate the causes for high doses and recommend dose-reduction techniques. The dose to the lens of the eye was estimated by using the ratio Hp(0.07)slab/Hlens of 1.1 where Hp(0.07) values are the reported doses read from TLD badge worn at the collar level. The average annual eye dose of each category for the 5-y monitoring period was determined. Cardiologists tend to receive higher doses than the nurses by a factor of 2-4 and can exceed 5 mSv y(-1). No correlation exists between the eye doses of nurses and the cardiologists. There is a need to use a conversion coefficient in terms of eye lens dose per dose-area product for faster estimation of eye lens doses. However, there is a limitation on the use of the conversion coefficient because it will depend on the clinical procedure and the X-ray tube angulation. Further investigation on this limitation is needed. PMID:25848104

  7. 77 FR 125 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Device Classification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    .... This draft guidance is not final nor is it in effect at this time. DATES: Although you can comment on... electronic radiation emitting products. The scope of the guidance document includes devices described in...

  8. An integrated nursing-pharmacy approach to a computerized medication dispensing/administration system.

    PubMed

    Cook, A A

    1985-05-01

    This paper describes the collaborative efforts of the nursing and pharmacy departments to develop a nurse-generated/pharmacist-verified computerized medication administration record (MAR). The objectives were to improve accuracy in dispensing and administering medications and a avoid duplicate labor efforts created by separate records to dispense and to administer the medications. These efforts provided the nurses with an accurate record to administer the medication and the physicians with an informative record with which to review their patient's drug therapy. PMID:10271106

  9. Social Media Policy on Campus: A Case Study of the Development and Implementation of a Social Media Policy for University Administrators, Faculty, and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Michelle Brooks

    2011-01-01

    This single-site qualitative study sought to address the challenges associated with the growing use of social media by university administrators, faculty, and staff (Wandel, 2007) through a case study analysis of a university with a social media policy for university employees. The study describes the development and implementation of a university…

  10. Provide a Staff Development Program. Competency-Based Vocational Education Administrator Module Series. Leadership and Training Series No. 58B-12.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller-Beach, Audni; And Others

    Designed to provide pre- and inservice vocational education administrators with the skills necessary to establish and/or facilitate implementation of a staff development program, this competency-based learning module consists of an introduction and three sequential learning experiences. Each learning experience contains an overview, required and…

  11. Special Needs Learners in Vocational Education. An In-Service Training and Resource Manual for Teachers, Counselors, Administrators, and Other Support Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkler, Kathleen; And Others

    This handbook is both a resource for teachers, counselors, administrators, and other support staff and an inservice training manual for a teacher trainer in a workshop setting. Each of the first three (of four) sections contains two components. The first is a resource component with informative materials and various exercises to help the teacher…

  12. 78 FR 100 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Refuse To Accept Policy for 510(k)s...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ... checklists for use by FDA review staff. In the Federal Register of August 13, 2012 (77 FR 48159), FDA...; Refuse To Accept Policy for 510(k)s; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... entitled ``Refuse to Accept Policy for 510(k)s.'' The purpose of this document is to explain the...

  13. The new economic credentialing: protecting hospitals from competition by medical staff members.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Elizabeth A

    2003-01-01

    This Article addresses hospitals' use of economic criteria to determine an individual's qualifications for staff privileges. Hospitals are resorting to economic conflict-of-interest credentialing policies in an attempt to ensure physician's loyalty and maintain their own economic viability. Physicians, however, argue that entrepreneurial activities are necessary for them to meet the economic challenges posed by declining reimbursements and rising insurance costs. The Article surveys the numerous legal theories that physicians (and, in some cases, the federal government) could employ in attacking these new types of credentialing policies and concludes that, on balance, hospitals should be able to implement their policies in ways that minimize liability in most jurisdictions. The Article concludes by discussing other issues that economic credentialing policies raise, including those implicating tax-exempt status and nonlegal considerations. PMID:12940678

  14. Client safety in assisted living: perspectives from clients, personal support workers and administrative staff in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Speller, Brittany; Stolee, Paul

    2015-03-01

    As the population ages, the demand for long-term care settings is expected to increase. Assisted living is a suitable and favourable residence for older individuals to receive care services specific to their needs while maintaining their independence and privacy. With the growing transition of older individuals into assisted living, facilities need to ensure that safe care is continually maintained. The purpose of this study was to determine the gaps and strengths in care related to safety in assisted living facilities (ALFs). A qualitative descriptive research design was used to provide a comprehensive understanding of client safety from the perspectives of clients, administrative staff and personal support workers. Interviews were conducted with 22 key informants from three ALFs in Toronto, Ontario throughout July 2012. All interviews were semi-structured, audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Initial deductive analysis used directed coding based on a prior literature review, followed by inductive analysis to determine themes. Three themes emerged relating to the safety of clients in ALFs: meaning of safety, a multi-faceted approach to providing safe care and perceived areas of improvement. Sub-themes also emerged including physical safety, multiple factors, working as a team, respecting clients' independence, communication and increased education and available resources. The study findings can contribute to the improvement and development of new processes to maintain and continually ensure safe care in ALFs. PMID:25175102

  15. Loneliness at the Top: Ten Ways Medical Practice Administrators Can Manage the Isolation of Leadership.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Medical practice.managers spend their days surrounded by people, so the last thing they may expect to feel is lonely. Yet for many, being the manager of a medical practice can lead to feelings of isolation from the rest of the staff, and loneliness. This article explores the many reasons that managing a medical practice can be a lonely business. It considers the risks when a practice manager's loneliness goes unchecked, both to the individual and to the practice. It suggests 10 effective and healthy strategies for preventing and managing the leadership loneliness that medical practice managers sometimes experience. Next, this article argues that acceptance is the first step in overcoming loneliness in the workplace. It offers guidance for medical practice managers who wish to help lonely members of their teams. It describes the benefits of having a confidant to help support the medical practice manager, and the characteristics of an ideal confidant. Finally, this article suggests a strategy for combatting loneliness by interacting with the staff more frequently. PMID:27249880

  16. Medication administration in the domiciliary care setting: whose role?

    PubMed

    Bradford, Jennie

    2012-11-01

    Unqualified social care workers are increasingly delegated the responsibility of both assisting with and administering medication in the domiciliary care setting. This article discusses the considerations required before the delegation of these roles by both commissioners and nurses. In particular, variations in training, policies and provision are explored with reference to the Care Quality Commission guidance and Nursing and Midwifery Council standards. The levels of support and their definitions are clarified for use in policy documents, and the effectiveness of devices used to support self-care are critiqued within a legal framework. The importance of joint working to provide a seamless medication management service are highlighted using reflections on examples from practice. PMID:23124424

  17. Searching for the Final Answer: Factors Contributing to Medication Administration Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape, Tess M.

    2001-01-01

    Causal factors contributing to errors in medication administration should be thoroughly investigated, focusing on systems rather than individual nurses. Unless systemic causes are addressed, many errors will go unreported for fear of reprisal. (Contains 42 references.) (SK)

  18. [The system of selection and training of military-medical staff for the 40th army (1979-1989)].

    PubMed

    Ryabinkin, V V

    2015-10-01

    In December 1979 in order to fulfil their internationalist duty troops and units of the 40th Army of the Armed Forces of the USSR was brought into Afghanistan. For complete and qualitative manning of the army with the military doctors it was needed in a short time to create a system capable to carry out candidates selection, their education and specialized training for work in extreme conditions of combat operations. This system was created in a short time. The article presents information about its features, advantages and problems that had to be solved during the entire period of the Soviet-Afghan war. The complex staff arrangements had allowed solving medical support problems of the 40th Army on the high level. PMID:26827509

  19. Using simulations to identify nursing student behaviors: a longitudinal study of medication administration.

    PubMed

    Schneidereith, Tonya A

    2014-02-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recognizes adverse drug events as a serious public health problem. Nurses routinely administer patient medications and must be safe when delivering care. Typically, students are taught the traditional rights method (RM) of safe medication administration in the skills laboratory and through the use of high-fidelity simulation scenarios. The RM includes measures of ensuring the right patient, right medication, right dose, right time, and right route. This pilot study demonstrates changes in verification of the rights among junior and senior nursing students in four simulation scenarios over the course of one academic year. The findings suggest that students become more neglectful in verification of the rights prior to medication administration as they progress through the curriculum. This study should help educators identify significant focus areas for clinical supervisors, including the importance of increased verification of the rights of safe medication administration in the clinical setting. PMID:24444012

  20. Scanning for safety: an integrated approach to improved bar-code medication administration.

    PubMed

    Early, Cynde; Riha, Chris; Martin, Jennifer; Lowdon, Karen W; Harvey, Ellen M

    2011-03-01

    This is a review of lessons learned in the postimplementation evaluation of a bar-code medication administration technology implemented at a major tertiary-care hospital in 2001. In 2006, with a bar-code medication administration scan compliance rate of 82%, a near-miss sentinel event prompted review of this technology as part of an institutional recommitment to a "culture of safety." Multifaceted problems with bar-code medication administration created an environment of circumventing safeguards as demonstrated by an increase in manual overrides to ensure timely medication administration. A multiprofessional team composed of nursing, pharmacy, human resources, quality, and technical services formalized. Each step in the bar-code medication administration process was reviewed. Technology, process, and educational solutions were identified and implemented systematically. Overall compliance with bar-code medication administration rose from 82% to 97%, which resulted in a calculated cost avoidance of more than $2.8 million during this time frame of the project. PMID:21099677

  1. 78 FR 20116 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Glass Syringes for Delivering...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... Staff; Glass Syringes for Delivering Drug and Biological Products: Technical Information To Supplement... availability of draft guidance for industry and FDA staff entitled ``Glass Syringes for Delivering Drug and... glass syringes that comply with the ISO 11040-4 standard when connected to devices (``connecting...

  2. Characteristics of medication errors made by students during the administration phase: a descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Zane Robinson; Hicks, Rodney; Serembus, Joanne Farley

    2006-01-01

    Faculty concentrate on teaching nursing students about safe medication administration practices and on challenging them to develop skills for calculating drug dose and intravenous flow rate problems. In spite of these efforts, students make medication errors and little is known about the attributes of these errors. Therefore, this descriptive, retrospective, secondary analysis study examined the characteristics of medication errors made by nursing students during the administration phase of the medication use process as reported to the MEDMARX, a database operated by the United States Pharmacopeia through the Patient Safety Program. Fewer than 3% of 1,305 student-made medication errors occurring in the administration process resulted in patient harm. Most were omission errors, followed by errors of giving the wrong dose (amount) of a drug. The most prevalent cause of the errors was students' performance deficits, whereas inexperience and distractions were leading contributing factors. The antimicrobial therapeutic class of drugs and the 10 subcategories within this class were the most commonly reported medications involved. Insulin was the highest-frequency single medication reported. Overall, this study shows that students' administration errors may be more frequent than suspected. Faculty might consider curriculum revisions that incorporate medication use safety throughout each course in nursing major courses. PMID:16459288

  3. Legal Issues in School Health Services and School Psychology: Guidelines for the Administration of Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur-Mosiewicz, Anna; Pierson, Eric E.; McIntosh, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of psychoactive medications to augment behavioral and psychosocial interventions in schools has significantly increased within the last few decades. Yet, advising, administrating, and supervising the dispensation of medication (including psychostimulants and psychoactive substances) tend to be some of the most risky tasks of school…

  4. Evaluation of Safe Medication Administration through the Use of Simulation in an Academic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dover, Cheryl D.

    2013-01-01

    Nursing educational programs are struggling with how to educate students to safely and efficiently administer medications. There is no doubt education programs need to find a way to assist students to acquire the skill of medication administration and to also transfer the skill into practice. Knowledge, skills, and abilities are requirements for…

  5. Mobile Technologies: Expectancy, Usage, and Acceptance of Clinical Staff and Patients at a University Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite their increasing popularity, little is known about how users perceive mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet PCs in medical contexts. Available studies are often restricted to evaluating the success of specific interventions and do not adequately cover the users’ basic attitudes, for example, their expectations or concerns toward using mobile devices in medical settings. Objective The objective of the study was to obtain a comprehensive picture, both from the perspective of the patients, as well as the doctors, regarding the use and acceptance of mobile devices within medical contexts in general well as the perceived challenges when introducing the technology. Methods Doctors working at Hannover Medical School (206/1151, response 17.90%), as well as patients being admitted to this facility (213/279, utilization 76.3%) were surveyed about their acceptance and use of mobile devices in medical settings. Regarding demographics, both samples were representative of the respective study population. GNU R (version 3.1.1) was used for statistical testing. Fisher’s exact test, two-sided, alpha=.05 with Monte Carlo approximation, 2000 replicates, was applied to determine dependencies between two variables. Results The majority of participants already own mobile devices (doctors, 168/206, 81.6%; patients, 110/213, 51.6%). For doctors, use in a professional context does not depend on age (P=.66), professional experience (P=.80), or function (P=.34); gender was a factor (P=.009), and use was more common among male (61/135, 45.2%) than female doctors (17/67, 25%). A correlation between use of mobile devices and age (P=.001) as well as education (P=.002) was seen for patients. Minor differences regarding how mobile devices are perceived in sensitive medical contexts mostly relate to data security, patients are more critical of the devices being used for storing and processing patient data; every fifth patient opposed this, but nevertheless, 4.8% of

  6. Re-launch of the South African Society of Medical Managers (previously known as the Medical Administrators Group).

    PubMed

    Dudley, L; Selebano, T E; Nathan, R; Kirsten, R; Ciapparelli, P; Mutshekwane, M N; Basu, D

    2013-01-01

    Medical management is a recognised specialty in many developing and developed countries, including Australia, India, New Zealand, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. In South Africa it was recognised as a sub-specialty in the 1990s, but this is no longer the case. The South African Society of Medical Managers, in close collaboration with the Division of Medical Management of the College of Public Health Medicine of South Africa, has been working to re-establish the specialty of medical management in South Africa. Well-trained specialist medical managers would play a significant role in the effective and efficient implementation of National Health Insurance and primary healthcare re-engineering through the practice of evidence-based health care, clinical economics and administrative medicine. PMID:23237117

  7. Use of cellular telephones and transmission of pathogens by medical staff in New York and Israel.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, Joseph Gil; Krief, Iris; Klonsky, Tal; Haller, Daniel; Milloul, Victor; Sixsmith, Diane M; Srugo, Isaac; Potasman, Israel

    2007-04-01

    Hands and instruments used by healthcare workers may serve as vectors for the nosocomial transmission of microorganisms. The use of cellular telephones by medical personnel and the associated nosocomial transmission of pathogens have not been thoroughly examined. Findings from our study show that cellular telephones are commonly used by hospital personnel, even during patient contact. One-fifth of the cellular telephones examined in this study were found to harbor pathogenic microorganisms, showing that these devices may serve as vectors for transmission to patients. PMID:17385162

  8. 77 FR 10537 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ...: The public conference will be held on the campus of Xavier University, 3800 Victory Pkwy., Cincinnati... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global... University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Medical...

  9. 75 FR 15439 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global... University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Medical Device... public conference will be held on the campus of Xavier University, 3800 Victory Pkwy., Cincinnati,...

  10. 76 FR 15986 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-22

    ... conference will be held on the campus of Xavier University, 3800 Victory Pkwy., ] Cincinnati, OH 45207, 513... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global... University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Medical...

  11. 78 FR 15957 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... public conference will be held on the campus of Xavier University, 3800 Victory Pkwy., Cincinnati, OH... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global... University, is announcing a public conference entitled ``FDA/Xavier University Global Medical...

  12. Risk of radiation exposure to medical staff involved in interventional endourology.

    PubMed

    Hristova-Popova, J; Zagorska, A; Saltirov, I; Petkova, K; Vassileva, J

    2015-07-01

    The aim is to estimate the possibility the new annual dose limit for eye lens to be exceeded and to study the impact of protective shield. Radiation exposure to medical personnel was evaluated with EDD-30 dosemeter in positions of operating surgeon, assisting doctor and nurse. At the operator's typical position for diagnosis and treatment of the urinary tract, the lens dose rates were 0.9 mSv h(-1) and 0.06 mSv h(-1) without and with lead shield. At the operator's position typical for percutaneous intervention dose rates were 1.9 and 0.02 mSv h(-1), respectively. At typical workload, the annual eye lens dose to the main operator without protective screen was estimated to be 29 mSv. With lead screen, operator lens dose can be reduced by a factor of 15-95 according to the procedure. Installation and use of lead screen and use of lead glasses were recommended to the endourology medical team. PMID:25855076

  13. The effect of a safe zone on nurse interruptions, distractions, and medication administration errors.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Mindy; Schadewald, Diane; Dietrich, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a health care priority. Yet medical errors are ranked the eighth leading cause of death. Medication administration errors (MAEs) often result from multiple environmental and individual factors. This quality improvement initiative adapted a protocol based on airline industry safety measures to decrease nurse distractions and interruptions during medication administration, with the goal of decreasing MAEs. Sources of distractions, interruptions, and MAEs were measured pre and post intervention. Patient satisfaction scores were measured concurrently. Results of this initiative differ from previous studies in which similar interventions reduced both distractions and MAEs. An unexpected finding was dramatically increased patient satisfaction. PMID:25723837

  14. Is technology the best medicine? Three practice theoretical perspectives on medication administration technologies in nursing.

    PubMed

    Boonen, Marcel Jmh; Vosman, Frans Jh; Niemeijer, Alistair R

    2016-06-01

    Even though it is often presumed that the use of technology like medication administration technology is both safer and more effective, the importance of nurses' know-how is not to be underestimated. In this article, we accordingly try to argue that nurses' labor, including their different forms of knowledge, must play a crucial role in the development, implementation and use of medication administration technology. Using three different theoretical perspectives ('heuristic lenses') and integrating this with our own ethnographic research, we will explore how nursing practices change through the use of medication technology. Ultimately, we will argue that ignoring (institutional) complexity and the various types of important knowledge that nurses have, will seriously complicate the implementation of medication administration technology. PMID:26491844

  15. Medical Bibliography and Medical Library Administration. LS 8497, 4 Quarter Hours: Course Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI. Dept. of Library Science.

    This publication outlines and presents a series of 27 learning modules for a course in medical librarianship intended to be conducted in an individualized instructional framework featuring lectures, small group discussions, talks by guest speakers from the medical profession, on-site observation of hospital libraries, on-line demonstrations of…

  16. [Administration of medication to use when needed and the care of psychiatric nursing].

    PubMed

    Estrela, Kelly da Silva Rocha; Loyola, Cristina Maria Douat

    2014-01-01

    This qualitative study aimed to analyze the clinical criteria used for the administration of prescribed medications for use when needed (SOS); and discuss the implication of the findings in this research to clinical psychiatric nursing. The records of female patients admitted to a psychiatric institution in the city of Rio de Janeiro, in the time frame from May to June 2009, were analyzed. In the 38 patient records, 16 prescriptions for medications SOS were found. The mean age of patients was around 45-55 years with a clinical diagnosis of Bipolar Mood Disorder. The medication category most prescribed as SOS was of benzodiazepines, followed by antipsychotics. It was noticed a tendency to not valuing the administration of medication in SOS notes. The study points out the importance to establish clinical criteria to indicate the need, or not, to administer prescribed SOS medications. PMID:25271580

  17. Pharmaceutical interventions in medications prescribed for administration via enteral tubes in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Carolina Justus Buhrer; Plodek, Caroline Koga; Soares, Franciny Kossemba; de Andrade, Rayza Assis; Teleginski, Fernanda; da Rocha, Maria Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze the impact of guidelines regarding errors in medications prescribed for administration through enteral tubes. Method: quantitative study, in three phases, undertaken in internal medicine, neurology and an intensive care unit in a general teaching hospital. In Phase 1, the following was undertaken: a protocol for dilution and unit-dose repackaging and administration for 294 medications via enteral tubes; a decision flowchart; operational-standard procedures for dilution and unit-dose repackaging of oral pharmaceutical forms and for administration of medications through enteral tubes. In phase 2, errors in 872 medications prescribed through enteral tubes, in 293 prescriptions for patients receiving inpatient treatment between March and June, were investigated. This was followed by training of the teams in relation to the guidelines established. In Phase 3, pharmaceutical errors and interventions in 945 medications prescribed through enteral tubes, in 292 prescriptions of patients receiving inpatient treatment between August and September, were investigated prospectively. The data collected, in a structured questionnaire, were compiled in the Microsoft Office Excel(r) program, and frequencies were calculated. Results: 786 errors were observed, 63.9% (502) in Phase 2, and 36.1% (284) in Phase 3. In Phase 3, a reduction was ascertained in the frequency of prescription of medications delivered via enteral tubes, medications which were contraindicated, and those for which information was not available. Conclusion: guidelines and pharmaceutical interventions were determined in the prevention of errors involving medications delivered through enteral tubes. PMID:27276019

  18. Hospital Collaboration with Emergency Medical Services in the Care of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction: Perspectives from Key Hospital Staff

    PubMed Central

    Landman, Adam B.; Spatz, Erica S.; Cherlin, Emily J.; Krumholz, Harlan M.; Bradley, Elizabeth H.; Curry, Leslie A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective Evidence suggests that active collaboration between hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) is significantly associated with lower acute myocardial infarction (AMI) mortality rates; however, the nature of such collaborations is not well understood. We sought to characterize views of key hospital staff regarding collaboration with EMS in the care of patients hospitalized with AMI. Methods We performed an exploratory analysis of qualitative data previously collected from site visits and in-depth interviews with 11 US hospitals that ranked in the top or bottom 5% of performance on 30-day risk-standardized AMI mortality rates (RSMRs) using Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services data from 2005–2007. We selected all codes from the first analysis in which EMS was most likely to have been discussed. A multidisciplinary team analyzed the data using the constant comparative method to generate recurrent themes. Results Both higher and lower performing hospitals reported that EMS is critical to the provision of timely care for patients with AMI. However, close, collaborative relationships with EMS were more apparent in the higher performing hospitals. Higher performing hospitals demonstrated specific investment in and attention to EMS through: 1) respect for EMS as valued professionals and colleagues; 2) strong communication and coordination with EMS; and 3) active engagement of EMS in hospital AMI quality improvement efforts. Conclusion Hospital staff from higher performing hospitals described broad, multifaceted strategies to support collaboration with EMS in providing AMI care. The association of these strategies with hospital performance should be tested quantitatively in a larger, representative study. PMID:23146627

