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Sample records for administrator charles bolden

  1. In Their Own Words: Charles Bolden

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, who flew four space shuttle missions, talks about how space travel changed his life and how he applies his astronaut training to his work as the head of the space...

  2. Administrator Bolden Speaks on the Passing of Neil Armstrong

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden says Armstrong "will always be remembered for taking humankind's first small step on a world beyond our own, but it was his courage, grace, and humility before, du...

  3. Administrator Bolden Talks to Station Crew on 10th Anniversary

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden talks with the Expedition 25 crew on board the International Space Station on November 2, marking the tenth anniversary of continuous human presence on the orbitin...

  4. Bolden Speaks at the URC Virtual Symposium

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden delivered a welcome address via video to support the NASA University Research Centers inaugural Virtual Poster Session and Symposium event November 8, 2012. A dive...

  5. Administrator Helps Students Discover Lab Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden visited the Langdon Elementary School in Washington to support National Lab Day. Bolden, a veteran of four space shuttle flights, spoke with the fifth graders abou...

  6. NASA Administrator Charles Bolden's Year-End Message

    NASA Video Gallery

    This year, your work made headlines around the world, but more importantly, it enlarged our understanding of the universe and our home planet, inspired people, and opened new frontiers for our drea...

  7. STS-31 Pilot Bolden with beverages on the FB-SMS middeck during JSC training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-31 Pilot Charles F. Bolden holds three beverage containers while in front of the galley on the middeck of the fixed based (FB) shuttle mission simulator (SMS) during a training simulation at JSC's Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5. From the middeck, Bolden, wearing lightweight headset, simulates a communications link with ground controllers and fellow crewmembers.

  8. LLCD Bolden Video to the Moon and Back

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Lunar Laser Communications Demonstration mission proved it can send and receive high definition video with a message from NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden. The message completed the trip to th...

  9. STS-31 MS Sullivan conducts DSO 473 test on Pilot Bolden on OV-103's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-31 Mission Specialist (MS) Kathryn D. Sullivan conducts a Merieux skin test on Pilot Charles F. Bolden as part of Detailed Supplementary Objective (DSO) 473, Delayed-Type Hypersensitivity. In Sullivan's left hand is a bar filled with doses of a bacterial antigen to be administered to the subject's skin. The two crewmembers are in front of forward lockers on the middeck of the Earth-orbiting Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103.

  10. Administrator Bolden Speaks to Astronomers Group

    NASA Video Gallery

    All together, NASA's Science Mission Directorate supports over 60 operating space missions. These missions are of great value to the nation and help us meet national needs in science, education, an...

  11. Administrator Bolden Calls Underwater NEEMO Crew

    NASA Video Gallery

    From outside their underwater laboratory in Florida, NASA Astronaut and NEEMO 16 Commander Dottie Metcalf-Lindenburger and European Space Agency astronaut Timothy Peake took a call from NASA Admini...

  12. NASA Administrator Flies Dream Chaser Simulator

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden had the opportunity to fly a simulated landing of the Sierra Nevada Corporation (SNC) Dream Chaser while touring the agency's Dryden Flight Research Center in Cali...

  13. Administrator Bolden on the SpaceX Falcon 9 Launch

    NASA Video Gallery

    While rocket launches from the Cape are considered a common occurrence to some, the historic significance of today’s achievement by SpaceX should not be lost. This is the first in a new generat...

  14. STS-135 Landing: Runway Remarks

    NASA Video Gallery

    The STS-135 astronauts get a close-up look at space shuttle Atlantis, hear from NASA Administrator Charles Bolden and speak to assembled employees, guests and media after landing at Kennedy Space C...

  15. Charles' Law of Gases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petty, John T.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment that uses air to test Charles' law. Reinforces the student's intuitive feel for Charles' law with quantitative numbers they can see, introduces the idea of extrapolating experimental data to obtain a theoretical value, and gives a physical quantitative meaning to the concept of absolute zero. (JRH)

  16. Atypical charles bonnet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Arun, Priti; Jain, Rajan; Tripathi, Vaibhav

    2013-10-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is not uncommon disorder. It may not present with all typical symptoms and intact insight. Here, a case of atypical CBS is reported where antipsychotics were not effective. Patient improved completely after restoration of vision.

  17. Charles Dickens: Multiform Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melvin H.

    In both speaking and writing, the goal is communication with the intended audience. Rejecting the view that rhetoric is based on an established set of conventions, this article examines the writings of Charles Dickens as models of rhetorical expression. Passages from Dicken's novels illustrate how the writer violated grammatical rules and broke…

  18. Charles Dickens and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Cosnett, J E

    1994-01-01

    Through some characters in his novels, Charles Dickens recorded observations on the nature of epileptic seizures, their causes and provocation, and their consequences. Three of his main characters, Monks, Guster, and Bradley Headstone, had seizures which Dickens realistically described. PMID:8082641

  19. [Charles Bukowski's acne].

    PubMed

    Bahmer, F A; Bahmer, J A

    2012-04-01

    In his autobiography, Charles Bukowski (1920-1994) describes his severe acne conglobata, his experience with therapy, family conflicts and emotional tension. Despite the stigmatization by his acne scars, Bukowski became a philobatic writer and a true chronist of the American way of life in the second half of the 20th century, writing in a coarse and obscene language.

  20. Charles Darwin's Botanical Investigations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harley, Suzanne M.

    2010-01-01

    Charles Darwin's botanical studies provide a way to expose students to his work that followed the publication of "On the Origin of Species." We can use stories from his plant investigations to illustrate key concepts in the life sciences and model how questions are asked and answered in science.

  1. [Charles Bukowski's acne].

    PubMed

    Bahmer, F A; Bahmer, J A

    2012-04-01

    In his autobiography, Charles Bukowski (1920-1994) describes his severe acne conglobata, his experience with therapy, family conflicts and emotional tension. Despite the stigmatization by his acne scars, Bukowski became a philobatic writer and a true chronist of the American way of life in the second half of the 20th century, writing in a coarse and obscene language. PMID:22406763

  2. Charles's Law- -The Truth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spurgin, CB

    1989-01-01

    Errors in the teaching of the concepts of Charles's Law are traced back through history to a major French physics text published in 1816. Relevant original sources are quoted and remedies are suggested. Five major criticisms are summarized. (Author/CW)

  3. Lake Charles CCS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Leib, Thomas; Cole, Dan

    2015-06-30

    In late September 2014 development of the Lake Charles Clean Energy (LCCE) Plant was abandoned resulting in termination of Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project which was a subset the LCCE Plant. As a result, the project was only funded through Phase 2A (Design) and did not enter Phase 2B (Construction) or Phase 2C (Operations). This report was prepared relying on information prepared and provided by engineering companies which were engaged by Leucadia Energy, LLC to prepare or review Front End Engineering and Design (FEED) for the Lake Charles Clean Energy Project, which includes the Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project in Lake Charles, Louisiana. The Lake Charles Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) Project was to be a large-scale industrial CCS project intended to demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. The Scope of work was divided into two discrete sections; 1) Capture and Compression prepared by the Recipient Leucadia Energy, LLC, and 2) Transport and Sequestration prepared by sub-Recipient Denbury Onshore, LLC. Capture and Compression-The Lake Charles CCS Project Final Technical Report describes the systems and equipment that would be necessary to capture CO2 generated in a large industrial gasification process and sequester the CO2 into underground formations. The purpose of each system is defined along with a description of its equipment and operation. Criteria for selection of major equipment are provided and ancillary utilities necessary for safe and reliable operation in compliance with environmental regulations are described. Construction considerations are described including a general arrangement of the CCS process units within the overall gasification project. A cost estimate is provided, delineated by system area with cost breakdown showing equipment, piping and materials

  4. Charles A. Lindbergh Learning Packet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez, Charley

    This aerospace education learning packet contains information about the famous pilot, Charles A. Lindbergh. Posters, recommended teaching methods, tests with keys, and task cards are also included. (KHR)

  5. 76 FR 27970 - Safety Zone; Cape Charles Fireworks, Cape Charles Harbor, Cape Charles, VA.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... in Cape Charles, VA in support of the Fourth of July Fireworks event. This action is necessary to... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do... notice. Basis and Purpose On July 3, 2011 the Town of Cape Charles will sponsor a fireworks display...

  6. Characters named Charles or Charley in novels by Charles Dickens.

    PubMed

    Barry, Herbert

    2007-10-01

    12 fictional characters named Charles or Charley are contained in eight of the 14 completed novels by Charles Dickens. Most of the author's namesakes have humorous attributes, an unusually close relationship with one or more other characters, and a happy subsequent life. Three stages of the author's adult life are youthful, mature, and after separation from his wife. The fictional namesakes are most humorous in the author's youthful stage and least humorous after separation from his wife. The 12 fictional namesakes of Charles Dickens are compared with the two fictional namesakes of Jane Austen. PMID:18175490

  7. Characters named Charles or Charley in novels by Charles Dickens.

    PubMed

    Barry, Herbert

    2007-10-01

    12 fictional characters named Charles or Charley are contained in eight of the 14 completed novels by Charles Dickens. Most of the author's namesakes have humorous attributes, an unusually close relationship with one or more other characters, and a happy subsequent life. Three stages of the author's adult life are youthful, mature, and after separation from his wife. The fictional namesakes are most humorous in the author's youthful stage and least humorous after separation from his wife. The 12 fictional namesakes of Charles Dickens are compared with the two fictional namesakes of Jane Austen.

  8. Visual hallucinations: charles bonnet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jan, Tiffany; Del Castillo, Jorge

    2012-12-01

    The following is a case of Charles Bonnet syndrome in an 86-year-old woman who presented with visual hallucinations. The differential diagnosis of visual hallucinations is broad and emergency physicians should be knowledgeable of the possible etiologies.

  9. Charles Darwin's mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hayman, John

    2013-05-01

    Charles Darwin's long-term illness has been the subject of much speculation. His numerous symptoms have led to conclusions that his illness was essentially psychogenic in nature. These diagnoses have never been fully convincing, however, particularly in regard to the proposed underlying psychological background causes of the illness. Similarly, two proposed somatic causes of illness, Chagas disease and arsenic poisoning, lack credibility and appear inconsistent with the lifetime history of the illness. Other physical explanations are simply too incomplete to explain the range of symptoms. Here, a very different sort of explanation will be offered. We now know that mitochondrial mutations producing impaired mitochondrial function may result in a wide range of differing symptoms, including symptoms thought to be primarily psychological. Examination of Darwin's maternal family history supports the contention that his illness was mitochondrial in nature; his mother and one maternal uncle had strange illnesses and the youngest maternal sibling died of an infirmity with symptoms characteristic of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome), a condition rooted in mitochondrial dysfunction. Darwin's own symptoms are described here and are in accord with the hypothesis that he had the mtDNA mutation commonly associated with the MELAS syndrome. PMID:23633139

  10. Charles Darwin's mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Hayman, John

    2013-05-01

    Charles Darwin's long-term illness has been the subject of much speculation. His numerous symptoms have led to conclusions that his illness was essentially psychogenic in nature. These diagnoses have never been fully convincing, however, particularly in regard to the proposed underlying psychological background causes of the illness. Similarly, two proposed somatic causes of illness, Chagas disease and arsenic poisoning, lack credibility and appear inconsistent with the lifetime history of the illness. Other physical explanations are simply too incomplete to explain the range of symptoms. Here, a very different sort of explanation will be offered. We now know that mitochondrial mutations producing impaired mitochondrial function may result in a wide range of differing symptoms, including symptoms thought to be primarily psychological. Examination of Darwin's maternal family history supports the contention that his illness was mitochondrial in nature; his mother and one maternal uncle had strange illnesses and the youngest maternal sibling died of an infirmity with symptoms characteristic of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome), a condition rooted in mitochondrial dysfunction. Darwin's own symptoms are described here and are in accord with the hypothesis that he had the mtDNA mutation commonly associated with the MELAS syndrome.

  11. Charles Ichoku Maniac Lecture, July 25, 2016

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA climate scientist Charles Ichoku presented a Maniac lecture entitled, "Reminiscences of a scientist's journey from Nawfia to NASA." Born in a small town in Nigeria, Charles traced his captivat...

  12. Charles Darwin in the Andes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bizzo, Nelio; Bizzo, Luis Eduardo Maestrelli

    2006-01-01

    Considering geological time as an important epistemological obstacle to the construction of ideas on biological evolution, a study was carried out on the so-called "Darwin Papers". The conclusion was that Charles Darwin's excursion in the Andes during March-April 1835 was a crucial step in this regard. An expedition was carried out in March-April…

  13. Charles Darwin 1809-2009.

    PubMed

    van Wyhe, John

    2009-02-01

    The year 2009 is the bicentenary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species. This article briefly surveys his life and work, dispelling some common myths and summarizes Darwin's achievement and legacy at his death in 1882. PMID:18793747

  14. Charles F. Richter; an interview

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1980-01-01

    Charles F. Richter, renowned seismologist, is a professor emeritus at the California Institue of techonology (Caltech). He is best known to the public for the Richter magnitude scale; but he is equally recognized in the scientific community for many other contributions to seismology including his books Elementary Seismology (1958) and Seismicity of the Earth (coauthored in 1954 with Beno Gutenberg). 

  15. In Memoriam: Charles Shive | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    Earlier this summer, NCI at Frederick lost a friend and colleague, Charles Shive, to cancer. Mr. Shive, better known to most as Charlie, was a systems architect and information technology manager for the Data Science and Information Technology Program, focused on the re-engineering initiative of the Clinical Trials Reporting System.

  16. Q&A: Charles Michener

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gould, Julie

    2015-05-01

    Charles Michener has been studying bees for more than 80 years, and, although he has seen many changes in the field, his interest in these insects has not diminished. Now aged 96, he contributes to bee research as a Watkins distinguished professor emeritus at Kansas University in Lawrence.

  17. Charles Gelso: The "Real" Person

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, Clara E.

    2010-01-01

    Charles Gelso has had a major influence in counseling psychology with his contributions to the literature in many areas such as research methodology, research training, psychotherapy outcome, and the therapeutic relationship as well as in his work as an editor and as a teacher and mentor. This interview with Gelso highlights the early experiences,…

  18. Anxiety and Charles Bonnet Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geueke, Anna; Morley, Michael G.; Morley, Katharine; Lorch, Alice; Jackson, MaryLou; Lambrou, Angeliki; Wenberg, June; Oteng-Amoako, Afua

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Some persons with Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) suffer significant anxiety because of their visual hallucinations, while others do not. The aim of the study presented here was to compare levels of anxiety in persons with low vision with and without CBS. Methods: This retrospective study compared the level of anxiety in 31 persons…

  19. Charles Darwin 1809-2009.

    PubMed

    van Wyhe, John

    2009-02-01

    The year 2009 is the bicentenary of the birth of Charles Darwin and the 150th anniversary of the publication of On the Origin of Species. This article briefly surveys his life and work, dispelling some common myths and summarizes Darwin's achievement and legacy at his death in 1882.

  20. Charles Darwin and John Herschel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warner, B.

    2009-11-01

    The influence of John Herschel on the philosophical thoughts of Charles Darwin, both through the former's book, Natural Philosophy, and through their meeting in 1836 at the Cape of Good Hope, is discussed. With Herschel having himself speculated on evolution just a few months before he met Darwin, it is probable that he stimulated at least the beginnings of the latter's lifelong work on the subject.

  1. Charles Lindburgh and Fred Weick

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    'In early 1930, Charles Lindburgh was pruning his new Lockheed Sirius for an attempt to break the cross-country record from Los Angeles to New York.' Quote from the book Engineer In Charge by James R. Hansen (page 52). This photograph is a copy and was originally photographed the early 1930's: NACA engineer Fred Weick is shown in the rear cockpit. Lindbergh in front. Tom Hamilton is standing.

  2. [A case of Charles Bonnet syndrome following syphilitic optic neuritis].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Hidenori; Shigeto, Hiroshi; Torii, Takako; Kawamura, Nobutoshi; Ohyagi, Yasumasa; Kira, Jun-ichi

    2011-08-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome refers to visual hallucinations in patients with visual acuity loss or visual field loss without dementia. We report a case of Charles Bonnet syndrome following syphilitic optic neuritis. A 62-year-old man was admitted to our hospital suffering acute bilateral visual loss in a few months. On admission, he was almost blind and his optic discs were found to be atrophic on fundoscopy. In addition to increased cell counts and protein concentration in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), serum and CSF rapid plasma reagin tests were positive. A diagnosis of syphilitic optic neuritis was made and he was treated with intravenous penicillin G (24 million units per day for 14 days) without any recovery. After treatment finished, he began to experience complex, vivid, elaborate and colored visual hallucinations. He recognized these visions as unreal and felt distressed by them. No cognitive impairment was observed on several neuropsychological tests. We diagnosed the patient as suffering from Charles Bonnet syndrome. Brain MRI revealed diffuse mild atrophy of the cerebral cortex and multiple T2 high signal intensity lesions in the deep cerebral white matter. Single photon emission computed tomography revealed decreased regional cerebral blood flow in bilateral medial occipital lobes. Administration of olanzapine resulted in a partial remission of visual hallucinations. Charles Bonnet syndrome following syphilitic optic neuritis is rare. In the present case, visual loss and dysfunction of bilateral medial occipital lobes may have triggered the visual hallucinations, which were alleviated by olanzapine.

  3. The Lake Charles CCS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Doug Cathro

    2010-06-30

    The Lake Charles CCS Project is a large-scale industrial carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) project which will demonstrate advanced technologies that capture and sequester carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions from industrial sources into underground formations. Specifically the Lake Charles CCS Project will accelerate commercialization of large-scale CO{sub 2} storage from industrial sources by leveraging synergy between a proposed petroleum coke to chemicals plant (the LCC Gasification Project) and the largest integrated anthropogenic CO{sub 2} capture, transport, and monitored sequestration program in the U.S. Gulf Coast Region. The Lake Charles CCS Project will promote the expansion of EOR in Texas and Louisiana and supply greater energy security by expanding domestic energy supplies. The capture, compression, pipeline, injection, and monitoring infrastructure will continue to sequester CO{sub 2} for many years after the completion of the term of the DOE agreement. The objectives of this project are expected to be fulfilled by working through two distinct phases. The overall objective of Phase 1 was to develop a fully definitive project basis for a competitive Renewal Application process to proceed into Phase 2 - Design, Construction and Operations. Phase 1 includes the studies attached hereto that will establish: the engineering design basis for the capture, compression and transportation of CO{sub 2} from the LCC Gasification Project, and the criteria and specifications for a monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) plan at the Hastings oil field in Texas. The overall objective of Phase 2, provided a successful competitive down-selection, is to execute design, construction and operations of three capital projects: (1) the CO{sub 2} capture and compression equipment, (2) a Connector Pipeline from the LLC Gasification Project to the Green Pipeline owned by Denbury and an affiliate of Denbury, and (3) a comprehensive MVA system at the Hastings oil field.

  4. Charles Darwin and panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Barloon, T J; Noyes, R

    1997-01-01

    Charles Darwin (1809-1882) suffered from a chronic illness that, throughout much of his adult life, impaired his functioning and severely limited his activities. The writings of this famous scientist as well as biographical materials indicate that he probably suffered from an anxiety disorder. His symptoms, when considered individually, suggest a variety of conditions, but taken together they point toward panic disorder with agoraphobia. This diagnosis brings coherence to Darwin's activities and explains his secluded lifestyle, including difficulty in speaking before groups and meeting with colleagues.

  5. Charles Darwin: Genius or Plodder?

    PubMed Central

    Wilkins, Adam S.

    2009-01-01

    There is no doubt about the magnitude of Charles Darwin's contributions to science. There has, however, been a long-running debate about how brilliant he was. His kind of intelligence was clearly different from that of the great physicists who are deemed geniuses. Here, the nature of Darwin's intelligence is examined in the light of Darwin's actual style of working. Surprisingly, the world of literature and the field of neurobiology might supply more clues to resolving the puzzle than conventional scientific history. Those clues suggest that the apparent discrepancy between Darwin's achievements and his seemingly pedestrian way of thinking reveals nothing to Darwin's discredit but rather a too narrow and inappropriate set of criteria for “genius.” The implications of Darwin's particular creative gifts with respect to the development of scientific genius in general are briefly discussed. PMID:19933233

  6. Charles Darwin: genius or plodder?

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Adam S

    2009-11-01

    There is no doubt about the magnitude of Charles Darwin's contributions to science. There has, however, been a long-running debate about how brilliant he was. His kind of intelligence was clearly different from that of the great physicists who are deemed geniuses. Here, the nature of Darwin's intelligence is examined in the light of Darwin's actual style of working. Surprisingly, the world of literature and the field of neurobiology might supply more clues to resolving the puzzle than conventional scientific history. Those clues suggest that the apparent discrepancy between Darwin's achievements and his seemingly pedestrian way of thinking reveals nothing to Darwin's discredit but rather a too narrow and inappropriate set of criteria for "genius." The implications of Darwin's particular creative gifts with respect to the development of scientific genius in general are briefly discussed.

  7. NASA fills key positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe has named Shannon Lucid, a NASA astronaut and veteran of five Space Shuttle flights, to serve as the agency's chief scientist. Lucid replaces Kathie Olsen, whom President Bush has said he intends to nominate as associate administrator for science in the White Office of Science and Technology Policy.President Bush also has announced his intention to nominate former NASA astronaut and Assistant Deputy Administrator Major General Charles F. Bolden as NASA Deputy Administrator.

  8. NASA honors Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise Jr.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden (left) presents the Ambassador of Exploration Award (an encased moon rock) to Biloxi native and Apollo 13 astronaut Fred Haise Jr. (right) for his contributions to space exploration. During a Dec. 2 ceremony at Gorenflo elementary School in Biloxi, Miss., Bolden praised Haise for his overall space career and his performance on the Apollo 13 mission that was crippled two days after launch. Haise and fellow crewmembers nursed the spacecraft on a perilous trip back to Earth. 'The historic Apollo 13 mission was as dramatic as any Hollywood production,' Bolden said. 'When an explosion crippled his command module, Fred and his crewmates, Jim Lovell and Jack Swigert, guided their spacecraft around the moon and back to a successful splashdown in the Pacific Ocean - all while the world held its breath. While Fred didn't have the chance to walk on the moon, the cool courage and concentration in the face of crisis is among NASA's most enduring legacies.'

  9. Charles Darwin: What Else Did He Write?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berra, Tim M.

    1980-01-01

    Lists a number of books written by Charles Darwin, selected to indicate the depth and breadth of Darwin's biological interests. Each entry is described with a short annotation. Also provides a reading list of references about Darwin's life. (CS)

  10. Charles Lipton on Indian Mineral Leases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal of the Institute for the Development of Indian Law, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Charles Lipton, an international lawyer who has negotiated mining agreements for various developing countries, discusses problems of Indian mineral leases and explains benefits and problems of mining projects in developing countries. (NQ)

  11. A Charles' Law Experiment for Beginning Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rockley, Mark G.; Rockley, Natalie L.

    1995-01-01

    Describes an experiment designed to measure absolute zero using Charles' Law without the use of mercury. Provides the procedure and details of the apparatus and includes experimental results obtained using the apparatus. (DDR)

  12. Eye-related visual hallucinations: consider 'Charles Bonnet syndrome'.

    PubMed

    Cinar, Nilgun; Sahin, Sevki; Karsidag, Sibel

    2011-01-01

    The Charles Bonnet Syndrome (CBS) is typically characterized by visual hallucinations in elderly people without cognitive defects. This article presents the case of an 80-year-old male patient with a one-year history of visual hallucinations, secondary to glaucoma, in both eyes. Neither a dopamine agonist nor cholinesterase inhibitor therapy improved his symptoms. In this case, the hallucinations were gradually improved after administration of a GABAergic drug, pregabalin, for diabetic polyneuropathy. Placebo-controlled clinical trials would be needed to support this effect of pregabalin, as suggested by this association.

  13. Charles Darwin’s Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Hayman, John

    2013-01-01

    Charles Darwin’s long-term illness has been the subject of much speculation. His numerous symptoms have led to conclusions that his illness was essentially psychogenic in nature. These diagnoses have never been fully convincing, however, particularly in regard to the proposed underlying psychological background causes of the illness. Similarly, two proposed somatic causes of illness, Chagas disease and arsenic poisoning, lack credibility and appear inconsistent with the lifetime history of the illness. Other physical explanations are simply too incomplete to explain the range of symptoms. Here, a very different sort of explanation will be offered. We now know that mitochondrial mutations producing impaired mitochondrial function may result in a wide range of differing symptoms, including symptoms thought to be primarily psychological. Examination of Darwin’s maternal family history supports the contention that his illness was mitochondrial in nature; his mother and one maternal uncle had strange illnesses and the youngest maternal sibling died of an infirmity with symptoms characteristic of mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis, and stroke-like episodes (MELAS syndrome), a condition rooted in mitochondrial dysfunction. Darwin’s own symptoms are described here and are in accord with the hypothesis that he had the mtDNA mutation commonly associated with the MELAS syndrome. PMID:23633139

  14. Charles Drew: dispelling the myth.

    PubMed

    Craft, P P

    1992-12-01

    The name Charles Drew is synonymous with blood transfusions, but his life encompassed many other areas of work. A native of Washington, DC, Drew attended Dunbar High School and Amherst College, and went to medical school at McGill University in Montreal. All during his schooling he was a highly regarded athlete (track and football). Drew spent 2 years in postdoctoral training in Montreal and 3 years in Washington, DC, followed by 2 years in New York City, working on a doctorate in medicine in blood banking. He was instrumental in the Blood for Britain program in 1940 and helped establish the future Red Cross blood bank in the United States. Finally, at Howard University, where he taught from 1941 to 1950, he trained a generation of black surgeons. He died, at age 45, of injuries received in a car accident in 1950 in North Carolina. Controversy surrounding his death, involving numerous erroneous claims, has served unfortunately to detract from the significance of his achievements.

  15. [Charles Gerhardt's life and work].

    PubMed

    Blondel-Mégrelis, Marika

    2008-05-01

    Charles Gerhardt's life and work is rather well-known thanks to Grimaux and Tiffeneau. His reform of the equivalents, his classification, his obtention of organic acid anhydrids and his famous Treatise of Organic Chemistry. His active collaboration to the Revue scientifique et industrielle du Docteur Quesneville, the creation of his Comptes-Rendus des Travaux de Chimie. Are not so often quoted. Thanks to his translations and reviews, German chemical advancements became well known in France Gerhardt was Liebig's translator for almost all his life, even through the fluctuations of their personal relation. He was the representative of German chemistry in France. With Auguste Laurent, with whom he is constantly associated, things need to be examined precisely. Laurent and Gerhardt, friends at a moment, cannot be confounded. Though they worked together for some years, they were not engaged in a similar project. Besides an experimentalist, Laurent was essentially a theorician of chemistry, whereas Gerhardt refused to think about atoms and arrangements. Formulas have to describe relations between facts, in no case anything about arrangements. For posterity however, Gerhardt will be, on the same level as Laurent, the creator of modern chemistry doctrines. PMID:19069201

  16. The Voyage of the Beagle: Field Work Lessons from Charles Darwin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Louis M.

    1987-01-01

    Analyzes Charles Darwin's letters to his family during his voyage on H.M.S. Beagle. Relates the information to the development of Darwin's professional identity and the degree to which the concepts, field methods, and research methods revealed in Darwin's personal correspondence are useful to students of educational administration. (MD)

  17. 76 FR 20033 - Robert Charles Ley, D.O. ; Dismissal of Proceeding

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... is nothing to revoke.'' Ronald J. Riegel, 63 FR 67132 (1998). While DEA has recognized a limited... William R. Lockridge, 71 FR 77791, 77797 (2006), Respondent has not identified any collateral consequence... Enforcement Administration Robert Charles Ley, D.O. ; Dismissal of Proceeding On September 28, 2009, I,...

  18. Genealogy of John and Charles Bell: their relationship with the children of Charles Shaw of Ayr.

    PubMed

    Kaufman, M

    2005-11-01

    The Reverend William Bell had six children who survived infancy. Two of his sons entered the legal profession and two other sons became distinguished anatomists and surgeons--John Bell, said for 20 years to have been the leading operating surgeon in Britain and throughout the world--and Sir Charles Bell, possibly the most distinguished anatomist and physiologist of his day. Information is not known about the fifth son or their sister. Charles Shaw, a lawyer of Ayr, had four sons and two daughters who survived infancy. Two of his sons, John and Alexander, became anatomists and later surgeons at the Middlesex Hospital, and both worked closely with Charles Bell at the Great Windmill Street School of Anatomy. His third son entered the law and his fourth son became a distinguished soldier. The two daughters of Charles Shaw married into the Bell family: Barbara married George Joseph Bell and Marion married Mr (later Sir) Charles Bell.

  19. The first Charles Darwin (1758-78).

    PubMed

    Harris, Stuart

    2009-11-01

    The paper places the first Charles Darwin in his family context: the eldest son of Dr Erasmus Darwin and Mary Howard. Mention is made of Charles's upbringing and education, with illustrative material taken from his father's writings and from Anna Seward's Memoirs of the Life of Dr Darwin (1804). The part played by Dr Andrew Duncan of the Edinburgh Medical School is established. The award to Charles in March 1778 of the first medal by the Aesculapian Society of Edinburgh is described. The involvement of Dr William Cullen and Dr Joseph Black in the treatment of Charles's fatal infection is evidenced from Erasmus' letters. Attention is given to 'An Elegy on the much-lamented death of a most ingenious young gentleman who lately died in the College at Edinburgh where he was a student' which was written jointly by Duncan and Erasmus in 1778. The Elegy's curious publishing history will be glanced at. The paper concludes with a statement of Charles's great promise as a medical student and of Erasmus' efforts to ensure that his son's achievements were memorialised.

  20. Charles Darwin, beetles and phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Rolf G; Friedrich, Frank; Leschen, Richard A B

    2009-11-01

    Here, we review Charles Darwin's relation to beetles and developments in coleopteran systematics in the last two centuries. Darwin was an enthusiastic beetle collector. He used beetles to illustrate different evolutionary phenomena in his major works, and astonishingly, an entire sub-chapter is dedicated to beetles in "The Descent of Man". During his voyage on the Beagle, Darwin was impressed by the high diversity of beetles in the tropics, and he remarked that, to his surprise, the majority of species were small and inconspicuous. However, despite his obvious interest in the group, he did not get involved in beetle taxonomy, and his theoretical work had little immediate impact on beetle classification. The development of taxonomy and classification in the late nineteenth and earlier twentieth century was mainly characterised by the exploration of new character systems (e.g. larval features and wing venation). In the mid-twentieth century, Hennig's new methodology to group lineages by derived characters revolutionised systematics of Coleoptera and other organisms. As envisioned by Darwin and Ernst Haeckel, the new Hennigian approach enabled systematists to establish classifications truly reflecting evolution. Roy A. Crowson and Howard E. Hinton, who both made tremendous contributions to coleopterology, had an ambivalent attitude towards the Hennigian ideas. The Mickoleit school combined detailed anatomical work with a classical Hennigian character evaluation, with stepwise tree building, comparatively few characters and a priori polarity assessment without explicit use of the outgroup comparison method. The rise of cladistic methods in the 1970s had a strong impact on beetle systematics. Cladistic computer programs facilitated parsimony analyses of large data matrices, mostly morphological characters not requiring detailed anatomical investigations. Molecular studies on beetle phylogeny started in the 1990s with modest taxon sampling and limited DNA data. This has

  1. Charles Darwin, beetles and phylogenetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beutel, Rolf G.; Friedrich, Frank; Leschen, Richard A. B.

    2009-11-01

    Here, we review Charles Darwin’s relation to beetles and developments in coleopteran systematics in the last two centuries. Darwin was an enthusiastic beetle collector. He used beetles to illustrate different evolutionary phenomena in his major works, and astonishingly, an entire sub-chapter is dedicated to beetles in “The Descent of Man”. During his voyage on the Beagle, Darwin was impressed by the high diversity of beetles in the tropics, and he remarked that, to his surprise, the majority of species were small and inconspicuous. However, despite his obvious interest in the group, he did not get involved in beetle taxonomy, and his theoretical work had little immediate impact on beetle classification. The development of taxonomy and classification in the late nineteenth and earlier twentieth century was mainly characterised by the exploration of new character systems (e.g. larval features and wing venation). In the mid-twentieth century, Hennig’s new methodology to group lineages by derived characters revolutionised systematics of Coleoptera and other organisms. As envisioned by Darwin and Ernst Haeckel, the new Hennigian approach enabled systematists to establish classifications truly reflecting evolution. Roy A. Crowson and Howard E. Hinton, who both made tremendous contributions to coleopterology, had an ambivalent attitude towards the Hennigian ideas. The Mickoleit school combined detailed anatomical work with a classical Hennigian character evaluation, with stepwise tree building, comparatively few characters and a priori polarity assessment without explicit use of the outgroup comparison method. The rise of cladistic methods in the 1970s had a strong impact on beetle systematics. Cladistic computer programs facilitated parsimony analyses of large data matrices, mostly morphological characters not requiring detailed anatomical investigations. Molecular studies on beetle phylogeny started in the 1990s with modest taxon sampling and limited DNA data

  2. Charles Darwin, beetles and phylogenetics.

    PubMed

    Beutel, Rolf G; Friedrich, Frank; Leschen, Richard A B

    2009-11-01

    Here, we review Charles Darwin's relation to beetles and developments in coleopteran systematics in the last two centuries. Darwin was an enthusiastic beetle collector. He used beetles to illustrate different evolutionary phenomena in his major works, and astonishingly, an entire sub-chapter is dedicated to beetles in "The Descent of Man". During his voyage on the Beagle, Darwin was impressed by the high diversity of beetles in the tropics, and he remarked that, to his surprise, the majority of species were small and inconspicuous. However, despite his obvious interest in the group, he did not get involved in beetle taxonomy, and his theoretical work had little immediate impact on beetle classification. The development of taxonomy and classification in the late nineteenth and earlier twentieth century was mainly characterised by the exploration of new character systems (e.g. larval features and wing venation). In the mid-twentieth century, Hennig's new methodology to group lineages by derived characters revolutionised systematics of Coleoptera and other organisms. As envisioned by Darwin and Ernst Haeckel, the new Hennigian approach enabled systematists to establish classifications truly reflecting evolution. Roy A. Crowson and Howard E. Hinton, who both made tremendous contributions to coleopterology, had an ambivalent attitude towards the Hennigian ideas. The Mickoleit school combined detailed anatomical work with a classical Hennigian character evaluation, with stepwise tree building, comparatively few characters and a priori polarity assessment without explicit use of the outgroup comparison method. The rise of cladistic methods in the 1970s had a strong impact on beetle systematics. Cladistic computer programs facilitated parsimony analyses of large data matrices, mostly morphological characters not requiring detailed anatomical investigations. Molecular studies on beetle phylogeny started in the 1990s with modest taxon sampling and limited DNA data. This has

  3. 33 CFR 117.591 - Charles River and its tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Charles River and its tributaries... BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.591 Charles River and its tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across the Charles River and...

  4. 49 CFR 372.209 - Lake Charles, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... points within a line drawn 6 miles beyond the municipal limits of Lake Charles; (c) Those points in... 49 Transportation 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Lake Charles, LA. 372.209 Section 372.209... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.209 Lake Charles, LA. The zone adjacent to,...

  5. 49 CFR 372.209 - Lake Charles, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... points within a line drawn 6 miles beyond the municipal limits of Lake Charles; (c) Those points in... 49 Transportation 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lake Charles, LA. 372.209 Section 372.209... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.209 Lake Charles, LA. The zone adjacent to,...

  6. 49 CFR 372.209 - Lake Charles, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... points within a line drawn 6 miles beyond the municipal limits of Lake Charles; (c) Those points in... 49 Transportation 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lake Charles, LA. 372.209 Section 372.209... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.209 Lake Charles, LA. The zone adjacent to,...

  7. 49 CFR 372.209 - Lake Charles, LA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... points within a line drawn 6 miles beyond the municipal limits of Lake Charles; (c) Those points in... 49 Transportation 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lake Charles, LA. 372.209 Section 372.209... ZONES, AND TERMINAL AREAS Commercial Zones § 372.209 Lake Charles, LA. The zone adjacent to,...

  8. Creative Work: The Case of Charles Darwin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gruber, Howard E.; Wallace, Doris B.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the evolving systems approach (ESA) to creative work, which emerged from a case study of Charles Darwin. Explains how the ESA differs from other approaches and describes various facets of creative work (networks of enterprise, uniqueness, insight, pluralism, and evolving belief systems and ensembles of metaphor). Emphasizes the…

  9. Charles Dickens, Social Worker in His Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Arlene Bowers

    2012-01-01

    As the world marks the 200th anniversary of Charles Dickens's birth, social workers may take note of the contributions Dickens made to 19th century social reform. Ever the advocate for people who were poor and oppressed, Dickens, in his timeless fictional narratives, continues to have relevance for contemporary social justice advocacy. This…

  10. Charles H. Winston and Confederate Sulfuric Acid.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riethmiller, Steven

    1995-01-01

    Describes the invention and use of a sulfuric acid chamber by Charles Henry Winston during the Civil War. This invention helped supply munitions for the South. Winston, who was President of the Richmond Female Institute in Virginia, constructed the chamber at his farm and was granted a patent by the Confederate Patent Office in 1863. (PVD)

  11. The Lost Acting Treatise of Charles Macklin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackey, Barbara

    This paper examines the career of Charles Macklin of London, an 18th-century actor/director/teacher, whose treatise on his performative approach and pedagogical techniques, "On the Science of Acting," was lost at sea in a 1772 shipwreck. Citing two letters Macklin received from his actress daughter, Maria, and fragments of his own accounts as well…

  12. The Home and Studio of Charles Demuth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2002-01-01

    Focuses on the home of Charles Demuth that is located in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Describes, in detail, the house and the Demuth Tobacco Shop, which is located next door to the house. Includes information on the life and work of Demuth. (CMK)

  13. A Simple Demonstration of Charles's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szczepanski, Nadine

    1994-01-01

    Describes a quick, inexpensive laboratory demonstration of Charles's Law. The opening of a large, round balloon is placed snugly over the mouth of a narrow-mouthed 750-mL Erlenmeyer flask, which is then heated in a strong flame. At end of the full procedure, students easily arrive at the conclusion that the volume of a gas is proportional to…

  14. Enduring Legacy? Charles Tilly and Durable Inequality

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This article assesses Charles Tilly’s Durable Inequality and traces its influence. In writing Durable Inequality, Tilly sought to shift the research agenda of stratification scholars. But the book’s initial impact was disappointing. In recent years, however, its influence has grown, suggesting a more enduring legacy. PMID:21258635

  15. Charles Johnson's "Middle Passage" as Historiographic Metafiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thaden, Barbara Z.

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that what makes Charles Johnson's "Middle Passage" significant and eminently teachable is that it is an accessible example of "historiographic metafiction"--bestselling postmodern novels set in the past. Notes that students find the novel "easy" and enjoyable and that teaching the novel with some of its intertexts, such as H. Melville's…

  16. [The Charles Bonnet syndrome and dementia].

    PubMed

    De Baerdemaeker, E; Bouckaert, F; D'Haenen, H

    2009-01-01

    An 83-year-old visually impaired woman was admitted to the hospital because of complex visual hallucinations. Her symptoms were indicative of the Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS). On the basis of this case we explore the relationship between CBS and dementia and discuss the different opinions on this topic.

  17. Sir Charles Edward Saunders, Dominion cerealist.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Malcolm J

    2008-06-01

    Charles Edward Saunders was born in London, Ontario, in 1867. His father, Sir William Saunders, was the first director of the Dominion Experimental Farms (1886-1911). Charles received his B.A. with honours in science from the University of Toronto in 1888 and his Ph.D. in chemistry from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1891. He attempted a career in music, his first love, from 1893 to 1902. With his father, Charles attended the 1902 International Conference on Plant Breeding and Hybridization in New York, where he learned of Mendel's theories of inheritance and their applicability to plant breeding. When he began work in 1903 in the Division of Cereal Breeding and Experimentation at the Central Experimental Farm in Ottawa, he used the knowledge he had gained at that conference. It was Charles's goal to achieve "fixity" in the varieties that had been bred and released using phenotypic mass selection, prior to his tenure as Cerealist. He selected four heads from the wheat variety Markham and in the winter of 1904 he performed a "chewing test" to select for gluten elasticity and colour. Seeds from two heads were chosen, and seeds from one went on to produce the variety Marquis after extensive yield trials on the Prairies. Marquis was 7 to 10 days earlier than Red Fife, the standard bread wheat of the Prairies. The earliness and tremendous yield of Marquis wheat resulted in the rapid and successful settlement of the Great Plains and countless billions of dollars in revenue to Canada. By 1923, 90% of the spring wheat in Canada and 70% in the USA was Marquis. Charles continued as Dominion Cerealist until his retirement in 1922. He was knighted in 1934, and died in 1937.

  18. Sir Charles Edward Saunders, Dominion cerealist.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Malcolm J

    2008-06-01

    Charles Edward Saunders was born in London, Ontario, in 1867. His father, Sir William Saunders, was the first director of the Dominion Experimental Farms (1886-1911). Charles received his B.A. with honours in science from the University of Toronto in 1888 and his Ph.D. in chemistry from Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1891. He attempted a career in music, his first love, from 1893 to 1902. With his father, Charles attended the 1902 International Conference on Plant Breeding and Hybridization in New York, where he learned of Mendel's theories of inheritance and their applicability to plant breeding. When he began work in 1903 in the Division of Cereal Breeding and Experimentation at the Central Experimental Farm in Ottawa, he used the knowledge he had gained at that conference. It was Charles's goal to achieve "fixity" in the varieties that had been bred and released using phenotypic mass selection, prior to his tenure as Cerealist. He selected four heads from the wheat variety Markham and in the winter of 1904 he performed a "chewing test" to select for gluten elasticity and colour. Seeds from two heads were chosen, and seeds from one went on to produce the variety Marquis after extensive yield trials on the Prairies. Marquis was 7 to 10 days earlier than Red Fife, the standard bread wheat of the Prairies. The earliness and tremendous yield of Marquis wheat resulted in the rapid and successful settlement of the Great Plains and countless billions of dollars in revenue to Canada. By 1923, 90% of the spring wheat in Canada and 70% in the USA was Marquis. Charles continued as Dominion Cerealist until his retirement in 1922. He was knighted in 1934, and died in 1937. PMID:18521125

  19. Charles Darwin as primatologist: a literature guide.

    PubMed

    Loy, J

    1997-01-01

    Charles Darwin made numerous references to the nonhuman primates in support of his evolutionary thesis. Most such references are found in The Descent of Man [1871] and The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals [1872], but other illuminating statements are scattered throughout Darwin's notebooks, letters, and lesser-known publications. As a research aid to modern primatologists, this paper presents a very nearly complete listing of Darwin's comments on primates, indexed by topic and primate type.

  20. Charles Tilly as a Theorist of Nationalism.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Rogers

    2010-12-01

    This paper considers Charles Tilly as an important but underappreciated theorist of nationalism. Tilly's theory of nationalism emerged from the "bellicist" strand of his earlier work on state-formation and later incorporated a concern with performance, stories, and cultural modeling. Yet despite the turn to culture in Tilly's later work, his theory of nationalism remained state-centered, materialist, and instrumentalist-a source of both its power and its limitations. PMID:21258439

  1. Venus 1882 and Jean-Charles Houzeau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.

    2009-06-01

    This paper focuses on one particular type of telescope - the heliometer - designed for solving one specific basic problem in astronomy: the scale factor of the solar system. One very special instrument of this type was the ``heliometer with unequal focal lengths'' designed by the Belgian astronomer Jean-Charles Houzeau for the 1882 transit of Venus. We also draw attention to the most interesting personality of Houzeau, and to his social engagement that went much beyond his work as a scientist.

  2. Charles Tilly as a Theorist of Nationalism.

    PubMed

    Brubaker, Rogers

    2010-12-01

    This paper considers Charles Tilly as an important but underappreciated theorist of nationalism. Tilly's theory of nationalism emerged from the "bellicist" strand of his earlier work on state-formation and later incorporated a concern with performance, stories, and cultural modeling. Yet despite the turn to culture in Tilly's later work, his theory of nationalism remained state-centered, materialist, and instrumentalist-a source of both its power and its limitations.

  3. Charles Bonnet, his life, and his syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hedges, Thomas R

    2007-01-01

    Charles Bonnet (1720-1792) was an eminent naturalist and philosopher whose contributions to botany and philosophy were highly regarded and honored by his contemporaries in the scientific community of his era in France and England. In1760 he first described and analyzed formed visual hallucinations experienced by his grandfather. The syndrome was named after Bonnet in 1937 by George de Mosier, another native of Geneva, Switzerland.

  4. [Charles Bonnet syndrome: a case presentation].

    PubMed

    Cumurcu, Tongabay; Elbozan Cumurcu, Birgül; Cam Celikel, Feryal

    2005-01-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome comprises the triad of visual hallucinations, visual sensory deprivation, and preserved cognitive status. This paper discusses a case diagnosed as Charles Bonnet syndrome, involving visual hallucinations secondary to bilateral primary optic atrophy. An 80-year-old female with normal cognitive functions in the presence of primary optic atrophy and visual hallucinations was diagnosed with Charles Bonnet syndrome. The patient, having had poor vision since childhood, had lost it totally in the last year. Her vision had not improved following cataract operations in both eyes 6 months previously. Her vision was at the level of hand movements. In biomicroscopic examination, bilateral pseudoaphakia was found. Since fundus examination showed bilateral primary optic atrophy in the presence of visual hallucinations, a psychiatric consultation was requested. In her psychiatric examination, she had had hallucinations for the last two years, first elementary and then complex in character. Her cognitive functions were normal with no pathology in her neurologic examination. Routine investigations and neuroradiologic examinations were normal. She had no past history of any personal or familial psychiatric or systemic physical disorder. She was given olanzapine 5 mg daily and was followed up. This syndrome, defined as visual hallucinations in the presence of preserved cognitive functions and deprived vision, requires further research.

