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Sample records for administratively required dental

  1. Radiation recommendation series: administratively required dental radiographs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    Administrative requirements for radiographs are found in many segments of the United States health care system. This document presents an FDA radiation recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations. In general, such examinations are not requested to further the patient's dental health, but rather as a means of monitoring claims. However, the administrative use of radiographs that have been taken in the normal course of patient care is usually appropriate, as long as the patient's right to privacy is respected.

  2. Administratively required dental radiographs: radiation recommendation series. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-09-01

    This publication is part of the continuing Radiation Recommendation Series published by the Bureau of Radiological Health. This Series was established to provide physicians, medical physicists, technologists, and others involved in the radiological process with guidance on appropriate radiological health principles in the medical radiation area. Administrative requirements for radiographs are found in many segments of the United States health care system. Such requirements are not intrinsically bad. If the resulting x-ray examinations provide a net public health benefit, they are certainly justified. However, where such examinations do not benefit the care and management of the patient, the requirements should be reviewed to determine whether they can be eliminated. This document presents an FDA radiation recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations. In general such examinations are not requested to further the patient's dental health, but rather as a means of monitoring claims. However, the administrative use of radiographs that have been taken in the normal course of patient care is usually appropriate, as long as the patient's right to privacy is respected.

  3. 21 CFR 1000.60 - Recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... x-ray examinations. 1000.60 Section 1000.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Recommendations § 1000.60 Recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations. (a) The Food and Drug Administration recommends that dental x-ray examinations be performed only after...

  4. 21 CFR 1000.60 - Recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... x-ray examinations. 1000.60 Section 1000.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Recommendations § 1000.60 Recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations. (a) The Food and Drug Administration recommends that dental x-ray examinations be performed only after...

  5. 21 CFR 1000.60 - Recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... x-ray examinations. 1000.60 Section 1000.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Recommendations § 1000.60 Recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations. (a) The Food and Drug Administration recommends that dental x-ray examinations be performed only after...

  6. 21 CFR 1000.60 - Recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... x-ray examinations. 1000.60 Section 1000.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Recommendations § 1000.60 Recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations. (a) The Food and Drug Administration recommends that dental x-ray examinations be performed only after...

  7. 21 CFR 1000.60 - Recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... x-ray examinations. 1000.60 Section 1000.60 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... Recommendations § 1000.60 Recommendation on administratively required dental x-ray examinations. (a) The Food and Drug Administration recommends that dental x-ray examinations be performed only after...

  8. Administrative trends in U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Fu, Martin M; Rodriguez, Angel; Chen, Rebecca Y; Fu, Earl; Liao, Shu-Yi; Karimbux, Nadeem Y

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study were to analyze the administrative trends in U.S. dental schools at the beginning and end of a thirteen-year period and to identify the predictive factors for those changes. Administrative trends were measured by the difference in the number of major administrative positions for 1997 and 2010 reported in American Dental Education Association (ADEA) and American Dental Association (ADA) publications. Secondary measures (program length, student enrollment, and tuition) were also gathered. The mean numbers of administrative positions per school significantly increased over the study period, while the mean number of clinical science departments per school significantly decreased. The change in the number of directors was positively correlated with the change in student enrollment, but inversely correlated with the change in number of vice/associate/assistant deans. The change in the number of clinical science departments was positively correlated with changes in student enrollment and out-of-state tuition, but inversely correlated with the change in in-state tuition. The number of all departments per U.S. dental school significantly decreased in this period. The schools that had consolidation of clinical science departments were less likely to have increases in student enrollment and out-of-state tuition, but more likely to have increases in in-state tuition.

  9. Health maintenance facility: Dental equipment requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, John; Gosbee, John; Billica, Roger

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were to test the effectiveness of the Health Maintenance Facility (HMF) dental suction/particle containment system, which controls fluids and debris generated during simulated dental treatment, in microgravity; to test the effectiveness of fiber optic intraoral lighting systems in microgravity, while simulating dental treatment; and to evaluate the operation and function of off-the-shelf dental handheld instruments, namely a portable dental hand drill and temporary filling material, in microgravity. A description of test procedures, including test set-up, flight equipment, and the data acquisition system, is given.

  10. Requirements and Guidelines for Dental Hygiene Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Dental Association, Chicago, IL. Council on Dental Education.

    The purpose of this report is to serve as a guide for dental hygiene education program development, and to serve as a stimulus for improving established programs. The first section of the report discusses the function of the Council on Dental Education and the trends in hygiene program development. In section II the requirements for an accredited…

  11. 43 CFR 32.5 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Administrative requirements. 32.5 Section 32.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior GRANTS TO STATES FOR ESTABLISHING YOUNG ADULT CONSERVATION CORPS (YACC) PROGRAM § 32.5 Administrative requirements. (a) The Governor...

  12. 43 CFR 32.5 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Administrative requirements. 32.5 Section 32.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior GRANTS TO STATES FOR ESTABLISHING YOUNG ADULT CONSERVATION CORPS (YACC) PROGRAM § 32.5 Administrative requirements. (a) The Governor...

  13. 43 CFR 32.5 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Administrative requirements. 32.5 Section 32.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior GRANTS TO STATES FOR ESTABLISHING YOUNG ADULT CONSERVATION CORPS (YACC) PROGRAM § 32.5 Administrative requirements. (a) The Governor...

  14. 43 CFR 26.5 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative requirements. 26.5 Section 26.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior GRANTS TO STATES FOR ESTABLISHING YOUTH CONSERVATION CORPS PROGRAMS § 26.5 Administrative requirements. The following...

  15. 43 CFR 32.5 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative requirements. 32.5 Section 32.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior GRANTS TO STATES FOR ESTABLISHING YOUNG ADULT CONSERVATION CORPS (YACC) PROGRAM § 32.5 Administrative requirements. (a) The Governor...

  16. 43 CFR 32.5 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Administrative requirements. 32.5 Section 32.5 Public Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior GRANTS TO STATES FOR ESTABLISHING YOUNG ADULT CONSERVATION CORPS (YACC) PROGRAM § 32.5 Administrative requirements. (a) The Governor...

  17. 50 CFR 253.24 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative requirements. 253.24 Section 253.24 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Fisheries § 253.24 Administrative requirements. Federal assistance awards made as a result of this Act...

  18. 50 CFR 253.54 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Administrative requirements. 253.54 Section 253.54 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC... Fisheries § 253.54 Administrative requirements. Federal assistance awards made as a result of this Act...

  19. 50 CFR 253.54 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Administrative requirements. 253.54 Section 253.54 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS...

  20. Impact of a research requirement in a dental school curriculum.

    PubMed

    Nalliah, Romesh P; Lee, Min Kyeong; Da Silva, John D; Allareddy, Veerasathpurush

    2014-10-01

    With reported shortages in full-time dental educators across the world, any exposure to teaching and/or research during dental school might increase a graduate's interest in an academic career. Harvard School of Dental Medicine (HSDM) has a mandatory research experience for all students enrolled in the Doctor of Dental Medicine program. Each year, the graduating class is surveyed about characteristics and outcomes of their research experience. The aim of this study was to use the resulting data for five years of graduating classes (2008 to 2012) to assess the impact of the research requirement. The results showed that 54 percent of these students had presented their research projects at a forum outside Harvard. Thirty-six percent had had their research published in peer-reviewed journals, 38 percent had manuscripts in preparation or submitted for review, and only 26 percent had no intention to publish their work. Overall, 81.5 percent felt positive about their research experience at HSDM. Only 48 percent said they would definitely have pursued research even if it was not compulsory, and 36 percent were uncertain. However, 83 percent said they would have some involvement in research during their careers, and only 10 percent were uncertain. Implementing a compulsory research experience may lead to increased numbers of graduates pursuing research in their careers and contributing to the scientific development of the dental profession. PMID:25281669

  1. Dental School Administrators' Attitudes Towards Providing Support Services for LGBT-Identified Students.

    PubMed

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Morris, Dustin R

    2015-08-01

    A lack of curriculum time devoted to teaching dental students about the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) health care patient needs and biases against LGBT students and faculty have been reported. Understanding dental school administrators' attitudes about LGBT students' needs might provide further insight into these long-standing issues. The aims of this study were to develop a survey to assess dental administrators' attitudes regarding the support services they believe LGBT-identified students need, to identify dental schools' current diversity inclusion policies, and to determine what types of support dental schools currently provide to LGBT students. A survey developed with the aid of a focus group, cognitive interviewing, and pilot testing was sent to 136 assistant and associate deans and deans of the 65 U.S. and Canadian dental schools. A total of 54 responses from 43 (66%) schools were received from 13 deans, 29 associate deans, and 11 assistant deans (one participant did not report a position), for a 40% response rate. The findings suggest there is a considerable lack of knowledge or acknowledgment of LGBT dental students' needs. Future studies are needed to show the importance of creating awareness about meeting the needs of all dental student groups, perhaps through awareness campaigns initiated by LGBT students.

  2. Dental School Administrators' Attitudes Towards Providing Support Services for LGBT-Identified Students.

    PubMed

    Behar-Horenstein, Linda S; Morris, Dustin R

    2015-08-01

    A lack of curriculum time devoted to teaching dental students about the needs of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered (LGBT) health care patient needs and biases against LGBT students and faculty have been reported. Understanding dental school administrators' attitudes about LGBT students' needs might provide further insight into these long-standing issues. The aims of this study were to develop a survey to assess dental administrators' attitudes regarding the support services they believe LGBT-identified students need, to identify dental schools' current diversity inclusion policies, and to determine what types of support dental schools currently provide to LGBT students. A survey developed with the aid of a focus group, cognitive interviewing, and pilot testing was sent to 136 assistant and associate deans and deans of the 65 U.S. and Canadian dental schools. A total of 54 responses from 43 (66%) schools were received from 13 deans, 29 associate deans, and 11 assistant deans (one participant did not report a position), for a 40% response rate. The findings suggest there is a considerable lack of knowledge or acknowledgment of LGBT dental students' needs. Future studies are needed to show the importance of creating awareness about meeting the needs of all dental student groups, perhaps through awareness campaigns initiated by LGBT students. PMID:26246536

  3. 45 CFR 164.530 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... against, or take other retaliatory action against any individual for the exercise by the individual of any....530 Public Welfare Department of Health and Human Services ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS SECURITY AND PRIVACY Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information §...

  4. 45 CFR 164.530 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... against, or take other retaliatory action against any individual for the exercise by the individual of any....530 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS SECURITY AND PRIVACY Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information §...

  5. 45 CFR 164.530 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... against, or take other retaliatory action against any individual for the exercise by the individual of any....530 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATIVE DATA STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS SECURITY AND PRIVACY Privacy of Individually Identifiable Health Information §...

  6. 7 CFR 1944.66 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Administrative requirements. 1944.66 Section 1944.66... which states in part, that no person in the United States shall, on the grounds of race, color, national...), Departmental Regulation 2400-5, and 7 CFR part 3018 apply to grantees under this subpart. (c) Grantees...

  7. 7 CFR 1944.66 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 13 2011-01-01 2009-01-01 true Administrative requirements. 1944.66 Section 1944.66... which states in part, that no person in the United States shall, on the grounds of race, color, national...), Departmental Regulation 2400-5, and 7 CFR part 3018 apply to grantees under this subpart. (c) Grantees...

  8. 40 CFR 35.6815 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... services to individuals, such as pipes, lines, or pumps providing hookups for homeowners on an existing... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administrative requirements. 35.6815 Section 35.6815 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER...

  9. 40 CFR 35.6815 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... services to individuals, such as pipes, lines, or pumps providing hookups for homeowners on an existing... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative requirements. 35.6815 Section 35.6815 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GRANTS AND OTHER...

  10. 47 CFR 64.623 - Administrator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... administrator of the TRS User Registration Database, the administrator of the VRS Access Technology Reference...) None of the administrator of the TRS User Registration Database, the administrator of the VRS...

  11. Premedication with midazolam in intellectually disabled dental patients: Intramuscular or oral administration? A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Boku, Aiji; Sugimura, Mitsutaka; Oyamaguchi, Aiko; Inoue, Mika; Niwa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Background The use of midazolam for dental care in patients with intellectual disability is poorly documented. The purpose of this study was to determine which method of premedication is more effective for these patients, 0.15 mg/kg of intramuscular midazolam or 0.3 mg/kg of oral midazolam. Material and Methods This study was designed and implemented as a non-randomized retrospective study. The study population was composed of patients with intellectual disability who required dental treatment under ambulatory general anesthesia from August 2009 through April 2013. Patients were administered 0.15 mg/kg of midazolam intramuscularly (Group IM) or 0.3 mg/kg orally (Group PO). The predictor variable was the method of midazolam administration. The outcome variables measured were Observer’s Assessment of Alertness/ Sedation (OAA/S) Scale scores, the level of cooperation when entering the operation room and for venous cannulation, post-anesthetic agitation and recovery time. Results Midazolam was administered intramuscularly in 23 patients and orally in 21 patients. More patients were successfully sedated with no resistance behavior during venous cannulation in Group PO than in Group IM (p=0.034). There were no differences in demographic data and other variables between the groups. Conclusions The results of this study suggest that oral premedication with 0.3 mg/kg of midazolam is more effective than 0.15 mg/kg of midazolam administered intramuscularly, in terms of patient resistance to venous cannulation. If both oral and intramuscular routes of midazolam are acceptable in intellectually disabled patients, the oral route is recommended. Key words:Premedication, midazolam, intellectual disability. PMID:27031068

  12. Dental trauma that require fixation in a children's hospital.

    PubMed

    Bruns, Timothy; Perinpanayagam, Hiran

    2008-02-01

    Children and adolescents who suffer traumatic injuries often seek emergency treatment at a Children's Hospital. Complex injuries to permanent teeth and their periodontium require immediate repositioning and stabilization. Many of these emergencies are treated by pediatric dental residents at the Women and Children's Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York. The purpose of this study was to characterize these complex injuries of permanent teeth that require emergency treatment in a Children's Hospital. All of the cases of dental trauma which had involved permanent teeth and which had been treated with a splint in 2001 and 2002 were reviewed. There were 79 patients that were between 5 and 19 years of age with twice as many males (54) as females (25). The number of males increased from childhood (5-10 years) to early adolescence (11-15 years) and then decreased rapidly in late adolescence (16-19 years), whereas the number of females decreased steadily with age. Most of the incidents occurred during the summer months (72%), particularly in June and July (42%), and Fridays and Saturdays were the busiest days of the week. Most of the injuries were caused by organized and recreational sporting activities (39%) and accidental falls (33%), followed by interpersonal violence (15%) and a few motor vehicle accidents (7%). The 173 permanent tooth injuries were mostly luxations (62%) or avulsions (20%), with only a few fractures of the alveolar bone (5%) or tooth root (1%). Most of the displacements were lateral luxations (40%) or extrusions (18%) with only a few intrusions (3%). These injuries most commonly afflicted the maxillary central incisors (54%), followed by the maxillary laterals (18%) and mandibular centrals (17%). The emergency treatment that was provided at the Children's Hospital included replantation and repositioning, and the placement of a semi-rigid or flexible splint.

  13. 47 CFR 64.623 - Administrator requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... section, the term “Administrator” shall refer to each of the TRS Numbering administrator, the administrator of the TRS User Registration Database, the administrator of the VRS Access Technology Reference... entity that is impartial and not an affiliate of any Internet-based TRS provider. (2) Neither...

  14. Community-oriented administration of fluoride for the prevention of dental caries: a summary of the current situation in Asia.

    PubMed

    Petersen, P E; Baez, R J; Lennon, M A

    2012-02-01

    Dental caries is the most prevalent chronic disease affecting human populations around the world. It is recognized that fluoride plays a significant role in dental caries reduction. Meanwhile, several low- and middle-income countries of Asia have not yet implemented systematic fluoride programs; contributing factors relate to misconceptions about the mechanisms of fluoride, low priority given to oral health in national health policy and strategic plans, and lack of interest among public health administrators. A workshop on the effective use of fluoride in Asia took place in Phang-Nga, Thailand, in 2011. A series of country presentations addressed some of the topics mentioned above; in addition, speakers from countries of the region provided examples of successful fluoride interventions and discussed program limitations, barriers encountered, and solutions, as well as possibilities for expanding coverage. Participants acknowledged that automatic fluoridation through water, salt, and milk is the most effective and equitable strategy for the prevention of dental caries. Concerns were expressed that government-subsidized community fluoride prevention programs may face privatization. In addition, the use of affordable fluoride-containing toothpastes should be encouraged. The workshop identified: strengths and weaknesses of ongoing community-based fluoride programs, as well as the interest of countries in a particular method; the requirement for World Health Organization (WHO) technical assistance on various aspects, including fluoridation process, feasibility studies, and implementation of effective epidemiological surveillance of the program; exchange of information; and the need for inter-country collaboration. It was acknowledged that program process and evaluation at the local and country levels need further dissemination. The meeting was co-sponsored by the World Health Organization, the International Association for Dental Research, and the World Dental Federation.

  15. REQUIREMENTS FOR AN ACCREDITED PROGRAM IN DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Dental Association, Chicago, IL.

    THE COUNCIL WORKS WITHIN THE AUTHORITY OF THE "BYLAWS" OF THE AMERICAN DENTAL ASSOCIATION AND THE NATIONAL COMMISSION ON ACCREDITING. IT PREFERS THAT AN ACCREDITED CURRICULUM IN DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY BE CONDUCTED IN 2- OR 4-YEAR COLLEGE OR POST-HIGH SCHOOL INSTITUTIONS WHICH ARE ACCREDITED OR ELIGIBLE FOR ACCREDITATION. AT AN EARLY STAGE OF…

  16. 34 CFR 604.10 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... description of the means by which they will be met: (a) Management practices and procedures will assure proper and efficient administration of each applicable program. The description of these methods...

  17. E-learning and the future of dental education: opinions of administrators and information technology specialists.

    PubMed

    Hillenburg, K L; Cederberg, R A; Gray, S A; Hurst, C L; Johnson, G K; Potter, B J

    2006-08-01

    The digital revolution and growth of the Internet have led to many innovations in the area of electronic learning (e-learning). To survive and prosper, educators must be prepared to respond creatively to these changes. Administrators and information technology specialists at six dental schools and their parent institutions were interviewed regarding their opinions of the impact that e-learning will have on the future of dental education. Interview questions encompassed vision, rate of change, challenges, role of faculty, resources, enrolment, collaboration, responsibility for course design and content, mission and fate of the institution. The objective of this qualitative study was to sample the opinions of educational administrators and information technology specialists from selected US universities regarding the impact of e-learning on dental education to detect trends in their attitudes. Responses to the survey indicated disagreement between administrators and informational technology specialists regarding the rate of change, generation of resources, impact on enrolment, responsibility for course design and content, mission and fate of the university. General agreement was noted with regard to vision, challenges, role of faculty and need for collaboration.

  18. 20 CFR 404.1620 - General administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 404.1620 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL OLD-AGE, SURVIVORS AND DISABILITY INSURANCE (1950- ) Determinations of Disability Administrative Responsibilities and Requirements... requirements in these areas and in those under “Administrative Responsibilities and Requirements” in order...

  19. 20 CFR 416.1020 - General administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Section 416.1020 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME FOR THE AGED, BLIND, AND DISABLED Determinations of Disability Administrative Responsibilities and Requirements... requirements in these areas and in those under “Administrative Responsibilities and Requirements” in order...

  20. 45 CFR 1385.9 - Grants administration requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Grants administration requirements. (a) The following parts of title 45 CFR apply to grants funded under... CFR Part 46—Protection of Human Subjects. 45 CFR Part 74—Administration of Grants. 45 CFR Part 75... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Grants administration requirements. 1385.9...

  1. Restrictive Behaviour Management Procedures with People with Intellectual Disabilities Who Require Dental Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newton, J. T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Dental disease is more common among people with intellectual disabilities than in the general population. Improvements in oral health require individuals to engage in daily oral hygiene and regular visits to a dental practitioner; both may be challenging for the individual with intellectual impairment. Materials and Methods: A review…

  2. [Barriers to the enforcement of hygiene requirements in dental practice].

    PubMed

    Bergler, R; Borneff, M

    1986-12-01

    In a psychological exploration study 40 dentists were interviewed on the basis of an attitude-orientated decision-making model; 20 of them also made dental units in their consulting rooms available to M. Borneff (10) for analysis and examination. Both subsamples are comparable in terms of structure; differences in the way of answering were not detected. The study focuses on the analysis of complex psychological barriers which would permit us to explain and predict unsatisfactory hygienic behavior in dental practice. The following major results deserve attention: Hygiene and infection prophylaxis in dental practice are questions of relatively high current relevance and sensitivity. The dealing with hygienic hazards and related prophylactic measures is relatively varied and indicates that dentists are willing to further receive and absorb information. But the elimination of possible risk factors is impaired by a variety of psychological barriers which do not exist independently from each other and which also tend to reciprocally intensify one another: Barriers for lack of knowledge While interviewees attribute increasing significance to hygiene in the study of dentistry, the compulsory subject hygienics plays a rather minor role within one's individual education. Knowledge in the field of hygiene and hygienic behavior are essentially a question of further training. But sources of information providing additional continued training are used rather sporadically and judged diversely. Incomprehensibilities and inconsistencies in scientific publications, unsatisfactory effectiveness and practicability of possible hygienic measures do not contribute to a coherent, systematic formation of opinion relevant to behaviour. Deficiencies in terms of knowledge also occur in dental assistants who play a crucial role in carrying out hygienic measures in dental practice. Barriers on account of probability Being aware of the essential hygienic risk factors (dental staff and patients

  3. 45 CFR 164.530 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... receiving complaints under this section and who is able to provide further information about matters covered... workforce whose functions are affected by a material change in the policies or procedures required by this subpart or subpart D of this part, within a reasonable period of time after the material change...

  4. 45 CFR 164.530 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... this subpart by the covered entity or its business associate. (g) Standard: Refraining from... health plan, or eligibility for benefits. (i)(1) Standard: Policies and procedures. A covered entity must... section in written or electronic form; (ii) If a communication is required by this subpart to be...

  5. 24 CFR 964.230 - Audit and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Audit and administrative... Program § 964.230 Audit and administrative requirements. (a) TOP grant recipients. The HUD Inspector... purpose of audit or other examinations. (1) Grant recipients must comply with the requirements of...

  6. In vivo administration of dental epithelial stem cells at the apical end of the mouse incisor

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Giovanna; Jimenez-Rojo, Lucia; Natsiou, Despoina; Putignano, Angelo; Mitsiadis, Thimios A.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based tissue regeneration is an attractive approach that complements traditional surgical techniques for replacement of injured and lost tissues. The continuously growing rodent incisor provides an excellent model system for investigating cellular and molecular mechanisms that underlie tooth renewal and regeneration. An active population of dental epithelial progenitor/stem cells located at the posterior part of the incisor, commonly called cervical loop area, ensures the continuous supply of cells that are responsible for the secretion of enamel matrix. To explore the potential of these epithelial cells in therapeutic approaches dealing with enamel defects, we have developed a new method for their in vivo administration in the posterior part of the incisor. Here, we provide the step-by-step protocol for the isolation of dental epithelial stem cells and their delivery at targeted areas of the jaw. This simple and yet powerful protocol, consisting in drilling a hole in the mandibular bone, in close proximity to the cervical loop area of the incisor, followed up by injection of stem cells, is feasible, reliable, and effective. This in vivo approach opens new horizons and possibilities for cellular therapies involving pathological and injured dental tissues. PMID:25914649

  7. Dental students' HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and intentions: impact of the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration's community-based dental partnership program.

    PubMed

    Hamershock, Rose A; Rajabiun, Serena; Fox, Jane E; Mofidi, Mahyar; Abel, Stephen N; York, Jill A; Kunzel, Carol; Sanogo, Moussa; Mayfield, Theresa G

    2014-08-01

    Access to oral health care for vulnerable populations is one of the concerns addressed by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration HIV/AIDS Bureau's Community-Based Dental Partnership Program (CBDPP). The program introduces dental students and residents at several dental schools to care for vulnerable patients through didactic and clinical work in community-based dental settings. This study of the dental students and residents in this program answered three questions: 1) What are their HIV knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors? 2) How has participation in the CBDPP impacted their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors? 3) Has the intervention affected their work placement decisions and attitudes after graduation, particularly with respect to treating people living with HIV and other underserved populations? A total of 305 first- through fourth-year dental students and first- and second-year residents at five dental schools across the United States completed surveys before and after a community-based rotation and following graduation. Response rates at each of the five schools ranged from 82.4 to 100 percent. The results showed an increase in the participants' knowledge and positive attitudes regarding treatment for patients with HIV and other vulnerable populations post-rotation compared to pre-rotation. Results after graduation found that most respondents were practicing in private settings or in academic institutions as residents but were willing to treat a diverse patient population. These findings support the role of training programs, such as the CBDPP, for expanding the dental workforce to treating vulnerable populations including people living with HIV/AIDS.

  8. Dental students' HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and intentions: impact of the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration's community-based dental partnership program.

    PubMed

    Hamershock, Rose A; Rajabiun, Serena; Fox, Jane E; Mofidi, Mahyar; Abel, Stephen N; York, Jill A; Kunzel, Carol; Sanogo, Moussa; Mayfield, Theresa G

    2014-08-01

    Access to oral health care for vulnerable populations is one of the concerns addressed by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration HIV/AIDS Bureau's Community-Based Dental Partnership Program (CBDPP). The program introduces dental students and residents at several dental schools to care for vulnerable patients through didactic and clinical work in community-based dental settings. This study of the dental students and residents in this program answered three questions: 1) What are their HIV knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors? 2) How has participation in the CBDPP impacted their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors? 3) Has the intervention affected their work placement decisions and attitudes after graduation, particularly with respect to treating people living with HIV and other underserved populations? A total of 305 first- through fourth-year dental students and first- and second-year residents at five dental schools across the United States completed surveys before and after a community-based rotation and following graduation. Response rates at each of the five schools ranged from 82.4 to 100 percent. The results showed an increase in the participants' knowledge and positive attitudes regarding treatment for patients with HIV and other vulnerable populations post-rotation compared to pre-rotation. Results after graduation found that most respondents were practicing in private settings or in academic institutions as residents but were willing to treat a diverse patient population. These findings support the role of training programs, such as the CBDPP, for expanding the dental workforce to treating vulnerable populations including people living with HIV/AIDS. PMID:25086143

  9. 24 CFR 92.505 - Applicability of uniform administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Applicability of uniform administrative requirements. 92.505 Section 92.505 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Program Administration §...

  10. 24 CFR 92.505 - Applicability of uniform administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Applicability of uniform administrative requirements. 92.505 Section 92.505 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Program Administration §...

  11. 24 CFR 92.505 - Applicability of uniform administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Applicability of uniform administrative requirements. 92.505 Section 92.505 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Program Administration §...

  12. 24 CFR 92.505 - Applicability of uniform administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability of uniform administrative requirements. 92.505 Section 92.505 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HOME INVESTMENT PARTNERSHIPS PROGRAM Program Administration §...

  13. 50 CFR 253.25 - Other administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 11 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Other administrative requirements. 253.25 Section 253.25 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE AID TO FISHERIES FISHERIES ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS Fisheries Finance...

  14. 47 CFR 400.9 - Financial and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E... 49 CFR part 18, the Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments, including applicable cost principles referenced at 49 CFR 18.22, govern...

  15. 47 CFR 400.9 - Financial and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E... 49 CFR part 18, the Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments, including applicable cost principles referenced at 49 CFR 18.22, govern...

  16. 47 CFR 400.9 - Financial and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E... 49 CFR part 18, the Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments, including applicable cost principles referenced at 49 CFR 18.22, govern...

  17. 47 CFR 400.9 - Financial and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E... 49 CFR part 18, the Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments, including applicable cost principles referenced at 49 CFR 18.22, govern...

  18. 47 CFR 400.9 - Financial and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE, AND NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION E... 49 CFR part 18, the Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments, including applicable cost principles referenced at 49 CFR 18.22, govern...

  19. 42 CFR 441.615 - Administration fee requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES Vaccines for Children Program § 441.615 Administration fee requirements. (a) Under the VFC Program, a provider who administers a qualified pediatric vaccine to a federally vaccine-eligible child, may... provider may not deny administration of a qualified pediatric vaccine to a vaccine-eligible child due...

  20. 45 CFR 30.8 - Required administrative proceedings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Required administrative proceedings. 30.8 Section 30.8 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CLAIMS COLLECTION.... See for example, 42 CFR part 50 (Public Health Service), 45 CFR part 16 (Departmental Grant...

  1. 32 CFR 700.106 - Control of administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... directive or a tasking will result in imposition of additional administrative requirements on commands not within the chain of command or the issuing authority, the first common superior of the commands...

  2. Stress, burnout, and renewal activities of dental hygiene education administrators in six U.S. Midwestern States.

    PubMed

    Hinshaw, Kathleen J; Richter, Louiseann T; Kramer, Gene A

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the patterns that emerge among stress, burnout, and renewal activities of dental hygiene education administrators in six midwestern states in the United States. The study investigated the effects of stress on these administrators by identifying when stress and burnout occur, what precautions they take to prevent it, and what actions might combat stress and/or burnout once it has occurred. The administrators were asked to complete a demographic questionnaire, the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI)-Educators Survey, and an in-depth interview. The response rate to the demographic questionnaire and MBI-Educators Survey was 54.5 percent (30/55). Respondents were primarily Caucasian females (93 percent), at least fifty-one years of age (67 percent), employed in dental hygiene education at least twenty-one years (56 percent), and dental hygiene education administrators for less than ten years (55 percent). Almost half (43 percent) reported a moderate to high Emotional Exhaustion burnout score, one of three characteristics measured by the MBI-Educators Survey. All participants (100 percent) responded that stress had affected their personal and/or professional lives. The findings indicate that dental hygiene education administrators a) experience stress, b) experience patterns of stress, and c) use preventive strategies. Study participants felt that the stress and burnout they experienced may be altered through personal and/or professional lifestyle modifications and that additional training in stress management is needed.

  3. 46 CFR 67.47 - Requirement for Maritime Administration approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... approval of the Maritime Administration in accordance with 46 CFR part 221: (1) Placement of the vessel... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.47... (a) of this section, even if the owner meets the citizenship requirements of this subpart,...

  4. 46 CFR 67.47 - Requirement for Maritime Administration approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... approval of the Maritime Administration in accordance with 46 CFR part 221: (1) Placement of the vessel... MEASUREMENT OF VESSELS DOCUMENTATION OF VESSELS Citizenship Requirements for Vessel Documentation § 67.47... (a) of this section, even if the owner meets the citizenship requirements of this subpart,...

  5. 45 CFR 96.30 - Fiscal and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Financial Management § 96.30 Fiscal and administrative requirements. (a) Fiscal control and accounting... the restrictions and prohibitions of the statute authorizing the block grant. (b) Financial summary of... required by paragraph (b)(1), (2), and (3) of this section on OMB Standard Form 269A, Financial...

  6. 45 CFR 96.30 - Fiscal and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Financial Management § 96.30 Fiscal and administrative requirements. (a) Fiscal control and accounting... the restrictions and prohibitions of the statute authorizing the block grant. (b) Financial summary of... required by paragraph (b)(1), (2), and (3) of this section on OMB Standard Form 269A, Financial...

  7. 45 CFR 96.30 - Fiscal and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Financial Management § 96.30 Fiscal and administrative requirements. (a) Fiscal control and accounting... the restrictions and prohibitions of the statute authorizing the block grant. (b) Financial summary of... required by paragraph (b)(1), (2), and (3) of this section on OMB Standard Form 269A, Financial...

  8. 42 CFR 51.4 - Grants administration requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.4 Grants administration requirements. The following parts of titles 42 and 45 CFR apply to grants funded under this part. 42 CFR Part 50, Subpart D. 45 CFR Part 16—Procedures of the Departmental...

  9. 42 CFR 51.4 - Grants administration requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.4 Grants administration requirements. The following parts of titles 42 and 45 CFR apply to grants funded under this part. 42 CFR Part 50, Subpart D. 45 CFR Part 16—Procedures of the Departmental...

  10. 42 CFR 51.4 - Grants administration requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.4 Grants administration requirements. The following parts of titles 42 and 45 CFR apply to grants funded under this part. 42 CFR Part 50, Subpart D. 45 CFR Part 16—Procedures of the Departmental...

  11. 42 CFR 51.4 - Grants administration requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.4 Grants administration requirements. The following parts of titles 42 and 45 CFR apply to grants funded under this part. 42 CFR Part 50, Subpart D. 45 CFR Part 16—Procedures of the Departmental...

  12. 42 CFR 51.4 - Grants administration requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... APPLICABLE TO THE PROTECTION AND ADVOCACY FOR INDIVIDUALS WITH MENTAL ILLNESS PROGRAM Basic Requirements § 51.4 Grants administration requirements. The following parts of titles 42 and 45 CFR apply to grants funded under this part. 42 CFR Part 50, Subpart D. 45 CFR Part 16—Procedures of the Departmental...

  13. 48 CFR 1516.303-77 - Administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 true Administrative requirements. 1516.303-77 Section 1516.303-77 Federal Acquisition Regulations System ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... cost-sharing contract. The face page of the contract award shall indicate the total estimated cost...

  14. 44 CFR 208.64 - Administrative and audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative and audit requirements. 208.64 Section 208.64 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY DISASTER ASSISTANCE NATIONAL URBAN SEARCH AND RESCUE RESPONSE SYSTEM Reimbursement Claims and Appeals §...

  15. 24 CFR 570.502 - Applicability of uniform administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Governments”; OMB Circular A-128, “Audits of State and Local Governments” (implemented at 24 CFR part 44); and with the following sections of 24 CFR part 85 “Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and... grant or subgrant conditions for ‘high-risk’ grantees”; (4) Section 85.20, “Standards for...

  16. 24 CFR 570.502 - Applicability of uniform administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Governments”; OMB Circular A-128, “Audits of State and Local Governments” (implemented at 24 CFR part 44); and with the following sections of 24 CFR part 85 “Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and... grant or subgrant conditions for ‘high-risk’ grantees”; (4) Section 85.20, “Standards for...

  17. 24 CFR 570.489 - Program administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... this subpart and 24 CFR part 58. (c) Federal grant payments—(1) Payments. The state shall be paid in advance in accordance with Treasury Circular 1075 (31 CFR part 205). The State shall use procedures to...) Applying the provisions in 24 CFR part 85 “Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and...