  19. Medical treatment for older people and people with disabilities: 1989 developments. National Legal Center Staff.

    PubMed

    1990-01-01

    Pending before the United States Supreme Court are cases involving eligibility of children with disabilities for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) benefits and a guardian's authority to withhold nutrition and hydration from a permanently disabled but not terminally ill ward. The United States Commission on Civil Rights has issued a comprehensive report demonstrating evidence of current discrimination against infants with disabilities and examining current legal protections. In the federal courts, litigation continues in a case brought by parents on behalf of their infants with disabilities who were allegedly denied medical treatment on the basis of disability. State courts continue to examine the rights of competent and incompetent patients to forgo life-sustaining treatment, including nutrition and hydration. Discrimination against persons with AIDS or HIV continues to affect their access to health care. In 1989 forty states and the District of Columbia have "living will" legislation, and nine states have durable power of attorney for health care laws; however, the provisions of each vary from state to state. PMID:2138594

  20. INTRAVENOUS MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION ERRORS AND THEIR CAUSES IN CARDIAC CRITICAL CARE UNITS IN IRAN

    PubMed Central

    Bagheri-Nesami, Masoumeh; Esmaeili, Ravanbakhsh; Tajari, Mojdeh

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The dangerous events caused by medication errors are one of the main challenges faced in critical care units. The present study was conducted to determine the frequency of intravenous medication administration errors and their causes in cardiac critical care units in Iran. Materials and Methods: The present descriptive study was conducted in the critical care units (CCUs and cardiac surgery intensive care units) of 12 teaching hospitals. Of the total of 240 nurses working in these departments, 190 participated in the present study. The data collection tools used in this study included the “nurses’ demographic data questionnaire”, the “patients’ medical and demographic data questionnaire” and the “nurses’ self-reporting questionnaire about the frequency of intravenous medication administration errors and their causes”. The data obtained were analyzed in SPSS-20 using descriptive statistics such as the absolute and relative frequency. Findings: During the 2 months in which this study was being conducted, 2542 patients were admitted to these departments and 20240 doses of intravenous medications were administered to these patients. The nurses reported 262 intravenous medication administration errors. The most common intravenous medication error pertained to administering the wrong medication (n=71 and 27.1%). As for the causes of intravenous medication administration errors, 51.5% of the errors were associated with work conditions, 24% with packaging, 13.4% with communication, 9.9% with transcription and 1.2% with pharmacies. Discussion and Conclusion: According to the results, strategies are recommended to be adopted for reducing or limiting medication errors, such as building a stronger pharmacology knowledge base in nurses and nursing students, improving work conditions and improving communication between the nurses and physicians. PMID:26889108

  1. Nursing administration of medication via enteral tubes in adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nicole M; Nay, Rhonda

    2007-09-01

    Background  Enteral tubes are frequently inserted as part of medical treatment in a wide range of patient situations. Patients with an enteral tube are cared for by nurses in a variety of settings, including general and specialised acute care areas, aged care facilities and at home. Regardless of the setting, nurses have the primary responsibility for administering medication through enteral tubes. Medication administration via an enteral tube is a reasonably common nursing intervention that entails a number of skills, including preparing the medication, verifying the tube position, flushing the tube and assessing for potential complications. If medications are not given effectively through an enteral tube, harmful consequences may result leading to increased morbidity, for example, tube occlusion, diarrhoea and aspiration pneumonia. There are resultant costs for the health-care system related to possible increased length of stay and increased use of equipment. Presently what is considered to be best practice to give medications through enteral tubes is unknown. Objectives  The objective of this systematic review was to determine the best available evidence on which nursing interventions are effective in minimising the complications associated with the administration of medications via enteral tubes in adults. Nursing interventions and considerations related to medication administration included form of medication, verifying tube placement before administration, methods used to give medication, methods used to flush tubes, maintenance of tube patency and specific practices to prevent possible complications related to the administration of enteral medications. Search strategy  The following databases were searched for literature reported in English only: CINAHL, MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, Current Contents/All Editions, EMBASE, Australasian Medical Index and PsychINFO. There was no date restriction applied. In addition, the reference lists of all included

  2. Information and communications technology, culture, and medical universities; organizational culture and netiquette among academic staff

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Iravani, Hoorsana; Abzari, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Netiquette is appropriate behavioral etiquette when communicating through computer networks or virtual space. Identification of a dominant organizational culture and its relationship with a network culture offers applied guidelines to top managers of the university to expand communications and develop and learn organization through the use of the internet. The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between netiquette and organizational culture among faculty members of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Iran. Materials and Methods: To achieve this aim, the research method in this study was correlational research, which belonged to the category of descriptive survey research. The target population comprised of 594 faculty members of the IUMS, from which a sample of 150 was randomly selected, based on a simple stratified sampling method. For collecting the required data, two researcher-made questionnaires were formulated. Even as the first questionnaire tended to measure the selected sample members’ organizational culture according to Rabbin's model (1999), the latter was designed in the Health Management and Economic Research Center (HMERC), to evaluate netiquette. The reliability of the questionnaires was computed by Choronbach's alpha coefficient formula and they happened to be 0.97 and 0.89, respectively. Ultimately, SPSS Version #15 was used for the statistical analysis of the data. Results: The findings revealed that the organizational culture and netiquette were below average level among the sample members, signifying a considerable gap in the mean. In spite of that, there was no significant relationship between netiquette and the organizational culture of the faculty members. Conclusion: Emphasizing the importance of cultural preparation and a network user's training, this research suggests that the expansion of network culture rules among IUMS and organizational official communications, through the use of internet

  3. Errors of oral medication administration in a patient with enteral feeding tube.

    PubMed

    Emami, Shahram; Hamishehkar, Hadi; Mahmoodpoor, Ata; Mashayekhi, Simin; Asgharian, Parina

    2012-07-01

    Enteral feeding tube is employed for feeding of critically ill patients who are unable to eat. In the cases of oral medication administration to enterally fed patients, some potential errors could happen. We report a 53-year-old man who was admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) of a teaching hospital due to the post-CPR hypoxemic encephalopathy. The patient was intubated and underwent mechanical ventilation. A nasogastric (NG) tube was used as the enteral route for nutrition and administration of oral medications. Oral medications were crushed then dissolved in tap water and were given to the patient through NG tube. In present article we report several medication errors occurred during enterally drug administration, including errors in dosage form selection, methods of oral medication administration and drug interactions and incompatibility with nutrition formula. These errors could reduce the effects of drugs and lead to unsuccessful treatment of patient and also could increase the risk of potential adverse drug reactions. Potential leading causes of these errors include lack of drug knowledge among physicians, inadequate training of nurses and lack of pharmacists participation in medical settings. PMID:24991587

  4. Teaching successful medication administration today: more than just knowing your 'rights'.

    PubMed

    Fothergill Bourbonnais, Frances; Caswell, Wenda

    2014-08-01

    Medication administration is an important skill taught in undergraduate nursing programs. Student learning for this activity includes not only how to prepare and administer medications, but also includes interventions such as patient and family teaching. Students also are taught a series of 'rights' in order to prevent medication errors. There are many factors, both personal and system related, which contribute to medication errors in the health care environment. The purpose of this article is to provide strategies for teaching students medication administration that encompass the multiple factors involved to ensure safe practice. This opinion paper is based on the authors' considerable years of teaching experience (35 years clinical setting and classroom teaching with senior students in final year of baccalaureate program for 1st author and 16 years total for co-author). Recommendations put forth by the authors are: a) leveling students' clinical experiences in administering medications to include understanding of system factors, b) structured scenarios and purposeful linking of theory to clinical courses to advance students' knowledge and skills related to medication administration as they progress through the program, 3) revisiting math skills. PMID:24857050

  5. How do Interruptions Impact Nurses’ Visual Scanning Patterns When Using Barcode Medication Administration Systems?

    PubMed Central

    He, Ze; Marquard, Jenna L.; Henneman, Philip L.

    2014-01-01

    While barcode medication administration (BCMA) systems have the potential to reduce medication errors, they may introduce errors, side effects, and hazards into the medication administration process. Studies of BCMA systems should therefore consider the interrelated nature of health information technology (IT) use and sociotechnical systems. We aimed to understand how the introduction of interruptions into the BCMA process impacts nurses’ visual scanning patterns, a proxy for one component of cognitive processing. We used an eye tracker to record nurses’ visual scanning patterns while administering a medication using BCMA. Nurses either performed the BCMA process in a controlled setting with no interruptions (n=25) or in a real clinical setting with interruptions (n=21). By comparing the visual scanning patterns between the two groups, we found that nurses in the interruptive environment identified less task-related information in a given period of time, and engaged in more information searching than information processing. PMID:25954449

  6. [Case report--cooperation among medical staff to improve home enteral nutrition and increase hope in a patient with dementia].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Mio; Hidaka, Kumi; Doi, Seiko; Hata, Akiko; Ibata, Takeshi; lijima, Shohei

    2013-12-01

    Herein, we describe the case of a man in his 70s who had slight dementia. Because of dysphagia, the patient received enteral nutrition by gastrostomy. The patient wished to care for his wife, who had severe dementia and was also receiving enteral nutrition. He was later re-hospitalized for aspiration-related pneumonia. At this point, it was discovered that the management of enteral nutrition via gastrostomy was different from that at the time of discharge from our hospital. Nutritional management during home care may change for various reasons after discharge from hospital. If a change is identified at the time of re-hospitalization, this process should be confirmed. In addition, it is necessary that any changes in nutritional management should benefit the patient. In order to improve the home care of the present patient, we changed his diet to semisolid enteral nutrition that was easier for him to manage. This diet would also be beneficial for the aspiration-related pneumonia. Importantly, we shared these changes in enteral nutrition with all medical staff involved in his care. This included explaining changes in nutritional content, dose, and method of delivery. PMID:24712154

  7. Medical devices; laser fluorescence caries detection device. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the laser fluorescence caries detection device into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are set forth below. The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997. The agency is classifying this device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:11010622

  8. Nurse delegation of medication administration for older adults in assisted living.

    PubMed

    Reinhard, Susan C; Young, Heather M; Kane, Rosalie A; Quinn, Winifred V

    2006-01-01

    Assisted living (AL) is a relatively new form of long-term care that offers residents personal care services and more independence in a home-like environment. Introduced to the United States in the 1980s, AL is changing the conventional thinking about how to care for frail older adults. One important issue to explore is registered nurse (RN) delegation to unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP), particularly for medication administration. This study provides a national perspective on medication delivery in AL settings from the perspectives of state Board of Nursing (BON) executives. Qualitative interviews using semi-structured interview guides were conducted with BON executives to validate a legal summary of AL regulations and nurse practice acts, and to identify nursing issues pertaining to medication management in AL across the United States. In this study, there was considerable variation across states regarding medication administration and the role of both the RN and the UAP. BON executives displayed a range of knowledge about nursing practice issues in AL, with many reporting low familiarity with this setting. Mechanisms for systematic review of quality of delegation were not in place. Medication administration and nurse delegation were dynamic issues, with practice and policy evolving concurrently. This study highlights the limited articulation of policies between agencies and across states in the important and growing setting of assisted living. Nurses have the opportunity to shape this evolving practice arena and to enhance awareness of the professional and clinical issues inherent in working with UAP in medication delivery. PMID:16597525

  9. Information technology for medication administration: assessing bedside readiness among nurses in Lebanon.

    PubMed

    Marini, Sana Daya; Hasman, Arie; Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad

    2009-03-01

    Medication errors continue to be of great concern to hospitals. The use of Information technology (IT) for medication administration was recommended to assist nurses to administer medications safely, decrease the chance of medication errors, and contribute to patient safety. Such IT will be operational soon in some Lebanese hospitals. Users' readiness and acceptance to use such an IT application is crucial as it is a prerequisite for successful system implementation. This descriptive study used the Technology Acceptance Model to determine the level of nurses' readiness to use IT for medication administration in Lebanon. The sample included nurses working in three different major hospitals in Beirut. Data were collected on nurses' demographics, attitudes, perceived usefulness and ease of use of IT for medication administration. During the first 2 weeks of July, 2007, nurses manually or electronically were asked to voluntarily complete the questionnaire. Results showed that the users' attitude towards the use of the proposed IT is correlated with their perceptions on system usefulness and ease of use. Many showed a positive attitude towards system use and scored high on both perceptions. Yet around 20% of the nurses in the sample showed a negative attitude towards the use of the proposed system. PMID:21631846

  10. 77 FR 18828 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Factors To Consider When Making...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ...; Factors To Consider When Making Benefit-Risk Determinations in Medical Device Premarket Approval and de... entitled ``Factors to Consider When Making Benefit-Risk Determinations in Medical Device Premarket Approval... When Making Benefit-Risk Determinations in Medical Device Premarket Approval and De...

  11. Professional or administrative value patterns? Clinical pathways in medical problem-solving processes.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Leif

    2007-11-01

    A health-care organization simultaneously belongs to two different institutional value patterns: a professional and an administrative value pattern. At the administrative level, medical problem-solving processes are generally perceived as the efficient application of familiar chains of activities to well-defined problems; and a low task uncertainty is therefore assumed at the work-floor level. This assumption is further reinforced through clinical pathways and other administrative guidelines. However, studies have shown that in clinical practice such administrative guidelines are often considered inadequate and difficult to implement mainly because physicians generally perceive task uncertainty to be high and that the guidelines do not cover the scope of encountered deviations. The current administrative level guidelines impose uniform structural features that meet the requirement for low task uncertainty. Within these structural constraints, physicians must organize medical problem-solving processes to meet any task uncertainty that may be encountered. Medical problem-solving processes with low task uncertainty need to be organized independently of processes with high task uncertainty. Each process must be evaluated according to different performance standards and needs to have autonomous administrative guideline models. Although clinical pathways seem appropriate when there is low task uncertainty, other kinds of guidelines are required when the task uncertainty is high. PMID:17958969

  12. 75 FR 59726 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological... Special Controls Guidance Document: Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays.'' This draft guidance document describes a means by which the herpes simplex virus (HSV) serological assay device...

  13. 75 FR 21632 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Total Product Life Cycle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Staff; Total Product Life Cycle: Infusion Pump--Premarket Notification Submissions; Availability AGENCY... announcing the availability of the draft guidance document entitled ``Total Product Life Cycle: Infusion Pump... external infusion pumps. DATES: Although you can comment on any guidance at any time (see 21 CFR...

  14. 76 FR 51993 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on In Vitro Companion...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... Register of July 14, 2011 (76 FR 41506). In the notice, FDA requested comments on a draft guidance document... 14, 2011 (76 FR 41506), FDA published a notice announcing the availability of the draft guidance... Staff on In Vitro Companion Diagnostic Devices; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and...

  15. 75 FR 69449 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Dear Health Care Provider...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ... Staff on Dear Health Care Provider Letters: Improving Communication of Important Safety Information... ``Dear Health Care Provider Letters: Improving Communication of Important Safety Information.'' Dear Health Care Provider (DHCP) Letters are correspondence--usually in the form of a mass mailing from...

  16. 76 FR 69274 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; 510(k) Device Modifications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... Device; Availability,'' that appeared in the Federal Register of July 27, 2011 (76 FR 44935). In that.... Background In the Federal Register of July 27, 2011 (76 FR 44935), FDA published a notice with a 90-day... Staff; 510(k) Device Modifications: Deciding When To Submit a 510(k) for a Change to an Existing...

  17. The Effect of the Senior High School Principal's Rule Administration Behavior on Staff Militancy and Leadership Perception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, William E.; Spaulding, H. Dale

    The central concern of the research reported in this speech was to investigate the relationships between the manner in which a senior high school principal administers rules and the teachers' perceptions of the principal's leadership, and staff militancy. The authors first discuss the conceptual framework for the study and then present the four…

  18. Evolution of Medication Administration Workflow in Implementing Electronic Health Record System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yuan-Han

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the clinical workflow evolutions when implementing the health information technology (HIT). The study especially emphasized on administrating medication when the electronic health record (EHR) systems were adopted at rural healthcare facilities. Mixed-mode research methods, such as survey, observation, and focus group, were…

  19. A School Administrator's Guide to the Family and Medical Leave Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosland, Carl C.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive, yet practical, reference for information and guidance to comply with the requirements of the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993. It provides school administrators with the latest information to ensure that school policies and practices are up-to-date and it helps to manage leave and avoid costly legal violations.…

  20. Developing an Academic Administration Clerkship for Upper-Division Medical Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hejna, William F.; Lerner, Wayne M.

    1978-01-01

    A course at Rush-Presbyterian-St. Luke's Medical Center in Chicago provides students with an understanding of the administrative responsibilities inherent in academic management positions. A practicum, thesis project, and seminars cover such topics as legislative trends and effects of health care institutions, manpower planning and recruitment,…

  1. The Relationship between Barcode Medication Administration Satisfaction and the Use of Workarounds among Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Sally F.

    2012-01-01

    Adverse drug events, resulting in preventable patient harm or death, are of great concern. To keep patients safe, hospitals have implemented barcode medication administration (BCMA) technology for RNs who have accepted this technology with varying levels of satisfaction. When nurses are dissatisfied with a BCMA system, they may find alternative…

  2. 75 FR 18219 - Drug and Medical Device Forum on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug and Medical Device Forum on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements and Supplier Controls; Public Educational Forum AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public educational forum. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration...

  3. Efficiency and Usability of a Near Field Communication-Enabled Tablet for Medication Administration

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Pamela M; Robertson, Alexandra; McEvoy, Dustin; Dinsmore, Michael; Sweet, Micheal; Bane, Anne; Takhar, Sukhjit S; Miles, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Background Barcode-based technology coupled with the electronic medication administration record (e-MAR) reduces medication errors and potential adverse drug events (ADEs). However, many current barcode-enabled medication administration (BCMA) systems are difficult to maneuver and often require multiple barcode scans. We developed a prototype, next generation near field communication-enabled medication administration (NFCMA) system using a tablet. Objective We compared the efficiency and usability of the prototype NFCMA system with the traditional BCMA system. Methods We used a mixed-methods design using a randomized observational cross-over study, a survey, and one-on-one interviews to compare the prototype NFCMA system with a traditional BCMA system. The study took place at an academic medical simulation center. Twenty nurses with BCMA experience participated in two simulated patient medication administration scenarios: one using the BCMA system, and the other using the prototype NFCMA system. We collected overall scenario completion time and number of medication scanning attempts per scenario, and compared those using paired t tests. We also collected participant feedback on the prototype NFCMA system using the modified International Business Machines (IBM) Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ) and a semistructured interview. We performed descriptive statistics on participant characteristics and responses to the IBM PSSUQ. Interview data was analyzed using content analysis with a qualitative description approach to review and categorize feedback from participants. Results Mean total time to complete the scenarios using the NFCMA and the BCMA systems was 202 seconds and 182 seconds, respectively (P=.09). Mean scan attempts with the NFCMA was 7.6 attempts compared with 6.5 attempts with the BCMA system (P=.12). In the usability survey, 95% (19/20) of participants agreed that the prototype NFCMA system was easy to use and easy to learn, with a pleasant

  4. The hospital board at risk and the need to restructure the relationship with the medical staff: bylaws, peer review and related solutions.

    PubMed

    Marren, John P; Feazell, G Landon; Paddock, Michael W

    2003-01-01

    This article argues that the current structure of the hospital governing board and medical staff relationship does not support and promote quality and patient-centered care. The fundamental flaw in the current structure is the interdependent, yet independent and discordant relationships between hospital governing boards and medical staffs. These relationships are described as cultures and fit into three types of "silos": organizational (the "structural silo"); professional (the "professional silo", including the "culture of blame"); and the fragmented quality information silo (the "informational silo"). While case law, statutory requirements and regulatory expectations clearly state that governing boards are ultimately responsible for quality of patient care, governing boards delegate these functions to medical staff without having sufficient information to measure and monitor quality. As a result, problems manifest because of these failures of oversight and compliance. Dramatic lapses in quality occur due to overuse, underuse, and misuse of healthcare services. Furthermore, the challenges and opportunities from improved quality and patient safety, as a strategic business driver, cannot be seized until the underlying structural flaws are understood and addressed. This article proposes that solutions become apparent when the various health care constituencies are educated about these cultural impacts and when multidisciplinary bodies, with board leadership and direct authority, integrate and consider quality information. PMID:12856456

  5. Donor organ distribution according to urgency of need or outcome maximization in liver transplantation. A questionnaire survey among patients and medical staff.

    PubMed

    Umgelter, Katrin S; Tobiasch, Moritz; Anetsberger, Aida; Blobner, Manfred; Thorban, Stefan; Umgelter, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Low donor rates in Germany cause a trade-off between equity in the distribution of chances for survival and efficiency in dead-donor liver transplantation. Public attitudes concerning the principles that should govern organ allocation are of interest. We performed a questionnaire-based study among patients and medical staff. 1826 of 2200 questionnaires were returned. 79.2%, 67.1%, and 24.4% patients wanted to accept liver transplantation for themselves if expected 1-year survival was 80%, 50%, and 20%, respectively. 57.7% affirmed 'averting immediate risk of death (urgency) is a more important criterion for organ allocation than expected long-term success' (P = 0.002 against indifference). The majority of medical staff took the opposite decision. 20.7%, 8.8%, and 21.2% of patients chose 50%, 33%, and 10% as lowest acceptable 5-year survival, respectively. 49.3% accepted a survival of <10%. Variables associated with preferring urgency over efficiency as criterion for allocation were age (OR 1.009; 95% CI: 1.000-1.017; female gender (OR 1.331; 95%CI 0.992-1.784); higher education (OR 0.881; 95%CI 0.801-0.969); and refusal of transplantation for oneself (OR 1.719; 95%CI 1.272-2.324). Most patients supported urgency-based liver allocation. Patients and medical staff would accept lower survival rates than the transplant community. PMID:25557453

  6. [Government tutelage of mothers and children in Argentina: administrative structures, law, and technical staff (1936-1955)].