  5. Charles F. Kettering Foundation and /I/D/E/A Mission in Educational Leadership and Management. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrimack Education Center, Chelmsford, MA.

    This report describes a program sponsored by the Charles F. Kettering Foundation that attempted to help practicing educational administrators take advantage of available materials and resources to improve their leadership and management skills. The program centered around four Educational Management Development Centers consisting of school…

  6. The Beginning of "Free Money" Ideology in American Universities: Charles W. Eliot at Harvard, 1869-1909

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Bruce A.; Johnson, Benjamin Ashby

    2012-01-01

    Rather than banking enormous gifts, Harvard University built its wealth by adhering to a coherent strategy that gradually became the common sense--the prevailing ideology--of how to build and maintain the wealth of private universities. President Charles W. Eliot formulated this "free money" strategy over the course of his administration from 1869…

  7. Cohort Profile: The China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS)

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yaohui; Hu, Yisong; Smith, James P; Strauss, John; Yang, Gonghuan

    2014-01-01

    The China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) is a nationally representative longitudinal survey of persons in China 45 years of age or older and their spouses, including assessments of social, economic, and health circumstances of community-residents. CHARLS examines health and economic adjustments to rapid ageing of the population in China. The national baseline survey for the study was conducted between June 2011 and March 2012 and involved 17 708 respondents. CHARLS respondents are followed every 2 years, using a face-to-face computer-assisted personal interview (CAPI). Physical measurements are made at every 2-year follow-up, and blood sample collection is done once in every two follow-up periods. A pilot survey for CHARLS was conducted in two provinces of China in 2008, on 2685 individuals, who were resurveyed in 2012. To ensure the adoption of best practices and international comparability of results, CHARLS was harmonized with leading international research studies in the Health and Retirement Study (HRS) model. Requests for collaborations should be directed to Dr Yaohui Zhao (yhzhao@nsd.edu.cn). All data in CHARLS are maintained at the National School of Development of Peking University and will be accessible to researchers around the world at the study website. The 2008 pilot data for CHARLS are available at: http://charls.ccer.edu.cn/charls/. National baseline data for the study are expected to be released in January 2013. PMID:23243115

  8. Charles Lyell and scientific thinking in geology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virgili, Carmina

    2007-07-01

    Charles Lyell (1797-1875) was born at Kinnordy, Scotland. His father, an amateur botanist, and his grandfather, a navigator, gave him very soon a taste for the observation of the Nature. He went to the Oxford University to study classical literature, but he also followed the geological course of William Buckland. After having been employed as jurist for some years, in 1827 he decided on a career of geologist and held the chair of geology of the King's College of London, from 1831 on. He was a contemporary of Cuvier, Darwin, von Humboldt, Hutton, Lavoisier, and was elected 'membre correspondant' of the 'Académie des sciences, France', in January 1862. Charles Lyell is one of the eminent geologists who initiated the scientific thinking in geology, in which his famous volumes of the Principles of Geology were taken as the authority. These reference volumes are based on multiple observations and field works collected during numerous fieldtrips in western Europe (principally Spain, France, and Italy) and North America. To his name are attached, among others: ( i) the concept of uniformitarism (or actualism), which was opposed to the famous catastrophism, in vogue at that time, and which may be summarized by the expression "The present is the key to the past"; ( ii) the division of the Tertiary in three series denominated Eocene, Miocene, and Pliocene, due to the study of the age of strata by fossil faunas; ( iii) the theory according to which the orogenesis of a mountain chain, as the Pyrenees, results from different pulsations on very long time scales and was not induced by a unique pulsation during a short and intense period. The uniformity of the laws of Nature is undeniably a principle Charles Lyell was the first to state clearly and to apply to the study of the whole Earth's crust, which opened a new era in geology.

  9. Charles Dickens, social worker in his time.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Arlene Bowers

    2012-10-01

    As the world marks the 200th anniversary of Charles Dickens's birth, social workers may take note of the contributions Dickens made to 19th century social reform. Ever the advocate for people who were poor and oppressed, Dickens, in his timeless fictional narratives, continues to have relevance for contemporary social justice advocacy. This article draws on Dickens's biography and writing to highlight select lessons of relevance to social work. The focus is on developing a professional lens, changing social norms, and interpreting case studies across ecological systems. PMID:23285830

  10. Charles R. Drew: surgeon, scientist, and educator.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ralph C

    2005-01-01

    The first African-American Surgeon to achieve extensive training in medical research in the modern era was Dr. Charles Drew (1904-1950) who completed a doctoral degree in medical sciences at Columbia University in 1940. He became the director of the American Red Cross Blood Bank program during World War II and received many accolades for his work with plasma. This historical vignette reviews the details of his life as a scientist and surgical educator while fighting the overpowering racism which black professionals were subjected to during that time. The controversial aspects and facts of his premature death in an automobile accident in the South are explored as well.

  11. Charles R. Drew: surgeon, scientist, and educator.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Ralph C

    2005-01-01

    The first African-American Surgeon to achieve extensive training in medical research in the modern era was Dr. Charles Drew (1904-1950) who completed a doctoral degree in medical sciences at Columbia University in 1940. He became the director of the American Red Cross Blood Bank program during World War II and received many accolades for his work with plasma. This historical vignette reviews the details of his life as a scientist and surgical educator while fighting the overpowering racism which black professionals were subjected to during that time. The controversial aspects and facts of his premature death in an automobile accident in the South are explored as well. PMID:16249164

  12. Geothermal community heating for Cape Charles, Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leffel, C. S., Jr.

    1981-10-01

    An economic feasibility study for a geothermal community heating system was made for the residential heat load of Cape Charles, Virginia using a computer program. The effects of inflation, interest rates, wellhead temperatures, and the addition of reinjection wells are investigated. It is concluded that the utilization of geothermal energy would be feasible if well flows of 500 gal/minute could be obtained and if reinjection of the geothermal fluids were not required. A comparison of the geothermal assisted community system with a coal fired system shows that the coal fired system may be the most attractive alternative to the heating of homes with individual oil fired furnaces.

  13. CHARLES M. RUSSELL WILDLIFE REFUGE, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Dudley D.; Miller, Michael S.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Charles M. Russell Wildlife Refuge in Montana indicates that parts of the area have demonstrated resources of low-rank coal and bentonite in areas of substantiated potential and all of the area is assigned a probable resource potential for oil and gas because it is underlain by sedimentary strata known to contain hydrocarbons in other areas. Potential hydrocarbon accumulations, including both oil and gas, are difficult to delineate because of the absence of subsurface control points within the refuge. Geophysical surveys and directional drilling along the fringes of the wildlife refuge would aid in refining resource estimates for organic fuels. 1 ref.

  14. The curious blindness of Charles F. Lummis.

    PubMed

    Margo, Curtis E; Harman, Lynn E; Smith, Don B

    2011-05-01

    Generations of disabled persons were inspired by the miraculous recovery Charles Fletcher Lummis made following a series of devastating strokes that began at the age of 28. The famed author, editor, and social activist was struck by misfortune again at 51 when he went bilaterally blind. At the height of his career, Lummis never let the loss of vision interfere with his many professional responsibilities or his personal life. The cause of Lummis's stroke and blindness has been the subject of speculation for nearly a century and involves one of the most sensitive and perplexing diagnoses in medicine. PMID:21555621

  15. Water resources of St. Charles Parish, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, Vincent E.; Prakken, Lawrence B.

    2015-01-01

    Information concerning the availability, use, and quality of water in St. Charles Parish, Louisiana, is critical for proper water-supply management. The purpose of this fact sheet is to present information that can be used by water managers, parish residents, and others for stewardship of this vital resource. Information on the availability, past and current use, use trends, and water quality from groundwater and surface-water sources in the parish is presented. Previously published reports and data stored in the U.S. Geological Survey’s National Water Information System (http://waterdata.usgs.gov/nwis) are the primary sources of the information presented here.

  16. Charles Bonnet syndrome: are medications necessary?

    PubMed

    Hartney, Kimberly E; Catalano, Glenn; Catalano, Maria C

    2011-03-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a clinical entity in which patients develop vivid visual hallucinations in the absence of psychiatric illness. In the great majority of cases, a decline in visual acuity precedes the development of CBS. The patient maintains intact reality testing and recognizes that the hallucinations are not real. There is no definitive cure for CBS, although various pharmacologic agents, behavioral strategies, and ophthalmologic interventions have been used in an attempt to reduce or relieve symptoms. We present the case of a 79-year-old man who presented with the onset of vivid visual hallucinations after developing cataracts. We also review previous case reports of CBS and discuss treatment options.

  17. [Charles Bonnet syndrome and visual hallucination].

    PubMed

    Singh, Amardeep; Sørensen, Torben Lykke

    2011-01-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome is characterized by vivid, complex and recurrent visual hallucinations occurring in psychologically normal people. Though not related to any specific eye condition, it commonly affects visually impaired elderly persons and is thus an important differential diagnosis to many conditions which cause visual hallucinations. Patients usually retain insight into the unreal nature of their hallucination. The hallucinatory experiences are generally not distressing, but patients may fear impending insanity. There is no specific treatment for this condition which in most cases is self-limiting.

  18. Charles Rycroft's contribution to contemporary psychoanalytic psychotherapy.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Jeremy

    2010-06-01

    Charles Rycroft played a significant part in gaining psychoanalysis understanding and intellectual acceptance within the wider intellectual community of post-war Britain. However he became gradually disaffected with the schisms and inward-looking character of UK psychoanalysis in its post-controversial discussions phase. He was ahead of his time in his interest in psychoanalysis as semantics, links between psychoanalysis and evolutionary and attachment theories, literary resonances with psychoanalytic thinking, and of the role of support as well as interpretation as a mutative agent. Renewed interest in his writings is long overdue. PMID:20505738

  19. Charles Dickens: Impact on Medicine and Society

    PubMed Central

    Kryger, Meir

    2012-01-01

    In 1836 Charles Dickens published the first installment of The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. In this novel he introduces the reader to a character, Joe, the Fat Boy who is obese, sleepy, difficult to arouse, snores, and has peripheral edema. This description so intrigued the medical field that many hypotheses about the symptoms were examined, but it was not until 120 years after the novel was published that physicians started to interrelate these features and a new field of medicine emerged. Although he is best known for this description, Dickens impacted medicine and medical care in many ways. Besides his brilliant clinical descriptions (many of which were unrecognized in his day) and his activities as a social reformer, he was instrumental in facilitating the development of homeless shelters for women, the first pediatric hospital in the United Kingdom, and the development of orthopedics. Citation: Kryger M. Charles Dickens: impact on medicine and society. J Clin Sleep Med 2012;8(3):333-338. PMID:22701393

  20. Charles Bonnet syndrome after herpes simplex encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Ömer Faruk; Ince, Hülya; Taşdemir, Haydar Ali; Özyürek, Hamit

    2012-04-01

    Visual impairment associated with Charles Bonnet syndrome is rarely reported in childhood. We describe a child who presented with visual hallucinations and postinfectious bilateral retrobulbar optic neuritis. The patient had undergone acyclovir therapy for 3 weeks because of herpes encephalitis. Four days after therapy was completed, he experienced visual impairment in both eyes. He manifested a bilateral decrease in visual acuity, with normal funduscopic findings. The patient experienced visual hallucinations for about 1 week, and then experienced total loss of vision. During his hallucinations, the patient did not exhibit behavioral changes or cognitive impairment. The visual hallucinations included unfamiliar children hiding under his bed, and he spoke to someone whom he did not know. Magnetic resonance imaging indicated bilateral optic nerve hyperintensity on T(2)-weighted and contrast-enhanced images. The patient received corticosteroid therapy for his retrobulbar optic neuritis, and his vision returned to normal after 1 month. Although rare, visual impairment can be associated with complex visual hallucinations indicative of Charles Bonnet syndrome.

  1. Obituary: Charles Latif Hyder, 1930-2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Oran Richard

    2004-12-01

    My friend and colleague, Charles Hyder, was a true physicist with a sound intuitive grasp of fundamentals in modern physics and the underlying mathematics. I admired his knowledge of the history of modern physics and quantum mechanics when we discussed contemporary problems in interpreting solar observations. He had the ability to present his ideas clearly and persuasively to both students and his colleagues. His insatiable curiosity about life in general led him to consider the effects of nuclear weapons development on the human race. Appreciation of the biological effects of radioactive materials produced in the course of weapons and power reactor development led him to a more public career beyond traditional research. Charles Hyder was born April 18, 1930 in Albuquerque, New Mexico. He graduated from Albuquerque High School and served in the Air Force during the Korean War. He received a BS and MS in physics from the University of New Mexico (1958, 1960) and a PhD in astrogeophysics at the University of Colorado (1964). His positions included the Department of Astronomy and Institute of Geophysics at UCLA (1964-65), Sacramento Peak Solar Observatory (1965-1970) and the Goddard Space Flight Center (1970-1977). He also taught at the University of New Mexico (1970-1977) and was active on the Solar Maximum Mission science team (1970-1977, 1980-1984). He was married twice with both marriages ending in divorce. He and his first wife Ann had three children (Paul, Roxanne and Querida) and he and his second wife Laurie had a son Niels. Charles Hyder's professional career in solar physics began in 1961 during his graduate studies at the Department of AstroGeophysics of the University of Colorado and continued until 1983 when he chose to follow his convictions to expose the threat of nuclear proliferation. His early research was in the study of the quantum mechanics of polarized light produced in the presence of magnetic fields. Application of this work to interpretation

  2. 1. Photocopy of Plate #24, 'Church of St. Charles Borromeo, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy of Plate #24, 'Church of St. Charles Borromeo, Twentieth and Christian Streets, Phila.', in Architectural Album of Edwin F. Durang and Son, 1200 Chestnut St., Philadelphia (a privately bound volume). Exact date not noted. - St. Charles Borromeo Roman Catholic Church, 900 South Twentieth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  3. 2. Photocopy of Plate #25, 'Church of St. Charles Borromeo, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of Plate #25, 'Church of St. Charles Borromeo, Twentieth and Christian Streets, Phila.', in Architectural Album of Edwin F. Durang and Son, 1200 Chestnut St., Philadelphia (a privately bound volume). Exact date not noted. - St. Charles Borromeo Roman Catholic Church, 900 South Twentieth Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  4. 33 CFR 117.591 - Charles River and its tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... vessels. (c) The draw of the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority (MBTA/Amtrak Bridge, mile 0.8, at... BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Massachusetts § 117.591 Charles River and its tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across the Charles River and...

  5. 33 CFR 117.591 - Charles River and its tributaries.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Charles River and its tributaries. 117.591 Section 117.591 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... its tributaries. (a) The following requirements apply to all bridges across the Charles River and...

  6. 76 FR 21889 - Lasky, Charles D.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-19

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Lasky, Charles D.; Notice of Filing Take notice that on April 12, 2011, Charles D. Lasky submitted for filing an application for authority to hold interlocking positions...-8659. Comment Date: 5 p.m. Eastern Time on May 3, 2011. Dated: April 12, 2011. Kimberly D....

  7. Sir Charles Ballance: pioneer British neurological surgeon.

    PubMed

    Stone, J L

    1999-03-01

    Sir Charles A. Ballance (1856-1936) began his medical career at St. Thomas's Hospital the University College, London, England, in 1875, receiving honors in every subject and a gold medal in surgery. Victor Horsley (1857-1916) and Ballance were classmates at the University and in the later 1880s began work together at the Brown Institute and the National Hospital, Queen Square. In addition to important studies on vascular surgery, Ballance was involved in primate work on cerebral localization with lifelong friends Charles Beevor, Charles Sherrington, David Ferrier, and others. In June of 1887, Ballance assisted Horsley at Queen Square in the successful removal of an extramedullary spinal cord tumor. Horsley was about to abandon the operation, but his friend urged the removal of one lamina higher and the tumor was discovered. Ballance, a demonstrator in anatomy, realized the spinal cord segments lay higher in relation to the vertebral bodies than was generally appreciated. Ballance popularized the operation of radical mastoidectomy for advanced middle ear infection (1890), standardized an approach to drain or excise temporal brain abscesses, and was the first to clearly understand the neurological signs of cerebellar abscess (1894). Ballance also devised cranial base approaches to attack infectious thrombophlebitis of the lateral, petrosal, and cavernous sinuses. He was the first to completely remove an acoustic tumor (1894); 18 years later, the patient remained well. Ballance also drained a posterior fossa subdural hematoma (1906) and successfully sectioned the auditory nerve for Meniere's syndrome (1908). Ballance's operative experience with both supra- and infratentorial brain lesions included approximately 400 cases, which are detailed in his 1907 book, Some Points in the Surgery of the Brain and Its Membranes. His two-volume set, Essays on the Surgery of the Temporal Bone (1919), remains a brilliantly written and illustrated classic. Ballance was an expert on

  8. Charles Darwin and the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Peretó, Juli; Bada, Jeffrey L; Lazcano, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    When Charles Darwin published The Origin of Species 150 years ago he consciously avoided discussing the origin of life. However, analysis of some other texts written by Darwin, and of the correspondence he exchanged with friends and colleagues demonstrates that he took for granted the possibility of a natural emergence of the first life forms. As shown by notes from the pages he excised from his private notebooks, as early as 1837 Darwin was convinced that "the intimate relation of Life with laws of chemical combination, & the universality of latter render spontaneous generation not improbable". Like many of his contemporaries, Darwin rejected the idea that putrefaction of preexisting organic compounds could lead to the appearance of organisms. Although he favored the possibility that life could appear by natural processes from simple inorganic compounds, his reluctance to discuss the issue resulted from his recognition that at the time it was possible to undertake the experimental study of the emergence of life. PMID:19633921

  9. [Charles Bonnet and Leibniz's notion of organism].

    PubMed

    Duchesneau, François

    2003-01-01

    This article takes into account Leibniz's notion of organism and its impact on Charles Bonnet's Considérations sur les corps oganisés (1762). Leibniz adopted mechanical, dynamical and teleological views to explain the structure and function of living bodies. He stressed the idea of continuity in animal generation, and held a moderate version of preformation in the field of embryology. Organisms are the outcome of the combination of infinite series of microstructures and of their powers. Bonnet adhered to Leibniz's principle of continuity in his investigations on th reproduction of the polyps. It is therefore apparent, as shown by Bonnet, that in the late XVIIIth century, Leibniz's notion of life played an important role in life sciences.

  10. Charles Dickens: impact on medicine and society.

    PubMed

    Kryger, Meir

    2012-06-15

    In 1836 Charles Dickens published the first installment of The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club. In this novel he introduces the reader to a character, Joe, the Fat Boy who is obese, sleepy, difficult to arouse, snores, and has peripheral edema. This description so intrigued the medical field that many hypotheses about the symptoms were examined, but it was not until 120 years after the novel was published that physicians started to interrelate these features and a new field of medicine emerged. Although he is best known for this description, Dickens impacted medicine and medical care in many ways. Besides his brilliant clinical descriptions (many of which were unrecognized in his day) and his activities as a social reformer, he was instrumental in facilitating the development of homeless shelters for women, the first pediatric hospital in the United Kingdom, and the development of orthopedics. PMID:22701393

  11. Charles Dickens (1812-1870) and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Larner, A J

    2012-08-01

    To coincide with the bicentenary of the birth of Charles Dickens (1812-1870), accounts of epilepsy found in his novels and journalism have been collated and analyzed. From these, it may be inferred that Dickens was clearly aware of the difference between epilepsy and syncope and recognized different types of epilepsy and that seizures could be fatal. Speculations that Dickens himself suffered from epilepsy are not corroborated. Dickens's novelistic construction of epilepsy as a marker of criminality, as in the characters of Monks in Oliver Twist and Bradley Headstone in Our Mutual Friend, and perhaps of mental abnormality, was in keeping with conventional contemporary views of epilepsy, but his journalistic descriptions of individuals with epilepsy confined in the workhouse system indicate an awareness of the inadequacy of their care. PMID:22704997

  12. Charles Theodore Dotter: The Father of Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Misty M.

    2001-01-01

    The 1st percutaneous transluminal angioplasty marked a new era in the treatment of peripheral atherosclerotic lesions. The early techniques used in peripheral percutaneous transluminal angioplasty form the basis for subsequent percutaneous intervention both in the peripheral and coronary arteries and are largely the contribution of Charles Dotter. Dotter was the 1st to describe flow-directed balloon catheterization, the double-lumen balloon catheter, the safety guidewire, percutaneous arterial stenting, and more. This practical genius dedicated his considerable energy to the belief that there is always a better way to treat disease. His personal contributions to clinical medicine, research, and teaching have saved millions of limbs and lives all over the world. PMID:11330737

  13. Visual hallucinations and the Charles Bonnet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ffytche, Dominic H

    2005-06-01

    After dividing clinicians for almost 70 years, Charles Bonnet syndrome has reached an impasse. Defined by a neurologist in the 1930s, the syndrome was intended to eponymize the association of visual hallucinations with age, but evolved into one describing their association with eye disease or, more recently, an etiologically neutral phenomenologic description. Each tradition has its merits but none has defined a specific clinical entity or accounted for visual hallucinations across the spectrum of associated clinical conditions. Recent insights into the neurobiology of vision have shed new light on the problem. Viewed from a neuro-phenomenologic perspective, clinical evidence reveals two distinct hallucination syndromes: one directly related to visual system pathology, the other to pathology in the brainstem or ascending neurotransmitter pathways. The implication is of two independent but interacting pathophysiologic mechanisms and of a need to reassess the classification and management of this common psychopathologic symptom.

  14. PEOPLE IN PHYSICS: Interview with Charles Taylor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pople, Conducted by Stephen

    1996-07-01

    Charles Taylor started his university teaching career at UMIST in 1948. In 1965 he became Professor and Head of the Department of Physics at University College, Cardiff. He was a Vice-President of the Institute of Physics from 1970 to 1975, and Professor of Experimental Physics at the Royal Institution from 1977 until 1989. Over the years, Professor Taylor has delighted audiences of all ages with his demonstration lectures, including the Royal Institution Christmas Lectures televised in 1971 and 1989. In 1986 he became the first recipient of the Royal Society's Michael Faraday Award for contributions to the public understanding of science. His many books include Exploring Music, The Art and Science of the Lecture Demonstration, and also the Oxford Children's Book of Science, co-written with interviewer Stephen Pople.

  15. Recognizing Charles Bonnet syndrome in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Christina M; Hilas, Olga

    2009-04-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is an under-recognized and commonly misdiagnosed condition characterized by the presence of visual hallucinations that psychologically normal people acknowledge as being unreal. It is commonly associated with ocular pathology and usually observed in elderly individuals with visual impairment. The exact etiology of CBS is unknown; however, the presentation of hallucinations is believed to be a result of functional deterioration of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Eradication of hallucinations and recurrent episodes has been seen with the use of neuroleptic and anticonvulsant agents. Correction of underlying ocular disorders and low-vision rehabilitation may also help in the resolution of visions. Careful patient assessment is necessary to appropriately diagnose CBS and determine the best approach to management.

  16. Seeing the unseen: Charles Bonnet syndrome revisited.

    PubMed

    Nair, Aditya Gopinathan; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Shah, Bharat R; Gandhi, Rashmin Anilkumar

    2015-09-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a rare condition that encompasses three clinical features: complex visual hallucinations, ocular pathology causing visual deterioration, and preserved cognitive status. Common associated ocular pathologies include age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and cataracts. Several theories have been proposed to try to explain the visual hallucinations. However, the pathophysiology remains poorly understood, and treatment is largely based on anecdotal data. The lack of awareness of CBS among medical professionals often leads to inappropriate diagnosis and medication. In a country like India, where awareness of mental health is not widespread, cultural myths and stigma prevent patients from seeking professional help. Here we describe two cases of CBS and revisit different ocular morbidities that have been reported to occur in conjunction with CBS. Psychiatrists and ophthalmologists alike must be sensitive to this clinical condition to ensure prompt diagnosis and treatment.

  17. Charles Darwin and the origin of life.

    PubMed

    Peretó, Juli; Bada, Jeffrey L; Lazcano, Antonio

    2009-10-01

    When Charles Darwin published The Origin of Species 150 years ago he consciously avoided discussing the origin of life. However, analysis of some other texts written by Darwin, and of the correspondence he exchanged with friends and colleagues demonstrates that he took for granted the possibility of a natural emergence of the first life forms. As shown by notes from the pages he excised from his private notebooks, as early as 1837 Darwin was convinced that "the intimate relation of Life with laws of chemical combination, & the universality of latter render spontaneous generation not improbable". Like many of his contemporaries, Darwin rejected the idea that putrefaction of preexisting organic compounds could lead to the appearance of organisms. Although he favored the possibility that life could appear by natural processes from simple inorganic compounds, his reluctance to discuss the issue resulted from his recognition that at the time it was possible to undertake the experimental study of the emergence of life.

  18. Charles Fabry métrologue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouchareine, P.

    We describe the two main experimental results obtained by Charles Fabry in fundamental metrology. First, the measurement of the volume of a quartz cube was achieved with Macé de Lépinay, conducting to an enhanced value of the ratio between one "litre" and one cubic decimetre. The probably most important experimental result is the second measurement of the "metre" in optical wavelengths, made in "Conservatoire des arts et métiers”, some years after the first one achieved by Albert Michelson with Jean-René Benoît in the "Bureau international des poids et mesures" in Sèvres. We compare the two experimental devices and processes, the results and their uncertainties. The very good agreement between the two interferometrists was an argument to convince the international community that an atomic wavelength is a better standard for lengths measurements than the platinum Prototype, and lead to the two new definitions of the "mètre" in 1960 and1983. Nous décrivons les deux principaux résultats obtenus par Charles Fabry en métrologie fondamentale. Tout d'abord la mesure du volume d'un cube de quartz a été faite avec Macé de Lépinay, conduisant à une meilleure valeur du rapport du litre au décimètre cube. Le résultat expérimental le plus significatif est probablement la mesure du mètre en longueurs d'onde lumineuses, effectuée au Conservatoire des arts et métiers, quelques années après la première mesure de ce type faite par Albert Michelson avec Jean-René Benoît au Bureau international des poids et mesures à Sèvres. Nous comparons les deux dispositifs expérimentaux et leur exploitation, les résultats et leurs incertitudes. Le très bon accord entre les deux expérimentateurs fut décisif pour convaincre la communauté internationale que la longueur d'onde d'une radiation atomique est un meilleur étalon pour les mesures de longueur que le Prototype international en platine iridié, et conduisit aux deux nouvelles définitions du mètre de 1960

  19. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Charles Norton, Jr., Photographer. June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey, Charles Norton, Jr., Photographer. June 8 to July 4, 1936. OFFICERS' WOOD QUARTERS (From West) - Fort Mackinac, Officers Wood Quarters, Mackinac Island, Mackinac County, MI

  20. 14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Charles Acey Cobb standing adjacent to the fish screen he designed and installed in the Congdon Canal, facing southeast. Photo dates ca. late 1920's. - Congdon Canal, Fish Screen, Naches River, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  1. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2007

    2007-01-01

    This article announces the 2007 recipient of the Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Baron Perlman. A brief biography, highlighting areas of special focus in Perlman's work, is provided.

  2. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Charles Norton, Jr., Photographer. June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Charles Norton, Jr., Photographer. June 8 to July 4, 1936. EAST BLOCK HOUSE (Outside of Palisades) - Fort Mackinac, East Blockhouse, Mackinac Island, Mackinac County, MI

  3. 24. View looking north up corridor from Charles Street Bridge. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. View looking north up corridor from Charles Street Bridge. Providence, Providence Co., RI. Sec. 4116, mp 186.44. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak route between CT & MA state lines, Providence, Providence County, RI

  4. 9. Photocopy of Charles H. Parkers Patent (Original in possession ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Photocopy of Charles H. Parkers Patent (Original in possession of United States Patent Office) PATENT DRAWING OF C. H. PARKER TRUSS BRIDGE - Elm Street Bridge, Spanning Ottauquechee River, Woodstock, Windsor County, VT

  5. Charles Burchfield: "October Wind and Sunlight in the Woods."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Gaynell

    1986-01-01

    Based on Charles Burchfield's watercolor, "October Wind and Sunlight in the Woods," the goal of this lesson is to introduce students in grades seven through nine to Burchfield's use of symbolism. (JDH)

  6. 1. Photocopy from stereoptican picture (original owned by Charles van ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopy from stereoptican picture (original owned by Charles van Ravenswaay, Wilmington, Delaware) J. C. Macurdy, Photographer ca. 1871 EXTERIOR IN 1871 - St. Peter & Paul Roman Catholic Church, Seventh & Spring Streets, Boonville, Cooper County, MO

  7. 2. Photocopy of March 16, 1971 photograph by Charles T. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopy of March 16, 1971 photograph by Charles T. Higgins, courtesy of The Evening Bulletin. ANOTHER DEMOLITION SCENE - Gladstone Hotel, 328-338 South Front Street, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  8. Filtrates & Residues. Charles's Law: Students Develop Their Own Procedure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Diane

    1987-01-01

    Outlines an approach to chemistry experiments designed to help students appreciate the importance of each step in an experimental procedure. Describes an experiment involving Charles's Law to illustrate this idea. (TW)

  9. Delirium superimposed on Charles Bonnet syndrome: a case study.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Jennifer J

    2013-01-01

    Older adults with visual impairment may experience visual hallucinations in the setting of normal cognition and absence of psychiatric illness. This phenomenon is referred to as Charles Bonnet syndrome. Information concerning Charles Bonnet syndrome predominantly comes from case studies. Reassuring the person experiencing the hallucinations they are not suffering from psychosis constitutes the mainstay of treatment. What follows is the case of a vision impaired, older adult male with known Charles Bonnet syndrome, who, following emergency surgery and associated delirium while in the intensive care unit, experiences an aggressive change in hallucinations. Nurses need to understand the pathology and characteristics of Charles Bonnet syndrome in order to distinguish it from other pathologies underlying hallucinations. This knowledge is necessary to provide safe, patient-centered care for older adults.

  10. Soil moisture ground truth, Lafayette, Indiana, site; St. Charles Missouri, site; Centralia, Missouri, site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E. B.

    1975-01-01

    The soil moisture ground-truth measurements and ground-cover descriptions taken at three soil moisture survey sites located near Lafayette, Indiana; St. Charles, Missouri; and Centralia, Missouri are given. The data were taken on November 10, 1975, in connection with airborne remote sensing missions being flown by the Environmental Research Institute of Michigan under the auspices of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. Emphasis was placed on the soil moisture in bare fields. Soil moisture was sampled in the top 0 to 1 in. and 0 to 6 in. by means of a soil sampling push tube. These samples were then placed in plastic bags and awaited gravimetric analysis.

  11. Evolutionary plant physiology: Charles Darwin's forgotten synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Niklas, Karl J.

    2009-11-01

    Charles Darwin dedicated more than 20 years of his life to a variety of investigations on higher plants (angiosperms). It has been implicitly assumed that these studies in the fields of descriptive botany and experimental plant physiology were carried out to corroborate his principle of descent with modification. However, Darwin’s son Francis, who was a professional plant biologist, pointed out that the interests of his father were both of a physiological and an evolutionary nature. In this article, we describe Darwin’s work on the physiology of higher plants from a modern perspective, with reference to the following topics: circumnutations, tropisms and the endogenous oscillator model; the evolutionary patterns of auxin action; the root-brain hypothesis; phloem structure and photosynthesis research; endosymbioses and growth-promoting bacteria; photomorphogenesis and phenotypic plasticity; basal metabolic rate, the Pfeffer-Kleiber relationship and metabolic optimality theory with respect to adaptive evolution; and developmental constraints versus functional equivalence in relationship to directional natural selection. Based on a review of these various fields of inquiry, we deduce the existence of a Darwinian (evolutionary) approach to plant physiology and define this emerging scientific discipline as the experimental study and theoretical analysis of the functions of green, sessile organisms from a phylogenetic perspective.

  12. The Charles Perkins Centre's Twins Research Node.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Lucas C; Craig, Jeffrey M; Hopper, John L; Carrick, Susan E

    2016-08-01

    Twins can help researchers disentangle the roles of genes from those of the environment on human traits, health, and diseases. To realize this potential, the Australian Twin Registry (ATR), University of Melbourne, and the Charles Perkins Centre (CPC), University of Sydney, established a collaboration to form the Twins Research Node, a highly interconnected research facility dedicated specifically to research involving twins. This collaboration aims to foster the adoption of twin designs as important tools for research in a range of health-related domains. The CPC hosted their Twins Research Node's launch seminar entitled 'Double the power of your research with twin studies', in which experienced twin researchers described how twin studies are supporting scientific discoveries and careers. The launch also featured twin pairs who have actively participated in research through the ATR. Researchers at the CPC were surveyed before the event to gauge their level of understanding and interest in utilizing twin research. This article describes the new Twins Research Node, discusses the survey's main results and reports on the launch seminar. PMID:27302367

  13. Acute Charles Bonnet Syndrome following Hughes procedure.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michelle E; Pointdujour-Lim, Renelle; Lally, Sara; Shields, Carol L; Rabinowitz, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    A 69-year-old male experienced monocular formed visual hallucinations after occlusion of the right eye following resection of eyelid basal cell carcinoma and reconstruction with a Hughes procedure (tarsoconjunctival flap). His symptoms included recurrent, well-defined, organized, complex, formed images of small children playing in the snow. These visual phenomena occurred only in the occluded eye, began several hours after surgery, and recurred intermittently several times daily for 4 days, lasting several minutes with each occurrence. The patient retained insight into the false nature of the images throughout the duration of his symptoms, and the hallucinations resolved spontaneously while the flap was still in place. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Charles Bonnet Syndrome (CBS) following a Hughes procedure in a patient with normal visual acuity in the non-occluded fellow eye. Unlike other reported cases of acute onset CBS following transient monocular occlusion, hallucinations in the occluded eye remitted prior to restoration of vision in the occluded eye. Ophthalmologists should be aware of the potential for CBS following even transient monocular occlusion and should consider warning patients about its potential to occur. PMID:27467709

  14. Evolutionary plant physiology: Charles Darwin's forgotten synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich; Niklas, Karl J

    2009-11-01

    Charles Darwin dedicated more than 20 years of his life to a variety of investigations on higher plants (angiosperms). It has been implicitly assumed that these studies in the fields of descriptive botany and experimental plant physiology were carried out to corroborate his principle of descent with modification. However, Darwin's son Francis, who was a professional plant biologist, pointed out that the interests of his father were both of a physiological and an evolutionary nature. In this article, we describe Darwin's work on the physiology of higher plants from a modern perspective, with reference to the following topics: circumnutations, tropisms and the endogenous oscillator model; the evolutionary patterns of auxin action; the root-brain hypothesis; phloem structure and photosynthesis research; endosymbioses and growth-promoting bacteria; photomorphogenesis and phenotypic plasticity; basal metabolic rate, the Pfeffer-Kleiber relationship and metabolic optimality theory with respect to adaptive evolution; and developmental constraints versus functional equivalence in relationship to directional natural selection. Based on a review of these various fields of inquiry, we deduce the existence of a Darwinian (evolutionary) approach to plant physiology and define this emerging scientific discipline as the experimental study and theoretical analysis of the functions of green, sessile organisms from a phylogenetic perspective.

  15. Charles bonnet syndrome: treating nonpsychiatric hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Diem; Osterweil, Dan; Hoffman, Janice

    2013-03-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is characterized by recurrent or persistent complex visual hallucinations that occur in visually impaired individuals with intact cognition and no evidence of psychiatric illness. Patients usually retain insight into the unreal nature of their hallucinations.3,4 CBS is often misdiagnosed, and predominantly affects elderly patients with vision changes (e.g., age-related macular degeneration, glaucoma, and cataract). While many require only the assurance of the benign nature of the hallucinations, nonpharmacological and pharmacological interventions have been reported to be useful in the treatment of CBS. This case involves an 83-year-old female, with a two-year history of CBS, who presented to the clinic with worsening visual hallucinations over the past few months. She was starting to lose insight into her hallucinations secondary to her new diagnosis of dementia. Several pharmacological agents were explored to determine the most appropriate choice for our patient. Ultimately, this patient was started on donepezil (reported to be successful in a CBS case report), which helped improve her cognitive function. At future follow-up visits, her hallucinations improved and her cognitive function stabilized. Pharmacists should be aware of CBS and its treatment options to properly assist physicians in the medication-selection process to alleviate distress experienced by patients with CBS. In patients who may benefit from pharmacological treatment, physicians should weigh the risks and benefits of the different treatment options. Donepezil can be a favorable option in CBS patients with Alzheimer's type dementia.

  16. Acute Charles Bonnet Syndrome following Hughes procedure.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michelle E; Pointdujour-Lim, Renelle; Lally, Sara; Shields, Carol L; Rabinowitz, Michael P

    2016-10-01

    A 69-year-old male experienced monocular formed visual hallucinations after occlusion of the right eye following resection of eyelid basal cell carcinoma and reconstruction with a Hughes procedure (tarsoconjunctival flap). His symptoms included recurrent, well-defined, organized, complex, formed images of small children playing in the snow. These visual phenomena occurred only in the occluded eye, began several hours after surgery, and recurred intermittently several times daily for 4 days, lasting several minutes with each occurrence. The patient retained insight into the false nature of the images throughout the duration of his symptoms, and the hallucinations resolved spontaneously while the flap was still in place. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of Charles Bonnet Syndrome (CBS) following a Hughes procedure in a patient with normal visual acuity in the non-occluded fellow eye. Unlike other reported cases of acute onset CBS following transient monocular occlusion, hallucinations in the occluded eye remitted prior to restoration of vision in the occluded eye. Ophthalmologists should be aware of the potential for CBS following even transient monocular occlusion and should consider warning patients about its potential to occur.

  17. Charles Bachman Moore (1920-2010)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winn, William; Krehbiel, Paul

    2011-02-01

    Charles B. Moore passed away 2 March 2010 at the age of 89, following a long and varied scientific career in meteorology and the atmospheric sciences. He will be remembered best for his substantial contributions in the field of atmospheric electricity and for the students and faculty he guided as chairman of Langmuir Laboratory for Atmospheric Research and professor of physics at the New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. He possessed a unique sense of humor and an excellent memory that served as a reservoir of scientific and historical knowledge. Like many of his generation, Charlie's career was profoundly influenced by the Second World War. Following Pearl Harbor, he interrupted his undergraduate studies in chemical engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology to enlist in the Army Air Corps, where he became the chief weather equipment officer in the 10th Weather Squadron, setting up and operating remote meteorological stations behind enemy lines in the China-Burma-India theater. He served with distinction alongside Athelstan Spilhaus Sr., who had been one of Charlie's instructors in the Army meteorology program.

  18. Creative work. The case of Charles Darwin.

    PubMed

    Gruber, H E; Wallace, D B

    2001-04-01

    The evolving systems approach (ESA) addresses the need for direct study of the creative process in recognized creators at work, in contrast to indirect methods, such as those used in psychometric studies. The ESA emerged from H. E. Gruber's prolonged study of Charles Darwin's manuscripts, especially the notebooks he kept after the Beagle voyage. Gruber's interviews with J. Piaget about the latter's creative processes, as well as many doctoral dissertations, also helped shape the authors' approach. Using Gruber's (1974/1981) study of Darwin, the authors describe some facets of creative work identified in the course of their work. Among these are networks of enterprise, ensembles of metaphors, insights, and evolving belief systems. Although the ESA emphasizes cognitive processes, social, affective, and esthetic aspects of the case are not neglected. Each creative case is unique, otherwise the individual would not meet the criterion of originality. Uniqueness does not mean isolation; people who differ must and do work together. The integration of all these facets into a plausible system for each creator remains the authors' central task.

  19. [Charles Bonnet syndrome. A 45-case series].

    PubMed

    Santos-Bueso, Enrique; Serrador-García, Mercedes; Porta-Etessam, Jesús; Rodríguez-Gómez, Octavio; Martínez-de-la-Casa, José M; García-Feijoo, Julián; García-Sánchez, Julián

    2015-04-16

    Introduccion. El sindrome de Charles Bonnet (SCB) es un cuadro clinico que se caracteriza por la presencia de alucinaciones visuales, principalmente complejas, en pacientes con estado cognitivo conservado e importante deterioro de la vision. El incremento del SCB se debe al aumento de la esperanza de vida y al desarrollo de patologias asociadas al envejecimiento, como la degeneracion macular asociada a la edad. Pacientes y metodos. Se estudian las caracteristicas de una serie de 45 pacientes diagnosticados de SCB en la unidad de neurooftalmologia del Hospital Clinico San Carlos. Los pacientes procedian de las unidades de patologia macular, glaucoma, superficie ocular y urgencias, en las que fueron diagnosticados de SCB, que se confirmo en la unidad multidisciplinar formada por oftalmologia, neurologia y psiquiatria del mismo hospital. Resultados. El 66,66% eran mujeres, de mas de 80 anos (68,88%), principalmente con degeneracion macular asociada a la edad (37,77%). Las alucinaciones que los pacientes presentaban con mas frecuencia eran personas y caras (35,55%), en color (66,66%), en movimiento (80%), con un tiempo de evolucion de 6-12 meses (26,66%), frecuencia de tres episodios al dia (35,55%) y de 3-5 minutos de duracion (35,55%). Conclusiones. El SCB es un complejo sindrome cuya incidencia se esta incrementando en nuestras consultas y que precisa un abordaje multidisciplinar entre oftalmologos, neurologos y psiquiatras para evitar diagnosticos erroneos y proporcionar un tratamiento adecuado. Son necesarios nuevos estudios para un conocimiento mas profundo y adecuado del SCB.

  20. Like grandfather, like grandson: Erasmus and Charles Darwin on evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, C U M

    2010-01-01

    Last year (2009) marked the bicentenary of Charles Darwin's birth and the sesquicentenary of The Origin of Species. This article examines the influence of Erasmus Darwin on Charles's evolutionary thought and shows how, in many ways, Erasmus anticipated his much better-known grandson. It discusses the similarity in the mindsets of the two Darwins, asks how far the younger Darwin was exposed to the elder's evolutionary thought, examines the similarities and differences in their theories of evolution, and ends by showing the surprising similarity between their theories of inheritance. Erasmus's influence on Charles is greater than customarily acknowledged, and now is an opportune time to bring the grandfather out from behind the glare of his stellar grandson. PMID:20495257

  1. The legacy of Charles R. Drew, MD, CM, MDSc.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Bryan A; O'Connor, Wendi G; Willis, Monte S

    2011-01-01

    April 2011 marked the 70th anniversary of the establishment of the American Red Cross Blood Services (ARCBS). In this report, we present a biography of Dr. Charles Drew, the first medical director of the ARCBS. Although many may recognize Dr. Charles Drew for this position, the research and training that led him to be uniquely qualified to take this position may not be as well known. We present his professional training, his research on blood preservation and distribution, and his service to the larger medical community and country. Lastly, we address the many myths that have arisen over the years since his untimely death at the age of 45 on April 1, 1950, and present the legacy of Dr. Charles Drew that has largely been unknown to the greater medical and scientific community.

  2. Like grandfather, like grandson: Erasmus and Charles Darwin on evolution.

    PubMed

    Smith, C U M

    2010-01-01

    Last year (2009) marked the bicentenary of Charles Darwin's birth and the sesquicentenary of The Origin of Species. This article examines the influence of Erasmus Darwin on Charles's evolutionary thought and shows how, in many ways, Erasmus anticipated his much better-known grandson. It discusses the similarity in the mindsets of the two Darwins, asks how far the younger Darwin was exposed to the elder's evolutionary thought, examines the similarities and differences in their theories of evolution, and ends by showing the surprising similarity between their theories of inheritance. Erasmus's influence on Charles is greater than customarily acknowledged, and now is an opportune time to bring the grandfather out from behind the glare of his stellar grandson.

  3. Charles L. Brewer award for distinguished teaching of psychology.

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2012 recipient of the Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology is Richard L. Miller. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 120th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 3, 2012, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2012 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; Charles L. Brewer, vice president/secretary; Gerald Koocher, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; Brian N. Baird; David H. Barlow; Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Connie Chan; William Howell; Anthony Jackson; Ronald F. Levant; Aurelio Prifitera; Sandra Shullman; Archie L. Turner; and Kurt Geisinger, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  4. [Visual hallucinations and giant cell arteritis: the Charles Bonnet syndrome].

    PubMed

    Bloch, J; Morell-Dubois, S; Koch, E; Launay, D; Maillard-Lefebvre, H; Buchdahl, A-L; Hachulla, E; Rouland, J-F; Hatron, P-Y; Lambert, M

    2011-12-01

    In patients with visual hallucinations, diagnostic strategy is unclearly codified. In patients known to have giant cell arteritis, the main diagnostic assumption is disease relapse. Indeed, this should lead to rapid corticosteroid therapy. However, the Charles Bonnet syndrome, that is a poorly known etiology of visual hallucinations usually observed in elderly people, should be part of the differential diagnosis. We report a 87-year-old woman, with a 2-year history of giant cell arteritis who was admitted with an acute onset of visual hallucinations and who met all the criteria for Charles Bonnet syndrome.

