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Sample records for administration staff medical

  1. Review of Medical School Administrative Staff Salaries, 1976-1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of American Medical Colleges, Washington, DC.

    Results of the most recent Administrative Salary Survey of the Association of American Medical Colleges are analyzed. The data represent 94 U.S. medical schools, with the number of applicable staff positions ranging from two to 52 per institution. The positions considered included those in which at least 20 percent of the time was spent in…

  2. 77 FR 125 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Device Classification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ... Staff; Medical Device Classification Product Codes; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... of the draft guidance entitled ``Medical Device Classification Product Codes.'' The purpose of the... classification product codes for medical devices regulated by the Center for Devices and Radiological...

  3. 78 FR 59038 - Mobile Medical Applications; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Mobile Medical Applications; Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance...

  4. 77 FR 63837 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability...

  5. 78 FR 102 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; eCopy Program for Medical Device Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of...

  6. 75 FR 44267 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological and Physical Medicine Device Guidance Document; Reopening of... for the notice that appeared in the Federal Register of April 5, 2010 (75 FR 17143). In the notice, FDA requested comments on draft guidance documents for 11 neurological and physical medicine...

  7. 75 FR 47604 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-06

    ... Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological and Physical Medicine Device Guidance Document; Reopening of... July 28, 2010 (75 FR 44267). The document reopened the comment period for a notice of availability of draft guidance documents for 11 neurological and physical medicine devices. The document was...

  8. 75 FR 17143 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices; Neurological...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Document: Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulator for Pain Relief; Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA... for Pain Relief Intended for Over the Counter Use; Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff''; (5... Output for Pain Relief; Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff''; (6) ``Class II Special...

  9. 76 FR 43689 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Mobile Medical Applications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... example, such an accessory would be similar to an infusion pump stand, which is currently classified as a class I device because it supports the intended use of an infusion pump (class II medical device)....

  10. Knowledge of Staff Members of Residential Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disability on Medication Administration via Enteral Feeding Tube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joos, E.; Mehuys, E.; Van Bocxlaer, J.; Remon, J. P.; Van Winckel, M.; Boussery, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Guidelines for the safe administration of drugs through enteral feeding tube (EFT) are an important tool to minimise the risk of errors. This study aimed to investigate knowledge of these guidelines among staff of residential care facilities (RCF) for people with ID. Method: Knowledge was assessed using a 13-item self-administered…

  11. 77 FR 16036 - Guidance for Industry, Third Parties and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Device ISO...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... System; the European Union Notified Body Accreditation System; the Therapeutics Goods Administration of... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry, Third Parties and Food and Drug... manufacturer whose establishment has been audited under one of the regulatory systems implemented by the...

  12. 75 FR 28257 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Third Parties and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-20

    ... Japanese Medical Device Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare system. This notice of availability and... Program.'' It does not create or confer any rights for or on any person and does not operate to bind...

  13. 77 FR 41413 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Medical Devices: The Pre...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-13

    ..., Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg... New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, Rm. 1666, Silver Spring, MD 20993-0002, 301-796-6380; or Stephen Ripley... specific questions during product development and early protocol ] planning, about device studies...

  14. African American Administrators and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Dianne; Taylor, Janice D.; Burrell, Charlotte; Stewart, Gregory

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the issues of African American participation in the administrative ranks of the academy. The authors find that African Americans tend to hold positions that are marginal in academic organizations, lacking power and influence, and that not much has changed over recent decades. Forces influencing this condition are explored,…

  15. Resources for Administrator Assessment and Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duttweiler, Patricia Cloud; Hord, Shirley M.

    A synthesis of literature on administrator assessment and staff development and a directory of resources are presented in this document. Section 1 discusses several aspects of administrator evaluation--the purposes of performance assessment; the components of evaluation; and the issues, processes, and recommendations for an effective evaluation…

  16. 76 FR 36543 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Applying Human Factors and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Staff: Applying Human Factors and Usability Engineering To Optimize Medical Device Design; Availability... Factors and Usability Engineering to Optimize Medical Device Design'' to the Division of Small... Administration Staff: Applying Human Factors and Usability Engineering to Optimize Medical Device Design.''...

  17. 76 FR 50484 - Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, and Food and Drug Administration Staff...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry, Clinical Investigators, and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Design Considerations for Pivotal Clinical Investigations for Medical Devices; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The...

  18. Focusing on Staff Development and Administrative Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolvitz, Marcia, Ed.

    These four conference papers from the Biennial Conference on Postsecondary Education for Persons who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing focus on staff development and administrative issues for postsecondary personnel working with students with deafness or who are hard of hearing. The first paper, "Mentorship for the Working Interpreter" (Caroline…

  19. Quality improvements in decreasing medication administration errors made by nursing staff in an academic medical center hospital: a trend analysis during the journey to Joint Commission International accreditation and in the post-accreditation era

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hua-fen; Jin, Jing-fen; Feng, Xiu-qin; Huang, Xin; Zhu, Ling-ling; Zhao, Xiao-ying; Zhou, Quan

    2015-01-01

    (1.81% versus 0.24%, P<0.001). Conclusion A 3-and-a-half-year intervention program on MAEs was confirmed to be effective. MAEs made by nursing staff can be reduced, but cannot be eliminated. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of multidiscipline collaboration among physicians, pharmacists, nurses, information engineers, and hospital administrators are pivotal to safety in medication administration. JCI accreditation may help health systems enhance the awareness and ability to prevent MAEs and achieve successful quality improvements. PMID:25767393

  20. Medical staff committees benefit from job descriptions.

    PubMed

    Topham, A S

    1982-11-01

    When new medical staff officers and committees begin their terms, the confusion potential runs high. Job descriptions a la industry have helped facilitate the orientation of officers and the smooth running of committees.

  1. 20 CFR 402.50 - Availability of administrative staff manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Availability of administrative staff manuals. 402.50 Section 402.50 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC § 402.50 Availability of administrative staff manuals. All administrative staff manuals of the Social...

  2. 20 CFR 402.50 - Availability of administrative staff manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Availability of administrative staff manuals. 402.50 Section 402.50 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION AVAILABILITY OF INFORMATION AND RECORDS TO THE PUBLIC § 402.50 Availability of administrative staff manuals. All administrative staff manuals of the Social...

  3. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  4. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  5. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  6. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  7. 32 CFR 700.720 - Administration and discipline: Staff embarked.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff embarked... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.720 Administration and discipline: Staff embarked. In matters of general discipline, the staff of a commander embarked and...

  8. Staff Prescription Medication: Safety and Privacy Concerns. A Roundtable Discussion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marugg Mary; Erceg, Linda Ebner; Weinberg, Stuart

    2003-01-01

    Staff medications, except for time-critical medications, should be kept at the camp health center, separate from camper medications. Medication use should be documented, with efforts to insure confidentiality. Staff should be able to access their own medications unless they are controlled substances. Medication policies should be explained to…

  9. 42 CFR 401.112 - Availability of administrative staff manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... instructions to staff personnel which contain policies, procedures, or interpretations that affect the public... distribution to the public. Selected material is maintained at Social Security Administration district...

  10. Should trustees be members of medical staff committees? Its' debatable.

    PubMed

    Mountz, W

    1978-06-01

    Trustee membership on medical staff committees is not an appropriate way of ensuring liasion between the medical staff and the governing board. All assurances concerning quality of care should come to the governing board from the organized medical staff, to whom such accountability is and should be delegated.

  11. 78 FR 15370 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Recommendations for Labeling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-11

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Recommendations for Labeling Medical Products To Inform Users That the Product or Product Container Is Not Made With Natural Rubber Latex; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration,...

  12. 20 CFR 632.40 - Administrative staff and personnel standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administrative staff and personnel standards....40 Administrative staff and personnel standards. (a) Staffing. Members of the population to be served.... Native American grantees shall establish systems to enhance the recruitment and hiring of...

  13. Analysis of high alert medication knowledge of medical staff in Tianjin: A convenient sampling survey in China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shang-feng; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Ye; Hou, Jie; Ji, Lu; Wang, Man-li; Huang, Rui

    2015-04-01

    The current situation of medical staff's awareness about high alert medication was investigated in order to promote safe medication and standardized management of the high alert medication in China. Twenty questions were designed concerning elementary knowledge of high alert medications, storage management, medication issues and risks. In order to understand the knowledge level and education status of high alert medication, a convenient survey was conducted among 300 medical staffs in Tianjin. Medical staff's average score of high alert medication knowledge was 12.43±0.27, and the average scores of elementary knowledge of high alert medication, storage management, medication issues and risks were 3.38±0.11, 2.46±0.14, 3.17±0.11 and 3.41±0.12 respectively. Occupation (F=4.86, P=0.003), education background (F=5.57, P=0.019) and professional titles (F=13.44, P≤0.001) contributed to the high alert medications knowledge scores. Currently, the most important channel to obtain high alert medication knowledge was hospital files or administrative rules, and clinical pharmacist seminars were the most popular education form. It was suggested that the high alert medication knowledge level of the medical staff needs to increase, and it might benefit from targeted, systematic and diverse training to the medical staff working in the different circulation nodes of the medications. Further research to develop and validate the instrument is needed.

  14. Medical Administrative Systems. Curriculum Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patton, Jan

    This curriculum guide provides materials for teachers to use in developing a course in medical administrative systems. Following an introductory section that lists the common essential elements of the course, the guide contains seven sections that cover the following course topics: (1) introduction to medical administrative systems; (2) word…

  15. 32 CFR 700.722 - Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.722 Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command. (a) When it is...

  16. 32 CFR 700.722 - Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.722 Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command. (a) When it is...

  17. 32 CFR 700.722 - Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.722 Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command. (a) When it is...

  18. 32 CFR 700.722 - Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.722 Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command. (a) When it is...

  19. 32 CFR 700.722 - Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned... REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.722 Administration and discipline: Staff unassigned to an administrative command. (a) When it is...

  20. Elected medical staff leaders: who needs 'em?

    PubMed

    Thompson, R E

    1994-03-01

    Authority, influence, and power are not synonyms. In working with elected medical staff leaders, a physician executive who chooses to exert authority may soon find him- or herself relatively powerless. But one who chooses to downplay authority, to influence through persuasion, and to coach leaders to lead effectively soon generates support for his or her ideas. The need to coax, cajole, explain, persuade, and "seek input" frustrates many leaders in all kinds of organizations. It would be much easier just to order people about. It's so tempting to think: "Who needs 'em? I'm the 'chief physician.' I know what needs to be done. Let's weigh anchor, take her out, and do what it takes to sail those rough, uncharted seas." If you really enjoy sailing a large ship in rough seas without a crew, go right ahead. Or if you think it makes sense to run an organization with only an executive staff and no knowledgeable middle managers, by all means let clinician leaders know that, now that you're aboard, they're just window-dressing. If you can make this approach work, well and good. Your life will be much less complicated, each day will have far fewer frustrations, and progress toward established goals will be much faster. However, given the reality of traditionally thinking physicians, it would be best to keep an up-dated resume in the locked lower left-hand drawer of your desk.

  1. Valuing Professional, Managerial and Administrative Staff in HE

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duncan, David

    2014-01-01

    The article explores the role of the Registrar (Chief Operating Officer) in a university, and the ways in which we value the contributions of professional, managerial and administrative (PMA) staff. It assesses the conditions in which PMA staff work and describes the professional development opportunities they enjoy. The article goes on to analyse…

  2. 42 CFR 401.112 - Availability of administrative staff manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Availability of administrative staff manuals. 401.112 Section 401.112 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS GENERAL ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS Confidentiality and Disclosure § 401.112 Availability of administrative...

  3. 20 CFR 633.313 - Administrative staff and personnel standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative staff and personnel standards. 633.313 Section 633.313 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR MIGRANT AND SEASONAL FARMWORKER PROGRAMS Program Design and Administrative Procedures §...

  4. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... accordance with State law, including scope-of-practice laws, the medical staff may also include other... candidates in accordance with State law, including scope-of-practice laws, and the medical staff bylaws... for use in the periodic appraisal of the distant-site physician or practitioner. At a minimum,...

  5. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... medical staff must be composed of doctors of medicine or osteopathy and, in accordance with State law, may... the committee must be doctors of medicine or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility for organization and conduct of the medical staff must be assigned only to an individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy...

  6. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to medical staff. The medical staff must include doctors of medicine or osteopathy. In accordance... majority of the members of the committee must be doctors of medicine or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility...) An individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy. (ii) A doctor of dental surgery or dental...

  7. 42 CFR 482.22 - Condition of participation: Medical staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... medical staff must be composed of doctors of medicine or osteopathy and, in accordance with State law, may... or osteopathy. (3) The responsibility for organization and conduct of the medical staff must be assigned only to an individual doctor of medicine or osteopathy or, when permitted by State law of...

  8. 20 CFR 633.313 - Administrative staff and personnel standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... personnel manual containing detailed procedures for hiring new employees, promoting present employees and... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administrative staff and personnel standards. 633.313 Section 633.313 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT...

  9. 28 CFR 345.64 - Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff. 345.64 Section 345.64 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits §...

  10. 28 CFR 345.64 - Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff. 345.64 Section 345.64 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits §...

  11. 28 CFR 345.64 - Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff. 345.64 Section 345.64 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits §...

  12. 28 CFR 345.64 - Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff. 345.64 Section 345.64 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits §...

  13. 28 CFR 345.64 - Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Referral of releasable medical data to FPI staff. 345.64 Section 345.64 Judicial Administration FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES, INC., DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE FEDERAL PRISON INDUSTRIES (FPI) INMATE WORK PROGRAMS Inmate Pay and Benefits §...

  14. Exploring Factors Affecting Emergency Medical Services Staffs' Decision about Transporting Medical Patients to Medical Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Seyedin, Hesam; Jamshidi-Orak, Roohangiz

    2014-01-01

    Transfer of patients in medical emergency situations is one of the most important missions of emergency medical service (EMS) staffs. So this study was performed to explore affecting factors in EMS staffs' decision during transporting of patients in medical situations to medical facilities. The participants in this qualitative study consisted of 18 EMS staffs working in prehospital care facilities in Tehran, Iran. Data were gathered through semistructured interviews. The data were analyzed using a content analysis approach. The data analysis revealed the following theme: “degree of perceived risk in EMS staffs and their patients.” This theme consisted of two main categories: (1) patient's condition' and (2) the context of the EMS mission'. The patent's condition category emerged from “physical health statuses,” “socioeconomic statuses,” and “cultural background” subcategories. The context of the EMS mission also emerged from two subcategories of “characteristics of the mission” and EMS staffs characteristics'. EMS system managers can consider adequate technical, informational, financial, educational, and emotional supports to facilitate the decision making of their staffs. Also, development of an effective and user-friendly checklist and scoring system was recommended for quick and easy recognition of patients' needs for transportation in a prehospital situation. PMID:24891953

  15. Trends in attrition among medical teaching staff at universities in Myanmar 2009–2013

    PubMed Central

    Nang Mie Mie Htun; Reyer, Joshua A.; Yamamoto, Eiko; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although lack of human resources for health is becoming a global problem, there are few studies on human resources in Myanmar. This study was conducted to investigate the attrition rates of teaching staff from universities for medical professions in Myanmar from 2009 to 2013. The data were collected from administrative records from Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Health, Myanmar. Numbers of staff and those who permanently left work (attrition) from 2009 to 2013 were counted. The reasons were classified into two categories; involuntary attrition (death or retirement) and voluntary attrition (resignation or absenteeism). Official records of the attrited staff were reviewed for identifying demographic characteristics. The annual attrition rate for all kinds of health workers was about 4%. Among 494 attrited staff from 2009 to 2013, 357 staff (72.3%) left their work by involuntary attrition, while 137 staff (27.7%) left voluntarily. Doctors left their work with the highest annual rate (6.7%), while the rate for nurses was the lowest (1.1%). Male staff attrited with a higher rate (4.6%) than female staff (2.7%). Staff aged 46–60 years had the highest attrition rate. PhD degree holders had the highest rate (5.9%), while basic degree holders had the second highest rate (3.5%). Associate professors and above showed the highest attrition rate (8.1%). Teaching staff from non-clinical subjects had the higher rates (8.2%). Among 494 attrited staff, significant differences between involuntary attrition and voluntary attrition were observed in age, marital status, education, overseas degree, position, field of teaching, duration of services and duration of non-residential service. These findings indicated the need to develop appropriate policies such as educational reforms, local recruitment plans, transparent regulatory and administrative measures, and professional incentives to retain the job. PMID:27019526

  16. Trends in attrition among medical teaching staff at universities in Myanmar 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Nang Mie Mie Htun; Reyer, Joshua A; Yamamoto, Eiko; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Although lack of human resources for health is becoming a global problem, there are few studies on human resources in Myanmar. This study was conducted to investigate the attrition rates of teaching staff from universities for medical professions in Myanmar from 2009 to 2013. The data were collected from administrative records from Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Health, Myanmar. Numbers of staff and those who permanently left work (attrition) from 2009 to 2013 were counted. The reasons were classified into two categories; involuntary attrition (death or retirement) and voluntary attrition (resignation or absenteeism). Official records of the attrited staff were reviewed for identifying demographic characteristics. The annual attrition rate for all kinds of health workers was about 4%. Among 494 attrited staff from 2009 to 2013, 357 staff (72.3%) left their work by involuntary attrition, while 137 staff (27.7%) left voluntarily. Doctors left their work with the highest annual rate (6.7%), while the rate for nurses was the lowest (1.1%). Male staff attrited with a higher rate (4.6%) than female staff (2.7%). Staff aged 46-60 years had the highest attrition rate. PhD degree holders had the highest rate (5.9%), while basic degree holders had the second highest rate (3.5%). Associate professors and above showed the highest attrition rate (8.1%). Teaching staff from non-clinical subjects had the higher rates (8.2%). Among 494 attrited staff, significant differences between involuntary attrition and voluntary attrition were observed in age, marital status, education, overseas degree, position, field of teaching, duration of services and duration of non-residential service. These findings indicated the need to develop appropriate policies such as educational reforms, local recruitment plans, transparent regulatory and administrative measures, and professional incentives to retain the job. PMID:27019526

  17. 76 FR 36542 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: The Content of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Staff: The Content of Investigational Device Exemption and Premarket Approval Applications for Low... document entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: The Content of... Staff: The Content of Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) and Premarket Approval (PMA)...

  18. Chronic Disease Medication Administration Rates in a Public School System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weller, Lawrence; Fredrickson, Doren D.; Burbach, Cindy; Molgaard, Craig A.; Ngong, Lolem

    2004-01-01

    Anecdotal reports suggest school nurses and staff treat increasing numbers of public school students with chronic diseases. However, professionals know little about actual disease burden in schools. This study measured prevalence of chronic disease medication administration rates in a large, urban midwestern school district. Data from daily…

  19. Impact of an electronic medication administration record on medication administration efficiency and errors.

    PubMed

    McComas, Jeffery; Riingen, Michelle; Chae Kim, Son

    2014-12-01

    The study aims were to evaluate the impact of electronic medication administration record implementation on medication administration efficiency and occurrence of medication errors as well as to identify the predictors of medication administration efficiency in an acute care setting. A prospective, observational study utilizing time-and-motion technique was conducted before and after electronic medication administration record implementation in November 2011. A total of 156 cases of medication administration activities (78 pre- and 78 post-electronic medication administration record) involving 38 nurses were observed at the point of care. A separate retrospective review of the hospital Midas+ medication error database was also performed to collect the rates and origin of medication errors for 6 months before and after electronic medication administration record implementation. The mean medication administration time actually increased from 11.3 to 14.4 minutes post-electronic medication administration record (P = .039). In a multivariate analysis, electronic medication administration record was not a predictor of medication administration time, but the distractions/interruptions during medication administration process were significant predictors. The mean hospital-wide medication errors significantly decreased from 11.0 to 5.3 events per month post-electronic medication administration record (P = .034). Although no improvement in medication administration efficiency was observed, electronic medication administration record improved the quality of care with a significant decrease in medication errors.

  20. 32 CFR 700.721 - Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff based... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.721 Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore. When a staff is based ashore, the enlisted persons serving with the...

  1. 32 CFR 700.721 - Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff based... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.721 Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore. When a staff is based ashore, the enlisted persons serving with the...

  2. 32 CFR 700.721 - Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff based... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.721 Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore. When a staff is based ashore, the enlisted persons serving with the...

  3. 32 CFR 700.721 - Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff based... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.721 Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore. When a staff is based ashore, the enlisted persons serving with the...

  4. 32 CFR 700.721 - Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Administration and discipline: Staff based... Commanders In Chief and Other Commanders Administration and Discipline § 700.721 Administration and discipline: Staff based ashore. When a staff is based ashore, the enlisted persons serving with the...

  5. Medication Errors Involving the Intravenous Administration Route: Characteristics of Voluntarily Reported Medication Errors.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Zane Robinson

    2016-01-01

    Characteristics of medication errors involving the intravenous (IV) route of administration were analyzed in reports from 1995 to 2013. This was accomplished through a voluntary medication error reporting program. A retrospective case study design analyzed reports by practitioners or consumers on IV-associated medication errors (N = 975) affecting patients. Patterns in error accounts reflected cultural changes in health care organizations. Equipment, labeling, incorrect route of administration, types of errors, patient outcomes, and causal agents represented major codes. Results point to health care provider and consumer knowledge, the need for ongoing education of nursing staff, and interdisciplinary strategies for preventing IV-associated medication errors. PMID:27379682

  6. Exposed medical staff: challenges, available tools, and opportunities for improvement.

    PubMed

    Dauer, Lawrence T

    2014-02-01

    Medical staff doses have increased over the past decade, as there is an increasing need for the benefits and use of radiation in medicine. While current average medical staff doses are well within limits, some doses to individuals could exceed 20 mSv y deep dose equivalent or lens dose equivalent (if unprotected), and there is the potential for some workers to exceed 500 mSv y shallow dose equivalent without careful assessment and protection. Nuclear medicine radiochemistry and patient dose preparation present challenging opportunities for improved dose control. In addition, fluoroscopically guided intervention procedures continue to represent an important area for careful protection implementation. Optimization of radiation protection in the medical setting should include tried and true principles of justification, optimization, and limitation with emphasis on training, credentialing, planning, and quality management. As newer and developing uses of radiation in medicine are tested and implemented, it is important to consider effective dosimetric monitoring, lens of eye doses, extremity doses, novel uses, and novel radionuclide characteristics. An ongoing assessment of current and future patterns of use for radiation in medicine is an essential activity to assist in prioritizing limited resources for staff protection. Introduction of Exposed Medical Staff (Video 1:27, http://links.lww.com/HP/A20).

  7. Perinatal Staff Nurse Medical Device Use and Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McConnell, Edwina A.

    1998-01-01

    Survey responses from 48 perinatal nurses found that most learned about medical devices by reading manuals; 75% had received inservice training; and 95% learned from other staff. Inadequate knowledge was related to fear of causing patient harm. Initial learning method influenced what was learned, and hands-on experience was considered efficacious.…

  8. Medication Administration Practices of School Nurses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Reed, David

    2000-01-01

    Assessed medication administration practices among school nurses, surveying members of the National Association of School Nurses. Respondents were extremely concerned about medication administration. Errors in administering medications were reported by 48.5 percent of respondents, with missed doses the most common error. Most nurses followed…

  9. California decides that medical staff bylaws are not contracts.

    PubMed

    Cassidy, Michael A

    2002-03-01

    The point of conflict between the majority and minority views is the existence of consideration. There is no question that hospitals are required to adopt medical staff bylaws, nor is there any doubt hornbook law states the performance of a pre-existing duty does not constitute consideration. Therefore, the issue of law is whether the hospital's grant of privileges and the physician's agreement to abide by the bylaws is separate or different "consideration" sufficient to justify the creation of a contract.

  10. Nursing Home Medical Staff Organization and 30-Day Rehospitalizations

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Julie C.; Intrator, Orna; Karuza, Jurgis; Wetle, Terrie; Mor, Vincent; Katz, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the relationship between features of nursing home (NH) medical staff organization and residents’ 30-day rehospitalizations. Design Cross-sectional study combining primary data collected from a survey of medical directors, NH resident assessment data (minimum data set), Medicare claims, and the Online Survey Certification and Reporting (OSCAR) database. Setting A total of 202 freestanding US nursing homes. Participants Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries who were hospitalized and subsequently admitted to a study nursing home. Measurements Medical staff organization dimensions derived from the survey, NH residents’ characteristics derived from minimum data set data, hospitalizations obtained from Part A Medicare claims, and NH characteristics from the OSCAR database and from www.ltcfocus.org. Study outcome defined within a 30-day window following an index hospitalization: rehospitalized, otherwise died, otherwise survived and not rehospitalized. Results Thirty-day rehospitalizations occurred for 3788 (20.3%) of the 18,680 initial hospitalizations. Death was observed for 884 (4.7%) of residents who were not rehospitalized. Adjusted by hospitalization, resident, and NH characteristics, nursing homes having a more formal appointment process for physicians were less likely to have 30-day rehospitalization (b = −0.43, SE = 0.17), whereas NHs in which a higher proportion of residents were cared for by a single physician were more likely to have rehospitalizations (b = 0.18, SE = 0.08). Conclusion This is the first study to show a direct relationship between features of NH medical staff organization and resident-level process of care. The relationship of a more strict appointment process and rehospitalizations might be a consequence of more formalized and dedicated medical practice with a sense of ownership and accountability. A higher volume of patients per physician does not appear to improve quality of care. PMID:22682694

  11. Confirming delivery: understanding the role of the hospitalized patient in medication administration safety.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Marilyn T; Heilemann, MarySue V; MacKinnon, Neil J; Lang, Ariella; Gregory, David; Gurnham, Mary Ellen; Fillatre, Theresa

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of our study was to gain an understanding of current patient involvement in medication administration safety from the perspectives of both patients and nursing staff members. Administering medication is taken for granted and therefore suited to the development of theory to enhance its understanding. We conducted a constructivist, grounded theory study involving 24 patients and 26 nursing staff members and found that patients had the role of confirming delivery in the administration of medication. Confirming delivery was characterized by three interdependent subprocesses: engaging in the medication administration process, being "half out of it" (patient mental status), and perceiving time. We believe that ours is one of the first qualitative studies on the role of hospitalized patients in administering medication. Medication administration and nursing care systems, as well as patient mental status, impose limitations on patient involvement in safe medication administration.

  12. Motivating Staff--A Problem for the School Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batchler, Merv

    1981-01-01

    Examines the implications for educators of the "Motivation-Hygiene Theory" proposed by Frederick Herzberg. Suggests increasing staff opportunities for goal setting, decision making, and expanded professional competence as strategies for developing staff motivation. (Author/MLF)

  13. 75 FR 73107 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Blood Lancet Labeling; Availability

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... ``Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Blood Lancet Labeling.'' FDA is issuing this guidance with labeling recommendations because of concerns that both healthcare providers and patients...

  14. Medical staff privileges for ethics consultants: an institutional model.

    PubMed

    La Puma, J; Priest, E R

    1992-01-01

    On January 1, 1991, the Joint Commission required hospitals to be equipped for resolving moral dilemmas that arise in the care of a patient. Regulation of those professing expertise in clinical ethics is new and untested yet must be evaluated and further developed to protect patients from practitioners who lack expertise in clinical ethics but may promote themselves as qualified. The authors report the development of standard criteria for clinical ethics consultation privileges as one model to protect patients. An institutional medical staff model utilizing approved credentialing mechanisms is a generous umbrella under which patients may be protected, qualified clinical ethicists may practice, and continuous quality improvement may be sought.

  15. 77 FR 67379 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Highly Multiplexed...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... Staff; Highly Multiplexed Microbiological/Medical Countermeasure In Vitro Nucleic Acid Based Diagnostic... Multiplexed Microbiological/Medical Countermeasure In Vitro Nucleic Acid Based Diagnostic Devices.'' This... nucleic acid based diagnostic devices (HMMDs) intended to simultaneously detect and identify...

  16. Workplace Information Literacy for Administrative Staff in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hepworth, Mark; Smith, Marian

    2008-01-01

    A joint project carried out by Leeds University and Loughborough University, funded by JISC, studied the information literacy of non academic staff in higher education. The in-depth, qualitative study deployed an information audit, interviews and focus groups with eleven staff in the Finance and Research Departments at Loughborough University. The…

  17. Quantifying nursing workflow in medication administration.

    PubMed

    Keohane, Carol A; Bane, Anne D; Featherstone, Erica; Hayes, Judy; Woolf, Seth; Hurley, Ann; Bates, David W; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2008-01-01

    New medication administration systems are showing promise in improving patient safety at the point of care, but adoption of these systems requires significant changes in nursing workflow. To prepare for these changes, the authors report on a time-motion study that measured the proportion of time that nurses spend on various patient care activities, focusing on medication administration-related activities. Implications of their findings are discussed.

  18. Understanding Relationships between Academic Staff and Administrators: An Organisational Culture Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuo, Hui-Min

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to advance the understanding of relationships between university academic staff and administrators through information in interviews with 18 academic staff members and 18 administrators at a large public research university in the United States. Through exploring the first-hand insights and perceptions of interviewees from an…

  19. Views on Multilingualism and Internationalisation in Higher Education: Administrative Staff in the Spotlight

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Llurda, Enric; Cots, Josep M.; Armengol, Lurdes

    2014-01-01

    The key role of administrative staff in the implementation of specific institutional policies at university has often been ignored when analysing policies or attitudes related to higher education. Consequently, little is known about the administrative staff's attitudes and involvement relating to the processes of internationalisation and…

  20. Job Satisfaction and Gender Factor of Administrative Staff in South West Nigeria Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olorunsola, E. O.

    2010-01-01

    The study investigated the level of job satisfaction of male and female administrative staff in South West Nigeria Universities. The research design used was a descriptive survey type. The population consisted of all the senior administrative staff in the universities, out of which a sample of 400 respondents made up of 100 respondents from each…

  1. Job Performance and Gender Factors of Administrative Staff in South West Nigeria Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olorunsola, E. O.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the level of administrative staff job performance in South West Nigerian universities and also investigates whether the administrative staff job performance is related to their sexual characteristics. An instrument titled Job Performance Questionnaire (JPQ) was used to collect the data and was administered 400 subjects in…

  2. The Relationship between Organizational Climate and the Organizational Silence of Administrative Staff in Education Department

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pozveh, Asghar Zamani; Karimi, Fariba

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the relationship between organizational climate and the organizational silence of administrative staff in Education Department in Isfahan. The research method was descriptive and correlational-type method. The study population was administrative staff of Education Department in Isfahan during the…

  3. 18 CFR 12.4 - Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority. 12.4 Section 12.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT WORKS General Provisions § 12.4 Staff administrative responsibility...

  4. 18 CFR 12.4 - Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority. 12.4 Section 12.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT WORKS General Provisions § 12.4 Staff administrative responsibility...

  5. 18 CFR 12.4 - Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority. 12.4 Section 12.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT WORKS General Provisions § 12.4 Staff administrative responsibility...

  6. 18 CFR 12.4 - Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority. 12.4 Section 12.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT WORKS General Provisions § 12.4 Staff administrative responsibility...

  7. 18 CFR 12.4 - Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff administrative responsibility and supervisory authority. 12.4 Section 12.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL... WATER POWER PROJECTS AND PROJECT WORKS General Provisions § 12.4 Staff administrative responsibility...

  8. Medication Administration Technician. Update. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Dept. of Vocational and Technical Education, Stillwater. Curriculum and Instructional Materials Center.

    This teacher's edition contains curriculum materials for an upgrading course for medication administration technicians who have completed initial training. The course consists of six units of instruction that cover the following: (1) controlling infection; (2) administering medication; (3) obtaining vital signs; (4) discussing legal issues and…

  9. The American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on School Health POLICY STATEMENT: Guidelines for the Administration of Medication in School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of School Nursing, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Many children who take medications require them during the school day. This policy statement is designed to guide prescribing physicians as well as school administrators and health staff on the administration of medications to children at school. The statement addresses over-the-counter products, herbal medications, experimental drugs that are…

  10. 20 CFR 632.40 - Administrative staff and personnel standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... shall be provided maximum employment opportunities at all levels of the JTPA grantee administration.... 632.40 Section 632.40 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Administrative Standards and Procedures §...

  11. Administrative, Faculty, and Staff Perceptions of Organizational Climate and Commitment in Christian Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, John Charles

    2008-01-01

    Findings of 957 surveyed employees from four evangelical higher education institutions found a negative correlation for climate and commitment and staff members. Administrators were found to have a more favorable view of their institutional climate than staff. Employee age, tenure, and classification had predictive value for organizational…

  12. 76 FR 68767 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; De Novo Classification Process (Evaluation of Automatic Class III Designation); Availability; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice; extension of...

  13. School Nurses' Experiences with Medication Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Michael W.; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Mordhorst, Matthew J.

    2003-01-01

    This article reports school nurses' experiences with medication administration through qualitative analyses of a written survey and focus groups. From a random sample of 1,000 members of the National Association of School Nurses, 649 (64.9%) school nurses completed the survey. The quantitative data from the survey were presented previously.…

  14. Survey of House Staff Benefits at Forty-Four Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutzwiller, Roberta; Shawhan, Gerald L.

    As an aid in evaluating the present and future benefits given house staff personnel (residents, interns, and clinical fellows) at the University of Cincinnati Medical Center, the Department of Institutional Studies sent out questionnaires concerning benefits extended to house staff personnel to the 46 medical schools using university owned or…

  15. The balancing act. Collaboration between frontline forensic staff and hospital administration.

    PubMed

    Encinares, Maxima; Pullan, Shirley

    2003-12-01

    1. Flexibility, creativity, and consistency are critical characteristics for both frontline staff and administrators in the delivery of treatment and care for complex forensic patients who may be difficult to manage. 2. Through collaborative efforts and ongoing communication, plans can be identified and implemented that enhance patient and staff safety and facilitate positive behavioral and rehabilitation outcomes for patients. 3. Effective partnerships among frontline staff, administration, patients, their families, labor unions, and communities contribute significantly to the effective resolution of conflicts and dilemmas in the provision of holistic care to forensic patients. PMID:14682030

  16. 77 FR 14403 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Norovirus Serological Reagents; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  17. Roles of Medical Record and Statistic Staff on Research at the Tawanchai Center.

    PubMed

    Pattaranit, Rumpan; Chantachum, Vasana; Lekboonyasin, Orathai; Pradubwong, Suteera

    2015-08-01

    The medical record and statistic staffs play a crucial role behind the achievements of treatment and research of physicians, nurses and other health care professionals. The medical record and statistic staff are in charge of keeping patient medical records; creating databases; presenting information; sorting patient's information; providing patient medical records and related information for various medical teams and researchers; Besides, the medical record and statistic staff have collaboration with the Center of Cleft Lip-Palate, Khon Kaen University in association with the Tawanchai Project. The Tawanchai Center is an organization, involving multidisciplinary team which aims to continuing provide care for patients with cleft lip and palate and craniofacial deformities who need a long term of treatment since newborns until the age of 19 years. With support and encouragement from the Tawanchai team, the medical record and statistic staff have involved in research under the Tawanchai Centre since then and produced a number of publications locally and internationally.

  18. Medication administration errors for older people in long-term residential care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Older people in long-term residential care are at increased risk of medication prescribing and administration errors. The main aim of this study was to measure the incidence of medication administration errors in nursing and residential homes using a barcode medication administration (BCMA) system. Methods A prospective study was conducted in 13 care homes (9 residential and 4 nursing). Data on all medication administrations for a cohort of 345 older residents were recorded in real-time using a disguised observation technique. Every attempt by social care and nursing staff to administer medication over a 3-month observation period was analysed using BCMA records to determine the incidence and types of potential medication administration errors (MAEs) and whether errors were averted. Error classifications included attempts to administer medication at the wrong time, to the wrong person or discontinued medication. Further analysis compared data for residential and nursing homes. In addition, staff were surveyed prior to BCMA system implementation to assess their awareness of administration errors. Results A total of 188,249 medication administration attempts were analysed using BCMA data. Typically each resident was receiving nine different drugs and was exposed to 206 medication administration episodes every month. During the observation period, 2,289 potential MAEs were recorded for the 345 residents; 90% of residents were exposed to at least one error. The most common (n = 1,021, 45% of errors) was attempting to give medication at the wrong time. Over the 3-month observation period, half (52%) of residents were exposed to a serious error such as attempting to give medication to the wrong resident. Error incidence rates were 1.43 as high (95% CI 1.32-1.56 p < 0.001) in nursing homes as in residential homes. The level of non-compliance with system alerts was very low in both settings (0.075% of administrations). The pre-study survey revealed that only 12

  19. Staff Satisfaction with Administration as a Measure of Consumer Satisfaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanguma, Jesus; Luster, Jane Nell

    The school district in this study, "Special School District" (SSD), is under the administration of the Louisiana State Department of education and thus classified as a Louisiana state agency required to conform to the mandate that state agencies have performance indicators, including one for customer satisfaction. For the SSD, customer…

  20. Two Models of Integrating Buprenorphine Treatment and Medical Staff within Formerly "Drug-Free" Outpatient Programs.

    PubMed

    Monico, Laura; Schwartz, Robert P; Gryczynski, Jan; O'Grady, Kevin E; Mitchell, Shannon Gwin

    2016-01-01

    "Drug-free" outpatient programs deliver treatment to the largest number of patients of all treatment modalities in the U.S., providing a significant opportunity to expand access to medication treatments for substance use disorders. This analysis examined staff perceptions of organizational dynamics associated with the delivery of buprenorphine maintenance within three formerly "drug-free" outpatient treatment programs. Semi-structured interviews (N = 15) were conducted with counseling and medical staff, and respondents were predominantly African American (n = 11) and female (n = 12). Themes and concepts related to medical staff integration emerged through an inductive and iterative coding process using Atlas.ti qualitative analysis software. Two treatment clinics incorporated buprenorphine maintenance into their programs using a co-located model of care. Their staff generally reported greater intra-organizational discord regarding the best ways to combine medication and counseling compared to the clinic using an integrated model of care. Co-located program staff reported less communication between medical and clinical staff, which contributed to some uncertainty about proper dosing and concerns about the potential for medication diversion. Clinics that shift from "drug-free" to incorporating buprenorphine maintenance should consider which model of care they wish to adapt and how to train staff and structure staff communication. PMID:26940870

  1. The Mobile Staff: Concepts and Determinants of Academic Administrator Job Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sagaria, Mary Ann D.

    Predictors of academic staff administrators' job change were studied based on a conceptual framework derived from Rosabeth Kanter's work on opportunity. Questionnaire data from higher education administrators who had been employed between 1973 and 1978 following the application of affirmative action to higher education were analyzed. "Academic…

  2. Human Resource Management in Small Rural Districts: The Administrator's Role in Recruitment, Hiring and Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Townsell, Rhodena

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to review the rural area administrator's role in the areas of teacher recruitment, hiring and staff development. State and Regional Policies reveal that these areas are chief among the concerns of rural school leaders (Johnson, 2005). The rural school administrator's role often requires him/her to become involved in…

  3. A Profile of the Faculty, Staff and Administrators of Montgomery College, Fall 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gell, Robert L.; Armstrong, David F.

    Faculty, staff, and administrators of the three campuses and central administration of Montgomery College are described in terms of their sex, racial group, residence, and salary levels. In addition, the profile of faculty members includes their years of service, age, rank and sex in each discipline, tenure, length of contract, academic…

  4. Medical staff privileges and the antitrust laws: a view from the Federal Trade Commission.

    PubMed

    Horoschak, M J

    1992-01-01

    This article describes the types of medical staff credentialing and peer review activities that invite the scrutiny of the Federal Trade Commission. To avoid antitrust problems, medical staffs and their members are advised to offer recommendations based on specific quality-of-care concerns. Antitrust problems will arise, however, if the medical staff or its members engage in collective activities that involve threats or coercion directed at the hospital's governing board or that are calculated solely to exclude an entire class of potential competitors.

  5. Intravenous Medication Administration in Intensive Care: Opportunities for Technological Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jacqueline; Berner, Eta; Bothe, Olaf; Rymarchuk, Irina

    2008-01-01

    Medication administration errors have been shown to be frequent and serious. Error is particularly prevalent in highly technical specialties such as critical care. The purpose of this study was to describe the characteristics of intravenous medication administration in five intensive care units. These data were used within the context of a larger study to design information system decision support to decrease medication administration errors in these settings. Nurses were observed during the course of their work and their intravenous medication administration process, medication order source, references used, calculation method, number of medications prepared simultaneously, and any interruptions occurring during the preparation and delivery phases of the administration event were recorded. In addition, chart reviews of medication administration records were completed and nurses were asked to complete an anonymous drop-box questionnaire regarding their experiences with medication administration error. The results of this study are discussed in terms of potential informatics solutions for reducing medication administration error. PMID:18998790

  6. 76 FR 9027 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Best Practices for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Electronic Healthcare Data Sets; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... industry and FDA staff entitled ``Best Practices for Conducting and Reporting Pharmacoepidemiologic...