    PubMed

    Biernat, Carolina; Ramacciotti, Karina

    2008-01-01

    The article describes and analyzes one of the political projects that gained strength in Argentina during the between-war years and remained in place throughout Peronism: government tutelage of mothers and children. It examines how the Dirección de Maternidad e Infancia viewed the mother-child dyad, how this office proposed to address the issue of infant mortality, what type of technical staff was in place, and what limitations were encountered in trying to enforce these ideas. It also looks at what changed and what stayed the same at the office under Peronism. PMID:19397024

  7. Implementing a patient centered medical home in the Veterans health administration: Perspectives of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Stewart, Kenda R; Stewart, Gregory L; Rosenthal, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of a patient centered medical home challenges primary care providers to change their scheduling practices to enhance patient access to care as well as to learn how to use performance metrics as part of a self-reflective practice redesign culture. As medical homes become more commonplace, health care administrators and primary care providers alike are eager to identify barriers to implementation. The objective of this study was to identify non-technological barriers to medical home implementation from the perspective of primary care providers. We conducted qualitative interviews with providers implementing the medical home model in Department of Veterans Affairs clinics-the most comprehensive rollout to date. Primary care providers reported favorable attitudes towards the model but discussed the importance of data infrastructure for practice redesign and panel management. Respondents emphasized the need for administrative leadership to support practice redesign by facilitating time for panel management and recognizing providers who utilize non-face-to-face ways of delivering clinical care. Health care systems considering adoption of the medical home model should ensure that they support both technological capacities and vertically aligned expectations for provider performance. PMID:26250631

  8. 77 FR 70166 - Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is establishing a public docket for information pertaining to FDA's implementation of the provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act (FDASIA) related to medical gases. This action is intended to ensure that information submitted to FDA on the implementation of the medical gas provisions of FDASIA is available to all......

  9. Design and implementation of web-based mobile electronic medication administration record.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sung-Huai; Hou, I-Ching; Cheng, Po-Hsun; Tan, Ching-Ting; Shen, Po-Chao; Hsu, Kai-Ping; Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Lai, Feipei

    2010-10-01

    Patients' safety is the most essential, critical issue, however, errors can hardly prevent, especially for human faults. In order to reduce the errors caused by human, we construct Electronic Health Records (EHR) in the Health Information System (HIS) to facilitate patients' safety and to improve the quality of medical care. During the medical care processing, all the tasks are based upon physicians' orders. In National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH), the Electronic Health Record committee proposed a standard of order flows. There are objectives of the standard: first, to enhance medical procedures and enforce hospital policies; secondly, to improve the quality of medical care; third, to collect sufficient, adequate data for EHR in the near future. Among the proposed procedures, NTUH decides to establish a web-based mobile electronic medication administration record (ME-MAR) system. The system, build based on the service-oriented architecture (SOA) as well as embedded the HL7/XML standard, is installed in the Mobile Nursing Carts. It also implement accompany with the advanced techniques like Asynchronous JavaScript and XML (Ajax) or Web services to enhance the system usability. According to researches, it indicates that medication errors are highly proportion to total medical faults. Therefore, we expect the ME-MAR system can reduce medication errors. In addition, we evaluate ME-MAR can assist nurses or healthcare practitioners to administer, manage medication properly. This successful experience of developing the NTUH ME-MAR system can be easily applied to other related system. Meanwhile, the SOA architecture of the system can also be seamless integrated to NTUH or other HIS system. PMID:20703613

  10. Moving Staff through Difficult Issues. Ideas for Training Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie; Pelo, Ann

    2002-01-01

    Offers practical solutions to three problems faced by administrators of early childhood education programs: motivating staff with different levels of commitment, dealing with staff communications and conflicts, and minimizing the impact of teacher turnover. (JPB)

  11. Product-line administration: a framework for redefining medical record department services.

    PubMed

    Postal, S N

    1990-06-01

    Product-line administration is a viable approach for managing medical records services in an environment that demands high quantity and quality service levels. Product-line administration directs medical record department team members to look outside of the department and seek input from the customers it is intended to serve. The feedback received may be alarming at first, as the current state of products usually reveals a true lack of customer input. As the planning, defining, managing, and marketing phases are implemented, the road will not be easy and rewards will be slow to come. Product-line administration does not provide quick fixes, but it does provide long-term problem resolution as products are refined and new products developed to meet customer needs and expectations. In addition to better meeting the needs of the department's external customers, the department's internal customers' needs and expectations will be addressed. The participative management approach will help nurture each team member's creativity. The team members will have the opportunity to reach their full potential while reaping the rewards and benefits of providing products and services that meet the needs and expectations of all department customers. The future of the health care industry promises more changes as the country moves toward some form of prospective payment in the ambulatory setting. Reactive management and the constant struggle to catch up can no longer be accepted as a management approach. It is imperative that the medical record department be viewed as a business with product lines composed of quality products. The planning, defining, managing, and marketing components of product-line administration afford responsiveness to the current situation and the development of quality products that will ensure that medical record departments are prepared for the future. PMID:10106655

  12. Improving Medication Administration Safety in a Community Hospital Setting Using Lean Methodology.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all health care organizations have goals of improving patient safety, but despite clear goals and considerable investments, gains have been limited. This article explores a community hospital's resounding success using Lean methodology to improve medication administration safety with process changes designed by engaged employees and leaders with the knowledge and skill to effect improvements. This article inspires an interdisciplinary approach to quality improvement using reproducible strategies. PMID:25599523

  13. Legal aspects of administrating antipsychotic medications to jail and prison inmates.

    PubMed

    Dlugacz, Henry; Wimmer, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The administration of antipsychotic medications to jail and prison inmates involves two related components: conducting the informed consent process in a coercive environment and, where consent is not obtained, forcible administration of medication if needed. In the United States, both involve common law, statutory, and constitutional principles. Obtaining informed consent in correctional institutions is complicated. Patients in correctional institutions lack access to alternate sources of information, and depend on the correctional system completely - a system which they may distrust. This may influence the patient's view of the administering physician. Where consent cannot be obtained, forcible administration may be legally permissible for two primary reasons: to restore a criminal defendant to competency in order to stand trial and to ameliorate severe symptoms of mental disability, particularly when they threaten the safety of self, others, or in some instances, property. The interests at stake for the individual and the government, and the legal standards developed to balance these interests, differ between the two situations. When considering challenges to forcible medication of inmates serving a prison sentence, the United States Supreme Court has treated the interest of the institution in maintaining security as paramount. By contrast, when considering challenges to forcible medication of pretrial detainees, the Court's concern for the fair trial rights guaranteed by the Sixth Amendment has seemingly led it to moderate its emphasis on security. However, this distinction is not stable and may in fact be breaking down, as the recent case of Jared Loughner demonstrates. This article discusses the various federal, state, and international legal standards applicable to both informed consent and forcible medication, and their implementation in the correctional setting, focusing on issues related to the United States. PMID:23683884

  14. 75 FR 70271 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Pressure Wound Therapy; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT).'' This guidance document describes a means by which non-powered suction... Device Intended for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT)'' to the Division of Small...

  15. 76 FR 69040 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for Yersinia Species Detection.'' This draft guidance document describes a means by which in vitro diagnostic devices for Yersinia species (spp.) detection may comply with the requirement of special controls for class II......

  16. Empowering Staff and Clients: Comparing Preferences for Management Models by the Professional Degrees Held by Organization Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardina, Donna; Montana, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    In this article, findings from a national survey of social service managers are described. Respondents were asked to identify theories and models of management that influenced their administrative activities. The results indicate that many of the respondents used an empowerment-oriented approach to management. Respondents were more likely to…

  17. 76 FR 29251 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls; Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... Administration (FDA) is correcting a notice that appeared in the Federal Register of April 25, 2011 (76 FR 22906...., Bldg. 66, Rm. G424, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301-796-6438. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR Doc...; Class II Special Controls; Guidance Document: Topical Oxygen Chamber for Extremities;...

  18. 75 FR 53316 - Draft Guidance for Food and Drug Administration Staff and Tobacco Retailers on Civil Money...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Adolescents.'' When this guidance document is final, several provisions in the Family Smoking Prevention and... Products, Food and Drug Administration, 9200 Corporate Blvd., Rockville, MD 20850-3229. Send one self... Restricting the Sale and Distribution of Cigarettes and Smokeless Tobacco to Protect Children and...

  19. 75 FR 53971 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Impact-Resistant Lenses: Questions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Impact-Resistant Lenses: Questions and Answers.'' This guidance document answers manufacturer, importer, and consumer questions on impact-resistant lenses, including questions on test procedures, lens testing apparatus, record maintenance, and exemptions to...

  20. Using a Policy Classification Model to Analyze Major Changes Regarding Control and Administration of Policies Relative to Professional Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozma, Ernest J.; Walker, John H.

    There has been a diversity of activity to change policies relating to the recruitment, admission, and preparation of new educational professionals in college and university settings. These policies, coupled with state mandated polices to upgrade the competence of current teachers and administrators, has resulted in a great amount of policy to…

  1. Perceptions and Attitudes of Administrative and Counseling Staffs Toward Drug Use and Abuse in Nebraska Junior Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Gerald Douglass

    Administrators and counselors at one private and six public junior colleges in Nebraska answered questions and offered their opinions on and knowledge of drug use and abuse in their colleges. Topics covered by this study include: kinds of student involved; extent of the problem on Nebraska junior college campuses; factors that influence students…

  2. 76 FR 22903 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing That a Tobacco...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ...The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Establishing That a Tobacco Product Was Commercially Marketed in the United States as of February 15, 2007.'' This draft guidance provides information on how a manufacturer may demonstrate that a tobacco product was commercially marketed in the United States as of February 15, 2007. In this......

  3. 75 FR 32952 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; “‘Harmful and Potentially...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act''; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Products as Used in Section 904(e) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance... Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance, when finalized, will discuss the meaning of the term ``harmful...

  4. 76 FR 5387 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; “`Harmful and Potentially Harmful...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In the Federal Register of June 10, 2010 (75 FR 32952), FDA announced... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act''; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Section 904(e) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This guidance provides written guidance...

  5. 76 FR 81510 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; the 510(k) Program...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... Communication, Outreach and Development (HFM-40), Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER), Food and... Stephen Ripley, Center for Biologics Evaluation and Research (HFM-17), Food and Drug Administration, 1401... Evaluations--Volume II: Task Force on the Utilization of Science in Regulatory Decision Making...

  6. Convergence and translation: attitudes to inter-professional learning and teaching of creative problem-solving among medical and engineering students and staff

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare worldwide needs translation of basic ideas from engineering into the clinic. Consequently, there is increasing demand for graduates equipped with the knowledge and skills to apply interdisciplinary medicine/engineering approaches to the development of novel solutions for healthcare. The literature provides little guidance regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, effective interdisciplinary learning for engineering and medical students in a team-based project context. Methods A quantitative survey was distributed to engineering and medical students and staff in two universities, one in Ireland and one in Belgium, to chart knowledge and practice in interdisciplinary learning and teaching, and of the teaching of innovation. Results We report important differences for staff and students between the disciplines regarding attitudes towards, and perceptions of, the relevance of interdisciplinary learning opportunities, and the role of creativity and innovation. There was agreement across groups concerning preferred learning, instructional styles, and module content. Medical students showed greater resistance to the use of structured creativity tools and interdisciplinary teams. Conclusions The results of this international survey will help to define the optimal learning conditions under which undergraduate engineering and medicine students can learn to consider the diverse factors which determine the success or failure of a healthcare engineering solution. PMID:24450310

  7. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical, psychiatric and psychological... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall... psychological care provided to convicted inmates. (b) Staff shall advise the court, through the U.S. Marshal,...

  8. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medical, psychiatric and psychological... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall... psychological care provided to convicted inmates. (b) Staff shall advise the court, through the U.S. Marshal,...

  9. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical, psychiatric and psychological... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall... psychological care provided to convicted inmates. (b) Staff shall advise the court, through the U.S. Marshal,...

  10. Every move counts in learning: filipino clinical instructors' scaffolding behaviors in teaching medication administration.

    PubMed

    Valdez, Les Paul M; de Guzman, Allan B; Escolar-Chua, Rowena L

    2013-10-01

    The role of clinical instructors in preparing student nurses for the realities and dynamics of clinical practice cannot be underestimated. Previous literature has identified scaffolding as a diagnostic tool that enables both supervisor and learner to recognize knowledge-in-waiting and knowledge-in-use (Spouse, 1998). The pivotal role of scaffolding in the teaching-learning process cannot be underestimated. However, literature pertaining to its use in nursing is hard to locate (Dickieson, Carter and Walsh, 2008; Spouse, 1998). Hence, this qualitative study was conducted to capture nursing students' views and experiences of the scaffolding moves of their clinical instructors as they learn medication administration. From the thickness and richness of the descriptions of a select group of nursing students (n=31) in a comprehensive university in the Philippines, three interesting and yet intersecting themes surfaced relative to the scaffolding moves employed by clinical instructors, which include: (1) thought-provoking; (2) focus-steering; and (3) action-enabling. The said moves are carried out in a timely fashion to facilitate students' acquisition of knowledge, skills and attitudes pertaining to medication administration. Through the understanding of clinical instructors' scaffolding behaviors, this study provides a platform for more effective clinical instruction aimed at supporting future nurses' role in medication safety. PMID:22818953

  11. Proposal for a European Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical administrative data (PHRIMA).

    PubMed

    Burgun, Anita; Oksen, Dina V; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas; Buchan, Iain; van Staa, Tjeerd; Cunningham, James; Gjerstorff, Marianne L; Dufour, Jean-Charles; Gibrat, Jean-Francois; Nikolski, Macha; Verger, Pierre; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Masella, Cristina; Lettieri, Emanuele; Bertele, Paolo; Salokannel, Marjut; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Persoz, Charles; Chêne, Geneviève; Ohmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, health and medical administrative data is increasingly accumulating on a national level. Looking further than re-use of this data on a national level, sharing health and medical administrative data would enable large-scale analyses and European-level public health projects. There is currently no research infrastructure for this type of sharing. The PHRIMA consortium proposes to realise the Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical Administrative data (PHRIMA) which will enable and facilitate the efficient and secure sharing of healthcare data. PMID:26262306

  12. Islamic Personal Religiosity as a Moderator of Job Strain and Employee's Well-Being: The Case of Malaysian Academic and Administrative Staff.

    PubMed

    Achour, Meguellati; Mohd Nor, Mohd Roslan; MohdYusoff, Mohd Yakub Zulkifli

    2016-08-01

    Presently, there is increased in research on job strain and the effects of religiosity on employee well-being. Despite increased recognition of religiosity as a moderator of well-being, limited research has focused on Islamic perspective of moderating job strain. This study examines the moderating effects of Islamic personal religiosity on the relationship between job strain and employee well-being in Malaysian universities. One hundred and seventeen (117) Muslim academic and administrative staff from four public universities were sampled. Data were collected via questionnaires, and our findings show that the effect of job strain on well-being is significant for employees and that personal religiosity of employees contributed to alleviating job strain and enhancing well-being. Thus, the study concludes that Islamic personal religiosity moderates the relationship between job strain and employee well-being. PMID:25835985

  13. Retaining medical directors in community health centers. The importance of administrative relationships.

    PubMed

    Cochran, Christopher; Peltier, James W

    2003-01-01

    Physician retention has become a critical issue for maintaining the success of today's health care organizations. With many external factors--increasing malpractice premiums, lower reimbursement rates, and managed care controls--driving physicians out of the practice, it is imperative to understand how the internal functions of the organization can help maintain satisfaction in the workplace and prevent physicians from leaving (Reece, 2000; Taylor, 2002). This is especially important in Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs), federally supported health clinics providing care to low-income and uninsured patients in medically underserved communities and neighborhoods. In this study, we examine the medical directors' roles and responsibilities, their relationships with the C/MHC administrators, and whether these impact satisfaction and, ultimately retention in the centers. PMID:12856504

  14. Medical devices; revocation of cardiac pacemaker registry. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-11-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to revoke a regulation requiring a cardiac pacemaker registry. The registry, which was mandated by the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984, requires any physician and any provider of services who requests or receives Medicare payment for an implantation, removal, or replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker devices and pacemaker leads to submit certain information to the registry. The information is used by FDA to track the performance of permanent cardiac pacemakers and pacemaker leads and by the Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA) to administer its Medicare payment program for these devices. This action is being taken to implement an act to Repeal An Unnecessary Medical Device Reporting Requirement passed by Congress in 1996 to remove the cardiac pacemaker registry to eliminate duplicative and unnecessary reporting. PMID:11010690

  15. Using administrative medical claims data to supplement state disease registry systems for reporting zoonotic infections

    PubMed Central

    Coulter, Steven; Conner, William

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine what, if any, opportunity exists in using administrative medical claims data for supplemental reporting to the state infectious disease registry system. Materials and methods Cases of five tick-borne (Lyme disease (LD), babesiosis, ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain spotted fever (RMSF), tularemia) and two mosquito-borne diseases (West Nile virus, La Crosse viral encephalitis) reported to the Tennessee Department of Health during 2000–2009 were selected for study. Similarly, medically diagnosed cases from a Tennessee-based managed care organization (MCO) claims data warehouse were extracted for the same time period. MCO and Tennessee Department of Health incidence rates were compared using a complete randomized block design within a general linear mixed model to measure potential supplemental reporting opportunity. Results MCO LD incidence was 7.7 times higher (p<0.001) than that reported to the state, possibly indicating significant under-reporting (∼196 unreported cases per year). MCO data also suggest about 33 cases of RMSF go unreported each year in Tennessee (p<0.001). Three cases of babesiosis were discovered using claims data, a significant finding as this disease was only recently confirmed in Tennessee. Discussion Data sharing between MCOs and health departments for vaccine information already exists (eg, the Vaccine Safety Datalink Rapid Cycle Analysis project). There may be a significant opportunity in Tennessee to supplement the current passive infectious disease reporting system with administrative claims data, particularly for LD and RMSF. Conclusions There are limitations with administrative claims data, but health plans may help bridge data gaps and support the federal administration's vision of combining public and private data into one source. PMID:22811492

  16. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: Council on Naturopathic Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Council on Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME) is a programmatic accrediting agency. CNME's current scope of recognition is the accreditation and preaccreditation throughout the United States of graduate level, four-year naturopathic medical education programs leading to the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (N.M.D.) or Doctor of Naturopathy…

  17. 28 CFR 570.42 - Non-medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Non-medical escorted trips. 570.42... RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.42 Non-medical escorted trips. (a) Non-medical escorted trips allow an inmate to leave the institution under staff escort for approved, non-medical...

  18. 28 CFR 570.42 - Non-medical escorted trips.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Non-medical escorted trips. 570.42... RELEASE COMMUNITY PROGRAMS Escorted Trips § 570.42 Non-medical escorted trips. (a) Non-medical escorted trips allow an inmate to leave the institution under staff escort for approved, non-medical...

  19. Nurses' Perceptions of the Impact of Work Systems and Technology on Patient Safety during the Medication Administration Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher Gordon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines nurses' perceptions of the impacts of systems and technology utilized during the medication administration process on patient safety and the culture of medication error reporting. This exploratory research study was grounded in a model of patient safety based on Patricia Benner's Novice to Expert Skill…

  20. Improving Patient Safety by Identifying Side Effects from Introducing Bar Coding in Medication Administration

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Emily S.; Cook, Richard I.; Render, Marta L.

    2002-01-01

    Objective. In addition to providing new capabilities, the introduction of technology in complex, sociotechnical systems, such as health care and aviation, can have unanticipated side effects on technical, social, and organizational dimensions. To identify potential accidents in the making, the authors looked for side effects from a natural experiment, the implementation of bar code medication administration (BCMA), a technology designed to reduce adverse drug events (ADEs). Design. Cross-sectional observational study of medication passes before (21 hours of observation of 7 nurses at 1 hospital) and after (60 hours of observation of 26 nurses at 3 hospitals) BCMA implementation. Measurements. Detailed, handwritten field notes of targeted ethnographic observations of in situ nurse–BCMA interactions were iteratively analyzed using process tracing and five conceptual frameworks. Results. Ethnographic observations distilled into 67 nurse–BCMA interactions were classified into 12 categories. We identified five negative side effects after BCMA implementation: (1) nurses confused by automated removal of medications by BCMA, (2) degraded coordination between nurses and physicians, (3) nurses dropping activities to reduce workload during busy periods, (4) increased prioritization of monitored activities during goal conflicts, and (5) decreased ability to deviate from routine sequences. Conclusion. These side effects might create new paths to ADEs. We recommend design revisions, modification of organizational policies, and “best practices” training that could potentially minimize or eliminate these side effects before they contribute to adverse outcomes. PMID:12223506

  1. The Relationship Between Nursing Experience and Education and the Occurrence of Reported Pediatric Medication Administration Errors.