  5. 15. Historic American Buildings Survey Charles Snow, Photographer ca.1962 EXTERIOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Historic American Buildings Survey Charles Snow, Photographer ca.1962 EXTERIOR VIEW OF JOPLIN HOTEL CIRCA 1962 From the Collection of the Joplin Globe, Photocopy by Charles Snow - The Connor Hotel, 324 Main Street, Joplin, Jasper County, MO

  6. 16. Historic American Buildings Survey Charles Snow, Photographer ca.1962 VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Historic American Buildings Survey Charles Snow, Photographer ca.1962 VIEW OF LOBBY CIRCA 1962 From the Collection of the Joplin Globe, Photocopy by Charles Snow - The Connor Hotel, 324 Main Street, Joplin, Jasper County, MO

  7. 77 FR 30028 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Registration; Cambrex Charles City, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... Charles City, Inc. to ensure that the company's registration is consistent with the public interest. The... FR 62449, Cambrex Charles City, Inc., 1205 11th Street, Charles City, Iowa 50616, made application by...) II Remifentanil (9739) II The company plans to manufacture the listed controlled...

  8. VIEW OF 2328 PIEDMONT AVENUE, CHARLES MILLS GAYLEY HOUSE DESIGNED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF 2328 PIEDMONT AVENUE, CHARLES MILLS GAYLEY HOUSE DESIGNED BY JULIA MORGAN, 1905. SEEN FROM SIDEWALK LOOKING NW TOWARDS DURANT AVENUE. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 9, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  9. Could Charles Darwin Teach Psychology in the 1980s?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rigby, Marilyn K.

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the implications of Charles Darwin's personal and professional history for an academic career in psychology. Relationships between his theoretical position and the content of an introductory psychology course he might teach and how he might fare in a contemporary academic environment are sketched in this fictionalized account.…

  10. Charles Darwin: His Life, Journeys and Discoveries. A Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Overy, Caroline

    This handbook aims to: (1) introduce teachers and pupils to Charles Darwin, his life and work at Down House, his voyage on the Beagle, and his evolutionary theory; (2) set his ideas within the wider context of the 19th century; (3) link the subject areas to the British National Curriculum, particularly in history, science, and English at various…

  11. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2009 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is William Buskist. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Teaching Award at the 117th…

  12. The Self According to Allan Bloom and Charles Reich.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aspy, David N.; Aspy, Cheryl B.

    1998-01-01

    Discusses the works of Charles Reich and Allan Bloom that have helped to shape current social and political debate concerning self theory. Both Reich and Bloom were concerned with the relationship between self and environment. Argues that it is important to insure that its cultural role of self theory is clearly interpreted and applied. (MKA)

  13. The Performance Career of Charles Dickens: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentile, John Samuel

    Offered in response to the broad appeal of Charles Dickens's performance career to various disciplines, this annotated bibliography lists 40 resources concerned with Dickens's success as a performer interpreting his literary works. The resources are categorized under books, theses and dissertations, articles in scholarly journals, nineteenth…

  14. An Analysis and Implementation of Charles Dickens' Sole Curricular Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanna, Robert C.

    This paper examines the curriculum Charles Dickens wrote for his children, an "easy account" of selections from the New Testament. Dickens designed the curriculum to make this material accessible and meaningful to his children prior to schooling under the direction of other teachers, tutors, or governesses, and earlier than the language of the…

  15. 78 FR 35756 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Charles River, Boston, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Charles River, Boston, MA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary deviation from regulations. SUMMARY: The Commander,...

  16. 78 FR 37455 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Charles River, Boston, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-21

    ... regulation was published in the Federal Register (78 FR 35756) under the same name and docket number. This... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Charles River, Boston, MA...

  17. Room used at one point by Charles Edison, the inventor's ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Room used at one point by Charles Edison, the inventor's son, as his office while president of the Edison companies in the 1930s. The large metal tanks to the right are part of a modern halon gas fire suppression system for the building. - Thomas A. Edison Laboratories, Building No. 5, Main Street & Lakeside Avenue, West Orange, Essex County, NJ

  18. "Good Indian": Charles Eastman and the Warrior as Civil Servant

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopenzina, Drew

    2003-01-01

    Charles Alexander Eastman remains an enigmatic figure in the early days of American Indian activism--a man whose contributions, while unimpeachable in terms of devotion and good will, are often complicated by the lingering shadow of assimilationist values evident in his writings and his career as one of the so-called "red progressives." Eastman…

  19. A Wireless World: Charles County Public Schools Makes Wireless Universal

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Richard

    2007-01-01

    Wireless connectivity in schools is all the rage, and many school systems have at least gotten their feet wet with a wireless lab or a few portable laptop carts. But Bijaya Devkota, the chief information officer of Charles County Public Schools, has done what many school systems only dream of--implemented universal wireless access throughout his…

  20. 13. Historic American Buildings Survey, Charles S. Stewart, 1868, National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Historic American Buildings Survey, Charles S. Stewart, 1868, National Archives, Cartographic Archives Division, RG 77, Drawer 47, Sheet 28, See Catalog of Graphic Material #92, PHOTOCOPY OF 'NO. 1 PLAN OF FORT MIFFLIN', LEFT HALF. - Fort Mifflin, Mud Island, Marine & Penrose Ferry Roads, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. 12. Historic American Buildings Survey, Charles S. Stewart, 1868, National ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Historic American Buildings Survey, Charles S. Stewart, 1868, National Archives, Cartographic Archives Division, RG 77, Drawer 47, Sheet 28, See Catalog of Graphic Material #92, PHOTOCOPY OF 'NO. 1 PLAN OF FORT MIFFLIN', RIGHT HALF. - Fort Mifflin, Mud Island, Marine & Penrose Ferry Roads, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  2. Visions and Re-Visions of Charles Joseph Minard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friendly, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Describes the contributions of Charles Joseph Minard to statistical graphics, noting the time course of his work and providing background on his famous effort, the flow-map depiction of Napoleon's march on Moscow. Explores some modern re-visions of this famous graphic from an information visualization perspective. (SLD)

  3. [Medical services at Paris-Charles-de-Gaulle airport].

    PubMed

    Bargain, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Charles-de-Gaulle airport in Roissy, a 3 400 hectare citadel, contains a multitude of airlines, service companies, businesses, retailers and public services, including firefighters, police officers, customs officers, ministers and medical teams. This article presents its missions, notably with regard to health services.

  4. INTERIOR OF BARN HAYLOFT, LOOKING WEST (Charles Arnold added a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF BARN HAYLOFT, LOOKING WEST (Charles Arnold added a Cleaning Mill to the barn's hayloft c. 1960. This photograph shows the elevator, chaff shoot, and metal funnel that still remain. The barn's gambrel roof is supported by a three-hinged arch truss system) - Arnold Farm, Barn, 1948 Arnold Road, Coupeville, Island County, WA

  5. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Charles E. Peterson, Photographer c. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Charles E. Peterson, Photographer c. 1936 Brick Parapet, Earth Traverse, and Columbiad Mounted in Water Battery East of Sally-Port - Fort McHenry National Monument & Historic Shrine, East Fort Avenue at Whetstone Point, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  6. A Response to Charles Sides's "Psychological Types and Teaching Writing."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beebe, John

    1990-01-01

    Supports the typological approach to education lauded by Charles Sides (in an article in the same issue of this journal) but cautions educators to beware of imposing on others their own type biases. Calls for a commitment to take seriously the unconscious side of the "psychological type" problem. (NH)

  7. Education and Utopia: Robert Owen and Charles Fourier

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leopold, David

    2011-01-01

    The aims of education, and the appropriate means of realising them, are a recurring preoccupation of utopian authors. The utopian socialists Robert Owen (1771-1858) and Charles Fourier (1772-1837) both place human nature at the core of their educational views, and both see education as central to their wider objective of social and political…

  8. Charles Bonnet Syndrome: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Farrell, Lauren; Lewis, Sandra; McKenzie, Amy; Jones, Lynda

    2010-01-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) commonly occurs in older adults with visual impairments, particularly those with age-related macular degeneration. It is characterized by complex visual hallucinations in individuals without mental disorders. The authors explore diagnostic criteria, demographic characteristics, clinical features, theories of…

  9. Charles Bonnet Syndrome: An Often-Misunderstood Clinical Condition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springer, Joseph M.

    2000-01-01

    This article discusses Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS), a disability in which the individual has visual hallucinations that are complex, persistent, or repetitive, retains full or partial insight into the unreality of the hallucinations, does not have hallucinations in other modalities, and does not have delusional ideation. (Contains 12…

  10. A Life in Language Testing: An Interview with Charles Stansfield

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Daniel J.; Bowles, Melissa

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Charles W. Stansfield is widely recognized as one of the most important figures in contemporary language testing. He is respected and relied upon by leading language professionals in education, government agencies, academia, and the private sector. During his 40 years of working with languages, he has been a secondary school teacher of…

  11. Scientific Cousins: The Relationship between Charles Darwin and Francis Galton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fancher, Raymond E.

    2009-01-01

    This article traces the personal as well as the intellectual and scientific relationship between Charles Darwin and his younger half-cousin Francis Galton. Although they had been on friendly terms as young men, and Darwin had in some ways been a role model for Galton, the two did not share major scientific interests until after the publication of…

  12. The Rice University Press Initiative: An Interview with Charles Henry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trevitte, Chad; Henry, Charles

    2007-01-01

    In this interview Charles Henry, publisher of the Rice University Press (RUP), discusses RUP's rebirth as a fully digital university press. Henry addresses the circumstances that led to this decision, and he further outlines the RUP business model whereby the press will publish its own titles--both digitally and in print-on-demand--while…

  13. MANAGEMENT OF CHARLES BONNET SYNDROME IN THE ELDERLY

    PubMed Central

    Unni, K.E. Sandanandan; Venugopal, M.; Gupta, Suparna; Rani, Sudha R.; Patro, D.K.

    1996-01-01

    The case of an 82 year old lady who suffered from vivid episodic complex visual pseudohallucination is presented. The alleviation of symptoms with carbamazepine monotherapy is highlighted. Correction of visual defect as another aspect of the management of Charles Bonnet syndrome in elderly patients is recommended. PMID:21584145

  14. 75 FR 33999 - Safety Zone; Fourth of July Fireworks Event, Cape Charles City Harbor, Cape Charles, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Coast Guard is establishing a 420-foot radius safety zone on the navigable waters of Cape Charles City..., vessel traffic will be temporarily restricted within 420 feet of the fireworks launch site. Discussion of... Harbor within the area bounded by a 420-foot radius circle centered on position 37 15'59'' N/ 076...

  15. 2nd Charles Richet et Jules Héricourt Workshop

    PubMed Central

    Daguet, Arnaud

    2011-01-01

    The Charles Richet and Jules Héricourt workshops honor the memory of Jules Héricourt (1850–1938) and Charles Richet (1850–1935) who described the principle of serotherapy in 1888 and made the very first attempts to fight cancer with serotherapy in 1895. In 1902, Charles Richet and Paul Portier described “anaphylaxis,” a discovery awarded the Nobel Prize in 1913. The first workshop, “Towards the clinical use of monoclonal antibodies with higher cytolytic efficacy in cancer” was held in Tours, France on November 20–21, 2008. The second Charles Richet and Jules Héricourt workshop, held May 31–June 1, 2011 at the University of Tours, France, was also organized by the Cancéropôle Grand Ouest. The topic of the workshop was therapeutic antibodies and anaphylaxis, a subject rarely addressed in congresses focused on mAbs. To have discussions about mAb side effects with complete objectivity, the congress was organized independently of any sponsorship from pharmaceutical companies. This academic event was motivated by the high incidence of shocks to cetuximab and the need to compile and evaluate scattered information. This growing public health concern was thus analyzed from different scientific and medical angles. The first session was devoted to acute infusion reactions, with an emphasis on deconvolution of the terms “cytokine-release syndrome,” “cytokine storms,” “anaphylaxis” and their epidemiology. This session concluded with the Charles Richet lecture on cetuximab anaphylaxis and anti-αGal IgE by Thomas Platts-Mills, its discoverer. In the next session, the involvement of anti-glycan antibodies in both anaphylaxis and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to therapeutic antibodies was discussed. A gala dinner was held in the gardens of the beautiful château of Villandry, which was acquired and restored by Joachim Carvalho, a pupil of Charles Richet's and great-grandfather of the present owner. The final session focused on strategies to

  16. Charles L. Brewer award for distinguished teaching of psychology.

    PubMed

    2009-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2009 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is William Buskist. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Teaching Award at the 117th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 7, 2009, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2009 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; William Howell, vice president/secretary; Archie L. Turner, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; David H. Barlow; Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Charles L. Brewer; Anthony Jackson; Steven E. James; Ronald F. Levant; Gerald Koocher; Sandra Shullman; and Rosie Phillips Bingham, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  17. Occipital lobe epilepsy presenting as Charles Bonnet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Brown-Vargas, Damaris; Cienki, John J

    2012-11-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome describes visual field or acuity loss with complex hallucinations. This typically occurs in the elderly with preexisting visual impairment. We describe a patient who presented to the emergency department with acute hemianopsia and intermittent complex hallucinations. A 57-year-old man was referred for visual field loss and hallucinations. Chief complaint was “seeing little heads of people” and a right-sided visual loss. The patient was alert, oriented, and able to repeat and name and had fluent speech. On cranial nerve examination, he had 20/20 visual acuity and right homonymous hemianopsia. The patient had normal laboratory examination and electrocardiogram results. Results of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the head with contrast were negative. Standard 30-minute electroencephalography revealed near-continuous epileptiform discharges in the left occipital lobe. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of new-onset seizure presenting as Charles Bonnet syndrome.

  18. [Charles Bonnet syndrome: case reports and short review].

    PubMed

    Lagoudis, A; Bozikas, V

    2011-01-01

    Charles Bonnet first described visual hallucinations in a ground of visual deprivation in the 18th century. In this paper, two case reports with the syndrome are presented (female 83 years old, male 68 years old) along with a short literature review. The distinction of the syndrome from other psychiatric disorders (delirium, dementia), where visual hallucinations are also present, demands the presence of the diagnostical triad: visual hallucinations, visual impairment, intact cognitive status. The hallucinations are rich in colors and tension, people usually have the "leading roles" and patients mostly are curious, enjoy the hallucinations and are not afraid of them. More often hallucinations appear after acute visual impairment and in older patients. There are several theories concerning the mechanisms that lead to the syndrome. The Charles Bonnet syndrome appears to be self-restricted and there are no clear guidelines regarding its treatment.

  19. Astronaut Charles Conrad trims hair of Astronaut Paul Weitz

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Skylab 2 commander, trims the hair of Astronaut Paul J. Weitz, Skylab 2 pilot, during the 28-day Skylab 2 mission in Earth orbit. They are in the crew quarters wardroom of the Orbital Workshop of the Skylab 1 and 2 space station. Weitz is holding a vacuum hose in his right hand. This picture was taken by Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, Skylab 2 science pilot.

  20. Charles Darwin and the 1835 earthquake at Concepcion, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spall, H.

    1981-01-01

    On a stormy night in October 1836, H.M.S Beagle hove to and dropped anchor at Falmouth, a remote harbor in southwest England. Charles Darwin, the ship's naturalist, came ashore to take the mail coach to Shrewsbury. This was inauspicious end to an epic 5-year voyage around the coast of South America, the results of which were to have a tumultuous impact on scientific thought that has lasted to this day. 

  1. Charles Dickens: the man, medicine, and movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Schoffer, Kerrie L; O'Sullivan, John D

    2006-11-01

    Nineteenth-century Victorian novelists played an important role in developing our understanding of medicine and illness. With the eye of an expert clinician, Charles Dickens provided several detailed accounts of movement disorders in his literary works, many of which predated medical descriptions. His gift for eloquence, imagery, and precision attest not only to the importance of careful clinical observation, but also provide an insightful and entertaining perspective on movement disorders for modern students of neuroscience. PMID:17015015

  2. Charles Dickens and the movement for sanitary reform.

    PubMed

    Litsios, Socrates

    2003-01-01

    Charles Dickens's adult life parallels the period when the movement for sanitary reform took root in England. Although he was not one of its leaders, he became in time one of its most outspoken advocates. This essay describes Dickens's growing involvement in the sanitary movement and looks at one of the most important ways he supported it--articles published in his weekly journal Household Words PMID:12721520

  3. Astronaut Joseph Kerwin takes blood sample from Astronaut Charles Conrad

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Scientist-Astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin (right), Skylab 2 science pilot and a doctor of medicine, takes a blood sample from Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., Sylab 2 commander, as seen in this reproduction taken from a color television transmission made by a TV camera aboard the Skylab 1 and 2 space station cluster in Earth orbit. The blood sampling was part of the Skylab Hematology and Immunology Experiment M110 series.

  4. [Mental health in Pointe-St-Charles : towards collective responsibility.].

    PubMed

    Blanchet, L

    1978-01-01

    The Pointe St-Charles Community Clinic is a popular, user-run clinic, where psychiatric treatment is integrated into the services of the medical-social teams, and where, more globally, an attitude of a collective responsability for mental health is beginning to develop as a result of the active involvement, on the part of both clinic workers and users, in the social change process and the optimal use of the natural community ressource network.

  5. What psychology students know and believe about Charles Darwin.

    PubMed

    Knapp, T; Rasmussen, C; Wagner, M J

    1997-12-01

    204 introductory and 154 advanced students in psychology were asked about their knowledge of Charles Darwin and endorsement of belief statements about the status of evolutionary theory. Advanced students had higher scores than introductory students on three of six multiple-choice knowledge items and differed from them on all six statements of belief as assessed by chi 2. Advanced students appear to know more about evolutionary theory but may be less inclined to endorse its relevancy to psychology.

  6. Astronaut Charles Conrad checks out Human Vestibular Function experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the first manned Skylab mission, checks out the Human Vestibular Function, Experiment M131, during Skylab training at JSC. Conrad is in the work and experiments compartment of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC. The reference sphere with a magnetic rod is used by the astronaut to indicate body orientation non-visually. The litter chair in which he is seated can be rotated by a motor at its base or, when not being rotated, can tilt forward, backward or to either side.

  7. Insights into the life and work of Sir Charles Sherrington.

    PubMed

    Molnár, Zoltán; Brown, Richard E

    2010-06-01

    Much of the original historical data behind the greatest discoveries in neuroscience are now lost. However, a recently rediscovered box of histological slides belonging to Sir Charles Sherrington, a pioneer in spinal cord and motor control research, has survived at the University of Oxford since 1936. Sherrington coined the term 'synapse', developed the concept of inhibition in neuronal function, demonstrated the integration of sensory and motor actions of the nervous system, and examined the synaptic activity of single neurons and their integration into neuronal circuits. Here, we explore Sherrington's lifetime of discoveries, with reference to histological specimens from his box of slides.

  8. Charles Bonnet syndrome in a Borneo Iban tribesman.

    PubMed

    Sabri, R; Yasin, Y

    2009-01-01

    A 31-year-old man Charles Bonnet syndrome is a condition usually seen in the visually-impaired elderly, causing complex visual hallucinations in the absence of any delirium, dementia or psychiatric illness. We report an elderly man, with blindness in one eye and a cataract in the other, from the Iban tribe, which is indigenous to the island of Borneo. He presented with a three-week history of vivid hallucinations of burglars intruding on his living quarters in the longhouse where he lived. PMID:19224072

  9. Charles Richet: medical scientist, innovator, peace thinker and savant.

    PubMed

    Lewer, Nick

    2006-01-01

    This article looks at the life of Professor Charles Richet (1850-1935), a distinguished medical scientist who received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1913 for his work on anaphylaxis. He was also an aeroplane engineer, an investigator of psychic phenomena, active in the medical and international peace movement as a member of the leading peace organisations of the time including the International Medical Association for the Suppression of War, and the French Peace League. He also promoted controversial views about eugenics and the means of constructing what he considered to be a strong and healthy society.

  10. Charles E. Rosenberg and the multifaceted promise of medical history.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Rosemary A

    2008-10-01

    Charles E. Rosenberg has had a major influence in defining the history of medicine as a field. However, critics who focus on his leadership or "school" in terms of defined scholarly perspectives, including those of social history and the framing of disease, offer inadequate descriptions of the messages, breadth, and scope of his scholarly work as a whole. Shoehorning the history of medicine into prescribed patterns in order to build a more unitary discipline would weaken rather than strengthen the field and is not in the Rosenberg tradition. PMID:18403428

  11. Visual hallucinations (Charles Bonnet syndrome) associated with neurosarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jason; Waisbren, Emily; Hashemi, Nafiseh; Lee, Andrew G

    2013-01-01

    The Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) refers to lucid and complex visual hallucinations in cognitively normal patients with acquired vision loss. It can be associated with any type of vision loss including that related to macular degeneration, corneal disease, diabetic retinopathy, and occipital infarct. Neurosarcoidosis, a multi-systemic inflammatory granulomatous disease affecting both the central and peripheral nervous systems, is rarely associated with CBS. We report a patient with biopsy-confirmed neurosarcoidosis who experienced visual hallucinations following the development of a right seventh-nerve palsy, right facial paresthesia, and bilateral progressive visual loss. This case highlights the importance of recognizing that the CBS can occur in visual loss of any etiology.

  12. Commentary on visual hallucinations and Charles Bonnet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Benaur, Marina; Kahn, David

    2011-03-01

    The authors comment on two case reports of visual hallucinations due to non-psychiatric disorders: retinal detachment in a patient with schizophrenia, and Charles Bonnet syndrome. The physiology of visual misperception is reviewed, based on abnormalities along various points from the eye to the optic tracts to the occipital cortex. The approach to patients with visual hallucinations should include not only an evaluation for psychiatric disorders, but also an appreciation of possible non-psychiatric causes that may have major ramifications for care and potentially for preservation of sight.

  13. Charles Bonnet syndrome in a Borneo Iban tribesman.

    PubMed

    Sabri, R; Yasin, Y

    2009-01-01

    A 31-year-old man Charles Bonnet syndrome is a condition usually seen in the visually-impaired elderly, causing complex visual hallucinations in the absence of any delirium, dementia or psychiatric illness. We report an elderly man, with blindness in one eye and a cataract in the other, from the Iban tribe, which is indigenous to the island of Borneo. He presented with a three-week history of vivid hallucinations of burglars intruding on his living quarters in the longhouse where he lived.

  14. Manfred Girbardt and Charles Bracker: outstanding pioneers in fungal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Bartnicki-Garcia, Salomon

    2015-01-01

    Midway through the twentieth century, the availability of new and improved optical and electronic microscopes facilitated rapid advances in the elucidation of the fine structure of fungal cells. In this Essay, I pay tribute to Manfred Girbardt (1919-1991) and Charles Bracker (1938-2012)—two individuals who, despite being separated by geography and the restrictions of the Cold War, both made equally fundamental discoveries in fungal cell ultrastructure and set high standards for specimen manipulation and image processing. PMID:25383602

  15. A strange horn between Paolo Mantegazza and Charles Darwin.

    PubMed

    Garbarino, Carla; Mazzarello, Paolo

    2013-09-01

    During the preparation of an exhibition in Pavia dedicated to the centennial anniversary of the death of the Italian Pathologist Paolo Mantegazza, a strange cheratinic horn was found at the Museum for the History of the University of Pavia labelled as 'spur of a cock transplanted into an ear of a cow.' After some historical investigation, we found this strange object was at the centre of a scientific correspondence between Mantegazza and Charles Darwin, who made reference to it in his book The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication.

  16. Advertising eugenics: Charles M. Goethe's campaign to improve the race.

    PubMed

    Schoenl, William; Peck, Danielle

    2010-06-01

    Over the last several decades historians have shown that the eugenics movement appealed to an extraordinarily wide constituency. Far from being the brainchild of the members of any one particular political ideology, eugenics made sense to a diverse range of Americans and was promoted by professionals ranging from geneticists and physicians to politicians and economists.(1) Seduced by promises of permanent fixes to national problems, and attracted to the idea of a scientifically legitimate form of social activism, eugenics quickly grew in popularity during the first decades of the twentieth century. Charles M. Goethe, the land developer, entrepreneur, conservationist and skilled advertiser who founded the Eugenics Society of Northern California, exemplifies the broad appeal of the eugenics movement. Goethe played an active role within the American eugenics movement at its peak in the 1920s. The last president of the Eugenics Research Association,(2) he also campaigned hard against Mexican immigration to the US and he continued open support for the Nazi regime's eugenic practices into the later 1930s.(3) This article examines Goethe's eugenic vision and, drawing on his correspondence with the leading geneticist Charles Davenport, explores the relationship between academic and non-academic advocates of eugenics in America.

  17. Phytoremedial effect of Withania somnifera against arsenic-induced testicular toxicity in Charles Foster rats

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Arun; Kumar, Ranjit; Rahman, Mohammad Samuir; Iqubal, Mohammad Asif; Anand, Gautam; Niraj, Pintoo Kumar; Ali, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of the current study was to observe the ameliorative effect of Withania somnifera on arsenic-induced testicular toxicity by exploring the crucial parameters such as sperm counts, sperm motility, hormonal assay and lipid peroxidation including histopathology. Materials and Methods: In the present study, arsenic in the form of sodium arsenite was administered orally to male Charles Foster rats for 45 days. Thereafter, ethanolic root extract of Withania somnifera was administered for 30 days to observe its ameliorative effect on male reproductive system. Results: The study revealed that after administration of sodium arsenite, there was a decrease in the sperm counts and sperm motility accompanied by an increased incidence of sperm abnormalities and hormonal imbalance leading to infertility. However, after administration of Withania somnifera, there was significant reversal in the parameters denoting that it not only possesses antioxidant and rejuvenating property but also maintains the cellular integrity of testicular cells leading to normal functioning of it. Conclusion: The study concludes that Withania somnifera possesses phytoremedial effect. It is one of the best antidotes against arsenic-induced reproductive toxicity. PMID:26445714

  18. Environmental Education in the Galapagos: 2007 Report to the Charles Darwin Foundation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stepath, Carl M.

    2007-01-01

    Background: "Environmental education in the Galapagos: 2007 report to the Charles Darwin Foundation" is a report to the Charles Darwin Foundation (CDF) about the researchers observations about the status of environmental education in the Galapagos in 2006 and 2007. Purpose: This paper reports on environmental education in the Galapagos islands,…

  19. An Analysis of Environmental Issues in 19th Century England Using the Writings of Charles Dickens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Ann Haley

    2008-01-01

    Charles Dickens lived during the best and worst of times in 19th century England. His writings were greatly influenced by the ongoing industrial revolution. He described abhorrent environmental conditions, inadequate sanitary practices, child abuse, and other social maladies of the times. By bringing Charles Dickens into the biology classroom,…

  20. Soils maps supplement to soil moisture ground truth, Lafayette, Indiana, site St. Charles, Missouri, site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, E. B.; Olt, S. E.

    1975-01-01

    A compilation of soils information obtained as the result of a library search of data on the Lafayette, Indiana, site and St. Charles, Missouri, site is presented. Soils data for the Lafayette, Indiana, site are shown in Plates 1 and 2; and soils data for the St. Charles, Missouri, site are shown in Plates 3 and 4.

  1. Charles Davies Sherborn and the “Indexer’s Club”

    PubMed Central

    Evenhuis, Neal L.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The first few words of the title of this symposium are “Anchoring Biodiversity Information”. In order to properly anchor anything for a long-lasting future, a solid foundation needs to have been laid. For the zoological portion of biodiversity information, that firm foundation is best exemplified in the works of Charles Davies Sherborn. This man, like others of his ilk, was intimately focused on indexing names. This incredible focus was a life-long passion for him and culminated in his 9500-page Index Animalium of over 400,000 names of animals. This Index represents not only one of the most prodigious efforts in publication by a single man and the single most important reference to names in zoology, but a permanent legacy to the efforts of an indexer that proved to be an inspiration to many. PMID:26877650

  2. Scientific cousins: the relationship between Charles Darwin and Francis Galton.

    PubMed

    Fancher, Raymond E

    2009-01-01

    This article traces the personal as well as the intellectual and scientific relationship between Charles Darwin and his younger half-cousin Francis Galton. Although they had been on friendly terms as young men, and Darwin had in some ways been a role model for Galton, the two did not share major scientific interests until after the publication of Darwin's On the Origin of Species in 1859. That work precipitated a religious and philosophical crisis in Galton, which he gradually resolved after conceiving and developing the basic ideas of "hereditary genius" and eugenics. More mathematically inclined than Darwin, he subsequently contributed to the Darwinian evolutionary discussion, and to the future science of psychology, by proposing the basic concept of the nature-nurture dichotomy, the conceptual and statistical foundations for behavior genetics, and the idea for intelligence testing. PMID:19203140

  3. [Charles Robert Darwin: the great founder of scientific evolutionism].

    PubMed

    Liang, Qian-Jin; Bin, Jie; Zhang, Gen-Fa

    2009-12-01

    Today, we celebrated 200 years since Charles Darwin, one of the world's most creative and influential thinkers, was born. And there happens to be the 150th anniversary of the publication of his famous book, On the Origin of Species. It is verified that On the Origin of Species is an immortal classic book and is still guiding the study of anagenesis in life science as the development of natural science from then on, and even though most of the ideas in the book are well-known at the present age. In the article, we recall the brilliance and predomination life of Darwin, a great sage with rich scientific achievements, review briefly the novel discoveries and theories after him in the field, and then elucidate the focal points and perspectiveas in near future study of evolution. PMID:20042383

  4. Gustave Flaubert, Charles Dickens, and Isaac Pulvermacher's "magic band".

    PubMed

    Waits, Robert K

    2013-01-01

    Around 1850, Isaac L. Pulvermacher (1815-1884) joined the ranks of so-called "galvanists" who had, for nearly a century, been touting the shocks and sparks of electricity as a miracle cure for all ills, including neurological complaints such as palsy and hemiplegia. The famed authors, Gustave Flaubert (1821-1880), in France, and Charles Dickens (1812-1870), in England, although contemporaries, apparently never met or corresponded. But during their lives, they both became aware of Pulvermacher and his patented Hydro-Electric Chains, claimed to impart vigor and cure nearly every complaint. Pulvermacher's chains made a cameo appearance in Madame Bovary (1857), Flaubert's controversial (and most successful) novel. Among Dickens's last letters (1870) was an order for I. L. Pulvermacher and Company's "magic band." Since the Victorian age, electrical and magnetic cures, for better or worse, continue to be products of both the medical profession and quackery. PMID:24290267

  5. ["Wetlands". Charles Bukowski and Charlotte Roche on hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Bahmer, F A; Bahmer, J A

    2010-08-01

    More than 40 years ago Charles Bukowski described his experiences with coloscopy and the ensuing surgery on his hemorrhoids, both performed by a doctor pictured as sadistic. Bukowski not only depicts these procedures but also characterizes his compassionate inpatients as well as the nursing staff. In her bestseller published in 2008 Charlotte Roche's protagonist Helen needs surgical inpatient treatment because of hemorrhoidal bleeding. Her stay in the hospital, prolonged by a postoperative self-inflicted bleeding, provides the basis not only for strategies to bring her divorced parents together but also for thoughts on genitalia, manifold sexual practices, as well as on rules of hygiene. From a psychodynamic viewpoint the protagonists in both stories suffer from a depressive basic conflict, compensated in Bukowski's work by a dependent, self-destructive, philobatic form of coping and in Roche's alter ego Helen by an impulsive, sexualized behaviour.

  6. The teacher taught? What Charles Darwin owed to John Lubbock

    PubMed Central

    Pearn, Alison

    2014-01-01

    The period around the publication of John Lubbock's Origin of civilisation in 1870 and Charles Darwin's Descent of man and selection in relation to sex the following year is key to a re-evaluation of the relationship between the two men, usually characterized as that of pupil and master. It is in the making of Descent that Lubbock's role as a scientific collaborator is most easily discerned, a role best understood within the social and political context of the time. Lubbock made Darwin—both the man and his science—acceptable and respectable. Less obvious is Darwin's conscious cultivation of Lubbock's patronage in both his private and public life, and Lubbock's equally conscious bestowal, culminating in his role in Darwin's burial in Westminster Abbey.

  7. Charles Drew and the origins of deep hypothermic circulatory arrest.

    PubMed

    Dobell, A R; Bailey, J S

    1997-04-01

    Convinced that the high risk of operation using the early heart-lung machines was due to a toxic effect of the oxygenators in use in the 1950s, Charles Drew of Westminster Hospital in London devised a circulatory support system in which the patient's own lungs functioned as the oxygenator. With this support, body temperature was reduced to the point where circulatory arrest could be tolerated for the time required to carry out the intracardiac operation. He used only this technique for the rest of his surgical career, a period of 22 years. We have attempted to record how this came to pass and to describe the qualities of this man that led him to be original and creative.

  8. STS-78 Mission Specialist Charles E. Brady suits up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    STS-78 Mission Specialist Charles E. Brady Jr. is donning his launch/entry suit in the Operations and Checkout Building. A spaceflight rookie, Brady was selected by NASA to join the astronaut corps in March 1992; he is a medical doctor who also is a commander in the U.S. Navy. Along with six fellow crew members, he will depart the O&C in a short while and head for Launch Pad 39B, where the Space Shuttle Columbia awaits liftoff during a two-and-a-half hour launch window opening at 10:49 a.m. EDT, June 20. STS-78 will be an extended duration flight during which extensive research will be conducted in the Life and Microgravity Spacelab (LMS) located in the payload bay.

  9. ["Wetlands". Charles Bukowski and Charlotte Roche on hemorrhoids].

    PubMed

    Bahmer, F A; Bahmer, J A

    2010-08-01

    More than 40 years ago Charles Bukowski described his experiences with coloscopy and the ensuing surgery on his hemorrhoids, both performed by a doctor pictured as sadistic. Bukowski not only depicts these procedures but also characterizes his compassionate inpatients as well as the nursing staff. In her bestseller published in 2008 Charlotte Roche's protagonist Helen needs surgical inpatient treatment because of hemorrhoidal bleeding. Her stay in the hospital, prolonged by a postoperative self-inflicted bleeding, provides the basis not only for strategies to bring her divorced parents together but also for thoughts on genitalia, manifold sexual practices, as well as on rules of hygiene. From a psychodynamic viewpoint the protagonists in both stories suffer from a depressive basic conflict, compensated in Bukowski's work by a dependent, self-destructive, philobatic form of coping and in Roche's alter ego Helen by an impulsive, sexualized behaviour. PMID:20617296

  10. An Englishman abroad: Charles Blagden's visit to Paris in 1783.

    PubMed

    Fauque, Danielle M E

    2008-12-20

    Once the preliminaries of peace had been signed in January 1783, after the war of American independence, exchanges between British and French men of science resumed their normal course. On a visit to Paris in 1783, the francophile Charles Blagden (with the encouragement of Joseph Banks) made a number of contacts that fostered relations between the Royal Society and the Académie royale des sciences. In the course of this and several subsequent visits to France, Blagden became especially intimate with the chemist Claude-Louis Berthollet. His correspondence, now in the Royal Society, is a rich source for our understanding of some of the leading scientific debates of the day, in particular concerning the nature of water, which forms the main subject of this article.

  11. The death of King Charles XII--the forensic verdict.

    PubMed

    Nordling, C O

    1998-09-28

    King Charles XII of Sweden was killed in 1718 during his siege of the Danish fortress of Fredriksten. For 276 years, it remained an open question whether the lethal bullet came from the enemy or from a Swedish assassin. Now, a treatise published by a Swedish historian finally proves that the King's death was a case of political murder. Ballistic circumstances and the Danish ammunition then available are incompatible with a random shot from enemy quarters. Major-general Carl Cronstedt possessed the expertise needed to make an assassination look like a war casualty. It appears that the King was shot with a makeshift jacketed bullet long before jacketed bullets came into common use. PMID:9854825

  12. Charles Hard Townes: Remarkable Scientist and Inspiring Teacher

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldsmith, P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Charles Townes is renowned for his work elucidating the structure of molecules through microwave spectroscopy and for his invention of the maser and the laser. He also had a lifelong interest in astronomy, and in the later portion of his remarkable and long career devoted himself to astronomical research, pioneering the study of molecules in interstellar space and the development of infrared spectroscopy, first from the ground and then from airborne facilities. His interest in high angular resolution, as well as high spectral resolution observations, led to development of the first infrared spatial interferometer employing coherent signal processing techniques. In this short review I will only touch on some of Townes' many scientific contributions, concentrating on astronomy, and will also give some personal thoughts about how he inspired students in their research, helping to make the "Townes Group" at the University of California, Berkeley, an ideal environment in which to start a career in research.

  13. Pregabalin in the treatment of Charles Bonnet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Sawant, Neena Sanjiv; Bokdawala, Rohann Astad

    2013-04-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome is a condition characterised by the presence of visual hallucinations in patients having visual impairment most commonly reported in the seventh decade. We describe a case of a 55-year-old lady who had developed retinopathy causing significant visual loss secondary to diabetes mellitus. She had started seeing images of men for the past 2 months which made her feel uncomfortable and seek psychiatric help. She was aware that the hallucinations were not real but a part of her imagination. A detailed history did not reveal any psychopathology but the patient had several medical complications due to her uncontrolled diabetes. Pregabalin, which was started for her neuropathy, dramatically remitted her symptoms within 2 days.

  14. Charles bonnet syndrome, management with simple behavioral technique.

    PubMed

    Issa, Baba Awoye; Yussuf, Abdullahi Dasliva

    2013-01-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome occurs in visually impaired but cognitively normal individuals. This report describes a condition of vivid visual hallucination (phantom images) in an 85-year-old conscious man, who had been blind by bilateral progressively worsening glaucoma. This common, but rarely reported, condition was managed by behavioral approach of repeated blinking, intermittent eyes closure, and reassurance. While emotional, mood and cognitive disorders need to be ruled out, the condition, though frightening to the afflicted, is benign and remediable with simple, inexpensive approach. Health workers managing people with terminal blindness should always ask for the presence of hallucinations from their patients to forestall a preventable distress resulting from wrong perception without visual stimulus.

  15. Charles Dickens and the ear, nose, and throat.

    PubMed

    Pahor, A L

    1979-01-01

    Charles Dickens is known as a novelist, humorist, humanist, and a social reformist. One of his many abilities was an astute power of observation, and some of his writings included descriptions considered as original medical knowledge. Among the hundreds of characters portrayed by Dickens, many had depictions or diseases of interest to the otolaryngologist. Dickens described deaf children and was interested in the methods used in their teaching. He had a keen interest in children and their welfare and described his visits to the Childrens Hospital in London and to Parkins Institute at Boston. He described both temporary and permanent deafness following exposure to loud noise. Dickens was a medical critic and most of his writings on the subject were humorous, though mixed at times with a spicy element of satire.

  16. The singular vision of William Charles Wells (1757-1817).

    PubMed

    Wade, Nicholas J; Ono, Hiroshi; Mapp, Alistair P; Lillakas, Linda

    2011-01-01

    William Charles Wells retained an interest in vision throughout his life. His first book was on single vision with two eyes; he integrated vision and eye movements to determine principles of visual direction. On the basis of experiments and observations he formulated three principles of visual direction, which can readily be demonstrated. In the course of these studies, he also examined visual acuity, accommodation and convergence, visual persistence, and visual vertigo. Insights into visual processing were mainly derived from observations of afterimages that were used to provide an index of how the eyes moved. His experiments enabled him to distinguish between the consequences of active and passive eye movements (later called outflow and inflow) as well as describing nystagmus following body rotation. After providing a brief account of Wells's life, his neglected research on vision is described and assessed. PMID:21253934

  17. Scientific cousins: the relationship between Charles Darwin and Francis Galton.

    PubMed

    Fancher, Raymond E

    2009-01-01

    This article traces the personal as well as the intellectual and scientific relationship between Charles Darwin and his younger half-cousin Francis Galton. Although they had been on friendly terms as young men, and Darwin had in some ways been a role model for Galton, the two did not share major scientific interests until after the publication of Darwin's On the Origin of Species in 1859. That work precipitated a religious and philosophical crisis in Galton, which he gradually resolved after conceiving and developing the basic ideas of "hereditary genius" and eugenics. More mathematically inclined than Darwin, he subsequently contributed to the Darwinian evolutionary discussion, and to the future science of psychology, by proposing the basic concept of the nature-nurture dichotomy, the conceptual and statistical foundations for behavior genetics, and the idea for intelligence testing.

  18. [Charles Robert Darwin: the great founder of scientific evolutionism].

    PubMed

    Liang, Qian-Jin; Bin, Jie; Zhang, Gen-Fa

    2009-12-01

    Today, we celebrated 200 years since Charles Darwin, one of the world's most creative and influential thinkers, was born. And there happens to be the 150th anniversary of the publication of his famous book, On the Origin of Species. It is verified that On the Origin of Species is an immortal classic book and is still guiding the study of anagenesis in life science as the development of natural science from then on, and even though most of the ideas in the book are well-known at the present age. In the article, we recall the brilliance and predomination life of Darwin, a great sage with rich scientific achievements, review briefly the novel discoveries and theories after him in the field, and then elucidate the focal points and perspectiveas in near future study of evolution.

  19. Visual Hallucinations (Charles Bonnet Syndrome) Associated with Neurosarcoidosis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jason; Waisbren, Emily; Hashemi, Nafiseh; Lee, Andrew G.

    2013-01-01

    The Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) refers to lucid and complex visual hallucinations in cognitively normal patients with acquired vision loss. It can be associated with any type of vision loss including that related to macular degeneration, corneal disease, diabetic retinopathy, and occipital infarct. Neurosarcoidosis, a multi-systemic inflammatory granulomatous disease affecting both the central and peripheral nervous systems, is rarely associated with CBS. We report a patient with biopsy-confirmed neurosarcoidosis who experienced visual hallucinations following the development of a right seventh-nerve palsy, right facial paresthesia, and bilateral progressive visual loss. This case highlights the importance of recognizing that the CBS can occur in visual loss of any etiology. PMID:24339694

  20. BOOK REVIEW: Jean-Charles Houzeau et son temps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Verhas, P.

    2002-12-01

    This is a wonderful book. It describes the life and work of Belgian astronomer Jean-Charles Houzeau (1820-1888) and, as the last three words of the title indicate, it has a broader focus including the social, industrial and scientific context of the second part of the 19th century. This is set in a very broad international social context including social revolutions in Belgium and France, and the abolition of slavery in the United States. The biography clearly shows that this hard-working man was driven by science and justice, by individualism and generosity, by humor and sentiment. The book is divided in four parts, each part is placed in its own historical context. The first part "The apprentice, the master and his disciples" describes Houzeau's childhood and young years, his early scientific career at the Observatory in Brussels, and his relationship with Adolphe Quetelet. The evolution of this relationship is very well documented: the turbulent revolutionary Houzeau versus cool, moderated and diplomatic royalist Quetelet, the observer versus the mathematician theorist. But both were very dedicated teachers: Quetelet established public courses and after the Revolution of 1830 he contributed to the foundation of the University of Brussels; Houzeau was the peripatetic teacher wherever place he was, also after his return to Belgium. The second part is "The politician" and deals with Houzeau's political ideas and revolutionary attitudes and their consequences. His revolutionary ideas, though, were not confined to politics only: he also severely criticised the paucity of high-precision observations collected at the Royal Observatory in his days. Because he participated at revolutionary meetings, Houzeau was fired from his position at the Observatory by the Minister of Interior Affairs Charles Rogier. Thus started his peripathetic life, covering observational work in astronomy, geography, geodesy and natural sciences in many places in Belgium and abroad. The third

  1. Tested Demonstrations. Balloon Balance Thermometer: A Lecture Demonstration of Charles's Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carney, G. D.; Kern, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Describes a lecture demonstration illustrating Charles's Law with a balloon-balance thermometer. The technique allows a determination of the absolute minimum temperature to within an accuracy of 10 percent of the exact value: -273.15 degrees Celsius. (BT)

  2. The Egg in the Bottle Revisited: Air Pressure and Amontons' Law (Charles' Law)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adcock, Louis H.

    1998-12-01

    The "egg in the bottle" is a classic demonstration of Charles' law (P, T) found in many books of chemical demonstrations aimed primarily at elementary and high school students. Unfortunately, most of the explanations of the experiment are misleading and incorrect, many involving a shrinkage of the gas volume in a closed container. The correct interpretation of Charles' law is given along with some additional variations of the experiment.

  3. ACS National Historic Chemical Landmark: Charles Martin Hall's Discovery of the Electrochemical Process for Aluminum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, Norman C.