  7. Testing a Mediational Model of Communication Among Medical Staff and Families of Cancer Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gionta, Dana A.; Harlow, Lisa L.; Loitman, Jane E.; Leeman, Joanne M.

    2005-01-01

    Three structural equation models of communication between family members and medical staff were examined to understand relations among staff accessibility, inhibitory family attitudes, getting communication needs met, perceived stress, and satisfaction with communication. Compared to full and direct models, a mediational model fit best in which…

  8. Reducing avoidable time delays in immediate medication administration - learning from a failed intervention

    PubMed Central

    Nagar, Sachin; davey, nicola

    2015-01-01

    Stat medications are regularly prescribed on hospital wards as part of the ongoing care for patients. Because they are prescribed at variable times that do not coincide with regular nursing drug administration times, they rely on good communication and vigilance on staff to ensure they are administered in a timely manner. Delays in drug administration can lengthen patient recovery times, prolong admission, and can lead to avoidable patient harm and suffering. While working on a geriatrics ward I noticed that there were often significant delays in administration of stat medications which occurred on a regular basis. I therefore investigated this by collecting data over a two week period to assess the situation based on our current practice. After root cause analysis (figure 1), it became clear that communication between staff was a significant factor in delayed administration. A solution was implemented in the form of “ward bay wall charts” to aid documentation and communication of stat medication requirements between nursing and medical staff with the intention to reduce delays by improving communication. After gaining support of medical and nursing staff, a trial was undertaken and a further two weeks of data collected to see the effect of the intervention. The results showed that there was an increase in the median time delay (1 hour 34 minutes to 2 hours 26 minutes, a 55% increase in median time delay) after the implementation of the my intervention, suggesting that it actually made communication worse, creating more delays. Subsequent feedback and analysis showed that this was due to a number of factors that led to worsened communication between staff and therefore an increase in medication delays. Early recognition allowed the intervention to be promptly withdrawn and a re-assessment of the nature of the initial problem. This project highlights the importance of measurement in determining if an intervention actually works and is an improvement on current

  9. 77 FR 74195 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Design Considerations for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-13

    ... Staff; Design Considerations for Devices Intended for Home Use; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Design Considerations for Devices Intended for Home Use.'' This document is intended to assist manufacturers in designing and developing home use medical devices...

  10. Are Culturally Sophisticated Agencies Better Workplaces for Social Work Staff and Administrators?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gant, Larry M.

    1996-01-01

    Analyzes data from 285 African American social workers and administrators to demonstrate effect of perceptions of agency cultural sophistication on reports of psychological and work-related stress. Discusses usefulness of cultural sophistication as an explanatory variable in understanding staff perceptions of occupational and psychological stress…

  11. 75 FR 3238 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Heart Valves...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... guidance practices regulation. FDA withdrew the 1994 draft on January 5, 2005 (70 FR 824) and is now... Staff; Heart Valves -- Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) and Premarket Approval (PMA) Applications... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance document entitled ``Heart...

  12. Friend or Foe? New Managerialism and Technical, Administrative and Clerical Support Staff in Australian Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pick, David; Teo, Stephen; Yeung, Melissa

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess and conceptualise the effects of new managerialism-related organisational reforms in three Australian public universities on technical, administrative and clerical support staff job stressors and job satisfaction. Using a mixed method approach consisting of a quantitative core component and qualitative…

  13. The Use of Management Games for Developing Army Officers in Administrative and Staff Jobs. [Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olmstead, Joseph A.; Elder, B. Leon

    A research project was undertaken to provide a foundation for future research on the efficacy of games and simulations for use in training and assessing junior company-grade officers working in administrative, nontactical support, and staff jobs. Based on survey interviews with nineteen incumbents of Finance, Adjutant General, and Quartermaster…

  14. Administrative Staff Members' Job Competency and Their Job Satisfaction in a Korean Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jisun; Shin, Jung Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of administrative staff's job competency on their job satisfaction in a Korean research university. We conceptualized job satisfaction into three subcomponents: satisfaction in the job field, in the workplace, and with the actual task. In the regression analysis, we included demographics, inner…

  15. The Improvement of Staff Development for General and Special Administration Through a New Partnership: Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University Council for Educational Administration, Columbus, OH.

    The Special and General Education Leadership (SAGE) Project was a 3 year effort focusing on inservice activities for administrators and other personnel geared toward implementation of P.L. 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act. The project involved three objectives: to design, implement, and evaluate a series of staff development…

  16. What We've Learned about Supporting Faculty, Administrator, and Staff Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadlec, Alison; Rowlett, Isaac

    2014-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how colleges can increase faculty, administrator, and staff engagement in reform processes, with the message that large-scale change is not merely technical work; there is a powerful human dimension that can make or break a reform.

  17. All Together Now: Getting Faculty, Administrators, and Staff Engaged in Information Literacy Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oakleaf, Megan; Millet, Michelle S.; Kraus, Leah

    2011-01-01

    Trinity University has established effective strategies for engaging faculty, administrators, and staff in information literacy instruction and assessment. Succeeding in an area in which many libraries struggle, the Coates Library at Trinity University offers a model for libraries seeking to actively engage their campuses through 1) establishing a…

  18. CCSF Survey on Using Technology: Administrators, Department Chairs, Classified Staff, and Student Services.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Coll. of San Francisco, CA. Office of Institutional Research, Planning and Grants.

    This document discusses the findings of a survey completed by all employees of City College of San Francisco in 2003. The employees surveyed include administrators, department chairs, classified staff, and student service faculty. The survey discovered that these employees differ from instructional faculty in the following ways: (1) they do their…

  19. 76 FR 72951 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-28

    ... (74 FR 46433), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance. Comments on the draft guidance... Differentiation of Human Papillomaviruses; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Differentiation of Human Papillomaviruses.'' This guidance document provides industry and Agency staff...

  20. Leadership Styles of Nursing Home Administrators and Their Association with Staff Turnover

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donoghue, Christopher; Castle, Nicholas G.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the associations between nursing home administrator (NHA) leadership style and staff turnover. Design and Methods: We analyzed primary data from a survey of 2,900 NHAs conducted in 2005. The Online Survey Certification and Reporting database and the Area Resource File were utilized to extract…

  1. Reflecting on the ethical administration of computerized medical records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collmann, Jeff R.

    1995-05-01

    This presentation examines the ethical issues raised by computerized image management and communication systems (IMAC), the ethical principals that should guide development of policies, procedures and practices for IMACS systems, and who should be involved in developing a hospital's approach to these issues. The ready access of computerized records creates special hazards of which hospitals must beware. Hospitals must maintain confidentiality of patient's records while making records available to authorized users as efficiently as possible. The general conditions of contemporary health care undermine protecting the confidentiality of patient record. Patients may not provide health care institutions with information about themselves under conditions of informed consent. The field of information science must design sophisticated systems of computer security that stratify access, create audit trails on data changes and system use, safeguard patient data from corruption, and protect the databases from outside invasion. Radiology professionals must both work with information science experts in their own hospitals to create institutional safeguards and include the adequacy of security measures as a criterion for evaluating PACS systems. New policies and procedures on maintaining computerized patient records must be developed that obligate all members of the health care staff, not just care givers. Patients must be informed about the existence of computerized medical records, the rules and practices that govern their dissemination and given the opportunity to give or withhold consent for their use. Departmental and hospital policies on confidentiality should be reviewed to determine if revisions are necessary to manage computer-based records. Well developed discussions of the ethical principles and administrative policies on confidentiality and informed consent and of the risks posed by computer-based patient records systems should be included in initial and continuing

  2. An audit of medication administration: a glimpse into school health offices.

    PubMed

    Canham, Daryl L; Bauer, Laurie; Concepcion, Michelle; Luong, June; Peters, Jill; Wilde, Claudia

    2007-02-01

    Many students require prescription and nonprescription medication to be administered during the school day for chronic and acute illnesses. School office staff members are typically delegated this task, yet these individuals are unlicensed assistive personnel without medical training. Five school nurses developed and participated in a medication audit providing a glimpse into the administration and management of medications in school health offices. The audit included 154 medications. Results of the audit showed a wide range of errors and discrepancies, including problems with transcription, physician orders or lack thereof, timing, documentation, and storage. Audit results highlight the importance of training in medication administration and management at schools. It also directs attention to view training not as a once-a-year event, but as a process. A process is needed to ensure and sustain the safe and accurate administration of medication. Towards this end, school nurses need to periodically evaluate school office staff, audit school medication records and documents, and conduct refresher classes throughout the school year.

  3. Workarounds to barcode medication administration systems: their occurrences, causes, and threats to patient safety.

    PubMed

    Koppel, Ross; Wetterneck, Tosha; Telles, Joel Leon; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2008-01-01

    The authors develop a typology of clinicians' workarounds when using barcoded medication administration (BCMA) systems. Authors then identify the causes and possible consequences of each workaround. The BCMAs usually consist of handheld devices for scanning machine-readable barcodes on patients and medications. They also interface with electronic medication administration records. Ideally, BCMAs help confirm the five "rights" of medication administration: right patient, drug, dose, route, and time. While BCMAs are reported to reduce medication administration errors--the least likely medication error to be intercepted--these claims have not been clearly demonstrated. The authors studied BCMA use at five hospitals by: (1) observing and shadowing nurses using BCMAs at two hospitals, (2) interviewing staff and hospital leaders at five hospitals, (3) participating in BCMA staff meetings, (4) participating in one hospital's failure-mode-and-effects analyses, (5) analyzing BCMA override log data. The authors identified 15 types of workarounds, including, for example, affixing patient identification barcodes to computer carts, scanners, doorjambs, or nurses' belt rings; carrying several patients' prescanned medications on carts. The authors identified 31 types of causes of workarounds, such as unreadable medication barcodes (crinkled, smudged, torn, missing, covered by another label); malfunctioning scanners; unreadable or missing patient identification wristbands (chewed, soaked, missing); nonbarcoded medications; failing batteries; uncertain wireless connectivity; emergencies. The authors found nurses overrode BCMA alerts for 4.2% of patients charted and for 10.3% of medications charted. Possible consequences of the workarounds include wrong administration of medications, wrong doses, wrong times, and wrong formulations. Shortcomings in BCMAs' design, implementation, and workflow integration encourage workarounds. Integrating BCMAs within real-world clinical workflows

  4. Anaphylaxis in the allergist's office: preparing your office and staff for medical emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Dana V

    2013-01-01

    All allergists who administer subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT) experience anaphylaxis in their offices and must devote proper planning, preparation, and practice to ensure that all staff members recognize the early signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis and can respond appropriately. Educating staff and patients, preparing an anaphylaxis emergency cart, developing and following selection criteria for SCIT and high-risk procedures, and customizing an "Action Plan for Anaphylaxis Management" create the foundation for mounting an adequate response to anaphylaxis. Strategies to prevent near-fatal and fatal reactions include (1) avoiding, when possible, the administration of SCIT to patients on beta-blockers; (2) using a preinjection questionnaire to review changes in the patient's medical condition, e.g., episodes of asthma since the previous injection; (3) using standardized forms and procedures for SCIT; (4) one might also consider an objective measure of airway function (e.g., peak flow measurement) for the asthmatic patient before allergy injections; (5) insisting on a 30-minute waiting time after SCIT; and (6) giving consideration to prescribing a dual-pack epinephrine autoinjector to all SCIT patients. Treatment of anaphylaxis should start with epinephrine administered intramuscularly at the first sign of anaphylaxis. Oxygen and i.v. fluids may be needed for moderate-to-severe anaphylaxis or anaphylaxis that is quickly developing or unresponsive to the first injection of epinephrine. Emergency medical services should be called for all patients who are experiencing moderate-to-severe (grade 2 or higher) anaphylaxis, if they require more than 1 dose of epinephrine and/or i.v. fluids, or if they do not immediately respond to treatment.

  5. Issues of medication administration and control in Iowa schools.

    PubMed

    Farris, Karen B; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W; Clay, Daniel; Gross, Jami N

    2003-11-01

    Who is responsible for medication administration at school? To answer this question, a descriptive, self-administered survey was mailed to a random sample of 850 school principals in Iowa. The eight-page, 57-item, anonymous survey was mailed first class, and a follow-up reminder post card was mailed two weeks later. Descriptive analyses were conducted, with type of respondent (principal versus school nurse), grade level, and size of school examined to explore differences. A 46.6% response rate was obtained; 97% of respondents indicated their schools had written guidelines for medication administration. Principals (41%) and school nurses (34%) reported that they have the ultimate legal responsibility for medication administration. Policies for medication administration on field trips were available in schools of 73.6% of respondents. High schools were more likely to allow self-medication than other grade levels. "Missed dose" was the most common medication error. The main reasons contributing to medication administration errors included poor communication among school, family, and healthcare providers, and the increased number of students on medication. It remains unclear who holds ultimate responsibility for medication administration in schools. Written policies typically exist for medication administration at school, but not field trips. Communicating medication changes to schools, and ensuring medications are available at school, likely can reduce medication administration errors.

  6. 76 FR 44594 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Systems... Document: Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Systems.'' This guidance document describes a...

  7. Streamlining administration at the University of Minnesota Medical School.

    PubMed

    Mitsch, Peter; Jensen, Allison Campbell

    2007-03-01

    The authors describe the events and restructuring efforts of the 1990s that led the University of Minnesota Medical School leadership to advocate a new administrative model for its clinical departments. This new streamlined model established six administrative centers, each serving a cluster of two to four clinical departments. Each administrative center was charged with managing functions of finance, human resources, information technology, clinical service unit operations, research support, and education support for its departments. These centers, first proposed in 1993 when an outside firm analyzed the medical school's administration, were initially seen by most medical school department heads as too radical. Yet, after a campaign of one-on-one persuasion by medical school dean's office leadership, combined with a successful example of clustering that occurred spontaneously among three medical school departments, the administrative centers were launched in late 1998 to serve clustered clinical departments. The administrative centers were intended to improve departmental responsiveness to the dean of the medical school; improve internal medical school controls; improve on administrative services traditionally provided by outside units, such as grants management and information systems; and reduce administrative costs. Since their establishment, these administrative centers have evolved into a flexible, efficient system of administration. In a 2005 evaluation, ECG Management Consultants found the administrative center model appropriate and effective in managing the school's clinical departments. In addition, the consultants estimated that if the medical school still had stand-alone departmental administrative units, annual administrative costs would be $3 million higher.

  8. Nurses' attitudes toward the use of the bar-coding medication administration system.

    PubMed

    Marini, Sana Daya; Hasman, Arie; Huijer, Huda Abu-Saad; Dimassi, Hani

    2010-01-01

    This study determines nurses' attitudes toward bar-coding medication administration system use. Some of the factors underlying the successful use of bar-coding medication administration systems that are viewed as a connotative indicator of users' attitudes were used to gather data that describe the attitudinal basis for system adoption and use decisions in terms of subjective satisfaction. Only 67 nurses in the United States had the chance to respond to the e-questionnaire posted on the CARING list server for the months of June and July 2007. Participants rated their satisfaction with bar-coding medication administration system use based on system functionality, usability, and its positive/negative impact on the nursing practice. Results showed, to some extent, positive attitude, but the image profile draws attention to nurses' concerns for improving certain system characteristics. The high bar-coding medication administration system skills revealed a more negative perception of the system by the nursing staff. The reasons underlying dissatisfaction with bar-coding medication administration use by skillful users are an important source of knowledge that can be helpful for system development as well as system deployment. As a result, strengthening bar-coding medication administration system usability by magnifying its ability to eliminate medication errors and the contributing factors, maximizing system functionality by ascertaining its power as an extra eye in the medication administration process, and impacting the clinical nursing practice positively by being helpful to nurses, speeding up the medication administration process, and being user-friendly can offer a congenial settings for establishing positive attitude toward system use, which in turn leads to successful bar-coding medication administration system use.

  9. Satisfaction of staff of Swiss insurance companies with medical appraisals: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A high quality of timely delivered medical appraisals is crucial for social and other insurances to judge possible occupational reintegration measures for patients with medical conditions who are in danger to lose their job. However, little is known about the satisfaction of staff of insurance companies with medical appraisals that they have commissioned. Our questionnaire survey prospectively included all medical appraisals arriving at Swiss insurances from FEB to APR 2008. We assessed the satisfaction of the commissioner with medical appraisals performed by medical assessors. In addition, we evaluated the contribution of several factors to overall satisfaction. The unit of sample was the medical appraisal. Findings We analysed 3165 medical appraisals, 2444 (77%) of them from the public disability insurance, 678 (22%) from private accident, liability and loss of income insurances and 43 (1%) from other insurances. Overall satisfaction of staff of insurance companies in Switzerland was high, but satisfaction of the disability insurance with appraisals was generally lower compared to satisfaction of private insurances. The staff of the disability insurance judged time for preparation as too long in 30%. For staff of private insurance companies 20% of appraisals were not "worth its price". Well-grounded and comprehensible conclusions were the single most important factor for high overall satisfaction (OR 10.1; 95%-CI: 1.1-89.3). Conclusions From the viewpoint of staff of insurance companies, a relevant part of medical appraisals arrives too late. Medical assessors have to take the specific needs of insurances into account, to perform more appraisals with sound conclusions in due time. PMID:21443762

  10. Explaining Perceptions of Administrative Support among Prison Treatment Staff: A Spotlight on Deputy Wardens in Charge of Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garland, Brett E.; McCarty, William P.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores how perceptions of administrative support among 83 treatment staff working in a midwest prison system vary according to personal and work-related variables. It extends on previous literature by: (1) analyzing how perceptions of administrative support vary exclusively among prison treatment staff; (2) focusing on a single type…

  11. Development of the Family Caregiver Medication Administration Hassles Scale

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Travis, Shirley S.; Bernard, Marie A.; McAuley, William J.; Thornton, Megan; Kole, Tristen

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: "Medication administration hassles" are the minor daily irritants that family caregivers experience when they assist a dependent family member with medication regimens. This study was designed to develop and test a multidimensional measure of the hassles in family caregiver medication administration. Design and Method: The authors…

  12. Guidelines for Medication Administration in Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maryland State Dept. of Health and Mental Hygiene, Baltimore.

    These guidelines present standards for administering medication in Maryland schools, both prescribed and over-the-counter medications. In general, medication during school hours is discouraged unless necessary. The guidelines recommend that, whenever possible, children administer their own medication under appropriate supervision. Specifically,…

  13. 76 FR 24494 - Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Processing/Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    .../ Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care Settings: Validation Methods and Labeling; Availability AGENCY... Staff: Processing/Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health Care Settings: Validation Methods and Labeling... ``Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Processing/Reprocessing Medical Devices in Health...

  14. 78 FR 101 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Acceptance and Filing Reviews for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Acceptance and Filing Reviews for Premarket Approval Applications; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing...

  15. 76 FR 48870 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug..., Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 66, rm. 4613, Silver Spring, MD...

  16. 78 FR 28228 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Best Practices for Conducting and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... Healthcare Data; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for industry and FDA...

  17. 76 FR 77542 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Humanitarian Use Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on Humanitarian Use Device Designations; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a...

  18. Longitudinal Examination of Medical Staff Utilization in Substance Use Disorder Treatment Organizations.

    PubMed

    Fields, Dail; Roman, Paul

    2015-12-01

    This study examined changes in utilization of medical staff within organizations specializing in treatment of patients with substance use disorder (SUD) at two points in time (2007 and 2010). Utilization was calculated as the number of hours paid weekly for psychiatrists, physicians, nurses, and other medical staff working as employees or on contract. Study data come from a longitudinal national sample of 274 substance use disorder treatment centers. Average utilization of medical staff by these SUD treatment organizations increased by 26% from 2007 to 2010. The results showed that growing SUD treatment centers that obtained more referrals from health care providers, used case managers to coordinate comprehensive approaches to patient care, provided medication assisted treatment (MAT), and that were connected more closely with hospitals made increased use of medical staff over the 2007-2010 period. In 2010, these organizations seem to have been moving in directions consistent with trends forecasted for the SUD treatment environment after implementation of the Affordable Care Act. PMID:26219681

  19. Medication Administration in the School Setting. Position Statement. Amended

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zacharski, Susan; Kain, Carole A.; Fleming, Robin; Pontius, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    It is the position of the National Association of School Nurses (NASN) that school districts develop written medication administration policies and procedures that focus on safe and efficient medication administration at school by a registered professional school nurse (hereinafter referred to as school nurse). Policies should include prescription…

  20. Upgrading a ColdFusion-Based Academic Medical Library Staff Intranet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vander Hart, Robert; Ingrassia, Barbara; Mayotte, Kerry; Palmer, Lisa A.; Powell, Julia

    2010-01-01

    This article details the process of upgrading and expanding an existing academic medical library intranet to include a wiki, blog, discussion forum, and photo collection manager. The first version of the library's intranet from early 2002 was powered by ColdFusion software and existed primarily to allow staff members to author and store minutes of…

  1. Effective physician credentialing. Properly monitoring medical staffs can protect hospitals from liability.

    PubMed

    Blaes, S M; Knight, G E

    1990-11-01

    Healthcare facilities today are finding themselves increasingly liable in malpractice suits if they have hired incompetent physicians or allowed them to remain on the medical staff. Thus appropriate processes for physician credentialing are important. The hospital medical staff has the authority to evaluate medical staff membership status and clinical privileges and to take disciplinary and corrective action. If the medical staff fails to do its job, however, the hospital governing board is responsible for making sure the credentialing process is carried out properly. The same rules apply to the reapplication process. The hospital must associate its credentialing process with its prevailing concern for high-quality patient care and document that ideal. Preservation of market share and elimination of competition must never enter into the credentialing process. Well-framed hospital bylaws will help provide protection from liability, if they are followed correctly. If a hospital deviates from its bylaws when processing an application or granting clinical privileges, it risks a lawsuit. Congress has passed the Health Care Quality Improvement Act of 1986-an act that not only protects patients from incompetent practitioners but also can help limit facility's risk of liability by requiring facilities and third-party payers to report any adverse actions taken against physicians. The National Practitioner Data Bank is an information clearing-house opened in September 1990 that hospitals must use to report and obtain professional information about physicians. PMID:10107456

  2. Understanding the Use of Educational Technology among Faculty, Staff, and Students at a Medical University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazley, Abby Swanson; Annan, Dustin L.; Carson, Nancy E.; Freeland, Melissa; Hodge, Ashley B.; Seif, Gretchen A.; Zoller, James S.

    2013-01-01

    A college of health professions at a medical university located in the southeastern United States is striving to increase the use of educational technology among faculty, staff, and students. A strategic planning group was formed and charged with enhancing the use of educational technology within the college. In order to understand the current…

  3. 76 FR 50483 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Factors to Consider When...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Staff; Factors to Consider When Making Benefit-Risk Determinations in Medical Device Premarket Review... When Making Benefit-Risk Determinations in Medical Device Premarket Review.'' The recommendations in... document entitled ``Factors to Consider When Making Benefit- Risk Determinations in Medical...

  4. Sink or swim: the Titanic medication administration fair.

    PubMed

    Ward, Kathleen R; Koerner, Dianna K

    2008-04-01

    The Peer Review Committee at a Midwest hospital identified a knowledge deficit relative to medication administration. A continuing increase in the number of medication errors helped the committee to address the issue in a creative and educational way that reinforced knowledge of medication administration. Under the guidance of the Director of Education, employees who recently made medication errors developed and implemented a creative medication administration learning opportunity for hospital employees. The employees chose a project theme, developed educational workstations, and used creative approaches to increase awareness of medication administration pitfalls. This article explains the process of implementing and delivering this fun and exciting learning activity. Theme-based educational experiences are effective teaching strategies that can be used to trigger participants' learning in almost any setting.

  5. Medication Administration Practices in Pennsylvania Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ficca, Michelle; Welk, Dorette

    2006-01-01

    As a result of various health concerns, children are receiving an increased number of medications while at school. In Pennsylvania, the School Code mandates a ratio of 1 certified school nurse to 1,500 students, which may mean that 1 school nurse is covering 3-5 buildings. This implies that unlicensed personnel are administering medications, a…

  6. 41 CFR 105-54.309 - Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators. 105-54.309 Section 105-54.309 Public... 54.3-Advisory Committee Procedures § 105-54.309 Added responsibilities of service and staff...

  7. 41 CFR 105-54.309 - Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Added responsibilities of service and staff office heads and regional administrators. 105-54.309 Section 105-54.309 Public... 54.3-Advisory Committee Procedures § 105-54.309 Added responsibilities of service and staff...

  8. 75 FR 22601 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Staff; User Fees for 513(g); Requests for Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration... the draft guidance entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information.'' This draft guidance describes the user fees associated with 513(g) requests...

  9. The Impact of Occupational Stress on Academic and Administrative Staff, and on Students: An Empirical Case Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ablanedo-Rosas, Jose Humberto; Blevins, Randall C.; Gao, Hongman; Teng, Wen-Yuan; White, Joann

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of occupational stress among academic staff, administrative staff, and students in a well-established US university environment. The results show that there are different correlations associated with stress such as organisational demand, health issues, and stress management. Findings suggest that occupational…

  10. 76 FR 29251 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls; Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... Administration (FDA) is correcting a notice that appeared in the Federal Register of April 25, 2011 (76 FR...

  11. The afterlife for retiring deans and other senior medical administrators.

    PubMed

    Tannen, Richard L

    2008-11-01

    Career options for individuals leaving the administrative role as dean of a school of medicine or other senior administrative positions are considered. Options discussed include retirement and a variety of other positions both within schools of medicines and in other venues. Many opportunities exist for a challenging and fulfilling career path after leaving the role as a senior administrator in an academic medical center.

  12. Joint Task Force Andrew: the 44th Medical Brigade mental health staff officer's after action review.

    PubMed

    Holsenbeck, L S

    1994-03-01

    The massive Department of Defense deployment in support of Hurricane Andrew relief cast the military medical departments in a new role. Military medical personnel were challenged to apply the traditional principles of combat medicine to a noncombat environment, within the continental United States, within an existing health care infrastructure, in a role subordinate to local civilian health care agencies. As a medical "subject matter expert" assigned to the Joint Task Force Andrew Surgeon's staff, the author worked at the civil-military interface. The lessons learned in his role as a special staff officer should benefit any health care provider involved in disaster relief. They focus on problem areas peculiar to the disaster relief scenario.

  13. The mat study: global insight into the medication administration process.

    PubMed

    Elganzouri, Erika; Standish, Cynthia; Androwich, Ida

    2009-01-01

    An important aspect of global patient safety that has recently become a focal topic is preventing adverse drug events. As many as 7,000 patients die every year as a result of medication errors. (1) According to Bates, Spell, & Cullen, adverse drug events can cost up to an average of $8.4 million per year in a 700 bed hospital, not including injury to patient or malpractice costs. (2) Errors can occur throughout the process of ordering a medicine, dispensing, retrieving, and administrating process. Safety measures have been implemented for physicians prescribing medication and pharmacists dispensing medication through MARs and CPOE. However, there is no safety net for nursing. Bar coding can offer that safety net and allow the nurse to verify "the five rights" of medication administration electronically. However, prior to implementation of a bar coding medication system (BCMA), it is important for an institution to gain full understanding of its current nursing work flow during the medication administration process.

  14. 78 FR 11654 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Providing Information About...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-19

    ... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Pediatric Uses of Medical Devices Under Section 515A of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' FDA is... information required under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act). This draft guidance is...

  15. Modeling the acceptance of clinical information systems among hospital medical staff: an extended TAM model.

    PubMed

    Melas, Christos D; Zampetakis, Leonidas A; Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Moustakis, Vassilis

    2011-08-01

    Recent empirical research has utilized the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) to advance the understanding of doctors' and nurses' technology acceptance in the workplace. However, the majority of the reported studies are either qualitative in nature or use small convenience samples of medical staff. Additionally, in very few studies moderators are either used or assessed despite their importance in TAM based research. The present study focuses on the application of TAM in order to explain the intention to use clinical information systems, in a random sample of 604 medical staff (534 physicians) working in 14 hospitals in Greece. We introduce physicians' specialty as a moderator in TAM and test medical staff's information and communication technology (ICT) knowledge and ICT feature demands, as external variables. The results show that TAM predicts a substantial proportion of the intention to use clinical information systems. Findings make a contribution to the literature by replicating, explaining and advancing the TAM, whereas theory is benefited by the addition of external variables and medical specialty as a moderator. Recommendations for further research are discussed.

  16. Two RFID-based solutions for secure inpatient medication administration.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yi-Chung; Lo, Nai-Wei; Wu, Tzong-Chen

    2012-10-01

    Medication error can easily cause serious health damage to inpatients in hospital. Consequently, the whole society has to spend huge amount of extra resources for additional therapies and medication on those affected inpatients. In order to prevent medication errors, secure inpatient medication administration system is required in a hospital. Using RFID technology, such administration system provides automated medication verification for inpatient's medicine doses and generates corresponding medication evidence, which may be audited later for medical dispute. Recently, Peris-Lopez et al. (Int. J. Med. Inform., 2011) proposed an IS-RFID system to enhance inpatient medication safety. Nevertheless, IS-RFID system does not detect the denial of proof attack efficiently and the generated medication evidence cannot defend against counterfeit evidence generated from the hospital. That is, the hospital possesses enough privilege from the design of IS-RFID system to modify generated medication evidence whenever it is necessary. Hence, we design two lightweight RFID-based solutions for secure inpatient medication administration, one for online verification environment and the other for offline validation situation, to achieve system security on evidence generation and provide early detection on denial of proof attack.

  17. Nurses' medication administration practices at two Singaporean acute care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Choo, Janet; Johnston, Linda; Manias, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    This study examined registered nurses' overall compliance with accepted medication administration procedures, and explored the distractions they faced during medication administration at two acute care hospitals in Singapore. A total of 140 registered nurses, 70 from each hospital, participated in the study. At both hospitals, nurses were distracted by personnel, such as physicians, radiographers, patients not under their care, and telephone calls, during medication rounds. Deviations from accepted medication procedures were observed. At one hospital, the use of a vest during medication administration alone was not effective in avoiding distractions during medication administration. Environmental factors and distractions can impact on the safe administration of medications, because they not only impair nurses' level of concentration, but also add to their work pressure. Attention should be placed on eliminating distractions through the use of appropriate strategies. Strategies that could be considered include the conduct of education sessions with health professionals and patients about the importance of not interrupting nurses while they are administering medications, and changes in work design.

  18. 76 FR 78670 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Evaluation of Sex Differences...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... Staff; Evaluation of Sex Differences in Medical Device Clinical Studies; Availability AGENCY: Food and... the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Evaluation of Sex Differences in Medical Device Clinical Studies.'' This document provides guidance on the study and evaluation of sex differences...

  19. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Rate for Medical Staff: Influence of Hospital-Based Vaccination Campaign.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, T M; Szymańczak, M; Jakubiak, J; Nitsch-Osuch, A; Życińska, K

    2016-01-01

    Despite intensive recommendations, influenza vaccination rate in medical staff in Poland ranges from about 20 % in physicians to 10 % in nurses. The objective of this work was to assess the influence of hospital influenza vaccination campaign directed toward health care workers, combined with dispensing free of charge vaccine, on vaccination rate. The campaign was conducted by the Hospital Infection Control Team of the Czerniakowski Hospital in Warsaw, Poland, separately for physicians, nurses, and physiotherapists. Overall, 37 % of medical staff were vaccinated, including 55 % of physicians and 21 % of nurses. Concerning physicians, the greatest vaccination rate was in the orthopedic (80 %) and ophthalmology units (73 %), whereas the lowest rate was in the intensive care (22 %) and neurology units (20 %). Concerning nurses, the greatest vaccination rate was in those working in the outpatient (40 %) and emergency units (29 %), whereas the lowest rate was in the ophthalmology (6 %) and surgery units (11 %). We conclude that the professional knowledge campaign combined with the incentive of free of charge vaccine substantially raises the vaccination rate among medical staff.

  20. Job-related burnout and the relationship to quality of life among Chinese medical college staff.

    PubMed

    Yao, Shang-Man; Yu, Hong-Mei; Ai, Yong-Mei; Song, Ping-Ping; Meng, Su-Yan; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Although staffs in medical colleges have traditionally been characterized as a stressed group of people, there are no specific studies assessing burnout and the relationship to quality of life (QOL). The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to evaluate job-related burnout and the relationship to QOL among medical college staff in mainland China. Some 360 medical college staffs from 15 schools and departments were enrolled in the study. The Chinese Teachers' Burnout Inventory (TBI) and the World Health Organization Quality of Life--brief Chinese version were used. Data on sociodemographic, work-related, and health-related factors were also collected. Multiple stepwise regression analysis was used to identify significant factors related to the 3 domain scores of the TBI. Structural equation modeling was performed to test the correlation between job-related burnout and QOL. The most significant and common predictors of burnout prevention were a love of the teaching profession and work acknowledgment from a direct supervisor. Job-related burnout had a direct negative effect on QOL. Corresponding health policies and suggestions could be developed to prevent job-related burnout and improve QOL.

  1. Resiliency Improvements in Medical Emergency Staff in Burn Missions: A Qualitative Study in an Iranian Context

    PubMed Central

    Froutan, Razieh; Khankeh, Hamid Reza; Fallahi, Masoud; Ahmadi, Fazlollah; Norouzi, Kian

    2015-01-01

    Background: Medical emergency staff complete understanding of the nature of resiliency in burn events is a prerequisite for improving the quality of clinical service delivery in pre-hospital burn events. Objectives: The present study aimed to describe resiliency in view of medical emergency staff in burn events. Materials and Methods: The present qualitative study was performed using a content analysis method. In total, 18 Iranian emergency care personnel participated in the study. A purposeful sampling method was applied until reaching data saturation. Data was collected using semi-structured interviews and field observations. Afterwards, data was analyzed by face content analysis. Results: By analyzing 456 primary codes, four main concepts including: 1) scene safety/security, 2) effective clinical decision making, 3) self-efficacy and 4) religious support were extracted through content analysis from experiences of pre-hospital emergency personnel during burn care. Conclusions: Different factors affect resiliency improvements in medical emergency staff and consequently the quality of pre-hospital burn care. This study showed that various factors such as scene security/safety, effective decision making, self-efficacy and religious support are effective in the improvement of resiliency and the quality of pre-hospital emergency care. PMID:26421172

  2. Influenza Vaccination Coverage Rate for Medical Staff: Influence of Hospital-Based Vaccination Campaign.

    PubMed

    Zielonka, T M; Szymańczak, M; Jakubiak, J; Nitsch-Osuch, A; Życińska, K

    2016-01-01

    Despite intensive recommendations, influenza vaccination rate in medical staff in Poland ranges from about 20 % in physicians to 10 % in nurses. The objective of this work was to assess the influence of hospital influenza vaccination campaign directed toward health care workers, combined with dispensing free of charge vaccine, on vaccination rate. The campaign was conducted by the Hospital Infection Control Team of the Czerniakowski Hospital in Warsaw, Poland, separately for physicians, nurses, and physiotherapists. Overall, 37 % of medical staff were vaccinated, including 55 % of physicians and 21 % of nurses. Concerning physicians, the greatest vaccination rate was in the orthopedic (80 %) and ophthalmology units (73 %), whereas the lowest rate was in the intensive care (22 %) and neurology units (20 %). Concerning nurses, the greatest vaccination rate was in those working in the outpatient (40 %) and emergency units (29 %), whereas the lowest rate was in the ophthalmology (6 %) and surgery units (11 %). We conclude that the professional knowledge campaign combined with the incentive of free of charge vaccine substantially raises the vaccination rate among medical staff. PMID:26839107

  3. Is the relationship between your hospital and your medical staff sustainable?

    PubMed

    Carlson, Greg; Greeley, Hugh

    2010-01-01

    Issues in the macro-environment are affecting the historic relationships that have existed between hospitals and their medical staffs over the last half century. Rising healthcare costs, deteriorating relationships, unexplained variations in clinical outcomes, transparency in healthcare outcomes, medical tourism, competition between hospitals and physicians, and reluctance by hospitals and physicians to change are among the issues challenging the sustainability of the current business model. This article highlights barriers to maintaining traditional relationships and concludes with strategies to preserve and strengthen relationships between physicians and hospitals. PMID:20565033

  4. 76 FR 81511 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Center for Devices and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-28

    ... Staff; Center for Devices and Radiological Health Appeals Processes; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug... and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave. Bldg. 66, rm. 4613.... Buckles, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and Drug Administration, 10903 New Hampshire...

  5. Negative Impact of Employment on Engineering Student Time Management, Time to Degree, and Retention: Faculty, Administrator, and Staff Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tyson, Will

    2012-01-01

    Interviews with faculty, administrators, staff, and students at four engineering programs reveal the role of undergraduate student employment on retention and timely degree completion among engineering students. Dueling narratives reveal how student approaches to earning an engineering degree differ greatly from faculty, administrator, and staff…

  6. 76 FR 22905 - Guidance for Food and Drug Administration Staff and Tobacco Retailers on Civil Money Penalties...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 13225) (21 CFR part 1140). The Tobacco Control Act also authorizes FDA to impose a no... Register of August 31, 2010 (75 FR 53316), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance of the same... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Food and Drug Administration Staff and...

  7. 77 FR 20825 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... classification information.'' In the Federal Register of April 29, 2010 (75 FR 22601), FDA announced the...; User Fees for 513(g) Requests for Information; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; User Fees for...

  8. 77 FR 48159 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Refuse To Accept Policy for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... Staff; Refuse To Accept Policy for 510(k)s; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... draft guidance entitled ``Refuse to Accept Policy for 510(k)s.'' The purpose of this document is to... (510(k)) submission is administratively complete, which determines whether it should be accepted...

  9. Introduction of Ambulatory Medical Training in a Veterans Administration Hospital.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casciato, Dennis A.

    1979-01-01

    The implementation of a continuity of a care clinic in a highly subspecialized Veterans Administration internal medicine training program for postgraduate medical students is described, with focus on resolving problems created by the idiosyncratic administrative features and resource limitations of the hospital. (Author/JMD)

  10. Descriptive study of stress and satisfaction at work in the Saragossa university services and administration staff

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The notion of stress in connection with the work environment became an important topic during the 1970's, when the first studies on the subject were published and the term of work stress was first coined. In 1974, Freudenberger proposed the term burnout to refer to the condition of physical and emotional exhaustion, as well as the associated negative attitudes, resulting from the intense interaction in working with people. The aim of our study is to examine burnout and job satisfaction in Saragossa University Services and Administration Staff (SAS) and detect the main factors which could contribute to too much stress, because job stress has emerged as a major psychosocial influence on mental health, associated with burnout. Methods 24 people from the Services and Administration Staff in the University of Saragossa participated in the study. The research was carried out during the implementation of a module on Stress Management organised by the University of Saragossa and commissioned to the Unit for Research in Physical Therapy (University School of Health Sciences) from that University. This research is an exploratory research to improve the stress management program. A personal interview was carried out and additionally, participants were given the Maslach Burnout Inventory and the Scale of Satisfaction at Work of Warr, Cook & Wall. Results However using small sample this is worth to state that participants present most of them low burnout levels in the burnout scale. Only in one person high exhaustion level was reflected, even though other seven showed mean levels; in the professional self-esteem section, most of them showed high self-esteem, with two cases of low self-esteem and five with mean level. With regard to satisfaction people participating in the study show mean levels in intrinsic as much as in extrinsic factors and general satisfaction. Conclusions Services and Administration Staff from the University of Saragossa shows low burnout levels

  11. The Impact of Bar Code Medication Administration Technology on Reported Medication Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holecek, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    The use of bar-code medication administration technology is on the rise in acute care facilities in the United States. The technology is purported to decrease medication errors that occur at the point of administration. How significantly this technology affects actual rate and severity of error is unknown. This descriptive, longitudinal research…

  12. Work mistreatment and hospital administrative staff: policy implications for healthier workplaces.

    PubMed

    Harlos, Karen P; Axelrod, Lawrence J

    2008-08-01

    Research on work life quality in hospitals has focused on how nurses and physicians perceive or react to work conditions. We extend this focus to another major professional group - healthcare administrators - to learn more about how these employees experience the work environment. Administrators merit such attention given their key roles in sustaining the financial health of the hospital and in fulfilling management functions efficiently to support consistent, high-quality care. Specifically, we examined mistreatment in the workplace experienced by administrative staff from a hospital in a large Canadian city. Three dimensions of mistreatment - verbal abuse, work obstruction and emotional neglect - have been associated with diminished well-being, work satisfaction and organizational commitment, along with stronger intent to leave. In this paper, we provide additional support for interpreting these three dimensions as mistreatment and report on their frequencies in our sample. We then consider implications for policy development (e.g., communication and conflict resolution skills training, mentoring programs, respect-at-work policies) to make workplaces healthier for these neglected but important healthcare professionals. PMID:19377340

  13. Factors influencing the perception of medical staff and outpatients of dual practice in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiping; Li, Meina; Dai, Zhixin; Deng, Qiangyu; Zhang, Lulu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dual practice is defined as a physician’s performance of medical activities in different health care institutions (two or more) simultaneously. This study aimed to examine the perception and acceptance of medical staff and outpatients of dual practice and explore the possible factors affecting people’s perception. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 13 public hospitals in Shanghai. Participants included medical staff and outpatients. We distributed 1,000 questionnaires to each participant group, and the response rates were 66.7% and 69.4%, respectively. Statistical differences in variables were tested, and multinomial logistic regression methods were employed for statistical analysis. Results The study included two parts: medical staff survey and outpatient survey. The results of medical staff survey showed that 63.0% of the respondents supported dual practice. Medical staff who belonged to the surgical department or held positive belief of dual practice were more willing to participate in dual practice. Moreover, the publicity activities of dual practice and hospitals’ human resource management system were important factors affecting the willingness of the medical staff. The results of outpatient survey showed that 44.5% of respondents believed that dual practice could reduce difficulty in consulting a doctor. Regarding the perceived benefits of dual practice, the proportion of outpatients who believed that dual practice could meet the demand for health convenience, minor illness, and chronic disease were 45.4%, 42.4%, and 53.7%, respectively. Additionally, demographic characteristics significantly influenced the perception of outpatients. Conclusion This study confirmed that both medical staff and outpatients generally held positive attitudes toward dual practice. Medical staff who belonged to the surgical department or held positive belief of dual practice were more willing to participate in dual practice. Moreover, the existence of

  14. The Automated Alert System for the Hospital Infection Control and the Safety of Medical Staff Based on EMR Data.

    PubMed

    Jo, Eunmi

    2016-01-01

    This report is about planning, developing, and implementing the automated alert system for the Hospital infection control and the safety of medical staffs about information on patients exposed to infection based on EMR Data in a tertiary hospital in Korea.