    PubMed

    Sears, Kim; O'Brien-Pallas, Linda; Stevens, Bonnie; Murphy, Gail Tomblin

    2016-01-01

    Medication errors are one of the most common incidents in the hospitals. They can be harmful, and they are even more detrimental for pediatric patients. This study explored the relationship between nursing experience, education, the frequency and severity of reported pediatric medication administration errors (PMAEs). The data for this study were collected from a larger pan Canadian study. A survey tool was developed to collect self-reported data from nurses. In addition to descriptive statistics, a Poisson regression or a multiple linear regression was completed to address the research questions, and a Boneferrai correction was conducted to adjust for the small sample size. Results demonstrated that on units with more nurses with a higher level of current experience, more PMAEs were reported (p=.001), however; the PMAEs reported by these nurses were not as severe (p=.003). Implications to advance both safe medication delivery in the pediatric setting and safe culture of reporting for both actual and potential errors are identified. PMID:26872514

  2. Differential medical and surgical house staff involvement in end-of-life decisions: A retrospective chart review.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Amy S; Gold, Heather T; Roach, Keith W; Fins, Joseph J

    2006-08-01

    To quantify the house officer's role in end-of-life decisions, the authors abstracted charts for documentation of end-of-life discussions for 100 patients withdrawn from life-sustaining treatment. They assessed the proportion of end-of-life care notes written by house officers, controlling for service, length of stay, outpatient physician involvement, race, and diagnostic category. Patients on the medical service were 22 times more likely to have house officer end-of-life notes than patients on the surgical service (P < 0.00001). Sixty-one percent of medical patients and 10% of surgical patients had a do-not-resuscitate note written by a house officer (P < 0.00001). House officers on the medical service wrote a significantly greater proportion of notes regarding withdrawal of care than surgical house officers (41% vs. 10%, P < 0.00001). This study reveals extensive involvement of medical house officers in primary end-of-life discussions with a complex patient population undergoing withdrawal of life-sustaining therapy. Team structure and professional culture may account for some of the observed differences between the medical and surgical services. These findings have significant implications for the education of house officers on end-of-life communication. PMID:16877178

  3. A comparison of comorbidities obtained from hospital administrative data and medical charts in older patients with pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of comorbidities in risk adjustment for health outcomes research is frequently necessary to explain some of the observed variations. Medical charts reviews to obtain information on comorbidities is laborious. Increasingly, electronic health care databases have provided an alternative for health services researchers to obtain comorbidity information. However, the rates obtained from databases may be either over- or under-reported. This study aims to (a) quantify the agreement between administrative data and medical charts review across a set of comorbidities; and (b) examine the factors associated with under- or over-reporting of comorbidities by administrative data. Methods This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of patients aged 55 years and above, hospitalized for pneumonia at 3 acute care hospitals. Information on comorbidities were obtained from an electronic administrative database and compared with information from medical charts review. Logistic regression was performed to identify factors that were associated with under- or over-reporting of comorbidities by administrative data. Results The prevalence of almost all comorbidities obtained from administrative data was lower than that obtained from medical charts review. Agreement between comorbidities obtained from medical charts and administrative data ranged from poor to very strong (kappa 0.01 to 0.78). Factors associated with over-reporting of comorbidities were increased length of hospital stay, disease severity, and death in hospital. In contrast, those associated with under-reporting were number of comorbidities, age, and hospital admission in the previous 90 days. Conclusions The validity of using secondary diagnoses from administrative data as an alternative to medical charts for identification of comorbidities varies with the specific condition in question, and is influenced by factors such as age, number of comorbidities, hospital admission in the previous 90 days, severity

  4. THE ROLE OF OBSERVATION AND FEEDBACK IN ENHANCING PERFORMANCE WITH MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION.

    PubMed

    Davies, Karen; Mitchell, Charles; Coombes, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Legislation in Queensland such as the Health (Drugs and Poisons) Regulation 1996, the national registration competency standards set by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia, and the Continuing Professional Development Registration Standards made pursuant to the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law define expected standards of practice for nurses. The Framework for Assessing Standards for Practice for Registered Nurses, Enrolled Nurses and Midwives, released in July 2015, includes the principles for assessing standards but not the methods. Local policies and procedures offer specific requirements founded on evidence-based practice. Observation of clinical practice with the provision of immediate descriptive feedback to individual practitioners has been associated with improved performance. This column describes the role of regular observation and individual feedback on medication administration as a strategy to enhance performance and patient care. PMID:26939498

  5. Identification of Job Coach Competencies, Staff Roles and Agency Administrative Patterns. Summary Report from the Community-Based Supported Employment Symposium (St. Cloud, Minnesota, June 10-11, 1986).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Association for Rehabilitation, Education, and Training.

    A symposium on community-based supported employment for developmentally disabled adults in Minnesota was attended by agency direct service staff who provide job training, executive directors and administrators of agencies, and personnel who refer clients to agencies providing supported work and other types of community-based training and…

  6. Perceptions by Faculty, Staff, and Administrators of the Role of Intercollegiate Athletics at a Metropolitan University as a NCAA Division II Athletics Program Reclassifies to a NCAA Division I Athletics Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisel, John B.; Navin, John C.; Sullivan, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides empirical findings associated with the perceptions of faculty, staff, and administrators regarding a decision to reclassify a metropolitan university's athletics program from NCAA Division II to NCAA Division I. A survey is developed that asks respondents about their perceptions of the current state of the athletics program,…

  7. College and University Staff Development Workshop Proceedings (Willamette University, December 2-3, 1976; Otter Crest, April 20-21, 1977). [Statewide Infusion of Career Education into the Preparation of Teachers, Counselors and Administrators].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Zola, Ed.

    This report summarizes the two statewide staff development workshops that were conducted for faculties of Oregon colleges and universities participating in a consortium project designed to infuse career education into the preparation of teachers, counselors, and administrators. (Three previous workshops are reported in CE 019 416.) Included in…

  8. [Anti-tetanus immunity among university students and health staff in North Lebanon and administration of anti-tetanus serums in two hospitals].

    PubMed

    Hamze, M; Hlais, S; Dabboussi, F; Mallat, H

    2014-10-01

    Tetanus is a serious illness that kills about one million people a year globally. This study aimed to i) evaluate immunity against tetanus (by antibodies titres in blood) among health staff and students at the Public Health Faculty, Lebanese University, ii) explore the determinants of the anti-tetanus immunity by a questionnaire and iii) estimate anti-tetanic serum use in the emergency departments of two hospitals (1 private, 1 public) in Tripoli. Most of the participants (76.6%) had anti-tetanus antibody titres ≥ 0.1 UI/mL. There was no association between immune status and gender (P = 0.614) but more participants ≤ 25 years were immunized than those > 25 years (P < 0.001) and more students were immunized than employees (P = 0.032). There was an inverse association between anti-tetanus immunity and having visited a physician in the past year (P = 0.009). In 2011, 1037 people received anti-tetanus immunoglobulins at the hospitals, 73% at the private hospital. Vaccination campaigns targetting adults > 25 years may be warranted to assure good anti-tetanus protection and avoid administration of anti-tetanus immunoglobulins in emergency departments. PMID:25356694

  9. Assessment of occupational radiation exposure among medical staff in health-care facilities in the Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Khaled Fikry; AlObireed, Abdulrahman; AlBagawi, Mohammed; AlSufayan, Yuosef; AlSerheed, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation exposure poses hazards for health-care providers as well as patients in health-care facilities (HCFs). Radiographic imaging is extremely valuable as a diagnostic tool in medicine, but ionizing radiation and computed tomography (CT) scan carry well-known potential risks. Personnel and radiation safety monitoring is an important safety precaution in the practice of radiography. Aim: The study aimed to assess the occupational radiation exposure and safety protection among medical staff in HCFs in the Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Materials and Methods: Total of 4 HCFs with radiological services were randomly selected for the study in the period from January to April 2013. The radiation survey has been carried out by the measurement of radiation in the x-ray and CT-scan room at different points of the diagnostic, imaging, and waiting rooms of different hospitals. The radiation safety was assessed by using a questionnaire Results: The results of our study are surprising and alarming. Data revealed that there are a significant association between the levels of radiation exposure in all selected hospitals concerning imaging and waiting X-ray and CT-scan operating room (P < 0.01). For radiation safety, most hospitals have lead aprons and thyroid shields in place, but only about 50% have lead glasses and lead shields, showing that many hospitals still lack essential equipment. Moreover, actual utilization rate of radiation dosimeters are 57.7% and 68.9%, respectively. Conclusion: All medical staff as well as patients are at risk of exposure to x-ray and CT-scan radiation exposure, and the levels are exceeding the standard guidelines. Many hospitals still lack safety protection tools and there is a complete absence of radiation protection equipment. Further studies should be conducted to highlight different aspects of radiation exposure dose and safety protection tools. PMID:27390475

  10. Effectiveness of a modified administration protocol for the medical treatment of canine pyometra.

    PubMed

    Contri, Alberto; Gloria, Alessia; Carluccio, Augusto; Pantaleo, Stefania; Robbe, Domenico

    2015-03-01

    Pyometra is one of the most common diseases in intact bitches. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified aglepristone protocol for the medical treatment of pyometra in the bitch. Of these, 73 bitches affected by pyometra of different breeds and age (2-14 years old) were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to a control group (CTG - 26 bitches) treated with classical protocol (aglepristone at 0, 1 and 6 days - day 0 = day of the diagnosis) and a modified treated group (MTG - 47 bitches) treated with a different administration protocol (aglepristone at 0, 2, 5 and 8 days). The classical protocol with the anti-progestagen aglepristone was effective in 88.5 % (23/26) of CTG bitches while the modified protocol was effective in all (47/47) of MTG bitches. One of the 23 CTG bitches received a further administration on day 14, which resolved the pyometra, while in the three cases of CTG bitches, in which the treatment was ineffective, an ovariohysterectomy was carried out. The modified protocol showed a success rate of 100 %, compared with the classical protocol proposed in the literature, and no recurrence of the disease was recorded in the 24 months follow up. After treatment, the oestrus onset was earlier than expected (interoestrus of 128 ± 32 days). In this study, the modified treatment protocol showed high efficacy and lack of recurrence within 24 months, suggesting a complete recovery of reproductive function in the bitch, with a normal fertility. PMID:25323020

  11. Helicopter emergency medical services crew administration of antibiotics for open fractures.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Stephen H; Arthur, Annette O; Howard, Zoe; Shear, Melissa L; Kadzielski, John L; Vrahas, Mark S

    2013-01-01

    This study had 3 major aims: (1) to ascertain the degree to which helicopter emergency medical services (HEMS) administration of antibiotics (Abx) can streamline the time to Abx in open fracture patients, (2) to determine whether any clinical outcome improvements were associated with HEMS Abx therapy, and (3) to calculate the cost-effectiveness of prehospital HEMS Abx. The design of the study was a prospective, nonrandomized, nonintervention, natural study of timing and clinical outcomes for patients with suspected open extremity fracture. There were 138 scene trauma cases transported by 8 participating HEMS programs from July 2009 to June 2010. The participating HEMS programs were both urban and rural. The diagnosis of an open fracture by the HEMS crews had an accuracy rate of 97.8% (95% confidence interval, 90.8%-98.4%). The time from the incident to Abx was 30 minutes shorter (P = .0001) when Abx were administered by HEMS crews. There was no statistical significance (P = 1.0) regarding the endpoint of infection or nonunion development in HEMS- versus hospital-administered Abx. In conclusion, the administration of Abx by HEMS crews to patients diagnosed with open extremity fractures is feasible, it may decrease the time to Abx by 30 minutes, and the effect magnitude (40.3% relative risk reduction) was promising. PMID:23452364

  12. Use of an Electronic Medication Administration Record (eMAR) for Surveillance of Medication Omissions: Results of a One Year Study of Antimicrobials in the Inpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Bruce R.; Sabuda, Deana M.; Bresee, Lauren C.; Conly, John M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Medication administration omissions (MAO) are usually considered medication errors but not all MAO are clinically relevant. We determined the frequency of clinically relevant MAO of antimicrobial drugs in adult hospitals in Calgary, Alberta, Canada based on electronic medication administration record (eMAR). Methods We examined 2011 data from eMAR records on medical wards and developed a reproducible assessment scheme to categorize and determine clinical relevance of MAO. We applied this scheme to records from 2012 in a retrospective cohort study to quantify clinically relevant MAO. Significant predictors of clinically relevant MAO were identified. Results A total of 294,718 dose records were assessed of which 10,282 (3.49%) were for doses not administered. Among these 4903 (1.66% of total); 47.68% of MAO were considered clinically relevant. Significant positive predictors of clinically relevant MAO included inhaled (OR 4.90, 95% CI 3.54-6.94) and liquid oral (OR 1.32, 95% CI 1.18-1.47) route of medication compared to solid oral and irregular dose schedules. Evening nursing shift compared to night shift (OR 0.77 95% CI 0.70-0.85) and parenteral (OR 0.50, 95% CI 0.46-0.54) were negative predictors, The commonest reasons for relevant MAO were patient preference, unspecified reason, administration access issues, drug not available or patient condition. Conclusion Assessment of MAO by review of computer records provides a greater scope and sample size than directly observed medication administration assessments without “observer” effect. We found that MAO of antimicrobials in inpatients were uncommon but were seen more frequently with orally administered antimicrobials which may have significance to antimicrobial stewardship initiatives. PMID:25856373

  13. Medical devices; gastroenterology-urology devices; nonimplanted, peripheral electrical continence device. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying the nonimplanted, peripheral electrical continence device into class II (special controls). The special controls that will apply to this device are set forth below. The agency is taking this action in response to a petition submitted under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976, the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990, and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997. The agency is classifying this device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device. PMID:11010624

  14. Staff Association Handbook, 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery Coll. Staff Association, Takoma Park, MD.

    This handbook provides a list of Staff Senate and Committee members of the Staff Association of Montgomery College, a copy of the bylaws of the association, and sections of the college's "Policies and Procedures Manual" that affect staff employees. These sections of the manual pertain to: Administrative and Staff Communication; Affirmative Action…

  15. Comparison of endotracheal intubation, combitube, and laryngeal mask airway between inexperienced and experienced emergency medical staff: A manikin study

    PubMed Central

    Saeedi, Morteza; Hajiseyedjavadi, Houman; Seyedhosseini, Javad; Eslami, Vahid; Sheikhmotaharvahedi, Hojat

    2014-01-01

    Background: Emergency Medical Service (EMS) personnel manage the airway, but only a group of them are allowed to engage in Endotracheal Intubation (ETI). Our purpose was to evaluate if the use of laryngeal mask airway (LMA) or Combitube can be used by inexperienced care providers. Materials and Methods: A randomized, prospective manikin study was conducted. Fifty-nine participants were randomly assigned into two groups. Experienced group included 16 paramedics, eight anesthetic-technicians, and inexperienced group included 27 Emergency Medical Technician-Basic (EMT-B) and eight nurses. Our main outcomes were success rate and time to airway after only one attempt. Results: Airway success was 73% for ETI, 98.3% for LMA, and 100% for Combitube. LMA and Combitube were faster and had greater success than ETI (P = 0.0001). Inexperienced had no differences in time to securing LMA compared with experienced (6.05 vs. 5.4 seconds, respectively, P = 0.26). One failure in inexperienced, and no failure in experienced group occurred to secure the LMA (P = 0.59). The median time to Combitube placement in experienced and inexperienced was 5.05 vs. 5.00 seconds, P = 0.65, respectively. Inexperienced and experienced groups performed ETI in 19.15 and 17 seconds, respectively (P = 0.001). After the trial, 78% preferred Combitube, 15.3% LMA, and 6.8% ETI as the device of choice in prehospital setting. Conclusion: Time to airway was decreased and success rate increased significantly with the use of LMA and combitube compared with ETI, regardless of the experience level. This study suggests that both Combitube and LMA may be acceptable choices for management of airway in the prehospital setting for experienced and especially inexperienced EMS personnel. PMID:25625062

  16. Staff Caricatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Templeton, Kristine

    2010-01-01

    This article describes how the author brings staff and students together through an art project that deals with caricatures. The author started with a lesson on caricature, and she made a PowerPoint presentation showcasing the work of Al Hirschfeld. Using photos of the staff, students created portraits and hung them in a main hallway after school.…

  17. Myelosuppression grading of chemotherapies for hematologic malignancies to facilitate communication between medical and dental staff: lessons from two cases experienced odontogenic septicemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    and facilitating communication between medical and dental staff. During the period around the primary chemotherapy, especially for de novo hematologic malignancy patients who often received grade B to C myelosuppression chemotherapy, caution should be exercised for severe odontogenic infection by the oral medicine team, irrespective of whether invasive treatment is to be performed. PMID:23957921

  18. 28 CFR 551.32 - Staff supervision.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff supervision. 551.32 Section 551.32 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Inmate Organizations § 551.32 Staff supervision. (a) The Warden shall appoint a staff member as...

  19. Yes, We Can Improve Staff Morale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Dick B.

    A literature review and discussion the effect of school administrators on staff morale is presented in this paper. Four factors for improving staff morale include: a supportive workplace; meaningful incentives; a good working environment; and personal display of high morale by the administrator. Ten recommendations for improving staff relations…

  20. Improving Breast Cancer Preventive Behavior among Female Medical Staff: The Use of Educational Intervention based on Health Belief Model

    PubMed Central

    TORBAGHAN, Ameneh Eskandari-; FARMANFARMA, Khadijah Kalan-; MOGHADDAM, Alireza Ansari-; ZAREI, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is one of the most common types of cancer prevalent among women worldwide. Preventive behaviors such as early diagnosis through screening tests play an important role in prevention and control of the disease. This study aimed to determine the effects of educational intervention using a health belief model on breast cancer preventive behaviors. Methods: This interventional study was conducted on 130 female employees of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences who were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. A questionnaire, made and validated by the researcher, was completed before and one month after training by the study subjects. Data were analysed using regression analysis, independent sample T-test, chi-square and Pearson’s correlation coefficient using the SPSS software 18. Results: There were significant changes in the training group, following educational intervention in the awareness construct and in some constructs of the model including perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers, as well as in practice compared to the control group (P < 0.05). Nevertheless, perceived barriers remained as the only predictor in the model, such that for every unit increase in this variable, the behavior score increased by 18%. Conclusion: The use of educational intervention based on Health Belief Model had positive effect on knowledge of breast cancer preventive behaviors among participants. PMID:25977633

  1. Energy-efficient management of lighting in a Veterans Administration medical center

    SciTech Connect

    Verderber, R.R.; Arthur, A.; Morse, O.; Rubinstein, F.

    1981-03-01

    More thn 200 solid-state fluorescent ballasts were installed in representative areas of the Veterans Administration Medical Center in Long Beach, California, to determine the cost-effectiveness of the installation and to measure levels of conducted and radiated electromagnetic interference (EMI). The power, illumination, and EMI levels were measured first as the test sites initially existed, then after the fixtures were cleaned and relamped with energy-saving fluorescent lamps, and finally after the core-coil ballasts were replaced with solid-state ballasts. The annual energy savings for the complete retrofit was measured as 34%. In the director's suite natural daylight was used to supplement the electrical illumination, saving an additional 20 to 25% in energy. Thus, in that area, the total annual energy savings amounted to 51%. EMI levels were measured in general areas (lobby and director's suite), in diagnostic examination areas, and in a coronary care ward. The EMI levels, compared to existing levels, were not considered excessive. All of the above data are analyzed on the basis of life-cycle costing. The analysis is presented on sets of curves relating the cost-effective price of a ballast to the cost of electrical energy.

  2. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA 91-395-2244, Veterans Administration Medical Center, Los Angeles, California

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.E.; Miller, A.

    1992-08-01

    In response to a request from an employee of the Veterans Administration Medical Center (SIC-8062), Los Angeles, California, an investigation was undertaken of exposures to chemicals in the laboratory department, excessive heat and humidity in the kitchen area of the dietetics department, and carbon-monoxide (630080) exposures inside the building. In three of five personal breathing zone samples taken in the histopathology laboratory, formaldehyde (50000) was detected at concentrations up to 0.17 part per million (ppm) and it was also present in all four of the area air samples at concentrations up to 1.1ppm. The predominant symptoms associated with work in the laboratory included occasional headaches and nose/throat irritation. Mild episodes of dermal irritation and rash were also reported. All carbon-monoxide levels were less than 5ppm. In the kitchens, relative humidity levels were below the recommended range. Temperatures were above the range of temperatures recommended for a medium level of work. The authors conclude that a potential carcinogenic risk existed for workers in laboratories which use formaldehyde. The authors recommend specific measures to lower the risk of formaldehyde exposures in the laboratory.

  3. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical, psychiatric and psychological... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall provide the pretrial inmate with the same level of basic medical (including dental), psychiatric,...

  4. 28 CFR 551.114 - Medical, psychiatric and psychological.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical, psychiatric and psychological... MANAGEMENT MISCELLANEOUS Pretrial Inmates § 551.114 Medical, psychiatric and psychological. (a) Staff shall provide the pretrial inmate with the same level of basic medical (including dental), psychiatric,...

  5. 78 FR 17611 - Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-22

    ... these new sections. On November 23, 2012 (77 FR 70166), FDA issued a Federal Register notice... FR 74852), FDA issued a notice of availability announcing publication of a draft guidance for... Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases; Request for Comments Regarding...

  6. Instructional Design Process for a Course on Time Management for Head Nurses and Supervisors at a Veterans Administration Medical Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geering, Adrian D.

    This paper develops an instructional design process for teaching a time management course to head nurses and supervisors. (The course was conducted at the Veterans' Administration Medical Center, Lincoln, Nebraska, and was based on "A New Instructional Design Development Process for Instructors of Adults," by Mary Jane Even.) The paper covers…

  7. Glossitis and tongue trauma subsequent to administration of an oral medication, using an udder infusion cannula, in a horse.