  18. 32 CFR 700.106 - Control of administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Control of administrative requirements. 700.106 Section 700.106 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS...

  19. 32 CFR 700.106 - Control of administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Control of administrative requirements. 700.106 Section 700.106 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS...

  20. 32 CFR 700.106 - Control of administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Control of administrative requirements. 700.106 Section 700.106 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS...

  1. 32 CFR 700.106 - Control of administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Control of administrative requirements. 700.106 Section 700.106 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS UNITED STATES NAVY REGULATIONS AND OFFICIAL RECORDS...

  2. 24 CFR 570.489 - Program administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... this subpart and 24 CFR part 58. (c) Federal grant payments—(1) Payments. The state shall be paid in advance in accordance with Treasury Circular 1075 (31 CFR part 205). The State shall use procedures to...) Applying the provisions in 24 CFR part 85 “Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and...

  3. 44 CFR 206.207 - Administrative and audit requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... amount of pass-through funds for management costs provided under 44 CFR part 207 that the grantee will... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Administrative and audit requirements. 206.207 Section 206.207 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT...

  4. 24 CFR 1006.370 - Federal administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... following: (i) Depreciation methods for fixed assets shall not be changed without specific approval of HUD... State, Local and Indian Tribal Governments,” and with 24 CFR part 85 “Uniform Administrative... Non-profit Organizations,” and the requirements of 24 CFR part 84, “Uniform...

  5. 42 CFR 441.615 - Administration fee requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES Vaccines for Children Program § 441.615 Administration fee requirements. (a) Under the VFC Program, a provider who administers a qualified pediatric vaccine to a federally vaccine-eligible child, may not impose a charge for the cost of the vaccine. (1) A provider can impose a fee for...

  6. 24 CFR 1006.370 - Federal administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... following: (i) Depreciation methods for fixed assets shall not be changed without specific approval of HUD... State, Local and Indian Tribal Governments,” and with 24 CFR part 85 “Uniform Administrative... Non-profit Organizations,” and the requirements of 24 CFR part 84, “Uniform...

  7. 45 CFR 1385.9 - Grants administration requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Disabilities. Appeals filed by States shall be decided in accordance with 45 CFR part 16. (d) In making audits... Grants administration requirements. (a) The following parts of title 45 CFR apply to grants funded under parts 1386 and 1388 of this chapter and to grants for Projects of National Significance under...

  8. Dental Hygienists

    MedlinePlus

    ... anatomy, patient management, and periodontics, which is the study of gum disease. High school students interested in becoming dental hygienists should take courses in biology, chemistry, and math. Most dental hygiene programs also require applicants to have completed at ...

  9. Required qualifications in the Swedish Public Dental Health Service as indicators of organizational ideology.

    PubMed

    Franzén, C; Söderfeldt, B

    2001-12-01

    The manifestly required qualifications in job advertisements in the Journal of the Swedish Dental Association were analyzed as indicators of the organizational ideology in the Swedish Public Dental Health Service from the employers' viewpoint. All job advertisements that concerned dentists and managers on different hierarchical levels in general dentistry from January 1990 to December 1998 were included (n = 1152). The number of vacancies was 1856. The textual material was analyzed by content analysis, permitting quantitative descriptions of the text and analysis of the latent characteristics. Words and phrases were classified into categories on different levels of abstraction developed from the theoretical background and the purpose of the study. Altogether 5705 required qualifications were categorized. The inter-coder reliability of the first-level categorization resulted in 81% correspondence of the classification, and lambda = 0.90. Qualifications were more frequently required with higher hierarchical job positions, and personality characteristics were more frequent than technical competence and knowledge. Qualifications interpreted as related to economic goals occurred more frequently than those related to odontological goals. The qualification demands reflected the language of human resource management (HRM), emphasizing the 'soft' people-centered approach and was interpreted as an 'ideal' model of HRM. Dentists were regarded as a profitable organizational asset rather than participants in relations with patients. In conclusion, the results indicate an organizational ideology primarily of economic character. PMID:11831491

  10. 30 CFR 886.18 - What audit and administrative requirements must I meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What audit and administrative requirements must... INDIAN TRIBES § 886.18 What audit and administrative requirements must I meet? (a) You must comply with the audit requirements of the OMB Circular A-133. (b) You must follow administrative...

  11. 45 CFR 1336.50 - Financial and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR NATIVE AMERICANS, NATIVE... part: 45 CFR Part 16Department grant appeals process. 45 CFR Part 46Protection of human subjects. 45 CFR Part 74Administration of grants. 45 CFR Part 75Informal grant appeals procedures (indirect...

  12. 45 CFR 1336.50 - Financial and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR NATIVE AMERICANS, NATIVE... part: 45 CFR Part 16Department grant appeals process. 45 CFR Part 46Protection of human subjects. 45 CFR Part 74Administration of grants. 45 CFR Part 75Informal grant appeals procedures (indirect...

  13. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug Administration determines that...

  14. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug Administration determines that...

  15. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug Administration determines that...

  16. 21 CFR 107.200 - Food and Drug Administration-required recall.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration-required recall. 107... SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION INFANT FORMULA Infant Formula Recalls § 107.200 Food and Drug Administration-required recall. When the Food and Drug Administration determines that...

  17. Description and Documentation of the Dental School Dental Delivery System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chase, Rosen and Wallace, Inc., Alexandria, VA.

    A study was undertaken to describe and document the dental school dental delivery system using an integrated systems approach. In late 1976 and early 1977, a team of systems analysts and dental consultants visited three dental schools to observe the delivery of dental services and patient flow and to interview administrative staff and faculty.…

  18. Rural–urban differences in dental service use among children enrolled in a private dental insurance plan in Wisconsin: analysis of administrative data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies on rural–urban differences in dental care have primarily focused on differences in utilization rates and preventive dental services. Little is known about rural–urban differences in the use of wider range of dental procedures. This study examined patterns of preventive, restorative, endodontic, and extraction procedures provided to children enrolled in Delta Dental of Wisconsin (DDWI). Methods We analyzed DDWI enrollment and claims data for children aged 0-18 years from 2002 to 2008. We modified and used a rural and urban classification based on ZIP codes developed by the Wisconsin Area Health Education Center (AHEC). We categorized the ZIP codes into 6 AHEC categories (3 rural and 3 urban). Descriptive and multivariable analysis using generalized linear mixed models (GLMM) were used to examine the patterns of dental procedures provided to children. Tukey-Kramer adjustment was used to control for multiple comparisons. Results Approximately, 50%, 67% and 68 % of enrollees in inner-city Milwaukee, Rural 1 (less than 2500 people), and suburban-Milwaukee had at least one annual dental visit, respectively. Children in inner city-Milwaukee had the lowest utilization rates for all procedures examined, except for endodontic procedures. Compared to children from inner-city Milwaukee, children in other locations had significantly more preventive procedures. Children in Rural 1-ZIP codes had more restorative, endodontic and extraction procedures, compared to children from all other regions. Conclusions We found significant geographic variation in dental procedures received by children enrolled in DDWI. PMID:23259637

  19. 45 CFR 1336.50 - Financial and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION FOR NATIVE AMERICANS, NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS NATIVE AMERICAN PROGRAMS Financial Assistance Provisions § 1336.50 Financial and... part: 45 CFR Part 16Department grant appeals process. 45 CFR Part 46Protection of human subjects....

  20. 45 CFR 1336.50 - Financial and administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... part: 45 CFR Part 16Department grant appeals process. 45 CFR Part 46Protection of human subjects. 45 CFR Part 74Administration of grants. 45 CFR Part 75Informal grant appeals procedures (indirect cost rates and other cost allocations). 45 CFR Part 80Nondiscrimination under programs receiving...

  1. Modelling of pain intensity and informative dropout in a dental pain model after naproxcinod, naproxen and placebo administration

    PubMed Central

    Björnsson, Marcus A; Simonsson, Ulrika S H

    2011-01-01

    AIMS To describe pain intensity (PI) measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and dropout due to request for rescue medication after administration of naproxcinod, naproxen or placebo in 242 patients after wisdom tooth removal. METHODS Non-linear mixed effects modelling was used to describe the plasma concentrations of naproxen, either formed from naproxcinod or from naproxen itself, and their relationship to PI and dropout. Goodness of fit was assessed by simultaneous simulations of PI and dropout. RESULTS Baseline PI for the typical patient was 52.7 mm. The PI was influenced by placebo effects, using an exponential model, and by naproxen concentrations using a sigmoid Emax model. Typical maximal placebo effect was a decrease in PI by 20.2%, with an onset rate constant of 0.237 h−1. EC50 was 0.135 µmol l−1. A Weibull time-to-event model was used for the dropout, where the hazard was dependent on the predicted PI and by the PI at baseline. Since the dropout was not at random, it was necessary to include the simulated dropout in visual predictive checks (VPC) of PI. CONCLUSIONS This model describes the relationship between drug effects, PI and the likelihood of dropout after naproxcinod, naproxen and placebo administration. The model provides an opportunity to describe the effects of other doses or formulations, after dental extraction. VPC created by simultaneous simulations of PI and dropout provides a good way of assessing the goodness of fit when there is informative dropout. PMID:21272053

  2. 24 CFR 954.502 - Applicability of uniform administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with 24 CFR 85.36(h). Performance and payment bonds for 100 percent of the total contract price are acceptable to HUD. There may be circumstances under which the bonding requirements of § 85.36(h) are... contracts that exceed the amount for small purchase under 24 CFR 85.36, each contractor shall be required...

  3. 24 CFR 954.502 - Applicability of uniform administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with 24 CFR 85.36(h). Performance and payment bonds for 100 percent of the total contract price are acceptable to HUD. There may be circumstances under which the bonding requirements of § 85.36(h) are... contracts that exceed the amount for small purchase under 24 CFR 85.36, each contractor shall be required...

  4. 45 CFR 235.50 - State plan requirements for methods of personnel administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ASSISTANCE (ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS), ADMINISTRATION FOR CHILDREN AND FAMILIES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ADMINISTRATION OF FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS § 235.50 State plan requirements for methods of personnel administration. (a) A State plan for financial assistance programs under title I, IV-A, X, XIV,...

  5. Legal requirements for the prescribing and administration of medicines.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Richard

    2007-10-01

    On the 15th anniversary of the introduction of the Medicinal Products: Prescription by Nurses etc. Act 1992, Richard Griffith reflects on the development of nurse prescribing since the Acts implementation and outlines the current procedures by which district nurses may prescribe, supply or administer medicines to patients and the requirements that must be met in order to do so lawfully. PMID:18073650

  6. 40 CFR 725.25 - General administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... description of all other data known to or reasonably ascertainable by me as required by 40 CFR 725.160 or 725... to EPA (via CDX) using e-PMN software. See 40 CFR 720.40(a)(2)(ii) for information on how to obtain e... attachments appear in the open scientific literature) must be in English. All information submitted must...

  7. 40 CFR 725.25 - General administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... description of all other data known to or reasonably ascertainable by me as required by 40 CFR 725.160 or 725... submit on paper, the Certification statement in 40 CFR 725.25(b) along with submitter identification and... e-PMN software must be used to print the biotechnology notice submission to be sent to EPA....

  8. 40 CFR 725.25 - General administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... description of all other data known to or reasonably ascertainable by me as required by 40 CFR 725.160 or 725... submit on paper, the Certification statement in 40 CFR 725.25(b) along with submitter identification and... e-PMN software must be used to print the biotechnology notice submission to be sent to EPA....

  9. 40 CFR 725.25 - General administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... description of all other data known to or reasonably ascertainable by me as required by 40 CFR 725.160 or 725... submit on paper, the Certification statement in 40 CFR 725.25(b) along with submitter identification and... e-PMN software must be used to print the biotechnology notice submission to be sent to EPA....

  10. 40 CFR 725.25 - General administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... description of all other data known to or reasonably ascertainable by me as required by 40 CFR 725.160 or 725... submit on paper, the Certification statement in 40 CFR 725.25(b) along with submitter identification and... e-PMN software must be used to print the biotechnology notice submission to be sent to EPA....

  11. A National Study of State Credentialing Requirements for Administrators of Special Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boscardin, Mary Lynn; Weir, Kerry; Kusek, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Unlike data that show that all states require credentials for special education teachers, national data indicate that only 27 states require licensure/certification/endorsement as an administrator of special education. The titles used by states to identify the local director of special education include administrator of special education, director…

  12. 76 FR 17138 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-28

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  13. 77 FR 8886 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  14. 76 FR 78933 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  15. 75 FR 14448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-25

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... announcing a public workshop entitled ``FDA Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good... representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among the FDA and clinical trial staff,...

  16. 76 FR 51040 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-17

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  17. 77 FR 49449 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... announcing a public workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the... FDA and clinical trial staff, investigators, and institutional review boards (IRBs). Individual...

  18. 77 FR 49448 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Compliance, and Good Clinical Practice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-16

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  19. 75 FR 51824 - Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements, Regulations, Compliance, and Good...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration Clinical Trial Requirements... workshop. The public workshop on FDA's clinical trial requirements is designed to aid the clinical research... interaction with FDA representatives. The program will focus on the relationships among FDA and clinical...

  20. 25 CFR 23.41 - Uniform grant administration provisions, requirements and applicability.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... administration provisions and requirements specified at 25 CFR part 276 and under this subpart are applicable to... applicability. 23.41 Section 23.41 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR HUMAN SERVICES INDIAN CHILD WELFARE ACT General and Uniform Grant Administration Provisions and Requirements §...

  1. 26 CFR 1.7519-2T - Required payments-procedures and administration (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 13 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Required payments-procedures and administration (temporary). 1.7519-2T Section 1.7519-2T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES The Tax Court § 1.7519-2T Required payments—procedures and administration (temporary)....

  2. Structure and types of dental manpower.

    PubMed

    Bezroukov, V

    1979-09-01

    The different categories of dental health personnel, professional, operating and non-operating auxiliary are defined and their roles examined. Where professional and auxiliary dental manpower is in short supply the use of non-dental personnel such as teachers and health educators should be emphasised as a means of providing firrst aid and preventive measures. Manpower remains the central problem in improving oral health. Although the number of dental schools and the total number of dentists has increased in the past two decades, the dentist/population ratio has declined. Considerable variations occur between countries and the geographical distribution within countries is very uneven, an undue proportion often practising within the large cities. A greater increase in numbers of dentists, though desirable, will not be sufficient to solve the problem of adequate dental health coverage in this century. The advanced skills of the dental graduate are not required for many routine procedures and greater use must be made of operating auxiliaries. More research is needed into the best composition of the dental team. Increased use of larger, more complex teams seems likely to be the most important development for the future. This will require a careful reappraisal of the curricula for all categories of personnel. WHO is actively engaged in formulating guidelines for dental administrators in the development of educational and planning criteria for the improvment of dental health.

  3. Is routine replacement of i.v. administration sets required after each change of intermittently administrated antibiotic infusions?

    PubMed Central

    von Au, Felix; Ryll, Sylvia; Wegner, Christian; Gessner, Stephan; Kramer, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Manufacturers’ instructions recommend changing the infusion line together with the infusion bottle after each administration. We investigated if the complete infusion line may be microbiologically contaminated after short-time antibiotic and rinse-solution application. Method: Immediately after the change of an infusion administration set after 72 hours the remaining antibiotic solution was inactivated with yolk and cultured on blood agar for 48 hours at 36°C to detect possible contaminants. Results: Among 87 investigated samples no microbial growth was detected. One sample which hadn’t any contact to antibiotics yielded 1 colony forming unit (cfu) of coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results suggest that in case of consecutive antibiotic-short- and rinse-infusions the infusion line may be in place up to 72 hours without contamination. This, however, may be only the case for infusion sets, which are in contact with antibiotics. If no antibiotic is administered, the infusion bottle and the infusion line must be renewed together for every change. To clarify this question into more detail, a larger consecutive study is required. Conclusion: I.v. administration sets without any contact to antibiotics must be changed together with their infusion bottle after administration. In case of consecutive antibiotic-short- and rinse-infusions our pilot study suggests using the i.v. administration sets for up to 72 hours without renewing it at every infusion-set exchange. PMID:23967394

  4. 45 CFR 97.16 - What fiscal, matching and administrative requirements apply to grantees?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What fiscal, matching and administrative requirements apply to grantees? 97.16 Section 97.16 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION CONSOLIDATION OF GRANTS TO THE INSULAR AREAS § 97.16 What fiscal, matching...

  5. 8 CFR 215.7 - Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROLS OF ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.7 Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases. In the absence of appropriate instructions from the Administrator of... authority conferred by § 215.2 in the case of any alien who seeks to depart from the United......

  6. 8 CFR 215.7 - Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROLS OF ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.7 Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases. In the absence of appropriate instructions from the Administrator of... authority conferred by § 215.2 in the case of any alien who seeks to depart from the United......

  7. 8 CFR 215.7 - Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS CONTROLS OF ALIENS DEPARTING FROM THE UNITED STATES § 215.7 Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases. In the absence of appropriate instructions from the Administrator of... authority conferred by § 215.2 in the case of any alien who seeks to depart from the United......

  8. 30 CFR 885.18 - What audit, accounting, and administrative requirements must I meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... accounting, payment, records, property, and management contained in 43 CFR part 12. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What audit, accounting, and administrative... TRIBES § 885.18 What audit, accounting, and administrative requirements must I meet? (a) You must...

  9. 30 CFR 885.18 - What audit, accounting, and administrative requirements must I meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... accounting, payment, records, property, and management contained in 43 CFR part 12. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What audit, accounting, and administrative... TRIBES § 885.18 What audit, accounting, and administrative requirements must I meet? (a) You must...

  10. 30 CFR 885.18 - What audit, accounting, and administrative requirements must I meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... accounting, payment, records, property, and management contained in 43 CFR part 12. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What audit, accounting, and administrative... TRIBES § 885.18 What audit, accounting, and administrative requirements must I meet? (a) You must...

  11. 30 CFR 885.18 - What audit, accounting, and administrative requirements must I meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... accounting, payment, records, property, and management contained in 43 CFR part 12. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What audit, accounting, and administrative... TRIBES § 885.18 What audit, accounting, and administrative requirements must I meet? (a) You must...

  12. 30 CFR 885.18 - What audit, accounting, and administrative requirements must I meet?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... accounting, payment, records, property, and management contained in 43 CFR part 12. ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What audit, accounting, and administrative... TRIBES § 885.18 What audit, accounting, and administrative requirements must I meet? (a) You must...

  13. Comparison of Dental Caries Experience in Children Suffering From Epilepsy with and without Administration of Long Term Liquid Oral Medication

    PubMed Central

    Bhadravathi, Manjunath Chaluvaiah; Kumar, Adarsh; Narang, Ridhi; Gupta, Ambika; Singh, Harneet

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Sucrose is added as sweetening agent in liquid oral medication (LOM) to mask the acrid taste of medicines which may be potentially cariogenic. Many children under long term LOM therapy for treatment of epilepsy may be susceptible to dental caries. Aim To assess and compare dental caries experience in children under long term liquid oral medication with those not under such medication among 2-12 years old children suffering from epilepsy. Materials and Methods A cross-sectional study was undertaken on a total of 84 children aged 2–12 years, who were suffering from epilepsy receiving liquid oral medication for more than 3 months were selected (study group) and for comparison 106 children of similar age group and disease but on other forms of medication were included as control group. Dental caries was assessed using DMFT/DMFS (Decayed, Missing, Fillled Teeth / Surfaces), dmft/dft and dmfs/dfs indices. One-way ANOVA and t-test were used with p-value fixed at 0.05. Univariate logistic regression was applied. Results Children on LOM were at increased risk of dental caries than those with other forms of medications (OR: 2.55, 95% CI (2.37-4.15) p=0.000, HS). Caries prevalence was high in the study group (76.1%) when compared to control group (55.6%). Conclusion Long term use of liquid medicines containing sucrose is a risk factor for dental caries among children with epilepsy. PMID:27504416

  14. 34 CFR 682.610 - Administrative and fiscal requirements for participating schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... participating schools. 682.610 Section 682.610 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of... LOAN (FFEL) PROGRAM Requirements, Standards, and Payments for Participating Schools § 682.610 Administrative and fiscal requirements for participating schools. (a) General. Each school shall— (1)...

  15. An Improved Technique Using Dental Prostheses for Field Quantification of the Force Required by Primates for the Dental Penetration of Fruit.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Adrian A; Santos, Paulo J P; Boyle, Sarah A; Bezerra, Bruna M

    2015-01-01

    Tooth morphology is an important determinant of primate diet, setting potential limits on processable item size and material properties. Plunger-based commercial fruit firmness testers (penetrometers) have been used to estimate primate diet item hardness and, by proxy, bite force required for penetration. However, geometric forms and surface areas of penetrometer plungers and primate teeth differ considerably. Accurate bite force estimation is especially important with pitheciine primates as these penetrate fruit pericarps with their canines. To achieve more realistic bite force measures, we replaced a fruit penetrometer's standard plunger with a Cacajao calvus canine prosthesis. We compared indentation and penetration values for Hevea spruceana (Euphorbiaceae; hard-pericarp) and Mauritia flexuosa (Arecaceae; soft-pericarp) fruits (both natural Cacajao foods), and standard penetrometer head and canine prosthesis values for penetrating H. spruceana sulci. Compared to the canine prosthesis, a standard head overestimated the force needed to indent and penetrate H. spruceana fruit by more than twofold and, due to greater width, could not effectively penetrate a sulcus: sulcal penetrability data were easily retrieved with the canine prosthesis. We believe this new approach using dental prostheses has potential in the analysis of primate foraging mechanisms, especially for pitheciines for which canines are of paramount importance in accessing food. PMID:26338228

  16. Dental Amalgam

    MedlinePlus

    ... Products and Medical Procedures Dental Devices Dental Amalgam Dental Amalgam Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options Linkedin Pin it Email Print Dental amalgam is a dental filling material which is ...

  17. Guide to good practices for operations and administration updates through required reading

    SciTech Connect

    1998-12-01

    This Guide to Good Practices is written to enhance understanding of, and provide direction for, Required Reading, Chapter XIV of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.19, Conduct of Operations Requirements for DOE Facilities. The practices in this guide should be considered when planning or reviewing programs for updating personnel with operations and administration information through required reading. Contractors are advised to adopt procedures that meet the intent of DOE Order 5480.19. Required Reading is an element of an effective Conduct of Operations program. The complexity and array of activities performed in DOE facilities dictate the necessity for a coordinated required reading program to promote safe and efficient operations.

  18. Accreditation in Dental Hygiene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Commission on Accrediting, Washington, DC.

    The Council on Dental Education cooperates with the American Dental Hygienists' Association in developing educational requirements for schools of dental hygiene. To be eligible for accreditation, schools must operate on a non-profit basis. A school applying for accreditation completes a previsitation questionnaire concerning its program. The…

  19. 34 CFR 403.195 - What are the administrative cost requirements applicable to local recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM What Conditions Must be Met by Local Recipients? § 403... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the administrative cost requirements applicable to local recipients? 403.195 Section 403.195 Education Regulations of the Offices of...

  20. 24 CFR 1000.26 - What are the administrative requirements under NAHASDA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sections of 24 CFR part 85 “Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments.” For purposes of this part, “grantee” as defined in 24 CFR part 85 has the...) Section 85.12, “Special grant or subgrant conditions for ‘high risk’ grantees.” (4) Section...

  1. 24 CFR 1000.26 - What are the administrative requirements under NAHASDA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... sections of 24 CFR part 85 “Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Cooperative Agreements to State and Local Governments.” For purposes of this part, “grantee” as defined in 24 CFR part 85 has the...) Section 85.12, “Special grant or subgrant conditions for ‘high risk’ grantees.” (4) Section...

  2. 22 CFR 46.7 - Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...), 11 (4), or 11(5) of the Agreement between the United Nations and the United States of America regarding the Headquarters of the United Nations (61 Stat. 756): Provided, That in cases of extreme urgency... FROM THE UNITED STATES § 46.7 Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases. In...

  3. 24 CFR 570.610 - Uniform administrative requirements and cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT COMMUNITY FACILITIES COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Uniform administrative requirements and cost principles. 570.610 Section 570.610 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating...

  4. 24 CFR 1000.26 - What are the administrative requirements under NAHASDA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., “Monitoring and reporting program performance,” except paragraphs (b) through (d) and paragraph (f). (14... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false What are the administrative requirements under NAHASDA? 1000.26 Section 1000.26 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING...

  5. 24 CFR 1000.26 - What are the administrative requirements under NAHASDA?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... reporting program performance,” except paragraphs (b) through (d) and paragraph (f). (14) Section 85.41... 24 Housing and Urban Development 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false What are the administrative requirements under NAHASDA? 1000.26 Section 1000.26 Housing and Urban Development REGULATIONS RELATING...

  6. 27 CFR 17.136 - Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements. 17.136 Section 17.136 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS DRAWBACK ON TAXPAID DISTILLED SPIRITS USED IN MANUFACTURING...

  7. 25 CFR 700.477 - Administration of financial assistance and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Administration of financial assistance and recordkeeping requirements. 700.477 Section 700.477 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION... residing off of the Navajo or Hopi reservation applying for a grant or cooperative agreement under...

  8. 25 CFR 700.477 - Administration of financial assistance and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Administration of financial assistance and recordkeeping requirements. 700.477 Section 700.477 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION... residing off of the Navajo or Hopi reservation applying for a grant or cooperative agreement under...

  9. 25 CFR 700.477 - Administration of financial assistance and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Administration of financial assistance and recordkeeping requirements. 700.477 Section 700.477 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION... residing off of the Navajo or Hopi reservation applying for a grant or cooperative agreement under...

  10. 45 CFR 1336.69 - Reporting requirements: Responsibilities of the Loan Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the loan fund and the sources of the monies to support the administrative costs. (b) The Loan... loan by source; (iv) Loan status (current/delinquent/paid); (v) Principal and interest outstanding; and..., or any equivalent report required by the Department....

  11. 45 CFR 1336.69 - Reporting requirements: Responsibilities of the Loan Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... the loan fund and the sources of the monies to support the administrative costs. (b) The Loan... loan by source; (iv) Loan status (current/delinquent/paid); (v) Principal and interest outstanding; and..., or any equivalent report required by the Department....

  12. 22 CFR 46.7 - Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... seeks to depart from the United States in the status of a nonimmigrant under section 101(a)(15) (A) or (G) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, or in the status of a nonimmigrant under section 11(3... FROM THE UNITED STATES § 46.7 Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases. In......

  13. 22 CFR 46.7 - Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... seeks to depart from the United States in the status of a nonimmigrant under section 101(a)(15) (A) or (G) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, or in the status of a nonimmigrant under section 11(3... FROM THE UNITED STATES § 46.7 Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases. In......

  14. 22 CFR 46.7 - Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... seeks to depart from the United States in the status of a nonimmigrant under section 101(a)(15) (A) or (G) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, or in the status of a nonimmigrant under section 11(3... FROM THE UNITED STATES § 46.7 Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases. In......

  15. 22 CFR 46.7 - Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... seeks to depart from the United States in the status of a nonimmigrant under section 101(a)(15) (A) or (G) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, or in the status of a nonimmigrant under section 11(3... FROM THE UNITED STATES § 46.7 Instructions from the Administrator required in certain cases. In......

  16. 24 CFR 511.72 - Applicability of uniform Federal administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATON GRANT... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Applicability of uniform Federal administrative requirements. 511.72 Section 511.72 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  17. 24 CFR 511.72 - Applicability of uniform Federal administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATON GRANT... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Applicability of uniform Federal administrative requirements. 511.72 Section 511.72 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  18. 24 CFR 511.72 - Applicability of uniform Federal administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Applicability of uniform Federal administrative requirements. 511.72 Section 511.72 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  19. 24 CFR 511.72 - Applicability of uniform Federal administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Applicability of uniform Federal administrative requirements. 511.72 Section 511.72 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  20. 24 CFR 511.72 - Applicability of uniform Federal administrative requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT SLUM CLEARANCE AND URBAN RENEWAL RENTAL REHABILITATION GRANT... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Applicability of uniform Federal administrative requirements. 511.72 Section 511.72 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to...

  1. 27 CFR 26.202 - Requirements of the Federal Alcohol Administration Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements of the Federal Alcohol Administration Act. 26.202 Section 26.202 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL... RICO AND THE VIRGIN ISLANDS Products Coming Into the United States From the Virgin Islands §...

  2. 34 CFR 403.186 - What are the administrative cost requirements applicable to a State?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM What Financial Conditions Must Be Met by a State? § 403.186 What are... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the administrative cost requirements applicable to a State? 403.186 Section 403.186 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department...

  3. 34 CFR 403.195 - What are the administrative cost requirements applicable to local recipients?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION PROGRAM What Conditions Must be Met by Local Recipients? § 403... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the administrative cost requirements applicable to local recipients? 403.195 Section 403.195 Education Regulations of the Offices of...

  4. 20 CFR 655.815 - What are the requirements for the Administrator's determination?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Administrator's written determination required by § 655.805 of this part shall: (1) Set forth the determination...) by an employer, prescribe any remedies, including the amount of any back wages assessed, the amount of any civil money penalties assessed and the reason therefor, and/or any other remedies assessed....

  5. 75 FR 18219 - Drug and Medical Device Forum on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Drug and Medical Device Forum on Food and Drug Administration Drug and Device Requirements and Supplier Controls; Public Educational Forum AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public educational forum. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration...

  6. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 22 - Administrative Requirements and Issues To Be Addressed in Award Terms and Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Administrative Requirements and Issues To Be Addressed in Award Terms and Conditions C Appendix C to Part 22 National Defense Department of Defense... AND ADMINISTRATION Pt. 22, App. C Appendix C to Part 22—Administrative Requirements and Issues To...

  7. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 22 - Administrative Requirements and Issues To Be Addressed in Award Terms and Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Administrative Requirements and Issues To Be Addressed in Award Terms and Conditions C Appendix C to Part 22 National Defense Department of Defense... AND ADMINISTRATION Pt. 22, App. C Appendix C to Part 22—Administrative Requirements and Issues To...

  8. 32 CFR Appendix C to Part 22 - Administrative Requirements and Issues To Be Addressed in Award Terms and Conditions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Administrative Requirements and Issues To Be Addressed in Award Terms and Conditions C Appendix C to Part 22 National Defense Department of Defense... AND ADMINISTRATION Pt. 22, App. C Appendix C to Part 22—Administrative Requirements and Issues To...

  9. Marketing the dental hygienist as a manager in oral health care settings.

    PubMed

    Thomson, E M

    1989-09-01

    In 1985, the ADHA, in response to the changing health care environment, identified six roles for the future of dental hygiene. The administrator/manager role, one of the six, is an expansion of dental hygiene skills to facilitate the provision of quality oral health care. Oral health care settings require personnel trained in management to accomplish practice-related goals and objectives. Dental hygiene is preparing individuals to assume managerial roles to fill this health care need. This paper discusses the skills and knowledge level required to assume managerial roles and strategies for marketing the dental hygienist as a manager.

  10. A double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized comparison of pre and postoperative administration of ketorolac and tramadol for dental extraction pain

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Hitesh; Khan, Farhan Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the analgesic efficacy and safety of single-dose oral ketorolac and tramadol administered pre and postoperatively for dental extraction pain. Materials and Methods: 74 patients undergoing third molar extraction (impacted or other causes) were recruited into the study, over a period of 1 year. The patients were divided into six groups and they were given ketorolac (20 mg), tramadol (100 mg), or placebo either preoperatively or postoperatively (half an hour before or half an hour after the procedure). Placebo was glucose powder filled in empty capsule. Pain assessment was done using a modified Verbal Rating Scale (VRS) at 30 min, 2, 4, and 6 h after the procedure. A record of whether rescue analgesic (ibuprofen 400 mg) was taken during the 6 h study period, along with the time it was taken, was made. Record of any adverse effects experienced by the patient was also kept. Maximum pain scores for each of the six study groups, over the 6 h study period, were noted. Results: Ketorolac and tramadol were significantly better than placebo in relieving molar tooth extraction pain. Postoperative administration of tramadol was found to be more efficacious than preoperative administration in relieving the pain, whereas the preoperative administration of ketorolac was better than its postoperative administration. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that tramadol is equally effective to ketorolac in relieving pain in the first 6 h after molar extraction and therefore can be tried in patients who are intolerant to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:22557747

  11. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a...

  12. 21 CFR 872.3240 - Dental bur.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental bur. 872.3240 Section 872.3240 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3240 Dental bur. (a) Identification. A dental bur is a...

  13. 21 CFR 872.6390 - Dental floss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental floss. 872.6390 Section 872.6390 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6390 Dental floss. (a) Identification. Dental floss is...

  14. 21 CFR 320.34 - Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Requirements for batch testing and certification... § 320.34 Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) If the Commissioner determines that individual batch testing by the Food and Drug Administration...

  15. 21 CFR 320.34 - Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Requirements for batch testing and certification... § 320.34 Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) If the Commissioner determines that individual batch testing by the Food and Drug Administration...

  16. 21 CFR 320.34 - Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Requirements for batch testing and certification... § 320.34 Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) If the Commissioner determines that individual batch testing by the Food and Drug Administration...

  17. 21 CFR 320.34 - Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Requirements for batch testing and certification... § 320.34 Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) If the Commissioner determines that individual batch testing by the Food and Drug Administration...

  18. 21 CFR 320.34 - Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Requirements for batch testing and certification... § 320.34 Requirements for batch testing and certification by the Food and Drug Administration. (a) If the Commissioner determines that individual batch testing by the Food and Drug Administration...

  19. Dental Implant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Oshida, Yoshiki; Tuna, Elif B.; Aktören, Oya; Gençay, Koray

    2010-01-01

    Among various dental materials and their successful applications, a dental implant is a good example of the integrated system of science and technology involved in multiple disciplines including surface chemistry and physics, biomechanics, from macro-scale to nano-scale manufacturing technologies and surface engineering. As many other dental materials and devices, there are crucial requirements taken upon on dental implants systems, since surface of dental implants is directly in contact with vital hard/soft tissue and is subjected to chemical as well as mechanical bio-environments. Such requirements should, at least, include biological compatibility, mechanical compatibility, and morphological compatibility to surrounding vital tissues. In this review, based on carefully selected about 500 published articles, these requirements plus MRI compatibility are firstly reviewed, followed by surface texturing methods in details. Normally dental implants are placed to lost tooth/teeth location(s) in adult patients whose skeleton and bony growth have already completed. However, there are some controversial issues for placing dental implants in growing patients. This point has been, in most of dental articles, overlooked. This review, therefore, throws a deliberate sight on this point. Concluding this review, we are proposing a novel implant system that integrates materials science and up-dated surface technology to improve dental implant systems exhibiting bio- and mechano-functionalities. PMID:20480036

  20. Dental Sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Data & Statistics > Find Data by Topic > Dental Sealants Dental Sealants Main Content Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that protect the chewing surfaces of children’s back teeth from tooth decay. Overall, the prevalence of sealants ...