    1997-11-01

    On September 17, 1997 in Oberlin, OH, Oberlin College and the Cleveland Section of the American Chemical Society hosted a celebration in which Charles Martin Hall's discovery of the electrochemical process for extracting aluminum metal from the ore was designated as a National Historic Chemical Landmark by the ACS. Woodshed laboratory with mannequins of Charles Martin Hall and his sister Julia. Photograph used with permission from Oberlin News-Tribune

  4. The history and reception of Charles Darwin's hypothesis of pangenesis.

    PubMed

    Holterhoff, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores Charles Darwin's hypothesis of pangenesis through a popular and professional reception history. First published in The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication (1868), pangenesis stated that inheritance can be explained by sub-cellular "gemmules" which aggregated in the sexual organs during intercourse. Pangenesis thereby accounted for the seemingly arbitrary absence and presence of traits in offspring while also clarifying some botanical and invertebrates' limb regeneration abilities. I argue that critics largely interpreted Variation as an extension of On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (1859), while pangenesis was an extension of natural selection. Contrary to claims that pangenesis was divorced from natural selection by its reliance on the inheritance of acquired characters, pangenesis's mid nineteenth-century reception suggests that Darwin's hypothesis responded directly to selection's critics. Using Variation's several editions, periodical reviews, and personal correspondence I assess pangenesis popularly, professionally, and biographically to better understand Variation's impact on 1860s and 70s British evolutionism and inheritance. PMID:24570302

  5. Charles Darwin's views of classification in theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Padian, K

    1999-06-01

    It has long been argued that Charles Darwin was the founder of the school of "evolutionary taxonomy" of the Modern Synthesis and, accordingly, that he recognized genealogy and similarity as dual, synergistic criteria for classification. This view is based on three questionable interpretations: first, of isolated passages in the 13th chapter of the Origin of Species; second, of one phrase in a letter that Darwin wrote about the work of an author he had partly misunderstood; and third, of his taxonomic practice in the barnacle monographs, which only implicitly embody his philosophy of classification, if at all. These works, seen in fuller context and with the perspective of extensive correspondence, are consistent with the view that Darwin advocated only genealogy as the basis of classification, and that similarity was merely a tool for discovering evolutionary relationships. Darwin was neither a Mayrian taxonomist nor a cladist, and he did not approach systematic issues in the same terms that we do in the late 20th century. PMID:12066712

  6. The history and reception of Charles Darwin's hypothesis of pangenesis.

    PubMed

    Holterhoff, Kate

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores Charles Darwin's hypothesis of pangenesis through a popular and professional reception history. First published in The Variation of Animals and Plants under Domestication (1868), pangenesis stated that inheritance can be explained by sub-cellular "gemmules" which aggregated in the sexual organs during intercourse. Pangenesis thereby accounted for the seemingly arbitrary absence and presence of traits in offspring while also clarifying some botanical and invertebrates' limb regeneration abilities. I argue that critics largely interpreted Variation as an extension of On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection (1859), while pangenesis was an extension of natural selection. Contrary to claims that pangenesis was divorced from natural selection by its reliance on the inheritance of acquired characters, pangenesis's mid nineteenth-century reception suggests that Darwin's hypothesis responded directly to selection's critics. Using Variation's several editions, periodical reviews, and personal correspondence I assess pangenesis popularly, professionally, and biographically to better understand Variation's impact on 1860s and 70s British evolutionism and inheritance.

  7. Charles Darwin and the Origins of Plant Evolutionary Developmental Biology

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, William E.; Diggle, Pamela K.

    2011-01-01

    Much has been written of the early history of comparative embryology and its influence on the emergence of an evolutionary developmental perspective. However, this literature, which dates back nearly a century, has been focused on metazoans, without acknowledgment of the contributions of comparative plant morphologists to the creation of a developmental view of biodiversity. We trace the origin of comparative plant developmental morphology from its inception in the eighteenth century works of Wolff and Goethe, through the mid nineteenth century discoveries of the general principles of leaf and floral organ morphogenesis. Much like the stimulus that von Baer provided as a nonevolutionary comparative embryologist to the creation of an evolutionary developmental view of animals, the comparative developmental studies of plant morphologists were the basis for the first articulation of the concept that plant (namely floral) evolution results from successive modifications of ontogeny. Perhaps most surprisingly, we show that the first person to carefully read and internalize the remarkable advances in the understanding of plant morphogenesis in the 1840s and 1850s is none other than Charles Darwin, whose notebooks, correspondence, and (then) unpublished manuscripts clearly demonstrate that he had discovered the developmental basis for the evolutionary transformation of plant form. PMID:21515816

  8. "Professor" Charles Tyrrell and his ideal sight restorer.

    PubMed

    Ferry, A P

    1986-09-01

    Charles A. Tyrrell was a masseur who obtained his MD degree at age 57 in 1900. In addition to his private practice he was editor of several pseudomedical magazines. He also owned two proprietary ventures that he conducted on a mail order basis. One of these involved production and sale of the The Ideal Sight Restorer, a U-shaped device consisting of a rubber bulb at the base, from which on both sides arose an arm of rubber tubing capped by an ivory eye piece. The eye cups were applied to the closed eyelids and the intermittent suction produced by squeezing the rubber bulb was claimed to provide a form of ocular massage capable of curing serious eye diseases (eg. cataract and glaucoma), as well as doing away with the need for spectacles. Although his fraudulent activities and deceptive advertising practices were described on several occasions in the Journal of the American Medical Association, Dr. Tyrrell persisted in his enterprises until he died in 1918. PMID:3543791

  9. Astronauts Alan Bean and Charles Conrad on Lunar Surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn Five launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Their lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples. In this photograph, one of the astronauts on the Moon's surface is holding a container of lunar soil. The other astronaut is seen reflected in his helmet. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  10. Searching the animal psyche with Charles Le Brun.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sarah R

    2010-07-01

    Around 1670 the French court painter and Academician Charles Le Brun produced a series of drawings featuring naturalistic animal heads, as well as imaginary heads in which he refashioned various nonhuman animal species to make humanoid physiognomies. What were the purpose and significance of these unusual works? I argue that they show Le Brun's interest in what we today would call animal psychology: focusing upon the sensory organs and their connections with the animal's brain, Le Brun studied his animals as conscious protagonists of the natural realm. One source that may have served him in this project was Marin Cureau de La Chambre's De la Connoissance des bestes of 1645, in which the physician argued that animals possess a conscious soul grounded in the senses. However, Le Brun's animal-humans have no clear place in the artist's taxonomy--nor, indeed, in any seventeenth-century understandings of species. It is rather John Locke, at his most skeptical, who offers the best parallel in the realm of natural philosophy to Le Brun's unsettling animal-humans. Probably without meaning to, Le Brun demonstrated through his eerie, boundary-crossing creatures the limits of visual classification.

  11. Charles Darwin and Evolution: Illustrating Human Aspects of Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kampourakis, Kostas; McComas, William F.

    2010-06-01

    Recently, the nature of science (NOS) has become recognized as an important element within the K-12 science curriculum. Despite differences in the ultimate lists of recommended aspects, a consensus is emerging on what specific NOS elements should be the focus of science instruction and inform textbook writers and curriculum developers. In this article, we suggest a contextualized, explicit approach addressing one core NOS aspect: the human aspects of science that include the domains of creativity, social influences and subjectivity. To illustrate these ideas, we have focused on Charles Darwin, a scientist whose life, work and thought processes were particularly well recorded at the time and analyzed by scholars in the succeeding years. Historical facts are discussed and linked to core NOS ideas. Creativity is illustrated through the analogies between the struggle for existence in human societies and in nature, between artificial and natural selection, and between the division of labor in human societies and in nature. Social influences are represented by Darwin’s aversion of criticism of various kinds and by his response to the methodological requirements of the science of that time. Finally, subjectivity is discussed through Darwin’s development of a unique but incorrect source for the origin of variations within species.

  12. The Curious Case of Charles Darwin and Homeopathy

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    In 1849, Charles Darwin was so ill that he was unable to work one out of every 3 days, and after having various troubling symptoms for 2–12 years, he wrote to a friend that he was ‘going the way of all flesh’. He sought treatment from Dr James Manby Gully, a medical doctor who used water cure and homeopathic medicines. Despite being highly skeptical of these treatments, he experienced a dramatic improvement in his health, though some of his digestive and skin symptoms returned various times in his life. He grew to appreciate water cure, but remained skeptical of homeopathy, even though his own experiments on insectivore plants using what can be described as homeopathic doses of ammonia salts surprised and shocked him with their significant biological effect. Darwin even expressed concern that he should publish these results. Two of Darwin's sons were as incredulous as he was, but their observations confirmed the results of his experiments. Darwin was also known to have read a book on evolution written by a homeopathic physician that Darwin described as similar to his own but ‘goes much deeper.’ PMID:19875430

  13. Charles Darwin's views of classification in theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Padian, K

    1999-06-01

    It has long been argued that Charles Darwin was the founder of the school of "evolutionary taxonomy" of the Modern Synthesis and, accordingly, that he recognized genealogy and similarity as dual, synergistic criteria for classification. This view is based on three questionable interpretations: first, of isolated passages in the 13th chapter of the Origin of Species; second, of one phrase in a letter that Darwin wrote about the work of an author he had partly misunderstood; and third, of his taxonomic practice in the barnacle monographs, which only implicitly embody his philosophy of classification, if at all. These works, seen in fuller context and with the perspective of extensive correspondence, are consistent with the view that Darwin advocated only genealogy as the basis of classification, and that similarity was merely a tool for discovering evolutionary relationships. Darwin was neither a Mayrian taxonomist nor a cladist, and he did not approach systematic issues in the same terms that we do in the late 20th century.

  14. Charles Bonnet syndrome and cognitive impairment: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Russell, Gregor; Burns, Alistair

    2014-05-22

    ABSTRACT Background: Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is defined as complex persistent visual hallucinations in the absence of mental disorder. It is common in conditions causing significant visual impairment. Many authors advise reassurance, considering the condition benign. However, others have suggested that CBS may in some patients represent the early stages of dementia. This review seeks to systematically examine the evidence for any link between CBS and cognitive impairment. Methods: Literature search using OVID Medline, PsychINFO, and Embase. Results: Three studies where cognitive functioning was the primary focus of the research were found. All were small, did not properly apply diagnostic criteria, and reported conflicting results. Eight other studies commented on cognitive functioning, but none used tests sufficiently sensitive to detect changes seen in early dementia. One hundred and thirty four case reports were scrutinized, and reports found of 16 patients with CBS where dementia emerged. High rates of partial insight at diagnosis of CBS were seen in these patients. Conclusions: There have been no adequately powered studies, using accepted diagnostic criteria, where changes in cognitive functioning were the primary outcome. Existing studies are of limited methodological quality and allow no conclusion regarding a relationship between cognitive impairment and CBS to be reached. Numerous case reports of dementia developing in patients with CBS and partial insight raise the possibility of a link between these conditions. There is a clear need for properly constructed studies to investigate this.

  15. John Tweedie and Charles Darwin in Buenos Aires.

    PubMed

    Ollerton, Jeff; Chancellor, Gordon; van Wyhe, John

    2012-06-20

    The journey of exploration undertaken by Charles Darwin FRS during the voyage of HMS Beagle has a central place within the historical development of evolutionary theory and has been intensively studied. Despite this, new facts continue to emerge about some of the details of Darwin's activities. Drawing on recently published Darwin material and unpublished letters in the archives of the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, we document a hitherto unexamined link between Darwin and John Tweedie (1775-1862), a relatively obscure Scottish gardener turned South American plant collector. All of the available evidence points to a meeting between the two men in Buenos Aires in 1832. Tweedie provided Darwin with information about the geography of the Rio Paraná, including the locality of fossilized wood eroding from the river bank. It also seems likely that Tweedie supplied Darwin with seeds that he later shipped back to John Stevens Henslow in Cambridge. Although this brief meeting was at the time relatively unimportant to either man, echoes of that encounter have resonated with Tweedie's descendants to the present day and have formed the basis for a family story about a written correspondence between Darwin and Tweedie. Local information supplied to Darwin by residents such as Tweedie was clearly important and deserves further attention.

  16. Charles Darwin and the origins of plant evolutionary developmental biology.

    PubMed

    Friedman, William E; Diggle, Pamela K

    2011-04-01

    Much has been written of the early history of comparative embryology and its influence on the emergence of an evolutionary developmental perspective. However, this literature, which dates back nearly a century, has been focused on metazoans, without acknowledgment of the contributions of comparative plant morphologists to the creation of a developmental view of biodiversity. We trace the origin of comparative plant developmental morphology from its inception in the eighteenth century works of Wolff and Goethe, through the mid nineteenth century discoveries of the general principles of leaf and floral organ morphogenesis. Much like the stimulus that von Baer provided as a nonevolutionary comparative embryologist to the creation of an evolutionary developmental view of animals, the comparative developmental studies of plant morphologists were the basis for the first articulation of the concept that plant (namely floral) evolution results from successive modifications of ontogeny. Perhaps most surprisingly, we show that the first person to carefully read and internalize the remarkable advances in the understanding of plant morphogenesis in the 1840s and 1850s is none other than Charles Darwin, whose notebooks, correspondence, and (then) unpublished manuscripts clearly demonstrate that he had discovered the developmental basis for the evolutionary transformation of plant form.

  17. The curious case of charles darwin and homeopathy.

    PubMed

    Ullman, Dana

    2010-03-01

    In 1849, Charles Darwin was so ill that he was unable to work one out of every 3 days, and after having various troubling symptoms for 2-12 years, he wrote to a friend that he was 'going the way of all flesh'. He sought treatment from Dr James Manby Gully, a medical doctor who used water cure and homeopathic medicines. Despite being highly skeptical of these treatments, he experienced a dramatic improvement in his health, though some of his digestive and skin symptoms returned various times in his life. He grew to appreciate water cure, but remained skeptical of homeopathy, even though his own experiments on insectivore plants using what can be described as homeopathic doses of ammonia salts surprised and shocked him with their significant biological effect. Darwin even expressed concern that he should publish these results. Two of Darwin's sons were as incredulous as he was, but their observations confirmed the results of his experiments. Darwin was also known to have read a book on evolution written by a homeopathic physician that Darwin described as similar to his own but 'goes much deeper.'

  18. Streamflow, water quality, and contaminant loads in the lower Charles River Watershed, Massachusetts, 1999-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breault, Robert F.; Sorenson, Jason R.; Weiskel, Peter K.

    2002-01-01

    Streamflow data and dry-weather and stormwater water-quality samples were collected from the main stem of the Charles River upstream of the lower Charles River (or the Basin) and from four partially culverted urban streams that drain tributary subbasins in the lower Charles River Watershed. Samples were collected between June 1999 and September 2000 and analyzed for a number of potential contaminants including nitrate (plus nitrite), ammonia, total Kjeldahl nitrogen, phosphorus, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, and zinc; and water-quality properties including specific conductance, turbidity, biochemical oxygen demand, fecal coliform bacteria, Entero-coccus bacteria, total dissolved solids, and total suspended sediment. These data were used to identify the major pathways and to determine the magnitudes of contaminants loads that contribute to the poor water quality of the lower Charles River. Water-quality and streamflow data, for one small urban stream and two storm drains that drain subbasins with uniform (greater than 73 percent) land use (including single-family residential, multifamily residential, and commercial), also were collected. These data were used to elucidate relations among streamflow, water quality, and subbasin characteristics. Streamflow in the lower Charles River Watershed can be characterized as being unsettled and flashy. These characteristics result from the impervious character of the land and the complex infrastructure of pipes, pumps, diversionary canals, and detention ponds throughout the watershed. The water quality of the lower Charles River can be considered good?meeting water-quality standards and guidelines?during dry weather. After rainstorms, however, the water quality of the river becomes impaired, as in other urban areas. The poor quality of stormwater and its large quantity, delivered over short periods (hours and days), together with illicit sanitary cross connections, and combined sewer overflows, results in large contaminant

  19. The life and significance of Charles Lucas (1713-1771).

    PubMed

    Kelly, J

    2015-09-01

    Charles Lucas (1713-1771) was one of the most controversial popular politicians to stride the Irish political stage in the eighteenth century. Though the descendant of a beneficiary of the Cromwellian plantation, Lucas's personal inheritance was small, and he was apprenticed in his teens to an apothecary in Dublin. Lucas prospered in that capacity, both as an advocate of higher standards within the profession, and as a representative on the lower house (the common council) of Dublin Corporation. Predisposed to challenge what he perceived as abuses by vested and established interests, Lucas made a name for himself as an outspoken critic of the oligarchical pretensions of the lord mayor and aldermen, which comprised the upper chamber of the Corporation. His successes were few, but he was possessed of a fluent pen, and a precocious awareness that he could best communicate with his natural audience through the use of print. As a result, he became the darling of an emerging popular political interest, which shared his vision of a reformed Protestant constitution. Encouraged by this positive response, Lucas offered himself to the electorate of Dublin in 1749, but though he campaigned vigorously, and polled well, he was not elected. More consequently for Lucas personally, his extension of his critical gaze from the municipality to the larger canvas of national and Anglo-Irish politics elicited the hostile notice of the most powerful figures in the land, which prompted him to flee the country to avoid imprisonment. Lucas was not inactive during his eleven-year 'exile', but these were comparatively quiet years by comparison with his final decade when, following his return to Ireland in 1761, he acquired a national profile as MP for Dublin City, a vigorous advocate, and a tireless proponent of Patriot policies.

  20. Charles Darwin and the evolution of human grammatical systems.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Hugh W; Christman, Sarah S

    2010-04-01

    Charles Darwin's evolutionary theories of animal communication were deeply embedded in a centuries-old model of association psychology, whose prodromes have most often been traced to the writings of Aristotle. His notions of frequency of occurrence of pairings have been passed down through the centuries and were a major ontological feature in the formation of associative connectivity. He focused on the associations of cause and effect, contiguity of sequential occurrence, and similarity among items. Cause and effect were often reduced to another type of contiguity relation, so that Aristotle is most often evoked as the originator of the associative bondings through similarity and contiguity, contiguity being the most powerful and frequent means of association. Contiguity eventually became the overriding mechanism for serial ordering of mental events in both perception and action. The notions of concatenation throughout the association psychology took the form of "trains" of events, both sensory and motor, in such a way that serial ordering came to be viewed as an item-by-item string of locally contiguous events. Modern developments in the mathematics of serial ordering have advanced in sophistication since the early and middle twentieth century, and new computational methods have allowed us to reevaluate the serial concatenative theories of Darwin and the associationists. These new models of serial order permit a closer comparative scrutiny between human and nonhuman. The present study considers Darwin's insistence on a "degree" continuity between human and nonhuman animal serial ordering. We will consider a study of starling birdsongs and whether the serial ordering of those songs provides evidence that they have a syntax that at best differs only in degree and not in kind with the computations of human grammatical structures. We will argue that they, in fact, show no such thing.

  1. Mitochondrial disorder caused Charles Darwin’s cyclic vomiting syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Finsterer, Josef; Hayman, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Charles Darwin (CD), “father of modern biology,” suffered from multisystem illness from early adulthood. The most disabling manifestation was cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS). This study aims at finding the possible cause of CVS in CD. Methods A literature search using the PubMed database was carried out, and CD’s complaints, as reported in his personal writings and those of his relatives, friends, colleagues, biographers, were compared with various manifestations of mitochondrial disorders (MIDs), known to cause CVS, described in the literature. Results Organ tissues involved in CD’s disease were brain, nerves, muscles, vestibular apparatus, heart, gut, and skin. Cerebral manifestations included episodic headache, visual disturbance, episodic memory loss, periodic paralysis, hysterical crying, panic attacks, and episodes of depression. Manifestations of polyneuropathy included numbness, paresthesias, increased sweating, temperature sensitivity, and arterial hypotension. Muscular manifestations included periods of exhaustion, easy fatigability, myalgia, and muscle twitching. Cardiac manifestations included episodes of palpitations and chest pain. Gastrointestinal manifestations were CVS, dental problems, abnormal seasickness, eructation, belching, and flatulence. Dermatological manifestations included painful lips, dermatitis, eczema, and facial edema. Treatments with beneficial effects to his complaints were rest, relaxation, heat, and hydrotherapy. Conclusion CVS in CD was most likely due to a multisystem, nonsyndromic MID. This diagnosis is based upon the multisystem nature of his disease, the fact that CVS is most frequently the manifestation of a MID, the family history, the variable phenotypic expression between affected family members, the fact that symptoms were triggered by stress, and that only few symptoms could not be explained by a MID. PMID:24453499

  2. Charles Darwin and the evolution of human grammatical systems.

    PubMed

    Buckingham, Hugh W; Christman, Sarah S

    2010-04-01

    Charles Darwin's evolutionary theories of animal communication were deeply embedded in a centuries-old model of association psychology, whose prodromes have most often been traced to the writings of Aristotle. His notions of frequency of occurrence of pairings have been passed down through the centuries and were a major ontological feature in the formation of associative connectivity. He focused on the associations of cause and effect, contiguity of sequential occurrence, and similarity among items. Cause and effect were often reduced to another type of contiguity relation, so that Aristotle is most often evoked as the originator of the associative bondings through similarity and contiguity, contiguity being the most powerful and frequent means of association. Contiguity eventually became the overriding mechanism for serial ordering of mental events in both perception and action. The notions of concatenation throughout the association psychology took the form of "trains" of events, both sensory and motor, in such a way that serial ordering came to be viewed as an item-by-item string of locally contiguous events. Modern developments in the mathematics of serial ordering have advanced in sophistication since the early and middle twentieth century, and new computational methods have allowed us to reevaluate the serial concatenative theories of Darwin and the associationists. These new models of serial order permit a closer comparative scrutiny between human and nonhuman. The present study considers Darwin's insistence on a "degree" continuity between human and nonhuman animal serial ordering. We will consider a study of starling birdsongs and whether the serial ordering of those songs provides evidence that they have a syntax that at best differs only in degree and not in kind with the computations of human grammatical structures. We will argue that they, in fact, show no such thing. PMID:20446157

  3. The life and significance of Charles Lucas (1713-1771).

    PubMed

    Kelly, J

    2015-09-01

    Charles Lucas (1713-1771) was one of the most controversial popular politicians to stride the Irish political stage in the eighteenth century. Though the descendant of a beneficiary of the Cromwellian plantation, Lucas's personal inheritance was small, and he was apprenticed in his teens to an apothecary in Dublin. Lucas prospered in that capacity, both as an advocate of higher standards within the profession, and as a representative on the lower house (the common council) of Dublin Corporation. Predisposed to challenge what he perceived as abuses by vested and established interests, Lucas made a name for himself as an outspoken critic of the oligarchical pretensions of the lord mayor and aldermen, which comprised the upper chamber of the Corporation. His successes were few, but he was possessed of a fluent pen, and a precocious awareness that he could best communicate with his natural audience through the use of print. As a result, he became the darling of an emerging popular political interest, which shared his vision of a reformed Protestant constitution. Encouraged by this positive response, Lucas offered himself to the electorate of Dublin in 1749, but though he campaigned vigorously, and polled well, he was not elected. More consequently for Lucas personally, his extension of his critical gaze from the municipality to the larger canvas of national and Anglo-Irish politics elicited the hostile notice of the most powerful figures in the land, which prompted him to flee the country to avoid imprisonment. Lucas was not inactive during his eleven-year 'exile', but these were comparatively quiet years by comparison with his final decade when, following his return to Ireland in 1761, he acquired a national profile as MP for Dublin City, a vigorous advocate, and a tireless proponent of Patriot policies. PMID:25875079

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Jean-Charles Houzeau et son temps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, C.; Verhas, P.

    2002-12-01

    This is a wonderful book. It describes the life and work of Belgian astronomer Jean-Charles Houzeau (1820-1888) and, as the last three words of the title indicate, it has a broader focus including the social, industrial and scientific context of the second part of the 19th century. This is set in a very broad international social context including social revolutions in Belgium and France, and the abolition of slavery in the United States. The biography clearly shows that this hard-working man was driven by science and justice, by individualism and generosity, by humor and sentiment. The book is divided in four parts, each part is placed in its own historical context. The first part "The apprentice, the master and his disciples" describes Houzeau's childhood and young years, his early scientific career at the Observatory in Brussels, and his relationship with Adolphe Quetelet. The evolution of this relationship is very well documented: the turbulent revolutionary Houzeau versus cool, moderated and diplomatic royalist Quetelet, the observer versus the mathematician theorist. But both were very dedicated teachers: Quetelet established public courses and after the Revolution of 1830 he contributed to the foundation of the University of Brussels; Houzeau was the peripatetic teacher wherever place he was, also after his return to Belgium. The second part is "The politician" and deals with Houzeau's political ideas and revolutionary attitudes and their consequences. His revolutionary ideas, though, were not confined to politics only: he also severely criticised the paucity of high-precision observations collected at the Royal Observatory in his days. Because he participated at revolutionary meetings, Houzeau was fired from his position at the Observatory by the Minister of Interior Affairs Charles Rogier. Thus started his peripathetic life, covering observational work in astronomy, geography, geodesy and natural sciences in many places in Belgium and abroad. The third

  5. An interview with Charles Cantor: achievements and advice from 50 years of biotechnology expertise.

    PubMed

    Cantor, Charles

    2015-06-01

    Interview with Professor Charles Cantor PhD by Claire Raison (Commissioning Editor) Professor Charles Cantor was awarded his PhD from the University of California, Berkeley (CA, USA), in 1966, and via professorships at Columbia University (New York, NY, USA), UC Berkeley and Boston University (Boston, MA, USA), went on to be Chief Scientific Officer of Sequenom (San Diego, CA, USA) and now retired, continues to act as consultant for more than 16 biotechnology companies. His research focused on inventing new techniques for solving biological problems, including faster DNA sequencing, better DNA amplification and advanced methods: for nucleic acid separation.

  6. Complex visual hallucinations in a Parkinson patient: don't blame James if it's Charles's fault.

    PubMed

    Segers, Kurt

    2013-03-01

    A patient with a history of Parkinson's disease and severe bilateral peripheral vision loss due to vitreous hemorrhages had complex visual hallucinations that persisted for three days and appeared every morning on awakening. The persistent nature of these hallucinations, the patient's preserved insight, and the presence of severe visual impairment was suggestive for Charles Bonnet syndrome rather than Parkinson-related hallucinations. A treatment with carbamazepine was started and proved to be successful. Physicians treating Parkinson patients should be familiar with Charles Bonnet syndrome and consider it as a potential alternative etiology for visual hallucinations, especially when the patient has severely impaired vision and when the hallucinations are sustained during wakefulness.

  7. An Appraisal of the Life of Charles Thomas Jackson as Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder.

    PubMed

    Martin, Ramon F; Desai, Sukumar P

    2015-04-01

    Charles Thomas Jackson claimed to have original ideas that led to the creation of guncotton, the electromagnetic telegraph, and the use of ether as an anesthetic. There was, though, a gap between when the idea was enunciated and when it became reality, with other individuals accomplishing the latter. An examination of Charles Jackson's life reveals a pattern of behavior that is compatible with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder with an associated diagnosis of oppositional defiant disorder. These diagnoses are explored in the context of Jackson's life to explain why he did not carry his initial thoughts to fruition. PMID:26205570

  8. 75 FR 42281 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect To the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... 19, 2010. [FR Doc. 2010-17989 Filed 7-20-10; 8:45 am] Billing code 3195-W0-P ... Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor On July 22, 2004, by Executive Order 13348, the President declared a... connected to the former Liberian regime of Charles Taylor, pursuant to the International Emergency...

  9. 78 FR 43751 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... Register and transmitted to the Congress. (Presidential Sig.) THE WHITE HOUSE, July 17, 2013. [FR Doc. 2013... Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor On July 22, 2004, by Executive Order 13348, the President declared a national emergency with respect to the former Liberian regime of Charles Taylor pursuant to...

  10. 76 FR 43799 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ....) THE WHITE HOUSE, July 20, 2011. [FR Doc. 2011-18703 Filed 7-20-11; 2:00 pm] Billing code 3195-W1-P ... With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0; #0... Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor On July 22, 2004, by Executive Order 13348,...

  11. 77 FR 42413 - The Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... 17, 2012. [FR Doc. 2012-17703 Filed 7-17-12; 2:15 pm] Billing code 3295-F2-P ... Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor #0; #0; #0; Presidential Documents #0... Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor On July 22, 2004, by Executive...

  12. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Notice of July 19, 2010 Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor On July 22, 2004,...

  13. The Scientific Instruments of Charles Wheatstone and the Blending of Science, Art, and Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Don

    2015-01-01

    Charles Wheatstone was a British scientist who is most often remembered for his association with the Wheatstone bridge for measuring electrical resistance. A painfully shy man in public, Wheatstone, in reality, possessed a vibrant personality and a wide array of personal interests from acoustics to electricity to optics and parlour tricks. In this…

  14. Darwin's Other Bulldog: Charles Kingsley and the Popularisation of Evolution in Victorian England

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Piers J.

    2012-01-01

    The nineteenth-century Anglican Priest Charles Kingsley (1819-1875) was a significant populariser of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection. Kingsley was successful in this regard because he developed such diverse connections throughout his career. In the 1840s he associated with Chartists and radical journalists; in the 1850s and 1860s…

  15. Darwin and Teacher: An Analysis of the Mentorship between Charles Darwin and Professor John Henslow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGreevy, Ann

    1990-01-01

    The paper examines the mentorship between Charles Darwin and his teacher, John Stevens Henslow of Cambridge University (England). The importance of a mentor in stimulating creative productivity is demonstrated through discussion of their teaching and learning styles, their interests, their time spent together, and Henslow's character traits.…

  16. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Neil Lutsky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Psychologist, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is Neil Lutsky. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Distinguished Teaching Award…

  17. 78 FR 74004 - Amendment of Class D and Class E Airspace; Lake Charles, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-10

    ... Executive Order 12866; (2) is not a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR...; E.O. 10854, 24 FR 9565, 3 CFR, 1959-1963 Comp., p. 389. Sec. 71.1 0 2. The incorporation by... geographic coordinates for Lake Charles Regional Airport, and the airport name and geographic coordinates...

  18. APOLLO 16 ASTRONAUTS JOHN YOUNG AND CHARLES DUKE EXAMINE FAR ULTRAVIOLET CAMERA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    Apollo 16 Lunar Module Pilot Charles M. Duke, Jr., left and Mission Commander John W. Young examine Far Ultraviolet Camera they will take to the Moon in March. They will measure the universe's ultraviolet spectrum. They will be launched to the Moon no earlier than March 17, 1972, with Command Module Pilot Thomas K. Mattingly, II.

  19. School Renovation and the Importance of Maintenance. [Interview with Charles Boney, Jr.].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Eric

    Charles Boney, Jr., Director of Boney Architects, offers his views on school districts that build schools that have to be replaced too soon, general problems concerning renovation of older buildings, and keeping maintenance costs down. He discusses the types of flooring materials school districts should consider using to lower maintenance costs…

  20. An appreciation of Christiane Groehen: the correspondence between Charles Darwin and Anton Dohrn.

    PubMed

    Browne, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Anton Dohrn was introduced to Darwinism by Ernst Haeckel during his student years at Jena, and became an eager disciple of Charles Darwin's work. He founded the Stazione Zoologica in 1872. Darwin became a patron of Dohrn's Stazione, and the two naturalists corresponded regularly. This article discusses their relationship and the contributions of Christiane Groeben to its elucidation. PMID:26013199

  1. Charles Huntington, Ojibwe Sculptor. With Teacher's Guide. Native Americans of the Twentieth Century.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minneapolis Public Schools, MN.

    A biography for the elementary grades of Charles Huntington (Ojibwe), an American Indian sculptor, includes photographs of the artist and some of his work. A teacher's guide following the bibilography contains information on sculpture and the Ojibwe people, suggested activities for learning about sculpture and sculptors, learning objectives and…

  2. Promising Breakthroughs: Initial Results of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation's Breaking Through Initiative. In Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragg, Debra D.; Barnett, Elisabeth A.

    2008-01-01

    The Breaking Through (BT) initiative of the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation seeks to prepare low-skilled adults, adult learners who are below college-level in reading, writing and/or mathematics, often lacking a high school diploma, and frequently low-income, to be successful in college and the labor market by strengthening and expanding policies…

  3. 77 FR 67829 - Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge and UL Bend National Wildlife Refuge, MT...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    .... Montana State University- 1500 University Drive, 406-657-2011 Billings. Billings, MT 59101. Montana State... Refuge, MT; Availability of Record of Decision for the Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Final... of the message. U.S. mail: Charles M. Russell NWR, P.O. Box 110, Lewistown, MT 59457....

  4. Charles Bonnet's description of Cotard's delusion and reduplicative paramnesia in an elderly patient (1788)

    PubMed

    Förstl, H; Beats, B

    1992-03-01

    An elderly woman developed the delusion that she was dead ('Cotard's delusion') and that she was in another place ('reduplicative paramnesia'). Charles Bonnet reported this unique combination of symptoms a century before Cotard's influential description of the nihilistic delusions and of Pick's description of 'reduplicative paramnesia'.

  5. Readings on Charles Dickens. The Greenhaven Press Literary Companion to British Authors. Literary Companion Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swisher, Clarice, Ed.

    Intended as an accessible resource for students researching Great Britain's greatest literary figures, this collection of essays about Charles Dickens's (1812-1870) work contains an in-depth biography and essays taken from a wide variety of sources. The essays are edited to accommodate the reading and comprehension levels of young adults; each…

  6. Revisiting Charles H. Thompson's Proposals for Educating Gifted African American Students, 1933-1961

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ray, Louis

    2012-01-01

    Charles H. Thompson is best known as the founder and the first editor-in-chief of "The Journal of Negro Education" (1932-1963). Throughout his career, Thompson sought to extend educational opportunity in ways that were "for the good of Negro education as a whole." His main concern was in educating future leaders for service in African American…

  7. Developing a Partnership between the Riverina Environmental Education Centre and Charles Sturt University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boylan, Colin; Collin, Keith

    2006-01-01

    A collaborative partnership has evolved between the Riverina Environmental Education Centre (REEC) and Charles Sturt University in Wagga Wagga. The Riverina Environmental Education Centre (REEC) is one of 24 Department of Education and Training environmental education centres in New South Wales (see www.reec.nsw.edu.au). As part of this…

  8. Charles C. Fries in Japan: A Case Study in Methodological Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henrichsen, Lynn E.

    The success of Charles C. Fries' Oral Approach to teaching English as a second language (ESL) as promoted in Japan by the English Language Exploratory Committee in the late 1950s and early 1960s is examined according to Jack Richards' four major factors that affect the course of a teaching method: appeals to facts; appeals to authority; form of…

  9. The Essential Charles Dickens School Resource: Contemporary Approaches to Teaching Classic Texts Ages 7-14

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robins, Gill; Evans-Jones, Laura-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Charles Dickens is arguably the greatest storyteller in English Literature and his novels have been loved and respected for nearly two hundred years. As accurate reflections of Victorian society they are unparalleled. Vivid characters and realistic settings are created in the mind of the reader, all laced with Dickens inimitable humour, wit and…

  10. 78 FR 27960 - Charles Hotchkin and Claire Fay; Notice of Application for Amendment of Exemption, Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Charles Hotchkin and Claire Fay; Notice of Application for Amendment of... the following hydroelectric application has been filed with the Commission and is available for...

  11. Identifying Success Factors of ICT in Developing a Learning Community: Case Study Charles Sturt University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Matthew; Uys, Philip

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: A learning community has been developing in a distributed environment amongst the members of the Centre for Enhancing of Learning and Teaching (CELT) located in the Bathurst, Goulburn and Orange campuses of Charles Sturt University. This group is known by the acronym of GDMOB, with the purpose of the community to facilitate the…

  12. Charles Silberman's "Crisis in the Classroom, The Remaking of American Education": A Critical Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costley, Kevin C.

    2009-01-01

    In 1970, journalist and scholar Charles Silberman published "Crisis in the Classroom; the Remaking of American Education." His intended audiences was teachers and students, school board members and taxpayers, public officials and civic leaders, newspaper and magazine editors and readers, television directors and viewers, parents and children.…

  13. Enlightening the Wilderness: Charles Nisbet's Failure at Higher Education in Post-Revolutionary Pennsylvania.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robson, David W.

    1997-01-01

    Provides an examination of Charles Nisbet's stewardship of Dickinson College in post-revolutionary Pennsylvania. Nisbet's attempts to create a university reflecting the republican ideals of an enlightened aristocracy governing a deferential population met with disastrous resistance from a faculty and student body more aligned with revolutionary…

  14. New Workflows for Born-Digital Assets: Managing Charles E. Bracker's Orchid Photographs Collection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hurford, Amanda A.; Runyon, Carolyn F.

    2011-01-01

    Charles E. Bracker was a professor of botany and plant pathology at Purdue University from 1964 to 1999. His late wife, Anri, was an orchid enthusiast who began collecting and housing orchids in the 1980s. In 2009, Bracker's 30,000 digital orchid photographs were donated to Ball State University Libraries, where both of this article's authors…

  15. 77 FR 23599 - Special Local Regulations for Marine Events; Potomac River, Charles County, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-20

    .... Ronald Houck, U.S. Coast Guard Sector Baltimore, MD; telephone 410-576-2674, email Ronald.L.Houck@uscg...; Potomac River, Charles County, MD'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 27). We received one comment on the... the commenter concerning the proposed regulations. The commenter, Mr. David R. Horning of...

  16. [Transient charles bonnet syndrome after excision of a right occipital meningioma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Arai, Takao; Hasegawa, Yuzuru; Tanaka, Toshihide; Kato, Naoki; Watanabe, Mitsuyoshi; Nakamura, Aya; Murayama, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome is a condition characterized by visual hallucinations. These simple or complex visual hallucinations are more common in elderly individuals with impaired peripheral vision. The current report describes a case of transient Charles Bonnet syndrome appearing after the removal of a meningioma. The patient was a 61-year-old man who already had impaired visual acuity due to diabetic retinopathy. Brain MRI revealed a cystic tumor severely compressing the right occipital lobe. Starting on day 2 postoperatively, the patient was troubled by recurring visual hallucinations involving people, flowers, pictures, and familiar settings(the train and a coffee shop). These continued for 3.5 months. This period roughly coincided with the time for the occipital lobe to recover from the compression caused by the tumor, a fact that was confirmed by several MRI scans. ¹²³I-IMP SPECT performed 1 month after the surgical operation showed an area of hypoperfusion in the right parieto-occipital lobe. Based on the patient's clinical course and MRI findings, the mechanism of onset of visual hallucinations in this patient was put forward. The release of pressure in the brain by tumor removal and subsequent recovery changed the blood flow to the brain. This triggered visual hallucinations in the patient, who was already predisposed to developing Charles Bonnet syndrome because of diabetic retinopathy. This case is interesting since it indicates that central neurological factors, as well as visual deficits, may induce the appearance of visual hallucinations in Charles Bonnet syndrome.

  17. Interview with Charles M. Reigeluth: Applying Instructional Design to Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simsek, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Charles M. Reigeluth is one of the most contributing and certainly the leading scholars in the field of educational technology and instructional design. His early contributions were about developing instructional design theories such as Elaboration Theory and Component Display Theory. He has also edited monumental books as collections of major ID…

  18. Charles W. Stuber: Maize geneticist and pioneer of marker-assisted selection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Charles W. Stuber is considered a pioneer of quantitative genetic mapping and marker-assisted selection in maize. The achievements of his four decade career in research include the development of genetic marker systems used in maize and adapted in many other crops, the first methods and studies to i...

  19. Does Big Business Rule America? Critical Commentaries on Charles E. Lindblom's "Politics and Markets."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hessen, Robert, Ed.

    This volume pulls together commentaries on Charles E. Lindblom's book entitled "Politics and Markets: The World's Political-Economic Systems" (1977) which expounds the thesis that big business dominates American culture and politics and prevents the introduction of central planning in place of a market-oriented economy. Following an introduction,…

  20. A Lifetime of Language Testing: An Interview with J. Charles Alderson

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunfaut, Tineke

    2014-01-01

    Professor J. Charles Alderson grew up in the town of Burnley, in the North-West of England, and is still based in the North West but in the ancient city of Lancaster. From Burnley to Lancaster, however, lies a journey and a career that took him all around the world to share his knowledge, skills, and experience in language testing and to learn…

  1. Charles Morris's Semiotic Model and Analytical Studies of Visual and Verbal Representations in Technical Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Jiang-Ping

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author demonstrates that the semiotic model proposed by Charles Morris enables us to optimize our understanding of technical communication practices and provides a good point of inquiry. To illustrate this point, the author exemplifies the semiotic approaches by scholars in technical communication and elaborates Morris's model…

  2. An appreciation of Christiane Groehen: the correspondence between Charles Darwin and Anton Dohrn.

    PubMed

    Browne, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Anton Dohrn was introduced to Darwinism by Ernst Haeckel during his student years at Jena, and became an eager disciple of Charles Darwin's work. He founded the Stazione Zoologica in 1872. Darwin became a patron of Dohrn's Stazione, and the two naturalists corresponded regularly. This article discusses their relationship and the contributions of Christiane Groeben to its elucidation.

  3. Administrative Synergy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Weckstein, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles to overcome in creating and sustaining an administrative professional learning community (PLC) is time. Administrators are constantly deluged by the tyranny of the urgent. It is a Herculean task to carve out time for PLCs, but it is imperative to do so. In this article, the authors describe how an administrative PLC…

  4. An historical note on Darwin and nonhuman drug self-administration.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Stephen T

    2003-11-01

    This note brings to the attention of readers a quote from Charles Darwin on the scientific implications of nonhuman drug self-administration. The quote is from The Descent of Man; and Selection in Relation to Sex (2nd ed.; C. Darwin, 1874/1998). Consistent with Darwin's prescience in many areas of science, he discerned potential scientific importance in voluntary nonhuman drug self-administration almost a century before that potential was realized in any substantive or systematic manner.

  5. Remembering Charles B. Huggins' Nobel Prize for Hormonal Treatment of Prostatic Cancer at its 50th Anniversary.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Moll, Friedrich; Schultheiss, Dirk; Krischel, Matthis

    2016-06-01

    Charles B. Huggins received the Nobel Prize in 1966. Based on archival sources from the Nobel archive we have found that nominators emphasised the practical therapeutic applications of his discoveries that were showing 25 yr after his key publications.

  6. Charles L. Brewer Award for distinguished teaching of psychology: Neil Lutsky.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is Neil Lutsky. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Distinguished Teaching Award at the 119th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2011, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2011 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; William Howell, vice president/secretary; Gerald Koocher, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; David H. Barlow, Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Charles L. Brewer; Connie Chan; Anthony Jackson; Ronald F. Levant; Sandra Shullman; Archie L. Turner; and Kurt Geisinger, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  7. Gold medal award for life achievement in the practice of psychology: Charles Silverstein.

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Gold Medal Awards recognize distinguished and enduring records of accomplishment in four areas of psychology: the application of psychology, the practice of psychology, psychology in the public interest, and the science of psychology. The 2011 recipient of the Gold Medal Award for Life Achievement in the Practice of Psychology is Charles Silverstein. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the APF Gold Medal Awards at the 119th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2011, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2011 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; William Howell, vice president/secretary; Gerald Koocher, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Norman Anderson; David H. Barlow, Camilla Benbow; Sharon Stephens Brehm; Charles L. Brewer; Connie Chan; Anthony Jackson; Ronald F. Levant; Sandra Shullman; Archie L. Turner; and Kurt Geisinger, APA Board of Directors liaison.

  8. [On the creativity of the researcher: the work of Charles Richet].

    PubMed

    Estingoy, Pierette

    2003-01-01

    At the birth of the scientific thoughts, the degree of creativity of the searcher depends on his capacity to extract himself from the previously acquired notions in this domain. The discovery of anaphylaxis, by Charles Richet and Paul Portier, constitutes therefore an epistemological break off, knocking over the theory on organism defences and the universality of the biological response to different stimuli. In the light of the works of Charles Richet on hypnosis, renal physiology, thermoregulation and psychophysiology, we see that the most creative discoveries are also the most unexpected or the most difficult to impose. They require courage and initiative, severity of thought, a radical independence of mind and a certain distance concerning eventual practical consequences.

  9. Charles Bonnet syndrome: a literature review into diagnostic criteria, treatment and implications for nursing practice.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D F

    2013-03-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome is a disease of vision which may be mistakenly identified as manifestations of psychosis and consequently be treated by psychiatrists and mental health nurses rather than ophthalmologists. This literature review considers current understanding of the syndrome, its treatment and the role of mental health nurses. The two main findings of the review are that despite a long recognition of the syndrome, diagnostic criteria are not established and that there is no recognized evidence-based medical treatment. As well as this, two novel treatments which may offer future benefits are discussed. Current best practice is identified as identifying the condition and providing reassurance and education, a role that mental health nurses that are aware of Charles Bonnet syndrome can fulfil perhaps better than any other discipline.

  10. Charles Darwin (1758-1778) and the history of the early use of digitalis. 1934.

    PubMed

    Fulton, J F

    1999-12-01

    The evidence which I have just summarized establishes priority of publication concerning the action of digitalis for Erasmus Darwin, but on every other ground, Withering deserves full credit for the discovery. Charles Darwin, the medical student, had been informed of its action by his father and had attempted to account for it on the basis of improvement of lymphatic drainage. But the work, accomplished by the first Charles Darwin is less significant than the abundant evidence of his intellectual ability and precocity, and I have ventured to lay the details of his career before you because of their intrinsic interest and in the hope that the information will serve in a small way to clarify the unsolved problem of the relation of nature to nurture in establishing mental traits and capacities.

  11. Bravo Emma! Music in the life and work of Charles Darwin.

    PubMed

    Derry, J F

    2009-03-01

    The long-term marital dance of Emma and Charles Darwin was set to the routine beat of an almost daily piano recital. Emma was a proficient pianist, and so a quality instrument was a welcome and appropriate house-warming present for their first marital home in London. That same piano accompanied the Darwins on their move to Downe before being upgraded for a newer model, which is still there, whilst another, cheaper piano may have played in Charles Darwin's work, particularly on earthworms. Whilst he lamented his own lack of musicality, Darwin revelled in his wife's prowess, a capacity that he recognised could be inherited, not least through observation of his own children. The evolution of musicality, he reasoned, was rooted in sexual attraction as a form of communication that preceded language.

  12. NASA Kicks Off Summer of Innovation

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Administrator Charlie Bolden, astronaut Leland Melvin and others joined students at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in California to kick off the Summer of Innovation, an initiative to engage...

  13. This Week @ NASA - 11/5/10

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Postponement of Mission STS-133 tops the billboard on This Week @ NASA. Also, EPOXI meets a Comet, NASA and LEGO build a future together, Administrator Bolden heralds ten years of ISS, KSC Twee...

  14. Charles Dickens' A Tale of Two Cities: a case report of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    PubMed

    Huber, Thomas J; te Wildt, Bert T

    2005-01-01

    In posttraumatic stress disorder, a traumatic event is persistently re-experienced in the form of intrusive recollections, dreams or dissociative flashback episodes; cues to the event lead to distress and are avoided, and there are persistent symptoms of increased arousal. While this diagnostic concept has been widely discussed and its existence questioned, a novel written by Charles Dickens long before it was included in any diagnostic system can be viewed as an early case report of posttraumatic stress disorder. PMID:16269868

  15. Physician/chemist/geologist: Charles Thomas Jackson's life of conflict and controversy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Landa, E.R.

