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Sample records for administrators community members

  1. 7 CFR 7.9 - Election of community committee members, delegates to local administrative area and county...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Election of community committee members, delegates to local administrative area and county conventions, and county committee members. 7.9 Section 7.9... CONSERVATION STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.9 Election of community committee members, delegates...

  2. Union Members Are Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, David

    2013-01-01

    Unions serve their members' interests. But union members are also community members, and their interests go well beyond increasing pay and benefits. A local union president has found that his members are best served by participating in a community-wide coalition. Providing eyeglasses to needy students, promoting healthy eating, and increasing…

  3. Constructivist Beliefs about the Science Classroom Learning Environment: Perspectives from Teachers, Administrators, Parents, Community Members, and Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haney, Jodi J.; Lumpe, Andrew T.; Czerniak, Charlene M.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions of teachers, administrators, parents, community members, and high school students about the science learning environment. The participants were active members of a grant project aimed at creating community action teams. Varrella and Burry-Stock's (1997) Beliefs About Learning Environments (BALE) Instrument was…

  4. Family Involvement in Four Voices: Administrator, Teacher, Students, and Community Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiseman, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Collaborations and partnerships among schools and community members have been described as a way to provide better educational opportunities for students. Such school-community partnerships have been described as relationships that involve exchange and engagement with mutually defined goals benefiting all participants. However, the process of…

  5. Reliability, validity and administrative burden of the community reintegration of injured service members computer adaptive test (CRIS-CAT)”

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The Computer Adaptive Test version of the Community Reintegration of Injured Service Members measure (CRIS-CAT) consists of three scales measuring Extent of, Perceived Limitations in, and Satisfaction with community integration. The CRIS-CAT was developed using item response theory methods. The purposes of this study were to assess the reliability, concurrent, known group and predictive validity and respondent burden of the CRIS-CAT. The CRIS-CAT was developed using item response theory methods. The purposes of this study were to assess the reliability, concurrent, known group and predictive validity and respondent burden of the CRIS-CAT. Methods This was a three-part study that included a 1) a cross-sectional field study of 517 homeless, employed, and Operation Enduring Freedom / Operation Iraqi Freedom (OEF/OIF) Veterans; who completed all items in the CRIS item set, 2) a cohort study with one year follow-up study of 135 OEF/OIF Veterans, and 3) a 50-person study of CRIS-CAT administration. Conditional reliability of simulated CAT scores was calculated from the field study data, and concurrent validity and known group validity were examined using Pearson product correlations and ANOVAs. Data from the cohort were used to examine the ability of the CRIS-CAT to predict key one year outcomes. Data from the CRIS-CAT administration study were used to calculate ICC (2,1) minimum detectable change (MDC), and average number of items used during CAT administration. Results Reliability scores for all scales were above 0.75, but decreased at both ends of the score continuum. CRIS-CAT scores were correlated with concurrent validity indicators and differed significantly between the three Veteran groups (P < .001). The odds of having any Emergency Room visits were reduced for Veterans with better CRIS-CAT scores (Extent, Perceived Satisfaction respectively: OR = 0.94, 0.93, 0.95; P < .05). CRIS-CAT scores were predictive of SF-12 physical and mental

  6. COMMUNITY MEMBERS' PERCEPTIONS OF MASS DRUG ADMINISTRATION FOR CONTROL OF LYMPHATIC FILARIASIS IN RURAL AND URBAN TANZANIA.

    PubMed

    Kisoka, William J; Tersbøl, Britt Pinkowsky; Meyrowitsch, Dan W; Simonsen, Paul E; Mushi, Declare L

    2016-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis is one of several neglected tropical diseases with severely disabling and stigmatizing manifestations that are referred to as 'neglected diseases of poverty'. It is a mosquito-borne disease found endemically and exclusively in low-income contexts where, concomitantly, general public health care is often deeply troubled and fails to meet the basic health needs of impoverished populations. This presents particular challenges for the implementation of mass drug administration (MDA), which currently is the principal means of control and eventual elimination. Several MDA programmes face the dilemma that they are unable to attain and maintain the required drug coverage across target groups. In recognition of this, a qualitative study was conducted in the Morogoro and Lindi regions of Tanzania to gain an understanding of community experiences with, and perceptions of, the MDA campaign implemented in 2011 by the National Lymphatic Filariasis Elimination Programme. The study revealed a wide variation of perceptions and experiences regarding the aim, rationale and justification of MDA. There were positive sentiments about the usefulness of the drugs, but many study participants were sceptical about the manner in which MDA is implemented. People were particularly disappointed with the limited attempts by implementers to share information and mobilize residents. In addition, negative sentiments towards MDA for lymphatic filariasis reflected a general feeling of desertion and marginalization by the health care system and political authorities. However, the results suggest that if the communities are brought on board with genuine respect for their integrity and informed self-determination, there is scope for major improvements in community support for MDA-based control activities.

  7. Knowledge, attitude, practices and their associated factors towards diabetes mellitus among non diabetes community members of Bale Zone administrative towns, South East Ethiopia. A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kassahun, Chanyalew Worku; Mekonen, Alemayehu Gonie

    2017-01-01

    Background Diabetes kills more than 4.9 million adults per year. It becomes rapidly increasing, non-communicable disease—a major threat to global public health particularly in Sub-Saharan Africa. Though previous studies among diabetic patients were focused in health institution, limited knowledge, attitude and practice were seen. There is no study conducted about diabetes related to knowledge, attitudes, practice and associated factors in the community level. Objective of the study The study assessed knowledge, attitude, practices, and its associated factors towards diabetes mellitus among non diabetic community members of Bale Zone, Ethiopia. Methods Community based cross-sectional study was conducted from November 15 to December 15, 2015 among 605 non diabetic community members of Bale Zone administrative towns. Data was collected using pretested structured face-to-face interview after taking informed written consent. Respondents were selected by systematic random sampling. The data was entered into EPI data version 3.1 and analyzed using Statistical package for social sciences version 20. Odds ratio and 95% confidence interval were calculated and P<0.05 was considered statistically significant. Finally, multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to indicate the independent predictors of knowledge, attitude and practice. Result Response rate of the study was 98.2%. About 52.5% of participants were knowledgeable, 55.9% and 56.6% had good attitude and practice respectively. Earning average monthly family income of ≤500 Ethiopian birr (AOR = 0.4, CI = 0.2, 0.6) and 501–1000 (AOR = 0.4, CI = 0.2, 0.7), heard about diabetes (AOR = 4.4, CI = 1.9, 10.2), had diabetes health education exposure (AOR = 5, CI = 2.5, 9.7) resulted to have good diabetes knowledge. Student, (AOR = 5.1, CI = 2.1,12), government/private employee (AOR = 3,CI = 1.4,6.7), merchant (AOR = 2,CI = 1.1,3.6) and Knowledgeable (AOR = 3, CI = 2.1, 4.7) subjects had positive attitude

  8. Perceptions of Virginia Community College System Faculty and Administrators on the Purposes for and Composition of a Comprehensive Evaluation System for Teaching Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hightower, William H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    A survey instrument was developed to measure community college faculty and administrator views on the faculty evaluation process. Responses were then compared based on demographic characteristics such as primary area of instruction, supervisory responsibility, years of experience, and gender. Open-ended survey questions asked respondents to…

  9. Administration for Community Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... Information for Current Grantees About ACL Organization Why Community Living? Authorizing Statutes Budget Mandatory Grant Allocations Strategic ... Final Rule Get ACL Updates OAA Reauthorization Why Community Living? FEATURES #InclusionWorks IL Final Rule Get ACL ...

  10. Administration for Community Living

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Competitive Grant Information for Current Grantees About ACL Organization Why Community Living? Authorizing Statutes Budget Mandatory ... FEATURES Older Americans Month DD Awareness Month Get ACL Updates OAA Reauthorization Why Community Living? FEATURES Older ...

  11. Converting virtual community members into online buyers.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sumeet; Kim, Hee-Woong; Shin, Seon-Jin

    2010-10-01

    Although many online vendors have sponsored virtual communities (VCs) in the hope of reaping commercial benefits from it, not many have been successful in reaping commercial benefits from their VC. Online vendors can benefit greatly from having a VC, if the VC members can be converted into online buyers. This study examines the conversion of a VC member into an online buyer. Using a classical-conditioning approach, this study finds that members' committed participation in the VC is the springboard for online vendors to convert VC members into online buyers.

  12. Mutual Recognition of the Food and Drug Administration and European Community Member State Conformity Assessment Procedures; pharmaceutical GMP inspection reports, medical device quality system evaluation reports, and certain medical device premarket evaluation reports--FDA. Proposed rule.

    PubMed

    1998-04-10

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is proposing to amend its regulations pursuant to an international agreement that is expected to be concluded between the United States and the European Community (EC) (Ref. 1). Under the terms of that agreement, FDA may normally endorse good manufacturing practice (GMP) inspection reports for pharmaceuticals provided by equivalent EC Member State regulatory authorities and medical device quality system evaluation reports and certain medical device premarket evaluation reports provided by equivalent conformity assessment bodies. FDA is taking this action to enhance its ability to ensure the safety and efficacy of pharmaceuticals and medical devices through more efficient and effective utilization of its regulatory resources. The agency is requesting comments on the proposed rule.