  15. Building Faculty Community: Fellowship in Graduate Medical Education Administration

    PubMed Central

    Edler, Alice A.; Dohn, Ann; Davidson, Heather A.; Grewal, Daisy; Behravesh, Bardia; Piro, Nancy

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The Department of Graduate Medical Education at Stanford Hospital and Clinics has developed a professional training program for program directors. This paper outlines the goals, structure, and expected outcomes for the one-year Fellowship in Graduate Medical Education Administration program. Background The skills necessary for leading a successful Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) training program require an increased level of curricular and administrative expertise. To meet the ACGME Outcome Project goals, program directors must demonstrate not only sophisticated understanding of curricular design but also competency-based performance assessment, resource management, and employment law. Few faculty-development efforts adequately address the complexities of educational administration. As part of an institutional-needs assessment, 41% of Stanford program directors indicated that they wanted more training from the Department of Graduate Medical Education. Intervention To address this need, the Fellowship in Graduate Medical Education Administration program will provide a curriculum that includes (1) readings and discussions in 9 topic areas, (2) regular mentoring by the director of Graduate Medical Education (GME), (3) completion of a service project that helps improve GME across the institution, and (4) completion of an individual scholarly project that focuses on education. Results The first fellow was accepted during the 2008–2009 academic year. Outcomes for the project include presentation of a project at a national meeting, internal workshops geared towards disseminating learning to peer program directors, and the completion of a GME service project. The paper also discusses lessons learned for improving the program. PMID:21975722

  16. Telephone survey of hospital staff knowledge of medical device surveillance in a Paris hospital.

    PubMed

    Mazeau, Valérie; Grenier-Sennelier, Catherine; Paturel, Denys Xavier; Mokhtari, Mostafa; Vidal-Trecan, Gwenaëlle

    2004-12-01

    Reporting of incidents or near incidents because of medical devices in French hospitals relies on procedures following European and national guidelines. The authors intend to evaluate hospital staff knowledge on these surveillance procedures as a marker of appropriate application. A telephone survey is conducted on a sample of Paris University hospital staff (n = 327) using a structured questionnaire. Two-hundred sixteen persons completed the questionnaire. The response rate was lower among physicians, especially surgeons paid on an hourly basis. Rates of correct answers were different according to age, seniority, job, and department categories. Physicians and nurses correctly answered questions on theoretical knowledge more often than the other job categories. However, on questions dealing with actual practice conditions, correct answers depended more on age and seniority with a U-shaped distribution (minimum rates in intermediate categories of age and seniority). PMID:15492050

  17. Suicidality among medical students – A practical guide for staff members in medical schools

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Thea; Plener, Paul; Kliemann, Andrea; Fegert, Jörg M.; Allroggen, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Although suicidality in medical students is important, few studies dealt with this issue regarding German universities. Our aims were to describe the epidemiology as well as factors leading to suicidality in medical students. Furthermore we wanted to raise awareness for this topic among university employees and show options for handling suicidal crises in students. This manuscript especially aims to address university employees working in direct contact with students (such as student counselors or teachers). PMID:24282451

  18. Adverse Drug Events caused by Serious Medication Administration Errors

    PubMed Central

    Sawarkar, Abhivyakti; Keohane, Carol A.; Maviglia, Saverio; Gandhi, Tejal K; Poon, Eric G

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine how often serious or life-threatening medication administration errors with the potential to cause patient harm (or potential adverse drug events) result in actual patient harm (or adverse drug events (ADEs)) in the hospital setting. DESIGN Retrospective chart review of clinical events that transpired following observed medication administration errors. BACKGROUND Medication errors are common at the medication administration stage for hospitalized patients. While many of these errors are considered capable of causing patient harm, it is not clear how often patients are actually harmed by these errors. METHODS In a previous study where 14,041 medication administrations in an acute-care hospital were directly observed, investigators discovered 1271 medication administration errors, of which 133 had the potential to cause serious or life-threatening harm to patients and were considered serious or life-threatening potential ADEs. In the current study, clinical reviewers conducted detailed chart reviews of cases where a serious or life-threatening potential ADE occurred to determine if an actual ADE developed following the potential ADE. Reviewers further assessed the severity of the ADE and attribution to the administration error. RESULTS Ten (7.5% [95% C.I. 6.98, 8.01]) actual adverse drug events or ADEs resulted from the 133 serious and life-threatening potential ADEs, of which 6 resulted in significant, three in serious, and one life threatening injury. Therefore 4 (3% [95% C.I. 2.12, 3.6]) serious and life threatening potential ADEs led to serious or life threatening ADEs. Half of the ten actual ADEs were caused by dosage or monitoring errors for anti-hypertensives. The life threatening ADE was caused by an error that was both a transcription and a timing error. CONCLUSION Potential ADEs at the medication administration stage can cause serious patient harm. Given previous estimates of serious or life-threatening potential ADE of 1.33 per 100

  19. Questionnaire on the awareness of generic drugs among outpatients and medical staff.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, S; Kimura, H

    2008-06-01

    Generic drugs are not as widely used in Japan as they are in the West. The objective of this study was to survey the awareness of generic drugs among outpatients and medical staff and propose methods of promoting the use of generic drugs. Our survey showed that 86.7% of respondents were aware of generic drugs. This is a higher awareness rate than that in a survey of other groups conducted last year. One reason to explain this higher awareness is the recent increase in generic drug advertisements both in newspapers and on television. However, a point of note is that generic drug usage has not increased. Our survey also showed that generic drug awareness was differed widely among age groups, as younger respondents were much more aware of generic drugs than older respondents. Still, about 40% of respondents who were aware of generic drugs did not realize that they were less expensive than name-brand drugs ? including 30% of medical staff. In addition to continuing advertisement of generic drugs in the media, medical doctors and pharmacists should also be encouraged to endorse the use of generic drugs. Furthermore a new system allowing for substitution prescriptions started in April 2008 and consequently pharmacists can now play an important role in promoting the use of generic drugs. PMID:22504572

  20. Academic Staff Quality in Higher Education: An Empirical Analysis of Portuguese Public Administration Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarrico, Cláudia S.; Alves, André A.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education accreditation frameworks typically consider academic staff quality a key element. This article embarks on an empirical study of what academic staff quality means, how it is measured, and how different aspects of staff quality relate to each other. It draws on the relatively nascent Portuguese experience with study programme…

  1. Motivation and job satisfaction among medical and nursing staff in a Cyprus public general hospital

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate how medical and nursing staff of the Nicosia General Hospital is affected by specific motivation factors, and the association between job satisfaction and motivation. Furthermore, to determine the motivational drive of socio-demographic and job related factors in terms of improving work performance. Methods A previously developed and validated instrument addressing four work-related motivators (job attributes, remuneration, co-workers and achievements) was used. Two categories of health care professionals, medical doctors and dentists (N = 67) and nurses (N = 219) participated and motivation and job satisfaction was compared across socio-demographic and occupational variables. Results The survey revealed that achievements was ranked first among the four main motivators, followed by remuneration, co-workers and job attributes. The factor remuneration revealed statistically significant differences according to gender, and hospital sector, with female doctors and nurses and accident and emergency (A+E) outpatient doctors reporting greater mean scores (p < 0.005). The medical staff showed statistically significantly lower job satisfaction compared to the nursing staff. Surgical sector nurses and those >55 years of age reported higher job satisfaction when compared to the other groups. Conclusions The results are in agreement with the literature which focuses attention to management approaches employing both monetary and non-monetary incentives to motivate health care professionals. Health care professionals tend to be motivated more by intrinsic factors, implying that this should be a target for effective employee motivation. Strategies based on the survey's results to enhance employee motivation are suggested. PMID:21080954

  2. Attitudes towards and barriers to writing advance directives amongst cancer patients, healthy controls, and medical staff

    PubMed Central

    Sahm, S; Will, R; Hommel, G

    2005-01-01

    Objectives: After years of public discussion too little is still known about willingness to accept the idea of writing an advance directive among various groups of people in EU countries. We investigated knowledge about and willingness to accept such a directive in cancer patients, healthy controls, physicians, and nursing staff in Germany. Methods: Cancer patients, healthy controls, nursing staff, and physicians (n = 100 in each group) were surveyed by means of a structured questionnaire. Results: Only 18% and 19% of the patients and healthy controls respectively, and 10% of the medical staff had written an advance directive. However, 50–81% of those surveyed indicated that they wished to write one. This intention was associated with deteriorating health (p < 0.001). Only 29% of the healthy controls and 43% of the patients knew about the possibility of appointing a health care proxy. A majority in all groups believed that advance directives may influence the course of treatment (79–85%), yet half of those surveyed in all groups fear that patients could be pressurised into writing an advance directive, and 38–65% thought that relatives could abuse such documents. Conclusions: Only a minority of the participants had written an advance directive and knew about the possibility of authorising a health care proxy. Deteriorating health was associated with increasing willingness to make a directive. Despite a majority belief that advance directives may influence treatment at the end of life, other factors limit their employment, such as fear of abuse. PMID:16076965

  3. [On gods, snakes and staffs--the emblem of the medical profession].

    PubMed

    Rabinerson, David; Salzer, Liat; Gabbay-Benziv, Rinnat

    2014-10-01

    The commonly accepted emblems of the Medical Profession are the staff of the Greek god of medicine--Asklepios (or Asclepius], on which one serpent is entwined. Later, around the 16th century C.E., the wand of the herald of the Greek Gods, e.g., Hermes, on which two snakes are entwined and facing each other, became popular as the emblem of the medical profession. We elaborate on the history of the evolution of these emblems as symbols of medicine, including earlier influences from the times of the ancient Egyptians and Babylonians, which were followed by Judeo-Christian traditions and concepts. The relevance of the use of the wand of Hermes as an emblem of our profession is further discussed.

  4. Academic Benefits of Transitional Bilingual Education: A Literary Review, Staff Development, and Guidebook for Elementary Administrators and Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nunez, Jean Ann; Karr-Kidwell, PJ

    This paper provides a literature review, staff development information, and a guidebook for elementary administrators and educators that explains the academic benefits of Transitional Bilingual Education (TBE) for prekindergarten through fifth grade students. TBE allows limited English speaking students to learn a second language while being…

  5. 76 FR 28688 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for... entitled ``Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for Bacillus spp. Detection.'' This draft guidance document describes means by which in vitro diagnostic devices for...

  6. 76 FR 44935 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; 510(k) Device Modifications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-27

    ... Staff; 510(k) Device Modifications: Deciding When To Submit a 510(k) for a Change to an Existing Device... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``510(k) Device Modifications: Deciding When To Submit a 510(k) for a Change to an Existing Device.'' The recommendations in this...

  7. A Case Study of Two Regional State Universities Qualifying as Learning Organizations Based on Administration and Staff Viewpoints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Tammy Morrison

    2011-01-01

    This case study of 2 state universities qualifying as learning organizations, based on administration and staff viewpoints, was completed using a qualitative methodology. The idea of what a learning organization is can be different depending on who or what is being analyzed. For this study, the work of theorists including W. Edwards Deming,…

  8. 78 FR 9396 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Civil Money Penalties for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... Tobacco to Protect Children and Adolescents'' (75 FR 13225, March 19, 2010, codified at 21 CFR part 1140... Staff; Civil Money Penalties for Tobacco Retailers: Responses to Frequently Asked Questions... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry entitled ``Civil...

  9. Monte Carlo calculations on extremity and eye lens dosimetry for medical staff at interventional radiology procedures.

    PubMed

    Carinou, E; Ferrari, P; Koukorava, C; Krim, S; Struelens, L

    2011-03-01

    There are many factors that can influence the extremity and eye lens doses of the medical staff during interventional radiology and cardiology procedures. Numerical simulations can play an important role in evaluating extremity and eye lens doses in correlation with many different parameters. In the present study, the first results of the ORAMED (Optimisation of Radiation protection of MEDical staff) simulation campaign are presented. The parameters investigated for their influence on eye lens, hand, wrist and leg doses are: tube voltage, filtration, beam projection, field size and irradiated part of the patient's body. The tube voltage ranged from 60 to 110 kV(p), filtration from 3 to 6 mm Al and from 0 to 0.9 mm Cu. For all projections, the results showed that doses received by the operator decreased with increasing tube voltage and filtration. The magnitude of the influence of the tube voltage and the filtration on the doses depends on the beam projection and the irradiated part of the patient's body. Finally, the influence of the field size is significant in decreasing the doses.

  10. Identification and Analysis of Labor Productivity Components Based on ACHIEVE Model (Case Study: Staff of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences)

    PubMed Central

    Ziapour, Arash; Khatony, Alireza; Kianipour, Neda; Jafary, Faranak

    2015-01-01

    Identification and analysis of the components of labor productivity based on ACHIEVE model was performed among employees in different parts of Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences in 2014. This was a descriptive correlational study in which the population consisted of 270 working personnel in different administrative groups (contractual, fixed- term and regular) at Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences (872 people) that were selected among 872 people through stratified random sampling method based on Krejcie and Morgan sampling table. The survey tool included labor productivity questionnaire of ACHIEVE. Questionnaires were confirmed in terms of content and face validity, and their reliability was calculated using Cronbach’s alpha coefficient. The data were analyzed by SPSS-18 software using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean scores for labor productivity dimensions of the employees, including environment (environmental fit), evaluation (training and performance feedback), validity (valid and legal exercise of personnel), incentive (motivation or desire), help (organizational support), clarity (role perception or understanding), ability (knowledge and skills) variables and total labor productivity were 4.10±0.630, 3.99±0.568, 3.97±0.607, 3.76±0.701, 3.63±0.746, 3.59±0.777, 3.49±0.882 and 26.54±4.347, respectively. Also, the results indicated that the seven factors of environment, performance assessment, validity, motivation, organizational support, clarity, and ability were effective in increasing labor productivity. The analysis of the current status of university staff in the employees’ viewpoint suggested that the two factors of environment and evaluation, which had the greatest impact on labor productivity in the viewpoint of the staff, were in a favorable condition and needed to be further taken into consideration by authorities. PMID:25560364

  11. Administrative compensation for medical injuries: lessons from three foreign systems.

    PubMed

    Mello, Michelle M; Kachalia, Allen; Studdert, David M

    2011-07-01

    The United States requires patients injured by medical negligence to seek compensation through lawsuits, an approach that has drawbacks related to fairness, cost, and impact on medical care. Several countries, including New Zealand, Sweden, and Denmark, have replaced litigation with administrative compensation systems for patients who experience an avoidable medical injury. Sometimes called "no-fault" systems, such schemes enable patients to file claims for compensation without using an attorney. A governmental or private adjudicating organization uses neutral medical experts to evaluate claims of injury and does not require patients to prove that health care providers were negligent in order to receive compensation. Information from claims is used to analyze opportunities for patient safety improvement. The systems have successfully limited liability costs while improving injured patients' access to compensation. American policymakers may find many of the elements of these countries' systems to be transferable to demonstration projects in the U.S.

  12. Aromatherapy alleviates endothelial dysfunction of medical staff after night-shift work: preliminary observations.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Kenei; Fukuda, Shota; Maeda, Kumiko; Kawasaki, Toshihiro; Kono, Yasushi; Jissho, Satoshi; Taguchi, Haruyuki; Yoshiyama, Minoru; Yoshikawa, Junichi

    2011-02-01

    Night-shift work causes mental stress and lifestyle changes, and is recognized as a risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with impaired endothelial function. Aromatherapy is becoming popular as a complementary therapy that is beneficial for mental relaxation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of aromatherapy on the endothelial function of medical staff after night-shift work. This study consisted of 19 healthy medical personnel (19 men, mean age 32 ± 7 years), including 11 physicians and 8 technicians. Aromatherapy was performed for 30 min by inhalation of the essential oil of lavender. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery was measured three times in each subject: on a regular workday, and after night-shift work before and immediately after aromatherapy. A control study was performed to assess the effect of a 30-min rest without aromatherapy. The mean value of sleep time during night-shift work was 3.3 ± 1.3 h. FMD after night-shift work was lower than on a regular workday (10.4 ± 1.8 vs. 12.5 ± 1.7%, P<0.001), which improved after aromatherapy (11.8 ± 2.5%, P=0.02 vs. before aromatherapy). FMD was stable in the control study (10.1 ± 1.9 vs. 10.1 ± 2.2%, P=0.9). This study demonstrated that night-shift work impaired endothelial function in medical staff, an effect that was alleviated by short-term aromatherapy.

  13. 76 FR 76166 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; the Content of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ..., including CTR, CTT, and Low Glucose Suspend systems. On June 22, 2011 (76 FR 36542), FDA announced the... Staff; the Content of Investigational Device Exemption and Premarket Approval Applications for... document entitled ``Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: The Content of Investigational...

  14. Factors influencing the perception of medical staff and outpatients of dual practice in Shanghai, People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haiping; Li, Meina; Dai, Zhixin; Deng, Qiangyu; Zhang, Lulu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Dual practice is defined as a physician’s performance of medical activities in different health care institutions (two or more) simultaneously. This study aimed to examine the perception and acceptance of medical staff and outpatients of dual practice and explore the possible factors affecting people’s perception. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 13 public hospitals in Shanghai. Participants included medical staff and outpatients. We distributed 1,000 questionnaires to each participant group, and the response rates were 66.7% and 69.4%, respectively. Statistical differences in variables were tested, and multinomial logistic regression methods were employed for statistical analysis. Results The study included two parts: medical staff survey and outpatient survey. The results of medical staff survey showed that 63.0% of the respondents supported dual practice. Medical staff who belonged to the surgical department or held positive belief of dual practice were more willing to participate in dual practice. Moreover, the publicity activities of dual practice and hospitals’ human resource management system were important factors affecting the willingness of the medical staff. The results of outpatient survey showed that 44.5% of respondents believed that dual practice could reduce difficulty in consulting a doctor. Regarding the perceived benefits of dual practice, the proportion of outpatients who believed that dual practice could meet the demand for health convenience, minor illness, and chronic disease were 45.4%, 42.4%, and 53.7%, respectively. Additionally, demographic characteristics significantly influenced the perception of outpatients. Conclusion This study confirmed that both medical staff and outpatients generally held positive attitudes toward dual practice. Medical staff who belonged to the surgical department or held positive belief of dual practice were more willing to participate in dual practice. Moreover, the existence of

  15. Improving medication administration error reporting systems. Why do errors occur?

    PubMed

    Wakefield, B J; Wakefield, D S; Uden-Holman, T

    2000-01-01

    Monitoring medication administration errors (MAE) is often included as part of the hospital's risk management program. While observation of actual medication administration is the most accurate way to identify errors, hospitals typically rely on voluntary incident reporting processes. Although incident reporting systems are more economical than other methods of error detection, incident reporting can also be a time-consuming process depending on the complexity or "user-friendliness" of the reporting system. Accurate incident reporting systems are also dependent on the ability of the practitioner to: 1) recognize an error has actually occurred; 2) believe the error is significant enough to warrant reporting; and 3) overcome the embarrassment of having committed a MAE and the fear of punishment for reporting a mistake (either one's own or another's mistake).

  16. Benefits and Barriers of E-Learning for Staff Training in a Medical University.

    PubMed

    Franz, Stefan; Behrends, Marianne; Haack, Claudia; Marschollek, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Learning Management Systems (LMS) are a feasible solution to fulfill the various requirements for e-learning based training in a medical university. Using the LMS ILIAS, the Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology has designed an e-learning unit about data protection, which has been used by 73% of the department's employees in the first three months. To increase the use of e-learning for staff training, it is necessary to identify barriers and benefits, which encourage the use of e-learning. Therefore, we started an online survey to examine how the employees evaluate this learning opportunity. The results show that 87% of the employees had no technical problems and also competence of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) was no barrier. If anything, reported issues were time shortages and tight schedules. Therefore, short learning modules (less than 20 minutes) are preferred. Furthermore, temporal flexibility for learning is important for 83% of employees. PMID:26152964

  17. 76 FR 40921 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Enforcement Policy for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-12

    ... Staff; Enforcement Policy for Premarket Notification Requirements for Certain In Vitro Diagnostic and... ``Enforcement Policy for Premarket Notification Requirements for Certain In Vitro Diagnostic and Radiology...(k)) requirements for certain in vitro diagnostic and radiology devices under the regulations....

  18. 78 FR 15957 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Cincinnati District, in cosponsorship with...

  19. 77 FR 10537 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Cincinnati District, in cosponsorship with...

  20. [A report on staff development in advanced knowledge and technology of gene diagnosis for medical technologists by the Japanese Association of Medical Technologists: the view of medical technologists].

    PubMed

    Miyanishi, S; Ueno, I

    2000-10-01

    With advancement of the molecular biology, gene diagnosis is widely utilized in clinical application of medicine. For medical technologists, it is necessary to receive continued education to practice such advanced scientific trends. The Japanese Association of Medical Technologists established a working group for a staff development program of gene diagnosis and chromosome analysis in 1996, and has continued its activities in making inquiries about the present conditions, publishing a textbook, and providing seminars. The internal laboratory utilization of gene diagnosis was 8.7%(213 of 2437 hospitals). Based on the fact that about half of the hospitals use external laboratory, staff development for the internal utilization of gene diagnosis is an urgent issue. We have been providing seminars to meet the educational needs of our members. In addition to those activities, we have continued our efforts in providing a manual with clinically useful information, standardizing methods, establishing an information network, and conducting a controlled survey. The role of the working group is now shared by the local prefecture to further increase the numbers of those with expertise in gene diagnosis. We, medical technologists, need to have a global view of professional growth, and also to cooperate with academic societies related to gene diagnosis to establish a certification system. PMID:11215100

  1. The optimal choice of medication administration route regarding intravenous, intramuscular, and subcutaneous injection

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jing-fen; Zhu, Ling-ling; Chen, Meng; Xu, Hui-min; Wang, Hua-fen; Feng, Xiu-qin; Zhu, Xiu-ping; Zhou, Quan

    2015-01-01

    pharmacoeconomics because patient preference will ensure optimal treatment adherence and ultimately improve patient experience or satisfaction, while pharmacoeconomic concern will help alleviate nurse shortages and reduce overall health care costs. Besides the principles, the following detailed factors might affect the decision: patient characteristics-related factors (body mass index, age, sex, medical status [eg, renal impairment, comorbidities], personal attitudes toward safety and convenience, past experience, perception of current disease status, health literacy, and socioeconomic status), medication administration-related factors (anatomical site of injection, dose, frequency, formulation characteristics, administration time, indication, flexibility in the route of administration), and health care staff/institution-related factors (knowledge, human resources). Conclusion This updated review of findings of comparative studies of different injection routes will enrich the knowledge of safe, efficacious, economic, and patient preference-oriented medication administration as well as catching research opportunities in clinical nursing practice. PMID:26170642

  2. 76 FR 70150 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Investigational Device...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration..., Including Certain First in Human Studies; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a...

  3. 77 FR 39498 - Guidances for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Computer-Assisted Detection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-03

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidances for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Approval and Premarket Notification (510(k)) Submissions; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability...

  4. [Basic problems of staff training in medical engineering management at the N.E, Bauman Moscow State Engineering University].

    PubMed

    Zharov, V P; Kalinin, S A

    2000-01-01

    The topicality of staff training in medical engineering management in the sphere of medicine and medical engineering is dictated by that the substantiated and flexible strategy in purchasing foreign medical equipment and drugs and supporting purely Russian biomedical technologies must be one of the first steps of health public reforms in Russia. As early as 1992, the N. E. Bauman Moscow State Engineering University was the first that organize to train staff in business and management in biomedical engineering and health public. The accumulated experiment was put in the development of new curricula by the supplementary education system. Interdisciplinary training in medical engineering marketing and management was organized, thus providing both additional education for specialists having complete and incomplete higher education who received diplomas of a management bachelor or master and through training of students who got diplomas of an engineer and diplomas of a management bachelor at the international level.

  5. Education of hand rubbing technique to prospective medical staff, employing UV-based digital imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Lehotsky, Ákos; Szilágyi, László; Demeter-Iclănzan, Annamária; Haidegger, Tamás; Wéber, György

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively assess the hand hygiene performance of medical students. Hand rubbing technique was evaluated by employing innovative UV-light-based imaging technology, identifying patterns and trends in missed areas after applying WHO's six-step protocol. This specially designed hand hygiene education and assessment program targeted 1,344 medical students at two distant sites in Central Europe. Students were introduced to a short video, presenting the basics of hand hygiene, and then received further demonstration from professional trainers, focusing on the correct execution of WHO's six-step technique. To verify the acquired skill, participants rubbed their hands with UV-marked alcohol-based solution. Digital images of the hands were recorded under UV light, followed by computer evaluation and assessment. Immediate objective visual feedback was given to the participants showing missed areas on their hands. The statistical analysis of missed spots was based on retrospective expert-driven manual evaluation. Significant difference in rubbing quality was found between female and male participants [35.3% (CI 95%: 33-38%) versus 29.0% (CI 95%: 27-31%), p < 0.001], dominant and non-dominant hands [43.4% (CI 95%: 39-48%) versus 34.9% (CI 95%: 32-38%), p = 0.002], and various zones of the hands' dorsal side. Based on the participants' feedback and the evaluation of the infection control specialists, it can be stated that the identification of typically missed patterns and the instant visual feedback have a vital role in improving the hand hygiene technique of prospective medical staff.

  6. Education of hand rubbing technique to prospective medical staff, employing UV-based digital imaging technology.

    PubMed

    Lehotsky, Ákos; Szilágyi, László; Demeter-Iclănzan, Annamária; Haidegger, Tamás; Wéber, György

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to objectively assess the hand hygiene performance of medical students. Hand rubbing technique was evaluated by employing innovative UV-light-based imaging technology, identifying patterns and trends in missed areas after applying WHO's six-step protocol. This specially designed hand hygiene education and assessment program targeted 1,344 medical students at two distant sites in Central Europe. Students were introduced to a short video, presenting the basics of hand hygiene, and then received further demonstration from professional trainers, focusing on the correct execution of WHO's six-step technique. To verify the acquired skill, participants rubbed their hands with UV-marked alcohol-based solution. Digital images of the hands were recorded under UV light, followed by computer evaluation and assessment. Immediate objective visual feedback was given to the participants showing missed areas on their hands. The statistical analysis of missed spots was based on retrospective expert-driven manual evaluation. Significant difference in rubbing quality was found between female and male participants [35.3% (CI 95%: 33-38%) versus 29.0% (CI 95%: 27-31%), p < 0.001], dominant and non-dominant hands [43.4% (CI 95%: 39-48%) versus 34.9% (CI 95%: 32-38%), p = 0.002], and various zones of the hands' dorsal side. Based on the participants' feedback and the evaluation of the infection control specialists, it can be stated that the identification of typically missed patterns and the instant visual feedback have a vital role in improving the hand hygiene technique of prospective medical staff. PMID:27352974

  7. Analysis of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach

    PubMed Central

    Keyvanara, Mahmoud; Sohrabi, Mozaffar Cheshmeh; Zare, Firoozeh; Hassnazadeh, Akbar; Malekahmadi, Parisa

    2014-01-01

    Background: Numerous researches conducted on about the quality of perception of media messages shows that the people are not passive receivers but they have the ability of understanding, interpreting and accepting or rejecting messages. In order to make clear the relationship of information and communication technologies with social changes and to gain a broader vision from this scope, sociological theories about information and communication technologies’ usage, especially appropriation approach can be very useful. So, keeping in mind the important role of Databases in the qualitative expansion of education, research, diagnosis, remedy and medical services presentation, this research was carried out with the aim of status determination of databases appropriation in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences according to the social appropriation approach in 2012. Materials and Methods: This is an applicative research of an analytical-descriptive type, which was carried out by measurement approach. The statistical society of this research was composed of the academic staffs of the Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences in 2012 and finally 390 academic staffs were selected according to the Cochran's formula were selected. The research tool are searcher's made questionnaire, which was composed of nine separate parts. Its validity was accepted by the specialists and its reliability was calculated and found to be 0.961 by Cronbakh's alpha. Results: Database appropriation score in the academic staffs of Iranian Universities of Medical Sciences with 65.020% was in a good status and data bases dis appropriation score with 71.484 was in a high status. Conclusion: According to the findings of this research, Librarians and politicians in this scope-with determination of the academic staff's positive and negative points in usage and appropriation would be capable of accurately diagnozing and analyzing the chances and challenges of the academic staffs

  8. [An analysis of the medical administration pattern of the Yuan Dynasty as interpreted from the Guan yi ti ju si (Department of Official Medical Administration)].

    PubMed

    Han, Xiaowen; Yu, Hong; Zhang, Qicheng

    2015-07-01

    The Imperial Academy of Medicine of the Yuan Dynasty established an institution called Guan yi ti ju si (Department of Official Medical Administration). Through its central to local network, the Department carried out its medical administration throughout the nation. The responsibilities of Guan yi ti ju si included 5 aspects, viz., the selection of local medical professionals and talents; the dispatch of prison doctors; the examination and administration of local medical workers; the revision and publication of medical works and the inspection and identification of local herbs. Guan yi ti ju si played an important role in medical education and the publication of medical books which were generally considered as the work of Yi xue ti ju si (Department of General Medical Administration ). In terms of administrative pattern, there were two specialties, the government focused its work on the rational allocation and governing of local medical professionals and resources, with medical administration and medical education belonged to two separate systems, which, at the same time, supervised and controlled mutually. These noticeable features of medical administration of the Yuan Dynasty are still revealing its reference value today. PMID:26815020

  9. Ineffective Staff, Ineffective Supervision, or Ineffective Administration? Why Some Nursing Homes Fail to Provide Adequate Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sheridan, John E.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This study involved 530 nursing staff working in 25 for-profit and nonprofit nursing homes, 2 of which failed to meet residential care standards. Nursing home climate in failed homes was perceived as being significantly lower in human relations and higher in laissez-faire and status orientation dimensions that the climate in the successful homes.…

  10. 76 FR 789 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Section 905(j) Reports...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ...; Section 905(j) Reports: Demonstrating Substantial Equivalence for Tobacco Products; Availability AGENCY... announcing the availability of a guidance for industry and FDA staff entitled ``Section 905(j) Reports... products before they may be marketed; alternatively, manufacturers may submit a 905(j) report intended...

  11. Beyond Administration and Management: Reconstructing the Identities of Professional Staff in UK Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitchurch, Celia

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an empirical study associated with earlier reviews of the changing roles and identities of contemporary professional staff in UK higher education (Whitchurch, 2004; 2006a; 2006b). The study draws on the narratives of 24 individuals to illustrate that identity movements cannot be captured solely in terms of a shift from…

  12. 76 FR 36133 - Draft Guidances for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Classification of Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    ... if: ``through either chemical reaction or intermolecular forces or both, the product mediates a... Issues; and Interpretation of the Term ``Chemical Action'' in the Definition of Device Under Section 201...'' and ``Draft Guidance for Industry and FDA Staff: Interpretation of the Term 'Chemical Action' in...

  13. A Survey of the Knowledge of Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis among the Medical Staff of Intensive Care Units in North China

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiao; Sun, Bing; Yang, Yuanhua; Tong, Zhaohui

    2015-01-01

    Background Guideline concordance for venous thromboembolism (VTE) prophylaxis in critically ill patients in intensive care units (ICUs) varies across different countries. Objective To explore how the medical staff of ICUs in China comprehend and practice VTE prophylaxis. Method Questionnaires comprising 39 questions and including 4 dimensions of thromboprophylaxis were administered in ICUs in North China. Results In all, 52 ICUs at 23 tertiary hospitals in 7 Chinese provinces and municipalities were surveyed. A total of 2500 questionnaires were sent, and 1861 were returned, corresponding to a response rate of approximately 74.4%. Of all surveyed medical staff, 36.5% of physicians and 22.2% of nurses were aware of the guidelines in China, and 19.0% of physicians and 9.5% of nurses comprehended the 9th edition of the guidelines of the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP). Additionally, 37.6% of the medical staff chose a prophylaxis method based on the related guidelines, and 10.3% could demonstrate the exact indication for mechanical pattern application. Worries about skin injury, difficulty with removal and discomfort during mechanical thromboprophylaxis were cited by more than 30% of nurses, which was significantly more frequent than for physicians (graduated compression stockings: 54.3% VS 34.1%, 60.7% VS 49%, and 59.4% VS 54%, p = 0.000; intermittent pneumatic compression: 31% VS 22.2%, 19.2% VS 13.9%, and 37.8% VS 27.2%, p = 0.000). Conclusions and Relevance The knowledge of VTE prophylaxis among the medical staff of ICUs in North China remains limited, which may lead to a lack of standardization of VTE prophylaxis. Strengthened, standardized training may help medical staff to improve their comprehension of the relevant guidelines and may finally reduce the occurrence of VTE in ICUs and improve the prognosis of critically ill patients with VTE. PMID:26418162

  14. Staff Training and Development for University Management and Administration--Swedish Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skoglund, Anders

    1984-01-01

    Some recent Swedish training activities in college administration for both faculty and administrators are described, focusing on problem areas such as retrenchment and how they affect the work of management and administration. The design of training programs to provide support in such situations is discussed. (MSE)

  15. Special report on medical staff relationships. Handling "impaired" health care professionals.

    PubMed

    Paine, S J

    1991-06-01

    Applying the doctrine of corporate negligence, courts will, in appropriate circumstances, deem hospitals and other institutional health care providers responsible for the quality of patient care in their institutions and for the consequences of negligent physician performance that could have been discovered and prevented. See, e.g., Darling v. Charleston Community Memorial Hosp., 33 Ill. 2d 326 (1965), cert, denied, 383 U.S. 946 (1966); Johnson v. Misericordia Community Hosp., 99 Wis. 2d 709 (1981); Elam v. College Park Hosp., 132 Cal. App. 3d 332 (1982). In such a climate, and with Data Bank reporting now a reality, neither institutional providers nor health care professionals on their medical staffs can afford to ignore problems of practitioner impairment. Recognizing this reality, some state laws now mandate an organized approach--such as the establishment of an impaired practitioners committee--to problems of professional impairment. However, whether state-mandated or not, providers must have policies and procedures in place to insure not only that impaired professionals are referred to available treatment programs, but that they fully participate in and complete such programs, and achieve rehabilitation, before they return to practice at the institution. The earlier detection and treatment are initiated, preferably before peer review action becomes necessary, the better for patients, institutions, and practitioners themselves. PMID:10111959

  16. Impact of School Sense of Community within a Faith-Based University: Administrative and Academic Staff Perceptions on Institutional Mission and Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Cowman, Shaun E.; Milner, Lauren A.; Gutierrez, Robert E.; Drake, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Academic staff (n = 305) and administrative staff (n = 595) at a large urban, Catholic, and religious order teaching university completed on-line school sense of community, social desirability, and mission-identity plus mission-driven activity measures. Partial correlates (controlling for social desirability) indicated that for both faculty and…

  17. [Evaluation of a risk communication approach for maintenance staff working with induced radioactivity in medical linear accelerators].

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hiroshi; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Maehara, Yoshiaki; Koizumi, Mitsue; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Kida, Tetsuo; Tsukamoto, Atsuko; Horitsugi, Genki; Hiraki, Hitoshi; Kimura, Yumi; Oyama, Masaya

    2013-12-01

    In order to promote consensus building on decommissioning operation rules for medical linear accelerators in Japan, we carried out a risk communication (RC) approach mainly providing knowledge for maintenance staff regarding induced radioactivity. In February 2012, we created a booklet (26 pages) to present an overview of the amended law, the mechanism and the distribution of induced radioactivity showing the actual radiation dose rate around a linear accelerator and actual exposure doses to staff. In addition, we co-sponsored a seminar for workers in this field organized by the Japan Medical Imaging and Radiological Systems Industries Association to explain the contents of this booklet, and answer questions regarding induced radioactivity of linear accelerators as an RC program. As a result, the understanding of staff regarding the regulations on maximum X-ray energy on linear accelerators (P<0.05), and the outline of clearance systems (P<0.01), were facilitated by RC. In addition, we found that about 70% of maintenance staff considered that the cooling time for decommissioning operation depended on the situation. Our RC approach suggests that consensus building should be used to make rules on decommissioning operations for linear medical accelerators.

  18. Indiana Health Occupations Education: Student Modules for Administration of Medications for Unlicensed Nursing Personnel. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bilger, Phyllis; And Others

    These learning modules are designed to provide health care workers involved with medications with basic information about the nature and administration of medications. The 30 modules are organized into six units. An overview of preparation and administration of medicines, principles of medication therapy, and medication fundamentals are presented…

  19. Plan for Your Professional Development. Module LT-E-3 of Category E--Professional and Staff Development. Competency-Based Vocational Education Administrator Module Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Puleo, Nancy F.; And Others

    This module, one in a series of competency-based administrator instructional packages, focuses on a specific competency that vocational education administrators need to be successful in the area of professional and staff development. The purpose of the module is to help administrators to analyze their professional needs and to devise and implement…

  20. 75 FR 32953 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Use of “Light,” “Mild,” “Low,” or...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Use of ``Light,'' ``Mild,'' ``Low,'' or Similar Descriptors in the Label, Labeling, or Advertising of Tobacco Products; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY:...

  1. 75 FR 22599 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice...) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance is not final...) Requests for Information Under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act'' to the Division of...

  2. 77 FR 20826 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Food and Drug Administration and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ..., 2010 (75 FR 22599), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance. Comments on the draft... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Procedures for Section 513(g) Requests for Information under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.''...

  3. 78 FR 14305 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Types of Communication During...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-05

    ... efficiency of the review process. This draft guidance is not final nor is it in effect at this time. DATES... review process between FDA and industry for specific medical device premarket submissions. Further... recommendations for MDUFA III, Title II of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act, Public...

  4. [The assessment of knowledge about recent tobacco law number 5727 among our university students, academic and administrative staff].

    PubMed

    Gelen, Mehmet Emin; Köksal, Nurhan; Ozer, Ali; Atilla, Nurhan; Cinkara, Müge; Kahraman, Hasan; Ekerbiçer, Hasan

    2011-01-01

    In this study we investigated the level of knowledge and ideas of the university students and staff, about the last stage of Tobacco Law No. 5727, which came into force on 19 July 2009 in our country. This is descriptive questionnaire survey. Study's universe was consisting of the students 2009-2010 academic year studying in our universities and academic and administrative staff. A total of 2271 people were included the study. In our study, smoking prevalence was 21.3%. The prevalence for narghile smoking as 4.8% was the highest among students. 94.9% of participants thought that passive smoking increased the risk for human health. Asked whether the banned places, the most correct answers were; the school (97.0%), bank branches (96.3%) and hospitals (96.2%) as the most incorrect answers were; in the garden of hospital (55.7%), garden of private education (53.4%) and the school playground (46.1%). 87.6% of the participants were supporting the new tobacco law. 61.3% of smokers were supporting the law (p= 0.000). 54.3% of narghile-smokers support the law, and this rate was lower than cigarette smokers. Overall, tobacco law is known and supported between our students and staff. More information and supervision should be given about the banned places like school garden and private course gardens which were the high rate of false knowledge. The support to law among students is lower than staff. Similarly narghile use among students is often more. The community should be informed also about the other tobacco products. PMID:21740387

  5. Medical staff extremity dosimetry in CT fluoroscopy: an anthropomorphic hand voxel phantom study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueira, C.; Becker, F.; Blunck, C.; DiMaria, S.; Baptista, M.; Esteves, B.; Paulo, G.; Santos, J.; Teles, P.; Vaz, P.

