Science.gov

Sample records for administrative controls alternative

  1. Alternatives for jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    The technical progress of researches Alternatives for Jet Engine Control is reported. A numerical study employing feedback tensors for optimal control of nonlinear systems was completed. It is believed that these studies are the first of their kind. State regulation, with a decrease in control power is demonstrated. A detailed treatment follows.

  2. Alternatives for jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    The technical progress of researches on alternatives for jet engine control is reported. Extensive numerical testing is included. It is indicated that optimal inputs contribute significantly to the process of calculating tensor approximations for nonlinear systems, and that the resulting approximations may be order-reduced in a systematic way.

  3. Alternatives for jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    The technical progress of researches on alternatives for jet engine control, is reported. The principal new activities involved the initial testing of an input design method for choosing the inputs to a non-linear system to aid the approximation of its tensor parameters, and the beginning of order reduction studies designed to remove unnecessary monomials from tensor models.

  4. Alternator control for battery charging

    DOEpatents

    Brunstetter, Craig A.; Jaye, John R.; Tallarek, Glen E.; Adams, Joseph B.

    2015-07-14

    In accordance with an aspect of the present disclosure, an electrical system for an automotive vehicle has an electrical generating machine and a battery. A set point voltage, which sets an output voltage of the electrical generating machine, is set by an electronic control unit (ECU). The ECU selects one of a plurality of control modes for controlling the alternator based on an operating state of the vehicle as determined from vehicle operating parameters. The ECU selects a range for the set point voltage based on the selected control mode and then sets the set point voltage within the range based on feedback parameters for that control mode. In an aspect, the control modes include a trickle charge mode and battery charge current is the feedback parameter and the ECU controls the set point voltage within the range to maintain a predetermined battery charge current.

  5. ARAC: Alternative Route to Administrative Certification. A New Model for Administrator Certification.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hecht, Jeffrey B.; Ashby, Dianne; Azinger, Al; Klass, Patricia H.

    Alternative routes to administrator certification may provide many benefits to states and school districts unable to fill critical public school administrative positions. Such programs can appeal to qualified individuals outside of education, as well as those persons unable or unwilling to progress through a traditional program of study. To be…

  6. Alternative Administrative Certification: Socializing Factors Influencing Program Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickmore, Dana L.; Bickmore, Steven T.; Raines, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    This study used an organizational socialization lens to examine factors influencing participants' decision to pursue the principalship and choice to engage in an alternate administration certification program. Through an analysis of participant focus groups and interviews, factors emerged from the codes that were compared with dimensions of…

  7. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on electric utility systems

    SciTech Connect

    Veselka, T.D.; Portante, E.C.; Koritarov, V.

    1995-03-01

    This technical memorandum estimates the effects of alternative contractual commitments that may be initiated by the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. It also studies hydropower operational restrictions at the Salt Lake City Area Integrated Projects in combination with these alternatives. Power marketing and hydropower operational effects are estimated in support of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Electricity production and capacity expansion for utility systems that will be directly affected by alternatives specified in the EIS are simulated. Cost estimates are presented by utility type and for various activities such as capacity expansion, generation, long-term firm purchases and sales, fixed operation and maintenance expenses, and spot market activities. Operational changes at hydropower facilities are also investigated.

  8. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Stanley J; Kearns, David N; Cohn, Scott I; Schindler, Charles W; Panlilio, Leigh V

    2003-01-01

    Environmental stimuli that set the occasion wherein drugs are acquired can "trigger" drug-related behavior. Investigating the stimulus control of drug self-administration in laboratory animals should help us better understand this aspect of human drug abuse. Stimulus control of cocaine self-administration was generated here for the first time using multiple and chained schedules with short, frequently-alternating components--like those typically used to study food-maintained responding. The procedures and results are presented along with case histories to illustrate the strategies used to produce this stimulus control. All these multicomponent schedules contained variable-interval (VI) components as well as differential-reinforcement-of-other-behavior (DRO) or extinction components. Schedule parameters and unit dose were adjusted for each rat to produce stable, moderate rates in VI components, with minimal postreinforcement (infusion) pausing, and response cessation in extinction and DRO components. Whole-body drug levels on terminal baselines calculated retrospectively revealed that all rats maintained fairly stable drug levels (mean, 2.3 to 3.4 mg/kg) and molar rates of intake (approximately 6.0 mg/kg/hr). Within this range, no relation between local VI response rates and drug level was found. The stimulus control revealed in cumulative records was indistinguishable from that achieved with food under these schedules, suggesting that common mechanisms may underlie the control of cocaine- and food-maintained behavior. PMID:12696744

  9. Alternatives for Jet Engine Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leake, R. J.; Sain, M. K.

    1976-01-01

    Approaches are developed as alternatives to current design methods which rely heavily on linear quadratic and Riccati equation methods. The main alternatives are discussed in two broad categories, local multivariable frequency domain methods and global nonlinear optimal methods.

  10. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on air quality and noise

    SciTech Connect

    Chun, K.C.; Chang, Y.S.; Rabchuk, J.A.

    1995-05-01

    The Western Area Power Administration, which is responsible for marketing electricity produced at the hydroelectric power-generating facilities operated by the Bureau of Reclamation on the Upper Colorado River, has proposed changes in the levels of its commitment (sales) of long-term firm capacity and energy to its customers. This report describes (1) the existing conditions of air resources (climate and meteorology, ambient air quality, and acoustic environment) of the region potentially affected by the proposed action and (2) the methodology used and the results of analyses conducted to assess the potential impacts on air resources of the proposed action and the commitment-level alternatives. Analyses were performed for the potential impacts of both commitment-level alternatives and supply options, which include combinations of electric power purchases and different operational scenarios of the hydroelectric power-generating facilities.

  11. Alternatives for jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.; Yurkovich, S.; Hill, J. P.; Kingler, T. A.

    1983-01-01

    The development of models of tensor type for a digital simulation of the quiet, clean safe engine (QCSE) gas turbine engine; the extension, to nonlinear multivariate control system design, of the concepts of total synthesis which trace their roots back to certain early investigations under this grant; the role of series descriptions as they relate to questions of scheduling in the control of gas turbine engines; the development of computer-aided design software for tensor modeling calculations; further enhancement of the softwares for linear total synthesis, mentioned above; and calculation of the first known examples using tensors for nonlinear feedback control are discussed.

  12. Alternative approaches in schistosomiasis control.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, F S; Coimbra Júnior, C E

    1992-01-01

    Measures for the control of schistosomiasis were implemented in Egypt beginning 1922. This shows that developing endemic countries are facing this problem for near 70 years. However, results in the control of this infection have not been satisfactorily obtained in spite of the technologies and strategies recently developed. The idea that social and economic components are relevant in the control of schistosomiasis is not new although its extension and profundity have not usually been well understood. More recently, most of the workers have recognized that the focal distribution of the prevalence rates of schistosomiasis should not be neglected in the control of the infection. At present, field work projects on the control of schistosomiasis are being developed in rural areas of two Brazilian studies (Espírito Santo and Pernambuco). The adopted strategy aims to interfere in the complex relationships between man and his bio-social-cultural environment, without forgetting that the unequal distribution of the space is a consequence of the political and economic organization of the Society.

  13. Alternatives for jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    Research centered on basic topics in the modeling and feedback control of nonlinear dynamical systems is reported. Of special interest were the following topics: (1) the role of series descriptions, especially insofar as they relate to questions of scheduling, in the control of gas turbine engines; (2) the use of algebraic tensor theory as a technique for parameterizing such descriptions; (3) the relationship between tensor methodology and other parts of the nonlinear literature; (4) the improvement of interactive methods for parameter selection within a tensor viewpoint; and (5) study of feedback gain representation as a counterpart to these modeling and parameterization ideas.

  14. Alternative Asbestos Control Method (AACM) Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the status to date of the Alternative Asbestos Control Method research, which is intended as a possible alternative technology for use in the demolition of buildings that contain asbestos and are covered under the regulatory requirements of the Asbesto...

  15. Alternatives for jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    Tensor model order reduction, recursive tensor model identification, input design for tensor model identification, software development for nonlinear feedback control laws based upon tensors, and development of the CATNAP software package for tensor modeling, identification and simulation were studied. The last of these are discussed.

  16. Alternatives for jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.

    1979-01-01

    The research is classified in two categories: (1) the use of modern multivariable frequency domain methods for control of engine models in the neighborhood of a set-point, and (2) the use of nonlinear modelling and optimization techniques for control of engine models over a more extensive part of the flight envelope. Progress in the first category included the extension of CARDIAD (Complex Acceptability Region for Diagonal Dominance) methods developed with the help of the grant to the case of engine models with four inputs and four outputs. A suitable bounding procedure for the dominance function was determined. Progress in the second category had its principal focus on automatic nonlinear model generation. Simulations of models produced satisfactory results where compared with the NASA DYNGEN digital engine deck.

  17. Alternatives for jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.

    1980-01-01

    Nonlinear modeling researches involving the use of tensor analysis are presented. Progress was achieved by extending the studies to a controlled equation and by considering more complex situations. Included in the report are calculations illustrating the modeling methodology for cases in which variables take values in real spaces of dimension up to three, and in which the degree of tensor term retention is as high as three.

  18. Alternatives for jet engine control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leake, R. J.; Sain, M. K.

    1978-01-01

    General goals of the research were classified into two categories. The first category involves the use of modern multivariable frequency domain methods for control of engine models in the neighborhood of a quiescent point. The second category involves the use of nonlinear modelling and optimization techniques for control of engine models over a more extensive part of the flight envelope. In the frequency domain category, works were published in the areas of low-interaction design, polynomial design, and multiple setpoint studies. A number of these ideas progressed to the point at which they are starting to attract practical interest. In the nonlinear category, advances were made both in engine modelling and in the details associated with software for determination of time optimal controls. Nonlinear models for a two spool turbofan engine were expanded and refined; and a promising new approach to automatic model generation was placed under study. A two time scale scheme was developed to do two-dimensional dynamic programming, and an outward spiral sweep technique has greatly speeded convergence times in time optimal calculations.

  19. 77 FR 10800 - Requested Administrative Waiver of the Coastwise Trade Laws: Vessel ALTERNATE LATITUDE...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... LATITUDE; Invitation for Public Comments AGENCY: Maritime Administration, Department of Transportation... applicant the intended service of the vessel ALTERNATE LATITUDE is: Intended Commercial Use of...

  20. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of exenatide following alternate routes of administration.

    PubMed

    Gedulin, Bronislava R; Smith, Pamela A; Jodka, Carolyn M; Chen, Kim; Bhavsar, Sunil; Nielsen, Loretta L; Parkes, David G; Young, Andrew A

    2008-05-22

    Exenatide is a 39-amino acid peptide incretin mimetic approved for adjunctive treatment of type 2 diabetes. It shares several glucoregulatory activities with the mammalian hormone, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1). In clinical use, subcutaneous exenatide injections demonstrate glucoregulatory and weight loss effects with sustained plasma concentrations in the 50-100 pM range. We investigated the pharmacokinetics of exenatide in normoglycemic rats and biological activity in diabetic db/db mice after delivery to various epithelial surfaces of the intestinal and respiratory tracts. In rats, elimination kinetics were similar for all routes of administration (median k(e) 0.017 min(-1)). Bioavailability (versus intravenous administration) and C(max) per unit dose differed markedly. For gastrointestinal administration, sublingual administration invoked the highest bioavailability (0.37%); in db/db mice, potentially therapeutic concentrations were obtainable. In contrast, intraduodenal bioavailability was low (0.0053%). In regard to respiratory surfaces, bioavailability of intratracheal exenatide was up to 13.6%, and for nasal administration, 1.68%. Both routes of administration produced therapeutic plasma concentrations and glucose-lowering in db/db mice. At high doses, aerosolized exenatide also achieved effective concentrations and glucose-lowering. In summary, the intestinal tract seems to have limited potential as a route of exenatide administration, with sublingual being most promising. In contrast, the respiratory tract appears to be more viable, comparing favorably with the clinically approved subcutaneous route. Despite little optimization of the delivery formulation, exenatide bioavailability compared favorable to that of several commercially available bioactive peptides.

  1. 76 FR 12129 - Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup AGENCY: Fish and... (Service), announce a ] meeting of the Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup (Workgroup... and implementation of sea lamprey control techniques alternative to lampricide that are...

  2. INTRAPERITONEAL DEXTROSE ADMINISTRATION AS AN ALTERNATIVE EMERGENCY TREATMENT FOR HYPOGLYCEMIC YEARLING CALIFORNIA SEA LIONS (ZALOPHUS CALIFORNIANUS).

    PubMed

    Fravel, Vanessa A; Van Bonn, William; Gulland, Frances; Rios, Carlos; Fahlman, Andreas; Graham, James L; Havel, Peter J

    2016-03-01

    The Marine Mammal Center (TMMC) cares for malnourished California sea lion (CSL) (Zalophus californianus) pups and yearlings every year. Hypoglycemia is a common consequence of malnutrition in young CSLs. Administering dextrose during a hypoglycemic crisis is vital to recovery. Traditional veterinary approaches to treat hypoglycemia pose therapeutic challenges in otariids, as vascular access and catheter maintenance can be difficult. The current approach to a hypoglycemic episode at TMMC is to administer dextrose intravenously (i.v.) by medically trained personnel. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) dextrose administration is an attractive alternative to i.v. administration because volunteer staff with basic training can administer treatment instead of waiting for trained staff to treat. This study compares the effects of i.v., i.p., and no dextrose administration on serum glucose and insulin in clinically healthy, euglycemic CSL yearlings. Three groups of animals, consisting of five sea lions each, were treated with 500 mg/kg dextrose using one of the following routes: i.v., i.p., or no dextrose (control). A jugular catheter was placed, and blood samples were collected at times 0, 5, 15, 30, 60, 120, 180, and 240 min after dextrose administration. I.v. dextrose administration resulted in an increase of serum glucose concentrations from a baseline level of approximately 150 mg/dl to a peak of approximately 350 mg/dl. The resulting hyperglycemia persisted for approximately 2 hr and was associated with an attenuated plasma insulin response compared with most terrestrial mammals. Intraperitoneal dextrose administration resulted in increases of serum glucose to approximately 200 mg/dl, which gradually declined to baseline by 2 hr after dextrose administration. These data suggest that the initial treatment of a hypoglycemic crisis in young malnourished CSLs can be accomplished with i.p. dextrose, thus enabling minimally trained volunteer staff to respond immediately to a crisis

  3. An Administrator's Legal Guide to Student Control.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Eugene T.

    The purpose of this study was to help public school administrators, especially principals, to understand the legal and constitutional limitations of their authority in dealing with students. Control of students is discussed as five separate topics, each representing a chapter, as follows: (1) freedom of expression and First Amendment rights; (2)…

  4. OVERVIEW ON ALTERNATIVE ASBESTOS CONTROL METHOD RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alternative asbestos control method (AACM) is an experimental approach to building demolition. Unlike the NESHAP method, the AACM allows some regulated asbestos-containing material to remain in the building and a surfactant-water solution is used to suppress asbestos fibers ...

  5. Visual operations control in administrative environments

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, M.L.; Levine, L.O.

    1995-03-01

    When asked what comes to mind when they think of ``controlling work`` in the office, people may respond with ``overbearing boss,`` ``no autonomy,`` or ``Theory X management.`` The idea of controlling work in white collar or administrative environments can have a negative connotation. However, office life is often chaotic and miserable precisely because the work processes are out of control, and managers must spend their time looking over people`s shoulders and fighting fires. While management styles and structures vary, the need for control of work processes does not. Workers in many environments are being reorganized into self-managed work teams. These teams are expected to manage their own work through increased autonomy and empowerment. However, even empowered work teams must manage their work processes because of process variation. The amount of incoming jobs vary with both expected (seasonal) and unexpected demand. The mixture of job types vary over time, changing the need for certain skills or knowledge. And illness and turnover affect the availability of workers with needed skills and knowledge. Clearly, there is still a need to control work, whether the authority for controlling work is vested in one person or many. Visual control concepts provide simple, inexpensive, and flexible mechanisms for managing processes in work teams and continuous improvement administrative environments.

  6. Science, Systems, and Theoretical Alternatives in Educational Administration: The Road Less Travelled

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Colin W.; Lakomski, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to offer a critical reflection on ideas that have been published in the "Journal of Educational Administration" over the last 50 years that present perspectives on the nature of educational administration and its various aspects, that are alternatives to the mainstream systems-scientific view of…

  7. 75 FR 54163 - Office of the Secretary: Renewal of the Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-03

    ... Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup AGENCY: Office of the Secretary, Interior. ACTION... General Services Administration, has reestablished the charter for the Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control... policy and technical advice on efforts to develop and implement sea lamprey control...

  8. Designing an Alternate Mission Operations Control Room

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montgomery, Patty; Reeves, A. Scott

    2014-01-01

    The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) is a multi-project facility that is responsible for 24x7 real-time International Space Station (ISS) payload operations management, integration, and control and has the capability to support small satellite projects and will provide real-time support for SLS launches. The HOSC is a service-oriented/ highly available operations center for ISS payloads-directly supporting science teams across the world responsible for the payloads. The HOSC is required to endure an annual 2-day power outage event for facility preventive maintenance and safety inspection of the core electro-mechanical systems. While complete system shut-downs are against the grain of a highly available sub-system, the entire facility must be powered down for a weekend for environmental and safety purposes. The consequence of this ground system outage is far reaching: any science performed on ISS during this outage weekend is lost. Engineering efforts were focused to maximize the ISS investment by engineering a suitable solution capable of continuing HOSC services while supporting safety requirements. The HOSC Power Outage Contingency (HPOC) System is a physically diversified compliment of systems capable of providing identified real-time services for the duration of a planned power outage condition from an alternate control room. HPOC was designed to maintain ISS payload operations for approximately three continuous days during planned HOSC power outages and support a local Payload Operations Team, International Partners, as well as remote users from the alternate control room located in another building.

  9. 46 CFR 62.25-10 - Manual alternate control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Manual alternate control systems. 62.25-10 Section 62.25... AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-10 Manual alternate control systems. (a) Manual alternate control systems must— (1) Be operable in an emergency and after a remote...

  10. 46 CFR 62.25-10 - Manual alternate control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Manual alternate control systems. 62.25-10 Section 62.25... AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-10 Manual alternate control systems. (a) Manual alternate control systems must— (1) Be operable in an emergency and after a remote...

  11. Chaos Theory: A Scientific Basis for Alternative Research Methods in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peca, Kathy

    This paper has three purposes. First, it places in scientific perspective the growing acceptance in educational administration research of alternative methods to empiricism by an explication of chaos theory and its assumptions. Second, it demonstrates that chaos theory provides a scientific basis for investigation of complex qualitative variables…

  12. Alternate Routes of Administration among Prescription Opioid Misusers and Associations with Sexual HIV Transmission Risk Behaviors.

    PubMed

    Buttram, Mance E; Kurtz, Steven P

    2016-01-01

    Literature suggests that young adult prescription opioid misusers who are using alternate routes of administration (e.g., snorting, injecting) may be engaging in sexual and non-sexual HIV risk behaviors. This study examines demographics, substance use, sexual risk behavior, and health and social problems associated with alternate routes of administration of prescription opioids among a sample of young adult prescription opioid misusers. Data are drawn from baseline assessments from a behavioral intervention trial. Eligible participants were ages 18-39, and reported recent (past 90 days) heterosexual sex, and recent and regular substance use and attendance at large, recognized local nightclubs. The analyses include 446 racially/ethnically diverse participants. In bivariate regression models, compared to those who did not, participants reporting alternate routes of administration (n = 209) were more likely to be White (p < 0.025) and report group sex participation history (p = 0.002), sex with an injection drug user (p = 0.003), sexual victimization history (p = 0.003), and severe mental distress (p < 0.000). White race, group sex participation history, and severe mental distress remained significant in the multivariate model. Alternate routes of administration of prescription opioids are associated with sexual HIV transmission risk behaviors. Early prevention and intervention efforts that address sexual and non-sexual HIV risk behaviors are warranted.

  13. Negotiating a Curriculum Balance: Perceptions of Special Education Teachers and Administrators Regarding Alternate Assessments in Oklahoma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modenbach, Joy Lynn

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study sought to understand how teachers and administrators navigate the state and federal requirements for students with severe and profound disabilities in regards to alternate standards and assessments. Special education teachers must balance the required curriculum while continuing to meet the physical and emotional needs of…

  14. Internal Administrative Control: Its Applicability to the Marine Corps.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-06-01

    ADMINISTRATIVE CONTROL : Master’s Thesis ITS APPLICABILITY TO THE MARINE CORPS June 1984 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(e) 4. CONTRACT OR GRANT Nr...NUMBERS Naval Postgraduate School Monterey, California 93943 It. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Naval Postgraduate School jUne 1984 13...Continu. on fevers# side It nec esary and Identify by. block number) internal Control Internal Administrative Control Administrative Control 0

  15. Alternate routes of administration and risk for HIV among prescription opioid abusers.

    PubMed

    Surratt, Hilary; Kurtz, Steven P; Cicero, Theodore J

    2011-10-01

    Route of administration is an important contributor to the adverse health consequences of prescription medication abuse. The current study examines characteristics associated with non-oral routes of administration among a large sample of prescription opioid abusers and explores needle-related human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) risk behaviors as well. In the study, 791 opioid abusers completed a one-time structured interview, including complete histories of illicit and prescription drug abuse and route of drug administration. The most common method of pill use was oral (91%), followed by intranasal (53.1%), injection (23.8%), and smoking (14.5%). The youngest prescription opioid abusers, ages 18-24, displayed significantly higher odds of using alternate routes of administration and of reusing nonsterile needles for injection. HIV prevention programming should be developed for young prescription opioid injectors.

  16. Diversity in health administration doctoral education: alternative scenarios for the future.

    PubMed

    Begun, J W

    2001-01-01

    Doctoral programs in health administration are characterized by extreme diversity in focus, format, content, and market. The observed diversity reflects two key structural attributes of health administration as a doctoral field of study: 1) its multidisciplinary base, and 2) its small size. These attributes leave doctoral programs vulnerable to a host of external pressures. The field lacks structure and organizing principles at the national or international level, and students, employers, and other stakeholders suffer some damaging consequences. Pressures from the institutional environment are weak and splintered (among the constituent disciplines of health administration), while the technical environment (economic forces such as competition for students and research funding) produces a powerful set of incentives that shape the form and substance of health administration doctoral education. As alternatives to the current hybrid nature of the field, two additional future scenarios are considered: Integration with Health Services Research, and Integration with Business Administration. The future of health administration doctoral education is interdependent with 1) the continued differentiation of health administration as a master's field of study; 2) trends in research funding; and 3) economies in the delivery of small-scale or individually customized doctoral education. At the least, programs and students currently would benefit from more information classifying program breadth and goals and reporting outcomes; more adequate information on careers and placement; and a modicum of workforce planning.

  17. Analysis of Alternative Mercury Control Strategies

    EIA Publications

    2005-01-01

    This analysis responds to a September 14, 2004, request from Chairmen James M. Inhofe and George V. Voinovich asking the Energy Information Administration (EIA) to analyze the impacts of different approaches for removing mercury from coal-fired power plants.

  18. ALTERNATIVE ASBESTOS CONTROL METHOD (AACM) AT GEBO

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the status to date of the AACM research, which is intended as a possible alternative technology for use in the demolition of buildings that contain asbestos and are covered under the regulatory requirements of the Asbestos NESHAP. This abstract and pr...

  19. Perceptions of Alternative School Teachers and Administrators about the Impact of the No Child Left behind Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queenan, Carla Glover

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate and examine the perceptions of alternative school teachers and administrators about the impact of No Child Left Behind on their students and school. Through the lens of alternative school practitioners, this study examined the intersection of at-risk students, alternative education programs,…

  20. 10. Control Area, Administration Building, interior view of former day ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Control Area, Administration Building, interior view of former day room VIEW SOUTHEAST - NIKE Missile Battery PR-79, Control Area, Tucker Hollow Road south of State Route 101, Foster, Providence County, RI

  1. 75 FR 82061 - Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ...-1335-0000-J3] Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife...), announce a meeting of the Lake Champlain Sea Lamprey Control Alternatives Workgroup (Workgroup). The... date. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Lake Champlain Basin Program/Vermont Fish and...

  2. 46 CFR 62.25-10 - Manual alternate control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Manual alternate control systems. 62.25-10 Section 62.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-10 Manual alternate control...

  3. 46 CFR 62.25-10 - Manual alternate control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Manual alternate control systems. 62.25-10 Section 62.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-10 Manual alternate control...

  4. 46 CFR 62.25-10 - Manual alternate control systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Manual alternate control systems. 62.25-10 Section 62.25-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING VITAL SYSTEM AUTOMATION General Requirements for All Automated Vital Systems § 62.25-10 Manual alternate control...

  5. 7 CFR 58.141 - Alternate quality control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate quality control program. 58.141 Section 58... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.141 Alternate quality control program. When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality program, at the producer level, which is approved by...

  6. 7 CFR 58.141 - Alternate quality control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate quality control program. 58.141 Section 58... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.141 Alternate quality control program. When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality program, at the producer level, which is approved by...

  7. 7 CFR 58.141 - Alternate quality control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate quality control program. 58.141 Section 58... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.141 Alternate quality control program. When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality program, at the producer level, which is approved by...

  8. 7 CFR 58.141 - Alternate quality control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate quality control program. 58.141 Section 58... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.141 Alternate quality control program. When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality program, at the producer level, which is approved by...

  9. 7 CFR 58.141 - Alternate quality control program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate quality control program. 58.141 Section 58... Service 1 Quality Specifications for Raw Milk § 58.141 Alternate quality control program. When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality program, at the producer level, which is approved by...

  10. 78 FR 16127 - Administration of Reformed Export Controls

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-13

    ... March 13, 2013 Part III The President Executive Order 13637--Administration of Reformed Export Controls... of March 8, 2013 Administration of Reformed Export Controls By the authority vested in me as President by the Constitution and the laws of the United States of America, including the Arms...

  11. Alternative model for administration and analysis of research-based assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Zwickl, Benjamin M.; Hobbs, Robert D.; Aiken, John M.; Welch, Nathan M.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-06-01

    Research-based assessments represent a valuable tool for both instructors and researchers interested in improving undergraduate physics education. However, the historical model for disseminating and propagating conceptual and attitudinal assessments developed by the physics education research (PER) community has not resulted in widespread adoption of these assessments within the broader community of physics instructors. Within this historical model, assessment developers create high quality, validated assessments, make them available for a wide range of instructors to use, and provide minimal (if any) support to assist with administration or analysis of the results. Here, we present and discuss an alternative model for assessment dissemination, which is characterized by centralized data collection and analysis. This model provides a greater degree of support for both researchers and instructors in order to more explicitly support adoption of research-based assessments. Specifically, we describe our experiences developing a centralized, automated system for an attitudinal assessment we previously created to examine students' epistemologies and expectations about experimental physics. This system provides a proof of concept that we use to discuss the advantages associated with centralized administration and data collection for research-based assessments in PER. We also discuss the challenges that we encountered while developing, maintaining, and automating this system. Ultimately, we argue that centralized administration and data collection for standardized assessments is a viable and potentially advantageous alternative to the default model characterized by decentralized administration and analysis. Moreover, with the help of online administration and automation, this model can support the long-term sustainability of centralized assessment systems.

  12. Impacts on irrigated agriculture of changes in electricity costs resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.K.; Flaim, S.J.; Howitt, R.E.; Palmer, S.C.

    1995-03-01

    Irrigation is a major factor in the growth of US agricultural productivity, especially in western states, which account for more than 85% of the nation`s irrigated acreage. In some of these states, almost all cropland is irrigated, and nearly 50% of the irrigation is done with electrically powered pumps. Therefore, even small increases in the cost of electricity could have a disproportionate impact on irrigated agriculture. This technical memorandum examines the impacts that could result from proposed changes in the power marketing programs of the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The changes could increase the cost of power to all Western customers, including rural municipalities and irrigation districts that rely on inexpensive federal power to pump water. The impacts are assessed by translating changes in Western`s wholesale power rate into changes in the cost of pumping water as an input for agricultural production. Farmers can adapt to higher electricity prices in many ways, such as (1) using different pumping fuels, (2) adding workers and increasing management to irrigate more efficiently, and (3) growing more drought-tolerant crops. This study projects several responses, including using less groundwater and planting fewer waterintensive crops. The study finds that when dependence on Western`s power is high, the cost of power can have a major effect on energy use, agricultural practices, and the distribution of planted acreage. The biggest percentage changes in farm income would occur (1) in Nevada and Utah (however, all projected changes are less than 2% of the baseline) and (2) under the marketing alternatives that represent the lowest capacity and energy offer considered in Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement. The aggregate impact on farm incomes and the value of total farm production would be much smaller than that suggested by the changes in water use and planted acreage.

  13. An alternative control structure for telerobotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boissiere, Peter T.; Harrigan, Raymond W.

    1989-01-01

    A new teletobotic control concept which couples human supervisory commands with computer reasoning is presented. The control system is responsive and accomplishes an operator's commands while providing obstacle avoidance and stable controlled interactions with the environment in the presence of communication time delays. This provides a system which not only assists the operator in accomplishing tasks but modifies inappropriate operator commands which can result in safety hazards and/or equipment damage.

  14. The administration`s non-proliferation and export control policy

    SciTech Connect

    1993-11-01

    On September 27, during his speech to the United Nations, President Bill Clinton outlined his administration`s arm control policies, urging tighter restraints on international export control policies and measures to enhance nuclear non-proliferation. That same day, the White House released a fact sheet summarizing the framework for U.S. efforts to prevent proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and missiles that deliver them.

  15. Alternative methods for the design of jet engine control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sain, M. K.; Leake, R. J.; Basso, R.; Gejji, R.; Maloney, A.; Seshadri, V.

    1976-01-01

    Various alternatives to linear quadratic design methods for jet engine control systems are discussed. The main alternatives are classified into two broad categories: nonlinear global mathematical programming methods and linear local multivariable frequency domain methods. Specific studies within these categories include model reduction, the eigenvalue locus method, the inverse Nyquist method, polynomial design, dynamic programming, and conjugate gradient approaches.

  16. Alternative Asbestos Control Method (AACM) Research - Feb 2008

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the status to date of the Alternative Asbestos Control Method research, which is intended as a possible alternative technology for use in the demolition of buildings that contain asbestos and are covered under the regulatory requirements of the Asbesto...

  17. ALTERNATIVE ASBESTOS CONTROL METHOD (AACM) RESEARCH - BALTIMORE, MD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the status to date of the Alternative Asbestos Control Method research, which is intended as a possible alternative technology for use in the demolition of buildings that contain asbestos and are covered under the regulatory requirements of the Asbesto...

  18. Relocatable control systems; An alternative for maintenance

    SciTech Connect

    Luque, J.; Mejias, M.; Molina, F.J. ); Rivera, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The Compania Sevillana de Electricidad (CSE) is an electric utility company with more than 2.8 million customers. It produces and distributes electric power to the south of Spain, with a coverage area of 100,000 km{sup 2}. CSE has started a program to provide its maintenance division with a control system that would be ready to substitute 1 to 10 middle-size existing substations within 24 to 48 hours. The Pedro Marin, Linarejos, and Badajoz systems will be replaced soon. Its conception as a relocatable maintenance system covers the whole design. The specifications of the system are presented in this article.

  19. Computer Generated Ability Complements as an Alternative to Continuous Hierarchy Positions: A Cybernetic Model of School Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cote, Ron Roy

    The design of an alternative administrative structure related to the cybernetic era and its organizational characteristics are discussed. In View of the role of electronic information systems today, it would be valuable to synthesize the six perspectives of administration--leader, manager, change agent, theorist, planner, and futurist--to provide…

  20. Administration knowledge of economic costs of foreign policy export controls

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-02

    The Export Administration Act of 1979 requires consultation, as appropriate, with businesses affected by proposed controls and consideration of the controls economic impact. GAO found that although there was minimal formal business consultation, the business community and the Commerce and State Departments did provide decision-makers with the essential economic arguments against the use of export controls. Administration economic analyses usually did not provide estimates of the controls indirect effects, but important limits exist to Commerce's ability to better quantify such economic costs. GAO's review does not support the conclusion that the administration might have acted differently had it been aware of the total economic costs, and it shifts the debate back to the usefulness of such foreign policy controls.

  1. Overview On Alternative Asbestos Control Method Research: Alternative Methods To Demolition

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Alternative Asbestos Control Method (AACM) is an experimental approach to building demolition. Unlike the NESHAP method, the AACM allows some regulated asbestos-containing material to remain in the building and a surfactant-water solution is used to suppress asbestos fibers ...

  2. Alternative control techniques document: Nitric and adipic acid manufacturing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Lazzo, D.W.

    1991-12-01

    The Alternative Control Techniques document describes available control techniques for reducing NOx emission levels from nitric and adipic acid manufacturing plants. The document contains information on the formation of NOx and uncontrolled NOx emissions from nitric and adipic acid plants. The following NOx control techniques for nitric acid plants are discussed: extended absorption, nonselective catalytic reduction (NSCR), and selective catalytic reduction (SCR). The following NOx control techniques for adipic acid plants are discussed: extended absorption and thermal reduction. For each control technique, achievable controlled NOx emission levels, capital and annual costs, cost effectiveness, and environmental and energy impacts are presented.

  3. Oxytocin administration enhances controlled social cognition in patients with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, J.D.; Chuang, B.; Lam, O.; Lai, W.; O’Donovan, A.; Rankin, K.P.; Mathalon, D.H.; Vinogradov, S.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Individuals with schizophrenia have functionally significant deficits in automatic and controlled social cognition, but no currently available pharmacologic treatments reduce these deficits. The neuropeptide oxytocin has multiple prosocial effects when administered intranasally in humans and there is growing interest in its therapeutic potential in schizophrenia. Methods We administered 40 IU of oxytocin and saline placebo intranasally to 29 male subjects with schizophrenia and 31 age-matched, healthy controls in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study. Social cognition was assessed with The Awareness of Social Inference Test (TASIT) and the Reading the Mind in the Eyes Test (RMET). We examined the effects of oxytocin administration on automatic social cognition (the ability to rapidly interpret and understand emotional cues from the voice, face, and body); controlled social cognition (the ability to comprehend indirectly expressed emotions, thoughts, and intentions through complex deliberations over longer time periods); and a control task (the ability to comprehend truthful dialog and perform general task procedures) in individuals with and without schizophrenia using mixed factorial analysis of variance models. Results Patients with schizophrenia showed significant impairments in automatic and controlled social cognition compared to healthy controls, and administration of oxytocin significantly improved their controlled, but not automatic, social cognition, F(1, 58) = 8.75; p = 0.004. Conversely, oxytocin administration had limited effects on social cognition in healthy participants. Patients and controls performed equally well and there were no effects of oxytocin administration on the control task. Discussion Intact social cognitive abilities are associated with better functional outcomes in individuals with schizophrenia. Our data highlight the potentially complex effects of oxytocin on some but not all aspects of

  4. Subsurface barrier design alternatives for confinement and controlled advection flow

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, S.J.; Stewart, W.E.; Alexander, R.G.; Cantrell, K.J.; McLaughlin, T.J.

    1994-02-01

    Various technologies and designs are being considered to serve as subsurface barriers to confine or control contaminant migration from underground waste storage or disposal structures containing radioactive and hazardous wastes. Alternatives including direct-coupled flood and controlled advection designs are described as preconceptual examples. Prototype geotechnical equipment for testing and demonstration of these alternative designs tested at the Hanford Geotechnical Development and Test Facility and the Hanford Small-Tube Lysimeter Facility include mobile high-pressure injectors and pumps, mobile transport and pumping units, vibratory and impact pile drivers, and mobile batching systems. Preliminary laboratory testing of barrier materials and additive sequestering agents have been completed and are described.

  5. 75 FR 64216 - Interpretation of OSHA's Provisions for Feasible Administrative or Engineering Controls of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-19

    ... for Feasible Administrative or Engineering Controls of Occupational Noise AGENCY: Occupational Safety... OSHA's official interpretation of the term feasible administrative or engineering controls as used in... standards. Under the standard, employers must use administrative or engineering controls rather...

  6. 75 FR 77798 - Interpretation of OSHA's Provisions for Feasible Administrative or Engineering Controls of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-14

    ... for Feasible Administrative or Engineering Controls of Occupational Noise AGENCY: Occupational Safety... Interpretation of OSHA's Provisions for Feasible Administrative or Engineering Controls of Occupational Noise... Interpretation of OSHA's Provisions for Feasible Administrative or Engineering Controls of Occupational...

  7. 8 CFR 1003.11 - Administrative control Immigration Courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Administrative control Immigration Courts. 1003.11 Section 1003.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Office of the Chief Immigration...

  8. 8 CFR 1003.11 - Administrative control Immigration Courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administrative control Immigration Courts. 1003.11 Section 1003.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Office of the Chief Immigration...

  9. 8 CFR 1003.11 - Administrative control Immigration Courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative control Immigration Courts. 1003.11 Section 1003.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Office of the Chief Immigration...

  10. 8 CFR 1003.11 - Administrative control Immigration Courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Administrative control Immigration Courts. 1003.11 Section 1003.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Office of the Chief Immigration...

  11. 8 CFR 1003.11 - Administrative control Immigration Courts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Administrative control Immigration Courts. 1003.11 Section 1003.11 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE GENERAL PROVISIONS EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW Office of the Chief Immigration...

  12. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-5 - Administratively controlled items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Administratively controlled items. 109-1.5108-5 Section 109-1.5108-5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL...

  13. Overview On Alternative Asbestos Control Method Research - Wisconsin Dells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alternative asbestos control method (AACM) is an experimental approach to building demolition. Unlike the NESHAP method, the AACM allows some regulated asbestos containing material to remain in the building and a surfactant-water solution is used to suppress asbestos fibers ...

  14. Overview On Alternative Asbestos Control Method Research - Nashville, TN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alternative asbestos control method (AACM) is an experimental approach to building demolition. Unlike the NESHAP method, the AACM allows some regulated asbestos-containing material to remain in the building and a surfactant-water solution is used to suppress asbestos fibers ...

  15. Overview On Alternative Asbestos Control Method Research - St. Louis, MO

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alternative asbestos control method (AACM) is an experimental approach to building demolition. Unlike the NESHAP method, the AACM allows some regulated asbestos-containing material to remain in the building and a surfactant-water solution is used to suppress asbestos fibers ...

  16. Alternative Asbestos Control Method and the Asbestos Releasability Research

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternative Asbestos Control Method shows promise in speed, cost, and efficiency if equally protective. ORD conducted side by side test of AACM vs NESHAP on identical asbestos-containing buildings at Fort Chaffee. This abstract and presentation are based, at least in part, on pr...

  17. Advances in developing alternative treatments for postharvest pest control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    USDA-ARS made two significant advances in the last 10 years in the development of alternative treatments for postharvest pest control: oxygenated phosphine fumigation and nitric oxide fumigation. Oxygenated phosphine is phosphine fumigation in an oxygen enriched atmosphere. It is significantly more...

  18. Alternative Strategies for Control of Sulfur Dioxide Emissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacDonald, Bryce I.

    1975-01-01

    Achievement of air quality goals requires careful consideration of alternative control strategies in view of national concerns with energy and the economy. Three strategies which might be used by coal fired steam electric plants to achieve ambient air quality standards for sulfur dioxide have been compared and the analysis presented. (Author/BT)

  19. 45 CFR 2550.60 - From which of the State Commission requirements is an Alternative Administrative Entity exempt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false From which of the State Commission requirements is an Alternative Administrative Entity exempt? 2550.60 Section 2550.60 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENTS...

  20. 45 CFR 2550.60 - From which of the State Commission requirements is an Alternative Administrative Entity exempt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false From which of the State Commission requirements is an Alternative Administrative Entity exempt? 2550.60 Section 2550.60 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENTS...

  1. 45 CFR 2550.60 - From which of the State Commission requirements is an Alternative Administrative Entity exempt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false From which of the State Commission requirements is an Alternative Administrative Entity exempt? 2550.60 Section 2550.60 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENTS...

  2. 45 CFR 2550.30 - How does a State decide whether to establish a State commission or an alternative administrative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How does a State decide whether to establish a State commission or an alternative administrative entity? 2550.30 Section 2550.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE...

  3. 45 CFR 2550.30 - How does a State decide whether to establish a State commission or an alternative administrative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false How does a State decide whether to establish a State commission or an alternative administrative entity? 2550.30 Section 2550.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE...

  4. 45 CFR 2550.60 - From which of the State Commission requirements is an Alternative Administrative Entity exempt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false From which of the State Commission requirements is an Alternative Administrative Entity exempt? 2550.60 Section 2550.60 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE REQUIREMENTS...

  5. 45 CFR 2550.30 - How does a State decide whether to establish a State commission or an alternative administrative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false How does a State decide whether to establish a State commission or an alternative administrative entity? 2550.30 Section 2550.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE...

  6. 45 CFR 2550.30 - How does a State decide whether to establish a State commission or an alternative administrative...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false How does a State decide whether to establish a State commission or an alternative administrative entity? 2550.30 Section 2550.30 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE...

  7. Insecticide resistance in the horn fly: alternative control strategies.

    PubMed

    Oyarzún, M P; Quiroz, A; Birkett, M A

    2008-09-01

    The horn fly, Haematobia irritans (Linnaeus 1758) (Diptera: Muscidae) is one of the most widespread and economically important pests of cattle. Although insecticides have been used for fly control, success has been limited because of the development of insecticide resistance in all countries where the horn fly is found. This problem, along with public pressure for insecticide-free food and the prohibitive cost of developing new classes of compounds, has driven the investigation of alternative control methods that minimize or avoid the use of insecticides. This review provides details of the economic impact of horn flies, existing insecticides used for horn fly control and resistance mechanisms. Current research on new methods of horn fly control based on resistant cattle selection, semiochemicals, biological control and vaccines is also discussed.

  8. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on retail electricity rates and utility financial viability

    SciTech Connect

    Bodmer, E.; Fisher, R.E.; Hemphill, R.C.

    1995-03-01

    Changes in power contract terms for customers of Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office affect electricity rates for consumers of electric power in Arizona, Colorado, Nevada, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. The impacts of electricity rate changes on consumers are studied by measuring impacts on the rates charged by individual utility systems, determining the average rates in regional areas, and conducting a detailed rate analysis of representative utility systems. The primary focus is an evaluation of the way retail electricity rates for Western`s preference customers vary with alternative pricing and power quantity commitment terms under Western`s long-term contracts to sell power (marketing programs). Retail rate impacts are emphasized because changes in the price of electricity are the most direct economic effect on businesses and residences arising from different Western contractual and operational policies. Retail rates are the mechanism by which changes in cost associated with Western`s contract terms are imposed on ultimate consumers, and rate changes determine the dollar level of payments for electric power incurred by the affected consumers. 41 figs., 9 tabs.

  9. Regional economic impacts of changes in electricity rates resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, T.; Griffes, P.; Edwards, B.K.

    1995-03-01

    This technical memorandum describes an analysis of regional economic impacts resulting from changes in retail electricity rates due to six power marketing programs proposed by Western Area Power Administration (Western). Regional economic impacts of changes in rates are estimated in terms of five key regional economic variables: population, gross regional product, disposable income, employment, and household income. The REMI (Regional Impact Models, Inc.) and IMPLAN (Impact Analysis for Planning) models simulate economic impacts in nine subregions in the area in which Western power is sold for the years 1993, 2000, and 2008. Estimates show that impacts on aggregate economic activity in any of the subregions or years would be minimal for three reasons. First, the utilities that buy power from Western sell only a relatively small proportion of the total electricity sold in any of the subregions. Second, reliance of Western customers on Western power is fairly low in each subregion. Finally, electricity is not a significant input cost for any industry or for households in any subregion.

  10. Altered prefrontal connectivity after acute heroin administration during cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, André; Borgwardt, Stefan; Gerber, Hana; Schmid, Otto; Wiesbeck, Gerhard A; Riecher-Rössler, Anita; Bendfeldt, Kerstin; Smieskova, Renata; Lang, Undine E; Rubia, Katya; Walter, Marc

    2014-09-01

    Neuroimaging studies have reported reduced activity in a broad network of brain regions during response inhibition in heroin-dependent patients. However, how heroin in an acute dose modulates the neural correlates of response inhibition and the underlying brain connectivity has not yet been investigated. In this double-blind placebo-controlled study, we used functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine whether acute heroin administration changed whole brain activity during response inhibition in 26 heroin-dependent patients. We then applied dynamic causal modelling to investigate the effect of an acute dose of heroin on the functional interactions between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) and the bilateral inferior frontal gyri (IFG). Heroin acutely reduced dACC activity, as well as the inhibition-induced modulation of connectivity from the dACC to the right IFG compared with placebo. Furthermore, dACC activity was positively related to false alarm rates after placebo but not heroin administration. These results suggest that acute heroin administration impairs cognitive control in dependent patients by reducing the activity in the dACC activity and the functional connectivity from the dACC to the right IFG.

  11. Sec16 alternative splicing dynamically controls COPII transport efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelmi, Ilka; Kanski, Regina; Neumann, Alexander; Herdt, Olga; Hoff, Florian; Jacob, Ralf; Preußner, Marco; Heyd, Florian

    2016-01-01

    The transport of secretory proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi depends on COPII-coated vesicles. While the basic principles of the COPII machinery have been identified, it remains largely unknown how COPII transport is regulated to accommodate tissue- or activation-specific differences in cargo load and identity. Here we show that activation-induced alternative splicing of Sec16 controls adaptation of COPII transport to increased secretory cargo upon T-cell activation. Using splice-site blocking morpholinos and CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome engineering, we show that the number of ER exit sites, COPII dynamics and transport efficiency depend on Sec16 alternative splicing. As the mechanistic basis, we suggest the C-terminal Sec16 domain to be a splicing-controlled protein interaction platform, with individual isoforms showing differential abilities to recruit COPII components. Our work connects the COPII pathway with alternative splicing, adding a new regulatory layer to protein secretion and its adaptation to changing cellular environments. PMID:27492621

  12. Educational Administrative Software Packages: Alternatives to In-House Developed Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Edward V.

    1985-01-01

    Historically, educational institutions have largely relied on in-house development of administrative software. However, the costs of skilled programmers and rapidly advancing technology are making in-house development too expensive. These and other factors are addressed and changes needed for future educational administrative computing support are…

  13. Evaluation of alternative host bacteria as vehicles for oral administration of bacteriophages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Survival of bacteriophages through the upper gastrointestinal tract (UGIT) and persistence in the lower gastrointestinal tract (LGIT) is essential for treatment of enteric bacterial infections. We have hypothesized that non-pathogenic Alternative Host Bacteriophage (AHB), originally isolated from p...

  14. Regenerative thermal oxidation and alternative technologies for VOC control

    SciTech Connect

    Biedell, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    Thermal oxidation technologies have been used successfully to control VOC`s for many years but the recent 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments have spurred improvements in the established processes and development of economic alternatives. The combination of the regulatory maze and confusion in the selection of the best technology for a particular application has created a potential nightmare for those companies facing a need to reduce their VOC EMISSIONS. The relative advantages and disadvantages of regenerative, recuperative and catalytic oxidizers will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the economic justification for regenerative thermal oxidation (RTO). Control efficiencies of more than 99% have been demonstrated for RTO`s on a multitude of industrial process exhaust streams. Lowest evaluated cost over a fifteen to twenty year effective equipment life is a key selection criteria. This paper describes the underlying principles of thermal oxidation, and discusses the applicability of these and other emerging technologies for VOC control.

  15. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, Victor W.

    1988-01-01

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for and is particularly suitable for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. In the preferred embodiment, the motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of readonly memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  16. Notification: Notification Memo for Evaluation of Management Controls for Alternative Asbestos Control Method Experiments

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OPE-FY12-0011, February 27, 2012. This memorandum is to notify you that the Office of Inspector General (OIG) is initiating an evaluation on the Alternative Asbestos Control Method (AACM) experiments.

  17. Evaluation of Alternative Field Buses for Lighting ControlApplications

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, Ed; Rubinstein, Francis

    2005-03-21

    The Subcontract Statement of Work consists of two major tasks. This report is the Final Report in fulfillment of the contract deliverable for Task 1. The purpose of Task 1 was to evaluate existing and emerging protocols and standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The detailed task description follows: Task 1. Evaluate alternative sensor/field buses. The objective of this task is to evaluate existing and emerging standards for interfacing sensors and controllers for communicating with integrated lighting control systems in commercial buildings. The protocols to be evaluated will include at least: (1) 1-Wire Net, (2) DALI, (3) MODBUS (or appropriate substitute such as EIB) and (4) ZigBee. The evaluation will include a comparative matrix for comparing the technical performance features of the different alternative systems. The performance features to be considered include: (1) directionality and network speed, (2) error control, (3) latency times, (4) allowable cable voltage drop, (5) topology, and (6) polarization. Specifically, Subcontractor will: (1) Analyze the proposed network architecture and identify potential problems that may require further research and specification. (2) Help identify and specify additional software and hardware components that may be required for the communications network to operate properly. (3) Identify areas of the architecture that can benefit from existing standards and technology and enumerate those standards and technologies. (4) Identify existing companies that may have relevant technology that can be applied to this research. (5) Help determine if new standards or technologies need to be developed.

  18. Multilayered Control of Alternative Splicing Regulatory Networks by Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Han, Hong; Braunschweig, Ulrich; Gonatopoulos-Pournatzis, Thomas; Weatheritt, Robert J; Hirsch, Calley L; Ha, Kevin C H; Radovani, Ernest; Nabeel-Shah, Syed; Sterne-Weiler, Tim; Wang, Juli; O'Hanlon, Dave; Pan, Qun; Ray, Debashish; Zheng, Hong; Vizeacoumar, Frederick; Datti, Alessandro; Magomedova, Lilia; Cummins, Carolyn L; Hughes, Timothy R; Greenblatt, Jack F; Wrana, Jeffrey L; Moffat, Jason; Blencowe, Benjamin J

    2017-02-02

    Networks of coordinated alternative splicing (AS) events play critical roles in development and disease. However, a comprehensive knowledge of the factors that regulate these networks is lacking. We describe a high-throughput system for systematically linking trans-acting factors to endogenous RNA regulatory events. Using this system, we identify hundreds of factors associated with diverse regulatory layers that positively or negatively control AS events linked to cell fate. Remarkably, more than one-third of the regulators are transcription factors. Further analyses of the zinc finger protein Zfp871 and BTB/POZ domain transcription factor Nacc1, which regulate neural and stem cell AS programs, respectively, reveal roles in controlling the expression of specific splicing regulators. Surprisingly, these proteins also appear to regulate target AS programs via binding RNA. Our results thus uncover a large "missing cache" of splicing regulators among annotated transcription factors, some of which dually regulate AS through direct and indirect mechanisms.

  19. Control of Avian Coccidiosis: Future and Present Natural Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Quiroz-Castañeda, Rosa Estela; Dantán-González, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Numerous efforts to date have been implemented in the control of avian coccidiosis caused by the Eimeria parasite. Since the appearance of anticoccidial chemical compounds, the search for new alternatives continues. Today, no product is available to cope with the disease; however, the number of products commercially available is constantly increasing. In this review, we focus on natural products and their anticoccidial activity. This group comprises fatty acids, antioxidants, fungal and herbal extracts, and immune response modulators with proven anticoccidial activity, many of which exist as dietary supplements. Additionally, we offer an overview of the poultry industry and the economic cost of coccidiosis as well as the classical strategies used to control the disease. PMID:25785269

  20. Precision electronic speed controller for an alternating-current motor

    DOEpatents

    Bolie, V.W.

    A high precision controller for an alternating-current multi-phase electrical motor that is subject to a large inertial load. The controller was developed for controlling, in a neutron chopper system, a heavy spinning rotor that must be rotated in phase-locked synchronism with a reference pulse train that is representative of an ac power supply signal having a meandering line frequency. The controller includes a shaft revolution sensor which provides a feedback pulse train representative of the actual speed of the motor. An internal digital timing signal generator provides a reference signal which is compared with the feedback signal in a computing unit to provide a motor control signal. The motor control signal is a weighted linear sum of a speed error voltage, a phase error voltage, and a drift error voltage, each of which is computed anew with each revolution of the motor shaft. The speed error signal is generated by a novel vernier-logic circuit which is drift-free and highly sensitive to small speed changes. The phase error is also computed by digital logic, with adjustable sensitivity around a 0 mid-scale value. The drift error signal, generated by long-term counting of the phase error, is used to compensate for any slow changes in the average friction drag on the motor. An auxillary drift-byte status sensor prevents any disruptive overflow or underflow of the drift-error counter. An adjustable clocked-delay unit is inserted between the controller and the source of the reference pulse train to permit phase alignment of the rotor to any desired offset angle. The stator windings of the motor are driven by two amplifiers which are provided with input signals having the proper quadrature relationship by an exciter unit consisting of a voltage controlled oscillator, a binary counter, a pair of read-only memories, and a pair of digital-to-analog converters.