  13. An Ethical Decision-Making Framework for Community College Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Diane E.; Hioco, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a decision-making framework developed for use by community college administrators and higher education faculty members who teach graduate courses in community college administration or leadership. The rationale for developing a decision-making approach that integrates ethics and critical thinking was…

  14. 7 CFR 7.15 - Eligibility requirements of county committee members, community committee members, and delegates.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligibility requirements of county committee members, community committee members, and delegates. 7.15 Section 7.15 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of... COMMITTEES § 7.15 Eligibility requirements of county committee members, community committee members,...

  15. Evolution properties of the community members for dynamic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Kai; Guo, Qiang; Li, Sheng-Nan; Han, Jing-Ti; Liu, Jian-Guo

    2017-03-01

    The collective behaviors of community members for dynamic social networks are significant for understanding evolution features of communities. In this Letter, we empirically investigate the evolution properties of the new community members for dynamic networks. Firstly, we separate data sets into different slices, and analyze the statistical properties of new members as well as communities they joined in for these data sets. Then we introduce a parameter φ to describe community evolution between different slices and investigate the dynamic community properties of the new community members. The empirical analyses for the Facebook, APS, Enron and Wiki data sets indicate that both the number of new members and joint communities increase, the ratio declines rapidly and then becomes stable over time, and most of the new members will join in the small size communities that is s ≤ 10. Furthermore, the proportion of new members in existed communities decreases firstly and then becomes stable and relatively small for these data sets. Our work may be helpful for deeply understanding the evolution properties of community members for social networks.

  16. Scholarship and the Professional Identity of Community College Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, James C.

    2015-01-01

    The institutional culture of community colleges often fosters a professional identity among faculty members that sees research, publication, and other forms of out-of-class scholarship as detrimental to teaching and student learning. But the professional associations established by and for community college faculty members in specific academic…

  17. Community College Administrator Involvement with Forensics Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaskill, Rex W.

    The administration at Normandale Community College in Bloomington, Minnesota, has had tremendous influence on the college's forensics program. The first positive administrative decision made was to involve every full-time person hired in speech and theatre in the activity part of the program. Another positive aspect of the administration is its…

  18. Member Perspectives on the Role of BDSM Communities.

    PubMed

    Graham, Benjamin C; Butler, Sarah E; McGraw, Ryan; Cannes, Shelby Marie; Smith, Joanna

    2015-10-19

    Bondage-discipline/Dominance-submission/sadomasochism (BDSM) is an often misunderstood and misrepresented social phenomenon warranting further discourse and study. Community-based research that engages member perspective can assist in understanding socially marginalized experiences. The current study examined the role, meaning, and function of BDSM communities from the perspective of self-identified members. Seven nominal group technique workshops were conducted representing a variety of practitioner experiences and identities. Workshops involved 48 participants and resulted in the generation of 133 unique terms describing the role of BDSM communities in their lives. Terms were coded using a five-step procedure involving both academic and community members. A total of 15 categories were identified and included domains such as acceptance, sexual expression, friendship, safety, and sharing of educational knowledge. Results underscore the multifaceted nature of the role of such communities. While results consisted of mostly positive features, participants also identified certain negative aspects, such as conflict among members. Results from the study provide a succinct, member-derived, structured inventory of the role of BDSM communities that can serve to validate and synthesize existing research, improve dissemination of community voice around BDSM, and inform future research. We conclude with a discussion of the study's implications for sex education, clinical practice, and community dissemination.

  19. Stop the Presses! Using the Journalism Field as a Case Study to Help Community College Administrators Today

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basham, Matthew J.; Campbell, Dale F.; Garcia, Emmanual

    2010-01-01

    A focus group consisting of board of trustee members, community college presidents, senior administrators, administrators, and faculty members from community colleges around the United States developed the top six critical issues facing community colleges with respect to instructional planning and services; planning, governance, and finance; and…

  20. Online depression communities: members' interests and perceived benefits.

    PubMed

    Nimrod, Galit

    2013-01-01

    Most previous studies on online communities (peer-to-peer support groups) dedicated to people with depression related to members as a homogeneous group, and none examined differences between segments based on psychographic measures. Such segmentation may be most helpful in understanding members' participation patterns and explaining the benefits members gain from participation. This study aimed to explore whether members of online depression communities vary in their interests in issues discussed in the communities, and if so, whether groups with different interests also differ with regard to the benefits gained from participation. The study was based on an online survey of 793 members of 16 online depression communities. Results identified four member groups: concerned about daily living, information seekers, interested in all topics, and relatively less involved. There were very few differences between the groups in background characteristics, participation patterns, and level of depression. However, results indicated significant differences between the groups in perceived benefits, as the interested in all topics reported more "online support" and "offline improvement" than the information seekers and the relatively less involved, and more "offline improvement" than the concerned about daily living. Assuming that the reported interests reflected actual involvement in discussions of different issues, the findings suggest that combining supportive and informative discussions is more beneficial than attending to only one type of discussion, and stress the importance of informative discussions.

  1. Community members as recruiters of human subjects: ethical considerations.

    PubMed

    Simon, Christian; Mosavel, Maghboeba

    2010-03-01

    Few studies have considered in detail the ethical issues surrounding research in which investigators ask community members to engage in research subject recruitment within their own communities. Peer-driven recruitment (PDR) and its variants are useful for accessing and including certain populations in research, but also have the potential to undermine the ethical and scientific integrity of community-based research. This paper examines the ethical implications of utilizing community members as recruiters of human subjects in the context of PDR, as well as the authors' experience with a variant of PDR in a research project in South Africa. The importance of situating PDR in a comprehensive community engagement process that is responsive to the constraints of science and local needs and interests is emphasized. The paper will have relevance to bioethicists, health researchers, and research regulators concerned about the appropriate use of peer-driven recruitment strategies in health research.

  2. Psychological Community Integration among People with Psychiatric Disabilities and Nondisabled Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yanos, Philip T.; Stefanic, Ana; Tsemberis, Sam

    2011-01-01

    This study examined individual and neighborhood predictors of the psychological community integration of people with psychiatric disabilities and nondisabled community members. One hundred twenty-three adults (60 psychiatrically disabled, 63 general community residents), completed measures of sense of community, life satisfaction, psychiatric…

  3. Community Needs Assessment Office Administration & Technology (OAT).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzoli, J. A.; Lum, Ku'uipo; Meyer, Diane

    The purpose of this survey was to obtain from employers the requisite skills and potential employment demand for office workers on Maui. Of particular interest was: (1) the assessment of various clerical skills and computer software in its relevance to the Office Administration & Technology (OAT) curriculum at Maui Community College; and (2)…

  4. Burnout and Humor Usage among Community College Nursing Faculty Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talbot, Laura A.

    2000-01-01

    Assesses the correlation of burnout among community college nursing faculty members and their use of humor to mediate academic stress related to burnout. Differences in burnout between high versus low humor usage respondents showed a higher sense of personal accomplishment with high humor usage. Of those with low humor usage, workload was related…

  5. Effects of Hurricane Hugo: Mental Health Workers and Community Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muzekari, Louis H.; And Others

    This paper reports the effects of Hurricane Hugo on mental health workers and indigenous community members. The response and perceptions of mental health staff from the South Carolina Department of Mental Health (Go Teams) from areas unaffected by the hurricane were compared and contrasted with those of a subsequent Hugo Outreach Support Team…

  6. Legal Liability of Community College Presidents and Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumer, D. H.

    This document describes the criminal and legal liability of community college presidents and board members in such areas as contracts,civil rights, and fiduciary responsibilities. Also described are the defenses which universities ordinarily build to protect their employees from these liabilities. These defenses include the sovereign or charitable…

  7. The Retired School Administrator as Professor of Educational Administration: A Summary of a Survey Taken among Members of the National Council of Professors of Educational Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farmer, Richard F.

    Occupational experiences of former elementary-secondary school administrators as educational administration faculty are summarized in this report. Methodology involved a survey of 37 members of the National Council of Professors of Educational Administration and 123 educational administrative departments. Faculty respondents expressed an…

  8. The Historically Black College and University Community and the Obama Administration: A Lesson in Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasman, Marybeth; Collins, Heather

    2014-01-01

    The Obama administration has some improbable critics: members of the Historically Black College and University (HBCU) community. What started out as carefully worded commentaries have given way to more direct criticisms and complaints about the administration's policies affecting HBCUs. Although some of these gripes can be attributed to…

  9. Formative Research on Perceptions of Biobanking: What Community Members Think

    PubMed Central

    Luque, John S.; Quinn, Gwendolyn P.; Montel-Ishino, Francisco A.; Arevalo, Mariana; Bynum, Shalanda A.; Noel-Thomas, Shalewa; Wells, Kristen J.; Gwede, Clement K.; Meade, Cathy D.

