Science.gov

Sample records for administrative cost recovery

  1. 77 FR 38802 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Standex International Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-29

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Standex International Corporation AGENCY... a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of past response costs concerning the Trinity... hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of past response costs concerning...

  2. 75 FR 21292 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Agreement; AVX Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Agreement; AVX Corporation AGENCY... administrative settlement for recovery of projected future response oversight costs and performance of...

  3. 78 FR 18429 - Cost Recovery for Permit Processing, Administration, and Enforcement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-26

    ... 30 CFR Parts 701, 736, 737 et al. Cost Recovery for Permit Processing, Administration, and... 701, 736, 737, 738, and 750 RIN 1029-AC65 Cost Recovery for Permit Processing, Administration, and... fees to recover the actual costs for permit review and administration and permit enforcement...

  4. 77 FR 9652 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Lake Linden Superfund Site in Lake...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Lake Linden Superfund Site in Lake Linden... Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of past response costs concerning the Lake Linden Superfund Site in...

  5. 78 FR 40738 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Double H Pesticide Burial Site

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Double H Pesticide Burial Site AGENCY... (CERCLA), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of response costs... the EPA Hazardous Substance Superfund. Upon payment of this sum to EPA, the settling parties will...

  6. 75 FR 146 - Proposed Cercla Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; David Benvenuti and Howe Cleaners, Howe...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-04

    ...: E9-31176] ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY [FRL-9099-6] Proposed Cercla Administrative Cost Recovery... (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for recovery of past costs concerning the Howe Cleaners Superfund Site in Barre, Vermont with the...

  7. 26 CFR 301.7430-2 - Requirements and procedures for recovery of reasonable administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... administrative proceeding, then an affidavit that specialized skills and distinctive knowledge as described in... reasonable administrative costs. 301.7430-2 Section 301.7430-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... reasonable administrative costs. (a) Introduction. Section 7430(a)(1) provides for the recovery,...

  8. 75 FR 34448 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Great Lakes Container Corporation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-17

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Great Lakes Container Corporation... Lakes Container Corporation Superfund Site, located in Coventry Rhode Island with the settling parties...-1216. Comments should reference the Great Lakes Container Corporation Superfund Site, Coventry,...

  9. 76 FR 14968 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Eugenio Painting Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Eugenio Painting Company AGENCY... following settling party: Eugenio Painting Company. The settlement requires the settling party to pay...

  10. 77 FR 42310 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; City of Middletown, CT and RLO...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ..., Inc., Omo Manufacturing Site, Middletown, CT AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice... administrative settlement for recovery of response costs under CERCLA, concerning the Omo Manufacturing Superfund... the Omo Manufacturing Superfund Site in Middletown, Connecticut with the following settling...

  11. 78 FR 42944 - Proposed Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ...: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice; request for public comment. SUMMARY: In accordance with... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Proposed Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Under the Comprehensive Environmental...

  12. 76 FR 51029 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Carpenter Avenue Mercury Site, Iron...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Carpenter Avenue Mercury Site, Iron... Mercury site in Iron Mountain, Dickenson County, Michigan with the following settling parties: The.... Comments should reference the Carpenter Avenue Mercury site, Iron Mountain, Dickenson County, Michigan...

  13. 75 FR 57272 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Gilberts/Kedzie Site, Village of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Gilberts/Kedzie Site, Village of Gilberts..., as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(I), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative... Hazardous Substance Superfund and additional payments when the Site is sold. The settlement includes...

  14. 78 FR 77673 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Cadie Auto Salvage Site, Belvidere...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-24

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Cadie Auto Salvage Site, Belvidere, Boone... Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for... not to sue the Settling Party pursuant to CERCLA, contribution protection for the Settling...

  15. 76 FR 69733 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Tracy Lead Battery Site, Tracy, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-09

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Tracy Lead Battery Site, Tracy, MN AGENCY... of past response costs concerning the Tracy Lead Battery Site in Tracy, Minnesota with the following.... Comments should reference the Tracy Lead Battery Site and EPA Docket No. CERCLA-05-2012-0001 and should...

  16. 76 FR 79678 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San... Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los... to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund....

  17. 76 FR 77528 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San... Hollywood Operable Unit of the San Fernando Valley Area 1 Superfund Site, located in the vicinity of Los... to the North Hollywood Operable Unit Special Account within the Hazardous Substance Superfund....

  18. 76 FR 64943 - Proposed Cercla Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; ACM Smelter and Refinery Site, Located...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-19

    ... AGENCY Proposed Cercla Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; ACM Smelter and Refinery Site, Located in..., Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (CERCLA), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed... portions of Operable Unit 1 of the Site, and to pay $1,050,000.00 to the Hazardous Substance Superfund...

  19. 75 FR 10481 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement: Sherwood Motors, Inc.; West Site/Hows...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement: Sherwood Motors, Inc.; West Site/Hows Corner Superfund Site, Plymouth, ME AGENCY: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice; request... Response, Compensation and Liability Act (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of...

  20. 76 FR 71342 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; River Forest Dry Cleaners Site, River...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-17

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; River Forest Dry Cleaners Site, River..., Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a... of receipt of notice by the Settling Party that EPA has signed the CERCLA 122(h), 42 U.S.C....

  1. 75 FR 36388 - Proposed Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Under Section 122(h) of the Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act, as Amended, 42 U.S.C. 9622(h), Doe Run Resources... administrative settlement with Doe Run Resources Corporation (Doe Run), for recovery of past response costs concerning the response actions taken by Doe Run to address lead contamination associated with a...

  2. 77 FR 22785 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Estate of Benjamin C. Schilberg...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Estate of Benjamin C. Schilberg... the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42... settling party pursuant to Section 107(a) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9607(a). For thirty (30) days following...

  3. 78 FR 22451 - Cost Recovery for Permit Processing, Administration, and Enforcement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR Parts 701, 736, 737, 738, and 750 RIN 1029-AC65 Cost Recovery for Permit Processing, Administration, and Enforcement Correction In proposed...

  4. 77 FR 46433 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlements for the Buckbee-Mears Co. Superfund Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlements for the Buckbee-Mears Co. Superfund Site.... Superfund Site located in Cortland, New York, Cortland County, EPA Region II Docket No.'s CERCLA-02-2012..., Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (``CERCLA''), notice is hereby given of two...

  5. 77 FR 58989 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement for the Buckbee-Mears Co. Superfund Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-25

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement for the Buckbee-Mears Co. Superfund Site... Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (``CERCLA''), notice is hereby given of a.... Superfund Site located in Cortland, Cortland County, New York, (the ``Site'') with the State Bank of...

  6. 76 FR 54223 - Notice of Proposed Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Pursuant to the Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-31

    ... Logistics Base Barstow, CA AGENCY: Department of the Navy, DoD. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: In accordance with... for the Recovery of Past Costs in the Matter of Marine Corps Logistics Base, Yermo Annex, Barstow... Marine Corps Logistics Base in Barstow, California (the ``Site''), located in San Bernardino...

  7. 77 FR 44238 - Proposed Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Under the Comprehensive Environmental Response...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ... amended (CERCLA), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement with The Doe Run... Mine Tailings Superfund Site in St. Francois County, Missouri. The settlement requires The Doe...

  8. 78 FR 940 - Proposed Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Under Section 122(h) of the Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act, as Amended, Former W&J Lanyon Zinc Works Superfund Site... with MCP Industries, Inc., for compromise of past response costs concerning the Former W&J Lanyon Zinc... Zinc Works Superfund Site, EPA Docket No. CERCLA-07-2012-0012. Comments should be addressed to:...

  9. 78 FR 7776 - Notice of Administrative Settlement Agreement for Recovery of Past Response Costs Pursuant to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... of the Proposed Agreement may be obtained from Robin E. Eiseman (3RC41), Senior Assistant Regional... Past Response Costs'' and ``EPA Docket No. CERCLA-03-2013- 0018DC,'' and should be forwarded to Robin E. Eiseman at the above address. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robin E. Eiseman (3RC41),...

  10. 78 FR 48868 - Proposed Cercla Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; MassDOT, MassDOT Route 1 Right-of-Way...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Proposed Cercla Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; MassDOT, MassDOT Route 1 Right-of-Way... Environmental Response Compensation, and Liability Act, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C....

  11. Cost Recovery Through Depreciation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forrester, Robert T.; Wesolowski, Leonard V.

    1983-01-01

    The approach of adopting depreciation rather than use allowance in order to recover more accurately the cost of college buildings and equipment used on federal projects is considered. It is suggested that depreciation will offer most colleges and universities a higher annual recovery rate, and an opportunity for better facilities planning. For…

  12. 47 CFR 52.17 - Costs of number administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Costs of number administration. 52.17 Section... (CONTINUED) NUMBERING Administration § 52.17 Costs of number administration. All telecommunications carriers... efficient administration of the number administration cost recovery. (c) For the purposes of this...

  13. 50 CFR 679.85 - Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION... subject to the rockfish cost recovery fee liability for the current year. (3) Publication—(i) General... the current fee percentage, details of rockfish primary species and rockfish secondary species...

  14. Unintended Consequences of Cost Recovery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piercey, David

    2010-01-01

    An Alberta school district that used a cost-recovery model to finance school services for 20 years is finding that the model produces unintended negative results. Some schools didn't spend this money on services but used it for other school operations. Some spent the money on external consultants. Professional relationships were damaged, and…

  15. 24 CFR 583.135 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative costs. 583.135... Administrative costs. (a) General. Up to five percent of any grant awarded under this part may be used for the purpose of paying costs of administering the assistance. (b) Administrative costs. Administrative...

  16. 45 CFR 96.88 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Administrative costs. 96.88 Section 96.88 Public... Assistance Program § 96.88 Administrative costs. (a) Costs of planning and administration. Any expenditure... be included in determining administrative costs subject to the statutory limitation on...

  17. 45 CFR 1336.71 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative costs. 1336.71 Section 1336.71... Administrative costs. Reasonable administrative costs of the RLF may be paid out of the loan fund. The grant award agreement between the Loan Administrator and ANA will set forth the allowable administrative...

  18. 40 CFR 20.9 - Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cost recovery. 20.9 Section 20.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CERTIFICATION OF FACILITIES § 20.9 Cost recovery. Where it appears that, by reason of estimated profits to be derived through the recovery...

  19. 40 CFR 20.9 - Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cost recovery. 20.9 Section 20.9 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CERTIFICATION OF FACILITIES § 20.9 Cost recovery. Where it appears that, by reason of estimated profits to be derived through the recovery...

  20. 24 CFR 511.71 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative costs. 511.71... Administration § 511.71 Administrative costs. (a) Maximum amount. Any grantee may use not to exceed 10 percent of... years for administrative costs eligible under paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section. Eligible...

  1. 20 CFR 632.174 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administrative costs. 632.174 Section 632.174 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN... Administrative costs. Administrative costs for this subpart are limited to and shall not exceed 20 percent of...

  2. Personnel administration can act on cost containment.

    PubMed

    Adams, J

    1980-01-01

    Hosiptal personnel administration programs have the potential to contain costs in a variety of areas, including human resources management, payroll costs, benefits costs, labor turnover, and recruitment costs. Recognizing this, the Maine Society for Hospital Personnel Administration presented a seminar and prepared a guide for trustees and administrators on the role that personnel administration can play in the Voluntary Effort to contain costs. The following article is an adaptation of the information included in the seminar and guide.

  3. 20 CFR 632.263 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administrative costs. 632.263 Section 632.263... EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.263 Administrative costs. Administrative costs for this subpart are limited to and shall not exceed 20 percent of the funds available....

  4. Cost analysis of water recovery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    A methodology was developed to predict the relevant contributions of the more intangible cost elements encountered in the development of flight-qualified hardware based on an extrapolation of past hardware development experience. Major items of costs within water recovery systems were identified and related to physical and/or performance criteria. Cost and performance data from Gemini, Skylab, and other aerospace and biotechnology programs were analyzed to identify major cost elements required to establish cost estimating relationships for advanced water recovery systems. The results of the study are expected to assist NASA in long-range planning and allocation of resources in a cost effective manner in support of earth orbital programs. This report deals with the cost analysis of the five leading water reclamation systems, namely: (1) RITE waste management-water system, (2) reverse osmosis system, (3) multifiltration system, (4) vapor compression system, and (5) closed air evaporation system with electrolytic pretreatment.

  5. Administrative costs in selected industrialized countries

    PubMed Central

    Poullier, Jean-Pierre

    1992-01-01

    The costs of health administration are compared across several countries, accompanied by discussion of some of the variations in the definition of health administration. The influence of American health accounting on other countries is examined, and findings are presented regarding the relative costs of insurance-based and direct-delivery systems. Data are presented on health administrative spending providing gross as well as per capita measures. PMID:10122004

  6. 20 CFR 632.263 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative costs. 632.263 Section 632.263 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Summer Youth Employment and Training Programs § 632.263 Administrative...

  7. 20 CFR 255.16 - Administrative relief from recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administrative relief from recovery. 255.16... RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.16 Administrative relief from recovery. (a) Where the Board seeks to recover... part, and where waiver of recovery, as provided for in § 255.10 of this part, is not available...

  8. 20 CFR 255.16 - Administrative relief from recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative relief from recovery. 255.16... RECOVERY OF OVERPAYMENTS § 255.16 Administrative relief from recovery. (a) Where the Board seeks to recover... part, and where waiver of recovery, as provided for in § 255.10 of this part, is not available...

  9. 47 CFR 54.712 - Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Contributor recovery of universal service costs...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.712 Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users. (a) Federal universal service contribution costs may be...

  10. 47 CFR 54.712 - Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contributor recovery of universal service costs...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.712 Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users. (a) Federal universal service contribution costs may be...

  11. 47 CFR 54.712 - Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contributor recovery of universal service costs...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.712 Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users. (a) Federal universal service contribution costs may be...

  12. 47 CFR 54.712 - Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Contributor recovery of universal service costs...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.712 Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users. (a) Federal universal service contribution costs may be...

  13. 47 CFR 54.712 - Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Contributor recovery of universal service costs...) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.712 Contributor recovery of universal service costs from end users. (a) Federal universal service contribution costs may be...

  14. 50 CFR 679.45 - IFQ cost recovery program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false IFQ cost recovery program. 679.45 Section... Fishing Quota Management Measures § 679.45 IFQ cost recovery program. (a) Cost recovery fees—(1...) Annual report. NMFS will publish annually a report describing the status of the IFQ Cost Recovery Program....

  15. 50 CFR 679.45 - IFQ cost recovery program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false IFQ cost recovery program. 679.45 Section... Fishing Quota Management Measures § 679.45 IFQ cost recovery program. (a) Cost recovery fees—(1...) Annual report. NMFS will publish annually a report describing the status of the IFQ Cost Recovery Program....

  16. 24 CFR 511.71 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATON GRANT PROGRAM Grant Administration § 511.71... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Administrative costs. 511.71 Section 511.71 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  17. 24 CFR 511.71 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM Grant Administration § 511.71... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Administrative costs. 511.71 Section 511.71 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  18. 45 CFR 98.52 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.52 Administrative costs. (a) Not more than five percent of...) Planning, developing, and designing the Child Care and Development Fund program; (ii) Providing...

  19. 45 CFR 98.52 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.52 Administrative costs. (a) Not more than five percent of...) Planning, developing, and designing the Child Care and Development Fund program; (ii) Providing...

  20. 45 CFR 98.52 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.52 Administrative costs. (a) Not more than five percent of...) Planning, developing, and designing the Child Care and Development Fund program; (ii) Providing...

  1. 45 CFR 98.52 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.52 Administrative costs. (a) Not more than five percent of...) Planning, developing, and designing the Child Care and Development Fund program; (ii) Providing...

  2. 45 CFR 98.52 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CHILD CARE AND DEVELOPMENT FUND Use of Child Care and Development Funds § 98.52 Administrative costs. (a) Not more than five percent of...) Planning, developing, and designing the Child Care and Development Fund program; (ii) Providing...

  3. Administrative Costs of Education Voucher Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Paul T.

    This paper focuses on the administrative costs of vouchers programs. It considers the tasks that public and private agencies must undertake and estimates the administrative burdens and cash flow that local programs create. It assumes that all voucher programs, including those meant in part to reduce overcrowding, will be voluntary. The paper…

  4. 45 CFR 96.88 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative costs. 96.88 Section 96.88 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Low-income Home Energy... planning and administering the low-income home energy assistance program shall be 20 percent of...

  5. 45 CFR 96.88 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Administrative costs. 96.88 Section 96.88 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Low-income Home Energy... planning and administering the low-income home energy assistance program shall be 20 percent of...

  6. 45 CFR 96.88 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Administrative costs. 96.88 Section 96.88 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Low-income Home Energy... planning and administering the low-income home energy assistance program shall be 20 percent of...

  7. 45 CFR 96.88 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Administrative costs. 96.88 Section 96.88 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION BLOCK GRANTS Low-income Home Energy... planning and administering the low-income home energy assistance program shall be 20 percent of...

  8. Why Block Grants Should Increase Administrative Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Keith

    1983-01-01

    Federal education programs increase costs because they attach fewer strings to funds than state or local grants, and this is likely to lead to administrative empire-building. Bureaucracy tends pathologically as it grows to generate more work for itself independent of true administrative needs. Some policy implications are drawn. (MJL)

  9. Cost analysis of oxygen recovery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    The design and development of equipment for flight use in earth-orbital programs, when optimally approached cost effectively, proceed through the following logical progression: (1) bench testing of breadboard designs, (2) the fabrication and evaluation of prototype equipment, (3) redesign to meet flight-imposed requirements, and (4) qualification and testing of a flight-ready system. Each of these steps is intended to produce the basic design information necessary to progress to the next step. The cost of each step is normally substantially less than that of the following step. An evaluation of the cost elements involved in each of the steps and their impact on total program cost are presented. Cost analyses of four leading oxygen recovery subsystems which include two carbon dioxide reduction subsystem, Sabatier and Bosch, and two water electrolysis subsystems, the solid polymer electrolyte and the circulating KOH electrolyte are described.

  10. Cost analysis of oxygen recovery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1973-01-01

    Report is made of the cost analysis of four leading oxygen recovery subsystems which include two carbon dioxide reduction subsystems and two water electrolysis subsystems, namely, the solid polymer electrolyte and the circulating KOH electrolyte. The four oxygen recovery systems were quantitatively evaluated. System characteristics, including process flows, performance, and physical characteristics were also analyzed. Additionally, the status of development of each of the systems considered and the required advance technology efforts required to bring conceptual and/or pre-prototype hardware to an operational prototype status were defined. Intimate knowledge of the operations, development status, and capabilities of the systems to meet space mission requirements were found to be essential in establishing the cost estimating relationships for advanced life support systems.

  11. Low cost process heat recovery. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Theisen, P.; McCray, J.

    1980-01-01

    The objectives of this project are to analyze waste heat recovery potential, economic analysis, heat exchanger and system design, and computer analysis programs. The heating demand and heat recovery potential at a Madison neighborhood bakery was conducted. The building has steam heat and natural gas is used in the hot water heater, the cooking stoves, and in the baking oven. Heat recovery potential was analyzed based upon fuel consumption in the baking oven, flue gas temperature, mass flow rate, and hours of oven operation. The feasibility of waste heat recovery systems is analyzed using life cycle cost and life cycle savings. For a first approximation, hand calculations were performed for air-to-air flat plate, fin-plate, and liquid-to-air tube type heat exchangers using the temperature and mass flow data from a pizza restaurant in Madison. Then a heat exchanger analysis program was written in interactive BASIC. The analysis indicates that heat recovery using the flat-plate and fin-plate exchanger designs is technically feasible and yields high effectiveness. (MCW)

  12. 47 CFR 25.111 - Additional information and ITU cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Additional information and ITU cost recovery....111 Additional information and ITU cost recovery. (a) The Commission may request from any party at any... interference caused by radio stations authorized by other Administrations is guaranteed unless ITU...

  13. 40 CFR 35.935-15 - Submission and approval of industrial cost recovery system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... timely development of its system of industrial cost recovery nor shall the Regional Administrator pay... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Submission and approval of industrial... Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.935-15 Submission and approval of industrial cost recovery system....

  14. 40 CFR 35.935-15 - Submission and approval of industrial cost recovery system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... timely development of its system of industrial cost recovery nor shall the Regional Administrator pay... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Submission and approval of industrial... Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.935-15 Submission and approval of industrial cost recovery system....

  15. 75 FR 5170 - Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures-Productivity Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures--Productivity Adjustment AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Proposed Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures Productivity Adjustment....

  16. 75 FR 16575 - Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures-Productivity Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... Surface Transportation Board Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures--Productivity Adjustment AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Adoption of a railroad cost recovery procedures productivity adjustment. SUMMARY... productivity adjustment, as measured by the average change in railroad productivity for the years 2004...

  17. 78 FR 10262 - Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures-Productivity Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... Surface Transportation Board Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures--Productivity Adjustment AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board, DOT. ACTION: Proposed railroad cost recovery procedures productivity adjustment. SUMMARY... of average change in railroad productivity for the 2007-2011 (5-year) averaging period....

  18. 24 CFR 511.71 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM Grant... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Administrative costs. 511.71 Section 511.71 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  19. 24 CFR 511.71 - Administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT PROGRAM Grant... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Administrative costs. 511.71 Section 511.71 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban...

  20. 42 CFR 90.14 - Documentation and cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Documentation and cost recovery. 90.14 Section 90..., PRACTICES, AND PROCEDURES § 90.14 Documentation and cost recovery. (a) During all phases of ATSDR health... cost recovery, as specified in section 107 of CERCLA. (b) Where appropriate, the information...

  1. 47 CFR 51.215 - Dialing parity: Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dialing parity: Cost recovery. 51.215 Section... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.215 Dialing parity: Cost recovery... service in the area served by the LEC, including that LEC. The LEC shall use a cost recovery...

  2. 42 CFR 90.14 - Documentation and cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Documentation and cost recovery. 90.14 Section 90..., PRACTICES, AND PROCEDURES § 90.14 Documentation and cost recovery. (a) During all phases of ATSDR health... cost recovery, as specified in section 107 of CERCLA. (b) Where appropriate, the information...

  3. 50 CFR 12.42 - Recovery of certain storage costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recovery of certain storage costs. 12.42... PLANTS SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES Restoration of Proceeds and Recovery of Storage Costs § 12.42 Recovery of certain storage costs. If any wildlife, plant, or evidentiary item is seized and...

  4. 47 CFR 51.215 - Dialing parity: Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dialing parity: Cost recovery. 51.215 Section... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.215 Dialing parity: Cost recovery... service in the area served by the LEC, including that LEC. The LEC shall use a cost recovery...

  5. 50 CFR 12.42 - Recovery of certain storage costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recovery of certain storage costs. 12.42... PLANTS SEIZURE AND FORFEITURE PROCEDURES Restoration of Proceeds and Recovery of Storage Costs § 12.42 Recovery of certain storage costs. If any wildlife, plant, or evidentiary item is seized and...

  6. 40 CFR 300.160 - Documentation and cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Documentation and cost recovery. 300... CONTINGENCY PLAN Responsibility and Organization for Response § 300.160 Documentation and cost recovery. (a... actions taken under the NCP and to form the basis for cost recovery. In general, documentation shall...

  7. 40 CFR 300.160 - Documentation and cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Documentation and cost recovery. 300... CONTINGENCY PLAN Responsibility and Organization for Response § 300.160 Documentation and cost recovery. (a... actions taken under the NCP and to form the basis for cost recovery. In general, documentation shall...

  8. 76 FR 59058 - Minerals Management: Adjustment of Cost Recovery Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management 43 CFR Part 3000 RIN 1004-AE22 Minerals Management: Adjustment of Cost Recovery... Management Act of 1976 (FLPMA), 43 U.S.C. 1734. In 2005, the BLM published a final cost recovery rule (70 FR... comment period on the original cost recovery rule, and this new rule simply administers the procedure...

  9. 78 FR 40696 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Alaska Crab Cost Recovery

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... Crab Cost Recovery AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Commerce. ACTION... and Aleutian Islands (BSAI) Crab includes the Crab Rationalization (CR) Program, a limited access system that allocates BSAI Crab resources among harvesters, processors, and coastal communities....

  10. 76 FR 26291 - Proposed CERCLA AdministrativeCost Recovery” Settlement; the Doe Run Resources Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative ``Cost Recovery'' Settlement; the Doe Run Resources Corporation.... Francois Mining Area, St. Francois County, Missouri with the following settling party: The Doe...

  11. 29 CFR 825.213 - Employer recovery of benefit costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Employer recovery of benefit costs. 825.213 Section 825.213... Leave Act § 825.213 Employer recovery of benefit costs. (a) In addition to the circumstances discussed... not unpaid, recovery of health insurance premiums does not apply to such paid leave. (e) The...

  12. 47 CFR 64.1515 - Recovery of costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recovery of costs. 64.1515 Section 64.1515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS... Recovery of costs. No common carrier shall recover its cost of complying with the provisions of...

  13. 47 CFR 64.1515 - Recovery of costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recovery of costs. 64.1515 Section 64.1515 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS... Recovery of costs. No common carrier shall recover its cost of complying with the provisions of...

  14. 47 CFR 51.215 - Dialing parity: Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dialing parity: Cost recovery. 51.215 Section... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.215 Dialing parity: Cost recovery. (a) A LEC may recover the incremental costs necessary for the implementation of toll dialing...

  15. 47 CFR 51.215 - Dialing parity: Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dialing parity: Cost recovery. 51.215 Section... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.215 Dialing parity: Cost recovery. (a) A LEC may recover the incremental costs necessary for the implementation of toll dialing...

  16. 47 CFR 51.215 - Dialing parity: Cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dialing parity: Cost recovery. 51.215 Section... (CONTINUED) INTERCONNECTION Obligations of All Local Exchange Carriers § 51.215 Dialing parity: Cost recovery. (a) A LEC may recover the incremental costs necessary for the implementation of toll dialing...

  17. Uncertain environmental costs and the optimum rate of oil recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Dabirian, S.; Wong, D.C.

    1995-10-01

    The socially optimal rate of oil recovery from a known reservoir is analyzed when enviromental costs are uncertain and planners are either risk neutral or risk averse. It is shown that the rate of oil recovery has the same characteristics whether environmental costs are certain or uncertain. In either case, the rate of oil recovery falls monotonically to zero over the time horizon. However, the planner`s attitude toward risk is an important consideration. Risk averse planners, as a rule, begin oil recovery at a higher rate, reduce the rate of recovery more rapidly, and complete the oil recovery in a shorter time than risk neutral planners. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  18. 26 CFR 301.7430-4 - Reasonable administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... witnesses; (iii) Reasonable costs of any study, analysis, engineering report, test or project that is...) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings Civil Actions by the...

  19. 26 CFR 301.7430-4 - Reasonable administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... witnesses; (iii) Reasonable costs of any study, analysis, engineering report, test or project that is...) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings Civil Actions by the...

  20. 26 CFR 301.7430-4 - Reasonable administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... witnesses; (iii) Reasonable costs of any study, analysis, engineering report, test or project that is...) PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION PROCEDURE AND ADMINISTRATION Judicial Proceedings Civil Actions by the...

  1. 15 CFR 904.507 - Recovery of certain storage costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recovery of certain storage costs. 904.507 Section 904.507 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade... PROCEDURES Seizure and Forfeiture Procedures § 904.507 Recovery of certain storage costs. If any...

  2. 18 CFR 284.265 - Cost recovery by interstate pipeline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cost recovery by interstate pipeline. 284.265 Section 284.265 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... § 284.265 Cost recovery by interstate pipeline. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b), an...

  3. 77 FR 7237 - Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures-Productivity Adjustment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... Surface Transportation Board Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures--Productivity Adjustment AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Proposed railroad cost recovery procedures productivity adjustment. SUMMARY: In a... change in railroad productivity for the 2006-2010 (5-year) averaging period. This represents a...

  4. 76 FR 14659 - Proposed CERCLA AdministrativeCost Recovery” Settlement; The Goldfield Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative ``Cost Recovery'' Settlement; The Goldfield Corporation AGENCY... (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative settlement for...

  5. 24 CFR 1003.206 - Program administration costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Program administration costs. 1003... Eligible Activities § 1003.206 Program administration costs. ICDBG funds may be used for the payment of... to undertake a specific funded activity are also not considered program administration costs....

  6. Earthquake recovery of historic buildings: exploring cost and time needs.

    PubMed

    Al-Nammari, Fatima M; Lindell, Michael K

    2009-07-01

    Disaster recovery of historic buildings has rarely been investigated even though the available literature indicates that they face special challenges. This study examines buildings' recovery time and cost to determine whether their functions (that is, their use) and their status (historic or non-historic) affect these outcomes. The study uses data from the city of San Francisco after the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake to examine the recovery of historic buildings owned by public agencies and non-governmental organisations. The results show that recovery cost is affected by damage level, construction type and historic status, whereas recovery time is affected by the same variables and also by building function. The study points to the importance of pre-incident recovery planning, especially for building functions that have shown delayed recovery. Also, the study calls attention to the importance of further investigations into the challenges facing historic building recovery.

  7. 29 CFR 20.59 - Assessment of administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... because it became delinquent. Calculation of administrative costs shall be based on cost analyses... delinquency. (c) The Chief Financial Officer shall issue each year a schedule providing the costs...

  8. Cost analysis of water recovery systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakut, M. M.

    1972-01-01

    Cost and performance data from Gemini, Skylab, and other aerospace and biotechnology programs were analyzed to identify major cost elements required to establish cost estimating relationships for advanced life support subsystems for long range planning in support of earth orbital programs. Cost analysis are presented for five leading water reclamation systems; (1) RITE waste management-water system;(2) reverse osmosis system;(3) multifiltration system;(4) vapor compression system; and(5) closed air evaporation system with electrolytic pretreatment.

  9. 38 CFR 62.70 - Financial management and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... management of the program. These costs will include the administrative costs, both direct and indirect, of... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Financial management and administrative costs. 62.70 Section 62.70 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS...

  10. 38 CFR 62.70 - Financial management and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... management of the program. These costs will include the administrative costs, both direct and indirect, of... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Financial management and administrative costs. 62.70 Section 62.70 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS...

  11. 38 CFR 62.70 - Financial management and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... management of the program. These costs will include the administrative costs, both direct and indirect, of... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Financial management and administrative costs. 62.70 Section 62.70 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS...

  12. 38 CFR 62.70 - Financial management and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... management of the program. These costs will include the administrative costs, both direct and indirect, of... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Financial management and administrative costs. 62.70 Section 62.70 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS...

  13. 24 CFR 92.207 - Eligible administrative and planning costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... planning costs. 92.207 Section 92.207 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of... Prohibited Activities § 92.207 Eligible administrative and planning costs. A participating jurisdiction may expend, for payment of reasonable administrative and planning costs of the HOME program and ADDI,...

  14. 5 CFR 179.214 - Interest, penalties and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Interest, penalties and administrative costs. 179.214 Section 179.214 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS CLAIMS COLLECTION STANDARDS Salary Offset § 179.214 Interest, penalties and administrative...

  15. 24 CFR 1003.206 - Program administration costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... of such activities. In addition, technical assistance costs associated with developing the capacity... URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANTS FOR INDIAN TRIBES AND ALASKA NATIVE VILLAGES... reasonable administrative costs and carrying charges related to the planning and execution of...

  16. 18 CFR 284.265 - Cost recovery by interstate pipeline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... interstate pipeline. 284.265 Section 284.265 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... § 284.265 Cost recovery by interstate pipeline. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b), an interstate... directly assign the emergency gas costs to the recipient. (b) If an interstate pipeline cannot...

  17. 18 CFR 284.265 - Cost recovery by interstate pipeline.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... interstate pipeline. 284.265 Section 284.265 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... § 284.265 Cost recovery by interstate pipeline. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b), an interstate... directly assign the emergency gas costs to the recipient. (b) If an interstate pipeline cannot...

  18. 24 CFR 1006.230 - Administrative and planning costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative and planning costs... Administrative and planning costs. Up to such amount as HUD may authorize, or such other limit as may be... planning expenses of the DHHL relating to carrying out the Act and this part and activities assisted...

  19. 45 CFR 607.12 - Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Interest, penalties, and administrative costs. 607.12 Section 607.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SALARY OFFSET § 607.12 Interest, penalties, and administrative costs. Charges may be assessed on...

  20. 45 CFR 607.12 - Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Interest, penalties, and administrative costs. 607.12 Section 607.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SALARY OFFSET § 607.12 Interest, penalties, and administrative costs. Charges may be assessed on...

  1. 45 CFR 607.12 - Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Interest, penalties, and administrative costs. 607.12 Section 607.12 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION SALARY OFFSET § 607.12 Interest, penalties, and administrative costs. Charges may be assessed on...

  2. 7 CFR 277.9 - Administrative costs principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Administrative costs principles. 277.9 Section 277.9 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF... households for Food Stamp Program benefits are allowable costs for FNS reimbursement. (c) When costs...

  3. Cost-cutting for offshore sulfur recovery processes studied

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, M.P.; Echterhoff, L.W.; Leppin, D.; Meyer, H.S.

    1997-07-21

    An increasing portion of future US gas supply is likely to come from offshore, primarily Gulf of Mexico. Because this gas can be sour, the industry has sought lower cost H{sub 2}S-removal/recovery processes for treating it. Usually the gas contains < 5 tons/day (tpd) of sulfur. A study to compare several emerging sulfur-removal/recovery processes against a baseline Amine/LO-CAT II process has indicated that some emerging processes, though not yet commercialized, show considerable potential for reducing costs. Specifically, the major findings were that Double Loop and CrystaSulf, developed by Radian International LLC, Austin, were the least expensive capital-cost processes by a significant margin and that Marathon Oil Co.`s Hysulf`s cost has the potential to compete with Double Loop and CrystaSulf.

  4. 75 FR 33379 - Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures-Productivity Adjustment; Quarterly Rail Cost Adjustment Factor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... Surface Transportation Board Railroad Cost Recovery Procedures--Productivity Adjustment; Quarterly Rail... Railroads that the Board restate the previously published productivity adjustment for the 2003-2007 averaging period (2007 productivity adjustment) so that it tracks the 2007 productivity adjustment...