    PubMed

    Fuller, Mark C; Abutarbush, Sameeh M

    2007-08-01

    A 10-year-old gelding was presented with a tongue that had swelled immediately after oral administration of oxfendazole, using an udder infusion cannula. The tongue appeared to have been punctured inadvertently. The horse recovered after treatment with intravenous fluid, antibiotics, and anti-inflammatory drugs. Administering oral medication by this method should be discouraged. PMID:17824329

  8. Examination of cross contamination risks between hospitals by external medical staff via cross-sectional intercept survey of hand hygiene

    PubMed Central

    Schiffers, Hank; Zaatreh, Sarah; Mittelmeier, Wolfram; Bader, Rainer

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Work in hospitals is supported by contributions of life sciences industry representatives (IR) in various ways of fields. Close contact between them, caretakers and patients is unavoidable, even in situations where hygiene is critical. The present study investigates whether IR display comparable levels of Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) contamination after being exposed to a shared environment for a minimum of 4 hours. Material and methods: An anonymous survey to sample a group of healthcare professionals for traces of fingertip contamination was performed. We used dip slides (S. aureus and MRSA) to evaluate 311 healthcare professionals at the medical exhibition MEDICA. After applying exclusion criteria 298 participants remained valid, they consisted of 208 industry representatives, 49 nurses and 41 physicians. Results: IR where engaged in hospitals, operating rooms and outpatient clinics (82%, 41.8%, 51.9% respectively). 65.9% of IR (vs. 48.8% physicians and 40.8% nurses) carried a microbiological burden ≥104 CFU (colony forming units). Neither S. aureus (≥104 CFU) in IR (40.9%) did show statistical differences in contamination patterns in comparison to physicians (43.9%, p=0.346) and nurses (36.7%, p=0.878) nor did MRSA (physicians p=0.579, nurses p=0.908). We were unable to differentiate transient from pre-existing permanent colonization. Conclusion: Exposure to the same environment may result in similar hand contamination patterns of IR when compared caregivers. This supports the concern that industry representatives can cause cross infection between hospitals and hygiene sensitive areas like operation room, intensive care unit and central sterilization units particularly. Further study is required to clarify whether pre-existing bacterial colonization is an influencing factor and how industry is taking care of this to create a safe working environment for their employees, the customers and

  9. An exploration of cancer staff attitudes and values.

    PubMed

    McKegney, F P; Visco, G; Yates, J; Hughes, J

    1979-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team involved in the care of patients with advanced cancer including physicians, nurses, social workers, physical therapists, nutritionists, clergymen, enterostomal therapists, biostatisticians and administrative personnel were studied over a period of eighteen months. A prospective study of staff attitudes and values about life, disease, and medical care which focused particularly on cancer, cancer treatment and patients with cancer was undertaken. Data were gathered from the staff by written responses to the following instruments: 1) Rokeach Value Survey and 2) a Personal Attitudes Toward Illness Questionnaire. This longitudinal prospective study demonstrated the reliability of scrutinizing individual and collective staff characteristics in a cancer care team. Although most team members had minimal previous contact with clinical research or with patients with advanced cancer, increased exposure did not result in changes in staff attitudes and values over the period of seventeen months. PMID:481321

  10. Medical Inspection of Schools in Great Britain. Bulletin, 1916, No. 49

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, E. L.

    1917-01-01

    This bulletin comprises the results of personal investigations supplemented by official reports covering the entire work of medical inspection as developed in Great Britain, including: (1) History of the development of medical inspection in England, Wales, and Scotland; (2) Administration by the chief medical staff, (3) Medical examination--the…

  11. Administrative data is as good as medical chart review for comorbidity ascertainment in patients with infections in Singapore.

    PubMed

    Hwang, J; Chow, A; Lye, D C; Wong, C S

    2016-07-01

    The Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) is widely used for control of confounding from comorbidities in epidemiological studies. International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-coded diagnoses from administrative hospital databases is potentially an efficient way of deriving CCI. However, no studies have evaluated its validity in infectious disease research. We aim to compare CCI derived from administrative data and medical record review in predicting mortality in patients with infections. We conducted a cross-sectional study on 199 inpatients. Correlation analyses were used to compare comorbidity scores from ICD-coded administrative databases and medical record review. Multivariable regression models were constructed and compared for discriminatory power for 30-day in-hospital mortality. Overall agreement was fair [weighted kappa 0·33, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0·23-0·43]. Kappa coefficient ranged from 0·17 (95% CI 0·01-0·36) for myocardial infarction to 0·85 (95% CI 0·59-1·00) for connective tissue disease. Administrative data-derived CCI was predictive of CCI ⩾5 from medical record review, controlling for age, gender, resident status, ward class, clinical speciality, illness severity, and infection source (C = 0·773). Using the multivariable model comprising age, gender, resident status, ward class, clinical speciality, illness severity, and infection source to predict 30-day in-hospital mortality, administrative data-derived CCI (C = 0·729) provided a similar C statistic as medical record review (C = 0·717, P = 0·8548). In conclusion, administrative data-derived CCI can be used for assessing comorbidities and confounding control in infectious disease research. PMID:26758244

  12. Pharmaceutical Use among Older Adults: Using Administrative Data to Examine Medication-Related Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metge, Colleen Jane; Grymonpre, Ruby; Yogendran, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Medication use is recognized as the least expensive, most cost-effective health care intervention. In older adults this is especially important, as they are the largest consumer of prescription medications. We describe the use of a linked data set including pharmaceutical, medical, and hospital claims to examine pharmaceutical use in the…

  13. Understanding the causes of intravenous medication administration errors in hospitals: a qualitative critical incident study

    PubMed Central

    Keers, Richard N; Williams, Steven D; Cooke, Jonathan; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the underlying causes of intravenous medication administration errors (MAEs) in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals. Setting Two NHS teaching hospitals in the North West of England. Participants Twenty nurses working in a range of inpatient clinical environments were identified and recruited using purposive sampling at each study site. Primary outcome measures Semistructured interviews were conducted with nurse participants using the critical incident technique, where they were asked to discuss perceived causes of intravenous MAEs that they had been directly involved with. Transcribed interviews were analysed using the Framework approach and emerging themes were categorised according to Reason's model of accident causation. Results In total, 21 intravenous MAEs were discussed containing 23 individual active failures which included slips and lapses (n=11), mistakes (n=8) and deliberate violations of policy (n=4). Each active failure was associated with a range of error and violation provoking conditions. The working environment was implicated when nurses lacked healthcare team support and/or were exposed to a perceived increased workload during ward rounds, shift changes or emergencies. Nurses frequently reported that the quality of intravenous dose-checking activities was compromised due to high perceived workload and working relationships. Nurses described using approaches such as subconscious functioning and prioritising to manage their duties, which at times contributed to errors. Conclusions Complex interactions between active and latent failures can lead to intravenous MAEs in hospitals. Future interventions may need to be multimodal in design in order to mitigate these risks and reduce the burden of intravenous MAEs. PMID:25770226

  14. Modeling nurses' acceptance of bar coded medication administration technology at a pediatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Roger L; Scanlon, Matthew C; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2012-01-01

    Objective To identify predictors of nurses' acceptance of bar coded medication administration (BCMA). Design Cross-sectional survey of registered nurses (N=83) at an academic pediatric hospital that recently implemented BCMA. Methods Surveys assessed seven BCMA-related perceptions: ease of use; usefulness for the job; social influence from non-specific others to use BCMA; training; technical support; usefulness for patient care; and social influence from patients/families. An all possible subset regression procedure with five goodness-of-fit indicators was used to identify which set of perceptions best predicted BCMA acceptance (intention to use, satisfaction). Results Nurses reported a moderate perceived ease of use and low perceived usefulness of BCMA. Nurses perceived moderate-or-higher social influence to use BCMA and had moderately positive perceptions of BCMA-related training and technical support. Behavioral intention to use BCMA was high, but satisfaction was low. Behavioral intention to use was best predicted by perceived ease of use, perceived social influence from non-specific others, and perceived usefulness for patient care (56% of variance explained). Satisfaction was best predicted by perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness for patient care, and perceived social influence from patients/families (76% of variance explained). Discussion Variation in and low scores on ease of use and usefulness are concerning, especially as these variables often correlate with acceptance, as found in this study. Predicting acceptance benefited from using a broad set of perceptions and adapting variables to the healthcare context. Conclusion Success with BCMA and other technologies can benefit from assessing end-user acceptance and elucidating the factors promoting acceptance and use. PMID:22661559

  15. Physical qualification of drivers; medical examination; certificate. Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA), DOT. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-10-01

    This document updates and simplifies the medical examination form that is currently used to determine the physical qualification of commercial motor vehicle (CMV) drivers operating in interstate commerce. The FMCSA takes this action in response to numerous requests from medical examiners to update and simplify the medical examination form that is currently used. This action is intended to reduce the incidence of errors on such forms and to provide more uniform medical examinations of CMV drivers engaged in interstate commerce. The current Federal physical qualification standards tested by medical examiners and recorded on the form will not be revised in this rulemaking. PMID:11503655

  16. Innovating team-based outpatient mental health care in the Veterans Health Administration: Staff-perceived benefits and challenges to pilot implementation of the Behavioral Health Interdisciplinary Program (BHIP).

    PubMed

    Barry, Catherine N; Abraham, Kristen M; Weaver, Kendra R; Bowersox, Nicholas W

    2016-05-01

    In the past decade, the demand for Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health care has increased rapidly. In response to the increased demand, the VHA developed the Behavioral Health Interdisciplinary Program (BHIP) team model as an innovative approach to transform VHA general outpatient mental health delivery. The present formative evaluation gathered information about pilot implementation of BHIP to understand the struggles and successes that staff experienced during facility transitions to the BHIP model. Using a purposive, nonrandom sampling approach, we conducted 1-on-1, semistructured interviews with 37 licensed and nonlicensed clinical providers and 13 clerical support staff assigned to BHIP teams in 21 facilities across the VHA. Interviews revealed that having actively involved facility mental health leaders, obtaining adequate staffing for teams to meet the requirements of the BHIP model, creating clear descriptions and expectations for team member roles within the BHIP framework, and allocating designated time for BHIP team meetings challenged many VHA sites but are crucial for successful BHIP implementation. Despite the challenges, staff reported that the transition to BHIP improved team work and improved patient care. Staff specifically highlighted the potential for the BHIP model to improve staff working relationships and enhance communication, collaboration, morale, and veteran treatment consistency. Future evaluations of the BHIP implementation process and BHIP team functioning focusing on patient outcomes, organizational outcomes, and staff functioning are recommended for fully understanding effects of transitioning to the BHIP model within VHA general mental health clinics and to identify best practices and areas for improvement. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27148949

  17. Reviewing staff performance and salaries.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura Sachs

    2005-01-01

    Do you feel like you're on shaky ground when it comes time to evaluate your staffs performance or to give them raises? If so, you're not alone. Staff performance and salary reviews are among the most dreaded tasks among medical practice managers. Yet, they are among the most effective techniques you can use to motivate, manage, correct, and reward your staff. This article provides an overview of the different kinds of appraisals you will need to conduct with your staff and the order in which to do them. It suggests that you begin the process by establishing concrete goals for your medical practice and then help your staff follow suit by developing their own performance goals for the next six months. This article also provides how-to guidance about conducting regular interim progress reviews with your staff to keep abreast of progress, changes, and problems and to issue ongoing assistance and feedback. It explains how to conduct tension-free semi-annual staff performance reviews and semi-annual or annual salary reviews, including a formula for calculating potential raises for each employee in nine increments. Finally, this article offers additional tips for evaluating your staffs performance, including job description updates and staff surveys. PMID:16302443

  18. A Quantitative Analysis of the Effect of Simulation on Medication Administration in Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scudmore, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors are a leading cause of injury and death in health care, and nurses are the last line of defense for patient safety. Nursing educators must develop curriculum to effectively teach nursing students to prevent medication errors and protect the public. The purpose of this quantitative, quasi-experimental study was to determine if…

  19. The Impact of Word Processing on Office Administration in the Medical and Allied Health Professions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Platt, Naomi Dornfeld

    The effect of word processing equipment on the future medical secretarial science curriculum was studied. A literature search focused on word processing and the medical and allied health professions, word processing and business education, and futuring of and changes in the secretarial science curriculum. Questionnaires to identify various aspects…

  20. An Administrator's Suggestions for a Sample Staff Training Program Sequence in an Early Childhood Education Center for Handicapped Children. Vol. 1, No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirby, Fred W.

    Described is a projected 40-hour staff training program in general educational principles for personnel in early childhood education centers. Three developmental goals of early childhood educational programs are said to be: wholesome self concept, acceptable social concepts, and aesthetic concepts. Program aspects discussed are: educational…

  1. A Prosecutor's Handbook for School Administrators. (Revised.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakland County Office of Prosecuting Attorney, Pontiac, MI.

    This handbook analyzes problems encountered by school administrators and staff involving school law, student rights, and school legal responsibility. Each section summarizes the relevant county, state, and federal laws and court decisions pertaining to such areas as student disturbances, student medical care, truancy, school security, married…

  2. Understanding the information dynamics of medication administration in residential aged care facilities (RACFs): a prerequisite for design of effective ICT systems.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amina; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Medication information is a critical part of the information required to ensure residents' safety in the highly collaborative care context of RACFs. Studies report poor medication information as a barrier to improve medication management in RACFs. Research exploring medication work practices in aged care settings remains limited. This study aimed to identify contextual and work practice factors contributing to breakdowns in medication information exchange in RACFs in relation to the medication administration process. We employed non-participant observations and semi-structured interviews to explore information practices in three Australian RACFs. Findings identified inefficiencies due to lack of information timeliness, manual stock management, multiple data transcriptions, inadequate design of essential documents such as administration sheets and a reliance on manual auditing procedures. Technological solutions such as electronic medication administration records offer opportunities to overcome some of the identified problems. However these interventions need to be designed to align with the collaborative team based processes they intend to support. PMID:23941954

  3. Issues surrounding the administration of a credit course for medical students: survey of US academic health sciences librarians*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jolene Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: For librarians developing a credit course for medical students, the process often involves trial and error. This project identified issues surrounding the administration of a credit course, so that librarians nationally can rely more upon shared knowledge of common practices and less upon trial and error. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to the education services librarian at each medical school listed in the 2000 AAMC Data Book. A second questionnaire was sent to those librarians who did not return the first one. Results: Of the 125 librarians surveyed, 82 returned the questionnaire. Of those 82, only 11 offered a credit course for medical students, though 19 more were in the process of developing one. Data were gathered on the following aspects of course administration: credit course offerings, course listing, information learned to administer the course, costs associated with the course, relationships with other departments on campus, preparation for teaching and grading, and evaluation of the course. Conclusions: Because of small number of respondents offering a credit course and institutional variations, making generalizations about issues surrounding the administration of a credit course is difficult. The article closes with a list of recommendations for librarians planning to develop a course. PMID:15243642

  4. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew.

    PubMed

    Rizal, Rachel E; Mediratta, Rishi P; Xie, James; Kambhampati, Swetha; Hills-Evans, Kelsey; Montacute, Tamara; Zhang, Michael; Zaw, Catherine; He, Jimmy; Sanchez, Magali; Pischel, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful servicelearning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students' attitudes about population health, highlights the program's outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians. PMID:26170731

  5. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew

    PubMed Central

    Rizal, Rachel E; Mediratta, Rishi P; Xie, James; Kambhampati, Swetha; Hills-Evans, Kelsey; Montacute, Tamara; Zhang, Michael; Zaw, Catherine; He, Jimmy; Sanchez, Magali; Pischel, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful servicelearning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students’ attitudes about population health, highlights the program’s outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians. PMID:26170731

  6. Prevalence and cost of medication nonadherence in Parkinson's disease: evidence from administrative claims data.

    PubMed

    Davis, Keith L; Edin, Heather M; Allen, Jeffery K

    2010-03-15

    We estimated the prevalence of medication nonadherence in Parkinson's disease (PD) and the association between treatment nonadherence and healthcare costs. Insurance claims from over 30 US health plans were analyzed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: PD diagnosis, >or=1 PD-related prescription between 1/1/1997 and 12/31/2004, continuous health plan enrollment for >or=6 months before and >or=12 months after first PD prescription. Adherence, all-cause healthcare utilization, and all-cause costs were evaluated over 12 months post-treatment initiation. Adherence was measured using the medication possession ratio (MPR), with MPR < 0.8 defining nonadherence. Among patients identified for inclusion (N = 3,119), 58% were male and mean age was 69 years. Mean MPR was 0.58 and 61% of patients were nonadherent. Unadjusted mean medical costs were significantly higher (P < 0.01) among nonadherers ($15,826) compared with adherers ($9,228), although nonadherers had lower prescription drug costs ($2,684 vs. $3,854; P < 0.05). After controlling for confounders in multivariable analyses, a large positive relationship between nonadherence and both medical and total healthcare costs remained (+$3,451, P < 0.0001 and +$2,383, P = 0.0053, respectively). Medication adherence in PD is suboptimal and nonadherence may be associated with increased healthcare costs despite offsets from reduced drug intake. Efforts to promote medication adherence in PD may lead to cost savings for managed care systems. PMID:20131374

  7. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations in Medical Research: Perceptions and Experiences of Older Italians, Their Families, Ethics Administrators and Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hughson, Jo-anne; Parker, Anna; Bresin, Agnese; Hajek, John; Knoch, Ute; Phan, Tuong Dien; Story, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-participation of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients in medical research remains a problem in migrant and refugee destination countries such as Australia. The aims of this study were to explore i) CALD persons’ perceptions and experiences of the medical system and medical research, in this case, older Italian Australians; and ii) the views of research professionals on CALD patient participation in medical research. Design and Methods A qualitative study was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, in 2015 utilising in-depth interviews and focus groups with four stakeholder groups: older Italian Australians (n=21); adult children of older Italian Australians (n=10); hospital Human Research Ethics Committee administrators (n=4); and clinical researchers (n=4). The data were analysed for content and thematic analysis. Results Themes for the CALD and family group were getting by in medical interactions; receptivity to medical research: testing the waters; and, receptivity to technology for support: passive versus active. Themes for the researcher and HREC groups about CALD patient participation in research were: exclusion; cultural factors; and e-consent. Conclusions Our findings from four stakeholder perspectives and experiences confirm that there were considerable cultural, linguistic, and resourcing barriers hindering the participation of older Italian-Australians in medical research. Furthermore, our findings showed that in this study setting there were few enabling strategies in place to address these barriers despite the national ethics guidelines for equitable participation in research. The findings informed the creation of a multimedia tool whose purpose is to address and improve representation of CALD groups in clinical research. Significance for public health Many people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds remain excluded from medical research such as clinical trials due to a range of language and

  8. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  9. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  10. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  11. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  12. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  13. 13 CFR 400.105 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 400.105 Section 400.105... Board Procedures § 400.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the Board advises... with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff,...

  14. 1 CFR 15.3 - Staff assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff assistance. 15.3 Section 15.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PREPARATION, TRANSMITTAL, AND PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS SERVICES TO FEDERAL AGENCIES General § 15.3 Staff assistance. The staff of the Office of...

  15. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics... GUARANTEED LOAN § 1310.6 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and assists the Board... administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and performs such other duties as...

  16. 1 CFR 15.3 - Staff assistance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2014-01-01 2012-01-01 true Staff assistance. 15.3 Section 15.3 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER PREPARATION, TRANSMITTAL, AND PROCESSING OF DOCUMENTS SERVICES TO FEDERAL AGENCIES General § 15.3 Staff assistance. The staff of the Office of...

  17. 77 FR 43846 - Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Medical Devices Workshop; Notice of Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products Development is announcing the following workshop: FDA Pediatric... Office of Orphan Product Development and will include participants from the FDA's Center for Devices...

  18. A reconstruction of a medical history from administrative data: with an application to the cost of skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Rowell, David; Gordon, Louisa G; Olsen, Catherine M; Whiteman, David C

    2015-01-01

    The medical record is a repository of clinical data, which can greatly enhance the quality of health and healthcare analysis. Administrative data are collected for the purpose of billing and reimbursement, and are valued by health researchers because the data are routinely audited to maintain accurate financial records. However, the quantity of incorporated clinical data can be variable. In this paper we reconstruct the medical record from health service invoices to estimate the cost of treating keratinocytic cancer (KC). The data from an epidemiological survey were linked to an administrative data set supplied by the national health insurer. A matched sampling technique with multivariable analysis was used to estimate cost. A KC treatment was identified with 42 service codes which explicitly nominated treatment of a KC. Algorithms identifying comorbities potentially correlated with KC were constructed from the service codes. The annual cost of a KC treatment was estimated to be AU$667 per individual. The average cost of explicit KC treatments was AU$231, while the cost of generic procedures used to treat KC was AU$436. Our ability to accurately control for the medical history enabled our analysis to quantify and describe the constituent costs of KC treatment. PMID:25853002

  19. Veterans Administration support for medical research: opinions of the endangered species of physician-scientists.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Stanley; Crabbe, John C; Cooper, George; Finkelman, Fred; Largman, Corey; McCarley, Robert W; Rice, Louis; Rubin, Janet; Richardson, Bruce; Seil, Frederick; Snider, Gordon L; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2004-10-01

    Over the past three decades the Veterans Affairs (VA) Research program has evolved into a powerful, peer-reviewed funding mechanism for basic and translational research that has resulted in numerous important contributions to medical science and improvements in patient care. Continuity in VA Merit Review funding has fostered and nurtured the scientific careers of a large number of physician-scientists who have remained devoted to the mission of performing creative and innovative research that affects the patient care mission of the VA. VA medical research policies have undergone a major overhaul in the past year. Although many of these changes (de-emphasizing bench research and revamping the peer review process) have recently been reversed, the future direction of VA research remains in flux. The goal of this manuscript is to demonstrate the importance of the Merit Review medical research funding mechanism not just to the VA, but to the entire nation's health care system. To achieve this goal, the opinions of 65 established VA medical investigators were obtained regarding the past success and future direction of VA research. The conclusions reached include the following. 1) Merit Review research funding has been essential to the training, recruitment, and retention of productive VA physician-scientists. 2) The VA research program has contributed both basic and clinical innovations that have led to improvements in medical care. Contributions of VA researchers to excellence in many aspects of patient care at VA hospitals have been extraordinary. 3) Development of initiatives that entice outstanding Ph.D.'s to develop their careers in the VA has been crucial to the success of the program. 4) The VA research program has fostered a mutually beneficial relationship with affiliated medical schools. 5) Better methods to quantify VA research contributions and outcomes are essential for future program development. PMID:15466355

  20. Educate, Medicate, or Litigate? What Teachers, Parents, and Administrators Must Do about Student Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGiulio, Robert C.