    2013-01-01

    Preparing healthy community members with timely communications prior to engaging them in a request to donate biospecimens promises to improve the experience of biobanking participation. To this end, a qualitative study was conducted to assess community member knowledge, attitudes, beliefs, and informational needs about cancer-related biospecimen collection in a large metropolitan area in southwest Florida. The study utilized purposive sampling techniques to recruit a total of 95 participants to participate in 12 focus groups, segmented by race/ethnicity and language preference (mixed race, African American only, and Spanish speaking) and age (18–29, 30–54, and 55 and older). Focus group interviews were analyzed using content analysis to identify emergent themes. Overall, participants in the 30 years and older groups were favorable toward participating in biobanking if their concerns were addressed, such as confidentiality and consent issues, in contrast to participants aged 18–29 who were more skeptical. For all participants, the desire to participate in research that seeks new cancer treatments outweighed mistrust. Moreover, many cited the potential scientific benefit for future generations as a primary motivator. Finally, in some groups a therapeutic misconception was expressed, where participants expressed a willingness to forego confidentiality of their health status in exchange for therapeutic benefit. This study contributes to the literature on community perceptions of the benefits and barriers of biobanking and adds to the development of meaningful education communication priming tools to advance understandings about biobanking. PMID:21927867

  10. 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Administration, Datasets and Codebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-04

    ABSTRACT This report documents the administration of the 2012 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Sexual ... Active Duty Members Information Gathered on the Survey G-2 HOMESAFE To what extent do/would you feel safe from being sexually assaulted on your...of Active Duty Members Information Gathered on the Survey G-26 In an effort to prevent sexual assault, please indicate how well your unit

  11. Racism? Administrative and Community Perspectives in Data-Driven Decision Making: Systemic Perspectives versus Technical-Rational Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khalifa, Muhammad A.; Jennings, Michael E.; Briscoe, Felecia; Oleszweski, Ashley M.; Abdi, Nimo

    2014-01-01

    This case study describes tensions that became apparent between community members and school administrators after a proposal to close a historically African American public high school in a large urban Southwestern city. When members of the city's longstanding African American community responded with outrage, the school district's senior…

  12. Aligning Provider Team Members With Polyvalent Community Health Workers.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Beth A; Davis, Sheila; Kulbok, Pamela; Frank-Lightfoot, Loraine; Sgarlata, Lisa; Poree, Shawanda

    2015-01-01

    In light of the fragmentation of health care services and the need for health promotion and disease prevention, it is time to consider the important role community health workers (CHWs) could play as part of the health care team. Globally, CHWs tend to focus on a single patient condition, resulting in fragmented, uncoordinated health care services. Polyvalent (or multimodal) CHWs can provide a comprehensive, patient-centric range of care coordination services with other members of the health care team, ultimately improving patient outcomes and decreasing the cost of care. The potential benefits of the polyvalent CHW to the health care team are not widely understood in the United States. To fill this knowledge gap, a toolkit for nurse leaders in mainstream health care settings was created. The toolkit outlines the key elements essential to a successful CHW program and offers strategies for navigating the various challenges involved when integrating this new role into existing models of care.

  13. Institutional Review Board Community Members: Who Are They, What Do They Do, and Whom Do They Represent?

    PubMed Central

    Klitzman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The roles of nonaffiliated and nonscientific institutional review board (IRB) members at academic medical centers have received some attention, but questions remain—Who are they, what do they do, and whom, if anyone, do they represent? Method The author interviewed 46 IRB chairs, directors, administrators, and members in 2007–2009. He contacted the leadership of 60 IRBs (every fourth one in the list of the top 240 institutions by National Institutes of Health funding), interviewed IRB leaders from 34 of these institutions, then recruited 7 additional members from these IRBs to interview. Results Regular IRB members often called these individuals community members and were confused as to who these members were, or should be, and whether they did, or should, represent anyone and, if so, whom. IRBs encountered challenges in finding, training, and retaining these community members. Tensions emerged because nonscientific members, by definition, have no scientific training, so they have difficulty understanding key aspects of protocols, making them feel unempowered to contribute to reviews. IRBs varied in how much they encouraged these members to participate, in what ways, and with what success. Conclusions At academic medical centers, IRBs struggled with how to view, choose, employ, and retain nonaffiliated and nonscientific members, and they varied widely in these regards. Some IRBs had these members review entire protocols, others only limited parts (particularly reading consent forms for comprehension), pro forma. Yet, at times, these members’ input proved very important. These findings have critical implications for policy, practice, and research. PMID:22622206

  14. How Community College Faculty Members May Improve Student Learning Productivity in Their Online Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Katrina A.

    2014-01-01

    Eleven experienced community college faculty members were interviewed to elicit examples of how they improved student learning productivity in their online courses. The 11 faculty members represented eight different states, nine different fields or disciplines, and all were permanent or full-time faculty members at community colleges in the…

  15. The Community College Faculty Member: A Brief Review of the Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, James J.

    A review of the literature on the community college faculty member is presented. In contrast to the college and university professor, the community college faculty member does not possess a persona that has been subject to treatment in the media. The academic literature portrays this faculty member as the doctoral candidate that couldn't make it,…

  16. Administrators' Views on Factors Influencing Full-Time Faculty Members' Participation in Online Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesht, Faye; Windes, Deborah L.

    2011-01-01

    This pilot study was conducted in order to explore factors that facilitate and inhibit the teaching of online courses from an administrative perspective. A random sample of community college and public and private universities was selected, and administrators working closely in online education were invited to participate. A qualitative…

  17. Perceptions of Pharmacy Students, Faculty Members, and Administrators on the Use of Technology in the Classroom

    PubMed Central

    DiVall, Margarita V.; Hayney, Mary S; Marsh, Wallace; Neville, Michael W.; O’Barr, Stephen; Sheets, Erin D.; Calhoun, Larry D.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To gather and evaluate the perceptions of students, faculty members, and administrators regarding the frequency and appropriateness of classroom technology use. Methods. Third-year pharmacy students and faculty members at 6 colleges and schools of pharmacy were surveyed to assess their perceptions about the type, frequency, and appropriateness of using technology in the classroom. Upper-level administrators and information technology professionals were also interviewed to ascertain overall technology goals and identify criteria used to adopt new classroom technologies. Results. Four hundred sixty-six students, 124 faculty members, and 12 administrators participated in the survey. The most frequently used and valued types of classroom technology were course management systems, audience response systems, and lecture capture. Faculty members and students agreed that faculty members appropriately used course management systems and audience response systems. Compared with their counterparts, tech-savvy, and male students reported significantly greater preference for increased use of classroom technology. Eighty-six percent of faculty members reported having changed their teaching methodologies to meet student needs, and 91% of the students agreed that the use of technology met their needs. Conclusions. Pharmacy colleges and schools use a variety of technologies in their teaching methods, which have evolved to meet the needs of the current generation of students. Students are satisfied with the appropriateness of technology, but many exhibit preferences for even greater use of technology in the classroom. PMID:23716743

  18. Talking About Your Prostate: Perspectives from Providers and Community Members.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seul Ki; Seel, Jessica S; Steck, Susan E; Payne, Johnny; McCormick, Douglas; Schrock, Courtney S; Friedman, Daniela B

    2017-03-07

    Prostate cancer (PrCA) screening is controversial, especially for African-American (AA) men who have higher PrCA incidence and mortality than other racial/ethnic groups. Patient-provider communication is important for the PrCA screening decision process. The study purpose was to better understand the current dialogue between primary care providers (PCPs-physicians and nurse practitioners) and AA men about PrCA prevention and screening. An online survey with 46 PCPs, education sessions (including pre/post surveys) with 56 AA men, and a forum with 5 panelists and 38 AA men for open dialogue were held to examine both provider and community perspectives on PrCA communication needs and practices. PCPs' perceptions of PrCA screening were varied and they used different PrCA screening guidelines in their practices. PCPs and AA men had different experiences with PrCA communication. PCPs reported that they have discussions about PrCA screening and prostate health with AA patients; few AA men reported these same experiences. About 38.0% of PCPs reported that they remain neutral about PSA testing during discussions; however, only 10.7% of AA men reported that their doctor remained neutral. Prostate health knowledge among AA men increased significantly following participation in the education sessions (p < 0.001). AA community members reported high satisfaction regarding the education session and forum. Different recommendations from PCPs may hinder AA men's decisions about PrCA screening. The forum used in this study could be a model for others to help improve patient-provider communication and increase engagement in dialogue about this common cancer.

  19. Community College Administrators as Educational Partnership Champions: Phenomenological Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boodrookas, George J.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored, through the use of phenomenological research methods, the experiences of community college administrators in the development and implementation of educational partnerships. The study focused on the actions of these administrators who serve as partnership "champions" in ventures related to community, economic and…

  20. Advancing coalition theory: the effect of coalition factors on community capacity mediated by member engagement.

    PubMed

    Kegler, Michelle C; Swan, Deanne W

    2012-08-01

    Community coalitions have the potential to enhance a community's capacity to engage in effective problem solving for a range of community concerns. Although numerous studies have documented correlations between member engagement and coalition processes and structural characteristics, fewer have examined associations between coalition factors and community capacity outcomes. The current study uses data from an evaluation of the California Healthy Cities and Communities program to examine pathways between coalition factors (i.e. membership, processes), member engagement (i.e. participation, satisfaction) and community capacity as hypothesized by the Community Coalition Action Theory (CCAT). Surveys were completed by 231 members of 19 healthy cities and communities coalitions. Multilevel mediation analyses were used to examine possible mediating effects of member engagement on three community capacity indicators: new skills, sense of community and social capital. Results generally supported CCAT. Member engagement mediated the effects of leadership and staffing on community capacity outcomes. Results also showed that member engagement mediated several relationships between process variables (i.e. task focus, cohesion) and community capacity, but several unmediated direct effects were also observed. This suggests that although member engagement does explain some relationships, it alone is not sufficient to explain how coalition processes influence indicators of community capacity.

  1. Advancing coalition theory: the effect of coalition factors on community capacity mediated by member engagement

    PubMed Central

    Kegler, Michelle C.; Swan, Deanne W.