  5. Cost Recovery: Finding a Needle in the Haystack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colucci, Michael A.

    1988-01-01

    The first step in cost recovery for asbestos removal is identification of product and manufacturer. Tables illustrate sources of product identification, types of asbestos bulk sample reports and source documents, asbestos-related diseases, and the synergistic effect of asbestos and cigarette smoking. (MLF)

  6. 78 FR 49945 - Minerals Management: Adjustment of Cost Recovery Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-16

    ... permit 25 \\6\\ 25 application--Alaska Renewal of exploration permit-- 25 \\7\\ 25 Alaska Geothermal (part... than $1, or to the nearest penny for values under $1. \\6\\ Section 365 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005...-dated the 2005 cost recovery rule and were not affected by the Energy Policy Act prohibition, the...

  7. 75 FR 55678 - Minerals Management: Adjustment of Cost Recovery Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-14

    ... of Cost Recovery Fees AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This final rule amends the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) mineral resources regulations to update some fees... filing fees for mineral-related documents. These updates include fees for actions such as lease...

  8. 77 FR 55420 - Minerals Management: Adjustment of Cost Recovery Fees

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-10

    ... Bureau of Land Management 43 CFR Part 3000 RIN 1004-AE29 Minerals Management: Adjustment of Cost Recovery Fees AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This final rule amends the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) mineral resources regulations to update some fees that cover...

  9. 24 CFR 1003.206 - Program administration costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Eligible Activities § 1003.206 Program administration costs. ICDBG funds may be used for the payment of... this section and in § 1003.205—Eligible planning, urban environmental design and policy-planning... official business in carrying out the program; (3) Administrative services performed under third...

  10. Pupil Transportation Guide: Cost Analysis, Service Options, and Contract Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento.

    Designed to help school administrators improve the efficiency of pupil transportation programs and control costs, this guide provides detailed guidance on how to collect and analyze costs, assess the effects of service levels and policies, and develop and administer a pupil transportation contract. Following an introductory chapter, part I…

  11. 43 CFR 426.20 - Assessment of administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... costs. (a) Assessment of administrative costs for delivery of water to ineligible land. Reclamation will... delivers irrigation water to land that was ineligible because the landholders did not submit certification or reporting forms prior to the receipt of irrigation water in accordance with § 426.18; or...

  12. 24 CFR 578.59 - Project administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Activities and UFA costs, for the payment of project administrative costs related to the planning and... carrying out the environmental review responsibilities under § 578.31. (b) Sharing requirement. (1) UFAs. If the recipient is a UFA that carries out a project, it may use up to 10 percent of the grant...

  13. 24 CFR 578.59 - Project administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Activities and UFA costs, for the payment of project administrative costs related to the planning and... carrying out the environmental review responsibilities under § 578.31. (b) Sharing requirement. (1) UFAs. If the recipient is a UFA that carries out a project, it may use up to 10 percent of the grant...

  14. 20 CFR 641.859 - What other special rules govern the classification of costs as administrative costs or program...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... classification of costs as administrative costs or program costs? 641.859 Section 641.859 Employees' Benefits... EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM Administrative Requirements § 641.859 What other special rules govern the classification of costs as administrative costs or program costs? (a) Recipients and subrecipients must comply...

  15. Cost/Benefit Analysis of the Heat Recovery Incinerator (HRI).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    RD-0169 272 COST/BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF THE HEAT RECOVERY INCINERAR ill (HRI)(U) NAVAL CIVIL ENGINEERING LAO PORT HUENEME CA R M ROBERTS ET AL. SEP 85...Roberts & K. T. C. SwansonN O EL Sponsored By Naval Facilities Technical Note Engineering Command -:. NCOST/BENEFIT ANALYSIS 8 OF THE HEAT RECOVERY...with the HRI computer model. These sensitivity data are presented in a form to aid in the conceptual design of the optimum HRI facility for a given Navy

  16. Assessing administrative costs of mental health and substance abuse services.

    PubMed

    Broyles, Robert W; Narine, Lutchmie; Robertson, Madeline J

    2004-05-01

    Increasing competition in the market for mental health and substance abuse MHSA services and the potential to realize significant administrative savings have created an imperative to monitor, evaluate, and control spending on administrative functions. This paper develops a generic model that evaluates spending on administrative personnel by a group of providers. The precision of the model is demonstrated by examining a set of data assembled from five MHSA service providers. The model examines a differential cost construction derived from inter-facility comparisons of administrative expenses. After controlling for the scale of operations, the results enable MHSA programs to control the efficiency of administrative personnel and related rates of compensation. The results indicate that the efficiency of using the administrative complement and the scale of operations represent the lion's share of the total differential cost. The analysis also indicates that a modest improvement in the use of administrative personnel results in substantial cost savings, an increase in the net cash flow derived from operations, an improvement in the fiscal performance of the provider, and a decline in opportunity costs that assume the form of foregone direct patient care.

  17. The social impact of cost recovery measures in Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Nyambuya, M N

    1994-03-01

    Since the International Monetary Fund/World Bank Economic Structural Adjustment Program (ESAP) in Zimbabwe was adopted in 1990, health care and education costs have escalated, and many people fail to get these services owing to poverty. The post-independence era in Zimbabwe witnessed a tremendous growth in education and health with many schools, colleges, hospitals and clinics built, professional staff employed, and a general expansion in demand. Nevertheless, the question of drug shortages and ever-increasing health care costs were not addressed. A deficient transport network, the increases in drug prices, the exodus of professional staff, the devaluation of the Zimbabwe dollar, and the cost recovery measures endangered the right to acceptable health care. The social service cutbacks adopted by the government in education will deepen poverty. After independence, the Zimbabwean education system had a free tuition policy at primary school levels. Now that the government reintroduced school fees, a generation of illiterate and semi-illiterate school dropouts will grow up. The social implications of this include increases in crime, prostitution, the number of street kids, the spread of diseases, and social discontent, which are the symptoms of a shrinking economy. As a result of the cost recovery measures, school enrollment in rural areas has gone up. Some urban parents have been forced to transfer their children to rural schools. Higher education also suffers, as government subsidies to colleges and universities have been drastically curtailed. The budgetary cuts have grave repercussions for teaching and research, as poor working conditions and low morals of lecturers and students become prevalent. Most wage-earning Zimbabweans' living standards have deteriorated as the cost of living continues to escalate, coupled with the cost recovery measures in the name of ESAP.

  18. Stranded cost recovery presents stumbling block to open access

    SciTech Connect

    Del Roccili, J.A.

    1996-04-01

    Much of the impetus for the movement to competitive power markets is a result of the tremendous variance in energy prices across the country. Large commercial and industrial customers are becoming increasingly aware of these discrepancies and are marshaling the market and political forces required to guarantee the eventual development of a national open-access transmission policy. Such a policy will facilitate competition and equalize prices on a regional, and to some extent, national level. The stumbling block, however, is the recovery of stranded investment. Under traditional regulation, historical costs could be collected through approved rates for a bundled service. With the protection of a monopoly franchise, average electricity prices provide the possibility of cost recovery for assets that might not be recoverable in a competitive market.

  19. A comparison of hospital administrative costs in eight nations: US costs exceed all others by far.

    PubMed

    Himmelstein, David U; Jun, Miraya; Busse, Reinhard; Chevreul, Karine; Geissler, Alexander; Jeurissen, Patrick; Thomson, Sarah; Vinet, Marie-Amelie; Woolhandler, Steffie

    2014-09-01

    A few studies have noted the outsize administrative costs of US hospitals, but no research has compared these costs across multiple nations with various types of health care systems. We assembled a team of international health policy experts to conduct just such a challenging analysis of hospital administrative costs across eight nations: Canada, England, Scotland, Wales, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United States. We found that administrative costs accounted for 25.3 percent of total US hospital expenditures--a percentage that is increasing. Next highest were the Netherlands (19.8 percent) and England (15.5 percent), both of which are transitioning to market-oriented payment systems. Scotland and Canada, whose single-payer systems pay hospitals global operating budgets, with separate grants for capital, had the lowest administrative costs. Costs were intermediate in France and Germany (which bill per patient but pay separately for capital projects) and in Wales. Reducing US per capita spending for hospital administration to Scottish or Canadian levels would have saved more than $150 billion in 2011. This study suggests that the reduction of US administrative costs would best be accomplished through the use of a simpler and less market-oriented payment scheme.

  20. 42 CFR 409.46 - Allowable administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... billable include, but are not limited to, the following: (a) Registered nurse initial evaluation visits. Initial evaluation visits by a registered nurse for the purpose of assessing a beneficiary's health needs... be an administrative cost. (b) Visits by registered nurses or qualified professionals for...

  1. 42 CFR 409.46 - Allowable administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... billable include, but are not limited to, the following: (a) Registered nurse initial evaluation visits. Initial evaluation visits by a registered nurse for the purpose of assessing a beneficiary's health needs... be an administrative cost. (b) Visits by registered nurses or qualified professionals for...

  2. 42 CFR 409.46 - Allowable administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... billable include, but are not limited to, the following: (a) Registered nurse initial evaluation visits. Initial evaluation visits by a registered nurse for the purpose of assessing a beneficiary's health needs... be an administrative cost. (b) Visits by registered nurses or qualified professionals for...

  3. 42 CFR 409.46 - Allowable administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... billable include, but are not limited to, the following: (a) Registered nurse initial evaluation visits. Initial evaluation visits by a registered nurse for the purpose of assessing a beneficiary's health needs... be an administrative cost. (b) Visits by registered nurses or qualified professionals for...

  4. 42 CFR 409.46 - Allowable administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... billable include, but are not limited to, the following: (a) Registered nurse initial evaluation visits. Initial evaluation visits by a registered nurse for the purpose of assessing a beneficiary's health needs... be an administrative cost. (b) Visits by registered nurses or qualified professionals for...

  5. 22 CFR 309.5 - Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... 309.5 Section 309.5 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION General Provisions § 309.5 Interest... accordance with FCCS, Peace Corps will assess: (1) Interest on unpaid debts in accordance with 31 CFR 901.9...) Waiver. Peace Corps will consider waiver of interest, penalties and/or administrative costs in...

  6. 22 CFR 309.5 - Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... 309.5 Section 309.5 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION General Provisions § 309.5 Interest... accordance with FCCS, Peace Corps will assess: (1) Interest on unpaid debts in accordance with 31 CFR 901.9...) Waiver. Peace Corps will consider waiver of interest, penalties and/or administrative costs in...

  7. 22 CFR 309.5 - Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... 309.5 Section 309.5 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION General Provisions § 309.5 Interest... accordance with FCCS, Peace Corps will assess: (1) Interest on unpaid debts in accordance with 31 CFR 901.9...) Waiver. Peace Corps will consider waiver of interest, penalties and/or administrative costs in...

  8. 22 CFR 309.5 - Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... 309.5 Section 309.5 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION General Provisions § 309.5 Interest... accordance with FCCS, Peace Corps will assess: (1) Interest on unpaid debts in accordance with 31 CFR 901.9...) Waiver. Peace Corps will consider waiver of interest, penalties and/or administrative costs in...

  9. 22 CFR 309.5 - Interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... 309.5 Section 309.5 Foreign Relations PEACE CORPS DEBT COLLECTION General Provisions § 309.5 Interest... accordance with FCCS, Peace Corps will assess: (1) Interest on unpaid debts in accordance with 31 CFR 901.9...) Waiver. Peace Corps will consider waiver of interest, penalties and/or administrative costs in...

  10. Of Dirty Sheets and Worse: Administration Costs and Staffing Matters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keigher, Sharon M.

    1993-01-01

    Considers article written by professor of social welfare in 1981 in which job security of social workers is addressed. Compares views expressed in 1981 with situation faced by social workers today. Considers danger of administration costs resulting in short-staffing of hospitals serving the poor and discusses case of 22-year-old obstetrics patient…

  11. 40 CFR 13.11 - Interest, penalty and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Interest, penalty and administrative costs. 13.11 Section 13.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS... inaction, and without fault by the debtor; or (iii) Collection of these charges would be against equity...

  12. 40 CFR 13.11 - Interest, penalty and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Interest, penalty and administrative costs. 13.11 Section 13.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS... inaction, and without fault by the debtor; or (iii) Collection of these charges would be against equity...

  13. 40 CFR 13.11 - Interest, penalty and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Interest, penalty and administrative costs. 13.11 Section 13.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS... inaction, and without fault by the debtor; or (iii) Collection of these charges would be against equity...

  14. 40 CFR 13.11 - Interest, penalty and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Interest, penalty and administrative costs. 13.11 Section 13.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS... inaction, and without fault by the debtor; or (iii) Collection of these charges would be against equity...

  15. 40 CFR 13.11 - Interest, penalty and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Interest, penalty and administrative costs. 13.11 Section 13.11 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CLAIMS... inaction, and without fault by the debtor; or (iii) Collection of these charges would be against equity...

  16. Administration knowledge of economic costs of foreign policy export controls

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-09-02

    The Export Administration Act of 1979 requires consultation, as appropriate, with businesses affected by proposed controls and consideration of the controls economic impact. GAO found that although there was minimal formal business consultation, the business community and the Commerce and State Departments did provide decision-makers with the essential economic arguments against the use of export controls. Administration economic analyses usually did not provide estimates of the controls indirect effects, but important limits exist to Commerce's ability to better quantify such economic costs. GAO's review does not support the conclusion that the administration might have acted differently had it been aware of the total economic costs, and it shifts the debate back to the usefulness of such foreign policy controls.

  17. 40 CFR 35.928-4 - Moratorium on industrial cost recovery payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... industrial cost recovery charges incurred for accounting periods or portions of periods ending before January... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Moratorium on industrial cost recovery... Water Act § 35.928-4 Moratorium on industrial cost recovery payments. (a) EPA does not require...

  18. 40 CFR 23.4 - Timing of Administrator's action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 23.4 Section 23.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  19. 40 CFR 23.4 - Timing of Administrator's action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 23.4 Section 23.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  20. 40 CFR 23.4 - Timing of Administrator's action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 23.4 Section 23.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  1. 40 CFR 23.4 - Timing of Administrator's action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 23.4 Section 23.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  2. 40 CFR 23.4 - Timing of Administrator's action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Timing of Administrator's action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. 23.4 Section 23.4 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... action under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. Unless the Administrator otherwise...

  3. 36 CFR 1206.45 - What rules govern subgrant distribution, cost sharing, grant administration, and reporting?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... distribution, cost sharing, grant administration, and reporting? 1206.45 Section 1206.45 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL RULES NATIONAL HISTORICAL..., cost sharing, grant administration, and reporting? (a) The Commission will annually establish...

  4. 20 CFR 255.16 - Administrative relief from recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the overpaid individual was at fault as defined in § 255.11 of this part, the Board may forego recovery of the overpayment where the individual from whom recovery is sought was not at fault in causing... illustrated by the following examples: Example (1): An employee, through his own fault, causes an...

  5. 20 CFR 255.16 - Administrative relief from recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... the overpaid individual was at fault as defined in § 255.11 of this part, the Board may forego recovery of the overpayment where the individual from whom recovery is sought was not at fault in causing... illustrated by the following examples: Example (1): An employee, through his own fault, causes an...

  6. 24 CFR 266.656 - Recovery of costs after final claim settlement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recovery of costs after final claim... Contract Rights and Obligations Claim Procedures § 266.656 Recovery of costs after final claim settlement... project or otherwise, the total amount of such recovery shall be shared by HUD and the HFA in...

  7. 26 CFR 1.43-4 - Qualified enhanced oil recovery costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Qualified enhanced oil recovery costs. 1.43-4... TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.43-4 Qualified enhanced oil recovery costs. (a) Qualifying costs—(1) In... “qualified enhanced oil recovery costs” if the amounts are paid or incurred with respect to an asset which...

  8. 26 CFR 1.43-4 - Qualified enhanced oil recovery costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Qualified enhanced oil recovery costs. 1.43-4... TAXES Credits Against Tax § 1.43-4 Qualified enhanced oil recovery costs. (a) Qualifying costs—(1) In... “qualified enhanced oil recovery costs” if the amounts are paid or incurred with respect to an asset which...

  9. 40 CFR 35.925-11 - User charges and industrial cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false User charges and industrial cost... Water Act § 35.925-11 User charges and industrial cost recovery. That, in the case of grant assistance... requirements for user charge and industrial cost recovery systems. (See §§ 35.928 et seq., 35.929 et seq.,...

  10. Superfund cost recovery through national contingency plan compliance

    SciTech Connect

    Mundell, J.A.; Wightman, A.

    1994-12-31

    The National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (``NCP``), codified at 40 C.F.R. pt. 300, was first promulgated by the US EPA on July 16, 1982 (the ``1982 NCP``). Required by section 105 of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, or CERCLA, and by section 311 of the Clean Water Act (CWA), the NCP ``establish[es] procedures and standards for responding to releases of hazardous substances`` at Superfund sites. The purpose of the NCP ``is to give some consistency and cohesiveness to response planning and actions``. The primary goal of the NCP is to mitigate damage to the environment and protect the public health at the least possible expense. Within this framework, the NCP allows for the evaluation and clean-up activities at a Superfund site to be led directly by the US EPA, the designated state regulatory agency or, under monitoring, by private parties who are potentially responsible for the site contamination. This paper addresses NCP consistency review from both a technical and legal standpoint. The authors will first address the regulatory standards and process for evaluating private party NCP compliance, and then review common legal attacks on NCP compliance that bar the recovery of clean-up costs.

  11. 77 FR 69441 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Cost Accounting Standards Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... Regulation; Information Collection; Cost Accounting Standards Administration AGENCY: Department of Defense...: Under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, the Regulatory Secretariat will be submitting to... approved information collection requirement concerning cost accounting standards administration....

  12. The Economics of Perception: Potential Effect regarding Institutional Uses of Recovered Facilities and Administrative Costs upon a Faculty Member's Decision to Engage in Sponsored Research Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatfield, Anne Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    There is one aspect of sponsored research associated with higher education's research enterprise that often places the institution's research administrators and the institution's faculty members in conflict with each other; the recovery of Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs associated with sponsored research projects (Sedwick, 2009;…

  13. 43 CFR 429.18 - When do I have to pay the administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true When do I have to pay the administrative costs? 429.18 Section 429.18 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF... Application Fees and Administrative Costs § 429.18 When do I have to pay the administrative costs?...

  14. 26 CFR 1.168(a)-1 - Modified accelerated cost recovery system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Modified accelerated cost recovery system. 1.168(a)-1 Section 1.168(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Corporations § 1.168(a)-1 Modified accelerated cost recovery system. (a) Section 168 determines...

  15. 26 CFR 1.168(a)-1 - Modified accelerated cost recovery system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Modified accelerated cost recovery system. 1.168(a)-1 Section 1.168(a)-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... Corporations § 1.168(a)-1 Modified accelerated cost recovery system. (a) Section 168 determines...

  16. 45 CFR 286.55 - What types of costs are subject to the administrative cost limit on Tribal Family Assistance...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR... tracking, data entry and monitoring, including personnel and other costs associated with the...

  17. Phronesis, a diagnosis and recovery tool for system administrators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haen, C.; Barra, V.; Bonaccorsi, E.; Neufeld, N.

    2014-06-01

    The LHCb experiment relies on the Online system, which includes a very large and heterogeneous computing cluster. Ensuring the proper behavior of the different tasks running on the more than 2000 servers represents a huge workload for the small operator team and is a 24/7 task. At CHEP 2012, we presented a prototype of a framework that we designed in order to support the experts. The main objective is to provide them with steadily improving diagnosis and recovery solutions in case of misbehavior of a service, without having to modify the original applications. Our framework is based on adapted principles of the Autonomic Computing model, on Reinforcement Learning algorithms, as well as innovative concepts such as Shared Experience. While the submission at CHEP 2012 showed the validity of our prototype on simulations, we here present an implementation with improved algorithms and manipulation tools, and report on the experience gained with running it in the LHCb Online system.

  18. Cost recovery of NGO primary health care facilities: a case study in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about the cost recovery of primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. This study estimated the cost recovery of a primary health care facility run by Building Resources Across Community (BRAC), a large NGO in Bangladesh, for the period of July 2004 - June 2005. This health facility is one of the seven upgraded BRAC facilities providing emergency obstetric care and is typical of the government and private primary health care facilities in Bangladesh. Given the current maternal and child mortality in Bangladesh and the challenges to addressing health-related Millennium Development Goal (MDG) targets the financial sustainability of such facilities is crucial. Methods The study was designed as a case study covering a single facility. The methodology was based on the 'ingredient approach' using the allocation techniques by inpatient and outpatient services. Cost recovery of the facility was estimated from the provider's perspective. The value of capital items was annualized using 5% discount rate and its market price of 2004 (replacement value). Sensitivity analysis was done using 3% discount rate. Results The cost recovery ratio of the BRAC primary care facility was 59%, and if excluding all capital costs, it increased to 72%. Of the total costs, 32% was for personnel while drugs absorbed 18%. Capital items were17% of total costs while operational cost absorbed 12%. Three-quarters of the total cost was variable costs. Inpatient services contributed 74% of total revenue in exchange of 10% of total utilization. An average cost per patient was US$ 10 while it was US$ 67 for inpatient and US$ 4 for outpatient. Conclusion The cost recovery of this NGO primary care facility is important for increasing its financial sustainability and decreasing donor dependency, and achieving universal health coverage in a developing country setting. However, for improving the cost recovery of the health facility, it needs to increase utilization, efficient

  19. 43 CFR 426.23 - Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M... operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. (a) General. All new, amended, and renewed contracts shall provide for payment of O&M costs as specified in this section. (b) Amount of O&M costs a district must pay...

  20. 43 CFR 426.23 - Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M) costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Recovery of operation and maintenance (O&M... operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. (a) General. All new, amended, and renewed contracts shall provide for payment of O&M costs as specified in this section. (b) Amount of O&M costs a district must pay...

  1. 47 CFR 27.1162 - Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan. 27... Cost-Sharing Policies Governing Microwave Relocation from the 2110-2150 Mhz and 2160-2200 Mhz Bands § 27.1162 Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan. The Wireless Telecommunications Bureau,...

  2. 47 CFR 27.1178 - Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan. 27... Cost-Sharing Policies Governing Broadband Radio Service Relocation from the 2150-2160/62 Mhz Band § 27.1178 Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan. The Wireless Telecommunications Bureau, under...

  3. 48 CFR 52.230-6 - Administration of Cost Accounting Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Clauses 52.230-6 Administration of Cost Accounting Standards. As prescribed in 30.201-4(d)(1), insert the following clause: Administration of Cost Accounting Standards (JUN 2010) For the purpose of administering the Cost Accounting Standards (CAS) requirements under this contract, the Contractor shall take...

  4. 24 CFR 1006.230 - Administrative and planning costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... paragraphs (a)(1)(i) through (vi) of this section; (2) Travel costs incurred for official business in... maintenance (but not purchase) of office space. (b) Staff and overhead. Staff and overhead costs...

  5. What School Administrators Should Know about Inclusion and Its Costs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pruslow, John T.

    2003-01-01

    Examines cost-effectiveness of school inclusion for special-needs students. Includes cost analysis of instructional personnel, impact on general education spending, transportation, and school space. Draws policy implications. (Contains 34 references.) (PKP)

  6. 40 CFR 35.925-11 - User charges and industrial cost recovery.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... implementation to show that their user charge and industrial cost recovery systems will be approved in accordance... percent of the design flow or design pollutant loading of the treatment works. In addition, the...

  7. 42 CFR 417.564 - Apportionment and allocation of administrative and general costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... providing medical care. Enrollment, marketing, and other administrative and general costs that benefit the... bear a significant relationship to the services furnished, are not apportioned to Medicare...

  8. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. 247.24 Section 247.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY...

  9. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. 247.24 Section 247.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY...

  10. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. 247.24 Section 247.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY...

  11. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. 247.24 Section 247.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY...

  12. 7 CFR 247.24 - Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Recovery and redistribution of caseload and administrative funds. 247.24 Section 247.24 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHILD NUTRITION PROGRAMS COMMODITY...

  13. 20 CFR 632.39 - Administrative cost plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... a Native American grantee may be accounted for separately and be allocated by title and program....39 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Administrative Standards and Procedures § 632.39...

  14. 20 CFR 632.39 - Administrative cost plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... a Native American grantee may be accounted for separately and be allocated by title and program....39 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING PROGRAMS Administrative Standards and Procedures § 632.39...

  15. 75 FR 49508 - Recovery Policy, RP9525.7, Labor Costs-Emergency Work

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Recovery Policy, RP9525.7, Labor Costs--Emergency Work AGENCY...: The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) is accepting comments on RP9525.7, Labor Costs... policies are up to date, incorporate lessons learned and are consistent with current laws and...

  16. 40 CFR 35.928-2 - Use of industrial cost recovery payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Water Act § 35.928-2 Use of industrial cost recovery payments. (a) The grantee shall use industrial cost... amounts received from industrial users, together with any interest earned, to the U.S. Treasury annually. (2) The grantee shall retain 50 percent of the amount recovered from industrial users. (i) A...

  17. 40 CFR 35.928-2 - Use of industrial cost recovery payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Water Act § 35.928-2 Use of industrial cost recovery payments. (a) The grantee shall use industrial cost... amounts received from industrial users, together with any interest earned, to the U.S. Treasury annually. (2) The grantee shall retain 50 percent of the amount recovered from industrial users. (i) A...

  18. Reducing Building HVAC Costs with Site-Recovery Energy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pargeter, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    Building owners are caught between two powerful forces--the need to lower energy costs and the need to meet or exceed outdoor air ventilation regulations for occupant health and comfort. Large amounts of energy are wasted each day from commercial, institutional, and government building sites as heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC)…

  19. 76 FR 74806 - Adjustment of the Amount of an Administrative Costs Assessment

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-01

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Adjustment of the Amount of an Administrative Costs Assessment AGENCY: Bureau of... decreasing the amount of the administrative costs assessment set forth in the Acreage Limitation Rules and Regulations (Regulations), 43 CFR part 426. Based on our latest required review, the current...

  20. 25 CFR 122.8 - Administrative costs for management of the fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Administrative costs for management of the fund. 122.8 Section 122.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES MANAGEMENT OF OSAGE JUDGMENT FUNDS FOR EDUCATION § 122.8 Administrative costs for management of the fund....

  1. 25 CFR 122.8 - Administrative costs for management of the fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Administrative costs for management of the fund. 122.8 Section 122.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES MANAGEMENT OF OSAGE JUDGMENT FUNDS FOR EDUCATION § 122.8 Administrative costs for management of the fund....

  2. 25 CFR 122.8 - Administrative costs for management of the fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administrative costs for management of the fund. 122.8 Section 122.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES MANAGEMENT OF OSAGE JUDGMENT FUNDS FOR EDUCATION § 122.8 Administrative costs for management of the fund....

  3. 25 CFR 122.8 - Administrative costs for management of the fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Administrative costs for management of the fund. 122.8 Section 122.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES MANAGEMENT OF OSAGE JUDGMENT FUNDS FOR EDUCATION § 122.8 Administrative costs for management of the fund....

  4. 25 CFR 122.8 - Administrative costs for management of the fund.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administrative costs for management of the fund. 122.8 Section 122.8 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR FINANCIAL ACTIVITIES MANAGEMENT OF OSAGE JUDGMENT FUNDS FOR EDUCATION § 122.8 Administrative costs for management of the fund....

  5. 10 CFR 171.25 - Collection, interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Collection, interest, penalties, and administrative costs. 171.25 Section 171.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ANNUAL FEES FOR REACTOR... Collection, interest, penalties, and administrative costs. All annual fees in §§ 171.15 and 171.16 will...

  6. 10 CFR 171.25 - Collection, interest, penalties, and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Collection, interest, penalties, and administrative costs. 171.25 Section 171.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) ANNUAL FEES FOR REACTOR... Collection, interest, penalties, and administrative costs. All annual fees in §§ 171.15 and 171.16 will...

  7. 31 CFR Appendix I(f) to Part 13 - Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs I(F) Appendix I(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. I(F) Appendix I(F) to Part 13—Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs Date:...

  8. 31 CFR Appendix I(f) to Part 13 - Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs I(F) Appendix I(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. I(F) Appendix I(F) to Part 13—Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs Date:...

  9. 31 CFR Appendix II(f) to Part 13 - Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Overhead and Administrative Costs II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13—Overhead and Administrative Costs Date: Select Only...

  10. 31 CFR Appendix II(f) to Part 13 - Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Overhead and Administrative Costs II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. II(F) Appendix II(F) to Part 13—Overhead and Administrative Costs Date: Select Only...

  11. 31 CFR Appendix I(f) to Part 13 - Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs I(F) Appendix I(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. I(F) Appendix I(F) to Part 13—Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs Date:...

  12. 31 CFR Appendix I(f) to Part 13 - Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs I(F) Appendix I(F) to Part 13 Money and Finance: Treasury Office of the Secretary of the Treasury... Pt. 13, App. I(F) Appendix I(F) to Part 13—Estimated Overhead and Administrative Costs Date:...

  13. Energy recovery efficiency and cost analysis of VOC thermal oxidation pollution control technology.

    PubMed

    Warahena, Aruna S K; Chuah, Yew Khoy

    2009-08-01

    Thermal oxidation of VOC is extremely energy intensive, and necessitates high efficiency heat recovery from the exhaust heat. In this paper, two independent parameters heat recovery factor (HRF) and equipment cost factor (ECF) are introduced. HRF and ECF can be used to evaluate separately the merits of energy efficiency and cost effectiveness of VOC oxidation systems. Another parameter equipment cost against heat recovery (ECHR) which is a function of HRF and ECF is introduced to evaluate the merit of different systems for the thermal oxidation of VOC. Respective cost models were derived for recuperative thermal oxidizer (TO) and regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO). Application examples are presented to show the use and the importance of these parameters. An application examples show that TO has a lower ECF while RTO has a higher HRF. However when analyzed using ECHR, RTO would be of advantage economically in longer periods of use. The analytical models presented can be applied in similar environmental protection systems.

  14. Waste processing cost recovery at Los Alamos National Laboratory--analysis and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Booth, Steven Richard

    2008-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is implementing full cost recovery for waste processing in fiscal year 2009 (FY2009), after a transition year in FY2008. Waste processing cost recovery has been implemented in various forms across the nuclear weapons complex and in corporate America. The fundamental reasoning of sending accurate price signals to waste generators is economically sound, and leads to waste minimization and reduced waste expense over time. However, Los Alamos faces significant implementation challenges because of its status as a government-owned, contractor-operated national scientific institution with a diverse suite of experimental and environmental cleanup activities, and the fact that this represents a fundamental change in how waste processing is viewed by the institution. This paper describes the issues involved during the transition to cost recovery and the ultimate selection of the business model. Of the six alternative cost recovery models evaluated, the business model chosen to be implemented in FY2009 is Recharge Plus Generators Pay Distributed Direct. Under this model, all generators who produce waste must pay a distributed direct share associated with their specific waste type to use a waste processing capability. This cost share is calculated using the distributed direct method on the fixed cost only, i.e., the fixed cost share is based on each program's forecast proportion of the total Los Alamos volume forecast of each waste type. (Fixed activities are those required to establish the waste processing capability, i.e., to make the process ready, permitted, certified, and prepared to handle the first unit ofwaste. Therefore, the fixed cost ends at the point just before waste begins 'to be processed. The activities to actually process the waste are considered variable.) The volume of waste actually sent for processing is charged a unit cost based solely on the variable cost of disposing of that waste. The total cost recovered each year is the

  15. Cost Scaling of a Real-World Exhaust Waste Heat Recovery Thermoelectric Generator: A Deeper Dive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hendricks, Terry J.; Yee, Shannon; LeBlanc, Saniya

    2016-03-01

    Cost is equally important to power density or efficiency for the adoption of waste heat recovery thermoelectric generators (TEG) in many transportation and industrial energy recovery applications. In many cases, the system design that minimizes cost (e.g., the /W value) can be very different than the design that maximizes the system's efficiency or power density, and it is important to understand the relationship between those designs to optimize TEG performance-cost compromises. Expanding on recent cost analysis work and using more detailed system modeling, an enhanced cost scaling analysis of a waste heat recovery TEG with more detailed, coupled treatment of the heat exchangers has been performed. In this analysis, the effect of the heat lost to the environment and updated relationships between the hot-side and cold-side conductances that maximize power output are considered. This coupled thermal and thermoelectric (TE) treatment of the exhaust waste heat recovery TEG yields modified cost scaling and design optimization equations, which are now strongly dependent on the heat leakage fraction, exhaust mass flow rate, and heat exchanger effectiveness. This work shows that heat exchanger costs most often dominate the overall TE system costs, that it is extremely difficult to escape this regime, and in order to achieve TE system costs of 1/W it is necessary to achieve heat exchanger costs of 1/(W/K). Minimum TE system costs per watt generally coincide with maximum power points, but preferred TE design regimes are identified where there is little cost penalty for moving into regions of higher efficiency and slightly lower power outputs. These regimes are closely tied to previously identified low cost design regimes. This work shows that the optimum fill factor F opt minimizing system costs decreases as heat losses increase, and increases as exhaust mass flow rate and heat exchanger effectiveness increase. These findings have profound implications on the design and

  16. Average System Cost Methodology : Administrator's Record of Decision.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1984-06-01

    Significant features of average system cost (ASC) methodology adopted are: retention of the jurisdictional approach where retail rate orders of regulartory agencies provide primary data for computing the ASC for utilities participating in the residential exchange; inclusion of transmission costs; exclusion of construction work in progress; use of a utility's weighted cost of debt securities; exclusion of income taxes; simplification of separation procedures for subsidized generation and transmission accounts from other accounts; clarification of ASC methodology rules; more generous review timetable for individual filings; phase-in of reformed methodology; and each exchanging utility must file under the new methodology within 20 days of implementation by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission of the ten major participating utilities, the revised ASC will substantially only affect three. (PSB)

  17. Optimal administrative scale for planning public services: a social cost model applied to Flemish hospital care.

    PubMed

    Blank, Jos L T; van Hulst, Bart

    2015-01-01

    In choosing the scale of public services, such as hospitals, both economic and public administrative considerations play important roles. The scale and the corresponding spatial distribution of public institutions have consequences for social costs, defined as the institutions' operating costs and the users' travel costs (which include the money and time costs). Insight into the relationship between scale and spatial distribution and social costs provides a practical guide for the best possible administrative planning level. This article presents a purely economic model that is suitable for deriving the optimal scale for public services. The model also reveals the corresponding optimal administrative planning level from an economic perspective. We applied this model to hospital care in Flanders for three different types of care. For its application, we examined the social costs of hospital services at different levels of administrative planning. The outcomes show that the social costs of rehabilitation in Flanders with planning at the urban level (38 areas) are 11% higher than those at the provincial level (five provinces). At the regional level (18 areas), the social costs of rehabilitation are virtually equal to those at the provincial level. For radiotherapy, there is a difference of 88% in the social costs between the urban and the provincial level. For general care, there are hardly any cost differences between the three administrative levels. Thus, purely from the perspective of social costs, rehabilitation should preferably be planned at the regional level, general services at the urban level and radiotherapy at the provincial level.