  1. Dental Procedures.

    PubMed

    Ramponi, Denise R

    2016-01-01

    Dental problems are a common complaint in emergency departments in the United States. There are a wide variety of dental issues addressed in emergency department visits such as dental caries, loose teeth, dental trauma, gingival infections, and dry socket syndrome. Review of the most common dental blocks and dental procedures will allow the practitioner the opportunity to make the patient more comfortable and reduce the amount of analgesia the patient will need upon discharge. Familiarity with the dental equipment, tooth, and mouth anatomy will help prepare the practitioner for to perform these dental procedures. PMID:27482994

  2. History of dental hygiene research.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society. PMID:24046337

  3. History of dental hygiene research.

    PubMed

    Bowen, Denise M

    2013-01-01

    Dental hygiene is defined as the science and practice of the recognition, treatment and prevention of oral diseases. The history of dental hygiene research is considered in the context of the development of the discipline and an emerging infrastructure. Research-related events supporting the growth and maturation of the profession are considered from the early years to the most recent. The benefits of preventive oral health services provided by dental hygienists have been supported by research, and the practice of dental hygiene has expanded as a result of research findings since its inception 100 years ago. Dental hygienists' engagement in research, however, did not begin until the 1960s as research associates or administrators, primarily with dental researchers as primary investigators. The Journal of Dental Hygiene (JDH) has provided information for dental hygiene practice since 1927, and has been the primary venue for dissemination of dental hygiene research since 1945. Graduate education in dental hygiene at the master's degree level and the work of early dental hygiene researchers led to the first conference on dental hygiene research in 1982. Over 30 years later, dental hygiene has established a meta-paradigm and defined conceptual models, built an initial infrastructure to support research endeavors and contributed much to the development of dental hygiene as a unique discipline. A doctoral degree in the discipline, continued theory-based research, initiatives to foster collaborations between dental hygiene and other researchers and enhanced capabilities to attract funding to support large scale studies are goals that must be attained through the efforts of future researchers to address the needs for additional development in the discipline of dental hygiene. Dental hygiene research supports the growing discipline and its value to society.

  4. Dental Assisting Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental assisting curriculum for technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level dental assistants, and includes job skills in the technical areas of preventive dentistry; four-handed dentistry; chairside assisting with emphasis in diagnostics,…

  5. 20 CFR 671.170 - What are the program and administrative requirements that apply to national emergency grants?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What are the program and administrative...? (a) In general, the program requirements and administrative standards set forth at 20 CFR parts 663... can be clearly demonstrated that such adjustments will achieve a greater positive benefit for...

  6. Exploring Design Requirements for Repurposing Dental Virtual Patients From the Web to Second Life: A Focus Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Panagiotis E; Athanasopoulou, Christina A; Dafli, Eleni

    2014-01-01

    Background Since their inception, virtual patients have provided health care educators with a way to engage learners in an experience simulating the clinician’s environment without danger to learners and patients. This has led this learning modality to be accepted as an essential component of medical education. With the advent of the visually and audio-rich 3-dimensional multi-user virtual environment (MUVE), a new deployment platform has emerged for educational content. Immersive, highly interactive, multimedia-rich, MUVEs that seamlessly foster collaboration provide a new hotbed for the deployment of medical education content. Objective This work aims to assess the suitability of the Second Life MUVE as a virtual patient deployment platform for undergraduate dental education, and to explore the requirements and specifications needed to meaningfully repurpose Web-based virtual patients in MUVEs. Methods Through the scripting capabilities and available art assets in Second Life, we repurposed an existing Web-based periodontology virtual patient into Second Life. Through a series of point-and-click interactions and multiple-choice queries, the user experienced a specific periodontology case and was asked to provide the optimal responses for each of the challenges of the case. A focus group of 9 undergraduate dentistry students experienced both the Web-based and the Second Life version of this virtual patient. The group convened 3 times and discussed relevant issues such as the group’s computer literacy, the assessment of Second Life as a virtual patient deployment platform, and compared the Web-based and MUVE-deployed virtual patients. Results A comparison between the Web-based and the Second Life virtual patient revealed the inherent advantages of the more experiential and immersive Second Life virtual environment. However, several challenges for the successful repurposing of virtual patients from the Web to the MUVE were identified. The identified challenges

  7. Health Occupations. Dental Auxiliaries, Nursing, Therapy and Rehabilitation, Health Services Administration. Reprinted from the Occupational Outlook Handbook, 1978-79 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Labor Statistics (DOL), Washington, DC.

    Focusing on health occupations, this document is one in a series of forty-one reprints from the Occupational Outlook Handbook providing current information and employment projections for individual occupations and industries through 1985. The specific occupations covered in this document include dental assistants, dental hygienists, dental…

  8. Bioequivalence of generic drugs: a simple explanation for a US Food and Drug Administration requirement.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Chittaranjan

    2015-06-01

    There is a widespread misconception that for a generic drug to be deemed bioequivalent to a branded drug, it must contain 80%-125% of the active ingredient that is present in the branded version. More correctly, bioequivalence is studied in randomized crossover trials that compare the generic drug with the reference agent, and the relevant outcome measures are pharmacokinetic (PK) parameters such as peak drug concentration and area under the curve, which describe the rate and extent of absorption of the drug. The ratio of each PK characteristic of the generic drug to the reference drug is computed; the ideal value of this ratio is 1:1, or just 1.00 (indicating a perfect match, or perfect bioequivalence). Because this ideal is probably unattainable, the US Food and Drug Administration requires that the 90% confidence interval of the PK ratio should lie between 0.80 and 1.25. For the entire 90% confidence interval to meet this requirement, the mean PK value of the generic product should actually lie quite close to that of the reference standard. Therefore, the variation between the generic and the reference is actually small. These concepts are explained in this article with the help of simple, easy-to-understand examples.

  9. Basic training requirements for the use of dental CBCT by dentists: a position paper prepared by the European Academy of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology.

    PubMed

    Brown, J; Jacobs, R; Levring Jäghagen, E; Lindh, C; Baksi, G; Schulze, D; Schulze, R

    2014-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) is a relatively new imaging modality, which is now widely available to dentists for examining hard tissues in the dental and maxillofacial regions. CBCT gives a three-dimensional depiction of anatomy and pathology, which is similar to medical CT and uses doses generally higher than those used in conventional dental imaging. The European Academy of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology recognizes that dentists receive training in two-dimensional dental imaging as undergraduates, but most of them have received little or no training in the application and interpretation of cross-sectional three-dimensional imaging. This document identifies the roles of dentists involved in the use of CBCT, examines the training requirements for the justification, acquisition and interpretation of CBCT imaging and makes recommendations for further training of dentists in Europe who intend to be involved in any aspect of CBCT imaging. Two levels of training are recognized. Level 1 is intended to train dentists who prescribe CBCT imaging, such that they may request appropriately and understand the resultant reported images. Level 2 is intended to train to a more advanced level and covers the understanding and skills needed to justify, carry out and interpret a CBCT examination. These recommendations are not intended to create specialists in CBCT imaging but to offer guidance on the training of all dentists to enable the safe use of CBCT in the dentoalveolar region.

  10. Basic training requirements for the use of dental CBCT by dentists: a position paper prepared by the European Academy of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, R; Levring Jäghagen, E; Lindh, C; Baksi, G; Schulze, D; Schulze, R

    2014-01-01

    Cone beam CT (CBCT) is a relatively new imaging modality, which is now widely available to dentists for examining hard tissues in the dental and maxillofacial regions. CBCT gives a three-dimensional depiction of anatomy and pathology, which is similar to medical CT and uses doses generally higher than those used in conventional dental imaging. The European Academy of DentoMaxilloFacial Radiology recognizes that dentists receive training in two-dimensional dental imaging as undergraduates, but most of them have received little or no training in the application and interpretation of cross-sectional three-dimensional imaging. This document identifies the roles of dentists involved in the use of CBCT, examines the training requirements for the justification, acquisition and interpretation of CBCT imaging and makes recommendations for further training of dentists in Europe who intend to be involved in any aspect of CBCT imaging. Two levels of training are recognized. Level 1 is intended to train dentists who prescribe CBCT imaging, such that they may request appropriately and understand the resultant reported images. Level 2 is intended to train to a more advanced level and covers the understanding and skills needed to justify, carry out and interpret a CBCT examination. These recommendations are not intended to create specialists in CBCT imaging but to offer guidance on the training of all dentists to enable the safe use of CBCT in the dentoalveolar region. PMID:24132023

  11. 45 CFR 1356.40 - Adoption assistance program: Administrative requirements to implement section 473 of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E § 1356.40 Adoption assistance... requirements of section 475(3) of the Act and must: (1) Be signed and in effect at the time of or prior to...

  12. 45 CFR 1356.40 - Adoption assistance program: Administrative requirements to implement section 473 of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E § 1356.40 Adoption assistance... requirements of section 475(3) of the Act and must: (1) Be signed and in effect at the time of or prior to...

  13. 45 CFR 1356.40 - Adoption assistance program: Administrative requirements to implement section 473 of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION ON CHILDREN, YOUTH AND FAMILIES, FOSTER CARE MAINTENANCE PAYMENTS, ADOPTION ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E § 1356.40 Adoption assistance... requirements of section 475(3) of the Act and must: (1) Be signed and in effect at the time of or prior to...

  14. Monitoring of vital signs during dental care.

    PubMed

    Fukayama, Haruhisa; Yagiela, John A

    2006-04-01

    Advances in medicine have greatly increased the survival of patients with severe health problems and have significantly prolonged life in elderly individuals with systemic disorders. Concomitant advances in dentistry and evolving societal expectations regarding dental health and function have likewise ensured that these patients are increasingly retaining their teeth and/or seeking dental care. The administration of local anaesthetics and the performance of extensive dental procedures may cause stress and systemic disturbances in such patients. In order to avoid potentially serious reactions, dentists are obligated to monitor continuously their medically challenged patients. Monitoring provides three important benefits. First, it helps the dentist detect acute medical emergencies that may require an immediate response. Second, monitoring may reveal gradual deleterious trends that can often be easily reversed before a true emergency occurs. Third, monitoring can assist the dentist in evaluating the efficacy of any emergency treatments or preventive measures that are rendered. The purposes of this article are to: briefly review monitoring techniques and devices, discuss their suitability for use in the dental office, and provide some tips for their application during dental care. In overall decreasing order of routine importance, monitoring resources include the following: responsible personnel, non-invasive blood pressure monitor, pulse oximeter, ECG, and the pretracheal stethoscope or capnograph. PMID:16620039

  15. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  16. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1)...

  17. 21 CFR 872.3100 - Dental amalgamator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgamator. 872.3100 Section 872.3100 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3100 Dental amalgamator. (a) Identification. A...

  18. 21 CFR 872.3275 - Dental cement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental cement. 872.3275 Section 872.3275 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3275 Dental cement. (a) Zinc oxide-eugenol—(1)...

  19. Processing dental claims electronically.

    PubMed

    Mylan, V

    1996-01-01

    A reduction of healthcare costs is an important part of the reform our society is demanding. We cannot ignore this. Lowering administrative costs is a particularly good way to reduce health care expenditures since this decreases the cost without compromising the quality of services. Implementing an EDI structure for submitting claims and receiving claim remittance advice is one way to significantly reduce the cost of health care by lowering administrative costs. EDI allows the consumer to receive the same level of health care at a lower cost. To accomplish this goal, the industry must accept some standardization. While providers, dental software vendors, and clearinghouses request an electronic claims system that is uniform-payers (insurance companies, State-administered Medicaid programs, etc.) often insist on proprietary formats that fit their own requirements. This impedes the implementation of a successful electronic interchange of data. Under the leadership of the Canadian Dental Association, payers and dentists in Canada were able to create a superior electronic claim processing network, CDAnet. Providers and payers using CDAnet agree that the system works very well. The Canadian dentist does not pay for this service, and insurance companies benefit significantly. Dentists in the USA do not have a universal electronic claim processing network. A USA dentist who wants to send claims electronically has limited selections and often pays additional fees. Organized dentistry has the best opportunity of establishing electronic data interchange between providers and payers in the USA. The first step is creating a universal electronic claim processing system. This system must protect confidentiality by maintaining data that keeps anonymous provider and patient data. It is the dentist who produces the claim. Dentists must become involved in the decisions affecting electronic claim processing. The proper guidance from organized dentistry will enable providers, payers

  20. 45 CFR 1336.69 - Reporting requirements: Responsibilities of the Loan Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (vi) Amount delinquent/defaulted, if any. (2) Financial status of the RLF: (i) Administrative cost.... (d) The Loan Administrator must submit to the Department a quarterly SF-269, Financial Status Report... items discussed, correspondence with the borrower, progress reports and analyses. (2) Monthly status...

  1. 29 CFR 2590.606-4 - Notice requirements for plan administrators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... the Social Security Administration, under title II or XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 401 et... disability by the Social Security Administration regarding a covered employee, qualified beneficiary, or... qualified beneficiary of any termination of continuation coverage that takes effect earlier than the end...

  2. 29 CFR 2590.606-4 - Notice requirements for plan administrators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... the Social Security Administration, under title II or XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 401 et... disability by the Social Security Administration regarding a covered employee, qualified beneficiary, or... qualified beneficiary of any termination of continuation coverage that takes effect earlier than the end...

  3. 29 CFR 2590.606-4 - Notice requirements for plan administrators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the Social Security Administration, under title II or XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 401 et... disability by the Social Security Administration regarding a covered employee, qualified beneficiary, or... qualified beneficiary of any termination of continuation coverage that takes effect earlier than the end...

  4. 29 CFR 2590.606-4 - Notice requirements for plan administrators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... the Social Security Administration, under title II or XVI of the Social Security Act (42 U.S.C. 401 et... disability by the Social Security Administration regarding a covered employee, qualified beneficiary, or... relating to the use of electronic media. (g) Model notice. The appendix to this section contains a...

  5. Post-training cocaine administration facilitates habit learning and requires the infralimbic cortex and dorsolateral striatum.

    PubMed

    Schmitzer-Torbert, Neil; Apostolidis, Steven; Amoa, Romeo; O'Rear, Connor; Kaster, Michael; Stowers, Josh; Ritz, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Human drug addiction is a complex disorder, in which exogenous substances are able to recruit and maintain behaviors involved in drug taking. Many drugs that are addictive in humans are able to act on natural brain systems for learning and memory, and while many memory systems may be affected by addictive drugs, work with operant tasks has shown that addictive drugs (e.g. cocaine and alcohol) are particularly effective in recruiting habit learning systems, compared to natural rewards. It is currently unknown if the ability of addictive drugs to facilitate habit learning depends on a direct action on habit learning systems in the brain, versus the rewarding properties of drug administration. To differentiate between these options, rats were trained to perform two actions (lever pressing), each of which was rewarded with a different natural reward. After acquiring the behavior, rats received three training sessions which were followed by post-training injections of saline or cocaine (5 or 10mg/kg, i.p.). Using sensory-specific satiety, extinction tests revealed that lever pressing for actions which were paired with saline were sensitive to devaluation (typical of goal-directed behaviors) while actions which were paired with cocaine were not sensitive to devaluation (typical of habitual behaviors). Lesions of the infralimbic or dorsolateral striatum were able to block the action of post-training cocaine injections. These data indicate that, within individual rats, cocaine injections facilitate the transition of behavior to habitual control for actions that have been recently performed, without a general facilitation of habit learning, and that this action of cocaine requires brain areas that are critical for learning natural habits.

  6. Post-training cocaine administration facilitates habit learning and requires the infralimbic cortex and dorsolateral striatum.

    PubMed

    Schmitzer-Torbert, Neil; Apostolidis, Steven; Amoa, Romeo; O'Rear, Connor; Kaster, Michael; Stowers, Josh; Ritz, Robert

    2015-02-01

    Human drug addiction is a complex disorder, in which exogenous substances are able to recruit and maintain behaviors involved in drug taking. Many drugs that are addictive in humans are able to act on natural brain systems for learning and memory, and while many memory systems may be affected by addictive drugs, work with operant tasks has shown that addictive drugs (e.g. cocaine and alcohol) are particularly effective in recruiting habit learning systems, compared to natural rewards. It is currently unknown if the ability of addictive drugs to facilitate habit learning depends on a direct action on habit learning systems in the brain, versus the rewarding properties of drug administration. To differentiate between these options, rats were trained to perform two actions (lever pressing), each of which was rewarded with a different natural reward. After acquiring the behavior, rats received three training sessions which were followed by post-training injections of saline or cocaine (5 or 10mg/kg, i.p.). Using sensory-specific satiety, extinction tests revealed that lever pressing for actions which were paired with saline were sensitive to devaluation (typical of goal-directed behaviors) while actions which were paired with cocaine were not sensitive to devaluation (typical of habitual behaviors). Lesions of the infralimbic or dorsolateral striatum were able to block the action of post-training cocaine injections. These data indicate that, within individual rats, cocaine injections facilitate the transition of behavior to habitual control for actions that have been recently performed, without a general facilitation of habit learning, and that this action of cocaine requires brain areas that are critical for learning natural habits. PMID:25460040

  7. Post-training cocaine administration facilitates habit learning and requires the infralimbic cortex and dorsolateral striatum

    PubMed Central

    Schmitzer-Torbert, Neil; Apostolidis, Steven; Amoa, Romeo; O’Rear, Connor; Kaster, Michael; Stowers, Josh; Ritz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Human drug addiction is a complex disorder, in which exogenous substances are able to recruit and maintain behaviors involved in drug taking. Many drugs that are addictive in humans are able to act on natural brain systems for learning and memory, and while many memory systems may be affected by addictive drugs, work with operant tasks has shown that addictive drugs (e.g. cocaine and alcohol) are particularly effective in recruiting habit learning systems, compared to natural rewards. It is currently unknown if the ability of addictive drugs to facilitate habit learning depends on a direct action on habit learning systems in the brain, versus the rewarding properties of drug administration. To differentiate between these options, rats were trained to perform two actions (lever pressing), each of which was rewarded with a different natural reward. After acquiring the behavior, rats received three training sessions which were followed by post-training injections of saline or cocaine (5 or 10 mg/kg, i.p.). Using sensory-specific satiety, extinction tests revealed that lever pressing for actions which were paired with saline were sensitive to devaluation (typical of goal-directed behaviors) while actions which were paired with cocaine were not sensitive to devaluation (typical of habitual behaviors). Lesions of the infralimbic or dorsolateral striatum were able to block the action of post-training cocaine injections. These data indicate that, within individual rats, cocaine injections facilitate the transition of behavior to habitual control for actions that have been recently performed, without a general facilitation of habit learning, and that this action of cocaine requires brain areas that are critical for learning natural habits. PMID:25460040

  8. Dental sealants

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000779.htm Dental sealants To use the sharing features on this ... case a sealant needs to be replaced. How Dental Sealants Are Applied Your dentist applies sealants on ...

  9. Maintenance of an Adequate Dental Hygiene Education System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ley, Eugene; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Administrative decisions about the future of dental hygiene programs are often based on inadequate information about employment trends and about the importance of the dental hygienist in dental practices. Studies indicate that demand for dental hygiene services will remain high in the 1980s. (Author/MLW)

  10. 45 CFR 1336.69 - Reporting requirements: Responsibilities of the Loan Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES THE ADMINISTRATION... expenditures; (ii) Level of base capital; (iii) Level of current capital; (iv) Amount of ANA funding;...

  11. Review of Spaceflight Dental Emergencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menon, Anil

    2012-01-01

    All exploration class missions--extending beyond earth's orbit--differ from existing orbital missions by being of longer duration and often not having a means of evacuation. If an exploration mission extends beyond a year, then there will be a greater lapse since the crewmembers last terrestrial dental exams, which routinely occur each year. This increased time since professional dental care could increase the chance of a dental emergency such as intractable pain, dental decay requiring a temporary filling, crown replacement, exposed pulp, abscess, tooth avulsion, or toothache. Additionally, any dental emergency will have to be treated in-flight with available resources and personnel who may not have extensive training in dental care. Thus, dental emergencies are an important risk to assess in preparation for exploration missions.

  12. Is stopping of anticoagulant therapy really required in a minor dental surgery? - How about in an endodontic microsurgery?

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Yong-Wook

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, oral anticoagulants are commonly prescribed to numerous patients for preventing cardiovascular accident such as thromboembolism. An important side effect of anticoagulant is anti-hemostasis. In a major surgery, the oral anticoagulant therapy (OAT) regimen must be changed before the surgery for proper post-operative bleeding control. However, in a minor dental surgery and endodontic surgery, the necessity for changing or discontinuing the OAT is open to debate. In this study, risks of the consequences were weighed and analyzed. In patients who stop the OAT, the occurrence of thromboembolic complication is rare but the result is fatal. In patients who continuing the OAT, post-operative bleeding can be controlled well with the local hemostatic measures. In the endodontic surgery, there are almost no studies about this issue. The intra-operative bleeding control is particularly important in the endodontic surgery because of its delicate and sensitive procedures such as inspection of resected root surface using dental microscope and retrograde filling. Further studies are necessary about this issue in the viewpoint of endodontic surgery. PMID:24010076

  13. 34 CFR 654.60 - What requirements must an SEA meet in the administration of this program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What requirements must an SEA meet in the administration of this program? 654.60 Section 654.60 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ROBERT C. BYRD...

  14. 26 CFR 1.414(r)-6 - Qualified separate line of business-administrative scrutiny requirement-individual determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...-administrative scrutiny requirement-individual determinations. 1.414(r)-6 Section 1.414(r)-6 Internal Revenue... Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(r)-6 Qualified separate line of business... determined under § 1.414(r)-3) that does not satisfy any of the safe harbors in § 1.414(r)-5 for a...

  15. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... radioactivity; (iv) Chemistry of byproduct material for medical use; and (v) Radiation biology; and (2) Has...

  16. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... radioactivity; (iv) Chemistry of byproduct material for medical use; and (v) Radiation biology; and (2) Has...

  17. 10 CFR 35.396 - Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Training for the parenteral administration of unsealed byproduct material requiring a written directive. 35.396 Section 35.396 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION... radioactivity; (iv) Chemistry of byproduct material for medical use; and (v) Radiation biology; and (2) Has...

  18. The Effects of the Chapter 2, ECIA Consolidation on the Administrative and Paperwork Requirements for Local School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastings, Anne H.; Bartell, Ted

    The purpose of this report is to analyze how the administrative and paperwork requirements with which local school districts must comply have been affected by the consolidation of 28 federal education programs into the Chapter 2, Education Consolidation and Improvement Act (ECIA) block grant. The information reported is based on interviews with…

  19. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colston, Bill W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Dasilva, Luiz B.; Everett, Matthew J.; Stroeve, Pieter; Otis, L. L.

    1998-09-01

    We present here the first in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) images of human dental tissue. A novel dental optical coherence tomography system has been developed. This system incorporates the interferometer sample arm and transverse scanning optics into a handpiece that can be used intraorally to image human dental tissues. The average imaging depth of this system varied from 3 mm in hard tissues to 1.5 mm in soft tissues. We discuss the application of this imaging system for dentistry and illustrate the potential of our dental OCT system for diagnosis of periodontal disease, detection of caries, and evaluation of dental restorations.

  20. 42 CFR 137.405 - Is the Secretary required to report to Congress on administration of Title V and the funding...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... administration of Title V and the funding requirements presently funded or unfunded? 137.405 Section 137.405... Is the Secretary required to report to Congress on administration of Title V and the funding... report regarding the administration of Title V. The report shall include a detailed analysis of...

  1. 42 CFR 137.405 - Is the Secretary required to report to Congress on administration of Title V and the funding...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... administration of Title V and the funding requirements presently funded or unfunded? 137.405 Section 137.405... Is the Secretary required to report to Congress on administration of Title V and the funding... report regarding the administration of Title V. The report shall include a detailed analysis of...

  2. 42 CFR 137.405 - Is the Secretary required to report to Congress on administration of Title V and the funding...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... administration of Title V and the funding requirements presently funded or unfunded? 137.405 Section 137.405... Is the Secretary required to report to Congress on administration of Title V and the funding... report regarding the administration of Title V. The report shall include a detailed analysis of...

  3. 42 CFR 137.405 - Is the Secretary required to report to Congress on administration of Title V and the funding...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... administration of Title V and the funding requirements presently funded or unfunded? 137.405 Section 137.405... Is the Secretary required to report to Congress on administration of Title V and the funding... report regarding the administration of Title V. The report shall include a detailed analysis of...

  4. 42 CFR 137.405 - Is the Secretary required to report to Congress on administration of Title V and the funding...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... administration of Title V and the funding requirements presently funded or unfunded? 137.405 Section 137.405... Is the Secretary required to report to Congress on administration of Title V and the funding... report regarding the administration of Title V. The report shall include a detailed analysis of...

  5. 34 CFR 682.610 - Administrative and fiscal requirements for participating schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... regulations in this part and in 34 CFR part 668; (2) Follow the record retention and examination provisions in this part and in 34 CFR 668.24; and (3) Submit all reports required by this part and 34 CFR part 668 to the Secretary. (b) Loan record requirements. In addition to records required by 34 CFR part 668,...

  6. 34 CFR 682.610 - Administrative and fiscal requirements for participating schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... regulations in this part and in 34 CFR part 668; (2) Follow the record retention and examination provisions in this part and in 34 CFR 668.24; and (3) Submit all reports required by this part and 34 CFR part 668 to the Secretary. (b) Loan record requirements. In addition to records required by 34 CFR part 668,...

  7. 34 CFR 682.610 - Administrative and fiscal requirements for participating schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... regulations in this part and in 34 CFR part 668; (2) Follow the record retention and examination provisions in this part and in 34 CFR 668.24; and (3) Submit all reports required by this part and 34 CFR part 668 to the Secretary. (b) Loan record requirements. In addition to records required by 34 CFR part 668,...

  8. 24 CFR 1003.501 - Applicability of uniform administrative requirements and cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ‘high-risk’ grantees”. (4) Section 85.20, “Standards for financial management systems,” except paragraph... 24 CFR part 44) and with the following sections of 24 CFR part 85 “Uniform Administrative... and suspended parties”. (13) Section 85.36, “Procurement,” except paragraphs (a) States,...

  9. 24 CFR 1003.501 - Applicability of uniform administrative requirements and cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ‘high-risk’ grantees”. (4) Section 85.20, “Standards for financial management systems,” except paragraph... 24 CFR part 44) and with the following sections of 24 CFR part 85 “Uniform Administrative... and suspended parties”. (13) Section 85.36, “Procurement,” except paragraphs (a) States,...

  10. 26 CFR 301.7430-2 - Requirements and procedures for recovery of reasonable administrative costs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... administrative proceeding, then an affidavit that specialized skills and distinctive knowledge as described in that section were necessary in the representation of the taxpayer in the proceeding and that there is a limited availability of representatives possessing such skills and knowledge as described in that...

  11. 34 CFR 461.40 - What are the State and local administrative costs requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION STATE...'s award from the SEA must be expended for adult education instructional activities. (2) The... 34 Education 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the State and local administrative...

  12. 34 CFR 461.40 - What are the State and local administrative costs requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION STATE...'s award from the SEA must be expended for adult education instructional activities. (2) The... 34 Education 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false What are the State and local administrative...

  13. 34 CFR 461.40 - What are the State and local administrative costs requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION STATE...'s award from the SEA must be expended for adult education instructional activities. (2) The... 34 Education 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false What are the State and local administrative...

  14. 34 CFR 461.40 - What are the State and local administrative costs requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION STATE...'s award from the SEA must be expended for adult education instructional activities. (2) The... 34 Education 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false What are the State and local administrative...

  15. 34 CFR 461.40 - What are the State and local administrative costs requirements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Continued) OFFICE OF VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ADULT EDUCATION STATE...'s award from the SEA must be expended for adult education instructional activities. (2) The... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the State and local administrative...

  16. Required Preliminary Administrative Service Credential Program Culminating Activities in California NCATE Accredited Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wildman, Louis

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this effort is to share information about the variety of culminating activities used in the acquisition of the California Preliminary Administrative Services Credential. Knowledge of these varying culminating activities and related practices has not previously been readily available. The culminating activities among…

  17. 27 CFR 17.136 - Compliance with Food and Drug Administration requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... flavors or animal feed flavors) in accordance with laws and regulations administered by FDA. Under § 17... violate a ban or restriction of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) pertaining to such products. If FDA bans or restricts the use of any ingredient in such a way that further manufacture of...

  18. 77 FR 31026 - Requirements for Importing Food and Drug Administration Regulated Products Into the United States

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... to be discussed are FDA regulations with respect to importing pharmaceutical products, medical... meeting. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the following meeting..., Chicago, IL 60661; 312-596-4217; email: lisa.misevicz@fda.hhs.gov . Registration: Send...

  19. 24 CFR 1003.501 - Applicability of uniform administrative requirements and cost principles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 CFR part 44) and with the following sections of 24 CFR part 85 “Uniform Administrative...) Section 85.33, “Supplies”. (11) Section 85.34, “Copyrights”. (12) Section 85.35, “Subawards to debarred... retention period referenced in § 85.42(b) pertaining to individual ICDBG activities starts from the date...

  20. Dental hygienists' perceptions of barriers to graduate education.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Linda D; Bailey, Angela

    2011-08-01

    To advance the profession of dental hygiene, graduate education is necessary to support growth in research, education, administration, and practice in the discipline and to sustain credibility in a climate in which other health professions require entry-level master's and doctoral degrees. The purpose of this study was to explore what dental hygienists perceive as barriers to pursuing a graduate degree. A survey was developed based on the literature and other national surveys. Data were collected from 160 respondents to the survey: 50 percent held an entry-level baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene, while the rest held an entry-level associate degree (48 percent) or certificate (2 percent) in dental hygiene. All respondents had completed a bachelor's degree. The top five barriers these respondents identified in pursuing graduate education were as follows: 1) cost of graduate education, 2) family responsibilities are too great, 3) concerns about personal funding to pay for graduate education, 4) finding time for graduate school while working, and 5) fear of thesis research. Dental hygiene is one of the few health professions that still have entry-level degrees at the associate and baccalaureate levels. The profession needs to reduce such barriers to enable dental hygienists to pursue graduate education and thus ensure an adequate supply of future leaders, educators, and researchers.

  1. Dental hygienists' perceptions of barriers to graduate education.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Linda D; Bailey, Angela

    2011-08-01

    To advance the profession of dental hygiene, graduate education is necessary to support growth in research, education, administration, and practice in the discipline and to sustain credibility in a climate in which other health professions require entry-level master's and doctoral degrees. The purpose of this study was to explore what dental hygienists perceive as barriers to pursuing a graduate degree. A survey was developed based on the literature and other national surveys. Data were collected from 160 respondents to the survey: 50 percent held an entry-level baccalaureate degree in dental hygiene, while the rest held an entry-level associate degree (48 percent) or certificate (2 percent) in dental hygiene. All respondents had completed a bachelor's degree. The top five barriers these respondents identified in pursuing graduate education were as follows: 1) cost of graduate education, 2) family responsibilities are too great, 3) concerns about personal funding to pay for graduate education, 4) finding time for graduate school while working, and 5) fear of thesis research. Dental hygiene is one of the few health professions that still have entry-level degrees at the associate and baccalaureate levels. The profession needs to reduce such barriers to enable dental hygienists to pursue graduate education and thus ensure an adequate supply of future leaders, educators, and researchers. PMID:21828296

  2. 25 CFR 700.477 - Administration of financial assistance and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... including Federal Procurement Regulations (41 CFR subpart 1-15.2) for determining the reasonableness... including Federal Procurement Regulations (41 CFR parts 1-1 through 1-30). Recordkeeping requirements for... requirements; and (2) Federal Management Circular 74-4 5 CFR part 1310, entitled “Cost Principles Applicable...

  3. 25 CFR 700.477 - Administration of financial assistance and recordkeeping requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... including Federal Procurement Regulations (41 CFR subpart 1-15.2) for determining the reasonableness... including Federal Procurement Regulations (41 CFR parts 1-1 through 1-30). Recordkeeping requirements for... requirements; and (2) Federal Management Circular 74-4 5 CFR part 1310, entitled “Cost Principles Applicable...

  4. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Manned Spacecraft Center data based requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The results are summarized of a study to determine the requirements of a data management system to meet the needs of MSC in mission planning and program and resource management during the 1975 time frame. The study addresses overall system requirements, implementation considerations, and cost/benefit comparisions.

  5. Supervising dentists' perspectives on the effectiveness of community-based dental education.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Preethy; McFarland, Kimberly; Lange, Brian; Ojha, Diptee; Chandak, Aastha

    2014-08-01

    The Commission on Dental Accreditation recently implemented new predoctoral standards that require dental schools in the United States to provide students with community-based dental education (CBDE) experiences. The objective of this study was to examine the perspectives of supervising dentists (also known as dental preceptors) at rural CBDE sites regarding the University of Nebraska Medical Center program's effectiveness in improving the competencies of dental students. Surveys were sent to all forty-three preceptors in two subsequent years: nineteen responded to all questions in 2012 and sixteen in 2013, for a total of thirty-five participants. These preceptors evaluated the effectiveness of the program based on the American Dental Education Association (ADEA) Competencies for the New General Dentist. Overall, these preceptors rated the CBDE program as effective (excellent or very good) in improving the students' competence in five of the six ADEA domains: Critical Thinking, Professionalism, Communication and Interpersonal Skills, Health Promotion, Patient Care: Assessment, Diagnosis, and Treatment Planning, and Patient Care: Establishment and Maintenance of Oral Health. Practice Management and Informatics was found to be the least effective domain of competence. CBDE provides a unique opportunity to develop a competent dental workforce with an appreciation for the value of community service. Applying a competency-based framework to program evaluation can provide valuable information on program effectiveness to program administrators, educators, and the dental preceptors.

  6. 26 CFR 1.414(r)-6 - Qualified separate line of business-administrative scrutiny requirement-individual determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...-administrative scrutiny requirement-individual determinations. 1.414(r)-6 Section 1.414(r)-6 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(r)-6 Qualified separate line of business... determined under § 1.414(r)-3) that does not satisfy any of the safe harbors in § 1.414(r)-5 for a...