    2013-08-01

    This work aims to contribute to the study of the radiation dose distribution delivered to the hands of medical staff members during a general computed tomographic (CT) fluoroscopic guided procedure. In this study, both Monte Carlo simulations and measurements were performed. For free-in-air and computed tomography dose index (CTDI) body phantom measurements, a standard pencil ionization chamber (IC) 100 mm long was used. The CT scanner model was implemented using MCNPX (Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended) and was successfully validated by comparing the simulated results with measurements. Subsequently, CT images of a hand, together with an anthropomorphic phantom, were voxelized and used with the MCNPX code for dose calculations. The hand dose distribution study was performed both by using thermo-luminescent detector measurements and Monte Carlo simulations. The validated simulation tool provides a new perspective for detailed investigations of CT-irradiation scenarios. Simulations show that there is a strong dose gradient, namely the even zones of the hand that are in precise vicinity to the x-ray beam only receive about 4% of the maximum dose delivered to adjacent areas which are directly exposed to the primary x-ray beam. Finally, the scatter contribution of the patient was also studied through MC simulations. The results show that for directly exposed parts of the hand surface, the dose is reduced by the body of the patient (due to the shielding), whereas the dose is increased by scattered radiation from the patient for parts of the skin that receive scattered radiation only.

  6. Effect of an Organizational Linkage Intervention on Staff Perceptions of Medication-Assisted Treatment and Referral Intentions in Community Corrections

    PubMed Central

    Friedmann, Peter D.; Wilson, Donna; Knudsen, Hannah; Ducharme, Lori; Welsh, Wayne; Frisman, Linda; Knight, Kevin; Lin, Hsiu-Ju; James, Amy; Albizu-Garcia, Carmen; Pankow, Jennifer; Hall, Elizabeth; Urbine, Terry; Abdel-Salam, Sami; Duvall, Jamieson; Vocci, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Medication-assisted treatment (MAT) is effective for alcohol and opioid use disorders but it is stigmatized and underutilized in criminal justice settings. Methods This study cluster-randomized 20 community corrections sites to determine whether an experimental implementation strategy of training and an organizational linkage intervention improved staff perceptions of MAT and referral intentions more than training alone. The 3-hour training was designed to address deficits in knowledge, perceptions and referral information, and the organizational linkage intervention brought together community corrections and addiction treatment agencies in an interagency strategic planning and implementation process over 12 months. Results Although training alone was associated with increases in familiarity with pharmacotherapy and knowledge of where to refer clients, the experimental intervention produced significantly greater improvements in functional attitudes (e.g. that MAT is helpful to clients) and referral intentions. Corrections staff demonstrated greater improvements in functional perceptions and intent to refer opioid dependent clients for MAT than did treatment staff. Conclusion Knowledge, perceptions and information training plus interorganizational strategic planning intervention is an effective means to change attitudes and intent to refer clients for medication assisted treatment in community corrections settings, especially among corrections staff. PMID:25456091

  7. 76 FR 569 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... for the Detection and Differentiation of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus aureus; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. ] SUMMARY: The... Detection and Differentiation of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and...

  8. 78 FR 4417 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Submissions for Postapproval...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... Administration, 10903 New Hampshire Ave., Bldg. 32, rm. 5129, Silver Spring, MD 20993. Send one self-addressed... regulatory identity of the modified constituent part differs from the application type under which...

  9. [EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE EQ--A NECESSARY SKILL FOR SUCCESS OF MEDICAL STAFF IN THE 21ST CENTURY].

    PubMed

    Tadmor, Tamar; Dolev, Niva; Attias, Dina; Reuven-Lelong, Ayalla; Rofe, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    During the last decade, medical organizations have undergone major changes worldwide and these continue to evolve at a rapid pace. Today the medical profession faces many new challenges that will eventually have an impact on almost every aspect of daily hospital routine. To a large extent, these issues arise from emerging new technologies, the entry of a new generation of trained workers who have different views and characteristics than previous generations, and the introduction of stricter regulations and accreditation procedures in recent years. In addition, the various hospital staff members now have different professional expectations and demands; there is also an important need to reduce costs, accompanied by a shift towards the concept of patients perceiving themselves as clients rather than only as people needing medical assistance. Facing all these challenges, undoubtedly, medical teams will need to acquire a more comprehensive set of professional skills critical for their continued success in the 21st century. These skills will have to include the ability to be more flexible, so as to be able to adapt to changing environments, to remain effective at work under stress, to develop positive personal interactive working relationships, while providing excellent service to patients, and to maintain the ability to guide and lead others in a changing medical environment. People with the above skills reflect the positive attributes of high emotional intelligence. Recent studies show that emotional intelligence plays an important role in the success of the entire medical staff and particularly for those in management roles. Hospitals will have to take into consideration all the necessary characteristics, if they wish to maintain and further consolidate their previous achievements in the 21st century. In particular, they will need to pay attention to the EQ of both new and existing staff, using it as a meaningful parameter for new recruits and for the further

  10. An Audit of Medication Administration: A Glimpse into School Health Offices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canham, Daryl L.; Bauer, Laurie; Concepcion, Michelle; Luong, June; Peters, Jill; Wilde, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Many students require prescription and nonprescription medication to be administered during the school day for chronic and acute illnesses. School office staff members are typically delegated this task, yet these individuals are unlicensed assistive personnel without medical training. Five school nurses developed and participated in a medication…

  11. Marital Satisfaction: The Differential Impact of Social Support Dependent on Situation and Gender in Medical Staff in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Rostami, Arian; Ghazinour, Mehdi; Richter, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Stress is unavoidable in everyday life and it can effect on marital relationship. Social support especially from emotionally closed persons as a protective factor can help individuals to deal with stress and buffers the negative effects of life stress on marital satisfaction. In the present cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between social and spousal support and marital satisfaction in medical staff in Iran. Data collection was performed in 653 medical staff using socio-demographic questions, the ENRICH Marital Satisfaction Inventory, and the Social Support Questionnaire. Women and men did not differ in total social support satisfaction and the total number of supporting people; but, women were more often support providers for their husbands than men were for their wives. Spouse support was a more important indicator of marital satisfaction for women than for men. Also results revealed that spouse support is more important than social support from other resources to explain marital satisfaction. Job satisfaction had an explanatory effect on marital satisfaction especially in men. Furthermore, the findings showed that social support could decrease the explanatory impact of job satisfaction on scales of marital satisfaction. Therefore, focusing on social support, especially spouse support could be an effective approach in family counseling or family education programs to improve marital satisfaction in medical staff. PMID:23777731

  12. 78 FR 14557 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff: Investigational Device Exemption...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-06

    ... vision that is not correctable to normal levels by spectacles, contact lenses, medications, surgery, or... indicated for the treatment of visual impairments resulting from retinal diseases. DATES: Submit either... the heading of this document. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: For pre-clinical concerns: ] Ethan...

  13. Family Perceptions of Medication Administration at School: Errors, Risk Factors, and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Daniel; Farris, Karen; McCarthy, Ann Marie; Kelly, Michael W.; Howarth, Robyn

    2008-01-01

    Medications are administered every day in schools across the country. Researchers and clinicians have studied school nurses' and educators' experiences with medication administration, but not the experiences of children or their parents. This study examined medication administration from the child and parent perspectives to (a) determine problems…

  14. When Grief Visits School: Organizing a Successful Response. A Resource for Administrators, Counselors, and Other Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudley, John

    Each week the equivalent of fifty 48-passenger bus loads of students do not return to school because they have died. Created to foster successful responses to crisis situations, this book serves as a step by step reference guide for school administrators, counselors, and other faculty. Techniques are presented for dealing with: (1) murders; (2)…

  15. Factors Influencing Staff Perceptions of Administrator Support for Tier 2 and 3 Interventions: A Multilevel Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debnam, Katrina J.; Pas, Elise T.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2013-01-01

    Although the number of schools implementing School-Wide Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports (SWPBIS) is increasing, and there is great demand for evidence-based Tier 2 and 3 interventions for students requiring additional support, little systematic research has examined administrator support for such programming. This article examines…

  16. Divisions among Us: Women Administrators, Faculty, and Staff on the Complicated Realities of Support and Sisterhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaccaro, Annemarie

    2011-01-01

    Although Robin Morgan argued that sisterhood is powerful (1970) and forever (2003), results from this case study show that sisterhood is not easily achieved, even in women's groups in which support for women was a formal goal. Narratives of eight women faculty, middle managers, and top administrators reveal that organizational sexism and women's…

  17. 76 FR 50740 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Procedures for Handling...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-16

    ... Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the FD&C Act), procedural information on how to fulfill section 522... INFORMATION: I. Background Postmarket surveillance under section 522 of the FD&C Act (21 U.S.C. 306l) is one... Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 amended section 522 of the FD&C ] Act to expand...

  18. 75 FR 57963 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing the Performance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ... Helicobacter pylori; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food... detecting Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). This draft guidance is not final nor is it in effect at this time... Detection of Antibodies to Helicobacter pylori,'' to suggest information that submitters provide that...

  19. 77 FR 43846 - Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Medical Devices Workshop; Notice of Workshop

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Pediatric Medical Devices... Administration's (FDA) Office of Orphan Products Development is announcing the following workshop: FDA Pediatric Medical Devices Workshop. This meeting is intended to focus on challenges in pediatric device...

  20. A Mixed Method Study Measuring the Perceptions of Administrators, Classroom Teachers and Professional Staff on the Use of iPads in a Midwest School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beckerle, Andrea Laux

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this mixed methods study was to assess the perceptions of classroom teachers, administrators and professional support staff in one Midwest school district regarding the usefulness and effectiveness of the iPad device as an instructional and support tool within the classroom. The need to address classroom teacher, administrator and…

  1. What is the measure of a safe hospital? Medication errors missed by risk management, clinical staff, and surveyors.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Benjamin C; Rothschild, Jeffrey M; Jordan, Constance W; Jayaram, Geetha

    2005-07-01

    Research in the last decade has identified medication errors as a more frequent cause of unintended harm than was previously thought. Inpatient medication errors and error-prone medication usage are detected internally by medication error reporting and externally through hospital licensing and accreditation surveys. A hospital's rate of medication errors is one of several measures of patient safety available to staff. However, prospective patients and other interested parties must rely upon licensing and accreditation scores, along with varying access to outcome data, as their sole measures of patient safety. We have previously reported that much higher rates of medication errors were found when an independent audit was used compared with rates determined by the usual process of self-report. In this study, we summarize these earlier findings and then compare the error detection sensitivity of licensing and accreditation surveys with that of an independent audit. When experienced surveyors fail to detect a highly error prone medication usage system, it raises questions about the validity of survey scores as a measure of safety (i.e., lack of medication errors). Replication of our findings in other hospital settings is needed. We also recommend measures for improving patient safety by reducing error rates and increasing error detection. PMID:16041238

  2. [The voluntary medical care during the First World War. The work of the nursing staff in the military field hospitals on the eastern and western frontlines].

    PubMed

    Stölzle, Astrid

    2012-01-01

    The voluntary medical care consisted of civilians who were provided to the medical corps in the First World War for the first time in this great dimension. The nursing staff on the eastern and the western German frontlines were sending letters back home, some of them were drafting diaries due to the special event or recorded their experiences after the war. Besides the narratives of their private impressions, these documents are reflecting their nursing work, which the nursing staff had to achieve. An important factor was, that the patients were soldiers. Conflicts in the cooperation with the medical staff and among the nurses did not seem to have influenced a good quality of care, however it facilitated a harmonic coexistence and above all, it helped to sustain behind the fronts. The study of the nursing care and the relationship with patients and among the staff reflects on the meaning of nursing care for the staff.

  3. Development and assessment of learning objects about intramuscular medication administration

    PubMed Central

    Tamashiro, Lilian Mayumi Chinen; Peres, Heloisa Helena Ciqueto

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: to develop and assess a learning object about intramuscular medication administration for nursing undergraduates and nurses. METHOD: a random, intentional and non-probabilistic sample was selected of nurses from a Brazilian social network of nursing and students from the Undergraduate Program at the University of São Paulo School of Nursing to serve as research subjects and assess the object. RESULTS: the participants, 8 nurses and 8 students, studied the object and answered an assessment instrument that included the following criteria: educational aspects (relevance of the theme, objectives and texts/hypertexts), interface of the environment (navigation, accessibility and screen design) and didactic resources (interactivity and presentation of resources). In total, 128 significant answers were obtained, 124 (97%) of which were positive, assessed as excellent and satisfactory, considered as a flexible, dynamic, objective resources that is appropriate to the nursing learning process. CONCLUSION: the educational technology shows a clear and easily understandable language and the teaching method could be applied in other themes, contributing to the education and training of nursing professionals, positively affecting nursing teaching, stimulating the knowledge, autonomous and independent learning, aligned with the new professional education requirements. PMID:25493665

  4. Evaluating the Imbalance Between Increasing Hemodialysis Patients and Medical Staff Shortage After the Great East Japan Earthquake: Report From a Hemodialysis Center Near the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Takaaki; Nishiuchi, Takamitsu; Akaihata, Hidenori; Haga, Nobuhiro; Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Kubo, Hajime; Kasahara, Masato; Hayashi, Masayuki

    2016-04-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 caused an unprecedented imbalance between an increasing number of hemodialysis patients and medical staff shortage in the Sousou area, the site of the Fukushima nuclear power plants. In 2014, capacity of our hemodialysis center reached a critical limit due to such an imbalance. We attempted to evaluate the effort of medical staff to clarify to what extent their burden had increased post-disaster. The ratio of total dialysis sessions over total working days of medical staff was determined as an approximate indicator of effort per month. The mean value of each year was compared. Despite fluctuations of the ratio, the mean value did not differ from 2010 to 2013. However, the ratio steadily increased in 2014, and there was a significant increase in the mean value. This proposed indicator of the effort of medical staff appears to reflect what we experienced, although its validity must be carefully examined in future studies.

  5. Evaluating the Imbalance Between Increasing Hemodialysis Patients and Medical Staff Shortage After the Great East Japan Earthquake: Report From a Hemodialysis Center Near the Fukushima Nuclear Power Plants.

    PubMed

    Koshiba, Takaaki; Nishiuchi, Takamitsu; Akaihata, Hidenori; Haga, Nobuhiro; Kojima, Yoshiyuki; Kubo, Hajime; Kasahara, Masato; Hayashi, Masayuki

    2016-04-01

    The Great East Japan Earthquake in 2011 caused an unprecedented imbalance between an increasing number of hemodialysis patients and medical staff shortage in the Sousou area, the site of the Fukushima nuclear power plants. In 2014, capacity of our hemodialysis center reached a critical limit due to such an imbalance. We attempted to evaluate the effort of medical staff to clarify to what extent their burden had increased post-disaster. The ratio of total dialysis sessions over total working days of medical staff was determined as an approximate indicator of effort per month. The mean value of each year was compared. Despite fluctuations of the ratio, the mean value did not differ from 2010 to 2013. However, the ratio steadily increased in 2014, and there was a significant increase in the mean value. This proposed indicator of the effort of medical staff appears to reflect what we experienced, although its validity must be carefully examined in future studies. PMID:26935477

  6. Medication safety issue brief. Series II, Part 6: Tapping into your staff's energy.

    PubMed

    2003-11-01

    The front-line workers in a hospital are its greatest resources, particularly when it comes to improving safety. After all, they know the crucial details about day-to-day operations and can offer innovative solutions to problems. But staff members don't always feel comfortable getting involved in change. To tap this hidden well of talent, hospitals leaders should train staff in systems thinking, cultivate a culture of safety and make it easy for employees to contribute their ideas. PMID:14689965

  7. [Conditions of professional activity of the staff of units and formations of special support and its medical and psychological support].

    PubMed

    Poluboyarinov, V N; Grabskii, Yu V; Zemlyannikov, D A; Kushchev, G G

    2016-02-01

    In the field of special support of nuclear- and radiation-dangerous objects "human factor" is highlighted, which means that psychological status of crew is at the first place. The authors analysed conditions of professional activity, determined morbidity rates and psychologically important labour characteristics for military specialists working at nuclear- and radiation-dangerous objects. The staff working at these objects undergoes irradiation, hostility of inhabitation and high psychological pressure. The authors presented data on peculiarities of health status and morbidity rate among military servicemen of the given category: the frequency of digestive apparatus diseases, diseases of nervous and circulatory systems is higher than in auxiliary subunits of the same military units. The authors determined the main principles and structure of measures of medical and psychological support of professional activity of the staff of military units of special support. PMID:27263211

  8. 75 FR 15439 - Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/Xavier University Global Medical Device Conference AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public conference. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Cincinnati District, in co-sponsorship with...

  9. [Experience with a microcomputer-controlled blood bank administration system in the blood bank of the Hannover Medical University].

    PubMed

    Raufmann, W; Stangel, W

    1990-01-01

    During the last three years two components of a modular administration system were implemented in the blood bank of the Medical University of Hannover (MHH). Considering the integration of the blood bank system to the central hospital information system of the clinic the aspect of independence and self-controlling by the blood bank was the most important point. This goal was reached by a couple of PC's which are compounded by a local area network (LAN). This LAN can communicate with the host of the computer center of the MHH. By this way the short staff capacity was not stressed more than absolute necessary by taking over all parameters of the central data base. On the other hand all functions for administrating the blood bank were in self-responsibility of the department. This concept of different modules has the possibility of using single parts like donor- or storage-system in other blood banks without implementing the whole system.

  10. A prevalence study of bestiality (zoophilia) in psychiatric in-patients, medical in-patients, and psychiatric staff.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, W A; Freinhar, J P

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of bestiality (both actual sexual contacts and sexual fantasy) was investigated in an experimental group (psychiatric in-patients) and two control populations (medical in-patients and psychiatric staff). Psychiatric patients were found to have a statistically significant higher prevalence rate (55%) of bestiality than the control groups (10% and 15% respectively). Implications of these findings are discussed. It is recommended that due to the obvious prevalence of this condition, questions exploring this previously ignored topic should be routinely included in the psychiatric interview.

  11. Facilitators and Barriers to Safe Medication Administration to Hospital Inpatients: A Mixed Methods Study of Nurses’ Medication Administration Processes and Systems (the MAPS Study)

    PubMed Central

    McLeod, Monsey; Barber, Nicholas; Franklin, Bryony Dean

    2015-01-01

    Context Research has documented the problem of medication administration errors and their causes. However, little is known about how nurses administer medications safely or how existing systems facilitate or hinder medication administration; this represents a missed opportunity for implementation of practical, effective, and low-cost strategies to increase safety. Aim To identify system factors that facilitate and/or hinder successful medication administration focused on three inter-related areas: nurse practices and workarounds, workflow, and interruptions and distractions. Methods We used a mixed-methods ethnographic approach involving observational fieldwork, field notes, participant narratives, photographs, and spaghetti diagrams to identify system factors that facilitate and/or hinder successful medication administration in three inpatient wards, each from a different English NHS trust. We supplemented this with quantitative data on interruptions and distractions among other established medication safety measures. Findings Overall, 43 nurses on 56 drug rounds were observed. We identified a median of 5.5 interruptions and 9.6 distractions per hour. We identified three interlinked themes that facilitated successful medication administration in some situations but which also acted as barriers in others: (1) system configurations and features, (2) behaviour types among nurses, and (3) patient interactions. Some system configurations and features acted as a physical constraint for parts of the drug round, however some system effects were partly dependent on nurses’ inherent behaviour; we grouped these behaviours into ‘task focused’, and ‘patient-interaction focused’. The former contributed to a more streamlined workflow with fewer interruptions while the latter seemed to empower patients to act as a defence barrier against medication errors by being: (1) an active resource of information, (2) a passive information resource, and/or (3) a

  12. An Assessment of Psychological Need in Emergency Medical Staff in the Northern Health and Social Care Trust Area

    PubMed Central

    Aisling, Diamond; David, Curran

    2016-01-01

    Setting Psychological stress is increasingly recognised within emergency medicine, given the environmental and clinical stressors associated with the specialism. The current study assessed whether psychological distress is experienced by emergency medical staff and if so, what is the expressed need within this population? Participants Participants included ambulance personnel, nursing staff, doctors and ancillary support staff within two Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments and twelve ambulance bases within one Trust locality in NI (N = 107). Primary and secondary outcome measures The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1972, 1978), Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS, Bride, 2004) and an assessment of need questionnaire were completed and explored using mixed method analysis. Results Results showed elevated levels of psychological distress within each profession except ambulance service clinical support officers (CSOs). Elevated levels of secondary trauma symptomatology were also found; the highest were within some nursing grades and junior doctors. Decreased enjoyment in job over time was significantly associated with higher scores. Analysis of qualitative data identified sources of stress to include low morale. A total of 65% of participants thought that work related stressors had negatively affected their mental health. Participants explored what they felt could decrease psychological distress including improved resources and psychoeducation. Conclusion There were elevated levels of distress and secondary traumatic stress within this population as well as an expressed level of need, on both systemic and support levels. PMID:27601762

  13. An Assessment of Psychological Need in Emergency Medical Staff in the Northern Health and Social Care Trust Area

    PubMed Central

    Aisling, Diamond; David, Curran

    2016-01-01

    Setting Psychological stress is increasingly recognised within emergency medicine, given the environmental and clinical stressors associated with the specialism. The current study assessed whether psychological distress is experienced by emergency medical staff and if so, what is the expressed need within this population? Participants Participants included ambulance personnel, nursing staff, doctors and ancillary support staff within two Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments and twelve ambulance bases within one Trust locality in NI (N = 107). Primary and secondary outcome measures The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12, Goldberg, 1972, 1978), Secondary Traumatic Stress Scale (STSS, Bride, 2004) and an assessment of need questionnaire were completed and explored using mixed method analysis. Results Results showed elevated levels of psychological distress within each profession except ambulance service clinical support officers (CSOs). Elevated levels of secondary trauma symptomatology were also found; the highest were within some nursing grades and junior doctors. Decreased enjoyment in job over time was significantly associated with higher scores. Analysis of qualitative data identified sources of stress to include low morale. A total of 65% of participants thought that work related stressors had negatively affected their mental health. Participants explored what they felt could decrease psychological distress including improved resources and psychoeducation. Conclusion There were elevated levels of distress and secondary traumatic stress within this population as well as an expressed level of need, on both systemic and support levels.

  14. Insulin Administration in Catholic Schools: A New Look at Legal and Medical Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Mike

    2015-01-01

    Anecdotal evidence indicates that more students with type 1 diabetes are enrolling in Catholic schools across the United States. Meeting the medical needs of these students appears to be a significant challenge--legally and logistically--for many Catholic schools. District officials, school leaders, and school staff need support to understand the…

  15. Ensuring Safe Medication Administration to Children in New Jersey's Child Care Programs. ACNJ Special Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdette, Dianne S.; Coogan, Mary E.; Giosa, Ritamarie; Lucarelli, Patti; Pavignano, Debra

    2006-01-01

    Modern medications allow children with a variety of acute and chronic health conditions to participate in daily activities. However, parents and child care providers may not realize that there are different dosage strengths available on the market. The parent or staff may not fully understand the dosage or a miscommunication may occur. These…

  16. Establishing compliance with liquid medication administration in a child with autism.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Averil; Tarbox, Jonathan; Lanagan, Taira; Farag, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Children with autism often display difficulty with swallowing pills and liquid medications. In the current study, stimulus fading and positive reinforcement established compliance with liquid medication administration in a young boy with autism. The boy's mother eventually administered liquid medication on her own. PMID:21709797

  17. Establishing Compliance with Liquid Medication Administration in a Child with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiff, Averil; Tarbox, Jonathan; Lanagan, Taira; Farag, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Children with autism often display difficulty with swallowing pills and liquid medications. In the current study, stimulus fading and positive reinforcement established compliance with liquid medication administration in a young boy with autism. The boy's mother eventually administered liquid medication on her own. (Contains 1 figure.)

  18. Social Media Policy on Campus: A Case Study of the Development and Implementation of a Social Media Policy for University Administrators, Faculty, and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garber, Michelle Brooks

    2011-01-01

    This single-site qualitative study sought to address the challenges associated with the growing use of social media by university administrators, faculty, and staff (Wandel, 2007) through a case study analysis of a university with a social media policy for university employees. The study describes the development and implementation of a university…

  19. 78 FR 100 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Refuse To Accept Policy for 510(k)s...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-02

    ... checklists for use by FDA review staff. In the Federal Register of August 13, 2012 (77 FR 48159), FDA...; Refuse To Accept Policy for 510(k)s; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... entitled ``Refuse to Accept Policy for 510(k)s.'' The purpose of this document is to explain the...

  20. Client safety in assisted living: perspectives from clients, personal support workers and administrative staff in Toronto, Canada.

    PubMed

    Speller, Brittany; Stolee, Paul

    2015-03-01

    As the population ages, the demand for long-term care settings is expected to increase. Assisted living is a suitable and favourable residence for older individuals to receive care services specific to their needs while maintaining their independence and privacy. With the growing transition of older individuals into assisted living, facilities need to ensure that safe care is continually maintained. The purpose of this study was to determine the gaps and strengths in care related to safety in assisted living facilities (ALFs). A qualitative descriptive research design was used to provide a comprehensive understanding of client safety from the perspectives of clients, administrative staff and personal support workers. Interviews were conducted with 22 key informants from three ALFs in Toronto, Ontario throughout July 2012. All interviews were semi-structured, audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim. Initial deductive analysis used directed coding based on a prior literature review, followed by inductive analysis to determine themes. Three themes emerged relating to the safety of clients in ALFs: meaning of safety, a multi-faceted approach to providing safe care and perceived areas of improvement. Sub-themes also emerged including physical safety, multiple factors, working as a team, respecting clients' independence, communication and increased education and available resources. The study findings can contribute to the improvement and development of new processes to maintain and continually ensure safe care in ALFs. PMID:25175102

  1. Educating medical staff about responding to a radiological or nuclear emergency.

    PubMed

    McCurley, M Carol; Miller, Charles W; Tucker, Florie E; Guinn, Amy; Donnelly, Elizabeth; Ansari, Armin; Holcombe, Maire; Nemhauser, Jeffrey B; Whitcomb, Robert C

    2009-05-01

    A growing body of audience research reveals medical personnel in hospitals are unprepared for a large-scale radiological emergency such as a terrorist event involving radioactive or nuclear materials. Also, medical personnel in hospitals lack a basic understanding of radiation principles, as well as diagnostic and treatment guidelines for radiation exposure. Clinicians have indicated that they lack sufficient training on radiological emergency preparedness; they are potentially unwilling to treat patients if those patients are perceived to be radiologically contaminated; and they have major concerns about public panic and overloading of clinical systems. In response to these findings, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has developed a tool kit for use by hospital medical personnel who may be called on to respond to unintentional or intentional mass-casualty radiological and nuclear events. This tool kit includes clinician fact sheets, a clinician pocket guide, a digital video disc (DVD) of just-in-time basic skills training, a CD-ROM training on mass-casualty management, and a satellite broadcast dealing with medical management of radiological events. CDC training information emphasizes the key role that medical health physicists can play in the education and support of emergency department activities following a radiological or nuclear mass-casualty event. PMID:19359842

  2. [Medical university teaching staff training for formation of communicative competence in dentists].

    PubMed

    Lopanova, E V; Lomiashvili, L M

    2015-01-01

    Psychology and pedagogical preparation provides improvement of the ability of psychological interaction with the patient, promotes deepening of constructive cooperation between them. It facilitates collecting and analysis of clinical data and has direct impact on efficiency of treatment and prophylactic actions. Formation of communicative competence becomes one of key problems of continuous medical education. Introduction of the Medical Communication module in the program of professional development will provide modern technologies of training in technics of active hearing, effective communication, adjustment of contact, feedback, behavior in a stress situation.

  3. 78 FR 20116 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Glass Syringes for Delivering...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-03

    ... Staff; Glass Syringes for Delivering Drug and Biological Products: Technical Information To Supplement... availability of draft guidance for industry and FDA staff entitled ``Glass Syringes for Delivering Drug and... glass syringes that comply with the ISO 11040-4 standard when connected to devices (``connecting...

  4. Awareness and knowledge of common eye diseases among the academic staff (non-medical faculties) of University of Malaya.

    PubMed

    Chew, Y K; Reddy, S C; Karina, R

    2004-08-01

    A cross sectional study was conducted to assess the level of awareness and knowledge of common eye diseases (cataract, glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy and refractive errors) among 473 academic staff (non-medical faculties) of University Malaya. The awareness of cataract was in 88.2%, diabetic retinopathy in 83.5%, refractive errors in 75.3% and glaucoma in 71.5% of the study population. The knowledge about all the above common eye diseases was moderate, except presbyopia which was poor. Multivariate analysis revealed that females, older people, and those having family history of eye diseases were significantly more aware and more knowledgeable about the eye diseases. Health education about eye diseases would be beneficial to seek early treatment and prevent visual impairment in the society.

  5. [The system of selection and training of military-medical staff for the 40th army (1979-1989)].

    PubMed

    Ryabinkin, V V

    2015-10-01

    In December 1979 in order to fulfil their internationalist duty troops and units of the 40th Army of the Armed Forces of the USSR was brought into Afghanistan. For complete and qualitative manning of the army with the military doctors it was needed in a short time to create a system capable to carry out candidates selection, their education and specialized training for work in extreme conditions of combat operations. This system was created in a short time. The article presents information about its features, advantages and problems that had to be solved during the entire period of the Soviet-Afghan war. The complex staff arrangements had allowed solving medical support problems of the 40th Army on the high level.

  6. Loneliness at the Top: Ten Ways Medical Practice Administrators Can Manage the Isolation of Leadership.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Medical practice.managers spend their days surrounded by people, so the last thing they may expect to feel is lonely. Yet for many, being the manager of a medical practice can lead to feelings of isolation from the rest of the staff, and loneliness. This article explores the many reasons that managing a medical practice can be a lonely business. It considers the risks when a practice manager's loneliness goes unchecked, both to the individual and to the practice. It suggests 10 effective and healthy strategies for preventing and managing the leadership loneliness that medical practice managers sometimes experience. Next, this article argues that acceptance is the first step in overcoming loneliness in the workplace. It offers guidance for medical practice managers who wish to help lonely members of their teams. It describes the benefits of having a confidant to help support the medical practice manager, and the characteristics of an ideal confidant. Finally, this article suggests a strategy for combatting loneliness by interacting with the staff more frequently.

  7. Loneliness at the Top: Ten Ways Medical Practice Administrators Can Manage the Isolation of Leadership.

    PubMed

    Hills, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Medical practice.managers spend their days surrounded by people, so the last thing they may expect to feel is lonely. Yet for many, being the manager of a medical practice can lead to feelings of isolation from the rest of the staff, and loneliness. This article explores the many reasons that managing a medical practice can be a lonely business. It considers the risks when a practice manager's loneliness goes unchecked, both to the individual and to the practice. It suggests 10 effective and healthy strategies for preventing and managing the leadership loneliness that medical practice managers sometimes experience. Next, this article argues that acceptance is the first step in overcoming loneliness in the workplace. It offers guidance for medical practice managers who wish to help lonely members of their teams. It describes the benefits of having a confidant to help support the medical practice manager, and the characteristics of an ideal confidant. Finally, this article suggests a strategy for combatting loneliness by interacting with the staff more frequently. PMID:27249880

  8. Searching for the Final Answer: Factors Contributing to Medication Administration Errors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pape, Tess M.

    2001-01-01

    Causal factors contributing to errors in medication administration should be thoroughly investigated, focusing on systems rather than individual nurses. Unless systemic causes are addressed, many errors will go unreported for fear of reprisal. (Contains 42 references.) (SK)

  9. Mobile Technologies: Expectancy, Usage, and Acceptance of Clinical Staff and Patients at a University Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite their increasing popularity, little is known about how users perceive mobile devices such as smartphones and tablet PCs in medical contexts. Available studies are often restricted to evaluating the success of specific interventions and do not adequately cover the users’ basic attitudes, for example, their expectations or concerns toward using mobile devices in medical settings. Objective The objective of the study was to obtain a comprehensive picture, both from the perspective of the patients, as well as the doctors, regarding the use and acceptance of mobile devices within medical contexts in general well as the perceived challenges when introducing the technology. Methods Doctors working at Hannover Medical School (206/1151, response 17.90%), as well as patients being admitted to this facility (213/279, utilization 76.3%) were surveyed about their acceptance and use of mobile devices in medical settings. Regarding demographics, both samples were representative of the respective study population. GNU R (version 3.1.1) was used for statistical testing. Fisher’s exact test, two-sided, alpha=.05 with Monte Carlo approximation, 2000 replicates, was applied to determine dependencies between two variables. Results The majority of participants already own mobile devices (doctors, 168/206, 81.6%; patients, 110/213, 51.6%). For doctors, use in a professional context does not depend on age (P=.66), professional experience (P=.80), or function (P=.34); gender was a factor (P=.009), and use was more common among male (61/135, 45.2%) than female doctors (17/67, 25%). A correlation between use of mobile devices and age (P=.001) as well as education (P=.002) was seen for patients. Minor differences regarding how mobile devices are perceived in sensitive medical contexts mostly relate to data security, patients are more critical of the devices being used for storing and processing patient data; every fifth patient opposed this, but nevertheless, 4.8% of

  10. Use of cellular telephones and transmission of pathogens by medical staff in New York and Israel.

    PubMed

    Goldblatt, Joseph Gil; Krief, Iris; Klonsky, Tal; Haller, Daniel; Milloul, Victor; Sixsmith, Diane M; Srugo, Isaac; Potasman, Israel

    2007-04-01

    Hands and instruments used by healthcare workers may serve as vectors for the nosocomial transmission of microorganisms. The use of cellular telephones by medical personnel and the associated nosocomial transmission of pathogens have not been thoroughly examined. Findings from our study show that cellular telephones are commonly used by hospital personnel, even during patient contact. One-fifth of the cellular telephones examined in this study were found to harbor pathogenic microorganisms, showing that these devices may serve as vectors for transmission to patients.

  11. Oral Medications: Proper Use and Administration. Book 1, Bosnian and Russian. Book 2, Nuer and Spanish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anoka County Community Health and Environmental Services, Coon Rapids, MN.

    These two guides provide information in English, Bosnian, Russian, Nuer, and Spanish on the proper use and administration of oral medications. Topics covered include the reasons for taking medication, information on the prescription label, following special instructions, asking questions of the pharmacist, safe storage of medicine, child-proof…

  12. Evaluation of Safe Medication Administration through the Use of Simulation in an Academic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dover, Cheryl D.

    2013-01-01

    Nursing educational programs are struggling with how to educate students to safely and efficiently administer medications. There is no doubt education programs need to find a way to assist students to acquire the skill of medication administration and to also transfer the skill into practice. Knowledge, skills, and abilities are requirements for…

  13. Legal Issues in School Health Services and School Psychology: Guidelines for the Administration of Medication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mazur-Mosiewicz, Anna; Pierson, Eric E.; McIntosh, David E.

    2009-01-01

    The use of psychoactive medications to augment behavioral and psychosocial interventions in schools has significantly increased within the last few decades. Yet, advising, administrating, and supervising the dispensation of medication (including psychostimulants and psychoactive substances) tend to be some of the most risky tasks of school…

  14. 75 FR 21632 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Total Product Life Cycle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-26

    ... Staff; Total Product Life Cycle: Infusion Pump--Premarket Notification Submissions; Availability AGENCY... announcing the availability of the draft guidance document entitled ``Total Product Life Cycle: Infusion Pump... Life Cycle: Infusion Pump-- Premarket Notification Submissions'' to the Division of Small...

  15. Re-launch of the South African Society of Medical Managers (previously known as the Medical Administrators Group).

    PubMed

    Dudley, L; Selebano, T E; Nathan, R; Kirsten, R; Ciapparelli, P; Mutshekwane, M N; Basu, D

    2013-01-01

    Medical management is a recognised specialty in many developing and developed countries, including Australia, India, New Zealand, Pakistan and Sri Lanka. In South Africa it was recognised as a sub-specialty in the 1990s, but this is no longer the case. The South African Society of Medical Managers, in close collaboration with the Division of Medical Management of the College of Public Health Medicine of South Africa, has been working to re-establish the specialty of medical management in South Africa. Well-trained specialist medical managers would play a significant role in the effective and efficient implementation of National Health Insurance and primary healthcare re-engineering through the practice of evidence-based health care, clinical economics and administrative medicine. PMID:23237117

  16. [Significance of Multi-center Obstetrics Perioperative Team Training Including Various Medical Staffs].

    PubMed

    Komasawa, Nobuyasu; Fujita, Daisuke; Nakayama, Mai; Fujiwara, Shunsuke; Mihara, Ryosuke; Okada, Daisuke; Omoto, Haruka; Tanaka, Motoshige; Nishihara, Isao; Minami, Toshiaki

    2016-02-01

    We report the development of a multi-center/multispecialist obstetrics perioperative team training program. Participants were members of the team, including anesthesiologists, obstetricians, and operation nurses. A questionnaire survey was conducted prior to course participation to clarify any questions team members had. The courses included a lecture and simulation training with scenario-based discussions or the use of a simulator. Scenarios included massive bleeding during cesarean section, massive bleeding after vaginal delivery, and emergency cesarean section for premature placental abruption. After each course, participants discussed problems associated with obstetrics medical safety in the context of each theme. Simulation-based perioperative team training with anesthesiologists, obstetricians, and operation nurses may serve as a vehicle to promote perioperative obstetrics patient safety.

  17. Medical versus nonmedical mental health referral: clinical decision-making by telephone access center staff.

    PubMed

    Pulier, Myron L; Ciccone, Donald S; Castellano, Cherie; Marcus, Karen; Schleifer, Steven J

    2003-01-01

    A database review investigated decisions of clinicians staffing a university-based telephone access center in referring new adult patients to nonpsychiatrists versus psychiatrists for initial ambulatory behavioral health care appointments. Systematically collected demographic and clinical data in a computer log of calls to highly trained care managers at the access center had limited predictive value with respect to their referral decisions. Furthermore, while 28% of the 610 study patients were initially referred to psychiatrists, billing data revealed that in-person therapists soon cross-referred at least 20% more to a psychiatrist. Care managers sent 56% of callers already taking psychotropic medications to nonpsychiatrists, 51% of whom were then cross-referred to psychiatrists. Predictive algorithms showed no potential to enhance efficiency of decisions about referral to a psychiatrist versus a nonpsychiatrist. Efforts to enhance such efficiency may not be cost-effective. It may be more fiscally efficient to assign less-experienced personnel as telephone care managers.

  18. The effect of a safe zone on nurse interruptions, distractions, and medication administration errors.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Mindy; Schadewald, Diane; Dietrich, Kim

    2015-01-01

    Patient safety is a health care priority. Yet medical errors are ranked the eighth leading cause of death. Medication administration errors (MAEs) often result from multiple environmental and individual factors. This quality improvement initiative adapted a protocol based on airline industry safety measures to decrease nurse distractions and interruptions during medication administration, with the goal of decreasing MAEs. Sources of distractions, interruptions, and MAEs were measured pre and post intervention. Patient satisfaction scores were measured concurrently. Results of this initiative differ from previous studies in which similar interventions reduced both distractions and MAEs. An unexpected finding was dramatically increased patient satisfaction. PMID:25723837

  19. Medicated tampons: intravaginal sustained administration of metronidazole and in vitro-in vivo relationships.

    PubMed

    Chien, Y W; Oppermann, J; Nicolova, B; Lambert, H J

    1982-07-01

    The technical feasibility of utilizing tampons as a drug delivery system for prolonged intravaginal drug administrations was studied. Several commercially available brands of tampons were examined. The methodology for the incorporation of various doses of metronidazole, an antitrichomonas agent, in tampons was described. The sustained-release profile of metronidazole from these medicated tampons was characterized. Intravaginal administration of metronidazole via the medicated tampons was investigated in rhesus monkeys and human volunteers, and in vitro-in vivo correlations were established. The biopharmaceutics of intravaginal absorption of metronidazole via medicated tampons was analyzed in comparison with a vaginal solution formulation.

  20. [Educational game of medication administration: a validation study].

    PubMed

    Moreira, Amanda Portugal de Andrade; Sabóia, Vera Maria; Camacho, Alessandra Conceição Leite Funchal; Daher, Donizete Vago; Teixeira, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    This is a methodological research, which aimed to determine the validity of an educational technology (ET) in the form of educational game of medicine administration, according to the judges and audience, using the theoretical stage of Pasquali model. Data were collected between September 2011 and May 2012 in two stages: 1) application and validation of TE by forty students of the 4th period of Nursing, at the Fluminense Federal University (target audience); 2) observation and validation of TE by 8 teachers (judges). The questionnaires were organized in Likert scale, with items distributed in blocks and analyzed quantitatively. The game was validated, since it has over 80% approval by the two groups, and may therefore be used as a TE in the discipline of Fundamentals of Nursing. The results were positive, demonstrating that students and teachers are more interested in content taught when most dynamic technologies are used in the classroom.

  1. Is technology the best medicine? Three practice theoretical perspectives on medication administration technologies in nursing.