  18. 77 FR 64513 - Proposed Administrative Agreement for Collection of CERCLA Past Costs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... AGENCY Proposed Administrative Agreement for Collection of CERCLA Past Costs AGENCY: U.S Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). ACTION: Notice. Proposed CERCLA 122 Administrative Agreement. SUMMARY: U.S. EPA is proposing to execute an Administrative Agreement (Agreement) under Section 122 of CERCLA...

  19. Recovery Act: Low Cost Integrated Substrate for OLED Lighting Development

    SciTech Connect

    Benton, Scott; Bhandari, Abhinav

    2012-12-26

    PPG pursued the development of an integrated substrate, including the anode, external, and internal extraction layers. The objective of PPG's program was to achieve cost reductions by displacing the existing expensive borosilicate or double-side polished float glass substrates and developing alternative electrodes and scalable light extraction layer technologies through focused and short-term applied research. One of the key highlights of the project was proving the feasibility of using PPG's high transmission Solarphire® float glass as a substrate to consistently achieve organic lightemitting diode (OLED) devices with good performance and high yields. Under this program, four low-cost alternatives to the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) anode were investigated using pilot-scale magnetron sputtered vacuum deposition (MSVD) and chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technologies. The anodes were evaluated by fabricating small and large phosphorescent organic lightemitting diode (PHOLED) devices at Universal Display Corporation (UDC). The device performance and life-times comparable to commercially available ITO anodes were demonstrated. A cost-benefit analysis was performed to down-select two anodes for further low-cost process development. Additionally, PPG developed and evaluated a number of scalable and compatible internal and external extraction layer concepts such as scattering layers on the outside of the glass substrate or between the transparent anode and the glass interface. In one external extraction layer (EEL) approach, sol-gel sprayed pyrolytic coatings were deposited using lab scale equipment by hand or automated spraying of sol-gel solutions on hot glass, followed by optimizing of scattering with minimal absorption. In another EEL approach, PPG tested large-area glass texturing by scratching a glass surface with an abrasive roller and acid etching. Efficacy enhancements of 1.27x were demonstrated using white PHOLED devices for 2.0mm substrates which are at par with

  20. The Obama administration's options for health care cost control: hope versus reality.

    PubMed

    Marmor, Theodore; Oberlander, Jonathan; White, Joseph

    2009-04-07

    Controlling the costs of medical care has long been an elusive goal in U.S. health policy. This article examines the options for health care cost control under the Obama administration. The authors argue that the administration's approach to health reform offers some potential for cost control but also embraces many strategies that are not likely to be successful. Lessons the United States can learn from other countries' experiences in constraining medical care spending are then explored.

  1. Effect of nandrolone decanoate administration on recovery from bupivacaine-induced muscle injury

    PubMed Central

    White, James P.; Baltgalvis, Kristen A.; Sato, Shuichi; Wilson, L. Britt

    2009-01-01

    Although testosterone administration elicits well-documented anabolic effects on skeletal muscle mass, the enhancement of muscle regeneration after injury has not been widely examined. The purpose of this study was to determine whether anabolic steroid administration improves skeletal muscle regeneration from bupivacaine-induced injury. Male C57BL/6 mice were castrated 2 wk before muscle injury induced by an intramuscular bupivacaine injection into the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Control mice received an intramuscular PBS injection. Anabolic steroid [nandrolone decanoate (ND), 6 mg/kg] or sesame seed oil was administered at the time of initial injury and continued every 7 days for the study's duration. Mice were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups for 5, 14, or 42 days of recovery, as follows: 1) control (uninjured); 2) ND only (uninjured + ND); 3) bupivacaine only (injured); or 4) bupivacaine + ND (injured + ND). TA morphology, protein, and gene expression were analyzed at 14 and 42 days after injury; protein expression was analyzed at 5 days after injury. After 14 days of recovery, the injury and injury + ND treatments induced small-diameter myofiber incidence and also decreased mean myofiber area. The increase in small-myofiber incidence was 65% greater in injury + ND muscle compared with injury alone. At 14 days, injury + ND induced a fivefold increase in muscle IGF-I mRNA expression, which was greater than injury alone. Muscle Akt activity and glycogen synthetase kinase-3β activity were also induced by injury + ND at 14 days of recovery, but not by injury alone. ND had a main effect for increasing muscle MyoD and cyclin D1 mRNA expression at 14 days. After 42 days of recovery, injury + ND increased large-diameter myofiber incidence compared with injury only. Nandrolone decanoate (ND) administration can enhance castrated mouse muscle regeneration during the recovery from bupivacaine-induced injury. PMID:19745189

  2. The Long-Term Effectiveness of Reading Recovery and the Cost-Efficiency of Reading Recovery Relative to the Learning Disabled Classification Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galluzzo, Charles A.

    2010-01-01

    There is a great deal of research supporting Reading Recovery as a successful reading intervention program that assists below level first graders readers in closing the gap in reading at the same level of their average peers. There is a lack of research that analyses the cost-effectiveness of the Reading Recovery program compared to the cost in…

  3. Estimating the human recovery costs of seriously injured road crash casualties.

    PubMed

    Bambach, M R; Mitchell, R J

    2015-12-01

    Road crashes result in substantial trauma and costs to societies around the world. Robust costing methods are an important tool to estimate costs associated with road trauma, and are key inputs into policy development and cost-benefit analysis for road safety programmes and infrastructure projects. With an expanding focus on seriously injured road crash casualties, in addition to the long standing focus on fatalities, methods for costing seriously injured casualties are becoming increasingly important. Some road safety agencies are defining a seriously injured casualty as an individual that was admitted to hospital following a road crash, and as a result, hospital separation data provide substantial potential for estimating the costs associated with seriously injured road crash casualties. The aim of this study is to establish techniques for estimating the human recovery costs of (non-fatal) seriously injured road crash casualties directly from hospital separation data. An individuals' road crash-related hospitalisation record and their personal injury insurance claim were linked for road crashes that occurred in New South Wales, Australia. These records provided the means for estimating all of the costs to the casualty directly related to their recovery from their injuries. A total of 10,897 seriously injured road crash casualties were identified and four methods for estimating their recovery costs were examined, using either unit record or aggregated hospital separation data. The methods are shown to provide robust techniques for estimating the human recovery costs of seriously injured road crash casualties, that may prove useful for identifying, implementing and evaluating safety programmes intended to reduce the incidence of road crash-related serious injuries.

  4. Cost recovery of municipal solid waste management in small cities of inland China.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xin; Hu, Shunong

    2014-04-01

    Financial performance of waste management, the key for efficiency and sustainability, has rarely been studied in China, especially for small cities. Through questionnaires and interviews, we conducted such a case study in several cities aiming to fill the gap and improve waste service. We found that labour accounts for more than half to three-quarters of the operation cost, followed by fuel and vehicle maintenance. The waste service heavily relies on budget transfer of the municipality. User fees collected recover less than half of total operation cost at best, even if the collection rate is relatively high. The low cost recovery is mainly due to low fee rates, unchanged for years owing to public pressure. Public complaint seems to be justified by the finding that the service only accounts for 5-10% of municipal revenue annually and even lower in government spending. Contrary to general perception, per capita waste generation in small cities is not less than big ones. Waste composition is dominated by kitchen wastes, with fractions of recyclables and combustibles much lower than big cities. These findings have implications on the waste management strategy: commercial incineration or recycling may not be economically viable for small cities. The article concludes that user fees might better serve, and be designed for, behaviour change than for cost recovery. Municipalities need to first improve cost efficiency and transparency of waste services to gain public trust and support in order to tackle the biggest challenge facing developing countries, cost recovery.

  5. 34 CFR 690.10 - Administrative cost allowance to participating schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... General Definitions § 690.10 Administrative cost allowance to participating schools. (a) Subject to... make financial aid services available during times and in places that will most effectively...

  6. 20 CFR 641.856 - What functions and activities constitute costs of administration?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., including: (i) Accounting, budgeting, financial, and cash management functions; (ii) Procurement and... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM... the direct provision of programmatic services specified in § 641.864. These costs may be...

  7. Environmental residuals and capital costs of energy recovery from municipal sludge and feedlot manure

    SciTech Connect

    Ballou, S W; Dale, L; Johnson, R; Chambers, W; Mittelhauser, H

    1980-09-01

    The capital and environmental cost of energy recovery from municipal sludge and feedlot manure is analyzed. Literature on waste processing and energy conversion and interviews with manufacturers were used for baseline data for construction of theoretical models using three energy conversion processes: anaerobic digestion, incineration, and pyrolysis. Process characteristics, environmental impact data, and capital costs are presented in detail for each conversion system. The energy recovery systems described would probably be sited near large sources of sludge and manure, i.e., metropolitan sewage treatment plants and large feedlots in cattle-raising states. Although the systems would provide benefits in terms of waste disposal as well as energy production, they would also involve additional pollution of air and water. Analysis of potential siting patterns and pollution conflicts is needed before energy recovery systems using municipal sludge can be considered as feasible energy sources.

  8. 40 CFR 35.928-1 - Approval of the industrial cost recovery system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... treatment works or (2) the charges to be collected by the grantee in providing waste water treatment... AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.928-1 Approval of the industrial cost recovery system. The Regional...

  9. 40 CFR 35.928-1 - Approval of the industrial cost recovery system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... treatment works or (2) the charges to be collected by the grantee in providing waste water treatment... AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.928-1 Approval of the industrial cost recovery system. The Regional...

  10. 40 CFR 35.928-1 - Approval of the industrial cost recovery system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... treatment works or (2) the charges to be collected by the grantee in providing waste water treatment... AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.928-1 Approval of the industrial cost recovery system. The Regional...

  11. 40 CFR 35.928-1 - Approval of the industrial cost recovery system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... treatment works or (2) the charges to be collected by the grantee in providing waste water treatment... AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.928-1 Approval of the industrial cost recovery system. The Regional...

  12. 40 CFR 35.928-1 - Approval of the industrial cost recovery system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... treatment works or (2) the charges to be collected by the grantee in providing waste water treatment... AND OTHER FEDERAL ASSISTANCE STATE AND LOCAL ASSISTANCE Grants for Construction of Treatment Works-Clean Water Act § 35.928-1 Approval of the industrial cost recovery system. The Regional...

  13. 75 FR 17139 - Proposed CERCLA Section 122(h) Cost Recovery Settlement for the Kentucky Avenue Wellfield...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Section 122(h) Cost Recovery Settlement for the Kentucky Avenue Wellfield Superfund Site, Town of Horseheads and Village of Horseheads, Chemung County, NY AGENCY: Environmental... (``CERCLA''), 42 ] U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency...

  14. 26 CFR 1.43-4 - Qualified enhanced oil recovery costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 1992 project is a qualified enhanced oil recovery cost. Example 8. Carbon dioxide pipeline. In 1992, E, the owner of an operating mineral interest in a property, undertakes an immiscible carbon dioxide displacement project with respect to the property. E constructs a pipeline to convey carbon dioxide to...

  15. 26 CFR 1.168(a)-1 - Modified accelerated cost recovery system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Modified accelerated cost recovery system. 1.168... provided in section 167(a) and that is placed in service after December 31, 1986 (or after July 31, 1986, if the taxpayer made an election under section 203(a)(1)(B) of the Tax Reform Act of 1986; 100...

  16. 26 CFR 1.168(a)-1 - Modified accelerated cost recovery system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Modified accelerated cost recovery system. 1.168... provided in section 167(a) and that is placed in service after December 31, 1986 (or after July 31, 1986, if the taxpayer made an election under section 203(a)(1)(B) of the Tax Reform Act of 1986; 100...

  17. 45 CFR 1630.8 - Recovery of disallowed costs and other corrective action.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... giving rise to a questioned cost. (c) In the event of an appeal of the Corporation's management decision... limits and conditions set forth in the Corporation's management decision. Recovery of the disallowed... conditions set forth in the Corporation's management decision. The recipient shall have taken final...

  18. Stranded cost recovery: Reregulating the electricity markets in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagle, Pushkar Ghanashyam

    2000-10-01

    For the past few years, Stranded Cost recovery has been one of the most contentious issues regarding the restructuring of electricity markets among the regulators, researchers, and the other interested parties. Among the states that have moved towards retail competition, some have already made decisions regarding the levels of the stranded cost recovery. So the question is: how have these states handled the "stranded cost problem"? Following the introduction and the historical perspective of the industry in the first chapter, the second chapter takes a broad view for understanding the overall process of deregulation. It attempts to analyze why some states have made a rapid transition to competition in the electric utility industry, while other states are just beginning to consider the issue. White (1996) and Ando & Palmer (1998) have conducted a similar exercise. We present a more comprehensive and theoretically informed econometric analysis that sheds light over some of the crucial issues involved in restructuring, such as, stranded cost recovery, regulation of transmission and distribution sectors, and establishment of Independent System Operator, etc. This chapter offers the rationale for alternative econometric techniques, and extends the political economy analysis to incorporate actual timings of retail competition. Once we have identified the role of stranded cost in restructuring and the theoretical foundations, we study empirically the political economy of states' decisions to grant stranded cost recovery. This constitutes the third chapter. Here, we concentrate on California and Pennsylvania, two states that are at the frontiers of deregulation, and compare their respective treatments of the stranded cost. We probe the reasons behind Pennsylvania's lead over California on the path towards deregulation.

  19. Performance and cost models for the direct sulfur recovery process. Task 1 Topical report, Volume 3

    SciTech Connect

    Frey, H.C.; Williams, R.B.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop performance and cost models of the Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP). The DSRP is an emerging technology for sulfur recovery from advanced power generation technologies such as Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems. In IGCC systems, sulfur present in the coal is captured by gas cleanup technologies to avoid creating emissions of sulfur dioxide to the atmosphere. The sulfur that is separated from the coal gas stream must be collected. Leading options for dealing with the sulfur include byproduct recovery as either sulfur or sulfuric acid. Sulfur is a preferred byproduct, because it is easier to handle and therefore does not depend as strongly upon the location of potential customers as is the case for sulfuric acid. This report describes the need for new sulfur recovery technologies.

  20. 12 CFR 1408.12 - Charges for interest, administrative costs, and penalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Charges for interest, administrative costs, and penalties. 1408.12 Section 1408.12 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES Administrative Collection of Claims § 1408.12 Charges for...

  1. 20 CFR 641.867 - What are the limitations on the amount of SCSEP administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What are the limitations on the amount of SCSEP administrative costs? 641.867 Section 641.867 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT...

  2. 20 CFR 641.856 - What functions and activities constitute administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What functions and activities constitute administrative costs? 641.856 Section 641.856 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM...

  3. 20 CFR 641.856 - What functions and activities constitute administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What functions and activities constitute administrative costs? 641.856 Section 641.856 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM...

  4. 20 CFR 641.867 - What are the limitations on the amount of SCSEP administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are the limitations on the amount of SCSEP administrative costs? 641.867 Section 641.867 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT...

  5. 20 CFR 668.820 - What rules apply to administrative costs under the INA program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false What rules apply to administrative costs under the INA program? 668.820 Section 668.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE I OF...

  6. 20 CFR 668.820 - What rules apply to administrative costs under the INA program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What rules apply to administrative costs under the INA program? 668.820 Section 668.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE I OF...

  7. 20 CFR 668.820 - What rules apply to administrative costs under the INA program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What rules apply to administrative costs under the INA program? 668.820 Section 668.820 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS UNDER TITLE I OF...

  8. No Child Left Behind and Administrative Costs: A Resource Dependence Study of Local School Districts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    This study considers the impact of federal funding on the administrative expenditures of local school districts since the passage of the No-Child-Left-Behind (NCLB) Act of 2001. Under NCLB, federal education funds were made contingent upon a variety of accountability and reporting standards, creating new administrative costs and challenges for…

  9. 20 CFR 667.210 - What administrative cost limits apply to Workforce Investment Act title I grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... INVESTMENT ACT Administrative Rules, Costs and Limitations § 667.210 What administrative cost limits apply to... be identified in the grant or contract award document. (c) In a One-Stop environment,...

  10. 45 CFR 2540.110 - Limitation on use of Corporation funds for administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... administrative costs. 2540.110 Section 2540.110 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Corporation will approve one of the following methods in the award document: (i) Limit the amount or rate of... Federal awards will be limited to this method; and (B) Unreimbursed indirect costs may be applied...

  11. 45 CFR 2521.95 - To what extent may I use grant funds for administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... administrative costs? 2521.95 Section 2521.95 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued... Corporation will approve one of the following methods in the award document: (1) Limit the amount or rate of... Federal awards will be limited to this method; and (ii) Unreimbursed indirect costs may be applied...

  12. 75 FR 3236 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Cost Accounting Standards Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-20

    ... and the provision at 52.230-5 include pertinent rules and regulations related to the Cost Accounting... Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Cost Accounting Standards Administration AGENCIES: Department of...-0129). SUMMARY: Under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act of 1995 (44 U.S.C. Chapter 35),...

  13. Local administration of AAV-BDNF to subventricular zone induces functional recovery in stroke rats.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Jin; Tseng, Kuan-Yin; Shen, Hui; Harvey, Brandon K; Airavaara, Mikko; Wang, Yun

    2013-01-01

    Migration of new neuroprogenitor cells (NPCs) from the subventricular zone (SVZ) plays an important role in neurorepair after injury. Previous studies have shown that brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances the migration of NPCs from SVZ explants in neonatal mice in vitro. The purpose of this study was to identify the role of BDNF in SVZ cells using AAV-BDNF in an animal model of stroke. BDNF protein production after AAV-BDNF infection was verified in primary neuronal culture. AAV-BDNF or AAV-RFP was injected into the left SVZ region of adult rats at 14 days prior to right middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo). SVZ tissues were collected from the brain and placed in Metrigel cultures 1 day after MCAo. Treatment with AAV-BDNF significantly increased the migration of SVZ cells in the stroke brain in vitro. In another set of animals, AAV-GFP was co-injected with AAV-BDNF or AAV-RFP to label cells in left SVZ prior to right MCAo. Local administration of AAV-BDNF significantly enhanced recovery of locomotor function and migration of GFP-positive cells from the SVZ toward the lesioned hemisphere in stroke rats. Our data suggest that focal administration of AAV-BDNF to the SVZ increases behavioral recovery post stroke, possibly through the enhancement of migration of cells from SVZ in stroke animals. Regional manipulation of BDNF expression through AAV may be a novel approach for neurorepair in stroke brains.

  14. Cost Effective Recovery of Low-TDS Frac Flowback Water for Re-use

    SciTech Connect

    Claire Henderson; Harish Acharya; Hope Matis; Hareesh Kommepalli; Brian Moore; Hua Wang

    2011-03-31

    The project goal was to develop a cost-effective water recovery process to reduce the costs and envi-ronmental impact of shale gas production. This effort sought to develop both a flowback water pre-treatment process and a membrane-based partial demineralization process for the treatment of the low-Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) portion of the flowback water produced during hydrofracturing operations. The TDS cutoff for consideration in this project is < 35,000 {approx} 45,000 ppm, which is the typical limit for economic water recovery employing reverse osmosis (RO) type membrane desalination processes. The ultimate objective is the production of clean, reclaimed water suitable for re-use in hydrofracturing operations. The team successfully compiled data on flowback composition and other attributes across multiple shale plays, identified the likely applicability of membrane treatment processes in those shales, and expanded the proposed product portfolio to include four options suitable for various reuse or discharge applications. Pretreatment technologies were evaluated at the lab scale and down-selected based upon their efficacy in removing key contaminants. The chosen technologies were further validated by performing membrane fouling studies with treated flowback water to demonstrate the technical feasibility of flowback treatment with RO membranes. Process flow schemes were constructed for each of the four product options based on experimental performance data from actual flowback water treatment studies. For the products requiring membrane treatment, membrane system model-ing software was used to create designs for enhanced water recovery beyond the typical seawater desalination benchmark. System costs based upon vendor and internal cost information for all process flow schemes were generated and are below target and in line with customer expectations. Finally, to account for temporal and geographic variability in flowback characteristics as well as local

  15. Using cost/risk procedures to establish recovery criteria following a nuclear reactor accident.

    PubMed

    Tawil, J J; Strenge, D L

    1987-02-01

    In the event of a major accidental release of radionuclides at a nuclear power plant, large populated areas could become seriously contaminated. Local officials would be responsible for establishing radiation recovery criteria that would permit the evacuated population to return safely to their jobs and homes. The range of acceptable criteria could imply variations in property losses in the billions of dollars. Given the likely public concern over the health consequences and the enormity of the potential property losses, a cost/risk analysis can provide important input to establishing the recovery criteria. This paper describes procedures for conducting a cost/risk analysis of a site radiologically contaminated by a nuclear power plant accident. The procedures are illustrated by analyzing a hypothetically contaminated site, using software developed for determining the property and health effects of major reactor accidents.

  16. From Free to Free Market: Cost Recovery in Federally Funded Clinical Research

    PubMed Central

    McCammon, Margaret G.; Fogg, Thomas T.; Jacobsen, Lynda; Roache, John; Sampson, Royce; Bower, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    In a climate of increased expectation for the translation of research, academic clinical research units are looking at new ways to streamline their operation and maintain effective translational support services. Clinical research, although undeniably expensive, is an essential step in the translation of any medical breakthrough, and as a result, many academic clinical research units are actively looking to expand their clinical services despite financial pressures. We examine some of the hybrid academic-business models in 19 clinical research centers within the Clinical and Translational Science Award consortium that are emerging to address the issue of cost recovery of clinical research that is supported by the United States federal government. We identify initiatives that have succeeded or failed, essential supporting and regulatory components, and lessons learned from experience to design an optimal cost recovery model and a timeline for its implementation. PMID:22764204

  17. Impacts on irrigated agriculture of changes in electricity costs resulting from Western Area Power Administration`s power marketing alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, B.K.; Flaim, S.J.; Howitt, R.E.; Palmer, S.C.

    1995-03-01

    Irrigation is a major factor in the growth of US agricultural productivity, especially in western states, which account for more than 85% of the nation`s irrigated acreage. In some of these states, almost all cropland is irrigated, and nearly 50% of the irrigation is done with electrically powered pumps. Therefore, even small increases in the cost of electricity could have a disproportionate impact on irrigated agriculture. This technical memorandum examines the impacts that could result from proposed changes in the power marketing programs of the Western Area Power Administration`s Salt Lake City Area Office. The changes could increase the cost of power to all Western customers, including rural municipalities and irrigation districts that rely on inexpensive federal power to pump water. The impacts are assessed by translating changes in Western`s wholesale power rate into changes in the cost of pumping water as an input for agricultural production. Farmers can adapt to higher electricity prices in many ways, such as (1) using different pumping fuels, (2) adding workers and increasing management to irrigate more efficiently, and (3) growing more drought-tolerant crops. This study projects several responses, including using less groundwater and planting fewer waterintensive crops. The study finds that when dependence on Western`s power is high, the cost of power can have a major effect on energy use, agricultural practices, and the distribution of planted acreage. The biggest percentage changes in farm income would occur (1) in Nevada and Utah (however, all projected changes are less than 2% of the baseline) and (2) under the marketing alternatives that represent the lowest capacity and energy offer considered in Western`s Electric Power Marketing Environmental Impact Statement. The aggregate impact on farm incomes and the value of total farm production would be much smaller than that suggested by the changes in water use and planted acreage.

  18. FACTS Devices Cost Recovery During Congestion Management in Deregulated Electricity Markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ashwani Kumar; Mittapalli, Ram Kumar; Pal, Yash

    2016-09-01

    In future electricity markets, flexible alternating current transmission system (FACTS) devices will play key role for providing ancillary services. Since huge cost is involved for the FACTS devices placement in the power system, the cost invested has to be recovered in their life time for the replacement of these devices. The FACTS devices in future electricity markets can act as an ancillary services provider and have to be remunerated. The main contributions of the paper are: (1) investment recovery of FACTS devices during congestion management such as static VAR compensator and unified power flow controller along with thyristor controlled series compensator using non-linear bid curves, (2) the impact of ZIP load model on the FACTS cost recovery of the devices, (3) the comparison of results obtained without ZIP load model for both pool and hybrid market model, (4) secure bilateral transactions incorporation in hybrid market model. An optimal power flow based approach has been developed for maximizing social welfare including FACTS devices cost. The optimal placement of the FACTS devices have been obtained based on maximum social welfare. The results have been obtained for both pool and hybrid electricity market for IEEE 24-bus RTS.

  19. Intravenous Administration of Achyranthes Bidentata Polypeptides Supports Recovery from Experimental Ischemic Stroke in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hualing

    2013-01-01

    Background Achyranthes bidentata Blume (A. bidentata) is a commonly prescribed Chinese medicinal herb. A. bidentata polypeptides (ABPP) is an active composite constituent, separated from the aqueous extract of A. bidentata. Our previous studies have found that ABPP have the neuroprotective function in vitro and in rat middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) model in attenuating the brain infract area induced by focal ischemia-reperfusion. However, the ultimate goal of the stroke treatment is the restoration of behavioral function. Identifying behavioral deficits and therapeutic treatments in animal models of ischemic stroke is essential for potential translational applications. Methodology and Principal Findings The effect of ABPP on motor, sensory, and cognitive function in an ischemic stroke model with MCAO was investigated up to day 30. The function recovery monitored by the neurological deficit score, grip test, body asymmetry, beam-balancing task, and the Morris Water Maze. In this study, systemic administration of ABPP by i.v after MCAO decreased the neurological deficit score, ameliorated the forepaw muscle strength, and diminished the motor and sensory asymmetry on 7th and 30th day after MCAO. MCAO has been observed to cause prolonged disturbance of spatial learning and memory in rats using the MWM, and ABPP treatment could improve the spatial learning and memory function, which is impaired by MCAO in rats, on 30th day after MCAO. Then, the viable cells in CA1 region of hippocampus were counted by Nissl staining, and the neuronal cell death were significantly suppressed in the ABPP treated group. Conclusion ABPP could improve the recovery of sensory, motor and coordination, and cognitive function in MCAO-induced ischemic rats. And this recovery had a good correlation to the less of neuronal injury in brain. PMID:23468912

  20. Glutathione Depletion and Recovery After Acute Ethanol Administration in the Aging Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Vogt, Barbara L.; Richie, John P.

    2007-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays an important role in the detoxification of ethanol (EtOH) and acute EtOH administration leads to GSH depletion in the liver and other tissues. Aging is also associated with a progressive decline in GSH levels and impairment in GSH biosynthesis in many tissues. Thus, the present study was designed to examine the effects of aging on EtOH-induced depletion and recovery of GSH in different tissues of the C57Bl/6NNIA mouse. EtOH (2-5 g/kg) or saline was administered i.p. to mice of ages 6 mo (young), 12 mo (mature), and 24 mo (old); and GSH and cyst(e)ine concentrations were measured 0-24 hours thereafter. EtOH administration (5g/kg) depleted hepatic GSH levels >50% by 6 hr in all animals. By 24 hr, levels remained low in both young and old mice, but recovered to baseline levels in mature mice. At 6 hr, the decrease in hepatic GSH was dose-dependent up to 3 g/kg EtOH, but not at higher doses. The extent of depletion at the 3 g/kg dose was dependent upon age, with old mice demonstrating significantly lower GSH levels than mature mice (P<0.001). Altogether these results indicate that aging was associated with a greater degree of EtOH and fasting-induced GSH depletion and subsequent impaired recovery in liver. An impaired ability to recover was also observed in young animals. Further studies are required to determine if an inability to recover from GSH depletion by EtOH is associated with enhanced toxicity. PMID:17343832

  1. 75 FR 9102 - Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ..., or dental care. This change responds to the increase in medical costs since 1992, when the current... Part 43 Recovery of Cost of Hospital and Medical Care and Treatment Furnished by the United States... intervening period, the cost of medical care and treatment has increased substantially. That increase...

  2. Material and energy recovery in integrated waste management systems: a life-cycle costing approach.

    PubMed

    Massarutto, Antonio; de Carli, Alessandro; Graffi, Matteo

    2011-01-01

    A critical assumption of studies assessing comparatively waste management options concerns the constant average cost for selective collection regardless the source separation level (SSL) reached, and the neglect of the mass constraint. The present study compares alternative waste management scenarios through the development of a desktop model that tries to remove the above assumption. Several alternative scenarios based on different combinations of energy and materials recovery are applied to two imaginary areas modelled in order to represent a typical Northern Italian setting. External costs and benefits implied by scenarios are also considered. Scenarios are compared on the base of the full cost for treating the total waste generated in the area. The model investigates the factors that influence the relative convenience of alternative scenarios.

  3. 24 CFR 570.610 - Uniform administrative requirements and cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Uniform administrative requirements and cost principles. 570.610 Section 570.610 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR COMMUNITY PLANNING...

  4. 47 CFR 24.241 - Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan. 24.241 Section 24.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband PCS Policies Governing Microwave Relocation from the...

  5. 34 CFR 363.51 - What are the allowable administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the allowable administrative costs? 363.51 Section 363.51 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION THE STATE SUPPORTED...

  6. 77 FR 19425 - Prescription Drugs Not Administered During Treatment; Update to Administrative Cost for Calendar...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... AFFAIRS Prescription Drugs Not Administered During Treatment; Update to Administrative Cost for Calendar... purposes of calculating VA's charges for prescription drugs that were not administered during treatment but... administered during treatment for: (1) A nonservice-connected disability for which the veteran is entitled...

  7. 17 CFR 143.3 - Interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs. 143.3 Section 143.3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges COMMODITY FUTURES TRADING COMMISSION COLLECTION OF CLAIMS OWED THE UNITED STATES ARISING FROM ACTIVITIES UNDER THE COMMISSION'S...

  8. 47 CFR 24.241 - Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan. 24.241 Section 24.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband PCS Policies Governing Microwave Relocation from the...

  9. 47 CFR 24.241 - Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administration of the Cost-Sharing Plan. 24.241 Section 24.241 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES PERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Broadband PCS Policies Governing Microwave Relocation from the...

  10. 78 FR 13675 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Cost Accounting Standards Administration

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... accounting practice change, the total potential impact of the change on contracts containing a CAS provision... Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Cost Accounting Standards Administration AGENCY: Department of Defense...: Under the provisions of the Paperwork Reduction Act, the Regulatory Secretariat will be submitting...

  11. Losartan administration reduces fibrosis but hinders functional recovery after volumetric muscle loss injury.

    PubMed

    Garg, Koyal; Corona, Benjamin T; Walters, Thomas J

    2014-11-15

    Losartan is a Food and Drug Administration approved antihypertensive medication that is recently emerging as an antifibrotic therapy. Previously, losartan has been successfully used to reduce fibrosis and improve both muscle regeneration and function in several models of recoverable skeletal muscle injuries, such as contusion and laceration. In this study, the efficacy of losartan treatment in reducing fibrosis and improving regeneration was determined in a Lewis rat model of volumetric muscle loss (VML) injury. VML has been defined as the traumatic or surgical loss of skeletal muscle with resultant functional impairment. It is among the top 10 causes for wounded service members to be medically retired from the military. This study shows that, after several weeks of recovery, VML injury results in little to no muscle regeneration, but is marked by persistent inflammation, chronic upregulation of profibrotic markers and extracellular matrix (i.e., collagen type I), and fat deposition at the defect site, which manifest irrecoverable deficits in force production. Losartan administration at 10 mg·kg(-1)·day(-1) was able to modulate the gene expression of fibrotic markers and was also effective at reducing fibrosis (i.e., the deposition of collagen type I) in the injured muscle. However, there were no improvements in muscle regeneration, and deleterious effects on muscle function were observed instead. We propose that, in the absence of regeneration, reduction in fibrosis worsens the ability of the VML injured muscle to transmit forces, which ultimately results in decreased muscle function.