    2012-01-01

    Community coalitions have the potential to enhance a community’s capacity to engage in effective problem solving for a range of community concerns. Although numerous studies have documented correlations between member engagement and coalition processes and structural characteristics, fewer have examined associations between coalition factors and community capacity outcomes. The current study uses data from an evaluation of the California Healthy Cities and Communities program to examine pathways between coalition factors (i.e. membership, processes), member engagement (i.e. participation, satisfaction) and community capacity as hypothesized by the Community Coalition Action Theory (CCAT). Surveys were completed by 231 members of 19 healthy cities and communities coalitions. Multilevel mediation analyses were used to examine possible mediating effects of member engagement on three community capacity indicators: new skills, sense of community and social capital. Results generally supported CCAT. Member engagement mediated the effects of leadership and staffing on community capacity outcomes. Results also showed that member engagement mediated several relationships between process variables (i.e. task focus, cohesion) and community capacity, but several unmediated direct effects were also observed. This suggests that although member engagement does explain some relationships, it alone is not sufficient to explain how coalition processes influence indicators of community capacity. PMID:21911845

  2. The Community College Theatre Department: An Administrative Point of Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine, Don

    This paper discusses aspects of faculty, administration, departmental structure, curriculum, and production operations of community college theatre departments in general and of Illinois Central College in particular. It contends that the common and revered tenet of community college institutional philosophy is "community service." The importance…

  3. The Rural Community College as an Administrative Labor Market

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Nathan T.; Cejda, Brent D.

    2007-01-01

    External culture acts as a powerful force on rural community colleges and the presidents that lead them. This article examines whether rural community colleges comprise an administrative labor market, based on the careers of 69 chief academic officers employed in rural community colleges. Findings indicate the characteristics of both an…

  4. Administrative Rules of the Illinois Community College Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois Community Coll. Board, Springfield.

    This document outlines the administrative rules of the Illinois Community College Board (ICCB), delineating: (1) ICCB Administration, including definitions, regulations of advisory groups and opinions, manuals, the role of the executive director, appearance at ICCB meetings, appeal procedure, administration of detachments and subsequent…

  5. An Internet Primer for Community College Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brumbaugh, Kenneth E.; McRae, Mary S.

    1995-01-01

    Provides information designed to assist administrators in utilizing the advanced information technologies available on the Internet. Describes the uses of such elements of the Internet as "e-mail,""ftp (file transfer protocol),""gopher," and "telnet." Indicates that administrators can use the internet to…

  6. 77 FR 14404 - Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Advisory Committee Members, and FDA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Guidance for the Public, Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Advisory Committee Members, and FDA Staff: Public Availability of Advisory Committee Members' Financial.... SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing the availability of a guidance for...

  7. Faculty Members' Perceptions of Rigor in Dual Enrollment, Accelerated Programs, and Standard Community College Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferguson, Colin; Baker, Pete; Burnett, Dana

    2015-01-01

    This chapter presents the results of a study that investigated faculty members' views on the level of academic rigor in three settings at one community college: dual enrollment, accelerated programs, and standard community college courses.

  8. Community-Based Participatory Research with Hispanic/Latino Leaders and Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amendola, Mary Grace

    2013-01-01

    Hispanic/Latinos (H/L) are being studied for healthcare disparities research utilizing community-based participatory research (CBPR). CBPR's active participation of community members and researchers suggests improvement in community health. Yet there are no known studies that inductively investigated the lived experience of H/L community leaders…

  9. Every Mark on the Page: Educating Family and Community Members about Young Children's Writing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusumano, Kate Foley

    2008-01-01

    Family and community members often look at children's writing from a deficit point of view--seeing only what's "wrong" with it, what needs "fixing." Teachers can take a proactive role as family and community member educators, communicating to them how writing develops in young children and how they can play a positive role in this development.…

  10. Building Relationships: It's Not Always Easy, but Juggling Relationships with Board Members and Community Stakeholders Is Essential to Making Needed Campus Reforms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collett, Stacy

    2014-01-01

    Building relationships is the essence of the community college. Higher education administrators learned long ago that building rapport with businesses, state and local government, and constituents is the best way to represent the interests of the community. But that does not make it easy. Board members come and go and the shifting dynamics of…

  11. Insider's Guide to Community College Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Robert; Giles, Ray; Kirklin, Pat

    This book offers advice on the skills and attitudes needed to succeed as a community college leader. As one begins to move up the organizational ladder from program director or assistant dean to dean or vice president, the sphere of influence expands dramatically. There is a greater need to be able to see how programs and decisions affect the…

  12. Management Principles for the Community College Administrator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breuder, Robert L., Ed.

    Six critical areas of community college organization and management are addressed in a direct and practical fashion. John W. Lee offers strategies for coping with the paradoxical decline in the quality of learning and the associated increase in instructional productivity. The translation of traditional intraorganizational into interorganizational…

  13. Community and team member factors that influence the operations phase of local prevention teams: the PROSPER Project.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Mark E; Chilenski, Sarah M; Greenberg, Mark T; Spoth, Richard L; Redmond, Cleve

    2007-09-01

    This study examined the longitudinal predictors of quality of functioning of community prevention teams during the "operations" phase of team development. The 14 community teams were involved in a randomized-trial of a university-community partnership project, PROSPER (Spoth et al., Prevention Science, 5(1): 31-39, 2004b), that implements evidence-based interventions intended to support positive youth development and reduce early substance use, as well as other problem behaviors. The study included a multi-informant approach to measurement of constructs, and included data from 137 team members, 59 human service agency directors and school administrators, 16 school principals, and 8 Prevention Coordinators (i.e. technical assistance providers). We examined how community demographics and social capital, team level characteristics, and team member attributes and attitudes are related to local team functioning across an 18-month period. Findings indicate that community demographics (poverty), social capital, team member attitudes towards prevention, and team members' views of the acceptability of teen alcohol use played a substantial role in predicting various indicators of the quality of team functioning 18 months later.

  14. Shared Understandings: Environmental Perspectives of Kenyan Community Members and Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigely, Cassie F.; Dogbey, James; Che, S. Megan; Hallo, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Environmental issues are a shared human concern as communities in all nations and geographic regions are grappling with environmental degradation. Despite this concern, there are multiple different viewpoints on the current state of environmental issues and how to understand these problems. Understanding how different communities conceive of the…

  15. The Carter Administration: Small Community and Rural Development Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Jimmy

    The Carter Administration is adopting a Small Community and Rural Development Policy because: (1) rural America's human and natural resources are a mainstay of the nation's economy and way of life; (2) many rural areas are in the midst of significant economic and demographic change; (3) rural people and communities have greater unmet basic human…

  16. Achieving Administrative Diversity. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 94.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowen, Raymond C., Ed.; Muller, Gilbert H., Ed.

    1996-01-01

    Focusing on the challenge of expanding administrative opportunities for minorities, the 10 essays in this volume explore the problem of underrepresentation of minority administrators at community colleges and suggest strategies for improving diversity. The following articles are provided: (1) "Paradox and Promise: Leadership and the Neglected…

  17. An Analysis of Community Pharmacy Shared Faculty Members' Contributions to Teaching, Service, and Scholarship.

    PubMed

    Bacci, Jennifer L; Akinwale, Tolu P; Adams, Alex J; McGivney, Melissa Somma

    2016-09-25

    Objective. To identify community pharmacy shared faculty members across the United States and to describe their roles and responsibilities in terms of teaching, service, and scholarship. Methods. This study was a mixed-methods analysis using surveys and key informant interviews. Results. Twenty-two faculty members completed the survey; nine were interviewed. Their major roles and responsibilities included teaching in community-based and experiential learning courses, precepting students and/or residents, being actively involved in professional organizations, providing patient care while leading innovation, and disseminating findings through scholarship. Conclusion. Community pharmacy shared faculty members contribute to their academic institutions and community pharmacy organizations by educating learners, providing direct patient care, and advancing community practice through innovation and service to the profession. Findings of this study can be used as a guide for academic institutions and community pharmacy organizations interested in partnering to develop a community pharmacy shared faculty position.

  18. The relative importance of relational and scientific characteristics of psychotherapy: Perceptions of community members vs. therapists.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Nicholas R; Deacon, Brett J

    2016-03-01

    Although client preferences are an integral component of evidence-based practice in psychology (American Psychological Association, 2006), relatively little research has examined what potential mental health consumers value in the psychotherapy they may receive. The present study was conducted to examine community members' preferences for the scientific and relational aspects of psychotherapy for different types of presenting problems, and how accurately therapists perceive these preferences. Community members (n = 200) were surveyed about the importance of scientific (e.g., demonstrated efficacy in clinical trials) and relational (e.g., therapist empathy) characteristics of psychotherapy both for anxiety disorders (e.g., obsessive-compulsive disorder) and disorder-nonspecific issues (e.g., relationship difficulties). Therapists (n = 199) completed the same survey and responded how they expected the average mental health consumer would. Results showed that although community members valued relational characteristics significantly more than scientific characteristics, the gap between these two was large for disorder-nonspecific issues (d = 1.24) but small for anxiety disorders (d = .27). Community members rated scientific credibility as important across problem types. Therapists significantly underestimated the importance of scientific characteristics to community members, particularly in the treatment of disorder-nonspecific issues (d = .74). Therapists who valued research less in their own practice were more likely to underestimate the importance of scientific credibility to community members. The implications of the present findings for understanding the nature of client preferences in evidence-based psychological practice are discussed.

  19. Fall Meeting: Showcasing our members' achievements and building community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McPhaden, Michael J.