  1. Market scenarios and alternative administrative frameworks for US educational satellite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walkmeyer, J. E., Jr.; Morgan, R. P.; Singh, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    Costs and benefits of developing an operational educational satellite system in the U.S. are analyzed. Scenarios are developed for each educational submarket and satellite channel and ground terminal requirements for a large-scale educational telecommunications system are estimated. Alternative organizational frameworks for such a system are described.

  2. Effect of physician specialist alternative payment plans on administrative health data in Calgary: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Ceara Tess; Jetté, Nathalie; Li, Bing; Dhanoa, Ravneet Robyn; Hemmelgarn, Brenda; Noseworthy, Tom; Beck, Cynthia A.; Dixon, Elijah; Samuel, Susan; Ghali, William A.; DeCoster, Carolyn; Quan, Hude

    2015-01-01

    Background: There are concerns that alternate payment plans for physicians may be associated with erosion of data quality, given that physicians are paid regardless of whether claims are submitted. Our objective was to determine the proportion of claims submitted by physician specialists using fee-for-service and alternative payment plans, and to identify and compare the validity of information coded in physician billing claims submitted by these specialists in Calgary. Methods: We conducted a survey of physician specialists to determine their plan status and obtained consent to use physicians' claims data from 4 acute care hospitals in Calgary. Inpatient and emergency department services were identified from the Discharge Abstract Database for Alberta (Canadian Institute for Health Information) and the Alberta Ambulatory Care Classification System database. We linked services to claims by Alberta physicians from 2002 to 2009 by using unique patient and physician identifiers. After identifying the proportion of claims submitted, we reviewed inpatient charts to determine the completeness of submissions as defined by positive predictive value. Results: Of 182 physicians who responded to the survey, 94 (51.6%) used fee-for-service plans exclusively and 51 (28.0%) used alternative payment plans exclusively. Overall completeness of physician submissions for claims was 91.8% for physicians using fee-for-service plans and 90.0% for physicians using alternative payment plans. Submission rate varied by medical specialty (surgery: 92.4% for fee for service v. 88.6% for alternative payment; internal medicine: 94.1% v. 91.3%; neurology: 95.1% v. 91.0%; and pediatrics: 95.1% v. 89.3%). Among claims submitted, the physician accuracies for billing of medical conditions were 87.8% for fee-for-service and 85.0% for alternative payment. Interpretation: Overall submission rates and accuracy in recording diagnoses by physicians who used both plans were high. These findings show that

  3. Alternative approaches for the control of gastrointestinal nematodes in sheep farming: a review.

    PubMed

    Šimpraga, Miljenko; Ljubičić, Iva; Hlede, Jadranka Pejaković; Vugrovečki, Ana Shek; Marinculić, Albert; Tkalčić, Suzana

    2015-01-01

    Gastrointestinal nematodes (GIN) are a serious health problem and represent the most significant constraint in sheep grazing operations. Problems tend to be worse in organic sheep farming systems, as a consequence of a less restricted access of animals to outdoor environment with a higher exposure to infective larvae. In domestic animals, GIN are effectively controlled by an aggressive prophylactic administration of commercially available anthelmintics. As a consequence to a common overdose and misuse of readily available antiparasitic treatments, there is an inevitable development of populations of GIN resistant to all major classes of anthelmintics. Also, the control of GIN that is based entirely on the anthelmintic use, threatens sustainability of the sheep farming worldwide. The combination of the optimized use of anthelmintic drugs and alternative approaches seem to be a reasonable choice in sustainable parasitic control programs that offer a substantial reduction of anthelmintic treatments and conservation of anthelmintic efficacy. In that aspect, a "targeted selective treatment (TST)" directed towards animals clinically diagnosed with GIN, seems to be an effective approach to leave some parasite populations unexposed to anthelmintics (refugia) and to reduce development of anthelmintic resistance. Also, many current research efforts aim to find and validate sustainable non-chemotherapeutic approaches to GIN control, including changes in grazing management, optimized nutrition, dietary supplementation, consumption of plants with anthelmintic properties, biological control by nematophagous fungi, copper oxide wire particles (COWP), and homeopathic treatments. This manuscript outlines (outlines) and discusses relevant alternative approaches for GIN control in modern sheep farming systems.

  4. Admission to the Master of Business Administration Program: An Alternative for Savannah State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dowling, Bill

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, graduate programs in business administration have heavily relied on the Graduate Management Aptitude Test prepared and administered by the Educational Testing Service in the decision to admit a candidate to the program. The purpose of this paper is to review the literature regarding the statistical validity and statistical…

  5. The Effects of Applying Alternative Research Methods to Educational Administration Theory and Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peca, Kathy

    Ways in which the application of positivistic, phenomenological, ethnomethodological, and critical theories affect educational administration theory and practice are explored in this paper. A review of literature concludes that positivism separates practice from abstract theory; phenomenology offers a different view of reality; ethnomethodology is…

  6. Classified Computer Configuration Control System (C{sup 4}S), Revision 3, Database Administrator`s Guide

    SciTech Connect

    O`Callaghan, P.B.; Nelson, R.A.; Grambihler, A.J.

    1994-04-01

    This document provides a guide for database administration and specific information for the Classified Computer Configuration Control System (C{sup 4}S). As a guide, this document discusses required database administration functions for the set up of database tables and for users of the system. It is assumed that general and user information has been obtained from the Classified Computer Configuration Control System (C{sup 4}S), Revision 3, User`s Information (WHC 1994).

  7. Alternative systems for in situ bioremediation: Enhanced control and contact

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, G.K.; Rhodes, D.K.

    1995-12-31

    Much of the past emphasis on biological degradation remediation has been placed on culturing or enhancing microbes to consume contaminants within a soil or water matrix, and site contaminant characterization. This emphasis has demonstrated that microbes are effective degraders for a variety of contaminants, and at most sites, contaminant-degrading microbes are present within the subsurface. For sites where microbes are present, they typically are inefficient for in situ remediation without the appropriate environmental conditions. In situ bioremediation tends to be governed by the ability to cost effectively and rapidly distribute oxygen, microbes, nutrients, and/or surfactants throughout the subsurface soils while simultaneously maintaining a controlled subsurface environment. Adapted equipment has been used to efficiently permeate or saturate the contaminated soils with a combination of oxygen source material, nutrients, surfactants and/or microbial cultures. These technologies, combined with oxygen delivery and control systems, enhance bioremediation as a viable alternative for in situ remediation. These same systems can deliver oxidation chemistry to pretreat the soils. The development and utilization of a number of in situ bioremediation technologies with a demonstrated ability to enhance contact and control within the contaminated subsoils are discussed, focusing on Bioventing, BioSparge{sup SM}, and Deep Soil Fracture BioInjection{trademark}.

  8. Passive Motion Paradigm: An Alternative to Optimal Control

    PubMed Central

    Mohan, Vishwanathan; Morasso, Pietro

    2011-01-01

    In the last years, optimal control theory (OCT) has emerged as the leading approach for investigating neural control of movement and motor cognition for two complementary research lines: behavioral neuroscience and humanoid robotics. In both cases, there are general problems that need to be addressed, such as the “degrees of freedom (DoFs) problem,” the common core of production, observation, reasoning, and learning of “actions.” OCT, directly derived from engineering design techniques of control systems quantifies task goals as “cost functions” and uses the sophisticated formal tools of optimal control to obtain desired behavior (and predictions). We propose an alternative “softer” approach passive motion paradigm (PMP) that we believe is closer to the biomechanics and cybernetics of action. The basic idea is that actions (overt as well as covert) are the consequences of an internal simulation process that “animates” the body schema with the attractor dynamics of force fields induced by the goal and task-specific constraints. This internal simulation offers the brain a way to dynamically link motor redundancy with task-oriented constraints “at runtime,” hence solving the “DoFs problem” without explicit kinematic inversion and cost function computation. We argue that the function of such computational machinery is not only restricted to shaping motor output during action execution but also to provide the self with information on the feasibility, consequence, understanding and meaning of “potential actions.” In this sense, taking into account recent developments in neuroscience (motor imagery, simulation theory of covert actions, mirror neuron system) and in embodied robotics, PMP offers a novel framework for understanding motor cognition that goes beyond the engineering control paradigm provided by OCT. Therefore, the paper is at the same time a review of the PMP rationale, as a computational theory, and a perspective presentation of

  9. An alternative for rapid administration of medication and fluids in the emergency setting using a novel device.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Neal; Nejak, Daniel; Lomotan, Nadine; Mokszycki, Robert; Jamieson, Stephen; McDowell, Marc; Kulstad, Erik

    2015-08-01

    Routes of administration for medications and fluids in the acute care setting have primarily focused on oral, intravenous, or intraosseous routes, but, in many patients, none of these routes is optimal. A novel device (Macy Catheter; Hospi Corp) that offers an easy route for administration of medications or fluids via rectal mucosal absorption (proctoclysis) has recently become available in the palliative care market; we describe here the first known uses of this device in the emergency setting. Three patients presenting to the hospital with conditions limiting more typical routes of medication or fluid administration were treated with this new device; patients were administered water for hydration, lorazepam for treatment of alcohol withdrawal, ondansetron for nausea, acetaminophen for fever, aspirin for antiplatelet effect, and methimazole for hyperthyroidism. Placement of the device was straightforward, absorption of administered medications (judged by immediacy of effects, where observable) was rapid, and use of the device was well tolerated by patients, suggesting that this device may be an appealing alternative route to medication and fluid administration for a variety of indications in acute and critical care settings.

  10. Central apelin-13 administration modulates hypothalamic control of feeding.

    PubMed

    Ferrante, C; Orlando, G; Recinella, L; Leone, S; Chiavaroli, A; Di Nisio, C; Shohreh, R; Manippa, F; Ricciuti, A; Vacca, M; Brunetti, L

    2016-01-01

    The 77 amino prepropeptide apelin has been isolated from bovine stomach tissue and several smaller fragments, including apelin-13, showed high affinity for the orphan APJ receptor. The distribution of apelinergic fibers and receptors in the hypothalamus may suggest a role of apelin-13 on energy balance regulation, albeit the studies reporting the acute effects of apelin on feeding control are inconsistent. Considering the possible involvement of apelinergic system on hypothalamic appetite controlling network, in the present study we evaluated in the rat the effects of intrahypothalamic apelin-13 injection on food intake and the involvement of orexigenic and anorexigenic hypothalamic peptides and neurotransmitters. Eighteen rats (6 for each group of treatment) were injected into the ARC with either vehicle or apelin-13 (1-2 μg/rat). Food intake and hypothalamic peptide and neurotransmitter levels were evaluated 2 and 24 h after injection. Compared to vehicle, apelin-13 administration increased food intake both 2 and 24 h following treatment. This effect could be related to inhibited cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) gene expression and serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) synthesis and release, and increased orexin A gene expression in the hypothalamus.

  11. Selected computer system controls at the Energy Information Administration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The purpose of our review of the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) computer system was to evaluate disk and tape information storage and the adequacy of internal controls in the operating system programs. We used a set of computer-assisted audit techniques called CAATS, developed by the US Department of Transportation, Office of Inspector General, in performing the review at the EIA Forrestal Computer Facility. Improved procedures are needed to assure more efficient use of disk space. By transferring data sets from disk to tape, deleting invalid data, releasing unused reserve space and blocking data efficiently, disk space with an estimated value of $1.1 million a year could be recovered for current use. Also, procedures governing the maximum times for storage of information on tapes should be enforced to help ensure that data is not lost. In addition, improved internal controls are needed over granting users system-wide privileges and over authorized program library names to prevent unauthorized access to the system and possible destruction or manipulation of data. Automated Data Processing (ADP) Services Staff officials indicated that software maintenance was not current, due to contractual difficulties with the operating contractor for the Forrestal Facility. Our review confirmed that improvements were needed to help prevent malfunctions of the operating system, which could cause performance degradations, system failures, or loss of either system or user data. Management generally concurred with the recommendations in the report.

  12. Valuation of selected environmental impacts associated with Bonneville Power Administration Resource Program alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Englin, J E; Gygi, K F

    1992-03-01

    This report documents work undertaken by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and its contractors to assist the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in assessing the potential environmental consequences of new power resources. A major purpose of this effort is to describe and evaluate the techniques available for economic valuation of environmental costs. Another is to provide estimates of the environmental costs associated with specific power resources called for under Bonneville's Resource Programs. Bonneville's efforts to extend valuation techniques to as many impacts as can be reliably assessed represents a substantial advance in the application of state-of-the-art economic techniques to environmental assessments. This economic analysis evaluates effects on human health, wildlife, crops, and visibility impacts associated with air pollution. This report also discusses river recreation (primarily fishing) which may be affected by fluctuations in water levels. 70 refs.

  13. Loss Control Supplement to Administration of the School District Risk Management Program. School Business Administration Publication No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Association of School Business Officials, Sacramento.

    This supplement to the California State Department of Education's "Administration of the School District Risk Management Program" focuses on the basic considerations of the loss control program and the various methods that may be used in providing effective cost reduction through adequate loss control measures. The publication is…

  14. Quality Control in the Administration of Sport Management Internships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Dennie Ruth

    2004-01-01

    The quality of an intern's learning experience is the joint responsibility of the academic internship coordinator, the administrator of the sport management program, and the agency supervisor. The purpose of this article is to identify the areas of administrative concern in the three major components of an internship: the institution granting…

  15. 7 CFR 58.149 - Alternate quality control programs for dairy products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternate quality control programs for dairy products... and Grading Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.149 Alternate quality control programs for dairy products. (a) When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality control program which...

  16. 7 CFR 58.149 - Alternate quality control programs for dairy products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternate quality control programs for dairy products... and Grading Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.149 Alternate quality control programs for dairy products. (a) When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality control program which...

  17. 7 CFR 58.149 - Alternate quality control programs for dairy products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternate quality control programs for dairy products... and Grading Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.149 Alternate quality control programs for dairy products. (a) When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality control program which...

  18. 7 CFR 58.149 - Alternate quality control programs for dairy products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternate quality control programs for dairy products... and Grading Service 1 Operations and Operating Procedures § 58.149 Alternate quality control programs for dairy products. (a) When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality control program which...

  19. 77 FR 22191 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR): Export Control Classification Number...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-13

    ... the Export Administration Regulations (EAR): Export Control Classification Number 0Y521 Series, Items..., which amends the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) by establishing a new Export Control... the EAR. The ECCN 0Y521 series will be used for items that warrant control on the CCL but are not...

  20. 77 FR 14403 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Norovirus Serological Reagents; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  1. Trust and Control: Public Administration and Risk Society

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoyer, Hans Christian; Wood, Elin Marit

    2011-01-01

    Today we live in a society with many choices and possibilities which were absent just a few decades ago. Knowledge is seen as temporary, and many paradoxes are experienced in the flow of information surrounding us. A basic insecurity can be seen as a consequence of this development. This paper re-thinks the consequences at the administrational and…

  2. Conducting Randomized Controlled Trials with Offenders in an Administrative Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahlin, Eileen M.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation research conducted in agencies that sanction law violators is often challenging and due process may preclude evaluators from using experimental methods in traditional criminal justice agencies such as police, courts, and corrections. However, administrative agencies often deal with the same population but are not bound by due process…

  3. γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) administration improves action selection processes: a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Steenbergen, Laura; Sellaro, Roberta; Stock, Ann-Kathrin; Beste, Christian; Colzato, Lorenza S.

    2015-01-01

    In order to accomplish a task goal, real-life environments require us to develop different action control strategies in order to rapidly react to fast-moving visual and auditory stimuli. When engaging in complex scenarios, it is essential to prioritise and cascade different actions. Recent studies have pointed to an important role of the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic system in the neuromodulation of action cascading. In this study we assessed the specific causal role of the GABA-ergic system in modulating the efficiency of action cascading by administering 800 mg of synthetic GABA or 800 mg oral of microcrystalline cellulose (placebo). In a double-blind, randomised, between-group design, 30 healthy adults performed a stop-change paradigm. Results showed that the administration of GABA, compared to placebo, increased action selection when an interruption (stop) and a change towards an alternative response were required simultaneously, and when such a change had to occur after the completion of the stop process. These findings, involving the systemic administration of synthetic GABA, provide the first evidence for a possible causal role of the GABA-ergic system in modulating performance in action cascading. PMID:26227783

  4. Control of tumor-associated macrophage alternative activation by MIF

    PubMed Central

    Yaddanapudi, Kavitha; Putty, Kalyani; Rendon, Beatriz E.; Lamont, Gwyneth J.; Faughn, Jonathan D.; Satoskar, Abhay; Lasnik, Amanda; Eaton, John W.; Mitchell, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    Tumor stromal alternatively activated macrophages are important determinants of anti-tumor T lymphocyte responses, intratumoral neovascularization and metastatic dissemination. Our recent efforts to investigate the mechanism of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) in antagonizing anti-melanoma immune responses reveal that macrophage-derived MIF participates in macrophage alternative activation in melanoma-bearing mice. Both peripheral and tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) isolated from melanoma bearing MIF-deficient mice display elevated pro-inflammatory cytokine expression and reduced anti-inflammatory, immunosuppressive and pro-angiogenic gene products compared to macrophages from tumor bearing MIF wildtype mice. Moreover, TAMs and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) from MIF-deficient mice exhibit reduced T lymphocyte immunosuppressive activities than do those from their wildtype littermates. Corresponding with reduced tumor immunosuppression and neoangiogenic potential by TAMs, MIF-deficiency confers protection against transplantable subcutaneous melanoma outgrowth and melanoma lung metastatic colonization. Finally, we report for the first time that our previously discovered MIF small molecule antagonist, 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP), recapitulates MIF-deficiency in vitro and in vivo and attenuates tumor polarized macrophage alternative activation, immunosuppression, neoangiogenesis and melanoma tumor outgrowth. These studies describe an important functional contribution by MIF to tumor-associated macrophage alternative activation and provide justification for immunotherapeutic targeting of MIF in melanoma patients. PMID:23390297

  5. Space Shuttle main engine. NASA has not evaluated the alternate fuel turbopump costs and benefits. Report to the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    NASA's plans to develop an alternate high pressure fuel turbopump for the Space Shuttle's main engines were assessed by the General Accounting Office as a part of the evaluation of the Space Shuttle Safety and Obsolescence Upgrade program. The objective was to determine whether NASA has adequately analyzed cost, performance, and benefits that are expected to result from this program in comparison to other alternatives before resuming development of the alternate pump, which was suspended in 1992. The alternate fuel pump is one of five improvements being developed or planned to significantly enhance safety margins of the engines.

  6. A computer control system for the alternating gradient magnetometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Michael M.

    1989-12-01

    An alternating gradient magnetometer was interfaced to a computer for the automation of data taking. Using a fast Fourier transform analysis system data can be acquired and processed in real time. Data are stored on disk and can be recalled for plotting and further analysis. With the addition of a simple liquid nitrogen cryostat, magnetization measurements can be performed in the range from 300 to 77 K. Results are reported on three different types of piezoelectric transducers.

  7. A computer control system for the alternating gradient magnetometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, Michael M.

    1989-01-01

    An alternating gradient magnetometer was interfaced to a computer for the automation of data taking. Using a fast Fourier transform analysis system data can be acquired and processed in real time. Data are stored on disk and can be recalled for plotting and further analysis. With the addition of a simple liquid nitrogen cryostat, magnetization measurements can be performed in the range from 300 to 77 K. Results are reported on three different types of piezoelectric transducers.

  8. Expeditionary Energy Assessment Environmental Control Unit Alternatives Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-28

    base case using the equipment and energy footprint of the Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Forward (FWD) in Afghanistan and four alternative cases...year) were varied. A base case, designed around the Marine Expeditionary Force (MEF) Forward (FWD) Equipment Density List (EDL) and current ECU...report calculated the cost up through the first leg of tactical delivery, i.e., from the point of retail sale to the main camp to the Forward Operating

  9. 40 CFR 721.30 - EPA approval of alternative control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the substance. (3) The citation for the specific section in subpart E of this part which pertains to... release control measures. (6) An analysis justifying why such alternative control measures...

  10. 40 CFR 721.30 - EPA approval of alternative control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the substance. (3) The citation for the specific section in subpart E of this part which pertains to... release control measures. (6) An analysis justifying why such alternative control measures...

  11. 21 CFR 1307.22 - Disposal of controlled substances by the Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... substances desired and the purpose for which intended. The delivery of such controlled drugs shall be ordered... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Disposal of controlled substances by the Administration. 1307.22 Section 1307.22 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  12. 3 CFR 13637 - Executive Order 13637 of March 8, 2013. Administration of Reformed Export Controls

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Executive Order 13637 of March 8, 2013. Administration of Reformed Export Controls 13637 Order 13637 Presidential Documents Executive Orders Executive Order 13637 of March 8, 2013 EO 13637 Administration of Reformed Export Controls By the authority...

  13. Oral administration of Lactobacillus strains isolated from breast milk as an alternative for the treatment of infectious mastitis during lactation.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, E; Fernández, L; Maldonado, A; Martín, R; Olivares, M; Xaus, J; Rodríguez, J M

    2008-08-01

    In this study, 20 women with staphylococcal mastitis were randomly divided in two groups. Those in the probiotic group daily ingested 10 log(10) CFU of Lactobacillus salivarius CECT5713 and the same quantity of Lactobacillus gasseri CECT5714 for 4 weeks, while those in the control one only ingested the excipient. Both lactobacillus strains were originally isolated from breast milk. On day 0, the mean staphylococcal counts in the probiotic and control groups were similar (4.74 and 4.81 log(10) CFU/ml, respectively), but lactobacilli could not be detected. On day 30, the mean staphylococcal count in the probiotic group (2.96 log(10) CFU/ml) was lower than that of the control group (4.79 log(10) CFU/ml). L. salivarius CECT5713 and L. gasseri CECT5714 were isolated from the milk samples of 6 of the 10 women of the probiotic group. At day 14, no clinical signs of mastitis were observed in the women assigned to the probiotic group, but mastitis persisted throughout the study period in the control group women. In conclusion, L. salivarius CECT5713 and L. gasseri CECT5714 appear to be an efficient alternative for the treatment of lactational infectious mastitis during lactation.

  14. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-5 - Administratively controlled items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., contaminated property, tool crib items, and equipment pool items. Various control records can be employed to help safeguard this property against waste and abuse, including purchase vs. use information, tool crib.... Control techniques would include physical security, custodial responsibility, identification/marking,...

  15. Alternative Controller for a Fiber-Optic Switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Robert

    2007-01-01

    A simplified diagram of a relatively inexpensive controller for a DiCon VX (or equivalent) fiber-optic switch -- an electromechanically actuated switch for optically connecting one or two input optical fibers to any of a number of output optical fibers is shown. DiCon VX fiber-optic switches are used primarily in research and development in the telecommunication industry. This controller can control any such switch having up to 32 output channels.

  16. Alternatives to anthelmintics for the control of nematodes in livestock.

    PubMed

    Stear, M J; Doligalska, M; Donskow-Schmelter, K

    2007-02-01

    Efficient and welfare-friendly livestock production demands the control of nematode infection. Current control measures rely upon anthelmintic treatment but are threatened by the widespread evolution of drug-resistance in parasite populations. Several methods have been advocated to control nematodes without relying on effective anthelmintics. These include grazing management, biological control, nutritional supplementation, vaccination, and genetic approaches. Each method has its advantages and disadvantages. There are several grazing management schemes that can reduce the severity of infection but they are insufficient on their own to control infection. Biological control includes the use of predatory fungi to control nematode populations and the use of pasture species that can reduce the intensity of infection. Fungi can control nematodes but the current requirement for daily feeding means that this approach will be most useful for animals that are handled daily. Feeding supplementary protein can control nematode infection. The method is simple but can be expensive and may not be cost-effective for some marginal enterprises. Genetic approaches include the use of resistant breeds and selective breeding. Some breeds will thrive in conditions that kill animals from other breeds but substitution of resistant breeds is not always feasible. Selective breeding is effective and inexpensive but requires a high level of expertise. The most appropriate method or set of methods to minimize the adverse consequences of nematode infection may vary among farms.

  17. Elicitors aboveground: an alternative for control of a belowground pest

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant defense pathways mediate multitrophic interactions above and belowground. Understanding the effects of these pathways on pests and natural enemies above and belowground holds great potential for designing effective control strategies. Here we investigate the effects of aboveground stimulation ...

  18. The Obama administration's options for health care cost control: hope versus reality.

    PubMed

    Marmor, Theodore; Oberlander, Jonathan; White, Joseph

    2009-04-07

    Controlling the costs of medical care has long been an elusive goal in U.S. health policy. This article examines the options for health care cost control under the Obama administration. The authors argue that the administration's approach to health reform offers some potential for cost control but also embraces many strategies that are not likely to be successful. Lessons the United States can learn from other countries' experiences in constraining medical care spending are then explored.

  19. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-5 - Administratively controlled items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... controlled items. 109-1.5108-5 Section 109-1.5108-5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5108-5...

  20. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-5 - Administratively controlled items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... controlled items. 109-1.5108-5 Section 109-1.5108-5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5108-5...

  1. 41 CFR 109-1.5108-5 - Administratively controlled items.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... controlled items. 109-1.5108-5 Section 109-1.5108-5 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS GENERAL 1-INTRODUCTION 1.51-Personal Property Management Standards and Practices § 109-1.5108-5...

  2. The Level of Administrator, Counselor and Student Acceptability of Alternative Agri-Business Education Programs in Indiana Secondary Schools. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goecker, Allan D.

    The study described in the report was designed to determine the degree of acceptance that secondary school administrators, guidance counselors, vocational agriculture teachers, and students may give to alternative agribusiness education programs which could be offered in Indiana schools. A list of 20 vocational agribusiness subjects was…

  3. Faculty and Administrator Knowledge of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act at Select U.S. Complimentary and Alternative Healthcare Educational Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werosh, Keith R.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine what relationship exists between knowledge of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) to organizational position and training among faculty and administrators employed within complementary and alternative healthcare educational institutions. Within these knowledge levels, this study…

  4. 76 FR 43690 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the guidance entitled ``Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Electrocardiograph Electrodes.'' The special controls identify the following risks to health... Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Electrocardiograph...

  5. Alternative control technology document for bakery oven emissions. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, C.W.

    1992-12-01

    The document was produced in response to a request by the baking industry for Federal guidance to assist in providing a more uniform information base for State decision-making with regard to control of bakery oven emissions. The information in the document pertains to bakeries that produce yeast-leavened bread, rolls, buns, and similar products but not crackers, sweet goods, or baked foodstuffs that are not yeast leavened. Information on the baking processes, equipment, operating parameters, potential emissions from baking, and potential emission control options are presented. Catalytic and regenerative oxidation are identified as the most appropriate existing control technologies applicable to VOC emissions from bakery ovens. Cost analyses for catalytic and regenerative oxidation are included. A predictive formula for use in estimating oven emissions has been derived from source tests done in junction with the development of the document. Its use and applicability are described.

  6. 40 CFR 725.975 - EPA approval of alternative control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA approval of alternative control... Procedures for Reporting on Significant New Uses of Microorganisms § 725.975 EPA approval of alternative... which EPA has determined provide substantially the same degree of protection as the specified...

  7. Alternative Splicing of AMPA Subunits in Prefrontal Cortical Fields of Cynomolgus Monkeys Following Chronic Ethanol Self-Administration

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Glen; Freidman, David P.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Hemby, Scott E.

    2012-01-01

    Functional impairment of the orbital and medial prefrontal cortex underlies deficits in executive control that characterize addictive disorders, including alcohol addiction. Previous studies indicate that alcohol alters glutamate neurotransmission and one substrate of these effects may be through the reconfiguration of the subunits constituting ionotropic glutamate receptor (iGluR) complexes. Glutamatergic transmission is integral to cortico-cortical and cortico-subcortical communication and alcohol-induced changes in the abundance of the receptor subunits and/or their splice variants may result in critical functional impairments of prefrontal cortex in alcohol dependence. To this end, the effects of chronic ethanol self-administration on glutamate receptor ionotropic AMPA (GRIA) subunit variant and kainate (GRIK) subunit mRNA expression were studied in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC), dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of male cynomolgus monkeys. In DLPFC, total AMPA splice variant expression and total kainate receptor subunit expression were significantly decreased in alcohol drinking monkeys. Expression levels of GRIA3 flip and flop and GRIA4 flop mRNAs in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and blood ethanol concentrations (BEC) averaged over the 6 months prior to necropsy. In OFC, AMPA subunit splice variant expression was reduced in the alcohol treated group. GRIA2 flop mRNA levels in this region were positively correlated with daily ethanol intake and BEC averaged over the 6 months prior to necropsy. Results from these studies provide further evidence of transcriptional regulation of iGluR subunits in the primate brain following chronic alcohol self-administration. Additional studies examining the cellular localization of such effects in the framework of primate prefrontal cortical circuitry are warranted. PMID:22291662

  8. Cost analysis of NOx control alternatives for stationary gas turbines

    SciTech Connect

    Bill Major

    1999-11-05

    The use of stationary gas turbines for power generation has been growing rapidly with continuing trends predicted well into the future. Factors that are contributing to this growth include advances in turbine technology, operating and siting flexibility and low capital cost. Restructuring of the electric utility industry will provide new opportunities for on-site generation. In a competitive market, it maybe more cost effective to install small distributed generation units (like gas turbines) within the grid rather than constructing large power plants in remote locations with extensive transmission and distribution systems. For the customer, on-site generation will provide added reliability and leverage over the cost of purchased power One of the key issues that is addressed in virtually every gas turbine application is emissions, particularly NO{sub x} emissions. Decades of research and development have significantly reduced the NO{sub x} levels emitted from gas turbines from uncontrolled levels. Emission control technologies are continuing to evolve with older technologies being gradually phased-out while new technologies are being developed and commercialized. The objective of this study is to determine and compare the cost of NO{sub x} control technologies for three size ranges of stationary gas turbines: 5 MW, 25 MW and 150 MW. The purpose of the comparison is to evaluate the cost effectiveness and impact of each control technology as a function of turbine size. The NO{sub x} control technologies evaluated in this study include: Lean premix combustion, also known as dry low NO{sub x} (DLN) combustion; Catalytic combustion; Water/steam injection; Selective catalytic reduction (SCR)--low temperature, conventional, high temperature; and SCONO{sub x}{trademark}.

  9. Methylmalonic acidemia controlled with oral administration of vitamin B12.

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, B. A.; Carson, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A 3-month-old male infant had two episodes of fever, projectile vomiting, dehydration, generalized fine tremors and gross metabloic ketoacidosis. Methylmalonic acid was found in high concentration in both serum and urine, although the concentration of serum vitamin B12 was normal. A therapeutic trial of vitamin B12, administered parenterally, reduced greatly the methylmalonic aciduria. The patient has since been given vitamin B12 supplements continuously, initially 1 mg intramuscularly every other day, then 15 mg/d orally, and the protein in his diet was subsequently restricted. The most effected control of the methylmalonic aciduria was achieved with the combined regimen of oral vitamin therapy and dietary protein restriction. His physical and intellectual development have progressed normally and he has survived several acute respiratory tract infections without recurrence of metabolic acidosis. PMID:953884

  10. PRELIMINARY RESULTS: EVALUATIONS OF THE ALTERNATIVE ASBESTOS CONTROL METHOD FOR BUILDING DEMOLITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation describes the preliminary results of the evaluations of the alternative asbestos control method for demolishing buildings containing asbestos, and are covered under the regulatory requirements of the Asbestos NESHAP. This abstract and presentation are based, at ...

  11. Tick control: trapping, biocontrol, host management and other alternative strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, Howard S.; Edited by Sonenshine, Daniel E.; Roe, R. Michael

    2014-01-01

    Biology of Ticks is the most comprehensive work on tick biology and tick-borne diseases. This second edition is a multi-authored work, featuring the research and analyses of renowned experts across the globe. Spanning two volumes, the book examines the systematics, biology, structure, ecological adaptations, evolution, genomics and the molecular processes that underpin the growth, development and survival of these important disease-transmitting parasites. Also discussed is the remarkable array of diseases transmitted (or caused) by ticks, as well as modern methods for their control. This book should serve as a modern reference for students, scientists, physicians, veterinarians and other specialists. Volume I covers the biology of the tick and features chapters on tick systematics, tick life cycles, external and internal anatomy, and others dedicated to specific organ systems, specifically, the tick integument, mouthparts and digestive system, salivary glands, waste removal, salivary glands, respiratory system, circulatory system and hemolymph, fat body, the nervous and sensory systems and reproductive systems. Volume II includes chapters on the ecology of non-nidicolous and nidicolous ticks, genetics and genomics (including the genome of the Lyme disease vector Ixodes scapularis) and immunity, including host immune responses to tick feeding and tick-host interactions, as well as the tick's innate immune system that prevents and/or controls microbial infections. Six chapters cover in depth the many diseases caused by the major tick-borne pathogens, including tick-borne protozoa, viruses, rickettsiae of all types, other types of bacteria (e.g., the Lyme disease agent) and diseases related to tick paralytic agents and toxins. The remaining chapters are devoted to tick control using vaccines, acaricides, repellents, biocontrol, and, finally, techniques for breeding ticks in order to develop tick colonies for scientific study.

  12. Controlled Release Pulmonary Administration of Curcumin Using Swellable Biocompatible Microparticles

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherbiny, Ibrahim M.; Smyth, Hugh D. C.

    2012-01-01

    This study involves a promising approach to achieve sustained pulmonary drug delivery. Dry powder particulate carriers were engineered to allow simultaneous aerosol lung delivery, evasion of macrophage uptake, and sustained drug release through a controlled polymeric architecture. Chitosan grafted with PEG was synthesized and characterized (FTIR, EA, DSC and 2D-XRD). Then, a series of respirable amphiphilic hydrogel microparticles were developed via spray drying of curcumin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles with chitosan-grafted-PEG or chitosan. The nano and microparticles were fully characterized using an array of physicochemical analytical methods including particle size, surface morphology, dynamic swelling, density, moisture content and biodegradation rates. The PLGA nanoparticles and the hydrogel microspheres encapsulating the curcumin-loaded PLGA nanoparticles showed average size of (221-243 nm) and (3.1-3.9 μm), respectively. The developed carriers attained high swelling within a few minutes, showed low moisture content as dry powders (0.9-1.8%), desirable biodegradation rates, high drug loading (up to 97%), and good sustained release. An aerosolization study was conducted using a next generation impactor and promising aerosolization characteristics were shown. In vitro macrophage uptake studies, cytotoxicity and in-vitro TNF-α assays were performed for the investigated particles. These assays revealed promising bio-interactions for the respirable/swellable nano-micro particles developed in this study as potential carriers for sustained pulmonary drug delivery. PMID:22136259

  13. An alternate approach to hospital cost control: the Rochester project.

    PubMed Central

    Sorensen, A A; Saward, E W

    1978-01-01

    The rapid escalation in health care costs has demonstrated a need to control costs in general and hospital costs in particular. In New York State, efforts at control have followed one of several paths, including reduction of Medicaid program expenditures, elimination of hospital beds, and prospective reimbursement of hospital costs. Although some success has been achieved in each of these areas, hospital costs containment has not been as successful as had been hoped. A new project called MAXICAP, being developed in the Rochester region, seeks to link payment with regional hospital planning. MAXICAP represents a voluntary attempt by hospitals, third party payers, planners, consumers, and governmental agencies to devise a prospective hospital payment system. Under this system community hospital plans in the Rochester region would be integrated and a cap imposed on both revenues and expenses for acute hospital care. The principal advantage of the MAXICAP is that it offers a mechanism for linking hospital planning with payment functions on a regional basis. The principal disadvantage is that the success of the MAXICAP depends upon the voluntary cooperation of the vast majority of the acute care hospitals in the area--hospitals that may be scattered throughout a relatively large region. PMID:98805

  14. Selecting alternative strategies for community health education in guineaworm control.

    PubMed

    Brieger, W R; Ramakrishna, J; Akpovi, S U; Adeniyi, J D

    1984-01-01

    Community health education strategies in guineaworm control can be applied at several intervention levels. Community development mobilizes local resources to provide safe water supplies such as wells. Mass education in schools and communities can teach personal protection measures such as filtering water. Training of volunteer community health workers produces front line staff, who by being culturally in tune with the community can demonstrate and promote the use of appropriate prevention and treatment measures. Advocacy assists community members to express their needs to government and ministry decision makers. All of these strategies have been applied in a community health education/primary health care program in Idere, Ibarapa District, Oyo State. Community development for well construction was found to be a long-term strategy that first must overcome problems of village organization and resource location. Mass education, to be effective, must have a simple and acceptable technology to promote. Trained village health workers must overcome traditional beliefs that inhibit use of preventive and treatment measures. Advocacy requires basic political education of community leaders. A variety of health education strategies is needed to address short- and long-term priorities as well as to overcome the different barriers to guineaworm control.

  15. 78 FR 31431 - Export Administration Regulations (EAR): Control of Spacecraft Systems and Related Items the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Administration Regulations (EAR): Control of Spacecraft Systems and Related Items the President Determines No Longer Warrant Control Under the United States Munitions List (USML) AGENCY: Bureau of Industry and... articles the President determines no longer warrant control under United States Munitions List...

  16. Alternatives to neonicotinoid insecticides for pest control: case studies in agriculture and forestry.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Lorenzo; Kreutzweiser, David

    2015-01-01

    Neonicotinoid insecticides are widely used for control of insect pests around the world and are especially pervasive in agricultural pest management. There is a growing body of evidence indicating that the broad-scale and prophylactic uses of neonicotinoids pose serious risks of harm to beneficial organisms and their ecological function. This provides the impetus for exploring alternatives to neonicotinoid insecticides for controlling insect pests. We draw from examples of alternative pest control options in Italian maize production and Canadian forestry to illustrate the principles of applying alternatives to neonicotinoids under an integrated pest management (IPM) strategy. An IPM approach considers all relevant and available information to make informed management decisions, providing pest control options based on actual need. We explore the benefits and challenges of several options for management of three insect pests in maize crops and an invasive insect pest in forests, including diversifying crop rotations, altering the timing of planting, tillage and irrigation, using less sensitive crops in infested areas, applying biological control agents, and turning to alternative reduced risk insecticides. Continued research into alternatives is warranted, but equally pressing is the need for information transfer and training for farmers and pest managers and the need for policies and regulations to encourage the adoption of IPM strategies and their alternative pest control options.

  17. Low-cost alternative for remedial sand control application

    SciTech Connect

    Peavy, M.A.; Bush, M.E.; Plummer, M.A. Perez, J.I.

    1995-09-01

    During mid-1992, a remedial workover program was implemented offshore within the Gulf of Mexico on low-rate marginal-reserve sand-producing wellbores. A process called through-tubing gravel packing (TTGP) was used on five offshore wells and one US Gulf Coast land well. This technique involved the placement of ceramic beads and prepacked screen within existing completions with coiled tubing (CT) to eliminate sand production. The basic steps of TTGP consist of wellbore cleanup, CT counter correlation, injectivity testing, running a dummy assembly, ceramic bead placement, prepacked screen placement, and installation of an isolation device. The TTGP method demonstrated versatility in adapting to individual well conditions. This remedial sand control technique was successfully applied in highly deviated wellbores, in the upper zones of a dual completion, and within existing gravel packs for screen repair. Throughout the implementation of this program, mechanical problems were addressed that led to improvements in subsequent workover programs. This paper details the TTGP program and recommends mechanical improvements for performing future through-tubing gravel packs.

  18. Introduction and Testing of an Alternative Control Approach for a Robotic Prosthetic Arm

    PubMed Central

    Griggs, Lauren; Fahimi, Farbod

    2014-01-01

    Commercially available robotic prosthetic arms currently use independent joint control. An alternative controller involving only control of the hand in a Cartesian frame rather than controlling each joint independently is proposed and tested. An experimental 4DOF robotic arm was used as the platform for testing the proposed control approach. As opposed to joint control, Cartesian control requires the solution to the inverse kinematics problem. The inverse kinematics solution was developed for the robotic arm using the extended Jacobian method. The two control methodologies, joint control and Cartesian control, were tested on five able-bodied human subjects. Improvement of one control methodology over the other was measured by the time it took for the subjects to complete a simple motor task. The timed trial results indicated that Cartesian control was both more intuitive and more effective than joint control. So, the results suggest that much improvement can be achieved by using the proposed Cartesian control methodology. PMID:25400714

  19. Direct coupling: a possible strategy to control fruit production in alternate bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, Awadhesh; Sakai, Kenshi; Hoshino, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the theoretical possibility of applying phenomenon of synchronization of coupled nonlinear oscillators to control alternate bearing in citrus. The alternate bearing of fruit crops is a phenomenon in which a year of heavy yield is followed by an extremely light one. This phenomenon has been modeled previously by the resource budget model, which describes a typical nonlinear oscillator of the tent map type. We have demonstrated how direct coupling, which could be practically realized through grafting, contributes to the nonlinear dynamics of alternate bearing, especially phase synchronization. Our results show enhancement of out-of-phase synchronization in production, which depends on initial conditions obtained under the given system parameters. Based on these numerical experiments, we propose a new method to control alternate bearing, say in citrus, thereby enabling stable fruit production. The feasibility of validating the current results through field experimentation is also discussed.

  20. Direct coupling: a possible strategy to control fruit production in alternate bearing

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Awadhesh; Sakai, Kenshi; Hoshino, Yoshinobu

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the theoretical possibility of applying phenomenon of synchronization of coupled nonlinear oscillators to control alternate bearing in citrus. The alternate bearing of fruit crops is a phenomenon in which a year of heavy yield is followed by an extremely light one. This phenomenon has been modeled previously by the resource budget model, which describes a typical nonlinear oscillator of the tent map type. We have demonstrated how direct coupling, which could be practically realized through grafting, contributes to the nonlinear dynamics of alternate bearing, especially phase synchronization. Our results show enhancement of out-of-phase synchronization in production, which depends on initial conditions obtained under the given system parameters. Based on these numerical experiments, we propose a new method to control alternate bearing, say in citrus, thereby enabling stable fruit production. The feasibility of validating the current results through field experimentation is also discussed. PMID:28051141

  1. 7 CFR 58.149 - Alternate quality control programs for dairy products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternate quality control programs for dairy products... FOR GRADES OF DAIRY PRODUCTS 1 General Specifications for Dairy Plants Approved for USDA Inspection... for dairy products. (a) When a plant has in operation an acceptable quality control program which...

  2. 40 CFR 721.30 - EPA approval of alternative control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false EPA approval of alternative control... SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT SIGNIFICANT NEW USES OF CHEMICAL SUBSTANCES General Provisions § 721.30 EPA approval... environmental release which EPA has determined provide substantially the same degree of protection as...

  3. Alternative stable states explain unpredictable biological control of Salvinia molesta in Kakadu.

    PubMed

    Schooler, Shon S; Salau, Buck; Julien, Mic H; Ives, Anthony R

    2011-02-03

    Suppression of the invasive plant Salvinia molesta by the salvinia weevil is an iconic example of successful biological control. However, in the billabongs (oxbow lakes) of Kakadu National Park, Australia, control is fitful and incomplete. By fitting a process-based nonlinear model to thirteen-year data sets from four billabongs, here we show that incomplete control can be explained by alternative stable states--one state in which salvinia is suppressed and the other in which salvinia escapes weevil control. The shifts between states are associated with annual flooding events. In some years, high water flow reduces weevil populations, allowing the shift from a controlled to an uncontrolled state; in other years, benign conditions for weevils promote the return shift to the controlled state. In most described ecological examples, transitions between alternative stable states are relatively rare, facilitated by slow-moving environmental changes, such as accumulated nutrient loading or climate change. The billabongs of Kakadu give a different manifestation of alternative stable states that generate complex and seemingly unpredictable dynamics. Because shifts between alternative stable states are stochastic, they present a potential management strategy to maximize effective biological control: when the domain of attraction to the state of salvinia control is approached, augmentation of the weevil population or reduction of the salvinia biomass may allow the lower state to trap the system.

  4. A fuzzy logic controller for hormone administration using an implantable pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, L. Stephen; Wells, George H., Jr.

    1994-01-01

    This paper describes the requirements for a Fuzzy Logic Controller for the physiologic administration of hormones by means of a FDA-approved surgically implantable infusion pump. Results of a LabVIEW computer simulation for the administration of insulin for diabetic adult patients as well as human growth hormone for pediatric patients are presented. A VHS video tape of the simulation in action has been prepared and is available for viewing.

  5. Disposition of Cannabinoids in Oral Fluid after Controlled Around-the-Clock Oral THC Administration

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J.; Schwope, David M.; Schwilke, Eugene W.; Darwin, William D.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Kelly, Deanna L.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Oral fluid, a promising alternative matrix for drug monitoring in clinical and forensic investigations, offers noninvasive sample collection under direct observation. Cannabinoid distribution into oral fluid is complex and incompletely characterized due to the lack of controlled drug administration studies. Methods To characterize cannabinoid disposition in oral fluid, we administered around-the-clock oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) (Marinol®) doses to 10 participants with current daily cannabis use. We obtained oral fluid samples (n = 440) by use of Quantisal™ collection devices before, during, and after 37 20-mg THC doses over 9 days. Samples were extracted with multiple elution solvents from a single SPE column and analyzed by 2-dimensional GC-MS with electron-impact ionization for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), cannabidiol, and cannabinol and negative chemical ionization for 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). Linear ranges were 0.5–50 μg/L, with the exception of cannabinol (1–50 μg/L) and THCCOOH (7.5–500 ng/L). Results THCCOOH was the most prevalent analyte in 432 samples (98.2%), with concentrations up to 1117.9 ng/L. In contrast, 11-OH-THC was not identified in any sample; cannabidiol and cannabinol were quantified in 3 and 8 samples, respectively, with maximum concentrations of 2.1 and 13 μg/L. THC was present in only 20.7% of samples, with highest concentrations near admission (median 4.2 μg/L, range 0.6–481.9) from previously self-administered smoked cannabis. Conclusions Measurement of THCCOOH in OF not only identifies cannabis exposure, but also minimizes the possibility of passive inhalation. THCCOOH may be a better analyte for detection of cannabis use. PMID:20530732

  6. 76 FR 64228 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-17

    ... and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: External Pacemaker Pulse Generator; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing...

  7. Control of alternative splicing by signal-dependent degradation of splicing-regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Katzenberger, Rebeccah J; Marengo, Matthew S; Wassarman, David A

    2009-04-17

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing is a major gene expression regulatory mechanism in metazoan organisms. Proteins that bind pre-mRNA elements and control assembly of splicing complexes regulate utilization of pre-mRNA alternative splice sites. To understand how signaling pathways impact this mechanism, an RNA interference screen in Drosophila S2 cells was used to identify proteins that regulate TAF1 (TBP-associated factor 1) alternative splicing in response to activation of the ATR (ATM-RAD3-related) signaling pathway by the chemotherapeutic drug camptothecin (CPT). The screen identified 15 proteins that, when knocked down, caused the same change in TAF1 alternative splicing as CPT treatment. However, combined RNA interference and CPT treatment experiments indicated that only a subset of the identified proteins are targets of the CPT-induced signal, suggesting that multiple independent pathways regulate TAF1 alternative splicing. To understand how signals modulate the function of splicing factors, we characterized one of the CPT targets, Tra2 (Transformer-2). CPT was found to down-regulate Tra2 protein levels. CPT-induced Tra2 down-regulation was ATR-dependent and temporally paralleled the change in TAF1 alternative splicing, supporting the conclusion that Tra2 directly regulates TAF1 alternative splicing. Additionally, CPT-induced Tra2 down-regulation occurred independently of new protein synthesis, suggesting a post-translational mechanism. The proteasome inhibitor MG132 reduced CPT-induced Tra2 degradation and TAF1 alternative splicing, and mutation of evolutionarily conserved Tra2 lysine 81, a potential ubiquitin conjugation site, to arginine inhibited CPT-induced Tra2 degradation, supporting a proteasome-dependent alternative splicing mechanism. We conclude that CPT-induced TAF1 alternative splicing occurs through ATR-signaled degradation of a subset of splicing-regulatory proteins.

  8. Impacts of Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives on utility demand-side management and conservation and renewable energy programs

    SciTech Connect

    Cavallo, J.D.; Germer, M.F.; Tompkins, M.M.

    1995-03-01

    The Western Area Power Administration (Western) requires all of its long-term firm power customers to implement programs that promote the conservation of electric energy or facilitate the use of renewable energy resources. Western has also proposed that all customers develop integrated resource plans that include cost-effective demand-side management programs. As part of the preparation of Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) developed estimates of the reductions in energy demand resulting from Western`s conservation and renewable energy activities in its Salt Lake City Area Office. ANL has also estimated the energy-demand reductions from cost-effective, demand-side management programs that could be included in the integrated resource plans of the customers served by Western`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The results of this study have been used to adjust the expected hourly demand for Western`s major systems in the Salt Lake City Area. The expected hourly demand served as the basis for capacity expansion plans develops with ANL`s Production and Capacity Expansion (PACE) model.

  9. Naval Facilities Engineering Command Needs to Improve Controls Over Task Order Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-02

    No. DODIG-2015-141 J U LY 2 , 2 0 1 5 Naval Facilities Engineering Command Needs to Improve Controls Over Task Order Administration Mission Our...r a u d , W a s t e & A b u s e DODIG-2015-141 (Project No. D2014-D000RA-0116.000) │ i Results in Brief Naval Facilities Engineering Command Needs...to Improve Controls Over Task Order Administration Visit us at www.dodig.mil Objective Our objective was to determine whether Naval Facilities

  10. Real-time scintigraphic assessment of intravenous radium-223 administration for quality control.

    PubMed

    Wright, Chadwick L; Monk, J Paul; Murrey, Douglas A; Hall, Nathan C

    2015-01-01

    Radium-223 ((223)Ra) dichloride is an approved intravenous radiotherapy for patients with osseous metastases from castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). In addition to the therapeutic alpha radiation, there is additional (223)Ra radiation generated which produces photons that can be imaged with conventional gamma cameras. No studies have evaluated real-time and quality imaging during intravenous (223)Ra administration to verify systemic circulation and exclude (223)Ra extravasation at the injection site. A retrospective review was performed for fifteen (223)Ra administrations for CRPC patients which were imaged using a large field of view portable gamma camera (LFOVPGC) for the purposes of quality control and patient safety. Dynamic imaging of the chest was performed before, during, and after the (223)Ra administration to verify systemic circulation, per institutional clinical protocol. Before and after (223)Ra administration, a static image was obtained of the intravenous access site. Dynamic imaging of the chest confirmed systemic administration early during the 1-minute injection period for all patients. There were no cases of focal (223)Ra extravasation at the site of intravenous access. These results verify that systemic (223)Ra administrations can be quantified with real-time imaging using an LFOVPGC. This simple approach can confirm and quantify systemic circulation of (223)Ra early during injection and exclude focal extravasation for the purposes of quality control.

  11. Controllability of Free-piston Stirling Engine/linear Alternator Driving a Dynamic Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kankam, M. David; Rauch, Jeffrey S.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents the dynamic behavior of a Free-Piston Stirling Engine/linear alternator (FPSE/LA) driving a single-phase fractional horse-power induction motor. The controllability and dynamic stability of the system are discussed by means of sensitivity effects of variations in system parameters, engine controller, operating conditions, and mechanical loading on the induction motor. The approach used expands on a combined mechanical and thermodynamic formulation employed in a previous paper. The application of state-space technique and frequency domain analysis enhances understanding of the dynamic interactions. Engine-alternator parametric sensitivity studies, similar to those of the previous paper, are summarized. Detailed discussions are provided for parametric variations which relate to the engine controller and system operating conditions. The results suggest that the controllability of a FPSE-based power system is enhanced by proper operating conditions and built-in controls.