  12. The Program Administrator Cost of Saved Energy for Utility Customer-Funded Energy Efficiency Programs

    SciTech Connect

    Billingsley, Megan A.; Hoffman, Ian M.; Stuart, Elizabeth; Schiller, Steven R.; Goldman, Charles A.; LaCommare, Kristina

    2014-03-19

    End-use energy efficiency is increasingly being relied upon as a resource for meeting electricity and natural gas utility system needs within the United States. There is a direct connection between the maturation of energy efficiency as a resource and the need for consistent, high-quality data and reporting of efficiency program costs and impacts. To support this effort, LBNL initiated the Cost of Saved Energy Project (CSE Project) and created a Demand-Side Management (DSM) Program Impacts Database to provide a resource for policy makers, regulators, and the efficiency industry as a whole. This study is the first technical report of the LBNL CSE Project and provides an overview of the project scope, approach, and initial findings, including: • Providing a proof of concept that the program-level cost and savings data can be collected, organized, and analyzed in a systematic fashion; • Presenting initial program, sector, and portfolio level results for the program administrator CSE for a recent time period (2009-2011); and • Encouraging state and regional entities to establish common reporting definitions and formats that would make the collection and comparison of CSE data more reliable. The LBNL DSM Program Impacts Database includes the program results reported to state regulators by more than 100 program administrators in 31 states, primarily for the years 2009–2011. In total, we have compiled cost and energy savings data on more than 1,700 programs over one or more program-years for a total of more than 4,000 program-years’ worth of data, providing a rich dataset for analyses. We use the information to report costs-per-unit of electricity and natural gas savings for utility customer-funded, end-use energy efficiency programs. The program administrator CSE values are presented at national, state, and regional levels by market sector (e.g., commercial, industrial, residential) and by program type (e.g., residential whole home programs, commercial new

  13. Cost saving and safety issues in the Billings Area of the Western Area Power Administration

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-11

    This report concerns possible cost savings that would result from a proposed transfer of power-dispatch functions from Fort Peck, Montana to Jamestown, North Dakota, in the Billings Area of the Western Area Power Administration (the Power Administration) and related issues concerning the reliability of service and the safety of personnel in the operation of the Billings Area of the Power Administration. Each of the three requests to the Inspector General (IG) raised the following questions: (1) Will the proposed transfer of the power dispatch function result in cost savings. (2) Will any detriment to the Power Administration's service to its Montana customers result from the transfer. (3) Will the safety of people who work on the electrical power systems in Montana be jeopardized by the transfer. IG recommended: (a) that the Power Administration reevaluate the adequacy of the plan to staff the Jamestown facility with a sufficient number of experienced power dispatchers familiar with the Montana power distribution system, and (b) that the Power Administration strictly enforce its published procedures for training, testing, and certifying operations and maintenance personnel.

  14. Design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Tian, Jiwei; Zhao, Wei; Song, Dalei; Xu, Ming; Xu, Xiaoyang; Lu, Jun

    2013-09-23

    Mooring systems are the most effective method for making sustained time series observations in the oceans. Generally there are two types of ocean mooring systems: surface and subsurface. Subsurface mooring system is less likely to be damaged after deployment than surface system. However, subsurface system usually needs to be retrieved from the ocean for data recovery. This paper describes the design and implementation of a new low-cost subsurface mooring system for efficient data recovery: Timed Communication Buoy System (TCBS). TCBS is usually integrated in the main float and the designated data is downloaded from the control system. After data retrieval, TCBS will separate from main float, rise up to the sea surface, and transmit data by satellite communication.

  15. Cost of Radiotherapy Versus NSAID Administration for Prevention of Heterotopic Ossification After Total Hip Arthroplasty

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, Jonathan B. Chen, Sea S.; Shah, Anand P.; Coon, Alan B.; Dickler, Adam

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: Heterotopic ossification (HO), or abnormal bone formation, is a common sequela of total hip arthroplasty. This abnormal bone can impair joint function and must be surgically removed to restore mobility. HO can be prevented by postoperative nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) use or radiotherapy (RT). NSAIDs are associated with multiple toxicities, including gastrointestinal bleeding. Although RT has been shown to be more efficacious than NSAIDs at preventing HO, its cost-effectiveness has been questioned. Methods and Materials: We performed an analysis of the cost of postoperative RT to the hip compared with NSAID administration, taking into account the costs of surgery for HO formation, treatment-induced morbidity, and productivity loss from missed work. The costs of RT, surgical revision, and treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding were estimated using the 2007 Medicare Fee Schedule and inpatient diagnosis-related group codes. The cost of lost wages was estimated using the 2006 median salary data from the U.S. Census Bureau. Results: The cost of administering RT was estimated at $899 vs. $20 for NSAID use. After accounting for the additional costs associated with revision total hip arthroplasty and gastrointestinal bleeding, the corresponding estimated costs were $1,208 vs. $930. Conclusion: If the costs associated with treatment failure and treatment-induced morbidity are considered, the cost of NSAIDs approaches that of RT. Other NSAID morbidities and quality-of-life differences that are difficult to quantify add to the cost of NSAIDs. These considerations have led us to recommend RT as the preferred modality for use in prophylaxis against HO after total hip arthroplasty, even when the cost is considered.

  16. Health Care Costs for Patients With Chronic Spinal Cord Injury in the Veterans Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    French, Dustin D; Campbell, Robert R; Sabharwal, Sunil; Nelson, Audrey L; Palacios, Polly A; Gavin-Dreschnack, Deborah

    2007-01-01

    Background/Objective: Recurring annual costs of caring for patients with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) is a large economic burden on health care systems, but information on costs of SCI care beyond the acute and initial postacute phase is sparse. The objective of this study was to establish a frame of reference and estimate of the annual direct medical costs associated with health care for a sample of patients with chronic SCI (ie, >2 years after injury). Methods: Patients were recruited from 3 Veterans Health Administration (VHA) SCI facilities; baseline patient information was cross-referenced to the Decision Support System (DSS) National Data Extracts (NDE) to obtain patient-specific health care costs in VHA. Descriptive statistical analysis of annual DSS-NDE cost of patients with SCI (N = 675) for fiscal year (FY) 2005 by level and completeness of injury was conducted. Results: Total (inpatient and outpatient) annual (FY 2005) direct medical costs for 675 patients with SCI exceeded $14.47 million or $21,450 per patient. Average annual total costs varied from $28,334 for cervical complete SCI to $16,792 for thoracic incomplete SCI. Two hundred thirty-three of the 675 patients with SCI who were hospitalized over the study period accounted for a total of 378 hospital discharges, costing in excess of $7.19 million. This approximated a cost of outpatient care received of $7.28 million for our entire sample. Conclusions: The comprehensive nature of health care delivery and related cost capture for people with chronic SCI in the VHA provided us the opportunity to accurately determine health care costs for this population. Future SCI postacute care cost analyses should consider case-mix adjusting patients at high risk for rehospitalization. PMID:18092564

  17. 75 FR 34117 - Proposed CERCLA Section 122(h) Cost Recovery Settlement for the H.M. Quackenbush, Inc. Superfund...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Section 122(h) Cost Recovery Settlement for the H.M. Quackenbush, Inc. Superfund... Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980, as amended (``CERCLA''), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is... recovery settlement agreement pursuant to Section 122(h) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9622(h), regarding the...

  18. Evaluation of lung recovery after static administration of three different perfluorocarbons in pigs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The respiratory properties of perfluorocarbons (PFC) have been widely studied for liquid ventilation in humans and animals. Several PFC were tested but their tolerance may depend on the species. Here, the effects of a single administration of liquid PFC into pig lungs were assessed and compared. Three different PFC having distinct evaporative and spreading coefficient properties were evaluated (Perfluorooctyl bromide [PFOB], perfluorodecalin [PFD] and perfluoro-N-octane [PFOC]). Methods Pigs were anesthetized and submitted to mechanical ventilation. They randomly received an intra-tracheal administration of 15 ml/kg of either PFOB, PFD or PFOC with 12 h of mechanical ventilation before awakening and weaning from ventilation. A Control group was submitted to mechanical ventilation with no PFC administration. All animals were followed during 4 days after the initial PFC administration to investigate gas exchanges and clinical recovery. They were ultimately euthanized for histological analyses and assessment of PFC residual concentrations within the lungs using dual nuclei fluorine and hydrogen Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Sixteen animals were included (4/group). Results In the PFD group, animals tended to be hypoxemic after awakening. In PFOB and PFOC groups, blood gases were not significantly different from the Control group after awakening. The poor tolerance of PFD was likely related to a large amount of residual PFC, as observed using MRI in all lung samples (≈10% of lung volume). This percentage was lower in the PFOB group (≈1%) but remained significantly greater than in the Control group. In the PFOC group, the percentage of residual PFC was not significantly different from that of the Control group (≈0.1%). Histologically, the most striking feature was an alveolar infiltration with foam macrophages, especially in the groups treated by PFD or PFOB. Conclusions Of the three tested perfluorocarbons, PFOC offered the best tolerance in terms

  19. Recovery of Utility Fixed Costs: Utility, Consumer, Environmental and Economist Perspectives

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Lisa; Hemphill, Ross; Howat, John; Cavanagh, Ralph; Borenstein, Severin; Deason, Jeff; Schwartz, Lisa; Schwartz, Lisa

    2016-06-14

    Utilities recover costs for providing electric service to retail customers through a combination of rate components that together comprise customers’ monthly electric bills. Rates and rate designs are set by state regulators and vary by jurisdiction, utility and customer class. In addition to the fundamental tenet of setting fair and reasonable rates, rate design balances economic efficiency, equity and fairness, customer satisfaction, utility revenue stability, and customer price and bill stability.1 At the most basic level, retail electricity bills in the United States typically include a fixed monthly customer charge — a set dollar amount regardless of energy usage — and a volumetric energy charge for each kilowatt-hour consumed.2 The energy charge may be flat across all hours, vary by usage level (for example, higher rates at higher levels of usage), or vary based on time of consumption.3 While some utility costs, such as fuel costs, clearly vary according to electricity usage, other costs are “fixed” over the short run — generally, those that do not vary over the course of a year. Depending on your point of view, and whether the state’s electricity industry has been restructured or remains vertically integrated, the set of costs that are “fixed” may be quite limited. Or the set may extend to all capacity costs for generation, transmission and distribution. In the long run, all costs are variable. In the context of flat or declining loads in some regions, utilities are proposing a variety of changes to retail rate designs, particularly for residential customers, to recover fixed costs. In this report, authors representing utility (Chapter 1), consumer (Chapter 2), environmentalist (Chapter 3) and economist (Chapter 4) perspectives discuss fixed costs for electric utilities and set out their principles for recovering those costs. The table on the next page summarizes each author’s relative preferences for various options for fixed cost

  20. Cost-effective recovery and purification of polyhydroxyalkanoates by selective dissolution of cell mass.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian; Chen, Lilian X L

    2006-01-01

    Highly efficient separation and purification of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from PHA-containing cell mass is essential to production of the bioplastics from renewable resources in a cost-effective, environmentally friendly way. Based on selective dissolution of non-PHA cell mass (NPCM) by protons in aqueous solution and crystallization kinetics of PHA biopolymers, a simple process is developed and demonstrated to recover PHAs from cell mass to high purity (>97 wt %) with high yield (>95 wt %). The average molecular weight of biopolyesters is controlled, which follows an exponential function of process severity, a combined factor of processing conditions. Compared with conventional chemical treatment such as sequential surfactant and hypochlorite treatment, this new technology substantially reduces the chemical cost for PHA recovery and purification from PHA-containing cell mass.

  1. Cost Benefit Analysis of Installing a Recovery Exercise Module (REM) in a Cruise Missile for an Operational Test Launch.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-01

    A±6 454 COST BENEFIT AINALYSIS OF INSTALLING A RECOVERY EXERCISE /In N9 ODULE (REM) IN R..(U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY CA H E GLASSNAN...BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF INSTALLING A RECOVERY EXERCISE MODULE (REM) IN A CRUISE MISSILE FOR AN OPERATIONAL TEST LAUNCH by Howard Elliott Glassman June 1987...iNI ELEMENT NO I NNO4 ACCESSION NO TITLE (InCludO Secu’fft C10uufCA1uon) COST BENEFIT ANALYSIS OF INSTALLING A RECOVERY EXERCISE MODULE (REM) IN A

  2. Costs of Integrated Mass Drug Administration for Neglected Tropical Diseases in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ann S.; Brady, Molly A.; Direny, Abdel; Desir, Luccene; Oscard, Roland; Vely, Jean-Francois; Linehan, Mary; Baker, Margaret

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a cost analysis of Haiti's Ministry of Public Health and Population neglected tropical disease program, Projet des Maladies Tropicales Negligées and collected data for 9 of 55 communes participating in the May 2008–April 2009 mass drug administration (MDA). The Projet des Maladies Tropicales Negligées Program partnered with IMA World Health and Hôpital Ste. Croix to implement MDA for treatment of lymphatic filariasis and soil-transmitted helminthiasis by using once a year treatment with albendazole and diethylcarbamazine in a population of approximately 8 million persons. Methods included analyzing partner financial records and conducting retrospective surveys of personnel. In the nine communes, 633,261 persons were treated at a cost of U.S. $0.64 per person, which included the cost of donated drugs, and at a cost of U.S. $0.42 per person treated, when excluding donated drug costs. The MDA for lymphatic filariasis in Haiti began in 2000, with the treatment of 105,750 persons at a cost per person of U.S. $2.23. The decrease in cost per person treated is the result of cumulative implementation experience and economies of scale. PMID:22049035

  3. Alternative strategies for energy recovery from municipal solid waste Part B: Emission and cost estimates.

    PubMed

    Consonni, S; Giugliano, M; Grosso, M

    2005-01-01

    This two-part paper assesses four strategies for energy recovery from Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) by dedicated Waste-To-Energy (WTE) plants. In strategy 1, the residue of Material Recovery (MR) is fed directly to a grate combustor, while in strategy 2 the grate combustor comes downstream of light mechanical treatment. In strategies 3 and 4, the MR residue is converted into Refuse Derived Fuel (RDF), in a fluidized cumbuster bed. The results of Part A, devoted to mass and energy balances, clearly show that pre-treating the MR residue in order to increase the heating value of the feedstock fed to the WTE plant has marginal effects on the energy efficiency of the WTE plant. When considering the efficiency of the whole strategy of waste management, the energy balances show that the more thorough the pre-treatment, the smaller the amount of energy recovered per unit of MR residue. Starting from the heat/mass balances illustrated in Part A, Part B examines the environmental impacts and economics of the various strategies by means of a Life Cycle Assessment (LCA). Results show that treating the MR residues ahead of the WTE plant does not provide environmental or economic benefits. RDF production worsens almost all impact indicators because it reduces net electricity production and thus the displacement of power plant emissions; it also increases costs, because the benefits of improving the quality of the material fed to the WTE plant do not compensate the cost of such improvement.

  4. 31 CFR 5.5 - How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Treasury...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Treasury debt? 5.5 Section 5.5 Money and Finance... Debts § 5.5 How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to...

  5. 15 CFR 19.5 - How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Commerce...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Commerce debt? 19.5 Section 19.5 Commerce and... Debts § 19.5 How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to...

  6. 36 CFR 1011.5 - What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a debt? 1011.5 Section 1011.5 Parks... § 1011.5 What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a...

  7. 31 CFR 5.5 - How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Treasury...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Treasury debt? 5.5 Section 5.5 Money and Finance... Debts § 5.5 How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to...

  8. 36 CFR 1011.5 - What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a debt? 1011.5 Section 1011.5 Parks... § 1011.5 What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a...

  9. 15 CFR 19.5 - How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Commerce...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Commerce debt? 19.5 Section 19.5 Commerce and... Debts § 19.5 How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to...

  10. 36 CFR 1011.5 - What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a debt? 1011.5 Section 1011.5 Parks... § 1011.5 What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a...

  11. 36 CFR 1011.5 - What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a debt? 1011.5 Section 1011.5 Parks... § 1011.5 What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a...

  12. 15 CFR 19.5 - How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Commerce...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Commerce debt? 19.5 Section 19.5 Commerce and... Debts § 19.5 How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to...

  13. 31 CFR 5.5 - How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Treasury...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Treasury debt? 5.5 Section 5.5 Money and Finance... Debts § 5.5 How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to...

  14. 31 CFR 5.5 - How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Treasury...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Treasury debt? 5.5 Section 5.5 Money and Finance... Debts § 5.5 How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to...

  15. 15 CFR 19.5 - How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Commerce...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Commerce debt? 19.5 Section 19.5 Commerce and... Debts § 19.5 How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to...

  16. 31 CFR 5.5 - How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Treasury...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Treasury debt? 5.5 Section 5.5 Money and Finance... Debts § 5.5 How will Treasury entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to...

  17. 15 CFR 19.5 - How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Commerce...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a Commerce debt? 19.5 Section 19.5 Commerce and... Debts § 19.5 How will Commerce entities add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to...

  18. 36 CFR 1011.5 - What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a debt?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a debt? 1011.5 Section 1011.5 Parks, Forests... What interest, penalty charges and administrative costs will the Presidio Trust add to a debt?...

  19. 45 CFR 1301.32 - Limitations on costs of development and administration of a Head Start program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitations on costs of development and... and General Administration § 1301.32 Limitations on costs of development and administration of a...

  20. 45 CFR 1301.32 - Limitations on costs of development and administration of a Head Start program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Limitations on costs of development and... and General Administration § 1301.32 Limitations on costs of development and administration of a...

  1. 45 CFR 1301.32 - Limitations on costs of development and administration of a Head Start program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Limitations on costs of development and... and General Administration § 1301.32 Limitations on costs of development and administration of a...

  2. 45 CFR 1301.32 - Limitations on costs of development and administration of a Head Start program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Limitations on costs of development and... and General Administration § 1301.32 Limitations on costs of development and administration of a...

  3. 45 CFR 1301.32 - Limitations on costs of development and administration of a Head Start program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Limitations on costs of development and... and General Administration § 1301.32 Limitations on costs of development and administration of a...

  4. Risk-adjusted impact of administrative costs on the distribution of terminal wealth for long-term investment.

    PubMed

    Guillén, Montserrat; Jarner, Søren Fiig; Nielsen, Jens Perch; Pérez-Marín, Ana M

    2014-01-01

    The impact of administrative costs on the distribution of terminal wealth is approximated using a simple formula applicable to many investment situations. We show that the reduction in median returns attributable to administrative fees is usually at least twice the amount of the administrative costs charged for most investment funds, when considering a risk-adjustment correction over a reasonably long-term time horizon. The example we present covers a number of standard cases and can be applied to passive investments, mutual funds, and hedge funds. Our results show investors the potential losses they face in performance due to administrative costs.

  5. Delayed administration of a single dose of lithium promotes recovery from AKI.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hui; Ge, Yan; Wang, Zhen; Zhuang, Shougang; Dworkin, Lance; Peng, Ai; Gong, Rujun

    2014-03-01

    Evidence suggests that glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) contributes to AKI; however, its role in post-AKI kidney repair remains uncertain. Here, delayed treatment with a single dose of lithium, a selective inhibitor of GSK3β and a US Food and Drug Administration-approved mood stabilizer, accelerated recovery of renal function, promoted repopulation of renal tubular epithelia, and improved kidney repair in murine models of cisplatin- and ischemia/reperfusion-induced AKI. These effects associated with reduced GSK3β activity and elevated expression of proproliferative molecules, including cyclin D1, c-Myc, and hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α), in renal tubular epithelia. In cultured renal tubular cells, cisplatin exposure led to transient repression of GSK3β activity followed by a prolonged upregulation of activity. Rescue treatment with lithium inhibited GSK3β activity, enhanced nuclear expression of cyclin D1, c-Myc, and HIF-1α, and boosted cellular proliferation. Similarly, ectopic expression of a kinase-dead mutant of GSK3β enhanced the expression of cyclin D1, c-Myc, and HIF-1α and amplified cellular proliferation after cisplatin injury, whereas forced expression of a constitutively active mutant of GSK3β abrogated the effects of lithium. Mechanistically, GSK3β colocalized and physically interacted with cyclin D1, c-Myc, and HIF-1α in tubular cells. In silico analysis revealed that cyclin D1, c-Myc, and HIF-1α harbor putative GSK3β consensus phosphorylation motifs, implying GSK3β-directed phosphorylation and subsequent degradation of these molecules. Notably, cotreatment with lithium enhanced the proapoptotic effects of cisplatin in cultured colon cancer cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that pharmacologic targeting of GSK3β by lithium may be a novel therapeutic strategy to improve renal salvage after AKI.

  6. The Department of the Navy Spent Recovery Act Funds on Photovoltaic Projects That Were Not Cost-Effective

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-22

    Report No. D-2011-106 September 22, 2011 The Department of the Navy Spent Recovery Act Funds on Photovoltaic Projects...Spent Recovery Act Funds on Photovoltaic Projects That Were Not Cost-Effective 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6...Command NFESC Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center MILCON Military Construction O&M Operations and Maintenance PV Photovoltaic

  7. Recovery

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video discusses the recovery events that occur in high-power rocketry and the various devices used in safely recovering the rocket. The video includes a discussion of black powder and ejection...

  8. Modeling the Impact and Costs of Semiannual Mass Drug Administration for Accelerated Elimination of Lymphatic Filariasis

    PubMed Central

    de Vlas, Sake J.; Fischer, Peter U.; Weil, Gary J.; Goldman, Ann S.

    2013-01-01

    The Global Program to Eliminate Lymphatic Filariasis (LF) has a target date of 2020. This program is progressing well in many countries. However, progress has been slow in some countries, and others have not yet started their mass drug administration (MDA) programs. Acceleration is needed. We studied how increasing MDA frequency from once to twice per year would affect program duration and costs by using computer simulation modeling and cost projections. We used the LYMFASIM simulation model to estimate how many annual or semiannual MDA rounds would be required to eliminate LF for Indian and West African scenarios with varied pre-control endemicity and coverage levels. Results were used to estimate total program costs assuming a target population of 100,000 eligibles, a 3% discount rate, and not counting the costs of donated drugs. A sensitivity analysis was done to investigate the robustness of these results with varied assumptions for key parameters. Model predictions suggested that semiannual MDA will require the same number of MDA rounds to achieve LF elimination as annual MDA in most scenarios. Thus semiannual MDA programs should achieve this goal in half of the time required for annual programs. Due to efficiency gains, total program costs for semiannual MDA programs are projected to be lower than those for annual MDA programs in most scenarios. A sensitivity analysis showed that this conclusion is robust. Semiannual MDA is likely to shorten the time and lower the cost required for LF elimination in countries where it can be implemented. This strategy may improve prospects for global elimination of LF by the target year 2020. PMID:23301115

  9. Economic Costs of a Postrelease Intervention for Incarcerated Female Substance Abusers: Recovery Management Checkups for Women Offenders (RMC-WO)

    PubMed Central

    McCollister, Kathryn E.; Scott, Christy K.; Dennis, Michael L.; Freitas, Derek M.; French, Michael T.; Funk, Rodney R.

    2015-01-01

    This study estimates the economic costs of Recovery Management Checkups for Women Offenders (RMC-WO), highlighting the unique mix of services and differential costs between two distinct phases of the intervention. Participants were randomly assigned to quarterly outcome monitoring (OM) only (n=242) or OM plus Recovery Management Checkups (OM-plus-RMC) (n=238). The OM-only condition has a total annual economic cost of $76,010, which equates to $81 quarterly per person. The average cost per OM interview completed is $86. OM-plus-RMC generates a total annual economic cost of $126,717, or $137 quarterly per person. The cost per interview completed is $147 and the cost per intervention session completed is $161. RMC-WO has a relatively modest additional cost compared with the average costs of post-release supervision, which can range from $3.42 ($1,250) per day (year) for probationers to $7.47 ($2,750) per day (year) for parolees. The clinical, economic, and policy implications of incorporating RMC-WO into existing corrections and/or community-based treatment settings are discussed. PMID:27030790

  10. 28 CFR 100.11 - Allowable costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable costs. 100.11 Section 100.11 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) COST RECOVERY REGULATIONS, COMMUNICATIONS ASSISTANCE FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT ACT OF 1994 § 100.11 Allowable costs. (a) Costs that are eligible...

  11. 75 FR 9142 - Regulations Under I.R.C. Section 7430 Relating to Awards of Administrative Costs and Attorneys...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... Awards of Administrative Costs and Attorneys Fees; Hearing Cancellation AGENCY: Internal Revenue Service... attorneys fees under section 7430 to conform to amendments made in the Taxpayer Relief Act of 1997 and...

  12. 20 CFR 667.210 - What administrative cost limits apply to Workforce Investment Act title I grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... reserve for Statewide activities, the State may spend up to five percent (5%) of the amount allotted under... reserved for local administrative costs needs to be allocated back to the individual funding streams....

  13. LOWER COST METHODS FOR IMPROVED OIL RECOVERY (IOR) VIA SURFACTANT FLOODING

    SciTech Connect

    William A. Goddard III; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Seung Soon Jang; Shiang-Tai Lin; Prabal Maiti; Yongfu Wu; Stefan Iglauer; Xiaohang Zhang

    2004-09-01

    This report provides a summary of the work performed in this 3-year project sponsored by DOE. The overall objective of this project is to identify new, potentially more cost-effective surfactant formulations for improved oil recovery (IOR). The general approach is to use an integrated experimental and computational chemistry effort to improve our understanding of the link between surfactant structure and performance, and from this knowledge, develop improved IOR surfactant formulations. Accomplishments for the project include: (1) completion of a literature review to assemble current and new surfactant IOR ideas, (2) Development of new atomistic-level MD (molecular dynamic) modeling methodologies to calculate IFT (interfacial tension) rigorously from first principles, (3) exploration of less computationally intensive mesoscale methods to estimate IFT, Quantitative Structure Property Relationship (QSPR), and cohesive energy density (CED) calculations, (4) experiments to screen many surfactant structures for desirable low IFT and solid adsorption behavior, and (5) further experimental characterization of the more promising new candidate formulations (based on alkyl polyglycosides (APG) and alkyl propoxy sulfate surfactants). Important findings from this project include: (1) the IFT between two pure substances may be calculated quantitatively from fundamental principles using Molecular Dynamics, the same approach can provide qualitative results for ternary systems containing a surfactant, (2) low concentrations of alkyl polyglycoside surfactants have potential for IOR (Improved Oil Recovery) applications from a technical standpoint (if formulated properly with a cosurfactant, they can create a low IFT at low concentration) and also are viable economically as they are available commercially, and (3) the alkylpropoxy sulfate surfactants have promising IFT performance also, plus these surfactants can have high optimal salinity and so may be attractive for use in higher

  14. 76 FR 60493 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Past Cost Recovery Settlement; IUNA, Inc. aka IU North America...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ...., Mine 2028 Site, Brazil, IN, SF Site B5KK AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice... 2028 site in Brazil, Clay County, Indiana with the following settling party: IUNA, Inc., also known as..., Chicago, IL 60604 or kujawa.jerome@epa.gov Comments should reference the Mine 2028 Site in Brazil,...

  15. 78 FR 74128 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; Cadie Auto Salvage Site, Belvidere...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ..., Inc.; S.J. Smith Company Inc.; United States Department of Energy/Argonne National Laboratory; United..., Illinois 60604. A copy of the proposed ] settlement may be obtained from Peter Felitti, Assoc. Regional... and EPA Docket No. and should be addressed to Peter Felitti, Assoc. Regional Counsel, EPA, Office...

  16. 78 FR 20393 - Cost Recovery for Permit Processing, Administration, and Enforcement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... April 4, 2013 Part II Department of the Interior Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30... Rules#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Office of Surface Mining Reclamation and Enforcement 30 CFR... Thursday, April 4, 2013 because of editing errors. AGENCY: Office of Surface Mining Reclamation...

  17. 78 FR 13056 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; in re: Factory H Superfund Site, Meriden...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... to Hugh W. Martinez, Senior Enforcement Counsel, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Region 1, 5... CONTACT: A copy of the proposed settlement may be obtained from Hugh W. Martinez, Senior Enforcement...), Boston, MA 02109-3912 (telephone no. (617) 918-1867; email Martinez.hugh@epa.gov ). Dated: December...

  18. 77 FR 123 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement; North Hollywood Operable Unit of the San...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-03

    ..., California, with the following settling party: Waste Management Recycling & Disposal Services of California, Inc., dba Bradley Landfill & Recycling Center. The settlement requires the settling party to pay...

  19. 76 FR 39401 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Agreement; Textron Inc., Whittaker...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-06

    ... Corporation, United States Army, and United States Department of Energy AGENCY: Environmental Protection... United States Department of Energy. The settlement requires payment of $4,115,000 in reimbursement of... response to any comments received will be available for public inspection at the Concord Free...

  20. 78 FR 25082 - Proposed Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Under Section 122(h) of the Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-29

    ... Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act, as Amended, Leadwood Mine Tailings Superfund Site, St... concerning the Leadwood Mine Tailings Superfund Site in St. Francois County, Missouri. The settlement.... Requests should reference the Leadwood Mine Tailings Superfund Site, EPA Docket No....

  1. 78 FR 48434 - Proposed Administrative Cost Recovery Settlement Under Section 122(h) of the Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ..., EPA Docket No. CERCLA-07-2013- 0009. Comments should be addressed to: J. Scott Pemberton, Senior... INFORMATION CONTACT: J. Scott Pemberton, at telephone: (913) 551-7276; fax number: (913) 551-7925/Attn: J. Scott Pemberton; email address: pemberton.scott@epa.gov . Dated: July 31, 2013. Robert W....

  2. 76 FR 10028 - Settlement Agreement for Recovery of Past Response Costs 10,000 Havana Street Site, Commerce City...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Settlement Agreement for Recovery of Past Response Costs 10,000 Havana Street Site, Commerce City, Adams County, CO AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency. ACTION: Notice and request for public...

  3. 76 FR 60493 - Settlement Agreements for Recovery of Past Response Costs; Granite Timber Post and Pole Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... AGENCY Settlement Agreements for Recovery of Past Response Costs; Granite Timber Post and Pole Site, Philipsburg, Granite County, MT AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Notice and Request for... Mark Metesh (Settling Party), regarding the Granite Timber Site (Site), located 5 miles south...

  4. 20 CFR 641.861 - Must SCSEP recipients provide funding for the administrative costs of sub-recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Must SCSEP recipients provide funding for the administrative costs of sub-recipients? 641.861 Section 641.861 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT...

  5. 20 CFR 641.861 - Must SCSEP recipients provide funding for the administrative costs of sub-recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Must SCSEP recipients provide funding for the administrative costs of sub-recipients? 641.861 Section 641.861 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT...

  6. Estimating the administrative cost of regulatory noncompliance: a pilot method for quantifying the value of prevention.

    PubMed

    Emery, R J; Charlton, M A; Mathis, J L

    2000-05-01

    Routine regulatory inspections provide a valuable independent quality assurance review of radiation protection programs that ultimately serves to improve overall program performance. But when an item of non-compliance is noted, regardless of its significance or severity the ensuing notice of violation (NOV) results in an added cost to both the permit holder and the regulatory authority. Such added costs may be tangible, in the form of added work to process and resolve the NOV, or intangible, in the form of damage to organizational reputation or worker morale. If the portion of the tangible costs incurred by a regulatory agency for issuing NOVs could be quantified, the analysis could aid in the identification of agency resources that might be dedicated to other areas such as prevention. Ideally, any prevention activities would reduce the overall number of NOVs issued without impacting the routine inspection process. In this study, the administrative costs of NOV issuance and resolution was estimated by obtaining data from the professional staff of the Texas Department of Health, Bureau of Radiation Control (TDH-BRC). Based a focus group model, the data indicate that approximately $106,000 in TDH-BRC personnel resources were expended to process and resolve the 6,800 NOVs issued in Texas during 1997 inspection activities. The study's findings imply that an incremental decrease in the number of NOVs issued would result in corresponding savings of agency resources. Suggested prevention activities that might be financed through any resource savings include the dissemination of common violation data to permit holders or training for improving correspondence with regulatory agencies. The significance of this exercise is that any savings experienced by an agency could enhance permittee compliance without impacting the routine inspection process.

  7. Good agreement between questionnaire and administrative databases for health care use and costs in patients with osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Estimating costs is essential to the economic analysis of health care programs. Health care costs are often captured from administrative databases or by patient report. Administrative records only provide a partial representation of health care costs and have additional limitations. Patient-completed questionnaires may allow a broader representation of health care costs; however the validity and feasibility of such methods have not been firmly established. This study was conducted to assess the validity and feasibility of using a patient-completed questionnaire to capture health care use and costs for patients with osteoarthritis, and to compare the research costs of the data-capture methods. Methods We designed a patient questionnaire and applied it in a clinical trial. We captured equivalent data from four administrative databases. We evaluated aspects of the questionnaire's validity using sensitivity and specificity, Lin's concordance correlation coefficient (ρc), and Bland-Altman comparisons. Results The questionnaire's response rate was 89%. Acceptable sensitivity and specificity levels were found for all types of health care use. The numbers of visits and the majority of medications reported by patients were in agreement with the database-derived estimates (ρc > 0.40). Total cost estimates from the questionnaire agreed with those from the databases. Patient-reported co-payments agreed with administrative records with respect to GP office transactions, but not pharmaceutical co-payments. Research costs for the questionnaire-based method were less than one-third of the costs for the databases method. Conclusion A patient-completed questionnaire is feasible for capturing health care use and costs for patients with osteoarthritis, and data collected using it mostly agree with administrative databases. Caution should be exercised when applying unit costs and collecting co-payment data. PMID:21489280

  8. An AMS method to determine analyte recovery from pharmacokinetic studies with concomitant extravascular and intravenous administration.

    PubMed

    Lappin, Graham; Seymour, Mark; Young, Graeme; Higton, David; Hill, Howard M

    2011-02-01

    The absolute bioavailability, clearance and volume of distribution of a drug can be investigated by administering a very low dose of the (14)C-drug intravenously along with a therapeutic nonlabeled dose by the extravascular route (typically orally). The total drug concentration is measured by an assay such as LC-MS and the (14)C-drug is measured by accelerator MS (AMS). In another article in this issue, a method validation is proposed where AMS was used as the analytical assay. Part of the validation is to assess the recovery of the analyte being measured as this has a direct impact on its quantification. In this article, a method of internal standardisation is described where the UV response of the nonlabeled analyte, spiked in excess into the matrix being analysed, is used for internal standardization. The method allows for the recovery of analyte to be measured in each individual sample being analysed. It is important to know the recovery of a (14)C-labeled analyte when determining its mass concentration from (14)C:(12)C isotopic ratio data using AMS. A method is reported in this article that utilizes the UV response of the nonlabeled drug for internal standardization, so that the recovery for each individual sample analyzed can be ascertained.