    This book explores factors that contribute to antisocial behavior among students and reviews the literature on preventing and responding to antisocial behavior. Chapter 1, "A Culture of Violence," links the widespread perception that school violence is increasing to a broader culture of violence. Schools are increasingly turning to medication and…

  1. Medication use in residential care for older people with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Medication administration may appear to be a 'simple' nursing task, but this audit published in Learning Disability Practice found that, due to a combination of multiple medication use and medical complexity in older people with learning disabilities, it can be more complicated than staff realise. PMID:27573967

  2. 28 CFR 541.32 - Medical and mental health care in the SHU.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical and mental health care in the SHU... necessary medical care. Emergency medical care is always available. (b) Mental Health Care. After every 30..., mental health staff will examine you, including a personal interview. Emergency mental health care...

  3. 28 CFR 541.32 - Medical and mental health care in the SHU.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medical and mental health care in the SHU... necessary medical care. Emergency medical care is always available. (b) Mental Health Care. After every 30..., mental health staff will examine you, including a personal interview. Emergency mental health care...

  4. 28 CFR 541.32 - Medical and mental health care in the SHU.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical and mental health care in the SHU... necessary medical care. Emergency medical care is always available. (b) Mental Health Care. After every 30..., mental health staff will examine you, including a personal interview. Emergency mental health care...

  5. 28 CFR 541.32 - Medical and mental health care in the SHU.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical and mental health care in the SHU... necessary medical care. Emergency medical care is always available. (b) Mental Health Care. After every 30..., mental health staff will examine you, including a personal interview. Emergency mental health care...

  6. Medical devices; exemption from premarket notification and reserved devices; class I. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-01-14

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its classification regulations to designate class I devices that are exempt from the premarket notification requirements, subject to certain limitations, and to designate those class I devices that remain subject to premarket notification requirements under the new statutory criteria for premarket notification requirements. The devices FDA is designating as exempt do not include class I devices that have been previously exempted by regulation from the premarket notification requirements. This action is being taken under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the 1976 amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (SMDA), and the FDA Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). FDA is taking this action in order to implement a requirement of FDAMA. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing that it is withdrawing proposed rules to revoke existing exemptions from premarket notification for two devices. PMID:11010655

  7. Compliance with adjuvant capecitabine in patients with stage II and III colon cancer: comparison of administrative versus medical record data.

    PubMed

    Amlani, Adam; Kumar, Aalok; Ruan, Jenny Y; Cheung, Winson Y

    2016-08-01

    We aimed to examine the frequency of treatment delays as well as the reasons and appropriateness of such delays in early stage colon cancer patients receiving adjuvant capecitabine by comparing data from pharmacy dispensing versus medical records. Patients diagnosed with stage II or III colon cancer from 2008 to 2012 and who received at least two cycle of adjuvant capecitabine were reviewed for treatment delays. Data from pharmacy dispensing and patient medical records were compared. Multivariate regression models were constructed to identify predictors of treatment delays. A total of 697 patients were analyzed: median age was 70 years (IQR 30-89), 394 (57%) were men, 598 (86%) reported Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group 0/1, and 191 (27%) had stage II disease. In this study cohort, 396 (57%) patients experienced at least 1 treatment delay during their adjuvant treatment. Upon medical record review, half of treatment delays identified using pharmacy administrative data were actually attributable to side effects, of which over 90% were considered clinically appropriate for patients to withhold rather than to continue the drug. The most prevalent side effects were hand-foot syndrome and diarrhea which occurred in 176 (44%) and 67 (17%) patients, respectively. Multivariate analysis revealed a statistically significant association between stage and inappropriate treatment delays whereby patients with stage II disease were more likely to experience drug noncompliance (OR 1.79, 95% CI: 1.27-2.53, P < 0.001) than those with stage III disease. Compliance with adjuvant capecitabine was reasonable. Adherence ascertained from pharmacy administrative data differs significantly from that obtained from medical records. PMID:27228415

  8. Creating a Culture of Safety Around Bar-Code Medication Administration: An Evidence-Based Evaluation Framework.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kandace; Harrington, Linda; Matos, Pat; Turner, Barbara; Johnson, Constance

    2016-01-01

    Bar-code medication administration (BCMA) effectiveness is contingent upon compliance with best-practice protocols. We developed a 4-phased BCMA evaluation program to evaluate the degree of integration of current evidence into BCMA policies, procedures, and practices; identify barriers to best-practice BCMA use; and modify BCMA practice in concert with changes to the practice environment. This program provides an infrastructure for frontline nurses to partner with hospital leaders to continually evaluate and improve BCMA using a systematic process. PMID:26641468

  9. Identifying the Latent Failures Underpinning Medication Administration Errors: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Rebecca; Carruthers, Sam; Gardner, Peter; Wright, John; McEachan, Rosie R C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this article was to identify the latent failures that are perceived to underpin medication errors. Study Setting The study was conducted within three medical wards in a hospital in the United Kingdom. Study Design The study employed a cross-sectional qualitative design. Data Collection Methods Interviews were conducted with 12 nurses and eight managers. Interviews were transcribed and subject to thematic content analysis. A two-step inter-rater comparison tested the reliability of the themes. Principal Findings Ten latent failures were identified based on the analysis of the interviews. These were ward climate, local working environment, workload, human resources, team communication, routine procedures, bed management, written policies and procedures, supervision and leadership, and training. The discussion focuses on ward climate, the most prevalent theme, which is conceptualized here as interacting with failures in the nine other organizational structures and processes. Conclusions This study is the first of its kind to identify the latent failures perceived to underpin medication errors in a systematic way. The findings can be used as a platform for researchers to test the impact of organization-level patient safety interventions and to design proactive error management tools and incident reporting systems in hospitals. PMID:22375850

  10. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training....

  11. A Computer-Assisted Instructional Software Program in Mathematical Problem-Solving Skills for Medication Administration for Beginning Baccalaureate Nursing Students at San Jose State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Sharon C.

    Nursing educators and administrators are concerned about medication errors made by students which jeopardize patient safety. The inability to conceptualize and calculate medication dosages, often related to math anxiety, is implicated in such errors. A computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program is seen as a viable method of allowing students to…

  12. Incompatibilities of lornoxicam with 4 antiemetic medications in polyolefin bags during simulated intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Fang, Bao-Xia; Li, Peng; Shi, Xiao-Ya; Chen, Fu-Chao; Wang, Lin-Hai

    2016-06-01

    The administration of drugs by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is routinely practiced for the management of postoperative pain. It is common for 2 or more drugs to be combined in PCA solutions. The combination of analgesics and antiemetic agents is frequently required. Unfortunately, the compatibility and stability of lornoxicam and antiemetic agents, such as droperidol, ondansetrone, granisetron, and tropisetron, has not been determined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the compatibility and stability of solutions containing lornoxicam with the 4 antiemetic agents in combination for PCA administration.In our study, test samples were prepared in triplicate by adding 40 mg lornoxicam and 5 mg droperidol, 8 mg ondansetron, 6 mg granisetron, or 5 mg tropisetron to 100-mL polyolefin bags of sodium chloride 0.9% and stored at 25 °C. The analgesic mixture samples were visually inspected for precipitation, cloudiness, and discoloration at each sampling interval. Drug concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis.No loss of lornoxicam occurred with any of the 4 antiemetic agents tested for up to 48 hours. However, the contents of droperidol, ondansetron, granisetron, and tropisetron were significant loss >48 hours. After storage of 4.0 to 48.0 hours, the presence of a slight precipitate was observed in all the injection combinations.The results indicate that combinations of lornoxicam with droperidol, ondansetrone, granisetron, or tropisetron in infusion solution during simulated intravenous PCA administration were incompatibility when stored protected from light at 25 °C. PMID:27336868

  13. Incompatibilities of lornoxicam with 4 antiemetic medications in polyolefin bags during simulated intravenous administration

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bao-xia; Li, Peng; Shi, Xiao-ya; Chen, Fu-chao; Wang, Lin-hai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The administration of drugs by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is routinely practiced for the management of postoperative pain. It is common for 2 or more drugs to be combined in PCA solutions. The combination of analgesics and antiemetic agents is frequently required. Unfortunately, the compatibility and stability of lornoxicam and antiemetic agents, such as droperidol, ondansetrone, granisetron, and tropisetron, has not been determined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the compatibility and stability of solutions containing lornoxicam with the 4 antiemetic agents in combination for PCA administration. In our study, test samples were prepared in triplicate by adding 40 mg lornoxicam and 5 mg droperidol, 8 mg ondansetron, 6 mg granisetron, or 5 mg tropisetron to 100-mL polyolefin bags of sodium chloride 0.9% and stored at 25 °C. The analgesic mixture samples were visually inspected for precipitation, cloudiness, and discoloration at each sampling interval. Drug concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis. No loss of lornoxicam occurred with any of the 4 antiemetic agents tested for up to 48 hours. However, the contents of droperidol, ondansetron, granisetron, and tropisetron were significant loss >48 hours. After storage of 4.0 to 48.0 hours, the presence of a slight precipitate was observed in all the injection combinations. The results indicate that combinations of lornoxicam with droperidol, ondansetrone, granisetron, or tropisetron in infusion solution during simulated intravenous PCA administration were incompatibility when stored protected from light at 25 °C. PMID:27336868

  14. US Food and Drug Administration Regulation of Medical Devices and Radiation Oncology: Can Reform Improve Safety?

    PubMed Central

    Hattangadi, Jona A.; O'Reilly, James T.; Recht, Abram

    2012-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is highly safe and effective in treating cancer, recent reports of dangerous radiation-related errors have focused a national spotlight on the field of radiation oncology and, more specifically, on the rapidly evolving and complex nature of radiation devices and how they are regulated. The purpose of this review is to explore the issues involved in medical device regulation in radiation oncology. We start with a general review of federal medical device regulation, including explanations of the legal and regulatory framework, and then discuss issues specific to radiation oncology with real-world examples. We also provide our thoughts on potential solutions and reforms to the current system, including better reporting of radiation-related errors in a centralized database, well-defined criteria for establishing substantial equivalence of a new device, and standard postmarket surveillance of radiation devices. Modern radiation therapy is a powerful tool that can help cure many patients' cancers and alleviate others' suffering with limited adverse effects. We must ensure that this promise is never compromised by avoidable mistakes. PMID:22548012

  15. The medical care programs of the Farm Security Administration, 1932 through 1947: a rehearsal for national health insurance?

    PubMed Central

    Grey, M R

    1994-01-01

    At a time of renewed interest in universal health insurance, an examination of earlier periods when society grappled with the link between socioeconomic status and health is fruitful. Between 1935 and 1947, the federal government sponsored a comprehensive medical care program for low-income farmers, sharecroppers, and migrant workers under the auspices of the Farm Security Administration (FSA). Despite the strong opposition of the American Medical Association, humanitarian and economic concerns at the local level often promoted physicians' participation in the program's group prepayment plans. Many FSA leaders clearly saw the program as a model upon which national health insurance might advance. However, in the wake of World War II, the FSA program declined as physicians' income improved, the rural population declined, and traditional ideological objections to federal intervention in medical care resurfaced. The FSA experience illuminates the complex ideological, economic, and humanitarian motivations of American physicians in the face of health care reform. Images p1680-a p1682-a p1684-a PMID:7943497

  16. An Analysis of the Need for Medical Record Administration Programs in New Jersey. Manpower Planning Series. Office of Research and Manpower, Volume 1, Report Number 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rineberg, Joan

    The need for medical record administrators in New Jersey, and specifically in hospitals, was studied using a methodology that projects requirements and accounts for the utilization of Registered Record Administrators (RRAs) in alternative health care settings by 1990. Furthermore, employment opportunities in such nontraditional settings as…

  17. Computer-Based Training at a Military Medical Center: Understanding Decreased Participation in Training among Staff and Ways to Improve Completion Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Military health care facilities make extensive use of computer-based training (CBT) for both clinical and non-clinical staff. Despite evidence identifying various factors that may impact CBT, the problem is unclear as to what factors specifically influence employee participation in computer-based training. The purpose of this mixed method case…

  18. Medical and health administration education in managed care: needs, content and readings.

    PubMed

    Ziegenfuss, J T; Weitekamp, M

    1996-01-01

    With both public and private reform initiatives moving toward managed care, curriculum designs are timely and useful to a diverse audience. This paper discusses the need for and design of education in managed care in medical schools and health services programs. The pressures for offering education regarding managed care are derived from interests of various actors of the health system e.g. regulators, purchasers, providers and consumers. The content of education in managed care is defined in seven areas: (1) managed care and health systems design-history and concepts; (2) environment and governmental policy; (3) models, products, services, outcomes and quality; (4) managed care economics and finance; (5) organization and strategic management; (6) legal issues; and (7) future designs/redesigns. Education in managed care is delivered by universities, professional associations and private training and development corporations. All can benefit from a dialogue on curricular content. PMID:10166710

  19. How Program Administrators Can Support Out-of-School Time Staff. Part 4 in a Series on Implementing Evidence-Based Practices in Out-of-School Time Programs: The Role of Organizational Context and External Influences. Research-to-Results Brief. Publication #2009-32

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Ashleigh; Metz, Allison J. R.

    2009-01-01

    Implementing high-quality out-of-school time programs requires well-trained and well-prepared frontline staff who are supported by informed, competent, and committed program managers and administrators. Research on out-of-school time programs has found that effective program managers--referred to as "facilitative administrators"--promote…

  20. 7 CFR 1700.27 - Chief of Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrator in developing and planning agency program initiatives. The Chief of Staff is responsible for... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chief of Staff. 1700.27 Section 1700.27 Agriculture... GENERAL INFORMATION Agency Organization and Functions § 1700.27 Chief of Staff. The Chief of Staff...

  1. Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service Is Associated With Decreased Administration of Seizure Medication.

    PubMed

    Wietstock, Sharon O; Bonifacio, Sonia L; McCulloch, Charles E; Kuzniewicz, Michael W; Glass, Hannah C

    2015-08-01

    This cohort study examines medication use in term neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and seizures before and after implementation of a Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service (N = 108), which included increased seizure monitoring. Nearly all neonates received phenobarbital (96% pre- vs 95% post-Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service) and total loading dose did not vary among groups (33 [95% confidence interval 29-37] vs 30 [26-34] mg/kg). After adjustment for seizure burden, neonates managed during the Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service era, on average, received 30 mg/kg less cumulative phenobarbital (95% confidence interval 15-46 mg/kg) and were on maintenance 5 fewer days (95% confidence interval 3-8 days) than those who were treated prior to implementation of the service. In spite of the enhanced ability to detect seizures because of improved monitoring and increased vigilance by bedside practitioners, implementation of the Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service was associated with decreased use of potentially harmful phenobarbital treatment among neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:25380602

  2. Pentobarbital Toxicity after Self-Administration of Euthasol Veterinary Euthanasia Medication.

    PubMed

    Crellin, Steven Jason; Katz, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    Suicide attempt via sodium pentobarbital is uncommon. A 48-year-old woman with a history of depression and prior suicide attempt was found unresponsive by her veterinarian spouse near a syringe containing pink solution. Upon EMS' arrival, the patient was experiencing apnea, hypoxemia, and miotic pupils; her blood glucose level measured 73 mg/dL. She was bradycardic and administered atropine with transient improvement in heart rate and transported to an emergency department; 2 mg of intravenous naloxone was administered without effect. She was endotracheally intubated via rapid sequence intubation. Rapid urine drug screening detected both benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The patient was transferred to an intensive care unit where she demonstrated a nearly absent radial pulse. Emergent fasciotomy to the left forearm and carpal tunnel was performed for acute compartment syndrome; "Euthasol" had been self-administered into the antecubital fossa. Expanded toxicological analysis via liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy detected caffeine, atropine, 7-aminoclonazepam, phenytoin, citalopram, and naproxen. The patient's coma resolved over 48 hours and she was successfully extubated without complication. Emergency physicians must closely monitor patients exposed to veterinary euthanasia agents who develop central nervous system and respiratory depression, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension, or skin injury. Consultation with a regional poison center and medical toxicologist is recommended. PMID:26881149

  3. Pentobarbital Toxicity after Self-Administration of Euthasol Veterinary Euthanasia Medication

    PubMed Central

    Crellin, Steven Jason; Katz, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Suicide attempt via sodium pentobarbital is uncommon. A 48-year-old woman with a history of depression and prior suicide attempt was found unresponsive by her veterinarian spouse near a syringe containing pink solution. Upon EMS' arrival, the patient was experiencing apnea, hypoxemia, and miotic pupils; her blood glucose level measured 73 mg/dL. She was bradycardic and administered atropine with transient improvement in heart rate and transported to an emergency department; 2 mg of intravenous naloxone was administered without effect. She was endotracheally intubated via rapid sequence intubation. Rapid urine drug screening detected both benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The patient was transferred to an intensive care unit where she demonstrated a nearly absent radial pulse. Emergent fasciotomy to the left forearm and carpal tunnel was performed for acute compartment syndrome; “Euthasol” had been self-administered into the antecubital fossa. Expanded toxicological analysis via liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy detected caffeine, atropine, 7-aminoclonazepam, phenytoin, citalopram, and naproxen. The patient's coma resolved over 48 hours and she was successfully extubated without complication. Emergency physicians must closely monitor patients exposed to veterinary euthanasia agents who develop central nervous system and respiratory depression, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension, or skin injury. Consultation with a regional poison center and medical toxicologist is recommended. PMID:26881149

  4. Medical treatment of biliary duct stones: effect of ursodeoxycholic acid administration.

    PubMed Central

    Salvioli, G; Salati, R; Lugli, R; Zanni, C

    1983-01-01

    Twenty-eight patients with radiolucent biliary duct stones without cholangitis and jaundice were randomly allocated into two treatment groups receiving ursodeoxycholic acid 12 mg/kg (group A) or placebo (group B) in three daily doses for 24 months. In group A stones disappeared completely in seven patients and partially in one; placebo administration had no effect on stone size and three patients of group B (only one of group A) went to surgery for complications. Ursodeoxycholic acid treatment did not adversely affect liver function tests, and alkaline phosphatase decreased. Abdominal and biliary colics also became less frequent in the first six months of therapy in group A, but not in the placebo group. The bile was supersaturated with cholesterol in both groups, but decreased significantly only in patients receiving ursodeoxycholic acid even though the lithogenic index remained high. Cholesterol saturation of bile does not seem to be the only factor determining the dissolution of biliary duct stones which sometimes contain cholesterol as the main component. PMID:6345281

  5. Ibuprofen Versus Indomethacin for Medical Closure of the Patent Arterial Duct: A Pooled Analysis by Route of Administration

    PubMed Central

    Nijhawan, Karan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Preterm infants are at increased risk of having a patent arterial duct (PAD). PADs may cause congestive heart failure, respiratory distress, necrotizing enterocolitis, and renal impairment. Consequently, in some infants, it becomes necessary to attempt closure of the PAD. Surgical closure can be difficult in small infants and is not without its risks; thus, medical closure offers advantages. Cyclooxygenase inhibitors have been used for medical closure of the PAD with both ibuprofen and indomethacin having been used clinically. Methods: We performed a systematic review of the literature to identify all studies comparing ibuprofen and indomethacin. Studies comparing ibuprofen and indomethacin for closure of the PAD in premature infants were included in the meta-analysis. A subanalysis was performed to compare the route of administration. Efficacy endpoints studied were PAD closure and surgical ligation while adverse effects studied were death in the first month of life, necrotizing enterocolitis, gastrointestinal bleeding, intestinal perforation, bronchopulmonary dysplasia in the first month of life, Grade 3 or 4 intraventricular hemorrhage, and change in the serum creatinine after treatment. Results: Ibuprofen and indomethacin were equally effective in closing the PAD in premature infants and demonstrated no difference in the incidence of adverse events. In respect to the route of administration, oral ibuprofen was as effective as intravenous indomethacin. When comparing both drugs via the intravenous route, the only difference noted between the ibuprofen and indomethacin was that ibuprofen was associated with a lesser increase in serum creatinine after treatment. Conclusion: Ibuprofen and indomethacin are equally effective in PAD closure without any difference in the incidence of adverse events. Importantly, oral ibuprofen was as effective as intravenous indomethacin. PMID:26180698

  6. Accuracy of administratively-assigned ancestry for diverse populations in an electronic medical record-linked biobank.

    PubMed

    Hall, Jacob B; Dumitrescu, Logan; Dilks, Holli H; Crawford, Dana C; Bush, William S

    2014-01-01

    Recently, the development of biobanks linked to electronic medical records has presented new opportunities for genetic and epidemiological research. Studies based on these resources, however, present unique challenges, including the accurate assignment of individual-level population ancestry. In this work we examine the accuracy of administratively-assigned race in diverse populations by comparing assigned races to genetically-defined ancestry estimates. Using 220 ancestry informative markers, we generated principal components for patients in our dataset, which were used to cluster patients into groups based on genetic ancestry. Consistent with other studies, we find a strong overall agreement (Kappa  = 0.872) between genetic ancestry and assigned race, with higher rates of agreement for African-descent and European-descent assignments, and reduced agreement for Hispanic, East Asian-descent, and South Asian-descent assignments. These results suggest caution when selecting study samples of non-African and non-European backgrounds when administratively-assigned race from biobanks is used. PMID:24896101

  7. Using HL7 in hospital staff assignments.

    PubMed

    Unluturk, Mehmet S

    2014-02-01

    Hospital staff assignments are the instructions that allocate the hospital staff members to the hospital beds. Currently, hospital administrators make the assignments without accessing the information regarding the occupancy of the hospital beds and the acuity of the patient. As a result, administrators cannot distinguish between occupied and unoccupied beds, and may therefore assign staff to unoccupied beds. This gives rise to uneven and inefficient staff assignments. In this paper, the hospital admission-discharge-transfer (ADT) system is employed both as a data source and an assignment device to create staff assignments. When the patient data is newly added or modified, the ADT system updates the assignment software client with the relevant data. Based on the relevant data, the assignment software client is able to construct staff assignments in a more efficient way. PMID:24480165

  8. 13 CFR 500.105 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 500.105 Section 500.105... LOAN PROGRAM Board Procedures § 500.105 Staff. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director of the... direction with respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the...