    PubMed

    Boonen, Marcel Jmh; Vosman, Frans Jh; Niemeijer, Alistair R

    2016-06-01

    Even though it is often presumed that the use of technology like medication administration technology is both safer and more effective, the importance of nurses' know-how is not to be underestimated. In this article, we accordingly try to argue that nurses' labor, including their different forms of knowledge, must play a crucial role in the development, implementation and use of medication administration technology. Using three different theoretical perspectives ('heuristic lenses') and integrating this with our own ethnographic research, we will explore how nursing practices change through the use of medication technology. Ultimately, we will argue that ignoring (institutional) complexity and the various types of important knowledge that nurses have, will seriously complicate the implementation of medication administration technology.

  2. Risk Factors for Increased Severity of Paediatric Medication Administration Errors

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Kim; Goodman, William M.

    2012-01-01

    Patients' risks from medication errors are widely acknowledged. Yet not all errors, if they occur, have the same risks for severe consequences. Facing resource constraints, policy makers could prioritize factors having the greatest severe–outcome risks. This study assists such prioritization by identifying work-related risk factors most clearly associated with more severe consequences. Data from three Canadian paediatric centres were collected, without identifiers, on actual or potential errors that occurred. Three hundred seventy-two errors were reported, with outcome severities ranging from time delays up to fatalities. Four factors correlated significantly with increased risk for more severe outcomes: insufficient training; overtime; precepting a student; and off-service patient. Factors' impacts on severity also vary with error class: for wrong-time errors, the factors precepting a student or working overtime significantly increase severe-outcomes risk. For other types, caring for an off-service patient has greatest severity risk. To expand such research, better standardization is needed for categorizing outcome severities. PMID:23968607

  3. Pharmaceutical interventions in medications prescribed for administration via enteral tubes in a teaching hospital

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Carolina Justus Buhrer; Plodek, Caroline Koga; Soares, Franciny Kossemba; de Andrade, Rayza Assis; Teleginski, Fernanda; da Rocha, Maria Dagmar

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: to analyze the impact of guidelines regarding errors in medications prescribed for administration through enteral tubes. Method: quantitative study, in three phases, undertaken in internal medicine, neurology and an intensive care unit in a general teaching hospital. In Phase 1, the following was undertaken: a protocol for dilution and unit-dose repackaging and administration for 294 medications via enteral tubes; a decision flowchart; operational-standard procedures for dilution and unit-dose repackaging of oral pharmaceutical forms and for administration of medications through enteral tubes. In phase 2, errors in 872 medications prescribed through enteral tubes, in 293 prescriptions for patients receiving inpatient treatment between March and June, were investigated. This was followed by training of the teams in relation to the guidelines established. In Phase 3, pharmaceutical errors and interventions in 945 medications prescribed through enteral tubes, in 292 prescriptions of patients receiving inpatient treatment between August and September, were investigated prospectively. The data collected, in a structured questionnaire, were compiled in the Microsoft Office Excel(r) program, and frequencies were calculated. Results: 786 errors were observed, 63.9% (502) in Phase 2, and 36.1% (284) in Phase 3. In Phase 3, a reduction was ascertained in the frequency of prescription of medications delivered via enteral tubes, medications which were contraindicated, and those for which information was not available. Conclusion: guidelines and pharmaceutical interventions were determined in the prevention of errors involving medications delivered through enteral tubes. PMID:27276019

  4. Medical Bibliography and Medical Library Administration. LS 8497, 4 Quarter Hours: Course Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wayne State Univ., Detroit, MI. Dept. of Library Science.

    This publication outlines and presents a series of 27 learning modules for a course in medical librarianship intended to be conducted in an individualized instructional framework featuring lectures, small group discussions, talks by guest speakers from the medical profession, on-site observation of hospital libraries, on-line demonstrations of…

  5. 76 FR 20688 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; 30-Day Notices, 135-Day Premarket...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... Supplements for Manufacturing Method or Process Changes; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration...

  6. Information and communications technology, culture, and medical universities; organizational culture and netiquette among academic staff

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad Hossein; Iravani, Hoorsana; Abzari, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Netiquette is appropriate behavioral etiquette when communicating through computer networks or virtual space. Identification of a dominant organizational culture and its relationship with a network culture offers applied guidelines to top managers of the university to expand communications and develop and learn organization through the use of the internet. The aim of this research was to examine the relationship between netiquette and organizational culture among faculty members of the Isfahan University of Medical Sciences (IUMS), Iran. Materials and Methods: To achieve this aim, the research method in this study was correlational research, which belonged to the category of descriptive survey research. The target population comprised of 594 faculty members of the IUMS, from which a sample of 150 was randomly selected, based on a simple stratified sampling method. For collecting the required data, two researcher-made questionnaires were formulated. Even as the first questionnaire tended to measure the selected sample members’ organizational culture according to Rabbin's model (1999), the latter was designed in the Health Management and Economic Research Center (HMERC), to evaluate netiquette. The reliability of the questionnaires was computed by Choronbach's alpha coefficient formula and they happened to be 0.97 and 0.89, respectively. Ultimately, SPSS Version #15 was used for the statistical analysis of the data. Results: The findings revealed that the organizational culture and netiquette were below average level among the sample members, signifying a considerable gap in the mean. In spite of that, there was no significant relationship between netiquette and the organizational culture of the faculty members. Conclusion: Emphasizing the importance of cultural preparation and a network user's training, this research suggests that the expansion of network culture rules among IUMS and organizational official communications, through the use of internet

  7. Nursing administration of medication via enteral tubes in adults: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Nicole M; Nay, Rhonda

    2007-09-01

    Background  Enteral tubes are frequently inserted as part of medical treatment in a wide range of patient situations. Patients with an enteral tube are cared for by nurses in a variety of settings, including general and specialised acute care areas, aged care facilities and at home. Regardless of the setting, nurses have the primary responsibility for administering medication through enteral tubes. Medication administration via an enteral tube is a reasonably common nursing intervention that entails a number of skills, including preparing the medication, verifying the tube position, flushing the tube and assessing for potential complications. If medications are not given effectively through an enteral tube, harmful consequences may result leading to increased morbidity, for example, tube occlusion, diarrhoea and aspiration pneumonia. There are resultant costs for the health-care system related to possible increased length of stay and increased use of equipment. Presently what is considered to be best practice to give medications through enteral tubes is unknown. Objectives  The objective of this systematic review was to determine the best available evidence on which nursing interventions are effective in minimising the complications associated with the administration of medications via enteral tubes in adults. Nursing interventions and considerations related to medication administration included form of medication, verifying tube placement before administration, methods used to give medication, methods used to flush tubes, maintenance of tube patency and specific practices to prevent possible complications related to the administration of enteral medications. Search strategy  The following databases were searched for literature reported in English only: CINAHL, MEDLINE, The Cochrane Library, Current Contents/All Editions, EMBASE, Australasian Medical Index and PsychINFO. There was no date restriction applied. In addition, the reference lists of all included

  8. The Food and Drug Administration and pragmatic clinical trials of marketed medical products.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Monique L; Griffin, Joseph; Goldkind, Sara F; Zeitler, Emily P; Wing, Liz; Al-Khatib, Sana M; Sherman, Rachel E

    2015-10-01

    Pragmatic clinical trials can help answer questions of comparative effectiveness for interventions routinely used in medical practice. Pragmatic clinical trials may examine outcomes of one or more marketed medical products, and they are heterogeneous in design and risk. The Food and Drug Administration is charged with protecting the rights, safety, and welfare of individuals enrolled in clinical investigations, as well as assuring the integrity of the data upon which approval of medical products is made. The Food and Drug Administration has broad jurisdiction over drugs and medical devices (whether or not they are approved for marketing), and as such, clinical investigations of these products are subject to applicable Food and Drug Administration regulations. While many pragmatic clinical trials will meet the criteria for an exemption from the requirements for an investigational new drug application or investigational device exemption, in general, all clinical investigations of medical products that fall under Food and Drug Administration jurisdiction must adhere to regulations for informed consent and review by an institutional review board. We are concerned that current Food and Drug Administration requirements for obtaining individual informed consent may deter or delay the conduct of pragmatic clinical trials intended to develop reliable evidence of comparative safety and effectiveness of approved medical products that are regulated by the Food and Drug Administration. Under current regulations, there are no described mechanisms to alter or waive informed consent to make it less burdensome or more practicable for low-risk pragmatic clinical trials. We recommend that the Food and Drug Administration establish a risk-based approach to obtaining informed consent in pragmatic clinical trials that would facilitate the conduct of pragmatic clinical trials without compromising the protection of enrolled individuals or the integrity of the resulting data.

  9. Policy statement--guidance for the administration of medication in school.

    PubMed

    2009-10-01

    Many children who take medications require them during the school day. This policy statement is designed to guide prescribing health care professionals, school physicians, and school health councils on the administration of medications to children at school. All districts and schools need to have policies and plans in place for safe, effective, and efficient administration of medications at school. Having full-time licensed registered nurses administering all routine and emergency medications in schools is the best situation. When a licensed registered nurse is not available, a licensed practical nurse may administer medications. When a nurse cannot administer medication in school, the American Academy of Pediatrics supports appropriate delegation of nursing services in the school setting. Delegation is a tool that may be used by the licensed registered school nurse to allow unlicensed assistive personnel to provide standardized, routine health services under the supervision of the nurse and on the basis of physician guidance and school nursing assessment of the unique needs of the individual child and the suitability of delegation of specific nursing tasks. Any delegation of nursing duties must be consistent with the requirements of state nurse practice acts, state regulations, and guidelines provided by professional nursing organizations. Long-term, emergency, and short-term medications; over-the-counter medications; alternative medications; and experimental drugs that are administered as part of a clinical trial are discussed in this statement. This statement has been endorsed by the American School Health Association.

  10. Teaching successful medication administration today: more than just knowing your 'rights'.

    PubMed

    Fothergill Bourbonnais, Frances; Caswell, Wenda

    2014-08-01

    Medication administration is an important skill taught in undergraduate nursing programs. Student learning for this activity includes not only how to prepare and administer medications, but also includes interventions such as patient and family teaching. Students also are taught a series of 'rights' in order to prevent medication errors. There are many factors, both personal and system related, which contribute to medication errors in the health care environment. The purpose of this article is to provide strategies for teaching students medication administration that encompass the multiple factors involved to ensure safe practice. This opinion paper is based on the authors' considerable years of teaching experience (35 years clinical setting and classroom teaching with senior students in final year of baccalaureate program for 1st author and 16 years total for co-author). Recommendations put forth by the authors are: a) leveling students' clinical experiences in administering medications to include understanding of system factors, b) structured scenarios and purposeful linking of theory to clinical courses to advance students' knowledge and skills related to medication administration as they progress through the program, 3) revisiting math skills.

  11. Teaching successful medication administration today: more than just knowing your 'rights'.

    PubMed

    Fothergill Bourbonnais, Frances; Caswell, Wenda

    2014-08-01

    Medication administration is an important skill taught in undergraduate nursing programs. Student learning for this activity includes not only how to prepare and administer medications, but also includes interventions such as patient and family teaching. Students also are taught a series of 'rights' in order to prevent medication errors. There are many factors, both personal and system related, which contribute to medication errors in the health care environment. The purpose of this article is to provide strategies for teaching students medication administration that encompass the multiple factors involved to ensure safe practice. This opinion paper is based on the authors' considerable years of teaching experience (35 years clinical setting and classroom teaching with senior students in final year of baccalaureate program for 1st author and 16 years total for co-author). Recommendations put forth by the authors are: a) leveling students' clinical experiences in administering medications to include understanding of system factors, b) structured scenarios and purposeful linking of theory to clinical courses to advance students' knowledge and skills related to medication administration as they progress through the program, 3) revisiting math skills. PMID:24857050

  12. 76 FR 22903 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Establishing That a Tobacco...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... Commercially Marketed in the United States as of February 15, 2007.'' It does not create or confer any rights... Staff; Establishing That a Tobacco Product Was Commercially Marketed in the United States as of February... Product Was Commercially Marketed in the United States as of February 15, 2007.'' This draft...

  13. 76 FR 51993 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff on In Vitro Companion...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-19

    ... Register of July 14, 2011 (76 FR 41506). In the notice, FDA requested comments on a draft guidance document... 14, 2011 (76 FR 41506), FDA published a notice announcing the availability of the draft guidance... Staff on In Vitro Companion Diagnostic Devices; Extension of Comment Period AGENCY: Food and...

  14. 77 FR 27461 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Pediatric Information for X...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-10

    ... Staff; Pediatric Information for X-Ray Imaging Device Premarket Notifications; Availability AGENCY: Food... announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Pediatric Information for X-ray Imaging Device... should be ] provided in premarket notifications for x-ray imaging devices with indications for use...

  15. 76 FR 69274 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; 510(k) Device Modifications...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-08

    ... Device; Availability,'' that appeared in the Federal Register of July 27, 2011 (76 FR 44935). In that.... Background In the Federal Register of July 27, 2011 (76 FR 44935), FDA published a notice with a 90-day... Staff; 510(k) Device Modifications: Deciding When To Submit a 510(k) for a Change to an Existing...

  16. 75 FR 59726 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological... Special Controls Guidance Document: Herpes Simplex Virus Types 1 and 2 Serological Assays.'' This draft guidance document describes a means by which the herpes simplex virus (HSV) serological assay device...

  17. Awareness on ex-gratia compensation scheme among medical department staff in a tertiary government hospital in Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Su, T; Hoe, V C W

    2008-10-01

    The Ex-Gratia Compensation Scheme was introduced by the Government of Malaysia in 1994 to provide compensation, which is not covered by any prior legislation, for all its workers suffering from injuries and illnesses due to work. Despite more than ten years of implementation, the submission for claims is still minimal and there is an impression that awareness on the provision of Ex-Gratia benefit among government employees, especially health care staff, is poor. A cross sectional survey was conducted at a medical department of a government hospital in Kuala Lumpur to assess the knowledge and awareness level on Ex-Gratia among a representative group of front line health care workers. The results show that the respondents' knowledge on Ex-Gratia is generally poor as compared to knowledge on the Social Security (SOCSO) Schemes. Majority of the respondents are unsure whether they will be compensated in case of occupational illness and injuries. They also do not know what kind of compensation scheme they are currently eligible. There is an urgent need for the Treasury and health care managers to expand the knowledge and awareness on Ex-Gratia among health care workers. PMID:19385489

  18. [Case report--cooperation among medical staff to improve home enteral nutrition and increase hope in a patient with dementia].

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Mio; Hidaka, Kumi; Doi, Seiko; Hata, Akiko; Ibata, Takeshi; lijima, Shohei

    2013-12-01

    Herein, we describe the case of a man in his 70s who had slight dementia. Because of dysphagia, the patient received enteral nutrition by gastrostomy. The patient wished to care for his wife, who had severe dementia and was also receiving enteral nutrition. He was later re-hospitalized for aspiration-related pneumonia. At this point, it was discovered that the management of enteral nutrition via gastrostomy was different from that at the time of discharge from our hospital. Nutritional management during home care may change for various reasons after discharge from hospital. If a change is identified at the time of re-hospitalization, this process should be confirmed. In addition, it is necessary that any changes in nutritional management should benefit the patient. In order to improve the home care of the present patient, we changed his diet to semisolid enteral nutrition that was easier for him to manage. This diet would also be beneficial for the aspiration-related pneumonia. Importantly, we shared these changes in enteral nutrition with all medical staff involved in his care. This included explaining changes in nutritional content, dose, and method of delivery. PMID:24712154

  19. Prevalence and associated factors of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome (CTS) among medical laboratory staff at King Saud University Hospitals, KSA

    PubMed Central

    Ahamed S, Shaffi; Anas M, Bardeesi; Aref A, Altwair; Abdulrahman A, AlMubarak

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is a group of symptoms resulting from local compression of the median nerve at the wrist leading to its subsequent functional impairment and local ischemia of the nerve. Our objective was to determine the prevalence and commonly reported symptoms of CTS in the laboratory workers of King Saud University (KSU) hospitals and to identify the associated variables with CTS. Methods: This was a quantitative observational cross-sectional study which was conducted in KSU hospitals’ laboratories with a total of 225 participants by using a standardized questionnaire known as “ Boston Carpal Tunnel Questionnaire (BCTQ). Data Analysis was carried out by IBM SPSS Statistics software version 21.0. Results: Out of the 225 participants, 57 were found to be severely symptomatic with a prevalence of 25.3%. Among the severely affected participants, females were more than males (58% > 42%) and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.045). Technicians affected (91.2%) were more than attendants (8.8%) and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.042). Conclusion: The prevalence of Carpal tunnel syndrome in KSU hospitals’ medical laboratory staff (25.3%) was close to what was found in literature (21.5%). So laboratory workers are at risk of developing CTS, especially females and technicians with the dominant hand most likely to be affected. PMID:26101485

  20. 77 FR 37058 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... Manufacturers, International and Consumer Assistance, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, Food and...

  1. The Food and Drug Administration's initiative for safe design and effective use of home medical equipment.

    PubMed

    Weick-Brady, Mary; Singh, Simran

    2014-06-01

    Although home-use medical devices provide significant benefits, including improved quality of life and cost savings, they are associated with unique risks. These risks result from interactions among the user, the use environment, and the device, and they can greatly impact user and patient safety. This article describes measures being taken by the Food and Drug Administration to address safe use of medical equipment by trained and untrained people outside of clinical facilities.

  2. Professional or administrative value patterns? Clinical pathways in medical problem-solving processes.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Leif

    2007-11-01

    A health-care organization simultaneously belongs to two different institutional value patterns: a professional and an administrative value pattern. At the administrative level, medical problem-solving processes are generally perceived as the efficient application of familiar chains of activities to well-defined problems; and a low task uncertainty is therefore assumed at the work-floor level. This assumption is further reinforced through clinical pathways and other administrative guidelines. However, studies have shown that in clinical practice such administrative guidelines are often considered inadequate and difficult to implement mainly because physicians generally perceive task uncertainty to be high and that the guidelines do not cover the scope of encountered deviations. The current administrative level guidelines impose uniform structural features that meet the requirement for low task uncertainty. Within these structural constraints, physicians must organize medical problem-solving processes to meet any task uncertainty that may be encountered. Medical problem-solving processes with low task uncertainty need to be organized independently of processes with high task uncertainty. Each process must be evaluated according to different performance standards and needs to have autonomous administrative guideline models. Although clinical pathways seem appropriate when there is low task uncertainty, other kinds of guidelines are required when the task uncertainty is high. PMID:17958969

  3. 77 FR 18828 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Factors To Consider When Making...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... FR 50483), FDA announced the availability of the draft guidance. Interested persons were invited to...; Factors To Consider When Making Benefit-Risk Determinations in Medical Device Premarket Approval and de... entitled ``Factors to Consider When Making Benefit-Risk Determinations in Medical Device Premarket...

  4. Evolution of Medication Administration Workflow in Implementing Electronic Health Record System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Yuan-Han

    2013-01-01

    This study focused on the clinical workflow evolutions when implementing the health information technology (HIT). The study especially emphasized on administrating medication when the electronic health record (EHR) systems were adopted at rural healthcare facilities. Mixed-mode research methods, such as survey, observation, and focus group, were…

  5. A School Administrator's Guide to the Family and Medical Leave Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosland, Carl C.

    2007-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive, yet practical, reference for information and guidance to comply with the requirements of the Family and Medical Leave Act of 1993. It provides school administrators with the latest information to ensure that school policies and practices are up-to-date and it helps to manage leave and avoid costly legal violations.…

  6. The Relationship between Barcode Medication Administration Satisfaction and the Use of Workarounds among Registered Nurses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bennett, Sally F.

    2012-01-01

    Adverse drug events, resulting in preventable patient harm or death, are of great concern. To keep patients safe, hospitals have implemented barcode medication administration (BCMA) technology for RNs who have accepted this technology with varying levels of satisfaction. When nurses are dissatisfied with a BCMA system, they may find alternative…

  7. A Client-Based Needs Assessment: A Model for Defining Staff Development Objectives for School-Based Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Small, Sue E.

    Research evidence clearly indicates the need to improve the school administrator's effectiveness as a key factor in educational reform. One difficulty is balancing administrators' wants with organizational needs. Inservice education planners' examination of these wants and needs led to the client-based needs assessment process described in this…

  8. A total design and implementation of an intelligent mobile chemotherapy medication administration.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ming-Chuan; Chang, Polun

    2014-01-01

    The chemotherapy medication administration is a process involved many stakeholders and efforts. Therefore, the information support system cannot be well designed if the entire process was not carefully examined and reengineered first. We, from a 805-teaching medical center, did a process reengineering and involved physicians, pharmacists and IT engineers to work together to design a mobile support solution. System was implemented in March to July, 2013. A 6" android handheld device with 1D BCR was used as the main hardware. 18 nurses were invited to evaluate their perceived acceptance of system based on Technology Acceptance Model for Mobile Service Model. Time saved was also calculated to measure the effectiveness of system. The results showed positive support from nurses. The estimated time saved every year was about 288 nursing days. We believe our mobile chemotherapy medication administration support system is successful in terms of acceptance and real impacts.

  9. A total design and implementation of an intelligent mobile chemotherapy medication administration.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ming-Chuan; Chang, Polun

    2014-01-01

    The chemotherapy medication administration is a process involved many stakeholders and efforts. Therefore, the information support system cannot be well designed if the entire process was not carefully examined and reengineered first. We, from a 805-teaching medical center, did a process reengineering and involved physicians, pharmacists and IT engineers to work together to design a mobile support solution. System was implemented in March to July, 2013. A 6" android handheld device with 1D BCR was used as the main hardware. 18 nurses were invited to evaluate their perceived acceptance of system based on Technology Acceptance Model for Mobile Service Model. Time saved was also calculated to measure the effectiveness of system. The results showed positive support from nurses. The estimated time saved every year was about 288 nursing days. We believe our mobile chemotherapy medication administration support system is successful in terms of acceptance and real impacts. PMID:24943579

  10. [Government tutelage of mothers and children in Argentina: administrative structures, law, and technical staff (1936-1955)].

    PubMed

    Biernat, Carolina; Ramacciotti, Karina

    2008-01-01

    The article describes and analyzes one of the political projects that gained strength in Argentina during the between-war years and remained in place throughout Peronism: government tutelage of mothers and children. It examines how the Dirección de Maternidad e Infancia viewed the mother-child dyad, how this office proposed to address the issue of infant mortality, what type of technical staff was in place, and what limitations were encountered in trying to enforce these ideas. It also looks at what changed and what stayed the same at the office under Peronism.

  11. 75 FR 18219 - Drug and Medical Device Forum on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug and Medical Device Forum on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements and Supplier Controls; Public Educational Forum AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public educational forum. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration...

  12. 77 FR 70166 - Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Provisions of the Food and Drug Administration Safety and Innovation Act Related to Medical Gases; Establishment of a Public Docket AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is establishing a...

  13. Donor organ distribution according to urgency of need or outcome maximization in liver transplantation. A questionnaire survey among patients and medical staff.

    PubMed

    Umgelter, Katrin S; Tobiasch, Moritz; Anetsberger, Aida; Blobner, Manfred; Thorban, Stefan; Umgelter, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Low donor rates in Germany cause a trade-off between equity in the distribution of chances for survival and efficiency in dead-donor liver transplantation. Public attitudes concerning the principles that should govern organ allocation are of interest. We performed a questionnaire-based study among patients and medical staff. 1826 of 2200 questionnaires were returned. 79.2%, 67.1%, and 24.4% patients wanted to accept liver transplantation for themselves if expected 1-year survival was 80%, 50%, and 20%, respectively. 57.7% affirmed 'averting immediate risk of death (urgency) is a more important criterion for organ allocation than expected long-term success' (P = 0.002 against indifference). The majority of medical staff took the opposite decision. 20.7%, 8.8%, and 21.2% of patients chose 50%, 33%, and 10% as lowest acceptable 5-year survival, respectively. 49.3% accepted a survival of <10%. Variables associated with preferring urgency over efficiency as criterion for allocation were age (OR 1.009; 95% CI: 1.000-1.017; female gender (OR 1.331; 95%CI 0.992-1.784); higher education (OR 0.881; 95%CI 0.801-0.969); and refusal of transplantation for oneself (OR 1.719; 95%CI 1.272-2.324). Most patients supported urgency-based liver allocation. Patients and medical staff would accept lower survival rates than the transplant community. PMID:25557453

  14. 75 FR 53971 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Impact-Resistant Lenses: Questions...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-02

    ...; Impact-Resistant Lenses: Questions and Answers; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... guidance entitled ``Impact-Resistant Lenses: Questions and Answers.'' This guidance document answers manufacturer, importer, and consumer questions on impact-resistant lenses, including questions on...

  15. Efficiency and Usability of a Near Field Communication-Enabled Tablet for Medication Administration

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Pamela M; Robertson, Alexandra; McEvoy, Dustin; Dinsmore, Michael; Sweet, Micheal; Bane, Anne; Takhar, Sukhjit S; Miles, Stephen

    2014-01-01

    Background Barcode-based technology coupled with the electronic medication administration record (e-MAR) reduces medication errors and potential adverse drug events (ADEs). However, many current barcode-enabled medication administration (BCMA) systems are difficult to maneuver and often require multiple barcode scans. We developed a prototype, next generation near field communication-enabled medication administration (NFCMA) system using a tablet. Objective We compared the efficiency and usability of the prototype NFCMA system with the traditional BCMA system. Methods We used a mixed-methods design using a randomized observational cross-over study, a survey, and one-on-one interviews to compare the prototype NFCMA system with a traditional BCMA system. The study took place at an academic medical simulation center. Twenty nurses with BCMA experience participated in two simulated patient medication administration scenarios: one using the BCMA system, and the other using the prototype NFCMA system. We collected overall scenario completion time and number of medication scanning attempts per scenario, and compared those using paired t tests. We also collected participant feedback on the prototype NFCMA system using the modified International Business Machines (IBM) Post-Study System Usability Questionnaire (PSSUQ) and a semistructured interview. We performed descriptive statistics on participant characteristics and responses to the IBM PSSUQ. Interview data was analyzed using content analysis with a qualitative description approach to review and categorize feedback from participants. Results Mean total time to complete the scenarios using the NFCMA and the BCMA systems was 202 seconds and 182 seconds, respectively (P=.09). Mean scan attempts with the NFCMA was 7.6 attempts compared with 6.5 attempts with the BCMA system (P=.12). In the usability survey, 95% (19/20) of participants agreed that the prototype NFCMA system was easy to use and easy to learn, with a pleasant

  16. Construct validity and reliability of the Single Checking Administration of Medications Scale.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Beverly; Hawkins, Mary; Ockerby, Cherene

    2013-06-01

    Research indicates that single checking of medications is as safe as double checking; however, many nurses are averse to independently checking medications. To assist with the introduction and use of single checking, a measure of nurses' attitudes, the thirteen-item Single Checking Administration of Medications Scale (SCAMS) was developed. We examined the psychometric properties of the SCAMS. Secondary analyses were conducted on data collected from 503 nurses across a large Australian health-care service. Analyses using exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses supported by structural equation modelling resulted in a valid twelve-item SCAMS containing two reliable subscales, the nine-item Attitudes towards single checking and three-item Advantages of single checking subscales. The SCAMS is recommended as a valid and reliable measure for monitoring nurses' attitudes to single checking prior to introducing single checking medications and after its implementation.

  17. Implementing a patient centered medical home in the Veterans health administration: Perspectives of primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Solimeo, Samantha L; Stewart, Kenda R; Stewart, Gregory L; Rosenthal, Gary

    2014-12-01

    Implementation of a patient centered medical home challenges primary care providers to change their scheduling practices to enhance patient access to care as well as to learn how to use performance metrics as part of a self-reflective practice redesign culture. As medical homes become more commonplace, health care administrators and primary care providers alike are eager to identify barriers to implementation. The objective of this study was to identify non-technological barriers to medical home implementation from the perspective of primary care providers. We conducted qualitative interviews with providers implementing the medical home model in Department of Veterans Affairs clinics-the most comprehensive rollout to date. Primary care providers reported favorable attitudes towards the model but discussed the importance of data infrastructure for practice redesign and panel management. Respondents emphasized the need for administrative leadership to support practice redesign by facilitating time for panel management and recognizing providers who utilize non-face-to-face ways of delivering clinical care. Health care systems considering adoption of the medical home model should ensure that they support both technological capacities and vertically aligned expectations for provider performance. PMID:26250631

  18. Impact of a pharmacist-prepared interim residential care medication administration chart on gaps in continuity of medication management after discharge from hospital to residential care: a prospective pre- and post-intervention study (MedGap Study)

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Tim; Taylor, Simone E; Harvey, Penelope A; Belfrage, Mary K; Jennings, Rhonda J; Marriott, Jennifer L

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To test the impact of a hospital pharmacist-prepared interim residential care medication administration chart (IRCMAC) on medication administration errors and use of locum medical services after discharge from hospital to residential care. Design Prospective pre-intervention and post-intervention study. Setting One major acute care hospital and one subacute aged-care hospital; 128 residential care facilities (RCF) in Victoria, Australia. Participants 428 patients (median age 84 years, IQR 79–88) discharged to a RCF from an inpatient ward over two 12-week periods. Intervention Seven-day IRCMAC auto-populated with patient and medication data from the hospitals' pharmacy dispensing software, completed and signed by a hospital pharmacist and sent with the patient to the RCF. Primary and secondary outcome measures Primary end points were the proportion of patients with one or more missed or significantly delayed (>50% of prescribed dose interval) medication doses, and the proportion of patients whose RCF medication chart was written by a locum doctor, in the 24 h after discharge. Secondary end points included RCF staff and general practitioners' opinions about the IRCMAC. Results The number of patients who experienced one or more missed or delayed doses fell from 37/202 (18.3%) to 6/226 (2.7%) (difference in percentages 15.6%, 95% CI 9.5% to 21.9%, p<0.001). The number of patients whose RCF medication chart was written by a locum doctor fell from 66/202 (32.7%) to 25/226 (11.1%) (difference in percentages 21.6%, 95% CI 13.5% to 29.7%, p<0.001). For 189/226 (83.6%) discharges, RCF staff reported that the IRCMAC improved continuity of care; 31/35 (88.6%) general practitioners said that the IRCMAC reduced the urgency for them to attend the RCF and 35/35 (100%) said that IRCMACs should be provided for all patients discharged to a RCF. Conclusions A hospital pharmacist-prepared IRCMAC significantly reduced medication errors and use of locum medical services

  19. [Experiences with a Token Ring Network in blood bank administration of the Hannover medical university].

    PubMed

    Raufmann, W; Stangel, W

    1991-01-01

    The Token Ring Network is a Local Area Network of IBM. It is a very helpful tool for modulating working processes by personal computers. The Token Ring is a network of the third generation and constructed like a star net. The blood bank of the Medical University of Hannover (MHH) is using the Token Ring for the administration of blood storage and donors. Medical data of foreign laboratories are transmitted into the blood bank computer. During the last year, we had no difficulties working with this software tool in response time and data security and it seemed to us a very cheap opportunity for data integration and data collection on decentralized systems.

  20. Using a Policy Classification Model to Analyze Major Changes Regarding Control and Administration of Policies Relative to Professional Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozma, Ernest J.; Walker, John H.

    There has been a diversity of activity to change policies relating to the recruitment, admission, and preparation of new educational professionals in college and university settings. These policies, coupled with state mandated polices to upgrade the competence of current teachers and administrators, has resulted in a great amount of policy to…

  1. Perceptions and Attitudes of Administrative and Counseling Staffs Toward Drug Use and Abuse in Nebraska Junior Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Gerald Douglass

    Administrators and counselors at one private and six public junior colleges in Nebraska answered questions and offered their opinions on and knowledge of drug use and abuse in their colleges. Topics covered by this study include: kinds of student involved; extent of the problem on Nebraska junior college campuses; factors that influence students…

  2. 75 FR 70271 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ... Pressure Wound Therapy; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT).'' This guidance document describes a means by which non-powered suction... Device Intended for Negative Pressure Wound Therapy (NPWT)'' to the Division of Small...

  3. Empowering Staff and Clients: Comparing Preferences for Management Models by the Professional Degrees Held by Organization Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardina, Donna; Montana, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    In this article, findings from a national survey of social service managers are described. Respondents were asked to identify theories and models of management that influenced their administrative activities. The results indicate that many of the respondents used an empowerment-oriented approach to management. Respondents were more likely to…

  4. 75 FR 32952 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; “‘Harmful and Potentially...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-10

    ... the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act''; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS... Products as Used in Section 904(e) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance... Cosmetic Act.'' This draft guidance, when finalized, will discuss the meaning of the term ``harmful...

  5. 76 FR 5387 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; “`Harmful and Potentially Harmful...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In the Federal Register of June 10, 2010 (75 FR 32952), FDA announced... Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act''; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... Section 904(e) of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act.'' This guidance provides written guidance...

  6. 75 FR 69089 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... for the Topical Approximation of Skin; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION... Intended for the Topical Approximation of Skin.'' This guidance document describes a means by which tissue adhesives with adjunct wound closure devices intended for the topical approximation of skin may comply...

  7. Police referral of drivers to the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration's Medical Advisory Board.

    PubMed

    Soderstrom, Carl A; Scottino, Mary Anne; Joyce, John J; Burch, Cynthia; Ho, Shiu M; Kerns, Timothy J

    2009-10-01

    In the 50 United States and the District of Columbia law enforcement medical referrals are accepted by licensing agencies. This study assessed driving actions, medical concerns, and medical conditions in 486 police referrals to the Medical Advisory Board of the Maryland Motor Vehicle Administration during a 25-month period. Driving actions, medical concerns, and medical conditions were grouped into categories and entered into a database. These elements were analyzed relative to driver age and sex. In addition, the issuance of citations for driving violations was studied relative to age and sex. A greater percentage of drivers 60 years of age or greater (senior adults) were referred compared to the general population of licensed drivers that age, being 71.4% vs 20.6% (p <0.01). Crashing, the most common driving action, was not associated with age or sex. Among driving actions frequently mentioned relative to older drivers, only confusion of pedals was associated with senior adults drivers as compared to younger drivers (6.1% vs 0.1%, p <0.01). Of the most frequently mentioned medical concerns, confusion/disorientation was associated with being a senior adult (p <0.01), while loss of consciousness was associated with younger drivers (p <0.01). The most frequently mentioned medical conditions, diabetes and seizure, were associated with being under 60 years of age. All mentions of dementia were in senior adult drivers. Compared with younger drivers, drivers 60 years of age or older, were less often summoned for driving violations, being 33.0% vs 53.5% (p <0.01), respectively. The threshold for the issuance of fewer citations was lower for men (40 to 59 years of age) compared to women (60 years of age or greater). Studies are needed to correlate specific traffic violations and/or crashes to specific medical conditions.

  8. Product-line administration: a framework for redefining medical record department services.

    PubMed

    Postal, S N

    1990-06-01

    Product-line administration is a viable approach for managing medical records services in an environment that demands high quantity and quality service levels. Product-line administration directs medical record department team members to look outside of the department and seek input from the customers it is intended to serve. The feedback received may be alarming at first, as the current state of products usually reveals a true lack of customer input. As the planning, defining, managing, and marketing phases are implemented, the road will not be easy and rewards will be slow to come. Product-line administration does not provide quick fixes, but it does provide long-term problem resolution as products are refined and new products developed to meet customer needs and expectations. In addition to better meeting the needs of the department's external customers, the department's internal customers' needs and expectations will be addressed. The participative management approach will help nurture each team member's creativity. The team members will have the opportunity to reach their full potential while reaping the rewards and benefits of providing products and services that meet the needs and expectations of all department customers. The future of the health care industry promises more changes as the country moves toward some form of prospective payment in the ambulatory setting. Reactive management and the constant struggle to catch up can no longer be accepted as a management approach. It is imperative that the medical record department be viewed as a business with product lines composed of quality products. The planning, defining, managing, and marketing components of product-line administration afford responsiveness to the current situation and the development of quality products that will ensure that medical record departments are prepared for the future.

  9. Improving Medication Administration Safety in a Community Hospital Setting Using Lean Methodology.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all health care organizations have goals of improving patient safety, but despite clear goals and considerable investments, gains have been limited. This article explores a community hospital's resounding success using Lean methodology to improve medication administration safety with process changes designed by engaged employees and leaders with the knowledge and skill to effect improvements. This article inspires an interdisciplinary approach to quality improvement using reproducible strategies. PMID:25599523

  10. A student emergency: helping school staff cope.

    PubMed

    Silver, R

    1999-04-01

    A serious illness, injury, or other medical emergency in a student while in school can be upsetting to school staff not accustomed to such situations. A healthcare emergency in a special health needs child in one school district prompted a nurse and a building principal to develop a protocol which would enable school staff to effectively assist the nurse in the event of a student emergency. The plan involved training school personnel to assist the nurse and the administrator in tasks such as answering and monitoring telephones, serving as a runner, controlling unnecessary traffic into the nurse's office, and passing clean supplies to the nurse.

  11. Analysis of the technology acceptance model in examining hospital nurses' behavioral intentions toward the use of bar code medication administration.

    PubMed

    Song, Lunar; Park, Byeonghwa; Oh, Kyeung Mi

    2015-04-01

    Serious medication errors continue to exist in hospitals, even though there is technology that could potentially eliminate them such as bar code medication administration. Little is known about the degree to which the culture of patient safety is associated with behavioral intention to use bar code medication administration. Based on the Technology Acceptance Model, this study evaluated the relationships among patient safety culture and perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, and behavioral intention to use bar code medication administration technology among nurses in hospitals. Cross-sectional surveys with a convenience sample of 163 nurses using bar code medication administration were conducted. Feedback and communication about errors had a positive impact in predicting perceived usefulness (β=.26, P<.01) and perceived ease of use (β=.22, P<.05). In a multiple regression model predicting for behavioral intention, age had a negative impact (β=-.17, P<.05); however, teamwork within hospital units (β=.20, P<.05) and perceived usefulness (β=.35, P<.01) both had a positive impact on behavioral intention. The overall bar code medication administration behavioral intention model explained 24% (P<.001) of the variance. Identified factors influencing bar code medication administration behavioral intention can help inform hospitals to develop tailored interventions for RNs to reduce medication administration errors and increase patient safety by using this technology.

  12. Islamic Personal Religiosity as a Moderator of Job Strain and Employee's Well-Being: The Case of Malaysian Academic and Administrative Staff.

    PubMed

    Achour, Meguellati; Mohd Nor, Mohd Roslan; MohdYusoff, Mohd Yakub Zulkifli

    2016-08-01

    Presently, there is increased in research on job strain and the effects of religiosity on employee well-being. Despite increased recognition of religiosity as a moderator of well-being, limited research has focused on Islamic perspective of moderating job strain. This study examines the moderating effects of Islamic personal religiosity on the relationship between job strain and employee well-being in Malaysian universities. One hundred and seventeen (117) Muslim academic and administrative staff from four public universities were sampled. Data were collected via questionnaires, and our findings show that the effect of job strain on well-being is significant for employees and that personal religiosity of employees contributed to alleviating job strain and enhancing well-being. Thus, the study concludes that Islamic personal religiosity moderates the relationship between job strain and employee well-being.