  9. The administrative costs of community-based health insurance: a case study of the community health fund in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Josephine; Makawia, Suzan; Kuwawenaruwa, August

    2015-02-01

    Community-based health insurance expansion has been proposed as a financing solution for the sizable informal sector in low-income settings. However, there is limited evidence of the administrative costs of such schemes. We assessed annual facility and district-level costs of running the Community Health Fund (CHF), a voluntary health insurance scheme for the informal sector in a rural and an urban district from the same region in Tanzania. Information on resource use, CHF membership and revenue was obtained from district managers and health workers from two facilities in each district. The administrative cost per CHF member household and the cost to revenue ratio were estimated. Revenue collection was the most costly activity at facility level (78% of total costs), followed by stewardship and management (13%) and pooling of funds (10%). Stewardship and management was the main activity at district level. The administration cost per CHF member household ranged from USD 3.33 to USD 12.12 per year. The cost to revenue ratio ranged from 50% to 364%. The cost of administering the CHF was high relative to revenue generated. Similar studies from other settings should be encouraged.

  10. The administrative costs of community-based health insurance: a case study of the community health fund in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Josephine; Makawia, Suzan; Kuwawenaruwa, August

    2015-01-01

    Community-based health insurance expansion has been proposed as a financing solution for the sizable informal sector in low-income settings. However, there is limited evidence of the administrative costs of such schemes. We assessed annual facility and district-level costs of running the Community Health Fund (CHF), a voluntary health insurance scheme for the informal sector in a rural and an urban district from the same region in Tanzania. Information on resource use, CHF membership and revenue was obtained from district managers and health workers from two facilities in each district. The administrative cost per CHF member household and the cost to revenue ratio were estimated. Revenue collection was the most costly activity at facility level (78% of total costs), followed by stewardship and management (13%) and pooling of funds (10%). Stewardship and management was the main activity at district level. The administration cost per CHF member household ranged from USD 3.33 to USD 12.12 per year. The cost to revenue ratio ranged from 50% to 364%. The cost of administering the CHF was high relative to revenue generated. Similar studies from other settings should be encouraged. PMID:24334331

  11. 75 FR 2543 - Proposed Settlement Agreement for Recovery of Past Response Costs and Certain Other Costs Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-15

    ...: Commerce Street Plume Superfund Site, Located in Williston, VT AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency... costs and certain other costs in connection with the Commerce Street Plume Superfund Site, in Williston... connection with the Commerce Street Plume Superfund Site in Williston, Vermont. The Settling Party will...

  12. 23 CFR Appendix F to Part 1200 - PLANNING AND ADMINISTRATION (P&A) COSTS

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... (P&A) costs are those direct and indirect costs that are attributable to the management of the... rental costs specific to the Highway Safety Agency. Program management costs are those costs attributable... salary and related costs may be programmed to P&A. If the employee works performing program...

  13. 23 CFR Appendix F to Part 1200 - Planning and Administration (P&A) Costs

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... (P&A) costs are those direct and indirect costs that are attributable to the management of the... rental costs specific to the Highway Safety Agency. Program management costs are those costs attributable... salary and related costs may be programmed to P&A. If the employee works performing program...

  14. The impact of consumer awareness of water sector issues on willingness to pay and cost recovery in Zambia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ntengwe, F. W.

    The recovery of costs in water utilities is a key element in sustainability of both the provider and of the water resource itself. This paper examines the role played by consumer awareness in their willingness to pay for water supply in two cities in Zambia. Research conducted in Kitwe and Lusaka reveals that level of awareness, willingness to pay and cost recovery all vary directly. Whereas awareness may increase consumers’ willingness to pay, therefore assisting service provider’s cost recovery, the research presented here also reveals that factors such as ability to pay, affordability of bills, quality of water and of the service provided, as well as good business-consumer relations are important factors affecting a utility’s ability to recover its costs. If water utilities are to attain sustainability over the long-term, they will have to embark on and maintain consumer awareness programmes, raise the quality of service (e.g., through improved operation and maintenance), and develop and apply the right water tariff.

  15. 20 CFR 641.859 - What other special rules govern the classification of costs as administrative costs or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM Administrative Requirements § 641.859 What other special rules govern... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What other special rules govern...

  16. 20 CFR 641.859 - What other special rules govern the classification of costs as administrative costs or...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM Administrative Requirements § 641.859 What other special rules govern... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What other special rules govern...

  17. Cost Effective Surfactant Formulations for Improved Oil Recovery in Carbonate Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    William A. Goddard; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Yongfu Wu

    2007-09-30

    This report summarizes work during the 30 month time period of this project. This was planned originally for 3-years duration, but due to its financial limitations, DOE halted funding after 2 years. The California Institute of Technology continued working on this project for an additional 6 months based on a no-cost extension granted by DOE. The objective of this project is to improve the performance of aqueous phase formulations that are designed to increase oil recovery from fractured, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. This process works by increasing the rate and extent of aqueous phase imbibition into the matrix blocks in the reservoir and thereby displacing crude oil normally not recovered in a conventional waterflood operation. The project had three major components: (1) developing methods for the rapid screening of surfactant formulations towards identifying candidates suitable for more detailed evaluation, (2) more fundamental studies to relate the chemical structure of acid components of an oil and surfactants in aqueous solution as relates to their tendency to wet a carbonate surface by oil or water, and (3) a more applied study where aqueous solutions of different commercial surfactants are examined for their ability to recover a West Texas crude oil from a limestone core via an imbibition process. The first item, regarding rapid screening methods for suitable surfactants has been summarized as a Topical Report. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the surface of these chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite

  18. Recovery Act: Billions of Dollars in Education Credits Appear to Be Erroneous. Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration. Reference Number: 2011-41-083

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of the Treasury, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Education credits are available to help offset the costs of higher education for taxpayers, their spouses, and dependents who qualify as eligible students. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (Recovery Act) amended the Hope Scholarship Tax Credit (Hope Credit) to provide for a refundable tax credit known as the American Opportunity…

  19. Effects of para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) form and administration mode on PABA recovery in 24-hour urine collections.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rashmi S; Joy, Raechel C; Boushey, Carol J; Ferruzzi, Mario G; Leonov, Alexei P; McCrory, Megan A

    2014-03-01

    Para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) has long been used as an objective measure to assess completeness of 24-hour urine collections. However, pharmaceutical-grade PABA for human ingestion is not available in the United States. An alternative, the potassium salt of PABA, aminobenzoate potassium, can be obtained for clinical use, although it has not yet been validated in this role. Both PABA and aminobenzoate potassium can be directly ingested in their tablet or capsule forms or added to food before consumption. Our aim was to investigate the effect of form (PABA vs aminobenzoate potassium) and administration mode (directly ingested as a tablet/capsule vs added to food) on urinary PABA recovery levels. Twenty healthy participants underwent 3 test days separated by two 24-hour wash-out periods. Three test conditions, one on each test day, were investigated in randomized order: PABA tablet, aminobenzoate potassium capsule, and PABA or aminobenzoate potassium in food. Ingestion of each dose was supervised and participants performed the 24-hour urine collections while free-living. The 24-hour urine collections were analyzed for PABA recovery (%R) levels using a colorimetric assay. Recoveries 85% to 110% were deemed complete and those >110% were reanalyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Only complete collections (>85%R) were included in analyses. The recovery for the PABA tablet, aminobenzoate potassium capsule, and PABA/aminobenzoate potassium in food were similar at 98.8%R±2.0%R, 95.1%R±2.3%R, and 93.2%R±2.1%R, respectively, and did not differ significantly. These results suggest that aminobenzoate potassium may be used as an alternative to PABA for assessing the completeness of 24-hour urine collections and to track compliance with consuming provided diets in community-dwelling studies.

  20. Losartan Administration Reduces Fibrosis but Hinders Functional Recovery after Volumetric Muscle Loss Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-25

    Texas Submitted 1 August 2014; accepted in final form 23 September 2014 Garg K, Corona BT, Walters TJ. Losartan administration re- duces fibrosis but...therapy. Pre- viously, losartan has been successfully used to reduce fibrosis and improve both muscle regeneration and function in several models of...recoverable skeletal muscle injuries, such as contusion and laceration. In this study, the efficacy of losartan treatment in reducing fibrosis and

  1. Administration of interleukin-6 stimulates multilineage hematopoiesis and accelerates recovery from radiation-induced hematopoietic depression

    SciTech Connect

    Patchen, M.L.; MacVittie, T.J.; Williams, J.L.; Schwartz, G.N.; Souza, L.M. )

    1991-02-01

    Hematopoietic depression and subsequent susceptibility to potentially lethal opportunistic infections are well-documented phenomena following radiotherapy. Methods to therapeutically mitigate radiation-induced myelosuppression could offer great clinical value. In vivo studies have demonstrated that interleukin-6 (IL-6) stimulates pluripotent hematopoietic stem cell (CFU-s), granulocyte-macrophage progenitor cell (GM-CFC), and erythroid progenitor cell (CFU-e) proliferation in normal mice. Based on these results, the ability of IL-6 to stimulate hematopoietic regeneration following radiation-induced hematopoietic injury was also evaluated. C3H/HeN female mice were exposed to 6.5 Gy 60Co radiation and subcutaneously administered either saline or IL-6 on days 1 through 3 or 1 through 6 postexposure. On days 7, 10, 14, 17, and 22, femoral and splenic CFU-s, GM-CFC, and CFU-e contents and peripheral blood white cell, red cell, and platelet counts were determined. Compared with saline treatment, both 3-day and 6-day IL-6 treatments accelerated hematopoietic recovery; 6-day treatment produced the greater effects. For example, compared with normal control values (N), femoral and splenic CFU-s numbers in IL-6-treated mice 17 days postirradiation were 27% N and 136% N versus 2% N and 10% N in saline-treated mice. At the same time, bone marrow and splenic GM-CFC values were 58% N and 473% N versus 6% N and 196% N in saline-treated mice; bone marrow and splenic CFU-e numbers were 91% N and 250% N versus 31% N and 130% N in saline-treated mice; and peripheral blood white cell, red cell, and platelet values were 210% N, 60% N, and 24% N versus 18% N, 39% N, and 7% N in saline-treated mice. These studies demonstrate that therapeutically administered IL-6 can effectively accelerate multilineage hematopoietic recovery following radiation-induced hematopoietic injury.

  2. Life cycle cost of a hybrid forward osmosis - low pressure reverse osmosis system for seawater desalination and wastewater recovery.

    PubMed

    Valladares Linares, R; Li, Z; Yangali-Quintanilla, V; Ghaffour, N; Amy, G; Leiknes, T; Vrouwenvelder, J S

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, forward osmosis (FO) hybrid membrane systems have been investigated as an alternative to conventional high-pressure membrane processes (i.e. reverse osmosis (RO)) for seawater desalination and wastewater treatment and recovery. Nevertheless, their economic advantage in comparison to conventional processes for seawater desalination and municipal wastewater treatment has not been clearly addressed. This work presents a detailed economic analysis on capital and operational expenses (CAPEX and OPEX) for: i) a hybrid forward osmosis - low-pressure reverse osmosis (FO-LPRO) process, ii) a conventional seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination process, and iii) a membrane bioreactor - reverse osmosis - advanced oxidation process (MBR-RO-AOP) for wastewater treatment and reuse. The most important variables affecting economic feasibility are obtained through a sensitivity analysis of a hybrid FO-LPRO system. The main parameters taken into account for the life cycle costs are the water quality characteristics (similar feed water and similar water produced), production capacity of 100,000 m(3) d(-1) of potable water, energy consumption, materials, maintenance, operation, RO and FO module costs, and chemicals. Compared to SWRO, the FO-LPRO systems have a 21% higher CAPEX and a 56% lower OPEX due to savings in energy consumption and fouling control. In terms of the total water cost per cubic meter of water produced, the hybrid FO-LPRO desalination system has a 16% cost reduction compared to the benchmark for desalination, mainly SWRO. Compared to the MBR-RO-AOP, the FO-LPRO systems have a 7% lower CAPEX and 9% higher OPEX, resulting in no significant cost reduction per m(3) produced by FO-LPRO. Hybrid FO-LPRO membrane systems are shown to have an economic advantage compared to current available technology for desalination, and comparable costs with a wastewater treatment and recovery system. Based on development on FO membrane modules, packing density, and

  3. 18 CFR 35.26 - Recovery of stranded costs by public utilities and transmitting utilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... requirements contract if such contract does not contain an exit fee or other explicit stranded cost provision... an exit fee or other explicit stranded cost provision, and the seller under the contract is a public... utility, and if the contract does not contain an exit fee or other explicit stranded cost provision,...

  4. 18 CFR 35.26 - Recovery of stranded costs by public utilities and transmitting utilities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... requirements contract if such contract does not contain an exit fee or other explicit stranded cost provision... an exit fee or other explicit stranded cost provision, and the seller under the contract is a public... utility, and if the contract does not contain an exit fee or other explicit stranded cost provision,...

  5. 41 CFR 301-74.13 - May we include conference administrative costs in an employee's per diem allowance payment for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... conference administrative costs in an employee's per diem allowance payment for attendance at a conference? 301-74.13 Section 301-74.13 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 74-CONFERENCE PLANNING...

  6. 41 CFR 301-74.8 - May we include conference administrative costs in an employee's per diem allowance payment for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... conference administrative costs in an employee's per diem allowance payment for attendance at a conference? 301-74.8 Section 301-74.8 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 74-CONFERENCE PLANNING...

  7. 41 CFR 301-74.13 - May we include conference administrative costs in an employee's per diem allowance payment for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... conference administrative costs in an employee's per diem allowance payment for attendance at a conference? 301-74.13 Section 301-74.13 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 74-CONFERENCE PLANNING...

  8. 41 CFR 301-74.13 - May we include conference administrative costs in an employee's per diem allowance payment for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 4 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true May we include conference administrative costs in an employee's per diem allowance payment for attendance at a conference? 301-74.13 Section 301-74.13 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY...

  9. 41 CFR 301-74.13 - May we include conference administrative costs in an employee's per diem allowance payment for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... conference administrative costs in an employee's per diem allowance payment for attendance at a conference? 301-74.13 Section 301-74.13 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Travel Regulation System TEMPORARY DUTY (TDY) TRAVEL ALLOWANCES AGENCY RESPONSIBILITIES 74-CONFERENCE PLANNING...

  10. The Cost of Antibiotic Mass Drug Administration for Trachoma Control in a Remote Area of South Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Kolaczinski, Jan H.; Robinson, Emily; Finn, Timothy P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Mass drug administration (MDA) of antibiotics is a key component of the so-called “SAFE” strategy for trachoma control, while MDA of anthelminthics provides the cornerstone for control of a number of other neglected tropical diseases (NTDs). Simultaneous delivery of two or more of these drugs, renowned as “integrated NTD control,” is being promoted to reduce costs and expand intervention coverage. A cost analysis was conducted alongside an MDA campaign in a remote trachoma endemic area, to inform budgeting for NTD control in South Sudan. Methods and Findings A first round of antibiotic MDA was conducted in the highly trachoma endemic county of Mayom, Unity state, from June to August 2010. A core team of seven staff delivered the intervention, including recruitment and training of 44 supervisors and 542 community drug distributors. Using an ingredients approach, financial and economic costs were captured from the provider perspective in a detailed costing database. Overall, 123,760 individuals were treated for trachoma, resulting in an estimated treatment coverage of 94%. The economic cost per person treated was USD 1.53, excluding the cost of the antibiotic azithromycin. Ninety four per cent of the delivery costs were recurrent costs, with personnel and travel/transport costs taking up the largest share. Conclusions In a remote setting and for the initial round, MDA of antibiotics was considerably more expensive than USD 0.5 per person treated, an estimate frequently quoted to advocate for integrated NTD control. Drug delivery costs in South Sudan are unlikely to decrease substantially during subsequent MDA rounds, as the major cost drivers were recurrent costs. MDA campaigns for delivery of one or more drugs in South Sudan should thus be budgeted at around USD 1.5 per person treated, at least until further costing data for delivery of other NTD drugs, singly or in combination, are available. PMID:22022632

  11. Treated Seawater as a Magnesium Source for Phosphorous Recovery from Wastewater—A Feasibility and Cost Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Quist-Jensen, Cejna Anna; Koustrup Jørgensen, Mads; Christensen, Morten Lykkegaard

    2016-01-01

    Conventional resources of phosphorous are at high risk of depletion in the near future due to current practices of its exploitation, thus new and improved exploration methodologies need to be developed to ensure phosphorous security. Today, some treatment plants recover phosphorous from municipal wastewater as struvite (MgNH4PO4·6H2O). Magnesium is often added to the wastewater as MgCl2·6H2O to facilitate the phosphorous recovery. However, the use of magnesium increases the costs of the process and is not aligned with sustainable development, therefore, alternative magnesium sources have to be found. The current study analyzes the feasibility of integrated membrane processes for magnesium recovery from seawater for utilization in the phosphorous recovery process. The integrated membrane systems consist of nanofiltration (NF), membrane distillation (MD), and membrane crystallization (MCr). The lowest associated cost is found for standalone NF treatment. However, the additional treatment with MD and MCr produces fresh water and salts like NaCl or potentially other valuable minerals at the expense of low-grade heat. PMID:27983583

  12. The difference between energy consumption and energy cost: Modelling energy tariff structures for water resource recovery facilities.

    PubMed

    Aymerich, I; Rieger, L; Sobhani, R; Rosso, D; Corominas, Ll

    2015-09-15

    The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the importance of incorporating more realistic energy cost models (based on current energy tariff structures) into existing water resource recovery facilities (WRRFs) process models when evaluating technologies and cost-saving control strategies. In this paper, we first introduce a systematic framework to model energy usage at WRRFs and a generalized structure to describe energy tariffs including the most common billing terms. Secondly, this paper introduces a detailed energy cost model based on a Spanish energy tariff structure coupled with a WRRF process model to evaluate several control strategies and provide insights into the selection of the contracted power structure. The results for a 1-year evaluation on a 115,000 population-equivalent WRRF showed monthly cost differences ranging from 7 to 30% when comparing the detailed energy cost model to an average energy price. The evaluation of different aeration control strategies also showed that using average energy prices and neglecting energy tariff structures may lead to biased conclusions when selecting operating strategies or comparing technologies or equipment. The proposed framework demonstrated that for cost minimization, control strategies should be paired with a specific optimal contracted power. Hence, the design of operational and control strategies must take into account the local energy tariff.

  13. The economic costs of quarterly monitoring and recovery management checkups for adults with chronic substance use disorders.

    PubMed

    Dennis, Michael L; French, Michael T; McCollister, Kathryn E; Scott, Christy K

    2011-09-01

    Recovery management checkups (RMCs) for clients with substance use disorders reduce the time from relapse to treatment reentry, increase treatment retention, and improve long-term outcomes. The objectives of this article are to calculate and compare the economic costs of providing outcome monitoring (OM) only with those of providing OM + RMC to help understand the feasibility of disseminating this model more widely. We estimate the total and incremental costs of OM and OM + RMC using data from a recently completed randomized controlled trial with adult chronic substance users (N = 446). Adding RMC to OM increased total intervention costs by about 50% per person per year ($707 to $1,283) and quarter ($177 to $321). It cost an average of $834 to identify a person in relapse and $2,699 to identify, link, and retain them in treatment. The increased costs of RMC are modest relative to the substantial societal costs of chronic substance users returning to regular use, crime, and other risk behaviors.

  14. A Low Cost, Self Acting, Liquid Hydrogen Boil-Off Recovery System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelfrey, Joy W.; Sharp, Kirk V. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop a prototype liquid hydrogen boll-off recovery system. Perform analyses to finalize recovery system cycle, design detail components, fabricate hardware, and conduct sub-component, component, and system level tests leading to the delivery of a prototype system. The design point and off-design analyses identified cycle improvements to increase the robustness of the system by adding a by-pass heat exchanger. Based on the design, analysis, and testing conducted, the recovery system will liquefy 31% of the gaseous boil off from a liquid hydrogen storage tank. All components, including a high speed, miniature turbocompressor, were designed and manufacturing drawings were created. All hardware was fabricated and tests were conducted in air, helium, and hydrogen. Testing validated the design, except for the turbocompressor. A rotor-to-stator clearance issue was discovered as a result of a concentricity tolerance stack-up.

  15. The Economics of Direct versus Indirect Cost Recovery in Sponsored Research. AIR Annual 1984 Forum Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kutina, Kenneth L.; And Others

    The effect of reduced reimbursements by the federal government for indirect research costs was analyzed for the typical academic medical center. The effects of simply cutting indirect cost reimbursement were contrasted with the impact of securing compensating levels of increased direct project support. To determine if the consequences differed as…

  16. 20 CFR 645.235 - What types of activities are subject to the administrative cost limit on Welfare-to-Work grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...) Although administrative in nature, costs of information technology—computer hardware and software—needed... information, including job listing information, job skills information, and demand occupation information; and...) Developing systems and procedures, including information systems, required for these administrative......

  17. 20 CFR 645.235 - What types of activities are subject to the administrative cost limit on Welfare-to-Work grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...) Although administrative in nature, costs of information technology—computer hardware and software—needed... information, including job listing information, job skills information, and demand occupation information; and...) Developing systems and procedures, including information systems, required for these administrative......

  18. 20 CFR 645.235 - What types of activities are subject to the administrative cost limit on Welfare-to-Work grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) Although administrative in nature, costs of information technology—computer hardware and software—needed... information, including job listing information, job skills information, and demand occupation information; and...) Developing systems and procedures, including information systems, required for these administrative......

  19. 20 CFR 645.235 - What types of activities are subject to the administrative cost limit on Welfare-to-Work grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...) Although administrative in nature, costs of information technology—computer hardware and software—needed... information, including job listing information, job skills information, and demand occupation information; and...) Developing systems and procedures, including information systems, required for these administrative......

  20. Subcutaneous vs intravenous administration of immunoglobulin in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: an Italian cost-minimization analysis.

    PubMed

    Lazzaro, Carlo; Lopiano, Leonardo; Cocito, Dario

    2014-07-01

    Prior researches have suggested that home-based subcutaneous immunoglobulin (SCIG) is equally effective and can be less expensive than hospital-based intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) in treating chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) patients. This economic evaluation aims at comparing costs of SCIG vs IVIG for CIDP patients in Italy. A 1-year model-based cost-minimization analysis basically populated via neurologists' opinion was undertaken from a societal perspective. Health care resources included immunoglobulin; drugs for premedication and complications (rash, headache, and hypertension) management; time of various health care professionals; pump for SCIG self-administration; infusion disposables. Non-health care resources encompassed transport and parking; losses of working and leisure time for patients and caregivers. Unit or yearly costs for resources valuation were mainly obtained from published sources. Costs were expressed in Euro () 2013. An extensive one-way sensitivity analysis (OWSA) and a scenario SA tested the robustness of the base case findings. Overall costs per patient amount to 49,534.75 (SCIG) and 50,895.73 (IVIG); saving in favour of SCIG reaches 1360.98. For both SCIG and IVIG, the cost driver was immunoglobulin (94.06 vs 86.06 % of the overall costs, respectively). Sensitivity analyses confirmed the consistency of the baseline results. SCIG may be a cost-saving therapy for Italian CIDP patients.

  1. 15 CFR 40.4 - Administrative provisions on selection of participants and funding of costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... participants and funding of costs. (a) Within the framework of the aforementioned Memorandum of Agreement, the... including, where appropriate, each participant's education and experience, type of training desired,...

  2. 15 CFR 40.4 - Administrative provisions on selection of participants and funding of costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... participants and funding of costs. (a) Within the framework of the aforementioned Memorandum of Agreement, the... including, where appropriate, each participant's education and experience, type of training desired,...

  3. 15 CFR 40.4 - Administrative provisions on selection of participants and funding of costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... participants and funding of costs. (a) Within the framework of the aforementioned Memorandum of Agreement, the... including, where appropriate, each participant's education and experience, type of training desired,...

  4. 15 CFR 40.4 - Administrative provisions on selection of participants and funding of costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... participants and funding of costs. (a) Within the framework of the aforementioned Memorandum of Agreement, the... including, where appropriate, each participant's education and experience, type of training desired,...

  5. A cost-effective and fast recovery mechanism for multi-ring interconnection networks based on RPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhan, Yichun; Ji, Meng; Yu, Shaohua

    2005-11-01

    Resilient Packet Ring (RPR) has been standardized in the IEEE 802.17 working group. In multi-ring networks, similarly with other ring-based technology, intra-ring traffic demand is protected against single node and span failures within 50 ms by the "steering" and "wrapping" protection. Inter-ring traffic demand, however, is susceptible to failures at nodes or links where the traffic demand transits from one ring to another. Normally, the survivability of interconnecting node or link failure has to be provided by other technologies, such as MPLS and Spanning Tree Protocol. Unfortunately, most schemes cannot provide a cost-effective solution with guaranteeing the restoration within the 50 ms timeframe. In this paper we proposed a cost-effective and fast Recovery Mechanism for Multi-ring Interconnection Networks Based on RPR. Differential from Spanning Tree Protocol (STP) and other protection technologies, this mechanism has the ability of sub-50ms protection provisioning and scalability based on the bridging function in RPR. Particular with enhanced bridging support, this mechanism can provide efficient bandwidth spatial reuse on multi-ring RPR networks. The proposed novel mechanism has been implemented on our 10Gbps network processor (NP) based multi-service provisioning platform. All experimental results presented in this paper come from actual testing on the network test bed and show that the all the inter-ring traffic are given the sub-50ms recovery guarantee as intra-ring traffic in normal case.

  6. 34 CFR 403.195 - What are the administrative cost requirements applicable to local recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... reasonable for the proper and efficient administration of the projects, services, and activities for which... partner that receives an award under the Business-Labor-Education Partnership for Training Program may...

  7. Utility reduces fuel cost with heat recovery, industrial byproduct fuel, cogeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, R.J.

    1982-02-01

    A 50-MW North Dakota power plant is refurbished to recover major waste-heat sources. Use of agricultural byproduct fuel and cogeneration also helps to cut future costs. The plant is saving on fuel costs by burning 150-200 tons/day of sunflower seed hulls from a local processing plant. The hulls are pulverized and mixed with the primary fuel, North Dakota lignite. At the same time, the processing plant that supplies the sunflower hulls buys steam from the power plant, thus giving the utility some of the economic benefits of cogeneration.

  8. 13 CFR 120.883 - Eligible administrative costs for 504 loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) CDC processing fee; (d) Borrower's out-of-pocket costs associated with 504 loan and Debenture closing...) CDC Closing Fee (see § 120.971(a)(2)) up to a maximum of $2,500; and (f) Underwriters' fee....

  9. 13 CFR 120.883 - Eligible administrative costs for 504 loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) CDC processing fee; (d) Borrower's out-of-pocket costs associated with 504 loan and Debenture closing...) CDC Closing Fee (see § 120.971(a)(2)) up to a maximum of $2,500; and (f) Underwriters' fee....

  10. 13 CFR 120.883 - Eligible administrative costs for 504 loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) CDC processing fee; (d) Borrower's out-of-pocket costs associated with 504 loan and Debenture closing...) CDC Closing Fee (see § 120.971(a)(2)) up to a maximum of $2,500; and (f) Underwriters' fee....

  11. 13 CFR 120.883 - Eligible administrative costs for 504 loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) CDC processing fee; (d) Borrower's out-of-pocket costs associated with 504 loan and Debenture closing...) CDC Closing Fee (see § 120.971(a)(2)) up to a maximum of $2,500; and (f) Underwriters' fee....

  12. 13 CFR 120.883 - Eligible administrative costs for 504 loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) CDC processing fee; (d) Borrower's out-of-pocket costs associated with 504 loan and Debenture closing...) CDC Closing Fee (see § 120.971(a)(2)) up to a maximum of $2,500; and (f) Underwriters' fee....

  13. 48 CFR 52.230-6 - Administration of Cost Accounting Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... by the CFAO, submit on or before a date specified by the CFAO— (1) A general dollar magnitude (GDM... estimated general dollar magnitude of the cost impact), until such time as the Contractor provides...

  14. 26 CFR 1.43-4 - Qualified enhanced oil recovery costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... purchases equipment, including downhole equipment (e.g., casing, tubing, packers, and sucker rods), pumping... connection with the acquisition, construction, transportation, erection, or installation of an offshore... tertiary development of the field, costs incurred by K in connection with the acquisition,...

  15. 26 CFR 1.43-4 - Qualified enhanced oil recovery costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... purchases equipment, including downhole equipment (e.g., casing, tubing, packers, and sucker rods), pumping... connection with the acquisition, construction, transportation, erection, or installation of an offshore... tertiary development of the field, costs incurred by K in connection with the acquisition,...

  16. Recovery of metal oxides from fly ash. Volume 2. Engineering data and cost estimates. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Wilder, R.F.; Barrett, P.J.; Henslee, L.W. Jr.

    1984-06-01

    An engineering, cost and financial evaluation study was carried out for a conceptual commercial plant to process fly ash into marketable metal oxides by the direct HCl acid leach process. The proposed plant site was adjacent to the TVA Kingston, Tennessee power plant and was sized to process 1 million tons of ash (dry basis) per year. The capital cost requirements for the HCl direct acid leach (DAL) optimized process plant were estimated to be $244,390,000. Based upon the reported Kingston plant fly ash analysis and extractability, the conceptual commercial plant would annually produce about 158,000 TPY of alumina, 102,000 TPY of ferric oxide, 46,000 TPY of gypsum, 81,000 TPY of alkali sulfate salts, 866,000 TPY of spent fly ash and 1,940,000 kWh of excess cogeneration power. Potential long term average revenues were projected to be $126,400,000 per year which would indicate a commercial project's economics may be quite adequate. Volume 1 of this study report presents the investment and operating cost data, revenue considerations and an evaluation of profitability. Volume 2 presents the engineering data and capital cost estimates and Volume 3 presents the commercial facility design criteria. 16 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Compromised recovery of natural interferon-alpha/beta-producing cells after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation complicated by acute graft-versus-host disease and glucocorticoid administration.

    PubMed

    Kitawaki, T; Kadowaki, N; Ishikawa, T; Ichinohe, T; Uchiyama, T

    2003-07-01

    Delayed recovery of the immune system is a major cause of post-transplant infection. Natural interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta-producing cells (IPC) appear to play a critical role in inducing effective immune responses to a variety of microbial pathogens by producing an enormous amount of IFN-alpha/beta and thereafter by differentiating into dendritic cells. Here, we examined the recovery of IPC as well as other immune cells in 28 patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in order to investigate the role of IPC in post-transplant immune reconstitution. In uncomplicated cases, IPC frequency recovered to the lower range of normal values within 30 days after transplantation, resembling the prompt recovery of other cell types in innate immunity. In contrast, the recovery of IPC was profoundly suppressed in the cases with acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and glucocorticoid administration. The patients with lower numbers of IPC were significantly more susceptible to viral infection. The prompt recovery of IPC in uncomplicated cases may contribute to establishing a first line of host defense at the early stage after allogeneic HSCT, whereas the marked suppression of IPC recovery accompanying acute GVHD and glucocorticoid administration may increase the risk of opportunistic infections.

  18. Recovery of Indirect Costs in the Pricing of Equitable Adjustments and Terminations for Convenience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-05-01

    28,219. But see Rossen Builders, ASBCA 32305, 87-1 BCA 19538 at 98,727-28 (prior year’s G&A rate was used by Government and accepted by Board in lieu of...3 87 See e.g., Rossen Builders, ASBCA 32305, 87-1 BCA 19538 at 98,727 (holding bid estimator’s time and delivery costs were already in G&A--allowance

  19. A Robust and Cost-Effective Superhydrophobic Graphene Foam for Efficient Oil and Organic Solvent Recovery.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Haiguang; Chen, Dongyun; An, Wei; Li, Najun; Xu, Qingfeng; Li, Hua; He, Jinghui; Lu, Jianmei

    2015-10-21

    Water pollution caused by chemical reagent leaking, industrial wastewater discharging, and crude oil spills has raised global concerns on environmental sustainability, calling for high-performance absorbent materials for effective treatments. However, low-cost materials capable of effectively separating oils and organic solvents from water with a high adsorption capacity and good recyclability are rare on the market. Here, a cost-effective method is reported to fabricate high-performance graphene modified absorbents through the facile thermal reduction of graphene oxide on the skeletons of melamine foam. By integrating the high porosity, superior elasticity, and mechanical stability of raw sponge with the chemical stability and hydrophobicity of graphene sheets, the as-fabricated graphene foam not only possesses a rough and superhydrophobic surface, but also exhibits an excellent adsorption performance and extraordinary recyclability for various oils and organic solvents. It is worth mentioning that the superhydrophobic surface also endows the graphene foam with an excellent efficiency for oil/water separation. More importantly, the cost-effective fabrication method without involving expensive raw materials and sophisticated equipment permits a scale-up of the graphene foam for pollution disposal. All these features make the graphene foam an ideal candidate for removal and collection of oils and organic solvents from water.

  20. Cost (non)-recovery by platform technology facilities in the Bio21 Cluster.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Gerard; Clark, Stella; Quinn, Julieanne; Gleeson, Mary Joy

    2010-04-01

    Platform technologies (PT) are techniques or tools that enable a range of scientific investigations and are critical to today's advanced technology research environment. Once installed, they require specialized staff for their operations, who in turn, provide expertise to researchers in designing appropriate experiments. Through this pipeline, research outputs are raised to the benefit of the researcher and the host institution. Platform facilities provide access to instrumentation and expertise for a wide range of users beyond the host institution, including other academic and industry users. To maximize the return on these substantial public investments, this wider access needs to be supported. The question of support and the mechanisms through which this occurs need to be established based on a greater understanding of how PT facilities operate. This investigation was aimed at understanding if and how platform facilities across the Bio21 Cluster meet operating costs. Our investigation found: 74% of platforms surveyed do not recover 100% of direct operating costs and are heavily subsidized by their home institution, which has a vested interest in maintaining the technology platform; platform managers play a major role in establishing the costs and pricing of the facility, normally in a collaborative process with a management committee or institutional accountant; and most facilities have a three-tier pricing structure recognizing internal academic, external academic, and commercial clients.

  1. 34 CFR 226.23 - May charter schools use grant funds for administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May charter schools use grant funds for administrative... INCENTIVE PROGRAM What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 226.23 May charter schools use grant funds for... charter school subgrantees that use grant funds for construction activities may not be reimbursed...