  12. Regulation of hypnosis in Propofol anesthesia administration based on non-linear control strategy.

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Khaqan, Ali; Iqbal, Jamshed; Riaz, Raja Ali

    Continuous adjustment of Propofol in manual delivery of anesthesia for conducting a surgical procedure overburdens the workload of an anesthetist who is working in a multi-tasking scenario. Going beyond manual administration and Target Controlled Infusion, closed-loop control of Propofol infusion has the potential to offer several benefits in terms of handling perturbations and reducing the effect of inter-patient variability. This paper proposes a closed-loop automated drug administration approach to control Depth Of Hypnosis in anesthesia. In contrast with most of the existing research on anesthesia control which makes use of linear control strategies or their improved variants, the novelty of the present research lies in applying robust control strategy i.e. Sliding Mode Control to accurately control drug infusion. Based on the derived patient's model, the designed controller uses measurements from EEG to regulate DOH on Bispectral Index by controlling infusion rate of Propofol. The performance of the controller is investigated and characterized with real dataset of 8 patients undergoing surgery. Results of this in silico study indicate that for all the patients, with 0% overshoot observed, the steady state error lies in between ±5. Clinically, this implies that in all the cases, without any overdose, the controller maintains the desired DOH level for smooth conduction of surgical procedures.

  13. [Regulation of hypnosis in Propofol anesthesia administration based on non-linear control strategy].

    PubMed

    Ilyas, Muhammad; Khaqan, Ali; Iqbal, Jamshed; Riaz, Raja Ali

    Continuous adjustment of Propofol in manual delivery of anesthesia for conducting a surgical procedure overburdens the workload of an anesthetist who is working in a multi-tasking scenario. Going beyond manual administration and Target Controlled Infusion, closed-loop control of Propofol infusion has the potential to offer several benefits in terms of handling perturbations and reducing the effect of inter-patient variability. This paper proposes a closed-loop automated drug administration approach to control Depth Of Hypnosis in anesthesia. In contrast with most of the existing research on anesthesia control which makes use of linear control strategies or their improved variants, the novelty of the present research lies in applying robust control strategy i.e. Sliding Mode Control to accurately control drug infusion. Based on the derived patient's model, the designed controller uses measurements from EEG to regulate DOH on Bispectral Index by controlling infusion rate of Propofol. The performance of the controller is investigated and characterized with real dataset of 8 patients undergoing surgery. Results of this in silico study indicate that for all the patients, with 0% overshoot observed, the steady state error lies in between ±5. Clinically, this implies that in all the cases, without any overdose, the controller maintains the desired DOH level for smooth conduction of surgical procedures.

  14. 40 CFR 725.975 - EPA approval of alternative control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Additional Procedures for Reporting on Significant New Uses of Microorganisms § 725.975 EPA approval of alternative... identified microorganisms are described as the failure to establish and implement programs providing for...

  15. 40 CFR 725.975 - EPA approval of alternative control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Additional Procedures for Reporting on Significant New Uses of Microorganisms § 725.975 EPA approval of alternative... identified microorganisms are described as the failure to establish and implement programs providing for...

  16. 40 CFR 725.975 - EPA approval of alternative control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Additional Procedures for Reporting on Significant New Uses of Microorganisms § 725.975 EPA approval of alternative... identified microorganisms are described as the failure to establish and implement programs providing for...

  17. 40 CFR 725.975 - EPA approval of alternative control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) TOXIC SUBSTANCES CONTROL ACT REPORTING REQUIREMENTS AND REVIEW PROCESSES FOR MICROORGANISMS Additional Procedures for Reporting on Significant New Uses of Microorganisms § 725.975 EPA approval of alternative... identified microorganisms are described as the failure to establish and implement programs providing for...

  18. Overview On Alternate Asbestos Control Method Research And NESHAP Comparison - Nashville, TN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The alternative asbestos control method (AACM) is an experimental approach to building demolition. Unlike the NESHAP method, the AACM allows some regulated asbestos containing material to remain in the building and a surfactant-water solution is used to suppress asbestos fibers ...

  19. Organic acids and thymol: unsuitable alternative control of Aethina tumida Murray (Coleoptera: Nitidulidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To explore alternative small hive beetle control strategies, established Varroa destructor and Galleria mellonella treatments with organic acids (formic, lactic, oxalic and acetic) and thymol were investigated in the laboratory against eggs, larvae and adult small hive beetle (SHB). As formic and ox...

  20. Attractant-based systems as pesticide alternatives for control of tropical fruit flies (Diptera: Tephritidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass trapping and attract-and-kill bait stations are two attractant based systems that are being used or are under development as pesticide alternatives for control of a number of pest tephritid fruit flies. Results of field trials for suppression of Caribbean fruit flies in guava orchards in Florid...

  1. 40 CFR 721.30 - EPA approval of alternative control measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... environmental release which EPA has determined provide substantially the same degree of protection as the... why such alternative control measures provide substantially the same degree of protection as the... reviewed by EPA within 45 days. Determinations under this paragraph will be made by the Director, Office...

  2. A Study on Components of Internal Control-Based Administrative System in Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montri, Paitoon; Sirisuth, Chaiyuth; Lammana, Preeda

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to study the components of the internal control-based administrative system in secondary schools, and make a Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to confirm the goodness of fit of empirical data and component model that resulted from the CFA. The study consisted of three steps: 1) studying of principles, ideas, and theories…

  3. SKIP Confers Osmotic Tolerance during Salt Stress by Controlling Alternative Gene Splicing in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jinlin; Li, Jingjing; Gao, Zhaoxu; Lu, Yaru; Yu, Junya; Zheng, Qian; Yan, Shuning; Zhang, Wenjiao; He, Hang; Ma, Ligeng; Zhu, Zhengge

    2015-07-01

    Deciphering the mechanisms underlying plant responses to abiotic stress is key for improving plant stress resistance. Much is known about the regulation of gene expression in response to salt stress at the transcriptional level; however, little is known about this process at the posttranscriptional level. Recently, we demonstrated that SKIP is a component of spliceosome that interacts with clock gene pre-mRNAs and is essential for regulating their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. In this study, we found that skip-1 plants are hypersensitive to both salt and osmotic stresses, and that SKIP is required for the alternative splicing and mRNA maturation of several salt-tolerance genes, including NHX1, CBL1, P5CS1, RCI2A, and PAT10. A genome-wide analysis revealed that SKIP mediates the alternative splicing of many genes under salt-stress conditions, and that most of the alternative splicing events in skip-1 involve intron retention and can generate a premature termination codon in the transcribed mRNA. SKIP also controls alternative splicing by modulating the recognition or cleavage of 5' and 3' splice donor and acceptor sites under salt-stress conditions. Therefore, this study addresses the fundamental question of how the mRNA splicing machinery in plants contributes to salt-stress responses at the posttranscriptional level, and provides a link between alternative splicing and salt tolerance.

  4. 77 FR 37523 - Proposed Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations: Implementation of Export Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-21

    ...President Obama directed the Administration in August 2009 to conduct a broad-based review of the U.S. export control system in order to identify additional ways to enhance national security. Then- Secretary of Defense Gates described in April 2010 the initial results of that effort and why fundamental reform of the U.S. export control system is necessary to enhance national security. Since......

  5. Exploring drug delivery for the DOT1L inhibitor pinometostat (EPZ-5676): Subcutaneous administration as an alternative to continuous IV infusion, in the pursuit of an epigenetic target.

    PubMed

    Waters, Nigel J; Daigle, Scott R; Rehlaender, Bruce N; Basavapathruni, Aravind; Campbell, Carly T; Jensen, Tyler B; Truitt, Brett F; Olhava, Edward J; Pollock, Roy M; Stickland, Kim A; Dovletoglou, Angelos

    2015-12-28

    Protein methyltransferases are emerging as promising drug targets for therapeutic intervention in human cancers. Pinometostat (EPZ-5676) is a small molecule inhibitor of the DOT1L enzyme, a histone methyltransferase that methylates lysine 79 of histone H3. DOT1L activity is dysregulated in the pathophysiology of rearranged mixed lineage leukemia (MLL-r). Pinometostat is currently in Phase 1 clinical trials in relapsed refractory acute leukemia patients and is administered as a continuous IV infusion (CIV). The studies herein investigated alternatives to CIV administration of pinometostat to improve patient convenience. Various sustained release technologies were considered, and based on the required dose size as well as practical considerations, subcutaneous (SC) bolus administration of a solution formulation was selected for further evaluation in preclinical studies. SC administration offered improved exposure and complete bioavailability of pinometostat relative to CIV and oral administration. These findings warranted further evaluation in rat xenograft models of MLL-r leukemia. SC dosing in xenograft models demonstrated inhibition of MLL-r tumor growth and inhibition of pharmacodynamic markers of DOT1L activity. However, a dosing frequency of thrice daily (t.i.d) was required in these studies to elicit optimal inhibition of DOT1L target genes and tumor growth inhibition. Development of an extended release formulation may prove useful in the further optimization of the SC delivery of pinometostat, moving towards a more convenient dosing paradigm for patients.

  6. Global Status of DDT and Its Alternatives for Use in Vector Control to Prevent Disease

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Henk

    2009-01-01

    Objective I review the status of dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), used for disease vector control, along with current evidence on its benefits and risks in relation to the available alternatives. Data sources and extraction Contemporary data on DDT use were largely obtained from questionnaires and reports. I also conducted a Scopus search to retrieve published articles. Data synthesis DDT has been recommended as part of the arsenal of insecticides available for indoor residual spraying until suitable alternatives are available. Approximately 14 countries use DDT for disease control, and several countries are preparing to reintroduce DDT. The effectiveness of DDT depends on local settings and merits close consideration in relation to the alternatives. Concerns about the continued use of DDT are fueled by recent reports of high levels of human exposure associated with indoor spraying amid accumulating evidence on chronic health effects. There are signs that more malaria vectors are becoming resistant to the toxic action of DDT, and that resistance is spreading to new countries. A comprehensive cost assessment of DDT versus its alternatives that takes side effects into account is missing. Effective chemical methods are available as immediate alternatives to DDT, but the choice of insecticide class is limited, and in certain areas the development of resistance is undermining the efficacy of insecticidal tools. New insecticides are not expected in the short term. Nonchemical methods are potentially important, but their effectiveness at program level needs urgent study. Conclusions To reduce reliance on DDT, support is needed for integrated and multipartner strategies of vector control and for the continued development of new technologies. Integrated vector management provides a framework for developing and implementing effective technologies and strategies as sustainable alternatives to reliance on DDT. PMID:20049114

  7. ALARA Analysis of Radiological Control Criteria Associated with Alternatives for Disposal of Hazardous Wastes

    SciTech Connect

    Aaberg, Rosanne L.; Bilyard, Gordon R.; Branch, Kristi M.; Lavender, Jay C.; Miller, Peter L.

    2002-05-15

    This ALARA analysis of Radiological Control Criteria (RCC) considers alternatives to continued storage of certain DOE mixed wastes. It also considers the option of treating hazardous wastes generated by DOE facilities, which have a very low concentration of radionuclide contaminants, as purely hazardous waste. Alternative allowable contaminant levels examined correspond to doses to an individual ranging from 0.01 mrem/yr to 10 to 20 mrem/yr. Generic waste inventory data and radionuclide source terms are used in the assessment. Economic issues, potential health and safety issues, and qualitative factors relating to the use of RCCs are considered.

  8. Decision making under stress: scanning of alternatives under controllable and uncontrollable threats.

    PubMed

    Keinan, G

    1987-03-01

    This study tested the proposition that deficient decision making under stress is due, to a significant extent, to the individual's failure to fulfill adequately an elementary requirement of the decision-making process, that is, the systematic consideration of all relevant alternatives. One hundred one undergraduate students (59 women and 42 men), aged 20-40, served as subjects in this experiment. They were requested to solve decision problems, using an interactive computer paradigm, while being exposed to controllable stress, uncontrollable stress, or no stress at all. There was no time constraint for the performance of the task. The controllability of the stressor was found to have no effect on the participants' performance. However, those who were exposed to either controllable or uncontrollable stress showed a significantly stronger tendency to offer solutions before all available alternatives had been considered and to scan their alternatives in a nonsystematic fashion than did participants who were not exposed to stress. In addition, patterns of alternative scanning were found to be correlated with the correctness of solutions to decision problems.

  9. 76 FR 16425 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... document is immediately in effect as the special control for the ovarian adnexal mass assessment score...

  10. 76 FR 28688 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 866 Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for Bacillus Species Detection AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of...

  11. Methods, systems and apparatus for controlling operation of two alternating current (AC) machines

    DOEpatents

    Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel [Torrance, CA; Nagashima, James M [Cerritos, CA; Perisic, Milun [Torrance, CA; Hiti, Silva [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-06-05

    A system is provided for controlling two alternating current (AC) machines via a five-phase PWM inverter module. The system comprises a first control loop, a second control loop, and a current command adjustment module. The current command adjustment module operates in conjunction with the first control loop and the second control loop to continuously adjust current command signals that control the first AC machine and the second AC machine such that they share the input voltage available to them without compromising the target mechanical output power of either machine. This way, even when the phase voltage available to either one of the machines decreases, that machine outputs its target mechanical output power.

  12. Controlling Kink Geometry in Nanowires Fabricated by Alternating Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yun; Li, Liyi; Zhang, Cheng; Tuan, Chia-Chi; Chen, Xin; Gao, Jian; Wong, Ching-Ping

    2017-02-08

    Kinked silicon (Si) nanowires (NWs) have many special properties that make them attractive for a number of applications, such as microfluidics devices, microelectronic devices, and biosensors. However, fabricating NWs with controlled three-dimensional (3D) geometry has been challenging. In this work, a novel method called alternating metal-assisted chemical etching is reported for the fabrication of kinked Si NWs with controlled 3D geometry. By the use of multiple etchants with carefully selected composition, one can control the number of kinks, their locations, and their angles by controlling the number of etchant alternations and the time in each etchant. The resulting number of kinks equals the number times the etchant is alternated, the length of each segment separated by kinks has a linear relationship with the etching time, and the kinking angle is related to the surface tension and viscosity of the etchants. This facile method may provide a feasible and economical way to fabricate novel silicon nanowires, nanostructures, and devices for broad applications.

  13. Determination of an optimal control strategy for drug administration in tumor treatment using multi-objective optimization differential evolution.

    PubMed

    Lobato, Fran Sérgio; Machado, Vinicius Silvério; Steffen, Valder

    2016-07-01

    The mathematical modeling of physical and biologic systems represents an interesting alternative to study the behavior of these phenomena. In this context, the development of mathematical models to simulate the dynamic behavior of tumors is configured as an important theme in the current days. Among the advantages resulting from using these models is their application to optimization and inverse problem approaches. Traditionally, the formulated Optimal Control Problem (OCP) has the objective of minimizing the size of tumor cells by the end of the treatment. In this case an important aspect is not considered, namely, the optimal concentrations of drugs may affect the patients' health significantly. In this sense, the present work has the objective of obtaining an optimal protocol for drug administration to patients with cancer, through the minimization of both the cancerous cells concentration and the prescribed drug concentration. The resolution of this multi-objective problem is obtained through the Multi-objective Optimization Differential Evolution (MODE) algorithm. The Pareto's Curve obtained supplies a set of optimal protocols from which an optimal strategy for drug administration can be chosen, according to a given criterion.

  14. Genetic control of the alternative pathway of complement in humans and age-related macular degeneration.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Laura A; Edwards, Albert O; Ryu, Euijung; Tosakulwong, Nirubol; Baratz, Keith H; Brown, William L; Charbel Issa, Peter; Scholl, Hendrik P; Pollok-Kopp, Beatrix; Schmid-Kubista, Katharina E; Bailey, Kent R; Oppermann, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Activation of the alternative pathway of complement is implicated in common neurodegenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). We explored the impact of common variation in genes encoding proteins of the alternative pathway on complement activation in human blood and in AMD. Genetic variation across the genes encoding complement factor H (CFH), factor B (CFB) and component 3 (C3) was determined. The influence of common haplotypes defining transcriptional and translational units on complement activation in blood was determined in a quantitative genomic association study. Individual haplotypes in CFH and CFB were associated with distinct and novel effects on plasma levels of precursors, regulators and activation products of the alternative pathway of complement in human blood. Further, genetic variation in CFH thought to influence cell surface regulation of complement did not alter plasma complement levels in human blood. Plasma markers of chronic activation (split-products Ba and C3d) and an activating enzyme (factor D) were elevated in AMD subjects. Most of the elevation in AMD was accounted for by the genetic variation controlling complement activation in human blood. Activation of the alternative pathway of complement in blood is under genetic control and increases with age. The genetic variation associated with increased activation of complement in human blood also increased the risk of AMD. Our data are consistent with a disease model in which genetic variation in the complement system increases the risk of AMD by a combination of systemic complement activation and abnormal regulation of complement activation in local tissues.

  15. Analytical design of a parasitic-loading digital speed controller for a 400-hertz turbine driven alternator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingle, B. D.; Ryan, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A design for a solid-state parasitic speed controller using digital logic was analyzed. Parasitic speed controllers are used in space power electrical generating systems to control the speed of turbine-driven alternators within specified limits. The analysis included the performance characteristics of the speed controller and the generation of timing functions. The speed controller using digital logic applies step loads to the alternator. The step loads conduct for a full half wave starting at either zero or 180 electrical degrees.

  16. Preventing the Transmission of Tuberculosis in Health Care Settings: Administrative Control

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    It is well established that health care workers (HCWs) have a considerably higher risk of occupationally acquired tuberculosis (TB). To reduce the transmission of TB to HCWs and patients, TB infection control programs should be implemented in health care settings. The first and most important level of all protection and control programs is administrative control. Its goals are to prevent HCWs, other staff, and patients from being exposed to TB, and to reduce the transmission of infection by ensuring rapid diagnosis and treatment of affected individuals. Administrative control measures recommended by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the World Health Organization include prompt identification of people with TB symptoms, isolation of infectious patients, control of the spread of the pathogen, and minimization of time spent in health care facilities. Another key component of measures undertaken is the baseline and serial screening for latent TB infection in HCWs who are at risk of exposure to TB. Although the interferon-gamma release assay has some advantages over the tuberculin skin test, the former has serious limitations, mostly due to its high conversion rate. PMID:28119743

  17. Epidural analgesia during labor: continuous infusion or patient-controlled administration?

    PubMed

    Benhamou, D

    1995-05-01

    Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has several advantages over continuous epidural infusion of bupivacaine during labor: it produces a good analgesia with a limited sensory spread; generally, less bupivacaine is administered and maternal satisfaction with pain control is increased. However, the quality of analgesia is similar to that obtained with other forms of epidural administration. Moreover, PCEA is only a particular form of epidural and, as such, has the same safety requirements. PCEA does not appear to reduce the workload of the anesthetic team. The cost of the PCA pump will need to be included in future evaluation of the cost/benefit ratio.

  18. Local infiltration of rabies immunoglobulins without systemic intramuscular administration: An alternative cost effective approach for passive immunization against rabies

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Omesh Kumar; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Gaunta, Pyare Lal; Belludi, Ashwin Yajaman

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently the dose of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) which is an integral part of rabies post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is calculated based on body weight though the recommendation is to infiltrate the wound(s). This practice demands large quantities of RIG which may be unaffordable to many patients. In this background, we conducted this study to know if the quantity and cost of RIG can be reduced by restricting passive immunization to local infiltration alone and avoiding systemic intramuscular administration based on the available scientific evidence. Two hundred and sixty nine category III patients bitten by suspect or confirmed rabid dogs/animals were infiltrated with equine rabies immunoglobulin (ERIGs) in and around the wound. The quantity of ERIG used was proportionate to the size and number of wounds irrespective of their body weight. They were followed with a regular course of rabies vaccination by intra-dermal route. As against 363 vials of RIGs required for all these cases as per current recommendation based on body weight, they required only 42 vials of 5ml RIG. Minimum dose of RIGs given was 0.25 ml and maximum dose given was 8 ml. On an average 1.26 ml of RIGs was required per patient that costs Rs. 150 ($3). All the patients were followed for 9 months and they were healthy and normal at the end of observation period. With local infiltration, that required small quantities of RIG, the RIGs could be made available to all patients in times of short supply in the market. A total of 30 (11%) serum samples of patients were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and all showed antibody titers >0.5 IU/mL by day 14. In no case the dose was higher than that required based on body weight and no immunosuppression resulted. To conclude, this pilot study shows that local infiltration of RIG need to be considered in times of non-availability in the market or unaffordability by poor patients

  19. 76 FR 29251 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls; Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ...; Class II Special Controls; Guidance Document: Topical Oxygen Chamber for Extremities; Availability... Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance Documents: Topical Oxygen Chamber for... Guidance Document: Topical Oxygen Chamber for Extremities'' to the Division of Small...

  20. 40 CFR 23.8 - Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. 23.8 Section 23.8 Protection of Environment... Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Unless the...

  1. 40 CFR 23.8 - Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. 23.8 Section 23.8 Protection of Environment... Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Unless the...

  2. 40 CFR 23.8 - Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. 23.8 Section 23.8 Protection of Environment... Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Unless the...

  3. 40 CFR 23.8 - Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. 23.8 Section 23.8 Protection of Environment... Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Unless the...

  4. 40 CFR 23.8 - Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. 23.8 Section 23.8 Protection of Environment... Administrator's action under Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act of 1978. Unless the...

  5. Controlled Soil Warming Powered by Alternative Energy for Remote Field Sites

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Jill F.; Henkelman, Jonathan; Allen, Kirsten; Helgason, Warren; Bedard-Haughn, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Experiments using controlled manipulation of climate variables in the field are critical for developing and testing mechanistic models of ecosystem responses to climate change. Despite rapid changes in climate observed in many high latitude and high altitude environments, controlled manipulations in these remote regions have largely been limited to passive experimental methods with variable effects on environmental factors. In this study, we tested a method of controlled soil warming suitable for remote field locations that can be powered using alternative energy sources. The design was tested in high latitude, alpine tundra of southern Yukon Territory, Canada, in 2010 and 2011. Electrical warming probes were inserted vertically in the near-surface soil and powered with photovoltaics attached to a monitoring and control system. The warming manipulation achieved a stable target warming of 1.3 to 2°C in 1 m2 plots while minimizing disturbance to soil and vegetation. Active control of power output in the warming plots allowed the treatment to closely match spatial and temporal variations in soil temperature while optimizing system performance during periods of low power supply. Active soil heating with vertical electric probes powered by alternative energy is a viable option for remote sites and presents a low-disturbance option for soil warming experiments. This active heating design provides a valuable tool for examining the impacts of soil warming on ecosystem processes. PMID:24386125

  6. Controlled soil warming powered by alternative energy for remote field sites.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Jill F; Henkelman, Jonathan; Allen, Kirsten; Helgason, Warren; Bedard-Haughn, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Experiments using controlled manipulation of climate variables in the field are critical for developing and testing mechanistic models of ecosystem responses to climate change. Despite rapid changes in climate observed in many high latitude and high altitude environments, controlled manipulations in these remote regions have largely been limited to passive experimental methods with variable effects on environmental factors. In this study, we tested a method of controlled soil warming suitable for remote field locations that can be powered using alternative energy sources. The design was tested in high latitude, alpine tundra of southern Yukon Territory, Canada, in 2010 and 2011. Electrical warming probes were inserted vertically in the near-surface soil and powered with photovoltaics attached to a monitoring and control system. The warming manipulation achieved a stable target warming of 1.3 to 2 °C in 1 m(2) plots while minimizing disturbance to soil and vegetation. Active control of power output in the warming plots allowed the treatment to closely match spatial and temporal variations in soil temperature while optimizing system performance during periods of low power supply. Active soil heating with vertical electric probes powered by alternative energy is a viable option for remote sites and presents a low-disturbance option for soil warming experiments. This active heating design provides a valuable tool for examining the impacts of soil warming on ecosystem processes.

  7. Alternative Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annett, Larry D.

    A model is presented for the categorizing of alternative schools, then the nature of the free school, which represents the essence of the alternative school movement, is examined. Strengths and weaknesses of court, legislative, and administrative approaches to resolve governance issues are set forth. This is followed by an analysis of three…

  8. An alternative approach to congressional control: The case of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, L.E.

    1993-01-01

    This study is about congressional control of bureaucracy. It is an effort to explain the incidence of congressional control. The analysis examines how different policy environments, defined as the technical and political characteristics surrounding a policy issue, influence legislators' decisions about control and the subsequent level of intent to control incorporated into legislation. To do so, the author first elaborates on a theoretical perspective which describes how policy environments give rise to or constrain congressional efforts to control bureaucracy through the design of statutes and characterizes the conditions under which more versus less congressional control might be found. Then it is shown that the relationships in the model do, in fact, capture the thought processes and behavior of individual legislators quite well. Third, to test this alternate approach in a general sense, the author compares the influence of policy environments of various air pollution issues on efforts by Congress to control the Environmental Protection Agency in provisions of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990. Finally, to provide additional support for this perspective, the author explores the role of policy environments at different levels of policy making within Congress. The study concludes that the model is an effective way to illustrate the links between the characteristics of a policy issue, legislators' attributes, and intent to control. As a result, the model furthers the level of understanding that exists about congressional decisions to control bureaucracy.

  9. Chemical characterization of Lippia alba essential oil: an alternative to control green molds

    PubMed Central

    Glamočlija, Jasmina; Soković, Marina; Tešević, Vele; Linde, Giani Andrea; Colauto, Nelson Barros

    2011-01-01

    The essential oil of Lippia alba is reported as an antifungal against human pathogenic microorganisms but few articles report its use as an alternative to synthetic fungicides on green mould control. The objective of this study was to determine chemical characteristics of L. alba essential oil and its antifungal activity against green molds as an alternative to synthetic fungicides. Essential oil was extracted by Clevenger hydrodistillation, characterized by GC-MS analysis, and the structure of the main compounds confirmed by 1H and 13C-NMR spectroscopy. Microdilution assays evaluated the essential oil minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC). Commercial fungicides Ketoconazole and Bifonazole were used as control. Essential oil yield is of 0.15% and the major components are neral (33.32%) and geranial (50.94%). The L. alba essential oil has MIC of 0.300–1.250 mg/mL and MFC of 0.600–1.250 mg/mL. Ketoconazole and Bifonazole show MIC ranging from 0.025–0.500 to 0.100–0.200 mg/mL, and MFC ranging from 0.250–0.100 to 0.200–0.250 mg/mL, respectively. L. alba essential oil is classified as citral type and the results indicate that it is a potential alternative to synthetic fungicides. PMID:24031788

  10. Chemical characterization of Lippia alba essential oil: an alternative to control green molds.

    PubMed

    Glamočlija, Jasmina; Soković, Marina; Tešević, Vele; Linde, Giani Andrea; Colauto, Nelson Barros

    2011-10-01

    The essential oil of Lippia alba is reported as an antifungal against human pathogenic microorganisms but few articles report its use as an alternative to synthetic fungicides on green mould control. The objective of this study was to determine chemical characteristics of L. alba essential oil and its antifungal activity against green molds as an alternative to synthetic fungicides. Essential oil was extracted by Clevenger hydrodistillation, characterized by GC-MS analysis, and the structure of the main compounds confirmed by (1)H and (13)C-NMR spectroscopy. Microdilution assays evaluated the essential oil minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC). Commercial fungicides Ketoconazole and Bifonazole were used as control. Essential oil yield is of 0.15% and the major components are neral (33.32%) and geranial (50.94%). The L. alba essential oil has MIC of 0.300-1.250 mg/mL and MFC of 0.600-1.250 mg/mL. Ketoconazole and Bifonazole show MIC ranging from 0.025-0.500 to 0.100-0.200 mg/mL, and MFC ranging from 0.250-0.100 to 0.200-0.250 mg/mL, respectively. L. alba essential oil is classified as citral type and the results indicate that it is a potential alternative to synthetic fungicides.

  11. An alternate method for achieving temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Anderson, Mark R.; Lane, Robert W.; Cortez, Maximo G.

    1992-01-01

    Thermal vacuum testing often requires temperature control of chamber shrouds and heat exchangers within the -130 C to 75 C range. There are two conventional methods which are normally employed to achieve control through this intermediate temperature range: (1) single-pass flow where control is achieved by alternately pulsing hot gaseous nitrogen (GN2) and cold LN2 into the feed line to yield the setpoint temperature; and (2) closed-loop circulation where control is achieved by either electrically heating or LN2 cooling the circulating GN2 to yield the setpoint temperature. A third method, using a mass flow ratio controller along with modulating control valves on GN2 and LN2 lines, provides excellent control but equipment for this method is expensive and cost-prohibitive for all but long-term continuous processes. The single-pass method provides marginal control and can result in unexpected overcooling of the test article from even a short pulse of LN2. The closed-loop circulation method provides excellent control but requires an expensive blower capable of operating at elevated pressures and cryogenic temperatures. Where precise control is needed (plus or minus 2 C), single-pass flow systems typically have not provided the precision required, primarily because of overcooling temperature excursions. Where several individual circuits are to be controlled at different temperatures, the use of expensive cryogenic blowers for each circuit is also cost-prohibitive, especially for short duration of one-of-a-kind tests. At JPL, a variant of the single-pass method was developed that was shown to provide precise temperature control in the -130 C to 75 C range while exhibiting minimal setpoint overshoot during temperature transitions. This alternate method uses a commercially available temperature controller along with a GN2/LN2 mixer to dampen the amplitude of cold temperature spikes caused by LN2 pulsing. The design of the GN2/LN2 mixer, the overall control system

  12. An empirical evaluation of devolving administrative control to Costa Rican hospital and clinic directors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Theodore; McKee, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    In the early 2000s, Costa Rica implemented comprehensive reforms of its health care system, including devolving administrative power from the central government to some providers that remain part of the national system. In this article, we evaluate how this aspect of the reform affected clinic efficiency and population health by analyzing administrative data on regional providers and mortality rates in local areas. We compare changes in outcomes across time between areas that signed performance contracts with the central government and received limited budgetary control to those that continued to be managed directly by the central government. We believe the reform created opportunities for providers to become more efficient and effective. Our results suggest that the reform significantly decreased costs without adversely affecting quality of care or population health.

  13. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F

    2015-12-22

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system.

  14. Project Cerberus: tobacco industry strategy to create an alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control.

    PubMed

    Mamudu, Hadii M; Hammond, Ross; Glantz, Stanton A

    2008-09-01

    Between 1999 and 2001, British American Tobacco, Philip Morris, and Japan Tobacco International executed Project Cerberus to develop a global voluntary regulatory regime as an alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). They aimed to develop a global voluntary regulatory code to be overseen by an independent audit body and to focus attention on youth smoking prevention. The International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards announced in September 2001, however, did not have the independent audit body. Although the companies did not stop the FCTC, they continue to promote the International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards youth smoking prevention as an alternative to the FCTC. Public health civil society groups should help policymakers and governments understand the importance of not working with the tobacco industry.

  15. Alternatives to the sequential lineup: the importance of controlling the pictures.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, R C; Bellinger, K

    1999-06-01

    Because sequential lineups reduce false-positive choices, their use has been recommended (R. C. L. Lindsay, 1999; R. C. L. Lindsay & G. L. Wells, 1985). Blind testing is included in the recommended procedures. Police, concerned about blind testing, devised alternative procedures, including self-administered sequential lineups, to reduce use of relative judgments (G. L. Wells, 1984) while permitting the investigating officer to conduct the procedure. Identification data from undergraduates exposed to a staged crime (N = 165) demonstrated that 4 alternative identification procedures tested were less effective than the original sequential lineup. Allowing witnesses to control the photographs resulted in higher rates of false-positive identification. Self-reports of using relative judgments were shown to be postdictive of decision accuracy.

  16. The effect of alternative work arrangements on women's well-being: a demand-control model.

    PubMed

    Kelloway, E K; Gottlieb, B H

    1998-01-01

    The growth of women's participation in the labor force and evidence of the conflict they experience between job and family demands have spurred many employers to introduce alternative work arrangements such as flextime, job sharing, and telecommuting. Drawing on data gained from a sample of women (N = 998) in two large Canadian organizations, this study evaluates two mediational models of the impact of alternative work arrangements on women's stress and family role competence. Specifically, it tests and finds support for the hypotheses that (a) work arrangements involving scheduling flexibility (telecommuting and flextime) promote these aspects of women's well-being by increasing their perceived control over their time, and (b) arrangements involving reduced hours of employment (part-time employment and job sharing) promote well-being by reducing perceived job overload. Discussion of these findings centers on their implications for employed women, their employers, and future research.

  17. The Role of Alternative Splicing in the Control of Immune Homeostasis and Cellular Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Yabas, Mehmet; Elliott, Hannah; Hoyne, Gerard F.

    2015-01-01

    Alternative splicing of pre-mRNA helps to enhance the genetic diversity within mammalian cells by increasing the number of protein isoforms that can be generated from one gene product. This provides a great deal of flexibility to the host cell to alter protein function, but when dysregulation in splicing occurs this can have important impact on health and disease. Alternative splicing is widely used in the mammalian immune system to control the development and function of antigen specific lymphocytes. In this review we will examine the splicing of pre-mRNAs yielding key proteins in the immune system that regulate apoptosis, lymphocyte differentiation, activation and homeostasis, and discuss how defects in splicing can contribute to diseases. We will describe how disruption to trans-acting factors, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), can impact on cell survival and differentiation in the immune system. PMID:26703587

  18. Project Cerberus: Tobacco Industry Strategy to Create an Alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control

    PubMed Central

    Mamudu, Hadii M.; Hammond, Ross; Glantz, Stanton A.

    2008-01-01

    Between 1999 and 2001, British American Tobacco, Philip Morris, and Japan Tobacco International executed Project Cerberus to develop a global voluntary regulatory regime as an alternative to the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC). They aimed to develop a global voluntary regulatory code to be overseen by an independent audit body and to focus attention on youth smoking prevention. The International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards announced in September 2001, however, did not have the independent audit body. Although the companies did not stop the FCTC, they continue to promote the International Tobacco Products Marketing Standards youth smoking prevention as an alternative to the FCTC. Public health civil society groups should help policymakers and governments understand the importance of not working with the tobacco industry. PMID:18633079

  19. Nitrite, nitrite alternatives, and the control of Clostridium botulinum in cured meats.

    PubMed

    Pierson, M D; Smoot, L A

    1982-01-01

    Historically, nitrite has been a component of meat-curing additives for several centuries. In recent years the safety of nitrite as an additive in cured meats has been questioned mainly because of the possible formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines. Nitrite has many important functions in meat curing including its role in color development, flavor, antioxidant properties, and antimicrobial activity. The inhibition of Clostridium botulinum growth and toxin production is an especially important antimicrobial property of nitrite. This review discusses the effects of processing, curing ingredients (especially nitrite), and storage of cured meats in relation to the control of C. botulinum. If nitrite is eliminated from cured meats or the level of usage decreased, then alternatives for the antibotulinal function of nitrite need to be considered. Several potential alternatives including sorbates, parabens, and biological acidulants are discussed.

  20. Drug-Containing Gelatin Treats as an Alternative to Gavage for Long-Term Oral Administration in Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shuang; Ye, Bin; Zeng, Li; Chen, Younan; He, Sirong; Wang, Chengshi; Li, Xinli; Zhao, Jiuming; Shi, Meimei; Wang, Li; Li, Hongxia; Cheng, Jingqiu; Wang, Wei; Lu, Yanrong

    2012-01-01

    Long-term oral administration of immunosuppressive agents to transplanted rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) is one of the major challenges in such studies. To avoid the drawbacks of gavage, we tested an alternative method for oral dosing of sirolimus in rhesus monkeys by adding sirolimus, a commonly used immunosuppressant, to gelatin to create drug-containing gelatin ‘treats’ that our macaques would accept voluntarily. We evaluated the oral bioequivalence of the oral solution and drug-containing gelatin and assayed the whole-blood levels of sirolimus after long-term drug delivery. We found that time to peak concentration but not peak concentration itself or the area under the time–concentration curve differed between the 2 groups. Although the maximal concentration data did not fit the condition of bioequivalence, those for the time–concentration curves from 0 to 24 h and from 0 h to infinity did; therefore the extent of sirolimus absorption did not differ significantly between the 2 formulations. The sirolimus levels for long-term drug delivery were equivalent at 2.97 ± 1.91 ng/mL in the gelatin group and 3.13 ± 2.03 ng/mL in the solution group. The gelatin dosing technique we describe here is convenient and effective for oral administration of sirolimus in rhesus monkeys and likely can be adapted for other drugs. PMID:23294893

  1. Reduction of neonatal pain following administration of 25% lingual dextrose: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Sinojia, Ankit; Dongara, Ashish

    2013-06-01

    Neonates experience painful procedures during routine care. Orally administered, sweet tasting solutions are commonly used in management of neonatal pain. We conducted a double-blind randomized control trial in neonates admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of Shri Krishna Hospital, Karamsad-Gujarat-India, of lingual administration of 25% dextrose vs. no intervention, to evaluate reduction of pain following oropharyngeal infant feeding tube insertions. Pain was assessed using Premature Infant Pain Profile score. Almost all the patients in the control group (98%) experienced moderate-to-severe pain as compared with the intervention group (71%). Mean Premature Infant Pain Profile score was statistically significantly lower in the intervention group (8.21) as compared with control group (10.31). (p < 0.001, 95% CI 1.090-3.102). Lingual 25% dextrose is an effective analgesic for relieving pain during orogastric tube insertion.

  2. Alternative control of Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard (Acari: Tetranychidae) on tomato plants grown in greenhouses.

    PubMed

    Soto, Alberto; Venzon, Madelaine; Oliveira, Rafael M; Oliveira, Hamilton G; Pallini, Angelo

    2010-01-01

    Tetranychus evansi Baker & Pritchard is an important pest of solanaceous plants, including tomatoes. This mite is characterized by a high reproductive rate, which leads to high population growth in a short period of time causing important economic damage. Control of T. evansi is mainly through synthetic acaricides. In searching for environmentally friendly control measures, we evaluated the efficiency of alternative products to control T. evansi on tomato plants under greenhouse conditions. The products tested were lime sulphur and neem based products. We first estimated the lethal concentration (LC) and instantaneous rate of increase (r i) of T. evansi exposed to different product concentrations in laboratory conditions, and later tested the efficacy of LC95 and the concentrations that restrained mite population growth (r i = 0) in greenhouse conditions. The following treatments were repeated three times: NeemPro (81.0 and 71.6 mg a.i./l), Natuneem (31.1 and 20.4 mg ai/l), Organic Neem (39.1 and 30.4 mg a.i./l), lime sulphur (1.0 and 0.6%) and water (control). For all products, control provided by LC95 was higher than provided for lower concentrations (r i = 0) one day after spraying. However, after five days, for both concentrations, the percentage of T. evansi population reduction was superior to 95% and increased over time. Only plants sprayed with Natuneem (31.1 mg a.i./l) showed symptoms of phytotoxicity. Lime sulphur and neem based products, applied in appropriate concentrations and formulations, bear out as a viable alternative to control T. evansi on tomato plants.

  3. An alternative experimental case-control design for genetic association studies on bovine mastitis.

    PubMed

    Biffani, S; Del Corvo, M; Capoferri, R; Pedretti, A; Luini, M; Williams, J L; Pagnacco, G; Minvielle, F; Minozzi, G

    2017-04-01

    The possibility of using genetic control strategies to increase disease resistance to infectious diseases relies on the identification of markers to include in the breeding plans. Possible incomplete exposure of mastitis-free (control) animals, however, is a major issue to find relevant markers in genetic association studies for infectious diseases. Usually, designs based on elite dairy sires are used in association studies, but an epidemiological case-control strategy, based on cows repeatedly field-tested could be an alternative for disease traits. To test this hypothesis, genetic association results obtained in the present work from a cohort of Italian Holstein cows tested for mastitis over time were compared with those from a previous genome-wide scan on Italian Holstein sires genotyped with 50k single nucleotide polymorphisms for de-regressed estimated breeding values for somatic cell counts (SCCs) on Bos taurus autosome (BTA6) and BTA14. A total of 1121 cows were selected for the case-control approach (cases=550, controls=571), on a combination of herd level of SCC incidence and of within herd individual level of SCC. The association study was conducted on nine previously identified markers, six on BTA6 and four on BTA14, using the R statistical environment with the 'qtscore' function of the GenABEL package, on high/low adjusted linear score as a binomial trait. The results obtained in the cow cohort selected on epidemiological information were in agreement with those obtained from the previous sire genome-wide association study (GWAS). Six out of the nine markers showed significant association, four on BTA14 (rs109146371, rs109234250, rs109421300, rs109162116) and two on BTA6 (rs110527224 and rs42766480). Most importantly, using mastitis as a case study, the current work further validated the alternative use of historical field disease data in case-control designs for genetic analysis of infectious diseases in livestock.

  4. Selection of an Alternate Biocide for the ISS Internal Thermal Control System Coolant, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Mark E.; Cole, Harold; Weir, Natalee; Oehler, Bill; Steele, John; Varsik, Jerry; Lukens, Clark

    2004-01-01

    The ISS (International Space Station) ITCS (Internal Thermal Control System) includes two internal coolant loops that utilize an aqueous based coolant for heat transfer. A silver salt biocide had previously been utilized as an additive in the coolant formulation to control the growth and proliferation of microorganisms within the coolant loops. Ground-based and in-flight testing demonstrated that the silver salt was rapidly depleted, and did not act as an effective long-term biocide. Efforts to select an optimal alternate biocide for the ITCS coolant application have been underway and are now in the final stages. An extensive evaluation of biocides was conducted to down-select to several candidates for test trials and was reported on previously. Criteria for that down-select included: the need for safe, non-intrusive implementation and operation in a functioning system; the ability to control existing planktonic and biofilm residing microorganisms; a negligible impact on system-wetted materials of construction; and a negligible reactivity with existing coolant additives. Candidate testing to provide data for the selection of an optimal alternate biocide is now in the final stages. That testing has included rapid biocide effectiveness screening using Biolog MT2 plates to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (amount that will inhibit visible growth of microorganisms), time kill studies to determine the exposure time required to completely eliminate organism growth, materials compatibility exposure evaluations, coolant compatibility studies, and bench-top simulated coolant testing. This paper reports the current status of the effort to select an alternate biocide for the ISS ITCS coolant. The results of various test results to select the optimal candidate are presented.

  5. Maintenance Management Information and Control System (MMICS). Administrative Boon or Burden.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    AD A145 762 MAINTENANCE MANAGEMENT INFORMATION AND CONTROL SYSTEM li MMICS ADMINISTRATIVE BOON OR RtJRDEN(U) LESLEY COLL U L, CAMBRIDOE MA IP MURRAY...monitoring hranch training programs. EVALUAT ION "ETHODOLOGY A questionnaire/survey of orc3nization manar.ers 3nd suoerviscrs will be administered to...Questionnaire 4. Review l i Li terature x 5.Ccllectt t Completed Data J ~ [ 6. Evaluate Findings x xX 7. Prepare , _ _ Conclusions I.......i _ _ _jX x0

  6. Attentional Control and Interpretation of Facial Expression after Oxytocin Administration to Typically Developed Male Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hirosawa, Tetsu; Kikuchi, Mitsuru; Okumura, Eiichi; Yoshimura, Yuko; Hiraishi, Hirotoshi; Munesue, Toshio; Takesaki, Natsumi; Furutani, Naoki; Ono, Yasuki; Higashida, Haruhiro; Minabe, Yoshio

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in attentional-inhibitory control have been reported to correlate to anger, hostility, and aggressive behavior; therefore, inhibitory control appears to play an important role in prosocial behavior. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that oxytocin (OT) exerts a prosocial effect (e.g., decreasing negative behaviors, such as aggression) on humans. However, it is unknown whether the positively valenced effect of OT on sociality is associated with enhanced attentional-inhibitory control. In the present study, we hypothesized that OT enhances attentional-inhibitory control and that the positively valenced effect of OT on social cognition is associated with enhanced attentional-inhibitory control. In a single-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial, we tested this hypothesis using 20 healthy male volunteers. We considered a decrease in the hostility detection ratio, which reflects the positively valenced interpretation of other individuals’ facial expressions, to be an index of the positively valenced effects of OT (we reused the results of our previously published study). As a measure of attentional-inhibitory control, we employed a modified version of the flanker task (i.e., a shorter conflict duration indicated higher inhibitory control). These results failed to demonstrate any significant behavioral effects of OT (i.e., neither a positively valenced effect on facial cognition nor an effect on attentional-inhibitory control). However, the enhancement of attentional-inhibitory control after OT administration significantly correlated to the positively valenced effects on the interpretation of uncertain facial cognition (i.e., neutral and ambiguous facial expressions). PMID:25659131

  7. 75 FR 12769 - National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine Announcement of Workshop on Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine...: Notice. SUMMARY: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM) invites the.... Seating is limited. Background: The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM)...

  8. Use of complementary and alternative medicine in Swedish patients with inflammatory bowel disease: a controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Annelie; Löfberg, Robert; Sternby, Berit; Eriksson, Anders; Almer, Sven; Befrits, Ragnar; Fossum, Bjöörn; Karlén, Per; Broström, Olle; Tysk, Curt

    2016-01-01

    Background There is an increasing interest in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in patients with chronic diseases, including those with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Patients may turn to CAM when conventional therapies are inadequate or associated with side effects for symptomatic relief or to regain control over their disease. The objectives were to explore CAM use and perceived effects in IBD patients in comparison with a control group. Methods A cross-sectional, multicenter, controlled study was carried out. IBD patients were invited from 12 IBD clinics in Sweden. Controls were selected randomly from a residence registry. A study-specific questionnaire was used for data collection. Results Overall, 48.3% of patients with IBD had used some kind of CAM during the past year compared with 53.5% in controls (P=0.025, adjusted for age, sex, geographic residence, and diet). The most frequently used CAM among IBD patients was massage (21.3%), versus controls (31.4%) (adjusted P=0.0003). The second most used CAM was natural products, 18.7% in IBD patients versus 22.3% of the controls (unadjusted P=0.018). In all, 83.1% of the patients experienced positive effects from CAM and 14.4% experienced negative effects. Conclusion Overall, 48.3% of Swedish IBD patients used some kind of CAM and controls used CAM significantly more. Natural products were used by one-fifth of the patients and even more by controls. This is notable from a patient safety perspective considering the possible risks of interactions with conventional medication. In all, 40% of the patients reported adverse events from conventional medicine. Patients experienced predominantly positive effects from CAM, and so did controls. PMID:27472271

  9. Alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a review, of the experiences of Brazil, Canada, and New Zealand, which have implemented programs to encourage the use of alternative motor fuels. It will also discuss the results of a separate completed review of the Department of Energy's (DOE) progress in implementing the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. The act calls for, among other things, the federal government to use alternative-fueled vehicles in its fleet. The Persian Gulf War, environmental concerns, and the administration's National Energy Strategy have greatly heightened interest in the use of alternative fuels in this country.

  10. Control of alternative splicing by forskolin through hnRNP K during neuronal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenguang; Razanau, Aleh; Feng, Dairong; Lobo, Vincent G; Xie, Jiuyong

    2012-09-01

    The molecular basis of cell signal-regulated alternative splicing at the 3' splice site remains largely unknown. We isolated a protein kinase A-responsive ribonucleic acid (RNA) element from a 3' splice site of the synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (Snap25) gene for forskolin-inhibited splicing during neuronal differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. The element binds specifically to heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleo protein (hnRNP) K in a phosphatase-sensitive way, which directly competes with the U2 auxiliary factor U2AF65, an essential component of early spliceosomes. Transcripts with similarly localized hnRNP K target motifs upstream of alternative exons are enriched in genes often associated with neurological diseases. We show that such motifs upstream of the Runx1 exon 6 also bind hnRNP K, and importantly, hnRNP K is required for forskolin-induced repression of the exon. Interestingly, this exon encodes the peptide domain that determines the switch of the transcriptional repressor/activator activity of Runx1, a change known to be critical in specifying neuron lineages. Consistent with an important role of the target genes in neurons, knocking down hnRNP K severely disrupts forskolin-induced neurite growth. Thus, through hnRNP K, the neuronal differentiation stimulus forskolin targets a critical 3' splice site component of the splicing machinery to control alternative splicing of crucial genes. This also provides a regulated direct competitor of U2AF65 for cell signal control of 3' splice site usage.

  11. The argument for integrating vector control with multiple drug administration campaigns to ensure elimination of lymphatic filariasis

    PubMed Central

    Burkot, TR; Durrheim, DN; Melrose, WD; Speare, R; Ichimori, K

    2006-01-01

    Background There is a danger that mass drug administration campaigns may fail to maintain adequate treatment coverage to achieve lymphatic filariasis elimination. Hence, additional measures to suppress transmission might be needed to ensure the success of the Global Program for the Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis. Discussion Vector control successfully eliminated lymphatic filariasis when implemented alone or with mass drug administration. Challenges to lymphatic filariasis elimination include uncertainty of the exact level and duration of microfilarial suppression required for elimination, the mobility of infected individuals, consistent non-participation of some infected individuals with mass drug administration, the possible development of anti-filarial drug resistance and treatment strategies in areas co-endemic with loasis. Integration of vector control with mass drug administration can address some of these challenges. The potential benefits of vector control would include: (1) the ability to suppress filariasis transmission without the need to identify all individual 'foci of infection'; (2) minimizing the risk of reestablishment of transmission from imported microfilaria positive individuals; and (3) decreasing the risk of dengue or malaria transmission where, respectively, Aedes or Anopheles are lymphatic filariasis vectors. Summary With adequate sustained treatment coverage, mass drug administration should meet the criteria for elimination of lymphatic filariasis. However, it may be difficult to sustain sufficiently high mass drug administration coverage to achieve lymphatic filariasis elimination in some areas, particularly, where Aedes species are the vectors. Since vector control was effective in controlling and even eliminating lymphatic filariasis transmission, integration of vector control with mass drug administration will ensure the sustainability of transmission suppression and thereby better ensure the success of national filariasis

  12. Controlled microparticle manipulation employing low frequency alternating electric fields in an array of insulators.

    PubMed

    Baylon-Cardiel, Javier L; Jesús-Pérez, Nadia M; Chávez-Santoscoy, Ana V; Lapizco-Encinas, Blanca H

    2010-12-07

    Low frequency alternating current insulator-based dielectrophoresis is a novel technique that allows for highly controlled manipulation of particles. By varying the shape of an AC voltage applied across a microchannel containing an array of insulating cylindrical structures it was possible to concentrate and immobilize microparticles in bands; and then, move the bands of particles to a different location. Mathematical modeling was performed to analyze the distribution of the electric field and electric field gradient as function of the shape of the AC applied potential, employing frequencies in the 0.2-1.25 Hz range. Three different signals were tested: sinusoidal, half sinusoidal and sawtooth. Experimental results demonstrated that this novel dielectrophoretic mode allows highly controlled particle manipulation.

  13. Transfer of toxin genes to alternate bacterial hosts for mosquito control.

    PubMed

    Orduz, S; Restrepo, N; Patiño, M M; Rojas, W

    1995-01-01

    Mosquitoes are vector of serious human and animal diseases, such as malaria, dengue, yellow fever, among others. The use of biological control agents has provide an environmentally safe and highly specific alternative to the use of chemical insecticides in the control of vector borne diseases. Bacillus thuringiensis and B. sphaericus produce toxic proteins to mosquito larvae. Great progress has been made on the biochemical and molecular characterization of such proteins and the genes encoding them. Nevertheless, the low residuality of these biological insecticides is one of the major drawbacks. This article present some interesting aspects of the mosquito larvae feeding habits and review the attempts that have been made to genetically engineer microorganisms that while are used by mosquito larvae as a food source should express the Bacillus toxin genes in order to improve the residuality and stability in the mosquito breeding ponds.

  14. Argonaute-1 binds transcriptional enhancers and controls constitutive and alternative splicing in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Alló, Mariano; Agirre, Eneritz; Bessonov, Sergey; Bertucci, Paola; Gómez Acuña, Luciana; Buggiano, Valeria; Bellora, Nicolás; Singh, Babita; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Blaustein, Matías; Miñana, Belén; Dujardin, Gwendal; Pozzi, Berta; Pelisch, Federico; Bechara, Elías; Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Srebrow, Anabella; Lührmann, Reinhard; Valcárcel, Juan; Eyras, Eduardo; Kornblihtt, Alberto R.