  9. 28 CFR 600.5 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Staff. A Special Counsel may request the assignment of appropriate Department employees to assist the... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Staff. 600.5 Section 600.5 Judicial... employees, and the office for which the designated employee works shall make reasonable efforts...

  10. Pharmacokinetic study of enrofloxacin in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after a single oral administration in medicated feed.

    PubMed

    Teles, J A; Castello Branco, L C; Del Bianchi, M; Pilarski, F; Reyes, F G R

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the disposition kinetics of enrofloxacin (ENR) in the plasma and its distribution in the muscle tissue of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after a single oral dose of 10 mg/kg body weight via medicated feed. The fish were kept at a temperature between 28 and 30 °C. The collection period was between 30 min and 120 h after administration of the drug. The samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector (HPLC-FLD). The ENR was slowly absorbed and eliminated from the plasma (Cmax = 1.24 ± 0.37 μg/mL; Tmax = 8 h; T1/2Ke  = 19.36 h). ENR was efficiently distributed in the muscle tissue and reached maximum values (2.17 ± 0.74 μg/g) after 8 h. Its metabolite, ciprofloxacin (CIP), was detected and quantified in the plasma (0.004 ± 0.005 μg/mL) and muscle (0.01 ± 0.011 μg/g) for up to 48 h. After oral administration, the mean concentration of ENR in the plasma was well above the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC50 ) for most bacteria already isolated from fish except for Streptococcus spp. This way the dose used in this study allowed for concentrations in the blood to treat the diseases of tilapia. PMID:26270353

  11. 75 FR 55803 - Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory...). The meeting will be open to the public. Name of Committee: Neurological Devices Panel of the Medical... a disability, please contact AnnMarie Williams, Conference Management Staff, at 301-796-5966...

  12. Advancing regulatory science to bring novel medical devices for use in emergency care to market: the role of the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Scully, Christopher G; Forrest, Shawn; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne B; Strauss, David G

    2015-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) performs regulatory science to provide science-based medical product regulatory decisions. This article describes the types of scientific research the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health performs and highlights specific projects related to medical devices for emergency medicine. In addition, this article discusses how results from regulatory science are used by the FDA to support the regulatory process as well as how the results are communicated to the public. Regulatory science supports the FDA's mission to assure safe, effective, and high-quality medical products are available to patients. PMID:25128009

  13. Liquid medication administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... easily. Oral syringes have some advantages for giving liquid medicines. They are accurate. They are easy to ... cups are also a handy way to give liquid medicines. However, dosing errors have occurred with them. ...

  14. Automation and adaptation: Nurses' problem-solving behavior following the implementation of bar coded medication administration technology.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Rivera-Rodriguez, A Joy; Faye, Héléne; Scanlon, Matthew C; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2013-08-01

    The most common change facing nurses today is new technology, particularly bar coded medication administration technology (BCMA). However, there is a dearth of knowledge on how BCMA alters nursing work. This study investigated how BCMA technology affected nursing work, particularly nurses' operational problem-solving behavior. Cognitive systems engineering observations and interviews were conducted after the implementation of BCMA in three nursing units of a freestanding pediatric hospital. Problem-solving behavior, associated problems, and goals, were specifically defined and extracted from observed episodes of care. Three broad themes regarding BCMA's impact on problem solving were identified. First, BCMA allowed nurses to invent new problem-solving behavior to deal with pre-existing problems. Second, BCMA made it difficult or impossible to apply some problem-solving behaviors that were commonly used pre-BCMA, often requiring nurses to use potentially risky workarounds to achieve their goals. Third, BCMA created new problems that nurses were either able to solve using familiar or novel problem-solving behaviors, or unable to solve effectively. Results from this study shed light on hidden hazards and suggest three critical design needs: (1) ecologically valid design; (2) anticipatory control; and (3) basic usability. Principled studies of the actual nature of clinicians' work, including problem solving, are necessary to uncover hidden hazards and to inform health information technology design and redesign. PMID:24443642

  15. Effective method of measuring the radioactivity of [131I]-capsule prior to radioiodine therapy with significant reduction of the radiation exposure to the medical staff.

    PubMed

    Lützen, Ulf; Zhao, Yi; Marx, Malies; Imme, Thea; Assam, Isong; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Culman, Juaraj; Zuhayra, Maaz

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Protection in Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radio Oncology is of the utmost importance. Radioiodine therapy is a frequently used and effective method for the treatment of thyroid disease. Prior to each therapy the radioactivity of the [131I]-capsule must be determined to prevent misadministration. This leads to a significant radiation exposure to the staff. We describe an alternative method, allowing a considerable reduction of the radiation exposure. Two [131I]-capsules (A01 = 2818.5; A02 = 7355.0 MBq) were measured multiple times in their own delivery lead containers - that is to say, [131I]-capsules remain inside the containers during the measurements (shielded measurement) using a dose calibrator and a well-type and a thyroid uptake probe. The results of the shielded measurements were correlated linearly with the [131I]-capsules radioactivity to create calibration curves for the used devices. Additional radioactivity measurements of 50 [131I]-capsules of different radioactivities were done to validate the shielded measuring method. The personal skin dose rate (HP(0.07)) was determined using calibrated thermo luminescent dosimeters. The determination coefficients for the calibration curves were R2 > 0.9980 for all devices. The relative uncertainty of the shielded measurement was < 6.8%. At a distance of 10 cm from the unshielded capsule the HP(0.07) was 46.18 μSv/(GBq•s), and on the surface of the lead container containing the [131I]-capsule the HP(0.07) was 2.99 and 0.27 μSv/(GBq•s) for the two used container sizes. The calculated reduction of the effective dose by using the shielded measuring method was, depending on the used container size, 74.0% and 97.4%, compared to the measurement of the unshielded [131I]-capsule using a dose calibrator. The measured reduction of the effective radiation dose in the practice was 56.6% and 94.9 for size I and size II containers. The shielded [131I]-capsule measurement reduces the radiation exposure to the

  16. Enrollment and Monitoring of Women in Post-Approval Studies for Medical Devices Mandated by the Food and Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Naomi; Loyo-Berrios, Nilsa; Tarver, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background: Disease presentation, prevalence, and treatment effects vary by sex, thus it is important to ensure adequate participation of both sexes in medical device post-approval studies (PAS). Methods: The goals of this study were to determine the participation rate of women in PAS mandated by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and if participation varied by clinical area. The study also evaluated the frequency in which enrollment by sex is reported by applicant reports and FDA reviews, as well as the frequency in which final study reports analyze whether outcomes differ by sex. Results: Of 89 studies with enrollment completed, data on sex of participants were available in 93% of submitted reports, while data on enrollment by sex was evaluated and noted in 43% of FDA review memos. Study participation varied by clinical area, with female participation ranging from 32% in cardiovascular PAS to 90% in PAS for reconstructive devices. Of 53 completed studies, data on enrollment by sex was provided in 49 of the final reports. Of these 14% included a multivariate analysis that included sex as a covariate and 4% included a subgroup analysis for female participants. Conclusions: Data on sex was not routinely assessed in FDA reviews. Based on these findings, FDA implemented new procedures to ensure participation by sex is evaluated in PAS reviews. FDA will continue working with applicants to develop PAS that enroll and retain proportions of women consistent with the sex-specific prevalence for the disease or condition the device is used to treat. PMID:24405314

  17. [Characteristics of morphological manifestations of anaphylactic shock in response to the administration of pharmaceutical preparations encountered in the practice of forensic medical expert-histologist].

    PubMed

    Denisova, O P; Kul'bitskiĭ, B N; Putintsev, V A; Bogomolova, I N; Bogomolov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The authors report the results of a forensic medical investigation of 6 cases of death associated with the administration of pharmaceutical products documented by forensic medical experts of the Russian Centre of Forensic Medical Expertise. The results of the study are compared with the clinical data and summarized using the methods of tanatogenetic analysis. The following main clinical variants of iatrogenic anaphylactic shock (IAS) are distinguished: bronchospastic IAS (n = 1), asphyxic IAS (n = 1), hemodynamic IAS (n = 3), and combined (bronchospastic plus hemodynamic) IAS (n = 1). The signs of all these variants are described allowing for their diagnostics and differentiation diagnostics. These data can be used for the purpose of forensic medical diagnostics and elucidation of the mechanisms of tanatogenesis. PMID:22686058

  18. Transient and Sustained Changes in Operational Performance, Patient Evaluation, and Medication Administration During Electronic Health Record Implementation in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Michael J.; Froehle, Craig M.; Hart, Kimberly W.; Collins, Sean P.; Lindsell, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Study objective Little is known about the transient and sustained operational effects of electronic health records on emergency department (ED) performance. We quantify how the implementation of a comprehensive electronic health record was associated with metrics of operational performance, test ordering, and medication administration at a single-center ED. Methods We performed a longitudinal analysis of electronic data from a single, suburban, academic ED during 28 weeks between May 2011 and November 2011. We assessed length of stay, use of diagnostic testing, medication administration, radiologic imaging, and patient satisfaction during a 4-week baseline measurement period and then tracked changes in these variables during the 24 weeks after implementation of the electronic health record. Results Median length of stay increased and patient satisfaction was reduced transiently, returning to baseline after 4 to 8 weeks. Rates of laboratory testing, medication administration, overall radiologic imaging, radiographs, computed tomography scans, and ECG ordering all showed sustained increases throughout the 24 weeks after electronic health record implementation. Conclusion Electronic health record implementation in this single-center study was associated with both transient and sustained changes in metrics of ED performance, as well as laboratory and medication ordering. Understanding ways in which an ED can be affected by electronic health record implementation is critical to providing insight about ways to mitigate transient disruption and to maximize potential benefits of the technology. PMID:24041783

  19. Vocational Staff Workshops Project: April 26, 1991-May 30, 1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGillicuddy (Shirley) & Associates, Sierra Madre, CA.

    The Vocational Staff Workshops Project was initiated in 1984 by the California Community College Association of Occupational Education (CCCAOE) to provide staff development activities for vocational education instructors, administrators, and support services staff. In 1991-92, the project was implemented by Orange Coast College, which…

  20. Organizational Climate as a Tool for Child Care Staff Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klinkner, Joan M.; Riley, Dave; Roach, Mary A.

    2005-01-01

    A successful early childhood program that is a nurturing place for children must also be a good place for staff to work. Too often it is not, and employees leave. Coping with staff turnover in early childhood programs is a constant struggle, not only for administrators but also for children and their families and the staff who remain behind. Both…

  1. 7 CFR 2200.7 - Officer and staff responsibilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Officer and staff responsibilities. 2200.7 Section... § 2200.7 Officer and staff responsibilities. (a) Executive Director. The Executive Director advises and... respect to the administration of the Board's actions, directs the activities of the staff, and...

  2. Medical students' participation in the 2009 Novel H1N1 influenza vaccination administration: policy alternatives for effective student utilization to enhance surge capacity in disasters.

    PubMed

    Kaiser, Heather E; Barnett, Daniel J; Hayanga, Awori J; Brown, Meghan E; Filak, Andrew T

    2011-06-01

    As cases of 2009 novel H1N1 influenza became prevalent in Cincinnati, Ohio, Hamilton County Public Health called upon the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine to enhance its surge capacity in vaccination administration. Although the collaboration was well organized, it became evident that a system should exist for medical students' involvement in disaster response and recovery efforts in advance of a disaster. Therefore, 5 policy alternatives for effective utilization of medical students in disaster-response efforts have been examined: maintaining the status quo, enhancing the Medical Reserve Corps, creating medical school-based disaster-response units, using students within another selected disaster-response organization, or devising an entirely new plan for medical students' utilization. The intent of presenting these policy alternatives is to foster a policy dialogue around creating a more formalized approach for integrating medical students into disaster surge capacity-enhancement strategies. Using medical students to supplement the current and future workforce may help substantially in achieving goals related to workforce requirements. Discussions will be necessary to translate policy into practice. PMID:21482704

  3. Creating the optimal workspace for hospital staff using human centred design.

    PubMed

    Cawood, T; Saunders, E; Drennan, C; Cross, N; Nicholl, D; Kenny, A; Meates, D; Laing, R

    2016-07-01

    We were tasked with creating best possible non-clinical workspace solutions for approximately 450 hospital staff across 11 departments encompassing medical, nursing, allied health, administrative and other support staff. We used a Human-Centred Design process, involving 'Hear, Create and Deliver' stages. We used observations, contextual enquiry and role-specific workshops to understand needs, key interactions and drivers of behaviour. Co-design workshops were then used to explore and prototype-test concepts for the final design. With extensive employee engagement and design process expertise, an innovative solution was created that focussed on meeting the functional workspace needs of a diverse group of staff requiring a range of different spaces, incorporating space constraints and equity. This project demonstrated the strength of engaging employees in an expert-led Human-Centred Design process. We believe this is a successful blueprint process for other institutions to embrace when facing similar workspace design challenges. PMID:27405891

  4. Cognitive analyses of a paper medical record and electronic medical record on the documentation of two nursing tasks: patient education and adherence assessment of insulin administration.

    PubMed Central

    Rinkus, Susan M.; Chitwood, Ainsley

    2002-01-01

    The incorporation of electronic medical records into busy physician clinics has been a major development in the healthcare industry over the past decade. Documentation of key nursing activities, especially when interacting with patients who have chronic diseases, is often lacking or missing from the paper medical record. A case study of a patient with diabetes mellitus was created. Well established methods for the assessment of usability in the areas of human-computer interaction and computer supported cooperative work were employed to compare the nursing documentation of two tasks in a commercially available electronic medical record (eRecord) and in a paper medical record. Overall, the eRecord was found to improve the timeliness and quality of nursing documentation. With certain tasks, the number of steps to accomplish the same task was higher, which may result in the perception by the end user that the tool is more complex and therefore difficult to use. Recommendations for the eRecord were made to expand the documentation of patient teaching and adherence assessment and to incorporate web technology for patient access to medical records and healthcare information. PMID:12463905

  5. Staff Development Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashur, Nina E.; And Others

    An evaluation of the staff development program at College of the Canyons (California) was conducted in 1991 to provide information applicable to program improvement. Questionnaires were distributed to all faculty, classified staff, and flexible calendar program committee and staff development advisory committee members, resulting in response rates…

  6. Directions in Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela, Ed.

    This collection of readings is intended to provide a source book on best practices in staff development in higher education within a British context. The 13 papers are grouped into three parts: part 1 presents the educational development tradition which has focused on development of staff as teachers; part 2 considers development of staff in…

  7. Principals Can Increase Leadership Effectiveness by Knowing Staff Personalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberds-Baxter, Sharon

    1986-01-01

    An essential ingredient of good school administrators is understanding the differences among people. Provides a simplified outline of Carl Jung's typology of personality differences to provide administrators a better understanding of staff behavior. (MD)

  8. The Precise Observation System for the Safe Use of Medicines (POSSUM): An Approach for Studying Medication Administration Errors in the Field.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Johanna I; Raban, Magdalena Z; Lehnbom, Elin C; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Medication administration errors (MAEs) in hospital are frequent and significantly more likely to result in serious harm to patients than other medication error types. Many interventions have been proposed in order reduce MAEs and the amount of harm associated with these errors. A major limitation in assessing the effectiveness of these interventions has been the lack of robust measures for assessing changes in MAEs and associated harms. Drawing upon extensive foundational research we have developed a robust approach and data collection software to be applied in direct observational studies of nurses to allow measurement of changes in MAE rates. We report how this approach is being applied in a large stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of an electronic medication management system to reduce MAEs in a paediatric hospital. PMID:27577460

  9. [An a priori risk analysis study. Securisation of transfusion of blood product in a hospital: from the reception in the medical unit to its administration].

    PubMed

    Bertrand, E; Lévy, R; Boyeldieu, D

    2013-12-01

    Following an ABO accident after transfusion of red blood cells, an a priori risk analysis study is being performed in a hospital. The scope of this analysis covers from the reception of the blood product in the medical unit to its administration. The risk analysis enables to identify the potentially dangerous situations and the evaluation of the risks in order to propose corrective measures (precautionary or protective) and bring the system back to an acceptable risk level. The innovative concept of an a priori risk analysis in the medical field allows the extension of the analysis of this transfusion risk to other hospitals. In addition, it allows the extension of the use of this approach to other medical fields. PMID:24176607

  10. Malicious deprivation of hospital staff privileges.

    PubMed

    Firestone, M H; Schur, R

    1986-01-01

    The growing problem of discrimination against physicians seeking hospital staff privileges may be met by various tort and contract actions against hospitals and medical staff members. In many jurisdictions, the obstacles presented by common-law and statutory immunities and the unavailability of judicial review for actions involving private hospitals pose formidable obstacles. However, the current trend in the courts would seem to be toward actionability. PMID:3312890

  11. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling-ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People’s Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1) improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2) complications associated with vascular access; 3) incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4) liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan–do–check–act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety. PMID:24669192

  12. Improving medication calculation skills of practicing nurses and senior nursing students: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Kreamer, Carolyn L; Frownfelter, Penny; Helmuth, Amy; Lutter, Stacy; Schafer, Deborah J; Wilson, Cyndy

    2006-01-01

    Medication administration is an essential nursing competency as calculation difficulties can lead to serious medication errors. Nurses involved in staff education need to be aware of methods to assess for computation difficulty and develop strategies for nurses to improve their computation abilities. The purposes of this quasi-experimental pilot study were to assess the medication calculation skills of nurses and nursing students and to determine the effectiveness of teaching strategies aimed at improving these skills. PMID:16885685

  13. Integrating Telehealth Care-Generated Data With the Family Practice Electronic Medical Record: Qualitative Exploration of the Views of Primary Care Staff

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Emma

    2013-01-01

    Background Telehealth care is increasingly being employed in the management of long-term illness. Current systems are largely managed via “stand-alone” websites, which require additional log-ons for clinicians to view their patients’ symptom records and physiological measurements leading to frustrating delays and sometimes failure to engage with the record. However, there are challenges to the full integration of patient-acquired data into family physicians’ electronic medical records (EMR) in terms of reliability, how such data can best be summarized and presented to avoid overload to the clinicians, and how clarity of responsibility is managed when multiple agencies are involved. Objective We aimed to explore the views of primary care clinicians on the acceptability, clinical utility, and, in particular, the benefits and risks of integrating patient-generated telehealth care data into the family practice EMR and to explore how these data should be summarized and presented in order to facilitate use in routine care. Methods In our qualitative study, we carried out semi-structured interviews with clinicians with experience of and naïve to telehealth care following demonstration of pilot software, which illustrated various methods by which data could be incorporated into the EMR. Results We interviewed 20 clinicians and found 2 overarching themes of “workload” and “safety”. Although clinicians were largely positive about integrating telehealth care data into the EMR, they were concerned about the potential increased workload and safety issues, particularly in respect to error due to data overload. They suggested these issues could be mitigated by good system design that summarized and presented data such that they facilitated seamless integration with clinicians’ current routine processes for managing data flows, and ensured clear lines of communication and responsibility between multiple professionals involved in patients’ care. Conclusions

  14. 28 CFR 115.361 - Staff and agency reporting duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Staff and agency reporting duties. 115.361 Section 115.361 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Official Response Following A Resident Report § 115.361 Staff and agency reporting duties....

  15. 28 CFR 115.361 - Staff and agency reporting duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Staff and agency reporting duties. 115.361 Section 115.361 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Juvenile Facilities Official Response Following A Resident Report § 115.361 Staff and agency reporting duties....

  16. 28 CFR 42.414 - Federal agency staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Federal agency staff. 42.414 Section 42.414 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE NONDISCRIMINATION; EQUAL EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY... § 42.414 Federal agency staff. Sufficient personnel shall be assigned by a federal agency to its...

  17. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  18. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  19. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  20. Child Care Staff Working Conditions Project: Summary of the Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modigliani, Kathy; And Others

    The goals of the Working Conditions Project were to collect information about child care center staff members and administration in Washtenaw County, Michigan; to identify sources of job satisfaction; and to report administrative practices associated with high commitment to a center by its staff. Results showed that more than 75 percent of the…

  1. Staff rotation: implications for occupational therapy.

    PubMed

    Taylor, A; Andriuk, M L; Langlois, P; Provost, E

    1995-10-01

    Occupational therapy departments of tertiary care hospitals can provide staff with opportunities to gain diverse clinical experience if they rotate through the various services such as surgery, medicine, geriatrics, plastic surgery and orthopaedics. The system of rotation offers both advantages and disadvantages for the staff and the institution. The Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal, a large university teaching hospital, had traditionally offered staff the opportunity to rotate. Changes in staffing and their needs however, resulted in rotation becoming an important issue within the department. This article presents the pros and the cons of rotation and non-rotation systems as identified by therapists and administrators across Canada. Staff rotation was found to have an effect on job satisfaction and a therapist's career orientation. Given these findings, administrators may want to reconsider the role of the generalist and specialist in their facilities. PMID:10151790

  2. The need of community health centers for international medical graduates.

    PubMed Central

    Baer, L D; Konrad, T R; Miller, J S

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study sought to determine whether community health centers need international medical graduates to fill staff positions. METHODS: The authors surveyed 100 community health center administrators to learn about their perceptions of international medical graduates. RESULTS: Nationally, about one quarter of community health centers depend on international medical graduates to fill physician vacancies; most of these centers foresee unfilled positions in the event of a cutback. CONCLUSIONS: Policies calling for a national reduction in the supply of international medical graduates need to be balanced by an understanding of these individuals' role in reducing local physician shortages. PMID:10511843

  3. Comparison of Dental Caries Experience in Children Suffering From Epilepsy with and without Administration of Long Term Liquid Oral Medication

    PubMed Central

    Bhadravathi, Manjunath Chaluvaiah; Kumar, Adarsh; Narang, Ridhi; Gupta, Ambika; Singh, Harneet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sucrose is added as sweetening agent in liquid oral medication (LOM) to mask the acrid taste of medicines which may be potentially cariogenic. Many children under long term LOM therapy for treatment of epilepsy may be susceptible to dental caries. Aim To assess and compare dental caries experience in children under long term liquid oral medication with those not under such medication among 2-12 years old children suffering from epilepsy. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was undertaken on a total of 84 children aged 2–12 years, who were suffering from epilepsy receiving liquid oral medication for more than 3 months were selected (study group) and for comparison 106 children of similar age group and disease but on other forms of medication were included as control group. Dental caries was assessed using DMFT/DMFS (Decayed, Missing, Fillled Teeth / Surfaces), dmft/dft and dmfs/dfs indices. One-way ANOVA and t-test were used with p-value fixed at 0.05. Univariate logistic regression was applied. Results Children on LOM were at increased risk of dental caries than those with other forms of medications (OR: 2.55, 95% CI (2.37-4.15) p=0.000, HS). Caries prevalence was high in the study group (76.1%) when compared to control group (55.6%). Conclusion Long term use of liquid medicines containing sucrose is a risk factor for dental caries among children with epilepsy. PMID:27504416

  4. Copyright Implications for Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Carol Mann

    1994-01-01

    Discusses copyright compliance policies for school administrators and the librarian's role in policy implementation. Topics addressed include fines; court litigation; monitoring compliance; training sessions for teachers and staff; computer software audits; and sources for more information. (LRW)

  5. Descriptive Analysis of Medication Administration During Inpatient Cardiopulmonary Arrest Resuscitation (from the Mayo Registry for Telemetry Efficacy in Arrest Study).