    1995-01-01

    After a brief medical career, Charles Thomas Jackson (1805-1880) began work as a consulting chemist and geologist in Boston. He serves as State Geologist in Maine, Rhode Island, and New Hampshire from 1837 to 1884, and completed geological surveys of those States. In 1847, he was appointed United States Geologist to undertake a survey of the public lands of the Lake Superior region of Michigan. This survey was beset by strife, and Jackson was forced to resign in 1849. -from Author

  16. Charles Bonnet syndrome and vitamin B12 deficiency: a case report.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Valérie; Desbordes, Marie; Follet, Mathieu; Haouzir, Sadeq; Guillin, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    The Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a condition associated with complex visual hallucinations occurring in the elderly in patients with visual impairment and normal mental health. Here, we report the case of a 78-year-old woman who has a limited visual acuity with a CBS that we postulated to be in relationship to a vitamin B12 deficiency. This case is the first report of vitamin B12 deficiency-associated CBS.

  17. Charles Robert Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace: their dispute over the units of selection.

    PubMed

    Ruse, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace independently discovered the mechanism of natural selection for evolutionary change. However, they viewed the working of selection differently. For Darwin, selection was always focused on the benefit for the individual. For Wallace, selection was as much something of benefit for the group as for the individual. This difference is traced to their different background political-economic views, with Darwin in favor of Adam Smith's view of society and Wallace following Robert Owen in being a socialist.

  18. Extravehicular Activity Systems Education and Public Outreach in Support of NASA's STEM Initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.

    2011-01-01

    The exploration activities associated with NASA?s goals to return to the Moon, travel to Mars, or explore Near Earth Objects (NEOs) will involve the need for human-supported space and surface extravehicular activities (EVAs). The technology development and human element associated with these exploration missions provide fantastic content to promote science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). As NASA Administrator Charles F. Bolden remarked on December 9, 2009, "We....need to provide the educational and experiential stepping-stones to inspire the next generation of scientists, engineers, and leaders in STEM fields." The EVA Systems Project actively supports this initiative by providing subject matter experts and hands-on, interactive presentations to educate students, educators, and the general public about the design challenges encountered as NASA develops EVA hardware for these missions. This paper summarizes these education and public efforts.

  19. Congress Examines NASA Budget, Space Station, and Relations With Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2014-04-01

    Concerns about recent Russian activities related to Ukraine loomed over an 8 April congressional hearing focusing on NASA's fiscal year (FY) 2015 budget request. Rep. Frank Wolf (R-Va.), chair of the House of Representatives Appropriations Subcommittee on Commerce, Justice, Science, and Related Agencies, and several other committee members questioned NASA administrator Charles Bolden about the agency's contingency plans if tensions between Russia and the United States cause key joint scientific endeavors between the two countries to break off. That concern is particularly critical given the countries' longtime partnership on the International Space Station (ISS) and with the United States currently relying on Russian transport to and from the station until U.S. commercial vehicles are ready to transport astronauts back and forth.

  20. Administrative Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarity, Augustus C., III; Maulding, Wanda

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how all four facets of administrative ecology help dispel the claims about the "impossibility" of the superintendency. These are personal ecology, professional ecology, organizational ecology, and community ecology. Using today's superintendency as an administrative platform, current literature describes a preponderance of…

  1. Administrative Support.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doran, Dorothy; And Others

    This guide is intended to assist business education teachers in administrative support courses. The materials presented are based on the Arizona validated occupational competencies and tasks for the occupations of receptionist, secretary, and administrative assistant. Word processing skills have been infused into each of the three sections. The…

  2. STS-31 crewmembers review checklist with instructor on JSC's FB-SMS middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    STS-31 Discovery, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 103, Mission Specialist (MS) Bruce McCandless II (left) and Pilot Charles F. Bolden (right) discuss procedures with a training instructor on the middeck of JSC's fixed-based (FB) Shuttle Mission Simulator (SMS). The three are pointing to a checklist during this training simulation in the Mission Simulation and Training Facility Bldg 5.

  3. The Charles River, Eastern Massachusetts: Scientific Information in Support of Environmental Restoration

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Weiskel, Peter K.

    2007-01-01

    Human activity has profoundly altered the Charles River and its watershed over the past 375 years. Restoration of environmental quality in the watershed has become a high priority for private- and public-sector organizations across the region. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs worked together to coordinate the efforts of the various organizations. One result of this initiative has been a series of scientific studies that provide critical information concerning some of the major hydrologic and ecological concerns in the watershed. These studies have focused upon: * Streamflows - Limited aquifer storage, growing water demands, and the spread of impervious surfaces are some of the factors exacerbating low summer streamflows in headwater areas of the watershed. Coordinated management of withdrawals, wastewater returns, and stormwater runoff could substantially increase low streamflows in the summer. Innovative approaches to flood control, including preservation of upstream wetland storage capacity and construction of a specially designed dam at the river mouth, have greatly reduced flooding in the lower part of the watershed in recent decades. * Water quality - Since the mid-1990s, the bacterial quality of the Charles River has improved markedly, because discharges from combined sewer overflows and the number of illicit sewer connections to municipal storm drains have been reduced. Improved management of stormwater runoff will likely be required, however, for full attainment of State and Federal water-quality standards. Phosphorus inputs from a variety of sources remain an important water-quality problem. * Fish communities and habitat quality - The Charles River watershed supports a varied fish community of about 20 resident and migratory species. Habitat conditions for fish and other aquatic species have improved in many parts of the river system in recent years. However, serious challenges remain

  4. 'Like a Keen North Wind': how Charles Elton influenced Silent Spring.

    PubMed

    Davis, Frederick R

    2012-12-01

    Drawing upon archival and published sources, 'Like a Keen North Wind,' suggests that Charles Elton's book-The Ecology of Invasions by Animals and Plants-served to galvanize Rachel Carson's ideas while she was writing Silent Spring. Carson had already amassed numerous cases of the poisoning of the environment and wildlife as well as humans. Elton's book helped Carson to draw connections between the various kinds of exposures. Yet, it was Carson's genius to animate Silent Spring with vivid examples that captivated her readers and convinced them to question indiscriminate use of pesticides. Moreover, Carson adroitly bridged the growing divide between scientists and the public.

  5. The Observers Observed: Charles Dickens at the Royal Observatory, Greenwich, in 1850

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, A.

    2005-12-01

    In 1850 the magazine Household Words, which Charles Dickens edited, published three articles describing the instruments and workings of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. These 'popular' articles are invaluable primary sources for the historian of astronomy. They convey some of the Victorian public's fascination with an Institution believed by some to be a lighthouse for night-time shipping on the river Thames; by others, a national repository of 'divining rods' and 'magic mirrors'. Dickens was clearly impressed by the pragmatic usefulness of the Observatory to a commercial and maritime nation, and by seemingly magical, self-acting and recording instruments whereby the wind wrote its own 'Aeolian Autobiography'.

  6. On the Emergence of Mental Space in Psychology: Interview With Lucas Albert Charles Derks

    PubMed Central

    Derks, Lucas Albert Charles; Manea, Alexandru Ioan

    2016-01-01

    In this interview we have the chance to talk with Lucas Albert Charles Derks, founder of the International Laboratory for Mental Space Research and of the Society for Mental Space Psychology and the creator of the Social Panorama approach, about the paradigm that evolved in the last 25 years, entitled Mental Space Psychology, with roots from Cognitive Linguistics, Spatial Cognition and Neuroscience. Today we shall explore the psychotherapeutic approaches which use the Mental Space Psychology, their applicability and their limitations, with a special focus on his own approach, entitled Social Panorama. PMID:27298638

  7. Charles Robert Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace: their dispute over the units of selection.

    PubMed

    Ruse, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Charles Darwin and Alfred Russel Wallace independently discovered the mechanism of natural selection for evolutionary change. However, they viewed the working of selection differently. For Darwin, selection was always focused on the benefit for the individual. For Wallace, selection was as much something of benefit for the group as for the individual. This difference is traced to their different background political-economic views, with Darwin in favor of Adam Smith's view of society and Wallace following Robert Owen in being a socialist. PMID:24014173

  8. Dr Charles Thomas Jackson's (1805-80) life after death: the 20th century mythology.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Richard

    2007-08-01

    References to Dr Charles Thomas Jackson in 20th century anaesthesia literature and biographical dictionaries and encyclopedias emphasize his maniacal insanity and its relation to his usurpations of the discoveries of others, including the controversy with William TG Morton concerning the honour of the discovery of surgical anaesthesia. In 1873, seven years before his death, he experienced sudden collapse and paralysis requiring hospitalization. Seminal 19th century brain research before his hospitalization correlated the signs and symptoms of his illness with pathology found at his autopsy.

  9. Charles Bonnet syndrome and visual acuity--the involvement of dynamic or acute sensory deprivation.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Yasuko; Terao, Takeshi; Ibi, Kenji; Nakamura, Jun; Tawara, Akihiko

    2004-12-01

    A 61-year-old patient suffered from Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) while his visual acuity declined, whereas CBS subsided after he became blind. These findings suggest that reduction of visual acuity (dynamic or acute impairment) has a greater impact on the onset of CBS than low visual acuity (static or chronic impairment) per se in some patients. They may also explain why patients with low visual acuity do not always suffer from CBS. Although further studies are required, the present case highlights the importance of the differentiation between lowering and low visual acuity in the etiology of CBS.

  10. On the occasion of the Charles Greeley Abbot Award by the American Solar Energy Society

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrasekhar, S. )

    1993-09-01

    In 1991 the Charles Greely Abbot Award of the American Solar Energy Society was awarded to Dr. Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, in recognition of his well-known work on the internal operation and life cycle of stars such as the sun, and for his development of the new radiation heat transfer and fluid flow analysis techniques he had found to be necessary to do this work. His acceptance address is presented here, which explains the relationship between Abbot's work on the solar constant and Dr. Chandrasekhar's research.

  11. Musical tradition, insurrection, and resurrection: the life and legacy of composer/bassist Charles Mingus.

    PubMed

    St Louis, E K

    1999-01-01

    Charles Mingus was perhaps the foremost straight-ahead jazz upright bassist and composer of his generation, blending the inspirational influences of gospel, jazz improvisation, and art music leanings into a unique style all his own. His demise from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in his fifth decade robbed the world of one of the great creative voices of American music. Aspects of Mingus' life, his career as a bassist, bandleader, and composer, and his neuromuscular illness are discussed, emphasizing his legacy for the disparate fields of jazz and neurology. PMID:10718524

  12. Charles B.G. de Nancrede: academic surgeon at the fin de siècle.

    PubMed

    Bloom, D A; Uznis, G; Campbell, D A

    1998-11-01

    At the last turn of the century American surgery was in the midst of a number of paradigm shifts, involving transitions in technology, surgical practice, surgical specialization, patient care, surgical training, and medical economics. Charles B. G. de Nancrede was a leader during this formative period. A key figure in the transition from antiseptic to sterile technique in American medicine, he was also a prolific writer, a bold surgeon, and a great surgical educator. De Nancrede created one of the earliest prototypes of the modern multispecialty surgical departments. The coming turn of the century promises new transitions comparable to those of the past. PMID:9828728

  13. The Nanaimo and Charles Camsell Indian Hospitals: First Nations' narratives of health care, 1945 to 1965.

    PubMed

    Drees, Laurie Meijer

    2010-01-01

    First Nations' perspectives on health and health care as delivered by doctors, nurses, and Canada's former Indian hospital system form a significant part of Canada's medical history, as well as a part of First Nations people's personal histories. Oral histories collected in Alberta and British Columbia suggest that First Nations people who experienced the Nanaimo and Charles Camsell Indian hospitals between 1945 and 1965 perceive the value of their experiences to be reflected in their survivance, a concept recalled through narratives emphasizing both humour and pain, as well as past and present personal resilience.

  14. What became of Arthur Conan Doyle's father? The last years of Charles Altamont Doyle.

    PubMed

    Beveridge, A

    2006-10-01

    This paper examines the fate of Arthur Conan Doyle's father, Charles Altamont Doyle, a Victorian illustrator, who spent his last years as an asylum inmate. Based on new archival research, it looks at the reasons for his institutionalisation and what befell him during his stay. It will consider Doyle's claim that he was wrongfully confined and also the suggestion that his family were responsible for having him committed. Finally, the paper will examine the nature of Doyle's condition and the creative work he produced whilst an asylum inmate.

  15. [Legitimation of Andries Van Wesele, Andreas Vesalius's father, by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Fifth].

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hyonosuke

    2006-06-01

    Andries van Wesele, Andreas Vesalius's father and a court pharmacist of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the fifth, was an illegitimate son of Everard van Wesele, a court physician of the Hapsburgs. In the year of 1531, Andries was legitimated by the Emperor. The legitimation letter was written in French. The author tried to translate and analyze the letter. By this legitimation, not only Andries himself was legitimated but also his successors were approved to succeed Andries. By this letter, Andreas Vesalius obtained his position as a hereditary member of a family serving the court of the Hapsburgs, and as a result, he started his career as a physician of the court.

  16. The paradoxical advantages and disadvantages of natural selection: the case history of Charles Darwin.

    PubMed

    Lieb, J

    2007-01-01

    The biology of natural selection is an enduring mystery, as is the nature of Charles Darwin's chronic illness. Of the theories advanced to explain the latter, Oedipal conflicts and Chagas' disease are preeminent. Hypomania, however, propelled Darwin to the pinnacle of scientific achievement and good health, the depression that followed condemning him to intellectual stagnation, lethargy, impaired memory and concentration, and incapacitating gastrointestinal disorders. Examples of natural selection in humans are much sought after when, ironically, one need look no further than Darwin himself.

  17. Administrative IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Katherine, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    When it comes to Administrative IT solutions and processes, best practices range across the spectrum. Enterprise resource planning (ERP), student information systems (SIS), and tech support are prominent and continuing areas of focus. But widespread change can also be accomplished via the implementation of campuswide document imaging and sharing,…

  18. Database Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  19. ADMINISTRATIVE CLIMATE.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BRUCE, ROBERT L.; CARTER, G.L., JR.

    IN THE COOPERATIVE EXTENSION SERVICE, STYLES OF LEADERSHIP PROFOUNDLY AFFECT THE QUALITY OF THE SERVICE RENDERED. ACCORDINGLY, MAJOR INFLUENCES ON ADMINISTRATIVE CLIMATE AND EMPLOYEE PRODUCTIVITY ARE EXAMINED IN ESSAYS ON (1) SOURCES OF JOB SATISFACTION AND DISSATISFACTION, (2) MOTIVATIONAL THEORIES BASED ON JOB-RELATED SATISFACTIONS AND NEEDS,…

  20. Engineering Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    This book is intended to acquaint naval engineering officers with their duties in the engineering department. Standard shipboard organizations are analyzed in connection with personnel assignments, division operations, and watch systems. Detailed descriptions are included for the administration of directives, ship's bills, damage control, training…

  1. STS-45 blue shift crewmembers enjoy eating a meal on OV-104's middeck

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    STS-45 Commander Charles F. Bolden retrieves a straw from his meal tray assembly secured on the middeck ceiling as other blue shift crewmembers around him enjoy eating their meals. Below Bolden, Pilot Brian Duffy balances a meal tray assembly on his lap as a food package and spoon freefloat between his hands. Payload Specialist Dirk D. Frimout, holding a food package and a spoon, steadies himself while eating by positioning his feet under a forward locker handhold strap. In the background, Mission Specialist (MS) and Payload Commander (PLC) Kathryn D. Sullivan prepares to take a bite of food.

  2. Charles Darwin's beagle voyage, fossil vertebrate succession, and "the gradual birth & death of species".

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he collected and some of the extant fauna of South America before he returned to Britain. These comparisons, recorded in his correspondence, his diary and his notebooks during the voyage, were instances of a phenomenon that he later called the "law of the succession of types." Moreover, on the Beagle, he was following a geological research agenda outlined in the second volume of Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology, which implies that paleontological data alone could provide an insight into the laws which govern the appearance of new species. Since Darwin claims in On the Origin of Species that fossil vertebrate succession was one of the key lines of evidence that led him to question the fixity of species, it seems certain that he was seriously contemplating transmutation during the Beagle voyage. If so, historians of science need to reconsider both the role of Britain's expert naturalists and the importance of the fossil vertebrate evidence in the development of Darwin's ideas on transmutation. PMID:20665232

  3. Gender Differences in Cognition in China and Reasons for Change over Time: Evidence from CHARLS

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiaoyan; Sun, Xiaoting; Zhao, Yaohui

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we model gender differences in cognitive ability in China using a new sample of middle-aged and older Chinese respondents. Modeled after the American Health and Retirement Survey (HRS), CHARLS respondents are 45 years and older and are nationally representative of the Chinese population in this age span. Our measures of cognition in CHARLS rely on two measures that proxy for different dimensions of adult cognition—episodic memory and intact mental status. We relate these cognitive measures to adult health and SES outcomes during the adult years. We find large cognitive differences to the detriment of women that were mitigated by large gender differences in education among these generations of Chinese people. These gender differences in cognition are especially concentrated in the older age groups and poorer communities within the sample. We also investigated historical, geographical, and cultural characteristics of communities to understand how they impact cognition. Economic development and environmental improvement such as having electricity, increases in wage per capita and green coverage ratio generally contribute to higher cognition ability. Women benefit more from the fruits of development –electricity and growth of green coverage ratio are conducive to lessening female disadvantage in cognition. PMID:25530942

  4. Darwin's Other Bulldog: Charles Kingsley and the Popularisation of Evolution in Victorian England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hale, Piers J.

    2012-07-01

    The nineteenth-century Anglican Priest Charles Kingsley (1819-1875) was a significant populariser of Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection. Kingsley was successful in this regard because he developed such diverse connections throughout his career. In the 1840s he associated with Chartists and radical journalists; in the 1850s and 1860s he moved freely in scientific circles and was elected Fellow of the Linnean Society of London in 1856 and Fellow of the Geological Society of London in 1863. In 1859 he was appointed Chaplain in Ordinary to the Queen. In 1860 the Prince Consort was willing and able to secure Kingsley appointment as the Regius Professor of Modern History at Cambridge University and he subsequently became tutor to the Prince of Wales. Thereafter he was frequently invited into high Victorian Society. A friend of `Darwin's Bulldog' Thomas Huxley, of the eminent geologist Charles Lyell and a correspondent of Darwin, at every turn he sought to promote Darwin's ideas as theologically orthodox, a life-long campaign in which he was eminently successful.

  5. Charles Manson and the family: the application of sociological theories to multiple murder.

    PubMed

    Atchison, Andrew J; Heide, Kathleen M

    2011-08-01

    In 1969, Charles Manson and his "Family" of followers killed innocent people in an attempt to start a counterrevolution in the United States. Despite the notoriety of this cult leader and his followers over the past 40 years, the sociological literature on crime has not addressed the dynamics behind these seemingly senseless killings. To our knowledge, no serious attempt to apply criminological theory to these murderers and their actions has been made. In this article, labeling theory, general strain theory, and social learning theory are used to explain these murders using a case study approach. The article begins with a description of the goal of Manson's actions. The murders that took place and their victims are briefly summarized, and several criminological theories are introduced. Charles Manson's life is then chronicled, and the theories' connections to events in his life are illustrated. The article also highlights the lives of three followers and how the theories relate to particular events in their past history. The article concludes with a discussion of the limitations of this study and directions for future research.

  6. Charles Darwin's beagle voyage, fossil vertebrate succession, and "the gradual birth & death of species".

    PubMed

    Brinkman, Paul D

    2010-01-01

    The prevailing view among historians of science holds that Charles Darwin became a convinced transmutationist only in the early spring of 1837, after his Beagle collections had been examined by expert British naturalists. With respect to the fossil vertebrate evidence, some historians believe that Darwin was incapable of seeing or understanding the transmutationist implications of his specimens without the help of Richard Owen. There is ample evidence, however, that he clearly recognized the similarities between several of the fossil vertebrates he collected and some of the extant fauna of South America before he returned to Britain. These comparisons, recorded in his correspondence, his diary and his notebooks during the voyage, were instances of a phenomenon that he later called the "law of the succession of types." Moreover, on the Beagle, he was following a geological research agenda outlined in the second volume of Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology, which implies that paleontological data alone could provide an insight into the laws which govern the appearance of new species. Since Darwin claims in On the Origin of Species that fossil vertebrate succession was one of the key lines of evidence that led him to question the fixity of species, it seems certain that he was seriously contemplating transmutation during the Beagle voyage. If so, historians of science need to reconsider both the role of Britain's expert naturalists and the importance of the fossil vertebrate evidence in the development of Darwin's ideas on transmutation.

  7. King Charles' Star: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Dating the Supernova Known as Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunn, M.

    2012-06-01

    (Abstract only) Few astronomical phenomena have been as studied as the supernova known as Cassiopeia A. Widely believed to have occurred in the latter half of the seventeenth century, it is also thought to have gone unrecorded. This paper will argue that Cas A did not go unobserved, but in fact was seen in Britain on May 29, 1630, and coincided with the birth of the future King Charles II of Great Britain. This "noon-day star" is an important feature of Stuart/Restoration propaganda, the significance of which has been widely acknowledged by historians and literary experts. The argument here, however, is that in addition the historical accounts provide credible evidence for a genuine astronomical event, the nature of which must be explained. Combining documentary analysis with an overview of the current scientific thinking on dating supernovae, the authors put forward their case for why Charles' star should be recognized as a sighting of Cas A. Finally, it will be argued that a collaborative approach between the humanities and the sciences can be a valuable tool, not just in furthering our understanding of Cas A, but in the dating of supernovae in general.

  8. King Charles` Star: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Dating the Supernova Known as Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunn, Martin

    2011-05-01

    Few astronomical phenomena have been as studied as the supernova known as Cassiopeia A. Widely believed to have occurred in the latter half of the seventeenth century, it is also thought to have gone unrecorded. This paper will argue that Cas A did not go unobserved, but in fact was seen in Britain on May 29, 1630, and coincided with the birth of the future King Charles II of Great Britain. This 'noon-day star' is an important feature of Stuart/Restoration propaganda, the significance of which has been widely acknowledged by historians and literary experts. The argument here, however, is that in addition the historical accounts provide credible evidence for a genuine astronomical event, the nature of which must be explained. Combining documentary analysis with an overview of the current scientific thinking on dating supernova, the authors put forward their case for why Charles' star should be recognized as a sighting of Cas A. Finally, it will be argued that a collaborative approach between the humanities and the sciences can be a valuable tool, not just in furthering our understanding of Cas A, but in the dating of supernovae in general.

  9. What associates Charles Bonnet syndrome with age-related macular degeneration?

    PubMed

    Vojniković, Bozo; Radeljak, Sanja; Dessardo, Sandro; Zarković-Palijan, Tija; Bajek, Goran; Linsak, Zeljko

    2010-04-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a condition related to patients with visual loss due to age related macular degeneration or glaucoma that are having complex visual hallucinations. The CBS was first described by Swiss physician Charles Bonnet in 1760. Affected patients, who are otherwise mentally healthy people with significant visual loss, have vivid, complex recurrent visual hallucinations (VHs). One characteristic of these hallucinations is that they usually are "Lilliputian hallucinations" as patients experience micropsia (hallucinations in which the characters or objects are distorted and much smaller than normal). The prevalence of Charles Bonnet Syndrome has been reported to be between 10% and 40%; a recent Australian study has found the prevalence to be 17.5%. The high incidence of non-reported CBS is thought to be as a result of patient's fear to report the symptoms as they could be labeled as mentally insane since those type of visual hallucinations could be found in variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders such as drug or alcohol abuse (delirium tremens), Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS), psychosis, schizophrenia, dementia, narcolepsy, epilepsy, Parkinson disease, brain tumors, migraine, as well as, in long term sleep deprivation. VHs can also be presented as the initial sign of the Epstein-Barr virus infection in infectious mononucleosis. Patients who suffer from CBS usually possess insight into the unreality of their visual experiences, which are commonly pleasant but may sometimes cause distress. The hallucinations consist of well-defined, organized, and clear images over which the subject has little control. It is believed that they represent release phenomena due to deafferentiation of the visual association areas of the cerebral cortex, leading to a form of phantom vision. Cognitive defects, social isolation, and sensory deprivation have also been implicated in the etiology of this condition. This study was conducted on 350 patients

  10. What associates Charles Bonnet syndrome with age-related macular degeneration?

    PubMed

    Vojniković, Bozo; Radeljak, Sanja; Dessardo, Sandro; Zarković-Palijan, Tija; Bajek, Goran; Linsak, Zeljko

    2010-04-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) is a condition related to patients with visual loss due to age related macular degeneration or glaucoma that are having complex visual hallucinations. The CBS was first described by Swiss physician Charles Bonnet in 1760. Affected patients, who are otherwise mentally healthy people with significant visual loss, have vivid, complex recurrent visual hallucinations (VHs). One characteristic of these hallucinations is that they usually are "Lilliputian hallucinations" as patients experience micropsia (hallucinations in which the characters or objects are distorted and much smaller than normal). The prevalence of Charles Bonnet Syndrome has been reported to be between 10% and 40%; a recent Australian study has found the prevalence to be 17.5%. The high incidence of non-reported CBS is thought to be as a result of patient's fear to report the symptoms as they could be labeled as mentally insane since those type of visual hallucinations could be found in variety of psychiatric and neurological disorders such as drug or alcohol abuse (delirium tremens), Alice in Wonderland syndrome (AIWS), psychosis, schizophrenia, dementia, narcolepsy, epilepsy, Parkinson disease, brain tumors, migraine, as well as, in long term sleep deprivation. VHs can also be presented as the initial sign of the Epstein-Barr virus infection in infectious mononucleosis. Patients who suffer from CBS usually possess insight into the unreality of their visual experiences, which are commonly pleasant but may sometimes cause distress. The hallucinations consist of well-defined, organized, and clear images over which the subject has little control. It is believed that they represent release phenomena due to deafferentiation of the visual association areas of the cerebral cortex, leading to a form of phantom vision. Cognitive defects, social isolation, and sensory deprivation have also been implicated in the etiology of this condition. This study was conducted on 350 patients

  11. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to the former Liberian regime of Charles Taylor, pursuant to the International Emergency Economic... extraordinary threat to the foreign policy of the United States constituted by the actions and policies of..., and economic institutions and resources. The President further noted that the Comprehensive...

  12. 78 FR 28205 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Lake Charles Carbon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Lake Charles Clean Energy, LLC (LCCE), an affiliate of Leucadia Energy, LLC (Leucadia). Leucadia's... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Notice... Sequestration Project (DOE/EIS-0464D) AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy. ACTION: Notice of availability...

  13. London through Rose-Colored Graphics: Visual Rhetoric and Information Graphic Design in Charles Booth's Maps of London Poverty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimball, Miles A.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, I examine a historical information graphic--Charles Booth's maps of London poverty (1889-1902)--to analyze the cultural basis of ideas of transparency and clarity in information graphics. I argue that Booth's maps derive their rhetorical power from contemporary visual culture as much as from their scientific authority. The visual…

  14. A Life of Learning: Nancy Siraisi. Charles Homer Haskins Prize Lecture for 2010. ACLS Occasional Paper, No. 67

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Council of Learned Societies, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Nancy Siraisi has been a prolific and leading scholar in the history of medicine and science of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. This lecture of hers is the twenty-eighth of series of lectures named for Charles Homer Haskins, first chairman of the American Council of Learned Societies (ACLS) and himself a famed medievalist who brought…

  15. Industrial-hygiene walk-through survey report of Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Fajen, J.M.; Ungers, L.J.

    1986-03-01

    A walk-through survey was conducted at the Firestone Synthetic Rubber and Latex Company, Lake Charles, Louisiana in July, 1985. The purpose of the survey was to obtain information on the 1,3-butadiene polymer manufacturing process and evaluate exposure potential. Bulk samples of vinylpyridine latex, styrene/butadiene rubber, and polybutadiene rubber were analyzed for residual 1,3-butadiene.

  16. Embracing the Outsider, and Suffering Change: Charles A. Martin, Former Editor-in Chief, "The Journal of Negro Education"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Charles A.

    2007-01-01

    This article highlights the accomplishments and challenges of former Editor-in-Chief of "The Journal of Negro Education", Charles A. Martin. He documents the changes he made to the JNE as well as the resistance he faced, which made the process more complicated. There is also a discussion of the impact of "No Child Left Behind Act" on factors…

  17. Out of the Woods and into the Museum: Charles A. Eastman's 1910 Collecting Expedition across Ojibwe Country

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, David

    2008-01-01

    When "From the Deep Woods to Civilization" appeared in 1916, the Dakota writer and activist Charles Alexander Eastman (also known by his Dakota name, Ohiyesa) told of a rather unusual journey across northern Minnesota and Ontario, Canada. The purpose of the venture, which took place during the summer of 1910, was to "purchase rare curios and…

  18. Of Madness and Empire: The Rhetor as "Fool" in the Khartoum Siege Journals of Charles Gordon, 1884

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Jeff D.

    2007-01-01

    This essay examines the rhetorical persona of the "Fool" as employed by General Charles Gordon in six volumes of journals recorded during the siege of Khartoum by Mahdist forces from September to December, 1884. After identifying the particular rhetorical aspects of the "Fool" as social critic/site of ideological contestation, I argue that Gordon…

  19. Remembering Charles B. Huggins' Nobel Prize for Hormonal Treatment of Prostatic Cancer at its 50th Anniversary.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Nils; Moll, Friedrich; Schultheiss, Dirk; Krischel, Matthis

    2016-06-01

    Charles B. Huggins received the Nobel Prize in 1966. Based on archival sources from the Nobel archive we have found that nominators emphasised the practical therapeutic applications of his discoveries that were showing 25 yr after his key publications. PMID:26838478

  20. Charles Hamilton Houston: The Legal Scholar Who Laid the Foundation for Integrated Higher Education in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blight, David W.

    2002-01-01

    Presents the story of Charles Hamilton Houston, an African American legal scholar who led a crusade focused on equal educational opportunities and facilities for African American students. He used the courts to force Americans to listen to his message about racial subjugation, segregation, and lynch law. (SM)

  1. 75 FR 8804 - Safety Zone; NASSCO Launching of USNS Charles Drew, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; NASSCO Launching of USNS Charles Drew, San Diego Bay, San Diego, CA. AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the navigable waters of the San Diego Bay in support...

  2. Astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., in shadow of Lunar Module behind ultraviolet camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    Astronaut Charles M. Duke, Jr., lunar module pilot, stands in the shadow of the Lunar Module (LM) behind the ultraviolet (UV) camera which is in operation. This photograph was taken by astronaut John W. Young, mission commander, during the mission's second extravehicular activity (EVA-2). The UV camera's gold surface is designed to maintain the correct temperature. The astronauts set the prescribed angles of azimuth and elevation (here 14 degrees for photography of the large Magellanic Cloud) and pointed the camera. Over 180 photographs and spectra in far-ultraviolet light were obtained showing clouds of hydrogen and other gases and several thousand stars. The United States flag and Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) are in the left background. While astronauts Young and Duke descended in the Apollo 16 Lunar Module (lm) 'Orion' to explore the Descartes highlands landing site on the Moon, astronaut Thomas K. Mattingly II, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (csm) 'Casper' in lunar orbit.

  3. Charles Dickens and Barnaby Rudge: The First Description of Williams Syndrome?

    PubMed

    Eblovi, Darren; Clardy, Christopher

    2016-02-01

    Williams syndrome, a disorder caused by a genetic deletion and characterized by moderate intellectual disability with relatively strong language skills and a hypersocial personality, was first described in the medical literature in 1961. However, 120 years earlier, Charles Dickens wrote the novel Barnaby Rudge, which follows an "idiot" through London's Gordon Riots of 1780. We propose that Dickens based this character on a person he knew with Williams syndrome. Common features include an "elfin" face, decreased cognitive ability and dependence on a caretaker, strong language skills with emphatic and perseverative speech, anxiety, and an empathetic, overly trusting personality. In the novel, these traits lead the character Barnaby to be duped into actively participating in the riots, which nearly results in his hanging. This example of fiction providing a description of a disorder more detailed than that of medical journals more than a century later should encourage physicians to look to sources beyond traditional scientific articles for valuable clinical information. PMID:26878187

  4. HENRY H. CHEEK AND TRANSFORMISM: NEW LIGHT ON CHARLES DARWIN'S EDINBURGH BACKGROUND.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Bill

    2015-06-20

    Evidence for the transformist ideas espoused by Henry H. Cheek (1807-33), a contemporary of Charles Darwin's at the University of Edinburgh, sheds new light on the intellectual environment of Edinburgh in the late 1820s and early 1830s. Cheek was the author of several papers dealing with the transmutation of species influenced by the theories of Etienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1772-1844), Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (1744-1829) and the Comte de Buffon (1707-88). Some of these were read to student societies, others appeared in the Edinburgh Journal of Natural and Geographical Science, which Cheek edited between 1829 and 1831. His writings give us a valuable window onto some of the transformist theories that were circulating among Darwin's fellow medical students in the late 1820s, to which Darwin would have been exposed during his time in Edinburgh, and for which little other concrete evidence survives.

  5. Sir Charles Sherrington's the integrative action of the nervous system: a centenary appreciation.

    PubMed

    Burke, Robert E

    2007-04-01

    In 1906 Sir Charles Sherrington published The Integrative Action of the Nervous System, which was a collection of ten lectures delivered two years before at Yale University in the United States. In this monograph Sherrington summarized two decades of painstaking experimental observations and his incisive interpretation of them. It settled the then-current debate between the "Reticular Theory" versus "Neuron Doctrine" ideas about the fundamental nature of the nervous system in mammals in favor of the latter, and it changed forever the way in which subsequent generations have viewed the organization of the central nervous system. Sherrington's magnum opus contains basic concepts and even terminology that are now second nature to every student of the subject. This brief article reviews the historical context in which the book was written, summarizes its content, and considers its impact on Neurology and Neuroscience.

  6. Charles Lyell from 1832 to 1835: marriage, Principles, 2 trips to Heidelberg, snails and loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Ian; Markovic, Slobodan; O'Hara-Dhand, Ken

    2010-03-01

    Charles Lyell, on his way to becoming a famous geologist, married Mary Horner in Bonn in July 1832; volume 3 of his `Principles of Geology' was published by John Murray in London in May 1833. Between these two dates Lyell encountered the loess of the Rhine valley. The loess impressed Lyell and he included mentions of it in the Principles, first in 1833 and then, with some revised ideas, in volume 4 of the 4th edition published in 1835. Twelve editions of the Principles were published between 1830 and 1875 and it became one of the most important works in the development of geology, and made a major contribution to the worldwide spread of loess awareness. It is possible that Lyell was drawn to the loess because of its high molluscan content, he was particularly attracted to the study of shells.

  7. The Southern Surgical Association History of Medicine Scholarship presentation: Dr. Charles Drew, a surgical pioneer.

    PubMed

    Cornwell, Edward E; Chang, David C; Leffall, LaSalle D

    2006-05-01

    When one considers the circumstances of his birth, the barriers that he had to overcome, and his abbreviated life span (<46 years), a strong case can be made that Charles Drew, MD, CM, MDSc, was one of the most accomplished surgeons of the 20th Century; yet many practitioners and instructors of the surgical sciences know little or nothing about him. There are others who have heard of him and still harbor popular misconceptions about the circumstances of his death that have been perpetuated by several media outlets. The Southern Surgical Association promotes a substantially more inclusive brand of surgical fellowship than it did during the lifetime of Dr. Drew. We believe that the membership would greatly appreciate knowing some of the details of Dr. Drew's life, particularly his major scientific contributions and his commitment to excellence in patient care, and in the training of young surgeons.

  8. Henry H. Cheek and transformism: new light on Charles Darwin's Edinburgh background

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Evidence for the transformist ideas espoused by Henry H. Cheek (1807–33), a contemporary of Charles Darwin's at the University of Edinburgh, sheds new light on the intellectual environment of Edinburgh in the late 1820s and early 1830s. Cheek was the author of several papers dealing with the transmutation of species influenced by the theories of Étienne Geoffroy Saint-Hilaire (1772–1844), Jean-Baptiste Lamarck (1744–1829) and the Comte de Buffon (1707–88). Some of these were read to student societies, others appeared in the Edinburgh Journal of Natural and Geographical Science, which Cheek edited between 1829 and 1831. His writings give us a valuable window onto some of the transformist theories that were circulating among Darwin's fellow medical students in the late 1820s, to which Darwin would have been exposed during his time in Edinburgh, and for which little other concrete evidence survives. PMID:26665300

  9. Two new Mio-Pliocene Chadian hominids enlighten Charles Darwin's 1871 prediction.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Michel

    2010-10-27

    The idea of an evolutionary sequence for humans is quite recent. Over the last 150 years, we have discovered unexpected ancestors, numerous close relatives and our deep evolutionary roots in Africa. In the last decade, three Late Miocene hominids have been described, two about 6 Ma (Ardipithecus and Orrorin) in East Africa and the third dated to about 7 Ma (Sahelanthropus) in Central Africa. The specimens are too few to propose definite relationship to other species, but clearly these belong to a new evolutive grade distinct from Australopithecus and Homo. Moreover, all of them were probably habitual bipeds and lived in woodlands, thus falsifying the savannah hypothesis of human origins. In light of all this recent knowledge, Charles Darwin predicted correctly in 1871 that Africa is the birthplace of humans, chimpanzees and our close relatives.

  10. [Legitimation of Andries Van Wesele, Andreas Vesalius's father, by the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the Fifth].

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hyonosuke

    2006-06-01

    Andries van Wesele, Andreas Vesalius's father and a court pharmacist of the Holy Roman Emperor Charles the fifth, was an illegitimate son of Everard van Wesele, a court physician of the Hapsburgs. In the year of 1531, Andries was legitimated by the Emperor. The legitimation letter was written in French. The author tried to translate and analyze the letter. By this legitimation, not only Andries himself was legitimated but also his successors were approved to succeed Andries. By this letter, Andreas Vesalius obtained his position as a hereditary member of a family serving the court of the Hapsburgs, and as a result, he started his career as a physician of the court. PMID:17152536

  11. An astronomer calls: extracts from the diaries of Charles Piazzi Smyth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brück, Mary T.

    2003-06-01

    Charles Piazzi Smyth, who for forty-two years in the nineteenth century was Astronomer Royal for Scotland, was an indefatigable traveller who visited many observatories, amateur and professional, at home and abroad, during his years of office. An imaginative, artistic if somewhat eccentric character, he kept informal diaries in which he recorded his day to day experiences and impressions, personal as well as scientific. His reactions to people and places could be prejudiced, but were always interesting. The purpose of assembling these extracts is not so much to throw light on their author, whose story has already been told, as to provide glimpses of what life was like for working astronomers at that time, and of the extent of their collaboration and mutual support.

  12. "A dedicated missionary". Charles Galton Darwin and the new quantum mechanics in Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navarro, Jaume

    In this paper I discuss the work on quantum physics and wave mechanics by Charles Galton Darwin, a Cambridge wrangler of the last generation, as a case study to better understand the early reception of quantum physics in Britain. I argue that his proposal in the early 1920s to abandon the strict conservation of energy, as well as his enthusiastic embracement of wave mechanics at the end of the decade, can be easily understood by tracing his ontological and epistemological commitments to his early training in the Cambridge Mathematical Tripos. I also suggest that Darwin's work cannot be neglected in a study of quantum physics in Britain, since he was one of very few fellows of the Royal Society able to judge and explain quantum physics and quantum mechanics.

  13. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Sue Frantz.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2016 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is Sue Frantz. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the Distinguished Teaching Award at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record

  14. CHARLES SHELDON ANTELOPE RANGE AND SHELDON NATIONAL ANTELOPE REFUGE, NEVADA AND OREGON.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cathrall, J.B.; Tuchek, E.T.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Charles Sheldon Antelope Range and Sheldon National Antelope Refuge, in Humboldt and Washoe Counties, Nevada, and Lake and Harney Counties, Oregon, was conducted. The investigation identified areas of mineral-resource potential within the range and refuge. The range and refuge have areas of substantiated resource potential for precious opal and uranium, a demonstrated resource of decorative building stone, and areas with probable resource potential for mercury and for base- and precious-metal sulfide deposits. Reservoir temperatures, estimated from the analysis of thermal springs, indicate that a probable potential for geothermal resources exists in two areas in the range. No other energy resources were identitied in the area.

  15. "Ablation of the parental images": a secret core in Charles Rycroft's psychoanalytic thought.

    PubMed

    Borgogno, Franco; Cassullo, Gabriele

    2010-06-01

    This article arises from the need to "present" (that is, to read again in a "present and actual" light) the paper, "Why Analysts Need Their Patients' Transferences" by Charles Rycroft (which first appeared in 1993 and is re-published in this Special Issue), and is therefore strictly connected to the ideas the latter contains. The authors, on the one hand, outline the stages of the journey that took Rycroft to elaborate the concept of "ablation of the parental images", and on the other, retrace his personal "analytic genealogy" and discover a "missing forefather", Sándor Ferenczi, who has represented for a long time a direct "missing link" in the history of psychoanalysis.

  16. 'A ticklish sort of affair': Charles Mott, Haydock Lodge and the economics of asylumdom.

    PubMed

    Hirst, David

    2005-09-01

    In June 1846 complaints about the treatment of a Welsh clergyman at the privately run Haydock Lodge Asylum in England heralded a series of allegations about maltreatment of pauper patients at the institution. These prompted a number of Parliamentary reports on the institution. Allegations were also made about connections between the asylum and officials at the Poor Law Commission. This article demonstrates that many of the problems at Haydock Lodge relate to the character and personal circumstances of its first Superintendent, Charles Mott, a former Assistant Poor Law Commissioner. Despite this specific causation, the Haydock Lodge affair had a more general influence in raising once again questions about the propriety of entrusting the care of publicly funded patients to private institutions.

  17. William Charles Wells (1757-1817) and vestibular research before Purkinje and Flourens.

    PubMed

    Wade, N J

    2000-01-01

    Vestibular research before Flourens typically involved vertigo and eye movements. In 1820 Purkinje integrated these in studies of postrotary vertigo and he is linked with Flourens as a founder of vestibular research. In the late eighteenth century Erasmus Darwin described vertigo in detail, but he did not accept that it involved an oculomotor component. Darwin reached this conclusion despite detailed experiments by William Charles Wells (1757-1817), who described the pattern of postrotary nystagmus and its dependence on head orientation during rotation. Wells generated afterimages prior to rotation and subsequently compared their motions with those of real images. He was able to distinguish between the slow and fast phases of nystagmus, its reducing amplitude following cessation of rotation, its suppression with fixation, and its torsional dimension. In many ways, Wells's experiments were more sophisticated than those of Purkinje, and he should be recognised as a founder of vestibular research. Possible reasons for the neglect of Wells's work are discussed.

  18. Moving with climbing plants from Charles Darwin's time into the 21st century.

    PubMed

    Isnard, Sandrine; Silk, Wendy K

    2009-07-01

    We provide an overview of research on climbing plants from Charles Darwin to the present day. Following Darwin's interests, this review will focus on functional perspectives including attachment mechanisms and stem structure and function. We draw attention to a number of unsolved problems inviting future research. These include the mechanism for establishment of the twining habit, a quantitative description following the development of a tissue element through space and time, the chemistry of sticky exudates, the microstructure of xylem and the capacity for water storage, the vulnerability to embolism, and the mechanism for embolism repair. In conclusion we cite evidence that, in response to increasing CO(2) concentration, anthropic perturbation and/ or increasing forest fragmentation, lianas are increasing relative to tree species. In the 21st century, we are returning to the multiscale, multidisciplinary approach taken by Darwin to understand natural history.