    2014-01-01

    The roles of Argonaute proteins in cytoplasmic microRNA and RNAi pathways are well established. However, their implication in small RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in the mammalian cell nucleus is less understood. We have recently shown that intronic siRNAs cause chromatin modifications that inhibit RNA polymerase II elongation and modulate alternative splicing in an Argonaute-1 (AGO1)-dependent manner. Here we used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to investigate the genome-wide distribution of AGO1 nuclear targets. Unexpectedly, we found that about 80% of AGO1 clusters are associated with cell-type-specific transcriptional enhancers, most of them (73%) overlapping active enhancers. This association seems to be mediated by long, rather than short, enhancer RNAs and to be more prominent in intragenic, rather than intergenic, enhancers. Paradoxically, crossing ChIP-seq with RNA-seq data upon AGO1 depletion revealed that enhancer-bound AGO1 is not linked to the global regulation of gene transcription but to the control of constitutive and alternative splicing, which was confirmed by an individual gene analysis explaining how AGO1 controls inclusion levels of the cassette exon 107 in the SYNE2 gene. PMID:25313066

  15. Argonaute-1 binds transcriptional enhancers and controls constitutive and alternative splicing in human cells.

    PubMed

    Alló, Mariano; Agirre, Eneritz; Bessonov, Sergey; Bertucci, Paola; Gómez Acuña, Luciana; Buggiano, Valeria; Bellora, Nicolás; Singh, Babita; Petrillo, Ezequiel; Blaustein, Matías; Miñana, Belén; Dujardin, Gwendal; Pozzi, Berta; Pelisch, Federico; Bechara, Elías; Agafonov, Dmitry E; Srebrow, Anabella; Lührmann, Reinhard; Valcárcel, Juan; Eyras, Eduardo; Kornblihtt, Alberto R

    2014-11-04

    The roles of Argonaute proteins in cytoplasmic microRNA and RNAi pathways are well established. However, their implication in small RNA-mediated transcriptional gene silencing in the mammalian cell nucleus is less understood. We have recently shown that intronic siRNAs cause chromatin modifications that inhibit RNA polymerase II elongation and modulate alternative splicing in an Argonaute-1 (AGO1)-dependent manner. Here we used chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by deep sequencing (ChIP-seq) to investigate the genome-wide distribution of AGO1 nuclear targets. Unexpectedly, we found that about 80% of AGO1 clusters are associated with cell-type-specific transcriptional enhancers, most of them (73%) overlapping active enhancers. This association seems to be mediated by long, rather than short, enhancer RNAs and to be more prominent in intragenic, rather than intergenic, enhancers. Paradoxically, crossing ChIP-seq with RNA-seq data upon AGO1 depletion revealed that enhancer-bound AGO1 is not linked to the global regulation of gene transcription but to the control of constitutive and alternative splicing, which was confirmed by an individual gene analysis explaining how AGO1 controls inclusion levels of the cassette exon 107 in the SYNE2 gene.

  16. The role of the Therapeutic Goods Administration and the Medicine and Medical Devices Safety Authority in evaluating complementary and alternative medicines in Australia and New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dilip; Skinner, Margot; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2006-04-03

    Currently, the regulation of complementary and alternative medicines and related health claims in Australia and New Zealand is managed in a number of ways. Complementary medicines, including herbal, minerals, nutritional/dietary supplements, aromatherapy oils and homeopathic medicines are regulated under therapeutic goods/products legislation. The Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA), a division of the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing is responsible for administering the provisions of the legislation in Australia. The New Zealand Medicines and Medical Devices Safety Authority (Medsafe) administers the provision of legislation in New Zealand. In December 2003 the Australian and New Zealand governments signed a Treaty to establish a single, bi-national agency to regulate therapeutic products, including medical devices prescription, over-the-counter and complementary medicines. A single agency will replace the Australian TGA and the New Zealand Medsafe. The role of the new agency will be to safeguard public health through regulation of the quality, safety and efficacy or performance of therapeutic products in both Australia and New Zealand. The major activities of the new joint Australia New Zealand therapeutic products agency are in product licensing, specifying labelling standards and setting the advertising scheme, together with determining the risk classes of medicines and creating an expanded list of ingredients permitted in Class I medicines. A new, expanded definition of complementary medicines is proposed and this definition is currently under consultation. Related Australian and New Zealand legislation is being developed to implement the joint scheme. Once this legislation is passed, the Treaty will come into force and the new joint regulatory scheme will begin. The agency is expected to commence operation no later than 1 July 2006 and will result in a single agency to regulate complementary and alternative medicines.

  17. Compensatory mechanisms in Great Lakes sea lamprey populations: implications for alternative control strategies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Michael L.; Bergstedt, R.A.; Twohey, Michael B.; Fodale, Michael F.; Cuddy, Douglas W.; Slade, Jeffrey W.

    2003-01-01

    spawner abundance is reduced to low levels through alternative control. It is concluded that further study of recruitment variation in lamprey populations is critical to rationalizing alternative controls that target reproductive success, and that recruitment variation needs to be incorporated into models used to evaluate sea lamprey control options.

  18. ADMINISTRATIVE AND ENGINEERING CONTROLS FOR THE OPERATION OF VENTILATION SYSTEMS FOR UNDERGROUND RADIOACTIVE WASTE STORAGE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Wiersma, B.; Hansen, A.

    2013-11-13

    Liquid radioactive wastes from the Savannah River Site are stored in large underground carbon steel tanks. The majority of the waste is confined in double shell tanks, which have a primary shell, where the waste is stored, and a secondary shell, which creates an annular region between the two shells, that provides secondary containment and leak detection capabilities should leakage from the primary shell occur. Each of the DST is equipped with a purge ventilation system for the interior of the primary shell and annulus ventilation system for the secondary containment. Administrative flammability controls require continuous ventilation to remove hydrogen gas and other vapors from the waste tanks while preventing the release of radionuclides to the atmosphere. Should a leak from the primary to the annulus occur, the annulus ventilation would also serve this purpose. The functionality of the annulus ventilation is necessary to preserve the structural integrity of the primary shell and the secondary. An administrative corrosion control program is in place to ensure integrity of the tank. Given the critical functions of the purge and annulus ventilation systems, engineering controls are also necessary to ensure that the systems remain robust. The system consists of components that are constructed of metal (e.g., steel, stainless steel, aluminum, copper, etc.) and/or polymeric (polypropylene, polyethylene, silicone, polyurethane, etc.) materials. The performance of these materials in anticipated service environments (e.g., normal waste storage, waste removal, etc.) was evaluated. The most aggressive vapor space environment occurs during chemical cleaning of the residual heels by utilizing oxalic acid. The presence of NO{sub x} and mercury in the vapors generated from the process could potentially accelerate the degradation of aluminum, carbon steel, and copper. Once identified, the most susceptible materials were either replaced and/or plans for discontinuing operations

  19. Usnic Acid Potassium Salt: An Alternative for the Control of Biomphalaria glabrata (Say, 1818)

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Vera L. M.; Pereira, Eugênia C.; Falcão, Emerson P. S.; Melo, Ana M. M. A.; da Silva, Nicácio Henrique

    2014-01-01

    In Brazil, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata is the most important vector of schistosomiasis due to its wide geographical distribution, high infection rate and efficient disease transmission. Among the methods of schistosomiasis control, the World Health Organization recommends the use of synthetic molluscicides, such as niclosamide. However, different substances of natural origin have been tested as alternatives for the control or eradication of mollusks. The literature describes the antitumor, antimicrobial and antiviral properties of usnic acid as well as other important activities of common interest between medicine and the environment. However, usnic acid has a low degree of water solubility, which can be a limiting factor for its use, especially in aquatic environments, since the organic solvents commonly used to solubilize this substance can have toxic effects on aquatic biota. Thus, the aim of the present study was to test the potassium salt of usnic acid (potassium usnate) with regard to molluscicidal activity and toxicity to brine shrimp (Artemia salina). To obtain potassium usnate, usnic acid was extracted with diethyl ether isolated and purified from the lichen Cladonia substellata. Biological assays were performed with embryos and adult snails of B. glabrata exposed for 24 h to the usnate solution solubilized in dechlorinated water at 2.5; 5 and 10 µg/ml for embryos, 0.5; 0.9; 1;5 and 10 µg/ml for mollusks and 0.5; 1; 5; 10 µg/ml for A. salina. The lowest lethal concentration for the embryos and adult snails was 10 and 1 µg/ml, respectively. No toxicity to A. salina was found. The results show that modified usnic acid has increased solubility (100%) without losing its biological activity and may be a viable alternative for the control of B. glabrata. PMID:25375098

  20. Oral fluid cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations following controlled intravenous cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Ellefsen, Kayla N; Concheiro, Marta; Pirard, Sandrine; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2016-03-01

    Limited oral fluid (OF) pharmacokinetic data collected with commercially available collection devices after controlled cocaine administration hinder OF result interpretations. Ten cocaine-using adults provided OF, collected with Oral-Eze(®) (OE) and StatSure Saliva Sampler™ (SS) devices, an hour prior to and up to 69 h after 25mg intravenous (IV) cocaine administration. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine (BE) were quantified by a validated 2D-GC-MS method. Large inter-subject variability was observed. Cocaine was detected in OF in the first 0.17 h sample after IV administration, with much more rapid elimination than BE. OE observed Cmax median (range) concentrations were 932 (394-1574)μg/L for cocaine and 248 (96.9-953)μg/L for BE. SS observed cocaine and BE Cmax median (range) concentrations trended lower at 732 (83.3-1892)μg/L and 360 (77.2-836)μg/L, respectively. OE and SS cocaine OF detection times were 12.5 and 6.5h and for BE 30.5 and 28.0 h, respectively at 1 μg/L. There were no significant pharmacokinetic differences between OE and SS OF collection devices, except cocaine half-life was significantly shorter in SS OF specimens. This difference could be attributed to differences in stabilizing buffers present in OF collection devices, which may affect cocaine stability in OF specimens, or decreased recovery from collection pads. Both OE and SS OF collection devices were effective in monitoring cocaine and metabolite concentrations with similar detection windows. Furthermore, we demonstrated that different confirmatory OF cutoffs can be selected to produce shorter or longer cocaine and metabolite detection windows to address specific needs of clinical and forensic drug testing programs.

  1. Oral Fluid Cocaine and Benzoylecgonine Concentrations Following Controlled Intravenous Cocaine Administration

    PubMed Central

    Ellefsen, Kayla N.; Concheiro, Marta; Pirard, Sandrine; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2016-01-01

    Limited oral fluid (OF) pharmacokinetic data collected with commercially available collection devices after controlled cocaine administration hinder OF result interpretations. Ten cocaine-using adults provided OF, collected with Oral-Eze® (OE) and StatSure Saliva Sampler™ (SS) devices, an hour prior to and up to 69 h after 25 mg intravenous (IV) cocaine administration. Cocaine and benzoylecgonine (BE) were quantified by a validated 2D-GC-MS method. Large inter-subject variability was observed. Cocaine was detected in OF in the first 0.17 h sample after IV administration, with much more rapid elimination than BE. OE median observed Cmax (range) was 932 (394–1,574) μg/L for cocaine and 248 (96.9–953) μg/L for BE. SS median (range) observed cocaine and BE Cmax trended lower at 732 (83.3–1,892) μg/L and 360 (77.2–836) μg/L, respectively. OE and SS cocaine OF detection times were 12.5 and 6.5 h and for BE 30.5 and 28.0 h, respectively at 1 μg/L. There were no significant pharmacokinetic differences between OE and SS OF collection devices, except cocaine half-life was significantly shorter in SS OF specimens. This difference could be attributed to differences in stabilizing buffers present in OF collection devices, which may affect cocaine stability in OF specimens, or decreased recovery from collection pads. Both OE and SS OF collection devices were effective in monitoring cocaine and metabolite concentrations with similar detection windows. Furthermore, we demonstrated that different confirmatory OF cutoffs can be selected to produce shorter or longer cocaine and metabolite detection windows to address specific needs of clinical and forensic drug testing programs. PMID:26851651

  2. Performance experiments with alternative advanced teleoperator control modes for a simulated solar maximum satellite repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Das, H.; Zak, H.; Kim, W. S.; Bejczy, A. K.; Schenker, P. S.

    1992-01-01

    Experiments are described which were conducted at the JPL Advanced Teleoperator Lab to demonstrate and evaluate the effectiveness of various teleoperator control modes in the performance of a simulated Solar Max Satellite Repair (SMSR) task. THe SMSR was selected as a test because it is very rich in performance capability requirements and it actually has been performed by two EVA astronauts in the Space Shuttle Bay in 1984. The main subtasks are: thermal blanket removal; installation of a hinge attachment for electrical panel opening; opening of electrical panel; removal of electrical connectors; relining of cable bundles; replacement of electrical panel; securing parts and cables; re-mate electrical connectors; closing of electrical panel; and reinstating thermal blanket. The current performance experiments are limited to thermal blanket cutting, electrical panel unbolting and handling electrical bundles and connectors. In one formal experiment even different control modes were applied to the unbolting and reinsertion of electrical panel screws subtasks. The seven control modes are alternative combinations of manual position and rate control with force feedback and remote compliance referenced to force-torque sensor information. Force-torque sensor and end effector position data and task completion times were recorded for analysis and quantification of operator performance.

  3. Combustion instability and active control: Alternative fuels, augmentors, and modeling heat release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sammy Ace

    Experimental and analytical studies were conducted to explore thermo-acoustic coupling during the onset of combustion instability in various air-breathing combustor configurations. These include a laboratory-scale 200-kW dump combustor and a 100-kW augmentor featuring a v-gutter flame holder. They were used to simulate main combustion chambers and afterburners in aero engines, respectively. The three primary themes of this work includes: 1) modeling heat release fluctuations for stability analysis, 2) conducting active combustion control with alternative fuels, and 3) demonstrating practical active control for augmentor instability suppression. The phenomenon of combustion instabilities remains an unsolved problem in propulsion engines, mainly because of the difficulty in predicting the fluctuating component of heat release without extensive testing. A hybrid model was developed to describe both the temporal and spatial variations in dynamic heat release, using a separation of variables approach that requires only a limited amount of experimental data. The use of sinusoidal basis functions further reduced the amount of data required. When the mean heat release behavior is known, the only experimental data needed for detailed stability analysis is one instantaneous picture of heat release at the peak pressure phase. This model was successfully tested in the dump combustor experiments, reproducing the correct sign of the overall Rayleigh index as well as the remarkably accurate spatial distribution pattern of fluctuating heat release. Active combustion control was explored for fuel-flexible combustor operation using twelve different jet fuels including bio-synthetic and Fischer-Tropsch types. Analysis done using an actuated spray combustion model revealed that the combustion response times of these fuels were similar. Combined with experimental spray characterizations, this suggested that controller performance should remain effective with various alternative fuels

  4. Analysis of factors for poor activated partial thromboplastin time control after dabigatran administration.

    PubMed

    Kose, E; Sato, R; An, T; Kikkawa, A; Matsumoto, Y; Kawakubo, T; Hayashi, H

    2015-11-01

    In this study, we compared patients whose activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) was prolonged excessively with those whose APTT was controlled within the normal range after dabigatran administration. We analyzed the factors for the APTT prolongation. We divided the patients into two groups: those whose APTTs prolonged to more than 65 s and those whose APTTs were less than 65 s after dabigatran administration. There were 130 patients from March 2011 to July 2013, and we analyzed the background features and laboratory data of these patients. Results showed that there were no significant differences in the patients' background and laboratory data except for the high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) level. However, details of the relationship between the APTT prolongation and the HDL-C level are currently unknown. We hypothesize that the reason for the APTT prolongation is the variability in such parameters as the time of blood drawing, internal time of dabigatran, individual variability, and blood concentration. Therefore, we consider that these parameters need to be carefully evaluated even if APTT does not show prolongation.

  5. Cocaine and metabolite concentrations in DBS and venous blood after controlled intravenous cocaine administration

    PubMed Central

    Ellefsen, Kayla N; da Costa, Jose Luiz; Concheiro, Marta; Anizan, Sebastien; Barnes, Allan J; Pirard, Sandrine; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-01-01

    Background: DBS are an increasingly common clinical matrix. Methods & results: Sensitive and specific methods for DBS and venous blood cocaine and metabolite detection by LC–HRMS and 2D GC–MS, respectively, were validated to examine correlation between concentrations following controlled intravenous cocaine administration. Linear ranges from 1 to 200 µg/l were achieved, with acceptable bias and imprecision. Authentic matched specimens’ (392 DBS, 97 venous blood) cocaine and benzoylecgonine concentrations were qualitatively similar, but DBS had much greater variability (21.4–105.9 %CV) and were lower than in blood. Conclusion: DBS offer advantages for monitoring cocaine intake; however, differences between capillary and venous blood and DBS concentration variability must be addressed. PMID:26327184

  6. Differential Control of Cocaine Self-Administration by GABAergic and Glutamatergic CB1 Cannabinoid Receptors.

    PubMed

    Martín-García, Elena; Bourgoin, Lucie; Cathala, Adeline; Kasanetz, Fernando; Mondesir, Miguel; Gutiérrez-Rodriguez, Ana; Reguero, Leire; Fiancette, Jean-François; Grandes, Pedro; Spampinato, Umberto; Maldonado, Rafael; Piazza, Pier Vincenzo; Marsicano, Giovanni; Deroche-Gamonet, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    The type 1 cannabinoid receptor (CB1) modulates numerous neurobehavioral processes and is therefore explored as a target for the treatment of several mental and neurological diseases. However, previous studies have investigated CB1 by targeting it globally, regardless of its two main neuronal localizations on glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons. In the context of cocaine addiction this lack of selectivity is critical since glutamatergic and GABAergic neuronal transmission is involved in different aspects of the disease. To determine whether CB1 exerts different control on cocaine seeking according to its two main neuronal localizations, we used mutant mice with deleted CB1 in cortical glutamatergic neurons (Glu-CB1) or in forebrain GABAergic neurons (GABA-CB1). In Glu-CB1, gene deletion concerns the dorsal telencephalon, including neocortex, paleocortex, archicortex, hippocampal formation and the cortical portions of the amygdala. In GABA-CB1, it concerns several cortical and non-cortical areas including the dorsal striatum, nucleus accumbens, thalamic, and hypothalamic nuclei. We tested complementary components of cocaine self-administration, separating the influence of primary and conditioned effects. Mechanisms underlying each phenotype were explored using in vivo microdialysis and ex vivo electrophysiology. We show that CB1 expression in forebrain GABAergic neurons controls mouse sensitivity to cocaine, while CB1 expression in cortical glutamatergic neurons controls associative learning processes. In accordance, in the nucleus accumbens, GABA-CB1 receptors control cocaine-induced dopamine release and Glu-CB1 receptors control AMPAR/NMDAR ratio; a marker of synaptic plasticity. Our findings demonstrate a critical distinction of the altered balance of Glu-CB1 and GABA-CB1 activity that could participate in the vulnerability to cocaine abuse and addiction. Moreover, these novel insights advance our understanding of CB1 neuropathophysiology.

  7. Aptamer-Based Analysis: A Promising Alternative for Food Safety Control

    PubMed Central

    Amaya-González, Sonia; de-los-Santos-Álvarez, Noemí; Miranda-Ordieres, Arturo J.; Lobo-Castañón, Maria Jesús

    2013-01-01

    Ensuring food safety is nowadays a top priority of authorities and professional players in the food supply chain. One of the key challenges to determine the safety of food and guarantee a high level of consumer protection is the availability of fast, sensitive and reliable analytical methods to identify specific hazards associated to food before they become a health problem. The limitations of existing methods have encouraged the development of new technologies, among them biosensors. Success in biosensor design depends largely on the development of novel receptors with enhanced affinity to the target, while being stable and economical. Aptamers fulfill these characteristics, and thus have surfaced as promising alternatives to natural receptors. This Review describes analytical strategies developed so far using aptamers for the control of pathogens, allergens, adulterants, toxins and other forbidden contaminants to ensure food safety. The main progresses to date are presented, highlighting potential prospects for the future. PMID:24287543

  8. Electron Microscopy in the Catalysis of Alkane Oxidation, Environmental Control, and Alternative Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gai, Pratibha L.; Calvino, Jose J.

    2005-08-01

    The key role of electron microscopy in understanding and creating advanced catalyst materials and processes in selective alkane oxidation, environmental control, and alternative energy sources is reviewed. In many technological processes, catalysts are increasingly nanoscale heterogeneous materials. With growing regulatory guidelines requiring efficient and environmentally compatible catalytic processes, it is crucial to have a fundamental understanding of the catalyst nanostructure and modes of operation under reaction conditions to design novel catalysts and processes. The review highlights the pioneering development and applications of atomic resolution in situ-environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) for probing dynamic catalysis directly at the atomic level, high-resolution electron microscopy, and analytical spectroscopic methods in the development of alkane catalyzation, environmental protection, and new energy sources.

  9. Reduction of military high-altitude parachute entanglement using the controlled alternating parachute exit system.

    PubMed

    Hadley, A T; Hibst, J D

    1984-01-01

    The phenomenon of high-altitude parachute entanglement (HAE) results when two paratroopers have both a simultaneous and weak exit from the jump doors. They are then caught in the aircraft's slipstream and collision and entanglement follow. To avoid this phenomenon, the Controlled Alternating Parachute Exit System (CAPES) was introduced. CAPES focused upon manipulation of the exit technique to eliminate simultaneous paratrooper exit. Data from 90,894 consecutive parachute jumps revealed that the CAPES is highly successful in reducing te rate of high-altitude entanglement and the associated injury rate. CAPES seems to reduce the mid-altitude entanglement (MAE) and its injury rate but the results did not reach statistical significance as measured by chi square technique. The rate of landing or ground injuries, was essentially unchanged by the CAPES.

  10. Performance consequences of alternating directional control-response compatibility: Evidence from a coal mine shuttle car simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Zupanc, C.M.; Burgess-Limerick, R.J.; Wallis, G.

    2007-08-15

    This experiment examines the performance of 48 novice participants in a virtual analogy of an underground coal mine shuttle car. Participants were randomly assigned to a compatible condition, an incompatible condition, an alternating condition in which compatibility alternated within and between hands, or an alternating condition in which compatibility alternated between hands. Participants made fewer steering direction errors and made correct steering responses more quickly in the compatible condition. Error rate decreased over time in the incompatible condition. A compatibility effect for both errors and reaction time was also found when the control-response relationship alternated; however, performance improvements over time were not consistent. Isolating compatibility to a hand resulted in reduced error rate and faster reaction time than when compatibility alternated within and between hands. Thus consequences of alternating control-response relationships are higher error rates and slower responses, at least in the early stages of learning. This research highlights the importance of ensuring consistently compatible human-machine directional control-response relationships.

  11. Bacterial quorum sensing inhibitors: attractive alternatives for control of infectious pathogens showing multiple drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Ashima K; Vinothkumar, Kittappa; Rajpara, Neha

    2013-04-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a bacterial communication process that depends on the bacterial population density. It involves small diffusible signaling molecules which activate the expression of myriad genes that control diverse array of functions like bioluminescence, virulence, biofilm formation, sporulation, to name a few. Since QS is responsible for virulence in the clinically relevant bacteria, inhibition of QS appears to be a promising strategy to control these pathogenic bacteria. With indiscriminate use of antibiotics, there has been an alarming increase in the number of antibiotic resistant pathogens. Antibiotics are no longer the magic bullets they were once thought to be and therefore there is a need for development of new antibiotics and/or other novel strategies to combat the infections caused by multidrug resistant organisms. Quorum sensing inhibition or quorum quenching has been pursued as one of such novel strategies. While antibiotics kill or slow down the growth of bacteria, quorum sensing inhibitors (QSIs) or quorum quenchers (QQs) attenuate bacterial virulence. A large body of work on QS has been carried out in deadly pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio fischeri, V. harveyi, Escherichia coli and V. cholerae etc to unravel the mechanisms of QS as well as identify and study QSIs. This review describes various aspects of QS, QSI, different model systems to study these phenomena and recent patents on various QSIs. It suggests QSIs as attractive alternatives for controlling human, animal and plant pathogens and their utility in agriculture and other industries.

  12. Aeroelastic Sizing for High-Speed Research (HSR) Longitudinal Control Alternatives Project (LCAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, Joanne L.; Dunn, H. J.; Stroud, W. Jefferson; Barthelemy, J.-F.; Weston, Robert P.; Martin, Carl J.; Bennett, Robert M.

    2005-01-01

    The Longitudinal Control Alternatives Project (LCAP) compared three high-speed civil transport configurations to determine potential advantages of the three associated longitudinal control concepts. The three aircraft configurations included a conventional configuration with a layout having a horizontal aft tail, a configuration with a forward canard in addition to a horizontal aft tail, and a configuration with only a forward canard. The three configurations were aeroelastically sized and were compared on the basis of operational empty weight (OEW) and longitudinal control characteristics. The sized structure consisted of composite honeycomb sandwich panels on both the wing and the fuselage. Design variables were the core depth of the sandwich and the thicknesses of the composite material which made up the face sheets of the sandwich. Each configuration was sized for minimum structural weight under linear and nonlinear aeroelastic loads subject to strain, buckling, ply-mixture, and subsonic and supersonic flutter constraints. This report describes the methods that were used and the results that were generated for the aeroelastic sizing of the three configurations.

  13. Chronic fatigue syndrome and personality: a case-control study using the Alternative Five Factor Model.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Francàs, Naia; Valero, Sergi; Calvo, Natalia; Gomà-I-Freixanet, Montserrat; Alegre, José; de Sevilla, Tomás Fernández; Casas, Miquel

    2014-05-30

    Neuroticism is the personality dimension most frequently associated with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Most studies have also shown that CFS patients are less extraverted than non-CFS patients, but results have been inconsistent, possibly because the facets of the extraversion dimension have not been separately analyzed. This study has the following aims: to assess the personality profile of adults with CFS using the Alternative Five-Factor Model (AFFM), which considers Activity and Sociability as two separate factors of Extraversion, and to test the discriminant validity of a measure of the AFFM, the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire, in differentiating CFS subjects from normal-range matched controls. The CFS sample consisted of 132 consecutive patients referred for persistent fatigue or pain to the Department of Medicine of a university hospital. These were compared with 132 matched normal population controls. Significantly lower levels of Activity and significantly higher levels of Neuroticism-Anxiety best discriminated CFS patients from controls. The results are consistent with existing data on the relationship between Neuroticism and CFS, and clarify the relationship between Extraversion and CFS by providing new data on the relationship of Activity to CFS.

  14. An alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing NMR probes.

    PubMed

    Koczor, Bálint; Sedyó, Inez; Rohonczy, János

    2015-10-01

    Tuning and matching of NMR probes is necessary for many fields of NMR application including temperature dependent NMR, thermoporometry and cryoporometry, or when significantly different types of samples are measured in automation using sample changers. Mismatch of the probe is an especially critical issue in the case of high magnetic fields, polar or ionic solvents, or extreme thermal conditions. Careful tuning is particularly important for quantitative NMR measurements. Manual tuning and matching of the NMR probe is not possible in the case of automated or remotely controlled measurements. Spectrometer manufacturers offer modern probes equipped with automatic tuning/matching mechanics, like Bruker ATM™, suitable for these experiments. The disadvantages of probes with built-in ATM™ are the significantly higher price, and the non-detachable and non-portable construction. Computer controlled tuning and matching is highly desirrable in solid state NMR since no industrial solution has been developed yet for MAS NMR probes. We present an alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing Bruker probes. Building costs are significantly lower, since only commercially available components and ICs are used.

  15. An alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing NMR probes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koczor, Bálint; Sedyó, Inez; Rohonczy, János

    2015-10-01

    Tuning and matching of NMR probes is necessary for many fields of NMR application including temperature dependent NMR, thermoporometry and cryoporometry, or when significantly different types of samples are measured in automation using sample changers. Mismatch of the probe is an especially critical issue in the case of high magnetic fields, polar or ionic solvents, or extreme thermal conditions. Careful tuning is particularly important for quantitative NMR measurements. Manual tuning and matching of the NMR probe is not possible in the case of automated or remotely controlled measurements. Spectrometer manufacturers offer modern probes equipped with automatic tuning/matching mechanics, like Bruker ATM™, suitable for these experiments. The disadvantages of probes with built-in ATM™ are the significantly higher price, and the non-detachable and non-portable construction. Computer controlled tuning and matching is highly desirrable in solid state NMR since no industrial solution has been developed yet for MAS NMR probes. We present an alternative solution for computer controlled tuning and matching of existing Bruker probes. Building costs are significantly lower, since only commercially available components and ICs are used.

  16. Administration of copper oxide wire particles in a capsule or feed for gastrointestinal nematode control in goats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Widespread anthelmintic resistance in small ruminants has necessitated alternative means of gastrointestinal nematode (GIN) control. The objective was to determine the effectiveness of copper oxide wire particles (COWP) administered as a gelatin capsule or in a feed supplement to control GIN in goa...

  17. Female and Male Psychologists in Academic Administration: Resource Control and Perceived Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schenk, Jennifer

    2010-01-01

    This study examined male and female psychologists in academic administrative positions with regard to their perceptions of their own power and their actual power within the administrative hierarchies in which they work. In the past, researchers have compared women and men in academic administrative positions with regard to parity of numbers,…

  18. Design of magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles for controlled release of doxorubicin under an alternative magnetic field in athermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffete, N.; Fresnais, J.; Espinosa, A.; Wilhelm, C.; Bée, A.; Ménager, C.

    2015-11-01

    An innovative magnetic delivery nanomaterial for triggered cancer therapy showing active control over drug release by using an alternative magnetic field is proposed. In vitro and In vivo release of doxorubicin (DOX) were investigated and showed a massive DOX release under an alternative magnetic field without temperature elevation of the medium.An innovative magnetic delivery nanomaterial for triggered cancer therapy showing active control over drug release by using an alternative magnetic field is proposed. In vitro and In vivo release of doxorubicin (DOX) were investigated and showed a massive DOX release under an alternative magnetic field without temperature elevation of the medium. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr06133d

  19. Incorporation of methamphetamine and amphetamine in human hair following controlled oral methamphetamine administration

    PubMed Central

    Polettini, Aldo; Cone, Edward J.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Although hair testing is well established for the assessment of past drug exposure, uncertainties persist about mechanisms of drug incorporation into hair and interpretation of results. The aim of this study was to administer methamphetamine (MAMP) under controlled conditions as a model drug to investigate drug incorporation into human hair. Material and Methods Seven volunteers with a history of stimulant use received 4×10 mg (low) doses of sustained release S-(+)-MAMP HCl within one week, with weekly head hair samples collected by shaving. 3 weeks later, 4 of them received 4×20 mg (high) doses. After extensive isopropanol/phosphate buffer washing of the hair, MAMP and its metabolite amphetamine (AMP) concentrations were determined in all weekly hair samples by LC-MS-MS in selected reaction monitoring mode with the undeca- and deca-deuterated drugs, respectively, as internal standards (LLOQ, 0.005 ng/mg). Results MAMP Tmax occurred from 1 to 2 weeks after both doses, with Cmax ranging from 0.6–3.5 ng/mg after the low and 1.2–5.3 ng/mg after the high MAMP doses. AMP Cmax in hair was 0.1–0.3 ng/mg and 0.2–0.5 ng/mg, respectively, for low and high doses. Highly dose–related concentrations within subjects, but large variability between subjects were observed. MAMP concentrations were above the 0.2 ng/mg cutoff for at least two weeks following administration of both low and high doses. The overall AMP/MAMP ratio ranged from 0.07 to 0.37 with a mean value of 0.15±0.07, and a median of 0.13. The percentage of MAMP and AMP removed with the washing procedure decreased with time after administration. A strong correlation was found between area under the curve of MAMP (r2=0.90, p=0.00) and AMP (r2=0.94, p=0.00) concentrations calculated for the 3-week period following administration and the total melanin concentration in hair. Significant correlations were observed also between Cmax and melanin. Conclusions This study demonstrated that despite large

  20. Biodiversity vs. biocontrol: positive and negative effects of alternative prey on control of slugs by carabid beetles.

    PubMed

    Symondson, W O C; Cesarini, S; Dodd, P W; Harper, G L; Bruford, M W; Glen, D M; Wiltshire, C W; Harwood, J D

    2006-12-01

    Environment-friendly farming techniques seek to increase invertebrate biodiversity in part with the intention of encouraging greater numbers of predators that will help to control crop pests. However, in theory, this effect may be negated if the availability of a greater abundance and diversity of alternative prey diverts predators away from feeding on pests. The hypothesis that access to alternative prey can lead to reduced pest suppression under semi-field conditions was tested. Alternative prey type and diversity were manipulated in 70 mesocosms over 7+ weeks in the presence of the carabid Pterostichus melanarius (Illiger), a known predator of slugs, and reproducing populations of the slug Deroceras reticulatum (Müller). Significantly fewer slugs survived where no alternative prey were provided. Maximum slug numbers and biomass were found in treatments containing either carabids plus a high diversity of alternative prey (many species of earthworm and three of Diptera larvae) or a single additional prey (blowfly larvae, Calliphora vomitoria Linnaeus). In these treatments slug numbers and biomass were as high as in plots lacking predators. The effects of alternative prey were taxon-specific. Alternative prey strongly affected carabid fitness in terms of biomass and egg load. The fittest predators (those with access to high alternative prey diversity or C. vomitoria larvae) reduced slug numbers the least. The mean individual slug weights were greater in treatments with alternative prey than where no alternative prey were provided to the carabids. These results suggest that pests may survive and reproduce more rapidly in patches where predators have access to alternative prey.

  1. Teaching brain-machine interfaces as an alternative paradigm to neuroprosthetics control

    PubMed Central

    Iturrate, Iñaki; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Montesano, Luis; Minguez, Javier; Millán, José del R.

    2015-01-01

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) usually decode movement parameters from cortical activity to control neuroprostheses. This requires subjects to learn to modulate their brain activity to convey all necessary information, thus imposing natural limits on the complexity of tasks that can be performed. Here we demonstrate an alternative and complementary BMI paradigm that overcomes that limitation by decoding cognitive brain signals associated with monitoring processes relevant for achieving goals. In our approach the neuroprosthesis executes actions that the subject evaluates as erroneous or correct, and exploits the brain correlates of this assessment to learn suitable motor behaviours. Results show that, after a short user’s training period, this teaching BMI paradigm operated three different neuroprostheses and generalized across several targets. Our results further support that these error-related signals reflect a task-independent monitoring mechanism in the brain, making this teaching paradigm scalable. We anticipate this BMI approach to become a key component of any neuroprosthesis that mimics natural motor control as it enables continuous adaptation in the absence of explicit information about goals. Furthermore, our paradigm can seamlessly incorporate other cognitive signals and conventional neuroprosthetic approaches, invasive or non-invasive, to enlarge the range and complexity of tasks that can be accomplished. PMID:26354145

  2. Teaching brain-machine interfaces as an alternative paradigm to neuroprosthetics control.

    PubMed

    Iturrate, Iñaki; Chavarriaga, Ricardo; Montesano, Luis; Minguez, Javier; Millán, José del R

    2015-09-10

    Brain-machine interfaces (BMI) usually decode movement parameters from cortical activity to control neuroprostheses. This requires subjects to learn to modulate their brain activity to convey all necessary information, thus imposing natural limits on the complexity of tasks that can be performed. Here we demonstrate an alternative and complementary BMI paradigm that overcomes that limitation by decoding cognitive brain signals associated with monitoring processes relevant for achieving goals. In our approach the neuroprosthesis executes actions that the subject evaluates as erroneous or correct, and exploits the brain correlates of this assessment to learn suitable motor behaviours. Results show that, after a short user's training period, this teaching BMI paradigm operated three different neuroprostheses and generalized across several targets. Our results further support that these error-related signals reflect a task-independent monitoring mechanism in the brain, making this teaching paradigm scalable. We anticipate this BMI approach to become a key component of any neuroprosthesis that mimics natural motor control as it enables continuous adaptation in the absence of explicit information about goals. Furthermore, our paradigm can seamlessly incorporate other cognitive signals and conventional neuroprosthetic approaches, invasive or non-invasive, to enlarge the range and complexity of tasks that can be accomplished.

  3. Using Unconstrained Tongue Motion as an Alternative Control Mechanism for Wheeled Mobility

    PubMed Central

    Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2015-01-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, noncontact, and wireless assistive technology that infers users’ intentions by detecting and classifying their voluntary tongue motions, and translating them to user-defined commands. We have developed customized interface circuitry between an external TDS (eTDS) prototype and a commercial powered wheelchair (PWC) as well as three control strategies to evaluate the tongue motion as an alternative control input for wheeled mobility. We tested the eTDS performance in driving PWCs on 12 able-bodied human subjects, of which 11 were novice. The results showed that all subjects could complete navigation tasks by operating the PWC using their tongue motions. Despite little prior experience, the average time using the eTDS and the tongue was only approximately three times longer than using a joystick and the fingers. Navigation time was strongly dependant on the number of issued commands, which reduced by gaining experience. Particularly, the unintended issued commands (the Midas touch problem) were rare, demonstrating the effectiveness of the tongue tracking and external magnetic field cancellation algorithms as well as the safety of the TDS for wheeled mobility. PMID:19362901

  4. Using unconstrained tongue motion as an alternative control mechanism for wheeled mobility.

    PubMed

    Huo, Xueliang; Ghovanloo, Maysam

    2009-06-01

    Tongue drive system (TDS) is a tongue-operated, minimally invasive, unobtrusive, noncontact, and wireless assistive technology that infers users' intentions by detecting and classifying their voluntary tongue motions, and translating them to user-defined commands. We have developed customized interface circuitry between an external TDS (eTDS) prototype and a commercial powered wheelchair (PWC) as well as three control strategies to evaluate the tongue motion as an alternative control input for wheeled mobility. We tested the eTDS performance in driving PWCs on 12 able-bodied human subjects, of which 11 were novice. The results showed that all subjects could complete navigation tasks by operating the PWC using their tongue motions. Despite little prior experience, the average time using the eTDS and the tongue was only approximately three times longer than using a joystick and the fingers. Navigation time was strongly dependant on the number of issued commands, which reduced by gaining experience. Particularly, the unintended issued commands (the Midas touch problem) were rare, demonstrating the effectiveness of the tongue tracking and external magnetic field cancellation algorithms as well as the safety of the TDS for wheeled mobility.

  5. Engineered and Administrative Safety Systems for the Control of Prompt Radiation Hazards at Accelerator Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, James C.; Vylet, Vashek; Walker, Lawrence S.; /SLAC

    2007-12-17

    The ANSI N43.1 Standard, currently in revision (ANSI 2007), sets forth the requirements for accelerator facilities to provide adequate protection for the workers, the public and the environment from the hazards of ionizing radiation produced during and from accelerator operations. The Standard also recommends good practices that, when followed, provide a level of radiation protection consistent with those established for the accelerator communities. The N43.1 Standard is suitable for all accelerator facilities (using electron, positron, proton, or ion particle beams) capable of producing radiation, subject to federal or state regulations. The requirements (see word 'shall') and recommended practices (see word 'should') are prescribed in a graded approach that are commensurate with the complexity and hazard levels of the accelerator facility. Chapters 4, 5 and 6 of the N43.1 Standard address specially the Radiation Safety System (RSS), both engineered and administrative systems, to mitigate and control the prompt radiation hazards from accelerator operations. The RSS includes the Access Control System (ACS) and Radiation Control System (RCS). The main requirements and recommendations of the N43.1 Standard regarding the management, technical and operational aspects of the RSS are described and condensed in this report. Clearly some aspects of the RSS policies and practices at different facilities may differ in order to meet the practical needs for field implementation. A previous report (Liu et al. 2001a), which reviews and summarizes the RSS at five North American high-energy accelerator facilities, as well as the RSS references for the 5 labs (Drozdoff 2001; Gallegos 1996; Ipe and Liu 1992; Liu 1999; Liu 2001b; Rokni 1996; TJNAF 1994; Yotam et al. 1991), can be consulted for the actual RSS implementation at various laboratories. A comprehensive report describing the RSS at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC 2006) can also serve as a reference.

  6. Morphine and codeine concentrations in human urine following controlled poppy seeds administration of known opiate content.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael L; Nichols, Daniel C; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A; LoDico, Charles; Gorelick, David A; Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-08-01

    Opiates are an important component for drug testing due to their high abuse potential. Proper urine opiate interpretation includes ruling out poppy seed ingestion; however, detailed elimination studies after controlled poppy seed administration with known morphine and codeine doses are not available. Therefore, we investigated urine opiate pharmacokinetics after controlled oral administration of uncooked poppy seeds with known morphine and codeine content. Participants were administered two 45 g oral poppy seed doses 8 h apart, each containing 15.7 mg morphine and 3mg codeine. Urine was collected ad libitum up to 32 h after the first dose. Specimens were analyzed with the Roche Opiates II immunoassay at 2000 and 300 μg/L cutoffs, and the ThermoFisher CEDIA(®) heroin metabolite (6-acetylmorphine, 6-AM) and Lin-Zhi 6-AM immunoassays with 10 μg/L cutoffs to determine if poppy seed ingestion could produce positive results in these heroin marker assays. In addition, all specimens were quantified for morphine and codeine by GC/MS. Participants (N=22) provided 391 urine specimens over 32 h following dosing; 26.6% and 83.4% were positive for morphine at 2000 and 300 μg/L GC/MS cutoffs, respectively. For the 19 subjects who completed the study, morphine concentrations ranged from <300 to 7522 μg/L with a median peak concentration of 5239 μg/L. The median first morphine-positive urine sample at 2000 μg/L cutoff concentration occurred at 6.6 h (1.2-12.1), with the last positive from 2.6 to 18 h after the second dose. No specimens were positive for codeine at a cutoff concentration of 2000 μg/L, but 20.2% exceeded 300 μg/L, with peak concentrations of 658 μg/L (284-1540). The Roche Opiates II immunoassay had efficiencies greater than 96% for the 2000 and 300 μg/L cutoffs. The CEDIA 6-AM immunoassay had a specificity of 91%, while the Lin-Zhi assay had no false positive results. These data provide valuable information for interpreting urine opiate results.

  7. Morphine and Codeine Concentrations in Human Urine following Controlled Poppy Seeds Administration of Known Opiate Content

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael L.; Nichols, Daniel C.; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A.; LoDico, Charles; Gorelick, David A.; Newmeyer, Matthew N.; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Opiates are an important component for drug testing due to their high abuse potential. Proper urine opiate interpretation includes ruling out poppy seed ingestion; however, detailed elimination studies after controlled poppy seed administration with known morphine and codeine doses are not available. Therefore, we investigated urine opiate pharmacokinetics after controlled oral administration of uncooked poppy seeds with known morphine and codeine content. Participants were administered two 45g oral poppy seed doses 8h apart, each containing 15.7mg morphine and 3mg codeine. Urine was collected ad libitum up to 32h after the first dose. Specimens were analyzed with the Roche Opiates II immunoassay at 2,000 and 300μg/L cutoffs, and the ThermoFisher CEDIA® Heroin Metabolite (6-acetylmorphine, 6AM) and Lin-Zhi 6AM immunoassays with 10μg/L cutoffs to determine if poppy seed ingestion could produce positive results in these heroin marker assays. In addition, all specimens were quantified for morphine and codeine by GC/MS. Participants (N=22) provided 391 urine specimens over 32h following dosing; 26.6% and 83.4% were positive for morphine at 2,000 and 300μg/L GC/MS cutoffs, respectively. For the 19 subjects who completed the study, morphine concentrations ranged from <300 to 7,522μg/L with a median peak concentration of 5,239μg/L. The median first morphine-positive urine sample at 2,000μg/L cutoff concentration occurred at 6.6h (1.2-12.1), with the last positive from 2.6 to 18h after the second dose. No specimens were positive for codeine at a cutoff concentration of 2,000μg/L, but 20.2% exceeded 300μg/L, with peak concentrations of 658 μg/L (284-1540). The Roche Opiates II immunoassay had efficiencies greater than 96% for the 2000 and 300μg/L cutoffs. The CEDIA 6AM immunoassay had a specificity of 91%, while the Lin-Zhi assay had no false positive results. These data provide valuable information for interpreting urine opiate results. PMID:24887324

  8. Arthropod Pest Control for UK Oilseed Rape – Comparing Insecticide Efficacies, Side Effects and Alternatives

    PubMed Central

    Breeze, Tom; Bailey, Alison; Garthwaite, David; Harrington, Richard; Potts, Simon G.

    2017-01-01

    Oilseed rape (Brassica napus) is an important combinable break crop in the UK, which is largely protected from arthropod pests by insecticidal chemicals. Despite ongoing debate regarding the use of neonicotinoids, the dominant seed treatment ingredients used for this crop, there is little publicly available data comparing the efficacy of insecticides in controlling key arthropod pests or comparing the impacts on non-target species and the wider environment. To provide an insight into these matters, a UK-wide expert survey targeting agronomists and entomologists was conducted from March to June 2015. Based on the opinions of 90 respondents, an average of 20% yield loss caused by the key arthropod pests was expected to have occurred in the absence of insecticide treatments. Relatively older chemical groups were perceived to have lower efficacy for target pests than newer ones, partly due to the development of insecticide resistance. Without neonicotinoid seed treatments, a lack of good control for cabbage stem flea beetle was perceived. Wide spectrum foliar insecticide sprays were perceived to have significantly greater negative impacts than seed treatments on users’ health, natural enemies, pollinators, soil and water, and many foliar active ingredients have had potential risks for non-target arthropod species in UK oilseed rape fields for the past 25 years. Overall, 72% of respondents opposed the neonicotinoid restriction, while 10% supported it. Opposition and support of the restriction were largely based on concerns for pollinators and the wider environment, highlighting the uncertainty over the side effects of neonicotinoid use. More people from the government and research institutes leaned towards neutrality over the issue, compared to those directly involved in growing the crop. Neonicotinoid restriction was expected to result in greater effort and expenditure on pest control and lower production (0–1 t/ha less). Alternatives for future oilseed rape

  9. Centralized administrative services management.

    PubMed

    Freed, D H

    1994-06-01

    Virtually every hospital has imposed guidelines or controls on one or more administrative service expenses. However, the actual deployment of such strategies is often voluntary, decentralized, disjointed and episodic. An alternative approach is to cluster administrative elements across hospital departments and make them the responsibility of a dedicated manager. This approach treats administrative services as an organizing principle with uniform, predictable standards of service and cost. Customer requirements for products and services are met without the need for them to physically manage that process. Materiel managers can demonstrate a leadership role by applying their professionalism and know-how to a set of products and services traditionally ignored or dealt with in an uncoordinated manner. While some initial resistance can be expected as traditional barriers are disassembled, the results should be very rewarding for the hospital and materiel manager alike.

  10. HRMAS NMR spectroscopy combined with chemometrics as an alternative analytical tool to control cigarette authenticity.

    PubMed

    Shintu, Laetitia; Caldarelli, Stefano; Campredon, Mylène

    2013-11-01

    In this paper, we present for the first time the use of high-resolution magic angle spinning nuclear magnetic resonance (HRMAS NMR) spectroscopy combined with chemometrics as an alternative tool for the characterization of tobacco products from different commercial international brands as well as for the identification of counterfeits. Although cigarette filling is a very complex chemical mixture, we were able to discriminate between dark, bright, and additive-free cigarette blends belonging to six different filter-cigarette brands, commercially available, using an approach for which no extraction procedure is required. Second, we focused our study on a specific worldwide-distributed brand for which established counterfeits were available. We discriminated those from their genuine counterparts with 100% accuracy using unsupervised multivariate statistical analysis. The counterfeits that we analyzed showed a higher amount of nicotine and solanesol and a lower content of sugars, all endogenous tobacco leaf metabolites. This preliminary study demonstrates the great potential of HRMAS NMR spectroscopy to help in controlling cigarette authenticity.

  11. Corrosion control when using secondary treated municipal wastewater as alternative makeup water for cooling tower systems.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Li, Heng; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Monnell, Jason D; Chowdhury, Indranil; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2010-12-01

    Secondary treated municipal wastewater is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water, especially in arid regions. Laboratory and field testing was conducted in this study to evaluate the corrosiveness of secondary treated municipal wastewater for various metals and metal alloys in cooling systems. Different corrosion control strategies were evaluated based on varied chemical treatment. Orthophosphate, which is abundant in secondary treated municipal wastewater, contributed to more than 80% precipitative removal of phosphorous-based corrosion inhibitors. Tolyltriazole worked effectively to reduce corrosion of copper (greater than 95% inhibition effectiveness). The corrosion rate of mild steel in the presence of free chlorine 1 mg/L (as Cl2) was approximately 50% higher than in the presence of monochloramine 1 mg/L (as Cl2), indicating that monochloramine is a less corrosive biocide than free chlorine. The scaling layers observed on the metal alloys contributed to corrosion inhibition, which could be seen by comparing the mild steel 21-day average corrosion rate with the last 5-day average corrosion rate, the latter being approximately 50% lower than the former.

  12. Randomized controlled trials in pediatric complementary and alternative medicine: Where can they be found?

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Margaret; Campbell, Kaitryn; Ajiferuke, Isola; Moher, David

    2003-01-01

    Background The safety and effectiveness of CAM interventions are of great relevance to pediatric health care providers. The objective of this study is to identify sources of reported randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the field of pediatric complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Methods Reports of RCTs were identified by searching Medline and 12 additional bibliographic databases and by reviewing the reference lists of previously identified pediatric CAM systematic reviews. Results We identified 908 reports of RCTs that included children under 18 and investigated a CAM therapy. Since 1965, there has been a steady growth in the number of these trials that are being published. The four journals that published the most reported RCTs are The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Pediatrics, Journal of Pediatrics, and Lancet. Medline, CAB Health, and Embase were the best database sources for identifying these studies; they indexed 93.2%, 58.4% and 42.2 % respectively of the journals publishing reports of pediatric CAM RCTs. Conclusions Those working or interested in the field of pediatric CAM should routinely search Medline, CAB Health and Embase for literature in the field. The four core journals identified above should be included in their collection. PMID:12589711

  13. Corrosion control when using passively treated abandoned mine drainage as alternative makeup water for cooling systems.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Kai; Chien, Shih-Hsiang; Li, Heng; Monnell, Jason D; Dzombak, David A; Vidic, Radisav D

    2011-09-01

    Passively treated abandoned mine drainage (AMD) is a promising alternative to fresh water as power plant cooling water system makeup water in mining regions where such water is abundant. Passive treatment and reuse of AMD can avoid the contamination of surface water caused by discharge of abandoned mine water, which typically is acidic and contains high concentrations of metals, especially iron. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of reusing passively treated AMD in cooling systems with respect to corrosion control through laboratory experiments and pilot-scale field testing. The results showed that, with the addition of the inhibitor mixture orthophosphate and tolyltriazole, mild steel and copper corrosion rates were reduced to acceptable levels (< 0.127 mm/y and < 0.0076 mm/y, respectively). Aluminum had pitting corrosion problems in every condition tested, while cupronickel showed that, even in the absence of any inhibitor and in the presence of the biocide monochloramine, its corrosion rate was still very low (0.018 mm/y).