  13. Mitigating errors caused by interruptions during medication verification and administration: interventions in a simulated ambulatory chemotherapy setting

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Varuna; Koczmara, Christine; Savage, Pamela; Trip, Katherine; Stewart, Janice; McCurdie, Tara; Cafazzo, Joseph A; Trbovich, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Background Nurses are frequently interrupted during medication verification and administration; however, few interventions exist to mitigate resulting errors, and the impact of these interventions on medication safety is poorly understood. Objective The study objectives were to (A) assess the effects of interruptions on medication verification and administration errors, and (B) design and test the effectiveness of targeted interventions at reducing these errors. Methods The study focused on medication verification and administration in an ambulatory chemotherapy setting. A simulation laboratory experiment was conducted to determine interruption-related error rates during specific medication verification and administration tasks. Interventions to reduce these errors were developed through a participatory design process, and their error reduction effectiveness was assessed through a postintervention experiment. Results Significantly more nurses committed medication errors when interrupted than when uninterrupted. With use of interventions when interrupted, significantly fewer nurses made errors in verifying medication volumes contained in syringes (16/18; 89% preintervention error rate vs 11/19; 58% postintervention error rate; p=0.038; Fisher's exact test) and programmed in ambulatory pumps (17/18; 94% preintervention vs 11/19; 58% postintervention; p=0.012). The rate of error commission significantly decreased with use of interventions when interrupted during intravenous push (16/18; 89% preintervention vs 6/19; 32% postintervention; p=0.017) and pump programming (7/18; 39% preintervention vs 1/19; 5% postintervention; p=0.017). No statistically significant differences were observed for other medication verification tasks. Conclusions Interruptions can lead to medication verification and administration errors. Interventions were highly effective at reducing unanticipated errors of commission in medication administration tasks, but showed mixed effectiveness at

  14. Convergence and translation: attitudes to inter-professional learning and teaching of creative problem-solving among medical and engineering students and staff

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Healthcare worldwide needs translation of basic ideas from engineering into the clinic. Consequently, there is increasing demand for graduates equipped with the knowledge and skills to apply interdisciplinary medicine/engineering approaches to the development of novel solutions for healthcare. The literature provides little guidance regarding barriers to, and facilitators of, effective interdisciplinary learning for engineering and medical students in a team-based project context. Methods A quantitative survey was distributed to engineering and medical students and staff in two universities, one in Ireland and one in Belgium, to chart knowledge and practice in interdisciplinary learning and teaching, and of the teaching of innovation. Results We report important differences for staff and students between the disciplines regarding attitudes towards, and perceptions of, the relevance of interdisciplinary learning opportunities, and the role of creativity and innovation. There was agreement across groups concerning preferred learning, instructional styles, and module content. Medical students showed greater resistance to the use of structured creativity tools and interdisciplinary teams. Conclusions The results of this international survey will help to define the optimal learning conditions under which undergraduate engineering and medicine students can learn to consider the diverse factors which determine the success or failure of a healthcare engineering solution. PMID:24450310

  15. Proposal for a European Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical administrative data (PHRIMA).

    PubMed

    Burgun, Anita; Oksen, Dina V; Kuchinke, Wolfgang; Prokosch, Hans-Ulrich; Ganslandt, Thomas; Buchan, Iain; van Staa, Tjeerd; Cunningham, James; Gjerstorff, Marianne L; Dufour, Jean-Charles; Gibrat, Jean-Francois; Nikolski, Macha; Verger, Pierre; Cambon-Thomsen, Anne; Masella, Cristina; Lettieri, Emanuele; Bertele, Paolo; Salokannel, Marjut; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Persoz, Charles; Chêne, Geneviève; Ohmann, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In Europe, health and medical administrative data is increasingly accumulating on a national level. Looking further than re-use of this data on a national level, sharing health and medical administrative data would enable large-scale analyses and European-level public health projects. There is currently no research infrastructure for this type of sharing. The PHRIMA consortium proposes to realise the Public Health Research Infrastructure for Sharing of health and Medical Administrative data (PHRIMA) which will enable and facilitate the efficient and secure sharing of healthcare data.

  16. Medical devices; revocation of cardiac pacemaker registry. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1999-11-24

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule to revoke a regulation requiring a cardiac pacemaker registry. The registry, which was mandated by the Deficit Reduction Act of 1984, requires any physician and any provider of services who requests or receives Medicare payment for an implantation, removal, or replacement of permanent cardiac pacemaker devices and pacemaker leads to submit certain information to the registry. The information is used by FDA to track the performance of permanent cardiac pacemakers and pacemaker leads and by the Health Care Finance Administration (HCFA) to administer its Medicare payment program for these devices. This action is being taken to implement an act to Repeal An Unnecessary Medical Device Reporting Requirement passed by Congress in 1996 to remove the cardiac pacemaker registry to eliminate duplicative and unnecessary reporting. PMID:11010690

  17. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: Council on Naturopathic Medical Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Council on Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME) is a programmatic accrediting agency. CNME's current scope of recognition is the accreditation and preaccreditation throughout the United States of graduate level, four-year naturopathic medical education programs leading to the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine (N.M.D.) or Doctor of Naturopathy…

  18. Student Review Manual: Administrative Medical Assistant, 2nd edition, by M Kinn M Kinn Student Review Manual: Administrative Medical Assistant, 2nd edition W B Saunders 174pp £8.95 0-7216-2371-9 [Formula: see text].

    PubMed

    1989-06-24

    This revision manual can give some ideas on curriculum for those who are preparing for the implementation of Project 2000 and determining the role of the support worker. It also sheds light on the realities of privatised medical practice. It outlines the horrors of a health system rule by accountancy through the responses sought to items such as professional fees, accounting systems, banking services, billing procedures and insurance; and the implications it has for training of junior staff (pp 85-140).

  19. Nurses' Perceptions of the Impact of Work Systems and Technology on Patient Safety during the Medication Administration Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher Gordon, Mary

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines nurses' perceptions of the impacts of systems and technology utilized during the medication administration process on patient safety and the culture of medication error reporting. This exploratory research study was grounded in a model of patient safety based on Patricia Benner's Novice to Expert Skill…

  20. [Patients' preferences for nurses' nonverbal expressions of warmth during nursing rounds and administration of oral medication].

    PubMed

    Kim, H S; Kim, M S

    1990-12-01

    Nursing involves deep human interpersonal relationships between nurses and patients. But in modern Korea, the nurse-patient relationship tends to be ritualistic and mechanestic. Patients usually express the hope that nurses be more tender and kind. Patients expect nurses to express their warmth especially through nonverbal behaviour. This study was conducted to identify patients' preferences for nurse's nonverbal expressions of warmth. Through the confirmation of these preferences, nurses may learn how to enhance their interpersonal relationships with patients. Subjects for the study were 73 patients who had been admitted to a university teaching hospital for at least three days and agreed to be interviewed by the investigator. The interactions were studied nonverbal expressions of warmth during nursing rounds and administration of oral medication. The interview schedule was especially designed by the investigator to measure the nurse's posture, the distance between the nurse and the patient, the nurse's eye contact, facial expression, hand motion and head nodding. Data analysis included frequencies, percentages and X2-test. The results of this study may be summerized as follows: 1. Patient's preferences for nurse's nonverbal expressions of warmth during nursing rounds. Preferred nurse's posture was sitting (50.7%) or standing (49.3%) opposite the patient. Preferred distance between the nurse and the patient was close to the bed (93.2%), less than 1m. Preferred eye contact was directed to the patient's eyes or their affected part (41.1%). Preferred facial expression was a smile (97.3%). Preferred hand motions were light gestures (41.1%). Patients preferred head nodding which approved their own opinions (69.9%). 2. Patient's preferences for nurse's nonverbal expressions of warmth during administration of oral medication. Preferred nurse's posture was standing and waiting to confirm that the medication had been taken (58.9%). Preferred distance from the patient was

  1. Medical device reporting: manufacturer reporting, importer reporting, user facility reporting, distributor reporting. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-01-26

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its regulations governing reporting by manufacturers, importers, distributors and health care (user) facilities of adverse events related to medical devices. Amendments are being made to implement revisions to the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act) as amended by the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA).

  2. Health Economics Studies Information Exchange; Reports of Current Research in Health Economics, and Medical Care Administration. Publication No. 1719.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA. Home Economics Branch.

    The first volume of a continuing series reporting research in progress in health economics and medical care organization and administration was compiled by contacting (1) graduate schools offering degrees in the health professions, sociology, economics, public administration, and public health, (2) charitable foundations indicating an interest in…

  3. Internal conflict: undergraduate nursing students' response to inadequate supervision during the administration of medication.

    PubMed

    Reid-Searl, Kerry; Moxham, Lorna; Walker, Sandra; Happell, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Current legislation in Queensland requires that undergraduate nursing students are personally supervised when administering restricted medication in the clinical setting. Previous research suggests this is not always the case. Exploration of the experiences of undergraduate nursing students was undertaken using grounded theory as the methodological framework. In-depth, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 28 students during their final year clinical placements. Data were analysed using a constant comparative approach. The focus of this paper is to examine the emergent theme of internal conflict, which is experienced by the participants as a consequence of the theory-practice gap. This conflict is reflected by the divergent requirements and expectations between the university and the registered nurses providing supervision in light of the role both play in student assessment. In addition, the participants voiced concerns about patient safety due to the potential for medication error. Internal conflict was identified by participants as the cause of considerable fear and anxiety about passing the course, getting a job and avoiding harm to patients. These findings raise serious concerns about the adequacy of the supervision for nursing students and highlighted the need for a more concerted approach to the theoretical and clinical education of students in relation to medication administration.

  4. A cross-sectional prospective study of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication in acute psychiatric wards: patient, staff and ward characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Previous research on mental health care has shown considerable differences in use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication among different wards and geographical areas. This study investigates to what extent use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication for involuntary admitted patients in Norwegian acute psychiatric wards is associated with patient, staff and ward characteristics. The study includes data from 32 acute psychiatric wards. Methods Multilevel logistic regression using Stata was applied with data from 1016 involuntary admitted patients that were linked to data about wards. The sample comprised two hierarchical levels (patients and wards) and the dependent variables had two values (0 = no use and 1 = use). Coercive measures were defined as use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary depot medication during hospitalization. Results The total number of involuntary admitted patients was 1214 (35% of total sample). The percentage of patients who were exposed to coercive measures ranged from 0-88% across wards. Of the involuntary admitted patients, 424 (35%) had been secluded, 117 (10%) had been restrained and 113 (9%) had received involuntary depot medication at discharge. Data from 1016 patients could be linked in the multilevel analysis. There was a substantial between-ward variance in the use of coercive measures; however, this was influenced to some extent by compositional differences across wards, especially for the use of restraint. Conclusions The substantial between-ward variance, even when adjusting for patients' individual psychopathology, indicates that ward factors influence the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication and that some wards have the potential for quality improvement. Hence, interventions to reduce the use of seclusion, restraint and involuntary medication should take into account organizational and environmental factors. PMID:20370928

  5. College and University Staff Development Workshop Proceedings (Willamette University, December 2-3, 1976; Otter Crest, April 20-21, 1977). [Statewide Infusion of Career Education into the Preparation of Teachers, Counselors and Administrators].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunbar, Zola, Ed.

    This report summarizes the two statewide staff development workshops that were conducted for faculties of Oregon colleges and universities participating in a consortium project designed to infuse career education into the preparation of teachers, counselors, and administrators. (Three previous workshops are reported in CE 019 416.) Included in…

  6. Perceptions by Faculty, Staff, and Administrators of the Role of Intercollegiate Athletics at a Metropolitan University as a NCAA Division II Athletics Program Reclassifies to a NCAA Division I Athletics Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meisel, John B.; Navin, John C.; Sullivan, Timothy S.

    2014-01-01

    This article provides empirical findings associated with the perceptions of faculty, staff, and administrators regarding a decision to reclassify a metropolitan university's athletics program from NCAA Division II to NCAA Division I. A survey is developed that asks respondents about their perceptions of the current state of the athletics program,…

  7. [Anti-tetanus immunity among university students and health staff in North Lebanon and administration of anti-tetanus serums in two hospitals].

    PubMed

    Hamze, M; Hlais, S; Dabboussi, F; Mallat, H

    2014-10-20

    Tetanus is a serious illness that kills about one million people a year globally. This study aimed to i) evaluate immunity against tetanus (by antibodies titres in blood) among health staff and students at the Public Health Faculty, Lebanese University, ii) explore the determinants of the anti-tetanus immunity by a questionnaire and iii) estimate anti-tetanic serum use in the emergency departments of two hospitals (1 private, 1 public) in Tripoli. Most of the participants (76.6%) had anti-tetanus antibody titres ≥ 0.1 UI/mL. There was no association between immune status and gender (P = 0.614) but more participants ≤ 25 years were immunized than those > 25 years (P < 0.001) and more students were immunized than employees (P = 0.032). There was an inverse association between anti-tetanus immunity and having visited a physician in the past year (P = 0.009). In 2011, 1037 people received anti-tetanus immunoglobulins at the hospitals, 73% at the private hospital. Vaccination campaigns targetting adults > 25 years may be warranted to assure good anti-tetanus protection and avoid administration of anti-tetanus immunoglobulins in emergency departments.

  8. Innovating team-based outpatient mental health care in the Veterans Health Administration: Staff-perceived benefits and challenges to pilot implementation of the Behavioral Health Interdisciplinary Program (BHIP).

    PubMed

    Barry, Catherine N; Abraham, Kristen M; Weaver, Kendra R; Bowersox, Nicholas W

    2016-05-01

    In the past decade, the demand for Veterans Health Administration (VHA) mental health care has increased rapidly. In response to the increased demand, the VHA developed the Behavioral Health Interdisciplinary Program (BHIP) team model as an innovative approach to transform VHA general outpatient mental health delivery. The present formative evaluation gathered information about pilot implementation of BHIP to understand the struggles and successes that staff experienced during facility transitions to the BHIP model. Using a purposive, nonrandom sampling approach, we conducted 1-on-1, semistructured interviews with 37 licensed and nonlicensed clinical providers and 13 clerical support staff assigned to BHIP teams in 21 facilities across the VHA. Interviews revealed that having actively involved facility mental health leaders, obtaining adequate staffing for teams to meet the requirements of the BHIP model, creating clear descriptions and expectations for team member roles within the BHIP framework, and allocating designated time for BHIP team meetings challenged many VHA sites but are crucial for successful BHIP implementation. Despite the challenges, staff reported that the transition to BHIP improved team work and improved patient care. Staff specifically highlighted the potential for the BHIP model to improve staff working relationships and enhance communication, collaboration, morale, and veteran treatment consistency. Future evaluations of the BHIP implementation process and BHIP team functioning focusing on patient outcomes, organizational outcomes, and staff functioning are recommended for fully understanding effects of transitioning to the BHIP model within VHA general mental health clinics and to identify best practices and areas for improvement. (PsycINFO Database Record

  9. THE ROLE OF OBSERVATION AND FEEDBACK IN ENHANCING PERFORMANCE WITH MEDICATION ADMINISTRATION.

    PubMed

    Davies, Karen; Mitchell, Charles; Coombes, Ian

    2015-12-01

    Legislation in Queensland such as the Health (Drugs and Poisons) Regulation 1996, the national registration competency standards set by the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia, and the Continuing Professional Development Registration Standards made pursuant to the Health Practitioner Regulation National Law define expected standards of practice for nurses. The Framework for Assessing Standards for Practice for Registered Nurses, Enrolled Nurses and Midwives, released in July 2015, includes the principles for assessing standards but not the methods. Local policies and procedures offer specific requirements founded on evidence-based practice. Observation of clinical practice with the provision of immediate descriptive feedback to individual practitioners has been associated with improved performance. This column describes the role of regular observation and individual feedback on medication administration as a strategy to enhance performance and patient care. PMID:26939498

  10. Administration of over-the-counter medication to children at home--a survey of parents from community health centers.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Colleen; Rolfe, Paula; Brennan-Hunter, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Parents (n = 135) were surveyed in relation to administering antipyretic/analgesic medications to their children (2 months-6 years) at home. Parents usually chose acetaminophen, calculated dosages based on weight but did not always know the child's weight, administered medications with a dropper, and reported having a sick child was moderately stressful. Many children were medicated for pain and/or fever during the week prior to immunization and many weighed more than the age/weight recommended dosages on the label. Community health nurses can facilitate safe administration of medications by integrating knowledge of parents' pain and fever management practices into discussions and anticipatory planning during clinic visits.

  11. Assessment of occupational radiation exposure among medical staff in health-care facilities in the Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Salama, Khaled Fikry; AlObireed, Abdulrahman; AlBagawi, Mohammed; AlSufayan, Yuosef; AlSerheed, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Radiation exposure poses hazards for health-care providers as well as patients in health-care facilities (HCFs). Radiographic imaging is extremely valuable as a diagnostic tool in medicine, but ionizing radiation and computed tomography (CT) scan carry well-known potential risks. Personnel and radiation safety monitoring is an important safety precaution in the practice of radiography. Aim: The study aimed to assess the occupational radiation exposure and safety protection among medical staff in HCFs in the Eastern Province, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Materials and Methods: Total of 4 HCFs with radiological services were randomly selected for the study in the period from January to April 2013. The radiation survey has been carried out by the measurement of radiation in the x-ray and CT-scan room at different points of the diagnostic, imaging, and waiting rooms of different hospitals. The radiation safety was assessed by using a questionnaire Results: The results of our study are surprising and alarming. Data revealed that there are a significant association between the levels of radiation exposure in all selected hospitals concerning imaging and waiting X-ray and CT-scan operating room (P < 0.01). For radiation safety, most hospitals have lead aprons and thyroid shields in place, but only about 50% have lead glasses and lead shields, showing that many hospitals still lack essential equipment. Moreover, actual utilization rate of radiation dosimeters are 57.7% and 68.9%, respectively. Conclusion: All medical staff as well as patients are at risk of exposure to x-ray and CT-scan radiation exposure, and the levels are exceeding the standard guidelines. Many hospitals still lack safety protection tools and there is a complete absence of radiation protection equipment. Further studies should be conducted to highlight different aspects of radiation exposure dose and safety protection tools. PMID:27390475

  12. Reporting of adverse events related to dietary supplements to a public health center by medical staff: a survey of clinics and pharmacies

    PubMed Central

    Ide, Kazuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Kawasaki, Yohei; Noguchi, Marika; Kitagawa, Mamoru; Chiba, Tsuyoshi; Kagawa, Yoshiyuki; Umegaki, Keizo

    2016-01-01

    Background Dietary supplements are used by >50% of the adult population in Japan, and adverse events related to these products have been reported with their increased use. Thus, an efficient system to gather and report data on these adverse events is essential. To date, however, reporting has been limited. The aim of this study was to address this deficiency by exploring the routine reporting practices of the medical staff employed at clinics or pharmacies in Japan. Methods We conducted a survey of the procedures used by the medical staff to report adverse events related to dietary supplement intake to public health centers in Japan. The survey was conducted in Japan between November 2015 and January 2016. Based on a sample size calculation, questionnaires were administered to 1,700 potential respondents (850 pharmacists and 850 physicians). The questionnaire inquired about the sociodemographic characteristics and dietary supplement-related adverse event-reporting practices. Results The response rate was 34.7%, including 286 pharmacists and 304 physicians. Although >30% of the pharmacists and physicians had prior experience dealing with such adverse events, <5% had reported these to a public health center. The survey identified several barriers to reporting, such as “difficulty judging the relationship between an adverse event and the dietary supplement” and “lack of clarity regarding the severity of an adverse event”. Conclusion This is the first study to explore the routine reporting practices of physicians and pharmacists in terms of adverse events related to dietary supplements. Further studies are required to elucidate the severity of these adverse events. Moreover, standard reporting criteria ought to be introduced to improve public health. PMID:27672326

  13. Life cycle of medical product rules issued by the US Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Thomas J; Avorn, Jerry; Kesselheim, Aaron S

    2014-08-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) uses rulemaking as one of its primary tools to protect the public health and implement laws enacted by Congress and the president. Because of the many effects that these rules have on social welfare and the economy, the FDA and other executive agencies receive input from the executive branch, the public, and in some cases, the courts, during the process of rulemaking. In this article, we examine the life cycle of FDA regulations concerning medical products and review notable features of the rulemaking process. The current system grants substantial opportunities for diverse stakeholders to participate in and influence how rules are written and implemented. However, the duration, complexity, and adversarial qualities of the rulemaking process can hinder the FDA's ability to achieve its policy and public health goals. There is considerable variation in the level of transparency at different stages in the process, ranging from freely accessible public comments to undisclosed internal agency deliberations. In addition, significant medical product rules are associated with lengthy times to finalization, in some cases for unclear reasons. We conclude by identifying potential areas for reform on the basis of transparency and efficiency.

  14. A case of delayed methotrexate clearance following administration of a complementary medication containing chlorophyll.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Sally L; Sanders, Julie; Seymour, John F; Mellor, James D

    2014-06-01

    A 54-year-old male with relapsed primary cerebral lymphoma and normal renal function was treated with methotrexate (MTX) 3 g/m(2) monthly by intravenous infusion. Throughout treatment the patient self-administered a complementary medicine (Jason Winter's chlorophyll®), which he was advised to cease during methotrexate treatment due to the potential for unknown interactions. For the first four cycles, chlorophyll was ceased two days prior to commencement of methotrexate and withheld until clearance. These cycles were administered without complication, and the methotrexate level reduced to <0.05 µmol/L within three days of each dose. Prior to cycle 5, chlorophyll was not ceased and there were no changes to concomitant medications. A literature search found no documented interactions between methotrexate and chlorophyll and the chemotherapy was administered without a delay in treatment. The methotrexate level three days post-administration was 0.36 µmol/L and did not reduce to <0.05 µmol/L until day 10. Consequently, from cycles 6 to 12, the methotrexate dose was halved, and the patient ceased chlorophyll 48 h prior to methotrexate administration until clearance. There were no further episodes of delayed methotrexate clearance. No impurities were detected in a sample of Jason Winter's chlorophyll®. It is therefore likely that the patient's delayed methotrexate clearance was due to an interaction with chlorophyll. It is recommended that such chlorophyll containing preparations be avoided in patients treated with methotrexate.

  15. Effectiveness of a modified administration protocol for the medical treatment of canine pyometra.

    PubMed

    Contri, Alberto; Gloria, Alessia; Carluccio, Augusto; Pantaleo, Stefania; Robbe, Domenico

    2015-03-01

    Pyometra is one of the most common diseases in intact bitches. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a modified aglepristone protocol for the medical treatment of pyometra in the bitch. Of these, 73 bitches affected by pyometra of different breeds and age (2-14 years old) were enrolled. They were randomly assigned to a control group (CTG - 26 bitches) treated with classical protocol (aglepristone at 0, 1 and 6 days - day 0 = day of the diagnosis) and a modified treated group (MTG - 47 bitches) treated with a different administration protocol (aglepristone at 0, 2, 5 and 8 days). The classical protocol with the anti-progestagen aglepristone was effective in 88.5 % (23/26) of CTG bitches while the modified protocol was effective in all (47/47) of MTG bitches. One of the 23 CTG bitches received a further administration on day 14, which resolved the pyometra, while in the three cases of CTG bitches, in which the treatment was ineffective, an ovariohysterectomy was carried out. The modified protocol showed a success rate of 100 %, compared with the classical protocol proposed in the literature, and no recurrence of the disease was recorded in the 24 months follow up. After treatment, the oestrus onset was earlier than expected (interoestrus of 128 ± 32 days). In this study, the modified treatment protocol showed high efficacy and lack of recurrence within 24 months, suggesting a complete recovery of reproductive function in the bitch, with a normal fertility. PMID:25323020

  16. Staff Association Handbook, 1974-75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery Coll. Staff Association, Takoma Park, MD.

    This handbook provides a list of Staff Senate and Committee members of the Staff Association of Montgomery College, a copy of the bylaws of the association, and sections of the college's "Policies and Procedures Manual" that affect staff employees. These sections of the manual pertain to: Administrative and Staff Communication; Affirmative Action…

  17. [Like Moses' staff: pathological inheritance as an argument for medical vigilance of consanguine marriage in Mexico, 1870-1900].

    PubMed

    Soriano, Fabricio González

    2009-01-01

    This paper analyzes the discussions in the field of legal medicine in Mexico about the prudence of regulations concerning intermarriage that were decreed in the civil codes for the Federal District of 1871 and 1884. It shows that the heated debate forced the authors of the regulations to struggle for the need for medical vigilance of marriages between relatives, as a preventive measure sustained in a nihilistic vision of the pathological inheritance. The paper concludes by proposing a philosophical analysis that abandons the old fields of the "external" and the "internal".

  18. Yes, We Can Improve Staff Morale.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clough, Dick B.

    A literature review and discussion the effect of school administrators on staff morale is presented in this paper. Four factors for improving staff morale include: a supportive workplace; meaningful incentives; a good working environment; and personal display of high morale by the administrator. Ten recommendations for improving staff relations…

  19. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) Compliance Program Guidance Manual. Section 4. Medical and radiological devices. Basic section. (FY-89)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to the Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices.

  20. The Staff of Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Rebecca

    1994-01-01

    Some children have chronic illnesses that require diet modifications as part of their medical treatment. Advises school districts to hire a registered dietitian or look for resources at a local hospital or public health office. In addition, schools should work with parents, improve staff training, and conduct spot checks of school cafeterias. (MLF)

  1. 7 CFR 1700.27 - Chief of Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Administrator regarding policy initiatives and operational issues and assists the Administrator and the Deputy Administrator in developing and planning agency program initiatives. The Chief of Staff is responsible...

  2. An exploration of cancer staff attitudes and values.

    PubMed

    McKegney, F P; Visco, G; Yates, J; Hughes, J

    1979-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team involved in the care of patients with advanced cancer including physicians, nurses, social workers, physical therapists, nutritionists, clergymen, enterostomal therapists, biostatisticians and administrative personnel were studied over a period of eighteen months. A prospective study of staff attitudes and values about life, disease, and medical care which focused particularly on cancer, cancer treatment and patients with cancer was undertaken. Data were gathered from the staff by written responses to the following instruments: 1) Rokeach Value Survey and 2) a Personal Attitudes Toward Illness Questionnaire. This longitudinal prospective study demonstrated the reliability of scrutinizing individual and collective staff characteristics in a cancer care team. Although most team members had minimal previous contact with clinical research or with patients with advanced cancer, increased exposure did not result in changes in staff attitudes and values over the period of seventeen months. PMID:481321

  3. Staff Development and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dempsey, Richard A.; Breyer, Norman L.

    An ongoing behavioral model for implementing staff development and evaluation procedures is proposed, which systematically focuses on assessing and facilitating behavioral change in the classroom and enables the educational executive to assess what is actually happening there. The administrator is thus provided with the necessary information to…

  4. School Administration Handbook for Approved Schools for Medical Record Technicians. Revised April 66.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of Medical Record Librarians, Chicago, IL.

    These guidelines are for the development and operation of approved programs to prepare medical record technicians. "School Approval" discusses the cooperative roles of the American Medical Association (AMA) Council on Medical Education and the American Association of Medical Record Librarians (AAMRL) in connection with program approval, and other…

  5. An investigation on occupational stress of the operating room staffs in hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and its association with some factors

    PubMed Central

    Bakhtiari, Soheila; Mehrabi, Tayebeh; Hasanzadeh, Akbar

    2013-01-01

    Background: Stress is a nonspecific reaction to everything the body needs. Although occupational stress exists in every occupation, it is seen with more frequency and intensity amongst those occupations related to human health. In this study, we aimed to investigate the level of occupational stress in operating room staffs working in the hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences and its association with some factors. Materials and Methods: This is a descriptive co-relational study conducted in summer 2010. The population studied comprised 100 OP staffs working in hospitals affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. The data were collected by a questionnaire including two sections of personal information and Toft-Anderson Standard occupational stress inventory. The first section contained 13 questions and the second included 34 questions on stressful factors, measured through Likert's scale in which the scores of 0-33 indicated mild stress, 34-66 indicated moderate stress, and 67-100 indicated acute stress. The data were analyzed through SPSS. The statistical tests of Pearson correlation, variance analysis, and independent t-test were employed to analyze the data (P < 0 0.05 was considered significant). Results: Based on the findings, mean score of staffs’ stress (out of 100) was 32.3 (12.9) and was in the range of 1-65. The highest frequencies were for mild stress (57.4%) and moderate stress (42.6). In addition, mean score of stress was not the same in different domains. There was a significant inverse association between the score of stress and monthly working hours (r = -0.21, P = 0.049). Mean score of stress was 28.1 (12.3) among those with average income and 33.8 (12.8) for the low-income subjects, showing a significant difference (P = 0.048). Discussion and Conclusion: The present study showed that most of the subjects suffer from mild stress. Since the highest level of stress was for work overload, it is suggested to reduce

  6. Glossitis and tongue trauma subsequent to administration of an oral medication, using an udder infusion cannula, in a horse

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Mark C.; Abutarbush, Sameeh M.

    2007-01-01

    A 10-year-old gelding was presented with a tongue that had swelled immediately after oral administration of oxfendazole, using an udder infusion cannula. The tongue appeared to have been punctured inadvertently. The horse recovered after treatment with intravenous fluid, antibiotics, and anti-inflammatory drugs. Administering oral medication by this method should be discouraged. PMID:17824329

  7. 75 FR 74063 - Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration's Convener of Active Medical Product...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Supplemental Funding Under the Food and Drug Administration... Supplemental Application AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of intent. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a program expansion of its Conference...

  8. Disparity in Naloxone Administration by Emergency Medical Service Providers and the Burden of Drug Overdose in US Rural Communities

    PubMed Central

    Dailey, Michael W.; Sugerman, David E.; Sasser, Scott M.; Levy, Benjamin; Paulozzi, Len J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We determined the factors that affect naloxone (Narcan) administration in drug overdoses, including the certification level of emergency medical technicians (EMTs). Methods. In 2012, 42 states contributed all or a portion of their ambulatory data to the National Emergency Medical Services Information System. We used a logistic regression model to measure the association between naloxone administration and emergency medical services certification level, age, gender, geographic location, and patient primary symptom. Results. The odds of naloxone administration were much higher among EMT-intermediates than among EMT-basics (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] = 5.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.5, 6.5). Naloxone use was higher in suburban areas than in urban areas (AOR = 1.41; 95% CI = 1.3, 1.5), followed by rural areas (AOR = 1.23; 95% CI = 1.1, 1.3). Although the odds of naloxone administration were 23% higher in rural areas than in urban areas, the opioid drug overdose rate is 45% higher in rural communities. Conclusions. Naloxone is less often administered by EMT-basics, who are more common in rural areas. In most states, the scope-of-practice model prohibits naloxone administration by basic EMTs. Reducing this barrier could help prevent drug overdose death. PMID:25905856

  9. Medical education and family planning-II. Implementation of administrative recommendations for the Third Conference of Deans and Principals.

    PubMed

    Rice, D T

    1969-09-01

    In 1967 recommendation were made by the Deans and Principals of Medical Colleges on the teaching of population dynamics and family welfare planning in India. A survey was made in 1969 to determine to what extent the recommendations were implemented. 80 percent of the medical colleges returned the questionnaire. 30 percent of those responding had a special committee to promote family planning teaching, research, and service. 30 percent had instituted block teaching of 1 to 4 weeks for family planning during the final year. 80 percent claimed to devote at least 1 month of the internship to maternal and child health and family planning in rural areas. 76 percent utilitzed an urban family planning clinic and 56 percent used a rural family planning clinic in their training. 77 percent of the urban clinics and 56 percent of the rural clinics were under the complete control of the college concerned. Only a few had implemented the resolutions about: 1) staff assignment to rural center (8); 2) prerequisite of rural service before portgraduate study (3); 3) conducting refresher courses (8); and 4) organizing mobile family planning units (13). A number of colleges were concerned about the lack of coordination between departments teaching family planning and shortage of staff to conduct adequate teaching. Many colleges indicated that they were involved in a wide variety of family planning activities both within and outside the campus. Although some colleges did take steps toward the implementation of the recommendation, many did not act.

  10. Tradeoffs of Using Administrative Claims and Medical Records to Identify the Use of Personalized Medicine for Patients with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Su-Ying; Phillips, Kathryn A.; Wang, Grace; Keohane, Carol; Armstrong, Joanne; Morris, William M.; Haas, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background Administrative claims and medical records are important data sources to examine healthcare utilization and outcomes. Little is known about identifying personalized medicine technologies in these sources. Objectives To describe agreement, sensitivity, and specificity of administrative claims compared to medical records for two pairs of targeted tests and treatments for breast cancer. Research Design Retrospective analysis of medical records linked to administrative claims from a large health plan. We examined whether agreement varied by factors that facilitate tracking in claims (coding and cost) and that enhance medical record completeness (records from multiple providers). Subjects Women (35 – 65 years) with incident breast cancer diagnosed in 2006–2007 (n=775). Measures Use of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) and gene expression profiling (GEP) testing, trastuzumab and adjuvant chemotherapy in claims and medical records. Results Agreement between claims and records was substantial for GEP, trastuzumab, and chemotherapy, and lowest for HER2 tests. GEP, an expensive test with unique billing codes, had higher agreement (91.6% vs. 75.2%), sensitivity (94.9% vs. 76.7%), and specificity (90.1% vs. 29.2%) than HER2, a test without unique billing codes. Trastuzumab, a treatment with unique billing codes, had slightly higher agreement (95.1% vs. 90%) and sensitivity (98.1% vs. 87.9%) than adjuvant chemotherapy. Conclusions Higher agreement and specificity were associated with services that had unique billing codes and high cost. Administrative claims may be sufficient for examining services with unique billing codes. Medical records provide better data for identifying tests lacking specific codes and for research requiring detailed clinical information. PMID:21422962

  11. Measurements and evaluation of the risks due to external radiation exposures and to intake of activated elements for operational staff engaged in the maintenance of medical cyclotrons.

    PubMed

    Calandrino, R; del Vecchio, A; Parisi, R; Todde, S; De Felice, P; Savi, A; Pepe, A; Mrskova, A

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the activation phenomena and to evaluate the risk of external exposure and intake doses for the maintenance staff of two medical cyclotrons. Two self-shielded cyclotrons are currently operating in the facility for the routine production of (11)C and (18)F. Four radiochemistry laboratories are linked to the cyclotrons by means of shielded radioisotope delivery lines. Radiopharmaceuticals are prepared both for the PET Diagnostic Department, where four CT-PET scanners are operating with a mean patient workload of 40 d(-1) and for [(18)F]FDG external distribution, to provide radiopharmaceuticals for other institutions. In spite of the fact that air contamination inside the radiochemistry laboratories during the synthesis represents the largest 'slice of the pie' in the evaluation of annual intake dose, potential contamination due to the activated particulate, generated during cyclotron irradiation by micro-corrosion of targets and other components potentially struck by the proton beam and generated neutrons, should be considered. In this regard, the most plausible long-lived (T(1/2) > 30 d) radioisotopes formed are: (97)Tc, (56)Co, (57)Co, (58)Co, (60)Co, (49)V, (55)Fe, (109)Cd, (65)Zn and (22)Na. The results for the operating personnel survey has revealed only low-level contamination for (65)Zn in one test, together with minor (18)F intake, probably due to the environmental dispersion of the radioisotope during the [(18)F]FDG synthesis.

  12. Pharmaceutical Use among Older Adults: Using Administrative Data to Examine Medication-Related Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metge, Colleen Jane; Grymonpre, Ruby; Yogendran, Marina

    2005-01-01

    Medication use is recognized as the least expensive, most cost-effective health care intervention. In older adults this is especially important, as they are the largest consumer of prescription medications. We describe the use of a linked data set including pharmaceutical, medical, and hospital claims to examine pharmaceutical use in the…

  13. Understanding the causes of intravenous medication administration errors in hospitals: a qualitative critical incident study

    PubMed Central

    Keers, Richard N; Williams, Steven D; Cooke, Jonathan; Ashcroft, Darren M

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the underlying causes of intravenous medication administration errors (MAEs) in National Health Service (NHS) hospitals. Setting Two NHS teaching hospitals in the North West of England. Participants Twenty nurses working in a range of inpatient clinical environments were identified and recruited using purposive sampling at each study site. Primary outcome measures Semistructured interviews were conducted with nurse participants using the critical incident technique, where they were asked to discuss perceived causes of intravenous MAEs that they had been directly involved with. Transcribed interviews were analysed using the Framework approach and emerging themes were categorised according to Reason's model of accident causation. Results In total, 21 intravenous MAEs were discussed containing 23 individual active failures which included slips and lapses (n=11), mistakes (n=8) and deliberate violations of policy (n=4). Each active failure was associated with a range of error and violation provoking conditions. The working environment was implicated when nurses lacked healthcare team support and/or were exposed to a perceived increased workload during ward rounds, shift changes or emergencies. Nurses frequently reported that the quality of intravenous dose-checking activities was compromised due to high perceived workload and working relationships. Nurses described using approaches such as subconscious functioning and prioritising to manage their duties, which at times contributed to errors. Conclusions Complex interactions between active and latent failures can lead to intravenous MAEs in hospitals. Future interventions may need to be multimodal in design in order to mitigate these risks and reduce the burden of intravenous MAEs. PMID:25770226

  14. 78 FR 68459 - Medical Device Development Tools; Draft Guidance for Industry, Tool Developers, and Food and Drug...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-14

    ... guidance to FDA staff, industry, healthcare providers, researchers, and patient and consumer groups on a... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Medical Device Development Tools; Draft Guidance for Industry, Tool Developers, and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Availability AGENCY: Food and...

  15. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) compliance program guidance manual (FY 87). Section 4. Medical and radiological devices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices.

  16. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) Compliance Program Guidance Manual. Section 4. Medical and radiological devices. Irregular report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices.

  17. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) Compliance Program Guidance Manual (FY 88). Section 4. Medical and radiological devices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices.

  18. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) Compliance Program Guidance Manual (FY 85). Section 4. Medical and radiological devices

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices.

  19. 77 FR 50113 - ASTM International-Food and Drug Administration Workshop on Absorbable Medical Devices: Lessons...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-20

    ... Absorbable Medical Devices: Lessons Learned From Correlations of Bench Testing and Clinical Performance... ``ASTM International-FDA Workshop on Absorbable Medical Devices: Lessons Learned From Correlations of... interested in attending this public workshop must register online by November 13, 2012. Early registration...

  20. A Quantitative Analysis of the Effect of Simulation on Medication Administration in Nursing Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scudmore, Casey

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors are a leading cause of injury and death in health care, and nurses are the last line of defense for patient safety. Nursing educators must develop curriculum to effectively teach nursing students to prevent medication errors and protect the public. The purpose of this quantitative, quasi-experimental study was to determine if…

  1. Bachelors of Science in Nursing Students and a Qualitative Analysis of Their Medication Administration Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Betts, Kelly J.

    2016-01-01

    Lack of medication knowledge and skills is detrimental to the safety and welfare of patients. Lack of pharmacology knowledge and skills is detrimental to the safety and welfare of patients. In a southern baccalaureate nursing program, students demonstrated deficiencies in their medication knowledge and skill proficiency. This qualitative study…

  2. Strengthening Bullying Prevention through School Staff Connectedness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Brennan, Lindsey M.; Waasdorp, Tracy E.; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2014-01-01

    The growing concern about bullying and school violence has focused national attention on various aspects of school climate and school connectedness. The current study examined dimensions of staff connectedness (i.e., personal, student, staff, and administration) in relation to staff members' comfort intervening in bullying situations (e.g.,…

  3. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  4. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  5. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  6. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  7. 45 CFR 701.12 - Staff Director.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Staff Director. 701.12 Section 701.12 Public... FUNCTIONS OF THE COMMISSION Organization Statement § 701.12 Staff Director. A Staff Director for the... Director is the administrative head of the agency....

  8. Issues surrounding the administration of a credit course for medical students: survey of US academic health sciences librarians*

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jolene Michelle

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: For librarians developing a credit course for medical students, the process often involves trial and error. This project identified issues surrounding the administration of a credit course, so that librarians nationally can rely more upon shared knowledge of common practices and less upon trial and error. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to the education services librarian at each medical school listed in the 2000 AAMC Data Book. A second questionnaire was sent to those librarians who did not return the first one. Results: Of the 125 librarians surveyed, 82 returned the questionnaire. Of those 82, only 11 offered a credit course for medical students, though 19 more were in the process of developing one. Data were gathered on the following aspects of course administration: credit course offerings, course listing, information learned to administer the course, costs associated with the course, relationships with other departments on campus, preparation for teaching and grading, and evaluation of the course. Conclusions: Because of small number of respondents offering a credit course and institutional variations, making generalizations about issues surrounding the administration of a credit course is difficult. The article closes with a list of recommendations for librarians planning to develop a course. PMID:15243642

  9. Defining the scope of practice of enrolled nurses in medication administration in Australia: a review of the legislation.

    PubMed

    McEwan, Beryl

    2008-01-01

    Changing workforce patterns and changes in models of care delivery have renewed interest in the role of the enrolled nurse in Australia. A number of major reviews have confirmed the enrolled nurse as an integral member of the Australian health workforce and identified that the role of enrolled nurses is expanding in many practice settings. Medication administration is increasingly being delegated to enrolled nurses raising issues related to role, scope of practice, educational preparation, competence and delegation and supervision of nursing activities. Published reports and studies have identified a range of issues related to scope of practice nurses in Australia that have prompted the development of decision-making frameworks and a range of policies and guidelines to better define practice parameters. A review of the literature and documents available from various Australian nursing regulatory bodies related to medication administration by enrolled nurses was undertaken to determine the scope of practice of enrolled nurses in medication administration in Australia. The review confirmed that there is considerable variation in practice between jurisdictions, individual health care settings and on a daily basis in clinical practice. Despite the availability of a number of policy and practice guidelines, there is limited evidence on how they are used in clinical practice and the impact of variable policies on registered and enrolled nursing practice.

  10. Understanding the information dynamics of medication administration in residential aged care facilities (RACFs): a prerequisite for design of effective ICT systems.

    PubMed

    Tariq, Amina; Georgiou, Andrew; Westbrook, Johanna

    2013-01-01

    Medication information is a critical part of the information required to ensure residents' safety in the highly collaborative care context of RACFs. Studies report poor medication information as a barrier to improve medication management in RACFs. Research exploring medication work practices in aged care settings remains limited. This study aimed to identify contextual and work practice factors contributing to breakdowns in medication information exchange in RACFs in relation to the medication administration process. We employed non-participant observations and semi-structured interviews to explore information practices in three Australian RACFs. Findings identified inefficiencies due to lack of information timeliness, manual stock management, multiple data transcriptions, inadequate design of essential documents such as administration sheets and a reliance on manual auditing procedures. Technological solutions such as electronic medication administration records offer opportunities to overcome some of the identified problems. However these interventions need to be designed to align with the collaborative team based processes they intend to support.