  19. Charles L. Brewer Award for Distinguished Teaching of Psychology: Sue Frantz.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The American Psychological Foundation (APF) Charles L. Brewer Distinguished Teaching of Psychology Award recognizes an outstanding career contribution to the teaching of psychology. The 2016 recipient of the Distinguished Teaching Award is Sue Frantz. Dorothy W. Cantor, president of the APF, will present the Distinguished Teaching Award at the 124th Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association on August 5, 2016, at 4:00 p.m. Members of the 2016 APF Board of Trustees are Dorothy W. Cantor, president; David H. Barlow, vice president; Melba J. T. Vasquez, secretary; Richard C. McCarty, treasurer; Elisabeth R. Straus, executive vice president/executive director; Cynthia Belar; Camilla Benbow; Rosie Phillips Bingham; Connie S. Chan; Anthony Jackson; Terence M. Keane; Archie L. Turner; W. Bruce Walsh; and Bonnie Markham and Rick McGraw, APA Board of Directors liaisons. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27504572

  20. Charles Bonnet Syndrome Following Trans-Sphenoidal Adenomectomy without Optic Nerve Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jang-Ho; Ahn, Joon-Ho; Park, Jun-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) can develop after trans-sphenoidal adenomectomy (TSA); however, the neural mechanisms remain unknown. Sensory deprivation and releasing phenomenon are both hypothetical explanations for this condition; however, there is no definite evidence that strongly supports either supposition. We report the first case of CBS after TSA without optic nerve atrophy. Postoperatively, the patient's vision seemed to be relatively well preserved, apart from the left-side hemianopsia in the right eye. Distinctive visual hallucinations only appeared when his eyes were closed, and these responded to quetiapine in a dose-dependent manner. Dose dependent change in colors and formation of hallucination was reported. Two weeks after quetiapine initiation, the patient's CBS was completely resolved. This unique case suggests that blocking sensory input from the periphery is more critical than neural damage of the bottom-up connection to the visual association cortex. In addition, quetiapine should be considered as a specific treatment for CBS. PMID:27757139

  1. Two new Mio-Pliocene Chadian hominids enlighten Charles Darwin's 1871 prediction

    PubMed Central

    Brunet, Michel

    2010-01-01

    The idea of an evolutionary sequence for humans is quite recent. Over the last 150 years, we have discovered unexpected ancestors, numerous close relatives and our deep evolutionary roots in Africa. In the last decade, three Late Miocene hominids have been described, two about 6 Ma (Ardipithecus and Orrorin) in East Africa and the third dated to about 7 Ma (Sahelanthropus) in Central Africa. The specimens are too few to propose definite relationship to other species, but clearly these belong to a new evolutive grade distinct from Australopithecus and Homo. Moreover, all of them were probably habitual bipeds and lived in woodlands, thus falsifying the savannah hypothesis of human origins. In light of all this recent knowledge, Charles Darwin predicted correctly in 1871 that Africa is the birthplace of humans, chimpanzees and our close relatives. PMID:20855305

  2. The professionalisation of Irish medicine in the generations before Charles Lucas.

    PubMed

    Lyons, M A

    2015-09-01

    The educational opportunities and qualifications, corporate structures and regulation that had become accepted features of the Irish medical profession in the era of Charles Lucas were the fruits of a slow process of professionalization initiated by a handful of Irish medics who, from the 1620s, began tackling poor standards of medical practice in an era of medical pluralism. This paper begins by reviewing the standard of practice in early seventeenth-century Ireland. Through the examples of Thomas Arthur, M.D. and John Clavell, a self-styled medic, differences in the approaches adopted by university-trained physicians and unorthodox practitioners are highlighted. The succession of significant steps taken in this professionalization process are traced, with particular emphasis on the failed attempt to establish a Royal College of Physicians in Dublin during the mid-1620s and the importance of the influx of English physicians in the 1650s for the creation of permanent corporate structures and regulation.

  3. 'This excellent observer ...': the correspondence between Charles Darwin and James Crichton-Browne, 1869-75.

    PubMed

    Pearn, Alison M

    2010-06-01

    Between May 1869 and December 1875, Charles Darwin exchanged more than 40 letters with James Crichton-Browne, superintendent of the West Riding Pauper Lunatic Asylum, Wakefield, Yorkshire. This paper charts their relationship within the context of Darwin's wider research networks and methods; it analyses the contribution that Crichton-Browne made to the writing of Expression, arguing that the information he provided materially affected Darwin's thesis, and that it was partly the need to assimilate this that led Darwin to publish Expression separately from Descent. The letters help to reconstruct Crichton-Browne's early research interests, and document Darwin's little-explored role as a patron. Both men are revealed within a collaborative scientific network, with each of them at various times a beneficiary or a promoter.

  4. Sawfly taxa (Hymenoptera, Symphyta) described by Edward Newman and Charles Healy

    PubMed Central

    Liston, Andrew D.; Prous, Marko

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Type specimens of seven nominal species of sawfly described by Edward Newman and one by Charles Healy were studied. This material is housed in the Oxford University Museum of Natural History, United Kingdom. The following new synonymies are proposed (valid names in parentheses): Hartigia Schiødte, 1839 (Phylloecus Newman, 1838), Cephus helleri Taschenberg, 1871 (Phylloecus faunus Newman, 1838) and Euura gallae Newman, 1837 (Euura mucronata (Hartig, 1837)). The type species of Euura Newman, 1837 and Euura subgenus Gemmura E. L. Smith, 1968 belong to the same taxonomic species, Euura mucronata (Hartig, 1837), so that these genus group names become new synonyms. Lectotypes are designated for Phyllotoma tormentillae Healy, 1868, Fenusa ianthe Newman, 1837, Fenusa parviceps Newman, 1837, Selandria pallida Newman, 1837 and Phylloecus faunus Newman, 1838. 26 new combinations are proposed for species formerly placed in Hartigia and here transferred to Phylloecus, and 4 original combinations are re-instated as valid. PMID:24715803

  5. Geohydrologic data for the St. Charles County well field and public-water supply, 1985-91, and projected public-water supply, 1995 and 2000,for St. Charles County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mugel, D.N.

    1993-01-01

    The St. Charles County well field consists of 8 wells that penetrate the entire thickness of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer. The wells range from 98 to 116 ft deep. The lower 40 ft of each well is screened and open to the aquifer. The specific capacities of the wells calculated soon after well completion ranged from 115 to 248 gal/min/ft of drawdown. Transmissivities range from 900 to 60,200 sq ft/day. Hydraulic conductivities range from 23 to 602 ft/day. Storage coefficients range from 0.005 to 0.2. A tracer test determined effective porosity ranging from 0.21 to 0.32. A point dilution test determined a groundwater velocity of 0.83 ft/day. From 1985-91, the average daily water supply from the St. Charles County well field and water- treatment plant increased from 5.76 to 10.23 Mgal/day, an increase from 36.2 to 42.2 percent of the total quantity of water supplied by major public-water suppliers in St. Charles County. The average daily water supply from the well field and water-treatment plant is projected to increase to 11.0 Mgal/day during 1995 and 12.2 Mgal/day during 2000. The St. Charles County Water Department's projections of peak daily demands from customers indicate that these demands will exceed the capacity of the water-treatment plant during 1995 and will exceed the capacities of both the well field and water-treatment plant during 2000.

  6. Spatial distribution, temporal variability, and chemistry of the salt wedge in the lower Charles River, Massachusetts, June 1998 to July 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breault, R.F.; Barlow, L.K.; Reisig, K.D.; Parker, G.W.

    2000-01-01

    The Charles River is of great recreational and ecological value to the Boston metropolitan region and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. It is also the focus of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) Region I, Clean Charles 2005 Task Force. The main goal of the Task Force is to make the Charles River 'fishable and swimmable' by the year 2005. Achieving 'fishable and swimmable' conditions will require continued progress in addressing a range of environmental conditions now degrading water quality, including the infiltration of saltwater from Boston Harbor into the freshwater Charles River.To better understand the pattern of saltwater intrusion, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Massachusetts Department of Environmental Management (MADEM), and New England Interstate Water Pollution Control Commission (NEIWPCC), collected data on the spatial distribution, temporal variability, and chemistry of the saltwater that entered the lower Charles River from June 1998 to July 1999. The purpose of this investigation is to extend and complement a regional-scale study of Charles River water quality conducted in 1996 (T. Faber, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, written commun., 1997), and the ongoing water monitoring activities of the Massachusetts Water Resources Authority (MWRA) and the Charles River Watershed Association (CRWA). The data collected by this investigation supports the Clean Charles 2005 Task Force by providing detailed information concerning a major factor limiting 'fishable and swimmable' conditions in the lower Charles River. Finally, the study will be used to assist current planning efforts of the Metropolitan District Commission (MDC) to restore the historic parklands of the lower Charles River.The 'Basin' is the local term for the reach of the Charles River that begins at the Watertown Dam in Watertown, Mass., and extends about 8 mi through suburban and urban areas to Boston

  7. Low-dose aripiprazole resolved complex hallucinations in the left visual field after right occipital infarction (Charles Bonnet syndrome).

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng-Che; Liu, Hsing-Cheng

    2011-06-01

    We reported a patient who suffered from complex visual hallucinations with left homonymous hemianopsia. Brain imaging showed an acute haemorrhage infarct at the right occipital lobe. Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS) was suspected and aripiprazole was prescribed at 5 mg daily. After 3 weeks, the symptoms of hallucinations and anxiety were relieved. Although some CBS patients might be self-limited without discomfort, low-dose aripiprazole can be considered as a safe medication for significantly anxious patients with CBS.

  8. Engaging with Lyell: Alfred Russel Wallace's Sarawak Law and Ternate papers as reactions to Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology.

    PubMed

    Costa, J T

    2013-12-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) and Charles Darwin (1809-1882) are honored as the founders of modern evolutionary biology. Accordingly, much attention has focused on their relationship, from their independent development of the principle of natural selection to the receipt by Darwin of Wallace's essay from Ternate in the spring of 1858, and the subsequent reading of the Wallace and Darwin papers at the Linnean Society on 1 July 1858. In the events of 1858 Wallace and Darwin are typically seen as central players, with Darwin's friends Charles Lyell (1797-1875) and Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) playing supporting roles. This narrative has resulted in an under-appreciation of a more central role for Charles Lyell as both Wallace's inspiration and foil. The extensive anti-transmutation arguments in Lyell's landmark Principles of Geology were taken as the definitive statement on the subject. Wallace, in his quest to solve the mystery of species origins, engaged with Lyell's arguments in his private field notebooks in a way that is concordant with his engagement with Lyell in the 1855 and 1858 papers. I show that Lyell was the object of Wallace's Sarawak Law and Ternate papers through a consideration of the circumstances that led Wallace to send his Ternate paper to Darwin, together with an analysis of the material that Wallace drew upon from the Principles. In this view Darwin was, ironically, intended for a supporting role in mediating Wallace's attempted dialog with Lyell. PMID:24014172

  9. Ground-water flow and ground- and surface-water interaction at the Weldon Spring quarry, St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Imes, J.L.; Kleeschulte, M.J.

    1997-12-31

    Ground-water-level measurements to support remedial actions were made in 37 piezometers and 19 monitoring wells during a 19-month period to assess the potential for ground-water flow from an abandoned quarry to the nearby St. Charles County well field, which withdraws water from the base of the alluvial aquifer. From 1957 to 1966, low-level radioactive waste products from the Weldon Spring chemical plant were placed in the quarry a few hundred feet north of the Missouri River alluvial plain. Uranium-based contaminants subsequently were detected in alluvial ground water south of the quarry. During all but flood conditions, lateral ground-water flow in the bedrock from the quarry, as interpreted from water-table maps, generally is southwest toward Little Femme Osage Creek or south into the alluvial aquifer. After entering the alluvial aquifer, the ground water flows southeast to east toward a ground-water depression presumably produced by pumping at the St. Charles County well field. The depression position varies depending on the Missouri River stage and probably the number and location of active wells in the St. Charles County well field.

  10. Engaging with Lyell: Alfred Russel Wallace's Sarawak Law and Ternate papers as reactions to Charles Lyell's Principles of Geology.

    PubMed

    Costa, J T

    2013-12-01

    Alfred Russel Wallace (1823-1913) and Charles Darwin (1809-1882) are honored as the founders of modern evolutionary biology. Accordingly, much attention has focused on their relationship, from their independent development of the principle of natural selection to the receipt by Darwin of Wallace's essay from Ternate in the spring of 1858, and the subsequent reading of the Wallace and Darwin papers at the Linnean Society on 1 July 1858. In the events of 1858 Wallace and Darwin are typically seen as central players, with Darwin's friends Charles Lyell (1797-1875) and Joseph Dalton Hooker (1817-1911) playing supporting roles. This narrative has resulted in an under-appreciation of a more central role for Charles Lyell as both Wallace's inspiration and foil. The extensive anti-transmutation arguments in Lyell's landmark Principles of Geology were taken as the definitive statement on the subject. Wallace, in his quest to solve the mystery of species origins, engaged with Lyell's arguments in his private field notebooks in a way that is concordant with his engagement with Lyell in the 1855 and 1858 papers. I show that Lyell was the object of Wallace's Sarawak Law and Ternate papers through a consideration of the circumstances that led Wallace to send his Ternate paper to Darwin, together with an analysis of the material that Wallace drew upon from the Principles. In this view Darwin was, ironically, intended for a supporting role in mediating Wallace's attempted dialog with Lyell.

  11. A magpie with a card-index mind - Charles Davies Sherborn 1861-1942.

    PubMed

    Shindler, Karolyn

    2016-01-01

    Charles Davies Sherborn was geologist, indexer and bibliographer extraordinaire. He was fascinated by science from an early age and like so many Victorians, the young Sherborn was a passionate natural history collector and was obsessed with expanding his collection of land and freshwater shells. He later described himself as being a 'thorough magpie' and having 'a card-index mind', and these two traits coalesced in his monumental Index Animalium, the compilation of which occupied 43 years of his life. One of the first visitors through the doors of the Natural History Museum in South Kensington when it opened in 1881, Sherborn began work there seven years later as one of the small band of unofficial scientific workers, paid by the number of fossils he prepared. By the time of his death in 1942, Sherborn's corner in the Museum was the first port of call for generations of scientists seeking advice, information - or an invitation to one of his famous 'smoke and chat' parties. In addition to his work on the Index, Sherborn is also responsible for rescuing from damp and probable destruction the huge archive of Sir Richard Owen, the great comparative anatomist and the prime mover behind the creation of the Natural History Museum, London. Without Sherborn, this invaluable resource of correspondence, manuscripts and books may well have been irretrievably ruined.

  12. Evaluation of the Swedish breeding program for cavalier King Charles spaniels

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    A breeding program with the aim of reducing the prevalence of mitral regurgitation (MR) caused by myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) in Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCS) is currently ongoing in Sweden. In this investigation 353 CKCS were selected as a sample of the population and 150 were examined by auscultation for heart murmurs when they reached the age of six years in 2007 and 2009. The aim with this investigation was to study the prevalence of heart murmurs in six-year-old CKCS and to estimate if prevalence has decreased since the breeding program was introduced 2001. The effect of the breeding program was evaluated by comparing the prevalence of heart murmurs in the two groups. In 2007, the prevalence of heart murmurs was 52% (50% for females and 54% for males) and in 2009, the prevalence was 55% (44% for females and 67% for males). No significant difference was found in the prevalence of heart murmurs between 2007 and 2009 (P = 0.8). For all six-year-old CKCS, the prevalence of heart murmur was 53% (females 46% and males 61%), which is higher than previous Swedish investigations. PMID:20863375

  13. Charles Wesley Hargitt (1852-1927): American educator and cnidarian biologist.

    PubMed

    Calder, Dale R

    2009-10-01

    Charles Wesley Hargitt was born near Lawrenceburg, Indiana, USA, and died at Syracuse, New York. After a brief career as a Methodist Episcopal Minister, he carried out graduate studies in biology at Illinois Wesleyan University and Ohio University. He served briefly on the faculty at Moores Hill College and later at Miami University of Ohio before receiving an appointment at Syracuse University. Hargitt spent 36 years at Syracuse, and for 21 years was a trustee of the Marine Biological Laboratory, Woods Hole, Massachusetts. His research encompassed animal behaviour, cell biology, development, ecology, natural history, and taxonomy, as well as education, eugenics, and theology, and he wrote or contributed to more than 100 publications in science. Approximately half of these were on Cnidaria, with 41 of them on Hydrozoa. His most important works in hydrozoan taxonomy were on species of the Woods Hole region, the Philippines, and south China. Hargitt was author of three genera and 48 species and subspecies ascribed to Hydrozoa, seven species of Anthozoa, and one species of Cubozoa. Four species of hydroids are named in his honour. PMID:20014507

  14. Multilocus genotypes from Charles Darwin's finches: biodiversity lost since the voyage of the Beagle.

    PubMed

    Petren, Kenneth; Grant, Peter R; Grant, B Rosemary; Clack, Andrew A; Lescano, Ninnia V

    2010-04-12

    Genetic analysis of museum specimens offers a direct window into a past that can predate the loss of extinct forms. We genotyped 18 Galápagos finches collected by Charles Darwin and companions during the voyage of the Beagle in 1835, and 22 specimens collected in 1901. Our goals were to determine if significant genetic diversity has been lost since the Beagle voyage and to determine the genetic source of specimens for which the collection locale was not recorded. Using 'ancient' DNA techniques, we quantified variation at 14 autosomal microsatellite loci. Assignment tests showed several museum specimens genetically matched recently field-sampled birds from their island of origin. Some were misclassified or were difficult to classify. Darwin's exceptionally large ground finches (Geospiza magnirostris) from Floreana and San Cristóbal were genetically distinct from several other currently existing populations. Sharp-beaked ground finches (Geospiza difficilis) from Floreana and Isabela were also genetically distinct. These four populations are currently extinct, yet they were more genetically distinct from congeners than many other species of Darwin's finches are from each other. We conclude that a significant amount of the finch biodiversity observed and collected by Darwin has been lost since the voyage of the Beagle. PMID:20194164

  15. From Charles Darwin's botanical country-house studies to modern plant biology.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, U; Briggs, W R

    2009-11-01

    As a student of theology at Cambridge University, Charles Darwin (1809-1882) attended the lectures of the botanist John S. Henslow (1796-1861). This instruction provided the basis for his life-long interest in plants as well as the species question. This was a major reason why in his book On the Origin of Species, which was published 150 years ago, Darwin explained his metaphorical phrase 'struggle for life' with respect to animals and plants. In this article, we review Darwin's botanical work with reference to the following topics: the struggle for existence in the vegetable kingdom with respect to the phytochrome-mediated shade avoidance response; the biology of flowers and Darwin's plant-insect co-evolution hypothesis; climbing plants and the discovery of action potentials; the power of movement in plants and Darwin's conflict with the German plant physiologist Julius Sachs; and light perception by growing grass coleoptiles with reference to the phototropins. Finally, we describe the establishment of the scientific discipline of Plant Biology that took place in the USA 80 years ago, and define this area of research with respect to Darwin's work on botany and the physiology of higher plants. PMID:19796355

  16. The 'root-brain' hypothesis of Charles and Francis Darwin: Revival after more than 125 years.

    PubMed

    Baluska, Frantisek; Mancuso, Stefano; Volkmann, Dieter; Barlow, Peter W

    2009-12-01

    This year celebrates the 200(th) aniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin, best known for his theory of evolution summarized in On the Origin of Species. Less well known is that, in the second half of his life, Darwin's major scientific focus turned towards plants. He wrote several books on plants, the next-to-last of which, The Power of Movement of Plants, published together with his son Francis, opened plants to a new view. Here we amplify the final sentence of this book in which the Darwins proposed that: "It is hardly an exaggeration to say that the tip of the radicle thus endowed [with sensitivity] and having the power of directing the movements of the adjoining parts, acts like the brain of one of the lower animals; the brain being seated within the anterior end of the body, receiving impressions from the sense-organs, and directing the several movements." This sentence conveys two important messages: first, that the root apex may be considered to be a 'brain-like' organ endowed with a sensitivity which controls its navigation through soil; second, that the root apex represents the anterior end of the plant body. In this article, we discuss both these statements. PMID:20514226

  17. Living arrangements of the elderly in China: evidence from the CHARLS national baseline

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xiaoyan; Strauss, John; Tian, Meng; Zhao, Yaohui

    2016-01-01

    Declining fertility in China has raised concerns about elderly support, especially when public support is inadequate. Using rich information from the nationally representative China Health and Retirement Longitudinal Study (CHARLS) baseline survey, we describe the patterns of current living arrangements of the Chinese elderly and investigate their determinants and correlation with intergenerational transfers. We find that roughly 41% of Chinese aged 60 and over live with an adult child; living with a male adult child being strongly preferred. However another 34% have an adult child living in the same immediate neighborhood and 14% in the same county; only 5% have an adult child with none of them living in the same county. At the same time, a large fraction of the elderly, 45% in our sample, live alone or with only a spouse. In general, women, those from western provinces, and those from rural areas are more likely to live with or close to their adult children than their corresponding counterparts, but different types of intergenerational transfers play a supplementary role in the unequal distribution of living arrangements. Among non-co-resident children, those living close by visit their parents more frequently and have more communications by other means. In contrast, children who live farther away are more likely to send financial and in-kind transfers and send larger amounts. PMID:27182281

  18. Bibliographic citations pertinent to the Weldon Spring Site, St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, P. T.; Michelson, D. C.; Knox, N. P.

    1985-08-01

    This report is a compilation of 166 bibliographic references pertinent to the Weldon Spring Site (WSS), St. Charles County, Missouri. The WSS is a surplus US government facility which consists of the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant; two separate low-level radioactive waste storage properties, designated the ''raffinate pits'' and ''quarry'', and a number of potentially contaminated vicinity properties. The facility was used by the US Atomic Energy Commission from 1957 to 1966 to refine uranium. After several years the US Department of the Army acquired responsibility for the Weldon Spring Chemical Plant, performed some limited radiological decontamination, and then cancelled plans to construct a chemical process. Contamination of the facility and adjacent lands resulted from operation of the refining facility and the storage, transport, and disposal of process wastes on the property, as well as subsequent decontamination activities. All identified references to published technical documents that relate to the WSS were included in this report. In some cases citations from the reference section of existing documents were included in this report with no hardcopy to substantiate the existence of the document referenced.

  19. A magpie with a card-index mind - Charles Davies Sherborn 1861-1942.

    PubMed

    Shindler, Karolyn

    2016-01-01

    Charles Davies Sherborn was geologist, indexer and bibliographer extraordinaire. He was fascinated by science from an early age and like so many Victorians, the young Sherborn was a passionate natural history collector and was obsessed with expanding his collection of land and freshwater shells. He later described himself as being a 'thorough magpie' and having 'a card-index mind', and these two traits coalesced in his monumental Index Animalium, the compilation of which occupied 43 years of his life. One of the first visitors through the doors of the Natural History Museum in South Kensington when it opened in 1881, Sherborn began work there seven years later as one of the small band of unofficial scientific workers, paid by the number of fossils he prepared. By the time of his death in 1942, Sherborn's corner in the Museum was the first port of call for generations of scientists seeking advice, information - or an invitation to one of his famous 'smoke and chat' parties. In addition to his work on the Index, Sherborn is also responsible for rescuing from damp and probable destruction the huge archive of Sir Richard Owen, the great comparative anatomist and the prime mover behind the creation of the Natural History Museum, London. Without Sherborn, this invaluable resource of correspondence, manuscripts and books may well have been irretrievably ruined. PMID:26877651

  20. Matters of priority: Herbert Mayo, Charles Bell and discoveries in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Bradley, James

    2014-10-01

    Between 1822 and the late 1830s a highly personal priority dispute was fought between the celebrated surgeon and anatomist Sir Charles Bell and his ex-student Herbert Mayo. The dispute was over the motor and sensory functions of the Vth and VIIth cranial nerves. Over the course of the 1820s and the 1830s, the competing claims of Bell and Mayo were presented in newspapers, journals, and textbooks. But by the time of Bell's death in 1842, Mayo had been discredited, a seemingly tragic footnote in the history of nervous discovery. And yet, with the benefit of hindsight, Bell's case was at best disingenuous. His success was not due to any intrinsic scientific merit in his argument, but rather his ability to create a narrative that undermined the credibility of Mayo. However, only when Mayo's public performances elided with Bell's descriptions did this ploy succeed. As a result, the dispute illuminates the importance of credibility to the creation of an idealised scientific medical practitioner.

  1. The Essay on waters and other medical writings of Charles Lucas.

    PubMed

    Murphy, S J

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to Charles Lucas's medical career, in its own way just as interesting and important as his better-known political campaigns. Lucas's first concentrated period of medical activity was in the 1730s, when he had qualified as an apothecary, the second in the 1750s, following his flight from Ireland and achievement of qualifications in medicine. Having been prominently involved in the campaign which led to the 1735 drugs regulation act, in 1741 Lucas published a pamphlet, Pharmacomastix, which detailed abuses common in the apothecary's trade and pressed for more radical controls. His most substantial medical work, An Essay on Waters, was published in London in 1756, being devoted to analysis of European spas and the promotion of hydrotherapy. Lucas was able to return to Ireland in 1761 and was elected MP for Dublin city. While politics occupied most of his time until his death in 1771, Lucas maintained his interest in matters medical, securing the passage of another drugs regulation act in 1761, which remarkably is still on the Irish statute book.

  2. Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychiatric Comorbidity in a Patient with Charles Bonnet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. A significant proportion of patients with neurological disorders may have comorbid psychiatric symptomology, which may be managed by primary outpatient neurologists. Referral to their psychiatric colleagues is mediated by available consultation-liaison units and according to clinical opinion. Aims of Case Report. We present the case of a patient whose initial referral to epilepsy clinic led to a workup which ultimately diagnosed her with nonepileptic seizures (NES). In the course of her follow-up, she developed intractable headaches, and worsening mood symptoms and eventually exhibited Psychotic Features for which psychiatry became coinvolved in her care. Major Depression with Psychotic Features and Charles Bonnet syndrome were considered as a likely comorbid diagnoses. Her pharmacologic management on venlafaxine and quetiapine eventually caused substantial amelioration of her psychiatric symptomology as longitudinally followed by PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores. Conclusion. Optimal evaluation and management of mental illness in patients with complex neurologic symptomology may require independent evaluation and treatment by psychiatrists when clinically appropriate. PMID:25431721

  3. [When medicine appeals to our feelings: Charles de Villers' Le magnétiseur amoureux].

    PubMed

    Moruno, Dolores Martín

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the representation of affective phenomena brought into play in Charles de Villers' Le magnétiseur amoureux (1787) as it helps to better understand the historical transition from the Galenic conception of the passions of the soul to the cerebral interpretation of emotions. While feelings became the condition of possibility in the occurrence of the therapy, passion is identified as the cause of the young woman's illness, Caroline, who according to the interpretation proposed in this article, suffers from what was identified in the eighteenth century medical tradition as "love melancholy" or "hysteric affection", which were both pathologies that alluded to vapors in order to explain their symptoms. The analysis of the logic of feeling running across Villers' novel impels us to interpret the magnetic fluid in terms of the sympathy created between the two main characters. The ambivalence expressed by Villers between the meaning of "love sentiment" and that of "love passion" allows us to finally understand the somnambulist therapy as erotic knowledge that implies a reflection on love codes in late eighteenth century France. PMID:26403058

  4. Constriction structures related to viscous collision, southern Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corvino, Adrian F.; Boger, Steven D.; Fay, Clement

    2016-09-01

    Macroscopic structures are investigated in a zone of highly contorted migmatites from the southern Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica. Here, L-tectonite fabrics, rods, mullions, boudin pods, elongate enclaves, and fold hinges, are persistent linear features all plunging gently to the northeast. In contrast, amoeboid folds, ptygmatic folds and folded boudins with different orientations are the characteristic structures in transverse sections (perpendicular to the lineation). No consistent shear sense is recognised in any dimension. Together with strain and shape analysis, these observations strongly suggest that the deformation pattern is one of folding and stretching by constriction. Previous timing constraints indicate that this deformation overlapped with the waning stages of anatexis during decompression at approximately 510 Ma, up to 30 million years after initial orogeny at 540 Ma. The zone affected by constriction is several kilometres wide and has a contorted flower-like shape confined between two broad domal antiforms. In this context, the constricted zone is interpreted as a relatively late tectonic feature that could have formed via deep-seated viscous collision in response to orogenic collapse and doming.

  5. Complex visual hallucinations in the visually impaired: the Charles Bonnet Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Menon, G Jayakrishna; Rahman, Imran; Menon, Sharmila J; Dutton, Gordon N

    2003-01-01

    Visually impaired patients may experience complex visual hallucinations, a condition known as the Charles Bonnet Syndrome. Patients usually possess insight into the unreality of their visual experiences, which are commonly pleasant but may sometimes cause distress. The hallucinations consist of well-defined, organized, and clear images over which the subject has little control. It is believed that they represent release phenomena due to de-afferentation of the visual association areas of the cerebral cortex, leading to a form of phantom vision. Cognitive defects, social isolation, and sensory deprivation have also been implicated in the etiology of this condition. This condition, which is most common in the elderly, frequently goes unrecognized in clinical practice, due to both lack of awareness among doctors and patients' reluctance to admit to hallucinatory experiences, for fear of being labeled mentally unstable. Furthermore, patients who comprehend the unreality of their hallucinations may be distressed by the real fear of imminent insanity. Sensitive and sympathetic history taking is essential to ascertain the existence of hallucinations. Reassurance and explanation that the visions are benign and do not signify mental illness have a powerful therapeutic effect. Hallucinatory activity may terminate spontaneously, on improving visual function or on addressing social isolation. There is no universally effective drug treatment but anticonvulsants may play a limited role in aborting the hallucinations. Physician awareness and empathy are the cornerstones of management.

  6. Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842): contributions to neuro-ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Grzybowski, Andrzej; Kaufman, Matthew H

    2007-12-01

    Sir Charles Bell (1774-1842) was a Scottish anatomist, physiologist, neurologist, artist and surgeon, who enjoyed a distinguished career in teaching and clinical practice in London between 1804 and 1836. In 1814, he was appointed to the surgical staff of the Middlesex Hospital. In 1824, he was elected Professor of Anatomy and Surgery at the Royal College of Surgeons of England, and shortly afterwards was elected Professor of Physiology at the University of London. In 1831, he was knighted on the accession of William IV. In 1836, he was elected to the Chair of Surgery in the University of Edinburgh, and remained there until his death in 1842, at 68 years of age. During his career, Bell was a prolific medical author, a brilliant medical researcher and a skilled artist. In 1811, he discovered the distinct functions of the motor and sensory nerves, findings that were initially published in a pamphlet entitled 'Ideas of a New Anatomy of the Brain'. In 1821, Bell described the long thoracic nerve, which supplies the serratus anterior muscle, and which now bears his name. In the same paper he showed that lesions of the seventh cranial nerve produce facial paralysis (now termed Bell's palsy). He also demonstrated that the fifth cranial nerve is of sensory importance to the face and controls the muscles of mastication, whereas the seventh cranial nerve principally controls the muscles of facial expression. Bell published research on a number of ophthalmological subjects. This paper reviews some of these latter achievements.

  7. Loess encounters of three kinds: Charles Lyell talks about, reads about, and looks at loess

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smalley, Ian; Kels, Holger; Gaudenyi, Tivadar; Jovanovic, Mladjen

    2016-03-01

    Charles Lyell (1797-1875) was an important loess pioneer. His major contribution was to distribute information on the nature and existence of loess via his influential book `The Principles of Geology'. He was obviously impressed by loess when he encountered it; the initial encounter can be split into three phases: conversations about loess; confronting the actual material in the field; and reading about loess in the literature. Detail can be added to an important phase in the scientific development of the study of loess. Significant events include conversations with Hibbert in 1831, conversations and explorations with von Leonhard and Bronn in 1832, the opportunity to include a section on loess in vol. 3 of `Principles' for publication in 1833, a substantial Rhineland excursion in 1833, the reporting of the results of this excursion in 1834, discussions at the German Association for the Advancement of Science meeting in Bonn in 1835. Of all the people encountered perhaps H.G. Bronn was the most significant. Lyell eventually listed eleven people as relevant to the loess writings: Bronn, von Leonhard, Boue, Voltz, Steininger, Merian, Rozet, Hibbert, Noeggerath, von Meyer, Horner - of these Bronn, von Leonhard, Hibbert and Horner appear to have been the most significant, viewed from 2015.

  8. Matters of Priority: Herbert Mayo, Charles Bell and Discoveries in the Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, James

    2014-01-01

    Between 1822 and the late 1830s a highly personal priority dispute was fought between the celebrated surgeon and anatomist Sir Charles Bell and his ex-student Herbert Mayo. The dispute was over the motor and sensory functions of the Vth and VIIth cranial nerves. Over the course of the 1820s and the 1830s, the competing claims of Bell and Mayo were presented in newspapers, journals, and textbooks. But by the time of Bell’s death in 1842, Mayo had been discredited, a seemingly tragic footnote in the history of nervous discovery. And yet, with the benefit of hindsight, Bell’s case was at best disingenuous. His success was not due to any intrinsic scientific merit in his argument, but rather his ability to create a narrative that undermined the credibility of Mayo. However, only when Mayo’s public performances elided with Bell’s descriptions did this ploy succeed. As a result, the dispute illuminates the importance of credibility to the creation of an idealised scientific medical practitioner. PMID:25284895

  9. Jean-Charles Houzeau's Visual Magnitude Estimates from Jamaica in 1868

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, Christiaan

    2012-09-01

    Jean-Charles Houzeau de Lehaie (1820-1888) was a Belgian astronomer who, as an observer, covered astronomy, geography, cartography, geodesy and natural sciences. He is known for designing the ``heliometer with unequal focal lengths" for the 1882 transit of Venus, for which he organised two expeditions: one to San Antonio (Texas), and one to Santiago (Chile). Less known, but historically important from the point of view of his consistent approach to observational science, was his ``Uranométrie générale", in which he systematically recorded visual magnitudes of 5719 northern and southern stars up to mag 6.4. He carried out the visual estimates from Jamaica in less than 400 nights in 1875--76. This presentation discusses the observational approach of his project, and weighs the merit of a dataset that was produced in one throw, by one single person from one single observing site of excellent atmospheric quality, without any recourse to data produced by other observers. A proving example of the virtue of Houzeau's Uranométrie is that it has been used in the construction of the charts of the first edition of ``Norton's Star Atlas".

  10. The Essay on waters and other medical writings of Charles Lucas.

    PubMed

    Murphy, S J

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, more attention has been given to Charles Lucas's medical career, in its own way just as interesting and important as his better-known political campaigns. Lucas's first concentrated period of medical activity was in the 1730s, when he had qualified as an apothecary, the second in the 1750s, following his flight from Ireland and achievement of qualifications in medicine. Having been prominently involved in the campaign which led to the 1735 drugs regulation act, in 1741 Lucas published a pamphlet, Pharmacomastix, which detailed abuses common in the apothecary's trade and pressed for more radical controls. His most substantial medical work, An Essay on Waters, was published in London in 1756, being devoted to analysis of European spas and the promotion of hydrotherapy. Lucas was able to return to Ireland in 1761 and was elected MP for Dublin city. While politics occupied most of his time until his death in 1771, Lucas maintained his interest in matters medical, securing the passage of another drugs regulation act in 1761, which remarkably is still on the Irish statute book. PMID:25618171

  11. Dr Charles Morehead MD (Edinburgh), FRCP (1807-1882): Pioneer in medical education.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Sunil K

    2015-05-01

    Charles Morehead studied medicine in Edinburgh and Paris. Among his teachers were George Jardine (1742-1827) (moral philosophy), Professor William Pulteney Alison (1790-1859) (medicine), Pierre Louis (1787-1872) and René Laennec (1781-1826). He joined as Assistant Surgeon in the Bombay Medical Service of the East India Company and was appointed to the staff of Governor Sir Robert Grant (1779-1838). Grant and Morehead founded the Grant Medical College and Sir Jamsetjee Jejeebhoy (1811-1877) Hospital in Bombay. Morehead established standards of medical education at these institutions far superior to those in Calcutta and Madras and, in some ways, to those in Britain. His emphasis on discipline, regular attendance, learning medicine at the bedside, the maintenance of detailed records on all patients and thorough evaluation of the progress made by students were salutary. While in London to recover his health, he wrote his classic book Clinical Researches on Disease in India for Indian doctors and those from Britain entering the Indian Medical Services. He lived in Edinburgh after retirement from India but continued to help teachers and students at his institutions in Bombay.

  12. Multilocus genotypes from Charles Darwin's finches: biodiversity lost since the voyage of the Beagle.

    PubMed

    Petren, Kenneth; Grant, Peter R; Grant, B Rosemary; Clack, Andrew A; Lescano, Ninnia V

    2010-04-12

    Genetic analysis of museum specimens offers a direct window into a past that can predate the loss of extinct forms. We genotyped 18 Galápagos finches collected by Charles Darwin and companions during the voyage of the Beagle in 1835, and 22 specimens collected in 1901. Our goals were to determine if significant genetic diversity has been lost since the Beagle voyage and to determine the genetic source of specimens for which the collection locale was not recorded. Using 'ancient' DNA techniques, we quantified variation at 14 autosomal microsatellite loci. Assignment tests showed several museum specimens genetically matched recently field-sampled birds from their island of origin. Some were misclassified or were difficult to classify. Darwin's exceptionally large ground finches (Geospiza magnirostris) from Floreana and San Cristóbal were genetically distinct from several other currently existing populations. Sharp-beaked ground finches (Geospiza difficilis) from Floreana and Isabela were also genetically distinct. These four populations are currently extinct, yet they were more genetically distinct from congeners than many other species of Darwin's finches are from each other. We conclude that a significant amount of the finch biodiversity observed and collected by Darwin has been lost since the voyage of the Beagle.

  13. From Charles Darwin's botanical country-house studies to modern plant biology.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, U; Briggs, W R

    2009-11-01

    As a student of theology at Cambridge University, Charles Darwin (1809-1882) attended the lectures of the botanist John S. Henslow (1796-1861). This instruction provided the basis for his life-long interest in plants as well as the species question. This was a major reason why in his book On the Origin of Species, which was published 150 years ago, Darwin explained his metaphorical phrase 'struggle for life' with respect to animals and plants. In this article, we review Darwin's botanical work with reference to the following topics: the struggle for existence in the vegetable kingdom with respect to the phytochrome-mediated shade avoidance response; the biology of flowers and Darwin's plant-insect co-evolution hypothesis; climbing plants and the discovery of action potentials; the power of movement in plants and Darwin's conflict with the German plant physiologist Julius Sachs; and light perception by growing grass coleoptiles with reference to the phototropins. Finally, we describe the establishment of the scientific discipline of Plant Biology that took place in the USA 80 years ago, and define this area of research with respect to Darwin's work on botany and the physiology of higher plants.

  14. A magpie with a card-index mind – Charles Davies Sherborn 1861–1942

    PubMed Central

    Shindler, Karolyn

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Charles Davies Sherborn was geologist, indexer and bibliographer extraordinaire. He was fascinated by science from an early age and like so many Victorians, the young Sherborn was a passionate natural history collector and was obsessed with expanding his collection of land and freshwater shells. He later described himself as being a ‘thorough magpie’ and having ‘a card-index mind’, and these two traits coalesced in his monumental Index Animalium, the compilation of which occupied 43 years of his life. One of the first visitors through the doors of the Natural History Museum in South Kensington when it opened in 1881, Sherborn began work there seven years later as one of the small band of unofficial scientific workers, paid by the number of fossils he prepared. By the time of his death in 1942, Sherborn’s corner in the Museum was the first port of call for generations of scientists seeking advice, information – or an invitation to one of his famous ‘smoke and chat’ parties. In addition to his work on the Index, Sherborn is also responsible for rescuing from damp and probable destruction the huge archive of Sir Richard Owen, the great comparative anatomist and the prime mover behind the creation of the Natural History Museum, London. Without Sherborn, this invaluable resource of correspondence, manuscripts and books may well have been irretrievably ruined. PMID:26877651

  15. Charles Bonnet syndrome: two case reports and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lerario, Alberto; Ciammola, Andrea; Poletti, Barbara; Girotti, Floriano; Silani, Vincenzo

    2013-04-01

    Visual hallucinations (VHs) can be associated with a variety of clinical conditions, and are also experienced by healthy people due to visual impairment. The condition is known as Charles Bonnet Syndrome (CBS). The circumstances favoring VHs support the hypothesis that sensory deprivation enhances the ongoing activity of the visual system after sensory loss. Clinician should be aware that a significant proportion of visually impaired patients experience complex VHs, which are sometimes distressing. Herein, we report two cases of CBS. Case 1 is a 60-year-old man with visual impairment due to orbit pseudotumor in autoimmune hypothyroidism. Case 2 is an 87-year-old woman with Parkinson's disease and a 15-year history of intermittent complex VHs due to age-related macular degeneration in both eyes. In both cases investigations for alternative pathological causes of VHs were negative and, therefore, the aetiology of hallucinations was attributed to CBS. The course and treatment of CBS patients vary according to the nature of the visual dysfunction. Drug treatments remain partially satisfactory, with individual cases successfully treated with atypical antipsychotics. Nonpharmacological interventions aimed to reduce the visual pathway deprivation. Reassurance of the benign nature of CBS is essential to support patients and reduce caregiver's burden.

  16. Diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric comorbidity in a patient with charles bonnet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jasper J

    2014-01-01

    Background. A significant proportion of patients with neurological disorders may have comorbid psychiatric symptomology, which may be managed by primary outpatient neurologists. Referral to their psychiatric colleagues is mediated by available consultation-liaison units and according to clinical opinion. Aims of Case Report. We present the case of a patient whose initial referral to epilepsy clinic led to a workup which ultimately diagnosed her with nonepileptic seizures (NES). In the course of her follow-up, she developed intractable headaches, and worsening mood symptoms and eventually exhibited Psychotic Features for which psychiatry became coinvolved in her care. Major Depression with Psychotic Features and Charles Bonnet syndrome were considered as a likely comorbid diagnoses. Her pharmacologic management on venlafaxine and quetiapine eventually caused substantial amelioration of her psychiatric symptomology as longitudinally followed by PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores. Conclusion. Optimal evaluation and management of mental illness in patients with complex neurologic symptomology may require independent evaluation and treatment by psychiatrists when clinically appropriate.

  17. Charles Bonnet syndrome: evidence for a generative model in the cortex?

    PubMed

    Reichert, David P; Seriès, Peggy; Storkey, Amos J

    2013-01-01

    Several theories propose that the cortex implements an internal model to explain, predict, and learn about sensory data, but the nature of this model is unclear. One condition that could be highly informative here is Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS), where loss of vision leads to complex, vivid visual hallucinations of objects, people, and whole scenes. CBS could be taken as indication that there is a generative model in the brain, specifically one that can synthesise rich, consistent visual representations even in the absence of actual visual input. The processes that lead to CBS are poorly understood. Here, we argue that a model recently introduced in machine learning, the deep Boltzmann machine (DBM), could capture the relevant aspects of (hypothetical) generative processing in the cortex. The DBM carries both the semantics of a probabilistic generative model and of a neural network. The latter allows us to model a concrete neural mechanism that could underlie CBS, namely, homeostatic regulation of neuronal activity. We show that homeostatic plasticity could serve to make the learnt internal model robust against e.g. degradation of sensory input, but overcompensate in the case of CBS, leading to hallucinations. We demonstrate how a wide range of features of CBS can be explained in the model and suggest a potential role for the neuromodulator acetylcholine. This work constitutes the first concrete computational model of CBS and the first application of the DBM as a model in computational neuroscience. Our results lend further credence to the hypothesis of a generative model in the brain.

  18. King Charles` Star: A Multidisciplinary Approach To Dating The Supernova Known As Cassiopeia A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lunn, Martin; Rakoczy, L.

    2011-01-01

    Few astronomical phenomena have been as studied as the supernova known as Cassiopeia A. Widely believed to have occurred in the latter half of the seventeenth century, it is also thought to have gone unrecorded. This paper will argue that Cas A did not go unobserved, but in fact was seen in Britain on May 29, 1630, and coincided with the birth of the future King Charles II of Great Britain. This `noon-day star’ is an important feature of Stuart/Restoration propaganda, the significance of which has been widely acknowledged by historians and literary experts. The argument here, however, is that in addition the historical accounts provide credible evidence for a genuine astronomical event, the nature of which must be explained. Combining documentary analysis with an overview of the current scientific thinking on dating supernova, the authors put forward their case for why Charles’ star should be recognized as a sighting of Cas A. Finally, it will be argued that a collaborative approach between the humanities and the sciences can be a valuable tool, not just in furthering our understanding of Cas A, but in the dating of supernovae in general.

  19. Studying phenotypic evolution in domestic animals: a walk in the footsteps of Charles Darwin.

    PubMed

    Andersson, L

    2009-01-01

    Charles Darwin used domesticated plants and animals as proof of principle for his theory on phenotypic evolution by means of natural selection. Inspired by Darwin's work, we developed an intercross between the wild boar and domestic pigs to study the genetic basis for phenotypic changes during domestication. The difference in coat color is controlled by two major loci. Dominant white color is due to two consecutive mutations in the KIT gene: a 450-kb duplication and a splice mutation. Black spotting is caused by the combined effect of two mutations in MC1R: a missense mutation for dominant black color and a 2-bp insertion leading to a frameshift. A major discovery made using this pedigree is the identification of a single-nucleotide substitution in intron 3 of the gene for insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) that is underlying a quantitative trait locus affecting muscle growth, size of the heart, and fat deposition. The mutation disrupts the interaction with a repressor and leads to threefold increased IGF2 expression in postnatal muscle. In a recent study, we have identified the IGF2 repressor, and this previously unknown protein, named ZBED6, is specific for placental mammals and derived from a domesticated DNA transposon.

  20. The 'root-brain' hypothesis of Charles and Francis Darwin: Revival after more than 125 years.

    PubMed

    Baluska, Frantisek; Mancuso, Stefano; Volkmann, Dieter; Barlow, Peter W

    2009-12-01

    This year celebrates the 200(th) aniversary of the birth of Charles Darwin, best known for his theory of evolution summarized in On the Origin of Species. Less well known is that, in the second half of his life, Darwin's major scientific focus turned towards plants. He wrote several books on plants, the next-to-last of which, The Power of Movement of Plants, published together with his son Francis, opened plants to a new view. Here we amplify the final sentence of this book in which the Darwins proposed that: "It is hardly an exaggeration to say that the tip of the radicle thus endowed [with sensitivity] and having the power of directing the movements of the adjoining parts, acts like the brain of one of the lower animals; the brain being seated within the anterior end of the body, receiving impressions from the sense-organs, and directing the several movements." This sentence conveys two important messages: first, that the root apex may be considered to be a 'brain-like' organ endowed with a sensitivity which controls its navigation through soil; second, that the root apex represents the anterior end of the plant body. In this article, we discuss both these statements.

  1. Senior Administrators Should Have Administrative Contracts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posner, Gary J.