    PubMed

    Snipelisky, David; Ray, Jordan; Matcha, Gautam; Roy, Archana; Dumitrascu, Adrian; Harris, Dana; Bosworth, Veronica; Clark, Brooke; Thomas, Colleen S; Heckman, Michael G; Vadeboncoeur, Tyler; Kusumoto, Fred; Burton, M Caroline

    2016-05-15

    Advanced cardiovascular life support guidelines exist, yet there are variations in clinical practice. Our study aims to describe the utilization of medications during resuscitation from in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrest. A retrospective review of patients who suffered a cardiopulmonary arrest from May 2008 to June 2014 was performed. Clinical and resuscitation data, including timing and dose of medications used, were extracted from the electronic medical record and comparisons made. A total of 94 patients were included in the study. Patients were divided into different groups based on the medication combination used during resuscitation: (1) epinephrine; (2) epinephrine and bicarbonate; (3) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and calcium; (4) epinephrine, bicarbonate, and epinephrine drip; and (5) epinephrine, bicarbonate, calcium, and epinephrine drip. No difference in baseline demographics or clinical data was present, apart from history of dementia and the use of calcium channel blockers. The number of medications given was correlated with resuscitation duration (Spearman's rank correlation = 0.50, p <0.001). The proportion of patients who died during the arrest was 12.5% in those who received epinephrine alone, 30.0% in those who received only epinephrine and bicarbonate, and 46.7% to 57.9% in the remaining groups. Patients receiving only epinephrine had shorter resuscitation durations compared to that of the other groups (p <0.001) and improved survival (p = 0.003). In conclusion, providers frequently use nonguideline medications in resuscitation efforts for in-hospital cardiopulmonary arrests. Increased duration and mortality rates were found in those resuscitations compared with epinephrine alone, likely due to the longer resuscitation duration in the former groups. PMID:27015887

  6. The ABCs of the FDA: A Primer on the Role of the United States Food and Drug Administration in Medical Device Approvals and IR Research.

    PubMed

    Adamovich, Ashley; Park, Susie; Siskin, Gary P; Englander, Meridith J; Mandato, Kenneth D; Herr, Allen; Keating, Lawrence J

    2015-09-01

    The role of the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in medical device regulation is important to device-driven specialties such as interventional radiology. Whether it is through industry-sponsored trials during the approval process for new devices or investigator-initiated research prospectively evaluating the role of existing devices for new or established procedures, interaction with the FDA is an integral part of performing significant research in interventional radiology. This article reviews the potential areas of interface between the FDA and interventional radiology, as understanding these areas is necessary to continue the innovation that is the hallmark of this specialty. PMID:26189046

  7. Planning Staff Meetings. Ideas for Staff Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Margie

    2002-01-01

    Emphasizes the importance of the planning and the process of organizing staff meetings. Specifically addresses the areas concerning clarity of purpose and structure of meetings, as well as promoting learning and connecting during meetings. Provides specific strategies to achieve these goals including suggestions for self-assessment. (SD)

  8. [Principles of medical liability and practice in medical imaging].

    PubMed

    Thibierge, M; Fournier, L; Cabanis, E A

    1999-07-01

    Radiologists are liable for all aspects of their practice, from the indication of an examination to the radiology report and follow-up, as well as for providing information and recommendations. They are liable for their decisions and actions. They are liable for their competence and continuous medical education. They are also liable for their own equipment and staff. In cases of litigation, the liability of a radiologist may be questioned. Four types of procedures must been known: penal, civil, administrative and disciplinary. PMID:10431269

  9. Criteria for use of blue "Star of Life" for emergency medical services. National Highway Traffic Safety Administration. Notice.

    PubMed

    1994-08-11

    This notice amends NHTSA's guidelines for the authorized use of the blue "Star of Life" symbols for emergency medical services. Comments received in response to an earlier notice suggested uses for this symbol that were not considered when these guidelines were first developed. These amendments are intended to provide additional flexibility to the States within the purposes for which the blue Star of Life was originally registered as a certification mark. PMID:10136913

  10. Listening to Staff, 2002.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owen, Jane; Davies, Peter

    A 2002 staff satisfaction survey was administered to 100 sixth form colleges, general further education colleges, and beacon and specialist colleges in England. A questionnaire containing 38 positive statements concerning 6 broad areas one's own role; the staff of the college; style of senior management; communication; customers, including…

  11. Why Do Staff Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Connie

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 211 returning staff from 25 camps and interviewed 19 returning staff to study factors that influence a counselor's decision to return to camp. Examined the following dimensions of motivation and hygiene factors: (1) stimulation or inspiration; (2) personal; (3) job-related experience; (4) living conditions and camp life; (5) camp…

  12. Staff Development Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Menlo Park City School District, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Believing that the knowledge and expertise of the District's staff are essential in the strength of the District as an effective educational institution, the Menlo Park City School District expanded its current staff development plan to be more consistent with current knowledge on the…

  13. Administrative Codes Combined with Medical Records-based Criteria Accurately Identified Bacterial Infections among Rheumatoid Arthritis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Patkar, Nivedita M.; Curtis, Jeffrey R.; Teng, Gim Gee; Allison, Jeroan J.; Saag, Michael; Martin, Carolyn; Saag, Kenneth G.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate diagnostic properties of International Classification of Diseases, Version 9 (ICD-9) diagnosis codes and infection criteria to identify bacterial infections among rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. Study Design and Setting We performed a cross- sectional study of RA patients with and without ICD-9 codes for bacterial infections. Sixteen bacterial infection criteria were developed. Diagnostic properties of comprehensive and restrictive sets of ICD-9 codes and the infection criteria were tested against an adjudicated review of medical records. Results Records on 162 RA patients with and 50 without purported bacterial infections were reviewed. Positive (PPV) and negative predictive values (NPVs) of ICD-9 codes ranged from 54% – 85% and 84% – 100%, respectively. PPVs of the medical records-based criteria were: 84% and 89% for “definite” and “definite or empirically treated” infections, respectively. PPV of infection criteria increased by 50% as disease prevalence increased using ICD-9 codes to enhance infection likelihood. Conclusion ICD-9 codes alone may misclassify bacterial infections in hospitalized RA patients. Misclassification varies with the specificity of the codes used and strength of evidence required to confirm infections. Combining ICD-9 codes with infection criteria identified infections with greatest accuracy. Novel infection criteria may limit the requirement to review medical records. PMID:18834713

  14. Head of Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-03-01

    Purpose and scope of the position: The main task is to provide efficient administrative services and advice to the Director General, Division Leaders and to staff members in the scientific and technical areas in the fields of financial planning and accounting, personnel management, purchasing, legal and contractual matters, information systems and building and site maintenance. As a member of the ESO Management the Head of Administration contributes essentially to the development of the overall policy, strategic planning, relations to the members of the personnel and maintains professional contacts at highest level outside the Organisation. ESO employs in total approximately 650 staff members and the Administration Division comprises the Administration at the Headquarters in Garching near Munich and the Administration in Santiago (Chile). The successful candidate will be supported by some 50 qualified staff members.

  15. Using ATS-6 for Continuing Medical Education and Health Care in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler-Paisley, Matilda; And Others

    Ten Veterans Administration hospitals in Appalachia participated in five biomedical communication experiments using the Advanced Technology Satellite (ATS-6). Material was collected and evaluated by both questionnaires and interviews with the medical staff of the 10 hospitals. The five experiments were conducted in the areas of: (1) video…

  16. A two-year retrospective review of the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration by alpine helicopter emergency medical physicians to patients with isolated limb injury.

    PubMed

    Eidenbenz, D; Taffé, P; Hugli, O; Albrecht, E; Pasquier, M

    2016-07-01

    Up to 75% of pre-hospital trauma patients experience moderate to severe pain but this is often poorly recognised and treated with insufficient analgesia. Using multi-level logistic regression analysis, we aimed to identify the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration and choice of analgesic agent in a single helicopter-based emergency medical service, where available analgesic drugs were fentanyl and ketamine. Of the 1156 patients rescued for isolated limb injury, 657 (57%) received analgesia. Mean (SD) initial pain scores (as measured by a numeric rating scale) were 2.8 (1.8), 3.3 (1.6) and 7.4 (2.0) for patients who did not receive, declined, and received analgesia, respectively (p < 0.001). Fentanyl as a single agent, ketamine in combination with fentanyl and ketamine as a single agent were used in 533 (84%), 94 (14%) and 10 (2%) patients, respectively. A high initial on-scene pain score and a presumptive diagnosis of fracture were the main determinants of analgesia administration. Fentanyl was preferred for paediatric patients and ketamine was preferentially administered for severe pain by physicians who had more medical experience or had trained in anaesthesia. PMID:27091515

  17. Perception of the A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and acceptance of influenza vaccination by Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 staff: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Amour, Sélilah; Djhehiche, Khaled; Zamora, Adeline; Bergeret, Alain; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perception and attitudes of university staff, including medical school and other science specialties, toward the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and influenza vaccination program. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 4,529 university personnel on October 19–20, 2009. Seven hundred (15%) employees participated in the study. Only 18% were willing to be vaccinated, men more than women (29% versus 9%, P < 0.001), and professors/researchers more than administrative/technical staff (30% vs. 6%, P < 0.001). Intention to be vaccinated was insufficient. Additional efforts are needed to improve information dissemination among university staff. Medical university personnel should receive more information to increase vaccine coverage and protect them as well as patients. PMID:25715115

  18. Reducing the Risk of Harm From Medication Errors in Children

    PubMed Central

    Neuspiel, Daniel R.; Taylor, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors affect the pediatric age group in all settings: outpatient, inpatient, emergency department, and at home. Children may be at special risk due to size and physiologic variability, limited communication ability, and treatment by nonpediatric health care providers. Those with chronic illnesses and on multiple medications may be at higher risk of experiencing adverse drug events. Some strategies that have been employed to reduce harm from pediatric medication errors include e-prescribing and computerized provider order entry with decision support, medication reconciliation, barcode systems, clinical pharmacists in medical settings, medical staff training, package changes to reduce look-alike/sound-alike confusion, standardization of labeling and measurement devices for home administration, and quality improvement interventions to promote nonpunitive reporting of medication errors coupled with changes in systems and cultures. Future research is needed to measure the effectiveness of these preventive strategies. PMID:25114560

  19. [The need for training in gerontology and geriatrics among the staff providing services at a geriatric care institution].

    PubMed

    Baerga Duperoy, Rachel; Castro Rojas, Nydia; Orta Rodríguez, Brenda; González Caraballo, Enid; Cruz González, Angel; Vázquez Fernández, José; Oliver Vázquez, Marlén

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and identify the basic training needs of nursing home staff, in terms of attitudes, knowledge and skills required to work effectively with geriatric patients. Three focus groups were performed, two groups of employees, and a group of elderly residents of the institution, in order to explore issues pertaining to the following topics: personal attributes required to work with geriatric patients, basic knowledge and skills needed to provide effective services. Group discussions were transcribed and themes were extracted through consensus reached by the investigators. Results indicated that the interviewed staff lack of formal preparation or continuing education in gerontology or geriatrics. Needs identified were the following: the aging process, caring behaviors, management of common health conditions, administration of medications, transference and mobility of residents, among others. Finding were use to design an educational program aimed in assisting nursing home staff in providing an effective service to their geriatric patients. PMID:12572242

  20. Wait times to rheumatology care for patients with rheumatic diseases: a data linkage study of primary care electronic medical records and administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Widdifield, Jessica; Bernatsky, Sasha; Thorne, J. Carter; Bombardier, Claire; Jaakkimainen, R. Liisa; Wing, Laura; Paterson, J. Michael; Ivers, Noah; Butt, Debra; Lyddiatt, Anne; Hofstetter, Catherine; Ahluwalia, Vandana; Tu, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Wait Time Alliance recently established wait time benchmarks for rheumatology consultations in Canada. Our aim was to quantify wait times to primary and rheumatology care for patients with rheumatic diseases. Methods: We identified patients from primary care practices in the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database who had referrals to Ontario rheumatologists over the period 2000-2013. To assess the full care pathway, we identified dates of symptom onset, presentation in primary care and referral from electronic medical records. Dates of rheumatologist consultations were obtained by linking with physician service claims. We determined the duration of each phase of the care pathway (symptom onset to primary care encounter, primary care encounter to referral, and referral to rheumatologist consultation) and compared them with established benchmarks. Results: Among 2430 referrals from 168 family physicians, 2015 patients (82.9%) were seen by 146 rheumatologists within 1 year of referral. Of the 2430 referrals, 2417 (99.5%) occurred between 2005 and 2013. The main reasons for referral were osteoarthritis (32.4%) and systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (30.6%). Wait times varied by diagnosis and geographic region. Overall, the median wait time from referral to rheumatologist consultation was 74 (interquartile range 27-101) days; it was 66 (interquartile range 18-84) days for systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Wait time benchmarks were not achieved, even for the most urgent types of referral. For systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, most of the delays occurred before referral. Interpretation: Rheumatology wait times exceeded established benchmarks. Targeted efforts are needed to promote more timely access to both primary and rheumatology care. Routine linkage of electronic medical records with administrative data may help fill important gaps in knowledge about waits to primary and specialty care. PMID:27398365

  1. Alternatives for Staff Development of Adult Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrichter, Arthur W.; Gardner, Daniel L.

    The product of a three-year adult education teacher training project conducted for Florida's adult educators, this guide is designed to assist planners, facilitators, evaluators, and administrators of staff development programs for adult education teachers to design and conduct effective personal and professional learning experiences. It provides…

  2. Evaluation of a Statewide Staff Development Network.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandes, Barbara G.; Padia, William L.

    Findings from an evaluation of Teacher Education and Computer (TEC) Centers were presented. The California State Legislature authorized 15 TEC Centers to provide staff development services to teachers and administrators. Evaluation of the Centers focused on several policy issues in order to describe the major accomplishments of TEC Centers on a…

  3. Getting Staff to Use Data Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Sheila

    2006-01-01

    In this article, John Forbes, administrative analyst for the 80,000-student Fresno Unified School District in Fresno, and Terrence Young, chief information officer for the 70,000-student Guilford Country Schools in Greensboro, North Carolina, share their strategies for getting staff on board with Web-based data systems. These are the strategies:…

  4. Costing Child Protective Services Staff Turnover.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graef, Michelle I.; Hill, Erick L.

    2000-01-01

    Details process of determining a child welfare agency's actual dollar costs directly attributed to protective services staff turnover, using the agency's human resources database and interviews with administrative personnel. Provides formulas and process for calculating specific cost elements due to employee separation, replacement, and training.…

  5. Turning Up the Staff for Organizational Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Jr., Richard V.

    1969-01-01

    With the tremendous growth of innovation in education in recent years, the need to "tune up the staff has appeared as an essential ingredient. The days of change through administrative directives have disappeared with the rise in teacher militancy and competency. (CK)

  6. Staff Development Resources, 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Instructional Technology.

    This staff development resource guide provides listings of instructional television and radio broadcasts related to major areas of the Total Teaching Act in South Carolina's Program for Effective Teaching (PET). Television program topics include: administration; adult education; the arts; career education; certificate-renewal credit courses;…

  7. Effective Strategies for Engaging Faculty and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieving the Dream, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges are the pathways for millions of Americans to gain valuable education and to access career opportunities leading to family-sustaining wages. Faculty, student services staff, and administrators must share in the responsibility for student success if we are to meet national completion goals and reach even more students. During a…

  8. Medical Information & Technology: Rapidly Expanding Vast Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Anil K.

    2012-12-01

    During ÑMedical Council Of India?, Platinum Jubilee Year (1933-2008) Celebrations, In Year 2008, Several Scientific Meeting/Seminar/Symposium, On Various Topics Of Contemporary Importance And Relevance In The Field Of ÑMedical Education And Ethics?, Were Organized, By Different Medical Colleges At Various Local, State, National Levels. The Present Discussion, Is An Comprehensive Summary Of Various Different Aspects of ìMedical Information Communication Technologyî, Especially UseFul For The Audience Stratum Group Of Those Amateur Medical & Paramedical Staff, With No Previous Work Experience Knowledge Of Computronics Applications. Outlining The, i.Administration Applications: Medical Records Etc, ii. Clinical Applications: Pros pective Scope Of TeleMedicine Applicabilities Etc iii. Other Applications: Efforts To Augment Improvement Of Medical Education, Medical Presentations, Medical Education And Research Etc. ÑMedical Trancription? & Related Recent Study Fields e.g ÑModern Pharmaceuticals?,ÑBio-Engineering?, ÑBio-Mechanics?, ÑBio-Technology? Etc., Along With Important Aspects Of Computers-General Considerations, Computer Ergonomics Assembled To Summarize, The AwareNess Regarding Basic Fundamentals Of Medical Computronics & Its Practically SuccessFul Utilities.

  9. Migrant Education Administrative Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Compensatory Education.

    Relating specifically to the North Carolina migrant education program's administrative responsibilities, this guide is designed to aid administrators in program management, monitoring project activities, project evaluation, self-assessment, determining needs for training and staff development, site-visit preparation, policy development, and…

  10. Retention of Staff in the Early Childhood Education Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holochwost, Steven J.; DeMott, Kerri; Buell, Martha; Yannetta, Kelly; Amsden, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    What incentives can the administrators of early childhood education facilities offer their staff in order to retain them? In light of research identifying low staff turnover as a key component of high quality early childhood education, the answer to this question has ramifications beyond human-resources management. This paper presents the results…

  11. Teachers' Perceptions of an On-Site Staff Development Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engstrom, Mary E.; Danielson, Lana M.

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated teachers' perceptions of how one school district supported and sustained a teacher-led staff development committee's professional development program. In this small, rural school district, teachers regarded as exemplary by their administrators and colleagues were invited to serve on the district's staff development…

  12. 13 CFR 120.824 - Professional management and staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 13 Business Credit and Assistance 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Professional management and staff. 120.824 Section 120.824 Business Credit and Assistance SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION BUSINESS LOANS Development Company Loan Program (504) Requirements for Cdc Certification and Operation § 120.824 Professional management and staff. A CDC must...

  13. Staff Development Research and Rural Schools: A Critical Appraisal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Fred; Kleine, Paul F.

    This paper reviews staff development research related to rural schools. Only a limited number of studies have described, or evaluated the effects of, particular staff development programs in rural schools, or have assessed the perceived needs of rural faculty and administrators for inservice training. However, rural educators can draw implications…

  14. Issues in Staff Development. A Collection of Conference Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London Univ. (England). Inst. of Education.

    Papers and discussions presented at a British Staff Development in Universities program conference are reported in this collection. Focus was on the role of staff development units, courses and activities concerned with both teaching and administration, and information services. Topics and authors or reporters are: "The Longer Reach," by David…

  15. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  16. Staff support groups: helping nurses to help themselves.

    PubMed

    Scully, R

    1981-03-01

    When the goals of staff development programming include increased introspection, problem-solving skills, or team effort, nursing administration may find that nurses are their own best resources. A nursing staff support group, run by a qualified leader, can offer nurses mutual help in reducing stress and managing conflict. PMID:6924950

  17. International Review of Staff Appraisal Practices: Current Trends and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Richard; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes the purposes, form, and content of staff appraisal schemes in ten countries' public administrations and discusses a number of related trends and issues. Examines the effects of these trends in light of the organizations' experiences and draws attention to the inadequate monitoring and evaluation of staff appraisal schemes. (Author/JG)

  18. Statewide VTAE Staff Training Needs Assessment. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foxwell, Sue

    This final report begins with a three-page narrative of a statewide needs assessment of vocational, technical, and adult education (VTAE) instructors and administrators on technical staff training needs in Wisconsin. Statewide composite results for areas of need are presented for eight survey questionnaires sent to staff in these areas: management…

  19. Delivering Library Services at a Maximum Security Institution: Staff Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guenther, Lorraine

    The survey summarized in this report was administered to 54 sample staff members--school teachers, vocational education and shop instructors, corrections officers, counselors, administrators and secretaries, and inmates who hold responsible jobs--at the Connecticut Correctional Institution-Cheshire, to determine the extent to which the staff has…

  20. Your Investments in Staff Development--An Open Letter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buddy, Juanita Warren

    2009-01-01

    This article features an open letter written by the author to her school library media colleagues, applauding those who are providing informative and interesting staff development activities for teachers, administrators, and their library media peers. She reminds her colleagues about their role in staff development and not to underestimate the…