  14. Alternating Magnetic Field-Responsive Hybrid Gelatin Microgels for Controlled Drug Release

    PubMed Central

    Alboslemy, Talib; Kim, Chanjoong; Kim, Min-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically-responsive nano/micro-engineered biomaterials that enable a tightly controlled, on-demand drug delivery have been developed as new types of smart soft devices for biomedical applications. Although a number of magnetically-responsive drug delivery systems have demonstrated efficacies through either in vitro proof of concept studies or in vivo preclinical applications, their use in clinical settings is still limited by their insufficient biocompatibility or biodegradability. Additionally, many of the existing platforms rely on sophisticated techniques for their fabrications. We recently demonstrated the fabrication of biodegradable, gelatin-based thermo-responsive microgel by physically entrapping poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide) chains as a minor component within a three-dimensional gelatin network. In this study, we present a facile method to fabricate a biodegradable drug release platform that enables a magneto-thermally triggered drug release. This was achieved by incorporating superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and thermo-responsive polymers within gelatin-based colloidal microgels, in conjunction with an alternating magnetic field application system. PMID:26966888

  15. Lime Juice and Vinegar Injections as a Cheap and Natural Alternative to Control COTS Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Moutardier, Grégoire; Gereva, Sompert; Mills, Suzanne C.; Adjeroud, Mehdi; Beldade, Ricardo; Ham, Jayven; Kaku, Rocky; Dumas, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of the corallivorous crown-of-thorns seastar Acanthaster planci (COTS) represent one of the greatest disturbances to coral reef ecosystems in the Indo-Pacific, affecting not only coral reefs but also the coastal communities which rely on their resources. While injection approaches are increasingly used in an attempt to control COTS densities, most of them display severe drawbacks including logistical challenges, high residual environmental impacts or low cost-effectiveness. We tested a new alternative control method based upon acidic injections of cheap, 100% natural products. We investigated the lethal doses, intra- and inter-specific disease transmission and immune responses of COTS when injected with fresh lime juice (extracted from local Citrus arantifolia) and white spirit vinegar. High COTS mortality was achieved with small volumes: 10–20 ml per seastar induced death in 89%/97% of injected specimens after an average 34.3 h/29.8 h for lime juice and vinegar respectively. Highest efficiency was reached for both solutions with double shots of (2 × 10 ml) in two different areas on the body: 100% mortality occurred within 12–24 h, which is similar or faster compared with other current injection methods. Multiple immune measures suggested that death was very likely caused by pH stress from the acidic solutions rather than a bacterial infection. Contagion to either conspecifics or a variety of other reef species was not observed, even at COTS densities 15 times higher than the highest naturally reported. 10 to 20 l lime juice/vinegar could kill up to a thousand COTS at a cost of less than 0.05 USD per specimen; no permits or special handling procedures are required. We conclude that injections of lime juice and vinegar offer great advantages when compared to current best practises and constitute a cheap and natural option for all reefs affected by COTS. PMID:26356840

  16. Development, validation and acceptance of alternative methods in the quality control of vaccines: A case report.

    PubMed

    Hendriksen, C F

    1995-12-01

    Information about levels of protection against tetanus is needed both for the assessment of immune status and for the estimation of the potency of batches of tetanus toxoid. Originally, levels of protective antibodies in human serum samples were titrated in an in vivo toxin neutralization (TN) test. Potency testing was based either on an indirect protection test or a direct challenge test. In the former test, rabbits or guinea pigs are immunized and bled, followed by titration of serum samples in a TN test. In the latter test, used in the quality control of tetanus toxoid for human use, protective immunity is induced by vaccination in guinea pigs or mice and subsequently challenging them directly with tetanus toxin. In the mid-1980s, an in vitro model was developed at the National Institute of Public Health and Environmental Protection (RIVM) for estimating levels of tetanus antitoxin in serum samples. This model, the toxin-binding inhibition (ToBI) test, was validated recently for both diagnostic testing and potency testing. Although accurate estimation of antitoxin levels is more important for diagnostic testing than for potency testing, the ToBI test has been adopted for determining the immune status but not for potency testing. One major reason is that there are no official guidelines for titration of human serum samples. By contrast, potency testing is performed in accordance with the monographs of national and international pharmacopoeias, which complicates acceptance for technical and bureaucratic reasons. This paper focuses on the validation studies performed at the RIVM. In particular, attention is paid to the various problems encountered. Suggestions for the role of the European Centre for Validation of Alternative Methods (ECVAM)( *) in the quality control of vaccines are also presented.

  17. Lime Juice and Vinegar Injections as a Cheap and Natural Alternative to Control COTS Outbreaks.

    PubMed

    Moutardier, Grégoire; Gereva, Sompert; Mills, Suzanne C; Adjeroud, Mehdi; Beldade, Ricardo; Ham, Jayven; Kaku, Rocky; Dumas, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Outbreaks of the corallivorous crown-of-thorns seastar Acanthaster planci (COTS) represent one of the greatest disturbances to coral reef ecosystems in the Indo-Pacific, affecting not only coral reefs but also the coastal communities which rely on their resources. While injection approaches are increasingly used in an attempt to control COTS densities, most of them display severe drawbacks including logistical challenges, high residual environmental impacts or low cost-effectiveness. We tested a new alternative control method based upon acidic injections of cheap, 100% natural products. We investigated the lethal doses, intra- and inter-specific disease transmission and immune responses of COTS when injected with fresh lime juice (extracted from local Citrus arantifolia) and white spirit vinegar. High COTS mortality was achieved with small volumes: 10-20 ml per seastar induced death in 89%/97% of injected specimens after an average 34.3 h/29.8 h for lime juice and vinegar respectively. Highest efficiency was reached for both solutions with double shots of (2 × 10 ml) in two different areas on the body: 100% mortality occurred within 12-24 h, which is similar or faster compared with other current injection methods. Multiple immune measures suggested that death was very likely caused by pH stress from the acidic solutions rather than a bacterial infection. Contagion to either conspecifics or a variety of other reef species was not observed, even at COTS densities 15 times higher than the highest naturally reported. 10 to 20 l lime juice/vinegar could kill up to a thousand COTS at a cost of less than 0.05 USD per specimen; no permits or special handling procedures are required. We conclude that injections of lime juice and vinegar offer great advantages when compared to current best practises and constitute a cheap and natural option for all reefs affected by COTS.

  18. Searching for Controlled Trials of Complementary and Alternative Medicine: A Comparison of 15 Databases

    PubMed Central

    Cogo, Elise; Sampson, Margaret; Ajiferuke, Isola; Manheimer, Eric; Campbell, Kaitryn; Daniel, Raymond; Moher, David

    2011-01-01

    This project aims to assess the utility of bibliographic databases beyond the three major ones (MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane CENTRAL) for finding controlled trials of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). Fifteen databases were searched to identify controlled clinical trials (CCTs) of CAM not also indexed in MEDLINE. Searches were conducted in May 2006 using the revised Cochrane highly sensitive search strategy (HSSS) and the PubMed CAM Subset. Yield of CAM trials per 100 records was determined, and databases were compared over a standardized period (2005). The Acudoc2 RCT, Acubriefs, Index to Chiropractic Literature (ICL) and Hom-Inform databases had the highest concentrations of non-MEDLINE records, with more than 100 non-MEDLINE records per 500. Other productive databases had ratios between 500 and 1500 records to 100 non-MEDLINE records—these were AMED, MANTIS, PsycINFO, CINAHL, Global Health and Alt HealthWatch. Five databases were found to be unproductive: AGRICOLA, CAIRSS, Datadiwan, Herb Research Foundation and IBIDS. Acudoc2 RCT yielded 100 CAM trials in the most recent 100 records screened. Acubriefs, AMED, Hom-Inform, MANTIS, PsycINFO and CINAHL had more than 25 CAM trials per 100 records screened. Global Health, ICL and Alt HealthWatch were below 25 in yield. There were 255 non-MEDLINE trials from eight databases in 2005, with only 10% indexed in more than one database. Yield varied greatly between databases; the most productive databases from both sampling methods were Acubriefs, Acudoc2 RCT, AMED and CINAHL. Low overlap between databases indicates comprehensive CAM literature searches will require multiple databases. PMID:19468052

  19. Balancing Team Integrity with Administrative Control in the Development and Management of Special Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del-Val, Patricia B.; Griffin, Carol Lee

    The paper reviews the experiences of special education administrators in Quincy (MA) Public Schools regarding compliance with P.L. 94-142, the Education for All Handicapped Children Act. Noted are the decentralized model of Pupil Personnel Service Teams, the administrator's role in guiding teachers to set priorities in academic and vocational…

  20. Sulfate metabolites as alternative markers for the detection of 4-chlorometandienone misuse in doping control.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Georgina; Gómez, Cristina; Garrostas, Lorena; Pozo, Óscar J; Ventura, Rosa

    2016-09-30

    Sulfate metabolites have been described as long-term metabolites for some anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS). 4-chlorometandienone (4Cl-MTD) is one of the most frequently detected AAS in sports drug testing and it is commonly detected by monitoring metabolites excreted free or conjugated with glucuronic acid. Sulfation reactions of 4Cl-MTD have not been studied. The aim of this work was to evaluate the sulfate fraction of 4Cl-MTD metabolism by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to establish potential long-term metabolites valuable for doping control purposes. 4Cl-MTD was administered to two healthy male volunteers and urine samples were collected up to 8 days after administration. A theoretical selected reaction monitoring (SRM) method working in negative mode was developed. Ion transitions were based on ionization and fragmentation behaviour of sulfate metabolites as well as specific neutral losses (NL of 15 Da and NL of 36 Da) of compounds with related chemical structure. Six sulfate metabolites were detected after the analysis of excretion study samples. Three of the identified metabolites were characterized by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and gas chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS). Results showed that five out of the six identified sulfate metabolites were detected in urine up to the last collected samples from both excretion studies. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Establishing Discriminative Control of Responding Using Functional and Alternative Reinforcers during Functional Communication Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Wayne W.; Thompson, Rachel H.; Kuhn, David E.

    1998-01-01

    Two children with mental retardation were trained to emit different communication responses to request the reinforcer for destructive behavior and an alternative reinforcer. Differential reinforcement of communication reduced destructive behavior regardless of whether a functional reinforcer or an alternative reinforcer was available or whether…

  2. Cost-comparison of DDT and alternative insecticides for malaria control.

    PubMed

    Walker, K

    2000-12-01

    In anti-malaria operations the use of DDT for indoor residual spraying has declined substantially over the past 30years, but this insecticide is still considered valuable for malaria control, mainly because of its low cost relative to alternative insecticides. Despite the development of resistance to DDT in some populations of malaria vector Anopheles mosquitoes (Diptera: Culicidae), DDT remains generally effective when used for house-spraying against most species of Anopheles, due to excitorepellency as well as insecticidal effects. A 1990 cost comparison by the World Health Organization (WHO) found DDT to be considerably less expensive than other insecticides, which cost 2 to 23 times more on the basis of cost per house per 6 months of control. To determine whether such a cost advantage still prevails for DDT, this paper compares recent price quotes from manufacturers and WHO suppliers for DDT and appropriate formulations of nine other insecticides (two carbamates, two organophosphates and five pyrethroids) commonly used for residual house-spraying in malaria control programmes. Based on these 'global' price quotes, detailed calculations show that DDT is still the least expensive insecticide on a cost per house basis, although the price appears to be rising as DDT production declines. At the same time, the prices of pyrethroids are declining, making some only slightly more expensive than DDT at low application dosages. Other costs, including operations (labour), transportation and human safety may also increase the price advantages of DDT and some pyrethroids vs. organophosphates and carbamates, although possible environmental impacts from DDT remain a concern. However, a global cost comparison may not realistically reflect local costs or effective application dosages at the country level. Recent data on insecticide prices paid by the health ministries of individual countries showed that prices of particular insecticides can vary substantially in the open market

  3. Optimizing Intradermal Administration of Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Controlled Human Malaria Infection.

    PubMed

    Lyke, Kirsten E; Laurens, Matthew B; Strauss, Kathy; Adams, Matthew; Billingsley, Peter F; James, Eric; Manoj, Anita; Chakravarty, Sumana; Plowe, Christopher V; Li, Ming Lin; Ruben, Adam; Edelman, Robert; Green, Michael; Dube, Tina J; Sim, B Kim Lee; Hoffman, Stephen L

    2015-12-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) is a powerful tool to evaluate malaria vaccine and prophylactic drug efficacy. Until recently CHMI was only carried out by the bite of infected mosquitoes. A parenteral method of CHMI would standardize Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ) administration, eliminate the need for expensive challenge facility infrastructure, and allow for use of many P. falciparum strains. Recently, intradermal (ID) injection of aseptic, purified, cryopreserved PfSPZ was shown to induce P. falciparum malaria; however, 100% infection rates were not achieved by ID injection. To optimize ID PfSPZ dosing so as to achieve 100% infection, 30 adults aged 18-45 years were randomized to one of six groups composed of five volunteers each. The parameters of dose (1 × 10(4) versus 5 × 10(4) PfSPZ total dose per volunteer), number of injections (two versus eight), and aliquot volume per ID injection (10 μL versus 50 μL) were studied. Three groups attained 100% infection: 1 × 10(4) PfSPZ in 50 μL/2 doses, 1 × 10(4) PfSPZ in 10 μL/2 doses, and 5 × 10(4) PfSPZ in 10 μL/8 doses. The group that received 5 × 10(4) PfSPZ total dose in eight 10 μL injections had a 100% infection rate and the shortest prepatent period (mean of 12.7 days), approaching the prepatent period for the current CHMI standard of five infected mosquitoes.

  4. Methamphetamine and Amphetamine Isomer Concentrations in Human Urine Following Controlled Vicks VapoInhaler Administration

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael L.; Nichols, Daniel C.; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A.; Flegel, Ron; Gorelick, David A.; Newmeyer, Matthew N.; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Legitimate use of legal intranasal decongestants containing l-methamphetamine may complicate interpretation of urine drug tests positive for amphetamines. Our study hypotheses were that commonly used immunoassays would produce no false-positive results and a recently developed enantiomer-specific gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) procedure would find no d-amphetamine or d-methamphetamine in urine following controlled Vicks VapoInhaler administration at manufacturer's recommended doses. To evaluate these hypotheses, 22 healthy adults were each administered one dose (two inhalations in each nostril) of a Vicks VapoInhaler every 2 h for 10 h on Day 1 (six doses), followed by a single dose on Day 2. Every urine specimen was collected as an individual void for 32 h after the first dose and assayed for d- and l-amphetamines specific isomers with a GC–MS method with >99% purity of R-(−)-α-methoxy-α-(trifluoromethyl)phenylacetyl derivatives and 10 µg/L lower limits of quantification. No d-methamphetamine or d-amphetamine was detected in any urine specimen by GC–MS. The median l-methamphetamine maximum concentration was 62.8 µg/L (range: 11.0–1,440). Only two subjects had detectable l-amphetamine, with maximum concentrations coinciding with l-methamphetamine peak levels, and always ≤4% of the parent's maximum. Three commercial immunoassays for amphetamines EMIT® II Plus, KIMS® II and DRI® had sensitivities, specificities and efficiencies of 100, 97.8, 97.8; 100, 99.6, 99.6 and 100, 100, 100%, respectively. The immunoassays had high efficiencies, but our first hypothesis was not affirmed. The EMIT® II Plus assay produced 2.2% false-positive results, requiring an enantiomer-specific confirmation. PMID:25217541

  5. Methamphetamine and amphetamine isomer concentrations in human urine following controlled Vicks VapoInhaler administration.

    PubMed

    Smith, Michael L; Nichols, Daniel C; Underwood, Paula; Fuller, Zachary; Moser, Matthew A; Flegel, Ron; Gorelick, David A; Newmeyer, Matthew N; Concheiro, Marta; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-10-01

    Legitimate use of legal intranasal decongestants containing l-methamphetamine may complicate interpretation of urine drug tests positive for amphetamines. Our study hypotheses were that commonly used immunoassays would produce no false-positive results and a recently developed enantiomer-specific gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) procedure would find no d-amphetamine or d-methamphetamine in urine following controlled Vicks VapoInhaler administration at manufacturer's recommended doses. To evaluate these hypotheses, 22 healthy adults were each administered one dose (two inhalations in each nostril) of a Vicks VapoInhaler every 2 h for 10 h on Day 1 (six doses), followed by a single dose on Day 2. Every urine specimen was collected as an individual void for 32 h after the first dose and assayed for d- and l-amphetamines specific isomers with a GC-MS method with >99% purity of R-(-)-α-methoxy-α-(trifluoromethyl)phenylacetyl derivatives and 10 µg/L lower limits of quantification. No d-methamphetamine or d-amphetamine was detected in any urine specimen by GC-MS. The median l-methamphetamine maximum concentration was 62.8 µg/L (range: 11.0-1,440). Only two subjects had detectable l-amphetamine, with maximum concentrations coinciding with l-methamphetamine peak levels, and always ≤ 4% of the parent's maximum. Three commercial immunoassays for amphetamines EMIT(®) II Plus, KIMS(®) II and DRI(®) had sensitivities, specificities and efficiencies of 100, 97.8, 97.8; 100, 99.6, 99.6 and 100, 100, 100%, respectively. The immunoassays had high efficiencies, but our first hypothesis was not affirmed. The EMIT(®) II Plus assay produced 2.2% false-positive results, requiring an enantiomer-specific confirmation.

  6. Optimizing Intradermal Administration of Cryopreserved Plasmodium falciparum Sporozoites in Controlled Human Malaria Infection

    PubMed Central

    Lyke, Kirsten E.; Laurens, Matthew B.; Strauss, Kathy; Adams, Matthew; Billingsley, Peter F.; James, Eric; Manoj, Anita; Chakravarty, Sumana; Plowe, Christopher V.; Li, Ming Lin; Ruben, Adam; Edelman, Robert; Green, Michael; Dube, Tina J.; Kim Lee Sim, B.; Hoffman, Stephen L.

    2015-01-01

    Controlled human malaria infection (CHMI) is a powerful tool to evaluate malaria vaccine and prophylactic drug efficacy. Until recently CHMI was only carried out by the bite of infected mosquitoes. A parenteral method of CHMI would standardize Plasmodium falciparum sporozoite (PfSPZ) administration, eliminate the need for expensive challenge facility infrastructure, and allow for use of many P. falciparum strains. Recently, intradermal (ID) injection of aseptic, purified, cryopreserved PfSPZ was shown to induce P. falciparum malaria; however, 100% infection rates were not achieved by ID injection. To optimize ID PfSPZ dosing so as to achieve 100% infection, 30 adults aged 18–45 years were randomized to one of six groups composed of five volunteers each. The parameters of dose (1 × 104 versus 5 × 104 PfSPZ total dose per volunteer), number of injections (two versus eight), and aliquot volume per ID injection (10 μL versus 50 μL) were studied. Three groups attained 100% infection: 1 × 104 PfSPZ in 50 μL/2 doses, 1 × 104 PfSPZ in 10 μL/2 doses, and 5 × 104 PfSPZ in 10 μL/8 doses. The group that received 5 × 104 PfSPZ total dose in eight 10 μL injections had a 100% infection rate and the shortest prepatent period (mean of 12.7 days), approaching the prepatent period for the current CHMI standard of five infected mosquitoes. PMID:26416102

  7. Stereoselective urinary MDMA (ecstasy) and metabolites excretion kinetics following controlled MDMA administration to humans.

    PubMed

    Schwaninger, Andrea E; Meyer, Markus R; Barnes, Allan J; Kolbrich-Spargo, Erin A; Gorelick, David A; Goodwin, Robert S; Huestis, Marilyn A; Maurer, Hans H

    2012-01-01

    The R- and S-enantiomers of racemic 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) exhibit different dose-concentration curves. In plasma, S-MDMA was eliminated at a higher rate, most likely due to stereoselective metabolism. Similar data were shown in various in vitro experiments. The aim of the present study was the in vivo investigation of stereoselective elimination of MDMA's phase I and phase II metabolites in human urine following controlled oral MDMA administration. Urine samples from 10 participants receiving 1.0 and 1.6 mg/kg MDMA separated by at least one week were analyzed blind by liquid chromatography-high resolution-mass spectrometry and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after chiral derivatization with S-heptafluorobutyrylprolyl chloride. R/S ratios at C(max) were comparable after low and high doses with ratios >1 for MDMA, free DHMA, and HMMA sulfate, and with ratios <1 for MDA, free HMMA, DHMA sulfate and HMMA glucuronide. In the five days after the high MDMA dose, a median of 21% of all evaluated compounds were excreted as R-stereoisomers and 17% as S-stereoisomers. Significantly greater MDMA, DHMA, and HMMA sulfate R-enantiomers and HMMA and HMMA glucuronide S-stereoisomers were excreted. No significant differences were observed for MDA and DHMA sulfate stereoisomers. Changes in R/S ratios could be observed over time for all analytes, with steady increases in the first 48 h. R/S ratios could help to roughly estimate time of MDMA ingestion and therefore, improve interpretation of MDMA and metabolite urinary concentrations in clinical and forensic toxicology.

  8. Evaluation of alternatives to fungicide to control postharvest gray mold alone or with ozone storage in grapes, 2011

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Gray mold, caused by B. cinerea, causes severe losses since it spreads easily among berries during cold storage. Currently, it is controlled by fumigation with SO2 or SO2 emitting sheets within boxes. Alternative methods, such as storage in ozone atmospheres, are needed because SO2 is banned in orga...

  9. Randomized controlled trials and neuro-oncology: should alternative designs be considered?

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Alireza; Shin, Samuel; Cooper, Benjamin; Srivastava, Archita; Bhandari, Mohit; Kondziolka, Douglas

    2015-09-01

    Deficiencies in design and reporting of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) hinders interpretability and critical appraisal. The reporting quality of recent RCTs in neuro-oncology was analyzed to assess adequacy of design and reporting. The MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched to identify non-surgical RCTs (years 2005-2014, inclusive). The CONSORT and Jadad scales were used to assess the quality of design/reporting. Studies published in 2005-2010 were compared as a cohort against studies published in 2011-2014, in terms of general characteristics and reporting quality. A PRECIS-based scale was used to designate studies on the pragmatic-explanatory continuum. Spearman's test was used to assess correlations. Regression analysis was used to assess associations. Overall 68 RCTs were identified. Studies were often chemotherapy-based (n = 41 studies) focusing upon high grade gliomas (46 %) and metastases (41 %) as the top pathologies. Multi-center trials (71 %) were frequent. The overall median CONSORT and Jadad scores were 34.5 (maximum 44) and 2 (maximum 5), respectively; these scores were similar in radiation and chemotherapy-based trials. Major areas of deficiency pertained to allocation concealment, implementation of methods, and blinding whereby less than 20 % of articles fulfilled all criteria. Description of intervention, random sequence generation, and the details regarding recruitment were also deficient; less than 50 % of studies fulfilled all criteria. Description of sample size calculations and blinding improved in later published cohorts. Journal impact factor was significantly associated with higher quality (p = 0.04). Large academic consortia, multi-center designs, ITT analysis, collaboration with biostatisticians, larger sample sizes, and studies with pragmatic objectives were more likely to achieve positive primary outcomes on univariate analysis; none of these variables were significant on multivariate analysis. Deficiencies in the

  10. The alternative complement pathway control protein H binds to immune complexes and serves their detection

    SciTech Connect

    Nydegger, U.E.; Corvetta, A.; Spaeth, P.J.; Spycher, M.

    1983-01-01

    During solubilization of immune complexes C3b becomes fixed to the immunoglobulin part and serves as a receptor for the alternative complement pathway control protein H. The H-C3b immune complex interaction can be made detectable using 4% polyethyleneglycol to separate free from bound /sup 125/I-H. Tetanus toxoid (Te)/anti-Te complexes kept soluble with fresh serum and containing 125 IU of specific antibody bound 18% of /sup 125/I-H; when fresh serum was chelated with 10 mM EDTA, /sup 125/I-H binding was only 5%. On sucrose density gradients, the H-binding material sedimented in the range of 12 to 30 S. In 36 serum samples from rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients and in 12 serum samples from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), /sup 125/I-H binding was significantly elevated to 9.5 +/- 4.7% (mean +/- 1 SD) and 13.3 +/- 5.6%, respectively, while /sup 125/I-H binding by 36 normal human sera was 4 +/- 2%. RA samples (17/36, 47%) and SLE samples (9/12, 75%) had H-binding values increased by more than 2 SD above the normal mean. The serum samples were also assessed for conglutinin- and C1q-binding activities; a significant correlation between H and C1q binding was observed (P less than 0.001); there was no correlation between H and conglutinin binding. Although binding to immune complexes through its interaction with C3b, H clearly detects a population of complexes other than conglutinin, thus expanding the possibilities of further characterizing pathological complexes.

  11. 34 CFR 685.309 - Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting requirements for schools participating in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirements for schools participating in the Direct Loan Program. 685.309 Section 685.309 Education... Direct Loan Program Schools § 685.309 Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting requirements for schools participating in the Direct Loan Program. (a) General. A participating school shall—...

  12. Beyond the Randomized Controlled Trial: A Review of Alternatives in mHealth Clinical Trial Methods

    PubMed Central

    Wiljer, David; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Background Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have long been considered the primary research study design capable of eliciting causal relationships between health interventions and consequent outcomes. However, with a prolonged duration from recruitment to publication, high-cost trial implementation, and a rigid trial protocol, RCTs are perceived as an impractical evaluation methodology for most mHealth apps. Objective Given the recent development of alternative evaluation methodologies and tools to automate mHealth research, we sought to determine the breadth of these methods and the extent that they were being used in clinical trials. Methods We conducted a review of the ClinicalTrials.gov registry to identify and examine current clinical trials involving mHealth apps and retrieved relevant trials registered between November 2014 and November 2015. Results Of the 137 trials identified, 71 were found to meet inclusion criteria. The majority used a randomized controlled trial design (80%, 57/71). Study designs included 36 two-group pretest-posttest control group comparisons (51%, 36/71), 16 posttest-only control group comparisons (23%, 16/71), 7 one-group pretest-posttest designs (10%, 7/71), 2 one-shot case study designs (3%, 2/71), and 2 static-group comparisons (3%, 2/71). A total of 17 trials included a qualitative component to their methodology (24%, 17/71). Complete trial data collection required 20 months on average to complete (mean 21, SD 12). For trials with a total duration of 2 years or more (31%, 22/71), the average time from recruitment to complete data collection (mean 35 months, SD 10) was 2 years longer than the average time required to collect primary data (mean 11, SD 8). Trials had a moderate sample size of 112 participants. Two trials were conducted online (3%, 2/71) and 7 trials collected data continuously (10%, 7/68). Onsite study implementation was heavily favored (97%, 69/71). Trials with four data collection points had a longer study

  13. Educational Management Tools for the Practicing School Administrator. A Handbook for School Administrators Who Wish to Plan, Organize, Allocate Resources, and Control Educational Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Association of School Administrators, Arlington, VA.

    The purpose of this handbook is to describe selected management tools useful to elementary and secondary school administrators. It attempts to provide the administrator with knowledge that will stimulate the use of these tools in an educational environment. It is intended to enable the administrator to direct educational programs to a productive…

  14. Sustainability and optimal control of an exploited prey predator system through provision of alternative food to predator.

    PubMed

    Kar, T K; Ghosh, Bapan

    2012-08-01

    In the present paper, we develop a simple two species prey-predator model in which the predator is partially coupled with alternative prey. The aim is to study the consequences of providing additional food to the predator as well as the effects of harvesting efforts applied to both the species. It is observed that the provision of alternative food to predator is not always beneficial to the system. A complete picture of the long run dynamics of the system is discussed based on the effort pair as control parameters. Optimal augmentations of prey and predator biomass at final time have been investigated by optimal control theory. Also the short and large time effects of the application of optimal control have been discussed. Finally, some numerical illustrations are given to verify our analytical results with the help of different sets of parameters.

  15. Oxidative stress controls the choice of alternative last exons via a Brahma-BRCA1-CstF pathway.

    PubMed

    Fontana, Gabriele A; Rigamonti, Aurora; Lenzken, Silvia C; Filosa, Giuseppe; Alvarez, Reinaldo; Calogero, Raffaele; Bianchi, Marco E; Barabino, Silvia M L

    2017-01-25

    Alternative splicing of terminal exons increases transcript and protein diversity. How physiological and pathological stimuli regulate the choice between alternative terminal exons is, however, largely unknown. Here, we show that Brahma (BRM), the ATPase subunit of the hSWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex interacts with BRCA1/BARD1, which ubiquitinates the 50 kDa subunit of the 3' end processing factor CstF. This results in the inhibition of transcript cleavage at the proximal poly(A) site and a shift towards inclusion of the distal terminal exon. Upon oxidative stress, BRM is depleted, cleavage inhibition is released, and inclusion of the proximal last exon is favoored. Our findings elucidate a novel regulatory mechanism, distinct from the modulation of transcription elongation by BRM that controls alternative splicing of internal exons.

  16. Oxidative stress controls the choice of alternative last exons via a Brahma–BRCA1–CstF pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fontana, Gabriele A.; Rigamonti, Aurora; Lenzken, Silvia C.; Filosa, Giuseppe; Alvarez, Reinaldo; Calogero, Raffaele; Bianchi, Marco E.; Barabino, Silvia M.L.

    2017-01-01

    Alternative splicing of terminal exons increases transcript and protein diversity. How physiological and pathological stimuli regulate the choice between alternative terminal exons is, however, largely unknown. Here, we show that Brahma (BRM), the ATPase subunit of the hSWI/SNF chromatin-remodeling complex interacts with BRCA1/BARD1, which ubiquitinates the 50 kDa subunit of the 3′ end processing factor CstF. This results in the inhibition of transcript cleavage at the proximal poly(A) site and a shift towards inclusion of the distal terminal exon. Upon oxidative stress, BRM is depleted, cleavage inhibition is released, and inclusion of the proximal last exon is favoored. Our findings elucidate a novel regulatory mechanism, distinct from the modulation of transcription elongation by BRM that controls alternative splicing of internal exons. PMID:27591253

  17. Conference on alternatives for pollution control from coal-fired low emission sources, Plzen, Czech Republic. Plzen Proceedings

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The Conference on Alternatives for Pollution Control from Coal-Fired Emission Sources presented cost-effective approaches for pollution control of low emission sources (LES). It also identified policies and strategies for implementation of pollution control measures at the local level. Plzen, Czech Republic, was chosen as the conference site to show participants first hand the LES problems facing Eastern Europe today. Collectively, these Proceedings contain clear reports on: (a) methods for evaluating the cost effectiveness of alternative approaches to control pollution from small coal-fired boilers and furnaces; (b) cost-effective technologies for controlling pollution from coal-fired boilers and furnaces; (c) case studies of assessment of cost effective pollution control measures for selected cities in eastern Europe; and (d) approaches for actually implementing pollution control measures in cities in Eastern Europe. It is intended that the eastern/central European reader will find in these Proceedings useful measures that can be applied to control emissions and clean the air in his city or region. The conference was sponsored by the United States Agency for International Development (AID), the United States Department of Energy (DOE), and the Czech Ministry of Industry and Trade. Selected papers have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  18. 78 FR 22659 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations: Initial Implementation of Export Control Reform

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... chemical and biological weapon proliferation reasons) and before the 900 series (ECCNs that control items... would be controlled for Missile Technology Column 1 (``MT1''), Chemical and Biological...

  19. Behavior of Caenorhabditis elegans in alternating electric field and its application to their localization and control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezai, Pouya; Siddiqui, Asad; Selvaganapathy, Ponnambalam Ravi; Gupta, Bhagwati P.

    2010-04-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans is an attractive model organism because of its genetic similarity to humans and the ease of its manipulation in the laboratory. Recently, it was shown that a direct current electric field inside microfluidic channel induces directed movement that is highly sensitive, reliable, and benign. In this letter, we describe the worm's movement response to alternating electric fields in a similar channel setup. We demonstrate that the 1 Hz and higher frequency of alternating current field can effectively localize worms in the channel. This discovery could potentially help design microfluidic devices for high throughput automated analysis of worms.

  20. Oral administration of piperine for the control of aflatoxin intoxication in rats

    PubMed Central

    Gagini, Thalita B.; Silva, Robson E.; Castro, Isabela S.; Soares, Breno A.; Lima, Marco E.F.; Brito, Marilene F.; Mazur, Carlos; Direito, Glória M.; Danelli, Maria das Graças M.

    2010-01-01

    Aflatoxins are mycotoxins that have important toxic effects on human and animal health, even if consumed at low doses. The oral administration of piperine (1.12 mg/kg) during 23 days in rats seemingly interfered with the toxicity of aflatoxins, decreasing hepatic injuries and the leukocyte depletion in experimentally intoxicated animals. PMID:24031502

  1. 77 FR 72868 - The Centers for Disease Control (CDC)/Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention... (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and...., Designated Federal Officer, CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV, Viral Hepatitis and STD Prevention...

  2. ALTERNATIVE OXIDANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter reports on the efforts of the USEPA to study chloramines, chlorine dioxide and ozone as alternative oxidants/disinfectants to chlorine for the control of disinfection by-rpdocuts (DBPs) in drinking water. It examines the control of DBPs like trihalomethanes and haloa...

  3. Is early postoperative administration of pregabalin beneficial for patients with lung cancer?—randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Sakai, Tetsuya; Sato, Shuntaro; Yamasaki, Naoya; Tsuchiya, Tomoshi; Matsumoto, Keitaro; Kamohara, Ryotaro; Hatachi, Go; Doi, Ryoichiro; Nagayasu, Takeshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Post-thoracotomy pain is an obstacle for lung-cancer patients even after introduction of less invasive surgical procedures. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate if early postoperative administration of pregabalin is beneficial for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods We conducted a randomized open control trial. Patients with NSCLC were allocated randomly to epidural and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use for analgesia (control group) or pregabalin use (pregabalin group). Primary endpoint was the frequency of additional administration of a NSAID. Secondary endpoints were intensity of ongoing pain, frequency of neuropathic pain, and pain catastrophizing. Results Seventy-two patients were registered and allocated. Thirty-four cases in the control group and 33 in the pregabalin group were assessed. Age, sex, body mass index (BMI), type of surgical procedure, type of lymph-node dissection, operation time, bleeding, duration of chest-tube insertion, and postoperative hospital stay between the two groups was not significantly different. Frequency of additional NSAID use between the control group (2±4 suppositories) and pregabalin group (2±3 suppositories) was not significantly different (P=0.62). Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) for the intensity of ongoing pain, frequency of neuropathic pain, and Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) between each group were not significantly different at any time until 3 months after surgery. Conclusions Early postoperative administration of pregabalin is not beneficial for patients with NSCLC. PMID:28149551

  4. Distinction of clenbuterol intake from drug or contaminated food of animal origin in a controlled administration trial - the potential of enantiomeric separation for doping control analysis.

    PubMed

    Parr, Maria Kristina; Blokland, Marco H; Liebetrau, Franz; Schmidt, Alexander H; Meijer, Thijs; Stanic, Mijo; Kwiatkowska, Dorota; Waraksa, Emilia; Sterk, Saskia S

    2017-04-01

    The differentiation of clenbuterol abuse and unintentional ingestion from contaminated meat is crucial with respect to the valuation of an adverse analytical finding in human sports doping control. The proportion of the two enantiomers of clenbuterol may serve as potential discriminating parameter. For the determination of the individual enantiomers, specific methods were developed and validated for the different matrices under investigation based on chiral chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Data are presented from the administration to humans of clenbuterol from a pharmaceutical preparation, and from cattle meat and liver containing residues. A shift in the proportion of the enantiomers in cattle meat is detected and this signature is also found in human urine after ingestion. Thus, an altered enantiomeric composition of clenbuterol may be used to substantiate athletes' claims following adverse analytical findings in doping control. However, in meat, the enantiomeric composition was found to be highly variable. Species as well as tissue dependent variances need to be considered in interpreting enantiomer discrimination. Analysis of post administration urines from a controlled experiment comparing the administration of racemic clenbuterol from a registered pharmaceutical preparation and the administration of residue-containing meat and liver (nonracemic mixture) from treated animals is reported. Furthermore doping control samples from Mexican U17 World Championship 2011 of the Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), with adverse analytical findings for clenbuterol, were re-analysed.

  5. Alternatives to conventional fungicides for the control of citrus postharvest green and blue molds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Literature review for electronic review journal “Stewart Postharvest Review” on the subject of alternatives to the fungicides for postharvest use on citrus fruit. This review contributes to the development of practical technologies to reduce postharvest fruit losses without the use of synthetic fung...

  6. 76 FR 68675 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR): Control of Aircraft and Related Items...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-07

    ...This proposed rule describes how articles the President determines no longer warrant control under Category VIII (aircraft and related items) of the United States Munitions List (USML) would be controlled under the Commerce Control List (CCL) in new Export Control Classification Numbers (ECCNs) 9A610, 9B610, 9C610, 9D610, and 9E610. In addition, this proposed rule would control military......

  7. Alternative systems in Malaysian drug rehabilitation: organization and control in comparative perspective.

    PubMed

    Lee, R L

    1985-01-01

    This paper examines four drug rehabilitation systems in Malaysia from an organizational perspective. It focuses on authority structures in rehabilitation centres and their impact on rehabilitees' identities. The findings show that there are important differences between government-run and private centres in terms of administration and approach to therapy. Some policy implications are derived from a comparison of these systems.

  8. Alternative Zoning Scenarios for Regional Sustainable Land Use Controls in China: A Knowledge-Based Multiobjective Optimisation Model

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yin; Liu, Dianfeng; Liu, Yaolin; He, Jianhua; Hong, Xiaofeng

    2014-01-01

    Alternative land use zoning scenarios provide guidance for sustainable land use controls. This study focused on an ecologically vulnerable catchment on the Loess Plateau in China, proposed a novel land use zoning model, and generated alternative zoning solutions to satisfy the various requirements of land use stakeholders and managers. This model combined multiple zoning objectives, i.e., maximum zoning suitability, maximum planning compatibility and maximum spatial compactness, with land use constraints by using goal programming technique, and employed a modified simulated annealing algorithm to search for the optimal zoning solutions. The land use zoning knowledge was incorporated into the initialisation operator and neighbourhood selection strategy of the simulated annealing algorithm to improve its efficiency. The case study indicates that the model is both effective and robust. Five optimal zoning scenarios of the study area were helpful for satisfying the requirements of land use controls in loess hilly regions, e.g., land use intensification, agricultural protection and environmental conservation. PMID:25170679

  9. Alternative zoning scenarios for regional sustainable land use controls in China: a knowledge-based multiobjective optimisation model.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yin; Liu, Dianfeng; Liu, Yaolin; He, Jianhua; Hong, Xiaofeng

    2014-08-28

    Alternative land use zoning scenarios provide guidance for sustainable land use controls. This study focused on an ecologically vulnerable catchment on the Loess Plateau in China, proposed a novel land use zoning model, and generated alternative zoning solutions to satisfy the various requirements of land use stakeholders and managers. This model combined multiple zoning objectives, i.e., maximum zoning suitability, maximum planning compatibility and maximum spatial compactness, with land use constraints by using goal programming technique, and employed a modified simulated annealing algorithm to search for the optimal zoning solutions. The land use zoning knowledge was incorporated into the initialisation operator and neighbourhood selection strategy of the simulated annealing algorithm to improve its efficiency. The case study indicates that the model is both effective and robust. Five optimal zoning scenarios of the study area were helpful for satisfying the requirements of land use controls in loess hilly regions, e.g., land use intensification, agricultural protection and environmental conservation.

  10. ARRA FEMP Technical Assistance -- Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 -- Control Tower and Support Building, Palm Springs, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-31

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 100% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be built in Palm Springs, California by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  11. 78 FR 18814 - Amendment to the Export Administration Regulations: List of Items Classified Under Export Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-28

    ... bioluminescence as a process. This entry also includes a Related Controls paragraph that differentiates ECCNs... listed above; and d. Utilizes bioluminescence as a process. Related Controls. (1) See ECCN 1A004.c...

  12. The New DEEL (Democratic Ethical Educational Leadership) and the Work of Reclaiming a Progressive Alternative in Educational Administration from PreK-20

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Steven Jay; Shapiro, Joan Poliner

    2013-01-01

    Facing repressive accountability regimes and high-stakes testing in the US and beyond, university and practitioner educators around the world decided to take action. Inspired by the democratic administration movement of the 1930's and 1940's and current scholarship in ethics, we started a movement called the New DEEL (Democratic Ethical…

  13. Advancing Performance Pay in the Obama Administration: The Influence of Political Strategy and Alternative Priorities. Program on Education Policy and Governance Working Papers Series. PEPG 10-04

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smarick, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Even the most cursory look at the current administration's approach to performance pay reveals a noteworthy story. Unlike all of his Democratic predecessors--and some of his Republican ones--President Obama not only appreciates the value of differentiating the compensation of teachers based on a effectiveness, he has put energy and money behind…

  14. Guide to Vocational-Technical Education Program Alternatives: Secondary and Postsecondary. An Introduction. Competency-Based Vocational Education Administrator Module Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington, Lois G.; And Others

    Intended as a supplement to the Competency-Based Vocational Education Administrator Module Series, this guide overviews the typical vocational programs available and the general kinds of requirements involved that would have implications for program planning and budgeting. Part 1 of three parts defines what is meant by vocational education. The…

  15. Effect of Intranasal Oxytocin Administration on Psychiatric Symptoms: A Meta-Analysis of Placebo-Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Stefan G.; Fang, Angela; Brager, Daniel N.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical trials of intranasal administration of oxytocin for treating psychiatric problems have yielded mixed results. To conduct a quantitative review of placebo-controlled clinical trials of intranasally-administered oxytocin (OT) for psychiatric symptoms, manual and electronic searches using PubMed and PsycINFO were conducted. Of 1,828 entries, 16 placebo-controlled studies totaling 330 participants were included in the analysis. The overall placebo-controlled effect size was moderately strong (Hedges’ g = 0.67) and robust as suggested by the fail-safe N and funnel plot analysis. OT reduced symptoms of depression, anxiety, autism/repetitive behaviors, psychotic symptoms, and general psychopathology. In the combined sample, symptom reduction was moderated by frequency of administration. Publication year and diagnostic category did not moderate the effect of OT on the clinical outcome measures. We conclude that intranasal administration of OT is a potentially useful intervention for reducing psychiatric symptoms. However, more studies are needed to determine the best treatment target and to identify the mechanism of treatment change. PMID:26094200

  16. 78 FR 45026 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR): Control of Military Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-25

    ...This is the second proposed rule to describe how military electronics and certain superconducting and cryogenic equipment and related items the President determines no longer warrant control under the United States Munitions List (USML) would be controlled on the Commerce Control List (CCL). This proposed rule also would amend ECCNs 7A001 and 7A101 to apply the ``missile technology'' reason......

  17. 77 FR 25932 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR): Control of Energetic Materials and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ...The Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) publishes this proposed rule describing how energetic materials and related articles that the President determines no longer warrant control under Category V (Explosives and Energetic Materials, Propellants, Incendiary Agents and Their Constituents) of the United States Munitions List (USML) would be controlled under the Commerce Control List (CCL) in......

  18. 76 FR 76072 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR): Control of Gas Turbine Engines and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ...,'' ``production,'' operation, or maintenance of commodities controlled by ECCN 9A619 (except 9A619.y), 9B619... ``development,'' ``production,'' operation, or maintenance of commodities controlled by ECCN 9A619, 9B619, or...,'' operation or maintenance of commodities controlled by ECCN 9A619.y, 9B619.y, or 9C619.y (see ECCN ]...

  19. [Effects of controlled alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation on apple seedling morphological characteristics and root hydraulic conductivity].

    PubMed

    Yang, Qi-Liang; Zhang, Fu-Cang; Liu, Xiao-Gang; Ge, Zhen-Yang

    2012-05-01

    To investigate the effects of alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation (ADI) on the morphological characteristics and root hydraulic conductivity of apple seedlings, three irrigation modes, i.e., fixed partial root-zone drip irrigation (FDI, fixed watering on one side of the seedling root zone), controlled alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation (ADI, alternate watering on both sides of the seedling root zone), and conventional drip irrigation (CDI, watering cling to the seedling base), and three irrigation quotas, i. e., each irrigation amount of FDI and ADI was 10, 20 and 30 mm, and that of CDI was 20, 30 and 40 mm, respectively, were designed. In treatment ADI, the soil moisture content on the both sides of the root zone appeared a repeated alternation of dry and wet process; while in treatment CDI, the soil moisture content had less difference. At the same irrigation quotas, the soil moisture content at the watering sides had no significant difference under the three drip irrigation modes. At irrigation quota 30 mm, the root-shoot ratio, healthy index of seedlings, and root hydraulic conductivity in treatment ADI increased by 31.6% and 47.1%, 34.2% and 53.6%, and 9.0% and 11.0%, respectively, as compared with those in treatments CDI and FDI. The root dry mass and leaf area had a positive linear correlation with root hydraulic conductivity. It was suggested that controlled alternate partial root-zone drip irrigation had obvious compensatory effects on the root hydraulic conductivity of apple seedlings, improved the soil water use by the roots, benefited the equilibrated dry matter allocation in seedling organs, and markedly enhanced the root-shoot ratio and healthy index of the seedlings.

  20. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heyd, Florian; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-04-12

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4(+) T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify hnRNP U as a suppressor of exon7 inclusion. Whereas selective depletion of MALT1A impairs T-cell signalling and activation, downregulation of hnRNP U enhances MALT1A expression and T-cell activation. Thus, TCR-induced alternative splicing augments MALT1 scaffolding to enhance downstream signalling and to promote optimal T-cell activation.

  1. Alternative splicing of MALT1 controls signalling and activation of CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Meininger, Isabel; Griesbach, Richard A.; Hu, Desheng; Gehring, Torben; Seeholzer, Thomas; Bertossi, Arianna; Kranich, Jan; Oeckinghaus, Andrea; Eitelhuber, Andrea C.; Greczmiel, Ute; Gewies, Andreas; Schmidt-Supprian, Marc; Ruland, Jürgen; Brocker, Thomas; Heissmeyer, Vigo; Heyd, Florian; Krappmann, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    MALT1 channels proximal T-cell receptor (TCR) signalling to downstream signalling pathways. With MALT1A and MALT1B two conserved splice variants exist and we demonstrate here that MALT1 alternative splicing supports optimal T-cell activation. Inclusion of exon7 in MALT1A facilitates the recruitment of TRAF6, which augments MALT1 scaffolding function, but not protease activity. Naive CD4+ T cells express almost exclusively MALT1B and MALT1A expression is induced by TCR stimulation. We identify hnRNP U as a suppressor of exon7 inclusion. Whereas selective depletion of MALT1A impairs T-cell signalling and activation, downregulation of hnRNP U enhances MALT1A expression and T-cell activation. Thus, TCR-induced alternative splicing augments MALT1 scaffolding to enhance downstream signalling and to promote optimal T-cell activation. PMID:27068814

  2. Reversible Ponceau staining as a loading control alternative to actin in Western blots.

    PubMed

    Romero-Calvo, Isabel; Ocón, Borja; Martínez-Moya, Patricia; Suárez, María Dolores; Zarzuelo, Antonio; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; de Medina, Fermín Sánchez

    2010-06-15

    It is becoming standard practice to measure a housekeeping gene, typically actin, in Western blots, as it is the rule in RNA blots. We have applied reversible Ponceau staining to check equal loading of gels and measured actin in parallel under different conditions. Our results show that densitometric analysis is comparable with both techniques. Therefore, routine quantitation of Ponceau staining before antibody probing is validated as an alternative to actin blotting.

  3. Facile fabrication of controllable zinc oxide nanorod clusters on polyacrylonitrile nanofibers via repeatedly alternating immersion method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Ying; Li, Xia; Yu, Hou-Yong; Hu, Guo-Liang; Yao, Ju-Ming

    2016-12-01

    Polyacrylonitrile/zinc oxide (PAN/ZnO) composite nanofiber membranes with different ZnO morphologies were fabricated by repeatedly alternating hot-cold immersion and single alternating hot-cold immersion methods. The influence of the PAN/ZnCl2 ratio and different immersion methods on the morphology, microstructure, and properties of the nanofiber membranes was investigated by using field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) spectroscopy. A possible mechanism for different morphologies of PAN/ZnO nanofiber membranes with different PAN/ZnCl2 ratio through different immersion processes was presented, and well-dispersed ZnO nanorod clusters with smallest average dimeter of 115 nm and hexagonal wurtzite structure were successfully anchored onto the PAN nanofiber surface for R-7/1 nanofiber membrane. Compared to S-5/1 prepared by single alternating hot-cold immersion method, the PAN/ZnO nanofiber membrane fabricated by repeatedly alternating hot-cold immersion method (especially for R-7/1) showed improved thermal stability and high photocatalytic activity for methylene blue (MB). Compared to S-5/1, decomposition temperature at 5% weight loss ( T 5%) was increased by 43 °C from 282 to 325 °C for R-7/1; meanwhile, R-7/1 showed higher photocatalytic degradation ratio of approximately 100% (after UV light irradiation for 8 h) than 65% for S-5/1 even after irradiation for 14 h. Moreover, the degradation efficiency of R-7/1 with good reuse stability remained above 94% after 3 cycles.

  4. Alternatives generation and analysis for double-shell tank primary ventilation systems emissions control and monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    SEDERBURG, J.P.

    1999-09-30

    This AGA addresses the question: ''What equipment upgrades, operational changes, and/or other actions are required relative to the DST tanks farms' ventilation systems to support retrieval, staging (including feed sampling), and delivery of tank waste to the Phase I private contractor?'' Issues and options for the various components within the ventilation subsystem affect each other. Recommended design requirements are presented and the preferred alternatives are detailed.

  5. Script Conversion and Bibliographic Control of Documents in Dissimilar Scripts: Problems and Alternatives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wellisch, Hans H.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the numerous and profound problems with accepting Romanization as the sole means for universal bibliographic control, and suggests that some numerical system like the ISBN numbers might evolve to secure better bibliographic control of dissimilar scripts. (Author/VT)

  6. Identification of Alternative Vapor Intrusion Pathways Using Controlled Pressure Testing, Soil Gas Monitoring, and Screening Model Calculations.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuanming; Holton, Chase; Luo, Hong; Dahlen, Paul; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Johnson, Paul C

    2015-11-17

    Vapor intrusion (VI) pathway assessment and data interpretation have been guided by an historical conceptual model in which vapors originating from contaminated soil or groundwater diffuse upward through soil and are swept into a building by soil gas flow induced by building underpressurization. Recent studies reveal that alternative VI pathways involving neighborhood sewers, land drains, and other major underground piping can also be significant VI contributors, even to buildings beyond the delineated footprint of soil and groundwater contamination. This work illustrates how controlled-pressure-method testing (CPM), soil gas sampling, and screening-level emissions calculations can be used to identify significant alternative VI pathways that might go undetected by conventional sampling under natural conditions at some sites. The combined utility of these tools is shown through data collected at a long-term study house, where a significant alternative VI pathway was discovered and altered so that it could be manipulated to be on or off. Data collected during periods of natural and CPM conditions show that the alternative pathway was significant, but its presence was not identifiable under natural conditions; it was identified under CPM conditions when measured emission rates were 2 orders of magnitude greater than screening-model estimates and subfoundation vertical soil gas profiles changed and were no longer consistent with the conventional VI conceptual model.

  7. Summary Report for National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) and Centro Para Prevencao da Poluicao (C3P) 2011 International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The C3P &. NASA International Workshop on Environment and Alternative Energy was held on November 15-18, 2011 at the European Space Agency (ESA)'s Research and Technology Centre (ESTEC) in Noordwijk, The Netherlands. The theme of the workshop was "Global Collaboration in Environmental and Alternative Energy Strategies". The workshop was held at ESTEC's conference center. More than 110 individuals from eleven countries attended the workshop. For the first time since the inception of NASA-C3P workshops, a full day was dedicated to a student session. Fifteen students from around the globe gave oral presentations along with poster displays relating to the latest technologies in environmental and alternative energy strategies. Judges from NASA, C3P and ESA awarded plaques to the top three students. In addition to the students, thirty eight U.S. and international subject matter experts presented on the following general environmental-related topics: (1) Hazardous materials management and substitution in support of space operations (2) Emerging renewable and alternative energy technologies (3) Sustainable development and redevelopment (4) Remediation technologies and strategies The workshop also included a panel discussion on the topic of the challenges of operating installations across borders. Throughout the workshop, attendees heard about the scope of environmental and energy challenges that industry and governments face. They heard about technologies for increasing energy efficiency and increasing use of renewable energy. They learned about ways companies and government agencies are using materials, processes, goods and services in a manner more respectful with the environment and in compliance with health and safety rules. The concept of partnerships and their inherent benefits was evidenced throughout the workshop. Partnering is a key aspect of sustainability because sustainable development is complicated. Through formal presentations and side discussions, attendees

  8. Intralymphatic allergen administration renders specific immunotherapy faster and safer: A randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Senti, Gabriela; Prinz Vavricka, Bettina M.; Erdmann, Iris; Diaz, Mella I.; Markus, Richard; McCormack, Stephen J.; Simard, John J.; Wüthrich, Brunello; Crameri, Reto; Graf, Nicole; Johansen, Pål; Kündig, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    The only causative treatment for IgE-mediated allergies is allergen-specific immunotherapy. However, fewer than 5% of allergy patients receive immunotherapy because of its long duration and risk of allergic side effects. We aimed at enhancing s.c. immunotherapy by direct administration of allergen into s.c. lymph nodes. The objective was to evaluate safety and efficacy compared with conventional s.c. immunotherapy. In a monocentric open-label trial, 165 patients with grass pollen-induced rhinoconjunctivitis were randomized to receive either 54 s.c. injections with pollen extract over 3 years [cumulative allergen dose 4,031,540 standardized quality units (SQ-U)] or 3 intralymphatic injections over 2 months (cumulative allergen dose 3,000 SQ-U). Patients were evaluated after 4 months, 1 year, and 3 years by nasal provocation, skin prick testing, IgE measurements, and symptom scores. Three low-dose intralymphatic allergen administrations increased tolerance to nasal provocation with pollen already within 4 months (P < 0.001). Tolerance was long lasting and equivalent to that achievable after standard s.c. immunotherapy (P = 0.291 after 3 years). Intralymphatic immunotherapy ameliorated hay fever symptoms (P < 0.001), reduced skin prick test reactivity (P < 0.001), decreased specific serum IgE (P < 0.001), caused fewer adverse events than s.c. immunotherapy (P = 0.001), enhanced compliance (P < 0.001), and was less painful than venous puncture (P = 0.018). In conclusion, intralymphatic allergen administration enhanced safety and efficacy of immunotherapy and reduced treatment time from 3 years to 8 weeks. PMID:19001265

  9. Psychological and Physiological Alternatives in the Control of Human Communicative Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springhorn, Ron G.