  2. 34 CFR 226.23 - May charter schools use grant funds for administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May charter schools use grant funds for administrative... INCENTIVE PROGRAM What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 226.23 May charter schools use grant funds for... charter school subgrantees that use grant funds for construction activities may not be reimbursed...

  3. 34 CFR 226.23 - May charter schools use grant funds for administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May charter schools use grant funds for administrative... INCENTIVE PROGRAM What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 226.23 May charter schools use grant funds for... charter school subgrantees that use grant funds for construction activities may not be reimbursed...

  4. 34 CFR 226.23 - May charter schools use grant funds for administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May charter schools use grant funds for administrative... INCENTIVE PROGRAM What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 226.23 May charter schools use grant funds for... charter school subgrantees that use grant funds for construction activities may not be reimbursed...

  5. 34 CFR 226.23 - May charter schools use grant funds for administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May charter schools use grant funds for administrative... INCENTIVE PROGRAM What Conditions Must Be Met by a Grantee? § 226.23 May charter schools use grant funds for... charter school subgrantees that use grant funds for construction activities may not be reimbursed...

  6. 20 CFR 641.870 - Under what circumstances may the administrative cost limitation be increased?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM... operation requirements imposed by the Department; (ii) The number of community service assignment positions... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Under what circumstances may...

  7. 20 CFR 641.870 - Under what circumstances may the administrative cost limitation be increased?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR PROVISIONS GOVERNING THE SENIOR COMMUNITY SERVICE EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM... operation requirements imposed by the Department; (ii) The number of community service assignment positions... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Under what circumstances may...

  8. 15 CFR 40.4 - Administrative provisions on selection of participants and funding of costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... statistical activities of their home country. (c) Arrangements for security clearances, insurance, orientation... PARTICIPANTS IN CENSUS PROCEDURES AND GENERAL STATISTICS § 40.4 Administrative provisions on selection of..., a program for technical training of foreign participants in censuses and statistics. The Bureau...

  9. [Business administration of PET facilities: a nationwide survey for prices of PET screening and a cost analysis of three facilities].

    PubMed

    Mitsutake, Naohiro; Fujii, Ryo; Oku, Shinya; Furui, Yuji; Yasunaga, Hideo

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the business administration of PET facilities based on the survey of the price of PET cancer screening and cost analysis of PET examination. The questionnaire survey of the price of PET cancer screening was implemented for all PET facilities in Japan. Cost data of PET examination, including fixed costs and variable costs, were obtained from three different medical institutions. The marked price of the PET cancer screening was 111,499 yen in average, and the most popular range of prices was between 80,000 yen and 90,000 yen. Costs of PET per examination were accounted for 110,675 yen, 79,158 yen and Y11,644 yen in facility A, B and C, respectively. The results suggested that facilities with two or more PET/CT per a cyclotron could only secure profits. In Japan, the boom in PET facility construction could not continue in accordance with increasing number of PET facilities. It would become more essential to analyze the appropriate distribution of PET facilities and the adequate amount of PET procedures from the perspective of efficient utilization of the PET equipments and supply of PET-related healthcare.

  10. Recovery Act: Low-Cost, Highly Lambertian Reflector Composite For Improved LED Fixture Efficiency and Lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Teather, Eric

    2013-02-15

    The overall objective of the program was to demonstrate a 98% or greater reflective, highly diffuse, low-cost composite material that significantly improves luminaire efficiency, is able to withstand 50,000 hours or greater luminaire operation under expected LED system thermal and environmental operating extremes and meets the cost targets required to be an effective commercial solution for the Solid State Lighting industry. This project met most of the goals defined and contributed to the understanding of high reflectance, white coatings. Research under this program increased the understanding of coatings development using particle size reduction techniques and preparation of coating solutions with a broad range of particle types. The research explored scale-up of coating systems and generated understanding of processing required for high volume manufacturing applications. The work demonstrated how coating formulation and application technique can translate to material durability and LED system lifetime. The research also demonstrated improvements in lighting efficiency to be gained using high reflectance white coatings.

  11. Removal and recovery of metal ions from acid mine drainage using lignite--A low cost sorbent.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Dinesh; Chander, Subhash

    2006-10-11

    Acid mine drainage (AMD), has long been a significant environmental problem resulting from the microbial oxidation of iron pyrite in presence of water and air, affording an acidic solution that contains toxic metal ions. The main objective of this study was to remove and recover metal ions from acid mine drainage (AMD) by using lignite, a low cost sorbent. Lignite has been characterized and used for the AMD treatment. Sorption of ferrous, ferric, manganese, zinc and calcium in multi-component aqueous systems was investigated. Studies were performed at different pH to find optimum pH. To simulate industrial conditions for acid mine wastewater treatment, all the studies were performed using single and multi-columns setup in down flow mode. The empty bed contact time (EBCT) model was used for minimizing the sorbent usage. Recovery of the metal ions as well as regeneration of sorbent was achieved successfully using 0.1 M nitric acid without dismantling the columns.

  12. Keep it simple, stupid. Administrative complexity raises costs, frustrates patients and hampers care.

    PubMed

    Jessee, William F

    2004-03-01

    The administrative complexity of the U.S. health care system places an enormous wedge between our scientific capability and our performance in serving people promptly, affordably and inclusively. Those adverse effects have eroded public trust in health care and threaten the availability of physicians and other health workers to provide care for a growing and aging population. The author details the problem--and offers a solution.

  13. Administrative and Holding Costs Resulting from Processing Reports of Nonconforming Supplies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-01

    of a nonconforming item. The intent was to estimate these costs for individual items identified by Federal Supply Class (FSC), Federal Supply Group ...item to a supporting supply activity if this item is believed to be conforming . However, a service depot may also discover a nonconforming item and... nonconforming item. The first step of the analysis was the determination of the proportions (probabilities) of conforming and nonconforming items at each

  14. Cost efficient operations: Challenge from NASA administrator and lessons learned from hunting sacred cows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hornstein, Rhoda Shaller; Casasanta, Ralph; Hei, Donald J., Jr.; Hawkins, Frederick J.; Burke, Eugene S., Jr.; Todd, Jacqueline E.; Bell, Jerome A.; Miller, Raymond E.; Willoughby, John K.; Gardner, Jo Anne

    1996-01-01

    The conclusions and recommendations that resulted from NASA's Hunting Sacred Cows Workshop are summarized, where a sacred cow is a belief or assumption that is so well established that it appears to be unreasonably immune to criticism. A link was identified between increased complexity and increased costs, especially in relation to automation and autonomy. An identical link was identified for outsourcing and commercialization. The work of NASA's Cost Less team is reviewed. The following conclusions were stated by the Cost Less team and considered at the workshop: the way Nasa conducts business must change; NASA makes its best contributions to the public areas not addressed by other government organizations; the management tool used for the last 30 years is no longer suitable; the most important work on any program or project is carried out before the development or operations stages; automation should only be used to achieve autonomy if the reasons for automation are well understood, and NASA's most critical resources are its personnel.

  15. [Iron substitution in outpatients in Switzerland: Increase of costs associated with intravenous administration].

    PubMed

    Giger, Max; Achermann, Rita

    2013-01-01

    Iron anaemia and iron-deficient erythropoiesis are treated with oral iron supplements. For chronic haemodialysis or in the case of therapy failure or intolerance to oral iron therapy, intravenous supplements are administered. The costs of iron supplements borne by statutory health care insurance had strongly increased during the observation period from 2006 to 2010. Based on the invoice data of a large health insurance company with a market share of around 18 %, prescription data of iron preparations and laboratory tests were analysed and extrapolated to the Swiss population. During the 5-year observation period, costs of intravenous iron substitution increased by 16.5 m EUR (340.3 %) and the number of individuals treated by 243.5 %. A sharp rise was observed in women of menstruating age, which was mainly due to prescriptions issued by primary care physicians. More than 8 % of intravenous iron substitutions were administered without prior laboratory analysis,and must therefore be regarded as off-label use. A cost-benefit analysis is needed to demonstrate the additional value of intravenous over oral iron supplementation, and intravenous iron supplementation should be administered only to patients with proven iron deficiency.

  16. Stability and recovery of DIFICID(®) (Fidaxomicin) 200-mg crushed tablet preparations from three delivery vehicles, and administration of an aqueous dispersion via nasogastric tube.

    PubMed

    Tousseeva, Anna; Jackson, J Derek; Redell, Mark; Henry, Teresa; Hui, Michael; Capurso, Shelley; DeRyke, C Andrew

    2014-12-01

    Fidaxomicin is approved for the treatment of adults with Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea, many of whom have difficulty swallowing an intact tablet. The study objective was to evaluate the stability and recovery of crushed DIFICID(®) (fidaxomicin) 200-mg tablets dispersed in water, applesauce, or Ensure(®) brand liquid nutritional supplement, and to determine the recovery of fidaxomicin from the administration of an aqueous dispersion of a crushed DIFICID(®) tablet through a nasogastric (NG) tube. DIFICID(®) tablets were crushed and dispersed in water, applesauce, or Ensure(®). The stability and recovery of fidaxomicin were evaluated over 24 h in these vehicles. In a separate experiment, the ability to recover a full dose of fidaxomicin when administering as an aqueous dispersion through an NG tube was assessed. When DIFICID(®) tablets were crushed and dispersed in water, the active ingredient, fidaxomicin, was stable for up to 2 h at room temperature. Additionally, it was stable for up to 24 h in dispersions with applesauce or Ensure(®). Recovery of fidaxomicin after crushing and dispersing in any of the three vehicles studied ranged from 95 to 108 %, which is within the normal range of individual tablet variability. When crushed, dispersed in water, and administered through an NG tube, the average recovery of fidaxomicin was 96 %. Stability and recovery of fidaxomicin were confirmed when DIFICID(®) tablets were crushed and dispersed in water, applesauce, or Ensure(®). In addition, administration of an aqueous dispersion of a crushed tablet through an NG tube is supported by acceptable recovery of fidaxomicin.

  17. Advanced Membrane Filtration Technology for Cost Effective Recovery of Fresh Water from Oil & Gas Produced Brine

    SciTech Connect

    David B. Burnett

    2004-09-29

    Produced water is a major waste generated at the oil and natural gas wells in the state of Texas. This water could be a possible source of new fresh water to meet the growing demands of the state after treatment and purification. Treatment of brine generated in oil fields or produced water with an ultrafiltration membranes were the subject of this thesis. The characterization of ultrafiltration membranes for oil and suspended solids removal of produced water, coupled with the reverse osmosis (RO) desalination of brine were studied on lab size membrane testing equipment and a field size testing unit to test whether a viable membrane system could be used to treat produced water. Oil and suspended solids were evaluated using turbidity and oil in water measurements taken periodically. The research considered the effect of pressure and flow rate on membrane performance of produced water treatment of three commercially available membranes for oily water. The study also analyzed the flux through the membrane and any effect it had on membrane performance. The research showed that an ultrafiltration membrane provided turbidity removal of over 99% and oil removal of 78% for the produced water samples. The results indicated that the ultrafiltration membranes would be asset as one of the first steps in purifying the water. Further results on selected RO membranes showed that salt rejection of greater than 97% could be achieved with satisfactory flux and at reasonable operating cost.

  18. Process control, energy recovery and cost savings in acetic acid wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Vaiopoulou, E; Melidis, P; Aivasidis, A

    2011-02-28

    An anaerobic fixed bed loop (AFBL) reactor was applied for treatment of acetic acid (HAc) wastewater. Two pH process control concepts were investigated; auxostatic and chemostatic control. In the auxostatic pH control, feed pump is interrupted when pH falls below a certain pH value in the bioreactor, which results in reactor operation at maximum load. Chemostatic control assures alkaline conditions by setting a certain pH value in the influent, preventing initial reactor acidification. The AFBL reactor treated HAc wastewater at low hydraulic residence time (HRT) (10-12 h), performed at high space time loads (40-45 kg COD/m(3) d) and high space time yield (30-35 kg COD/m(3) d) to achieve high COD (Chemical Oxygen Demand) removal (80%). Material and cost savings were accomplished by utilizing the microbial potential for wastewater neutralization during anaerobic treatment along with application of favourable pH-auxostatic control. NaOH requirement for neutralization was reduced by 75% and HRT was increased up to 20 h. Energy was recovered by applying costless CO(2) contained in the biogas for neutralization of alkaline wastewater. Biogas was enriched in methane by 4 times. This actually brings in more energy profits, since biogas extra heating for CO(2) content during biogas combustion is minimized and usage of other acidifying agents is omitted.

  19. Low Cost Advanced Thermoelectric (TE) Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meisner, G. P.

    2014-03-01

    Low cost, fully integrated TE generators (TEGs) to recover waste heat from vehicle exhaust will reduce transportation sector energy consumption and emissions. TEGs will be the first application of high-temperature TE materials for high-volume use and establish new industrial sectors with scaled up production capability of TEG materials and components. We will create a potential supply chain for practical automotive TEGs and identify manufacturing and assembly processes for large scale production of TEG materials and components. Our work focusses on several innovative R&D paths: (1) enhanced TE material performance by doping and compositional tuning, (2) optimized TE material fabrication and processing to reduce thermal conductivity and improve fracture strength, (3) high volume production for successful skutterudite commercialization, (4) new material, nanostructure, and nanoscale approaches to reduce thermal interface and electrical contact resistances, (5) innovative heat exchangers for high efficiency heat flows and optimum temperature profiles despite highly variable exhaust gas operating conditions, (6) new modeling and simulation tools, and (7) inexpensive materials for thermal insulation and coatings for TE encapsulation. Recent results will be presented. Supported by the U.S. DOE Vehicle Technology Program.

  20. Greenhouse Gas Concentration Data Recovery Algorithm for a Low Cost, Laser Heterodyne Radiometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, J. Houston; Melroy, Hilary R.; Ott, Lesley E.; Mclinden, Matthew L.; Holben, Brent; Wilson, Emily L.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of a coordinated effort between groups at GWU and NASA GSFC is the development of a low-cost, global, surface instrument network that continuously monitors three key carbon cycle gases in the atmospheric column: carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), carbon monoxide (CO), as well as oxygen (O2) for atmospheric pressure profiles. The network will implement a low-cost, miniaturized, laser heterodyne radiometer (mini-LHR) that has recently been developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. This mini-LHR is designed to operate in tandem with the passive aerosol sensor currently used in AERONET (a well established network of more than 450 ground aerosol monitoring instruments worldwide), and could be rapidly deployed into this established global network. Laser heterodyne radiometry is a well-established technique for detecting weak signals that was adapted from radio receiver technology. Here, a weak light signal, that has undergone absorption by atmospheric components, is mixed with light from a distributed feedback (DFB) telecommunications laser on a single-mode optical fiber. The RF component of the signal is detected on a fast photoreceiver. Scanning the laser through an absorption feature in the infrared, results in a scanned heterodyne signal io the RF. Deconvolution of this signal through the retrieval algorithm allows for the extraction of altitude contributions to the column signal. The retrieval algorithm is based on a spectral simulation program, SpecSyn, developed at GWU for high-resolution infrared spectroscopies. Variations io pressure, temperature, composition, and refractive index through the atmosphere; that are all functions of latitude, longitude, time of day, altitude, etc.; are modeled using algorithms developed in the MODTRAN program developed in part by the US Air Force Research Laboratory. In these calculations the atmosphere is modeled as a series of spherically symmetric shells with boundaries specified at defined altitudes. Temperature

  1. Final Technical Report - Recovery Act: Organic Coatings as Encapsulants for Low Cost, High Performance PV Modules

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart Hellring; Jiping Shao; James Poole

    2011-12-05

    The objective of this project was to evaluate the feasibility of utilizing PPG's commercial organic coatings systems as efficient, modernized encapsulants for low cost, high performance, thin film photovoltaic modules. Our hypothesis was that the combination of an anticorrosive coating with a more traditional barrier topcoat would mitigate many electrochemical processes that are now responsible for the significant portion of photovoltaic (PV) failures, thereby nullifying the extremely high moisture barrier requirements of currently used encapsulation technology. Nine commercially available metal primer coatings and six commercially available top coatings were selected for screening. Twenty-one different primer/top coat combinations were evaluated. The primer coatings were shown to be the major contributor to corrosion inhibition, adhesion, and barrier properties. Two primer coatings and one top coating were downselected for testing on specially-fabricated test modules. The coated test modules passed initial current leakage and insulation testing. Damp Heat testing of control modules showed visible corrosion to the bus bar metal, whereas the coated modules showed none. One of the primer/top coat combinations retained solar power performance after Damp Heat testing despite showing some delamination at the EVA/solar cell interface. Thermal Cycling and Humidity Freeze testing resulted in only one test module retaining its power performance. Failure modes depended on the particular primer/top coating combination used. Overall, this study demonstrated that a relatively thin primer/top coating has the potential to replace the potting film and backsheet in crystalline silicon-based photovoltaic modules. Positive signals were received from commercially available coatings developed for applications having performance requirements different from those required for photovoltaic modules. It is likely that future work to redesign and customize these coatings would result in a

  2. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance US General Serices Administration - Project 193, John W. Bricker Federal Building, Columbus, OH

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-05-31

    This report documents the findings from an onsite audit of the John W. Bricker Federal building located in Columbus, Ohio. The Federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would either reduce electrical and gas consumption or increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

  3. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act ( ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance, U.S. General Services Administration - Project 194 U.S. Custom Cargo Inspection Facility, Detroit, MI

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-05-31

    This report documents the findings of an on-site audit of the U.S. Customs Cargo Inspection Facility (CIF) in Detroit, Michigan. The federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy-efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would reduce electrical and gas consumption and increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the future to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

  4. Cost and Performance Report for LNAPL Recovery: Multi-Phase Extraction and Dual-Pump Recovery of LNAPL at the BP Former Amoco Refinery, Sugar Creek, MO

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This case study was prepared to summarize the recovery of light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) at two locations at the BP Products of North America, Inc. Former Amoco Refinery (former refinery) in Sugar Creek, Missouri.

  5. 45 CFR 263.13 - Is there a limit on the amount of Federal TANF funds that a State may spend on administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Is there a limit on the amount of Federal TANF funds that a State may spend on administrative costs? 263.13 Section 263.13 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare OFFICE OF FAMILY ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  6. 20 CFR 668.825 - Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants? 668.825 Section 668.825 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN...

  7. 20 CFR 668.825 - Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants? 668.825 Section 668.825 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN...

  8. 20 CFR 668.825 - Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Does the WIA administrative cost limit for States and local areas apply to section 166 grants? 668.825 Section 668.825 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR (CONTINUED) INDIAN AND NATIVE AMERICAN...

  9. 20 CFR 645.235 - What types of activities are subject to the administrative cost limit on Welfare-to-Work grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Although administrative in nature, costs of information technology—computer hardware and software—needed... activities or the overall management of the WtW system; and (5) Costs of information systems related to... WtW including: (i) Accounting, budgeting, financial and cash management functions; (ii)...

  10. Removal and recovery of cobalt from aqueous solutions by adsorption using low cost lignocellulosic biomass--coir pith.

    PubMed

    Parab, Harshala; Joshi, Shreeram; Sudersanan, M; Shenoy, Niyoti; Lali, Arvind; Sarma, Umashankar

    2010-01-01

    The applicability of low-cost lignocellulosic biosorbent-coir pith, for removal of cobalt (II) from aqueous solutions using batch adsorption studies has been explored herein. Adsorption characteristics of coir pith were investigated systematically by varying the experimental parameters such as, solution pH, initial metal ion concentration, contact time, adsorbent dose and temperature. The studies revealed that optimum adsorption of cobalt onto coir pith occurred in the pH range of 4.0 - 7.0. Sorption kinetics of cobalt was found to be quite rapid under ambient conditions and the process followed second-order kinetics. The experimental data have been analyzed using non-linearized forms of Langmuir, Freundlich and Redlich-Peterson adsorption isotherms for mathematical description of the process. Desorption studies showed that the quantitative recovery of Co (II) from the spent coir pith was achieved by using 0.5 N HCl. The suitability of this adsorbent for real situation has been observed, when complete removal of cobalt from nuclear power plant coolant water was obtained. The present studies successfully demonstrated the use of coir pith as an efficient adsorbent material for removal of cobalt from aqueous solutions.

  11. Heavy oil recovery process: Conceptual engineering of a downhole methanator and preliminary estimate of facilities cost for application to North Slope Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Results from Tasks 8 and 9 are presented. Task 8 addressed the cost of materials and manufacturing of the Downhole Methanator and the cost of drilling and completing the vertical cased well and two horizontal drain holes in the West Sak reservoir. Task 9 addressed the preliminary design of surface facilities to support the enhanced recovery of heavy oil. Auxiliary facilities include steam reformers for carbon dioxide-rich natural gas reforming, emergency electric generators, nitrogen gas generators, and an ammonia synthesis unit. The ammonia is needed to stabilize the swelling of clays in the reservoir. Cost estimations and a description of how they were obtained are given.

  12. Delayed administration of the nucleic acid analog 2Cl-C.OXT-A attenuates brain damage and enhances functional recovery after ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Okabe, Naohiko; Nakamura, Emi; Himi, Naoyuki; Narita, Kazuhiko; Tsukamoto, Ikuko; Maruyama, Tokumi; Sakakibara, Norikazu; Nakamura, Takehiro; Itano, Toshifumi; Miyamoto, Osamu

    2013-04-19

    2Cl-C.OXT-A (COA-Cl) is a novel nucleic acid analog that enhances angiogenesis through extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 or 2 (ERK1/2) activation. ERK1/2 is a well-known kinase that regulates cell survival, proliferation and differentiation in the central nervous system. We performed in vitro and in vivo experiments to investigate whether COA-Cl can attenuate neuronal damage and enhance recovery after brain ischemia. In primary cortical neuron cultures, COA-Cl prevented neuronal injury after 2h of oxygen-glucose deprivation. COA-Cl increased phospho-ERK levels in a dose-dependent manner and COA-Cl-induced neuroprotection and ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by suramin or PD98059. The effect of COA-Cl was evaluated in vivo with 60min of middle cerebral artery occlusion combined with bilateral common carotid artery occlusion. COA-Cl or saline was injected intracerebroventricularly 5min after reperfusion. COA-Cl significantly reduced infarct volume and improved neurological deficits upon injection of 15 or 30μg/kg COA-Cl. Moreover, COA-Cl reduced the number of TUNEL positive cells in ischemic boundary, while rCBF was not significantly changed by COA-Cl administration. We also evaluated the effect of delayed COA-Cl administration on recovery from brain ischemia by continuous administration of COA-Cl from 1 to 8 days after reperfusion. Delayed continuous COA-Cl administration also reduced infarct volume. Furthermore, COA-Cl enhanced peri-infarct angiogenesis and synaptogenesis, resulting in improved motor function recovery. Our findings demonstrate that COA-Cl exerts both neuroprotective and neurorestorative effects over a broad therapeutic time window, suggesting COA-Cl might be a novel and potent therapeutic agent for ischemic stroke.

  13. Initial recovery and rebound of type f intestinal colonization botulism after administration of investigational heptavalent botulinum antitoxin.

    PubMed

    Fagan, Ryan P; Neil, Karen P; Sasich, Randy; Luquez, Carolina; Asaad, Hakam; Maslanka, Susan; Khalil, Wajahat

    2011-11-01

    Investigational heptavalent botulinum antitoxin (HBAT) is now the primary antitoxin for US noninfant botulism patients. HBAT consists of equine Fab/F(ab')2 IgG fragments, which are cleared from circulation faster than whole immunoglobulins. Rebound botulism after antitoxin administration is not previously documented but occurred in our patient 10 days after HBAT administration.

  14. 77 FR 49795 - Notice of Administrative Settlement Agreement for Recovery of Past Response Costs Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    .... Garcia (3RC42), Senior Assistant Regional Counsel, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1650 Arch Street...- 0154CR,'' and should be forwarded to Jefferie E. Garcia at the above address. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jefferie E. Garcia (3RC42), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1650 Arch Street,...

  15. 77 FR 64989 - Notice of Administrative Settlement Agreement for Recovery of Past Response Costs Pursuant to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... Jefferie E. Garcia (3RC42), Senior Assistant Regional Counsel, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1650.... CERCLA-03-2013-0004-CR,'' and should be forwarded to Jefferie E. Garcia at the above address. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jefferie E. Garcia (3RC42), U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1650 Arch...

  16. Oral administration of citrus pulp reduces gastrointestinal recovery of orally dosed Escherichia coli F18 in weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of citrus pulp (CTP) on the immune and cortisol responses to E. coli F18 inoculation and subsequent E. coli recovery were evaluated in newly weaned pigs (23.3 + 1.8 d of age). Barrows were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups; with (CTP; n = 15) and without (Control; n = 15) the in-feed i...

  17. Oral administration of citrus pulp reduces gasrointestinal recovery of orally dosed Escherichia coli F18 in weaned pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of citrus pulp (CTP), on the immune and cortisol responses to E. coli F18 inoculation and subsequent E. coli recovery were evaluated in newly weaned pigs (23.3 + 1.8 d of age). Barrows were assigned to 1 of 2 treatment groups; with (CTP; n = 15) and without (Control; n = 15) the in-feed ...

  18. Effect of lactose administration in drinking water prior to and during feed withdrawal on Salmonella recovery from broiler crops and ceca.

    PubMed

    Barnhart, E T; Caldwell, D J; Crouch, M C; Byrd, J A; Corrier, D E; Hargis, B M

    1999-02-01

    Salmonella contamination of the chicken crop has been reported to increase markedly and significantly during feed withdrawal, probably due to coprophagy, and may contribute to carcass contamination at processing. The effect of prolonged lactose administration (2.5%) in the drinking water on the incidence of Salmonella recovery from broiler crops or ceca was evaluated in seven experiments. In these experiments, all or a percentage (providing seeders and contacts) of 7-wk-old broilers were challenged with approximately 1 x 108 cfu Salmonella enteritidis and provided lactose for 5 or 11 d prior to and during an 18 or 24 h feed withdrawal period. A small but significant lactose-mediated reduction in Salmonella contamination of crops was observed in one of two identical experiments with 18 h feed withdrawal. Extending the feed withdrawal period to 24 h did not improve the ability of lactose to affect Salmonella recovery from crops or ceca. Similarly, lactose did not affect Salmonella recovery when the percentage of birds challenged was reduced to 3 out of 16 and Salmonella recovery from crops or ceca of unchallenged, contact broilers was measured. Extending the duration of exposure to 2.5% lactose in the drinking water from 5 to 11 d did not improve the ability of lactose to affect Salmonella recovery. Taken together, these data suggest that provision of 2.5% lactose in the drinking water during the last 5 to 11 d of growout prior to slaughter will not be useful in an integrated Salmonella control program under commercial conditions.

  19. Effects of intravenous administration of allogenic bone marrow- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells on functional recovery and brain repair markers in experimental ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Stem cell therapy can promote good recovery from stroke. Several studies have demonstrated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are safe and effective. However, more information regarding appropriate cell type is needed from animal model. This study was targeted at analyzing the effects in ischemic stroke of acute intravenous (i.v.) administration of allogenic bone marrow- (BM-MSC) and adipose-derived-stem cells (AD-MSC) on functional evaluation results and brain repair markers. Methods Allogenic MSC (2 × 106 cells) were administered intravenously 30 minutes after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO) to rats. Infarct volume and cell migration and implantation were analyzed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and immunohistochemistry. Function was evaluated by the Rogers and rotarod tests, and cell proliferation and cell-death were also determined. Brain repair markers were analyzed by confocal microscopy and confirmed by western blot. Results Compared to infarct group, function had significantly improved at 24 h and continued at 14 d after i.v. administration of either BM-MSC or AD-MSC. No reduction in infarct volume or any migration/implantation of cells into the damaged brain were observed. Nevertheless, cell death was reduced and cellular proliferation significantly increased in both treatment groups with respect to the infarct group. At 14 d after MSC administration vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), synaptophysin (SYP), oligodendrocyte (Olig-2) and neurofilament (NF) levels were significantly increased while those of glial fiibrillary acid protein (GFAP) were decreased. Conclusions i.v. administration of allogenic MSC - whether BM-MSC or AD-MSC, in pMCAO infarct was associated with good functional recovery, and reductions in cell death as well as increases in cellular proliferation, neurogenesis, oligodendrogenesis, synaptogenesis and angiogenesis markers at 14 days post-infarct. PMID:23356495

  20. Delayed administration of the GLP-1 receptor agonist liraglutide improves metabolic and functional recovery after cerebral ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wenbin; Miao, Yunping; Chen, Aiying; Cheng, Min; Ye, Xiaodi; Song, Fahuan; Zheng, Gaoli

    2017-02-22

    Glucagon-like peptide 1 receptor (GLP-1R) agonists administered before or immediately after induction of experimental stroke have been shown to provide acute neuroprotection. Here, we determined whether delayed treatment with a GLP-1R agonist could improve metabolic and functional recovery after stroke. Rats were subjected to middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) and given the well-established GLP-1R agonist liraglutide (50, 100, or 200μg/kg) or normal saline (NS) daily for 4 weeks, starting 1 day after MCAO. Cerebral glucose metabolism and neurological deficits were evaluated using (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose ((18)F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) imaging and modified neurological severity score (mNSS) test. Levels of neuronal nuclei (NeuN), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), von Willebrand factor (vWF), and GLP-1R were assessed by immunohistochemical staining and Western blot analysis. PET imaging showed that animals treated with liraglutide had significantly higher (18)F-FDG accumulation in the cerebral infarction compared with animals treated with NS. Liraglutide significantly reduced the mNSS score. It also greatly increased the expression of NeuN, GFAP, vWF, and GLP-1R in the cerebral ischemic area at postoperative week 4. These results demonstrated metabolic and functional recovery after delayed treatment with liraglutide in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

  1. Subcutaneous administration of rhIGF-I post irradiation exposure enhances hematopoietic recovery and survival in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shilei; Xu, Yang; Wang, Song; Shen, Mingqiang; Chen, Fang; Chen, Mo; Wang, Aiping; Cheng, Tianmin; Su, Yongping; Wang, Junping

    2012-01-01

    It is unclear how to effectively mitigate against irradiation injury. In this study, we studied the capacity of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-I (rhIGF-I) on hematologic recovery in irradiated BALB/c mice and its possible mechanism. BALB/c mice were injected with rhIGF-I subcutaneously at a dose of 100 μg/kg twice daily for 7 days after total body irradiation. Compared with a saline control group, treatment with rhIGF-I significantly improved the survival of mice after lethal irradiation (7.5 Gy). It was found that treatment with rhIGF-I not only could increase the frequency of Sca-1+ cells in bone marrow harvested at Day 14 after irradiation, but also it could decrease the apoptosis of mononuclear cells induced by irradiation as measured by flow cytometry, suggesting that rhIGF-I may mediate its effects primarily through promoting hematopoietic stem cell/progenitor survival and protecting mononuclear cells from apoptosis after irradiation exposure. Moreover, we have found that rhIGF-I might facilitate thrombopoiesis in an indirect way. Our data demonstrated that rhIGF-I could promote overall hematopoietic recovery after ionizing radiation and reduce the mortality when administered immediately post lethal irradiation exposure. PMID:22843623

  2. LCA and Cost Analysis of Membrane Bioreactor Systems: Influence of Scale, Population Density, Climate, and Methane Recovery

    EPA Science Inventory

    Future changes in drinking and waste water infrastructure need to incorporate a holistic view of the water service sustainability tradeoffs and potential benefits when considering shifts towards new treatment technology, decentralized systems, energy recovery and reuse of treated...

  3. Local infiltration of rabies immunoglobulins without systemic intramuscular administration: An alternative cost effective approach for passive immunization against rabies

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Omesh Kumar; Madhusudana, Shampur Narayan; Gaunta, Pyare Lal; Belludi, Ashwin Yajaman

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Presently the dose of rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) which is an integral part of rabies post exposure prophylaxis (PEP) is calculated based on body weight though the recommendation is to infiltrate the wound(s). This practice demands large quantities of RIG which may be unaffordable to many patients. In this background, we conducted this study to know if the quantity and cost of RIG can be reduced by restricting passive immunization to local infiltration alone and avoiding systemic intramuscular administration based on the available scientific evidence. Two hundred and sixty nine category III patients bitten by suspect or confirmed rabid dogs/animals were infiltrated with equine rabies immunoglobulin (ERIGs) in and around the wound. The quantity of ERIG used was proportionate to the size and number of wounds irrespective of their body weight. They were followed with a regular course of rabies vaccination by intra-dermal route. As against 363 vials of RIGs required for all these cases as per current recommendation based on body weight, they required only 42 vials of 5ml RIG. Minimum dose of RIGs given was 0.25 ml and maximum dose given was 8 ml. On an average 1.26 ml of RIGs was required per patient that costs Rs. 150 ($3). All the patients were followed for 9 months and they were healthy and normal at the end of observation period. With local infiltration, that required small quantities of RIG, the RIGs could be made available to all patients in times of short supply in the market. A total of 30 (11%) serum samples of patients were tested for rabies virus neutralizing antibodies by the rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT) and all showed antibody titers >0.5 IU/mL by day 14. In no case the dose was higher than that required based on body weight and no immunosuppression resulted. To conclude, this pilot study shows that local infiltration of RIG need to be considered in times of non-availability in the market or unaffordability by poor patients

  4. Reimagining cost recovery in Pakistan's irrigation system through willingness-to-pay estimates for irrigation water from a discrete choice experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Andrew Reid; Shah, M. Azeem Ali; Ward, Patrick S.

    2014-08-01

    It is widely argued that farmers are unwilling to pay adequate fees for surface water irrigation to recover the costs associated with maintenance and improvement of delivery systems. In this paper, we use a discrete choice experiment to study farmer preferences for irrigation characteristics along two branch canals in Punjab Province in eastern Pakistan. We find that farmers are generally willing to pay well in excess of current surface water irrigation costs for increased surface water reliability and that the amount that farmers are willing to pay is an increasing function of their existing surface water supply as well as location along the main canal branch. This explicit translation of implicit willingness-to-pay (WTP) for water (via expenditure on groundwater pumping) to WTP for reliable surface water demonstrates the potential for greatly enhanced cost recovery in the Indus Basin Irrigation System via appropriate setting of water user fees, driven by the higher WTP of those currently receiving reliable supplies.