  7. 26 CFR 1.414(r)-6 - Qualified separate line of business-administrative scrutiny requirement-individual determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...-administrative scrutiny requirement-individual determinations. 1.414(r)-6 Section 1.414(r)-6 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(r)-6 Qualified separate line of business... determined under § 1.414(r)-3) that does not satisfy any of the safe harbors in § 1.414(r)-5 for a...

  8. 26 CFR 1.414(r)-6 - Qualified separate line of business-administrative scrutiny requirement-individual determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...-administrative scrutiny requirement-individual determinations. 1.414(r)-6 Section 1.414(r)-6 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(r)-6 Qualified separate line of business... determined under § 1.414(r)-3) that does not satisfy any of the safe harbors in § 1.414(r)-5 for a...

  9. 26 CFR 1.414(r)-6 - Qualified separate line of business-administrative scrutiny requirement-individual determinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...-administrative scrutiny requirement-individual determinations. 1.414(r)-6 Section 1.414(r)-6 Internal Revenue... (CONTINUED) Pension, Profit-Sharing, Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(r)-6 Qualified separate line of business... determined under § 1.414(r)-3) that does not satisfy any of the safe harbors in § 1.414(r)-5 for a...

  10. Is oxygen required before atropine administration in organophosphorus or carbamate pesticide poisoning? – A cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Konickx, L. A.; Bingham, K.

    2014-01-01

    Background Early and adequate atropine administration in organophosphorus (OP) or carbamate insecticide poisoning improves outcome. However, some authors advise that oxygen must be given before atropine due to the risk of inducing ventricular dysrhythmias in hypoxic patients. Because oxygen is frequently unavailable in district hospitals of rural Asia, where the majority of patients with insecticide poisoning present, this guidance has significant implications for patient care. The published evidence for this advice is weak. We therefore performed a patient cohort analysis to look for early cardiac deaths in patients poisoned by anticholinesterase pesticides. Methods We analysed a prospective Sri Lankan cohort of OP or carbamate-poisoned patients treated with early atropine without the benefit of oxygen for evidence of early deaths. The incidence of fatal primary cardiac arrests within 3 h of admission was used as a sensitive (but non-specific) marker of possible ventricular dysrhythmias. Results The cohort consisted of 1957 patients. The incidence of a primary cardiac death within 3 h of atropine administration was 4 (0.2%) of 1957 patients. The majority of deaths occurred at a later time point from respiratory complications of poisoning. Conclusion We found no evidence of a high number of early deaths in an observational study of 1957 patients routinely given atropine before oxygen that might support guidance that oxygen must be given before atropine. The published literature indicates that early and rapid administration of atropine during resuscitation is life-saving. Therefore, whether oxygen is available or not, early atropinisation of OP- and carbamate-poisoned patients should be performed. PMID:24810796

  11. Management competencies required of administrative and clinical practitioners in the new millennium.

    PubMed

    Schell, B A; Slater, D Y

    1998-10-01

    Changes in the health care environment necessitate revisiting management-related competencies for both clinical and administrative practitioners. Major changes include the shift from recruitment to reengineering, direct service to multiple service models, department to program management, professional standards to market-driven standards, and single-system to multisystem management. Important competencies include the ability to identify and implement flexible staffing, to use communication technologies to support staff members across multiple sites, to understand of the business of health care, and to create innovative service delivery models consistent with the core values of the profession.

  12. Dental Implants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Procedures Dental Implants Dentures Direct Bonding Implants versus Bridges Orthodontics and Aligners Periodontal Plastic Surgery Porcelain Crowns Porcelain Fixed Bridges Porcelain Veneers Repairing Chipped Teeth Teeth Whitening Tooth- ...

  13. 45 CFR 164.414 - Administrative requirements and burden of proof.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... STANDARDS AND RELATED REQUIREMENTS SECURITY AND PRIVACY Notification in the Case of Breach of Unsecured... the event of a use or disclosure in violation of subpart E, the covered entity or business...

  14. Dental Laboratory Technology Program Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia Univ., Athens. Dept. of Vocational Education.

    This program guide contains the standard dental laboratory technology curriculum for both diploma programs and associate degree programs in technical institutes in Georgia. The curriculum encompasses the minimum competencies required for entry-level workers in the dental laboratory technology field. The general information section contains the…

  15. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The handbook contains laws, rules, and regulations of the New York State Education Department that govern dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state. It describes licensure requirements and includes complete application forms and instructions for obtaining license and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist. Applicants are…

  16. 21 CFR 1316.07 - Requirement for administrative inspection warrant; exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... such warrant shall not be required for establishments applying for initial registration under the Act... premises as set forth in § 1316.08; (b) In situations presenting imminent danger to health or safety; (c) In situations involving inspection of conveyances where there is reasonable cause to obtain a...

  17. Reflections on academic careers by current dental school faculty.

    PubMed

    Rogér, James M; Wehmeyer, Meggan M H; Milliner, Matthew S

    2008-04-01

    During the inaugural year (2006-07) of the Academic Dental Careers Fellowship Program (ADCFP), 110 faculty members at ten different dental schools were interviewed by dental students who were participating as ADCFP fellows in this year-long program designed to introduce them to faculty roles and activities and help them gain an appreciation for the rewards and issues associated with academic life. The goals, format, and components of the ADCFP are described in a companion article in this issue of the Journal of Dental Education. One of the fellows' assignments during the ADCFP was to interview faculty at various academic ranks who had differing degrees of work emphasis in teaching, research, service/patient care, and administration. Sixty-nine (63 percent of the total) of these interviews were reviewed and analyzed by the authors, who were student fellows in the ADCFP during 2006-07. The purpose of these interviews was to provide the fellows with insight into the positive aspects and challenges in becoming and remaining a dental school faculty member. This aggregate perspective of the interviews conducted at ten dental schools highlights the motivations and challenges that confront a dentist during the process of choosing a career in academic dentistry and determining if dental education is a good fit for each individual who elects to pursue this pathway. Thematic analysis of the interviews revealed several factors consistently identified by faculty across the schools as being positive influences on the quality of the academic work environment and career satisfaction: mentorship and student interaction, opportunities for scholarship (research and discovery), job diversity, intellectual challenge, satisfaction with the nature of academic work, lifestyle/family compatibility, flexibility, lifelong learning, professional duty, and lab responsibility. A series of negative themes were also consistently identified: bureaucracy/administrative burdens and barriers, time

  18. Dental Hygienist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental hygienist, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 9 units specific to the occupation of dental hygienist. The following skill areas are covered in…

  19. Dental Implants.

    PubMed

    Zohrabian, Vahe M; Sonick, Michael; Hwang, Debby; Abrahams, James J

    2015-10-01

    Dental implants restore function to near normal in partially or completely edentulous patients. A root-form implant is the most frequently used type of dental implant today. The basis for dental implants is osseointegration, in which osteoblasts grow and directly integrate with the surface of titanium posts surgically embedded into the jaw. Radiologic assessment is critical in the preoperative evaluation of the dental implant patient, as the exact height, width, and contour of the alveolar ridge must be determined. Moreover, the precise locations of the maxillary sinuses and mandibular canals, as well as their relationships to the site of implant surgery must be ascertained. As such, radiologists must be familiar with implant design and surgical placement, as well as augmentation procedures utilized in those patients with insufficient bone in the maxilla and mandible to support dental implants.

  20. Information requirements of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's safety, environmental health, and occupational medicine programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whyte, A. A.

    1978-01-01

    A survey of the internal and external reporting and recordkeeping procedures of these programs was conducted and the major problems associated with them are outlined. The impact of probable future requirements on existing information systems is evaluated. This report also presents the benefits of combining the safety and health information systems into one computerized system and recommendations for the development and scope of that system.

  1. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Manned Spacecraft Center data base requirements study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    A study was conducted to evaluate the types of data that the Manned Spacecraft Center (MSC) should automate in order to make available essential management and technical information to support MSC's various functions and missions. In addition, the software and hardware capabilities to best handle the storage and retrieval of this data were analyzed. Based on the results of this study, recommendations are presented for a unified data base that provides a cost effective solution to MSC's data automation requirements. The recommendations are projected through a time frame that includes the earth orbit space station.

  2. Dental OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilder-Smith, Petra; Otis, Linda; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Zhongping

    This chapter describes the applications of OCT for imaging in vivo dental and oral tissue. The oral cavity is a diverse environment that includes oral mucosa, gingival tissues, teeth and their supporting structures. Because OCT can image both hard and soft tissues of the oral cavity at high resolution, it offers the unique capacity to identity dental disease before destructive changes have progressed. OCT images depict clinically important anatomical features such as the location of soft tissue attachments, morphological changes in gingival tissue, tooth decay, enamel thickness and decay, as well as the structural integrity of dental restorations. OCT imaging allows for earlier intervention than is possible with current diagnostic modalities.

  3. Authority of the Food and Drug Administration to require data access and control use rights in the Sentinel data network.

    PubMed

    Evans, Barbara J

    2010-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act of 2007 (FDAAA) authorized the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to develop a 100-million-person health data network known as the Sentinel system. When fully operational, the Sentinel network will offer a very rich, very large health data resource that has the potential to become one of history's most powerful engines of biomedical innovation and clinical translation of discoveries. Who controls this asset will be a matter of great scientific and commercial importance. This article explores two key questions--data access and use rights--that are under debate as various parties jostle for control of the network: First, does FDA have legal authority to require private healthcare data environments--such as insurers, healthcare providers, pharmacists and other entities that hold data in administrative and clinical databases--to make data available for inclusion in the network? Second, who will decide how the network is used, once it is built? The article explains why a neutral analysis of these questions is essential as FDA designs the governance framework for protecting the diverse stakeholders who will be touched by the Sentinel network. The conclusion describes threats to network operations, including federal and state constitutional claims and state legislative interventions, which could arise if FDA fails to devote timely attention to these issues.

  4. Administration of high school competency requirements for chemical and petroleum engineers

    SciTech Connect

    Rollins, J.T.

    1984-01-01

    Increased instructional demands on engineering schools for chemical and petroleum graduates, caused by variations in energy prices, has led to efforts to better define and assess the competencies of students entering these fields. The standard of measurement of these competencies is that of freshmen grade point average (GPA). Required competencies include problem-solving ability, computer literacy, a knowledge of mathematics, and communications skills. Correlations of GPA with other readily available high school transcript data of high school rank and SAT scores is the traditional predictor of success or nonsuccess, or degree of competency, for these students. This study was concerned with different combinations of predictors than the traditional ones presently in use. Data from 307 students enrolled in chemical and petroleum engineering at Texas Tech University between 1972 and 1977 were subjected to statistical analysis using the procedure of multiple linear regression. The following variables were found to be meaningful predictors of freshman GPA: (1) SAT scores; (2) high school rank relative to class size; (3) advanced placement status; (4) grades in high school science courses; (5) grades in high school mathematics courses. From these variables, five equations were developed for use by the counselor or advisor in placing or advising entering students. These predictive equations yielded an R/sup 2/ value of approximately 0.54.

  5. Dental Fluorosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... when children regularly consume fluoride during the teeth-forming years, age 8 and younger. Most dental fluorosis ... over a long period when the teeth are forming under the gums. Only children aged 8 years ...

  6. Maintaining proper dental records.

    PubMed

    Leeuw, Wilhemina

    2014-01-01

    Referred to as Standard of Care, the legal duty of a dentist requires exercising the degree of skill and care that would be exhibited by other prudent dentists faced with the same patient-care situation. Primarily, the goal of keeping good dental records is to maintain continuity of care. Diligent and complete documentation and charting procedures are essential to fulfilling the Standard of Care. Secondly, because dental records are considered legal documents they help protect the interest of the dentist and/or the patient by establishing the details of the services rendered. Patients today are better educated and more assertive than ever before and dentists must be equipped to protect themselves against malpractice claims. Every record component must be handled as if it could be summoned to a court room and scrutinized by an attorney, judge or jury. Complete, accurate, objective and honest entries in a patient record are the only way to defend against any clinical and/or legal problems that might arise. Most medical and dental malpractice claims arise from an unfavorable interaction with the dentist and not from a poor treatment outcome. By implementing the suggestions mentioned in this course, dental health care professionals can minimize the legal risks associated with the delivery of dental care to promote greater understanding for patients of their rights and privileges to their complete record. PMID:24834675

  7. Dental obturation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Elizabeth; Chudej, Lauren; Bilyeu, Brian; Brostow, Witold

    2006-10-01

    During the last decades, people have tried to develop a better material for use in dental obturation materials. This new material should meet the following requirements: durability, wear resistance, biocompatibility and chemical adhesion to dentin enamel. Wear resistance is very important and it is related with the service life of dental replacements. We have obtained aesthetically promising novel nano composites that can be used as dental replacements. The main objective of this work is to study the scratch and wear resistance of these nano composites. To meet this goal, scratch tests are performed using a micro scratch tester machine (CSEM), where a diamond indenter is used to make the scratch and the penetration of this indenter is measured with high resolution (7nm). We will be looking at the penetration depth (Rp) and the residual (or healing) depth (Rh) to calculate the percent recovery. These measurements represent the scratch resistance of the material.

  8. Quality considerations in dental education in India.

    PubMed

    Virdi, Mandeep S

    2012-03-01

    Undergraduate dental education programs have grown tremendously in India over the last five to six decades, mainly in the private sector, putting significant pressure on resources including faculty. This has raised concerns about the quality of dental education in the country. This article examines the concept of quality as applicable to higher education. It provides a roadmap for application of quality concepts, including steps for improving the effectiveness of teaching and applying Total Quality Management to dental education. It also makes suggestions for college-level and structural-level changes to meet the requirement of improved quality, which includes the addition of dental education as a subject in postgraduate dental programs.

  9. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification....

  10. 21 CFR 872.3110 - Dental amalgam capsule.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Dental amalgam capsule. 872.3110 Section 872.3110 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3110 Dental amalgam capsule. (a) Identification....

  11. 21 CFR 872.6640 - Dental operative unit and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental operative unit and accessories. 872.6640 Section 872.6640 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... intended to supply power to and serve as a base for other dental devices, such as a dental handpiece,...

  12. Analysis of clinical records of dental patients attending Jordan University Hospital: Documentation of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections

    PubMed Central

    Dar-Odeh, Najla; Ryalat, Soukaina; Shayyab, Mohammad; Abu-Hammad, Osama

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze clinical records of dental patients attending the Dental Department at the University of Jordan Hospital: a teaching hospital in Jordan. Analysis aimed at determining whether dental specialists properly documented the drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections given to their patients. Methods: Dental records of the Dental Department at the Jordan University Hospital were reviewed during the period from April 3rd until April 26th 2007 along with the issued prescriptions during that period. Results: A total of 1000 records were reviewed with a total of 53 prescriptions issued during that period. Thirty records documented the prescription by stating the category of the prescribed drug. Only 13 records stated the generic or the trade names of the prescribed drugs. Of these, 5 records contained the full elements of a prescription. As for local anesthetic injections, the term “LA used” was found in 22 records while the names and quantities of the local anesthetics used were documented in only 13 records. Only 5 records documented the full elements of a local anesthetic injection. Conclusion: The essential data of drug prescriptions and local anesthetic injections were poorly documented by the investigated group of dental specialists. It is recommended that the administration of the hospital and the dental department implement clear and firm guidelines for dental practitioners in particular to do the required documentation procedure. PMID:19209291

  13. Reforming the mission of public dental services.

    PubMed

    Wright, F A C; List, P F

    2012-10-01

    Australia has a complex history of providing public dental services to its communities. From the early days of Colonial settlement, the provision of dental care to the Australian public has largely been driven and influenced by organized groups and associations of dentists. The Constitution of Australia, under Section 51 xxiii A, allows for the Commonwealth to provide for medical and dental services. Unlike the United Kingdom, however, dental services have not been embedded into a universal national health service agenda. In 1974, that the Australian Government through the Australian School Dental Program provided the first funding and national direction for public dental services - and that, limited to children. The Commonwealth Dental Health Program 1993-1997 was the second national endeavor to provide public dental services, this time to financially disadvantaged adults. Since that time, public dental service responsibility has been shuttled between States/Territories and the Commonwealth. A new paradigm for public dental services in Australia requires strong Commonwealth leadership, as well as the commitment of State and Territories and the organized dental profession. The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission provided the most recent scenario for a radical change in mission. This paper canvases the competing roles of strategic, functional, and structural issues in relationship to social network and policy issues, which must be recognized if Australians truly seek to reform public dental services. PMID:22998313

  14. Reforming the mission of public dental services.

    PubMed

    Wright, F A C; List, P F

    2012-10-01

    Australia has a complex history of providing public dental services to its communities. From the early days of Colonial settlement, the provision of dental care to the Australian public has largely been driven and influenced by organized groups and associations of dentists. The Constitution of Australia, under Section 51 xxiii A, allows for the Commonwealth to provide for medical and dental services. Unlike the United Kingdom, however, dental services have not been embedded into a universal national health service agenda. In 1974, that the Australian Government through the Australian School Dental Program provided the first funding and national direction for public dental services - and that, limited to children. The Commonwealth Dental Health Program 1993-1997 was the second national endeavor to provide public dental services, this time to financially disadvantaged adults. Since that time, public dental service responsibility has been shuttled between States/Territories and the Commonwealth. A new paradigm for public dental services in Australia requires strong Commonwealth leadership, as well as the commitment of State and Territories and the organized dental profession. The National Health and Hospitals Reform Commission provided the most recent scenario for a radical change in mission. This paper canvases the competing roles of strategic, functional, and structural issues in relationship to social network and policy issues, which must be recognized if Australians truly seek to reform public dental services.

  15. The food and drug administration is now preparing to establish tighter performance requirements for blood glucose monitors.

    PubMed

    Klonoff, David C

    2010-05-01

    On March 16 and 17, 2010, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) presented a public meeting about blood glucose monitoring at the Gaithersberg Hilton Hotel. The meeting was intended to present expert opinions and solicit input from the public about whether to develop new regulatory policies for blood glucose monitors. The meeting was divided into three sections: (1) Clinical Accuracy Requirements for Blood Glucose Monitors, (2) Interferences and Limitations of Blood Glucose Monitors, and (3) Tight Glycemic Control. Many officials from the Center for Devices and Radiologic Health and the Office of In Vitro Diagnostic Devices, which are the parts of FDA that regulate approval of blood glucose monitors, either spoke on the agenda or attended in the audience. Approximately 300 people attended; they were mostly clinicians (such as adult endocrinologists, pediatric endocrinologists, internists, clinical chemists, intensivists, surgeons, nurses, and diabetes educators) or industry officials from companies involved in glucose monitoring, pharmaceutical products, data analysis, or regulatory consulting. PMID:20513313

  16. 21 CFR 101.80 - Health claims: dietary noncariogenic carbohydrate sweeteners and dental caries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sweeteners and dental caries. 101.80 Section 101.80 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT... caries. (a) Relationship between dietary carbohydrates and dental caries. (1) Dental caries, or tooth... development of dental caries. Risk factors include tooth enamel crystal structure and mineral content,...

  17. Drug therapy for the pregnant dental patient.

    PubMed

    Mendia, Jonathan; Cuddy, Michael A; Moore, Paul A

    2012-09-01

    Providing needed dental treatment, managing oral infection, and controlling pain are essential functions of dentists for helping patients maintain overall health during pregnancy. Medications commonly required for dental care consist of local anesthetics and associated vasoconstrictors, centrally and peripherally acting analgesics, sedative and anxiolytic agents, and antibiotics. Therapeutic drugs routinely used in dental practice are selected because of their known safety and effectiveness. However, for a pregnant patient requiring dental care, the agents routinely prescribed should be reevaluated for potential risks to the mother and/or fetus. The decision to administer a specific drug requires that the benefits outweigh the potential risks of the drug therapy. This article reviews and updates the recommendations for using dental therapeutic agents, thereby enabling general practitioners to select the safest drugs when treating pregnant dental patients.

  18. Dental Calculus Arrest of Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Keyes, Paul H.; Rams, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Background An inverse relationship between dental calculus mineralization and dental caries demineralization on teeth has been noted in some studies. Dental calculus may even form superficial layers over existing dental caries and arrest their progression, but this phenomenon has been only rarely documented and infrequently considered in the field of Cariology. To further assess the occurrence of dental calculus arrest of dental caries, this study evaluated a large number of extracted human teeth for the presence and location of dental caries, dental calculus, and dental plaque biofilms. Materials and methods A total of 1,200 teeth were preserved in 10% buffered formal saline, and viewed while moist by a single experienced examiner using a research stereomicroscope at 15-25× magnification. Representative teeth were sectioned and photographed, and their dental plaque biofilms subjected to gram-stain examination with light microscopy at 100× magnification. Results Dental calculus was observed on 1,140 (95%) of the extracted human teeth, and no dental carious lesions were found underlying dental calculus-covered surfaces on 1,139 of these teeth. However, dental calculus arrest of dental caries was found on one (0.54%) of 187 evaluated teeth that presented with unrestored proximal enamel caries. On the distal surface of a maxillary premolar tooth, dental calculus mineralization filled the outer surface cavitation of an incipient dental caries lesion. The dental calculus-covered carious lesion extended only slightly into enamel, and exhibited a brown pigmentation characteristic of inactive or arrested dental caries. In contrast, the tooth's mesial surface, without a superficial layer of dental calculus, had a large carious lesion going through enamel and deep into dentin. Conclusions These observations further document the potential protective effects of dental calculus mineralization against dental caries. PMID:27446993

  19. The Dangers of Dental Devices as reported in the FDA MAUDE Database

    PubMed Central

    Hebballi, Nutan B; Ramoni, Rachel; Kalenderian, Elsbeth; Delattre, Veronique F.; Stewart, Denice C.L.; Kent, Karla; White, Joel M; Vaderhobli, Ram; Walji, Muhammad F

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To determine the frequency and type of adverse events (AEs) associated with dental devices reported to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database. Methods We downloaded and thoroughly reviewed the dental device-related AEs reported to MAUDE from January 01, 1996 – December 31, 2011. Results MAUDE received a total of 1,978,056 reports between January 01, 1996 and December 31, 2011. Among these reports, 28,046 (1.4 percent) AEs reports were associated with dental devices. Within the dental AE reports that had event type information, 17,261 reported injuries, 7,777 reported device malfunctions, and 66 reported deaths. Among the 66 entries classified as death reports, 52 actually reported a death in the description; the remaining were either misclassified or lacked sufficient information in the report to determine whether a death had occurred. 53.5 percent of the dental device associated AEs pertained to endosseous implants. Conclusion There is a plethora of devices used in dental care, and to achieve Element 1 of AHRQ’s Patient Safety Initiative, we must be able to monitor the safety of dental devices. While MAUDE is essentially the single source of this valuable information, our investigations led us to conclude that it currently has major limitations that prevent it from being the broad-based patient safety sentinel the profession requires. Practical Implications As potential contributors to MAUDE, dental care teams play a key role in improving the profession’s access to information about the safety of dental devices. PMID:25637208

  20. Dental Assistant. Health Occupations Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hefner, Dollie

    This curriculum is comprised of 31 instructional units divided into eight subject areas: orientation (6 units), anatomy and physiology (6 units), dental histology (1 unit), microbiology and bacteriology (2 units), pharmacology (2 units), chairside assistance (9 units), roentgenology (2 units), and practice administration (3 units). Each…

  1. Class Attitudes among Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardiner, James F.; Lancaster, Diana M.

    Class attitudes among dental students were studied at Louisiana State University in spring 1986, with attention to attitudes toward leadership, faculty and administration, study habits, labs and clinics, information acquisition, social life, and class unification. Class attitudes became more uniform and deeply held as the classes progressed…

  2. Perceived Barriers Affecting Access to Preventive Dental Services: Application of DEMATEL Method

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Ravangard, Ramin; Asghari, Baratali

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying perceived access barriers to preventive dental services is one of the basic steps to improve the public health. Objectives This study aimed to determine the perceived barriers affecting access to preventive dental services in one of Tehran dental clinics in 2012. Patients and Methods This research was a cross-sectional descriptive-analytical study conducted in one of Tehran dental clinics in 2012 using decision–making trial and evaluation laboratory (DEMATEL) method. The study sample included all patients (100 patients) who had referred to the endodontic treatment department from 26 - 31 May, 2012. The required data were collected using a questionnaire. Collected data were analyzed using SPSS 18.0 and MATLAB 7.9.0 SPSSS 18.0, as well as, some descriptive and analytical tests including Mean, Standard Deviation (SD), and Independent T- Test. Results The five determinants of cost, inconvenience, fear, organization, and patient-dentist relationship were determined as barriers to access to dental services among which the cost and patient-dentist relationship were identified as the first and last priorities with the coordinates (1.4 and 1.4) and (1.25 and -0.65), respectively. Conclusions High cost of dental care has led to not referring patients to the clinic. Oral health costs are too high; however insurance organizations have no commitment to support such services. Policymakers, administrators, and insurance organizations have a major role in improving access to dental services. These decision-makers in making their policies can provide the required financial resources, shift the available resources towards preventive care and periodic checkups, and consider providing proper and sufficient places for dental care facilities. PMID:24578831

  3. Dental Assistant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Univ., East Lansing. Coll. of Agriculture and Natural Resources Education Inst.

    This curriculum guide, developed for use in dental assistant education programs in Michigan, describes a task-based curriculum that can help a teacher to develop a classroom management system where students learn by doing. It is based on task analysis and reflects the skills, knowledge, and attitudes that employers expect entry-level dental…

  4. Increasing dental student diversity through the UNLV Dental Prospects Program.

    PubMed

    McClain, Mildred A; Jones, Francis R; McClain, Clifford R; Curd, Francis M

    2013-05-01

    Adequately providing for the health care of the growing minority population in the United States requires increased racial and ethnic diversity of the health care workforce. Long-term diversity in the dental profession depends on a more diverse student population in dental schools. The University of Nevada, Las Vegas School of Dental Medicine's (UNLV SDM) Dental Prospects Club is a predental education program that has increased the number of underrepresented minority and disadvantaged students in the school by concentrating on outreach, recruitment, and retention initiatives. The approaches used by the club members and faculty advisors to increase the number of underrepresented minority students recruited to and enrolled in the UNLV SDM are discussed in this report. Also described are the strategies, methods, internal infrastructure, and organizational support used to increase the number of underrepresented minority students at the school.

  5. Administrative and research policies required to bring cellular therapies from the research laboratory to the patient's bedside.

    PubMed

    Yim, Robyn

    2005-10-01

    presidential administrations on cellular therapy, variations in individual state laws, and states becoming involved in research funding, such as California's Proposition 71. Legal concerns include expanding private litigation with diversity of lawsuits, expanding lists of defendants, and the use of class-action lawsuits in research cases. Ownership issues also arise in terms of intellectual property, patents, and ownership of stem cells collected from minors, as in umbilical cord blood donations. Situations that challenge the regulatory processes established to ensure participant safety include differences in reporting requirements for private- and public-funded research and the lack of adequate funding and resources to implement and support the institutional review board (IRB) process. Financial considerations influence the development of clinical protocols, because funding is often limited. Financial incentives, personal investment in companies funding research activities, and fundraising pressures may present potential conflicts. In addition, the increasing role of emerging biotechnology start-up companies and pharmaceutical companies in clinical research introduces additional financial considerations. Administrative policies are needed to address these possible conflicts and ensure research participant safety as cellular therapies progress from the research laboratories to the patient's bedside. Administrative policies to ensure minimum standards of quality for emerging products before human clinical trials, policies to enforce consistent reporting requirements for private and public cellular research, policies to minimize financial conflicts of interest, policies to strengthen implementation of the existing IRB process and to structure into the process a consistent, systematic review of these identified conflicts, and policies to limit private litigation will help to preserve the objectivity of the review process and ultimately increase participant safety.

  6. Dental Training Films.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Washington, DC.

    This dental training films catalog is organized into two sections. Section I is a category listing of the films by number and title, indexed according to generalized headings; categories are as follow: anatomy, articulator systems, complete dentures, dental assisting, dental laboratory technology, dental materials, dental office emergencies,…

  7. The coverage and frequency of mass drug administration required to eliminate persistent transmission of soil-transmitted helminths

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Roy; Truscott, James; Hollingsworth, T. Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    A combination of methods, including mathematical model construction, demographic plus epidemiological data analysis and parameter estimation, are used to examine whether mass drug administration (MDA) alone can eliminate the transmission of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs). Numerical analyses suggest that in all but low transmission settings (as defined by the magnitude of the basic reproductive number, R0), the treatment of pre-school-aged children (pre-SAC) and school-aged children (SAC) is unlikely to drive transmission to a level where the parasites cannot persist. High levels of coverage (defined as the fraction of an age group effectively treated) are required in pre-SAC, SAC and adults, if MDA is to drive the parasite below the breakpoint under which transmission is eliminated. Long-term solutions to controlling helminth infections lie in concomitantly improving the quality of the water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). MDA, however, is a very cost-effective tool in long-term control given that most drugs are donated free by the pharmaceutical industry for poor regions of the world. WASH interventions, by lowering the basic reproductive number, can facilitate the ability of MDA to interrupt transmission. PMID:24821921

  8. The coverage and frequency of mass drug administration required to eliminate persistent transmission of soil-transmitted helminths.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Roy; Truscott, James; Hollingsworth, T Deirdre

    2014-01-01

    A combination of methods, including mathematical model construction, demographic plus epidemiological data analysis and parameter estimation, are used to examine whether mass drug administration (MDA) alone can eliminate the transmission of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs). Numerical analyses suggest that in all but low transmission settings (as defined by the magnitude of the basic reproductive number, R0), the treatment of pre-school-aged children (pre-SAC) and school-aged children (SAC) is unlikely to drive transmission to a level where the parasites cannot persist. High levels of coverage (defined as the fraction of an age group effectively treated) are required in pre-SAC, SAC and adults, if MDA is to drive the parasite below the breakpoint under which transmission is eliminated. Long-term solutions to controlling helminth infections lie in concomitantly improving the quality of the water supply, sanitation and hygiene (WASH). MDA, however, is a very cost-effective tool in long-term control given that most drugs are donated free by the pharmaceutical industry for poor regions of the world. WASH interventions, by lowering the basic reproductive number, can facilitate the ability of MDA to interrupt transmission.

  9. Dental practice in Paris.

    PubMed

    Baron, Pierre

    2003-01-01

    This describes dental practice and the availability of dental patent remedies in Paris. Accounts of legal disputes, from original sources, illustrate the status and social history of some of the most wealthy dental practitioners in Paris during the Revolution.

  10. American Dental Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Prevention Summit ADA Find-a-Dentist Health Literacy in Dentistry Volunteer Efforts Dental Benefit Plan Information ... on Sleep Bruxism Rethinking Dental Insurance Oral Health Literacy's Role in Missed Appointments Dental Implant Failure Rate ...

  11. 10 CFR 35.394 - Training for the oral administration of sodium iodide I-131 requiring a written directive in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... pertaining to the use and measurement of radioactivity; (iv) Chemistry of byproduct material for medical use... or human research subject dosages; (iv) Using administrative controls to prevent a medical event... research subjects, that includes at least 3 cases involving the oral administration of greater than...

  12. 10 CFR 35.394 - Training for the oral administration of sodium iodide I-131 requiring a written directive in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... pertaining to the use and measurement of radioactivity; (iv) Chemistry of byproduct material for medical use... or human research subject dosages; (iv) Using administrative controls to prevent a medical event... research subjects, that includes at least 3 cases involving the oral administration of greater than...

  13. UDENTE (Universal Dental E-Learning) a golden opportunity for dental education.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Patricia

    2012-01-10

    The incorporation of technological advancements in higher education has started to bridge the gap in local, national and global delivery of dental courses. This gap, including the global decrease in senior clinical academics, has influenced the development of new teaching and learning techniques. Institutional virtual learning environments (VLE) and other e-learning resources are now in higher demand. This paper describes how one such innovative solutions has been IVIDENT (International Virtual Dental School), has enabled secure and seamless access to high quality e-content and tools through an innovative, universal flexible learning platform. IVIDENT, now UDENTE (Universal Dental E-learning) has been shown to offer new learning experiences for students of dentistry, but its approach can apply across all educational domains. UDENTE also benefits staff as it allows them to contribute and access resources through peer reviewed publishing processes, which ensure the highest quality in education. UDENTE was developed thanks to a £2.3 million grant from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and the Department of Health. http://www.udente.org. This academically led educational research project involved dental schools in seven countries. An initially scoping of requirements was followed by elaboration of the tools needed. Pilot testing of the tools, systems and learning resources in particular and the impact of the UDENTE in general were carried out. The pilots revealed evidence of positive impact of a space for learning, teaching, development and communication, with tools for planning of electives and administrative support. The results of these initial pilots have been positive and encouraging, describing UDENTE as an accessible, user friendly platform providing tools that otherwise would be difficult to access in a single space. However, attention to supporting faculty to embrace these new learning domains is essential if such technology enhanced

  14. UDENTE (Universal Dental E-Learning) a golden opportunity for dental education.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    The incorporation of technological advancements in higher education has started to bridge the gap in local, national and global delivery of dental courses. This gap, including the global decrease in senior clinical academics, has influenced the development of new teaching and learning techniques. Institutional virtual learning environments (VLE) and other e-learning resources are now in higher demand. This paper describes how one such innovative solutions has been IVIDENT (International Virtual Dental School), has enabled secure and seamless access to high quality e-content and tools through an innovative, universal flexible learning platform. IVIDENT, now UDENTE (Universal Dental E-learning) has been shown to offer new learning experiences for students of dentistry, but its approach can apply across all educational domains. UDENTE also benefits staff as it allows them to contribute and access resources through peer reviewed publishing processes, which ensure the highest quality in education. UDENTE was developed thanks to a £2.3 million grant from the Higher Education Funding Council for England (HEFCE) and the Department of Health. http://www.udente.org. This academically led educational research project involved dental schools in seven countries. An initially scoping of requirements was followed by elaboration of the tools needed. Pilot testing of the tools, systems and learning resources in particular and the impact of the UDENTE in general were carried out. The pilots revealed evidence of positive impact of a space for learning, teaching, development and communication, with tools for planning of electives and administrative support. The results of these initial pilots have been positive and encouraging, describing UDENTE as an accessible, user friendly platform providing tools that otherwise would be difficult to access in a single space. However, attention to supporting faculty to embrace these new learning domains is essential if such technology enhanced

  15. Dentistry and Dental Hygiene Handbook. 1988 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Office of the Professions.