    1987-01-01

    Recognizing that termination is viewed by the employee as the equivalent to capital punishment of a career, an administrative contract can reduce the emotional and financial entanglements that often result. Administrative contracts are described. (MLW)

  2. Charles Darwin's Origin of Species, directional selection, and the evolutionary sciences today.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2009-11-01

    The book On the Origin of Species, published in November 1859, is an "abstract" without references, compiled by Charles Darwin from a much longer manuscript entitled "Natural Selection." Here, I summarize the five theories that can be extracted from Darwin's monograph, explain the true meaning of the phrase "struggle for life" (i.e., competition and cooperation), and outline Darwin's original concept of natural selection in populations of animals and plants. Since neither Darwin nor Alfred R. Wallace distinguished between stabilizing and directional natural selection, the popular argument that "selection only eliminates but is not creative" is still alive today. However, I document that August Weismann (Die Bedeutung der sexuellen Fortpflanzung für die Selektions-Theorie. Gustav Fischer-Verlag, Jena, 1886) and Ivan Schmalhausen (Factors of evolution. The theory of stabilizing selection. The Blackiston Company, Philadelphia, 1949) provided precise definitions for directional (dynamic) selection in nature and illustrate this "Weismann-Schmalhausen principle" with respect to the evolutionary development of novel phenotypes. Then, the modern (synthetic) theory of biological evolution that is based on the work of Theodosius Dobzhansky (Genetics and the origin of species. Columbia University Press, New York, 1937) and others, and the expanded version of this system of theories, are outlined. Finally, I document that symbiogenesis (i.e., primary endosymbiosis, a process that gave rise to the first eukaryotic cells), ongoing directional natural selection, and the dynamic Earth (plate tectonics, i.e., geological events that both created and destroyed terrestrial and aquatic habitats) were the key processes responsible for the documented macroevolutionary patterns in all five kingdoms of life. Since the evolutionary development of the earliest archaic bacteria more than 3,500 mya, the biosphere of our dynamic planet has been dominated by prokaryotic microbes. Eubacteria

  3. The Charles F. Prentice Award Lecture 2014: A 50-Year Research Journey: Giants and Great Collaborators.

    PubMed

    Holden, Brien A

    2015-07-01

    This article, an edited version of the 2014 Charles F. Prentice Medal presentation, recounts my 50-year journey in research, from graduation in 1965 to PhD to 2015. The most important lessons I have learned are that great people, "Giants" as I call them, are generous of spirit, creative, insightful, sharing, and caring, and second, that collaboration is really the only way to do what I want to get done. I have been very fortunate to have worked with many outstanding people. As someone said to me at the Prentice Medal presentation, "I don't like you very much but the people you work with are wonderful."My journey started with a PhD investigation into seeing if orthokeratology could control myopia at the City University London in 1966. It then moved to Australia where all aspects of contact lenses were researched to try to make contact lenses safer and more effective by understanding the cornea and anterior eye systems. That journey has now turned to making contact lenses the best they can be to slow the progress of myopia. An extremely high proportion of people who are involved with global eye care initiatives and ambitious projects to develop treatments and interventions for the major vision problems impacting the world are a joy to work with. Evidence-based systems for delivering vision to the more than 600 million people globally that are blind or vision impaired because of uncorrected refractive error have involved amazing people and collaborations. This article pays tribute to the generosity and humanity of my family and the Giants in and outside the field, and many more not so well known, and the people I work with, who have punctuated and greatly enriched this journey and made many of the scientific advances documented here possible.

  4. Charles Darwin's Origin of Species, directional selection, and the evolutionary sciences today.

    PubMed

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2009-11-01

    The book On the Origin of Species, published in November 1859, is an "abstract" without references, compiled by Charles Darwin from a much longer manuscript entitled "Natural Selection." Here, I summarize the five theories that can be extracted from Darwin's monograph, explain the true meaning of the phrase "struggle for life" (i.e., competition and cooperation), and outline Darwin's original concept of natural selection in populations of animals and plants. Since neither Darwin nor Alfred R. Wallace distinguished between stabilizing and directional natural selection, the popular argument that "selection only eliminates but is not creative" is still alive today. However, I document that August Weismann (Die Bedeutung der sexuellen Fortpflanzung für die Selektions-Theorie. Gustav Fischer-Verlag, Jena, 1886) and Ivan Schmalhausen (Factors of evolution. The theory of stabilizing selection. The Blackiston Company, Philadelphia, 1949) provided precise definitions for directional (dynamic) selection in nature and illustrate this "Weismann-Schmalhausen principle" with respect to the evolutionary development of novel phenotypes. Then, the modern (synthetic) theory of biological evolution that is based on the work of Theodosius Dobzhansky (Genetics and the origin of species. Columbia University Press, New York, 1937) and others, and the expanded version of this system of theories, are outlined. Finally, I document that symbiogenesis (i.e., primary endosymbiosis, a process that gave rise to the first eukaryotic cells), ongoing directional natural selection, and the dynamic Earth (plate tectonics, i.e., geological events that both created and destroyed terrestrial and aquatic habitats) were the key processes responsible for the documented macroevolutionary patterns in all five kingdoms of life. Since the evolutionary development of the earliest archaic bacteria more than 3,500 mya, the biosphere of our dynamic planet has been dominated by prokaryotic microbes. Eubacteria

  5. Site Report for USGS Test Holes Drilled at Cape Charles, Northampton County, Virginia, in 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gohn, Gregory S.; Sanford, Ward E.; Powars, David S.; Horton, J. Wright; Edwards, Lucy E.; Morin, Roger H.; Self-Trail, Jean M.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey drilled two test holes near Cape Charles, Virginia, during May and June 2004, as part of an investigation of the buried, late Eocene Chesapeake Bay impact structure. The first hole is designated as the USGS-Sustainable Technology Park test hole #1 (USGS-STP1). This test hole was abandoned at a depth of 300 ft; cuttings samples were collected, but no cores or geophysical logs were acquired. The second hole is designated as the USGS-Sustainable Technology Park test hole #2 (USGS-STP2). This test hole was drilled to a depth of 2,699 ft. Cores were collected between depths of 1,401.7 ft and 1,420.7 ft and between 2,440.0 ft and 2,699.0 ft. Cuttings samples were collected from the uncored intervals below 280-ft depth. Interim sets of geophysical logs were acquired during the drilling operation, and one final set was acquired at the end of drilling. Two wells were installed in the USGS-STP2 test hole. The deep well (designated 62G-24) was screened between 2,260 ft and 2,280 ft, and the shallow well (designated 62G-25) was screened between 1,360 ft and 1,380 ft. Ground-water salinities stabilized at 40 parts per thousand for the deep well and 20 parts per thousand for the shallow well. The geologic section encountered in the test holes consists of three main units: (1) Eocene, Oligocene, Miocene, Pliocene, and Pleistocene sands and clays are present between land surface and a depth of 1,163 ft; (2) sediment-clast breccias of the impact structure are present between depths of 1,163 ft and 2,150 ft; and (3) crystalline-clast breccias and cataclastic gneiss of the impact structure are present between depths of 2,150 ft and 2,699 ft.

  6. A tribute to Charles David Kelman MD: ophthalmologist, inventor and pioneer of phacoemulsification surgery.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Suresh K; Milverton, E John; Maloof, Anthony J

    2004-10-01

    Charles David Kelman was born in Brooklyn, New York, USA, on 23 May 1930 and passed away in Boca Raton, Florida, USA, on 1 June 2004 at the age of 74 years after a long battle with cancer. He received a Bachelor of Science degree from Tufts University in 1950 and completed medical studies at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, in 1956. He was Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology at New York Medical College and an Attending Surgeon at New York Eye and Ear Infirmary and Manhattan Eye, Ear and Throat Hospital. Although a prolific inventor, he will be best remembered for developing phacoemulsification, following his realization while sitting in a dentist's chair, that ultrasonic vibrations could be used to emulsify the aged crystalline lens through a very small incision. His pioneering work revolutionized cataract surgery. He also pioneered cryo-extraction of cataracts, the use of freezing for the repair of retinal detachments and designed numerous ophthalmic instruments and intraocular lenses. Dr Kelman received numerous awards, including the American Academy of Ophthalmology Achievement Award (1970), the Ridley Medal from the International Congress of Ophthalmology (1990), and the Inventor of the Year Award from The New York Patent, Trademark and Copyright Law Association (1992). Most recently (2003), Dr Kelman was honoured by the American Academy of Ophthalmology with the Laureate Recognition award. Dr Kelman was also an accomplished Broadway producer, composer and jazz saxophonist. With his demise, the ophthalmic and medical community lost a famed inventor with multifaceted talents and one of the great ophthalmologists of the twentieth century.

  7. Charles Bonnet Syndrome: Evidence for a Generative Model in the Cortex?

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, David P.; Seriès, Peggy; Storkey, Amos J.

    2013-01-01

    Several theories propose that the cortex implements an internal model to explain, predict, and learn about sensory data, but the nature of this model is unclear. One condition that could be highly informative here is Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS), where loss of vision leads to complex, vivid visual hallucinations of objects, people, and whole scenes. CBS could be taken as indication that there is a generative model in the brain, specifically one that can synthesise rich, consistent visual representations even in the absence of actual visual input. The processes that lead to CBS are poorly understood. Here, we argue that a model recently introduced in machine learning, the deep Boltzmann machine (DBM), could capture the relevant aspects of (hypothetical) generative processing in the cortex. The DBM carries both the semantics of a probabilistic generative model and of a neural network. The latter allows us to model a concrete neural mechanism that could underlie CBS, namely, homeostatic regulation of neuronal activity. We show that homeostatic plasticity could serve to make the learnt internal model robust against e.g. degradation of sensory input, but overcompensate in the case of CBS, leading to hallucinations. We demonstrate how a wide range of features of CBS can be explained in the model and suggest a potential role for the neuromodulator acetylcholine. This work constitutes the first concrete computational model of CBS and the first application of the DBM as a model in computational neuroscience. Our results lend further credence to the hypothesis of a generative model in the brain. PMID:23874177

  8. The Charles F. Prentice Award Lecture 2014: A 50-Year Research Journey: Giants and Great Collaborators.

    PubMed

    Holden, Brien A

    2015-07-01

    This article, an edited version of the 2014 Charles F. Prentice Medal presentation, recounts my 50-year journey in research, from graduation in 1965 to PhD to 2015. The most important lessons I have learned are that great people, "Giants" as I call them, are generous of spirit, creative, insightful, sharing, and caring, and second, that collaboration is really the only way to do what I want to get done. I have been very fortunate to have worked with many outstanding people. As someone said to me at the Prentice Medal presentation, "I don't like you very much but the people you work with are wonderful."My journey started with a PhD investigation into seeing if orthokeratology could control myopia at the City University London in 1966. It then moved to Australia where all aspects of contact lenses were researched to try to make contact lenses safer and more effective by understanding the cornea and anterior eye systems. That journey has now turned to making contact lenses the best they can be to slow the progress of myopia. An extremely high proportion of people who are involved with global eye care initiatives and ambitious projects to develop treatments and interventions for the major vision problems impacting the world are a joy to work with. Evidence-based systems for delivering vision to the more than 600 million people globally that are blind or vision impaired because of uncorrected refractive error have involved amazing people and collaborations. This article pays tribute to the generosity and humanity of my family and the Giants in and outside the field, and many more not so well known, and the people I work with, who have punctuated and greatly enriched this journey and made many of the scientific advances documented here possible. PMID:26002010

  9. CharlesTaylor, phronesis, and medicine: ethics and interpretation in illness narrative.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Dawson Stafford; Flasher, Lydia Victoria

    2011-08-01

    This paper provides a brief overview and critique of the dominant objectivist understanding and use of illness narrative in Enlightenment (scientific) medicine and ethics, as well as several revisionist accounts, which reflect the evolution of this approach. In light of certain limitations and difficulties endemic in the objectivist understanding of illness narrative, an alternative phronesis approach to medical ethics influenced by Charles Taylor's account of the interpretive nature of human agency and language is examined. To this end, the account of interpretive medical responsibility previously described by Schultz and Carnevale as "clinical phronesis" (based upon Taylor's notion of "strong" or "radical evaluation") is reviewed and expanded. The thesis of this paper is that illness narrative has the ability to benefit patients as well as the potential to cause harm or iatrogenic effects. This benefit or harm is contingent upon how the story is told and understood. Consequently, these tales are not simply "nice stories," cathartic gestures, or mere supplements to scientific procedures and decision making, as suggested by the objectivist approach. Rather, they open the agent to meanings that provide a context for explanation and evaluation of illness episodes and therapeutic activities. This understanding provides indicators (guides) for right action. Hence, medical responsibility as clinical phronesis involves, first, the patient and provider's coformulation and cointerpretation of what is going on in the patient's illness narrative, and second, the patient and provider's response to interpretation of the facts of illness and what they signify-not simply a response to the brute facts of illness, alone. The appeal to medical responsibility as clinical phronesis thus underscores the importance of getting the patient's story of illness right. It is anticipated that further elaboration concerning the idea of clinical phronesis as interpretive illness narrative will

  10. Potential effects of structural controls and street sweeping on stormwater loads to the lower Charles River, Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zarriello, Phillip J.; Breault, Robert F.; Weiskel, Peter K.

    2002-01-01

    The water quality of the lower Charles River is periodically impaired by combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and non-CSO stormwater runoff. This study examined the potential non-CSO load reductions of suspended solids, fecal coliform bacteria, total phosphorus, and total lead that could reasonably be achieved by implementation of stormwater best management practices, including both structural controls and systematic street sweeping. Structural controls were grouped by major physical or chemical process; these included infiltration-filtration (physical separation), biofiltration-bioretention (biological mechanisms), or detention-retention (physical settling). For each of these categories, upper and lower quartiles, median, and average removal efficiencies were compiled from three national databases of structural control performance. Removal efficiencies obtained indicated a wide range of performance. Removal was generally greatest for infiltration-filtration controls and suspended solids, and least for biofiltration-bioretention controls and fecal coliform bacteria. Street sweeping has received renewed interest as a water-quality control practice because of reported improvements in sweeper technology and the recognition that opportunities for implementing structural controls are limited in highly urbanized areas. The Stormwater Management Model that was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey for the lower Charles River Watershed was modified to simulate the effects of street sweeping in a single-family land-use basin. Constituent buildup and washoff variable values were calibrated to observed annual and storm-event loads. Once calibrated, the street sweeping model was applied to various permutations of four sweeper efficiencies and six sweeping frequencies that ranged from every day to once every 30 days. Reduction of constituent loads to the lower Charles River by the combined hypothetical practices of structural controls and street sweeping was estimated for a range

  11. Preliminary assessment of streamflow requirements for habitat protection for selected sites on the Assabet and Charles rivers, eastern Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, Gene W.; Armstrong, David S.

    2002-01-01

    Streamflow requirements for habitat protection were determined at several critical riffle reaches in the Assabet River and Charles River Basins. The R2Cross and Wetted-Perimeter methods yielded median streamflow requirements of 0.75 cubic feet per second per square mile (ft3/s/mi2) and 0.13 ft3/s/mi2, respectively. Three study reaches are on tributaries to the Assabet River (Danforth Brook, Great Brook, and Elizabeth Brook), two are on the mainstem of the Charles River, and one is on a tributary to the Charles River (Mine Brook). The strength of the R2Cross and Wetted-Perimeter methods is that they may be applied at ungaged locations. A Range of Variability Approach analysis was conducted on a common 30-year period of record from 1969 to 1998 for five mostly unaltered flow, streamgaging stations. The discharge range defined by the median R2Cross and Wetted-Perimeter streamflow requirements brackets the interquartile range for the median of monthly-mean flows during the summer low-flow period, as defined by the Range of Variability Approach analysis of five streamgaging stations. The median R2Cross streamflow requirement for the five riffles compares very closely to the median Tennant 40-percent of the mean annual flow requirement for good habitat condition. The median Wetted-Perimeter streamflow requirement compares closely to the median Tennant 10-percent of the mean annual-flow requirement for a poor habitat condition. Tennant and Range of Variability Approach methods require continuous discharge records for analysis.

  12. The doctor and the rebels--the diary of Charles Molteno Murray, recorded during the 1914 Boer rebellion.

    PubMed

    Murray, R

    2000-12-01

    Just 12 years after the conclusion of the Anglo-Boer war, South Africa was led by ex-Boer Generals Botha and Smuts into what was to become the Great War, on the side of the British. This was utterly unacceptable to thousands of Boers who had engaged in a bitter struggle, against overwhelming odds, to prevent their country from becoming part of the mighty British Empire. Led by Generals de Wet, Beyers, and de la Rey, Lieutenant-Colonel Maritz and Major Kemp, they took up arms in a doomed rebellion, without proper weapons, equipment or organisation--by the time they were defeated the casualty figures for both sides exceeded those that would later result from the German South West campaign. Charles Molteno Murray, 37 years old, was a GP in Kenilworth, Cape Town, at the time. His father was an Irish immigrant doctor, his mother the daughter of the first Prime Minister of the Cape, Sir John Charles Molteno. In spite of having a busy and successful practice, with a surgical appointment at Victoria Hospital, Charles Murray volunteered for duty and soon found himself in the Orange Free State and northern Cape, caring for the wounded and dying of both sides in the rebellion. He kept a meticulous record of his experiences, written on loose-leaf pages sent as letters to his wife, which were later bound into leather-backed diaries. These diaries were passed on to his grandson, Dr Robert Murray, who had them transcribed into modern format. They contain details of daily life in the midst of military action, and also insights into important and little-publicised events of the Boer Rebellion of 1914.

  13. Evaluation of Strategies for Balancing Water Use and Streamflow Reductions in the Upper Charles River Basin, Eastern Massachusetts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eggleston, Jack R.

    2004-01-01

    The upper Charles River basin, located 30 miles southwest of Boston, Massachusetts, is experiencing water shortages during the summer. Towns in the basin have instituted water-conservation programs and water-use bans to reduce summertime water use. During July through October, streamflow in the Charles River and its tributaries regularly falls below 0.50 cubic foot per second per square mile, the minimum streamflow used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as its Aquatic Base Flow standard for maintaining healthy freshwater ecosystems. To examine how human water use could be changed to mitigate these water shortages, a numerical ground-water flow model was modified and used in conjunction with response coefficients and optimization techniques. Streamflows at 10 locations on the Charles River and its tributaries were determined under various water-use scenarios and climatic conditions. A variety of engineered solutions to the water shortages were examined for their ability to increase water supplies and summertime streamflows. Results indicate that although human water use contributes to the problem of low summertime streamflows, human water use is not the only, or even the primary, cause of low flows in the basin. The lowest summertime streamflows increase by 12 percent but remain below the Aquatic Base Flow standard when all public water-supply pumpage and wastewater flows in the basin are eliminated in a simulation under average climatic conditions. Under dry climatic conditions, the same measures increase the lowest average monthly streamflow by 95 percent but do not increase it above the Aquatic Base Flow standard. The most promising water-management strategies to increase streamflows and water supplies, based on the study results, include wastewater recharge to the aquifer, altered management of pumping well schedules, regional water-supply sharing, and water conservation. In a scenario that simulated towns sharing water supplies, streamflow in the Charles

  14. The physiologist and the neurosurgeon: the enduring influence of Charles Sherrington on the career of Wilder Penfield.

    PubMed

    Feindel, William

    2007-11-01

    Wilder Penfield, a Rhodes scholar from Princeton University, New Jersey, was a student in the first course on mammalian physiology given in 1915 at Oxford University by Charles Sherrington, newly arrived from Liverpool where, as Holt Professor of Physiology for 20 years, he had become a leading authority on the physiology of the nervous system. The practical 'exercises' as well as graduate research on the Golgi apparatus and the decerebrate preparation, carried out by Penfield in Sherrington's laboratory, gave him the groundwork to develop his career as a physiological surgeon, who made fundamental observations on functional localization in the human brain during the surgical treatment of patients afflicted with epilepsy.

  15. [Charles Phillips (1811-1870), a famous urologist, born in Liege, and yet unknown in that city].

    PubMed

    de Leval, J

    2008-01-01

    Charles Phillips was born in Liege at the beginning of the XIXth century. In that city, he studied medicine and, later, lectured, during a few years, initially, at the School of Medicine, and, later, at the School of Veterinary Medicine. Having trained in several European centres, he settled in Paris where he soon became a well-known urologist. Remarkably intelligent and inventive, he was also a great medical artist; he produced some wonderful books and invented several devices that are still in use to-day in basic urology. Surprisingly, his name is almost unknown nowadays in his city of origin.

  16. Charles Darwin's impressions of New Zealand and Australia, and insights into his illness and his developing ideas on evolution.

    PubMed

    Hayman, John A

    Charles Darwin visited New Zealand in December 1835, and Australia from January until March 1836, on the return portion of his voyage around the world in HMS Beagle. Despite the shortness of these visits, he retained an interest in these countries throughout his life, maintaining correspondence and receiving many biological specimens. His experiences in these places influenced his thinking on evolution, particularly on the evolution of man. Aspects of his health recorded during this part of the voyage support a new hypothesis for the diagnosis of the illness that Darwin endured for most of his life.

  17. "My appointment received the sanction of the Admiralty": why Charles Darwin really was the naturalist on HMS Beagle.

    PubMed

    van Wyhe, John

    2013-09-01

    For decades historians of science and science writers in general have maintained that Charles Darwin was not the 'naturalist' or 'official naturalist' during the 1831-1836 surveying voyage of HMS Beagle but instead Captain Robert FitzRoy's 'companion', 'gentleman companion' or 'dining companion'. That is, Darwin was primarily the captain's social companion and only secondarily and unofficially naturalist. Instead, it is usually maintained, the ship's surgeon Robert McCormick was the official naturalist because this was the default or official practice at the time. Although these views have been repeated in countless accounts of Darwin's life, this essay aims to show that they are incorrect.

  18. Darwinian hydrology: can the methodology Charles Darwin pioneered help hydrologic science?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, C.; Troch, P. A.

    2013-05-01

    There have been repeated calls for a Darwinian approach to hydrologic science or for a synthesis of Darwinian and Newtonian approaches, to deepen understanding the hydrologic system in the larger landscape context, and so develop a better basis for predictions now and in an uncertain future. But what exactly makes a Darwinian approach to hydrology "Darwinian"? While there have now been a number of discussions of Darwinian approaches, many referencing Harte (2002), the term is potentially a source of confusion while its connections to Darwin remain allusive rather than explicit. Here we discuss the methods that Charles Darwin pioneered to understand a variety of complex systems in terms of their historical processes of change. We suggest that the Darwinian approach to hydrology follows his lead by focusing attention on the patterns of variation in populations, seeking hypotheses that explain these patterns in terms of the mechanisms and conditions that determine their historical development, using deduction and modeling to derive consequent hypotheses that follow from a proposed explanation, and critically testing these hypotheses against new observations. It is not sufficient to catalogue the patterns or predict them statistically. Nor is it sufficient for the explanations to amount to a "just-so" story not subject to critical analysis. Darwin's theories linked present-day variation to mechanisms that operated over history, and could be independently test and falsified by comparing new observations to the predictions of corollary hypotheses they generated. With a Darwinian framework in mind it is easy to see that a great deal of hydrologic research has already been done that contributes to a Darwinian hydrology - whether deliberately or not. The various heuristic methods that Darwin used to develop explanatory theories - extrapolating mechanisms, space for time substitution, and looking for signatures of history - have direct application in hydrologic science. Some

  19. Explosive Volcanic Activity at Extreme Depths: Evidence from the Charles Darwin Volcanic Field, Cape Verdes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Devey, C. W.; Hansteen, T. H.; Freundt, A.; Kutterolf, S.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions on the deep sea floor have traditionally been assumed to be non-explosive as the high-pressure environment should greatly inhibit steam-driven explosions. Nevertheless, occasional evidence both from (generally slow-) spreading axes and intraplate seamounts has hinted at explosive activity at large water depths. Here we present evidence from a submarine field of volcanic cones and pit craters called Charles Darwin Volcanic Field located at about 3600 m depth on the lower southwestern slope of the Cape Verdean Island of Santo Antão. We examined two of these submarine volcanic edifices (Tambor and Kolá), each featuring a pit crater of 1 km diameter, using photogrammetric reconstructions derived from ROV-based imaging followed by 3D quantification using a novel remote sensing workflow, aided by sampling. The measured and calculated parameters of physical volcanology derived from the 3D model allow us, for the first time, to make quantitative statements about volcanic processes on the deep seafloor similar to those generated from land-based field observations. Tambor cone, which is 2500 m wide and 250 m high, consists of dense, probably monogenetic medium to coarse-grained volcaniclastic and pyroclastic rocks that are highly fragmented, probably as a result of thermal and viscous granulation upon contact with seawater during several consecutive cycles of activity. Tangential joints in the outcrops indicate subsidence of the crater floor after primary emplacement. Kolá crater, which is 1000 m wide and 160 m deep, appears to have been excavated in the surrounding seafloor and shows stepwise sagging features interpreted as ring fractures on the inner flanks. Lithologically, it is made up of a complicated succession of highly fragmented deposits, including spheroidal juvenile lapilli, likely formed by spray granulation. It resembles a maar-type deposit found on land. The eruption apparently entrained blocks of MORB-type gabbroic country rocks with

  20. Charles Darwin's Origin of Species, directional selection, and the evolutionary sciences today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutschera, Ulrich

    2009-11-01

    The book On the Origin of Species, published in November 1859, is an “abstract” without references, compiled by Charles Darwin from a much longer manuscript entitled “Natural Selection.” Here, I summarize the five theories that can be extracted from Darwin’s monograph, explain the true meaning of the phrase “struggle for life” (i.e., competition and cooperation), and outline Darwin’s original concept of natural selection in populations of animals and plants. Since neither Darwin nor Alfred R. Wallace distinguished between stabilizing and directional natural selection, the popular argument that “selection only eliminates but is not creative” is still alive today. However, I document that August Weismann ( Die Bedeutung der sexuellen Fortpflanzung für die Selektions-Theorie. Gustav Fischer-Verlag, Jena, 1886) and Ivan Schmalhausen ( Factors of evolution. The theory of stabilizing selection. The Blackiston Company, Philadelphia, 1949) provided precise definitions for directional (dynamic) selection in nature and illustrate this “Weismann-Schmalhausen principle” with respect to the evolutionary development of novel phenotypes. Then, the modern (synthetic) theory of biological evolution that is based on the work of Theodosius Dobzhansky ( Genetics and the origin of species. Columbia University Press, New York, 1937) and others, and the expanded version of this system of theories, are outlined. Finally, I document that symbiogenesis (i.e., primary endosymbiosis, a process that gave rise to the first eukaryotic cells), ongoing directional natural selection, and the dynamic Earth (plate tectonics, i.e., geological events that both created and destroyed terrestrial and aquatic habitats) were the key processes responsible for the documented macroevolutionary patterns in all five kingdoms of life. Since the evolutionary development of the earliest archaic bacteria more than 3,500 mya, the biosphere of our dynamic planet has been dominated by

  1. Russian aeromagnetic surveys of the Prince Charles Mountains and adjacent regions into the 21st century

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golynsky, Alexander; Golynsky, Dmitry; Kiselev, Alexander; Masolov, Valery

    2014-05-01

    Russian aeromagnetic investigations in the Prince Charles Mountains (PCM) and surrounding areas, seek to contribute data on the tectonics of Precambrian igneous belts and cratonic fragments, the crustal structure of the Lambert Rift system and other major aspects of Antarctic geology, critical to understanding continental growth processes (Golynsky et al., 2006). Over the past decade, the Polar Marine Geoscience Expedition projects acquired approximately 77,400 line-km of aeromagnetic data over the largely ice-covered regions of MacRobertson Land and Princess Elizabeth Land. The airborne surveys were performed with a standard profile spacing of 5 km and tie-line interval of 15-25 km. The total amount of the Russian aeromagnetic data collected in this region exceeded more than 165,000 line-km. Together with the PCMEGA and AGAP surveys (Damaske and McLean, 2005; Ferraccioli et al., 2011) the PMGE dataset forms the longest transect ever mapped in East Antarctica exceeding 1950 km in length. Several distinct crustal subdivisions are clearly differentiated in the magnetic data. The high-amplitude positive anomalies that extend around the Vestfold Hills and Rauer Islands are likely be attributed to the southern boundary of high-grade metamorphic Late Archean craton. The northern PCM that are composed by ~1 Ga orthogneiss and charnockite display a predominantly northeasterly trending magnetic fabric that continues to the eastern shoulder of the Lambert Rift. The aeromagnetic data from the Southern PCM reveal the spatial boundary of the Archaean Ruker Terrane that is characterized by a short-wavelength anomalies and the prominent Ruker Anomaly that is associated with a banded iron formation. The prominent alternating system of linear NE-SW positive and negative anomalies over the eastern shoulder of the Lambert Rift may reflect the western boundary of the Princess Elizabeth Land cratonic(?) block, although its relationships and tectonic origin remained largely ambiguous

  2. Geohydrologic data for the St. Charles County well field and public-water supply 1985-91, and projected public-water supply, 1995 and 2000, for St. Charles County, Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Mugel, D.N.

    1996-10-01

    Geohydrologic data for this well field and public water supply data for St. Charles County were compiled to assist US DOE in developing the St. Charles County well field contingency plan to ensure a supply of water in the event that the well field becomes contaminated from wastes (radioactive, nitroaromatic, other) stored in the Weldon Spring quarry. The well field consists of 8 wells penetrating the entire thickness of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer and is 98-116 feet deep. Aquifer tests were conducted on 3 occasions at 3 different locations in the well field. Calculated transmissivities range from 900 to 60,200 feet squared per day; hydraulic conductivities ranged from 23 to 602 feet/day. Calculated/estimated storage coefficients ranged from 0.005 to 0.2. Tracer test showed effective porosity of 0. 21-0.32. Point dilution showed a ground-water velocity of 0.83 foot/day. From 1985-91, ave daily water supply from the well field and water treatment plant increased from 5.76 to 10.23 Mgd; this is projected to increase to 11.0 Mgd in 1995 and to 12.2 Mgd in 2000. The water department`s projections of peak daily demands from customers indicate that these demands will exceed the capacity of the treatment plant in 1995 and will exceed the capacities of the well field and plant during 2000.

  3. Peronosporomycetes (Oomycota) from a Middle Permian Permineralised Peat within the Bainmedart Coal Measures, Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Slater, Ben J.; McLoughlin, Stephen; Hilton, Jason

    2013-01-01

    The fossil record of Peronosporomycetes (water moulds) is rather sparse, though their distinctive ornamentation means they are probably better reported than some true fungal groups. Here we describe a rare Palaeozoic occurrence of this group from a Guadalupian (Middle Permian) silicified peat deposit in the Bainmedart Coal Measures, Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica. Specimens are numerous and comprise two morphologically distinct kinds of ornamented oogonia, of which some are attached to hyphae by a septum. Combresomyces caespitosus sp. nov. consists of spherical oogonia bearing densely spaced, long, hollow, slender, conical papillae with multiple sharply pointed, strongly divergent, apical branches that commonly form a pseudoreticulate pattern under optical microscopy. The oogonia are attached to a parental hypha by a short truncated stalk with a single septum. Combresomyces rarus sp. nov. consists of spherical oogonia bearing widely spaced, hollow, broad, conical papillae that terminate in a single bifurcation producing a pair of acutely divergent sharply pointed branches. The oogonium bears a short truncate extension where it attaches to the parental hypha. We propose that similarities in oogonium shape, size, spine morphology and hyphal attachment between the Permian forms from the Prince Charles Mountains and other reported Peronosporomycetes from Devonian to Triassic strata at widely separated localities elsewhere in the world delimit an extinct but once cosmopolitan Palaeozoic to early Mesozoic branch of the peronosporomycete clade. We name this order Combresomycetales and note that it played an important role in late Palaeozoic and early Mesozoic peatland ecosystems worldwide. PMID:23936465

  4. 3D-Reconstruction of recent volcanic activity from ROV-video, Charles Darwin Seamounts, Cape Verdes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwasnitschka, T.; Hansteen, T. H.; Kutterolf, S.; Freundt, A.; Devey, C. W.

    2011-12-01

    As well as providing well-localized samples, Remotely Operated Vehicles (ROVs) produce huge quantities of visual data whose potential for geological data mining has seldom if ever been fully realized. We present a new workflow to derive essential results of field geology such as quantitative stratigraphy and tectonic surveying from ROV-based photo and video material. We demonstrate the procedure on the Charles Darwin Seamounts, a field of small hot spot volcanoes recently identified at a depth of ca. 3500m southwest of the island of Santo Antao in the Cape Verdes. The Charles Darwin Seamounts feature a wide spectrum of volcanic edifices with forms suggestive of scoria cones, lava domes, tuff rings and maar-type depressions, all of comparable dimensions. These forms, coupled with the highly fragmented volcaniclastic samples recovered by dredging, motivated surveying parts of some edifices down to centimeter scale. ROV-based surveys yielded volcaniclastic samples of key structures linked by extensive coverage of stereoscopic photographs and high-resolution video. Based upon the latter, we present our workflow to derive three-dimensional models of outcrops from a single-camera video sequence, allowing quantitative measurements of fault orientation, bedding structure, grain size distribution and photo mosaicking within a geo-referenced framework. With this information we can identify episodes of repetitive eruptive activity at individual volcanic centers and see changes in eruptive style over time, which, despite their proximity to each other, is highly variable.

  5. The socio-hydrologic evolution of human-flood interactions on the Charles and Mystic River, eastern Massachusetts, USA.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mertz, Z.

    2015-12-01

    Socio-hydrology is an emerging subdiscipline for identifying the emergent properties of human-flood interactions. The Charles and the Mystic Rivers, in eastern Massachusetts, have been the subject of such interactions for hundreds of years. Over time, human dependency and settlement have altered the natural conditions of the rivers, and changed the potential for flood occurrence and property damage. As a result, flood management strategies have been enacted to counter this potential. Before we can assess how human vulnerability and actions related to river flooding will change under future climate conditions, we must first document the evolution of flooding and flood management and understand the motivations and thresholds of response that describe how the system has evolved in the past. We have mined historical data from traditional and non-traditional sources and have developed "mental models" from in-depth interviews of key personnel. We will present the socio-hydrological history of the Charles and Mystic Rivers and recommend how this information can inform future flood management strategies in the face of climate change.

  6. Summary of Organic Wastewater Compounds and Other Water-Quality Data in Charles County, Maryland, October 2007 through August 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lorah, Michelle M.; Soeder, Daniel J.; Teunis, Jessica A.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the government of Charles County, Maryland, and the Port Tobacco River Conservancy, Inc., conducted a water-quality reconnaissance and sampling investigation of the Port Tobacco River and Nanjemoy Creek watersheds in Charles County during October 2007 and June-August 2008. Samples were collected and analyzed for major ions, nutrients, organic wastewater compounds, and other selected constituents from 17 surface-water sites and 11 well sites (5 of which were screened in streambed sediments to obtain porewater samples). Most of the surface-water sites were relatively widely spaced throughout the Port Tobacco River and Nanjemoy Creek watersheds, although the well sites and some associated surface-water sites were concentrated in one residential community along the Port Tobacco River that has domestic septic systems. Sampling for enterococci bacteria was conducted by the Port Tobacco River Conservancy, Inc., at each site to coordinate with the sampling for chemical constituents. The purpose of the coordinated sampling was to determine correlations between historically high, in-stream bacteria counts and human wastewater inputs. Chemical data for the groundwater, porewater, and surface-water samples are presented in this report.

  7. Changes in serum progesterone concentrations in Bernese mountain dogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thejll Kirchhoff, K; Goericke-Pesch, S

    2016-10-15

    Progesterone (P4) concentrations during canine pregnancy follow a specific pattern. Although the general pattern is similar, it is likely that breed-specific differences exist. Detailed knowledge about the physiological range of P4 concentrations may be helpful in cases of suspected hypoluteoidism. The aim of this study was to investigate P4 changes during pregnancy in a small and a large breed, to obtain reference values for specific intervals during pregnancy and to test for breed- or body weight-specific differences. We studied P4 concentrations in pregnancies from healthy Bernese mountain dogs (BMDs, n = 6) and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs, n = 6) with a normal reproductive history. Blood samples for P4 were taken to determine the day of ovulation and after confirmation of pregnancy in regular intervals from Days 23 to 29 to Days 60 to 64. Bernese mountain dogs delivered 6.2 ± 2.6 puppies (range: 3-9) 63.4 ± 1.5 (range: 61-65) days after ovulation (excluding data from one BMD with elective c-section) and CKCS delivered 3.3 ± 1.9 puppies (range: 1-5) 63.5 ± 1.1 (range: 62-65) days after ovulation. In general, the P4 concentrations of individual dogs continuously decreased from the first to the last sampling during pregnancy. Respective mean concentrations were Days 23 to 29: 19.2 ± 4.3/22.2 ± 3.9 ng/mL (BMD/CKCS), Days 30 to 34: 15.6 ± 2.3/17.7 ± 5.8 ng/mL, Days 35 to 39: 12.5 ± 2.8/14.1 ± 3.4 ng/mL, Days 40 to 44: 8.9 ± 1.4/11.8 ± 3.7 ng/mL, Days 45 to 49: 7.7 ± 1.6/8.9 ± 1.9 ng/mL, Days 50 to 54: 6.0 ± 1.3/8.7 ± 7.1 ng/mL, Days 55 to 59: 4.7 ± 1.2/5.3 ± 2.8 ng/mL, and Days 60 to 64: 3.69 ± 1.86/2.62 ± 0.42 ng/mL. ANOVA indicated significant differences over time within each breed when considered individually (P < 0.0001 each), but not between breeds although mean P4 was slightly lower in BMD until Days 55 to 59. The present data clearly confirm the previously described P4 pattern

  8. Estimation of Streamflow Characteristics for Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge, Northeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Morgan, Timothy J.; Dutton, DeAnn M.; McCarthy, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge (CMR) encompasses about 1.1 million acres (including Fort Peck Reservoir on the Missouri River) in northeastern Montana. To ensure that sufficient streamflow remains in the tributary streams to maintain the riparian corridors, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is negotiating water-rights issues with the Reserved Water Rights Compact Commission of Montana. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, conducted a study to gage, for a short period, selected streams that cross CMR, and analyze data to estimate long-term streamflow characteristics for CMR. The long-term streamflow characteristics of primary interest include the monthly and annual 90-, 80-, 50-, and 20-percent exceedance streamflows and mean streamflows (Q.90, Q.80, Q.50, Q.20, and QM, respectively), and the 1.5-, 2-, and 2.33- year peak flows (PK1.5, PK2, and PK2.33, respectively). The Regional Adjustment Relationship (RAR) was investigated for estimating the monthly and annual Q.90, Q.80, Q.50, Q.20, and QM, and the PK1.5, PK2, and PK2.33 for the short-term CMR gaging stations (hereinafter referred to as CMR stations). The RAR was determined to provide acceptable results for estimating the long-term Q.90, Q.80, Q.50, Q.20, and QM on a monthly basis for the months of March through June, and also on an annual basis. For the months of September through January, the RAR regression equations did not provide acceptable results for any long-term streamflow characteristic. For the month of February, the RAR regression equations provided acceptable results for the long-term Q.50 and QM, but poor results for the long-term Q.90, Q.80, and Q.20. For the months of July and August, the RAR provided acceptable results for the long-term Q.50, Q.20, and QM, but poor results for the long-term Q.90 and Q.80. Estimation coefficients were developed for estimating the long-term streamflow characteristics for which the RAR did not provide

  9. Changes in serum progesterone concentrations in Bernese mountain dogs and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Thejll Kirchhoff, K; Goericke-Pesch, S

    2016-10-15

    Progesterone (P4) concentrations during canine pregnancy follow a specific pattern. Although the general pattern is similar, it is likely that breed-specific differences exist. Detailed knowledge about the physiological range of P4 concentrations may be helpful in cases of suspected hypoluteoidism. The aim of this study was to investigate P4 changes during pregnancy in a small and a large breed, to obtain reference values for specific intervals during pregnancy and to test for breed- or body weight-specific differences. We studied P4 concentrations in pregnancies from healthy Bernese mountain dogs (BMDs, n = 6) and Cavalier King Charles Spaniels (CKCSs, n = 6) with a normal reproductive history. Blood samples for P4 were taken to determine the day of ovulation and after confirmation of pregnancy in regular intervals from Days 23 to 29 to Days 60 to 64. Bernese mountain dogs delivered 6.2 ± 2.6 puppies (range: 3-9) 63.4 ± 1.5 (range: 61-65) days after ovulation (excluding data from one BMD with elective c-section) and CKCS delivered 3.3 ± 1.9 puppies (range: 1-5) 63.5 ± 1.1 (range: 62-65) days after ovulation. In general, the P4 concentrations of individual dogs continuously decreased from the first to the last sampling during pregnancy. Respective mean concentrations were Days 23 to 29: 19.2 ± 4.3/22.2 ± 3.9 ng/mL (BMD/CKCS), Days 30 to 34: 15.6 ± 2.3/17.7 ± 5.8 ng/mL, Days 35 to 39: 12.5 ± 2.8/14.1 ± 3.4 ng/mL, Days 40 to 44: 8.9 ± 1.4/11.8 ± 3.7 ng/mL, Days 45 to 49: 7.7 ± 1.6/8.9 ± 1.9 ng/mL, Days 50 to 54: 6.0 ± 1.3/8.7 ± 7.1 ng/mL, Days 55 to 59: 4.7 ± 1.2/5.3 ± 2.8 ng/mL, and Days 60 to 64: 3.69 ± 1.86/2.62 ± 0.42 ng/mL. ANOVA indicated significant differences over time within each breed when considered individually (P < 0.0001 each), but not between breeds although mean P4 was slightly lower in BMD until Days 55 to 59. The present data clearly confirm the previously described P4 pattern

  10. Pleistocene deglaciation chronology of the Amery Oasis and Radok Lake, northern Prince Charles Mountains, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fink, David; McKelvey, Barrie; Hambrey, Michael J.; Fabel, Derek; Brown, Roderick

    2006-03-01

    The East Antarctic Ice Sheet is the largest ice mass on Earth with a capacity to raise global sea level by up to 65 m. As the Lambert Glacier-Amery Ice Shelf drainage system is the largest to reach the coast of Antarctica, quantifying its evolution over the Quaternary is a vital component in developing an understanding of the Antarctic response to future climate change. Here we present a deglaciation chronology based on 10Be and 26Al in situ cosmogenic exposure ages of the northern Prince Charles Mountains, which flank the Lambert Glacier-Amery system, and that records the progressive emergence of McLeod Massif and Radok Lake basin from beneath the Mac.Robertson Land lobe of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. The exposure ages monotonically decrease with both decreasing altitude and increasing proximity to the Amery Ice Shelf at the Antarctic coast. Exposure ages from the crests of McLeod Massif near the edge the Amery Ice Shelf and from Fisher Massif, 75 km further inland, each at ˜1200 m above sea level, are 2.2 ± 0.3 and 1.9 ± 0.2 Ma, respectively, suggesting their continuous exposure above the ice sheet at least since close to the Plio-Pleistocene boundary. An extensive plateau at ˜800 m altitude on McLeod Massif above Battye Glacier records the massif's increased emergence above the ice sheet surface at about between 880 and 930 ka ago indicating 400 m of ice volume reduction in the mid Pleistocene. Correcting these apparent ages for a reasonable choice in erosion rate would extend this event to ˜1.15 Ma — a period identified from Prydz Bay ODP core-1167 when sedimentation composition alters and rates decrease 10-fold. Exposure ages from boulder-mantled erosional surfaces above and beyond the northern end of Radok Lake at 220 m, range from 28 to 121 ka. Independent of choice of model interpretation to explain this age spread, the most recent major reoccupation of Radok Lake by Battye Glacier ice occurred during the last glacial cycle. Moraine ridges at the

  11. Transportation Security Administration

    MedlinePlus

    ... content Official website of the Department of Homeland Security Transportation Security Administration A - Z Index What Can I Bring? Search form Apples Main menu Administrator Travel Security Screening Special Procedures TSA Pre✓® Passenger Support Travel ...

  12. NASA, NOAA administrators nominated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    President Ronald Reagan recently said he intended to nominate James Montgomery Beggs as NASA Administrator and John V. Byrne as NOAA Administrator. These two positions are key scientific posts that have been vacant since the start of the Reagan administration on January 20. The President also said he intends to nominate Hans Mark as NASA Deputy Administrator. At press time, Reagan had not designated his nominee for the director of the Office of Science and Technology Policy.

  13. A Philosophy of Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruening, William H.

    Justification is given for paying relatively large salaries to college administrators, specifically the president or chancellor and the chief academic officer. Three administrative task areas are discussed as criteria: management, administration per se, and leadership. It is contended that only leadership can be used as a criterion for…

  14. 78 FR 64017 - Manufacturer of Controlled Substances; Notice of Application; Cambrex Charles City, Inc.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE Drug... application by renewal to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) to be registered as a bulk manufacturer of the following basic classes of controlled substances: Drug Schedule Gamma Hydroxybutyric Acid (2010)...

  15. Evaluation of possible alternatives to lower the high water table of St. Charles Mesa, Pueblo County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brendle, Daniel L.