  5. Reimagining cost recovery in Pakistan's irrigation system through willingness-to-pay estimates for irrigation water from a discrete choice experiment

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Andrew Reid; Shah, M Azeem Ali; Ward, Patrick S

    2014-01-01

    It is widely argued that farmers are unwilling to pay adequate fees for surface water irrigation to recover the costs associated with maintenance and improvement of delivery systems. In this paper, we use a discrete choice experiment to study farmer preferences for irrigation characteristics along two branch canals in Punjab Province in eastern Pakistan. We find that farmers are generally willing to pay well in excess of current surface water irrigation costs for increased surface water reliability and that the amount that farmers are willing to pay is an increasing function of their existing surface water supply as well as location along the main canal branch. This explicit translation of implicit willingness-to-pay (WTP) for water (via expenditure on groundwater pumping) to WTP for reliable surface water demonstrates the potential for greatly enhanced cost recovery in the Indus Basin Irrigation System via appropriate setting of water user fees, driven by the higher WTP of those currently receiving reliable supplies. PMID:25552779

  6. 34 CFR 692.72 - May a State use the funds it receives under the SLEAP Program to pay administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May a State use the funds it receives under the SLEAP... Is the Amount of Assistance and How May It Be Used? § 692.72 May a State use the funds it receives under the SLEAP Program to pay administrative costs? A State may not use any of the funds it...

  7. 29 CFR 4903.6 - How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a debt owed to PBGC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a debt owed to PBGC? 4903.6 Section 4903.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued... Procedures To Collect Debts Owed to PBGC § 4903.6 How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges,...

  8. 29 CFR 4903.6 - How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a debt owed to PBGC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a debt owed to PBGC? 4903.6 Section 4903.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued... Procedures To Collect Debts Owed to PBGC § 4903.6 How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges,...

  9. 29 CFR 4903.6 - How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a debt owed to PBGC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a debt owed to PBGC? 4903.6 Section 4903.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued... Procedures To Collect Debts Owed to PBGC § 4903.6 How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges,...

  10. 29 CFR 4903.6 - How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a debt owed to PBGC?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges, and administrative costs to a debt owed to PBGC? 4903.6 Section 4903.6 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued... Procedures To Collect Debts Owed to PBGC § 4903.6 How will PBGC add interest, penalty charges,...

  11. 34 CFR 692.112 - May a State use the funds it receives from the GAP Program to pay administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false May a State use the funds it receives from the GAP Program to pay administrative costs? 692.112 Section 692.112 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  12. 34 CFR 692.112 - May a State use the funds it receives from the GAP Program to pay administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false May a State use the funds it receives from the GAP Program to pay administrative costs? 692.112 Section 692.112 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  13. 34 CFR 692.112 - May a State use the funds it receives from the GAP Program to pay administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false May a State use the funds it receives from the GAP Program to pay administrative costs? 692.112 Section 692.112 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION...

  14. 40 CFR 304.41 - Administrative fees, expenses, and Arbitrator's fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS ARBITRATION PROCEDURES FOR SMALL SUPERFUND COST RECOVERY CLAIMS Other Provisions § 304.41 Administrative fees, expenses, and Arbitrator's...

  15. 40 CFR 304.41 - Administrative fees, expenses, and Arbitrator's fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS ARBITRATION PROCEDURES FOR SMALL SUPERFUND COST RECOVERY CLAIMS Other Provisions § 304.41 Administrative fees, expenses, and Arbitrator's...

  16. 40 CFR 304.41 - Administrative fees, expenses, and Arbitrator's fee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) SUPERFUND, EMERGENCY PLANNING, AND COMMUNITY RIGHT-TO-KNOW PROGRAMS ARBITRATION PROCEDURES FOR SMALL SUPERFUND COST RECOVERY CLAIMS Other Provisions § 304.41 Administrative fees, expenses, and Arbitrator's...

  17. Rapid and sustained cognitive recovery in APP/PS1 transgenic mice by co-administration of EPPS and donepezil

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Yun; Kim, Hyunjin Vincent; Lee, Dongkeun K.; Yang, Seung-Hoon; Kim, YoungSoo

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by sequential progression of pathological events, such as aggregation of amyloid-β proteins, followed by outward symptoms of cognitive impairments. Given that a combination of different therapeutic strategies often provides more rapid and effective outcomes in diverse areas of clinical treatment, we hypothesized that administration of anti-amyloid drugs with cognitive enhancers would result in synergistic effects in AD treatment. Here, we co-administered 4-(2-hydroxyethyl)-1-piperazinepropane-sulphonic acid (EPPS), an amyloid-clearing chemical, and donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, to determine whether they could serve complementary roles for each other in regards to AD treatment. We found that oral administration of these two molecules led to a rapid and consistent cognitive improvement in APP/PS1 transgenic mice. Although there was no evidence for synergistic effects, our results indicated that EPPS and donepezil function complementary to each other without altering their individual effects. Thus, the combined use of disease-modifying and symptomatic relief drugs may be a promising approach in the treatment of AD. PMID:27796293

  18. Continuous nicotinamide administration improves behavioral recovery and reduces lesion size following bilateral frontal controlled cortical impact injury.

    PubMed

    Vonder Haar, Cole; Anderson, Gail D; Hoane, Michael R

    2011-10-31

    Previous research has demonstrated considerable preclinical efficacy of nicotinamide (NAM; vitamin B(3)) in animal models of TBI with systemic dosing at 50 and 500 mg/kg yielding improvements on sensory, motor, cognitive and histological measures. The current study aimed to utilize a more specific dosing paradigm in a clinically relevant delivery mechanism: continuously secreting subcutaneous pumps. A bilateral frontal controlled cortical impact (CCI) or sham surgery was performed and rats were treated with NAM (150 mg/kg day) or saline (1 ml/kg) pumps 30 min after CCI, continuing until seven days post-CCI. Rats were given a loading dose of NAM (50mg/kg) or saline (1 ml/kg) following pump implant. Rats received behavioral testing (bilateral tactile adhesive removal, locomotor placing task and Morris water maze) starting on day two post-CCI and were sacrificed at 31 days post-CCI and brains were stained to examine lesion size. NAM-treated rats had reductions in sensory, motor and cognitive behavioral deficits compared to vehicle-treated rats. Specifically, NAM-treated rats significantly improved on the bilateral tactile adhesive removal task, locomotor placing task and the reference memory paradigm of the Morris water maze. Lesion size was also significantly reduced in the NAM-treated group. The results from this study indicate that at the current dose, NAM produces beneficial effects on recovery from a bilateral frontal brain injury and that it may be a relevant compound to be explored in human studies.

  19. Administration of Bacillus coagulans in calves: recovery from faecal samples and evaluation of functional aspects of spores.

    PubMed

    Ripamonti, Barbara; Agazzi, Alessandro; Baldi, Antonella; Balzaretti, Claudia; Bersani, Carla; Pirani, Silvia; Rebucci, Raffaella; Savoini, Giovanni; Stella, Simone; Stenico, Alberta; Domeneghini, Cinzia

    2009-12-01

    An investigation was carried out into the recovery from calf faeces of Bacillus coagulans spores added to the feed as probiotic. For this purpose, Bacillus coagulans spores (9 log₁₀ CFU g⁻¹) were given daily to 10 calves during the whole farming periods; another 10 calves acted as controls. Throughout the trial the faecal spore counts were significantly (P < 0.01) higher in the treated group than in the controls (averaging 2.1 x 10⁵ vs 3.7 x 10⁴ CFU g⁻¹). Bacterial cells were recovered from faecal samples and ribotyping matched the strain isolated from faecal sample to the clone administered to the animals. In addition, the recovered cells were found to maintain their functionality aspects of acid production, survival in artificial gastric juice and in the presence of bile, and attachment to human intestinal epithelial cells. The results further elucidate the fate of spore formers administered to calves, and this will help in the development of new species-specific nutritional strategies.

  20. Impaired recovery of brain muscarinic receptor sites following an adaptive down-regulation induced by repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; De Angelis, S.; Michalek, H. )

    1990-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the recovery rate of brain cholinesterase activity (ChE) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites (mAChRs) following reduction induced by repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were s.c. injected with DFP on alternate days for 2 weeks and killed 48 hr and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after the last treatment. In the hippocampus and striatum, but not in the cerebral cortex, of control rats there as a significant age-related decline of ChE activity and maximal density of 3H-QNB binding sites (Bmax). The repeated administration of DFP during the first week caused a syndrome of cholinergic stimulation both in aged and young rats. The syndrome was more pronounced, in terms of intensity and duration in aged than in young animals resulting in 40 and 12% mortality, respectively; during the second week the syndrome attenuated in the two age-groups. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE at the end of DFP treatment did not differ between young and surviving aged rats. The down-regulation of mACRs was present in the three brain regions of both young and age rats (from 20 to 40%). Factorial analysis of variance showed significant differences for age, recovery rate, and significant interaction between age and recovery rate, both for ChE and mAChRs in young rats the three brain areas.

  1. State Compensation: A No-cost Scheme for Scalable Failure Recovery in Tree-based Overlay Networks

    SciTech Connect

    Arnold, D C; Miller, B P

    2006-07-11

    Tree-based overlay networks (TB{bar O}Ns) have become important for scalable data multicast and aggregation. This infrastructure's generality has lead to widespread usage in large scale and widely distributed environments--environments in which reliability must be addressed. This paper presents state compensation, a novel reliability concept for TB{bar O}N environments that avoids explicit state replication (such as checkpoints) for failure recovery by leveraging general properties of TB{bar O}N computations that allow computational state from non-failed processes to compensate for state lost from failed ones. In this paper, we present our state compensation mechanisms, prove sufficient properties of distributed computations that make these mechanisms feasible and show how to derive computation-specific recovery primitives from these properties. We also present a case study of the recovery process. The result is a general TB{bar O}N recovery model that requires no additional storage, network, or computational resources during normal operation.

  2. Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in patients participating in a graduated cost recovery program at an HIV care center in South India.

    PubMed

    Batavia, Ashita S; Balaji, Kavitha; Houle, Elizabeth; Parisaboina, Sangeetha; Ganesh, A K; Mayer, Kenneth H; Solomon, Suniti

    2010-08-01

    In resource-constrained settings, the most frequently cited barrier to optimal antiretroviral therapy (ART) adherence among HIV-infected patients has been the cost of medications. In recent years many subsidized medication programs have been developed to improve ART affordability. A Graduated Cost Recovery program at the largest care center in South India has enrolled 839 eligible patients into four tiers based on an evaluation of their financial information and willingness to pay, of these patients 635 consented to participate in this study. Patients in Tier 1 receive first-line ART at no cost, whereas patients in Tiers 2, 3, and 4 pay 50, 75, and 100%, respectively of the cost of first-line medications based on an assessment of their means. Adherence rates of 95% or greater on 3-day recall were achieved by 84.6% of Tier 1 (n = 156), 71.6% of Tier 2 (n = 141), 72.3% of Tier 3 (n = 242), and 79.2% of Tier 4 (n = 96). These findings suggest patients are highly motivated and that the provision of no-cost ART can promote higher rates of optimal adherence.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of triple drug administration (TDA) with praziquantel, ivermectin and albendazole for the prevention of neglected tropical diseases in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Evans, D; McFarland, D; Adamani, W; Eigege, A; Miri, E; Schulz, J; Pede, E; Umbugadu, C; Ogbu-Pearse, P; Richards, F O

    2011-12-01

    Onchocerciasis, lymphatic filariasis (LF), schistosomiasis and soil transmitted, helminthiasis (STH) are all co-endemic in Nigeria. Annual mass drug administration (MDA) with ivermectin (for onchocerciasis), albendazole (for STH and with ivermectin for LF) and praziquantel (for schistosomiasis) is the WHO-recommended treatment strategy for preventive chemotherapy. Separate delivery rounds for distribution of these drugs have been the usual approach to MDA. All three drugs, however, have now been shown to be clinically and programmatically safe for co-administration with what has come to be known as triple drug administration (TDA). We examined the cost savings of converting from separate delivery rounds to TDA in two states in Nigeria. In 2008, eight local government areas received a single round of ivermectin with albendazole followed at least 1 week later by a single round of praziquantel to school-aged children. The following year, a single round was administered with TDA. The number of treated individuals was essentially unchanged during both years (1,301,864 in 2008 and 1,297,509 in 2009) and no change in adverse events was reported. The total programmatic costs for the MDA, not including drug and overhead costs, reduced by 41% from $123,624 to $72,870. Cost savings were limited in larger populations due to economies of scale. TDA is recommended for mature MDA.

  4. Effects of Local Administration of Platelet Rich Plasma on Functional Recovery after Bridging Sciatic Nerve Defect Using Silicone Rubber Chamber; An Experimental Study

    PubMed Central

    Abbasipour-Dalivand, Sedighe; Mohammadi, Rahim; Mohammadi, Vahid

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effects of local administration of platelet rich plasma (PRP) on peripheral nerve regeneration in rat sciatic nerve transection model. Methods: Forty-five male white Wistar rats were randomized into three experimental groups (n=15): Normal control group (NC), silicon group (SIL), PRP treated group (SIL/PRP). In NC group left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In SIL group left sciatic nerve was exposed the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone conduit and filled with 10 µL phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/PRP group silicon conduit was filled with 20 µL PRP. Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five animals each and were studied 4, 8, 12 weeks after surgery. Results: The animals were comparable regarding the baseline characteristics. Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study and gastrocnemius muscle mass showed earlier regeneration of axons in SIL/PRP than in SIL group. Conclusion: Local administration of PRP combined with silicon grafting could accelerate functional recovery of peripheral nerve.  Easily available growth factors and bioactive proteins present in PRP may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after nerve transection. PMID:27162893

  5. Space Shuttle main engine. NASA has not evaluated the alternate fuel turbopump costs and benefits. Report to the Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-10-01

    NASA's plans to develop an alternate high pressure fuel turbopump for the Space Shuttle's main engines were assessed by the General Accounting Office as a part of the evaluation of the Space Shuttle Safety and Obsolescence Upgrade program. The objective was to determine whether NASA has adequately analyzed cost, performance, and benefits that are expected to result from this program in comparison to other alternatives before resuming development of the alternate pump, which was suspended in 1992. The alternate fuel pump is one of five improvements being developed or planned to significantly enhance safety margins of the engines.

  6. High-Efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery, STTR Phase II Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Timothy

    2011-01-07

    This is the final report of DoE STTR Phase II project, “High-efficiency, Cost-effective Thermoelectric Materials/Devices for Industrial Process Refrigeration and Waste Heat Recovery”. The objective of this STTR project is to develop a cost-effective processing approach to produce bulk high-performance thermoelectric (TE) nanocomposites, which will enable the development of high-power, high-power-density TE modulus for waste heat recovery and industrial refrigeration. The use of this nanocomposite into TE modules are expected to bring about significant technical benefits in TE systems (e.g. enhanced energy efficiency, smaller sizes and light weight). The successful development and applications of such nanocomposite and the resultant TE modules can lead to reducing energy consumption and environmental impacts, and creating new economic development opportunities.

  7. Different routes of administration of human umbilical tissue-derived cells improve functional recovery in the rat after focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Li, Yi; Romanko, Michael; Kramer, Brian C; Gosiewska, Anna; Chopp, Michael; Hong, Klaudyne

    2012-12-13

    Human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) are a potential neurorestorative candidate for stroke treatment. Here, we test the effects of hUTC treatment in a rat model of stroke via various routes of administration. Rats were treated with hUTC or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) via different routes including intraarterial (IA), intravenous (IV), intra-cisterna magna (ICM), lumber intrathecal (IT), or intracerebral injection (IC) at 24h after stroke onset. Treatment with hUTC via IV and IC route led to significant functional improvements starting at day 14, which persisted to day 60 compared with respective PBS-treated rats. HUTC administered via IA, ICM, and IT significantly improved neurological functional recovery starting at day 14 and persisted up to day 49 compared with PBS-treated rats. Although IA administration resulted in the highest donor cell number detected within the ischemic brain compared to the other routes, hUTC treatments significantly increased ipsilateral bromodeoxyuridine incorporating subventricular zone (SVZ) cells and vascular density in the ischemic boundary compared with PBS-treated rats regardless of the route of administration. While rats received hUTC treatment via IA, IV, IC, and ICM routes showed greater synaptophysin immunoreactivity, significant reductions in TUNEL-positive cells in the ipsilateral hemisphere were observed in IA, IV, and IC routes compared with PBS-treated rats. hUTC treatments did not reduce infarct volume when compared to the PBS groups. Our data indicate that hUTC administered via multiple routes provide therapeutic benefit after stroke. The enhancement of neurorestorative events in the host brain may contribute to the therapeutic benefits of hUTC in the treatment of stroke.

  8. 34 CFR 692.112 - May a State use the funds it receives from the GAP Program to pay administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May a State use the funds it receives from the GAP Program to pay administrative costs? 692.112 Section 692.112 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... Amount of Assistance and How May It Be Used? § 692.112 May a State use the funds it receives from the...

  9. 34 CFR 692.72 - May a State use the funds it receives under the SLEAP Program to pay administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false May a State use the funds it receives under the SLEAP... Program What Is the Amount of Assistance and How May It Be Used? § 692.72 May a State use the funds it receives under the SLEAP Program to pay administrative costs? A State may not use any of the funds...

  10. 34 CFR 692.112 - May a State use the funds it receives from the GAP Program to pay administrative costs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false May a State use the funds it receives from the GAP Program to pay administrative costs? 692.112 Section 692.112 Education Regulations of the Offices of the... Assistance and How May It Be Used? § 692.112 May a State use the funds it receives from the GAP Program...

  11. USING CABLE SUSPENDED SUBMERSIBLE PUMPS TO REDUCE PRODUCTION COSTS TO INCREASE ULTIMATE RECOVERY IN THE RED MOUNTAIN FIELD OF THE SAN JUAN BASIN REGION

    SciTech Connect

    Don L. Hanosh

    2004-11-01

    This report discusses: (1) being able to resume marginal oil production operations in the Red Mountain Oil Field, located in McKinley County, New Mexico by installing a cable suspended electric submersible pumping system (HDESP); (2) determining if this system can reduce life costs making it a more cost effective production system for similar oil fields within the region, and if warranted, drill additional wells to improve the economics. In April 2003, a cooperative 50% cost share agreement between Enerdyne and the DOE was executed to investigate the feasibility of using cable suspended electric submersible pumps to reduce the life costs and increase the ultimate oil recovery of the Red Mountain Oil Field, located on the Chaco Slope of the San Juan Basin, New Mexico. The field was discovered in 1934 and has produced approximately 55,650 cubic meters (m{sup 3}), (350,000 barrels, 42 gallons) of oil. Prior to April 2003, the field was producing only a few cubic meters of oil each month; however, the reservoir characteristics suggest that the field retains ample oil to be economic. This field is unique, in that, the oil accumulations, above fresh water, occur at depths from 88-305 meters, (290 feet to 1000 feet), and serves as a relatively good test area for this experiment.

  12. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.; Groves, F.R. Jr.; Wolcott, J.M.

    1989-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. The information from laboratory corefloods and data base evaluations will be used in the design and implementation of a Department of Energy sponsored field test. 1 ref.

  13. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. Coreflood experiments were initiated during this reporting period to examine the influence of CO{sub 2} injection rate on process performance. Experiments designed to determine the benefits of using a drive gas (N{sub 2}) have been completed. 2 refs., 2 tabs.

  14. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. This quarter, one final horizontal coreflood was performed to examine the influence of remaining oil saturation. An environmental assessment was performed in order to assess environmental impacts; and a numerical simulation was performed. 7 refs., 4 figs.

  15. 47 CFR 52.33 - Recovery of carrier-specific costs directly related to providing long-term number portability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... network elements under section 251. (iv) The incumbent local exchange carrier shall levelize the monthly... statistical areas or with an adjacent number portability-capable local exchange carrier may assess each end...) Incumbent local exchange carriers may recover their carrier-specific costs directly related to...

  16. Telerehabilitation in Stroke Recovery: A Survey on Access and Willingness to Use Low-Cost Consumer Technologies.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Mary C; Monsees, Sarah; Rhebergen, Josina; Waring, Jennifer; Van der Star, Todd; Eng, Janice J; Sakakibara, Brodie M

    2016-10-05

    Background/Introduction: Early telerehabilitation trials with stroke survivors have shown promising results, but there remains a lack of knowledge of what areas of rehabilitation people with stroke are interested and willing to receive using technology. The purpose of this study was to describe the access to low-cost consumer technologies and willingness to use them to receive rehabilitation services among stroke survivors.

  17. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery, performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.

    1991-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. The information from laboratory corefloods and data base evaluations will be used in the design and implementation of a Department of Energy sponsored field test. The results of all laboratory and field evaluations will be made available to the industry through workshops, periodic reports, and meetings. 1 ref., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.

    1991-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. The information from laboratory corefloods and data base evaluations will be used in the design and implementation of a Department of Energy sponsored field test. The results of all laboratory and field evaluations will be transferred to the industry through workshops, periodic reports, and meetings. This report presents results from a series of corefloods and air quality monitoring. 5 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  19. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.; Groves, F.R. Jr.; Wolcott, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. The information from laboratory corefloods and data base evaluations will be used in the design and implementation of a Department of Energy sponsored field test. The results of all laboratory and field evaluations will be made available to the industry through workshops, periodic reports, and meetings. 2 tabs.

  20. Cyclic CO sub 2 injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Bassiouni, Z.A.

    1990-01-01

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO{sub 2} huff n' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and analysis of a field test data base to facilitate target reservoir screening, and to identify sensitive operational parameters. The information from laboratory corefloods and data base evaluations will be used in the design and implementation of a Department of Energy sponsored field tests. The results of all laboratory and field evaluations will be made available to the industry through workshops, periodic reports, and meetings. 2 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  1. ARRA Investments in Technology, Innovation, and K-12 Reform: The Digital Education Funding Cliff. A Preliminary Report on State Administration of the American Recovery & Reinvestment Act of 2009: Enhancing Education Through Technology Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Educational Technology Directors Association, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This is the first in a forthcoming series of reports documenting state administration of educational technology funding included in the "American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009" (ARRA). The ARRA included a $650 million allocation in ESEA Title II, Part D, commonly referred to as the "Enhancing Education through Technology…

  2. Effect of local administration of platelet-derived growth factor B on functional recovery of peripheral nerve regeneration: A sciatic nerve transection model

    PubMed Central

    Golzadeh, Atefeh; Mohammadi, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Background: Effects of platelet-derived growth factor B (PDGF-B) on peripheral nerve regeneration was studied using a rat sciatic nerve transection model. Materials and Methods: Forty-five male, white Wistar rats were divided into three experimental groups (n = 15), randomly: Normal control group (NC), silicon group (SIL), and PDGF-B treated group (SIL/PDGF). In NC group, left sciatic nerve was exposed through a gluteal muscle incision and after homeostasis muscle was sutured. In the SIL group, the left sciatic nerve was exposed in the same way and transected proximal to tibio-peroneal bifurcation leaving a 10-mm gap. Proximal and distal stumps were each inserted into a silicone conduit and filled with 10 μL phosphate buffered solution. In SIL/PDGF group, the silicon conduit was filled with 10 μL PDGF-B (0.5 ng/mL). Each group was subdivided into three subgroups of five and were studied in 4, 8, 12 weeks after surgery. Results: Behavioral testing, sciatic nerve functional study, gastrocnemius muscle mass, and histomorphometric studies showed earlier regeneration of axons in SIL/PDGF than in SIL group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Local administration of PDGF-B combined with silicon grafting could accelerate functional recovery and may have clinical implications for the surgical management of patients after facial nerve transection. PMID:27274342

  3. Food Assistance: Financial Information on WIC Nutrition Services and Administrative Costs. United States General Accounting Office Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Robert E.

    The Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) is a federally funded nutrition assistance program administered by the Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Food and Nutrition Service (FNS). Responding to Congressional requests for information regarding program costs, this report provides information on: (1) funding…

  4. Caustic burn caused by intradermal self administration of muriatic acid for suicidal attempt: optimal wound healing and functional recovery with a non surgical treatment

    PubMed Central

    FINO, P.; SPAGNOLI, A.M.; RUGGIERI, M.; ONESTI, M.G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Caustic burns are burns of third and fourth degree caused by strong acids or strong bases. Muriatic acid is often used for suicidal attempt by ingestion. We describe a case of a caustic skin lesion caused by intravenous failed attempt of suicide by injection of Muriatic acid in a woman affected with bipolar-syndrome. Generally, caustic burns are treated by cleansing, escarectomy and coverage with skin grafts. Case report We treated the patient with a non invasive technique with collagenase and hyaluronic acid sodium salt cream (Bionect start®), hyaluronic acid-based matrix (Hyalomatrix®) and Vacuum-Assisted Closure (VAC) Therapy®. Results We obtained complete healing in 6 weeks. Conclusions Combined use of non invasive techniques seems to ensure only advantages for both the patients and the Health System. It reduces health care costs and risks for the patients such as nosocomial infections. Patient’s compliance is high, as its quality of life. Complete healing of the wound is fast and recovery of function is full. PMID:26712258

  5. Prevalence and Costs of Multimorbidity by Deprivation Levels in the Basque Country: A Population Based Study Using Health Administrative Databases

    PubMed Central

    Orueta, Juan F.; García-Álvarez, Arturo; García-Goñi, Manuel; Paolucci, Francesco; Nuño-Solinís, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Background Multimorbidity is a major challenge for healthcare systems. However, currently, its magnitude and impact in healthcare expenditures is still mostly unknown. Objective To present an overview of the prevalence and costs of multimorbidity by socioeconomic levels in the whole Basque population. Methods We develop a cross-sectional analysis that includes all the inhabitants of the Basque Country (N = 2,262,698). We utilize data from primary health care electronic medical records, hospital admissions, and outpatient care databases, corresponding to a 4 year period. Multimorbidity was defined as the presence of two or more chronic diseases out of a list of 52 of the most important and common chronic conditions given in the literature. We also use socioeconomic and demographic variables such as age, sex, individual healthcare cost, and deprivation level. Predicted adjusted costs were obtained by log-gamma regression models. Results Multimorbidity of chronic diseases was found among 23.61% of the total Basque population and among 66.13% of those older than 65 years. Multimorbid patients account for 63.55% of total healthcare expenditures. Prevalence of multimorbidity is higher in the most deprived areas for all age and sex groups. The annual cost of healthcare per patient generated for any chronic disease depends on the number of coexisting comorbidities, and varies from 637 € for the first pathology in average to 1,657 € for the ninth one. Conclusion Multimorbidity is very common for the Basque population and its prevalence rises in age, and unfavourable socioeconomic environment. The costs of care for chronic patients with several conditions cannot be described as the sum of their individual pathologies in average. They usually increase dramatically according to the number of comorbidities. Given the ageing population, multimorbidity and its consequences should be taken into account in healthcare policy, the organization of care and medical research

  6. Investigation of the strontium (Sr(II)) adsorption of an alginate microsphere as a low-cost adsorbent for removal and recovery from seawater.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hye-Jin; Ryu, Jungho; Park, In-Su; Ryu, Taegong; Chung, Kang-Sup; Kim, Byuong-Gyu

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we investigated alginate microspheres as a low-cost adsorbent for strontium (Sr(II)) removal and recovery from seawater. Alginate microspheres have demonstrated a superior adsorption capacity for Sr(II) ions (≈110 mg/g). A Freundlich isotherm model fits well with the Sr(II) adsorption of an alginate microsphere. The mechanism of Sr(II) adsorption is inferred as an ion exchange reaction with Ca(II) ions. The effects of the solution pH and co-existing ions in seawater are also investigated. Except for a pH of 1-2, Sr(II) adsorption capacity is not affected by pH. However, increasing the seawater concentration of metal cations seriously decreases Sr(II) uptake. In particular, highly concentrated (15,000 mg/L) Na(I) ions significantly interfere with Sr(II) adsorption. Sr(II) desorption was performed using 0.1 M HCl and CaCl2. Both regenerants show an excellent desorption efficiency, but the FTIR spectrum reveals that the chemical structure of the microsphere is destroyed after repeated use of HCl. Conversely, CaCl2 successfully desorbed Sr(II) without damage, and the Sr(II) adsorption capacity does not decrease after three repeated uses. The alginate microsphere was also applied to the adsorption of Sr(II) in a real seawater medium. Because of inhibition by co-existing ions, the Sr(II) adsorption capacity was decreased and the adsorption rate was retarded compared with D.I. water. Although the Sr(II) adsorption capacity was decreased, the alginate microsphere still exhibited 17.8 mg/g of Sr(II) uptake in the seawater medium. Considering its excellent Sr(II) uptake in seawater and its reusability, an alginate microsphere is an appropriate cost-effective adsorbent for the removal and recovery of Sr(II) from seawater.

  7. Are the costs of directed forgetting due to failures of sampling or recovery? Exploring the dynamics of recall in list-method directed forgetting.

    PubMed

    Spillers, Gregory J; Unsworth, Nash

    2011-04-01

    This study investigated the costs of directed forgetting within the framework of a search model. In such models, retrieval failure can occur at either the sampling or the recovery stage of recall. Multiple measures of performance were employed to answer two primary questions of interest: (1) Where does the locus of forgetting occur in the directed forgetting paradigm? and (2) What current theory of directed forgetting can best account for the pattern of data observed? Converging evidence from these measures suggested that the costs of directed forgetting are the result of sampling issues during retrieval. Further, these results were best explained by a contextual-change account that argues an instruction to forget creates a break in context causing individuals to sample more items at retrieval. It is argued that the retrieval deficits observed in list-method directed forgetting paradigms are due, in part, to the fact that individuals sample a greater number of items (that include both targets and intrusions) during retrieval in the forget-condition, thereby creating greater response competition compared with retrieval in the remember-condition.

  8. Fees-for-services, cost recovery, and equity in a district of Burkina Faso operating the Bamako Initiative.

    PubMed Central

    Ridde, Valéry

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To gauge the effects of operating the Bamako Initiative in Kongoussi district, Burkina Faso. METHODS: Qualitative and quasi-experimental quantitative methodologies were used. FINDINGS: Following the introduction of fees-for-services in July 1997, the number of consultations for curative care fell over a period of three years by an average of 15.4% at "case" health centres but increased by 30.5% at "control" health centres. Moreover, although the operational results for essential drugs depots were not known, expenditure increased on average 2.7 times more than income and did not keep pace with the decline in the utilization of services. Persons in charge of the management committees had difficulties in releasing funds to ensure access to care for the poor. CONCLUSION: The introduction of fees-for-services had an adverse effect on service utilization. The study district is in a position to bear the financial cost of taking care of the poor and the community is able to identify such people. Incentives must be introduced by the state and be swiftly applied so that the communities agree to a more equitable system and thereby allow access to care for those excluded from services because they are unable to pay. PMID:12973646

  9. 45 CFR 1336.77 - Recovery of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR NATIVE AMERICANS, NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS Native Hawaiian Revolving Loan Fund Demonstration Project § 1336.77 Recovery of... the following circumstances: (1) Whenever claimed costs are unallowable under the Native...

  10. 45 CFR 1336.77 - Recovery of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR NATIVE AMERICANS, NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS Native Hawaiian Revolving Loan Fund Demonstration Project § 1336.77 Recovery of... the following circumstances: (1) Whenever claimed costs are unallowable under the Native...

  11. 45 CFR 1336.77 - Recovery of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR NATIVE AMERICANS, NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS Native Hawaiian Revolving Loan Fund Demonstration Project § 1336.77 Recovery of... the following circumstances: (1) Whenever claimed costs are unallowable under the Native...

  12. 75 FR 8346 - Proposed CERCLA Administrative Settlement; Anderson-Calhoun Mine and Mill Site, Leadpoint, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ... AGENCY Proposed CERCLA Administrative Settlement; Anderson-Calhoun Mine and Mill Site, Leadpoint, WA..., as amended (CERCLA), 42 U.S.C. 9622(i), notice is hereby given of a proposed administrative... 107(a) of CERCLA, 42 U.S.C. 9606 or 9607(a), for recovery of past costs and for the performance of...

  13. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance U.S. General Services Administration – Project 195 John Seiberling Federal Office Building and U.S. Courthouse, Akron, Ohio

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-05-28

    This report documents the findings from an onsite audit of the John Seiberling Federal building located in Akron, Ohio. The Federal landlord for this building is the General Services Administration (GSA). The focus of the audit was to identify various no-cost or low-cost energy efficiency opportunities that, once implemented, would reduce in either electrical and gas consumption and increase the operational efficiency of the building. This audit also provided an opportunity to identify potential capital cost projects that should be considered in the to acquire additional energy (electric and gas) and water savings to further increase the operational efficiency of the building.

  14. Heavy oil recovery process: Conceptual engineering of a downhole methanator and preliminary estimate of facilities cost for application to North Slope Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Gondouin, M.

    1991-10-31

    The West Sak (Upper Cretaceous) sands, overlaying the Kuparuk field, would rank among the largest known oil fields in the US, but technical difficulties have so far prevented its commercial exploitation. Steam injection is the most successful and the most commonly-used method of heavy oil recovery, but its application to the West Sak presents major problems. Such difficulties may be overcome by using a novel approach, in which steam is generated downhole in a catalytic Methanator, from Syngas made at the surface from endothermic reactions (Table 1). The Methanator effluent, containing steam and soluble gases resulting from exothermic reactions (Table 1), is cyclically injected into the reservoir by means of a horizontal drainhole while hot produced fluids flow form a second drainhole into a central production tubing. The downhole reactor feed and BFW flow downward to two concentric tubings. The large-diameter casing required to house the downhole reactor assembly is filled above it with Arctic Pack mud, or crude oil, to further reduce heat leaks. A quantitative analysis of this production scheme for the West Sak required a preliminary engineering of the downhole and surface facilities and a tentative forecast of well production rates. The results, based on published information on the West Sak, have been used to estimate the cost of these facilities, per daily barrel of oil produced. A preliminary economic analysis and conclusions are presented together with an outline of future work. Economic and regulatory conditions which would make this approach viable are discussed. 28 figs.