    2012-11-01

    Amazing! Inspiring! Incomparable! These are words that describe AGU's Fall Meeting—the largest gathering of Earth and space scientists in the world. Every December for 45 years, scientists from around the globe have converged on the Fall Meeting in San Francisco, Calif. Excitement and enthusiasm pervade this unique annual event, where our members present their latest research and communicate its relevance to the great challenges that face society. Fall Meeting attendees can also survey the evolving panorama of geophysical research and hear firsthand about the latest pioneering advances in our understanding of the Earth and planetary system. It's an extraordinary opportunity to share, to learn, to network, and to renew old friendships; and it's one of the most important ways that we as a scholarly society advance our mission of promoting “discovery in Earth and space science for the benefit of humanity.”

  20. Determinants of Success for Online Communities: An Analysis of Three Communities in Terms of Members' Perceived Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hew, Khe Foon

    2009-01-01

    Recent empirical evidence suggests that the updated DeLone and McLean's information systems (D&M IS) model can identify the determinants of success of online communities in terms of member loyalty (Lin and Lee 2006). This study is similarly concerned with the challenge of identifying the determinants of success of online communities, but it…

  1. Can Community Members Identify Tropical Tree Species for REDD+ Carbon and Biodiversity Measurements?

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mingxu; Brofeldt, Søren; Li, Qiaohong; Xu, Jianchu; Danielsen, Finn; Læssøe, Simon Bjarke Lægaard; Poulsen, Michael Køie; Gottlieb, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity conservation is a required co-benefit of REDD+. Biodiversity monitoring is therefore needed, yet in most areas it will be constrained by limitations in the available human professional and financial resources. REDD+ programs that use forest plots for biomass monitoring may be able to take advantage of the same data for detecting changes in the tree diversity, using the richness and abundance of canopy trees as a proxy for biodiversity. If local community members are already assessing the above-ground biomass in a representative network of forest vegetation plots, it may require minimal further effort to collect data on the diversity of trees. We compare community members and trained scientists’ data on tree diversity in permanent vegetation plots in montane forest in Yunnan, China. We show that local community members here can collect tree diversity data of comparable quality to trained botanists, at one third the cost. Without access to herbaria, identification guides or the Internet, community members could provide the ethno-taxonomical names for 95% of 1071 trees in 60 vegetation plots. Moreover, we show that the community-led survey spent 89% of the expenses at village level as opposed to 23% of funds in the monitoring by botanists. In participatory REDD+ programs in areas where community members demonstrate great knowledge of forest trees, community-based collection of tree diversity data can be a cost-effective approach for obtaining tree diversity information. PMID:27814370

  2. Can Community Members Identify Tropical Tree Species for REDD+ Carbon and Biodiversity Measurements?

    PubMed

    Zhao, Mingxu; Brofeldt, Søren; Li, Qiaohong; Xu, Jianchu; Danielsen, Finn; Læssøe, Simon Bjarke Lægaard; Poulsen, Michael Køie; Gottlieb, Anna; Maxwell, James Franklin; Theilade, Ida

    2016-01-01

    Biodiversity conservation is a required co-benefit of REDD+. Biodiversity monitoring is therefore needed, yet in most areas it will be constrained by limitations in the available human professional and financial resources. REDD+ programs that use forest plots for biomass monitoring may be able to take advantage of the same data for detecting changes in the tree diversity, using the richness and abundance of canopy trees as a proxy for biodiversity. If local community members are already assessing the above-ground biomass in a representative network of forest vegetation plots, it may require minimal further effort to collect data on the diversity of trees. We compare community members and trained scientists' data on tree diversity in permanent vegetation plots in montane forest in Yunnan, China. We show that local community members here can collect tree diversity data of comparable quality to trained botanists, at one third the cost. Without access to herbaria, identification guides or the Internet, community members could provide the ethno-taxonomical names for 95% of 1071 trees in 60 vegetation plots. Moreover, we show that the community-led survey spent 89% of the expenses at village level as opposed to 23% of funds in the monitoring by botanists. In participatory REDD+ programs in areas where community members demonstrate great knowledge of forest trees, community-based collection of tree diversity data can be a cost-effective approach for obtaining tree diversity information.

  3. Community Members' Perceptions of Teacher Candidates during Panel Employment Interviews: Does Personality Mean More than Competence?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delli, Dane A.; Vera, Elizabeth M.

    2008-01-01

    The context for this study involves the intersection between a community's increasing expectation for hiring highly qualified classroom teachers and its increasing expectation for access and involvement in public schools. The current investigation attempted to identify community members' perceptions of the primary factors that influence their…

  4. Strengthening Parent-Community Member Relations on Agency Boards: Comparative Case Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bond, Meg A.; Keys, Christopher B.

    2000-01-01

    In this comparative study of the boards of three community agencies, the forces that influence the quality of parent-community member relations are examined. Results indicate that an organization's ability to manage intergroup tension is influenced by organizational history of intergroup relations, group identification, and organizational…

  5. 7 CFR 7.18 - Terms of office of county and community members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Terms of office of county and community members. 7.18 Section 7.18 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture SELECTION AND FUNCTIONS OF AGRICULTURAL STABILIZATION AND CONSERVATION STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.18 Terms of office of county...

  6. College and Community Choir Member Experiences in a Collaborative Intergenerational Performance Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conway, Colleen; Hodgman, Thomas M.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and describe the experiences of college and community choir members in a collaborative intergenerational performance project. Data included an initial focus group interview with college choir participants (n = 8), an initial focus group interview with community chorus participants (n = 8); collaborative…

  7. 75 FR 65331 - Federal Home Loan Bank Members Selected for Community Support Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... Federal Home Loan Bank (Bank) members it has selected for the 2010 first round review cycle under the FHFA... for the review cycle under the FHFA's community support requirements regulation must submit completed... 2010 first round review cycle under the FHFA's community support requirements regulation must...

  8. Community and team member factors that influence the early phase functioning of community prevention teams: the PROSPER project.

    PubMed

    Greenberg, Mark T; Feinberg, Mark E; Meyer-Chilenski, Sarah; Spoth, Richard L; Redmond, Cleve

    2007-11-01

    This research examines the early development of community teams in a specific university-community partnership project called PROSPER (Spoth et al., Prev Sci 5:31-39, 2004). PROSPER supports local community teams in rural areas and small towns to implement evidence-based programs intended to support positive youth development and reduce early substance use. The study evaluated 14 community teams and included longitudinal data from 108 team members. Specifically, it examined how community demographics and team member characteristics, perceptions, and attitudes at initial team formation were related to local team functioning 6 months later, when teams were planning for prevention program implementation. Findings indicate that community demographics (poverty), perceived community readiness, characteristics of local team members (previous collaborative experience) and attitudes toward prevention played a substantial role in predicting the quality of community team functioning 6 months later. EDITORS' STRATEGIC IMPLICATIONS: The authors identify barriers to successful long-term implementation of prevention programs and add to a small, but important, longitudinal research knowledge base related to community coalitions.

  9. Community Advisory Board Members' Perspectives Regarding Opportunities and Challenges of Research Collaboration.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Mary E; Lazoritz, Stephen; Shaffer, Ken; Palm, David; Ford, Amy L

    2017-03-01

    This case study examines the perspectives of rural community advisory board (CAB) members regarding the opportunities and challenges of partnering with academic investigators on funded research. We used a sequential exploratory design to evaluate the phenomena. Qualitative and quantitative data from CAB members were integrated to gain better understanding. Results showed that CAB members valued professional networking and gaining new evidence-based knowledge to enhance their professional practices. They identified rurality, the academic research process, and fulfilling research roles as the most significant challenges. CAB members also believed that strong community-based leaders had been essential in promoting and sustaining a shared vision for evidence-based research solutions to their community problem. Self-evaluation is essential for effective CAB research partnerships, and nurse researchers can strengthen these collaborations by (a) providing continuing education on research and evidence-based practices, (b) assuring that perceived benefits of CAB participation outweigh perceived challenges, and

  10. Brief report: do delinquency and community violence exposure explain internalizing problems in early adolescent gang members?

    PubMed

    Madan, Anjana; Mrug, Sylvie; Windle, Michael

    2011-10-01

    Adolescent gang members are at higher risk for internalizing problems as well as exposure to community violence and delinquency. This study examined whether gang membership in early adolescence is associated with internalizing problems (depression, anxiety, and suicidal behavior) and whether these associations are mediated by delinquency and witnessing community violence. In a sample of 589 ethnically diverse early adolescents, gang membership was related to suicidal behavior but not depression or anxiety. Both delinquency and witnessing community violence mediated this association. Professionals working with gang members should assess these youth for suicidal behavior and provide interventions as needed.

  11. With Their Help: How community members construct a congruent Third Space in an urban kindergarten classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, Cassie F.

    2013-03-01

    Through the use of narrative enquiry, this paper tells the story of how a kindergarten teacher in an all-girls' school incorporates family and community members' involvement to the construction of the congruent Third Space present in the classroom, and the ways the girls respond to this involvement, thereby providing a successful model for other schools in marginalized communities. In this study, the author sought to understand how this teacher and the community members' in this classroom create a congruent Third Space. This research enquiry includes the systematic use of the methodology portraiture with analysis of critical events. The portraits are titled: Mutual Desire for the Girls to Succeed and Community Members' Involvement. This paper moves Third Space theory towards praxis through concrete examples in an urban, kindergarten classroom.