    The paper considers whether precise control over the actions, thoughts, emotions, and desires of individuals is desirable. New technological methods for controlling human behavior enable systematic manipulation of people and promise an even greater degree of manipulation in the near future. Arguments for and against behavior control are presented.…

  10. ALTERNATE VOC CONTROL TECHNIQUE OPTIONS FOR SMALL ROTOGRAVURE AND FLEXOGRAPHY FACILITIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report identifies Available Control Techniques (ACTs) for states to use as a referenec when implementing Reasonable Available Control Technilogy (RACT) for graphic arts facilities that are covered by the Control Technologies Guidelines (CTGs), but emit less than 91 tonnes of ...

  11. 33 CFR 203.50 - Nonstructural alternatives to rehabilitation of flood control works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... rehabilitation of flood control works. 203.50 Section 203.50 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... DISASTER PROCEDURES Rehabilitation Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm... of flood control works. (a) Authority. Under Public Law 84-99, the Chief of Engineers is...

  12. 33 CFR 203.50 - Nonstructural alternatives to rehabilitation of flood control works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... rehabilitation of flood control works. 203.50 Section 203.50 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... DISASTER PROCEDURES Rehabilitation Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm... of flood control works. (a) Authority. Under Public Law 84-99, the Chief of Engineers is...

  13. 33 CFR 203.50 - Nonstructural alternatives to rehabilitation of flood control works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... rehabilitation of flood control works. 203.50 Section 203.50 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... DISASTER PROCEDURES Rehabilitation Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm... of flood control works. (a) Authority. Under Public Law 84-99, the Chief of Engineers is...

  14. 33 CFR 203.50 - Nonstructural alternatives to rehabilitation of flood control works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... rehabilitation of flood control works. 203.50 Section 203.50 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... DISASTER PROCEDURES Rehabilitation Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm... of flood control works. (a) Authority. Under Public Law 84-99, the Chief of Engineers is...

  15. 33 CFR 203.50 - Nonstructural alternatives to rehabilitation of flood control works.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... rehabilitation of flood control works. 203.50 Section 203.50 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS... DISASTER PROCEDURES Rehabilitation Assistance for Flood Control Works Damaged by Flood or Coastal Storm... of flood control works. (a) Authority. Under Public Law 84-99, the Chief of Engineers is...

  16. Privacy in confidential administrative micro data: implementing statistical disclosure control in a secure computing environment.

    PubMed

    Hochfellner, Daniela; Müller, Dana; Schmucker, Alexandra

    2014-12-01

    The demand for comprehensive and innovative data is constantly growing in social science. In particular, micro data from various social security agencies become more and more attractive. In contrast to survey data, administrative data offer a census with highly reliable information but are restricted in their usage. To make them accessible for researchers, data or research output either have to be anonymized or released after disclosure review procedures have been used. This article discusses the trade-off between maintaining a high capability of research potential while protecting private information, by exploiting the data disclosure portfolio and the adopted disclosure strategies of the Research Data Center of the German Federal Employment Agency.

  17. 78 FR 42430 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations Based on the 2012 Missile Technology Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... control text and providing examples of test methods. Because the MTCR partners decided to make the size... providing examples of test methods, as described in detail in the discussion of changes to ECCN 1C011 above... within the control text and providing examples of test methods. Because the MTCR partners decided to...

  18. 76 FR 41957 - Proposed Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR): Control of Items the President...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ..., reduce confusion about which items are controlled and how, and improve the ability of the U.S. Government... ``specially designed'' will improve the clarity of the control lists. (d) Goals and limitations of effort to...), Proliferation of Chemical and Biological Weapons Column 1 (CB1), and Firearms Convention (FC) reasons) unless...

  19. Alternate-day dosing of linagliptin in type 2 diabetes patients controlled on once daily dose: A case series

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Manash P.; Bhuyan, Sonali B.; Deka, Jumi; Bora, Jatin; Bora, Smritisikha; Barkakati, Murchana

    2016-01-01

    Linagliptin, a dipeptidyl peptidase 4 (DPP 4) inhibitor with a long terminal half life, significantly inhibits the DPP 4 enzyme at a steady state up to 48 h after the last dose. The present case series examined the hypothesis that linagliptin retains its efficacy during alternate day dosing in type 2 diabetes patients when switched over from once daily (OD) dosing. Eight type 2 diabetes patients maintaining stable glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) with acceptable fasting plasma glucose and postprandial glucose levels and receiving linagliptin 5 mg OD for at least 6 weeks, with a stable dose of concomitant antidiabetic medications were given linagliptin 5 mg every alternate day. The median HbA1c while on the OD regimen was 6.1% (43 mmol/mol) (range: 5.8–6.9% [40–52 mmol/mol]) and median duration of diabetes was 7 years (range: 0.75–16 years). After a median follow-up period of 21weeks,the glycemic control was maintained in all patients similar to their baseline values (median HbA1c: 6.0% [42 mmol/mol], range: 5.1–7.1% [32–54 mmol/mol]). The body weight, fasting, and random glucose levels at baseline were also well maintained at the end of treatment. Optimal glycemic status maintained in our study population favors our hypothesis that linagliptin used alternate daily after switching from initial OD dose of the drug in patients on a stable background antidiabetic medications retains its efficacy. Paradoxically, alternate day dosing may affect compliance if the patient forgets when they took the last dose. Further studies including larger cohorts are needed to validate this finding and identify patients who can benefit from the alternate day regimen. PMID:27366728

  20. Computational alternatives to obtain time optimal jet engine control. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basso, R. J.; Leake, R. J.

    1976-01-01

    Two computational methods to determine an open loop time optimal control sequence for a simple single spool turbojet engine are described by a set of nonlinear differential equations. Both methods are modifications of widely accepted algorithms which can solve fixed time unconstrained optimal control problems with a free right end. Constrained problems to be considered have fixed right ends and free time. Dynamic programming is defined on a standard problem and it yields a successive approximation solution to the time optimal problem of interest. A feedback control law is obtained and it is then used to determine the corresponding open loop control sequence. The Fletcher-Reeves conjugate gradient method has been selected for adaptation to solve a nonlinear optimal control problem with state variable and control constraints.

  1. An alternative to animal testing in the quality control of erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, H; Gerhard, D; Hothorn, L A; Dingermann, T

    2011-06-01

    A physico-chemical method has been developed as an alternative to the current bioassay in normocythaemic mice for estimating the biological activity of erythropoietin batches. Capillary zone electrophoresis was used for quantification of the isoforms and their substructures were further elucidated by N-glycan mapping techniques. The analytical study was carried out on a total of 40 batches of epoetin beta which were selected to cover an adequate range of precisely established potency values. The relationship between the biological and chemical parameters was evaluated statistically in order to identify suitable covariates for the prediction of the biological activity. Out of several alternatives, a prediction model which is based on the percentages of isoforms per batch and the degree of sialidation was selected and tested. This model is comparable in terms of accuracy to the established in vivo bioassay, but is far superior in terms of precision. Further advantages of the method are improved animal welfare and savings in time and effort. The question whether the prediction model already meets the requirements for replacing the bioassay according to the ICH guideline Q6B is discussed.

  2. Alternate method for achieving temperature control in the -160 to +90 Celcius range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Kenneth R. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A single-pass method for accurate and precise temperature control in the -160 to +90 C range is discussed. The method exhibited minimal set-point overshoot during temperature transitions. Control to +/-2 C with transitions between set-points of 7 C per minute were achieved. The method uses commercially available temperature controllers and a gaseous nitrogen/liquid nitrogen mixer to dampen the amplitude of cold temperature spikes caused by liquid nitrogen pulsing.

  3. Nonproliferation and arms control assessment of weapons-usable fissile material storage and excess plutonium disposition alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    This report has been prepared by the Department of Energy`s Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation (DOE-NN) with support from the Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (DOE-MD). Its purpose is to analyze the nonproliferation and arms reduction implications of the alternatives for storage of plutonium and HEU, and disposition of excess plutonium, to aid policymakers and the public in making final decisions. While this assessment describes the benefits and risks associated with each option, it does not attempt to rank order the options or choose which ones are best. It does, however, identify steps which could maximize the benefits and mitigate any vulnerabilities of the various alternatives under consideration.

  4. Conserved functional antagonism of CELF and MBNL proteins controls stem cell-specific alternative splicing in planarians.

    PubMed

    Solana, Jordi; Irimia, Manuel; Ayoub, Salah; Orejuela, Marta Rodriguez; Zywitza, Vera; Jens, Marvin; Tapial, Javier; Ray, Debashish; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2016-08-09

    In contrast to transcriptional regulation, the function of alternative splicing (AS) in stem cells is poorly understood. In mammals, MBNL proteins negatively regulate an exon program specific of embryonic stem cells; however, little is known about the in vivo significance of this regulation. We studied AS in a powerful in vivo model for stem cell biology, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We discover a conserved AS program comprising hundreds of alternative exons, microexons and introns that is differentially regulated in planarian stem cells, and comprehensively identify its regulators. We show that functional antagonism between CELF and MBNL factors directly controls stem cell-specific AS in planarians, placing the origin of this regulatory mechanism at the base of Bilaterians. Knockdown of CELF or MBNL factors lead to abnormal regenerative capacities by affecting self-renewal and differentiation sets of genes, respectively. These results highlight the importance of AS interactions in stem cell regulation across metazoans.

  5. Does concomitant administration of sevelamer and calcium carbonate modify the control of phosphatemia?

    PubMed

    Ouellet, Georges; Cardinal, Héloïse; Mailhot, Marjolaine; Ste-Marie, Louis-Georges; Roy, Louise

    2010-04-01

    There is no guideline regarding the concomitant or distant administration of sevelamer and calcium carbonate. Our aim was to determine whether serum phosphate varied when sevelamer and calcium carbonate were administered concomitantly in comparison to administration at separate meals. Fourteen chronic hemodialysis patients were enrolled in this cross-over, randomized trial. Each subject underwent two four-week study periods. During the "concomitant" period, subjects were instructed to take both sevelamer and calcium carbonate together at each meal, whereas in the "separate" period, they were required to take them at separate meals. The order of the "concomitant" and "separate" periods was randomized. Phosphate-binding agents were stopped for a one-week washout period before each study period. The total dose of sevelamer and calcium carbonate for each subject remained the same for the whole duration of the study and had been determined according to their usual dose of phosphate binders. Patients were instructed to keep their usual eating habits constant and a nutritionist evaluated the daily phosphate intake three times per week. Dialysis parameters were kept constant. Pre-dialysis serum phosphate, calcium, bicarbonate, and albumin were measured at the end of each week. The average daily dietary phosphate intake remained unchanged throughout the study. At the end of the two study periods there was no significant difference in serum phosphate (1.50 +/- 0.46 mmol/L in the "concomitant" period vs. 1.51 +/- 0.31 mmol/L in the "separate" period, P = 0.97), calcium (2.26 +/- 0.19 mmol/L in the "concomitant" period vs. 2.27 +/- 0.15 mmol/L in the "separate" period, P = 0.64), calcium x phosphate product (3.36 +/- 0.94 mmol(2)/L(2) in the "concomitant" period vs. 3.41 +/- 0.71 mmol(2)/L(2) in the "separate" period, P = 0.84) and bicarbonate levels (21.5 +/- 3.3 mmol/L for the "concomitant" period vs. 21.6 +/- 3.1 mmol/L for the "separate" period, P = 0.81). Our results show

  6. The Effect of Peer Modeling on Self-Control in Children: An Alternative to Punishment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toner, Ignatius J.

    Peer modeling as a non-punitive disciplinary technique was examined in two studies assessing its effectiveness in increasing self-control of young children in the absence of an authority figure. The first study investigated the effect of observing the rule-following behavior of a peer model on the observing child's subsequent self-control.…

  7. An Empirical Examination of the Construct Validity of Two Alternative Self-Control Measures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcus, Bernd

    2003-01-01

    Contrasted a new measure of self-control, the Retrospective Behavioral Self-Control scale (RBS), with the most widespread measure of this construct (H. Grasmick and others, 1993). Results show that the RBS measured the general factor of behavior across samples of 214 and 213 undergraduates and 76 employees, but the other scale, used with only one…

  8. Engineering Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    This book is intended to acquaint naval engineering officers with their duties in the engineering department. Standard shipboard organizations are analyzed in connection with personnel assignments, division operations, and watch systems. Detailed descriptions are included for the administration of directives, ship's bills, damage control, training…

  9. Evaluation of alternative rapid thin layer chromatography systems for quality control of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Mang'era, Kennedy; Wong, Derek; Douglas, David; Franz, Kellie; Biru, Taddese

    2014-04-01

    Whatman 3MM™ and Tec-Control™ systems were evaluated as ITLC-SG alternatives for 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals. They compare well in accuracy and reproducibility, and are faster and more convenient than ITLC-SG. Tec-Control™ radiochemical purity values for 99mTc-sestamibi were more conservative than ITLC-SG. Full solvent migration was not reproduced for 99mTc-tetrofosmin in Tec-Control™, and for this Whatman 3MM™ is preferred. Developing times were 10-15 min, 7-9 min and ~1min for ITLC-SG, Whatman 3MM™ and Tec-Control™, respectively. Overall, Tec-Control™ strips are preferred due to speed and ease of use.

  10. Air pollution control residues from waste incineration: Current UK situation and assessment of alternative technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Amutha Rani, D.; Boccaccini, A.R.; Deegan, D.; Cheeseman, C.R.

    2008-11-15

    Current disposal options for APC residues in the UK and alternative treatment technologies developed world-wide have been reviewed. APC residues are currently landfilled in the UK where they undergo in situ solidification, although the future acceptability of this option is uncertain because the EU waste acceptance criteria (WAC) introduce strict limits on leaching that are difficult to achieve. Other APC residue treatment processes have been developed which are reported to reduce leaching to below relevant regulatory limits. The Ferrox process, the VKI process, the WES-PHix process, stabilisation/solidification using cementitious binders and a range of thermal treatment processes are reviewed. Thermal treatment technologies convert APC residues combined with other wastes into inert glass or glass-ceramics that encapsulate heavy metals. The waste management industry will inevitably use the cheapest available option for treating APC residues and strict interpretation and enforcement of waste legislation is required if new, potentially more sustainable technologies are to become commercially viable.

  11. Standards of education, regulation, and market control: perspectives on complementary and alternative medicine in Ontario, Canada.

    PubMed

    Shahjahan, Riyad

    2004-04-01

    This paper provides a contemporary analysis of the issues and questions surrounding the regulation and standardization of education with respect to two complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) professions, namely Chinese traditional medicine and homeopath in Ontario, Canada. Rather than taking a standard of education for granted, the assumption that standardizing professional education is a positive move is critiqued because it is claimed to ensure public safety and uniformity within the profession. It is argued that such an assumption fails to deconstruct the power relations involved with setting a standard of education and continues to ignore the fact that setting a standard of education in CAM is part and parcel of biomedical dominance, competition, turf wars and survival. At the end of this paper, some critical questions regarding setting standards of education by the health professions in general are raised.

  12. [Transcranial alternating current stimulation. Entrainment and function control of neuronal networks].

    PubMed

    Vosskuhl, J; Strüber, D; Herrmann, C S

    2015-12-01

    Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) is a new technique for the modulation of oscillatory brain activity as measured in the electroencephalogram (EEG). In contrast to well-established stimulation techniques, such as transcranial direct current stimulation and transcranial magnetic stimulation, tACS applies a sinusoidal alternating current at a specific frequency. This enables the modulation of the amplitude and frequency of endogenous brain oscillations as well as related cognitive processes. Therefore, the use of tACS has the possibility to evaluate well-known correlations between brain oscillations and cognitive processes in terms of causality. Such causal relationships have been documented in numerous neurocognitive studies on sensory, motor and perceptual processes; however, the clinical application of tACS is still in its infancy. In principle, any pathology that can reliably be connected with brain oscillations of a defined frequency is treatable. A current main focus of clinical research is on symptoms of Parkinson's disease and to a lesser degree, tinnitus. For an effective application of tACS it is important to choose the electrode positions as well as the frequency, intensity and duration of the stimulation in a theory-based and symptom-related manner. A successful therapeutic intervention requires the persistence of the tACS effect after stimulation has ceased. A mechanism that offers not only an explanation to the origin of persistent tACS effects but is also of high therapeutic benefit is neural plasticity. Therefore, one current focus of research aims at a better understanding of tACS after effects.

  13. Elicitors as alternative strategy to pesticides in grapevine? Current knowledge on their mode of action from controlled conditions to vineyard.

    PubMed

    Delaunois, Bertrand; Farace, Giovanni; Jeandet, Philippe; Clément, Christophe; Baillieul, Fabienne; Dorey, Stéphan; Cordelier, Sylvain

    2014-04-01

    Development and optimisation of alternative strategies to reduce the use of classic chemical inputs for protection against diseases in vineyard is becoming a necessity. Among these strategies, one of the most promising consists in the stimulation and/or potentiation of the grapevine defence responses by the means of elicitors. Elicitors are highly diverse molecules both in nature and origins. This review aims at providing an overview of the current knowledge on these molecules and will highlight their potential efficacy from the laboratory in controlled conditions to vineyards. Recent findings and concepts (especially on plant innate immunity) and the new terminology (microbe-associated molecular patterns, effectors, etc.) are also discussed in this context. Other objectives of this review are to highlight the difficulty of transferring elicitors use and results from the controlled conditions to the vineyard, to determine their practical and effective use in viticulture and to propose ideas for improving their efficacy in non-controlled conditions.

  14. Insight into Alternative Approaches for Control of Avian Influenza in Poultry, with Emphasis on Highly Pathogenic H5N1

    PubMed Central

    Abdelwhab, E. M.; Hafez, Hafez M.

    2012-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) of subtype H5N1 causes a devastating disease in poultry but when it accidentally infects humans it can cause death. Therefore, decrease the incidence of H5N1 in humans needs to focus on prevention and control of poultry infections. Conventional control strategies in poultry based on surveillance, stamping out, movement restriction and enforcement of biosecurity measures did not prevent the virus spreading, particularly in developing countries. Several challenges limit efficiency of the vaccines to prevent outbreaks of HPAIV H5N1 in endemic countries. Alternative and complementary approaches to reduce the current burden of H5N1 epidemics in poultry should be encouraged. The use of antiviral chemotherapy and natural compounds, avian-cytokines, RNA interference, genetic breeding and/or development of transgenic poultry warrant further evaluation as integrated intervention strategies for control of HPAIV H5N1 in poultry. PMID:23202521

  15. MIMO Sliding Mode Control for a Tailless Fighter Aircraft, An Alternative to Reconfigurable Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wells, S. R.; Hess, R. A.

    2002-01-01

    A frequency-domain procedure for the design of sliding mode controllers for multi-input, multi-output (MIMO) systems is presented. The methodology accommodates the effects of parasitic dynamics such as those introduced by unmodeled actuators through the introduction of multiple asymptotic observers and model reference hedging. The design procedure includes a frequency domain approach to specify the sliding manifold, the observer eigenvalues, and the hedge model. The procedure is applied to the development of a flight control system for a linear model of the Innovative Control Effector (ICE) fighter aircraft. The stability and performance robustness of the resulting design is demonstrated through the introduction of significant degradation in the control effector actuators and variation in vehicle dynamics.

  16. Veganism Is a Viable Alternative to Conventional Diet Therapy for Improving Blood Lipids and Glycemic Control.

    PubMed

    Trepanowski, John F; Varady, Krista A

    2015-01-01

    The American Diabetes Association (ADA) and the National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) have each outlined a set of dietary recommendations aimed at improving glycemic control and blood lipids, respectively. However, traditional vegan diets (low-fat diets that proscribe animal product consumption) are also effective at improving glycemic control, and dietary portfolios (vegan diets that contain prescribed amounts of plant sterols, viscous fibers, soy protein, and nuts) are also effective at improving blood lipids. The purpose of this review was to compare the effects of traditional vegan diets and dietary portfolios with ADA and NCEP diets on body weight, blood lipids, blood pressure, and glycemic control. The main findings are that traditional vegan diets appear to improve glycemic control better than ADA diets in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), while dietary portfolios have been consistently shown to improve blood lipids better than NCEP diets in hypercholesterolemic individuals.

  17. Evaluation of secondary coolant control design alternatives and their effects on heat removal performance

    SciTech Connect

    Khayat, M.I.; Anderson, J.; Battle, R.; March-Leuba, J.

    1994-03-01

    This report documents a series of calculations that evaluate the performance of the core-inlet temperature controller under different transient conditions and design options. The present analyses show that the core-inlet temperature can be controlled at {approx}45{degrees}C under all transient conditions analyzed using the controller design described in the conceptual design report, which includes variable-speed secondary coolant pumps and variable-speed cooling tower fans. This study also shows that a constant-speed secondary pump would be sufficient to maintain core-inlet temperature <45{degrees}C if this temperature is allowed to drop below the set point during some demanding transients, such as normal startup. The use of secondary loop hot coolant to warm the reactor building was also evaluated; however, optimization of the secondary hot-leg temperature can only be achieved by trading off control of the primary side core-inlet temperature.

  18. Renal excretion profiles of psilocin following oral administration of psilocybin: a controlled study in man.

    PubMed

    Hasler, Felix; Bourquin, Daniel; Brenneisen, Rudolf; Vollenweider, Franz X

    2002-09-05

    In a clinical study eight volunteers received psilocybin (PY) in psychoactive oral doses of 212+/-25 microg/kg body weight. To investigate the elimination kinetics of psilocin (PI), the first metabolite of PY, urine was collected for 24 h and PI concentrations were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with column switching and electrochemical detection (HPLC-ECD). Sample workup included protection of the unstable PI with ascorbic acid, freeze-drying, and extraction with methanol. Peak PI concentrations up to 870 microg/l were measured in urine samples from the 2-4 h collection interval. The PI excretion rate in this period was 55.5+/-33.8 microg/h. The limit of quantitation (10 microg/L) was usually reached 24 h after drug administration. Within 24 h, 3.4+/-0.9% of the applied dose of PY was excreted as free PI. Addition of beta-glucuronidase to urine samples and incubation for 5 h at 40 degrees C led to twofold higher PI concentrations, although 18+/-7% of the amount of unconjugated PI was decomposed during incubation. We conclude that in humans PI is partially excreted as PI-O-glucuronide and that enzymatic hydrolysis extends the time of detectability for PI in urine samples.

  19. A Contingency in the Rosetta Reaction Control System: Alternative Cruise Trajectory Strategies to Cope with Degraded Delta-V Resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauske, Rainer; Companys, Vincente

    2007-01-01

    Since August 2006 a pressure transducer of the Rosetta Reaction Control System (RCS) shows anomalous telemetries indicating a possible leak in a pressurant line. The future operation mode of the RCS may be affected by this problem, resulting in performance degradation. The current propellant budget and its future evolution are evaluated to show the possible states w.r.t. the required mission delta-V. Alternative cruise trajectory strategies are analyzed, providing delta-V savings, to compensate for the expected performance loss of the RCS.

  20. Institutional Level Identity Control Strategies in the Distance Education Environment: A Survey of Administrative Staff

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amigud, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Physical separation of students and instructors creates the gap of anonymity and limited control over the remote learning environment. The ability of academic institutions to authenticate students and validate authorship of academic work at various points during a course is necessary for preserving not only perceived credibility but also public…

  1. 75 FR 20520 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations Based on the 2009 Missile Technology Control...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... fuels on the CCL because grouping the boron alloys with other propellants and constituent chemicals for... Controlled section, to read as follows: 1C111 Propellants and Constituent Chemicals for Propellants, Other... with delivery systems for chemical and biological weapons. MTCR members voluntarily pledge to adopt...

  2. Women in Educational Administration: Moving from a Paradigm of Power and Control to Empowerment and Equality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Francie

    Factors in the development of empowerment through ethical leadership are discussed in this paper, which draws on feminist and humanist theories. A review of literature describes the conditions in patriarchal societies that lead to and lessen the exaltation of power and control; conditions of temporary and permanent inequality; ways in which…

  3. 40 CFR 112.4 - Amendment of Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan by Regional Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Applicability, Definitions, and General Requirements for All Facilities and All Types of Oils § 112.4 Amendment of Spill... appropriate agency or agencies in charge of oil pollution control activities in the State in which...

  4. 40 CFR 112.4 - Amendment of Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan by Regional Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Applicability, Definitions, and General Requirements for All Facilities and All Types of Oils § 112.4 Amendment of Spill... appropriate agency or agencies in charge of oil pollution control activities in the State in which...

  5. 40 CFR 112.4 - Amendment of Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan by Regional Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Applicability, Definitions, and General Requirements for All Facilities and All Types of Oils § 112.4 Amendment of Spill... appropriate agency or agencies in charge of oil pollution control activities in the State in which...

  6. 40 CFR 112.4 - Amendment of Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan by Regional Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Applicability, Definitions, and General Requirements for All Facilities and All Types of Oils § 112.4 Amendment of Spill... appropriate agency or agencies in charge of oil pollution control activities in the State in which...

  7. 40 CFR 112.4 - Amendment of Spill Prevention, Control, and Countermeasure Plan by Regional Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER PROGRAMS OIL POLLUTION PREVENTION Applicability, Definitions, and General Requirements for All Facilities and All Types of Oils § 112.4 Amendment of Spill... appropriate agency or agencies in charge of oil pollution control activities in the State in which...

  8. Transformations in the Field of Symbolic Control and Their Implications for the Greek Educational Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsatsaroni, Anna; Sifakakis, Polychronis; Sarakinioti, Antigone

    2015-01-01

    This paper theorises the field of symbolic control and reflects on the critical literature of policy studies, exploring the possibilities that the former might offer to the analysis of global policy discourses and their up-take in specific national and local contexts. Starting from the rapidly expanding literature on the "globalising"…

  9. Effects of oral tetrachlorvinphos fly control (Equitrol) administration in horses: physiological and behavioural findings.

    PubMed

    Berger, J; Valdez, S; Puschner, B; Leutenegger, C M; Gardner, I A; Madigan, J E

    2008-01-01

    Highly reactive horses may pose risks to humans involved in equestrian activities. Among the factors that may affect horses' reactivity to external stimuli are pesticides used for fly control in equine facilities. The organophosphorus (OP) insecticide tetrachlorvinphos (TCVP) is used as a feed-through larvicide to prevent completion of the fly larval life cycle in horse manure. TCVP exerts its effect by inhibiting the enzyme cholinesterase (ChE) leading to the accumulation of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (AChE) in synapses of the central and peripheral nervous systems. The aim of the present study was to investigate alterations of whole-blood ChE levels associated with feeding a commercially available product (Equitrol, Farnam Companies, Inc.) to horses for fly control. A second aim was to report neurological, physiological and behavioural findings in addition to profiles of selected immune markers (IFN-gamma, IL-12p40 and COX-2) and serum thyroid hormones during and after a 30-day treatment period of TCVP feeding. The results indicated significant decreases in whole-blood ChE activity and concomitant behavioural alterations, manifested as increased reactivity and decreased controllability in treated horses. No changes were detected in physiological or neurological parameters, immune markers or thyroid hormones in treated (n=6) or control (n=4) horses during the course of the study.

  10. Morphine and Codeine in Oral Fluid after Controlled Poppy Seed Administration

    PubMed Central

    Concheiro, Marta; Newmeyer, Matthew N.; da Costa, Jose Luiz; Flegel, Ron; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2014-01-01

    Opiates are an important drug class in drug testing programs. Ingestion of poppy seeds containing morphine and codeine can yield positive opiate tests and mislead result interpretation in forensic and clinical settings. Multiple publications evaluated urine opiate concentrations following poppy seed ingestion, but only 2 addressed oral fluid (OF) results; neither provided the ingested morphine and codeine dosage. We administered two 45g raw poppy seed doses, each containing 15.7mg morphine and 3.1mg codeine, 8h apart to 17 healthy adults. All OF specimens were screened by on-site OF immunoassay Draeger DrugTest 5000, and confirmed with OF collected with Oral-Eze® device and quantified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (1μg/L morphine and codeine limits of quantification). Specimens (n=459) were collected before and up to 32h after the first dose. All specimens screened positive 0.5h after dosing and remained positive for 0.5-13h at Draeger 20μg/L morphine cutoff. Maximum OF morphine and codeine concentrations (Cmax) were 177 and 32.6μg/L, with times to Cmax (Tmax) of 0.5-1h and 0.5-2.5h post-dose, respectively. Windows of detection after the second dose extended at least 24h for morphine and to 18h for codeine. After both doses, the last morphine positive OF result was 1h with 40μg/L 2004 proposed US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration cutoff, and 0.5h with 95μg/L cutoff, recently recommended by the Driving Under the Influence of Drugs and Medicines project. Positive OF morphine results are possible 0.5-1h after ingestion of 15.7mg of morphine in raw poppy seeds, depending upon the cutoff employed. PMID:25345619

  11. Functional and structural insight into properdin control of complement alternative pathway amplification.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Dennis V; Roumenina, Lubka; Jensen, Rasmus K; Gadeberg, Trine Af; Marinozzi, Chiara; Picard, Capucine; Rybkine, Tania; Thiel, Steffen; Sørensen, Uffe Bs; Stover, Cordula; Fremeaux-Bacchi, Veronique; Andersen, Gregers R

    2017-03-06

    Properdin (FP) is an essential positive regulator of the complement alternative pathway (AP) providing stabilization of the C3 and C5 convertases, but its oligomeric nature challenges structural analysis. We describe here a novel FP deficiency (E244K) caused by a single point mutation which results in a very low level of AP activity. Recombinant FP E244K is monomeric, fails to support bacteriolysis, and binds weakly to C3 products. We compare this to a monomeric unit excised from oligomeric FP, which is also dysfunctional in bacteriolysis but binds the AP proconvertase, C3 convertase, C3 products and partially stabilizes the convertase. The crystal structure of such a FP-convertase complex suggests that the major contact between FP and the AP convertase is mediated by a single FP thrombospondin repeat and a small region in C3b. Small angle X-ray scattering indicates that FP E244K is trapped in a compact conformation preventing its oligomerization. Our studies demonstrate an essential role of FP oligomerization in vivo while our monomers enable detailed structural insight paving the way for novel modulators of complement.

  12. Oleoylethanolamide: a novel potential pharmacological alternative to cannabinoid antagonists for the control of appetite.

    PubMed

    Romano, Adele; Coccurello, Roberto; Giacovazzo, Giacomo; Bedse, Gaurav; Moles, Anna; Gaetani, Silvana

    2014-01-01

    The initial pharmaceutical interest for the endocannabinoid system as a target for antiobesity therapies has been restricted by the severe adverse effects of the CB1 antagonist rimonabant. This study points at oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a monounsaturated analogue, and functional antagonist of anandamide, as a potential and safer antiobesity alternative to CB1 antagonism. Mice treated with equal doses (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.) of OEA or rimonabant were analyzed for the progressive expression of spontaneous behaviors (eating, grooming, rearing, locomotion, and resting) occurring during the development of satiety, according to the paradigm called behavioral satiety sequence (BSS). Both drugs reduced food (wet mash) intake to a similar extent. OEA treatment decreased eating activity within the first 30 min and caused a temporary increase of resting time that was not accompanied by any decline of horizontal, vertical and total motor activity. Besides decreasing eating activity, rimonabant caused a marked increase of the time spent grooming and decreased horizontal motor activity, alterations that might be indicative of aversive nonmotivational effects on feeding. These results support the idea that OEA suppresses appetite by stimulating satiety and that its profile of action might be predictive of safer effects in humans as a novel antiobesity treatment.

  13. Russia and Arms Control: Are There Opportunities for the Obama Administration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information Operations and Reports, 1215 Jefferson Davis Highway, Suite...bilateral consequences thereof. But those are by no means the only reasons for concern regarding the arms control agenda. Since the outbreak of the Russo...still the case that the bilateral strategic relationship is a factor of enormous consequence in international affairs beyond their own bilateral

  14. STATUS REPORT ON THE EVALUATION OF THE ALTERNATIVE ASBESTOS CONTROL METHOD – A COMPARISON TO THE NESHAP METHOD OF DEMOLITION OF ASBESTOS CONTAINING BUILDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Status Report on the Evaluation of the Alternative Asbestos Control Method – A Comparison to the NESHAP Method of Demolition of Asbestos Containing Buildings. This abstract and presentation are based, at least in part, on preliminary data and conclusions. The Alternative Asbestos...

  15. Methods, systems and apparatus for controlling operation of two alternating current (AC) machines

    DOEpatents

    Gallegos-Lopez, Gabriel [Torrance, CA; Nagashima, James M [Cerritos, CA; Perisic, Milun [Torrance, CA; Hiti, Silva [Redondo Beach, CA

    2012-02-14

    A system is provided for controlling two AC machines. The system comprises a DC input voltage source that provides a DC input voltage, a voltage boost command control module (VBCCM), a five-phase PWM inverter module coupled to the two AC machines, and a boost converter coupled to the inverter module and the DC input voltage source. The boost converter is designed to supply a new DC input voltage to the inverter module having a value that is greater than or equal to a value of the DC input voltage. The VBCCM generates a boost command signal (BCS) based on modulation indexes from the two AC machines. The BCS controls the boost converter such that the boost converter generates the new DC input voltage in response to the BCS. When the two AC machines require additional voltage that exceeds the DC input voltage required to meet a combined target mechanical power required by the two AC machines, the BCS controls the boost converter to drive the new DC input voltage generated by the boost converter to a value greater than the DC input voltage.

  16. Skill Versus Chance Activity Preferences as Alternative Measures of Locus of Control: An Attempted Cross Validation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berzins, Juris I.; And Others

    1970-01-01

    The skill chance and Rotter's Locus of Control scales were administered to 97 male Ss. The two variables were unrelated, although the skill chance inventory showed an acceptable degree of internal consistency. The utility of the skill chance inventory with noncollegiate samples was questioned. (Author)

  17. Anaerobic Soil Disinfestation (ASD) and Steam As Alternatives For Parasitic Nematode Control In Florida Floriculture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anaerobic soil disinfestation (ASD) and steam are being investigated for controlling a broad spectrum of pests, including parasitic nematodes and weeds. ASD is a biologically-based method that combines organic amendments and solar heat with water saturated soil to create oxygen-depleted soil co...

  18. Extending MARC for Bibliographic Control in the Web Environment: Challenges and Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallum, Sally

    This paper looks at three avenues of exploration related to bibliographic records that the World Wide Web environment invites--sorting out the level of control for Web material, reevaluating aspects of descriptive content requirements for these materials, and experimenting with new format structures. Part I discusses extending MARC for Web…

  19. Administration of Triclabendazole Is Safe and Effective in Controlling Fascioliasis in an Endemic Community of the Bolivian Altiplano

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Fidel; Angles, René; Barrientos, René; Barrios, Gary; Valero, María Adela; Hamed, Kamal; Grueninger, Heiner; Ault, Steven K.; Montresor, Antonio; Engels, Dirk; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Gabrielli, Albis Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background The Bolivian northern Altiplano is characterized by a high prevalence of Fasciola hepatica infection. In order to assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of large-scale administration of triclabendazole as an appropriate public health measure to control morbidity associated with fascioliasis, a pilot intervention was implemented in 2008. Materials and Methods Schoolchildren from an endemic community were screened for fascioliasis and treated with a single administration of triclabendazole (10 mg/kg). Interviews to assess the occurrence of adverse events were conducted on treatment day, one week later, and one month after treatment. Further parasitological screenings were performed three months after treatment and again two months later (following a further treatment) in order to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention. Results Ninety infected children were administered triclabendazole. Adverse events were infrequent and mild. No serious adverse events were reported. Observed cure rates were 77.8% after one treatment and 97.8% after two treatments, while egg reduction rates ranged between 74% and 90.3% after one treatment, and between 84.2% and 99.9% after two treatments. The proportion of high-intensity infections (≥400 epg) decreased from 7.8% to 1.1% after one treatment and to 0% after two treatments. Conclusion Administration of triclabendazole is a feasible, safe and efficacious public health intervention in an endemic community in the Bolivian Altiplano, suggesting that preventive chemotherapy can be applied to control of fascioliasis. Further investigations are needed to define the most appropriate frequency of treatment. PMID:22880138

  20. Oral fluid/plasma cannabinoid ratios following controlled oral THC and smoked cannabis administration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dayong; Vandrey, Ryan; Milman, Garry; Bergamaschi, Mateus; Mendu, Damodara R; Murray, Jeannie A; Barnes, Allan J; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2013-09-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is a valuable biological alternative for clinical and forensic drug testing. Evaluating OF to plasma (OF/P) cannabinoid ratios provides important pharmacokinetic data on the disposition of drug and factors influencing partition between matrices. Eleven chronic cannabis smokers resided on a closed research unit for 51 days. There were four 5-day sessions of 0, 30, 60, and 120 mg oral ∆(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/day followed by a five-puff smoked cannabis challenge on Day 5. Each session was separated by 9 days ad libitum cannabis smoking. OF and plasma specimens were analyzed for THC and metabolites. During ad libitum smoking, OF/P THC ratios were high (median, 6.1; range, 0.2-348.5) within 1 h after last smoking, decreasing to 0.1-20.7 (median, 2.1) by 13.0-17.1 h. OF/P THC ratios also decreased during 5-days oral THC dosing, and after the smoked cannabis challenge, median OF/P THC ratios decreased from 1.4 to 5.5 (0.04-245.6) at 0.25 h to 0.12 to 0.17 (0.04-5.1) at 10.5 h post-smoking. In other studies, longer exposure to more potent cannabis smoke and oromucosal cannabis spray was associated with increased OF/P THC peak ratios. Median OF/P 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) ratios were 0.3-2.5 (range, 0.1-14.7) ng/μg, much more consistent in various dosing conditions over time. OF/P THC, but not THCCOOH, ratios were significantly influenced by oral cavity contamination after smoking or oromucosal spray of cannabinoid products, followed by time-dependent decreases. Establishing relationships between OF and plasma cannabinoid concentrations is essential for making inferences of impairment or other clinical outcomes from OF concentrations.

  1. Administrators: Nursing Home Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Anne

    1976-01-01

    Responsibilities, skills needed, training needed, earnings, employment outlook, and sources of additional information are outlined for the administrator who holds the top management job in a nursing home. (JT)

  2. Morphine and codeine in oral fluid after controlled poppy seed administration.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; Newmeyer, Matthew N; da Costa, Jose Luiz; Flegel, Ron; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2015-07-01

    Opiates are an important drug class in drug testing programmes. Ingestion of poppy seeds containing morphine and codeine can yield positive opiate tests and mislead result interpretation in forensic and clinical settings. Multiple publications evaluated urine opiate concentrations following poppy seed ingestion, but only two addressed oral fluid (OF) results; neither provided the ingested morphine and codeine dosage. We administered two 45 g raw poppy seed doses, each containing 15.7 mg morphine and 3.1 mg codeine, 8 h apart to 17 healthy adults. All OF specimens were screened by on-site OF immunoassay Draeger DrugTest 5000, and confirmed with OF collected with Oral-Eze® device and quantified by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (1 µg/L morphine and codeine limits of quantification). Specimens (n = 459) were collected before and up to 32 h after the first dose. All specimens screened positive 0.5 h after dosing and remained positive for 0.5-13 h at Draeger 20 µg/L morphine cut-off. Maximum OF morphine and codeine concentrations (Cmax ) were 177 and 32.6 µg/L, with times to Cmax (Tmax ) of 0.5-1 h and 0.5-2.5 h post-dose, respectively. Windows of detection after the second dose extended at least 24 h for morphine and to 18 h for codeine. After both doses, the last morphine positive OF result was 1 h with 40 µg/L 2004 proposed US Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration cut-off, and 0.5 h with 95 µg/L cut-off, recently recommended by the Driving under the Influence of Drugs and Medicines project. Positive OF morphine results are possible 0.5-1 h after ingestion of 15.7 mg of morphine in raw poppy seeds, depending on the cut-off employed.

  3. Estimating the incidence of food-borne Salmonella and the effectiveness of alternative control measures using the Delphi method.

    PubMed

    Henson, S

    1997-04-15

    The paper describes the use of the Delphi method to estimate the incidence of food-borne Salmonella in the UK and the effectiveness of alternative control measures. A panel of experts of food-borne Salmonella participated in the Delphi survey, which involved five rounds of questioning taking place in the period July 1993 to January 1994. Participants were asked to give initial estimates for a number of parameters and invited to revise these estimates through progressive rounds of the survey at which the group responses were reported back. This process resulted in a reduction in the variation between the estimates given by individual experts. The final estimated annual incidence of food-borne Salmonella in the UK was 537,000, although significant variation remained between, individual estimates. The foods judged to be the most important modes of transmission were poultry and poultry products (50% of cases) and eggs and egg products (26% of cases). The panel was also requested to estimate the effectiveness of strategies available to reduce the incidence of food-borne Salmonella from all sources. The most effective methods were judged to be food irradiation and mandatory application of HACCP, although there were significant differences in the judged effectiveness of these technologies for individual respondents. The paper demonstrates the efficacy of the Delphi method as a mechanism for reconciling differences between expert judgements of the incidence of food-borne disease and the effectiveness of alternative control strategies.

  4. In silico tumor control induced via alternating immunostimulating and immunosuppressive phases

    PubMed Central

    Reppas, AI; Alfonso, JCL; Hatzikirou, H

    2016-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the field of Oncoimmunology, the success potential of immunomodulatory therapies against cancer remains to be elucidated. One of the reasons is the lack of understanding on the complex interplay between tumor growth dynamics and the associated immune system responses. Toward this goal, we consider a mathematical model of vascularized tumor growth and the corresponding effector cell recruitment dynamics. Bifurcation analysis allows for the exploration of model's dynamic behavior and the determination of these parameter regimes that result in immune-mediated tumor control. In this work, we focus on a particular tumor evasion regime that involves tumor and effector cell concentration oscillations of slowly increasing and decreasing amplitude, respectively. Considering a temporal multiscale analysis, we derive an analytically tractable mapping of model solutions onto a weakly negatively damped harmonic oscillator. Based on our analysis, we propose a theory-driven intervention strategy involving immunostimulating and immunosuppressive phases to induce long-term tumor control. PMID:26305801

  5. Analysis of alternatives for insulinizing patients to achieve glycemic control and avoid accompanying risks of hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jialin; Xiong, Qianyin; Miao, Jun; Zhang, Yao; Xia, Libing; Lu, Meiqin; Zhang, Binhua; Chen, Yueping; Zhang, Ansu; Yu, Cui; Wang, Li-Zhuo

    2015-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to explore the efficacy of glycemic control and the risks of hypoglycemia with different methods of insulin therapy, and to provide reference data for the clinical treatment of diabetes. In this retrospective study, hospitalized patients diagnosed with type 2 diabetes between March and December 2014, in the Department of Endocrinology in the First Affiliated Hospital of Wannan Medical College, were divided into three groups, including an intensive insulin analogue therapy group, a premixed insulin analogue treatment group and a premixed human insulin therapy group. The efficacy of glycemic control and the incidence of hypoglycemia were determined in each of the insulin treatment groups. Compared with the other treatment groups, the intensive insulin analogue therapy group was associated with superior blood glucose control, shorter time to reach standard insulin regimen, shorter hospitalization time, fewer fluctuations in blood glucose levels and lower insulin dosage on discharge from hospital. However, this treatment was also associated with a high risk of hypoglycemia. In conclusion, when combined with the effective prevention of hypoglycemia and appropriate nursing care (especially in hospital care), intensive insulin analogue therapy may provide the greatest benefit to patients.

  6. Two alternative modes for diffuse pollution control in Wuhan City Zoo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qing-Feng; Shan, Bao-Qing; Yin, Cheng-Qing; Hu, Cheng-Xiao

    2007-01-01

    Pollution in urban zoos arises from diffuse and small point sources. However, its control has received little attention in past decades. Online and offline modes of ecological engineering technology were designed to control pollution from small point and diffuse sources in Wuhan City Zoo, China. Their characteristics and performances were investigated in sixteen runoff events from 2003 to 2005. The results showed that the two modes both improved runoff water quality and had high retention rates for water and pollutants. In the outflows, the event mean concentrations (EMCs) of total suspended solids (TSS), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total nitrogen (TN) and total phosphorus (TP) were reduced by 88%, 59%, 46% and 71% for the online mode, and those were 77%, 42%, 50% and 66% for the offline mode. The annual retention rates of pollutant loads for the online mode were 94.9%-98.5% in the three study years; those for the offline mode were 70.5%-86.4%. Based on calculation, the online mode was able to store the runoff of 66.7 mm rainfall completely, and the offline mode could store that of 31.3 mm rainfall. In addition, the online mode can provide an effective way for rainwater utilization and good habitats for aquatic wildlives, and has an excellent aesthetics value for recreationsal pastimes. The offline mode can save land resources and may be an effective and economical measure for diffuse pollution control in urban areas.

  7. Periodic Physical Disturbance: An Alternative Method for Controlling Sitophilus zeamais (Maize Weevil) Infestation

    PubMed Central

    Suleiman, Rashid; Rosentrater, Kurt A.; Chove, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky is the most important insect pest of stored maize in tropical regions. The objective of this study was to determine the practicality of periodic physical disturbance on S. zeamais mortality and its adoption by smallholder farmers in developing countries. In this experiment, treatments and control were arranged in a randomized block design with three replications and three storage times in three regions of Tanzania. Region was used as the blocking variable. A total of 108 clean 20-L plastic containers were each loaded with 10 kg of fresh white dent corn and 0.50 kg of maize infested with S. zeamais. For the treatment, containers were disturbed twice a day, whereas for the controls the containers were not disturbed until the end of storage. The overall mortality rate (%) after 30, 60, and 90 days of storage were 88%, 96%, and 98%, respectively. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed for the number of live S. zeamais between the control and experimental treatments. Additionally, the number of live S. zeamais in the treatment significantly decreased as storage time increased. This study shows the potential of a feasible, simple, affordable, and effective method of protecting maize grain for small-holder farmers in developing countries without using chemicals. PMID:27690113

  8. Periodic Physical Disturbance: An Alternative Method for Controlling Sitophilus zeamais (Maize Weevil) Infestation.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Rashid; Rosentrater, Kurt A; Chove, Bernard

    2016-09-29

    Sitophilus zeamais Motschulsky is the most important insect pest of stored maize in tropical regions. The objective of this study was to determine the practicality of periodic physical disturbance on S. zeamais mortality and its adoption by smallholder farmers in developing countries. In this experiment, treatments and control were arranged in a randomized block design with three replications and three storage times in three regions of Tanzania. Region was used as the blocking variable. A total of 108 clean 20-L plastic containers were each loaded with 10 kg of fresh white dent corn and 0.50 kg of maize infested with S. zeamais. For the treatment, containers were disturbed twice a day, whereas for the controls the containers were not disturbed until the end of storage. The overall mortality rate (%) after 30, 60, and 90 days of storage were 88%, 96%, and 98%, respectively. A statistically significant difference (p < 0.05) was observed for the number of live S. zeamais between the control and experimental treatments. Additionally, the number of live S. zeamais in the treatment significantly decreased as storage time increased. This study shows the potential of a feasible, simple, affordable, and effective method of protecting maize grain for small-holder farmers in developing countries without using chemicals.

  9. Instantaneous and controllable integer ambiguity resolution: review and an alternative approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jingyu; Wu, Meiping; Li, Tao; Zhang, Kaidong

    2015-11-01

    In the high-precision application of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS), integer ambiguity resolution is the key step to realize precise positioning and attitude determination. As the necessary part of quality control, integer aperture (IA) ambiguity resolution provides the theoretical and practical foundation for ambiguity validation. It is mainly realized by acceptance testing. Due to the constraint of correlation between ambiguities, it is impossible to realize the controlling of failure rate according to analytical formula. Hence, the fixed failure rate approach is implemented by Monte Carlo sampling. However, due to the characteristics of Monte Carlo sampling and look-up table, we have to face the problem of a large amount of time consumption if sufficient GNSS scenarios are included in the creation of look-up table. This restricts the fixed failure rate approach to be a post process approach if a look-up table is not available. Furthermore, if not enough GNSS scenarios are considered, the table may only be valid for a specific scenario or application. Besides this, the method of creating look-up table or look-up function still needs to be designed for each specific acceptance test. To overcome these problems in determination of critical values, this contribution will propose an instantaneous and CONtrollable (iCON) IA ambiguity resolution approach for the first time. The iCON approach has the following advantages: (a) critical value of acceptance test is independently determined based on the required failure rate and GNSS model without resorting to external information such as look-up table; (b) it can be realized instantaneously for most of IA estimators which have analytical probability formulas. The stronger GNSS model, the less time consumption; (c) it provides a new viewpoint to improve the research about IA estimation. To verify these conclusions, multi-frequency and multi-GNSS simulation experiments are implemented. Those results show that IA

  10. Alternating current-generated plasma discharges for the controlled direct current charging of ferroelectrets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cury Basso, Heitor; Monteiro, José Roberto B. de A.; Baladelli Mazulquim, Daniel; Teixeira de Paula, Geyverson; Gonçalves Neto, Luiz; Gerhard, Reimund

    2013-09-01

    The standard charging process for polymer ferroelectrets, e.g., from polypropylene foams or layered film systems involves the application of high DC fields either to metal electrodes or via a corona discharge. In this often-used process, the DC field triggers the internal breakdown and limits the final charge densities inside the ferroelectret cavities and, thus, the final polarization. Here, an AC + DC charging procedure is proposed and demonstrated in which a high-voltage high-frequency (HV-HF) wave train is applied together with a DC poling voltage. Thus, the internal dielectric-barrier discharges in the ferroelectret cavities are induced by the HV-HF wave train, while the final charge and polarization level is controlled separately through the applied DC voltage. In the new process, the frequency and the amplitude of the HV-HF wave train must be kept within critical boundaries that are closely related to the characteristics of the respective ferroelectrets. The charging method has been tested and investigated on a fluoropolymer-film system with a single well-defined cylindrical cavity. It is found that the internal electrical polarization of the cavity can be easily controlled and increases linearly with the applied DC voltage up to the breakdown voltage of the cavity. In the standard charging method, however, the DC voltage would have to be chosen above the respective breakdown voltage. With the new method, control of the HV-HF wave-train duration prevents a plasma-induced deterioration of the polymer surfaces inside the cavities. It is observed that the frequency of the HV-HF wave train during ferroelectret charging and the temperature applied during poling of ferroelectrics serve an analogous purpose. The analogy and the similarities between the proposed ferroelectret charging method and the poling of ferroelectric materials or dipole electrets at elevated temperatures with subsequent cooling under field are discussed.

  11. Acute Effects of an Alternative Electronic-Control-Device Waveform in Swine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    on nutrient digestibility determined at the end of the small intestine and over the total digestive tract in growing pigs . J Anim Sci. 1990;68:3687–93...DN, Ellis M, Bertol TM, et al. Effects of handling intensity and live weight on blood acid-base status in finishing pigs . J Anim Sci. 2004;82:2405–9...previous studies, repeated 5-s exposures of anesthetized pigs to an electronic control device (TASER International’s Advanced TASER X26 device

  12. Alternative methods to control postharvest decay caused by Penicillium expansum in plums (Prunus domestica L.).

    PubMed

    Molinu, M G; Pani, G; Venditti, T; Dore, A; Ladu, G; D'Hallewin, G

    2012-01-01

    In the latest years, investigation on postharvest treatments has been increasingly addressed to preserve human health and environment safeguard. Several preservative compounds, physical treatments and biological control agents to restrain postharvest pathogens on horticultural products have been widely studied. Among them potassium sorbate (KS) has been generally recognized as safe for use in foods and personal care products. It acts as microbial growth inhibitor and fungistatic agent in foods, including vegetable and fruit products. The efficacy of KS, used alone or combined with heat treatments or biocontrol agents, has been demonstrated in Citrus and stone fruits. Here we report the results of 3 experiments aimed at controlling Penicillium expansum Link decay with the use of KS on a yellow ('Shiro') and a red ('Sanguigna di Bosa II', from the Sardinian germplasm) plum cultivar. An integrated approach, combining ultrasounds (US) as a physical mean and KS solutions at different concentrations, has been employed. In the first experiment, 360 fruits were wounded twice and divided into 6 sets (6 x 60), three of which were inoculated with an isolate of P. expansum (20 microl of a 10(5) cfu x mL(-1)). Then, 180 fruit (half inoculated) were treated by pipetting into each wound 20 microl of a KS solution containing 0, 1.5 or 3% (w/v), respectively. In exp. 2, all fruit (number) was wounded and inoculated, and after 24 h treated by immersion (1 min) into solutions containing 0, 1.5 or 3% (w/v) of SK, with or without the use of US. In exp. 3, wounded fruits were treated by immersion or sonication like in exp. 2, while inoculation took place after 24 h. Then, plums were kept at 25 degrees C and 75-80% RH and the infection degree was monitored after 3 and 6 days. In both cultivars, the 1.5% KS solution significantly reduced the natural infection, while the 3% KS solution resulted effective only on the red one. Moreover, the 1.5% solution was effective in controlling decay of

  13. 75 FR 69089 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... for the Topical Approximation of Skin; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the...