    The laws, rules and regulations of the New York State Education Department governing dentistry and dental hygiene practice in the state are presented. In addition, the requirements and procedures for obtaining licensure and first registration as a dentist and dental hygienist in New York are discussed. The following chapters are provided: (1)…

  16. Apprenticeship and Training Policy for Dental Laboratory Technicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association of Dental Labs., Inc., Washington, DC.

    The dental technician performs completely one or more specialized areas of the dental laboratory procedures required in the creation of a dental appliance. Policies of the 8000 hour apprenticeship program are explained in terms of qualifications, apprenticeship terms and agreement, ratio of apprentices to technicians, probationary period, credit…

  17. First Aid for Sports-Related Dental Injuries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castaldi, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    Sports-related dental injuries are common but first aid is usually performed by non-dental personnel. This article describes basic procedures to be followed in order to diagnose the type and severity of the injury and to determine whether emergency treatment is required. Prevention of dental injuries is addressed. (Author/MT)

  18. Promoting Critical Thinking among Dental Hygiene Students: Strategies for Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jordan D'Ambrisi, Kathleen M.

    2011-01-01

    Dental hygiene education has evolved over the years from dental hygiene professions who provide patient education on oral health care to assuming the responsibility for the assimilation of knowledge that requires judgment, decision making and critical thinking skills. Given that the dental hygiene professions has moved toward evidence-based,…

  19. Dental students--dental advocates.

    PubMed

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future.

  20. Dental students--dental advocates.

    PubMed

    Bensch, Brittany

    2010-01-01

    Student advocacy and involvement in the political process is built into the structure of the American Student Dental Association (ASDA), especially in its Legislative Grassroots Network and an internal communication network among students to ensure political awareness. Students are concerned with such issues as a universally accepted, non-patient-based licensure process, mid-level providers, loan availability and tax deductibility, financial support for schools, and service early in one's professional career (giving forward rather than giving back). Through collaboration with the American Dental Education Association and with many state associations, students participate in lobbying, awareness campaigns, and behind the scenes as legislative aids. Although students share the same love for the profession that animates established practitioners, they are perceived by legislators as being different. Students are involved in the legislative process because it represents their future. PMID:21314046

  1. Sedation in Japanese dental schools.

    PubMed Central

    Morse, Zac; Sano, Kimito; Fujii, Kazuyuki; Kanri, Tomio

    2004-01-01

    There is very little information about the practice of sedation in Japan. Despite the remarkable advances in dentistry, fear and anxiety continue to be significant deterrents for seeking dental services. Most dental procedures can fortunately be undertaken with the aid of sedation. A comprehensive survey of all the dental schools in Japan was carried out to determine what sedation practices were used in Japan. All 29 dental schools in Japan possessed a dedicated department of anesthesiology at the time of this survey. The survey attempted to determine the specific sedation methods (techniques, routes of administration, and agents used in sedation) as well as practices (monitoring, fasting, location, education, and fees involved in sedation). The results indicate that there was a broad range in sedation practices. The Japanese Dental Society of Anesthesiology may wish to examine the findings of this study and may wish to formulate guidelines appropriate for the practice of sedation in Japan. Others may also wish to compare their own practices with those of Japan. PMID:15497299

  2. Students' Perception of Important Teaching Behaviors in Classroom and Clinical Environments of a Community College Nursing and Dental Hygiene Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimbrough-Walls, Vickie J.

    2012-01-01

    Student success is dependent on effective instruction. Yet, effective teaching is difficult to define and described differently by students, faculty, and administrators. Nursing and dental hygiene education programs require faculty to teach in both classroom and clinical environments. However, accreditation agencies for these programs mandate…

  3. 34 CFR 685.309 - Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting requirements for schools participating in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... this part and in 34 CFR part 668; and (2) Submit all reports required by this part and 34 CFR part 668... follow the record retention and examination requirements in this part and in 34 CFR 668.24. (d) Accounting requirements. A school must follow accounting requirements in 34 CFR 668.24(b). (e) Direct...

  4. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy; technical amendment. Final rule; technical amendment.

    PubMed

    2010-06-11

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published a final rule in the Federal Register of August 4, 2009 (74 FR 38686) which classified dental amalgam as a class II device, reclassified dental mercury from class I to class II, and designated special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. The effective date of the rule was November 2, 2009. The final rule was published with an inadvertent error in the codified section. This document corrects that error. This action is being taken to ensure the accuracy of the agency's regulations.

  5. Ethical obliqations and the dental office team.

    PubMed

    Roucka, Toni M; Zarkowski, Pamela; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Patthoff, Donald E

    2013-01-01

    A hypothetical case of alleged sexual misconduct in a practice with high employee turnover and stress is analyzed by three experts. This case commentary examines the ethical role expectations of an office manager who is not directly involved but becomes aware of the activities. The commentators bring the perspectives of a dental hygienist, academic administrator, and attorney; a teacher of behavioral sciences in a dental school; and a general dentist with many years of practice experience. PMID:24761582

  6. Ethical obliqations and the dental office team.

    PubMed

    Roucka, Toni M; Zarkowski, Pamela; Donate-Bartfield, Evelyn; Patthoff, Donald E

    2013-01-01

    A hypothetical case of alleged sexual misconduct in a practice with high employee turnover and stress is analyzed by three experts. This case commentary examines the ethical role expectations of an office manager who is not directly involved but becomes aware of the activities. The commentators bring the perspectives of a dental hygienist, academic administrator, and attorney; a teacher of behavioral sciences in a dental school; and a general dentist with many years of practice experience.

  7. Dried fruit and dental health.

    PubMed

    Sadler, Michèle Jeanne

    2016-12-01

    A comprehensive review of the literature has found that the common perceptions that dried fruits are "sticky", adhere to teeth, and are detrimental to dental health on account of their sugar content are based on weak evidence. There is a lack of good quality scientific data to support restrictive advice for dried fruit intake on the basis of dental health parameters and further research is required. A number of potentially positive attributes for dental health, such as the need to chew dried fruits which encourages salivary flow, and the presence of anti-microbial compounds and of sorbitol, also require investigation to establish the extent of their effects and whether they balance against any potentially negative attributes of dried fruit. Advice on dried fruit consumption should also take account of the nutritional benefits of dried fruit, being high in fibre, low in fat and containing useful levels of micronutrients.

  8. Bacterial contamination of dental unit waterlines.

    PubMed

    Szymańska, Jolanta; Sitkowska, Jolanta

    2013-05-01

    Safety of patients and dental personnel requires the appropriate microbiological water quality in dental units. During treatment, patients and dental workers are exposed both to direct contact with bacteria-contaminated water in the form of splatter and with contaminated water aerosol emitted during work by unit handpieces, including rotating and ultrasonic instruments. The aim of the study was to determine the qualitative and quantitative contamination of water in dental unit reservoirs with aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria. The study material included water sampled from 107 dental unit reservoirs located in dental surgeries of public health centres. Conventional microbiological methods were used to identify microorganisms. The study shows that the contamination of water in dental unit reservoirs with aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria is commonplace. The mean concentration of mesophile bacteria in dental unit reservoir water exceeded 1.1 × 10(5) cfu/ml. The prevailing species were Gram-negative bacteria of the families Burkholderiaceae, Pseudomonadaceae, Ralstoniaceae and Sphingomonadaceae. The most numerous bacteria were Ralstonia pickettii, constituting 49.33 % of all the identified aerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria. Among Gram-positive rods, the most numerous were bacteria of the genus Brevibacterium (5.83 %), while the highest percentage shares (13.25 %) of all Gram-positive microorganisms were found for Actinomyces spp. The study confirms the necessity of regular monitoring of microbial contamination of dental unit waterlines (DUWL) and use of various water treatment procedures available to disinfect DWUL.

  9. Allied Health Occupations II. Dental Assistant Component. Student Learning Guide. Middletown Public Schools Curriculum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middletown Public Schools, CT.

    This volume outlines the requirements and content of a second-year course in allied health occupations education that is designed to provide students with a practical understanding of the work done by dentists, dental hygienists, dental laboratory technicians, and dental assistants and also to help students acquire some basic dental assistant…

  10. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution.

  11. Dental education in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Jorge A.; Pulido, Jairo H. Ternera; Núñez, Jaime A. Castro; Bird, William F.; Komabayashi, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    This article describes Colombia's development of formal dentistry, its dental school system, curriculum, and dental licensure, and current issues in oral health care. In 1969, there were only 4 dental schools in Colombia; at this writing there are 21. Five dental schools are public and the other 16 are private. Nearly all classes are conducted in Spanish. Undergraduate pre-dental coursework is not a prerequisite for dental school in Colombia. To obtain licensure, Colombian dental students must complete 5 years of study in dental school, earn a diploma, and work for the government for 1 year. There are approximately 41,400 dentists in Colombia, and the number is increasing quickly. However, the unemployment rate among dentists is very high, even though graduation from dental school is extremely difficult. Although the 1,100:1 ratio of citizens to dentists is considered satisfactory, access to dental care is limited due to the high rate of poverty. PMID:20339245

  12. 34 CFR 682.610 - Administrative and fiscal requirements for schools that participated in the FFEL Program.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CFR part 668; (2) Follow the record retention and examination provisions in this part and in 34 CFR 668.24; and (3) Submit all reports required by this part and 34 CFR part 668 to the Secretary. (b) Loan record requirements. In addition to records required by 34 CFR part 668, for each Stafford,...

  13. 34 CFR 685.309 - Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting requirements for schools participating in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... set forth in this part and in 34 CFR part 668; and (2) Submit all reports required by this part and 34 CFR part 668 to the Secretary. (b) Student status confirmation reports. A school shall— (1) Upon... requirements in this part and in 34 CFR 668.24. (d) Accounting requirements. A school shall follow...

  14. 34 CFR 685.309 - Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting requirements for schools participating in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... set forth in this part and in 34 CFR part 668; and (2) Submit all reports required by this part and 34 CFR part 668 to the Secretary. (b) Student status confirmation reports. A school shall— (1) Upon... requirements in this part and in 34 CFR 668.24. (d) Accounting requirements. A school shall follow...

  15. 34 CFR 685.309 - Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting requirements for schools participating in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... this part and in 34 CFR part 668; and (2) Submit all reports required by this part and 34 CFR part 668... this part and in 34 CFR 668.24. (d) Accounting requirements. A school shall follow accounting requirements in 34 CFR 668.24(b). (e) Direct Loan Program bank account. Schools shall follow the procedures...

  16. 34 CFR 685.309 - Administrative and fiscal control and fund accounting requirements for schools participating in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... set forth in this part and in 34 CFR part 668; and (2) Submit all reports required by this part and 34 CFR part 668 to the Secretary. (b) Student status confirmation reports. A school shall— (1) Upon... requirements in this part and in 34 CFR 668.24. (d) Accounting requirements. A school shall follow...

  17. Requirements for Certification of Teachers, Counselors, Librarians, Administrators for Elementary and Secondary Schools. Seventy-Sixth Edition, 2011-2012

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, Elizabeth A., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This annual volume offers the most complete and current listings of the requirements for certification of a wide range of educational professionals at the elementary and secondary levels. "Requirements for Certification" is a valuable resource, making much-needed knowledge available in one straightforward volume. [For "Requirements for…

  18. Requirements for Certification of Teachers, Counselors, Librarians, Administrators for Elementary and Secondary Schools. Seventy-Seventh Edition, 2012-2013

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, Elizabeth A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This annual volume offers the most complete and current listings of the requirements for certification of a wide range of educational professionals at the elementary and secondary levels. "Requirements for Certification" is a valuable resource, making much-needed knowledge available in one straightforward volume. [For "Requirements for…

  19. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison. PMID:26126345

  20. Atypical Forensic Dental Identifications.

    PubMed

    Cardoza, Anthony R; Wood, James D

    2015-06-01

    Forensic dental identification specialists are typically the last conventional option for postmortem identification. Forensic dental identification is most often accomplished by comparing radiographs of the decedent's teeth with the dental radiographs obtained from the dentist of the suspected victim. Unfortunately, antemortem dental radiographs are not always available. When presented with this challenge, the authors of this article have been successful in completing identifications using means other than dental radiographic comparison.

  1. 10 CFR 35.392 - Training for the oral administration of sodium iodide I-131 requiring a written directive in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Chemistry of byproduct material for medical use; and (v) Radiation biology; and (2) Has work experience... research subject dosages; (iv) Using administrative controls to prevent a medical event involving the use... proper decontamination procedures; and (vi) Administering dosages to patients or human research...

  2. 10 CFR 35.392 - Training for the oral administration of sodium iodide I-131 requiring a written directive in...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) Chemistry of byproduct material for medical use; and (v) Radiation biology; and (2) Has work experience... research subject dosages; (iv) Using administrative controls to prevent a medical event involving the use... proper decontamination procedures; and (vi) Administering dosages to patients or human research...

  3. Calculus detection calibration among dental hygiene faculty members utilizing dental endoscopy: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Partido, Brian B; Jones, Archie A; English, Dana L; Nguyen, Carol A; Jacks, Mary E

    2015-02-01

    Dental and dental hygiene faculty members often do not provide consistent instruction in the clinical environment, especially in tasks requiring clinical judgment. From previous efforts to calibrate faculty members in calculus detection using typodonts, researchers have suggested using human subjects and emerging technology to improve consistency in clinical instruction. The purpose of this pilot study was to determine if a dental endoscopy-assisted training program would improve intra- and interrater reliability of dental hygiene faculty members in calculus detection. Training included an ODU 11/12 explorer, typodonts, and dental endoscopy. A convenience sample of six participants was recruited from the dental hygiene faculty at a California community college, and a two-group randomized experimental design was utilized. Intra- and interrater reliability was measured before and after calibration training. Pretest and posttest Kappa averages of all participants were compared using repeated measures (split-plot) ANOVA to determine the effectiveness of the calibration training on intra- and interrater reliability. The results showed that both kinds of reliability significantly improved for all participants and the training group improved significantly in interrater reliability from pretest to posttest. Calibration training was beneficial to these dental hygiene faculty members, especially those beginning with less than full agreement. This study suggests that calculus detection calibration training utilizing dental endoscopy can effectively improve interrater reliability of dental and dental hygiene clinical educators. Future studies should include human subjects, involve more participants at multiple locations, and determine whether improved rater reliability can be sustained over time. PMID:25640616

  4. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  5. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  6. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  7. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  8. 5 CFR 894.102 - If I have a pre-existing dental or vision condition, may I join FEDVIP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false If I have a pre-existing dental or vision... MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Administration and General Provisions § 894.102 If I have a pre-existing dental or...

  9. Component analysis of dental porcelain for assisting dental identification.

    PubMed

    Aboshi, H; Takahashi, T; Komuro, T

    2006-12-01

    The fluorescence of porcelain crowns recovered from the mouth of an unknown murder victim, and several control porcelain samples, were examined by fluorescent examination lamps. The fluorescence from two of the control samples was quite similar to that from the porcelain crowns recovered from the victim. To increase the objectivity of the results by quantitative analysis, the composition of each porcelain crown and control sample was also evaluated by wave dispersion X-ray microanalyser. The elements detected from the porcelain crowns of the victim matched those of two of the porcelain samples. Later, the antemortem dental records and radiographs of the victim were obtained through a dentist, who had recognized the name of the porcelain manufacturer in a postmortem dental information request placed on the Japanese Dental Association web page. Although component analysis of dental porcelain may be an effective means of assisting dental identification, a more rapid and non-destructive analysis for detecting the elements is required. The energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer was used for a pilot study of identification of porcelain composition.

  10. Computer Education for Dental Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffcoat, M. K.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A required computer course for preparing dental students to write computer programs, use software packages, and evaluate software for purchase is described. A post-course questionnaire survey of students revealed that the majority found the course helpful. A course outline is included. (Author/MLW)

  11. Dental hyponatraemia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, R M

    2011-08-01

    A 14-year-old girl developed dental pain and was treated for acute infected pulpitis of her right upper lateral incisor with drilling and filling. The pain continued and was helped by analgesia, sucking ice cubes and drinking cold water. Forty-eight hours later, she became confused and disoriented. She started to vomit and complained of headache. Investigations revealed hyponatraemia with normal serum potassium levels and initially normal urinary sodium excretion. Over the next 24 hours, she passed 5.45 L of urine and her serum sodium rose from 125 to 143 mmol/L. Self-induced water intoxication has been described during drinking games and initiation ceremonies, but this would appear to an unusual cause. Conservative management proved successful in allowing this girl to recover without sequelae. PMID:21873727

  12. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update

    PubMed Central

    Sehrawat, Nidhi; Bansal, Kalpana; Chopra, Radhika

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Special and medically compromised patients present a unique population that challenges the dentist’s skill and knowledge. Providing oral care to people with cerebral palsy (CP) requires adaptation of the skills we use everyday. In fact, most people with mild or moderate forms of CP can be treated successfully in the general practice setting. This article is to review various dental considerations and management of a CP patient. How to cite this article: Sehrawat N, Marwaha M, Bansal K, Chopra R. Cerebral Palsy: A Dental Update. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(2):109-118. PMID:25356010

  13. Federal role in dental public health: dental care for special populations.

    PubMed

    Reifel, Nancy

    2005-07-01

    California is home to more than 70 dental clinics operated or funded by the U.S. government. They operate on annual appropriations from Congress to serve a specific population and regulations that specify the type of dental services provided are usually promulgated at the national level. Dental clinics have the challenge of creating a program that delivers high-quality care within these financial and programmatic constraints. In California, U.S. government appropriations are the main source of funding dental clinics of immigration services, the Veterans Administration, the Bureau of Prisons, the Coast Guard, and American Indian clinics. The evolution and current practices of these five dental public health programs are described.

  14. Requirements for Certification of Teachers, Counselors, Librarians, Administrators for Elementary and Secondary Schools. Seventy-Fifth Edition, 2010-2011

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaye, Elizabeth A., Ed.; Makos, Jeffrey J., Ed.

    2010-01-01

    This annual volume offers the most complete and current listings of the requirements for certification of a wide range of educational professionals at the elementary and secondary levels. "Requirements for Certification" is a valuable resource, making much-needed knowledge available in one straightforward volume. Appended are: (1) How to Contact…

  15. Prevalence of dental erosions in GERD: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    PICOS, ALINA M.; POENAR, SIMINA; OPRIS, ALEXANDRA; CHIRA, ALEXANDRA; BUD, MARIUS; BERAR, ANTONELA; PICOS, ANDREI; DUMITRASCU, DAN L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Dental erosions are determined by a mechanism involving increased oral acidity. Gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) represents the pathological reflux of gastric content into the oral cavity, affecting the hard dental tissues integrity, with a major risk of advanced tooth wear. Aim This study aims to investigate the prevalence of dental erosions in GERD patients, in order to obtain a basis for therapeutic strategies and specific prophylactic measures. Methods We incorporated a mandatory dental consultation in the therapeutic protocol of GERD patients. The study was carried out in a group of 60 patients with GERD. Dental examination of these patients revealed 21 cases showing visible dental erosions. The control group included 60 patients, without GERD, age and sex matched. All examinations were carried out in a tertiary center by the same team of dentists, instructed in dental erosion recognition and questionnaire administration. Results The dental erosion prevalence in patients with GERD was 35%. In the control group, erosions were 13% (OR: 3.6); 67% of patients with dental erosions were females and 33% were males. Middle age showed the highest risk for dental erosions, with peaks in the fourth and sixth decades. Conclusions The risk of dental erosion was significantly higher in GERD patients as compared to the control group. The sex ratio shows a higher prevalence of erosion in females PMID:26527975

  16. Attitudes and beliefs toward the use of a dental diagnostic terminology A survey of dental providers in a dental practice

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Rachel B.; Walji, Muhammad F.; Kim, Soyun; Tokede, Oluwabunmi; McClellan, Lyle; Simmons, Kristen; Skourtes, Eugene; Yansane, Alfa; White, Joel M.; Kalenderian, Elsbeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Attitudes and views are critical to the adoption of innovation. While there have been broadening calls for a standardized dental diagnostic terminology, little is known about the views of private practice dental team members towards the adoption of such a terminology. Methods A survey was developed using validated questions identified through literature review. Domain experts’ input allowed for further modifications. The final survey was administered electronically to 814 team members at a multi-office practice based in the Pacific Northwest. Results Response proportion was 92%. The survey had excellent reliability (Cronbach alpha coefficient = 0.87). Results suggested that participants showed, in general, positive attitudes and beliefs towards using a standardized diagnostic terminology in their practices. Additional written comments by participants highlighted the potential for improved communication with use of the terminology. Conclusions Dental providers and staff in one multi-office practice showed positive attitudes towards the use of a diagnostic terminology, specifically they believed it would improve communication between the dentist and patient as well as among providers, while expressing some concerns if using standardized dental diagnostic terms helps clinicians to deliver better dental care. Practical Implications As the dental profession is advancing towards the use of standardized diagnostic terminologies, successful implementation will require that dental team leaders prepare their dental teams by gauging their attitude toward the use of such a terminology. PMID:26025826

  17. Errors in Federal Report on Dental Health Personnel Present Problems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Eric S.

    1990-01-01

    The "Seventh Report to the President and Congress on the Status of Health Personnel in the United States" by the Health Resources and Services Administration and the American Association of Dental Schools'"Manpower Project Report No. 2" are compared, and their findings and implications for dental health personnel are discussed. (MSE)

  18. Dental Aide: Task Analyses. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newport News Public Schools, VA.

    This task analysis guide is intended to help teachers and administrators develop instructional materials and implement competency-based education in the dental aide program. Section 1 contains a validated task inventory for dental aide. For each task, applicable information pertaining to performance and enabling objectives, criterion-referenced…

  19. 75 FR 33315 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ... received by FDA concerning the final rule on the classification of dental amalgam, which published in the... adequacy of the risk assessment performed by FDA in classifying dental amalgam in light of a new report on... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices...

  20. Smallfry Smiles: A Guide for Teaching Dental Health in Community Care Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Alice; And Others

    This publication has been designed to help nurses, teachers, volunteers, health administrators, social workers, and other individuals in the community in improving dental care instruction for the children in a community dental care program. The publication is based on the premise that availability of dental care services does not necessarily…

  1. 21 CFR 872.3070 - Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. 872.3070 Section 872.3070 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3070 Dental amalgam,...

  2. The Past and Future of the Electronic Dental Record from the Practitioners' View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neiburger, E. J.; Diehl, M. C.

    1991-01-01

    Future dental practice is seen to include not only the electronic dental record (EDR) but a fully electronic clinical dental documentation package, computer-assisted diagnostic support, and digital imaging. The EDR's development since the 1970s is reviewed. Specific suggestions are made concerning hardware, software, administration, and practical…

  3. 45 CFR 1356.40 - Adoption assistance program: Administrative requirements to implement section 473 of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... participation in adoption assistance payments under this part, the State must meet the requirements of this... moves from one State to another State, the family may apply for social services on behalf of...

  4. Dental Auxiliary Occupations. Interim Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Richard D.

    As part of a dental auxiliaries project, a Dental Auxiliary National Technical Advisory Committee was established, and its major undertaking was to assist in the development of a functional inventory for each of the three dental auxiliary occupations (dental assisting, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology). The analysis consisted of…

  5. Curriculum change in dental education, 2003-09.

    PubMed

    Haden, N Karl; Hendricson, William D; Kassebaum, Denise K; Ranney, Richard R; Weinstein, George; Anderson, Eugene L; Valachovic, Richard W

    2010-05-01

    This 2009 study of dental school curricula follows a similar one conducted in 2002-03. Through a web-based survey, the authors gathered information from dental schools about 1) past trends in curricular change over seven years; 2) current changes under way in dental school curricula; 3) significant challenges to curricular innovation; and 4) projected future trends in curricular change and innovation. Fifty-five schools (fifty U.S. and five Canadian) responded to the survey for a response rate of 86 percent. In addition to background information, the survey requested information in four broad areas: curriculum format, curriculum assessment, curriculum innovation, and resources needed for curriculum enhancement. Forty-nine percent of the respondents defined their curriculum format as primarily organized by disciplines. Half of the respondents reported the use of problem-based and case-reinforced learning for a section or specific component of some courses. In a significant change from the 2002-03 study, a high proportion (91 percent) of the responding schools require community-based patient care by all students, with just over half requiring five or more weeks of such experience. Competency-based education to prepare an entry-level general dentist seems well established as the norm in responding dental schools. Forty-three percent or less of the responding schools indicated that their students participate with other health professions education programs for various portions of their educational experience. Since the 2002-03 survey, dental schools have been active in conducting comprehensive curriculum reviews; 65 percent indicated that their most recent comprehensive curriculum review is currently under way or was conducted within the past two years. Respondents indicated that the primary reasons for the configuration of the current curriculum were "perceived success" (it works), "compatibility with faculty preferences," "faculty comfort," and "capacity

  6. Use of information and communication technology among dental students and registrars at the faculty of dental sciences, University of Lagos.

    PubMed

    Butali, A; Adeyemo, W L; Akinshipo, A O; Fashina, A; Savage, K O

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the use of information technology amongst dental students, dental nursing students and resident doctors in training at the faculty of dental Surgery University of Lagos. A structured questionnaire was distributed to 58 clinical dental students in 4 th and 5 th years of training in the 2010/2011 academic year, 36 dental nursing students and 63 resident doctors undergoing specialist training. All participants have access to the computers, 2.5% within the University and 31% at home and internet cafes and about 50% have the basic skills required. A significant difference was observed between the resident doctors and clinical dental students (P = 0.003), between resident doctors and dental nursing students (P = 0.0001) when the use of computer for study was compared. Over 95% of participants have access to internet and about 50% of them use the internet for their studies. A significant difference (P = 0.005) was observed between clinical dental students and dental nursing students that use the internet and word processing. The resident doctors used the computers for multimedia and MedLine search tools more than clinical dental students (P = 0.004) and dental nursing students (0.0006). The findings of the study show that dental students and resident doctors in training have the requisite knowledge to operate the computer for use in their study and personal activities. PMID:22248952

  7. The Dental Solid Waste Management in Different Categories of Dental Laboratories in Abha City, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Haralur, Satheesh B.; Al-Qahtani, Ali S.; Al-Qarni, Marie M.; Al-Homrany, Rami M.; Aboalkhair, Ayyob E.; Madalakote, Sujatha S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To study the awareness, attitude, practice and facilities among the different categories of dental laboratories in Abha city. Materials and Methods: A total of 80 dental technicians were surveyed in the study. The dental laboratories included in the study were teaching institute (Group I), Government Hospital (Group II), Private Dental Clinic (Group III) and Independent laboratory (Group IV). The pre-tested anonymous questionnaire was used to understand knowledge, attitude, facilities, practice and orientation regarding biomedical waste management. Results: The knowledge of biomedical waste categories, colour coding and segregation was better among Group I (55-65%) and Group II (65-75%). The lowest standard of waste disposal was practiced at Group IV (15-20%) and Group III (25-35%). The availability of disposal facilities was poor at Group IV. The continuous education on biomedical waste management lacked in all the Groups. Conclusion: The significant improvement in disposal facilities was required at Group III and Group IV laboratories. All dental technicians were in need of regular training of biomedical waste management. Clinical Significance: The dental laboratories are an integral part of dental practice. The dental laboratories are actively involved in the generation, handling and disposal of biomedical waste. Hence, it is important to assess the biomedical waste management knowledge, attitude, facilities and practice among different categories of dental laboratories. PMID:26962373

  8. American Dental Education Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity and Inclusion ADEA Commission on Change and Innovation in Dental Education What is ADEA CCI? ADEA ... Education, 2016–2017 Beyond the Crossroads: Change and Innovation in Dental Education ADEA Guidelines for Ethical Academic ...

  9. Dental x-rays

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - teeth; Radiograph - dental; Bitewings; Periapical film; Panoramic film; Digital image ... dentist's office. There are many types of dental x-rays. Some of them are: Bitewing. Shows the crown ...

  10. 45 CFR 1356.40 - Adoption assistance program: Administrative requirements to implement section 473 of the Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... to Public Welfare (Continued) OFFICE OF HUMAN DEVELOPMENT SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... ASSISTANCE, AND CHILD AND FAMILY SERVICES REQUIREMENTS APPLICABLE TO TITLE IV-E § 1356.40 Adoption assistance... assistance program provisions of the title IV-E State plan and to be eligible for Federal...

  11. Nanotechnology for dental implants.

    PubMed

    Tomsia, Antoni P; Lee, Janice S; Wegst, Ulrike G K; Saiz, Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    With the advent of nanotechnology, an opportunity exists for the engineering of new dental implant materials. Metallic dental implants have been successfully used for decades, but they have shortcomings related to osseointegration and mechanical properties that do not match those of bone. Absent the development of an entirely new class of materials, faster osseointegration of currently available dental implants can be accomplished by various surface modifications. To date, there is no consensus regarding the preferred method(s) of implant surface modification, and further development will be required before the ideal implant surface can be created, let alone become available for clinical use. Current approaches can generally be categorized into three areas: ceramic coatings, surface functionalization, and patterning on the micro- to nanoscale. The distinctions among these are imprecise, as some or all of these approaches can be combined to improve in vivo implant performance. These surface improvements have resulted in durable implants with a high percentage of success and long-term function. Nanotechnology has provided another set of opportunities for the manipulation of implant surfaces in its capacity to mimic the surface topography formed by extracellular matrix components of natural tissue. The possibilities introduced by nanotechnology now permit the tailoring of implant chemistry and structure with an unprecedented degree of control. For the first time, tools are available that can be used to manipulate the physicochemical environment and monitor key cellular events at the molecular level. These new tools and capabilities will result in faster bone formation, reduced healing time, and rapid recovery to function.

  12. Prevalence study of oral mucosal lesions, mucosal variants, and treatment required for patients reporting to a dental school in North India: In accordance with WHO guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Puneet; Rai, Shalu; Bhatnagar, Gunjan; Kaur, Mandeep; Goel, Sumit; Prabhat, Mukul

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the prevalence of oral mucosal lesions (OML) in adult patients reporting to the dental outpatient department at the Institute of Dental Studies and Technologies, Modinagar, Uttar Pradesh, India. The purpose was to determine the priorities in oral health education, preventive measures, and identify the group in urgent need of treatment. Materials and Methods: The study was conducted over a period of 6 months in 2010, when 8866 subjects were offered structured interviews and standardized extraoral and intraoral examinations according to the World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines. Result: Overall prevalence of OML was 1736 (16.8%), the most prevalent being smoker's palate (10.44%) followed by leukoplakia (2.83%), oral submucous fibrosis (1.97%), oral candidiasis (1.61%), recurrent aphthous stomatitis (1.53%), oral lichen planus (0.8%) and others (0.78%). The highest prevalence of the tobacco habit in both forms was recorded in the group aged 40–44 yearsand those aged between 60 and 64 years who wore dentures. Lesions were most prevalent in those aged 40–44 years with a significant predominance of males at 3:1 (M = 12.6% and F = 4.3%). Patients who consumed tobacco in any form or wore dentures had a significantly higher prevalence of OML (P < 0.001). The highest number of lesions were on the palate (59.7%) followed by buccal mucosa (19.9%). Various normal mucosal variants were recorded. Fordyce's granules (0.13%), fissured tongue (3.3%), leukoedema (1.47%), and lingual varices (2.73%) were also recorded. The tongue showed the highest number of variants (64.4%). Patients were grouped according to the treatment needed under the WHO criteria. One hundred and ninety-seven patients were given oral hygiene instructions only, whereas 1422 patients were advised on change of habit and a follow-up and 674 patients needed definitive treatment. Conclusion: This study thus highlights diagnostic criteria, multifactorial risk factors to

  13. Dental laser technology.

    PubMed

    Fasbinder, Dennis J

    2008-10-01

    Dental technology is rapidly affecting the treatment options available to patients. Dental lasers are an innovative technology for both hard- and soft-tissue treatment applications. The ability to recontour soft tissues efficiently and predictably with immediate hemostatsis and minimal postoperative sequelae is of value to both the dentist and the patient. This article reviews the principles of dental lasers, criteria to consider when selecting a dental laser, and some of their clinical applications.

  14. Dopamine D4 receptors linked to protein kinase G are required for changes in dopamine release followed by locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jeong Hwan; Lee, Dong Kun; Shim, Yoon-Bo; Ryu, In Soo; Seo, Su Yeon; Kim, Jieun; Yang, Ju Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Wook; Choe, Eun Sang

    2015-05-01

    We previously found that the dopamine D2-type receptors (D2 and D3 receptors), coupled to protein kinase G (PKG), upregulate locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. In this study, D4 receptors, another type of D2 receptor also coupled to PKG, were examined to determine their requirement in the regulation of locomotor activity after repeated cocaine administration. The results demonstrated that repeated injections of cocaine (20 mg/kg), given once a day for seven consecutive days, significantly increased extracellular dopamine concentrations. Intra-caudate infusion of the D4 receptor agonist, PD168077 (10 nmol), and the PKG inhibitor, KT5823 (2 nmol), significantly decreased the repeated cocaine-induced increase in dopamine levels and locomotor activity. However, intra-caudate infusion of KT5823, but not PD168077, decreased ∆FosB immunoreactivity elevated by repeated cocaine administration. These findings suggest that D4 receptors linked to PKG could be a key modulator for dopamine release required for changes in locomotor activity caused by repeated cocaine exposure. PMID:25702161

  15. Dental Arch Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Straightening teeth is an arduous process requiring months, often years, of applying corrective pressure by means of arch wires-better known as brace-which may have to be changed several times in the course of treatment. A new method has been developed by Dr. George Andreasen, orthodontist and dental scientist at the University of Iowa. The key is a new type of arch wire material, called Nitinol, with exceptional elasticity which helps reduce the required number of brace changes. An alloy of nickel and titanium, Nitinol was originally developed for aerospace applications by the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, now the Naval Surface Weapons Laboratory, White Oaks, Maryland. NASA subsequently conducted additional research on the properties of Nitinol and on procedures for processing the metal.