    2002-01-01

    St. Charles Mesa, an upland terrace southeast of Pueblo, Colorado, has become increasingly urbanized as cultivated fields have been subdivided and converted to residential areas. In some areas, the water table in the terrace alluvial aquifer underlying St. Charles Mesa is very shallow. Bessemer Ditch, which delivers irrigation water to farms on the mesa and other areas of the lower Arkansas River Valley, traverses St. Charles Mesa along its southern side and is the principal source of recharge to the terrace alluvial aquifer. The ground-water flow system was assumed to be in a state of dynamic equilibrium (steady-state condition) for this study. A steady-state ground-water flow model of the terrace alluvial aquifer was constructed and calibrated. The model was run in transient state to evaluate possible alternatives of lowering the water table. The possible alternatives evaluated were (1) reducing areal recharge by reducing recharge to irrigated areas by 25 percent, (2) lining Bessemer Ditch from (a) Aspen Street to 21st Lane; (b) Aspen Street to 23rd Lane; (c) Aspen Street to 25th Lane; and (d) Aspen Street to Nicholson Road, (3) installing two drains at a depth of 10 feet below land surface upgradient from the high water table areas, and (4) installing 22 dewatering wells within the high water table areas, each pumping at 80 gallons per minute. All alternatives evaluated were at least partly effective in lowering the water table. As the simulated extent of Bessemer Ditch lining was increased, the extent and magnitude of simulated water-table declines also increased. The maximum simulated declines in the water table were 3 feet when simulated areal recharge to irrigated areas was reduced by 25 percent, 29 feet when lining of Bessemer Ditch was simulated from Aspen Street to Nicholson Road, 6.8 feet when two drains were simulated at 10-foot depth, and 14.4 feet when 22 dewatering wells, each pumping at 80 gallons per minute, were simulated. Lining Bessemer Ditch

  16. European Information Centre of the Charles University for Further Education of Teachers. Information Review Series. Vol. 2, No. 1-2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1978

    "Newsletter EIC-FET" is a periodical of the Information Review series published by the European Information Centre of the Charles University for Further Education of Teachers in Prague twice a year in Czech, English, and Russian. It carries communications on main events organized by the Centre and on significant activities in the field of further…

  17. Transforming the Gray Factory: The Presidential Leadership of Charles M. Vest and the Architecture of Change at Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daas, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    The single-site exemplar study presents an in-depth account of the presidential leadership of Charles M. Vest of MIT--the second longest presidency in the Institute's history--and his leadership team's journey between 1990 and 2004 into campus architectural changes that involved over a billion dollars, added a quarter of floor space to MIT's…

  18. Educational Philanthropist George Peabody (1795-1869) and First U.S. Paleontology Professor Othniel Charles Marsh (1831-99) at Yale University.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Franklin; Parker, Betty J.

    This paper describes the lives and contributions of George Peabody and his nephew Othniel Charles Marsh. Marsh influenced his uncle's gifts to science and science education, particularly in the founding of the Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology at Harvard, the Peabody Museum of Natural History at Yale, and the Peabody Academy of Science,…

  19. Charles Darwin in Australia; or How To Introduce Some Local Colour to the Teaching of Evolution, Geology, Meteorology, and the Determination of Longitude.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicholas, Frank W.

    The background to Charles Darwin's little-known visit to Australia, and the account of his experiences while here, provide some invaluable historical material for teaching evolution, geology, meteorology, and the determination of longitude. Indeed, by using his Australian experiences as a foundation, it is possible to explain the theory of…

  20. In Response: "Psychology Is a Behavioral Science, Not a Biological Science", by Gary Greenberg and Charles Lambdin--Correct Conclusion, Unsound Arguments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Gary Greenberg and Charles Lambdin's review (in the summer 2007 issue) does an excellent job of summarizing the contents of Uttal's book "Neural Theories of Mind: Why the Mind-Brain Problem May Never Be Solved" (hereafter NTM). These authors make several insightful comments about the issues raised in NTM. In this response, the author disagrees,…

  1. Atlanta's Successful Charles R. Drew Charter School: The Cornerstone of East Lake's Community Transformation. The Abell Report. Volume 27, No.1

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhart, Linda; Barnes, Tara

    2014-01-01

    The community of East Lake, home to Charles R. Drew Charter School (Drew), is 6 miles from downtown Atlanta. In 1995, crime in East Lake was 19 times higher than the national average. Now, violent crime is down 95 percent. In 1995, 88 percent of residents were unemployed. Now, only 5 percent receive welfare. In 1995, just 5 percent of fifth…

  2. Arguing at Play in the Fields of the Lord; or, Abducting Charles Peirce's Rhetorical Theory in "A Neglected Argument for the Reality of God"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newcomb, Matthew J.

    2009-01-01

    This article argues that the ideas of "play" and "abduction" in Charles Peirce's work represent an inventive theory of argument that opens up the kinds of activities that can be called "arguments" and avoids some of the struggles over imposed beliefs with which recent argument theory has grappled. (Contains 12 notes.)

  3. Directions in General Relativity, Proceedings of the 1993 International Symposium, Maryland: Papers in Honor of Charles Misner.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, B. L.; Ryan, M. P., Jr.; Vishveshwara, C. V.

    1993-07-01

    These two volumes are the proceedings of a major International Symposium on General Relativity held at the University of Maryland May 27-29, 1993 to celebrate the sixtieth birthdays of Professor Charles Misner and Professor Dieter Brill. The volumes cover classical general relativity, quantum gravity and quantum cosmology, canonical formulation and the initial value problem, topology and geometry of spacetime and fields, mathematical and physical cosmology, and black hole physics and astrophysics. As invited articles, the papers in these volumes have an aim that goes beyond that of a standard conference proceedings. Not only do the authors discuss the most recent research results in their fields, but many also provide historical perspectives on how their subjects developed and offer individual insights in their search for new directions.

  4. "I listened with my eyes": writing speech and reading deafness in the fiction of Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins.

    PubMed

    Esmail, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    While characters with disabilities appear frequently in Victorian fiction, deaf characters, specifically, are almost entirely absent. In fact, the only deaf characters who use sign language in Victorian fiction are Madonna Blyth in Wilkie Collins’s Hide and Seek and Sophy Marigold in Charles Dickens’s “Doctor Marigold.” Grounding its analysis in these two texts, this article contends that it is, in particular, a deaf character’s relationship to language that disqualifies him or her from conventional representation in Victorian fiction. Through reading Hide and Seek and “Doctor Marigold” in the context of Victorian deaf history, Collins and Dickens’s realist aims, and Victorian generic conventions rooted in transcribing orality, this essay argues that the absence of deaf characters reveals the investment of mid-Victorian fiction in a particular and normativized relationship between bodies, spoken language, and textuality. PMID:22235490

  5. There is grandeur in this view of Newton: Charles Darwin, Isaac Newton and Victorian conceptions of scientific virtue.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Richard

    2014-01-01

    For Victorian men of science, the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century represented a moral awakening. Great theoretical triumphs of inductive science flowed directly from a philosophical spirit that embraced the virtues of self-discipline, courage, patience and humility. Isaac Newton exemplified this union of moral and intellectual excellence. This, at least, was the story crafted by scientific leaders like David Brewster, Thomas Chalmers, John Herschel, Adam Sedgwick and William Whewell. Not everyone accepted this reading of history. Evangelicals who decried the 'materialism' of mainstream science assigned a different meaning to Newton's legacy on behalf of their 'scriptural' alternative. High-church critics of science like John Henry Newman, on the other hand, denied that Newton's secular achievements carried any moral significance at all. These debates over Newtonian standards of philosophical behavior had a decisive influence on Charles Darwin as he developed his theory of evolution by natural selection. PMID:25455541

  6. Charles J. Pedersen: innovator in macrocyclic chemistry and co-recipient of the 1987 Nobel Prize in chemistry.

    PubMed

    Izatt, Reed M

    2007-02-01

    Charles J. Pedersen began life in Korea where his father was employed as an engineer at a gold mine in a remote region of that country. He received his primary and secondary school education in Japan and university training in the United States. He was employed as an organic research chemist at DuPont for 42 years. The signal accomplishment of this unusual individual was his serendipitous discovery of macrocyclic polyethers and of their selective complexation of alkali metal cations. This discovery sparked the development of a new field of chemistry and led to his sharing the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1987. An attempt is made to understand Pedersen as a person in this article.

  7. "Dancing on eggs": Charles H. Bynum, racial politics, and the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, 1938-1954.

    PubMed

    Mawdsley, Stephen E

    2010-01-01

    In 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his law partner Basil O'Connor formed the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (NFIP) to battle the viral disease poliomyelitis. Although the NFIP program was purported to be available for all Americans irrespective of "race, creed, or color," officials encountered numerous difficulties upholding this pledge in a nation divided by race. In 1944, NFIP officials hired educator Charles H. Bynum to head a new department of "Negro Activities." Between 1944 and 1954, Bynum negotiated the NFIP bureaucracy to educate officials and influence their national health policy. As part of the NFIP team, he helped increase interracial fund-raising in the March of Dimes, improve polio treatment for black Americans, and further the civil rights movement. PMID:20657055

  8. Planning ideology and geographic thought in the early twentieth century: Charles Whitnall's progressive era park designs for socialist Milwaukee.

    PubMed

    Platt, Lorne A

    2010-01-01

    As Milwaukee’s chief park planner in the early to mid-twentieth century, Charles Whitnall responded to the various underlying ideologies of the period within which he worked. His preference for parks was a political and physical response to and remedy for the industrialized and heavily congested city he called home. By examining the Progressive Era discourse associated with planning, this article situates Whitnall’s work within the political, aesthetic, and environmental contexts of geographic thought that influenced his plans for Milwaukee. In promoting a physical awareness associated with the natural features of the region and responding to the sociopolitical framework of contemporaries such as Ebenezer Howard, Whitnall incorporated a sense of compassion within his planning. He responded to the preexisting beer gardens of Pabst and Schlitz, as well as Olmsted-designed park spaces, by advocating for decentralization as part of a broader socialist agenda that had swept through Milwaukee during the early 1900s.

  9. "Dancing on eggs": Charles H. Bynum, racial politics, and the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis, 1938-1954.

    PubMed

    Mawdsley, Stephen E

    2010-01-01

    In 1938, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and his law partner Basil O'Connor formed the National Foundation for Infantile Paralysis (NFIP) to battle the viral disease poliomyelitis. Although the NFIP program was purported to be available for all Americans irrespective of "race, creed, or color," officials encountered numerous difficulties upholding this pledge in a nation divided by race. In 1944, NFIP officials hired educator Charles H. Bynum to head a new department of "Negro Activities." Between 1944 and 1954, Bynum negotiated the NFIP bureaucracy to educate officials and influence their national health policy. As part of the NFIP team, he helped increase interracial fund-raising in the March of Dimes, improve polio treatment for black Americans, and further the civil rights movement.

  10. "The orchids have been a splendid sport"--an alternative look at Charles Darwin's contribution to orchid biology.

    PubMed

    Yam, Tim Wing; Arditti, Joseph; Cameron, Kenneth M

    2009-12-01

    Charles Darwin's work with orchids and his thoughts about them are of great interest and not a little pride for those who are interested in these plants, but they are generally less well known than some of his other studies and ideas. Much has been published on what led to his other books and views. However, there is a paucity of information in the general literature on how Darwin's orchid book came about. This review will describe how The Various Contrivances by Which Orchids Are Fertilised by Insects came into being and will discuss the taxonomy of the orchids he studied. It also will concentrate on some of the less well-known aspects of Darwin's work and observations on orchids-namely, rostellum, seeds and their germination, pollination effects, and resupination-and their influence on subsequent investigators, plant physiology, and orchid science.

  11. "I listened with my eyes": writing speech and reading deafness in the fiction of Charles Dickens and Wilkie Collins.

    PubMed

    Esmail, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    While characters with disabilities appear frequently in Victorian fiction, deaf characters, specifically, are almost entirely absent. In fact, the only deaf characters who use sign language in Victorian fiction are Madonna Blyth in Wilkie Collins’s Hide and Seek and Sophy Marigold in Charles Dickens’s “Doctor Marigold.” Grounding its analysis in these two texts, this article contends that it is, in particular, a deaf character’s relationship to language that disqualifies him or her from conventional representation in Victorian fiction. Through reading Hide and Seek and “Doctor Marigold” in the context of Victorian deaf history, Collins and Dickens’s realist aims, and Victorian generic conventions rooted in transcribing orality, this essay argues that the absence of deaf characters reveals the investment of mid-Victorian fiction in a particular and normativized relationship between bodies, spoken language, and textuality.

  12. How Two Sides of the Atlantic Contributed to Understanding of the Global Oceans: Charles Yentsch and Andre Morel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acker, James G.

    2013-01-01

    In a few short days in September of this year, the ocean color/ocean optics community lost two of the founding members of its Hall of FameCharles Yentsch and Andre Morel. Yentsch passed away at the age of 85 on September 19, and Morel passed away on September 23 at the age of 79. It might sound clich to say that someone was instrumental to the advance of science in a particular field, but in the case of Yentsch and Morel and ocean color instrumentation, such an assessment would likely be accurate. Each mans career complimented that of the other Yentsch was one of the first to make measurements of the light field of the ocean from altitude and to advocate an instrument in space that could observe the spectrum of ocean radiance Morels theoretical underpinnings established a firm foundation for the measurements such an instrument could make, allowing their successful interpretation.

  13. Expeditions to Death and Disaster: Chappe d'Auteroche and Charles Green at the 1769 Transit of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasachoff, Jay M.

    2012-09-01

    Scientific expeditions usually bring back information or specimens that forward human knowledge. We also prefer them to bring back the humans in good shape, but that does not always occur. I discuss the expeditions to Siberia in 1761 and to Baja California in 1769 by the French abbé Jean Chappe d'Auteroche and to Tahiti in 1769 by the English astronomer Charles Green, accompanying Captain James Cook, to observe the transits of Venus. Neither Chappe d'Auteroche nor Green survived their expeditions. Chappe managed to hang on after the transit to see an eclipse of the Moon about two weeks later, and it is said that since ``the intent of his voyage was fulfilled, and the fruit of his observations secured,'' he ``died content,'' since ``he saw nothing more to wish for.'' Green died of dysentery caught in Batavia (now in Indonesia) on the continuation of his expedition with Capt. Cook on the ship Endeavour after the transit.

  14. Hydrologic data for the Weldon Spring radioactive waste-disposal sites, St. Charles County, Missouri; 1984-1986

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kleeschulte, M.J.; Emmett, L.F.; Barks, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    Hydrologic and water quality data were collected during an investigation of the Weldon Spring radioactive waste disposal sites and surroundings area in St. Charles County, Missouri, from 1984 to 1986. The data consists of water quality analyses of samples collected from 45 groundwater and 27 surface water sites. This includes analyses of water from four raffinate pits and from the Weldon Spring quarry. Also included in the report are the results of a seepage run on north flowing tributaries to Dardenne Creek from Kraut Run to Crooked Creek. Mean daily discharge from April 1985 to April 1986 is given for two springs located about 1.5 mi north of the chemical plant. (USGS)

  15. Influence and canonical supremacy: an analysis of how George Herbert Mead demoted Charles Horton Cooley in the sociological canon.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    This analysis assesses the factors underlying Charles Horton Cooley's place in the sociological canon as they relate to George Herbert Mead's puzzling diatribe-echoed in secondary accounts-against Cooley's social psychology and view of the self published scarcely a year after his death. The illocutionary act of publishing his critique stands as an effort to project the image of Mead's intellectual self and enhance his standing among sociologists within and outside the orbit of the University of Chicago. It expressed Mead's ambivalence toward his precursor Cooley, whose influence he never fully acknowledged. In addition, it typifies the contending fractal distinctions of the scientifically discursive versus literary styles of Mead and Cooley, who both founded the interpretive sociological tradition. The contrasting styles and attitudes toward writing of the two figures are discussed, and their implications for the problems of scale that have stymied the symbolic interactionist tradition are explored.

  16. There is grandeur in this view of Newton: Charles Darwin, Isaac Newton and Victorian conceptions of scientific virtue.

    PubMed

    Bellon, Richard

    2014-01-01

    For Victorian men of science, the scientific revolution of the seventeenth century represented a moral awakening. Great theoretical triumphs of inductive science flowed directly from a philosophical spirit that embraced the virtues of self-discipline, courage, patience and humility. Isaac Newton exemplified this union of moral and intellectual excellence. This, at least, was the story crafted by scientific leaders like David Brewster, Thomas Chalmers, John Herschel, Adam Sedgwick and William Whewell. Not everyone accepted this reading of history. Evangelicals who decried the 'materialism' of mainstream science assigned a different meaning to Newton's legacy on behalf of their 'scriptural' alternative. High-church critics of science like John Henry Newman, on the other hand, denied that Newton's secular achievements carried any moral significance at all. These debates over Newtonian standards of philosophical behavior had a decisive influence on Charles Darwin as he developed his theory of evolution by natural selection.

  17. Influence and canonical supremacy: an analysis of how George Herbert Mead demoted Charles Horton Cooley in the sociological canon.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Glenn

    2009-01-01

    This analysis assesses the factors underlying Charles Horton Cooley's place in the sociological canon as they relate to George Herbert Mead's puzzling diatribe-echoed in secondary accounts-against Cooley's social psychology and view of the self published scarcely a year after his death. The illocutionary act of publishing his critique stands as an effort to project the image of Mead's intellectual self and enhance his standing among sociologists within and outside the orbit of the University of Chicago. It expressed Mead's ambivalence toward his precursor Cooley, whose influence he never fully acknowledged. In addition, it typifies the contending fractal distinctions of the scientifically discursive versus literary styles of Mead and Cooley, who both founded the interpretive sociological tradition. The contrasting styles and attitudes toward writing of the two figures are discussed, and their implications for the problems of scale that have stymied the symbolic interactionist tradition are explored. PMID:19360893

  18. Naturalizing semiotics: The triadic sign of Charles Sanders Peirce as a systems property.

    PubMed

    Kilstrup, Mogens

    2015-12-01

    The father of pragmatism, Charles Sanders Peirce, gave in 1903 the following definition of a sign: "A Sign, or Representamen, is a First which stands in such a genuine triadic relation to a Second, called its Object, as to be capable of determining a Third, called its Interpretant, to assume the same triadic relation to its Object in which it stands itself to the same Object. The triadic relation is genuine, that is its three members are bound together by it in a way that does not consist in any complexus of dyadic relations". Despite its cult status and its pragmatic foundation, the Peircean sign has never revealed its true potential by being integrated into a formal system. In the present report, a reconstruction of the sign model is presented, which may at first appear somewhat obvious and superficial. However by use of the reconstructed model, the above statement and the majority of Peirce's other statements about the nature of signs fall into place. Instead of defining three links between Object (O), Representamen (R), and Interpretant (I), the sign is described as having a single three-dimensional link, specifying its location in a three dimensional (O,R,I) linkage space. To understand and explain sign function, the process of sign utilization (semiosis) has to be divided into two temporally separated phases, a sign-establishment phase where a three-dimensional link (Ψ(O,R,I)) is formed between three sign elements, and a later sign-interpretation phase where the established linkage is used for inferring significance to a novel phenomenon, if this satisfies the criteria for being a Representamen for the sign. Numerous statements from Peirce indicate that he used a two-staged semiosis paradigm although he did not state that explicitly. The three-dimensional model was primarily constructed for use in biosemiotics, as an exploratory frame for mapping the evolutionary establishment of sign links, which logically must have preceded the fixation of any regulatory

  19. Naturalizing semiotics: The triadic sign of Charles Sanders Peirce as a systems property.

    PubMed

    Kilstrup, Mogens

    2015-12-01

    The father of pragmatism, Charles Sanders Peirce, gave in 1903 the following definition of a sign: "A Sign, or Representamen, is a First which stands in such a genuine triadic relation to a Second, called its Object, as to be capable of determining a Third, called its Interpretant, to assume the same triadic relation to its Object in which it stands itself to the same Object. The triadic relation is genuine, that is its three members are bound together by it in a way that does not consist in any complexus of dyadic relations". Despite its cult status and its pragmatic foundation, the Peircean sign has never revealed its true potential by being integrated into a formal system. In the present report, a reconstruction of the sign model is presented, which may at first appear somewhat obvious and superficial. However by use of the reconstructed model, the above statement and the majority of Peirce's other statements about the nature of signs fall into place. Instead of defining three links between Object (O), Representamen (R), and Interpretant (I), the sign is described as having a single three-dimensional link, specifying its location in a three dimensional (O,R,I) linkage space. To understand and explain sign function, the process of sign utilization (semiosis) has to be divided into two temporally separated phases, a sign-establishment phase where a three-dimensional link (Ψ(O,R,I)) is formed between three sign elements, and a later sign-interpretation phase where the established linkage is used for inferring significance to a novel phenomenon, if this satisfies the criteria for being a Representamen for the sign. Numerous statements from Peirce indicate that he used a two-staged semiosis paradigm although he did not state that explicitly. The three-dimensional model was primarily constructed for use in biosemiotics, as an exploratory frame for mapping the evolutionary establishment of sign links, which logically must have preceded the fixation of any regulatory

  20. Veterans Administration Databases

    Cancer.gov

    The Veterans Administration Information Resource Center provides database and informatics experts, customer service, expert advice, information products, and web technology to VA researchers and others.

  1. The Administrative Power Grab

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sorenson, Richard D.

    2007-01-01

    Administrative power for some school teachers can be an aphrodisiac that can be applied negatively, especially when a leader has devastating instinct for the weaknesses of others. A leader's intellect and heart closes shop and ceases to function when drunk on power. In this article, the author describes how the use of administrative power can be…

  2. Innovation in Administrator Preparation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Don

    An innovative administrator preparation program based on guidelines established by national boards and commissions is described in this paper. The California State University, Fresno, administrator education curriculum was reorganized by faculty and an advisory committee of 11 superintendents to meet the needs of local school districts. The…

  3. Migrant Education Administrative Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Carolina State Dept. of Public Instruction, Raleigh. Div. of Compensatory Education.

    Relating specifically to the North Carolina migrant education program's administrative responsibilities, this guide is designed to aid administrators in program management, monitoring project activities, project evaluation, self-assessment, determining needs for training and staff development, site-visit preparation, policy development, and…

  4. Administration of Computer Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franklin, Gene F.

    Computing at Stanford University has, until recently, been performed at one of five facilities. The Stanford hospital operates an IBM 370/135 mainly for administrative use. The university business office has an IBM 370/145 for its administrative needs and support of the medical clinic. Under the supervision of the Stanford Computation Center are…

  5. Issues in Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ediger, Marlow

    School administrators need to study and analyze the pros and cons of issues before making decisions. Ultimately, decisions need to be made by administrators as to which philosophies of education to implement in resolving conflicting points of view. More research studies would lead to an increased number of syntheses of the pros and cons of certain…

  6. Justifying Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evers, Colin; Lakomski, Gabriele

    1993-01-01

    The traditional conceptions of science dominating educational administration are mistaken. Unacceptable epistemologies, like those implicit in logical positivism, justify knowledge solely in terms of empirical adequacy. An improved science of educational administration embraces a coherent global theory accounting for all the phenomena of human…

  7. Test Administration Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Kirk A.; Bergstrom, Betty A.

    2013-01-01

    The need for increased exam security, improved test formats, more flexible scheduling, better measurement, and more efficient administrative processes has caused testing agencies to consider converting the administration of their exams from paper-and-pencil to computer-based testing (CBT). Many decisions must be made in order to provide an optimal…

  8. Champions of Children. Administrators . . .

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaffee, John; Olds, H. Robert

    Today, in an era of taxpayer revolts, lack of clarity in values, and changing family structure, children need advocates in the political arena as well as in the schools. This pamphlet suggests that administrators are in an excellent position to defend the rights of children on all fronts. It focuses on what administrators have done and specific…

  9. The School Personnel Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knox, Rodney F.

    This paper provides an overview of the development of the school-personnel administrator role. It first describes the influence of the science-management and human-relations movements and the behavioral sciences on personnel administration and human resource management. It next discusses the role of the personnel-performance-appraisal system and…

  10. Tenure for Administrators?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holyer, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The practice of granting tenure to academic administrators, especially presidents and academic deans, seems fairly prevalent. However, it is important to consider the possible advantages and disadvantages carefully before making such an offer. Boards interested in attracting talented administrators empowered to do what is in the best interest of…

  11. 47 CFR 54.715 - Administrative expenses of the Administrator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Administrative expenses of the Administrator. 54.715 Section 54.715 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) UNIVERSAL SERVICE Administration § 54.715 Administrative expenses of the Administrator. (a) The annual administrative expenses...

  12. Extending non-fatigue Mode I subcritical crack growth data to subcritical fatigue crack growth: Demonstration of the equivalence of the Charles' law and Paris law exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keanini, Russell; Eppes, Martha-Cary

    2016-04-01

    Paris's law connects fatigue-induced subcritical crack growth and fatigue loading. Environmentally-driven subcritical crack growth, while a random process, can be decomposed into a spectrum of cyclic processes, where each spectral component is governed by Paris's law. Unfortunately, almost no data exists concerning the Paris law exponent, m; rather, the great majority of existing sub-critical crack growth measurements on rock have been carried out via Mode I tensile tests, where corresponding data are generally correlated using Charles' law, and where the latter, similar to Paris's law, exposes a power law relationship between crack growth rate and stress intensity. In this study, a statistical argument is used to derive a simple, rigorous relationship between the all-important Paris law and Charles law exponents, m and n. This result has a significant practical implication: subcritical fatigue crack growth in rock, driven by various random environmental weathering processes can now be predicted using available Mode I stress corrosion indices, n.

  13. Comparison of methods for determining streamflow requirements for aquatic habitat protection at selected sites on the Assabet and Charles Rivers, Eastern Massachusetts, 2000-02

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parker, Gene W.; Armstrong, David S.; Richards, Todd A.

    2004-01-01

    Four methods used to determine streamflow requirements for habitat protection at nine critical riffle reaches in the Assabet River and Charles River Basins were compared. The methods include three standard setting techniques?R2Cross, Wetted Perimeter, and Tennant?and a diagnostic method, the Range of Variability Approach. One study reach is on the main stem of the Assabet River, four reaches are on tributaries to the Assabet River (Cold Harbor Brook, Danforth Brook, Fort Meadow Brook, and Elizabeth Brook), three are on the main stem of the Charles River, and one is on a tributary to the Charles River (Mine Brook). The strength of the R2Cross and Wetted-Perimeter methods is that they may be applied at ungaged locations whereas the Tennant method and the Range of Variability Approach require a period of streamflow record for analysis. Fish community assessments conducted at or near riffle sites in flowing reaches of the Assabet River and Charles River Basins were used to indicate ecological conditions. The fish communities in the main stem and tributary reaches of both the Assabet and Charles River Basins indicated degraded aquatic ecosystems. However, the degree of degradation differs between the two basins. The extreme predominance of tolerant, generalist species in the Charles River fish community demon-strates the cumulative impacts of flow, habitat, and water-chemistry degradation, combined with the effects of nearby impoundments and changing land use. The range of discharges for nine ungaged riffle reaches defined by the median R2Cross 3-of-3 criteria, R2Cross 2-of-3 criteria, and Wetted-Perimeter streamflow requirements, was 0.86 cubic foot per second per square mile, 0.18 cubic foot per second per square mile, and 0.23 cubic foot per second per square mile, respectively. Application of R2Cross and Wetted-Perimeter methods to sites with altered streamflows or at sites that are riffles only at low to moderate flows can result in a greater variability of

  14. Thoughts for New Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaCrosse, E. Robert

    1977-01-01

    Discusses issues in program administration, with specific reference to preschool programs. Some of the issues discussed include coping with conflict, leadership, the sharing of power, and honesty. A short annotated bibliography is included. (BD)

  15. Evaluation of Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Edmund G.

    1979-01-01

    Guidelines are presented for the evaluation of college administrators: (1) purposes of the evaluation; (2) approaches to evaluation; (3) criteria for evaluation; (4) participants or evaluators in the process; and (5) evaluation results and use of results. (GDC)

  16. Serving the Space Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Jack E.; Thompson, Arthur W.

    1974-01-01

    The purpose of the current program was to establish an upward mobility program that afforded employees an opportunity to improve their credibility in job opportunity selection under the directives of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration. (Author/RK)

  17. Goldstone (GDSCC) administrative computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, H.

    1981-01-01

    The GDSCC Data Processing Unit provides various administrative computing services for Goldstone. Those activities, including finance, manpower and station utilization, deep-space station scheduling and engineering change order (ECO) control are discussed.

  18. Administrators Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, Fred V.

    1976-01-01

    A summary is presented of the issues and concerns discussed and the recommendations made by the American Vocational Association's (AVA) Administration Policy Committee during its meeting at the 1975 AVA Convention. (AJ)

  19. Book Review: No time to be brief: a scientific biography of Wolfgang Pauli. Charles P. Enz; Oxford University Press, New York, 2002, pp. 581, price US 60.00, £35.00, ISBN 0-19-856479-1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straumann, N.

    2004-09-01

    Charles Enz, the author of this first scientific biography of Wolfgang Pauli, was the last of a prestigious chain of Pauli assistants, during the last two years until Pauli's untimely death in December 1958. Friends and colleagues of Charles Enz had known for a long time that he was preparing a Pauli biography, but only after his retirement as a professor for theoretical physics at the University of Geneva he was able to devote all his time to this demanding endeavor.

  20. Causes of mortality of wild birds submitted to the Charles Darwin Research Station, Santa Cruz, Galapagos, Ecuador from 2002-2004.

    PubMed

    Gottdenker, Nicole L; Walsh, Timothy; Jiménez-Uzcátegui, Gustavo; Betancourt, Franklin; Cruz, Marilyn; Soos, Catherine; Miller, R Eric; Parker, Patricia G

    2008-10-01

    Necropsy findings were reviewed from wild birds submitted to the Charles Darwin Research Station, Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos Archipelago between 2004 and 2006. One hundred and ninety cases from 27 different species were submitted, and 178 of these cases were evaluated grossly or histologically. Trauma and trauma-related deaths (n=141) dominated necropsy submissions. Infectious causes of avian mortality included myiasis due to Philornis sp. (n=6), avian pox (n=1), and schistosomosis (n=1).

  1. Evolution in a fully constituted world: Charles Darwin's debts towards a static world in the Origin of Species (1859).

    PubMed

    Delisle, Richard G

    2014-01-01

    The Transformist Revolution was a long intellectual quest that has expanded from the 18th century to today. One area of inquiry after another has confronted the necessity of recasting its object of study under an evolutionary view: human history, geology, biology, astronomy, etc. No single scholar fully managed to make the transition from a static worldview to an evolutionary one during his or her own lifetime; Charles Darwin is no exception. Many versions of evolutionism were proposed during this revolution, versions offering all sorts of compromises between old and new views. Not sufficiently acknowledged in the historiography is the profoundness of Darwin's debts towards the old static view. As a dual child of the Scientific Revolution and natural theology, Darwin inherited key concepts such as stability, completeness, timelessness, unity, permanence, and uniformity. Darwin took these concepts into consideration while erecting his theory of biological evolution. Unsurprisingly, this theory was ill-equipped to embrace the directionality, historicity, and novelty that came along with a new evolutionary world. This paper analyses a fundamental idea at the heart of Darwin's Origins of Species (1859) inherited from a static, stable, and machine-like conception of the world: the notion of a fully constituted world. Although in principle antithetical to the very idea of evolution itself, Darwin found a way to 'loosen up' this notion so as to retain it in a way that allows for some kind of evolutionary change. PMID:25457647

  2. Charles Darwin's reputation: how it changed during the twentieth-century and how it may change again.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Charles Darwin died in 1882. During the twentieth century his reputation varied through time, as the scientific foundation of evolutionary theory changed. Beginning the century as an intellectual hero, he soon became a virtual footnote as experimental approaches to evolution began to develop. As the Modern Synthesis developed his reputation began to rise again until eventually he was identified as a founding father of the Modern Synthesis itself. In the meantime, developmental approaches to evolution began to challenge certain aspects of the Modern Synthesis. Synthesis authors attempted to refute the relevance of development by methodological arguments, some of them indirectly credited to Darwin. By the end of the century, molecular genetics had given new life to development approaches to evolution, now called evo devo. This must be seen as a refutation of the aforesaid methodological arguments of the Modern Synthesis advocates. By the way, we can also see now how the historiography that credited Darwin with the Synthesis was in error. In conclusion, one more historical revision is suggested.

  3. Evolution in a fully constituted world: Charles Darwin's debts towards a static world in the Origin of Species (1859).

    PubMed

    Delisle, Richard G

    2014-01-01

    The Transformist Revolution was a long intellectual quest that has expanded from the 18th century to today. One area of inquiry after another has confronted the necessity of recasting its object of study under an evolutionary view: human history, geology, biology, astronomy, etc. No single scholar fully managed to make the transition from a static worldview to an evolutionary one during his or her own lifetime; Charles Darwin is no exception. Many versions of evolutionism were proposed during this revolution, versions offering all sorts of compromises between old and new views. Not sufficiently acknowledged in the historiography is the profoundness of Darwin's debts towards the old static view. As a dual child of the Scientific Revolution and natural theology, Darwin inherited key concepts such as stability, completeness, timelessness, unity, permanence, and uniformity. Darwin took these concepts into consideration while erecting his theory of biological evolution. Unsurprisingly, this theory was ill-equipped to embrace the directionality, historicity, and novelty that came along with a new evolutionary world. This paper analyses a fundamental idea at the heart of Darwin's Origins of Species (1859) inherited from a static, stable, and machine-like conception of the world: the notion of a fully constituted world. Although in principle antithetical to the very idea of evolution itself, Darwin found a way to 'loosen up' this notion so as to retain it in a way that allows for some kind of evolutionary change.

  4. Keeping the fire burning: Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Paul Richer, Charles Féré and Alfred Binet.

    PubMed

    Walusinski, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Jean-Martin Charcot (1825-1893) was the one of the world's leading physicians during the final third of the 19th century. Rewarded in 1882 with the creation of the first chair in the diseases of the nervous system, he was extremely successful at recruiting loyal and talented students. Charcot himself never produced a general treatise on hysteria, but instead encouraged his pupils to write their own books. Here, we describe how the work on hysteria of Georges Gilles de la Tourette, Paul Richer, Charles Féré and Alfred Binet was closely associated with Charcot, and how they remained faithful to their mentor. We will highlight the unusual personality of G. Gilles de la Tourette and the tragic end to his life, the exceptional artistic talent of P. Richer (writer and painter of his magnificently illustrated thesis), the prolific writing capacity of C. Féré (bearing witness to his broad fields of interest) and A. Binet (blessed with an extraordinary capacity for work, and author of The Psychology of Reasoning, before presenting his metric scale of intelligence).

  5. Potential contaminants at a dredged spoil placement site, Charles City County, Virginia, as revealed by sequential extraction

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jianwu; Whittecar, G Richard; Johannesson, Karen H; Daniels, W Lee

    2004-01-01

    Backfills of dredged sediments onto a former sand and gravel mine site in Charles City County, VA may have the potential to contaminate local groundwater. To evaluate the mobility of trace elements and to identify the potential contaminants from the dredged sediments, a sequential extraction scheme was used to partition trace elements associated with the sediments from the local aquifer and the dredged sediments into five fractions: exchangeable, acidic, reducible, oxidizable, and residual phases. Sequential extractions indicate that, for most of the trace elements examined, the residual phases account for the largest proportion of the total concentrations, and their total extractable fractions are mainly from reducible and oxidizable phases. Only Cd, Pb, and Zn have an appreciable extractable proportion from the acidic phase in the filled dredged sediments. Our groundwater monitoring data suggest that the dredged sediments are mainly subject to a decrease in pH and a series of oxidation reactions, when exposed to the atmosphere. Because the trace elements released by carbonate dissolution and the oxidation (e.g., organic matter degradation, iron sulfide and, ammonia oxidation) are subsequently immobilized by sorption to iron, manganese, and aluminum oxides, no potential contaminants to local groundwater are expected by addition of the dredged sediments to this site.

  6. Charles Edward Isaacs (1811-1860): exploring the details of nephron structure and function in the post-Bowman period.

    PubMed

    Fine, Leon G

    2003-01-01

    Charles Edward Isaacs (1811-1860), an anatomist working in New York, undertook a series of studies which attempted to define the microscopic structure of the nephrons in a variety of species. Given that he published his findings 15 years after William Bowman's seminal paper on the subject, he was able to add only a few of the finer details to the picture. He observed the continuity of the epithelium of the glomerular capsule with that of the proximal tubule and he demonstrated that the glomerular tuft is covered by a layer of epithelial cells. In a series of studies on human renal function he erroneously concluded that the glomerulus must have an excretory function in addition to its filtration function and that diuretics act primarily on the glomerlus. The latter conclusion was based upon observations of substances not currently categorized as being diuretic agents. The absence of a major conceptual advance in the writings of Isaacs probably accounts for that fact that his contribution has been largely forgotten.

  7. An intimate understanding of place: Charles Sauriol and Toronto’s Don River Valley, 1927-1989.

    PubMed

    Bonnell, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Every summer from 1927 to 1968, Toronto conservationist Charles Sauriol and his family moved from their city home to a rustic cottage just a few kilometres away, within the urban wilderness of Toronto’s Don River Valley. In his years as a cottager, Sauriol saw the valley change from a picturesque setting of rural farms and woodlands to an increasingly threatened corridor of urban green space. His intimate familiarity with the valley led to a lifelong quest to protect it. This paper explores the history of conservation in the Don River Valley through Sauriol’s experiences. Changes in the approaches to protecting urban nature, I argue, are reflected in Sauriol’s personal experience – the strategies he employed, the language he used, and the losses he suffered as a result of urban planning policies. Over the course of Sauriol’s career as a conservationist, from the 1940s to the 1990s, the river increasingly became a symbol of urban health – specifically, the health of the relationship between urban residents and the natural environment upon which they depend. Drawing from a rich range of sources, including diary entries, published memoirs, and unpublished manuscripts and correspondence, this paper reflects upon the ways that biography can inform histories of place and better our understanding of individual responses to changing landscapes.

  8. Water-quality assessment and wastewater-management alternatives for Dardenne Creek in St Charles County, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkas, W.R.; Lodderhose, J.R.

    1985-01-01

    The quality of water in the 15 mile downstream reach of Dardenne Creek in St. Charles County, Missouri, was assessed to determine if it met the Missouri water quality standards. Concentrations of dissolved oxygen and total ammonia failed to meet water quality standards downstream from the Harvester-Dardenne and St. Peters Wastewater-Treatment Plants. The QUAL-II SEMCOG water quality model was calibrated and verified using two independent data sets from Dardenne Creek. Management alternatives using current, design capacity, and future expansion wastewater discharges from the St. Peters Wastewater-Treatment Plant were evaluated. Results of the computer simulation indicate that a nitrification-type advanced-treatment facility installed at the plant would produce a 5-day carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand of 10 mg/L. An effluent limit of 5.0 mg/L of 5-day carbonaceous biochemical oxygen demand would further improve the water quality of Dardenne Creek; however, an additional treatment process, such as sand filtration, would be needed to meet this criterion. (USGS)

  9. Balancing Necessity and Fallibilism: Charles Sanders Peirce on the Status of Mathematics and its Intersection with the Inquiry into Nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Ronald

    An interest in Charles Sanders Peirce and pragmatist thought in general emerged in the United States in the middle of last century to exert a powerful influence on a generation of American philosophers educated in the 1940s and 1950s, including Abner Shimony, whose thought is the occasion for this paper. Those threads in Peirce's work related to developing a scientifically informed worldview and metaphysics were the natural influences on Abner and this paper will begin by briefly reviewing a number of these threads and their influences in his writings. This sets the scene for the main project of the paper, an earlier historical project on a related aspect of Peirce's thought—his understanding of mathematics and its place in the description of nature. Mathematics was a foundational discipline for Peirce, one with qualities of necessity and certainty, features that stand in interesting contrast and tension to Peirce's view of an evolving nature which is governed by chance and our knowledge of which is always fallible and thus open to revision. Exploring these issues reveals deep background beliefs structuring Peirce's thought. The paper concludes in the contemporary realm with the speculation that due to the scientific developments of the 20th century, aspects of Peirce's work that formed a vision for a scientific metaphysics for earlier generations may be less relevant now. Nevertheless, the naturalistic spirit and orientation of Peirce's work remains compelling and productive.

  10. UCLA Astronomer Frederick Charles Leonard (1896-1960): From Childhood Prodigy to Mature Obsession

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, R. S.; Plotkin, H.

    2002-12-01

    The precocious 13-year-old Frederick Leonard burst onto the astronomical scene in 1909, when he audaciously attended the 10th anniversary meeting of the American Astronomical Society (AAS) at Yerkes Observatory. He was soon contributing frequent notes to ``Popular Astronomy" on double stars and a variety of other topics, and in 1911 founded the amateur Society for Practical Astronomy. Although he presided over its rapid growth, edited its ``Monthly Register," and dominated its administrrative structure with youthful mastery, the Society peaked early and faded into oblivion by 1917. Astronomers like F.R. Moulton and E.C. Pickering recognized his talents and provided encouragement, but he was denied membership to the AAS due to his youth. As well, his lack of rigor in observations, verbose editorializing, and hunger for the limelight gave his elders pause. After two degrees from Chicago, he moved in 1919 to the University of California, Berkeley, completing a solid Berkeley/Lick PhD in December, 1921, with a dissertation on the spectra of visual double stars. He moved within weeks to the Southern Branch of the University (later UCLA), where he introduced an undergraduate astronomy program which successfully attracted many first-rate students (Fred Whipple being perhaps the most illustrious). Although he continued various research projects at Mt. Wilson and later Lick, they were purely observational, with little interpretive analysis. Perhaps sensing that the science of astronomy was beginning to pass him by, Leonard's career path veered suddenly to meteoritics by 1930. He and meteorite collector-dealer Harvey H. Nininger founded the Society for Research on Meteorites in 1933 (later, the Meteoritical Society), and Leonard became its first president and edited its journal over the next 25 years. The Meteoritical Society provided the perfect vehicle for Leonard's adolescent preoccupation with scientific society administration and journal editing to blossom into an adult

  11. Armstrong remembered at memorial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-09-01

    Neil Armstrong, who died on 25 August, was recognized during a 13 September memorial service as a courageous, humble, and reluctant hero who in 1969 became the first person to step onto the Moon. The service, held at the National Cathedral in Washington, D. C., included remembrances from astronauts and friends, an excerpt from President John Kennedy's 1962 “We choose to go to the Moon” speech, and a somber rendition of the jazz standard “Fly Me to the Moon.” NASA administrator Charles Bolden said that Armstrong, commander of NASA's Apollo 11 mission, “left a foundation for the future and paved the way for future American explorers to be first to step foot on Mars or another planet. Today, let us recommit ourselves to this grand challenge in honor of the man who first demonstrated it was possible to reach new worlds—and whose life demonstrated the quiet resolve and determination that makes every new, more difficult step into space possible.”

  12. MCS Systems Administration Toolkit

    2001-09-30

    This package contains a number of systems administration utilities to assist a team of system administrators in managing a computer environment by automating routine tasks and centralizing information. Included are utilities to help install software on a network of computers and programs to make an image of a disk drive, to manage and distribute configuration files for a number of systems, and to run self-testss on systems, as well as an example of using amore » database to manage host information and various utilities.« less

  13. Computer hardware fault administration

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles J.; Megerian, Mark G.; Ratterman, Joseph D.; Smith, Brian E.

    2010-09-14

    Computer hardware fault administration carried out in a parallel computer, where the parallel computer includes a plurality of compute nodes. The compute nodes are coupled for data communications by at least two independent data communications networks, where each data communications network includes data communications links connected to the compute nodes. Typical embodiments carry out hardware fault administration by identifying a location of a defective link in the first data communications network of the parallel computer and routing communications data around the defective link through the second data communications network of the parallel computer.

  14. River basin administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Management of international rivers and their basins is the focus of the Centre for Comparative Studies on (International) River Basin Administration, recently established at Delft University of Technology in the Netherlands. Water pollution, sludge, and conflicting interests in the use of water in upstream and downstream parts of a river basin will be addressed by studying groundwater and consumption of water in the whole catchment area of a river.Important aspects of river management are administrative and policy aspects. The Centre will focus on policy, law, planning, and organization, including transboundary cooperation, posing standards, integrated environmental planning on regional scale and environmental impact assessments.

  15. 3 CFR - The Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... undermined Liberia's transition to democracy and the orderly development of its political, administrative, and economic institutions and resources. Although Liberia has made advances to promote democracy,...

  16. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to the Former Liberian Regime of Charles Taylor

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... transition to democracy and the orderly development of its political, administrative, and economic institutions and resources. Although Liberia has made significant advances to promote democracy, and...

  17. Urban School Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKelvey, Troy V., Ed.; Swanson, Austin D., Ed.

    This document contains 12 papers presented at an institute for urban school administrators designed to deal with the contemporary urban educational problems incident to school desegregation, social integration, and the equality of educational opportunity. The authors of the papers relate recent research findings to practical field experience, and…

  18. Telecommunications administration standard

    SciTech Connect

    Gustwiller, K.D.

    1996-05-01

    The administration of telecommunications is critical to proper maintenance and operation. The intent is to be able to properly support telecommunications for the distribution of all information within a building/campus. This standard will provide a uniform administration scheme that is independent of applications, and will establish guidelines for owners, installers, designers and contractors. This standard will accommodate existing building wiring, new building wiring and outside plant wiring. Existing buildings may not readily adapt to all applications of this standard, but the requirement for telecommunications administration is applicable to all buildings. Administration of the telecommunications infrastructure includes documentation (labels, records, drawings, reports, and work orders) of cables, termination hardware, patching and cross-connect facilities, telecommunications rooms, and other telecommunications spaces (conduits, grounding, and cable pathways are documented by Facilities Engineering). The investment in properly documenting telecommunications is a worthwhile effort. It is necessary to adhere to these standards to ensure quality and efficiency for the operation and maintenance of the telecommunications infrastructure for Sandia National Laboratories.

  19. Hospital Library Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Anne

    The objectives of a hospital are to improve patient care, while the objectives of a hospital library are to improve services to the staff which will support their efforts. This handbook dealing with hospital administration is designed to aid the librarian in either implementing a hospital library, or improving services in an existing medical…

  20. Administrative Salary Summary Data.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colorado Commission on Higher Education, Denver.

    This report presents salary data on selected administrative positions from all public higher education institutions, governing boards, and other higher education state-level agencies in Colorado. Table 1 presents, by institutional type, the median and mean salaries for 1994-95, as well as the frequency and range of salaries, for the following…