  12. Which Members of the Microbial Communities Are Active? Microarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Brandon E. L.

    only at the early stages of understanding the microbial processes that occur in petroliferous formations and the surrounding subterranean environment. Important first steps in characterising the microbiology of oilfield systems involve identifying the microbial community structure and determining how population diversity changes are affected by the overall geochemical and biological parameters of the system. This is relatively easy to do today by using general 16S rRNA primers for PCR and building clone libraries. For example, previous studies using molecular methods characterised many dominant prokaryotes in petroleum reservoirs (Orphan et al., 2000) and in two Alaskan North Slope oil facilities (Duncan et al., 2009; Pham et al., 2009). However, the problem is that more traditional molecular biology approaches, such as 16S clone libraries, fail to detect large portions of the community perhaps missing up to half of the biodiversity (see Hong et al., 2009) and require significant laboratory time to construct large libraries necessary to increase the probability of detecting the majority of even bacterial biodiversity. In the energy sector, the overarching desire would be to quickly assess the extent of in situ hydrocarbon biodegradation or to disrupt detrimental processes such as biofouling, and in these cases it may not be necessary to identify specific microbial species. Rather, it would be more critical to evaluate metabolic processes or monitor gene products that are implicated in the specific activity of interest. Research goals such as these are well suited for a tailored application of microarray technology.

  13. The administrative costs of community-based health insurance: a case study of the community health fund in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Borghi, Josephine; Makawia, Suzan; Kuwawenaruwa, August

    2015-02-01

    Community-based health insurance expansion has been proposed as a financing solution for the sizable informal sector in low-income settings. However, there is limited evidence of the administrative costs of such schemes. We assessed annual facility and district-level costs of running the Community Health Fund (CHF), a voluntary health insurance scheme for the informal sector in a rural and an urban district from the same region in Tanzania. Information on resource use, CHF membership and revenue was obtained from district managers and health workers from two facilities in each district. The administrative cost per CHF member household and the cost to revenue ratio were estimated. Revenue collection was the most costly activity at facility level (78% of total costs), followed by stewardship and management (13%) and pooling of funds (10%). Stewardship and management was the main activity at district level. The administration cost per CHF member household ranged from USD 3.33 to USD 12.12 per year. The cost to revenue ratio ranged from 50% to 364%. The cost of administering the CHF was high relative to revenue generated. Similar studies from other settings should be encouraged.

  14. The administrative costs of community-based health insurance: a case study of the community health fund in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Borghi, Josephine; Makawia, Suzan; Kuwawenaruwa, August

    2015-01-01

    Community-based health insurance expansion has been proposed as a financing solution for the sizable informal sector in low-income settings. However, there is limited evidence of the administrative costs of such schemes. We assessed annual facility and district-level costs of running the Community Health Fund (CHF), a voluntary health insurance scheme for the informal sector in a rural and an urban district from the same region in Tanzania. Information on resource use, CHF membership and revenue was obtained from district managers and health workers from two facilities in each district. The administrative cost per CHF member household and the cost to revenue ratio were estimated. Revenue collection was the most costly activity at facility level (78% of total costs), followed by stewardship and management (13%) and pooling of funds (10%). Stewardship and management was the main activity at district level. The administration cost per CHF member household ranged from USD 3.33 to USD 12.12 per year. The cost to revenue ratio ranged from 50% to 364%. The cost of administering the CHF was high relative to revenue generated. Similar studies from other settings should be encouraged. PMID:24334331

  15. The Quest for Continuous Improvement: A Qualitative Study on Diffusion of Outcomes Assessment among Career and Technical Education Faculty Members at Rocky Mountain States Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McFarlane, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The following qualitative multicase study presents an examination of outcomes assessment adoption as it relates to Career and Technical Education faculty at community colleges and outlines recommendations for postsecondary education administration as they introduce innovations to faculty members. The purpose of this investigation was to explore…

  16. Are Special Administrative Skills Required in the Community College Administrators' Relations with the Minority Constituencies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkpatrick, Malcolm

    To be effective in dealing with minority constituencies, the community college administrator needs special personality traits and communication skills: he/she must be tough-minded, articulate, aware of different life-styles, and empathetic; he/she should be able to withstand criticism, confront problems directly, accept compromise, and tolerate…

  17. The Influence of Community Members on Participation by Youth in an HIV Vaccine Trial in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mbunda, Theodora; Tarimo, Edith A. M.; Bakari, Muhammad; Sandström, Eric; Kulane, Asli

    2016-01-01

    In sub-Saharan Africa, the burden of HIV is high among young people and it is of the utmost importance that they be recruited into vaccination trials. Since community members influence the willingness of young people to participate in the vaccination trials, ascertaining their opinions is essential to overcoming barriers to such participation. Here, in seven focus group discussions we explored the views of 44 community members identified as someone they felt close by youth in Tanzania. The transcripts of these discussions were examined using content analysis. Our participants expressed that community members would be directly involved in the decisions of young people about whether or not to participate in an HIV vaccine trial. In general, they felt that community members would provide social support for youth during the trial and perceived that youth might have misconceptions concerning the vaccine and trial process. The participants pointed out structural factors such as substance use, poverty, stigma and unemployment that are barriers to participation. In conclusion, involvement of community members could be an integral part of the recruitment and retention of young people in HIV vaccine trials in Tanzania. PMID:27997617

  18. EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATOR TRAINING FOR THE MULTI-CULTURAL COMMUNITY. FINAL REPORT FOR THE NATIONAL INSTITUTE OF MENTAL HEALTH.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HOLEMON, RICHARD L.

    A THREE-YEAR PILOT PROJECT (1964-1967) WAS CONDUCTED TO DEVELOP AN EFFECTIVE PROGRAM FOR THE TRAINING OF EDUCATIONAL ADMINISTRATORS WHO COULD SERVE AS AGENTS OF CONSTRUCTIVE EDUCATIONAL CHANGE IN COMMUNITIES WITH SIZEABLE PROPORTIONS OF SPANISH- AND INDIAN- AS WELL AS ANGLO-AMERICAN MEMBERS. SPECIAL ASPECTS OF THE PROGRAM INCLUDED--(1)…

  19. Community College Administrative Roles in Identifying Faculty for Future Management Positions: A Phenomenological Study of Retired Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knirk, Brian Doyle

    2013-01-01

    The community college system is beginning to see waves of retirements at all levels of the administrative structure. These retirements, in conjunction with expected growth in administrative positions, will result in system-wide administrative vacancies. Community colleges not already seeking new leaders are likely to find themselves in the midst…

  20. Analyzing Members' Motivations to Participate in Role-Playing and Self-Expression Based Virtual Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Eun; Saharia, Aditya

    With the rapid growth of computer mediated communication technologies in the last two decades, various types of virtual communities have emerged. Some communities provide a role playing arena, enabled by avatars, while others provide an arena for expressing and promoting detailed personal profiles to enhance their offline social networks. Due to different focus of these virtual communities, different factors motivate members to participate in these communities. In this study, we examine differences in members’ motivations to participate in role-playing versus self-expression based virtual communities. To achieve this goal, we apply the Wang and Fesenmaier (2004) framework, which explains members’ participation in terms of their functional, social, psychological, and hedonic needs. The primary contributions of this study are two folds: First, it demonstrates differences between role-playing and self-expression based communities. Second, it provides a comprehensive framework describing members’ motivation to participate in virtual communities.

  1. Personality and community prevention teams: Dimensions of team leader and member personality predicting team functioning.

    PubMed

    Feinberg, Mark E; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Greenberg, Mark T

    2008-11-01

    The predictors and correlates of positive functioning among community prevention teams have been examined in a number of research studies; however, the role of personality has been neglected. In this study, we examined whether team member and leader personality dimensions assessed at the time of team formation predicted local prevention team functioning 2.5-3.5 years later. Participants were 159 prevention team members in 14 communities participating in the PROSPER study of prevention program dissemination. Three aspects of personality, aggregated at the team level, were examined as predictors: Openness to Experience, Conscientiousness, and Agreeableness. A series of multivariate regression analyses were performed that accounted for the interdependency of five categories of team functioning. Results showed that average team member Openness was negatively, and Conscientiousness was positively linked to team functioning. The findings have implications for decisions about the level and nature of technical assistance support provided to community prevention teams.

  2. Social Contract Among the Members of the Community of the Evergreen State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evergreen State Coll., Olympia, Washington.

    In its life as a community, the Evergreen State College requires a social contract rather than a list of specific prohibitions and essentially negative rules. The contract, open to modifications over time and responsive to the changing circumstances sure to attend the institution's future, represents a commitment by each member of the college…

  3. A Beach and Dune Community. 4-H Marine Science. Member's Guide. Activity I. MSp 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auburn Univ., AL. Cooperative Extension Service.

    The investigation in this booklet is designed to provide 4-H members with opportunities to identify common plants and animals found on beaches and sand dunes and to determine the role of the plants and animals in this community. Learners are provided with a picture of a hypothetical beach and sand dune and a list of organisms (included in the…

  4. With Their Help: How Community Members Construct a Congruent Third Space in an Urban Kindergarten Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quigley, Cassie F.

    2013-01-01

    Through the use of narrative enquiry, this paper tells the story of how a kindergarten teacher in an all-girls' school incorporates family and community members' involvement to the construction of the congruent Third Space present in the classroom, and the ways the girls respond to this involvement, thereby providing a successful model for other…

  5. Attitudes of Pakistani Community Members and Staff toward People with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patka, Mazna; Keys, Christopher B.; Henry, David B.; McDonald, Katherine E.