  16. Proposition 65 in the dental office.

    PubMed

    Pichay, T J; Seifert, L J

    2001-07-01

    In the mid-1990s, dentistry became included in enforcement activity for Proposition 65, the Safe Drinking Water and Toxic Enforcement Act of 1986. This year, 80 dental offices were served with 60-day notices for failing to post Prop. 65 warnings. The California Dental Association has been inundated with inquiries on what dental offices should be doing with regard to Prop. 65 requirements. This article provides a brief history of Prop. 65 and answers the questions most frequently asked of CDA. PMID:11490690

  17. Factors associated with the satisfaction of millennial generation dental residents.

    PubMed

    Lam, Hwai-Tai C; O'Toole, Terry G; Arola, Patricia E; Kashner, T Michael; Chang, Barbara K

    2012-11-01

    Data from the 2010 Learners' Perceptions Survey (LPS) administered through the Office of Academic Affiliations, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) were analyzed to identify factors associated with dental residents' satisfaction with the VA as a clinical training environment. Satisfaction scores were linked to clinic workloads, dental procedure complexity levels, staffing patterns, and facility infrastructure data to explore conditions that may improve residents' satisfaction. Findings supported the construct validity of the LPS survey data and underscored the importance of maintaining optimal ratios of attending dentists, dental assistants, and administrative staff to residents so that each trainee will have opportunities to perform an adequate level of dental workload. As programs strive to improve the quality of graduate dental education, findings from this study are vital for setting curriculum design guidelines and for providing infrastructure support for dental resident education. PMID:23144476

  18. Dental records: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Charangowda, B K

    2010-01-01

    Dental records consist of documents related to the history of present illness, clinical examination, diagnosis, treatment done, and the prognosis. A thorough knowledge of dental records is essential for the practicing dentist, as it not only has a forensic application, but also a legal implication with respect to insurance and consumerism. This article reviews the importance of dental records in forensics. PMID:21189983

  19. Dental Manpower Fact Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ake, James N.; Johnson, Donald W.

    Statistical data on many aspects of dental and allied dental personnel supply, distribution, characteristics, and education and on certain other aspects of dental services are presented and discussed. The data on dentist supply show the national trend in the supply of active dentists since 1950 and the concurrent changes in dentist-to-population…

  20. Dental Laboratory Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Air Force, Washington, DC.

    The Air Force dental laboratory technology manual is designed as a basic training text as well as a reference source for dental laboratory technicians, a specialty occupation concerned with the design, fabrication, and repair of dental prostheses. Numerous instructive diagrams and photographs are included throughout the manual. The comprehensive…

  1. DENTAL SCHOOL PLANNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GALAGAN, DONALD J.

    THIS DISCUSSION PRESENTS A COMPLETE PICTURE OF THE CURRENT STATE OF DENTAL EDUCATION WITH SUGGESTIONS FOR MEETING THE DEMANDS FOR DENTAL STAFF AND FACILITIES. THE AREAS INVESTIGATED ARE (1) OBJECTIVES IN DENTAL EDUCATION--COURSES, TEACHING MODES, INNOVATIONS IN CURRICULUM, COORDINATION OF BASIC AND CLINICAL INSTRUCTION, (2) FACILITY…

  2. Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Margorie Stockton

    2003-04-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is subject to annual emissions-reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. For calendar year 2001, the Technical Area 3 steam plant was the primary source of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory, while research and development activities were the primary source of volatile organic compounds. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20.2.72 NMAC. Hazardous air pollutant emissions from chemical use for research and development activities were also reported.

  3. Weaker dental enamel explains dental decay.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Alexandre R; Gibson, Carolyn W; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is "weaker" while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  4. Weaker Dental Enamel Explains Dental Decay

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Alexandre R.; Gibson, Carolyn W.; Deeley, Kathleen; Xue, Hui; Li, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries continues to be the most prevalent bacteria-mediated non-contagious disease of humankind. Dental professionals assert the disease can be explained by poor oral hygiene and a diet rich in sugars but this does not account for caries free individuals exposed to the same risk factors. In order to test the hypothesis that amount of amelogenin during enamel development can influence caries susceptibility, we generated multiple strains of mice with varying levels of available amelogenin during dental development. Mechanical tests showed that dental enamel developed with less amelogenin is “weaker” while the dental enamel of animals over-expressing amelogenin appears to be more resistant to acid dissolution. PMID:25885796

  5. Facial and Dental Injuries Facial and Dental Injuries in Karate.

    PubMed

    Vidovic-Stesevic, Vesna; Verna, Carlalberta; Krastl, Gabriel; Kuhl, Sebastian; Filippi, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Karate is a martial art that carries a high trauma risk. Trauma-related Swiss and European karate data are currently unavailable. This survey seeks to increase knowledge of the incidence of traumatic facial and dental injuries, their emergency management, awareness of tooth rescue boxes, the use of mouthguards and their modifications. Interviews were conducted with 420 karate fighters from 43 European countries using a standardized questionnaire. All the participants were semi-professionals. The data were evaluated with respect to gender, kumite level (where a karate practitioner trains against an adversary), and country. Of the 420 fighters interviewed, 213 had experienced facial trauma and 44 had already had dental trauma. A total of 192 athletes had hurt their opponent by inflicting a facial or dental injury, and 290 knew about the possibility of tooth replantation following an avulsion. Only 50 interviewees knew about tooth rescue boxes. Nearly all the individuals interviewed wore a mouthguard (n = 412), and 178 of them had made their own modifications to the guard. The results of the present survey suggest that more information and education in wearing protective gear are required to reduce the incidence of dental injuries in karate.

  6. The pregnant dental patient.

    PubMed

    Singh, Medha

    2012-01-01

    When dealing with a pregnant patient, the dental practitioner should keep in mind the various physiological changes that occur in the pregnant female and the potential effects on the fetus in using various types of local anesthesia. This article reviews the current considerations in the use of local anesthesia in the pregnant dental patient, and the safety of local anesthetics, their dosage, and any adverse effect on mother and fetus. It also discusses various dental procedures and the trimester during which they can be performed. Lastly, this article talks about the complications that can occur with a pregnant dental patient in the dental chair.

  7. Bone resorption: an actor of dental and periodontal development?

    PubMed Central

    Gama, Andrea; Navet, Benjamin; Vargas, Jorge William; Castaneda, Beatriz; Lézot, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Dental and periodontal tissue development is a complex process involving various cell-types. A finely orchestrated network of communications between these cells is implicated. During early development, communications between cells from the oral epithelium and the underlying mesenchyme govern the dental morphogenesis with successive bud, cap and bell stages. Later, interactions between epithelial and mesenchymal cells occur during dental root elongation. Root elongation and tooth eruption require resorption of surrounding alveolar bone to occur. For years, it was postulated that signaling molecules secreted by dental and periodontal cells control bone resorbing osteoclast precursor recruitment and differentiation. Reverse signaling originating from bone cells (osteoclasts and osteoblasts) toward dental cells was not suspected. Dental defects reported in osteopetrosis were associated with mechanical stress secondary to defective bone resorption. In the last decade, consequences of bone resorption over-activation on dental and periodontal tissue formation have been analyzed with transgenic animals (RANKTg and Opg−∕− mice). Results suggest the existence of signals originating from osteoclasts toward dental and periodontal cells. Meanwhile, experiments consisting in transitory inhibition of bone resorption during root elongation, achieved with bone resorption inhibitors having different mechanisms of action (bisphosphonates and RANKL blocking antibodies), have evidenced dental and periodontal defects that support the presence of signals originating bone cells toward dental cells. The aim of the present manuscript is to present the data we have collected in the last years that support the hypothesis of a role of bone resorption in dental and periodontal development. PMID:26594180

  8. Dental Quality Measurement--A Practitioner Perspective.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Craig W

    2016-04-01

    This article reviews the HealthPartners Dental Group's experience with clinical quality measurement and provides information on the administrative infrastructure that supports measurement within the group. Some examples of the role measurement plays in operations and clinical practice are also reviewed. PMID:27265979

  9. Employment Considerations of AIDS in Dental Institutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumpler, Diane C.; Carey, Moses

    1987-01-01

    Policies governing the employment of health care workers with AIDS, and the AIDS employment issue facing dental practitioners, administrators, and educators are discussed. Legal considerations of AIDS in the workplace are addressed as to HIV testing, employee rights to gain and/or retain employment, economic considerations, and confidentiality…

  10. Outcomes Assessment in Dental Hygiene Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimes, Ellen B.

    1999-01-01

    A survey of 22 dental-hygiene-program directors found that programs routinely and effectively assess student outcomes and use the information for program improvements and to demonstrate accountability. Both policy and faculty/administrative support were deemed important to implementation. Time constraints were a major barrier. Outcomes-assessment…

  11. 48 CFR 30.607 - Subcontract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Administration 30.607 Subcontract administration. When a negotiated CAS price adjustment or a determination of noncompliance is required at...

  12. 48 CFR 30.607 - Subcontract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Administration 30.607 Subcontract administration. When a negotiated CAS price adjustment or a determination of noncompliance is required at...

  13. 48 CFR 30.607 - Subcontract administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... CONTRACTING REQUIREMENTS COST ACCOUNTING STANDARDS ADMINISTRATION CAS Administration 30.607 Subcontract administration. When a negotiated CAS price adjustment or a determination of noncompliance is required at...

  14. Therapeutic ultrasound for dental tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Scheven, B A A; Shelton, R M; Cooper, P R; Walmsley, A D; Smith, A J

    2009-10-01

    Dental disease affects human health and the quality of life of millions worldwide. Tooth decay (caries) and diseases of the dental pulp result in loss of tooth vitality and function requiring invasive treatment to restore the tooth to health. "Therapeutic" low intensity pulsed ultrasound has been shown to accelerate bone fracture healing indicating that ultrasound may be used as a tool to facilitate hard tissue regeneration. We have shown recently that low frequency ultrasound is able to exert biological effects on odontoblast-like cells. In this paper, we postulate that low frequency, low intensity ultrasound may stimulate endogenous coronal tooth repair by stimulating dentine formation from existing odontoblasts or by activating dental pulp stem cells to differentiate into new reparative dentine-producing cells. Ultrasound therapy promoting dentine formation and repair may also have the potential benefit of alleviating dentine hypersensitivity by inducing occlusion of dentinal tubules. It is envisaged that therapeutic ultrasound may be used in future to facilitate dental tissue engineering and stem cell therapy applications for dental tissue regeneration. Further research is warranted in this clinically important area and we envisage that novel strategies in dental therapy will be realised that may ultimately lead to the development of novel non-invasive, multifunctional ultrasound devices for dental diagnostics, repair and regeneration.

  15. Patient satisfaction in Dental Healthcare Centers

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Dena A.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to (1) measure the degree of patient satisfaction among the clinical and nonclinical dental services offered at specialty dental centers and (2) investigate the factors associated with the degree of overall satisfaction. Materials and Methods: Four hundred and ninety-seven participants from five dental centers were recruited for this study. Each participant completed a self-administered questionnaire to measure patient satisfaction with clinical and nonclinical dental services. Analysis of variance, t-tests, a general linear model, and stepwise regression analysis was applied. Results: The respondents were generally satisfied, but internal differences were observed. The exhibited highest satisfaction with the dentists’ performance, followed by the dental assistants’ services, and the lowest satisfaction with the center's physical appearance and accessibility. Females, participants with less than a bachelor's degree, and younger individuals were more satisfied with the clinical and nonclinical dental services. The stepwise regression analysis revealed that the coefficient of determination (R2) was 40.4%. The patient satisfaction with the performance of the dentists explained 42.6% of the overall satisfaction, whereas their satisfaction with the clinical setting explained 31.5% of the overall satisfaction. Conclusion: Additional improvements with regard to the accessibility and physical appearance of the dental centers are needed. In addition, interventions regarding accessibility, particularly when booking an appointment, are required. PMID:27403045

  16. Assessment formats in dental medicine: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard-Szep, Susanne; Güntsch, Arndt; Pospiech, Peter; Söhnel, Andreas; Scheutzel, Petra; Wassmann, Torsten; Zahn, Tugba

    2016-01-01

    Aim: At the annual meeting of German dentists in Frankfurt am Main in 2013, the Working Group for the Advancement of Dental Education (AKWLZ) initiated an interdisciplinary working group to address assessments in dental education. This paper presents an overview of the current work being done by this working group, some of whose members are also actively involved in the German Association for Medical Education's (GMA) working group for dental education. The aim is to present a summary of the current state of research on this topic for all those who participate in the design, administration and evaluation of university-specific assessments in dentistry. Method: Based on systematic literature research, the testing scenarios listed in the National Competency-based Catalogue of Learning Objectives (NKLZ) have been compiled and presented in tables according to assessment value. Results: Different assessment scenarios are described briefly in table form addressing validity (V), reliability (R), acceptance (A), cost (C), feasibility (F), and the influence on teaching and learning (EI) as presented in the current literature. Infoboxes were deliberately chosen to allow readers quick access to the information and to facilitate comparisons between the various assessment formats. Following each description is a list summarizing the uses in dental and medical education. Conclusion: This overview provides a summary of competency-based testing formats. It is meant to have a formative effect on dental and medical schools and provide support for developing workplace-based strategies in dental education for learning, teaching and testing in the future. PMID:27579365

  17. Does HIV infection have an impact upon dental implant osseointegration? A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ata-Ali, Fadi; Di-Benedetto, Nicolas; Bagán, Leticia; Bagán, José-Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Background A systematic review is made to determine whether human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection has an impact upon dental implant osseointegration. Material and Methods A PubMed (MEDLINE) literature search was made of articles published up until 14 April 2014. The systematic review was conducted based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA). The quality of the studies included in the review was assessed using the Methodological Index for Nonrandomized Studies (MINORS) and levels of evidence (based on the University of Oxford’s Center for Evidence Based Medicine criteria). Results The combinations of search terms resulted in a list of 132 titles. Nine studies finally met the inclusion criteria and were selected for inclusion in the systematic review. A total of 173 dental implants were placed in 80 patients (135 implants in 56 HIV-positive subjects and 38 implants in 24 HIV-negative patients), and a single loss of dental implant osseointegration was recorded in an HIV-positive patient. Conclusions Our results suggest that dental implant placement in HIV-positive patients does not increase the dental implant failure rate. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment, the administration of highly active antiretroviral therapy, and control of the CD4+ T lymphocyte counts appear to be the main influencing factors in this respect. Given the few studies included in our systematic review, further prospective studies involving larger sample sizes and longer durations of follow-up are required in order to confirm the results obtained. Key words: Dental implants, implant failure, HIV positive, systematic review, AIDS, HAART. PMID:25662560

  18. Emissions Inventory Report Summary Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 1998

    SciTech Connect

    Air Quality Group, ESH-17

    1999-09-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is subject to emissions reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The Laboratory has the potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, and volatile organic compounds. For 1998, combustion products from the industrial sources contributed the greatest amount of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory. Research and development activities contributed the greatest amount of volatile organic compounds. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20 NMAC 2.72 Construction Permits.

  19. Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20 NMAC 2.73) for Calendar Year 1997

    SciTech Connect

    1999-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory (the Laboratory) is subject to emissions reporting requirements for regulated air contaminants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73, (20 NMAC 2.73), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The Laboratory has the potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). For 1997, combustion products from the industrial sources contributed the greatest amount of regulated air emissions from the Laboratory. Research and development activities contributed the greatest amount of VOCs. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20 NMAC 2.72, Construction Permits.

  20. 75 FR 58414 - Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory Committee; Amendment of Notice

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-24

    ... (75 FR 33315). The amendment is being made to reflect a change in the Agenda portion of the document... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Dental Products Panel of the Medical Devices Advisory... Administration (FDA) is announcing an amendment to the notice of meeting of the Dental Products Panel of...

  1. The Future of Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonsen, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    The author, a representative of the American Dental Trade Association, identifies major challenges facing dental education in the areas of predoctoral dental education, postdoctoral dental education, and continuing dental education. Ten recommendations address preclinical and clinical courses, licensing examinations, mandatory continuing…

  2. Intraoral Treatment of Dental Disease in Pet Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Capello, Vittorio

    2016-09-01

    The intraoral treatment of dental disease in pet rabbits follows a complete clinical examination, intraoral inspection under general anesthesia, and diagnostic imaging. It also implies thorough knowledge of dental disease in this species. The most common intraoral procedures are extraction of incisor teeth, coronal reduction, and extraction of cheek teeth. These dental procedures require specific instruments and equipment. They should be performed in conjunction with supportive and medical treatment followed by appropriate nutrition.

  3. 77 FR 26183 - Technical Revisions To Update Reference to the Required Assessment Tool for State Nursing Homes...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-03

    ... in 38 CFR Part 51 Administrative practice and procedure, Claims, Day care, Dental health Government... State homes that receive per diem from VA for providing nursing home care to veterans. It requires State... INFORMATION CONTACT: Nancy Quest, Director, Home and Community Based Services, Geriatrics and Extended...

  4. What is dental ecology?

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context.

  5. Dental hygiene in Slovakia.

    PubMed

    Luciak-Donsberger, C; Krizanová, M

    2004-08-01

    This article reports on the development of the dental hygiene profession in Slovakia from a global perspective. The aim is to inform about current developments and to examine, how access to qualified dental hygiene care might be improved and how professional challenges might be met. For an international study on dental hygiene, secondary source data were obtained from members of the House of Delegates of the International Federation of Dental Hygienists (IFDH) or by fax and e-mail from experts involved in the national professional and educational organization of dental hygiene in non-IFDH member countries, such as Slovakia. Responses were followed-up by interviews, e-mail correspondence, visits to international universities, and a review of supporting studies and reference literature. Results show that the introduction of dental hygiene in Slovakia in 1992 was inspired by the delivery of preventive care in Switzerland. Initiating local dentists and dental hygienists strive to attain a high educational level, equitable to that of countries in which dental hygiene has an established tradition of high quality care. Low access to qualified dental hygiene care may be a result of insufficient funding for preventive services, social and cultural lack of awareness of the benefits of preventive care, and of limitations inherent in the legal constraints preventing unsupervised dental hygiene practice. These may be a result of gender politics affecting a female-dominated profession and of a perception that dental hygiene is auxiliary to dental care. International comparison show that of all Eastern European countries, the dental hygiene profession appears most advanced in Slovakia. This is expressed in high evidence-based academic goals, in extensive work with international consultants from the Netherlands and Switzerland, in annual congresses of high professional quality, and in the establishment of a profession, which has not been introduced in all Western EU countries

  6. Lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues in dental school environments: dental student leaders' perceptions.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Joan I; Patterson, April N; Temple, Henry J; Inglehart, Marita Rohr

    2009-01-01

    The objectives of the study reported in this article were to assess dental student leaders' perceptions of educational efforts concerning lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) topics and the cultural climate concerning LGBT issues in dental schools in the United States and Canada. In addition, the perceptions of student leaders who self-identified as belonging to the LGBT community and of students with a heterosexual orientation were compared. Data were collected from 113 dental student leaders from twenty-seven dental schools in the United States and three in Canada. Fifty student leaders were females, and sixty-two were males. Only 13.3 percent of the respondents agreed that their dental education prepared them well to treat patients from LGBT backgrounds. The more the student leaders believed that their university has an honest interest in diversity, the better they felt prepared by their dental school program to treat patients from LGBT backgrounds (r=.327; p<.001). The better they felt prepared, the more they perceived the clinic environment as sensitive and affirming for patients with different sexual orientations (r=.464; p<.001). The more they reported that dental schools' administrations create a positive environment for students with LGBT orientations, the more they agreed that persons can feel comfortable regardless of their sexual orientation (r=.585; p<.001). In conclusion, the findings indicate that dental school administrators play an important role in ensuring that future care providers are well prepared to treat patients from LGBT backgrounds and that staff, faculty, students, and patients from these backgrounds are not discriminated against.

  7. Meeting Dental Health Needs Through Dental Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Alvin L.

    1972-01-01

    Dental health needs of the country cannot be met through education of more dentists. Rather, we must educate auxiliaries to perform many of the intraoral procedures now regarded the sole responsibility of dentists. (SB)

  8. Employment of Dental Hygienists as Dental Educators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fong, Cynthia; Odrich, Johanna

    1987-01-01

    A study of the use of dental hygienists to teach periodontics, preventive dentistry, community dentistry, and public health courses looked at employment patterns and practices and the qualifications of the teachers. (MSE)

  9. Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements, and administrative procedures; delay of effective date. Final rule; delay of effective date.

    PubMed

    2004-02-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is further delaying, until December 1, 2006, the effective date of certain requirements of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720). In the Federal Register of May 3, 2000 (65 FR 25639), the agency delayed until October 1, 2001, the effective date of certain requirements in the final rule relating to wholesale distribution of prescription drugs by distributors that are not authorized distributors of record, and distribution of blood derivatives by entities that meet the definition of a "health care entity" in the final rule. The agency further delayed the effective date of these requirements in three subsequent Federal Register notices. Most recently, in the Federal Register of January 31, 2003 (68 FR 4912), FDA delayed the effective date until April 1, 2004. This action further delays the effective date of these requirements until December 1, 2006. The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The agency is taking this action to address concerns about the requirements in the final rule raised by affected parties. As explained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section, FDA is working with stakeholders through its counterfeit drug initiative to facilitate widespread, voluntary adoption of track and trace technologies that will generate a de facto electronic pedigree, including prior transaction history back to the original manufacturer, as a routine course of business. If this technology is widely adopted, it is expected to help fulfill the pedigree requirements of the PDMA and obviate or resolve many of the concerns that have been raised with respect to the final rule by ensuring that an electronic pedigree travels with a drug product at all times. Therefore, it is necessary to delay the effective date of Sec

  10. Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987; Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992; policies, requirements, and administrative procedures; delay of effective date. Final rule; delay of effective date.

    PubMed

    2004-02-23

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is further delaying, until December 1, 2006, the effective date of certain requirements of a final rule published in the Federal Register of December 3, 1999 (64 FR 67720). In the Federal Register of May 3, 2000 (65 FR 25639), the agency delayed until October 1, 2001, the effective date of certain requirements in the final rule relating to wholesale distribution of prescription drugs by distributors that are not authorized distributors of record, and distribution of blood derivatives by entities that meet the definition of a "health care entity" in the final rule. The agency further delayed the effective date of these requirements in three subsequent Federal Register notices. Most recently, in the Federal Register of January 31, 2003 (68 FR 4912), FDA delayed the effective date until April 1, 2004. This action further delays the effective date of these requirements until December 1, 2006. The final rule implements the Prescription Drug Marketing Act of 1987 (PDMA), as modified by the Prescription Drug Amendments of 1992 (PDA), and the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act of 1997 (the Modernization Act). The agency is taking this action to address concerns about the requirements in the final rule raised by affected parties. As explained in the SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION section, FDA is working with stakeholders through its counterfeit drug initiative to facilitate widespread, voluntary adoption of track and trace technologies that will generate a de facto electronic pedigree, including prior transaction history back to the original manufacturer, as a routine course of business. If this technology is widely adopted, it is expected to help fulfill the pedigree requirements of the PDMA and obviate or resolve many of the concerns that have been raised with respect to the final rule by ensuring that an electronic pedigree travels with a drug product at all times. Therefore, it is necessary to delay the effective date of Sec

  11. Perceptions of uncivil student behavior in dental education.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Townsend, Janice A; Ballard, Mary B; Armbruster, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Students and faculty members in the health professions classroom are expected to exhibit professional behaviors that are conducive to maintaining a positive learning environment, but there is little published research concerning incivility in the area of dental education. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in perceptions of incivility between dental faculty and students, between students in different courses of study, and between students in different years of dental study. The study utilized an anonymous electronic survey of all dental faculty and administrators and all dental, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology students at a single institution. The survey instrument contained questions concerning perceived uncivil behavior in the classroom and clinical settings. Response rates were 54% for faculty and administrators and ranged from 60% to 97% for students in various years and programs. The results were analyzed based on gender, course of study, year of study, and ethnicity. Significant differences were found regarding perceptions of civil behaviour between faculty and students, male and female students, the year of study, and the course of study. These differences point to the need for further research as well as administrative leadership and faculty development to define guidelines in this area in order to ensure a positive learning environment. PMID:25576551

  12. Perceptions of uncivil student behavior in dental education.

    PubMed

    Ballard, Richard W; Hagan, Joseph L; Townsend, Janice A; Ballard, Mary B; Armbruster, Paul C

    2015-01-01

    Students and faculty members in the health professions classroom are expected to exhibit professional behaviors that are conducive to maintaining a positive learning environment, but there is little published research concerning incivility in the area of dental education. The aim of this study was to evaluate differences in perceptions of incivility between dental faculty and students, between students in different courses of study, and between students in different years of dental study. The study utilized an anonymous electronic survey of all dental faculty and administrators and all dental, dental hygiene, and dental laboratory technology students at a single institution. The survey instrument contained questions concerning perceived uncivil behavior in the classroom and clinical settings. Response rates were 54% for faculty and administrators and ranged from 60% to 97% for students in various years and programs. The results were analyzed based on gender, course of study, year of study, and ethnicity. Significant differences were found regarding perceptions of civil behaviour between faculty and students, male and female students, the year of study, and the course of study. These differences point to the need for further research as well as administrative leadership and faculty development to define guidelines in this area in order to ensure a positive learning environment.

  13. Better Together: Co-Location of Dental and Primary Care Provides Opportunities to Improve Oral Health.

    PubMed

    Pourat, Nadereh; Martinez, Ana E; Crall, James J

    2015-09-01

    Community Health Centers (CHCs) are one of the principal safety-net providers of health care for low-income and uninsured populations. Co-locating dental services in primary care settings provides an opportunity to improve access to dental care. Yet this study of California CHCs that provide primary care services shows that only about one-third of them co-located primary and dental care services on-site. An additional one-third were members of multisite organizations in which at least one other site provided dental care. The remaining one-third of CHC sites had no dental care capacity. Policy options to promote co-location include requiring on-site availability of dental services, providing infrastructure funding to build and equip dental facilities, and offering financial incentives to provide dental care and recruit dental providers.

  14. Navigating career pathways--dental therapists in the workforce: a report of the career path subcommittee.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Karen; DePaola, Dominick

    2011-01-01

    Creating career pathways to facilitate current dental and other healthcare providers becoming dental therapists can be an efficient means to expand the dental workforce and reduce barriers to access to oral health services. Career pathways are proposed to facilitate dental providers building on previously learned skills to broaden their scope of practice and become even more versatile and productive providers of oral health services. Creation of a unified and integrated curriculum will enable research to document the effectiveness of this new dental provider who will work as part of dental teams and with supervision by dentists. The goal of augmenting the current dental team and reducing barriers to access to dental services for underserved populations can be enhanced by offering alternative pathways to achieve the competencies required of dental therapists.

  15. Case based dental radiology.

    PubMed

    Niemiec, Brook A

    2009-02-01

    Dental radiology is quickly becoming integral to the standard of care in veterinary dentistry. This is not only because it is critical for proper patient care, but also because client expectations have increased. Furthermore, providing dental radiographs as a routine service can create significant practice income. This article details numerous conditions that are indications for dental radiographs. As you will see, dental radiographs are often critical for proper diagnosis and treatment. These conditions should not be viewed as unusual; they are present within all of our practices. When you choose not to radiograph these teeth, you leave behind painful pathology. Utilizing the knowledge gained from dental radiographs will both improve patient care and increase acceptance of treatment recommendations. Consequently, this leads to increased numbers of dental procedures performed at your practice. PMID:19410233

  16. A Guide to Dental Care for the Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment Program (EPSDT) Under Medicaid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindahl, Roy L.; Young, Wesley O.

    This guide has been developed to assist administrators, providers of dental care, and others involved in carrying out the dental care provisions of the EPSDT program (Early and Periodic Screening, Diagnosis, and Treatment Program). It is intended to assist in the development of programs concerned with the unique characteristics of dental diseases…

  17. [Determination of dental age].

    PubMed

    Willems, Guy

    2005-01-01

    A review of the most commonly used dental age estimating techniques is generated. The most important issue for the forensic odontologist involved in dental age estimation is to employ as many of these methods as possible by performing repetitive measurements and calculations of different age-related parameters. That is the only way in order to try and establish reliable dental age estimations. In particular, a special chapter is attributed to the complex problem of determining the age of majority. PMID:16370435

  18. Examination of social networking professionalism among dental and dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel K; Molnar, Amy L

    2013-11-01

    Becoming a dental professional requires one to apply ethical decision making skills and demonstrate high standards of professionalism in practice, including the way professionals present themselves to the public. With social media as an evergrowing part of personal and professional communications, this study aimed to determine the accessibility, amount, and type of unprofessional content on Facebook profiles of dental hygiene and dental students in a college of dentistry. The authors evaluated the online profiles of all 499 dental and dental hygiene students at The Ohio State University using objective measures that included existence of a profile, current privacy settings, and access to personally identifiable information. A sample of profiles were evaluated for unprofessional content including photos, comments, and wall posts. The majority of these students were found to use Facebook, with 61 percent having Facebook profiles. Dental hygiene students were more likely to have a Facebook profile than were dental students: 72.6 percent and 59.1 percent, respectively (p=0.027). The majority of the students' profiles had some form of privacy setting enabled, with only 4 percent being entirely open to the public. Fewer than 2 percent of the students allowed non-friends access to personal information. Based on in-depth analysis of the profiles, fourteen (5.8 percent) instances of unprofessionalism were recorded; the most common unprofessional content involved substance abuse. This study found that these dental and dental hygiene students frequently possessed an identifiable Facebook account and nearly half had some kind of personal information on their profile that could potentially be shared with the public. In some instances, the students gave patients, faculty, and potential employers access to content that is not reflective of a dental professional. Academic institutions should consider implementing policies that bring awareness to and address the use of social media

  19. Examination of social networking professionalism among dental and dental hygiene students.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel K; Molnar, Amy L

    2013-11-01

    Becoming a dental professional requires one to apply ethical decision making skills and demonstrate high standards of professionalism in practice, including the way professionals present themselves to the public. With social media as an evergrowing part of personal and professional communications, this study aimed to determine the accessibility, amount, and type of unprofessional content on Facebook profiles of dental hygiene and dental students in a college of dentistry. The authors evaluated the online profiles of all 499 dental and dental hygiene students at The Ohio State University using objective measures that included existence of a profile, current privacy settings, and access to personally identifiable information. A sample of profiles were evaluated for unprofessional content including photos, comments, and wall posts. The majority of these students were found to use Facebook, with 61 percent having Facebook profiles. Dental hygiene students were more likely to have a Facebook profile than were dental students: 72.6 percent and 59.1 percent, respectively (p=0.027). The majority of the students' profiles had some form of privacy setting enabled, with only 4 percent being entirely open to the public. Fewer than 2 percent of the students allowed non-friends access to personal information. Based on in-depth analysis of the profiles, fourteen (5.8 percent) instances of unprofessionalism were recorded; the most common unprofessional content involved substance abuse. This study found that these dental and dental hygiene students frequently possessed an identifiable Facebook account and nearly half had some kind of personal information on their profile that could potentially be shared with the public. In some instances, the students gave patients, faculty, and potential employers access to content that is not reflective of a dental professional. Academic institutions should consider implementing policies that bring awareness to and address the use of social media

  20. [Microscopic studies of the structures of different dental floss types].

    PubMed

    Dörfer, C; Böök, M; Staehle, H J

    1993-01-01

    26 different dental flosses, made from silk, polyamide (Nylon) or Teflon, were analyzed with respect to their surface structure and their cross-section. Principally, two different types of manufacturing could be distinguished. The dental flosses either consisted of a large number of individual fibers, or a single, falted membrane. Even flosses that were manufactured in the same manner revealed considerable differences. Apart from the chemical composition, the structure of dental flosses is decisive for their use and this is why an exact classification would be desirable. In this study the requirements for classifying dental flosses are provided.

  1. 'An unusual response of dental sepsis to antibiotics: parallels with the Jarisch-Herxheimer reaction'.

    PubMed

    Moss, Helen; Collier, Jonathan Marc; Collier, Sophie

    2012-06-14

    Spreading odontogenic infections are a common source of hospital admissions to Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery (OMFS) units. This report describes an unusual reaction to routine treatment for a spreading odontogenic infection in a healthy male with no known allergies, requiring the patient to be managed supportively in the resuscitation room. The patient deteriorated rapidly after the administration of paracetamol, intravenous fluids, steroids and antibiotics, demonstrating delusional behaviour, fever, rigors, tachycardia and hypoxia. Fever associated with sepsis can lead to confusional states, but similar symptoms have been described in the literature as a reaction to antibiotic therapy known as Jarisch-Herxheimer (J-H) reaction. This is potentially the first time a J-H like reaction has been described in the context of dental sepsis. The authors feel that the OMFS team should be aware of possible sequelae of medical therapy in patients with acute dental sepsis and be confident in their management of these complications.

  2. Emissions Inventory Report Summary: Reporting Requirements for the New Mexico Administrative Code, Title 20, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC) for Calendar Year 2003

    SciTech Connect

    M. Stockton

    2005-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory is subject to annual emissions-reporting requirements for regulated air pollutants under Title 20 of the New Mexico Administrative Code, Chapter 2, Part 73 (20.2.73 NMAC), Notice of Intent and Emissions Inventory Requirements. The applicability of the requirements is based on the Laboratory's potential to emit 100 tons per year of suspended particulate matter, nitrogen oxides, carbon monoxide, sulfur oxides, or volatile organic compounds. For calendar year 2003, the Technical Area 3 steam plant and the air curtain destructors were the primary sources of criteria air pollutants from the Laboratory, while the air curtain destructors and chemical use associated with research and development activities were the primary sources of volatile organic compounds and hazardous air pollutants. Emissions of beryllium and aluminum were reported for activities permitted under 20.2.72 NMAC. Hazardous air pollutant emissions were reported from chemical use as well as from all combustion sources. In addition, estimates of particulate matter with diameter less than 2.5 micrometers and ammonia were provided as requested by the New Mexico Environment Department, Air Quality Bureau.

  3. Digital Dental X-ray Database for Caries Screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rad, Abdolvahab Ehsani; Rahim, Mohd Shafry Mohd; Rehman, Amjad; Saba, Tanzila

    2016-06-01

    Standard database is the essential requirement to compare the performance of image analysis techniques. Hence the main issue in dental image analysis is the lack of available image database which is provided in this paper. Periapical dental X-ray images which are suitable for any analysis and approved by many dental experts are collected. This type of dental radiograph imaging is common and inexpensive, which is normally used for dental disease diagnosis and abnormalities detection. Database contains 120 various Periapical X-ray images from top to bottom jaw. Dental digital database is constructed to provide the source for researchers to use and compare the image analysis techniques and improve or manipulate the performance of each technique.