  14. 76 FR 20992 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff... AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA... subject to comment in accordance with the Agency's good guidance practices. DATES: Submit...

  15. 77 FR 37058 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-20

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2012-15025] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA 2012-D-0304] Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II...: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA)...

  16. 75 FR 59726 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration... Assays; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of the draft guidance entitled ``Class...

  17. Chitosan/tripolyphosphate nanoparticles loaded with paraquat herbicide: an environmentally safer alternative for weed control.

    PubMed

    Grillo, Renato; Pereira, Anderson E S; Nishisaka, Caroline S; de Lima, Renata; Oehlke, Kathleen; Greiner, Ralf; Fraceto, Leonardo F

    2014-08-15

    Paraquat is a fast acting nonselective contact herbicide that is extensively used worldwide. However, the aqueous solubility and soil sorption of this compound can cause problems of toxicity in nontarget organisms. This work investigates the preparation and characterization of nanoparticles composed of chitosan and sodium tripolyphosphate (TPP) to produce an efficient herbicidal formulation that was less toxic and could be used for safer control of weeds in agriculture. The toxicities of the formulations were evaluated using cell culture viability assays and the Allium cepa chromosome aberration test. The herbicidal activity was investigated in cultivations of maize (Zea mays) and mustard (Brassica sp.), and soil sorption of the nanoencapsulated herbicide was measured. The efficiency association of paraquat with the nanoparticles was 62.6 ± 0.7%. Encapsulation of the herbicide resulted in changes in its diffusion and release as well as its sorption by soil. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assays showed that the nanoencapsulated herbicide was less toxic than the pure compound, indicating its potential to control weeds while at the same time reducing environmental impacts. Measurements of herbicidal activity showed that the effectiveness of paraquat was preserved after encapsulation. It was concluded that the encapsulation of paraquat in nanoparticles can provide a useful means of reducing adverse impacts on human health and the environment, and that the formulation therefore has potential for use in agriculture.

  18. A Comparative Study of Alternative Controls and Displays for by the Severely Physically Handicapped

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D.; Simpson, C.; Barker, M.

    1984-01-01

    A modification of a row/column scanning system was investigated in order to increase the speed and accuracy with which communication aids can be accessed with one or two switches. A selection algorithm was developed and programmed in BASIC to automatically select individuals with the characteristic difficulty in controlling time dependent control and display systems. Four systems were compared: (1) row/column directed scan (2 switches); (2) row/column auto scan (1 switch); (3) row auto scan (1 switch); and (4) column auto scan (1 switch). For this sample population, there were no significant differences among systems for scan time to select the correct target. The row/column auto scan system resulted in significantly more errors than any of the other three systems. Thus, the most widely prescribed system for severely physically disabled individuals turns out for this group to have a higher error rate and no faster communication rate than three other systems that have been considered inappropriate for this group.

  19. Control of Gene Expression by RNA Binding Protein Action on Alternative Translation Initiation Sites

    PubMed Central

    Re, Angela; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Transcript levels do not faithfully predict protein levels, due to post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression mediated by RNA binding proteins (RBPs) and non-coding RNAs. We developed a multivariate linear regression model integrating RBP levels and predicted RBP-mRNA regulatory interactions from matched transcript and protein datasets. RBPs significantly improved the accuracy in predicting protein abundance of a portion of the total modeled mRNAs in three panels of tissues and cells and for different methods employed in the detection of mRNA and protein. The presence of upstream translation initiation sites (uTISs) at the mRNA 5’ untranslated regions was strongly associated with improvement in predictive accuracy. On the basis of these observations, we propose that the recently discovered widespread uTISs in the human genome can be a previously unappreciated substrate of translational control mediated by RBPs. PMID:27923063

  20. Hydrodynamic ratchet: Controlled motion of a polymer in an alternating microchannel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhen; Stark, Holger; Mikhailov, Alexander S.

    2013-10-01

    Using ratchets, periodic or irregular oscillations can be transformed into steady translational or rotational motions. Here, we consider a model system that operates as a hydrodynamic ratchet. A polymer is placed inside a narrow channel where an oscillating Poiseuille flow is externally created. The ratchet mechanism is implemented by introducing a feedback control for the lateral position of the polymer through which its mobility becomes effectively dependent on the direction of its motion along the channel. We employ the semi-flexible elastic chain modeling for the polymer and use the method of multi-particle collision dynamics to simulate the fluid. We indeed observe directed motion of the polymer and determine the dependence of the propagation velocity on the model parameters.

  1. MYCN controls an alternative RNA splicing program in high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shile; Wei, Jun S.; Li, Samuel Q.; Badgett, Tom C.; Song, Young K.; Agarwal, Saurabh; Coarfa, Cristian; Tolman, Catherine; Hurd, Laura; Liao, Hongling; He, Jianbin; Wen, Xinyu; Liu, Zhihui; Thiele, Carol J.; Westermann, Frank; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Seeger, Robert C.; Maris, John M.; Auvil, Jamie M Guidry; Smith, Malcolm A; Kolaczyk, Eric D; Shohet, Jason; Khan, Javed

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the aggressive behavior of MYCN driven neuroblastoma (NBL) is under intense investigation; however, little is known about the impact of this family of transcription factors on the splicing program. Here we used high-throughput RNA sequencing to systematically study the expression of RNA isoforms in stage 4 MYCN-amplified NBL, an aggressive subtype of metastatic NBL. We show that MYCN-amplified NBL tumors display a distinct gene splicing pattern affecting multiple cancer hallmark functions. Six splicing factors displayed unique differential expression patterns in MYCN-amplified tumors and cell lines, and the binding motifs for some of these splicing factors are significantly enriched in differentially-spliced genes. Direct binding of MYCN to promoter regions of the splicing factors PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 detected by ChIP-seq demonstrates MYCN controls the splicing pattern by direct regulation of the expression of these key splicing factors. Furthermore, high expression of PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 was significantly associated with poor overall survival of stage4 NBL patients (p≤0.05). Knocking down PTBP1, HNRNPA1 and their downstream target PKM2, an isoform of pro-tumor-growth, result in repressed growth of NBL cells. Therefore, our study reveals a novel role of MYCN in controlling global splicing program through regulation of splicing factors in addition to its well-known role in the transcription program. These findings suggest a therapeutically potential to target the key splicing factors or gene isoforms in high-risk NBL with MYCN-amplification. PMID:26683771

  2. MYCN controls an alternative RNA splicing program in high-risk metastatic neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shile; Wei, Jun S; Li, Samuel Q; Badgett, Tom C; Song, Young K; Agarwal, Saurabh; Coarfa, Cristian; Tolman, Catherine; Hurd, Laura; Liao, Hongling; He, Jianbin; Wen, Xinyu; Liu, Zhihui; Thiele, Carol J; Westermann, Frank; Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Seeger, Robert C; Maris, John M; Guidry Auvil, Jamie M; Smith, Malcolm A; Kolaczyk, Eric D; Shohet, Jason; Khan, Javed

    2016-02-28

    The molecular mechanisms underlying the aggressive behavior of MYCN driven neuroblastoma (NBL) is under intense investigation; however, little is known about the impact of this family of transcription factors on the splicing program. Here we used high-throughput RNA sequencing to systematically study the expression of RNA isoforms in stage 4 MYCN-amplified NBL, an aggressive subtype of metastatic NBL. We show that MYCN-amplified NBL tumors display a distinct gene splicing pattern affecting multiple cancer hallmark functions. Six splicing factors displayed unique differential expression patterns in MYCN-amplified tumors and cell lines, and the binding motifs for some of these splicing factors are significantly enriched in differentially-spliced genes. Direct binding of MYCN to promoter regions of the splicing factors PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 detected by ChIP-seq demonstrates that MYCN controls the splicing pattern by direct regulation of the expression of these key splicing factors. Furthermore, high expression of PTBP1 and HNRNPA1 was significantly associated with poor overall survival of stage4 NBL patients (p ≤ 0.05). Knocking down PTBP1, HNRNPA1 and their downstream target PKM2, an isoform of pro-tumor-growth, result in repressed growth of NBL cells. Therefore, our study reveals a novel role of MYCN in controlling global splicing program through regulation of splicing factors in addition to its well-known role in the transcription program. These findings suggest a therapeutically potential to target the key splicing factors or gene isoforms in high-risk NBL with MYCN-amplification.

  3. A multiobjective optimization approach for combating Aedes aegypti using chemical and biological alternated step-size control.

    PubMed

    Dias, Weverton O; Wanner, Elizabeth F; Cardoso, Rodrigo T N

    2015-11-01

    Dengue epidemics, one of the most important viral disease worldwide, can be prevented by combating the transmission vector Aedes aegypti. In support of this aim, this article proposes to analyze the Dengue vector control problem in a multiobjective optimization approach, in which the intention is to minimize both social and economic costs, using a dynamic mathematical model representing the mosquitoes' population. It consists in finding optimal alternated step-size control policies combining chemical (via application of insecticides) and biological control (via insertion of sterile males produced by irradiation). All the optimal policies consists in apply insecticides just at the beginning of the season and, then, keep the mosquitoes in an acceptable level spreading into environment a few amount of sterile males. The optimization model analysis is driven by the use of genetic algorithms. Finally, it performs a statistic test showing that the multiobjective approach is effective in achieving the same effect of variations in the cost parameters. Then, using the proposed methodology, it is possible to find, in a single run, given a decision maker, the optimal number of days and the respective amounts in which each control strategy must be applied, according to the tradeoff between using more insecticide with less transmission mosquitoes or more sterile males with more transmission mosquitoes.

  4. Iptakalim attenuates self-administration and acquired goal-tracking behavior controlled by nicotine.

    PubMed

    Charntikov, S; Swalve, N; Pittenger, S; Fink, K; Schepers, S; Hadlock, G C; Fleckenstein, A E; Hu, G; Li, M; Bevins, R A

    2013-12-01

    Iptakalim is an ATP-sensitive potassium channel opener, as well as an α4β2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) antagonist. Pretreatment with iptakalim diminishes nicotine-induced dopamine (DA) and glutamate release in the nucleus accumbens. This neuropharmacological profile suggests that iptakalim may be useful for treatment of nicotine dependence. Thus, we examined the effects of iptakalim in two preclinical models. First, the impact of iptakalim on the interoceptive stimulus effect of nicotine was evaluated by training rats in a discriminated goal-tracking task that included intermixed nicotine (0.4 mg/kg, SC) and saline sessions. Sucrose was intermittently presented in a response-independent manner only on nicotine sessions. On intervening test days, rats were pretreated with iptakalim (10, 30, 60 mg/kg, IP). Results revealed that iptakalim attenuated nicotine-evoked responding controlled by the nicotine stimulus in a dose-dependent manner. In a separate study, the impact of iptakalim on the reinforcing effects of nicotine was investigated by training rats to lever-press to self-administer nicotine (0.01 mg/kg/infusion) [Dosage error corrected]. Results revealed that pretreatment with iptakalim (1, 3, 6 mg/kg, IV) decreased nicotine intake (i.e., less active lever responding). Neither behavioral effect was due to a non-specific motor effect of iptakalim, nor to an ability of iptakalim to inhibit DA transporter (DAT) or serotonin transporter (SERT) function. Together, these finding support the notion that iptakalim may be an effective pharmacotherapy for increasing smoking cessation and a better understanding of its action could contribute to medication development.

  5. Aerosol deposition in the human lung following administration from a microprocessor controlled pressurised metered dose inhaler.

    PubMed Central

    Farr, S. J.; Rowe, A. M.; Rubsamen, R.; Taylor, G.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--Gamma scintigraphy was employed to assess the deposition of aerosols emitted from a pressurised metered dose inhaler (MDI) contained in a microprocessor controlled device (SmartMist), a system which analyses an inspiratory flow profile and automatically actuates the MDI when predefined conditions of flow rate and cumulative inspired volume coincide. METHODS--Micronised salbutamol particles contained in a commercial MDI (Ventolin) were labelled with 99m-technetium using a method validated by the determination of (1) aerosol size characteristics of the drug and radiotracer following actuation into an eight stage cascade impactor and (2) shot potencies of these non-volatile components as a function of actuation number. Using nine healthy volunteers in a randomised factorial interaction design the effect of inspiratory flow rate (slow, 30 l/min; medium, 90 l/min; fast, 270 l/min) combined with cumulative inspired volume (early, 300 ml; late, 3000 ml) was determined on total and regional aerosol lung deposition using the technique of gamma scintigraphy. RESULTS--The SmartMist firing at the medium/early setting (medium flow and early in the cumulative inspired volume) resulted in the highest lung deposition at 18.6 (1.42)%. The slow/early setting gave the second highest deposition at 14.1 (2.06)% with the fast/late setting resulting in the lowest (7.6 (1.15)%). Peripheral lung deposition obtained for the medium/early (9.1 (0.9)%) and slow/early (7.5 (1.06)%) settings were equivalent but higher than those obtained with the other treatments. This reflected the lower total lung deposition at these other settings as no difference in regional deposition, expressed as a volume corrected central zone:peripheral zone ratio, was apparent for all modes of inhalation studied. CONCLUSIONS--The SmartMist device allowed reproducible actuation of an MDI at a preprogrammed point during inspiration. The extent of aerosol deposition in the lung is affected by a change in

  6. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2011-01-01

    At present, NASA has considered a number of future human space exploration mission concepts . Yet, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents a roadmap for development of Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro gravity mission; 2) a long duration transit microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration surface exploration mission. To organize the effort, ECLSS was categorized into three major functional groups (atmosphere, water, and solid waste management) with each broken down into sub-functions. The ability of existing state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capabilities needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs will, in many cases, directly benefit the ISS operational capability, benefit the Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV), and guide long-term technology

  7. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Environmental Control and Life Support (ECLS) Integrated Roadmap Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metcalf, Jordan; Peterson, Laurie; Carrasquillo, Robyn; Bagdigian, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Although NASA is currently considering a number of future human space exploration mission concepts, detailed mission requirements and vehicle architectures remain mostly undefined, making technology investment strategies difficult to develop and sustain without a top-level roadmap to serve as a guide. This paper documents the process and results of an effort to define a roadmap for Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (ECLSS) capabilities required to enhance the long-term operation of the International Space Station (ISS) as well as enable beyond-Low Earth Orbit (LEO) human exploration missions. Three generic mission types were defined to serve as a basis for developing a prioritized list of needed capabilities and technologies. Those are 1) a short duration micro-gravity mission; 2) a long duration microgravity mission; and 3) a long duration partial gravity (surface) exploration mission. To organize the effort, a functional decomposition of ECLSS was completed starting with the three primary functions: atmosphere, water, and solid waste management. Each was further decomposed into sub-functions to the point that current state-of-the-art (SOA) technologies could be tied to the sub-function. Each technology was then assessed by NASA subject matter experts as to its ability to meet the functional needs of each of the three mission types. When SOA capabilities were deemed to fall short of meeting the needs of one or more mission types, those gaps were prioritized in terms of whether or not the corresponding capabilities enable or enhance each of the mission types. The result was a list of enabling and enhancing capability needs that can be used to guide future ECLSS development, as well as a list of existing hardware that is ready to go for exploration-class missions. A strategy to fulfill those needs over time was then developed in the form of a roadmap. Through execution of this roadmap, the hardware and technologies intended to meet exploration needs

  8. Conserved functional antagonism of CELF and MBNL proteins controls stem cell-specific alternative splicing in planarians

    PubMed Central

    Solana, Jordi; Irimia, Manuel; Ayoub, Salah; Orejuela, Marta Rodriguez; Zywitza, Vera; Jens, Marvin; Tapial, Javier; Ray, Debashish; Morris, Quaid; Hughes, Timothy R; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Rajewsky, Nikolaus

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to transcriptional regulation, the function of alternative splicing (AS) in stem cells is poorly understood. In mammals, MBNL proteins negatively regulate an exon program specific of embryonic stem cells; however, little is known about the in vivo significance of this regulation. We studied AS in a powerful in vivo model for stem cell biology, the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We discover a conserved AS program comprising hundreds of alternative exons, microexons and introns that is differentially regulated in planarian stem cells, and comprehensively identify its regulators. We show that functional antagonism between CELF and MBNL factors directly controls stem cell-specific AS in planarians, placing the origin of this regulatory mechanism at the base of Bilaterians. Knockdown of CELF or MBNL factors lead to abnormal regenerative capacities by affecting self-renewal and differentiation sets of genes, respectively. These results highlight the importance of AS interactions in stem cell regulation across metazoans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16797.001 PMID:27502555

  9. Ultraconserved elements are associated with homeostatic control of splicing regulators by alternative splicing and nonsense-mediated decay

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Julie Z.; Grate, Leslie; Donohue, John Paul; Preston, Christine; Nobida, Naomi; O’Brien, Georgeann; Shiue, Lily; Clark, Tyson A.; Blume, John E.; Ares, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Many alternative splicing events create RNAs with premature stop codons, suggesting that alternative splicing coupled with nonsense-mediated decay (AS-NMD) may regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally. We tested this idea in mice by blocking NMD and measuring changes in isoform representation using splicing-sensitive microarrays. We found a striking class of highly conserved stop codon-containing exons whose inclusion renders the transcript sensitive to NMD. A genomic search for additional examples identified >50 such exons in genes with a variety of functions. These exons are unusually frequent in genes that encode splicing activators and are unexpectedly enriched in the so-called “ultraconserved” elements in the mammalian lineage. Further analysis show that NMD of mRNAs for splicing activators such as SR proteins is triggered by splicing activation events, whereas NMD of the mRNAs for negatively acting hnRNP proteins is triggered by splicing repression, a polarity consistent with widespread homeostatic control of splicing regulator gene expression. We suggest that the extreme genomic conservation surrounding these regulatory splicing events within splicing factor genes demonstrates the evolutionary importance of maintaining tightly tuned homeostasis of RNA-binding protein levels in the vertebrate cell. PMID:17369403

  10. An alternative method for noise analysis using pixel variance as part of quality control procedures on digital mammography systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouwman, R.; Young, K.; Lazzari, B.; Ravaglia, V.; Broeders, M.; van Engen, R.

    2009-11-01

    According to the European Guidelines for quality assured breast cancer screening and diagnosis, noise analysis is one of the measurements that needs to be performed as part of quality control procedures on digital mammography systems. However, the method recommended in the European Guidelines does not discriminate sufficiently between systems with and without additional noise besides quantum noise. This paper attempts to give an alternative and relatively simple method for noise analysis which can divide noise into electronic noise, structured noise and quantum noise. Quantum noise needs to be the dominant noise source in clinical images for optimal performance of a digital mammography system, and therefore the amount of electronic and structured noise should be minimal. For several digital mammography systems, the noise was separated into components based on the measured pixel value, standard deviation (SD) of the image and the detector entrance dose. The results showed that differences between systems exist. Our findings confirm that the proposed method is able to discriminate systems based on their noise performance and is able to detect possible quality problems. Therefore, we suggest to replace the current method for noise analysis as described in the European Guidelines by the alternative method described in this paper.

  11. Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures

    MedlinePlus

    ... LASIK Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Laser Surgery Recovery Alternative Refractive Surgery Procedures Dec. 12, 2015 Today's refractive ... that releases controlled amounts of radio frequency (RF) energy, instead of a laser, to apply heat to ...

  12. Beyond Traditional RAFT: Alternative Activation of Thiocarbonylthio Compounds for Controlled Polymerization

    PubMed Central

    McKenzie, Thomas G.; Fu, Qiang; Uchiyama, Mineto; Satoh, Kotaro; Xu, Jiangtao

    2016-01-01

    Recent developments in polymerization reactions utilizing thiocarbonylthio compounds have highlighted the surprising versatility of these unique molecules. The increasing popularity of reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) radical polymerization as a means of producing well‐defined, ‘controlled’ synthetic polymers is largely due to its simplicity of implementation and the availability of a wide range of compatible reagents. However, novel modes of thiocarbonylthio activation can expand the technique beyond the traditional system (i.e., employing a free radical initiator) pushing the applicability and use of thiocarbonylthio compounds even further than previously assumed. The primary advances seen in recent years are a revival in the direct photoactivation of thiocarbonylthio compounds, their activation via photoredox catalysis, and their use in cationic polymerizations. These synthetic approaches and their implications for the synthesis of controlled polymers represent a significant advance in polymer science, with potentially unforeseen benefits and possibilities for further developments still ahead. This Research News aims to highlight key works in this area while also clarifying the differences and similarities of each system. PMID:27711266

  13. Rheostat re-wired: alternative hypotheses for the control of thioredoxin reduction potentials.

    PubMed

    Bewley, Kathryn D; Dey, Mishtu; Bjork, Rebekah E; Mitra, Sangha; Chobot, Sarah E; Drennan, Catherine L; Elliott, Sean J

    2015-01-01

    Thioredoxins are small soluble proteins that contain a redox-active disulfide (CXXC). These disulfides are tuned to oxidizing or reducing potentials depending on the function of the thioredoxin within the cell. The mechanism by which the potential is tuned has been controversial, with two main hypotheses: first, that redox potential (Em) is specifically governed by a molecular 'rheostat'-the XX amino acids, which influence the Cys pKa values, and thereby, Em; and second, the overall thermodynamics of protein folding stability regulates the potential. Here, we use protein film voltammetry (PFV) to measure the pH dependence of the redox potentials of a series of wild-type and mutant archaeal Trxs, PFV and glutathionine-equilibrium to corroborate the measured potentials, the fluorescence probe BADAN to measure pKa values, guanidinium-based denaturation to measure protein unfolding, and X-ray crystallography to provide a structural basis for our functional analyses. We find that when these archaeal thioredoxins are probed directly using PFV, both the high and low potential thioredoxins display consistent 2H+:2e- coupling over a physiological pH range, in conflict with the conventional 'rheostat' model. Instead, folding measurements reveals an excellent correlation to reduction potentials, supporting the second hypothesis and revealing the molecular mechanism of reduction potential control in the ubiquitous Trx family.

  14. LIFAC flue gas desulfurization process an alternative SO{sub 2} control strategy

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, J.G.; Vilala, J.

    1995-12-01

    This paper discusses the results from two recently completed LIFAC flue gas desulfurization plants - 300 MW Shand lignite powered station owned by Saskatchewan Power Corporation and 60 MW Whitewater Valley high sulfur coal fired station owned by Richmond Powerand Light. LIFACis a dry FGD process in which limestone is injected into the upper regions of the boiler furnace and an activation reactor is used to humidify the unreacted limestone to achieve additional sulfur capture. The performance in both plants indicates that 70 to 80% sulfur is removed at a Ca/S ratio of 2. Cost performance data from these plants has shown that LI FAC both on construction cost and $/ton SO{sub 2} removed basis is very cost competitive compared to other SO{sub 2} control technologies. The Richmond plant has been realized under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Clean Coal Technology program. The Shand plant is the first commercial installation in North America. The paper also discusses highlights of operating and maintenance experience, availability and handling of the solid waste product.

  15. Predictive spatial modelling of alternative control strategies for the foot-and-mouth disease epidemic in Great Britain, 2001.

    PubMed

    Morris, R S; Wilesmith, J W; Stern, M W; Sanson, R L; Stevenson, M A

    2001-08-04

    A spatial simulation model of foot-and-mouth disease was used in March and early April 2001 to evaluate alternative control policies for the 2001 epidemic in Great Britain. Control policies were those in operation from March 20, 2001, and comprised a ban on all animal movements from February 23, 2001, and a stamping-out policy. Each simulation commenced with the known population of infected farms on April 10, 2001, and ran for 200 days. For the control policy which best approximated that actually implemented from late March, the model predicted an epidemic of approximately 1800 to 1900 affected farms, and estimated that the epidemic would be eradicated between July and October 2001, with a low probability of continuing beyond October 2001. This policy included the slaughter-out of infected farms within 24 hours, slaughter of about 1.3 of the surrounding farms per infected farm within a further 48 hours, and minimal interfarm movements of susceptible animals. Delays in the slaughter of animals on infected farms beyond 24 hours after diagnosis slightly increased the epidemic size, and failure to achieve pre-emptive slaughter on an adequate number of at-risk farms substantially increased the expected size of the epidemic. Vaccination of up to three of the most outbreak-dense areas carried out in conjunction with the adopted control policy reduced the predicted size of the epidemic by less than 100 farms. Vaccination of buffer zones (designed to apply available vaccine and manpower as effectively as possible) carried out in place of the adopted control policy allowed the disease to spread out of control, producing an epidemic involving over 6000 farms by October 2001, with no prospect of immediate eradication.

  16. Alternate RASSF1 Transcripts Control SRC Activity, E-Cadherin Contacts, and YAP-Mediated Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Vlahov, Nikola; Scrace, Simon; Soto, Manuel Sarmiento; Grawenda, Anna M.; Bradley, Leanne; Pankova, Daniela; Papaspyropoulos, Angelos; Yee, Karen S.; Buffa, Francesca; Goding, Colin R.; Timpson, Paul; Sibson, Nicola; O’Neill, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Summary Tumor progression to invasive carcinoma is associated with activation of SRC family kinase (SRC, YES, FYN) activity and loss of cellular cohesion. The hippo pathway-regulated cofactor YAP1 supports the tumorigenicity of RAS mutations but requires both inactivation of hippo signaling and YES-mediated phosphorylation of YAP1 for oncogenic activity. Exactly how SRC kinases are activated and hippo signaling is lost in sporadic human malignancies remains unknown. Here, we provide evidence that hippo-mediated inhibition of YAP1 is lost upon promoter methylation of the RAS effector and hippo kinase scaffold RASSF1A. We find that RASSF1A promoter methylation reduces YAP phospho-S127, which derepresses YAP1, and actively supports YAP1 activation by switching RASSF1 transcription to the independently transcribed RASSF1C isoform that promotes Tyr kinase activity. Using affinity proteomics, proximity ligation, and real-time molecular visualization, we find that RASSF1C targets SRC/YES to epithelial cell-cell junctions and promotes tyrosine phosphorylation of E-cadherin, β-catenin, and YAP1. RASSF1A restricts SRC activity, preventing motility, invasion, and tumorigenesis in vitro and in vivo, with epigenetic inactivation correlating with increased inhibitory pY527-SRC in breast tumors. These data imply that distinct RASSF1 isoforms have opposing functions, which provide a biomarker for YAP1 activation and explain correlations of RASSF1 methylation with advanced invasive disease in humans. The ablation of epithelial integrity together with subsequent YAP1 nuclear localization allows transcriptional activation of β-catenin/TBX-YAP/TEAD target genes, including Myc, and an invasive phenotype. These findings define gene transcript switching as a tumor suppressor mechanism under epigenetic control. PMID:26549256

  17. Pilot-testing an alternative on-site wastewater treatment system for small communities and its automatic control.

    PubMed

    Hong, S W; Choi, Y S; Kim, S J; Kwon, G

    2005-01-01

    The pilot test of a new alternative for small wastewater treatment system has been conducted for two years. It consists of a hybrid bioreactor and the expert system including the programmable logic controller and human-machine interface. In order to monitor its status, the real-time data was transferred from the remote station to the central station via a wireless local area network. More efficient and stable performances were observed at automatic operating mode compared with the manual. On an average, COD, SS, T-N and T-P concentrations in the effluent from the hybrid bioreactor were less than 14, 7, 12 and 0.9 mg/L, respectively. According to the result from laboratory experiments, the quality of treated wastewater with chemical coagulation process followed by sand filtration was enough to be utilized again if a final disinfection step is included.

  18. Effect of Poly Unsaturated Fatty Acids Administration on Children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Anand, Puneet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is a common disorder of childhood. Studies have indicated nutritional deficiencies, particularly Poly Unsaturated Fatty Acids (PUFA) deficiency in these children and have suggested supplementation with PUFA for clinical improvement. Aim The present study aimed at evaluating the effect of PUFA administration in Indian children with ADHD. Settings and Design The study was conducted in the paediatrics and psychiatry departments of a tertiary care hospital. We conducted a prospective double blind randomized control trial on children aged 4-11 years, diagnosed with ADHD according to DSM-IV TR criterias and Kiddie-Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia - Present and lifetime version. Materials and Methods The study subjects were randomized into study and control groups. The control group was administered Atomoxetine, while the study group received Atomoxetine along with Eicosapentanoic acid (EPA) and Docosahexanoic acid (DHA). Both groups were followed up every 2 weeks over the next 4 months using Conner’s Parent Rating Scale - Revised (CPRS-R). Statistical Analysis The data was carefully analysed by SPSS (17th version) software with the help of a statistician. Confidence interval of 95% was used. The complete data was analysed using appropriate parametric and non parametric tests. Correlation was done between various socio-demographic and illness related parameters. For all analyses, probability of 5% or less was assumed to represent statistical significance. Results Fifty children diagnosed with ADHD were randomized to study group (n=25) and control group (n=25). The study group had greater reduction in ADHD scores as compared to the control group, although not statistically significant (p = 0.08). Improvement was more significant in male study subjects with combined type of ADHD. Conclusion It may be concluded that PUFA supplementation improves the symptoms of ADHD. However, the effect is not

  19. The Cost of Antibiotic Mass Drug Administration for Trachoma Control in a Remote Area of South Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Kolaczinski, Jan H.; Robinson, Emily; Finn, Timothy P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mass drug administration (MDA) of antibiotics is a key component of the so-called “SAFE” strategy for trachoma control, while MDA of anthelminthics provides the cornerstone for control of a number of other neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Simultaneous delivery of two or more of these drugs, renowned as “integrated NTD control,” is being promoted to reduce costs and expand intervention coverage. A cost analysis was conducted alongside an MDA campaign in a remote trachoma endemic area, to inform budgeting for NTD control in South Sudan. Methods and Findings A first round of antibiotic MDA was conducted in the highly trachoma endemic county of Mayom, Unity state, from June to August 2010. A core team of seven staff delivered the intervention, including recruitment and training of 44 supervisors and 542 community drug distributors. Using an ingredients approach, financial and economic costs were captured from the provider perspective in a detailed costing database. Overall, 123,760 individuals were treated for trachoma, resulting in an estimated treatment coverage of 94%. The economic cost per person treated was USD 1.53, excluding the cost of the antibiotic azithromycin. Ninety four per cent of the delivery costs were recurrent costs, with personnel and travel/transport costs taking up the largest share. Conclusions In a remote setting and for the initial round, MDA of antibiotics was considerably more expensive than USD 0.5 per person treated, an estimate frequently quoted to advocate for integrated NTD control. Drug delivery costs in South Sudan are unlikely to decrease substantially during subsequent MDA rounds, as the major cost drivers were recurrent costs. MDA campaigns for delivery of one or more drugs in South Sudan should thus be budgeted at around USD 1.5 per person treated, at least until further costing data for delivery of other NTD drugs, singly or in combination, are available. PMID:22022632

  20. Potential control of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 asp expression by alternative splicing in the upstream untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Michael S; Birch, Katherine E; Deacon, Nicholas J; Mosse, Jennifer A

    2012-07-01

    The negative-sense asp open reading frame (ORF) positioned opposite to the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) env gene encodes the 189 amino acid, membrane-associated ASP protein. Negative-sense transcription, regulated by long terminal repeat sequences, has been observed early in HIV-1 infection in vitro. All subtypes of HIV-1 were scanned to detect the negative-sense asp ORF and to identify potential regulatory sequences. A series of highly conserved upstream short open reading frames (sORFs) was identified. This potential control region from HIV-1(NL4-3), containing six sORFs, was cloned upstream of the reporter gene EGFP. Expression by transfection of HEK293 cells indicated that the introduction of this sORF region inhibits EGFP reporter expression; analysis of transcripts revealed no significant changes in levels of EGFP mRNA. Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis (RT-PCR) further demonstrated that the upstream sORF region undergoes alternative splicing in vitro. The most abundant product is spliced to remove sORFs I to V, leaving only the in-frame sORF VI upstream of asp. Sequence analysis revealed the presence of typical splice donor- and acceptor-site motifs. Mutation of the highly conserved splice donor and acceptor sites modulates, but does not fully relieve, inhibition of EGFP production. The strong conservation of asp and its sORFs across all HIV-1 subtypes suggests that the asp gene product may have a role in the pathogenesis of HIV-1. Alternative splicing of the upstream sORF region provides a potential mechanism for controlling expression of the asp gene.

  1. Chemical Ecology of the Colorado Potato Beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Say) (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), and Potential for Alternative Control Methods

    PubMed Central

    Sablon, Ludovic; Dickens, Joseph C.; Haubruge, Éric; Verheggen, François J.

    2012-01-01

    The Colorado potato beetle (CPB) has been a major insect pest to potato farming for over 150 years and various control methods have been established to reduce its impact on potato fields. Crop rotation and pesticide use are currently the most widely used approaches, although alternative methods are being developed. Here we review the role of various volatile and nonvolatile chemicals involved in behavior changes of CPB that may have potential for their control. First, we describe all volatile and nonvolatile chemicals involved in host plant localization and acceptance by CPB beetles, including glycoalcaloids and host plant volatiles used as kairomones. In the second section, we present the chemical signals used by CPB in intraspecific communication, including sex and aggregation pheromones. Some of these chemicals are used by natural enemies of CPBs to locate their prey and are presented in the third section. The last section of this review is devoted a discussion of the potential of some natural chemicals in biological control of CPB and to approaches that already reached efficient field applications. PMID:26466794

  2. Is case-chaos methodology an appropriate alternative to conventional case-control studies for investigating outbreaks?

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Michael; Wallensten, Anders; Kühlmann-Berenzon, Sharon

    2014-08-15

    Case-chaos methodology is a proposed alternative to case-control studies that simulates controls by randomly reshuffling the exposures of cases. We evaluated the method using data on outbreaks in Sweden. We identified 5 case-control studies from foodborne illness outbreaks that occurred between 2005 and 2012. Using case-chaos methodology, we calculated odds ratios 1,000 times for each exposure. We used the median as the point estimate and the 2.5th and 97.5th percentiles as the confidence interval. We compared case-chaos matched odds ratios with their respective case-control odds ratios in terms of statistical significance. Using Spearman's correlation, we estimated the correlation between matched odds ratios and the proportion of cases exposed to each exposure and quantified the relationship between the 2 using a normal linear mixed model. Each case-control study identified an outbreak vehicle (odds ratios = 4.9-45). Case-chaos methodology identified the outbreak vehicle 3 out of 5 times. It identified significant associations in 22 of 113 exposures that were not associated with outcome and 5 of 18 exposures that were significantly associated with outcome. Log matched odds ratios correlated with their respective proportion of cases exposed (Spearman ρ = 0.91) and increased significantly with the proportion of cases exposed (b = 0.054). Case-chaos methodology missed the outbreak source 2 of 5 times and identified spurious associations between a number of exposures and outcome. Measures of association correlated with the proportion of cases exposed. We recommended against using case-chaos analysis during outbreak investigations.

  3. 76 FR 44594 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug...'s good guidance practices. DATES: Submit either electronic or written comments on this guidance...

  4. 76 FR 43332 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff...; Availability AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug... subject to comment in accordance with the Agency's good guidance practices. DATES: Submit...

  5. Urinary pharmacokinetics of 11-nor-9-carboxy-delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol after controlled oral delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol administration.

    PubMed

    Gustafson, Richard A; Kim, Insook; Stout, Peter R; Klette, Kevin L; George, M P; Moolchan, Eric T; Levine, Barry; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2004-04-01

    Understanding the pharmacokinetics of orally administered cannabinoids is vitally important for optimizing therapeutic usage and to determine the impact of positive tests on drug detection programs. In this study, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (limit of quantitation = 2.5 ng/mL) was used to monitor the excretion of total 11-nor-9-carboxy-Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THCCOOH) in 4381 urine voids collected from seven participants throughout a controlled clinical study of multiple oral doses of THC. The National Institute on Drug Abuse Institutional Review Board approved the study and each participant provided informed consent. Seven participants received 0, 0.39, 0.47, 7.5, and 14.8 mg THC/day for five days in this double blind, placebo-controlled, randomized protocol conducted on a closed research ward. No significant differences (P /= 15 ng/mL. An average of only 2.9 +/- 1.6%, 2.5 +/- 2.7%, 1.5 +/- 1.4%, and 0.6 +/- 0.5% of the THC in the 0.39, 0.47, 7.5, and 14.8 mg/day doses, respectively, was excreted as THCCOOH in the urine over each 14-day dosing session. This study demonstrated that the terminal urinary elimination t(1/2) of THCCOOH following oral administration was approximately two to three days for doses ranging from 0.39 to 14.8 mg/d. These data also demonstrate that the apparent urinary elimination t(1/2) of THCCOOH prior to reaching a 15 ng/mL concentration is significantly shorter than the terminal urinary elimination t(1/2). These controlled drug administration data

  6. Effects of flood control alternatives on fish and wildlife resources of the Malheur-Harney lakes basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, David B.; Auble, Gregor T.; Ellison, Richard A.; Roelle, James E.

    1985-01-01

    Malheur Lake is the largest freshwater marsh in the western contiguous United States and is one of the main management units of the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in southeastern Oregon. The marsh provides excellent waterfowl production habitat as well as vital migration habitats for birds in the Pacific flyway. Water shortages have typically been a problem in this semiarid area; however, record snowfalls and cool summers have recently caused Malheur Lake to rise to its highest level in recorded history. This has resulted in the loss of approximately 57,000 acres of important wildlife habitat as well as extensive flooding of local ranches, roads, and railroad lines. Because of the importance of the Refuge, any water management plan for the Malheur-Harney Lakes Basin needs to consider the impact of management alternatives on the hydrology of Malheur Lake. The facilitated modeling workshop described in this report was conducted January 14-18, 1985, under the joint sponsorship of the Portland Ecological Services Field Office and the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Region 1, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS). The Portland Field Office is responsible for FWS reporting requirements on Federal water resource projects while the Refuge staff has management responsibility for much of the land affected by high water levels in the Malheur-Harney Lakes Basin. The primary objective of the workshop was to begin gathering and analyzing information concerning potential fish and wildlife impacts, needs, and opportunities associated with proposed U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) flood control alternatives for Malheur Lake. The workshop was structured around the formulation of a computer model that would simulate the hydrologic effects of the various alternatives and any concommitant changes in vegetation communities and wildlife use patterns. The simulation model is composed of three connected submodels. The Hydrology submodel calculates changes in lake volume, elevation

  7. A novel subcutaneous controlled-release amoxicillin degradable implant for extended-interval administration in veterinary medicine.

    PubMed

    Horwitz, E; Kagan, L; Avni-Magen, N; Daryi, D; Gati, I; Hoffman, A; Friedman, M; Lavy, E

    2011-10-01

    Dosage forms of antimicrobials play a critical role in facilitating the attainment of pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK-PD) targets as well as adherence in both veterinary and human medicine. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate a controlled-release subcutaneous amoxicillin implant for single-dose therapy of large ruminants such as goats, sheep, and deer. The degradable implant, designed to attain PK-PD targets following single administration, was evaluated for amoxicillin release rate and time-concentration profile. In vitro release studies demonstrated constant-rate release of approximately 40% of amoxicillin content within 96 h. In an in vivo study in goats, serving as a model for target animals, a serum concentration of approximately 0.4 mg/L was achieved within 8 h of implant insertion and maintained for >6 days. In comparison, in control goats given a standard single intramuscular amoxicillin dose of 15 mg/kg, amoxicillin peaked at 1.2 mg/L after 1 h, rapidly dropping to below detection level at 8 h. These results suggest that the proposed implant offers a unique modality for animal caregivers to conveniently administer a full antimicrobial course following a single dose of an efficient PK-PD-optimized dosage form. Furthermore, modifications of implant composition may allow for tailoring of its characteristics to various PK, PD, microbiological, and clinical requirements.

  8. Sustainability of soil-transmitted helminth control following a single-dose co-administration of albendazole and diethylcarbamazine.

    PubMed

    Rajendran, R; Mani, T R; Munirathinam, A; Sunish, I P; Abdullah, S Md; Augustin, D J; Satyanarayana, K

    2003-01-01

    We evaluated the long-term impact of single-dose diethylcarbamazine plus albendazole combination therapy with that of diethylcarbamazine alone on the control of soil-transmitted helminths (STH) in 2 blocks (revenue units) of Villupuram district, south India, as part of an ongoing mass drug administration (MDA) campaign for the elimination of lymphatic filariasis in 2001. The prevalence and intensities of STHs were studied in 287 children, aged 9 and 10 years (136 in the combination therapy cohort and 151 in the diethylcarbamazine alone cohort), using the Kato-Katz technique to examine stool samples at 4 time-points (baseline, and 3 weeks, 6 months and 11 months after MDA). The combination therapy showed long-term efficacy against STHs and the magnitude of control remained at a moderate and significant level for 11 months after MDA compared with the moderate gains of diethylcarbamazine alone. Single-dose MDA with albendazole and diethylcarbamazine combination therapy may prove to be a good strategy in treating multiple parasitic infections in endemic communities.

  9. Global perspectives on nematode parasite control in ruminant livestock: the need to adopt alternatives to chemotherapy, with emphasis on biological control.

    PubMed

    Waller, Peter J

    2003-06-01

    Effective, sustainable control of nematode parasites of grazing livestock is becoming evermore challenging and difficult. This is largely due to two contrasting issues. One is the rapid escalation of resistance to anthelmintic drugs, which is arguably the greatest problem now facing the small ruminant industries worldwide. Secondly, there is the increasing trend towards organic farming, in which there is prohibition of the prophylactic use of all chemical compounds. Livestock producers urgently need non-chemotherapeutic alternatives in parasite control. Researchers have responded to this challenge and a variety of quite different approaches have been the subject of intense investigation in many countries for several decades now. These vary in relation to their stage of development for on-farm use, their utility, and their applicability across the spectrum of grazing livestock enterprises throughout the world. One relatively recent innovation is the biological control approach to nematode parasites. This has now reached the stage of commercialization. This review focuses on these issues and provides an overview of the possible ways in which the biological control of nematode parasites could be employed in grazing ruminant livestock systems worldwide.

  10. Navigation-synchronized multimodal control wheelchair from brain to alternative assistive technologies for persons with severe disabilities.

    PubMed

    Puanhvuan, Dilok; Khemmachotikun, Sarawin; Wechakarn, Pongsakorn; Wijarn, Boonyanuch; Wongsawat, Yodchanan

    2017-04-01

    3 alternative input modules: an eye tracker module and chin and hand controller modules. The user could select the most suitable assistive technology based on his/her level of disability. Other existing assistive technologies could also be connected to the proposed system in the future using the same protocol.

  11. Alternatives to placebo-controlled trials in psychiatry. ECNP Consensus Meeting, September 26, 1996, Amsterdam. European College of Neuropsychopharmacology.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, S A

    1999-03-01

    Patients receiving placebo do not merely receive an inert substance but also receive support, concern, and reassurance that assists the therapeutic alliance and encourages the positive attitude that forms the basis of cognitive treatment. Response to non-specific factors is seen in all fields of medicine but is particularly potent in psychiatry. The placebo response is variable across settings and across time and is unpredictable. Historical data cannot therefore provide an adequate control for treatment effects in studies of new drugs. The scientific position is clear that a comparison against placebo is required for the unequivocal demonstration of the efficacy of a treatment. Evidence from at least two positive well designed and conducted placebo-controlled studies is generally accepted as appropriate to establish the efficacy of a drug. Attention to diagnosis, severity of illness, and to possible comorbid conditions is needed in the design and conduct of placebo-controlled studies in order to optimise the chance of obtaining valid data. The use of all data obtained, including dropouts due to lack of efficacy, should be maximised. The use of placebo may not be possible in some conditions that represent medical emergencies or may be difficult to justify in serious disorders where an effective treatment has already been established. Alternative designs to placebo-controlled studies can be considered. Consistent superior efficacy compared with a well accepted, effective treatment, given in an easily defended dose, is considered to be good evidence of efficacy provided that the studies are well designed and well conducted. Evidence of superior efficacy to an established effective comparator treatment may be regarded as evidence of efficacy. The demonstration of a dose-response relationship where one dose is found to be significantly better than another, can be taken as evidence for efficacy, particularly where there is already placebo-controlled evidence of the

  12. Oral Fluid and Plasma Cannabinoid Ratios after Around-the-Clock Controlled Oral Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration

    PubMed Central

    Milman, Garry; Schwope, David M.; Schwilke, Eugene W.; Darwin, William D.; Kelly, Deanna L.; Goodwin, Robert S.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Oral fluid (OF) testing is increasingly important for drug treatment, workplace, and drugged-driving programs. There is interest in predicting plasma or whole-blood concentrations from OF concentrations; however, the relationship between these matrices is incompletely characterized because of few controlled drug-administration studies. METHODS Ten male daily cannabis smokers received around-the-clock escalating 20-mg oral Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, dronabinol) doses (40–120 mg/day) for 8 days. Plasma and OF samples were simultaneously collected before, during, and after dosing. OF THC, 11-hydroxy-THC and 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH) were quantified by GC-MS at 0.5-μg/L, 0.5-μg/L, and 7.5-ng/L limits of quantification (LOQs), respectively. In plasma, the LOQs were 0.25 μg/L for THC and THCCOOH, and 0.5 μg/L for 11-hydroxy-THC. RESULTS Despite multiple oral THC administrations each day and increasing plasma THC concentrations, OF THC concentrations generally decreased over time, reflecting primarily previously self-administered smoked cannabis. The logarithms of the THC concentrations in oral fluid and plasma were not significantly correlated (r = −0.10; P = 0.065). The OF and plasma THCCOOH concentrations, albeit with 1000-fold higher concentrations in plasma, increased throughout dosing. The logarithms of OF and plasma THCCOOH concentrations were significantly correlated (r = 0.63; P < 0.001), although there was high interindividual variation. A high OF/plasma THC ratio and a high OF THC/THCCOOH ratio indicated recent cannabis smoking. CONCLUSIONS OF monitoring does not reliably detect oral dronabinol intake. The time courses of THC and THCCOOH concentrations in plasma and OF were different after repeated oral THC doses, and high inter-individual variation was observed. For these reasons, OF cannabinoid concentrations cannot predict concurrent plasma concentrations. PMID:21875944

  13. Neurophysiological effects of acute oxytocin administration: systematic review and meta-analysis of placebo-controlled imaging studies

    PubMed Central

    Wigton, Rebekah; Radua, Jocham; Allen, Paul; Averbeck, Bruno; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; McGuire, Philip; Shergill, Sukhi S.; Fusar-Poli, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxytocin (OXT) plays a prominent role in social cognition and may have clinical applications for disorders such as autism, schizophrenia and social anxiety. The neural basis of its mechanism of action remains unclear. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review of placebo-controlled imaging studies using OXT as a pharmacological manipulator of brain activity. Results We identified a total of 21 studies for inclusion in our review, and after applying additional selection criteria, 11 of them were included in our fMRI voxel-based meta-analysis. The results demonstrate consistent alterations in activation of brain regions, including the temporal lobes and insula, during the processing of social stimuli, with some variation dependent on sex and task. The meta-analysis revealed significant left insular hyperactivation after OXT administration, suggesting a potential modulation of neural circuits underlying emotional processing. Limitations This quantitative review included only a limited number of studies, thus the conclusions of our analysis should be interpreted cautiously. This limited sample size precluded a more detailed exploration of potential confounding factors, such as sex or other demographic factors, that may have affected our meta-analysis. Conclusion Oxytocin has a wide range of effects over neural activity in response to social and emotional processing, which is further modulated by sex and task specificity. The magnitude of this neural activation is largest in the temporal lobes, and a meta-analysis across all tasks and both sexes showed that the left insula demonstrated the most robust activation to OXT administration. PMID:25520163

  14. Alternative security

    SciTech Connect

    Weston, B.H. )

    1990-01-01

    This book contains the following chapters: The Military and Alternative Security: New Missions for Stable Conventional Security; Technology and Alternative Security: A Cherished Myth Expires; Law and Alternative Security: Toward a Just World Peace; Politics and Alternative Security: Toward a More Democratic, Therefore More Peaceful, World; Economics and Alternative Security: Toward a Peacekeeping International Economy; Psychology and Alternative Security: Needs, Perceptions, and Misperceptions; Religion and Alternative Security: A Prophetic Vision; and Toward Post-Nuclear Global Security: An Overview.

  15. Transgenic glyphosate-resistant oilseed rape (Brassica napus) as an invasive weed in Argentina: detection, characterization, and control alternatives.

    PubMed

    Pandolfo, Claudio E; Presotto, Alejandro; Carbonell, Francisco Torres; Ureta, Soledad; Poverene, Mónica; Cantamutto, Miguel

    2016-12-01

    The presence of glyphosate-resistant oilseed rape populations in Argentina was detected and characterized. The resistant plants were found as weeds in RR soybeans and other fields. The immunological and molecular analysis showed that the accessions presented the GT73 transgenic event. The origin of this event was uncertain, as the cultivation of transgenic oilseed rape cultivars is prohibited in Argentina. This finding might suggest that glyphosate resistance could come from unauthorized transgenic oilseed rape crops cultivated in the country or as seed contaminants in imported oilseed rape cultivars or other seed imports. Experimentation showed that there are alternative herbicides for controlling resistant Brassica napus populations in various situations and crops. AHAS-inhibiting herbicides (imazethapyr, chlorimuron and diclosulam), glufosinate, 2,4-D, fluroxypyr and saflufenacil proved to be very effective in controlling these plants. Herbicides evaluated in this research were employed by farmers in one of the fields invaded with this biotype and monitoring of this field showed no evidence of its presence in the following years.

  16. Factors Affecting Recruitment and Attrition in Randomised Controlled Trials of Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Pregnancy-Related Issues

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) investigating Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) for pregnancy-related issues have encountered issues with recruitment and attrition. Little is known about the cause of these issues. Methods. Data was gathered from an antenatal CAM randomised controlled trial. During foetal anomaly appointments, women meeting inclusion criteria were invited to participate in the trial. Numbers of women invited and eligible were recorded. Reasons for noninterest were noted and analysed. Focus groups exploring trial experience of participants were also conducted. Findings. Of the 428 women invited to participate, 376 were eligible and just under a quarter participated. Reasons for nonparticipation included concerns about CAM and lack of interest in participation in research. Other factors negatively affecting recruitment included recruitment timing, competition for participants, limited support from staff, and inadequate trial promotion. Factors encouraging recruitment included being interested in research and seeking pain relief. Reasons for dropping out were time constraints, travel issues, work commitments, and pregnancy issues. Several women in the sham and usual care group dropped out due to dissatisfaction with treatment allocation. Conclusion. CAM researchers must explore problems encountered with recruitment and attrition so that evidence-based implementation strategies to address the issues can be developed. PMID:27956921

  17. Alternating irrigation water quality as a method to control solute concentrations and mass fluxes below irrigated fields: A numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, David

    2016-05-01

    The aim of the present numerical study was to extend the data-driven protocol for the control of soil salinity, to control chloride and nitrate concentrations and mass fluxes below agricultural fields irrigated with treated waste water (TWW). The protocol is based on alternating irrigation water quality between TWW and desalinized water (DSW), guided by solute concentrations at soil depth, zs. Two different schemes, the first requires measurements of soil solution concentrations of chloride and nitrate at zs, while, the second scheme requires only measurements of soil solution EC at zs, were investigated. For this purpose, 3-D numerical simulations of flow and transport were performed for variably saturated, spatially heterogeneous, flow domains located at two different field sites. The sites differ in crop type, irrigation method, and in their lithology; these differences, in turn, considerably affect the performance of the proposed schemes, expressed in terms of their ability to reduce solute concentrations that drained below the root zone. Results of the analyses suggest that the proposed data-driven schemes allow the use of low-quality water for irrigation, while minimizing the consumption of high-quality water to a level, which, for given climate, soil, crop, irrigation method, and water quality, may be determined by the allowable nitrate and chloride concentrations in the groundwater. The results of the present study indicate that with respect to the diminution of groundwater contamination by chloride and nitrate, the more data demanding, first scheme is superior the second scheme.