    2013-01-01

    The acceptance and inclusion of persons with intellectual disability can vary across cultures, and understanding attitudes can provide insight into such variation. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored attitudes toward people with intellectual disability among Pakistani community members and disability service providers. We administered…

  6. Faculty Members' Perceptions of Community College Centers for Teaching and Learning: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frey, Sandra A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore faculty members' perceptions of community college Centers for Teaching and Learning (CTLs); whose main purpose is to promote, facilitate, and honor excellence in teaching and learning through the support of full-time and adjunct faculty, at all career stages. A generic qualitative study with a grounded…

  7. The Perceived Presence and Effect of Incentives on Community College Faculty Members' Enthusiasm to Teach Online

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beck, Burton Cornelius, Jr.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the perceived effects of incentives on community college faculty member enthusiasm to teach online courses. Ten incentives used with college faculty were identified in the literature: (a) release time, (b) personal satisfaction, (c) teaching development, (d) technical support, (e) professional prestige,…

  8. Brief Report: Do Delinquency and Community Violence Exposure Explain Internalizing Problems in Early Adolescent Gang Members?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madan, Anjana; Mrug, Sylvie; Windle, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Adolescent gang members are at higher risk for internalizing problems as well as exposure to community violence and delinquency. This study examined whether gang membership in early adolescence is associated with internalizing problems (depression, anxiety, and suicidal behavior) and whether these associations are mediated by delinquency and…

  9. Community Member and Stakeholder Perspectives on a Healthy Environment Initiative in North Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Lowe-Wilson, Abby; Mouw, Mary Sherwyn; Jeon, Janet Yewon; Baber, Ceola Ross; Vu, Maihan B.; Bethell, Monique

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The North Carolina Community Transformation Grant Project (NC-CTG) aimed to implement policy, system, and environmental strategies to promote healthy eating, active living, tobacco-free living, and clinical and community preventive services to advance health equity and reduce health disparities for the state’s most vulnerable communities. This article presents findings from the Health Equity Collaborative Evaluation and Implementation Project, which assessed community and stakeholder perceptions of health equity for 3 NC-CTG strategies: farmers markets, shared use, and smoke-free multiunit housing. Methods In a triangulated qualitative evaluation, 6 photo elicitation (PE) sessions among 45 community members in 1 urban and 3 rural counties and key informant interviews among 22 stakeholders were conducted. Nine participants from the PE sessions and key informant interviews in the urban county subsequently participated in a stakeholder power analysis and mapping session (SPA) to discuss and identify people and organizations in their community perceived to be influential in addressing health equity–related issues. Results Evaluations of the PE sessions and key informant interviews indicated that access (convenience, cost, safety, and awareness of products and services) and community fit (community-defined quality, safety, values, and norms) were important constructs across the strategies. The SPA identified specific community- and faith-based organizations, health care organizations, and local government agencies as key stakeholders for future efforts. Conclusions Both community fit and access are essential constructs for promoting health equity. Findings demonstrate the feasibility of and need for formative research that engages community members and local stakeholders to shape context-specific, culturally relevant health promotion strategies. PMID:26270741

  10. Perceptions of children and community members concerning the circumstances of orphans in rural Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Foster, G; Makufa, C; Drew, R; Mashumba, S; Kambeu, S

    1997-08-01

    Focus group discussions and interviews were held with 40 orphans, 25 caretakers and 33 other community workers from a rural area near Mutare, Zimbabwe. Orphan concerns included feeling different from other children, stress, stigmatization, exploitation, schooling, lack of visits and neglect of support responsibilities by relatives. Many community members, while recognizing their limitations due to poverty, were already actively helping orphans and caretakers. Extended family networks are the primary resource for orphans, though some relatives exploit orphans or fail to fulfil their responsibilities. Interventions are suggested which support community coping mechanisms by strengthening the capacities of families to care for orphans. Outside organizations can develop partnerships with community groups, helping them to respond to the impact of AIDS, by building upon existing concern for orphan families. They can help affected communities to develop orphan support activities which encourage caring responses by community leaders and relatives and which discourage property-grabbing and orphan neglect. Material support channelled through community groups to destitute families at critical times can strengthen family coping mechanisms. Income-generating activities should build upon communities' existing capabilities and benefit the most vulnerable orphan households. Some communities are responding to the AIDS disaster by adaptations to cope with devastating changes taking place in their communities.

  11. Attitudes of Pakistani community members and staff toward people with intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    Patka, Mazna; Keys, Christopher B; Henry, David B; McDonald, Katherine E

    2013-01-01

    The acceptance and inclusion of persons with intellectual disability can vary across cultures, and understanding attitudes can provide insight into such variation. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored attitudes toward people with intellectual disability among Pakistani community members and disability service providers. We administered the Community Living Attitudes Scale (Henry et al., 1996), a measure of attitudes toward people with intellectual disability developed in the United States, to 262 community members and 190 disability service providers in Pakistan. Confirmatory factor analysis found a 4-factor solution (empowerment, similarity, exclusion, and sheltering) fit the Pakistani sample. More positive attitudes were observed in staff serving people with intellectual disability, females, Christians, Hindus, Sunnis, and people with greater education. We discuss implications for research, theory, and practice.

  12. Building a Co-Created Citizen Science Program with Community Members Neighboring a Hazardous Waste Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramirez-Andreotta, M.; Brusseau, M. L. L.; Artiola, J. F.; Maier, R. M.; Gandolfi, A. J.

    2015-12-01

    A research project that is only expert-driven may ignore the role of local knowledge in research, often gives low priority to the development of a comprehensive strategy to engage the community, and may not deliver the results of the study to the community in an effective way. To date, only a limited number of co-created citizen science projects, where community members are involved in most or all steps of the scientific process, have been initiated at contaminated sites and even less in conjunction with risk communication. Gardenroots: The Dewey-Humboldt AZ Garden Project was a place-based, co-created citizen science project where community members and researchers together: defined the question for study, developed hypotheses, collected environmental samples, disseminated results broadly, translated the results into action, and posed new research questions. This co-created environmental research project produced new data and addressed an additional exposure route (consumption of vegetables grown in soils with elevated arsenic levels) that was not being evaluated in the current site assessment. Furthermore, co-producing science led to both individual learning and social-ecological outcomes. This approach illustrates the benefits of a co-created citizen-science program in addressing the complex problems that arise in communities neighboring a hazardous waste sites. Such a project increased the community's involvement in regional environmental assessment and decision-making, which has the potential to help mitigate environmental exposures and thereby reduce associated risks.

  13. A Study of Faculty, Administrative, and Staff Perceptions of the Climate for Shared Governance at Appalachian College Association Member Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Easton, Tanya L.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how faculty, administrators, and staff perceived the climate for shared governance at 36 member institutions of the Appalachian College Association (ACA), based on standards for sound shared governance in higher education as outlined by the American Association of University Professors (AAUP). Numerous…

  14. How School Administrators and Board Members Are Improving Learning and Saving Money. Energy-Smart Building Choices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC.

    This guide shows ways that school administrators and board members can contribute to energy choice decisions for educational facilities, and it discusses how reducing operating costs also can create better learning environments. The guide reveals how design guidelines help create high-performance school buildings. It explains the use of energy…

  15. Students, Parents and Community Members as Partners in Strategic School-Community Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blick, Charles (Buzz)

    1998-01-01

    This paper explores the question of who should be involved in strategic decisions that affect a school, a cluster of schools, or an entire school district. It discusses the common problems that hamper effective participation: such as workgroups that are too large or too small; selecting the same roster of persons to serve as team members; choosing…

  16. Recruitment of Members from the Rare Biosphere of Marine Bacterioplankton Communities after an Environmental Disturbance

    PubMed Central

    Sjöstedt, Johanna; Koch-Schmidt, Per; Pontarp, Mikael; Canbäck, Björn; Tunlid, Anders; Lundberg, Per; Hagström, Åke

    2012-01-01

    A bacterial community may be resistant to environmental disturbances if some of its species show metabolic flexibility and physiological tolerance to the changing conditions. Alternatively, disturbances can change the composition of the community and thereby potentially affect ecosystem processes. The impact of disturbance on the composition of bacterioplankton communities was examined in continuous seawater cultures. Bacterial assemblages from geographically closely connected areas, the Baltic Sea (salinity 7 and high dissolved organic carbon [DOC]) and Skagerrak (salinity 28 and low DOC), were exposed to gradual opposing changes in salinity and DOC over a 3-week period such that the Baltic community was exposed to Skagerrak salinity and DOC and vice versa. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis and clone libraries of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes showed that the composition of the transplanted communities differed significantly from those held at constant salinity. Despite this, the growth yields (number of cells ml−1) were similar, which suggests similar levels of substrate utilization. Deep 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that the composition of the disturbed communities had changed due to the recruitment of phylotypes present in the rare biosphere of the original community. The study shows that members of the rare biosphere can become abundant in a bacterioplankton community after disturbance and that those bacteria can have important roles in maintaining ecosystem processes. PMID:22194288

  17. Insights into the Shifting Perspectives of Members of the Gypsy and Traveller Community on Schooling, and Implications for School Leaders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Anna R. T.

    2017-01-01

    This article focuses on the perceptions and experiences of education of two female adult members of the Gypsy and Traveller community and one female adult member of the settled community who works closely with Travellers. Narrative interviews were conducted in England in 2016, to gain some understanding of the factors contributing to the…

  18. Sociology Faculty Members Employed Part-Time in Community Colleges: Structural Disadvantage, Cultural Devaluation, and Faculty-Student Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curtis, John W.; Mahabir, Cynthia; Vitullo, Margaret Weigers

    2016-01-01

    The large majority of faculty members teaching in community colleges are employed on a part-time basis, yet little is known about their working conditions and professional engagement. This article uses data from a recent national survey of faculty members teaching sociology in community colleges to provide this information, with particular…

  19. How community members and health professionals conceptualize medical emergencies: implications for primary care promotion.