  11. Galvanizing medical students in the administration of influenza vaccines: the Stanford Flu Crew

    PubMed Central

    Rizal, Rachel E; Mediratta, Rishi P; Xie, James; Kambhampati, Swetha; Hills-Evans, Kelsey; Montacute, Tamara; Zhang, Michael; Zaw, Catherine; He, Jimmy; Sanchez, Magali; Pischel, Lauren

    2015-01-01

    Many national organizations call for medical students to receive more public health education in medical school. Nonetheless, limited evidence exists about successful servicelearning programs that administer preventive health services in nonclinical settings. The Flu Crew program, started in 2001 at the Stanford University School of Medicine, provides preclinical medical students with opportunities to administer influenza immunizations in the local community. Medical students consider Flu Crew to be an important part of their medical education that cannot be learned in the classroom. Through delivering vaccines to where people live, eat, work, and pray, Flu Crew teaches medical students about patient care, preventive medicine, and population health needs. Additionally, Flu Crew allows students to work with several partners in the community in order to understand how various stakeholders improve the delivery of population health services. Flu Crew teaches students how to address common vaccination myths and provides insights into implementing public health interventions. This article describes the Stanford Flu Crew curriculum, outlines the planning needed to organize immunization events, shares findings from medical students’ attitudes about population health, highlights the program’s outcomes, and summarizes the lessons learned. This article suggests that Flu Crew is an example of one viable service-learning modality that supports influenza vaccinations in nonclinical settings while simultaneously benefiting future clinicians. PMID:26170731

  12. Prevalence and cost of medication nonadherence in Parkinson's disease: evidence from administrative claims data.

    PubMed

    Davis, Keith L; Edin, Heather M; Allen, Jeffery K

    2010-03-15

    We estimated the prevalence of medication nonadherence in Parkinson's disease (PD) and the association between treatment nonadherence and healthcare costs. Insurance claims from over 30 US health plans were analyzed. Inclusion criteria were as follows: PD diagnosis, >or=1 PD-related prescription between 1/1/1997 and 12/31/2004, continuous health plan enrollment for >or=6 months before and >or=12 months after first PD prescription. Adherence, all-cause healthcare utilization, and all-cause costs were evaluated over 12 months post-treatment initiation. Adherence was measured using the medication possession ratio (MPR), with MPR < 0.8 defining nonadherence. Among patients identified for inclusion (N = 3,119), 58% were male and mean age was 69 years. Mean MPR was 0.58 and 61% of patients were nonadherent. Unadjusted mean medical costs were significantly higher (P < 0.01) among nonadherers ($15,826) compared with adherers ($9,228), although nonadherers had lower prescription drug costs ($2,684 vs. $3,854; P < 0.05). After controlling for confounders in multivariable analyses, a large positive relationship between nonadherence and both medical and total healthcare costs remained (+$3,451, P < 0.0001 and +$2,383, P = 0.0053, respectively). Medication adherence in PD is suboptimal and nonadherence may be associated with increased healthcare costs despite offsets from reduced drug intake. Efforts to promote medication adherence in PD may lead to cost savings for managed care systems. PMID:20131374

  13. Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Populations in Medical Research: Perceptions and Experiences of Older Italians, Their Families, Ethics Administrators and Researchers

    PubMed Central

    Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Hughson, Jo-anne; Parker, Anna; Bresin, Agnese; Hajek, John; Knoch, Ute; Phan, Tuong Dien; Story, David

    2016-01-01

    Background Low-participation of culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) patients in medical research remains a problem in migrant and refugee destination countries such as Australia. The aims of this study were to explore i) CALD persons’ perceptions and experiences of the medical system and medical research, in this case, older Italian Australians; and ii) the views of research professionals on CALD patient participation in medical research. Design and Methods A qualitative study was conducted in Melbourne, Australia, in 2015 utilising in-depth interviews and focus groups with four stakeholder groups: older Italian Australians (n=21); adult children of older Italian Australians (n=10); hospital Human Research Ethics Committee administrators (n=4); and clinical researchers (n=4). The data were analysed for content and thematic analysis. Results Themes for the CALD and family group were getting by in medical interactions; receptivity to medical research: testing the waters; and, receptivity to technology for support: passive versus active. Themes for the researcher and HREC groups about CALD patient participation in research were: exclusion; cultural factors; and e-consent. Conclusions Our findings from four stakeholder perspectives and experiences confirm that there were considerable cultural, linguistic, and resourcing barriers hindering the participation of older Italian-Australians in medical research. Furthermore, our findings showed that in this study setting there were few enabling strategies in place to address these barriers despite the national ethics guidelines for equitable participation in research. The findings informed the creation of a multimedia tool whose purpose is to address and improve representation of CALD groups in clinical research. Significance for public health Many people from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds remain excluded from medical research such as clinical trials due to a range of language and

  14. Attitudes of Polish physicians and medical students toward breaking bad news, euthanasia and morphine administration in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Leppert, Wojciech; Majkowicz, Mikolaj; Forycka, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Medical students and physicians should possess basic knowledge concerning medical ethics and palliative care. The aim of the study was to explore the knowledge on the end-of-life ethics and palliative care in third-year medical students and physicians during internal medicine specialty training and their attitude towards breaking bad news and euthanasia. A voluntary and anonymous questionnaire survey with the participation of 401 students and 217 physicians filled after lectures concerning ethics for medical students and after palliative medicine course for physicians during internal medicine specialty training. A total of 28 % students and 24 % physicians (p = 0.282) were ready to reveal full information to advanced cancer patients. A total of 82 % of students and 90 % of physicians (p = 0.008) would not practice euthanasia; 67 % of students and 75 % of physicians (p = 0.039) were opponents of euthanasia legalisation. A total of 70 % doctors and 23 % students indicated oral as the most preferable route of morphine administration. A total of 74 % physicians and 43 % students stated that there is no maximal dose of morphine; 64 % of doctors and 6 % of students indicated constipation as a constant adverse effect of morphine. Breaking bad news is a significant difficulty for both students and physicians. There is a small percentage of those tending to practice euthanasia and bigger accepting its legalisation with fewer physicians than students. In contrast to medical students, the majority of physicians have knowledge concerning chronic morphine use in the treatment of cancer patients.

  15. 20 CFR 638.801 - Staff training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Staff training. 638.801 Section 638.801 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR JOB CORPS PROGRAM UNDER TITLE IV-B OF THE JOB TRAINING PARTNERSHIP ACT Administrative Provisions § 638.801 Staff training....

  16. Veterans Administration support for medical research: opinions of the endangered species of physician-scientists.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Stanley; Crabbe, John C; Cooper, George; Finkelman, Fred; Largman, Corey; McCarley, Robert W; Rice, Louis; Rubin, Janet; Richardson, Bruce; Seil, Frederick; Snider, Gordon L; Vandenbark, Arthur A

    2004-10-01

    Over the past three decades the Veterans Affairs (VA) Research program has evolved into a powerful, peer-reviewed funding mechanism for basic and translational research that has resulted in numerous important contributions to medical science and improvements in patient care. Continuity in VA Merit Review funding has fostered and nurtured the scientific careers of a large number of physician-scientists who have remained devoted to the mission of performing creative and innovative research that affects the patient care mission of the VA. VA medical research policies have undergone a major overhaul in the past year. Although many of these changes (de-emphasizing bench research and revamping the peer review process) have recently been reversed, the future direction of VA research remains in flux. The goal of this manuscript is to demonstrate the importance of the Merit Review medical research funding mechanism not just to the VA, but to the entire nation's health care system. To achieve this goal, the opinions of 65 established VA medical investigators were obtained regarding the past success and future direction of VA research. The conclusions reached include the following. 1) Merit Review research funding has been essential to the training, recruitment, and retention of productive VA physician-scientists. 2) The VA research program has contributed both basic and clinical innovations that have led to improvements in medical care. Contributions of VA researchers to excellence in many aspects of patient care at VA hospitals have been extraordinary. 3) Development of initiatives that entice outstanding Ph.D.'s to develop their careers in the VA has been crucial to the success of the program. 4) The VA research program has fostered a mutually beneficial relationship with affiliated medical schools. 5) Better methods to quantify VA research contributions and outcomes are essential for future program development. PMID:15466355

  17. Occupational Safety and Health Administration--Access to employee exposure and medical records. Final rule.

    PubMed

    1980-05-23

    This final occupational safety and health standard, promulgated today as a revised 29 CFR 1910.20, provides for employee, designated representative, and OSHA access to employer-maintained exposure and medical records relevant to employees exposed to toxic substances and harmful physical agents. Access is also assured to employer analyses using exposure and medical records. The final standard requires long term preservation of these records, contains provisions concerning informing employees of their rights under the standard, and includes provisions protective of trade secret information.

  18. Medication use in residential care for older people with intellectual disabilities.

    PubMed

    2016-08-01

    Medication administration may appear to be a 'simple' nursing task, but this audit published in Learning Disability Practice found that, due to a combination of multiple medication use and medical complexity in older people with learning disabilities, it can be more complicated than staff realise. PMID:27573967

  19. Educate, Medicate, or Litigate? What Teachers, Parents, and Administrators Must Do about Student Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiGiulio, Robert C.

    This book explores factors that contribute to antisocial behavior among students and reviews the literature on preventing and responding to antisocial behavior. Chapter 1, "A Culture of Violence," links the widespread perception that school violence is increasing to a broader culture of violence. Schools are increasingly turning to medication and…

  20. Medical devices; exemption from premarket notification and reserved devices; class I. Food and Drug Administration, HHS. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-01-14

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is amending its classification regulations to designate class I devices that are exempt from the premarket notification requirements, subject to certain limitations, and to designate those class I devices that remain subject to premarket notification requirements under the new statutory criteria for premarket notification requirements. The devices FDA is designating as exempt do not include class I devices that have been previously exempted by regulation from the premarket notification requirements. This action is being taken under the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (the act), as amended by the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 (the 1976 amendments), the Safe Medical Devices Act of 1990 (SMDA), and the FDA Modernization Act of 1997 (FDAMA). FDA is taking this action in order to implement a requirement of FDAMA. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing that it is withdrawing proposed rules to revoke existing exemptions from premarket notification for two devices. PMID:11010655

  1. Identifying the Latent Failures Underpinning Medication Administration Errors: An Exploratory Study

    PubMed Central

    Lawton, Rebecca; Carruthers, Sam; Gardner, Peter; Wright, John; McEachan, Rosie R C

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The primary aim of this article was to identify the latent failures that are perceived to underpin medication errors. Study Setting The study was conducted within three medical wards in a hospital in the United Kingdom. Study Design The study employed a cross-sectional qualitative design. Data Collection Methods Interviews were conducted with 12 nurses and eight managers. Interviews were transcribed and subject to thematic content analysis. A two-step inter-rater comparison tested the reliability of the themes. Principal Findings Ten latent failures were identified based on the analysis of the interviews. These were ward climate, local working environment, workload, human resources, team communication, routine procedures, bed management, written policies and procedures, supervision and leadership, and training. The discussion focuses on ward climate, the most prevalent theme, which is conceptualized here as interacting with failures in the nine other organizational structures and processes. Conclusions This study is the first of its kind to identify the latent failures perceived to underpin medication errors in a systematic way. The findings can be used as a platform for researchers to test the impact of organization-level patient safety interventions and to design proactive error management tools and incident reporting systems in hospitals. PMID:22375850

  2. Computer-Based Training at a Military Medical Center: Understanding Decreased Participation in Training among Staff and Ways to Improve Completion Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavender, Julie

    2013-01-01

    Military health care facilities make extensive use of computer-based training (CBT) for both clinical and non-clinical staff. Despite evidence identifying various factors that may impact CBT, the problem is unclear as to what factors specifically influence employee participation in computer-based training. The purpose of this mixed method case…

  3. A Computer-Assisted Instructional Software Program in Mathematical Problem-Solving Skills for Medication Administration for Beginning Baccalaureate Nursing Students at San Jose State University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wahl, Sharon C.

    Nursing educators and administrators are concerned about medication errors made by students which jeopardize patient safety. The inability to conceptualize and calculate medication dosages, often related to math anxiety, is implicated in such errors. A computer-assisted instruction (CAI) program is seen as a viable method of allowing students to…

  4. Incompatibilities of lornoxicam with 4 antiemetic medications in polyolefin bags during simulated intravenous administration

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Bao-xia; Li, Peng; Shi, Xiao-ya; Chen, Fu-chao; Wang, Lin-hai

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The administration of drugs by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) is routinely practiced for the management of postoperative pain. It is common for 2 or more drugs to be combined in PCA solutions. The combination of analgesics and antiemetic agents is frequently required. Unfortunately, the compatibility and stability of lornoxicam and antiemetic agents, such as droperidol, ondansetrone, granisetron, and tropisetron, has not been determined. The aim of this study was to evaluate the compatibility and stability of solutions containing lornoxicam with the 4 antiemetic agents in combination for PCA administration. In our study, test samples were prepared in triplicate by adding 40 mg lornoxicam and 5 mg droperidol, 8 mg ondansetron, 6 mg granisetron, or 5 mg tropisetron to 100-mL polyolefin bags of sodium chloride 0.9% and stored at 25 °C. The analgesic mixture samples were visually inspected for precipitation, cloudiness, and discoloration at each sampling interval. Drug concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) analysis. No loss of lornoxicam occurred with any of the 4 antiemetic agents tested for up to 48 hours. However, the contents of droperidol, ondansetron, granisetron, and tropisetron were significant loss >48 hours. After storage of 4.0 to 48.0 hours, the presence of a slight precipitate was observed in all the injection combinations. The results indicate that combinations of lornoxicam with droperidol, ondansetrone, granisetron, or tropisetron in infusion solution during simulated intravenous PCA administration were incompatibility when stored protected from light at 25 °C. PMID:27336868

  5. Prevalence and risk factors for hepatitis C virus infection at an urban Veterans Administration medical center.

    PubMed

    Briggs, M E; Baker, C; Hall, R; Gaziano, J M; Gagnon, D; Bzowej, N; Wright, T L

    2001-12-01

    This study was designed to determine the seroprevalence and risk factors for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection in veterans. Anti-HCV testing was performed in 1,032 patients and a questionnaire regarding sociodemographic characteristics and potential risk factors was administered. Adjusted prevalence of unique HCV-positive patients using outpatient services was 17.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 17.2%, 18.2%). The following risk factors were associated with HCV infection: a history of injection drug use (IDU), receipt of blood transfusion prior to 1992, history of tattoo (odds ratio [OR], 2.93; 95% CI, 1.70-5.08), combat job as a medical worker (OR, 2.68; 95% CI, 1.25-5.60), history of incarceration over 48 hours (OR, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.52-4.32), greater than 15 lifetime sexual partners (OR, 1.61; 95% CI, 0.94-2.76) and sexual relations with a prostitute (OR, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.25-0.82). We concluded that HCV is common in veterans. Risk factors independently associated with infection are IDU, prior transfusion, prior tattoo, combat medical work, incarceration, and multiple opposite sex partners. Infection with HCV among veterans is strongly associated with traditional risk factors for infection and less strongly associated with combat-related risk. PMID:11732010

  6. The medical care programs of the Farm Security Administration, 1932 through 1947: a rehearsal for national health insurance?

    PubMed Central

    Grey, M R

    1994-01-01

    At a time of renewed interest in universal health insurance, an examination of earlier periods when society grappled with the link between socioeconomic status and health is fruitful. Between 1935 and 1947, the federal government sponsored a comprehensive medical care program for low-income farmers, sharecroppers, and migrant workers under the auspices of the Farm Security Administration (FSA). Despite the strong opposition of the American Medical Association, humanitarian and economic concerns at the local level often promoted physicians' participation in the program's group prepayment plans. Many FSA leaders clearly saw the program as a model upon which national health insurance might advance. However, in the wake of World War II, the FSA program declined as physicians' income improved, the rural population declined, and traditional ideological objections to federal intervention in medical care resurfaced. The FSA experience illuminates the complex ideological, economic, and humanitarian motivations of American physicians in the face of health care reform. Images p1680-a p1682-a p1684-a PMID:7943497

  7. The emergency department medical director.

    PubMed

    Mayer, T A

    1987-02-01

    This article has presented an overview of the duties, responsibilities, and management roles of the emergency department Medical Director, a position that can be among the most challenging, stimulating, and exciting in medicine. However, prior to accepting a position as an Emergency Department medical director, one should have a clear understanding of what the job entails. Careful discussions with the hospital administration, medical staff, nursing personnel, and staff emergency physicians should be undertaken to learn the perceptions of these people and expectations of the position. Once the job has been accepted, using the roles, responsibilities, and duties detailed herein may be of benefit--but should always be applied with good judgment, tactful cooperation, and common sense. Finally, it should not be surprising to a medical director to find, as Spinoza did many years ago, that the excellent thing he aspires to are as difficult as they are rare.

  8. Medical education.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, P

    1992-01-01

    In theory, the Medical Council of India (MCI) determines the standards and qualifications of medical schools. It also sanctions curricula and ensures standards. Yet no standards exist on the mode of selection in medical schools, duration of study, course content, student stipends or period of internship. It takes 4.5 years to finish medical school. Students undergo preclinical, paraclinical, and clinical training. Most courses are in English which tends to favor the urban elite. Students cannot always communicate with patients in local languages. Textbooks often provide medical examples unrelated to India. Pedagogy consists mainly of lectures and rote learning predominates. Curricula tend not to provide courses in community health. Students pick up on the elitist attitudes of the faculty. For example, faculty do not put much emphasis on community health, individual health, equity in health care delivery, and teamwork. Further the education system is not patient oriented, but hospital or disease oriented. Faculty should train students in creating sanitation programs, knowing local nutritious foods, and in making community diagnoses. Yet they tend to be practitioners 1st then educators. Further faculty are not paid well and are not always invited to take part in improving curriculum, so morale is often low. Moreover experience in health planning and management issues is not required for administrators. In addition, medical schools are not well equipped with learning aids, libraries, or teaching staff. Tax revenues finance medical education. 75% of graduating physicians set up a private practice. Further many physicians go to urban areas. 34-57% emigrate to other countries. The problems of medical education will not be solved until the political and economic system becomes more responsive to the health needs of the people.

  9. Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service Is Associated With Decreased Administration of Seizure Medication.

    PubMed

    Wietstock, Sharon O; Bonifacio, Sonia L; McCulloch, Charles E; Kuzniewicz, Michael W; Glass, Hannah C

    2015-08-01

    This cohort study examines medication use in term neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy and seizures before and after implementation of a Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service (N = 108), which included increased seizure monitoring. Nearly all neonates received phenobarbital (96% pre- vs 95% post-Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service) and total loading dose did not vary among groups (33 [95% confidence interval 29-37] vs 30 [26-34] mg/kg). After adjustment for seizure burden, neonates managed during the Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service era, on average, received 30 mg/kg less cumulative phenobarbital (95% confidence interval 15-46 mg/kg) and were on maintenance 5 fewer days (95% confidence interval 3-8 days) than those who were treated prior to implementation of the service. In spite of the enhanced ability to detect seizures because of improved monitoring and increased vigilance by bedside practitioners, implementation of the Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service was associated with decreased use of potentially harmful phenobarbital treatment among neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy. PMID:25380602

  10. Pentobarbital Toxicity after Self-Administration of Euthasol Veterinary Euthanasia Medication.

    PubMed

    Crellin, Steven Jason; Katz, Kenneth D

    2016-01-01

    Suicide attempt via sodium pentobarbital is uncommon. A 48-year-old woman with a history of depression and prior suicide attempt was found unresponsive by her veterinarian spouse near a syringe containing pink solution. Upon EMS' arrival, the patient was experiencing apnea, hypoxemia, and miotic pupils; her blood glucose level measured 73 mg/dL. She was bradycardic and administered atropine with transient improvement in heart rate and transported to an emergency department; 2 mg of intravenous naloxone was administered without effect. She was endotracheally intubated via rapid sequence intubation. Rapid urine drug screening detected both benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The patient was transferred to an intensive care unit where she demonstrated a nearly absent radial pulse. Emergent fasciotomy to the left forearm and carpal tunnel was performed for acute compartment syndrome; "Euthasol" had been self-administered into the antecubital fossa. Expanded toxicological analysis via liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy detected caffeine, atropine, 7-aminoclonazepam, phenytoin, citalopram, and naproxen. The patient's coma resolved over 48 hours and she was successfully extubated without complication. Emergency physicians must closely monitor patients exposed to veterinary euthanasia agents who develop central nervous system and respiratory depression, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension, or skin injury. Consultation with a regional poison center and medical toxicologist is recommended. PMID:26881149

  11. Pentobarbital Toxicity after Self-Administration of Euthasol Veterinary Euthanasia Medication

    PubMed Central

    Crellin, Steven Jason; Katz, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Suicide attempt via sodium pentobarbital is uncommon. A 48-year-old woman with a history of depression and prior suicide attempt was found unresponsive by her veterinarian spouse near a syringe containing pink solution. Upon EMS' arrival, the patient was experiencing apnea, hypoxemia, and miotic pupils; her blood glucose level measured 73 mg/dL. She was bradycardic and administered atropine with transient improvement in heart rate and transported to an emergency department; 2 mg of intravenous naloxone was administered without effect. She was endotracheally intubated via rapid sequence intubation. Rapid urine drug screening detected both benzodiazepines and barbiturates. The patient was transferred to an intensive care unit where she demonstrated a nearly absent radial pulse. Emergent fasciotomy to the left forearm and carpal tunnel was performed for acute compartment syndrome; “Euthasol” had been self-administered into the antecubital fossa. Expanded toxicological analysis via liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy detected caffeine, atropine, 7-aminoclonazepam, phenytoin, citalopram, and naproxen. The patient's coma resolved over 48 hours and she was successfully extubated without complication. Emergency physicians must closely monitor patients exposed to veterinary euthanasia agents who develop central nervous system and respiratory depression, hypothermia, bradycardia, hypotension, or skin injury. Consultation with a regional poison center and medical toxicologist is recommended. PMID:26881149

  12. Neonatal neurocritical care service is associated with decreased administration of seizure medication

    PubMed Central

    Wietstock, Sharon O; Bonifacio, Sonia L; McCulloch, Charles E; Kuzniewicz, Michael W; Glass, Hannah C

    2014-01-01

    This cohort study examines medication use in term neonates with hypoxic-ischemic encephalopathy (HIE) and seizures before and after implementation of a Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service (N=108), which included increased seizure monitoring. Nearly all neonates received phenobarbital (96% pre- versus 95% post-Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service) and total loading dose did not vary among groups (33 [95% CI 29–37] versus 30 [26–34] mg/kg). After adjustment for seizure burden, neonates managed during the Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service era, on average, received 30 mg/kg less cumulative phenobarbital (95% CI 15–46 mg/kg) and were on maintenance 5 fewer days (95% CI 3–8 days) than those who were treated prior to implementation of the service. In spite of the enhanced ability to detect seizures due to improved monitoring and increased vigilance by bedside practitioners, implementation of the Neonatal Neurocritical Care Service was associated with decreased use of potentially harmful phenobarbital treatment among neonates with HIE. PMID:25380602

  13. Patient-centered medical home initiative produced modest economic results for Veterans Health Administration, 2010-12.

    PubMed

    Hebert, Paul L; Liu, Chuan-Fen; Wong, Edwin S; Hernandez, Susan E; Batten, Adam; Lo, Sophie; Lemon, Jaclyn M; Conrad, Douglas A; Grembowski, David; Nelson, Karin; Fihn, Stephan D

    2014-06-01

    In 2010 the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) began a nationwide initiative called Patient Aligned Care Teams (PACT) that reorganized care at all VHA primary care clinics in accordance with the patient-centered medical home model. We analyzed data for fiscal years 2003-12 to assess how trends in health care use and costs changed after the implementation of PACT. We found that PACT was associated with modest increases in primary care visits and with modest decreases in both hospitalizations for ambulatory care-sensitive conditions and outpatient visits with mental health specialists. We estimated that these changes avoided $596 million in costs, compared to the investment in PACT of $774 million, for a potential net loss of $178 million in the study period. Although PACT has not generated a positive return, it is still maturing, and trends in costs and use are favorable. Adopting patient-centered care does not appear to have been a major financial risk for the VHA.

  14. [The ambulatory polyclinic institutions in closed administrative territorial municipality].

    PubMed

    Fomin, E P

    2014-01-01

    The article presents the results characterizing functioning of ambulatory polyclinic institutions included into medical sanitary unit of closed administrative territorial municipality of lesser towns. The study established the resource support of staff and full-time positions of physician and paramedical personnel, dynamics of indicators from 2005 to 2013, coverage of population of able-bodied age with preventive and target medical examinations for syphilis and tuberculosis. The progression of contingents under dispensary registration was determined.

  15. Prevalence of antibody to hepatitits B surface antigen among staff in an Edinburgh hospital.

    PubMed

    Burrell, C J; Tonkin, R W; Proudfoot, E; Leadbetter, G; Cowan, P; Lockerbie, L; Gore, S; Lutz, W; Marmion, B P

    1977-02-01

    Antibody to hepatitis B surface antigen was detected by radioimmunoprecipitation in 74 (5-5%) of 1336 staff members in a large general hospital in Edinburgh, in 14 (2-9%) of 480 volunteer blood donors in the area, and in 12 (6-1%) of 197 pregnant women attending for the first time at the ante-natal clinic in the hospital. Rates of antibody prevalence rose with age in the sample of hospital staff and in that of the blood donors, particularly among males. On the other hand, in the ante-natal patients antibody prevalence declined with age. The rates in hospital staff were higher than those in blood donors of comparable age and sex, and high titres of antibody were more common in the staff group. However, no association was found between antibody prevalence and a history of clinical hepatitis, blood transfusion, or recognized contact with cases of hepatitis. Staff who had previously worked in an infectious disease hospital did not show increased antibody prevalence, indicating that simple isolation measures have been adequate to minimize exposure to hepatitis B. No particular prevalence of infection was seen in physicians and surgeons, in the nursing staff, or in workers in clinical diagnostic laboratories, hospital administration or other areas. One group clearly showing increased antibody prevalence was staff currently working, or who had worked, in the Haemodialysis Unit; this correlated with the outbreak of dialysis-associated hepatitis in 1969--70. However, no evidence suggested that significant dissemination of infection had occurred to other defined groups of hospital staff. Elevated rates were also observed in a small sample of kitchen and portering staff, and in obstetric medical and nursing staff; the latter observation indicate a need for further investigation to identify unsuspected exposure to hepatitis B virus.

  16. Staff Counselling in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, H. L.

    One aspect of staff development that has not received much attention is staff counseling. In fact, the general pastoral care of the teaching staff is largely neglected. Since most problems of teachers have a personal nature, what is needed is a specially trained staff within the institution to offer personal counseling. This counseling could focus…

  17. Pharmacokinetic study of enrofloxacin in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after a single oral administration in medicated feed.

    PubMed

    Teles, J A; Castello Branco, L C; Del Bianchi, M; Pilarski, F; Reyes, F G R

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the disposition kinetics of enrofloxacin (ENR) in the plasma and its distribution in the muscle tissue of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) after a single oral dose of 10 mg/kg body weight via medicated feed. The fish were kept at a temperature between 28 and 30 °C. The collection period was between 30 min and 120 h after administration of the drug. The samples were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with a fluorescence detector (HPLC-FLD). The ENR was slowly absorbed and eliminated from the plasma (Cmax = 1.24 ± 0.37 μg/mL; Tmax = 8 h; T1/2Ke  = 19.36 h). ENR was efficiently distributed in the muscle tissue and reached maximum values (2.17 ± 0.74 μg/g) after 8 h. Its metabolite, ciprofloxacin (CIP), was detected and quantified in the plasma (0.004 ± 0.005 μg/mL) and muscle (0.01 ± 0.011 μg/g) for up to 48 h. After oral administration, the mean concentration of ENR in the plasma was well above the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC50 ) for most bacteria already isolated from fish except for Streptococcus spp. This way the dose used in this study allowed for concentrations in the blood to treat the diseases of tilapia. PMID:26270353

  18. Advancing regulatory science to bring novel medical devices for use in emergency care to market: the role of the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Scully, Christopher G; Forrest, Shawn; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne B; Strauss, David G

    2015-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) performs regulatory science to provide science-based medical product regulatory decisions. This article describes the types of scientific research the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health performs and highlights specific projects related to medical devices for emergency medicine. In addition, this article discusses how results from regulatory science are used by the FDA to support the regulatory process as well as how the results are communicated to the public. Regulatory science supports the FDA's mission to assure safe, effective, and high-quality medical products are available to patients.

  19. Advancing regulatory science to bring novel medical devices for use in emergency care to market: the role of the Food and Drug Administration.

    PubMed

    Scully, Christopher G; Forrest, Shawn; Galeotti, Loriano; Schwartz, Suzanne B; Strauss, David G

    2015-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) performs regulatory science to provide science-based medical product regulatory decisions. This article describes the types of scientific research the FDA's Center for Devices and Radiological Health performs and highlights specific projects related to medical devices for emergency medicine. In addition, this article discusses how results from regulatory science are used by the FDA to support the regulatory process as well as how the results are communicated to the public. Regulatory science supports the FDA's mission to assure safe, effective, and high-quality medical products are available to patients. PMID:25128009

  20. Liquid medication administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... easily. Oral syringes have some advantages for giving liquid medicines. They are accurate. They are easy to ... cups are also a handy way to give liquid medicines. However, dosing errors have occurred with them. ...

  1. Automation and adaptation: Nurses' problem-solving behavior following the implementation of bar coded medication administration technology.

    PubMed

    Holden, Richard J; Rivera-Rodriguez, A Joy; Faye, Héléne; Scanlon, Matthew C; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2013-08-01

    The most common change facing nurses today is new technology, particularly bar coded medication administration technology (BCMA). However, there is a dearth of knowledge on how BCMA alters nursing work. This study investigated how BCMA technology affected nursing work, particularly nurses' operational problem-solving behavior. Cognitive systems engineering observations and interviews were conducted after the implementation of BCMA in three nursing units of a freestanding pediatric hospital. Problem-solving behavior, associated problems, and goals, were specifically defined and extracted from observed episodes of care. Three broad themes regarding BCMA's impact on problem solving were identified. First, BCMA allowed nurses to invent new problem-solving behavior to deal with pre-existing problems. Second, BCMA made it difficult or impossible to apply some problem-solving behaviors that were commonly used pre-BCMA, often requiring nurses to use potentially risky workarounds to achieve their goals. Third, BCMA created new problems that nurses were either able to solve using familiar or novel problem-solving behaviors, or unable to solve effectively. Results from this study shed light on hidden hazards and suggest three critical design needs: (1) ecologically valid design; (2) anticipatory control; and (3) basic usability. Principled studies of the actual nature of clinicians' work, including problem solving, are necessary to uncover hidden hazards and to inform health information technology design and redesign.

  2. Effective method of measuring the radioactivity of [131I]-capsule prior to radioiodine therapy with significant reduction of the radiation exposure to the medical staff.

    PubMed

    Lützen, Ulf; Zhao, Yi; Marx, Malies; Imme, Thea; Assam, Isong; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Culman, Juaraj; Zuhayra, Maaz

    2016-07-08

    Radiation Protection in Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radio Oncology is of the utmost importance. Radioiodine therapy is a frequently used and effective method for the treatment of thyroid disease. Prior to each therapy the radioactivity of the [131I]-capsule must be determined to prevent misadministration. This leads to a significant radiation exposure to the staff. We describe an alternative method, allowing a considerable reduction of the radiation exposure. Two [131I]-capsules (A01 = 2818.5; A02 = 7355.0 MBq) were measured multiple times in their own delivery lead containers - that is to say, [131I]-capsules remain inside the containers during the measurements (shielded measurement) using a dose calibrator and a well-type and a thyroid uptake probe. The results of the shielded measurements were correlated linearly with the [131I]-capsules radioactivity to create calibration curves for the used devices. Additional radioactivity measurements of 50 [131I]-capsules of different radioactivities were done to validate the shielded measuring method. The personal skin dose rate (HP(0.07)) was determined using calibrated thermo luminescent dosimeters. The determination coefficients for the calibration curves were R2 > 0.9980 for all devices. The relative uncertainty of the shielded measurement was < 6.8%. At a distance of 10 cm from the unshielded capsule the HP(0.07) was 46.18 μSv/(GBq•s), and on the surface of the lead container containing the [131I]-capsule the HP(0.07) was 2.99 and 0.27 μSv/(GBq•s) for the two used container sizes. The calculated reduction of the effective dose by using the shielded measuring method was, depending on the used container size, 74.0% and 97.4%, compared to the measurement of the unshielded [131I]-capsule using a dose calibrator. The measured reduction of the effective radiation dose in the practice was 56.6% and 94.9 for size I and size II containers. The shielded [131I]-capsule measurement reduces the radiation exposure to the

  3. Effective method of measuring the radioactivity of [131I]-capsule prior to radioiodine therapy with significant reduction of the radiation exposure to the medical staff.

    PubMed

    Lützen, Ulf; Zhao, Yi; Marx, Malies; Imme, Thea; Assam, Isong; Siebert, Frank-Andre; Culman, Juaraj; Zuhayra, Maaz

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Protection in Radiology, Nuclear Medicine and Radio Oncology is of the utmost importance. Radioiodine therapy is a frequently used and effective method for the treatment of thyroid disease. Prior to each therapy the radioactivity of the [131I]-capsule must be determined to prevent misadministration. This leads to a significant radiation exposure to the staff. We describe an alternative method, allowing a considerable reduction of the radiation exposure. Two [131I]-capsules (A01 = 2818.5; A02 = 7355.0 MBq) were measured multiple times in their own delivery lead containers - that is to say, [131I]-capsules remain inside the containers during the measurements (shielded measurement) using a dose calibrator and a well-type and a thyroid uptake probe. The results of the shielded measurements were correlated linearly with the [131I]-capsules radioactivity to create calibration curves for the used devices. Additional radioactivity measurements of 50 [131I]-capsules of different radioactivities were done to validate the shielded measuring method. The personal skin dose rate (HP(0.07)) was determined using calibrated thermo luminescent dosimeters. The determination coefficients for the calibration curves were R2 > 0.9980 for all devices. The relative uncertainty of the shielded measurement was < 6.8%. At a distance of 10 cm from the unshielded capsule the HP(0.07) was 46.18 μSv/(GBq•s), and on the surface of the lead container containing the [131I]-capsule the HP(0.07) was 2.99 and 0.27 μSv/(GBq•s) for the two used container sizes. The calculated reduction of the effective dose by using the shielded measuring method was, depending on the used container size, 74.0% and 97.4%, compared to the measurement of the unshielded [131I]-capsule using a dose calibrator. The measured reduction of the effective radiation dose in the practice was 56.6% and 94.9 for size I and size II containers. The shielded [131I]-capsule measurement reduces the radiation exposure to the

  4. Towards Tertiary Education. Staff and Staff Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ratcliffe, Joan

    This report is intended as a resource for all those interested in staff development, especially in the tertiary education context. It describes the staff development project in the first two years of a new tertiary college--Harlow Technical College in England. An introduction and a description of the context of the project begin the report.…

  5. The Process of Staff Development: Components for Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobin, Helen M.; And Others

    The purpose of this book is to examine the development, process, and concepts of staff development in nursing education and its relationship to the overall continuing education effort. It is intended for staff development educators in agency development or revision, for administrators of nursing services in planning staff development, and for…

  6. 28 CFR 549.43 - Involuntary psychiatric treatment and medication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... treatment for the mental illness and less restrictive alternatives (e.g., seclusion or physical restraint... institution mental health division administrator shall appoint a staff representative. Witnesses should be called if they have information relevant to the inmate's mental condition and/or need for medication,...

  7. 28 CFR 549.43 - Involuntary psychiatric treatment and medication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment for the mental illness and less restrictive alternatives (e.g., seclusion or physical restraint... institution mental health division administrator shall appoint a staff representative. Witnesses should be called if they have information relevant to the inmate's mental condition and/or need for medication,...

  8. [Characteristics of morphological manifestations of anaphylactic shock in response to the administration of pharmaceutical preparations encountered in the practice of forensic medical expert-histologist].

    PubMed

    Denisova, O P; Kul'bitskiĭ, B N; Putintsev, V A; Bogomolova, I N; Bogomolov, D V

    2012-01-01

    The authors report the results of a forensic medical investigation of 6 cases of death associated with the administration of pharmaceutical products documented by forensic medical experts of the Russian Centre of Forensic Medical Expertise. The results of the study are compared with the clinical data and summarized using the methods of tanatogenetic analysis. The following main clinical variants of iatrogenic anaphylactic shock (IAS) are distinguished: bronchospastic IAS (n = 1), asphyxic IAS (n = 1), hemodynamic IAS (n = 3), and combined (bronchospastic plus hemodynamic) IAS (n = 1). The signs of all these variants are described allowing for their diagnostics and differentiation diagnostics. These data can be used for the purpose of forensic medical diagnostics and elucidation of the mechanisms of tanatogenesis.

  9. Ensuring Competent Staff in Adult Literacy Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Anabel P.

    Since staff are a key element in adult literacy programs, this document outlines requirements and actions for effective administrative and instructional personnel for such programs. Addressing first administrative personnel and then instructional personnel, the paper describes skill and knowledge requirements, and recommends actions to be taken…

  10. [Prevalence and characteristics of the "burnout syndrome" of the medical staff of cancer and TB institutions of Primorskiĭ Kraĭ].

    PubMed

    Bektasova, M V; Kaptsov, V A; Sheparev, A A

    2012-01-01

    As 50 doctors and 70 nurses in oncologic dispensaries as well 90 doctors and 110 nurses in tuberculosis dispensaries in Primorye have been studied on the basis of voluntary testing methods supposed by C. Maslach and V.V. Boiko. The aim of this study was to estimate the relative prevalence and psychological features of the "burnout syndrome" among doctors and nurses of oncologic and tuberculosis dispensaries in Primorye Territory. "Emotional burnout" in various stages of its development is much more common among nurses (75% of respondents), compared with physicians (less than 50% tested). In nursing professional burnout syndrome developed significantly more frequently in the more severe form, and with less seniority of professional activity. The dependence of burning on the age and professional experience is more common for physicians. There is an urgent need to study the epidemiology of the "burnout syndrome" and identify ways to prevent the formation of social syndrome in medical personnel. PMID:23243724

  11. Creating the optimal workspace for hospital staff using human centred design.

    PubMed

    Cawood, T; Saunders, E; Drennan, C; Cross, N; Nicholl, D; Kenny, A; Meates, D; Laing, R

    2016-07-01

    We were tasked with creating best possible non-clinical workspace solutions for approximately 450 hospital staff across 11 departments encompassing medical, nursing, allied health, administrative and other support staff. We used a Human-Centred Design process, involving 'Hear, Create and Deliver' stages. We used observations, contextual enquiry and role-specific workshops to understand needs, key interactions and drivers of behaviour. Co-design workshops were then used to explore and prototype-test concepts for the final design. With extensive employee engagement and design process expertise, an innovative solution was created that focussed on meeting the functional workspace needs of a diverse group of staff requiring a range of different spaces, incorporating space constraints and equity. This project demonstrated the strength of engaging employees in an expert-led Human-Centred Design process. We believe this is a successful blueprint process for other institutions to embrace when facing similar workspace design challenges. PMID:27405891

  12. Creating the optimal workspace for hospital staff using human centred design.

    PubMed

    Cawood, T; Saunders, E; Drennan, C; Cross, N; Nicholl, D; Kenny, A; Meates, D; Laing, R

    2016-07-01

    We were tasked with creating best possible non-clinical workspace solutions for approximately 450 hospital staff across 11 departments encompassing medical, nursing, allied health, administrative and other support staff. We used a Human-Centred Design process, involving 'Hear, Create and Deliver' stages. We used observations, contextual enquiry and role-specific workshops to understand needs, key interactions and drivers of behaviour. Co-design workshops were then used to explore and prototype-test concepts for the final design. With extensive employee engagement and design process expertise, an innovative solution was created that focussed on meeting the functional workspace needs of a diverse group of staff requiring a range of different spaces, incorporating space constraints and equity. This project demonstrated the strength of engaging employees in an expert-led Human-Centred Design process. We believe this is a successful blueprint process for other institutions to embrace when facing similar workspace design challenges.

  13. Principals Can Increase Leadership Effectiveness by Knowing Staff Personalities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberds-Baxter, Sharon

    1986-01-01

    An essential ingredient of good school administrators is understanding the differences among people. Provides a simplified outline of Carl Jung's typology of personality differences to provide administrators a better understanding of staff behavior. (MD)

  14. Directions in Staff Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brew, Angela, Ed.

    This collection of readings is intended to provide a source book on best practices in staff development in higher education within a British context. The 13 papers are grouped into three parts: part 1 presents the educational development tradition which has focused on development of staff as teachers; part 2 considers development of staff in…

  15. Regulatory organizations for physicians' status and administrative sanctions on physicians: - examining the framework of government administrative systems for physicians in Japan based on a questionnaire survey conducted on 13 national medical associations.