  18. Testing Spirotetramat as an Alternative Solution to Abamectin for Cacopsylla pyri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) Control: Laboratory and Field Tests.

    PubMed

    Civolani, Stefano; Boselli, Mauro; Butturini, Alda; Chicca, Milvia; Cassanelli, Stefano; Tommasini, Maria Grazia; Aschonitis, Vassilis; Fano, Elisa Anna

    2015-12-01

    Aim of the study was to investigate the performance of the new insecticide "spirotetramat" as an alternative solution of "abamectin" for the control of Cacopsylla pyri L. (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) in the context of an IPM program in European pear, Pyrus communis L.. Laboratory bioassays for the estimation of LC50 and LC90 of both insecticides were performed using four populations collected in Emilia-Romagna (Italy) orchards where different pest management strategies were used (organic, integrated, and conventional). The same populations were also analyzed for the main insecticide detoxifying activities in nymphs by spectrofluorimetric in vitro assays. The performance of the two insecticides was also tested on field on one population under integrated pest management conditions. The laboratory experiments showed that the LC90 of spirotetramat were lower than the highest field concentration allowed in Europe (172.80 mg AI liter(-1)) giving reassurance about the efficacy of the product. Concerning the abamectin, the laboratory bioassays did not show strong indications of resistance development of C. pyri populations of Emilia-Romagna. A similarity in enzyme detoxifying activity was observed in both insecticides indicating a general absence of a significant insecticide resistance. The field trial showed a high efficacy (>90 %) of spirotetramat on C. pyri already after 15 d from application, and it was significantly higher from abamectin. Overall, spirotetramat is one more choice for C. pyri control, as well as abamectin in order to minimize the risks of occurrence of insecticide resistance.

  19. Central coordination as an alternative for local coordination in a multicenter randomized controlled trial: the FAITH trial experience

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Surgeons in the Netherlands, Canada and the US participate in the FAITH trial (Fixation using Alternative Implants for the Treatment of Hip fractures). Dutch sites are managed and visited by a financed central trial coordinator, whereas most Canadian and US sites have local study coordinators and receive per patient payment. This study was aimed to assess how these different trial management strategies affected trial performance. Methods Details related to obtaining ethics approval, time to trial start-up, inclusion, and percentage completed follow-ups were collected for each trial site and compared. Pre-trial screening data were compared with actual inclusion rates. Results Median trial start-up ranged from 41 days (P25-P75 10-139) in the Netherlands to 232 days (P25-P75 98-423) in Canada (p = 0.027). The inclusion rate was highest in the Netherlands; median 1.03 patients (P25-P75 0.43-2.21) per site per month, representing 34.4% of the total eligible population. It was lowest in Canada; 0.14 inclusions (P25-P75 0.00-0.28), representing 3.9% of eligible patients (p < 0.001). The percentage completed follow-ups was 83% for Canadian and Dutch sites and 70% for US sites (p = 0.217). Conclusions In this trial, a central financed trial coordinator to manage all trial related tasks in participating sites resulted in better trial progression and a similar follow-up. It is therefore a suitable alternative for appointing these tasks to local research assistants. The central coordinator approach can enable smaller regional hospitals to participate in multicenter randomized controlled trials. Circumstances such as available budget, sample size, and geographical area should however be taken into account when choosing a management strategy. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00761813 PMID:22225733

  20. Early Administration of Selenium in Patients with Acute Traumatic Brain Injury: A Randomized Double-blinded Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Omid Moradi; Lahiji, Mohammad Niakan; Hassani, Valiollah; Mozari, Shakiba

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The present study was carried out to examine this hypothesis that administration of selenium can prevent the development of injuries by brain trauma and thus can modulate patients’ functional recovery and also improve posttraumatic outcome. Materials and Methods: This double-blinded controlled trial was carried out on 113 patients who were hospitalized following traumatic brain injury (TBI) with Glasgow Coma Scale score of 4–12 that were randomly assigned to receive selenium within 8 h after injury plus standard treatment group or routine standard treatment alone as the control. The primary endpoint was to assess patients’ functional recovery at 2 months after the injury based on extended Glasgow Outcome Scale score (GOS-E). Secondary outcomes included the changes in Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score (FOUR) score, Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, and acute physiology and chronic health evaluation (APACHE) III score, side effects of selenium, length of Intensive Care Unit (ICU) stay, and length of hospital stay. Results: There was no difference in the length of ICU and hospital stay, the trend of the change in FOUR and SOFA scores within 15 days of first interventions, and the mean APACHE III score on the 1st and 15th days between the two groups. Mortality was 15.8% in selenium group and 19.6% in control group with no between-group difference. No difference was revealed between the two groups in appropriate outcome according to GOS-E score at 60 ± 10 days and also 30 ± 5 days according to the severity of TBI. Conclusion: This human trial study could not demonstrate beneficial effects of intravenous infusion of selenium in the improvement of outcomes in patients with acute TBI. PMID:28250601

  1. Improved outcomes from the administration of progesterone for patients with acute severe traumatic brain injury: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Guomin; Wei, Jing; Yan, Weiqi; Wang, Weimin; Lu, Zhenhui

    2008-01-01

    Background Severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) has been increasing with greater incidence of injuries from traffic or sporting accidents. Although there are a number of animal models of TBI using progesterone for head injury, the effects of progesterone on neurologic outcome of acute TBI patients remain unclear. The aim of the present clinical study was to assess the longer-term efficacy of progesterone on the improvement in neurologic outcome of patients with acute severe TBI. Methods A total of 159 patients who arrived within 8 hours of injury with a Glasgow Coma Score ≤ 8 were enrolled in the study. A prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of progesterone was conducted in the Neurotrauma Center of our teaching hospital. The patients were randomized to receive either progesterone or placebo. The primary endpoint was the Glasgow Outcome Scale score 3 months after brain injury. Secondary efficacy endpoints included the modified Functional Independence Measure score and mortality. In a follow-up protocol at 6 months, the Glasgow Outcome Scale and the modified Functional Independence Measure scores were again determined. Results Of the 159 patients randomized, 82 received progesterone and 77 received placebo. The demographic characteristics, the mechanism of injury, and the time of treatment were compared for the two groups. After 3 months and 6 months of treatment, the dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Scale score analysis exhibited more favorable outcomes among the patients who were given progesterone compared with the control individuals (P = 0.034 and P = 0.048, respectively). The modified Functional Independence Measure scores in the progesterone group were higher than those in the placebo group at both 3-month and 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01). The mortality rate of the progesterone group was significantly lower than that of the placebo group at 6-month follow-up (P < 0.05). The mean intracranial pressure values 72 hours and 7 days after

  2. [Effects of nitrogen forms on the growth, yield and fruit quality of tomato under controlled alternate partial root zone irrigation].

    PubMed

    Zhang Qiang; Xu, Fei; Wang, Rong-fu; Shu, Liang-zuo; Liu, Rui; Zhang, De-yu

    2014-12-01

    The effects of nitrogen (N) forms (ammonium-N and nitrate-N) on the growth, yield and fruit quality of tomato plants (cv. Zhongyan 988) under controlled alternate partial root zone irrigation (APRI) were examined in a split-root experiment. Under the same irrigation mode and/or controlled soil water limitation treatment, ammonium-N promoted plant growth at the early stage, while nitrate-N improved plant growth and development at the later stage leading to higher biomass accumulation and fruit yield at harvest. Under APRI and the same soil water conditions, plants of the nitrate-N treatment improved the content of vitamin C and the ratio of soluble sugar to organic acid and thus facilitated fruit quality when compared with those of the ammonium-N treatment. Plant height and leaf area under APRI treatment were lower compared with conventional irrigation (CK) under the same N form, but the stem diameter under APRI treatment with 60% theta(f) (field water capacity, theta(f)) soil moisture showed a slight increase at the late growth stage. Under the same N form, fruit yield was significantly lower in APRI treatment than that of the CK. Compared with the CK, fruit yield decreased by 22.4%-26.3% under the APRI treatment with 40% theta(f) soil moisture. Under 60% theta(f) soil moisture, the APRI treatment significantly improved fruit quality and water-use efficiency compared with the CK regardless small reduction (5.3%-5.4%) in fruit yield. The experimental results suggested that the APRI treatment with the lower limitation of soil moisture controlled at 60% theta(f), and nitrate-N supply would be the optimal option in terms of sustainable use of water resource and fertilizer.

  3. COMMUNITY MEMBERS' PERCEPTIONS OF MASS DRUG ADMINISTRATION FOR CONTROL OF LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS IN RURAL AND URBAN TANZANIA.

    PubMed

    Kisoka, William J; Tersbøl, Britt Pinkowsky; Meyrowitsch, Dan W; Simonsen, Paul E; Mushi, Declare L

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is one of several neglected tropical diseases with severely disabling and stigmatizing manifestations that are referred to as 'neglected diseases of poverty'. It is a mosquito-borne disease found endemically and exclusively in low-income contexts where, concomitantly, general public health care is often deeply troubled and fails to meet the basic health needs of impoverished populations. This presents particular challenges for the implementation of mass drug administration (MDA), which currently is the principal means of control and eventual elimination. Several MDA programmes face the dilemma that they are unable to attain and maintain the required drug coverage across target groups. In recognition of this, a qualitative study was conducted in the Morogoro and Lindi regions of Tanzania to gain an understanding of community experiences with, and perceptions of, the MDA campaign implemented in 2011 by the National Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Programme. The study revealed a wide variation of perceptions and experiences regarding the aim, rationale and justification of MDA. There were positive sentiments about the usefulness of the drugs, but many study participants were sceptical about the manner in which MDA is implemented. People were particularly disappointed with the limited attempts by implementers to share information and mobilize residents. In addition, negative sentiments towards MDA for lymphatic filariasis reflected a general feeling of desertion and marginalization by the health care system and political authorities. However, the results suggest that if the communities are brought on board with genuine respect for their integrity and informed self-determination, there is scope for major improvements in community support for MDA-based control activities.

  4. Factors Influencing Drug Uptake during Mass Drug Administration for Control of Lymphatic Filariasis in Rural and Urban Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Kisoka, William J.; Simonsen, Paul E.; Malecela, Mwelecele N.; Tersbøl, Britt P.; Mushi, Declare L.; Meyrowitsch, Dan W.

    2014-01-01

    Background In most countries of Sub-Saharan Africa, control of lymphatic filariasis (LF) is based on annual mass drug administration (MDA) with a combination of ivermectin and albendazole. Treatment coverages are however often suboptimal for programmes to reach the goal of transmission interruption within reasonable time. The present study aimed to identify predictors and barriers to individual drug uptake during MDA implementation by the National LF Elimination Programme in Tanzania. Methods A questionnaire based cross sectional household survey was carried out in two rural and two urban districts in Lindi and Morogoro regions shortly after the 2011 MDA. 3279 adults (≥15 years) were interviewed about personal characteristics, socio-economic status, MDA drug uptake among themselves and their children, reasons for taking/not taking drugs, and participation in previous MDA activities for LF control. Findings The overall drug uptake rate was 55.1% (range of 44.5–75.6% between districts). There was no overall major difference between children (54.8%) and adults (55.2%) or between females (54.9%) and males (55.8%), but the role of these and other predictors varied to some extent between study sites. Major overall predictors of drug uptake among the interviewed adults were increasing age and history of previous drug uptake. Being absent from home during drug distribution was the main reason for not taking the drugs (50.2%) followed by clinical contraindications to treatment (10.8%), missing household visits of drug distributors (10.6%), and households not being informed about the distribution (9.0%). Conclusion Drug uptake relied more on easily modifiable provider-related factors than on individual perceptions and practices in the target population. Limited investments in appropriate timing, dissemination of accurate timing information to recipients and motivation of drug distributors to visit all households (repeatedly when residents are absent) are likely to have

  5. Control system for an alternative actuator for the primary surface of the Large Millimeter Telescope (LMT/GTM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández Rebollar, José Luis; Lázaro Hernández, Josefina; Arteaga Magaña, Cesar; Hughes, David H.; Gale, David M.

    2016-07-01

    The Large Millimeter Telescope/Gran Telescopio Milimétrico (LMT/GTM) is a bi-national project between INAOE in México and UMASS in the USA. It is an open air radio telescope designed for astronomical observations in wavelengths ranging from 0.85 mm to 4 mm. Its 50-meter diameter primary reflector is so massive that its shape deviates from the theoretical parabola due to gravitational effect as it moves in elevation, which ultimately affects gain, one of the most important features of the telescope. To correct this elevation-dependent deformation, the primary surface is divided into 180 segments that are automatically positioned by means of four electro mechanical actuators. Unfortunately, the lifetime expectancy of the interim actuators installed in rings 1 to 3 during 2013, are below specs and the cost of substituting them with the new actuators, now under development for rings 4 and 5, may not be affordable. In this paper an alternative actuator control system that re uses most of the current electronics coupled to a completely redesigned mechanism is presented. The results of the performance tests under load show that the system is capable of achieving positioning with RMS error of 4 micron and that the accuracy is dominated by the LVDT characterization error.

  6. Fenitrothion: an alternative insecticide for the control of deltamethrin-resistant populations of Triatoma infestans in northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Germano, M; Picollo, M I; Spillmann, C; Mougabure-Cueto, G

    2014-03-01

    Deltamethrin-based campaigns to control Triatoma infestans (Klug) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) have decreased in success as a result of the development of insecticide resistance. We compared the in vitro effects of the pyrethroid deltamethrin and two doses of the organophosphate fenitrothion, presented on different materials, on T. infestans from La Esperanza, Argentina. Laboratory tests demonstrated a decrease in susceptibility to deltamethrin in the field population [LD50 : 30.32 nanograms per insect (ng/i)] compared with the reference population (LD50 : 0.13 ng/i), giving a high resistance ratio of 233.42. By contrast, similar susceptibility to fenitrothion was assessed in both the field and reference populations (LD50 : 21.65 ng/i and 21.38 ng/i, respectively). The effectiveness of the formulated insecticides varied according to the surfaces to which they were applied. The application of fenitrothion formulations to glass or brick resulted in mortality of 90-100%. The application of fenitrothion formulations to wood or mud caused mortality in the range of 6.7-56.7%. Resistant insects presented low mortality when exposed to the deltamethrin formulation and high mortality when exposed to fenitrothion formulations. Moreover, the insecticides demonstrated residual activity only when applied to glass. The present work demonstrates that fenitrothion is an alternative to pyrethroids for the management of deltamethrin-resistant insects in La Esperanza. However, this effectiveness is not sustained over time.

  7. Novel anti-infective molecule from innate immune cells as an antibiotic-alternative to control infections caused by Apicomplexa

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    With increasing needs for the global animal industry to address the regulatory restrictions on the use of antibiotic growth promoters (AGPs) in animal production, there is much interest to find alternatives to AGPs. To develop alternatives to antibiotics against the major poultry parasitic disease, ...

  8. Role of Alternative Food in Controlling Chaotic Dynamics in a Predator-Prey Model with Disease in the Predator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Krishna Pada; Bairagi, Nandadulal; Sen, Prabir

    It is generally, but not always, accepted that alternative food plays a stabilizing role in predator-prey interaction. Parasites, on the other hand, have the ability to change both the qualitative and quantitative dynamics of its host population. In recent times, researchers are showing growing interest in formulating models that integrate both the ecological and epidemiological aspects. The present paper deals with the effect of alternative food on a predator-prey system with disease in the predator population. We show that the system, in the absence of alternative food, exhibits different dynamics viz. stable coexistence, limit cycle oscillations, period-doubling bifurcation and chaos when infection rate is gradually increased. However, when predator consumes alternative food coupled with its focal prey, the system returns to regular oscillatory state from chaotic state through period-halving bifurcations. Our study shows that alternative food may have larger impact on the community structure and may increase population persistence.

  9. Does mass drug administration for the integrated treatment of neglected tropical diseases really work? Assessing evidence for the control of schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Less is known about mass drug administration [MDA] for neglected tropical diseases [NTDs] than is suggested by those so vigorously promoting expansion of the approach. This paper fills an important gap: it draws upon local level research to examine the roll out of treatment for two NTDs, schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths, in Uganda. Methods Ethnographic research was undertaken over a period of four years between 2005-2009 in north-west and south-east Uganda. In addition to participant observation, survey data recording self-reported take-up of drugs for schistosomiasis, soil-transmitted helminths and, where relevant, lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis was collected from a random sample of at least 10% of households at study locations. Data recording the take-up of drugs in Ministry of Health registers for NTDs were analysed in the light of these ethnographic and social survey data. Results The comparative analysis of the take-up of drugs among adults revealed that although most long term residents have been offered treatment at least once since 2004, the actual take up of drugs for schistosomiasis and soil-transmitted helminths varies considerably from one district to another and often also within districts. The specific reasons why MDA succeeds in some locations and falters in others relates to local dynamics. Issues such as population movement across borders, changing food supply, relations between drug distributors and targeted groups, rumours and conspiracy theories about the 'real' purpose of treatment, subjective experiences of side effects from treatment, alternative understandings of affliction, responses to social control measures and historical experiences of public health control measures, can all make a huge difference. The paper highlights the need to adapt MDA to local circumstances. It also points to specific generalisable issues, notably with respect to health education, drug distribution and more effective use of

  10. Simulation, Model Verification and Controls Development of Brayton Cycle PM Alternator: Testing and Simulation of 2 KW PM Generator with Diode Bridge Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankovic, Ana V.

    2003-01-01

    Professor Stankovic will be developing and refining Simulink based models of the PM alternator and comparing the simulation results with experimental measurements taken from the unit. Her first task is to validate the models using the experimental data. Her next task is to develop alternative control techniques for the application of the Brayton Cycle PM Alternator in a nuclear electric propulsion vehicle. The control techniques will be first simulated using the validated models then tried experimentally with hardware available at NASA. Testing and simulation of a 2KW PM synchronous generator with diode bridge output is described. The parameters of a synchronous PM generator have been measured and used in simulation. Test procedures have been developed to verify the PM generator model with diode bridge output. Experimental and simulation results are in excellent agreement.

  11. Identification of Recent Cannabis Use: Whole-Blood and Plasma Free and Glucuronidated Cannabinoid Pharmacokinetics following Controlled Smoked Cannabis Administration

    PubMed Central

    Schwope, David M.; Karschner, Erin L.; Gorelick, David A.; Huestis, Marilyn A.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is the most frequently observed illicit drug in investigations of accidents and driving under the influence of drugs. THC-glucuronide has been suggested as a marker of recent cannabis use, but there are no blood data following controlled THC administration to test this hypothesis. Furthermore, there are no studies directly examining whole-blood cannabinoid pharmacokinetics, although this matrix is often the only available specimen. METHODS Participants (9 men, 1 woman) resided on a closed research unit and smoked one 6.8% THC cannabis cigarette ad libitum. We quantified THC, 11-hydroxy-THC (11-OH-THC), 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH), cannabidiol (CBD), cannabinol (CBN), THC-glucuronide and THCCOOH-glucuronide directly in whole blood and plasma by liquid chromatography/ tandem mass spectrometry within 24 h of collection to obviate stability issues. RESULTS Median whole blood (plasma) observed maximum concentrations (Cmax) were 50 (76), 6.4 (10), 41 (67), 1.3 (2.0), 2.4 (3.6), 89 (190), and 0.7 (1.4) μg/L 0.25 h after starting smoking for THC, 11-OH-THC, THCCOOH, CBD, CBN, and THCCOOH-glucuronide, respectively, and 0.5 h for THC-glucuronide. At observed Cmax, whole-blood (plasma) detection rates were 60% (80%), 80% (90%), and 50% (80%) for CBD, CBN, and THC-glucuronide, respectively. CBD and CBN were not detectable after 1 h in either matrix (LOQ 1.0 μg/L). CONCLUSIONS Human whole-blood cannabinoid data following cannabis smoking will assist whole blood and plasma cannabinoid interpretation, while furthering identification of recent cannabis intake. PMID:21836075

  12. An Evaluation of the Wii Nunchuk as an Alternative Assistive Device for People with Intellectual and Physical Disabilities Using Switch Controlled Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Standen, P. J.; Camm, C.; Battersby, S.; Brown, D. J.; Harrison, M.

    2011-01-01

    Many people with intellectual disabilities also have physical difficulties which prevent them from using standard computer control devices. Custom made alternative devices for those with special needs can be expensive and the low unit turnover makes the prospect unattractive to potential manufacturers. One solution is to explore the potential of…

  13. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently utilized antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne di...

  14. Characterization of bacteriophages virulent for Clostridium perfringens and identification of phage lytic enzymes as alternatives to antibiotics for potential control of the bacterium

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a resurgent interest in the use of bacteriophages or their gene products to control bacterial pathogens as alternatives to currently utilized antibiotics. Clostridium perfringens is a Gram-positive, spore-forming anaerobic bacterium that plays a significant role in human food-borne d...

  15. Case-Control Study of Telavancin as an Alternative Treatment for Gram-Positive Bloodstream Infections in Patients with Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hachem, Ray; Jordan, Mary; Garoge, Kumait; Al Hamal, Zainab; El Zakhem, Aline; Viola, George M.; Granwehr, Bruno; Mulanovich, Victor; Gagel, Andrew; Reitzel, Ruth; Yousif, Ammar; Jiang, Ying; Raad, Issam

    2015-01-01

    Gram-positive bacterial infections are an important cause of morbidity and death among cancer patients, despite current therapy. In this case-control study, we evaluated the clinical outcomes and safety of telavancin in cancer patients with uncomplicated Gram-positive bloodstream infections (BSIs). Between March 2011 and May 2013, we enrolled cancer patients with uncomplicated Gram-positive BSIs to receive intravenous telavancin therapy for at least 14 days for Staphylococcus aureus and 7 days for other Gram-positive cocci. Patients with baseline creatinine clearance (CLCR) values of >50 ml/min received 10 mg/kg/day of telavancin, and those with CLCR values between 30 and 49 ml/min received 7.5 mg/kg/day. Patients were compared with a retrospective cohort of 39 historical patients with Gram-positive BSIs, matched for underlying malignancy, infecting organism, and neutropenia status, who had been treated with vancomycin. A total of 78 patients were analyzed, with 39 in each group. The most common pathogen causing BSIs was S. aureus (51%), followed by alpha-hemolytic streptococci (23%), Enterococcus spp. (15%), coagulase-negative staphylococci (8%), and beta-hemolytic streptococci (3%). Sixty-two percent of patients had hematological malignancies, and 38% had solid tumors; 51% of the patients were neutropenic. The overall response rate determined by clinical outcome and microbiological eradication at 72 h following the initiation of therapy, in the absence of relapse, deep-seated infections, and/or infection-related death, was better with telavancin than with vancomycin (86% versus 61%; P = 0.013). Rates of drug-related adverse events were similar in the two groups (telavancin, 31%; vancomycin, 23%; P = 0.79), with similar rates of renal adverse events. Telavancin may provide a useful alternative to standard vancomycin therapy for Gram-positive BSIs in cancer patients. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT01321879.) PMID

  16. 48 CFR 970.2204-1-1 - Administrative controls and criteria for application of the Davis-Bacon Act in operational or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... and criteria for application of the Davis-Bacon Act in operational or maintenance activities. 970.2204... Administrative controls and criteria for application of the Davis-Bacon Act in operational or maintenance... that are a part of operational and maintenance activities or which, being very closely and...

  17. 48 CFR 970.2204-1-1 - Administrative controls and criteria for application of the Davis-Bacon Act in operational or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... and criteria for application of the Davis-Bacon Act in operational or maintenance activities. 970.2204... Administrative controls and criteria for application of the Davis-Bacon Act in operational or maintenance... that are a part of operational and maintenance activities or which, being very closely and...

  18. Alternative Fuels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  19. Alternative Therapies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Late Effects of Poliomyelitis for Physicians and Survivors © Alternative Therapies Alternative therapies, also called complementary, can support ... of motion, pain, and fatigue are often reported. Energy work includes acupuncture and acupressure, traditional Chinese medicine ...

  20. Administrative Synergy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Weckstein, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles to overcome in creating and sustaining an administrative professional learning community (PLC) is time. Administrators are constantly deluged by the tyranny of the urgent. It is a Herculean task to carve out time for PLCs, but it is imperative to do so. In this article, the authors describe how an administrative PLC…

  1. Psychosocial Impact of Alternative Management Policies for Low-Grade Cervical Abnormalities: Results from the TOMBOLA Randomised Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Little, Julian; Gray, Nicola M.; Cruickshank, Margaret; Smart, Louise; Thornton, Alison; Waugh, Norman; Walker, Leslie

    2013-01-01

    Background Large numbers of women who participate in cervical screening require follow-up for minor cytological abnormalities. Little is known about the psychological consequences of alternative management policies for these women. We compared, over 30-months, psychosocial outcomes of two policies: cytological surveillance (repeat cervical cytology tests in primary care) and a hospital-based colposcopy examination. Methods Women attending for a routine cytology test within the UK NHS Cervical Screening Programmes were eligible to participate. 3399 women, aged 20–59 years, with low-grade abnormal cytology, were randomised to cytological surveillance (six-monthly tests; n = 1703) or initial colposcopy with biopsies and/or subsequent treatment based on colposcopic and histological findings (n = 1696). At 12, 18, 24 and 30-months post-recruitment, women completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). A subgroup (n = 2354) completed the Impact of Event Scale (IES) six weeks after the colposcopy episode or first surveillance cytology test. Primary outcomes were percentages over the entire follow-up period of significant depression (≥8) and significant anxiety (≥11; “30-month percentages”). Secondary outcomes were point prevalences of significant depression, significant anxiety and procedure-related distress (≥9). Outcomes were compared between arms by calculating fully-adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for initial colposcopy versus cytological surveillance. Results There was no significant difference in 30-month percentages of significant depression (OR = 0.99, 95% CI 0.80–1.21) or anxiety (OR = 0.97, 95% CI 0.81–1.16) between arms. At the six-week assessment, anxiety and distress, but not depression, were significantly less common in the initial colposcopy arm (anxiety: 7.9% vs 13.4%; OR = 0.55, 95% CI 0.38–0.81; distress: 30.6% vs 39.3%, OR = 0.67 95% CI 0.54–0.84). Neither anxiety nor depression differed between

  2. Independent Alternative Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wohl, Seth F.

    Ten alternative high schools serving a total of 2,750 students in New York City were evaluated in terms of their administration, programs, student body, and specific educational objectives. Three main types of programs were in operation at the schools. These included: (1) Remediation with emphasis on basic skills in reading, mathematics and…

  3. Drinking water from alternative water sources: differences in beliefs, social norms and factors of perceived behavioural control across eight Australian locations.

    PubMed

    Dolnicar, S; Hurlimann, A

    2009-01-01

    Australia is facing serious challenges in the management of water in various urban and regional locations. Two popular responses to these challenges are increasing supply through alternative water sources such as recycled and desalinated water. However, significant gaps exist in our knowledge of community attitudes to these alternative sources of water, particularly for potable use. This paper reports results from an Australian study of community attitudes to alternative water sources. Sixty six qualitative interviews were held at eight locations with distinctly different water situations. This paper explores all three antecedents to the behaviour of drinking recycled water and desalinated water as postulated by the Theory of Planned Behaviour: attitudes, social norms and factors of perceived behavioural control. Key results indicate that while people hold both positive and negative beliefs (mostly cost, health and environmental concerns) about water from alternative sources, nearly all of them are willing to drink it if the water crisis were to deteriorate further. People also feel they lack knowledge and state that information from scientists would influence their decision to drink recycled and desalinated water most. Friends and relatives are most influential in preventing people from drinking recycled water. The findings reported in this paper have major implications for water policy, and will be of particular interest to water engineers. The paper raises a provocative question: Is it better to avoid public consultation in introducing water from alternative sources?

  4. 75 FR 78997 - Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/Health Resources and Services Administration (CDC/HRSA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-17

    .../Health Resources and Services Administration (CDC/HRSA) Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and...-463) of October 6, 1972, that the CDC/HRSA Advisory Committee on HIV and STD Prevention and Treatment.... Contact Person for More Information: Kevin Fenton, M.D., PhD, Designated Federal Officer,...

  5. Ketamine Infusion Therapy as an Alternative Pain Control Strategy in Patients with Multi-Trauma including Rib Fracture; Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Losing, Ashley K; Jones, Justin M; Keric, Adis; Briggs, Steven E; Leedahl, David D

    2016-01-01

    Ketamine is a promising alternative agent for pain control that offers benefit to traditional strategies, particularly in the setting of rib fracture. Current pharmacologic therapies have clear adverse effects, and other options may be invasive, cost prohibitive, or marginally effective. We describe three consecutive patients with traumatic injuries including rib fracture for which a ketamine infusion was utilized as part of their pain control strategy.  For each patient, use of a ketamine infusion trended toward reduced opioid requirements with stable pain scores. One patient experienced a dissociative adverse effect prompting decrease and discontinuation of ketamine. No pulmonary complications in the form of emergent intubation or new diagnosis of pneumonia were observed. We believe the addition of ketamine infusion to be a valid alternative strategy for managing pain associated with rib fracture. PMID:27540552

  6. 7 CFR 932.30 - Alternates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.30 Alternates. An alternate for a member of...

  7. 7 CFR 932.30 - Alternates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.30 Alternates. An alternate for a member of...

  8. 7 CFR 932.30 - Alternates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.30 Alternates. An alternate for a member of...

  9. 7 CFR 932.30 - Alternates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.30 Alternates. An alternate for a member of...

  10. 7 CFR 932.30 - Alternates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE OLIVES GROWN IN CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Olive Administrative Committee § 932.30 Alternates. An alternate for a member of...

  11. 40 CFR 191.26 - Alternative provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alternative provisions. 191.26 Section....26 Alternative provisions. The Administrator may, by rule, substitute for any of the provisions of this subpart alternative provisions chosen after: (a) The alternative provisions have been proposed...

  12. Effects of gonadotropin-releasing hormone administration or a controlled internal drug-releasing insert after timed artificial insemination on pregnancy rates of dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jae Kwan; Choi, In Soo; Kang, Hyun Gu; Hur, Tai Young

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) administration (Experiment 1) and a controlled internal drug-releasing (CIDR) insert (Experiment 2) after timed artificial insemination (TAI) on the pregnancy rates of dairy cows. In Experiment 1, 569 dairy cows that underwent TAI (day 0) following short-term synchronization with prostaglandin F2α were randomly allocated into two groups: no further treatment (control, n = 307) or injection of 100 µg of gonadorelin on day 5 (GnRH, n = 262). In Experiment 2, 279 dairy cows that underwent TAI (day 0) following Ovsynch were randomly allocated into two groups: no further treatment (control, n = 140) or CIDR insert treatment from days 3.5 to 18 (CIDR, n = 139). The probability of pregnancy following TAI did not differ between the GnRH (34.4%) and control (31.6%, p > 0.05) groups. However, the probability of pregnancy following TAI was higher (odds ratio: 1.74, p < 0.05) in the CIDR group (51.1%) than in the control group (39.3%). Overall, CIDR insert treatment at days 3.5 to 18 increased pregnancy rates relative to non-treated controls, whereas a single GnRH administration on day 5 did not affect the pregnancy outcomes of dairy cows. PMID:27030200

  13. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 - Control Tower and Support Building, Las Vegas, NV

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-31

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 70% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be built in Las Vegas, Nevada by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specification that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  14. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration – Project 209 Control Tower and Support Building Oakland, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-01

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 70% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be build at Oakland, California by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specification that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  15. Detection of urinary markers for thiazide diuretics after oral administration of hydrochlorothiazide and altizide-relevance to doping control analysis.

    PubMed

    Deventer, K; Pozo, O J; Van Eenoo, P; Delbeke, F T

    2009-03-20

    In sports, thiazide diuretics are used to flush out previously taken prohibited substances with forced diuresis and in sports where weight classes are involved to achieve acute weight loss. Thiazide diuretics include compounds which are very unstable and hydrolyse in aqueous media. Because information regarding the urinary detection of the hydrolysis products is limited, urinary excretion profiles for the hydrolysis product 4-amino-6-chloro-1,3-benzenedisulphonamide were established in 6 healthy volunteers after oral administration of altizide (15 mg per tablet) and hydrochlorothiazide (25mg per tablet). Additionally, the excretion profile of chlorothiazide, a metabolite of altizide and hydrochlorothiazide, was also determined. A quantitative liquid-chromatographic tandem mass spectrometric method to detect the 4 substances was developed and validated. The result of this work shows that altizide is eliminated within 48 h in urine whereas hydrochlorothiazide was detectable after 120 h. Chlorothiazide was determined to be a minor metabolite of altizide and hydrochlorothiazide and could be detected up to 120 h. The hydrolysis product, 4-amino-6-chloro-1,3-benzenedisulphonamide, was detectable 120 h after administration, with concentrations at least 10 times higher than the parent drug. Concentrations ranged between 41-239 and 60-287 ng/mL after altizide and hydrochlorothiazide administration, respectively. The study shows that 4-amino-6-chloro-1,3-benzenedisulphonamide is an important target compound for the long time detection of thiazide diuretics in urine.

  16. Significant increase of salivary testosterone levels after single therapeutic transdermal administration of testosterone: suitability as a potential screening parameter in doping control.

    PubMed

    Thieme, Detlef; Rautenberg, Claudia; Grosse, Joachim; Schoenfelder, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The legally defensible proof of the abuse of endogenous steroids in sports is currently based on carbon isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), i.e. a comparison between (13)C/(12)C ratios of diagnostic precursors and metabolites of testosterone. The application of this technique requires a chromatographic baseline separation of respective steroids prior to IRMS detection and hence laborious sample pre-processing of the urinary steroid extracts including clean up by solid-phase extraction and/or liquid chromatography. Consequently, an efficient pre-selection of suspicious control urine samples is essential for appropriate follow up confirmation by IRMS and effective doping control. Two single transdermal administration studies of testosterone (50 mg Testogel® and Testopatch® at 3.8 mg in 16 h, respectively) were conducted and resulting profiles of salivary testosterone and urinary steroid profiles and corresponding carbon isotope ratios were determined. Conventional doping control markers (testosterone/epitestosterone ratio, threshold concentrations of androsterone, etiocholanolone, or androstanediols) did not approach or exceed critical thresholds. In contrast to these moderate variations, the testosterone concentration in oral fluid increased from basal values (30-142 pg/mg) to peak concentrations above 1000 pg/mg. It is likely that this significant increase in oral fluid is due to a pulsatile elevation of free (protein unbound) circulating testosterone after transdermal administration and may be assumed to represent a more diagnostic marker for transdermal testosterone administration.

  17. Improving food and agriculture productivity and the environment: Canadian initiatives in methyl bromide alternatives and emission control technologies. Revised edition

    SciTech Connect

    Marcotte, M.; Tibelius, C.

    1998-12-31

    Methyl bromide, a fumigant used in the agricultural sector, was listed as an ozone-depleting substance under the Montreal Protocol and is scheduled for phasing out in Canada. This report begins with a review of the joint industry/government approach being taken to plan and manage this phase-out. It then reviews alternative solutions that have been formulated and tested as replacements for the use of methyl bromide in greenhouse cultivation, soil fumigation, strawberry transplant production, tobacco production, grain production, and food processing facilities. Contact names and addresses are provided for those seeking further information. The final sections describe activities in methyl bromide recovery and recycling and list industry and government organizations that have expertise in methyl bromide alternatives.

  18. 75 FR 70271 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-17

    ...; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Non-Powered Suction Apparatus Device Intended for Negative... II Special Controls Guidance Document: Non-powered Suction Apparatus Device Intended for Negative... apparatus devices intended for NPWT may comply with the requirement of special controls for class II...

  19. Expanding Role of the Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibb, Jack R.

    The role of the secondary school administrator can be viewed in two ways: From a defensive point of view with the administrator marshaling the forces of organization, stimulating effort, capturing the imagination, inspiring teachers, coordinating efforts, and serving as a model of sustained effort; or from an alternative point of view with the…

  20. Control of fibroblast fibronectin expression and alternative splicing via the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway

    SciTech Connect

    White, Eric S.; Sagana, Rommel L.; Booth, Adam J.; Yan, Mei; Cornett, Ashley M.; Bloomheart, Christopher A.; Tsui, Jessica L.; Wilke, Carol A.; Moore, Bethany B.; Ritzenthaler, Jeffrey D.; Roman, Jesse; Muro, Andres F.

    2010-10-01

    Fibronectin (FN), a ubiquitous glycoprotein that plays critical roles in physiologic and pathologic conditions, undergoes alternative splicing which distinguishes plasma FN (pFN) from cellular FN (cFN). Although both pFN and cFN can be incorporated into the extracellular matrix, a distinguishing feature of cFN is the inclusion of an alternatively spliced exon termed EDA (for extra type III domain A). The molecular steps involved in EDA splicing are well-characterized, but pathways influencing EDA splicing are less clear. We have previously found an obligate role for inhibition of the tumor suppressor phosphatase and tensin homologue on chromosome 10 (PTEN), the primary regulator of the PI3K/Akt pathway, in fibroblast activation. Here we show TGF-{beta}, a potent inducer of both EDA splicing and fibroblast activation, inhibits PTEN expression and activity in mesenchymal cells, corresponding with enhanced PI3K/Akt signaling. In pten{sup -/-} fibroblasts, which resemble activated fibroblasts, inhibition of Akt attenuated FN production and decreased EDA alternative splicing. Moreover, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) in pten{sup -/-} cells also blocked FN production and EDA splicing. This effect was due to inhibition of Akt-mediated phosphorylation of the primary EDA splicing regulatory protein SF2/ASF. Importantly, FN silencing in pten{sup -/-} cells resulted in attenuated proliferation and migration. Thus, our results demonstrate that the PI3K/Akt/mTOR axis is instrumental in FN transcription and alternative splicing, which regulates cell behavior.

  1. Rbfox2-coordinated alternative splicing of Mef2d and Rock2 controls myoblast fusion during myogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Bland, Christopher S.; Kalsotra, Auinash; Scavuzzo, Marissa A.; Curk, Tomaz; Ule, Jernej; Li, Wei; Cooper, Thomas A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Alternative splicing plays important regulatory roles during periods of physiological change. During development a large number of genes coordinately express protein isoform transitions regulated by alternative splicing, however, the mechanisms that coordinate splicing and the functional integration of the resultant tissue-specific protein isoforms are typically unknown. Here we show that the conserved Rbfox2 RNA binding protein regulates 30% of the splicing transitions observed during myogenesis and is required for the specific step of myoblast fusion. Integration of Rbfox2-dependent splicing outcomes from RNA-seq with Rbfox2 iCLIP data identified Mef2d and Rock2 as Rbfox2 splicing targets. Restored activities of Mef2d and Rock2 rescued myoblast fusion in Rbfox2 depleted cultures demonstrating functional cooperation of protein isoforms generated by coordinated alterative splicing. The results demonstrate that coordinated alternative splicing by a single RNA binding protein modulates transcription (Mef2d) and cell signaling (Rock2) programs to drive tissue-specific functions (cell fusion) to promote a developmental transition. PMID:25087874

  2. An Alternative Approach to Combination Vaccines: Intradermal Administration of Isolated Components for Control of Anthrax, Botulism, Plague and Staphylococcal Toxic Shock

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-09-03

    and identification of correlates of immunity. Clin Immunol 2003, 108:51-59. 18. Williamson ED, Eley SM , Stagg AJ, Green M, Russell P, Titball RW: A...2005, 159:1136-1144. 24. Mikszta JA, Sullivan VJ, Dean C, Waterston AM, Alarcon JB, Dekker JP 3rd, Brittingham JM, Huang J, Hwang CR, Ferriter M, Jiang

  3. Goldstone (GDSCC) administrative computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, H.

    1981-01-01

    The GDSCC Data Processing Unit provides various administrative computing services for Goldstone. Those activities, including finance, manpower and station utilization, deep-space station scheduling and engineering change order (ECO) control are discussed.

  4. Administrative Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarity, Augustus C., III; Maulding, Wanda

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how all four facets of administrative ecology help dispel the claims about the "impossibility" of the superintendency. These are personal ecology, professional ecology, organizational ecology, and community ecology. Using today's superintendency as an administrative platform, current literature describes a preponderance of…

  5. Pleasant Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Unks, Gerald

    1981-01-01

    The author feels that the current wave of political conservatism may prove beneficial to education if the national mood of decentralization and decontrol leads to a resurgence of community involvement and locally-developed alternatives. He cites several examples of successful urban alternative schools. (SJL)

  6. Alternative Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stefonek, Tom; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This special double issue focuses on the issue of alternative assessment and its place in educational reform. "Alternative Assessment: A National Perspective" (T. Stefonek) emphasizes that the fundamental purposes of new assessment methods are grounded in educational goals, meaningful outcomes, and curricular and instructional programs…

  7. Control Points in School Business Management, Presenting General Observations, Specific Control Points, and a Series of Checkpoints for the Practicing School Business Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of School Business Officials, Chicago, IL.

    This revised outline of a 1962 address contains general guidelines considered still useful for practicing school business administrators. Introductory "general observations" and a preamble give advice about good personal qualities, policy and planning practices, and relations with school boards, community, staff, and fellow professional…

  8. RAFT Dispersion Alternating Copolymerization of Styrene with N-Phenylmaleimide: Morphology Control and Application as an Aqueous Foam Stabilizer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We report a new nonaqueous polymerization-induced self-assembly (PISA) formulation based on the reversible addition–fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) dispersion alternating copolymerization of styrene with N-phenylmaleimide using a nonionic poly(N,N-dimethylacrylamide) stabilizer in a 50/50 w/w ethanol/methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) mixture. The MEK cosolvent is significantly less toxic than the 1,4-dioxane cosolvent reported previously [YangP.; Macromolecules2013, 46, 8545−8556]. The core-forming alternating copolymer block has a relatively high glass transition temperature (Tg), which leads to vesicular morphologies being observed during PISA, as well as the more typical sphere and worm phases. Each of these copolymer morphologies has been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) studies. TEM studies reveal micrometer-sized elliptical particles with internal structure, with SAXS analysis suggesting an oligolamellar vesicle morphology. This structure differs from that previously reported for a closely related PISA formulation utilizing a poly(methacrylic acid) stabilizer block for which unilamellar platelet-like particles are observed by TEM and SAXS. This suggests that interlamellar interactions are governed by the nature of the steric stabilizer layer. Moreover, using the MEK cosolvent also enables access to a unilamellar vesicular morphology, despite the high Tg of the alternating copolymer core-forming block. This was achieved by simply conducting the PISA synthesis at a higher temperature for a longer reaction time (80 °C for 24 h). Presumably, MEK solvates the core-forming block more than the previously utilized 1,4-dioxane cosolvent, which leads to greater chain mobility. Finally, preliminary experiments indicate that the worms are much more efficient stabilizers for aqueous foams than either the spheres or the oligolamellar elliptical vesicles. PMID:27708458

  9. 77 FR 16123 - Draft Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... Guidance Document: Nucleic Acid-Based In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for the Detection of Mycobacterium...; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Nucleic Acid-Based In Vitro Diagnostic Devices for the... availability of a draft guidance entitled ``Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Nucleic Acid-Based...

  10. 77 FR 71213 - Revisions to the Export Administration Regulations (EAR) To Make the Commerce Control List (CCL...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... export control regime control lists and previous amendments to the EAR; (3) Structural changes to improve... `chemical warfare agents' includes those agents ``subject to the ITAR'' (see 22 CFR parts 120 through 130... chemicals that are ```subject to the ITAR' (see 22 CFR parts 120 through 130).'' ECCN 2B996. This rule...

  11. 76 FR 22906 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ...; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Topical Oxygen Chamber for Extremities; Availability AGENCY... Oxygen Chamber for Extremities.'' This guidance document was developed as a special control to support the reclassification of the topical oxygen chamber for extremities (TOCE) from class III...

  12. 75 FR 68364 - Guidance for Industry and Food and Drug Administration Staff; Class II Special Controls Guidance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ...; Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Full-Field Digital Mammography System; Availability AGENCY...-Field Digital Mammography System.'' This guidance document describes a means by which a full-field digital mammography (FFDM) system may comply with special controls that apply to these class II...

  13. Topical Versus Intravenous Administration of Tranexamic Acid in Primary Total Hip Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hanna, Sammy A.; Prasad, Anoop; Lee, Joshua; Achan, Pramod

    2016-01-01

    Tranexamic acid (TA) is widely used by orthopedic surgeons to decrease blood loss and the need for transfusion following total hip arthroplasty (THA). Although both intravenous and topical applications are described in the literature, there remains no consensus regarding the optimal regimen, dosage and method of delivery of TA during THA. In addition, concerns still exist regarding the risk of thromboembolic events with intravenous administration. The purpose of this meta-analysis was to compare the efficacy and safety of topical versus intravenous administration of TA in THA. A systemic review of the electronic databases PubMed, CENTRAL, EMBASE and Google Scholar was undertaken to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the topical and intravenous administration of TA during THA, in terms of total blood loss, rate of blood transfusion and incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) post-operatively. A meta-analysis was performed to evaluate and compare the efficacy and safety of both methods of administration. Of 248 potentially relevant papers, three RCTs comprising (482) were eligible for data extraction and meta-analysis. The results showed a slightly higher amount of blood loss [Mean Difference (MD) – 46.37, P=0.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) – 12.54 to 105.29] and rate of transfusion (Risk Ratio 1.30, P=0.39, 95%CI 0.71 to 2.37) postoperatively in the topical TA group, but both did not reach statistical significance. There were 3 cases (1.2%) of DVT/PE in the intravenous group and one case (0.4%) in the topical group. Topical TA is an effective and safe method to reduce blood loss and the rate of transfusion following primary THA. It has comparative effectiveness to IV administration with slightly less post-operative thromboembolic complications. Larger and better-designed RCTs are required to establish the optimum dosage and regimen for topical use. PMID:27761223

  14. Unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling: a management modality for treating acquired immune deficiency syndrome with Chinese medicine in Henan Province of China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Ran; Guo, Hui-jun; Liu, Zhi-bin; Li, Qiang; Yang, Ji-ping; He, Ying

    2015-04-01

    Henan Province in China has a major epidemic of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS). Chinese medicine (CM) has been used throughout the last decade, and a management modality was developed, which can be described by unified-planning, graded-administration, and centralized-controlling (UGC). The UGC modality has one primary concept (patient-centered medicine from CM theory), four basic foundations (classifying administrative region, characteristics of CM on disease treatment, health resource conditions, and distribution of patients living with HIV), six important relationships (the "three uniformities and three combinations," and the six relationships therein guide the treatment of AIDS with CM), and four key sections (management, operation, records, and evaluation). In this article, the authors introduce the UGC modality, which could be beneficial to developing countries or resource-limited areas for the management of chronic infectious disease.

  15. Cannabinoids and metabolites in expectorated oral fluid after 8 days of controlled around-the-clock oral THC administration.

    PubMed

    Milman, Garry; Barnes, Allan J; Schwope, David M; Schwilke, Eugene W; Goodwin, Robert S; Kelly, Deana L; Gorelick, David A; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2011-08-01

    Oral fluid (OF) is an increasingly accepted matrix for drug testing programs, but questions remain about its usefulness for monitoring cannabinoids. Expectorated OF specimens (n = 360) were obtained from 10 adult daily cannabis smokers before, during, and after 37 20-mg oral Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) doses over 9 days to characterize cannabinoid disposition in this matrix. Specimens were extracted and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with electron-impact ionization for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC, cannabidiol, and cannabinol, and negative chemical ionization for 11-nor-9-carboxy-THC (THCCOOH). Linear ranges for THC, 11-hydroxy-THC, and cannabidiol were 0.25-50 ng/mL; cannabinol 1-50 ng/mL; and THCCOOH 5-500 pg/mL. THCCOOH was the most prevalent analyte in 344 specimens (96.9%), with concentrations up to 1,390.3 pg/mL. 11-hydroxy-THC, cannabidiol, and cannabinol were detected in 1, 1, and 3 specimens, respectively. THC was detected in only 13.8% of specimens. The highest THC concentrations were obtained at admission (median 1.4 ng/mL, range 0.3-113.6) from previously self-administered smoked cannabis. A total of 2.5 and 3.7% of specimens were THC-positive at the recommended Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (2 ng/mL) and Driving Under the Influence of Drugs, Alcohol and Medicines (DRUID) (1 ng/mL) confirmation cutoffs, respectively. THC is currently the only analyte for monitoring cannabis exposure in OF; however, these data indicate chronic therapeutic oral THC administration and illicit oral THC use are unlikely to be identified with current guidelines. Measurement of THCCOOH may improve the detection and interpretation of OF cannabinoid tests and minimize the possibility of OF contamination from passive inhalation of cannabis smoke.

  16. 77 FR 14583 - Notice to Manufacturers of Alternative Fuel Vans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... Federal Aviation Administration Notice to Manufacturers of Alternative Fuel Vans AGENCY: Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), U.S. DOT. ACTION: Notice to Manufacturers of Alternative Fuel Vans. SUMMARY: Projects... manufacturers of alternative fuel vans. This notice requests information from manufacturers of alternative...

  17. Control Technology for Depainting Operations: Estimation of Life-Cycle Costs of Controlling Methylene Chloride in Aircraft-Depainting Operations Versus Alternative Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    alternative processes. However, this presupposes that all options depaint an equivalent surface, induce the same susceptibility to corrosion , and...Phenol N/Pc 9.7 20 5 5 Chromiumd N/P 0.2 0.8 0.1 mg/m3 0.05 mg/m3 Toluene N/P 1.4 N/P 100 50 Methanol N/P N/P N/P 200 200 Cresol N/P N/P N/P 5 5...to increase the rate of airframe corrosion . Aircraft skin corrosion data for the alternative chemicals are limited at present, so this may or may not

  18. Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAms) as an alternative drug line to control infections.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Jatin; Chandra, Harish; Nautiyal, Anant R; Kalra, Swinder J S

    2014-10-01

    Infectious diseases caused by antimicrobial-resistant microbes (ARMs) and the treatment are the serious problems in the field of medical science today world over. The development of alternative drug line to treat such infectious diseases is urgently required. Researches on ARMs revealed the presence of membrane proteins responsible for effusing the antibiotics from the bacterial cells. Such proteins have successfully been treated by plant-derived antimicrobials (PDAms) synergistically along with the commercially available antibiotics. Such synergistic action usually inhibits the efflux pump. The enhanced activity of plant-derived antimicrobials is being researched and is considered as the future treatment strategy to cure the incurable infections. The present paper reviews the advancement made in the researches on antimicrobial resistance along with the discovery and the development of more active PDAms.

  19. Negative Feedback Control of Jasmonate Signaling by an Alternative Splice Variant of JAZ101[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Moreno, Javier E.; Shyu, Christine; Campos, Marcelo L.; Patel, Lalita C.; Chung, Hoo Sun; Yao, Jian; He, Sheng Yang; Howe, Gregg A.

    2013-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonate (JA) activates gene expression by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation of jasmonate ZIM domain (JAZ) transcriptional repressor proteins. A key feature of all JAZ proteins is the highly conserved Jas motif, which mediates both JAZ degradation and JAZ binding to the transcription factor MYC2. Rapid expression of JAZ genes in response to JA is thought to attenuate JA responses, but little is known about the mechanisms by which newly synthesized JAZ proteins exert repression in the presence of the hormone. Here, we show in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) that desensitization to JA is mediated by an alternative splice variant (JAZ10.4) of JAZ10 that lacks the Jas motif. Unbiased protein-protein interaction screens identified three related basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors (MYC2, MYC3, and MYC4) and the corepressor NINJA as JAZ10.4-binding partners. We show that the amino-terminal region of JAZ10.4 contains a cryptic MYC2-binding site that resembles the Jas motif and that the ZIM motif of JAZ10.4 functions as a transferable repressor domain whose activity is associated with the recruitment of NINJA. Functional studies showed that the expression of JAZ10.4 from the native JAZ10 promoter complemented the JA-hypersensitive phenotype of a jaz10 mutant. Moreover, treatment of these complemented lines with JA resulted in the rapid accumulation of JAZ10.4 protein. Our results provide an explanation for how the unique domain architecture of JAZ10.4 links transcription factors to a corepressor complex and suggest how JA-induced transcription and alternative splicing of JAZ10 premessenger RNA creates a regulatory circuit to attenuate JA responses. PMID:23632853

  20. Alternative Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Stanley; Kimsey, Steve

    2002-01-01

    Describes the design of the DeKalb Alternative School in Atlanta, Georgia, located in a renovated shopping center. Purchasing commercial land and renovating the existing building saved the school system time and money. (EV)