  15. Immunologic response among HIV-infected patients enrolled in a graduated cost-recovery programme of antiretroviral therapy delivery in Chennai, India

    PubMed Central

    Solomon, Sunil Suhas; Ganesh, Aylur K.; Mehta, Shruti H.; Yepthomi, Tokugha; Balaji, Kavitha; Anand, Santhanam; Gallant, Joel E.; Solomon, Suniti

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Sustainability of free antiretroviral therapy (ART) roll out programmes in resource-limited settings is challenging given the need for lifelong therapy and lack of effective vaccine. This study was undertaken to compare treatment outcomes among HIV-infected patients enrolled in a graduated cost-recovery programme of ART delivery in Chennai, India. Methods: Financial status of patients accessing care at a tertiary care centre, YRGCARE, Chennai, was assessed using an economic survey; patients were distributed into tiers 1- 4 requiring them to pay 0, 50, 75 or 100 per cent of their medication costs, respectively. A total of 1754 participants (ART naïve = 244) were enrolled from February 2005-January 2008 with the following distribution: tier 1=371; tier 2=338; tier 3=693; tier 4=352. Linear regression models with generalized estimating equations were used to examine immunological response among patients across the four tiers. Results: Median age was 34; 73 per cent were male, and the majority were on nevirapine-based regimens. Median follow up was 11.1 months. The mean increase in CD4 cell count within the 1st three months of HAART was 50.3 cells/μl per month in tier 1. Compared to those in tier 1, persons in tiers 2, 3 and 4 had comparable increases (49.7, 57.0, and 50.9 cells/μl per month, respectively). Increases in subsequent periods (3-18 and >18 months) were also comparable across tiers. No differential CD4 gains across tiers were observed when the analysis was restricted to patients initiating ART under the GCR programme. Interpretation & conclusions: This ART delivery model was associated with significant CD4 gains with no observable difference by how much patients paid. Importantly, gains were comparable to those in other free rollout programmes. Additional cost-effectiveness analyses and mathematical modelling would be needed to determine whether such a delivery programme is a sustainable alternative to free ART programmes. PMID

  16. The Impact of the US Food and Drug Administration Chlorofluorocarbon Ban on Out-of-pocket Costs and Use of Albuterol Inhalers Among Individuals With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Anupam B.; Ho, Oliver; Goldman, Dana P.; Karaca-Mandic, Pinar

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The US Clean Air Act prohibits use of nonessential ozone-depleting substances. In 2005, the US Food and Drug Administration announced the ban of chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) albuterol inhalers by December 31, 2008. The policy resulted in the controversial replacement of generic CFC inhalers by more expensive, branded hydrofluoroalkane inhalers. The policy’s impact on out-of-pocket costs and utilization of albuterol is unknown. OBJECTIVE To study the impact of the US Food and Drug Administration’s CFC ban on out-of-pocket costs and utilization of albuterol inhalers. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Using private insurance data from January 1, 2004, to December 31, 2010, we investigated the effect of the CFC ban on out-of-pocket costs and utilization of albuterol inhalers among individuals with asthma (109 428 adults; 37 281 children), as well as asthma-related hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and outpatient visits. We estimated multivariable models adjusted for age, sex, comorbidities, and mean out-of-pocket costs of albuterol inhalers in an individual’s drug plan. We analyzed whether effects varied between adults vs children and those with persistent vs nonpersistent asthma. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Pharmacy claims for albuterol inhalers, as well as asthma-related hospitalizations, emergency department visits, and outpatient visits. RESULTS The mean out-of-pocket albuterol cost rose from $13.60 (95% CI, $13.40–$13.70) per prescription in 2004 to $25.00 (95% CI, $24.80–$25.20) immediately after the 2008 ban. By the end of 2010, costs had lowered to $21.00 (95% CI, $20.80–$21.20) per prescription. Overall albuterol inhaler use steadily declined from 2004 to 2010. Steep declines in use of generic CFC inhalers occurred after the fourth quarter of 2006 and were almost fully offset by increases in use of hydrofluoroalkane inhalers. In multivariable analyses, a $10 increase in out-of-pocket albuterol prescription costs was estimated to

  17. Prolonged Oral Administration of a Pan-Retinoic Acid Receptor Antagonist Inhibits Spermatogenesis in Mice With a Rapid Recovery and Changes in the Expression of Influx and Efflux Transporters.

    PubMed

    Chung, Sanny S W; Wang, Xiangyuan; Wolgemuth, Debra J

    2016-04-01

    We have previously shown that oral administration of a pan-retinoic acid receptor antagonist in mice daily at 2.5 mg/kg for 4 weeks reversibly inhibited spermatogenesis, with no detectable side effects. To elucidate the lowest dose and the longest dosing regimen that inhibits spermatogenesis but results in complete restoration of fertility upon cessation of administration of the drug, we examined the effects of daily doses as low as 1.0 mg/kg with dosing periods of 4, 8, and 16 weeks. We observed 100% sterility in all regimens, with restoration of fertility upon cessation of the drug treatment even for as long as 16 weeks. There was no change in testosterone levels in these males and the progeny examined from 2 of the recovered males were healthy and fertile, with normal testicular weight and testicular histology. Strikingly, a more rapid recovery, as assessed by mating studies, was observed at the lower dose and longer dosing periods. Insight into possible mechanisms underlying this rapid recovery was obtained at 2 levels. First, histological examination revealed that spermatogenesis was not as severely disrupted at the lower dose and with the longer treatment regimens. Second, gene expression analysis revealed that the more rapid recovery may involve the interplay of ATP-binding cassette efflux and solute carrier influx transporters in the testes.

  18. Issuance of final revised guidance on the use and issuance of administrative orders under Section 7003 of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-09-26

    The directive discusses guidance on the use and issuance of Administrative Orders under Section 7003 of RCRA where there is an emiminent and substantial endangerment to public health and the environment. In order to issue a Section 7003 order, the Administrator must possess evidence that the handling, storage, treatment, transportation or disposal of any solid waste or hazardous waste may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to health or the environment (42 U.S.C. Section 6973). Additionally, Section 7003 requires that the Administrator provide notice to the affected State prior to issuance of the order. Each of these requirements is discussed in the directive.

  19. Battleground Energy Recovery Project

    SciTech Connect

    Bullock, Daniel

    2011-12-31

    In October 2009, the project partners began a 36-month effort to develop an innovative, commercial-scale demonstration project incorporating state-of-the-art waste heat recovery technology at Clean Harbors, Inc., a large hazardous waste incinerator site located in Deer Park, Texas. With financial support provided by the U.S. Department of Energy, the Battleground Energy Recovery Project was launched to advance waste heat recovery solutions into the hazardous waste incineration market, an area that has seen little adoption of heat recovery in the United States. The goal of the project was to accelerate the use of energy-efficient, waste heat recovery technology as an alternative means to produce steam for industrial processes. The project had three main engineering and business objectives: Prove Feasibility of Waste Heat Recovery Technology at a Hazardous Waste Incinerator Complex; Provide Low-cost Steam to a Major Polypropylene Plant Using Waste Heat; and Create a Showcase Waste Heat Recovery Demonstration Project.

  20. 38 CFR 1.921 - Analysis of costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... periodic comparison of costs incurred and amounts collected. Data on costs and corresponding recovery rates... of further collection efforts are likely to exceed recoveries, assist in evaluating offers...

  1. Contract Administration of the Ice Delivery Contract between International American Products, Worldwide Services and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers during the Hurricane Katrina Recovery Effort

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-24

    Administration of the Water Contract Between the Lipsey Mountain Spring Water Company and the United States Army Corps of Engineers,” February 5, 2007...September 26, 2006 DoD IG Report No. D-2006-109, “Response to Congressional Requests on the Water Delivery Contract Between the Lipsey Mountain

  2. The administration of intermittent parathyroid hormone affects functional recovery from pertrochanteric fractured neck of femur: a protocol for a prospective mixed method pilot study with randomisation of treatment allocation and blinded assessment (FRACTT)

    PubMed Central

    Chesser, Tim; Fox, Rebecca; Harding, Karen; Greenwood, Rosemary; Javaid, Kassim; Barnfield, Steven; Halliday, Ruth; Willett, Keith; Lamb, Sallie

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Pertrochanteric hip fractures occur in an elderly population and cause considerable morbidity and loss of functional ability as the fracture heals. Recently, parathyroid hormone (PTH), which is licensed for the treatment of osteoporosis, has been shown to potentially accelerate bone healing in animal and human studies. If its administration could allow a faster functional recovery after pertrochanteric hip fracture, then a patient's hospital stay may be reduced and rehabilitation could be potentially accelerated. PTH can currently only be administered by subcutaneous injection. The acceptability of this intervention is unknown in this elderly population. The aim of this pilot study is to inform the design of a future powered study comparing the functional recovery after pertrochanteric hip fracture in patients undergoing standard care versus those who undergo administration of subcutaneous injection of PTH. Methods and analysis The study is an open label, prospective, randomised, comparative pilot study with blinded outcomes assessment to establish feasibility of the trial design. Patients will be randomised to receive a 6-week course of PTH or usual treatment. Functional outcomes will be assessed at 6 weeks and 12 weeks. Blinded assessment will be used to minimise the effect of bias of an open label study design. A nested qualitative study will investigate the patient experience of, and expectations following, hip fracture and the patient important aspects of recovery compared with the outcome measures proposed. Results Results will be analysed to establish the potential recruitment, compliance and retention rates using 95% CIs, and trial outcomes quoted with SDs and 95% CIs for the effect size. Ethics and dissemination The study has been approved by the South West 2 Research Ethics committee (reference 10/H0206/34). The findings of this study will be disseminated to the medical community via presentations to orthopaedic, orthogeriatric and

  3. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration Project 209 - Control Tower and Support Building, Las Vegas, NV

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-31

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 70% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be built in Las Vegas, Nevada by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specification that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  4. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration – Project 209 Control Tower and Support Building Oakland, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-03-01

    This report represents findings of a design review team that evaluated construction documents (at the 70% level) and operating specifications for a new control tower and support building that will be build at Oakland, California by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specification that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  5. Meta-Analysis of Dexmedetomidine on Emergence Agitation and Recovery Profiles in Children after Sevoflurane Anesthesia: Different Administration and Different Dosage

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Wang, Haiyun; Zhu, Ai; Niu, Kaijun; Wang, Guolin

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to evaluate the effect of dexmedetomidine on emergence agitation (EA) and recovery profiles in children after sevoflurane anesthesia and its pharmacological mechanisms. Standard bibliographic databases, including MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFP, Springer and ISI Web of Knowledge, were artificially searched to identify all randomized controlled trials (RCTs) comparing the impact of dexmedetomidine with placebo, fentanyl and midazolam on EA and recovery profiles after sevoflurane anesthesia in post-anesthesia care unit (PACU). Two authors assessed the quality of each study independently in accordance with strict inclusion criteria and extracted data. RevMan 5.0 software was applied for performing statistic analysis. The outcomes analyzed included: 1) incidence of EA, 2) emergence time, 3) time to extubation, 4) incidence of post-operation nausea and vomiting, 5) number of patients requiring an analgesic, and 6) time to discharge from PACU. A total of 1364 patients (696 in the dexmedetomidine group and 668 in the placebo, fentanyl and midazolam group) from 20 prospective RCTs were included in the meta-analysis. Compared with placebo, dexmedetomidine decreased the incidence of EA (risk ratio [RR] 0.37; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.46), incidence of nausea and vomiting (RR 0.57; 95% CI 0.38 to 0.85) and number of patients requiring an analgesic (RR 0.43; 95% CI 0.31 to 0.59). However, dexmedetomidine had a significantly delayed effect on the emergence time (weighted mean differences [WMD] 1.16; 95% CI 0.72 to 1.60), time to extubation (WMD 0.61; 95% CI 0.27 to 0.95), and time to discharge from recovery room (WMD 2.67; 95% CI 0.95 to 4.39). Compared with fentanyl (RR 1.39; 95% CI 0.78 to 2.48) and midazolam (RR 1.12; 95% CI 0.54 to 2.35), dexmedetomidine has no significantly difference on the incidence of EA. However, the analgesia effect of dexmedetomidine on postoperation pain has no significantly statistical differences compared with fentanyl (RR 1

  6. Prognostic Differences for Functional Recovery after Major Lower Limb Amputation: Effects of the Timing and Type of Inpatient Rehabilitation Services in the Veterans Health Administration

    PubMed Central

    Stineman, Margaret G.; Kwong, Pui L.; Xie, Dawei; Kurichi, Jibby E.; Ripley, Diane Cowper; Brooks, David M.; Bidelspach, Douglas E.; Bates, Barbara E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To compare the recovery of mobility and self-care functions among veteran amputees according to the timing and type of rehabilitation services received. Design Observational study of inpatient rehabilitation care patterns of 2 types (specialized and consultative) with 2 timings (early and late). Setting Data from inpatient specialized rehabilitation units (SRUs) and consultative services within 95 Veterans Affairs Medical Centers across the United States during fiscal years 2003-2004. Patients Medical records of 1,502 patients who received early or late consultative or specialized rehabilitation. Assessment of risk factors Hypotheses were established and general categories of negative and positive risk factors specified a priori from available clinical characteristics. Linear mixed effects models were used to model motor Functional Independence Measure (FIM™) gain scores on patient-level variables accounting for the correlation within the same facility. Main outcome measures Recovery of activities of daily living (ADLs) and mobility (physical functioning) expressed as the magnitudes of gains in motor FIM™ scores achieved by rehabilitation discharge. Results After adjustment, amputees who received specialized rehabilitation had motor FIM™ gains that were on average 8.0 points higher than those amputees who received consultative rehabilitation. Although patients whose rehabilitation was delayed until after discharge from the index surgical stay tended to be more clinically complex, they had comparable gains to patients who received early rehabilitation. Advanced age, trans-femoral amputation, paralysis, serious nutritional compromise, and psychosis were associated with lower motor FIM™ gains. The variance for the random effect for facility was statistically significant, suggesting extraneous variation within facility that was not explainable by observed patient-level variables. Conclusion Based on this analysis, those patients who receive

  7. Cost-Effective Fabrication Routes for the Production of Quantum Well Structures and Recovery of Waste Heat from Heavy Duty Trucks

    SciTech Connect

    Willigan, Rhonda

    2009-09-30

    The primary objectives of Phase I were: (a) carry out cost, performance and system level models, (b) quantify the cost benefits of cathodic arc and heterogeneous nanocomposites over sputtered material, (c) evaluate the expected power output of the proposed thermoelectric materials and predict the efficiency and power output of an integrated TE module, (d) define market acceptance criteria by engaging Caterpillar's truck OEMs, potential customers and dealers and identify high-level criteria for a waste heat thermoelectric generator (TEG), (e) identify potential TEG concepts, and (f) establish cost/kWatt targets as well as a breakdown of subsystem component cost targets for the commercially viable TEG.

  8. Effect of Pre- and Postoperative Phenylbutazone and Morphine Administration on the Breathing Response to Skin Incision, Recovery Quality, Behavior, and Cardiorespiratory Variables in Horses Undergoing Fetlock Arthroscopy: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Conde Ruiz, Clara; Cruz Benedetti, Inga-Catalina; Guillebert, Isabelle; Portier, Karine Genevieve

    2015-01-01

    This prospective blinded randomized study aimed to determine whether the timing of morphine and phenylbutazone administration affects the breathing response to skin incision, recovery quality, behavior, and cardiorespiratory variables in horses undergoing fetlock arthroscopy. Ten Standardbred horses were premedicated with acepromazine (0.04 mg kg−1 IM) and romifidine (0.04 mg kg−1 IV). Anesthesia was induced with diazepam (0.05 mg kg−1) and ketamine (2.2 mg kg−1) IV at T0. Horses in group PRE (n = 5) received morphine (0.1 mg kg−1) and phenylbutazone (2.2 mg kg−1) IV after induction and an equivalent amount of saline after surgery. Horses in group POST (n = 5) received the inversed treatment. Anesthesia was maintained with isoflurane 2% in 100% oxygen. Hypotension (mean arterial pressure <60 mmHg) was treated with dobutamine. All horses breathed spontaneously. Dobutamine requirements, respiratory rate (fR), heart rate (HR), mean arterial blood pressure, end-tidal CO2, inspired (i) and expired (e) tidal and minute volume (VT and V˙E), inspiratory time (IT), and the inspiratory gas flow (VTi/IT) were measured every 5 min. Data were averaged during four 15 min periods before (P1 and P2) and after the incision (P3 and P4). Serial blood–gas analyses were also performed. Recoveries were unassisted, video recorded, and scored by three anesthetists blinded to the treatment. The postoperative behavior of the horses (25 demeanors), HR, and fR were recorded at three time points before induction (T0–24 h, T0–12 h, and T0–2 h) and six time points after recovery (TR) (TR + 2, 4, 6, 12, 24, 48 h). Data were compared between groups using a Wilcoxon test and within groups using a Friedman test or a Kruskal–Wallis signed-rank test when applicable. Tidal volumes (VTe and VTi) were higher in PRE than in POST during all the considered periods but the difference between groups was only significant during P2 (VTe in mL kg−1

  9. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) FEMP Technical Assistance Federal Aviation Administration – Project 209 Control Tower and Support Building, Reno, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-06-30

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Redhorse Corporation (Redhorse) conducted an energy audit on the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) control tower and base building in Reno, Nevada. This report presents the findings of the energy audit team that evaluated construction documents and operating specifications (at the 100% level) and completed a site visit. The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for the FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  10. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) - FEMP Technical Assistance - Federal Aviation Administration - Project 209 - Control Tower and Support Building, Boise, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Arends, J.; Sandusky, William F.

    2010-06-28

    This report documents an energy audit performed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Redhorse Corporation (Redhorse) conducted on the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) control tower and base building in Boise, Idaho. This report presents findings of the energy audit team that evaluated construction documents and operating specifications (at the 100% level) followed by a site visit of the facility under construction. The focus of the review was to identify measures that could be incorporated into the final design and operating specifications that would result in additional energy savings for FAA that would not have otherwise occurred.

  11. Oral Administration of a Small Molecule Targeted to Block proNGF Binding to p75 Promotes Myelin Sparing and Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tep, Chhavy; Lim, Tae Hee; Ko, Pyung On; Getahun, Sami; Ryu, Jae Cheon; Goettl, Virginia M.; Massa, Stephen M.; Basso, Michele; Longo, Frank M.; Yoon, Sung Ok

    2013-01-01

    The lack of effective therapies for spinal cord injury points to the need for identifying novel targets for therapeutic intervention. Here we report that a small molecule, LM11A-31, developed to block proNGF-p75 interaction and p75-mediated cell death crosses the blood–brain barrier efficiently when delivered orally. Administered starting 4 h postinjury, LM11A-31 promotes functional recovery without causing any toxicity or increased pain in a mouse model of spinal contusion injury. In both weight-bearing open-field tests and nonweight-bearing swim tests, LM11A-31 was effective in improving motor function and coordination. Such functional improvement correlated with a >50% increase in the number of surviving oligodendrocytes and myelinated axons. We also demonstrate that LM11A-31 indeed inhibits proNGF-p75 interaction in vivo, thereby curtailing the JNK3-mediated apoptotic cascade. These results thus highlight p75 as a novel therapeutic target for an orally delivered treatment for spinal cord injury. PMID:23303920

  12. New developments in investment recovery and parts locating

    SciTech Connect

    Honeywell, A.P. ); Kelly, J.C. )

    1992-01-01

    Electric utilities and other industrial firms are discovering that by establishing special investment recovery groups they can release scarce investment capital tied up in excess spare parts and equipment. Some of these groups have become significant suppliers of material in the industrial equipment marketplace. Experience is showing that the efforts of these groups can potentially produce more profit for their companies per incremental unit of administrative cost than any other arm of a company's operation. The role of investment recovery groups to identify and profitably dispose of excess inventories will become more important, especially within utilities, because public utility agencies are now encouraging, even mandating, inventory reduction and tighter management overall.

  13. Development of a Field Demonstration for Cost-Effective Low-Grade Heat Recovery and Use Technology Designed to Improve Efficiency and Reduce Water Usage Rates for a Coal-Fired Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, Russell; Dombrowski, K.; Bernau, M.; Morett, D.; Maxson, A.; Hume, S.

    2016-06-30

    Coal-based power generation systems provide reliable, low-cost power to the domestic energy sector. These systems consume large amounts of fuel and water to produce electricity and are the target of pending regulations that may require reductions in water use and improvements in thermal efficiency. While efficiency of coal-based generation has improved over time, coal power plants often do not utilize the low-grade heat contained in the flue gas and require large volumes of water for the steam cycle make-up, environmental controls, and for process cooling and heating. Low-grade heat recovery is particularly challenging for coal-fired applications, due in large part to the condensation of acid as the flue gas cools and the resulting potential corrosion of the heat recovery materials. Such systems have also not been of significant interest as recent investments on coal power plants have primarily been for environmental controls due to more stringent regulations. Also, in many regions, fuel cost is still a pass-through to the consumer, reducing the motivation for efficiency improvements. Therefore, a commercial system combining low-grade heat-recovery technologies and associated end uses to cost effectively improve efficiency and/or reduce water consumption has not yet been widely applied. However, pressures from potential new regulations and from water shortages may drive new interest, particularly in the U.S. In an effort to address this issue, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has sought to identify and promote technologies to achieve this goal.

  14. Estradiol and Progesterone Administration After pMCAO Stimulates the Neurological Recovery and Reduces the Detrimental Effect of Ischemia Mainly in Hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Perez-Alvarez, Maria Jose; Mateos, Laura; Alonso, Alvaro; Wandosell, Francisco

    2015-12-01

    Epidemiological studies have suggested a differential response, males versus female, in stroke incidence and prognosis. These divergences in brain response after damage are based mostly on hormonal differences. To date, estradiol and progesterone administered independently have demonstrated neuroprotection after ischemia in animal models. Nonetheless, contradictory results were revealed using a combined administration. In order to evaluate the effects of combinatorial treatment administered after ischemia induction, we used two different approaches: in vivo and in vitro models. Male rats which underwent permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion were treated with a combination of estradiol/progesterone at 6, 24 and 48 h after injury and sacrificed at 54 h post-ischemia. The rat brains were evaluated for reactive gliosis, NeuN-positive neurons, levels of synapse-associated proteins and activity levels of PI3K/Akt/GSK3/β-catenin survival pathway. Also, primary cortical neurons were subjected to oxygen and glucose deprivation for 17 h and returned to a normal environment in the presence of estradiol or estradiol/progesterone. Cell viability was evaluated, and activity levels of the PI3K/Akt/GSK3/β-catenin pathway. Our results indicate that some beneficial effects of estradiol were abolished in the presence of progesterone, particularly in the cerebral cortex (core). However, the combinatorial treatment showed positive effects in the hippocampus.

  15. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Administration Induces Amnesia in Male Sprague Dawley Rats and Exacerbates Recovery from Functional Deficits Induced by a Controlled Cortical Impact Injury

    PubMed Central

    Geddes, Rastafa I.; Hayashi, Kentaro; Bongers, Quinn; Wehber, Marlyse; Anderson, Icelle M.; Jansen, Alex D.; Nier, Chase; Fares, Emily; Farquhar, Gabrielle; Kapoor, Amita; Ziegler, Toni E.; VadakkadathMeethal, Sivan; Bird, Ian M.

    2017-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids like conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are required for normal neural development and cognitive function and have been ascribed various beneficial functions. Recently, oral CLA also has been shown to increase testosterone (T) biosynthesis, which is known to diminish traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced neuropathology and reduce deficits induced by stroke in adult rats. To test the impact of CLA on cognitive recovery following a TBI, 5–6 month old male Sprague Dawley rats received a focal injury (craniectomy + controlled cortical impact (CCI; n = 17)) or Sham injury (craniectomy alone; n = 12) and were injected with 25 mg/kg body weight of Clarinol® G-80 (80% CLA in safflower oil; n = 16) or saline (n = 13) every 48 h for 4 weeks. Sham surgery decreased baseline plasma progesterone (P4) by 64.2% (from 9.5 ± 3.4 ng/mL to 3.4 ± 0.5 ng/mL; p = 0.068), T by 74.6% (from 5.9 ± 1.2 ng/mL to 1.5 ± 0.3 ng/mL; p < 0.05), 11-deoxycorticosterone (11-DOC) by 37.5% (from 289.3 ± 42.0 ng/mL to 180.7 ± 3.3 ng/mL), and corticosterone by 50.8% (from 195.1 ± 22.4 ng/mL to 95.9 ± 2.2 ng/mL), by post-surgery day 1. CCI injury induced similar declines in P4, T, 11-DOC and corticosterone (58.9%, 74.6%, 39.4% and 24.6%, respectively) by post-surgery day 1. These results suggest that both Sham surgery and CCI injury induce hypogonadism and hypoadrenalism in adult male rats. CLA treatment did not reverse hypogonadism in Sham (P4: 2.5 ± 1.0 ng/mL; T: 0.9 ± 0.2 ng/mL) or CCI-injured (P4: 2.2 ± 0.9 ng/mL; T: 1.0 ± 0.2 ng/mL, p > 0.05) animals by post-injury day 29, but rapidly reversed by post-injury day 1 the hypoadrenalism in Sham (11-DOC: 372.6 ± 36.6 ng/mL; corticosterone: 202.6 ± 15.6 ng/mL) and CCI-injured (11-DOC: 384.2 ± 101.3 ng/mL; corticosterone: 234.6 ± 43.8 ng/mL) animals. In Sham surgery animals, CLA did not alter body weight, but did markedly increase latency to find the hidden Morris Water Maze platform (40.3 ± 13.0 s

  16. Conjugated Linoleic Acid Administration Induces Amnesia in Male Sprague Dawley Rats and Exacerbates Recovery from Functional Deficits Induced by a Controlled Cortical Impact Injury.

    PubMed

    Geddes, Rastafa I; Hayashi, Kentaro; Bongers, Quinn; Wehber, Marlyse; Anderson, Icelle M; Jansen, Alex D; Nier, Chase; Fares, Emily; Farquhar, Gabrielle; Kapoor, Amita; Ziegler, Toni E; VadakkadathMeethal, Sivan; Bird, Ian M; Atwood, Craig S

    2017-01-01

    Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids like conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are required for normal neural development and cognitive function and have been ascribed various beneficial functions. Recently, oral CLA also has been shown to increase testosterone (T) biosynthesis, which is known to diminish traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced neuropathology and reduce deficits induced by stroke in adult rats. To test the impact of CLA on cognitive recovery following a TBI, 5-6 month old male Sprague Dawley rats received a focal injury (craniectomy + controlled cortical impact (CCI; n = 17)) or Sham injury (craniectomy alone; n = 12) and were injected with 25 mg/kg body weight of Clarinol® G-80 (80% CLA in safflower oil; n = 16) or saline (n = 13) every 48 h for 4 weeks. Sham surgery decreased baseline plasma progesterone (P4) by 64.2% (from 9.5 ± 3.4 ng/mL to 3.4 ± 0.5 ng/mL; p = 0.068), T by 74.6% (from 5.9 ± 1.2 ng/mL to 1.5 ± 0.3 ng/mL; p < 0.05), 11-deoxycorticosterone (11-DOC) by 37.5% (from 289.3 ± 42.0 ng/mL to 180.7 ± 3.3 ng/mL), and corticosterone by 50.8% (from 195.1 ± 22.4 ng/mL to 95.9 ± 2.2 ng/mL), by post-surgery day 1. CCI injury induced similar declines in P4, T, 11-DOC and corticosterone (58.9%, 74.6%, 39.4% and 24.6%, respectively) by post-surgery day 1. These results suggest that both Sham surgery and CCI injury induce hypogonadism and hypoadrenalism in adult male rats. CLA treatment did not reverse hypogonadism in Sham (P4: 2.5 ± 1.0 ng/mL; T: 0.9 ± 0.2 ng/mL) or CCI-injured (P4: 2.2 ± 0.9 ng/mL; T: 1.0 ± 0.2 ng/mL, p > 0.05) animals by post-injury day 29, but rapidly reversed by post-injury day 1 the hypoadrenalism in Sham (11-DOC: 372.6 ± 36.6 ng/mL; corticosterone: 202.6 ± 15.6 ng/mL) and CCI-injured (11-DOC: 384.2 ± 101.3 ng/mL; corticosterone: 234.6 ± 43.8 ng/mL) animals. In Sham surgery animals, CLA did not alter body weight, but did markedly increase latency to find the hidden Morris Water Maze platform (40.3 ± 13.0 s

  17. Recovery of renal function after administration of adipose-tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction in rat model of acute kidney injury induced by ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chunwoo; Jang, Myoung Jin; Kim, Bo Hyun; Park, Jin Young; You, Dalsan; Jeong, In Gab; Hong, Jun Hyuk; Kim, Choung-Soo

    2017-03-10

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) induced by ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a major challenge in critical care medicine. The purpose of this study is to determine the therapeutic effects of the adipose-tissue-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF) and the optimal route for SVF delivery in a rat model of AKI induced by I/R injury. Fifty male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into five groups (10 animals per group): sham, nephrectomy control, I/R injury control, renal arterial SVF infusion and subcapsular SVF injection. To induce AKI by I/R injury, the left renal artery was clamped with a nontraumatic vascular clamp for 40 min, and the right kidney was removed. Rats receiving renal arterial infusion of SVF had a significantly reduced increase in serum creatinine compared with the I/R injury control group at 4 days after I/R injury. The glomerular filtration rate of the renal arterial SVF infusion group was maintained at a level similar to that of the sham and nephrectomy control groups at 14 days after I/R injury. Masson's trichrome staining showed significantly less fibrosis in the renal arterial SVF infusion group compared with that in the I/R injury control group in the outer stripe (P < 0.001). TUNEL labeling showed significantly decreased apoptosis in both the renal arterial SVF infusion and subcapsular SVF injection groups compared with the I/R injury control group in the outer stripe (P < 0.001). Thus, renal function is effectively rescued from AKI induced by I/R injury through the renal arterial administration of SVF in a rat model.

  18. Effects of post-extinction l-DOPA administration on the spontaneous recovery and reinstatement of fear in a human fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Haaker, Jan; Lonsdorf, Tina B; Kalisch, Raffael

    2015-10-01

    Relapse is a pertinent problem in the treatment of anxiety disorders. In the laboratory, relapse is modeled as return of conditioned fear responses after successful fear extinction and is explained by insufficient retrieval and/or expression of the fear-inhibitory extinction memory that is generated during extinction learning. We have shown in mice and humans that return of fear can be prevented by administration of a single dose of the dopamine precursor l-3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (l-DOPA) immediately after extinction. In mice, this effect could be attributed to an enhancement of extinction memory consolidation. In our human study, we could not exclude that l-DOPA might have acted by interfering with the consolidation of the original fear memory. In the present study, we therefore used a combined differential cue and context conditioning paradigm where initial fear conditioning and extinction were conducted one day apart, in analogy to previous mouse studies. l-DOPA (N=21) or placebo (N=19) were administered after extinction, precluding any action on fear memory consolidation. In the return-of-fear test conducted one week later, drug effects on conditioned skin conductance responses were absent. However, we found evidence indicative of reduced neural activity, measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), in the l-DOPA group in areas related to conditioned fear and return of fear (amygdala, posterior hippocampus) and enhanced activity in a key area of extinction retrieval/expression (ventromedial prefrontal cortex), relative to placebo controls. These findings require further corroboration in additional experiments. Implications for further investigations on the role of the dopamine system in extinction and on the neuropharmacological augmentation of extinction-based therapies are discussed.

  19. Incremental health care costs for chronic pain in Ontario, Canada: a population-based matched cohort study of adolescents and adults using administrative data.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Mary-Ellen; Taddio, Anna; Katz, Joel; Shah, Vibhuti; Krahn, Murray

    2016-08-01

    Little is known about the economic burden of chronic pain and how chronic pain affects health care utilization. We aimed to estimate the annual per-person incremental medical cost and health care utilization for chronic pain in the Ontario population from the perspective of the public payer. We performed a retrospective cohort study using Ontario health care databases and the electronically linked Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) from 2000 to 2011. We identified subjects aged ≥12 years from the CCHS with chronic pain and closely matched them to individuals without pain using propensity score matching methods. We used linked data to determine mean 1-year per-person health care costs and utilization for each group and mean incremental cost for chronic pain. All costs are reported in 2014 Canadian dollars. After matching, we had 19,138 pairs of CCHS respondents with and without chronic pain. The average age was 55 years (SD = 18) and 61% were female. The incremental cost to manage chronic pain was $1742 per person (95% confidence interval [CI], $1488-$2020), 51% more than the control group. The largest contributor to the incremental cost was hospitalization ($514; 95% CI, $364-$683). Incremental costs were the highest in those with severe pain ($3960; 95% CI, $3186-$4680) and in those with most activity limitation ($4365; 95% CI, $3631-$5147). The per-person cost to manage chronic pain is substantial and more than 50% higher than a comparable patient without chronic pain. Costs are higher in people with more severe pain and activity limitations.

  20. Cyclic CO/sub 2/ injection for light oil recovery: Performance of a cost shared field test in Louisiana: Summary annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Monger, T.G.

    1989-08-15

    The ultimate objective of this research is to provide a base of knowledge on the CO/sub 2/ huff ''n'' puff process for the enhanced recovery of Louisiana crude oil. Project goals include laboratory corefloods to investigate several parameters important to the process, and numerical simulation to interpret coreflood results. Additional activities include construction and evaluation of a field test data base, and development of a radial core setup. Finally, Department of Energy sponsored field test(s) will be implemented and evaluated. The results of all laboratory and field evaluations will be made available to the industry through workshops, periodic reports and meetings.