  4. Professional and personal enhancement: a pragmatic approach in dental education

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Students of health education are often offended by the transitions and challenges they face while encountering diverse people, ideas and academic workloads. They may be offended because of reasons not only related to their societal background but also to their basic competence in managing transitions. In the Asian scenario, students enter the first year of professional education in their late teen age along with the definition of self which was created by their parents. There are different issues that arise in this age group that may positively shape or negatively affect the personalities of students. They need to achieve a sense of balance between personal and professional traits on their own. Several students are often unable to cultivate the expected required qualities, which leads to an abject state of mind and hinder their progress. We identified the most common personal and professional hurdles in the lives of dental students and we provided experiential solutions to overcome the hurdles by using a sociable approach through an integrated, continuing education program. Methods: Designing and implementing a cohesive, amalgamated and inspiring personal and professional enhancement action program for dental students. Results: Feedback from students reflected that the needs and expectations of students vary with academic phase. In addition students expressed that this program series inculcated some positive skills, and overall, they are satisfied with the utility of the program. Conclusion: Personal and professional enhancement of students in accordance with individual needs as well as with expected requirements needs a committed administrative action plan. Our results in this context are encouraging and can be considered for application in dental institutions. PMID:26932496

  5. Dental devices: classification of dental amalgam, reclassification of dental mercury, designation of special controls for dental amalgam, mercury, and amalgam alloy. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2009-08-01

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing a final rule classifying dental amalgam into class II, reclassifying dental mercury from class I to class II, and designating a special control to support the class II classifications of these two devices, as well as the current class II classification of amalgam alloy. The three devices are now classified in a single regulation. The special control for the devices is a guidance document entitled, "Class II Special Controls Guidance Document: Dental Amalgam, Mercury, and Amalgam Alloy." This action is being taken to establish sufficient regulatory controls to provide reasonable assurance of the safety and effectiveness of these devices. Elsewhere in this issue of the Federal Register, FDA is announcing the availability of the guidance document that will serve as the special control for the devices.

  6. Trends in Dental Specialty Education and Practice, 1990-99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumann, Laura M.; Nix, Judith A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes findings from a comprehensive study of American Dental Association-recognized dental specialties, including specialty practice and the practice environment, membership in specialty organizations, requirements and trends in board certification, advances in research and technology, and trends in advanced specialty education. (EV)

  7. Principal Components Analyses of Predictor Variables in Dental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zullo, Thomas G.

    This study was undertaken to determine the degree of factorial invariance that exists in a battery of predictor variables commonly used in the selection of applicants for dental school. The following variables were used in the analyses performed: 13 subscores from the Dental Aptitude Test Battery, Overall QPA, Required Courses QPA, years of…

  8. Critical Thinking Skills of United States Dental Hygiene Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Notgarnie, Howard M.

    2011-01-01

    The complexity of decision-making in dental hygienists' practice requires critical thinking skills. Interest in raising educational standards for entry into the dental hygiene profession is a response to the demand for enhanced professional skills, including critical thinking skills. No studies found in the course of literature review compared…

  9. 32 CFR 700.924 - Medical or dental aid to persons not in the naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Medical or dental aid to persons not in the... OFFICIAL RECORDS The Senior Officer Present Contents § 700.924 Medical or dental aid to persons not in the naval service. The senior officer present may require the officers of the Medical Corps and Dental...

  10. 32 CFR 700.924 - Medical or dental aid to persons not in the naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Medical or dental aid to persons not in the... OFFICIAL RECORDS The Senior Officer Present Contents § 700.924 Medical or dental aid to persons not in the naval service. The senior officer present may require the officers of the Medical Corps and Dental...

  11. 32 CFR 700.924 - Medical or dental aid to persons not in the naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Medical or dental aid to persons not in the... OFFICIAL RECORDS The Senior Officer Present Contents § 700.924 Medical or dental aid to persons not in the naval service. The senior officer present may require the officers of the Medical Corps and Dental...

  12. 32 CFR 700.924 - Medical or dental aid to persons not in the naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Medical or dental aid to persons not in the... OFFICIAL RECORDS The Senior Officer Present Contents § 700.924 Medical or dental aid to persons not in the naval service. The senior officer present may require the officers of the Medical Corps and Dental...

  13. 32 CFR 700.924 - Medical or dental aid to persons not in the naval service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Medical or dental aid to persons not in the... OFFICIAL RECORDS The Senior Officer Present Contents § 700.924 Medical or dental aid to persons not in the naval service. The senior officer present may require the officers of the Medical Corps and Dental...

  14. A critical discussion of the benefits of e-health in population-level dental research.

    PubMed

    Lam, Raymond; Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Population-level research is an essential area of health with the potential to affect quality of life and the broader economy. There are excellent epidemiological studies that have improved health services, but traditional research requires a considerable investment. Although electronic technology has changed the practice of many industries with improved efficiency, its application to health is relatively new. Termed 'e-health', this emerging area has been defined by the World Health Organization as the use of information technology to support many aspects of health such as in administration and scientific information. However, not all professionals are convinced of its use. This paper presents a novel application of this emerging area to describe the benefit in data collation and research to support one of the most pressing issues in public health: oral health and policy. Using the Chronic Disease Dental Scheme as an example, a critical discussion of its benefit to population-level research is presented. The Chronic Disease Dental Scheme method of electronic administration has been shown to enhance research and to complement existing progress in health data linkage. e-Health is an invaluable tool for population-level dental research.

  15. Education About Dental Hygienists' Roles in Public Dental Prevention Programs: Dental and Dental Hygiene Students' and Faculty Members' and Dental Hygienists' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Pervez, Anushey; Kinney, Janet S; Gwozdek, Anne; Farrell, Christine M; Inglehart, Marita R

    2016-09-01

    In 2005, Public Act No. 161 (PA 161) was passed in Michigan, allowing dental hygienists to practice in approved public dental prevention programs to provide services for underserved populations while utilizing a collaborative agreement with a supervising dentist. The aims of this study were to assess how well dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members and practicing dental hygienists have been educated about PA 161, what attitudes and knowledge about the act they have, and how interested they are in additional education about it. University of Michigan dental and dental hygiene students and faculty members, students in other Michigan dental hygiene programs, and dental hygienists in the state were surveyed. Respondents (response rate) were 160 dental students (50%), 63 dental hygiene students (82%), 30 dental faculty members (26%), and 12 dental hygiene faculty members (52%) at the University of Michigan; 143 dental hygiene students in other programs (20%); and 95 members of the Michigan Dental Hygienists' Association (10%). The results showed that the dental students were less educated about PA 161 than the dental hygiene students, and the dental faculty members were less informed than the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists. Responding dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists had more positive attitudes about PA 161 than did the students and dental faculty members. Most of the dental hygiene faculty members and dental hygienists knew a person providing services in a PA 161 program. Most dental hygiene students, faculty members, and dental hygienists wanted more education about PA 161. Overall, the better educated about the program the respondents were, the more positive their attitudes, and the more interested they were in learning more. PMID:27587574

  16. Dental anesthesia for patients with special needs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi-Chia; Lin, I-Hua; Huang, Chi-Hsiang; Fan, Shou-Zen

    2012-09-01

    To offer individualized dental treatment to certain patients who cannot tolerate dental treatment, sedation or general anesthesia is required. The needs could be either medical, mental, or psychological. The most common indications for sedation or general anesthesia are lack of cooperation, multiple morbidities, and pediatric autism. In adults, cognitive impairment and multiple morbidities are most commonly encountered indications. Because of suboptimal home care, incomplete medical history, poor preoperative management, lack of cooperation, and developmental abnormalities, it is a challenge to prepare anesthesia for patients with special needs. The American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) has proposed guidelines for office-based anesthesia for ambulatory surgery. In patients with ASA physical status IV and V, sedation or general anesthesia for treatment in the dental office is not recommended. The distinction between sedation levels and general anesthesia is not clear. If intravenous general anesthesia without tracheal intubation is chosen for dental procedures, full cooperation between the dentist, dental assistant, and anesthesiologist is needed. Teamwork between the dentist and healthcare provider is key to achieve safe and successful dental treatment under sedation or general anesthesia in the patient with special needs. PMID:23026171

  17. Dental findings in patients with West syndrome: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Khatri, Amit; Kalra, Namita; Tyagi, Rishi; Baweja, Mani; Khandelwal, Deepak

    2014-01-01

    West syndrome a rare, severe form of epilepsy occurs in early infancy. It is characterized by a triad consisting of infantile spasms that occurs in clusters, arrest of psychomotor development and hypsarrhythmia on electroencephalogram. We present here two cases of west syndrome where patients required dental care due to the presence of certain dental findings. Preventive measurements such as controlled diet and proper oral hygiene along with professional dental management are recommended in patients with west syndrome to avoid dental problems.

  18. Dental Charting. Student's Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Trudy Karlene; Apfel, Maura

    This manual is part of a series dealing with skills and information needed by students in dental assisting. The individualized student materials are suitable for classroom, laboratory, or cooperative training programs. This student manual contains four units covering the following topics: dental anatomical terminology; tooth numbering systems;…

  19. Dental Laboratory Technician.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This document, which is designed for use in developing a tech prep competency profile for the occupation of dental laboratory technician, lists technical competencies and competency builders for 13 units pertinent to the health technologies cluster in general and 8 units to the occupation of dental laboratory technician. The following skill areas…

  20. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries.

    PubMed

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J; Cooper, Paul R

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and reducing innate repair capacities. For complete tooth healing the formation of a reactionary/reparative dentin barrier to distance and protect the pulp from infectious agents and restorative materials is required. Clinical and in vitro experimental data clearly indicate that dentin barrier formation only occurs when pulp inflammation and infection are minimised, thus enabling reestablishment of tissue homeostasis and health. Therefore, promoting the resolution of pulp inflammation may provide a valuable therapeutic opportunity to ensure the sustainability of dental treatments. This paper focusses on key cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pulp responses to bacteria and in the pulpal transition between caries-induced inflammation and dentinogenic-based repair. We report, using selected examples, different strategies potentially used by odontoblasts and specialized immune cells to combat dentin-invading bacteria in vivo.

  1. Dental Pulp Defence and Repair Mechanisms in Dental Caries

    PubMed Central

    Farges, Jean-Christophe; Alliot-Licht, Brigitte; Renard, Emmanuelle; Ducret, Maxime; Gaudin, Alexis; Smith, Anthony J.; Cooper, Paul R.

    2015-01-01

    Dental caries is a chronic infectious disease resulting from the penetration of oral bacteria into the enamel and dentin. Microorganisms subsequently trigger inflammatory responses in the dental pulp. These events can lead to pulp healing if the infection is not too severe following the removal of diseased enamel and dentin tissues and clinical restoration of the tooth. However, chronic inflammation often persists in the pulp despite treatment, inducing permanent loss of normal tissue and reducing innate repair capacities. For complete tooth healing the formation of a reactionary/reparative dentin barrier to distance and protect the pulp from infectious agents and restorative materials is required. Clinical and in vitro experimental data clearly indicate that dentin barrier formation only occurs when pulp inflammation and infection are minimised, thus enabling reestablishment of tissue homeostasis and health. Therefore, promoting the resolution of pulp inflammation may provide a valuable therapeutic opportunity to ensure the sustainability of dental treatments. This paper focusses on key cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in pulp responses to bacteria and in the pulpal transition between caries-induced inflammation and dentinogenic-based repair. We report, using selected examples, different strategies potentially used by odontoblasts and specialized immune cells to combat dentin-invading bacteria in vivo. PMID:26538821

  2. The future dental workforce?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  3. The future dental workforce?

    PubMed

    Gallagher, J E; Wilson, N H F

    2009-02-28

    The Editor-in-Chief of the BDJ has previously raised important questions about dental workforce planning and the implications for dental graduates of recent changes and pressures. It is now time to revisit this issue. Much has changed since the last workforce review in England and Wales, and the rate of change is in all probability set to increase. First, at the time of writing this paper the momentous step of including dental care professionals (DCPs) on General Dental Council (GDC) registers in the United Kingdom has recently been completed. Second, the Scope of Practice of all dental professionals has been under consultation by the General Dental Council, and research evidence suggests that greater use should be made of skill-mix in the dental team. Third, within England, Lord Darzi has just published the 'Final Report of the NHS Next Stage Review', which emphasises 'quality care' and 'team-working' as key features of healthcare; this report was accompanied by an important document entitled 'A High Quality Workforce', in which plans for local workforce planning within the NHS are outlined, placing responsibilities at national, local and regional levels. Fourth, policy makers across the UK are wrestling with addressing oral health needs, promoting health and facilitating access to dental care, all of which have implications for the nature and shape of the dental workforce. Fifth, with the impact of globalisation and European policies we are net gainers of dentists as well as having more in training. Sixth, although there have been reviews and policy initiatives by regulatory, professional and other bodies in support of shaping the dental workforce, there has been little serious consideration of skill-mix and funding mechanisms to encourage team-working. Together, these events demand that we enter a fresh debate on the future dental workforce which should extend beyond professional and national boundaries and inform workforce planning. This debate is of great

  4. Preparation of spread oils meeting U.S. Food and Drug Administration Labeling requirements for trans fatty acids via pressure-controlled hydrogenation.

    PubMed

    Eller, Fred J; List, Gary R; Teel, Jeffrey A; Steidley, Kevin R; Adlof, Richard O

    2005-07-27

    On July 11, 2003, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced final regulations for trans fatty acid (TFA) labeling. By January 1, 2006, the TFA content of foods must be labeled as a separate line on the Nutrition Facts label. Products containing <0.5 g of TFA/14 g serving may be declared as zero. This paper describes technologies allowing compliance with TFA labeling requirements. Soybean oil was hydrogenated in a 2-L vessel at temperatures ranging from 120 to 170 degrees C at a hydrogen pressure of 200 psi. A commercial nickel-supported catalyst (25% Ni) was used at 0.02% Ni by weight of oil. The hydrogenated oils were characterized for fatty acid composition, solid fat content, and melting point. Compared to commercially processed soybean oil basestocks that typically contain approximately 40% TFA, those obtained at lower temperatures and higher pressures contain >56% less TFA. Basestocks prepared in the laboratory when blended with liquid soybean oil will yield spread oils meeting FDA labeling requirements for zero TFA, that is, <0.5 g of TFA/serving.

  5. Standards, Regulation and Registration of Dental Laboratories. An Industry Update.

    PubMed

    Giovannone, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    State dental associations are showing increased interest in maintaining current standards and regulations affecting the dental laboratory industry as mandated by the Food and Drug Administration. The domestic dental laboratory industry is being significantly stressed by foreign competition, rapid technology development and unprecedented consolidation, which are changing the way that prosthetic devices and restorations are manufactured and delivered to dentists. Of paramount importance to the prescribing dentist is the accurate documentation of the source and materials being used in prostheses being delivered to patients. PMID:26373035

  6. Standards, Regulation and Registration of Dental Laboratories. An Industry Update.

    PubMed

    Giovannone, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    State dental associations are showing increased interest in maintaining current standards and regulations affecting the dental laboratory industry as mandated by the Food and Drug Administration. The domestic dental laboratory industry is being significantly stressed by foreign competition, rapid technology development and unprecedented consolidation, which are changing the way that prosthetic devices and restorations are manufactured and delivered to dentists. Of paramount importance to the prescribing dentist is the accurate documentation of the source and materials being used in prostheses being delivered to patients.

  7. What is dental ecology?

    PubMed

    Cuozzo, Frank P; Sauther, Michelle L

    2012-06-01

    Teeth have long been used as indicators of primate ecology. Early work focused on the links between dental morphology, diet, and behavior, with more recent years emphasizing dental wear, microstructure, development, and biogeochemistry, to understand primate ecology. Our study of Lemur catta at the Beza Mahafaly Special Reserve, Madagascar, has revealed an unusual pattern of severe tooth wear and frequent tooth loss, primarily the result of consuming a fallback food for which these primates are not dentally adapted. Interpreting these data was only possible by combining our areas of expertise (dental anatomy [FC] and primate ecology [MS]). By integrating theoretical, methodological, and applied aspects of both areas of research, we adopted the term "dental ecology"-defined as the broad study of how teeth respond to the environment. Specifically, we view dental ecology as an interpretive framework using teeth as a vehicle for understanding an organism's ecology, which builds upon earlier work, but creates a new synthesis of anatomy and ecology that is only possible with detailed knowledge of living primates. This framework includes (1) identifying patterns of dental pathology and tooth use-wear, within the context of feeding ecology, behavior, habitat variation, and anthropogenic change, (2) assessing ways in which dental development and biogeochemical signals can reflect habitat, environmental change and/or stress, and (3) how dental microstructure and macro-morphology are adapted to, and reflect feeding ecology. Here we define dental ecology, provide a short summary of the development of this perspective, and place our new work into this context. PMID:22610892

  8. Uniform administrative requirements for grants and agreements with institutions of higher education, hospitals, other non-profit, and commercial organizations--Department of Commerce. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    1998-09-01

    This interim final rule implements the revisions to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Circular A-110, "Uniform Administrative Requirements for Grants and Agreements With Institutions of Higher Education, Hospitals, and Other Non-Profit Organizations" which was published in the Federal Register on November 29, 1993. The revised Circular was developed by an interagency task force for governmentwide use in a model rule format to facilitate regulatory adoption by executive departments and agencies. In the published revised Circular, OMB specified as "required action" that Federal agencies responsible for awarding and administering grants and other agreements to recipients described therein, shall adopt the language of the Circular unless other provisions are required by Federal statute or exceptions or deviations are approved by OMB. This interim final rule adopts the provisions of the Circular and its language to the maximum extent feasible. However, minor changes were made to update the procedures, clarify the language, and make the language apply specifically to the DoC and its operating units. No changes are intended to deviate from the substance of Circular A-110. The Circular covers both grants and cooperative agreements made by Federal agencies and subawards, unless sections of the Circular specifically exclude subrecipients from coverage. Consistent with guidance provided in the Circular, DoC will apply its provisions to grants and agreements with institutions of higher education, hospitals, other nonprofit, and commercial organizations. The provisions of the interim final rule will also apply to foreign governments, organizations under the jurisdiction of foreign governments, and international organizations when appropriate.

  9. Health Instruction Packages: Permanent Teeth, Dental Deposits, and Dental Instruments. Dientes Permanentes, Depositos Dentales y Instrumentos Dentales.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lind, Patricia; Germano, Catherine

    These five learning modules use text interspersed with illustrations and reinforcement exercises to instruct dental aide and dental hygiene students about jaw bones and gums, dental deposits, and dental instruments. The first four modules were prepared by Patricia Lind in both Spanish and English. "The Gum and Bone of Permanent Teeth" ("La Encia y…

  10. Dental journals: yesterday and today.

    PubMed

    Woodmansey, Karl

    2012-10-01

    Today's dentists may subscribe to, or receive complimentarily, a number of periodical publications containing technical professional information. Dental journals are the prime example: providing timely, reliable and useful information. The development of dental journals is a component of the evolution of scientific communication. This article reviews the origins and evolution of dental journals, including the Texas Dental Journal. PMID:23311024

  11. Integrating research into dental student training: a global necessity.

    PubMed

    Emrick, J J; Gullard, A

    2013-12-01

    The integration of research into dental education is necessary to ensure that evidence-based practice reaches the clinical setting and that dentistry remains a scientifically driven health profession. Consequently, dental accreditation standards in the United States and Canada require dental schools to integrate research components into curricula. Organizations (e.g., NIDCR, ADEA, AADR, IADR, and NSRG) provide some opportunities for dental students to experience research. Assessment of the integration of research into dental curricula suggests that US students are interested in learning and utilizing evidence-based practice, but lack adequate time for research participation. Records show limited student involvement in research organizations internationally (i.e., AADR and IADR). Vague accreditation standards and limited research opportunities outside of dental schools may be barriers. We lack an understanding of the status of integration of research into dental curricula internationally, but predict that similar issues exist. We propose that dental institutions consider implementing the following: (1) curriculum components to assess the use of evidence-based practice, (2) faculty and student seminars for discussing evidence-based practice, (3) subsidization of student membership in dental research organizations (e.g., AADR and IADR), and (4) sponsorship of students as institutional representatives at annual research meetings (e.g., IADR, AADR, ADA, and ADEA meetings), with subsequent school-wide dissemination of knowledge attained from attendance.

  12. Gastroesophageal Reflux is Not Associated with Dental Erosion in Children

    PubMed Central

    Wild, Yvette K.; Heyman, Melvin B.; Vittinghoff, Eric; Dalal, Deepal H.; Wojcicki, Janet M.; Clark, Ann L.; Rechmann, Beate; Rechmann, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Background & Aims Dental erosion is a complication of gastroesophageal reflux (GER) in adults; in children, it is not clear if GER has a role in dental pathologic conditions. Dietary intake, oral hygiene, high bacterial load, and decreased salivary flow might contribute independently to GER development or dental erosion, but their potential involvement in dental erosion from GER is not understood. We investigated the prevalence of dental erosion among children with and without GER symptoms, and whether salivary flow rate or bacterial load contribute to location-specific dental erosion. Methods We performed a cross-sectional study of 59 children (ages 9–17 y) with symptoms of GER and 20 asymptomatic children (controls); all completed a questionnaire on dietary exposure. Permanent teeth were examined for erosion into dentin, erosion locations, and affected surfaces. The dentist was not aware of GER status, nor was the gastroenterologist aware of dental status. Stimulated salivary flow was measured and salivary bacterial load was calculated for total bacteria, Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Results Controlling for age, dietary intake, and oral hygiene, there was no association between GER symptoms and dental erosion, by tooth location or affected surface. Salivary flow did not correlate with GER symptoms or erosion. Erosion location and surface were independent of total bacteria and levels of Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacilli. Conclusions Location-specific dental erosion is not associated with GER, salivary flow, or bacterial load. Prospective studies are required to determine the pathogenesis of GER-associated dental erosion and the relationship between dental caries to GER and dental erosion. PMID:21820389

  13. Dental student debt.

    PubMed

    Mannion, H; Bedi, R

    1995-09-01

    The aim of this investigation is to provide information about the financial status of dental students enrolled on the Bachelor of Dental Surgery degree course at the University of Birmingham. All undergraduate dental students enrolled during the academic year 1993-94 were asked to participate in the study. The pre-tested questionnaire, which was given to all students, covered personal details, expenditure levels, income, loans, overdrafts, use of government schemes ('top-up loans'), and so on. The questionnaire was completed by 115 dental students (response rate 47%). The results showed that dental students' debts increased each year throughout the course. A top-up loan (range 700 Pounds-850 Pounds) had been taken out by 36% of students. The financial status of 9% of students was severe enough to warrant their eligibility for awards from access funds. Credit cards were possessed by 52% of the surveyed students, and although only half of these owed money, 22% owed between 500 Pounds and 2000 Pounds. Personal overdrafts were held by 56% of respondents. A total of 17% of students engaged in weekly part-time employment. The average debt for final year students was 1200 Pounds. Dental students' estimates of the level of debt they were likely to incur was greater than the actual debt presently experienced by final year students. In conclusion, this preliminary study showed that most dental students incur debt during their undergraduate course and that this debt increases during the course.

  14. Credibility and Confidence in Your Dental Laboratory Work-How Quality Assurance Systems Can Be Used in the Manufacturing of Individual Custom-Made Dental Devices.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Anthony

    2015-08-01

    Manufacturing of custom-made dental devices such as removable dentures, fixed prosthodontics and orthodontics are subject to the requirements of the Medical Devices Directive (MDD). Many dental laboratories often enhance these requirements by implementing quality assurance procedures that then provide enhanced consistency. This paper provided a personal view of some of the systems currently being used in dental laboratories to provide a quality assured product and associated issues. PMID:26556514

  15. Prerequisites in behavioral science and business: opportunities for dental education.

    PubMed

    Dunning, David G; Lange, Brian M; Madden, Robert D; Tacha, Koko K

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing pressure on recent dental school graduates to understand and successfully utilize patient management and business management strategies to run a productive dental office. Dental schools are faced with the dilemma to either add more credit hours in their already crowded curriculum or adjust predental school requirements. All fifty-nine U.S. dental schools were assessed online to determine admission requirements in the areas of behavioral science and business education. Results show that only 11.9 percent of the schools require prerequisite course work in behavioral science and no school requires prerequisite course work in business. However, 64.4 percent and 30.5 percent of schools encouraged or recommended prerequisite course work in behavioral science and business, respectively. We suggest that the dental education community involve key stakeholders to discuss the incorporation of prerequisite course work in behavioral science and business. Additional courses in these disciplines would provide dental students better backgrounds from which the dental curriculum could build a more advanced and applied perspective to better prepare students for practice. PMID:21205731

  16. Prerequisites in behavioral science and business: opportunities for dental education.

    PubMed

    Dunning, David G; Lange, Brian M; Madden, Robert D; Tacha, Koko K

    2011-01-01

    There is increasing pressure on recent dental school graduates to understand and successfully utilize patient management and business management strategies to run a productive dental office. Dental schools are faced with the dilemma to either add more credit hours in their already crowded curriculum or adjust predental school requirements. All fifty-nine U.S. dental schools were assessed online to determine admission requirements in the areas of behavioral science and business education. Results show that only 11.9 percent of the schools require prerequisite course work in behavioral science and no school requires prerequisite course work in business. However, 64.4 percent and 30.5 percent of schools encouraged or recommended prerequisite course work in behavioral science and business, respectively. We suggest that the dental education community involve key stakeholders to discuss the incorporation of prerequisite course work in behavioral science and business. Additional courses in these disciplines would provide dental students better backgrounds from which the dental curriculum could build a more advanced and applied perspective to better prepare students for practice.

  17. Economic impact of dental hygienists on solo dental practices.

    PubMed

    Lazar, Vickie F; Guay, Albert H; Beazoglou, Tryfon J

    2012-08-01

    The fact that a significant percentage of dentists employ dental hygienists raises an important question: Are dental practices that utilize a dental hygienist structurally and operationally different from practices that do not? This article explores differences among dental practices that operate with and without dental hygienists. Using data from the American Dental Association's 2003 Survey of Dental Practice, a random sample survey of U.S. dentists, descriptive statistics were used to compare selected characteristics of solo general practitioners with and without dental hygienists. Multivariate regression analysis was used to estimate the effect of dental hygienists on the gross billings and net incomes of solo general practitioners. Differences in practice characteristics--such as hours spent in the practice and hours spent treating patients, wait time for a recall visit, number of operatories, square feet of office space, net income, and gross billings--were found between solo general practitioners who had dental hygienists and those who did not. Solo general practitioners with dental hygienists had higher gross billings. Higher gross billings would be expected, as would higher expenses. However, net incomes of those with dental hygienists were also higher. In contrast, the mean waiting time for a recall visit was higher among dentists who employed dental hygienists. Depending on personal preferences, availability of qualified personnel, etc., dentists who do not employ dental hygienists but have been contemplating that path may want to further research the benefits and opportunities that may be realized.

  18. Dental resin cure monitoring by inherent fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qun; Zhou, Jack X.; Li, Qingxiong; Wang, Sean X.

    2008-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the inherent fluorescence of a dental composite resin can be utilized to monitor the curing status, i.e. degree of conversion of the resin. The method does not require any sample preparation and is potentially very fast for real time cure monitoring. The method is verified by Raman spectroscopy analysis.

  19. The shortened dental arch: a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Armellini, Debora; von Fraunhofer, J Anthony

    2004-12-01

    The functional demands of patients are highly variable and individual, requiring dental treatment to be tailored to the individual's needs and adaptive capability. The World Health Organization indicates that a functional, esthetic, natural dentition has at least 20 teeth, while the literature indicates that dental arches comprising the anterior and premolar regions meet the requirements of a functional dentition. The English-language peer-reviewed literature pertaining to the short dental arch (SDA) was identified through the Medline search engine covering the period between 1966 and the present and critically reviewed. This treatment option for the partially dentate patient may provide oral functionality, improved oral hygiene, comfort, and, possibly, reduced costs.

  20. Clinical aspects of rodent dental anatomy.

    PubMed

    Crossley, D A

    1995-12-01

    The order Rodentia is vast, encompassing a large number of species with significant anatomical variations developed during natural adaptation to differing habitats. Many veterinarians have little knowledge of the anatomy of species other than the commoner domestic large herbivores and small carnivores. Clinicians require a basic knowledge of the relevant anatomy of species they are likely to be asked to treat. This article provides sufficient working knowledge of the oral and dental anatomy of those rodents commonly kept as pets to enable veterinarians to interpret clinical and radiographic findings when investigating suspected dental disease.

  1. Dental care - child

    MedlinePlus

    ... Zakher B, Mitchell JP, Pappas M. Preventing dental caries in children <5 years: systematic review updating USPSTF ... chap 7. Ng MW, Chase I. Early childhood caries: risk-based disease prevention and management. Dent Clin ...

  2. Dental mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Paul T

    2016-07-01

    Mammalian teeth harbour mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which contribute to tooth growth and repair. These dental MSCs possess many in vitro features of bone marrow-derived MSCs, including clonogenicity, expression of certain markers, and following stimulation, differentiation into cells that have the characteristics of osteoblasts, chondrocytes and adipocytes. Teeth and their support tissues provide not only an easily accessible source of MSCs but also a tractable model system to study their function and properties in vivo In addition, the accessibility of teeth together with their clinical relevance provides a valuable opportunity to test stem cell-based treatments for dental disorders. This Review outlines some recent discoveries in dental MSC function and behaviour and discusses how these and other advances are paving the way for the development of new biologically based dental therapies. PMID:27381225

  3. Glossary of Dental Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... geta poker friv Home InfoBites Find an AGD Dentist Your Family's Oral Health About the AGD Dental ... and shape of teeth performed by a general dentist | More Edentulous having lost most or all of ...

  4. Infant dental care (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Even though newborns and infants do not have teeth, care of the mouth and gums is important. ... sugar water. As the child grows, establishing proper dental hygiene will promote healthy teeth and gums which ...

  5. Dental Care in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... for you and your baby and contain less sugar that can damage your teeth. Water or low-fat milk hydrates you and contains little or no sugar. For More Information American Dental Association: Pregnancy http : / / ...

  6. A Care Pathway for Children Unable to Accept Dental Care Within the General Dental Services Involving the Use of Inhalation Sedation and General Anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Allyson R; Ali, Halimah

    2015-05-01

    Dental treatment is the commonest reason for a child to be in hospital in the UK. This is a shocking statistic for a preventable disease. How can we reduce the high numbers of dental general anaesthetics? It is essential that dental treatment under general anaesthesia (GA) is fully justifiable, ensuring that the right patients receive the right treatment. Guidance for general dental practitioners on when to refer a child for a dental GA is discussed. Treatment planning for this dentally high-risk group of children requires a holistic approach. It is complex and requires an experienced and competent clinical team, including dental care professionals with additional postgraduate qualifications. Often, alternative treatments are successful and a GA can be avoided. An audit of 85 patients referred for GA with Oldham Community Dental Service demonstrated 35% of patients accepted treatment with local anaesthesia only, 25% required inhalation sedation and only 25% were actually referred on for GA. Treatment for this group of patients must include the availability and provision of appropriate alternative treatment modalities, with the right staff and facilities, including those for dental general anaesthetic sessions. Ongoing follow-up within the general dental services is essential for this group of patients.

  7. Dental arch asymmetry

    PubMed Central

    Al-Zubair, Nabil Muhsen

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study was conducted to assess the dental arch asymmetry in a Yemeni sample aged (18-25) years. Materials and Methods: The investigation involved clinical examination of 1479 adults; only 253 (129 females, 124 males) out of the total sample were selected to fulfill the criteria for the study sample. Study models were constructed and evaluated to measure mandibular arch dimensions. Three linear distances were utilized on each side on the dental arch: Incisal-canine distance, canine-molar distance and incisal-molar distance, which represent the dental arch segmental measurements. Results: When applying “t-test” at P < 0.05, no significant differences were found between the right and left canine-molar, incisal-canine and incisal-molar distances in both dental arches for both sexes. The greater variation (0.30 mm) was observed between right and left canine-molar distance in the maxillary dental arch in male and the smaller (0.04 mm) in the mandibular dental arch between the right and left canine-molar distance in females. Conclusion: The findings of the present study revealed a symmetrical pattern of dental arches, since the right and left sides showed no statistically significant difference. In general, it can be observed that the measurements related to the central incisors and canines have the widest range of reading and give the impression that the location of central incisor and canines to each other and to other teeth is the strongest factor in determining the dental arch asymmetry. PMID:24966774

  8. Dental (Odontogenic) Pain

    PubMed Central

    Renton, Tara

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a simple overview of acute trigeminal pain for the non dentist. This article does not cover oral mucosal diseases (vesiculobullous disorders) that may cause acute pain. Dental pain is the most common in this group and it can present in several different ways. Of particular interest for is that dental pain can mimic both trigeminal neuralgia and other chronic trigeminal pain disorders. It is crucial to exclude these disorders whilst managing patients with chronic trigeminal pain. PMID:26527224

  9. Dental operatory water lines.

    PubMed

    Beierle, J W

    1993-02-01

    Water samples were collected from dental handpiece and air-water syringe lines at various times during the day and cultured for the presence and prevalence of various microbes. It was found that the longer a dental unit was out of use, the greater the microbial build-up in water lines. However, purging lines for two to three minutes at the start of the day and between patients significantly reduced microbial presence.

  10. Portable Dental System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Portable dental system provides dental care in isolated communities. System includes a patient's chair and a dentist's stool, an X-ray machine and a power unit, all of which fold into compact packages. A large yellow "pumpkin" is a collapsible compressed air tank. Portable system has been used successfully in South America in out of the way communities with this back-packable system, and in American nursing homes. This product is no longer manufactured.