    PubMed

    Morioka, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Norio; Kuroyanagi, Tatsuo; Nudeshima, Jiro

    2014-05-01

    Society bestows professional privilege on physicians. At the same time, it expects physicians to strive constantly to improve their ethics and quality in medical expertise. In every nation, some level of government is responsible for certifying or licensing physicians and imposes strict management, including revoking licenses from inappropriate physicians or providing severe sanctions for misconduct or conduct unbecoming of a physician. In reality, however, it is difficult to reduce the number of inappropriate or indiscreet physicians, and each nation faces its own challenges. We conducted a questionnaire survey of 13 national medical associations, including some major Western countries, regarding the licensing of physicians, the organizations managing their medical practice status, and the data and grounds for administrative sanctioning of physicians. We then examined the circumstances in Japan based on the survey results and pointed out the domestic issues.

  16. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) compliance program guidance manual and updates (FY 86). Section 4. Medical and radiological devices. Irregular report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    The FDA Compliance Program Guidance Manual provides a system for issuing and filing program plans and instructions directed to Food and Drug Administration Field operations for project implementation. Section IV provides those chapters of the Compliance Program Guidance Manual which pertain to the areas of medical and radiological devices. Some of the areas of coverage include laser and sunlamp standards inspections, compliance testing of various radiation-emitting products such as television receivers and microwave ovens, emergency response planning and policy, premarket approval and device manufacturers inspections, device problem reporting, sterilization of devices, and consumer education programs on medical and radiological devices.

  17. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  18. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  19. 28 CFR 115.176 - Disciplinary sanctions for staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disciplinary sanctions for staff. 115.176 Section 115.176 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PRISON RAPE ELIMINATION ACT NATIONAL STANDARDS Standards for Lockups Discipline § 115.176 Disciplinary sanctions for staff. (a)...

  20. 18 CFR 401.85 - Staff and other expert testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Staff and other expert testimony. 401.85 Section 401.85 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL RULES OF PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Administrative and Other Hearings § 401.85 Staff and...

  1. That’s nice, but what does IT do? Evaluating the impact of bar coded medication administration by measuring changes in the process of care

    PubMed Central

    Holden, Richard J.; Brown, Roger L.; Alper, Samuel J.; Scanlon, Matthew C.; Patel, Neal R.; Karsh, Ben-Tzion

    2011-01-01

    Health information technology (IT) is widely endorsed as a way to improve key health care outcomes, particularly patient safety. Applying a human factors approach, this paper models more explicitly how health IT might improve or worsen outcomes. The human factors model specifies that health IT transforms the work system, which transforms the process of care, which in turn transforms the outcome of care. This study reports on transformations of the medication administration process that resulted from the implementation of one type of IT: bar coded medication administration (BCMA). Registered nurses at two large pediatric hospitals in the US participated in a survey administered before and after one of the hospitals implemented BCMA. Nurses’ perceptions of the administration process changed at the hospital that implemented BCMA, whereas perceptions of nurses at the control hospital did not. BCMA appeared to improve the safety of the processes of matching medications to the medication administration record and checking patient identification. The accuracy, usefulness, and consistency of checking patient identification improved as well. In contrast, nurses’ perceptions of the usefulness, time efficiency, and ease of the documentation process decreased post-BCMA. Discussion of survey findings is supplemented by observations and interviews at the hospital that implemented BCMA. By considering the way that IT transforms the work system and the work process a practitioner can better predict the kind of outcomes that the IT might produce. More importantly, the practitioner can achieve or prevent outcomes of interest by using design and redesign aimed at controlling work system and process transformations. PMID:21686318

  2. Design and evaluation of a multimodal mHealth based medication management system for patient self administration.

    PubMed

    Schreier, Gunter; Schwarz, Mark; Modre-Osprian, Robert; Kastner, Peter; Scherr, Daniel; Fruhwald, Friedrich

    2013-01-01

    The intake of prescribed medication presents a challenge, in particular for elderly people and in cases where a variety of medications have to be taken in accordance to a complex schedule. To support patients with this task, an mHealth-concept was developed and evaluated in the course of a clinical trial. The system used a multimodal user interface concept, i.e. both RFID tags and barcodes to identify and document the intake of medications. Results of the clinical study with 20 patients indicate that the multimodal mHealth concept utilizing barcode and RFID tags enabled easy-to-use medication management. Although further clinical evaluation is needed to assess whether such a tool can also enhance adherence, the system shows the potential for targeting the problem of medication management with mHealth methods.

  3. The Precise Observation System for the Safe Use of Medicines (POSSUM): An Approach for Studying Medication Administration Errors in the Field.

    PubMed

    Westbrook, Johanna I; Raban, Magdalena Z; Lehnbom, Elin C; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Medication administration errors (MAEs) in hospital are frequent and significantly more likely to result in serious harm to patients than other medication error types. Many interventions have been proposed in order reduce MAEs and the amount of harm associated with these errors. A major limitation in assessing the effectiveness of these interventions has been the lack of robust measures for assessing changes in MAEs and associated harms. Drawing upon extensive foundational research we have developed a robust approach and data collection software to be applied in direct observational studies of nurses to allow measurement of changes in MAE rates. We report how this approach is being applied in a large stepped-wedge cluster randomised controlled trial to assess the effectiveness of an electronic medication management system to reduce MAEs in a paediatric hospital. PMID:27577460

  4. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People's Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1) improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2) complications associated with vascular access; 3) incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4) liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan-do-check-act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety. PMID:24669192

  5. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People’s Republic of China

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ling-ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People’s Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1) improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2) complications associated with vascular access; 3) incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4) liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan–do–check–act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety. PMID:24669192

  6. Injection device-related risk management toward safe administration of medications: experience in a university teaching hospital in The People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ling-Ling; Li, Wei; Song, Ping; Zhou, Quan

    2014-01-01

    The use of injection devices to administer intravenous or subcutaneous medications is common practice throughout a variety of health care settings. Studies suggest that one-half of all harmful medication errors originate during drug administration; of those errors, about two-thirds involve injectables. Therefore, injection device management is pivotal to safe administration of medications. In this article, the authors summarize the relevant experiences by retrospective analysis of injection device-related near misses and adverse events in the Second Affiliated Hospital of Zhejiang University, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, People's Republic of China. Injection device-related near misses and adverse events comprised the following: 1) improper selection of needle diameter for subcutaneous injection, material of infusion sets, and pore size of in-line filter; 2) complications associated with vascular access; 3) incidents induced by absence of efficient electronic pump management and infusion tube management; and 4) liquid leakage of chemotherapeutic infusion around the syringe needle. Safe injection drug use was enhanced by multidisciplinary collaboration, especially among pharmacists and nurses; drafting of clinical pathways in selection of vascular access; application of approaches such as root cause analysis using a fishbone diagram; plan-do-check-act and quality control circle; and construction of a culture of spontaneous reporting of near misses and adverse events. Pharmacists must be professional in regards to medication management and use. The depth, breadth, and efficiency of cooperation between nurses and pharmacists are pivotal to injection safety.

  7. Improving medication calculation skills of practicing nurses and senior nursing students: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Harne-Britner, Sarah; Kreamer, Carolyn L; Frownfelter, Penny; Helmuth, Amy; Lutter, Stacy; Schafer, Deborah J; Wilson, Cyndy

    2006-01-01

    Medication administration is an essential nursing competency as calculation difficulties can lead to serious medication errors. Nurses involved in staff education need to be aware of methods to assess for computation difficulty and develop strategies for nurses to improve their computation abilities. The purposes of this quasi-experimental pilot study were to assess the medication calculation skills of nurses and nursing students and to determine the effectiveness of teaching strategies aimed at improving these skills. PMID:16885685

  8. Where has all the staff gone? Strategies to recruit and retain quality staff.

    PubMed

    Hauff, Helen M

    2007-06-01

    Recruiting and retaining quality staff is a national issue for all healthcare organizations, and transplant programs are also affected by this crisis. Transplant administrators are faced with increased regulatory burdens, reduced reimbursement, increased competition for uniquely qualified staff, and rising healthcare costs. These factors negatively affect transplant programs that try to ensure the infrastructure exists to provide quality care. Human resources management is a key component to transplant administration. In today's environment, administrators need to adopt long-term strategic practices to recruit and retain quality staff. Maintaining adequate staffing levels means "thinking out of the box" and looking at human resources management at all levels of skill mix including physician extenders that can perform the transplant coordinator role. Investing in the future development of staff can attract quality professionals to the field of transplantation for years to come. PMID:17624130

  9. [A bit of business administration--no problem for physicians: Master of Business Administration as panacea?].

    PubMed

    Tecklenburg, A; Liebeneiner, J

    2010-08-01

    Medical professionals with additional economic qualifications are in high demand. For doctors who aim for leading positions at medical institutions the most popular additional qualification is a Master of Business Administration (MBA). The demands on executive managers in hospitals have without any doubt changed in recent years requiring them to be trained in basic economic understanding, human resource management etc. in addition to having excellent medical training. However, MBA programs differ from one academic institution to the next. Due to the lack of standardized schedules in MBA programs it cannot be ascertained whether a candidate received adequate training and can offer the skills necessary for a higher level medical profession. In this paper the author suggests that specific training in individually required skills would be more reasonable and effective rather than encouraging medical staff to pursue academic studies leading to an MBA.

  10. Managing a multicultural radiology staff.

    PubMed

    Davidhizar, R; Dowd, S; Giger, J

    1997-01-01

    Opportunities for minorities in healthcare increased with the Civil Rights movement in the 1960s. More recently, funds from the U.S. Public Health Service have been targeted toward disadvantaged minorities. The workforce in healthcare, and in business in general, has become increasingly multicultural. Much of the literature in healthcare management lacks practical guidelines for managing a diverse workforce. Communication, both verbal and nonverbal, and culture are closely intertwined. Managers, as they develop multicultural teams, will need to understand how culture influences communication in their organizations. Space, spatial behavior, and cultural attitudes influence people's behavior. This is a particularly important consideration for a radiology staff, which must often work in close quarters. For some cultural groups, the family as an organization has more significance than even personal, work-related or national causes. People's orientation to time, whether for the past, present or future, is usually related to the culture in which they grew up. Again, this may become an important issue for a radiology administrator whose organization must run punctually and time-efficiently. How patients feel about their environment, whether they believe they are in control or believe in an external locus of control, is of particular interest to those who attempt therapeutic changes in a patient's healthcare. Does the patient believe that illness is divine will or that suffering is intrinsic to the human condition? There is increasing research in the United States to show that people do differ biologically according to race. Such differences exist among patients as well as among staff members. It has been popular to assume that differences among races do not exist. Unfortunately such an attitude does not allow for different attributes and responses of individuals. Managing a multicultural staff presents a challenge to administrators who must be skilled in working with

  11. Light for nurses' work in the 21st century: a review of lighting, human vision limitations, and medication administration.

    PubMed

    Graves, Krisanne; Symes, Lene; Cesario, Sandra K

    2014-01-01

    A literature review was conducted to determine the state of the science related to medication errors and light. The limited literature is discussed in relationship to human vision and light needs. Little systematic action has been taken to increase nurses' awareness of the connection between lighting and potential medication errors. Implications for nursing practice and research about light conditions are provided. Interventions from other industries may aid nursing in making decisions about light conditions.

  12. Medical device review at the Food and Drug Administration: lessons from magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biliary lithotripsy.

    PubMed

    Makow, L S

    1994-02-01

    Medical devices marketed in the United States must satisfy FDA standards of safety and effectiveness. Many observers have criticized the FDA medical device review process as both time consuming and unpredictable. In this note, Lawrence Makow examines the Agency's treatment of two novel medical technologies, magnetic resonance spectroscopy and biliary extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy. He concludes that the outcomes of these cases exemplify the mismatch between clinical utility and FDA approval status that has prompted concerns about lack of predictability. Mr. Makow asserts that this mismatch results from the FDA's implementation of the medical device statute rather than from the statute itself. He proposes an asymmetric standard for evaluating the safety and efficacy of new medical devices. While the safety showing would always require a high burden of proof, the efficacy standard would vary depending on the relationship between the device's safety and efficacy. Under this asymmetric standard, the FDA could better manage its workload and achieve more predictable results without sacrificing the public interest in avoiding injury from unproven medical devices.

  13. Comparison of Dental Caries Experience in Children Suffering From Epilepsy with and without Administration of Long Term Liquid Oral Medication

    PubMed Central

    Bhadravathi, Manjunath Chaluvaiah; Kumar, Adarsh; Narang, Ridhi; Gupta, Ambika; Singh, Harneet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sucrose is added as sweetening agent in liquid oral medication (LOM) to mask the acrid taste of medicines which may be potentially cariogenic. Many children under long term LOM therapy for treatment of epilepsy may be susceptible to dental caries. Aim To assess and compare dental caries experience in children under long term liquid oral medication with those not under such medication among 2-12 years old children suffering from epilepsy. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was undertaken on a total of 84 children aged 2–12 years, who were suffering from epilepsy receiving liquid oral medication for more than 3 months were selected (study group) and for comparison 106 children of similar age group and disease but on other forms of medication were included as control group. Dental caries was assessed using DMFT/DMFS (Decayed, Missing, Fillled Teeth / Surfaces), dmft/dft and dmfs/dfs indices. One-way ANOVA and t-test were used with p-value fixed at 0.05. Univariate logistic regression was applied. Results Children on LOM were at increased risk of dental caries than those with other forms of medications (OR: 2.55, 95% CI (2.37-4.15) p=0.000, HS). Caries prevalence was high in the study group (76.1%) when compared to control group (55.6%). Conclusion Long term use of liquid medicines containing sucrose is a risk factor for dental caries among children with epilepsy. PMID:27504416

  14. An audit of smoking prevalence and awareness of HSE smoking cessation services among HSE staff.

    PubMed

    OhAiseadha, C; Killeen, M; Howell, F; Saunders, J

    2014-04-01

    This audit estimated smoking prevalence and awareness of quit services among Health Service Executive (HSE) staff. A questionnaire posted to a random sample of 1,064 staff received a 71% response rate. Staff smoking prevalence was 15.0% overall, and 4.4% among Medical/Dental staff. Front-line-healthcare staff were less likely to smoke than other staff categories (adjusted OR 0.38, p < 0.001). Only 63.6% of staff were aware of HSE quit services. Targeted interventions are required to help staff to quit smoking and to boost awareness of quit services.

  15. Why Do Staff Return?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnuson, Connie

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 211 returning staff from 25 camps and interviewed 19 returning staff to study factors that influence a counselor's decision to return to camp. Examined the following dimensions of motivation and hygiene factors: (1) stimulation or inspiration; (2) personal; (3) job-related experience; (4) living conditions and camp life; (5) camp…

  16. Staff Development Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherry Creek School District 5, Englewood, CO.

    This document lists staff development components in the Cherry Creek Schools of metropolitan Denver. A brief overview stresses that the establishment of the office of the Director of Staff Development in the Cherry Creek Schools reflects a recognition of the need for more active participation of local school districts as well as all interested…

  17. The Role of the Medical Care Advisory Committee in the Administration of State Medicaid Programs: A Twenty-Year Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciesla, James R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    This 10-year followup to an S. M. Davidson and others (1984) study surveyed all 50 states and the District of Columbia to determine the composition and role of state Medicare program Medical Care Advisory Committees (MCACs). Recommendations are given to enable MCACs to be more useful in policy development. (SLD)

  18. Integrating team resource management program into staff training improves staff’s perception and patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation: the experience in a university-affiliated medical center in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The process involved in organ procurement and transplantation is very complex that requires multidisciplinary coordination and teamwork. To prevent error during the processes, teamwork education and training might play an important role. We wished to evaluate the efficacy of implementing a Team Resource Management (TRM) program on patient safety and the behaviors of the team members involving in the process. Methods We implemented a TRM training program for the organ procurement and transplantation team members of the National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH), a teaching medical center in Taiwan. This 15-month intervention included TRM education and training courses for the healthcare workers, focused group skill training for the procurement and transplantation team members, video demonstration and training, and case reviews with feedbacks. Teamwork culture was evaluated and all procurement and transplantation cases were reviewed to evaluate the application of TRM skills during the actual processes. Results During the intervention period, a total of 34 staff members participated the program, and 67 cases of transplantations were performed. Teamwork framework concept was the most prominent dimension that showed improvement from the participants for training. The team members showed a variety of teamwork behaviors during the process of procurement and transplantation during the intervention period. Of note, there were two potential donors with a positive HIV result, for which the procurement processed was timely and successfully terminated by the team. None of the recipients was transplanted with an infected organ. No error in communication or patient identification was noted during review of the case records. Conclusion Implementation of a Team Resource Management program improves the teamwork culture as well as patient safety in organ procurement and transplantation. PMID:25115403

  19. Communicating with Congressional Staff

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byerly, Radford

    2000-03-01

    Washington DC is the seat of all U.S. policy, including Science Policy. Those that want to influence policy need to be able to work effectively in that arena. While the elected officials make the final decisions, it is the congressional staff who do the research, write the specific language of bills, and help the elected officials understand and sell the policy. Thus, it is critical to interact with staff in order to influence policy. This session will provide advice, suggestions, and plenty of time for questions with someone who spent a number of years as Chief of Staff of the House Science Committee.

  20. From a Suspect Victim to the Holmes: The Unexpected Value of a Home-Made Mobile Chemotherapy Medication Administration System.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Ming-Chuan; Chang, Polun

    2016-01-01

    Nurse used to be the first one to be investigated in a drug adverse event. Our newly hospital-wide implemented home-made mobile chemotherapy medication support system, which has released our nurses from the traditional heavy 2-nurse-double-checking loading, was unexpectedly used to protect our nurses from being suspected in a recent event of over delivery of infusion. The outcome turned us to reexamine the device maintenance and test protocols. PMID:27332369

  1. State Regulation of Medication Administration by Unlicensed Assistive Personnel in Residential Care and Adult Day Services Settings.

    PubMed

    Carder, Paula C; O'Keeffe, Janet

    2016-09-01

    Residential care settings and adult day services are two community-based care options used by older adults with chronic health conditions. Most states have regulatory provisions that allow unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) to administer medications. The current national policy study examined state regulations to identify which states permit UAP to administer medications, as well as staffing and training requirements. Key findings include states lack clear and adequate provisions for nurse oversight of UAP who administer medications, although adult day service regulations provide a greater level of nurse oversight than residential care settings. Specifically, 32 states require residential care to hire a nurse, but only six include provisions regarding nurse availability (e.g., on-call, on-site, number of hours). In contrast, 10 of 20 states that require adult day service programs to hire a nurse provide availability provisions. Nurse oversight of UAP is an important means of assuring quality care and reducing errors; thus, state regulatory agencies might need to strengthen nurse oversight provisions. [Res Gerontol Nurs. 2016; 9(5):209-222.]. PMID:27054368

  2. Comparing the Effects of Yoga & Oral Calcium Administration in Alleviating Symptoms of Premenstrual Syndrome in Medical Undergraduates

    PubMed Central

    Bharati, Mehta

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Medical undergraduates are heavily burdened by their curriculum. The females, in addition, suffer from vivid affective or somatic premenstrual syndrome (PMS) symptoms such as bloating, mastalgia, insomnia, fatigue, mood swings, irritability, and depression. The present study was proposed to attenuate the symptoms of PMS by simple lifestyle measures like yoga and/or oral calcium. Methods: 65 medical female students (18-22 years) with a regular menstrual cycle were asked to self-rate their symptoms, along with their severity, in a validated questionnaire for two consecutive menstrual cycles. Fifty-eight students were found to have PMS. Twenty girls were given yoga training (45 minutes daily, five days a week, for three months). Another group of 20 was given oral tablets of calcium carbonate daily (500 mg, for three months) and rest 18 girl served as control group. Data were analyzed by SPSS ver.13 software. Results: The yoga and calcium groups showed a significant decrease in number and severity of premenstrual symptoms whereas in the control group there was not the significant difference. Conclusion: Encouraging a regular practice of yoga or taking a tablet of calcium daily in the medical schools can decrease the symptoms of premenstrual syndrome. PMID:27752483

  3. 14 CFR 1310.6 - Staff.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Staff. 1310.6 Section 1310.6 Aeronautics and Space AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM STABILIZATION AIR TRANSPORTATION STABILIZATION BOARD AIR CARRIER GUARANTEE LOAN PROGRAM ADMINISTRATIVE REGULATIONS AND AMENDMENT OR WAIVER OF A TERM OR CONDITION...

  4. Effective Strategies for Engaging Faculty and Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieving the Dream, 2015

    2015-01-01

    Community colleges are the pathways for millions of Americans to gain valuable education and to access career opportunities leading to family-sustaining wages. Faculty, student services staff, and administrators must share in the responsibility for student success if we are to meet national completion goals and reach even more students. During a…

  5. Alternatives for Staff Development of Adult Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burrichter, Arthur W.; Gardner, Daniel L.

    The product of a three-year adult education teacher training project conducted for Florida's adult educators, this guide is designed to assist planners, facilitators, evaluators, and administrators of staff development programs for adult education teachers to design and conduct effective personal and professional learning experiences. It provides…

  6. Staff Development Resources, 1990-91.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Instructional Technology.

    This staff development resource guide provides listings of instructional television and radio broadcasts related to major areas of the Total Teaching Act in South Carolina's Program for Effective Teaching (PET). Television program topics include: administration; adult education; the arts; career education; certificate-renewal credit courses;…

  7. 78 FR 13686 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Review Staff on Pediatric Information Incorporated Into Human...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Review Staff on Pediatric Information Incorporated Into Human Prescription Drug and Biological Products Labeling; Availability AGENCY... announcing the availability of a draft guidance for industry and review staff entitled...

  8. [The need for training in gerontology and geriatrics among the staff providing services at a geriatric care institution].

    PubMed

    Baerga Duperoy, Rachel; Castro Rojas, Nydia; Orta Rodríguez, Brenda; González Caraballo, Enid; Cruz González, Angel; Vázquez Fernández, José; Oliver Vázquez, Marlén

    2002-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore and identify the basic training needs of nursing home staff, in terms of attitudes, knowledge and skills required to work effectively with geriatric patients. Three focus groups were performed, two groups of employees, and a group of elderly residents of the institution, in order to explore issues pertaining to the following topics: personal attributes required to work with geriatric patients, basic knowledge and skills needed to provide effective services. Group discussions were transcribed and themes were extracted through consensus reached by the investigators. Results indicated that the interviewed staff lack of formal preparation or continuing education in gerontology or geriatrics. Needs identified were the following: the aging process, caring behaviors, management of common health conditions, administration of medications, transference and mobility of residents, among others. Finding were use to design an educational program aimed in assisting nursing home staff in providing an effective service to their geriatric patients.

  9. Perception of the A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and acceptance of influenza vaccination by Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 staff: A descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Amour, Sélilah; Djhehiche, Khaled; Zamora, Adeline; Bergeret, Alain; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perception and attitudes of university staff, including medical school and other science specialties, toward the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and influenza vaccination program. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 4,529 university personnel on October 19-20, 2009. Seven hundred (15%) employees participated in the study. Only 18% were willing to be vaccinated, men more than women (29% versus 9%, P < 0.001), and professors/researchers more than administrative/technical staff (30% vs. 6%, P < 0.001). Intention to be vaccinated was insufficient. Additional efforts are needed to improve information dissemination among university staff. Medical university personnel should receive more information to increase vaccine coverage and protect them as well as patients. PMID:25715115

  10. Perception of the A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and acceptance of influenza vaccination by Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 staff: A descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Amour, Sélilah; Djhehiche, Khaled; Zamora, Adeline; Bergeret, Alain; Vanhems, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the perception and attitudes of university staff, including medical school and other science specialties, toward the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic and influenza vaccination program. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted among 4,529 university personnel on October 19–20, 2009. Seven hundred (15%) employees participated in the study. Only 18% were willing to be vaccinated, men more than women (29% versus 9%, P < 0.001), and professors/researchers more than administrative/technical staff (30% vs. 6%, P < 0.001). Intention to be vaccinated was insufficient. Additional efforts are needed to improve information dissemination among university staff. Medical university personnel should receive more information to increase vaccine coverage and protect them as well as patients. PMID:25715115

  11. Using ATS-6 for Continuing Medical Education and Health Care in Appalachia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler-Paisley, Matilda; And Others

    Ten Veterans Administration hospitals in Appalachia participated in five biomedical communication experiments using the Advanced Technology Satellite (ATS-6). Material was collected and evaluated by both questionnaires and interviews with the medical staff of the 10 hospitals. The five experiments were conducted in the areas of: (1) video…

  12. Motivating Your Development Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nancy

    1996-01-01

    Suggestions for motivating institutional advancement staff at colleges and universities include nonfinancial motivators (such as appreciation, team building, empowerment, professional development opportunities, flexibility, and formal recognition) and financial rewards (such as bonuses and merit pay). (DB)

  13. Migrant Education Administrative Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Compensatory Education.

    Relating specifically to the North Carolina migrant education program's administrative responsibilities, this guide is designed to aid administrators in program management, monitoring project activities, project evaluation, self-assessment, determining needs for training and staff development, site-visit preparation, policy development, and…

  14. A two-year retrospective review of the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration by alpine helicopter emergency medical physicians to patients with isolated limb injury.

    PubMed

    Eidenbenz, D; Taffé, P; Hugli, O; Albrecht, E; Pasquier, M

    2016-07-01

    Up to 75% of pre-hospital trauma patients experience moderate to severe pain but this is often poorly recognised and treated with insufficient analgesia. Using multi-level logistic regression analysis, we aimed to identify the determinants of pre-hospital analgesia administration and choice of analgesic agent in a single helicopter-based emergency medical service, where available analgesic drugs were fentanyl and ketamine. Of the 1156 patients rescued for isolated limb injury, 657 (57%) received analgesia. Mean (SD) initial pain scores (as measured by a numeric rating scale) were 2.8 (1.8), 3.3 (1.6) and 7.4 (2.0) for patients who did not receive, declined, and received analgesia, respectively (p < 0.001). Fentanyl as a single agent, ketamine in combination with fentanyl and ketamine as a single agent were used in 533 (84%), 94 (14%) and 10 (2%) patients, respectively. A high initial on-scene pain score and a presumptive diagnosis of fracture were the main determinants of analgesia administration. Fentanyl was preferred for paediatric patients and ketamine was preferentially administered for severe pain by physicians who had more medical experience or had trained in anaesthesia. PMID:27091515

  15. Handbook for Staff Development in Residential Schools for Deaf Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naiman, Doris W.; Mashikian, Hagop S.

    The handbook is intended to aid residential schools for deaf children in establishing comprehensive staff development programs. Stressed is the importance of involving all staff members including administrators, teachers, and dormitory counselors in the provision of an integrated 24-hour-a-day learning environment. The handbook is said to be…

  16. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  17. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  18. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  19. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  20. 16 CFR 1.72 - Examination, counseling and staff advice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Examination, counseling and staff advice. 1... PRACTICE GENERAL PROCEDURES Administration of the Fair Credit Reporting Act § 1.72 Examination, counseling... counseling. Requests for staff interpretation of the Fair Credit Reporting Act should be directed to...

  1. Issues in Staff Development. A Collection of Conference Papers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    London Univ. (England). Inst. of Education.

    Papers and discussions presented at a British Staff Development in Universities program conference are reported in this collection. Focus was on the role of staff development units, courses and activities concerned with both teaching and administration, and information services. Topics and authors or reporters are: "The Longer Reach," by David…

  2. When staff members sexually abuse children in residential care.

    PubMed

    Bloom, R B

    1992-01-01

    When an agency staff member is accused of sexually abusing a client, the administration is faced with the Solomonic task of balancing the necessity of protecting the child, supporting the staff, and maintaining the integrity and reputation of the agency. This article presents practical suggestions for managing the agency through such a crisis. PMID:1638902

  3. Retention of Staff in the Early Childhood Education Workforce

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holochwost, Steven J.; DeMott, Kerri; Buell, Martha; Yannetta, Kelly; Amsden, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    What incentives can the administrators of early childhood education facilities offer their staff in order to retain them? In light of research identifying low staff turnover as a key component of high quality early childhood education, the answer to this question has ramifications beyond human-resources management. This paper presents the results…

  4. International Review of Staff Appraisal Practices: Current Trends and Issues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Richard; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Describes the purposes, form, and content of staff appraisal schemes in ten countries' public administrations and discusses a number of related trends and issues. Examines the effects of these trends in light of the organizations' experiences and draws attention to the inadequate monitoring and evaluation of staff appraisal schemes. (Author/JG)

  5. Your Investments in Staff Development--An Open Letter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buddy, Juanita Warren

    2009-01-01

    This article features an open letter written by the author to her school library media colleagues, applauding those who are providing informative and interesting staff development activities for teachers, administrators, and their library media peers. She reminds her colleagues about their role in staff development and not to underestimate the…

  6. Wait times to rheumatology care for patients with rheumatic diseases: a data linkage study of primary care electronic medical records and administrative data

    PubMed Central

    Widdifield, Jessica; Bernatsky, Sasha; Thorne, J. Carter; Bombardier, Claire; Jaakkimainen, R. Liisa; Wing, Laura; Paterson, J. Michael; Ivers, Noah; Butt, Debra; Lyddiatt, Anne; Hofstetter, Catherine; Ahluwalia, Vandana; Tu, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Background: The Wait Time Alliance recently established wait time benchmarks for rheumatology consultations in Canada. Our aim was to quantify wait times to primary and rheumatology care for patients with rheumatic diseases. Methods: We identified patients from primary care practices in the Electronic Medical Record Administrative data Linked Database who had referrals to Ontario rheumatologists over the period 2000-2013. To assess the full care pathway, we identified dates of symptom onset, presentation in primary care and referral from electronic medical records. Dates of rheumatologist consultations were obtained by linking with physician service claims. We determined the duration of each phase of the care pathway (symptom onset to primary care encounter, primary care encounter to referral, and referral to rheumatologist consultation) and compared them with established benchmarks. Results: Among 2430 referrals from 168 family physicians, 2015 patients (82.9%) were seen by 146 rheumatologists within 1 year of referral. Of the 2430 referrals, 2417 (99.5%) occurred between 2005 and 2013. The main reasons for referral were osteoarthritis (32.4%) and systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases (30.6%). Wait times varied by diagnosis and geographic region. Overall, the median wait time from referral to rheumatologist consultation was 74 (interquartile range 27-101) days; it was 66 (interquartile range 18-84) days for systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases. Wait time benchmarks were not achieved, even for the most urgent types of referral. For systemic inflammatory rheumatic diseases, most of the delays occurred before referral. Interpretation: Rheumatology wait times exceeded established benchmarks. Targeted efforts are needed to promote more timely access to both primary and rheumatology care. Routine linkage of electronic medical records with administrative data may help fill important gaps in knowledge about waits to primary and specialty care. PMID:27398365

  7. Medical procedures and outcomes of Japanese patients with trisomy 18 or trisomy 13: analysis of a nationwide administrative database of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Ishitsuka, Kazue; Matsui, Hiroki; Michihata, Nobuaki; Fushimi, Kiyohide; Nakamura, Tomoo; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2015-08-01

    The choices of aggressive treatment for trisomy 18 (T18) and trisomy 13 (T13) remain controversial. Here, we describe the current medical procedures and outcomes of patients with T18 and T13 from a nationwide administrative database of hospitalized patients in Japan. We used the database to identify eligible patients with T18 (n = 438) and T13 (n = 133) who were first admitted to one of 200 hospitals between July 2010 and March 2013. Patients were divided into admission at day <7 (early neonatal) and admission at day ≥7 (late neonatal and post neonatal) groups, and we described the medical intervention and status at discharge for each group. In the day <7 groups, surgical interventions were performed for 56 (19.9%) T18 patients and 22 (34.4%) T13 patients, including pulmonary artery banding, and procedures for esophageal atresia and omphalocele. None received intracardiac surgery. The rate of patients discharged to home was higher in the day ≥7 groups than the day <7 groups (T18: 72.6 vs. 38.8%; T13: 73.9 vs. 21.9%, respectively). Our data show that a substantial number of patients with trisomy received surgery and were then discharged home, but, of these, a considerable number required home medical care. This included home oxygen therapy, home mechanical ventilation, and tube feeding. These findings will be useful to clinicians or families who care for patients with T18 and T13. PMID:25847518

  8. Reducing the Risk of Harm From Medication Errors in Children

    PubMed Central

    Neuspiel, Daniel R.; Taylor, Melissa M.

    2013-01-01

    Medication errors affect the pediatric age group in all settings: outpatient, inpatient, emergency department, and at home. Children may be at special risk due to size and physiologic variability, limited communication ability, and treatment by nonpediatric health care providers. Those with chronic illnesses and on multiple medications may be at higher risk of experiencing adverse drug events. Some strategies that have been employed to reduce harm from pediatric medication errors include e-prescribing and computerized provider order entry with decision support, medication reconciliation, barcode systems, clinical pharmacists in medical settings, medical staff training, package changes to reduce look-alike/sound-alike confusion, standardization of labeling and measurement devices for home administration, and quality improvement interventions to promote nonpunitive reporting of medication errors coupled with changes in systems and cultures. Future research is needed to measure the effectiveness of these preventive strategies. PMID:25114560

  9. Hospital opts for "greenhouse" atmosphere in staff dining area.

    PubMed

    Green, D E

    1981-02-16

    The administration of St. Elizabeth Hospital, Granite City, IL, chose a staff dining area design that accents natural light, foliage, and wood finishes in an attempt to provide their employees with a relaxing, intimate place to meet.

  10. Involving staff pharmacists in management decisions.

    PubMed

    Robinson, L A; Vanderveen, T W

    1977-03-01

    Various administrative techniques used to bring staff pharmacists in a decentralized, satellite pharmacy system into the managerial decision-making process are discussed. These techniques include a staff pharmacist on-call procedure to discourage absenteeism, and the concept of a head pharmacist to serve as a link with departmental administration. The head pharmacist works in the satelite pharmacy, is responsible for its daily operation and is the spokesman for the satellite. Active roles for the head pharmacist in the selection and evaluation of technicians are outlines. Management skills are developed in head pharmacists through a program of special classes and discussion groups. It is concluded that this program has improved the credibility of administrative decisions and has tapped an underused source of ideas and talent.

  11. Preventing medication errors with nimodipine by compounding proper dosage forms.

    PubMed

    McElhiney, Linda F

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacists can play an active role in preventing tragic medication errors by using United States Pharmacopeia standards, as well as other compounding guidelines, by using due diligence, and by following written standard operating procedures. Nimodipine is shown within this article as an example of the importance of proper dosing of a drug because, since the approval of nimodipine capsules in 1988, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has identified 31 cases of medication errors associated with its use. Pharmacists can compound nimodipine oral suspension and prepare the doses in oral syringes for the nursing and medical staff.

  12. Medical Information & Technology: Rapidly Expanding Vast Horizons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahni, Anil K.

    2012-12-01

    During ÑMedical Council Of India?, Platinum Jubilee Year (1933-2008) Celebrations, In Year 2008, Several Scientific Meeting/Seminar/Symposium, On Various Topics Of Contemporary Importance And Relevance In The Field Of ÑMedical Education And Ethics?, Were Organized, By Different Medical Colleges At Various Local, State, National Levels. The Present Discussion, Is An Comprehensive Summary Of Various Different Aspects of ìMedical Information Communication Technologyî, Especially UseFul For The Audience Stratum Group Of Those Amateur Medical & Paramedical Staff, With No Previous Work Experience Knowledge Of Computronics Applications. Outlining The, i.Administration Applications: Medical Records Etc, ii. Clinical Applications: Pros pective Scope Of TeleMedicine Applicabilities Etc iii. Other Applications: Efforts To Augment Improvement Of Medical Education, Medical Presentations, Medical Education And Research Etc. ÑMedical Trancription? & Related Recent Study Fields e.g ÑModern Pharmaceuticals?,ÑBio-Engineering?, ÑBio-Mechanics?, ÑBio-Technology? Etc., Along With Important Aspects Of Computers-General Considerations, Computer Ergonomics Assembled To Summarize, The AwareNess Regarding Basic Fundamentals Of Medical Computronics & Its Practically SuccessFul Utilities.

  13. 28 CFR 2.77 - Medical parole.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Medical parole. (a) Upon receipt of a report from the institution in which the prisoner is confined that... granted a medical parole on the basis of terminal illness if: (1) The institution's medical staff has... for a medical parole by submitting an application to the institution case management staff, who...

  14. Access to care for transgender veterans in the Veterans Health Administration: 2006-2013.

    PubMed

    Kauth, Michael R; Shipherd, Jillian C; Lindsay, Jan; Blosnich, John R; Brown, George R; Jones, Kenneth T

    2014-09-01

    A 2011 Veterans Health Administration directive mandated medically necessary care for transgender veterans. Internal education efforts informed staff of the directive and promoted greater access to care. For fiscal years 2006 through 2013, we identified 2662 unique individuals with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnoses related to transgender status in Veterans Health Administration medical records, with 40% of new cases in the 2 years following the directive. A bottom-up push for services by veterans and top-down education likely worked synergistically to speed implementation of the new policy and increase access to care. PMID:25100417

  15. Can oral fluid cannabinoid testing monitor medication compliance and/or cannabis smoking during oral THC and oromucosal Sativex administration?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dayong; Karschner, Erin L.; Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES We characterize cannabinoid disposition in oral fluid (OF) after Dronabinol, synthetic oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), and Sativex, a cannabis-extract oromucosal spray, and evaluate whether smoked cannabis relapse or Sativex compliance can be identified with OF cannabinoid monitoring. METHODS 5 and 15 mg synthetic oral THC, low (5.4 mg THC, 5.0 mg cannabidiol (CBD)) and high (16.2 mg THC, 15.0 mg CBD) dose Sativex, and placebo were administered in random order (n=14). Oral fluid specimens were collected for 10.5h after dosing and analyzed for THC, CBD, cannabinol (CBN), and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). RESULTS After oral THC, OF THC concentrations decreased over time from baseline, reflecting residual THC excretion from previously self-administered smoked cannabis. CBD and CBN also were rarely detected. After Sativex, THC, CBD and CBN increased greatly, peaking at 0.25–1h. Median CBD/THC and CBN/THC ratios were 0.82–1.34 and 0.04–0.06, respectively, reflecting cannabinoids’ composition in Sativex. THCCOOH/THC ratios within 4.5h post Sativex were ≤1.6 pg/ng, always lower than after oral THC and placebo. THCCOOH/THC ratios increased throughout each dosing session. CONCLUSIONS Lack of measurable THC, CBD and CBN in OF following oral THC, and high OF CBD/THC ratios after Sativex distinguish oral and sublingual drug delivery routes from cannabis smoking. Low THCCOOH/THC ratios suggest recent Sativex and smoked cannabis exposure. These data indicate that OF cannabinoid monitoring can document compliance with Sativex pharmacotherapy, and identify relapse to smoked cannabis during oral THC medication but not Sativex treatment, unless samples were collected shortly after smoking. PMID:23146820

  16. Hospice staff attitudes towards telehospice.

    PubMed

    Demiris, George; Oliver, Debra R Parker; Fleming, David A; Edison, Karen

    2004-01-01

    Telemedicine, defined as the use of advanced telecommunication technologies to bridge geographic distance and improve delivery of care, is perceived by many as a way to eliminate barriers to quality care at the end of life. The use of telemedicine in hospice, known as telehospice, is a novel approach to such care, and few pilot studies have investigated its feasibility. The purpose of this study was to assess hospice providers 'perceptions of telehospice. A focus group session was conducted with 10 staff members from five hospice agencies in Missouri. Participants included administrators, nurses, and social workers. Overall, providers had a positive perception of telehospice and found that the use of videophone technology enhanced care by enabling providers, patients, and family members a means to communicate. However, they emphasized that it was an additional tool and not a substitute for actual visits. Issues of privacy and usability were also raised.

  17. Teaching in Spanish Medical Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bombi, Josep Antoni

    2003-01-01

    Assesses the current situation of medical teaching, available healthcare facilities, and teaching staff employed at Spanish medical schools. Response rate was 100% from 27 schools surveyed. (Author/NB)

  18. Mobility of University Staff.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Cultural Cooperation, Strasbourg (France).

    This study deals with interuniversity mobility. Part I examines the harmonization of action taken to encourage mobility, the removal of legislative and statutory obstacles to mobility, the simplification of university staff regulations and careers, and incentives to mobility. Part II describes the ideas and activities of UNESCO, the Council of…

  19. Systematic Staff Selection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Norman L.

    1979-01-01

    Describes the process of staff selection for the general studies department at Piedmont Technical College. Makes suggestions on how to write a job description, establish selection criteria, develop the selection process, and make the selection itself. Includes sample forms used in the process. (DR)

  20. Faculty and Staff Information.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kentucky Univ., Lexington. Community Coll. System.

    This booklet is intended to acquaint faculty and staff members with general information about the University of Kentucky community College System, and to explain some of its policies affecting them. The booklet is organized into five sections. Section I contains general information about the system, gives its history, purpose, and a map of the…