  11. The educational challenge of dental geriatrics.

    PubMed

    MacEntee, Michael I

    2010-01-01

    Education in dentistry as in medicine is guided principally by the ontology and theory of science, which provides definitions of health and disease, legitimizes research methods, and influences the role of the clinician. The challenge of managing chronic oral disease and disability prompts interest in social theory as much as science. Therefore, dental geriatrics requires a solid foundation in the humanities from the belief that the determinants of health and the cause of chronic diseases lie within an intermingling of biology, economics, sociocultural structure, and human behavior. The dental curriculum in many places is reorganizing from the horizontal foundation of basic sciences to an integration of foundational and clinical knowledge focused on clinical competencies and integrated care. The impact of this integration on dental geriatrics necessitates a more humanistic and naturalistic perspective in dental education to balance and challenge the current evidence for best clinical practice, which at present is based almost exclusively on science. Consequently, dental students should be exposed to a consilience of the science and the humanities if dentists are to address effectively the needs of an aging population. PMID:20061525

  12. Use of social media by dental educators.

    PubMed

    Arnett, M R; Loewen, J M; Romito, L M

    2013-11-01

    Social networking applications have become an established means of communication; applications that did not exist ten years ago are now used daily. Social media can be used for a myriad of reasons including instructional tools to supplement learning. This project was designed to assess the usage of social media applications by dental school faculty members and identify the types of accounts they prefer. Four hundred forty-three full-time dental and dental hygiene faculty members from five U.S. dental schools were invited to complete a twelve-item online survey regarding their social media usage. The response rate was 50 percent (n=221). Of the respondents, nearly half were dentists, and 62 percent were ≥51 years of age. Facebook was the most popular social network, reportedly used by 111 respondents. The most often reported frequency of use was weekly (20.4 percent, n=221); users indicated utilizing a network primarily for personal rather than professional purposes. However, 37 percent of the respondents reported not using any social media. The most frequently cited barriers to the use of social media were time (48 percent) and privacy concerns (48 percent). Although few would dispute the influence social media has on today's students, the suitability and appropriateness of social media technology and its integration into dental curricula require further evaluation. PMID:24192405

  13. Use of social media by dental educators.

    PubMed

    Arnett, M R; Loewen, J M; Romito, L M

    2013-11-01

    Social networking applications have become an established means of communication; applications that did not exist ten years ago are now used daily. Social media can be used for a myriad of reasons including instructional tools to supplement learning. This project was designed to assess the usage of social media applications by dental school faculty members and identify the types of accounts they prefer. Four hundred forty-three full-time dental and dental hygiene faculty members from five U.S. dental schools were invited to complete a twelve-item online survey regarding their social media usage. The response rate was 50 percent (n=221). Of the respondents, nearly half were dentists, and 62 percent were ≥51 years of age. Facebook was the most popular social network, reportedly used by 111 respondents. The most often reported frequency of use was weekly (20.4 percent, n=221); users indicated utilizing a network primarily for personal rather than professional purposes. However, 37 percent of the respondents reported not using any social media. The most frequently cited barriers to the use of social media were time (48 percent) and privacy concerns (48 percent). Although few would dispute the influence social media has on today's students, the suitability and appropriateness of social media technology and its integration into dental curricula require further evaluation.

  14. Rethinking knowledge and pedagogy in dental education.

    PubMed

    Whipp, J L; Ferguson, D J; Wells, L M; Iacopino, A M

    2000-12-01

    Dentistry as a profession has often been considered both art and science. Traditional dental education has attempted to address both; however, in many places only the science of dentistry is emphasized. The move toward competency-based curricula in dental education requires an expansion of what constitutes meaningful knowledge in the curriculum and what pedagogies best support that curriculum. The scientific and technical knowledge considered foundational to clinical practice is not sufficient to teach competencies associated with the art of dentistry. Habermas, a social scientist, offers a way of looking beyond technical knowledge to consider two other forms of knowledge: practical and emancipatory. Pedagogy that supports development of practical and emancipatory knowledge includes problem-based learning and case methods, heuristics, reflective practica, journals, storytelling, and performance-based assessment methods. These important teaching strategies are being integrated into various dental curricula including a new competency-based dental curriculum at Marquette University's School of Dentistry. It will be critical for dental educators to continue developing these methods to provide efficient and effective education for future practitioners in both the art and science of dentistry.

  15. Is dental erosion really a problem?

    PubMed

    Schlueter, N; Jaeggi, T; Lussi, A

    2012-09-01

    Dental erosion is the non-carious dental substance loss induced by direct impact of exogenous or endogenous acids. It results in a loss of dental hard tissue, which can be serious in some groups, such as those with eating disorders, in patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease, and also in persons consuming high amounts of acidic drinks and foodstuffs. For these persons, erosion can impair their well-being, due to changes in appearance and/or loss of function of the teeth, e.g., the occurrence of hypersensitivity of teeth if the dentin is exposed. If erosion reaches an advanced stage, time- and money-consuming therapies may be necessary. The therapy, in turn, poses a challenge for the dentist, particularly if the defects are diagnosed at an advanced stage. While initial and moderate defects can mostly be treated non- or minimally invasively, severe defects often require complex therapeutic strategies, which often entail extensive loss of dental hard tissue due to preparatory measures. A major goal should therefore be to diagnose dental erosion at an early stage, to avoid functional and esthetic impairments as well as pain sensations and to ensure longevity of the dentition.

  16. Factors affecting utilization of dental health services and satisfaction among adolescent females in Riyadh City

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hussyeen, Al Johara A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This study was conducted to determine factors affecting utilization of dental health services among intermediate female school students in Riyadh. In addition to assessing their satisfaction with the dental care received during the last dental visit. Subjects and methods Self-administered questionnaires were distributed among students attending eight public and four private schools. These schools were selected randomly to represent the four different administrative zones in Riyadh. Results Of 600 questionnaires distributed, 531 were complete and suitable for analysis. Nearly three quarters of the students visited the dentist more than once during the last 2 years. A bout 75% had their treatment in private dental clinics and 63% made their visits for routine treatment. The quality of dental care was found to be the most encouraging factor for utilization of dental services, whereas, far geographic location of the dental clinics was the most discouraging factor. For those who received treatment in the government clinics, the most discouraging factor was post operative complications (P < 0.0001), while the most encouraging factor was the availability of friendly staff (P < 0.0001). The high cost of dental care was the most discouraging factor for utilizing the dental services for those who visited private clinics (P < 0.0001), while the high quality of dental care was the most encouraging factor (P < 0.009). Students who made their visits because of pain highly considered modern clinics and those recommended by friends as highly encouraging factors (P < 0.002), while they considered the high cost of dental care as discouraging factor for using dental services (P < 0.038). Students who visited the dentist for routine treatment gave the quality of dental care as encouraging for the use of dental clinics (P < 0.0001). Satisfaction with dental care was found to be significantly associated with high quality of dental care, convenient appointment

  17. Diagnostic Imaging for Dental Implant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nagarajan, Aishwarya; Perumalsamy, Rajapriya; Thyagarajan, Ramakrishnan; Namasivayam, Ambalavanan

    2014-01-01

    Dental implant is a device made of alloplastic (foreign) material implanted into the jaw bone beneath the mucosal layer to support a fixed or removable dental prosthesis. Dental implants are gaining immense popularity and wide acceptance because they not only replace lost teeth but also provide permanent restorations that do not interfere with oral function or speech or compromise the self-esteem of a patient. Appropriate treatment planning for replacement of lost teeth is required and imaging plays a pivotal role to ensure a satisfactory outcome. The development of pre-surgical imaging techniques and surgical templates helps the dentist place the implants with relative ease. This article focuses on various types of imaging modalities that have a pivotal role in implant therapy. PMID:25379354

  18. Saliva and dental erosion

    PubMed Central

    BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; HANNAS, Angélicas Reis; KATO, Melissa Thiemi

    2012-01-01

    Dental erosion is a multifactorial condition. The consideration of chemical, biological and behavioral factors is fundamental for its prevention and therapy. Among the biological factors, saliva is one of the most important parameters in the protection against erosive wear. Objective This review discusses the role of salivary factors on the development of dental erosion. Material and Methods A search was undertaken on MEDLINE website for papers from 1969 to 2010. The keywords used in the research were "saliva", "acquired pellicle", "salivary flow", "salivary buffering capacity" and "dental erosion". Inclusion of studies, data extraction and quality assessment were undertaken independently and in duplicate by two members of the review team. Disagreements were solved by discussion and consensus or by a third party. Results Several characteristics and properties of saliva play an important role in dental erosion. Salivary clearance gradually eliminates the acids through swallowing and saliva presents buffering capacity causing neutralization and buffering of dietary acids. Salivary flow allows dilution of the acids. In addition, saliva is supersaturated with respect to tooth mineral, providing calcium, phosphate and fluoride necessary for remineralization after an erosive challenge. Furthermore, many proteins present in saliva and acquired pellicle play an important role in dental erosion. Conclusions Saliva is the most important biological factor affecting the progression of dental erosion. Knowledge of its components and properties involved in this protective role can drive the development of preventive measures targeting to enhance its known beneficial effects. PMID:23138733

  19. Dental education and special-needs patients: challenges and opportunities.

    PubMed

    McTigue, Dennis J

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric dentists have, by tradition and default, provided care for persons with special health care needs (PSHCN), regardless of age. Deinstitutionalization of PSHCN in the 1960s, however, overwhelmed the dental care system, and oral health care became one of the greatest unmet needs of this population. This presentation follows the history of training for dentists in this aspect of care, from the first demonstration programs in the 1970s to the current educational programs in U.S. dental schools. Today's dental students must be competent in assessing the treatment needs of PSHCN, but accreditation standards do not require competency in the treatment of this group of patients. Recommendations to rectify this include revising dental school curricula to be more patient-centered, improving technology in schools, earlier clinical experiences for dental students, and the use of community-based clinics.

  20. Perspectives for the use of silver nanoparticles in dental practice.

    PubMed

    García-Contreras, René; Argueta-Figueroa, Liliana; Mejía-Rubalcava, Cynthia; Jiménez-Martínez, Rocio; Cuevas-Guajardo, Sahamanta; Sánchez-Reyna, Paola Ariselda; Mendieta-Zeron, Hugo

    2011-12-01

    Nanotechnology has been used for medical applications in several forms, including dental practice with the development of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) as a useful tool. The aim of this review was to identify the properties and appliances of Ag NPs in dental practice. Silver compounds and NPs have already been used as dental restorative material, endodontic retrofill cements, dental implants and caries inhibitory solution. Despite the effectiveness that Ag NPs has shown in dental practice, Ag NPs remain a controversial area of research with respect to their toxicity in biological and ecological systems. Therefore any application of Ag NPs in dentistry requires more studies. In order to avoid the toxicity of these materials Ag NPs can be temporarily used in dentistry.

  1. Dietary behaviours and dental fluorosis among Gaza Strip children.

    PubMed

    Abuhaloob, L; Abed, Y

    2013-07-01

    A high prevalence of dental fluorosis has been identified among children in the Gaza Strip. This study aimed to determine the history of breastfeeding and dietary behaviours among children in the Gaza Strip and to examine potential associations with the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis. A cross-sectional study recruited a stratified cluster random sample of 350 children aged 12-18 years and their mothers. Data about dietary behaviours in the first 7 years of life were collected by interview questionnaire. Dental fluorosis was determined using the Thyllstrup-Fejerskov index. A majority of children were breastfed exclusively in the first 6 months (82.9%) but 98.1% were given tea in the first year of life. The prevalence of dental fluorosis was 78.0%. Both intake of animal proteins and plant proteins were negatively associated with the prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis. Further studies to investigate fluoride intake is required to plan preventive interventions.

  2. American Association of Dental Schools 1998-99 Annual Proceedings (March 6, 1998-March 10, 1999).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1999

    1999-01-01

    The proceedings of the annual meeting of the American Association of Dental Schools include the president's annual report, president-elect's and executive director's addresses, a summary of proceedings, the revised constitution, a list of competencies for entry into the dental hygiene profession, association bylaws, member administrators,…

  3. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  4. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  5. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  6. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  7. 42 CFR Appendix G to Part 75 - Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography G Appendix G to Part 75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE...—Standards for Licensing Dental Hygienists and Dental Assistants in Dental Radiography The following...

  8. 5 CFR 894.701 - May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false May I keep my dental and/or vision... DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Annuitants and Compensationers § 894.701 May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation? (a) Your FEDVIP...

  9. 5 CFR 894.701 - May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false May I keep my dental and/or vision... DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Annuitants and Compensationers § 894.701 May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation? (a) Your FEDVIP...

  10. 5 CFR 894.507 - After I'm enrolled, may I change from one dental or vision plan or plan option to another?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... dental or vision plan or plan option to another? 894.507 Section 894.507 Administrative Personnel OFFICE... AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Enrollment and Changing Enrollment § 894.507 After I'm enrolled, may I change from one dental or vision plan or plan option to another? (a) You may change from one dental...

  11. 5 CFR 894.701 - May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false May I keep my dental and/or vision... DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Annuitants and Compensationers § 894.701 May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation? (a) Your FEDVIP...

  12. 5 CFR 894.507 - After I'm enrolled, may I change from one dental or vision plan or plan option to another?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... dental or vision plan or plan option to another? 894.507 Section 894.507 Administrative Personnel OFFICE... AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Enrollment and Changing Enrollment § 894.507 After I'm enrolled, may I change from one dental or vision plan or plan option to another? (a) You may change from one dental...

  13. 5 CFR 894.701 - May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false May I keep my dental and/or vision... DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Annuitants and Compensationers § 894.701 May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation? (a) Your FEDVIP...

  14. 5 CFR 894.507 - After I'm enrolled, may I change from one dental or vision plan or plan option to another?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... dental or vision plan or plan option to another? 894.507 Section 894.507 Administrative Personnel OFFICE... AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Enrollment and Changing Enrollment § 894.507 After I'm enrolled, may I change from one dental or vision plan or plan option to another? (a) You may change from one dental...

  15. 5 CFR 894.507 - After I'm enrolled, may I change from one dental or vision plan or plan option to another?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... dental or vision plan or plan option to another? 894.507 Section 894.507 Administrative Personnel OFFICE... AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Enrollment and Changing Enrollment § 894.507 After I'm enrolled, may I change from one dental or vision plan or plan option to another? (a) You may change from one dental...

  16. 5 CFR 894.507 - After I'm enrolled, may I change from one dental or vision plan or plan option to another?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... dental or vision plan or plan option to another? 894.507 Section 894.507 Administrative Personnel OFFICE... AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Enrollment and Changing Enrollment § 894.507 After I'm enrolled, may I change from one dental or vision plan or plan option to another? (a) You may change from one dental...

  17. 5 CFR 894.701 - May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false May I keep my dental and/or vision... DENTAL AND VISION INSURANCE PROGRAM Annuitants and Compensationers § 894.701 May I keep my dental and/or vision coverage when I retire or start receiving workers' compensation? (a) Your FEDVIP...

  18. Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); TRICARE Dental Program. Office of the Secretary, DoD. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2000-10-23

    This final rule revises the comprehensive CHAMPUS regulation pertaining to the Expanded Active Duty Dependents Benefit Plan, or more commonly referred to as the TRICARE Family Member Dental Plan (TFMDP). The TFMDP limited eligibility to eligible dependents of active duty members (under a call or order that does not specify a period of thirty (30) day or less). Concurrent with the timeframe of the publication of the proposed rule, the Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000 (Public Law 106-65, sec. 711) was signed into law and its provisions have been incorporated into this final rule. The Act authorized a new plan, titled the TRICARE dental program (TDP), which allows the Secretary of Defense to offer a comprehensive premium based indemnity dental insurance coverage plan to eligible dependents of active duty members (under a call or order that does not specify a period of thirty (30) days or less), eligible dependents of members of the Selected Reserve and Individual Ready Reserve, and eligible members of the Selected Reserve and Individual Ready Reserve. The Act also struck section 1076b (Selected Reserve dental insurance), or Chapter 55 of title 10, United States Code, since the affected population and the authority for that particular dental insurance plan has been incorporated in 10 U.S.C. 1076a. Consistent with the proposed rule and the provisions of the Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2000, the final rule places the responsibility for TDP enrollment and a large portion of the appeals program on the dental plan contractor; allows the dental plan contractor to bill beneficiaries for plan premiums in certain circumstances; reduces the former TFMDP enrollment period from twenty-four (24) to twelve (12) months; excludes Reserve component members ordered to active duty in support of a contingency operation from the mandatory twelve (12) month enrollment; clarifies dental plan requirements for different beneficiary populations; simplifies enrollment

  19. Required Postdoctoral Education Programs in General Dentistry: Accreditation Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santangelo, Mario V.

    1987-01-01

    A review of the history and current status of both the predoctoral dental curriculum and general dentistry programs gives insight into the nature and scope of the movement to make postdoctoral dental education a requirement. (MSE)

  20. Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) assessment in epilepsy: a review of epilepsy-specific PROs according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite collection of patient reported outcome (PRO) data in clinical trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), PRO results are not being routinely reported on European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) product labels. This review aimed to evaluate epilepsy-specific PRO instruments against FDA regulatory standards for supporting label claims. Structured literature searches were conducted in Embase and Medline databases to identify epilepsy-specific PRO instruments. Only instruments that could potentially be impacted by pharmacological treatment, were completed by adults and had evidence of some validation work were selected for review. A total of 26 PROs were reviewed based on criteria developed from the FDA regulatory standards. The ability to meet these criteria was classified as either full, partial or no evidence, whereby partial reflected some evidence but not enough to comprehensively address the FDA regulatory standards. Most instruments provided partial evidence of content validity. Input from clinicians and literature was common although few involved patients in both item generation and cognitive debriefing. Construct validity was predominantly compromised by no evidence of a-priori hypotheses of expected relationships. Evidence for test-retest reliability and internal consistency was available for most PROs although few included complete results regarding all subscales and some failed to reach recommended thresholds. The ability to detect change and interpretation of change were not investigated in most instruments and no PROs had published evidence of a conceptual framework. The study concludes that none of the 26 have the full evidence required by the FDA to support a label claim, and all require further research to support their use as an endpoint. The Subjective Handicap of Epilepsy (SHE) and the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) have the fewest gaps that would need to be addressed through

  1. Patient Reported Outcome (PRO) assessment in epilepsy: a review of epilepsy-specific PROs according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory requirements.

    PubMed

    Nixon, Annabel; Kerr, Cicely; Breheny, Katie; Wild, Diane

    2013-03-11

    Despite collection of patient reported outcome (PRO) data in clinical trials of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), PRO results are not being routinely reported on European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) product labels. This review aimed to evaluate epilepsy-specific PRO instruments against FDA regulatory standards for supporting label claims. Structured literature searches were conducted in Embase and Medline databases to identify epilepsy-specific PRO instruments. Only instruments that could potentially be impacted by pharmacological treatment, were completed by adults and had evidence of some validation work were selected for review. A total of 26 PROs were reviewed based on criteria developed from the FDA regulatory standards. The ability to meet these criteria was classified as either full, partial or no evidence, whereby partial reflected some evidence but not enough to comprehensively address the FDA regulatory standards. Most instruments provided partial evidence of content validity. Input from clinicians and literature was common although few involved patients in both item generation and cognitive debriefing. Construct validity was predominantly compromised by no evidence of a-priori hypotheses of expected relationships. Evidence for test-retest reliability and internal consistency was available for most PROs although few included complete results regarding all subscales and some failed to reach recommended thresholds. The ability to detect change and interpretation of change were not investigated in most instruments and no PROs had published evidence of a conceptual framework. The study concludes that none of the 26 have the full evidence required by the FDA to support a label claim, and all require further research to support their use as an endpoint. The Subjective Handicap of Epilepsy (SHE) and the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (NDDI-E) have the fewest gaps that would need to be addressed through

  2. [Conditions of dental extractions in areas health centers of Senegal].

    PubMed

    Faye, D; Tine, S D; Cisse, D; Lo, C M; Mbodj, El B; Diouf, M; Diallo, P D

    2009-12-01

    Dental extraction is a surgical act frequently carried out in the African dental structures. It requires the rigorous respect of the conditions of asepsis and antisepsis. Equipments and anaesthetic and avulsional products must be also sufficient. Our study undertaken among 46 dental services in areas health centers of Senegal aimed to determine the conditions under which dental extractions are carried out. The principle results of our study showed that 93% of dental practitioners wore sterilized gloves. 49% of the dentist's care activity consisted in dental extractions. 50% of the practitioners re-use anaesthetic needles, 2% re-use anaesthetic carpules. We noticed that the dental structures were facing a deficit of materials and products of extraction. Face to the outbreak of serious illnesses as infections of HIV and Hepatitis B, the practitioner and his team must be sensitized and trained to struggle against the transmissible infections and to carry out the dental extraction only if the conditions of asepsis and antisepsis are joined together. A pleading towards the medical authorities must be done to support the services in equipments and periodic renewals of the materials and products of extractions.

  3. Influence of dental materials on dental MRI

    PubMed Central

    Tymofiyeva, O; Vaegler, S; Rottner, K; Boldt, J; Hopfgartner, AJ; Proff, PC; Richter, E-J; Jakob, PM

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the potential influence of standard dental materials on dental MRI (dMRI) by estimating the magnetic susceptibility with the help of the MRI-based geometric distortion method and to classify the materials from the standpoint of dMRI. Methods: A series of standard dental materials was studied on a 1.5 T MRI system using spin echo and gradient echo pulse sequences and their magnetic susceptibility was estimated using the geometric method. Measurements on samples of dental materials were supported by in vivo examples obtained in dedicated dMRI procedures. Results: The tested materials showed a range of distortion degrees. The following materials were classified as fully compatible materials that can be present even in the tooth of interest: the resin-based sealer AH Plus® (Dentsply, Maillefer, Germany), glass ionomer cement, gutta-percha, zirconium dioxide and composites from one of the tested manufacturers. Interestingly, composites provided by the other manufacturer caused relatively strong distortions and were therefore classified as compatible I, along with amalgam, gold alloy, gold–ceramic crowns, titanium alloy and NiTi orthodontic wires. Materials, the magnetic susceptibility of which differed from that of water by more than 200 ppm, were classified as non-compatible materials that should not be present in the patient’s mouth for any dMRI applications. They included stainless steel orthodontic appliances and CoCr. Conclusions: A classification of the materials that complies with the standard grouping of materials according to their magnetic susceptibility was proposed and adopted for the purposes of dMRI. The proposed classification can serve as a guideline in future dMRI research. PMID:23610088

  4. Bulimia and Anorexia Nervosa in Dental and Dental Hygiene Curricula.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Karen B. W.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Dentists and dental hygienists are in a unique position to identify an eating disorder patient from observed oral manifestations and to refer the patient for psychological therapy. The inclusion of information on general and oral complications of bulimia and anorexia nervosa in dental and dental hygiene curriculum was examined. (MLW)

  5. Dental practice network of U.S. dental schools.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Monica A; Beeson, Dennis C; Hans, Mark G

    2009-12-01

    As dental schools incorporate training in evidence-based dentistry (EBD) into their curricula, students must learn how to critically evaluate systematic reviews and meta-analyses. It is important that dental education in the United States support the American Dental Association's position statement on EBD, which defines "best evidence" as data obtained from all study designs. Given that much evidence is missing when EBD is derived from Cochrane Systematic Reviews' randomized clinical trials, we propose the creation of a dental practice network of U.S. dental schools. We developed an electronic clinical dentistry research database for EBD using Epi-Info (available at www.cdc.gov/epiinfo/downloads.htm). As a free, public use software, Epi-Info provides the foundation for the development of clinical research databases that can increase the research capacity through multisite studies designed to generate outcomes data on the effectiveness of dental treatment. The creation of a dental practice network of dental schools with their large number of patients would expand the research capacity for EBD practice and advance the EBD science regarding the effectiveness of dental treatment. The next step is to link clinical dental researchers/educators at multiple dental schools through a collaborative clinical research network, so that the findings can be applied to the EBD component of problem-based learning curricula of dental education.

  6. Dental Implantology in U.S. Dental Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bavitz, J. Bruce

    1990-01-01

    The results of a survey of 44 dental schools corroborate the belief that dental implantology is gaining widespread acceptance in U.S. dental schools. Currently, predoctoral students have limited clinical participation. Most programs have taken the position that clinical techniques are best taught within the existing specialties at a graduate…

  7. Curriculum Guidelines foe Dental Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1989

    1989-01-01

    The American Association of Dental Schools' curriculum guidelines for dental nutrition include an overview of the curriculum, primary educational objectives, suggested prerequisites, a core content outline, and suggestions for sequencing and faculty qualifications. (MSE)

  8. Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Size Email Print Share Dental Health and Orthodontic Problems Page Content Article Body Dental Health Twin ... color can be tinted to match the teeth. Orthodontic Problems Crooked teeth, overbites and underbites are best ...

  9. American Association of Dental Schools Curricular Guidelines for Practice Management and for Preventive Dentistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Dental Education, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Curricular guidelines developed by the American Association of Dental Schools for use by individual educational institutions as curriculum development aids are provided. The guidelines were developed by the Sections on Community and Preventive Dentistry and Practice Administration. (MLW)

  10. Dental health in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Majid, Z A

    1984-12-01

    Three epidemiological surveys have been carried out in Malaysia since 1971. All showed a high level of caries prevalence. Ninety per cent of school children between the ages of 6 and 18 suffered from dental caries, with a DMFT of approximately 3 and a dft of approximately 2. Ninety-five per cent of the adult population had caries experience, with the mean DMFT being 13.2. Approximately 55 per cent of children showed the presence of gingivitis with the mean number of inflamed gingival units per child ranging from 1.9 to 2.8, while 72.4 per cent of adults had some form of periodontal disease with 29 per cent having pockets deeper than 3 mm. The OHI-S score for adults was 2.2 and 81 per cent used toothbrushes to clean their teeth. A further 5.1 per cent used twigs and fingers with powdered charcoal or salt. One-third of the child population needed orthodontic treatment, with 0.3 per cent examined in peninsular Malaysia having cleft lip or palate or both. In the adult population 10.4 per cent of those examined required some form of orthodontic treatment. Twenty per cent of the children in the survey were in need of dentures; 54.7 per cent of the adults were either in need of dentures or were wearing dentures. Of these 25 per cent had complete dentures. The smoking habit was most commonly associated with pre-cancerous/cancerous lesions with alcohol consumption a close competitor; 114 adults, that is 1.3 per cent of those examined, suffer from leukoplakia but only one case of oral cancer was detected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Nationwide survey on barriers for dental research in India

    PubMed Central

    Bishen, Kundendu Arya; Chhabra, Kumar Gaurav; Sagari, Shitalkumar; Gupta, Puneet

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Research in the dental field is progressing at mightier speed worldwide, but an unfortunately representation of India at this platform is negligible. The present study was undertaken to unearth the barriers for dental research among dental professionals in Indian scenario. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional questionnaire study was conducted on 1514 participant's (Master of Dental Surgery and Bachelor of Dental Surgery staff) and postgraduates in 40 dental colleges of India selected by multistage random sampling. The response rate was 75.7%. The survey was undertaken from July 2013 to December 2013. The survey instrument was 24-item, investigator developed, self-structured, close-ended, and self-administered questionnaire grouped into four categories that are, institutional/departmental support related barriers, financial/training support related barriers, time-related barriers, and general barriers. Results: Among all respondents 47.23% informed that they are administrative and educational work rather than research work as (P < 0.001). Overall 57.53% of study participants reported lack of administrative and technical support for research work as (P < 0.001). Overall 64.9% reported meager college funding was the barrier (P < 0.001). Overall 61.5% respondents reported lack of time to do research work due to clinical and teaching responsibilities (P < 0.001) was the barrier for research. Largely 80.25% agreed that, the lack of documentation and record maintenance are an obvious barrier for research (P < 0.001). Conclusions: Present study unearths certain barriers for research in an Indian scenario, which includes administrative overburden, lack of funds, and lack of documentation of the dental data. Governing authorities of dentistry in India have to make major interventions to make research non-intensive environment to research-friendly environment. PMID:26229354

  12. Requirement for natural killer cell-produced interferon gamma in defense against murine cytomegalovirus infection and enhancement of this defense pathway by interleukin 12 administration

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The presence of natural killer (NK) cells contributes to early defense against murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Although NK cells can mediate in vivo protection against MCMV, the mechanism by which they do so has not been defined. The studies presented here evaluate cytokine production by NK cells activated during MCMV infection and the role of NK cell-produced cytokines in early in vivo antiviral defenses. Experiments with normal C57BL/6, T cell-deficient C57BL/6 nude, and severe combined immunodeficient mice lacking T and B cells demonstrated that both interferon gamma (IFN-gamma) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) production were induced at early times after infection with MCMV. Conditioned media samples prepared with cells from these mice, on day 2 after infection, produced 11-43 pg/million cells of IFN-gamma and 12-19 pg/million cells of TNF as evaluated by specific protein enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Studies in the NK- and T cell-deficient mouse line, E26, in mice that had been depleted in vivo of NK cells by treatment with antibodies eliminating NK cells, anti-asialo ganglio-N- tetraosylceramide or anti-NK1.1, and with populations of cells that had been depleted of NK cells by complement treatment with the anti-NK cell antibody, SW3A4, demonstrated that NK cells were solely responsible for the IFN-gamma but were not required for TNF production. The in vivo absence of NK cells was accompanied by increased viral hepatitis and viral replication in both immunocompetent and immunodeficient mice, as well as decreased survival time of immunodeficient mice. In vivo treatments with antibodies neutralizing IFN-gamma demonstrated that this factor contributed to the NK cell-mediated antiviral defense and reduced the measured parameters of viral defense to levels indistinguishable from those observed in NK cell-deficient mice. These effects appeared to be independent of cytolytic activity, as NK cells isolated from anti-IFN-gamma-treated mice mediated

  13. DENTAL ABNORMALITIES OF EIGHT WILD QINLING GIANT PANDAS (AILUROPODA MELANOLEUCA QINLINGENSIS), SHAANXI PROVINCE, CHINA.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yipeng; Chen, Si; Chao, Yanqiao; Pu, Tianchun; Xu, Hongqian; Liu, Xiaobin; Zhao, Kaihui; Nie, Yonggang; Wei, Wei; Lin, Degui

    2015-10-01

    Eight adult (six male and two female) wild Qinling giant pandas (Ailuropoda melanoleuca qinlingensis) from China National Foping Nature Reserve were tracked, and their dental data collected and recorded from October 2010 to April 2014. Each panda had dental abnormalities of varying severity. Dental wear and fracture were the most common conditions. Absent teeth were common, with premolars missing most often. Mild caries were present in five molar teeth between two animals. Different degrees of dental plaque and calculus occurred in all animals but without severe periodontal disease. Two animals with severe dental abnormalities died due to intestinal problems. Large segments of bamboo were found in their intestinal tracts, and intestinal perforation and ulcers were evident, indicating dental abnormalities can be an important factor in the health of wild giant pandas and may lead to death. Further research with larger sample sizes of wild and captive giant pandas will be required to substantiate the relationship between dental abnormalities and mortality in giant pandas.

  14. Dental health services research utilizing comprehensive clinical databases and information technology.

    PubMed

    Hayden, W J

    1997-01-01

    Marketplace pressures for accountability in dentistry have made clear dental delivery systems' weaknesses in information generation, management, and analysis methods. Without this type of information, dentistry is unable to quantify and document the outcomes of the dental care services it provides. The Pew Health Professions Commission and the Institute of Medicine both suggest that dental schools should be among the leaders in the development and teaching of dental information capabilities, as well as the source of fundamental dental health services research. This paper argues that dental schools are the logical location for the development of valid, reliable, and acceptable health services research methods and databases. It describes the development of an insurance claims database to demonstrate the types of investigations possible, as well as the weaknesses and shortcomings of pure administrative data. PMID:9024342

  15. Nutrition education of medical and dental students: innovation through curriculum integration.

    PubMed

    Touger-Decker, Riva

    2004-02-01

    Nutrition is a necessary component of education in the health professions. Although often underplayed, nutrition is an integral facet of dental education, particularly because the oral cavity is the entry point to the gastrointestinal tract. This article addresses the current status of nutrition education in medical and dental schools, including the common themes, strategies, and challenges of integrating nutrition education in this venue, particularly in dental schools. The survival and progression of nutrition as a component of medical and dental education depends to a large extent on the creativity and innovative strategies used by educators and administrators in medical and dental schools and in training programs. A forward-thinking attitude with a focus on the integration of nutrition topics throughout the 4 y of medical or dental school and subsequent training programs will increase the potential for a successful program.

  16. Dental ethics and emotional intelligence.

    PubMed

    Rosenblum, Alvin B; Wolf, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Dental ethics is often taught, viewed, and conducted as an intell enterprise, uninformed by other noncognitive factors. Emotional intelligence (EQ) is defined distinguished from the cognitive intelligence measured by Intelligence Quotient (IQ). This essay recommends more inclusion of emotional, noncognitive input to the ethical decision process in dental education and dental practice.

  17. Dental Assistant Specialist. (AFSC 98150).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eling, David R.

    This four-volume student text is designed for use by Air Force personnel enrolled in a self-study extension course for dental assistant specialists. Covered in the individual volumes are an introduction to dental services (the mission and organization of medical/dental service, career ladder progressions, medical readiness/wartime training, and…

  18. Dental operatory design and equipment.

    PubMed

    Floyd, M

    1993-08-01

    Improving and expanding the dental services of a practice can involve purchasing new equipment and even modifying or expanding the physical plant. Operatory design is important to the efficiency with which dental procedures can be performed. Equipment purchases to outfit the dental operatory should be made based on the specific needs and functions of a practice.

  19. An Examination to Determine the English Competencies Required of Secretaries in the Administrative, Legal and Medical Areas with a Synthesis into a Core of Common Competencies to be Used in Forming a Basis for an English Curriculum. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Radloff, David Maurice

    The central problem of the study was to determine the English competencies required of secretaries in the Medical, Legal and Administrative Secretarial Areas. The questionnaire/interview method was employed, utilizing 50 questionnaires and ten interviews in each of the three secretarial areas, and distributing them to imployers and employees…

  20. Pediatric dental sedation: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Travis M; Xu, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    High levels of dental caries, challenging child behavior, and parent expectations support a need for sedation in pediatric dentistry. This paper reviews modern developments in pediatric sedation with a focus on implementing techniques to enhance success and patient safety. In recent years, sedation for dental procedures has been implicated in a disproportionate number of cases that resulted in death or permanent neurologic damage. The youngest children and those with more complicated medical backgrounds appear to be at greatest risk. To reduce complications, practitioners and regulatory bodies have supported a renewed focus on health care quality and safety. Implementation of high fidelity simulation training and improvements in patient monitoring, including end-tidal carbon dioxide, are becoming recognized as a new standard for sedated patients in dental offices and health care facilities. Safe and appropriate case selection and appropriate dosing for overweight children is also paramount. Oral sedation has been the mainstay of pediatric dental sedation; however, today practitioners are administering modern drugs in new ways with high levels of success. Employing contemporary transmucosal administration devices increases patient acceptance and sedation predictability. While recently there have been many positive developments in sedation technology, it is now thought that medications used in sedation and anesthesia may have adverse effects on the developing brain. The evidence for this is not definitive, but we suggest that practitioners recognize this developing area and counsel patients accordingly. Finally, there is a clear trend of increased use of ambulatory anesthesia services for pediatric dentistry. Today, parents and practitioners have become accustomed to children receiving general anesthesia in the outpatient setting. As a result of these changes, it is possible that dental providers will abandon the practice of personally administering large amounts of