    PubMed

    Wilkin, Holley A; Tannebaum, Michael A; Cohen, Elizabeth L; Leslie, Travie; Williams, Nora; Haley, Leon L

    2012-12-01

    Access to continuous care through a primary care provider is associated with improved health outcomes, but many communities rely on emergency departments (EDs) for both emergent and non-emergent health problems. This article describes one portion of a community-based participatory research project and investigates the type of education that might be needed as part of a larger intervention to encourage use of a local primary care clinic. In this article we examine how people who live in a low-income urban community and the healthcare workers who serve them conceptualize 'emergency medical condition'. We conducted forum and focus group discussions with 52 community members and individual interviews with 32 healthcare workers. Our findings indicate that while community members share a common general definition of what constitutes a medical emergency, they also desire better guidelines for how to assess health problems as requiring emergency versus primary care. Pain, uncertainty and anxiety tend to influence their choice to use EDs rather than availability of primary care. Implications for increasing primary care use are discussed.

  20. Iodine status of Eeyou Istchee community members of northern Quebec, Canada, and potential sources.

    PubMed

    Tam, Benita; Tsuji, Leonard J S; Martin, Ian D; Liberda, Eric N; Ayotte, Pierre; Coté, Suzanne; Dewailly, Éric; Nieboer, Evert

    2015-04-01

    A multi community environment-and-health study among six of the nine communities of Eeyou Istchee in northern Quebec, Canada provided greater insight into iodine intake levels among these Cree First Nation communities. Using data from this large population-based study, descriptive statistics of measured urinary iodine concentrations (UICs) and iodine-creatinine ratios (stratified by age, sex, community of residence, and water consumption) were calculated, and the associations between independent variables and iodine concentration measures were examined through a general linear model. Traditional food consumption contributions were examined through Pearson partial correlation tests and linear regression analyses; and the importance of water sources through ANOVA. Generally speaking, urinary iodine levels of Eeyou Istchee community members were within the adequate range set out by the World Health Organization, though sex and community differences existed. However, men in one community were considered to be at risk of iodine deficiency. Older participants had significantly higher mean iodine-creatinine ratios than younger participants (15-39 years = 90.50 μmol mol(-1); >39 years = 124.52 μmol mol(-1)), and consumption of beaver (Castor canadensis) meat, melted snow and ice, and bottled water were predictive of higher iodine excretion. It is concluded that using both urinary iodine indicators can be helpful in identifying subgroups at greater risk of iodine deficiency.

  1. Cultural Immersion: Developing a Community of Practice of Teachers and Aboriginal Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgess, Cathie; Cavanagh, Paddy

    2016-01-01

    A lack of teacher awareness of the cultural and historical background of Aboriginal students has long been recognised as a major causative factor in the failure of Australian schools to fully engage Aboriginal students and deliver equitable educational outcomes for them. Using Wenger's communities of practice framework, this paper analyses the…

  2. A Capacity Building Program to Promote CBPR Partnerships Between Academic Researchers and Community Members

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Michele L.; Culhane-Pera, Kathleen A.; Pergament, Shannon; Call, Kathleen Thiede

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Community-based participatory research (CBPR) adds community perspectives to research and aids translational research aims. There is a need for increased capacity in CBPR but few models exist for how to support the development of community/university partnerships Objective Evaluate an approach to promote nascent CBPR partnerships. Methods Design was a mixed-methods evaluation utilizing interviews, process notes, and open and closed ended survey questions. We trained ten community scholars, matched them with prepared researchers to form seven partnerships, and supported their developing partnerships. Sequential mixed-methods analysis assessed research and partnership processes and identified integrated themes. Results Four of seven partnerships were funded within 15 months; all self-reported their partnerships as successful. Themes were: 1) Motivators contributed to partnership development and resiliency; 2) Partners took on responsibilities that utilized individuals' strengths; 3) Partners grappled with communication, decision-making, and power-dynamics; and 4) Community-university infrastructure was essential to partnership development. Conclusions This program for developing nascent partnerships between academicians and community members may guide others in increasing capacity for CBPR. PMID:22212224

  3. Energy-Smart Building Choices: How School Administrators and Board Members Are Improving Learning and Saving Money

    SciTech Connect

    Energy Smart Schools Team

    2001-08-06

    Most K-12 schools could save 25% of their energy costs by being smart about energy. Nationwide, the savings potential is $6 billion. While improving energy use in buildings and busses, schools are likely to create better places for teaching and learning, with better lighting, temperature control, acoustics, and air quality. This brochure, targeted to school administrators and board members, describes how schools can become more energy efficient.

  4. Birth preparedness and complication readiness – a qualitative study among community members in rural Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    August, Furaha; Pembe, Andrea B.; Kayombo, Edmund; Mbekenga, Columba; Axemo, Pia; Darj, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Background Birth preparedness and complication readiness (BP/CR) strategies are aimed at reducing delays in seeking, reaching, and receiving care. Counselling on birth preparedness is provided during antenatal care visits. However, it is not clear why birth preparedness messages do not translate to utilisation of facility delivery. This study explores the perceptions, experiences, and challenges the community faces on BP/CR. Design A qualitative study design using Focused Group Discussions was conducted. Twelve focus group discussions were held with four separate groups: young men and women and older men and women in a rural community in Tanzania. Qualitative content analysis was used to analyse the data. Results The community members expressed a perceived need to prepare for childbirth. They were aware of the importance to attend the antenatal clinics, relied on family support for practical and financial preparations such as saving money for costs related to delivery, moving closer to the nearest hospital, and also to use traditional herbs, in favour of a positive outcome. Community recognised that pregnancy and childbirth complications are preferably treated at hospital. Facility delivery was preferred; however, certain factors including stigma on unmarried women and transportation were identified as hindering birth preparedness and hence utilisation of skilled care. Challenges were related to the consequences of poverty, though the maternal health care should be free, they perceived difficulties due to informal user fees. Conclusions This study revealed community perceptions that were in favour of using skilled care in BP/CR. However, issues related to inability to prepare in advance hinder the realisation of the intention to use skilled care. It is important to innovate how the community reinforces BP/CR, such as using insurance schemes, using community health funds, and providing information on other birth preparedness messages via community health workers

  5. School Insurance: A Handbook for School Board Members, School Administrators, and Other Officials Involved with Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, E. Lloyd, Ed.

    This is the latest edition of a handbook intended to guide school board members and other school officials in developing an appropriate insurance program for their local school district. Although the booklet emphasizes the particular legal requirements and regulations facing school officials in New York, much of its content is equally relevant for…

  6. The construction and validation of an instrument to measure "community understanding": Interdependence among community members, awareness of sustainability issues, and experience of connection with the environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkerly-Kolb, Susan Jessamyn

    Statement of the problem. Research in the areas of environmentalism and environmental education indicate the need to understand the concepts of environmental attitude and environmental action in order to better facilitate their positive development in students. This research indicates that environmental attitude is connected to certain characteristics found in persons who exhibit positive attitude toward the environment and who tend toward positive environmental action. These characteristics include interdependence among members of a community, awareness of sustainability issues, and experience of connection with nature. For this research, the above characteristics, taken together, are called Community Understanding. The purpose of this research was the development of an instrument to examine the construct of Community Understanding and to utilize the instrument to look at a possible correlation between Community Understanding and environmental attitudes and action. The instrument was also used to examine the differences in Community Understanding among rural and urban students. Methods. The Community Understanding Questionnaire was developed utilizing the method created by Dr. William Curlette at Georgia State University (Curlette, 1996). The questionnaire was then administered to 500 10sp{th} grade students in rural and urban Colorado. After the administration of a group difference study and the questionnaire, the results were analyzed using factor analysis to determine the fit of the questions into the original constructs of Interdependence, Awareness of Sustainability Issues, and Connection to Nature. The analysis resulted in the elimination of certain questions and the rearrangement of other questions to create a better fit into the three scales. Reliability analysis conducted on this new formation of questions resulted in a stronger instrument. Results. Statistical analyses of the Community Understanding Questionnaire imply the presence of a construct

  7. Most of the Dominant Members of Amphibian Skin Bacterial Communities Can Be Readily Cultured

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Matthew H.; Hughey, Myra C.; Swartwout, Meredith C.; Jensen, Roderick V.; Belden, Lisa K.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, it is estimated that only 0.001% to 15% of bacteria in any given system can be cultured by use of commonly used techniques and media, yet culturing is critically important for investigations of bacterial function. Despite this situation, few studies have attempted to link culture-dependent and culture-independent data for a single system to better understand which members of the microbial community are readily cultured. In amphibians, some cutaneous bacterial symbionts can inhibit establishment and growth of the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, and thus there is great interest in using these symbionts as probiotics for the conservation of amphibians threatened by B. dendrobatidis. The present study examined the portion of the culture-independent bacterial community (based on Illumina amplicon sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene) that was cultured with R2A low-nutrient agar and whether the cultured bacteria represented rare or dominant members of the community in the following four amphibian species: bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus), eastern newts (Notophthalmus viridescens), spring peepers (Pseudacris crucifer), and American toads (Anaxyrus americanus). To determine which percentage of the community was cultured, we clustered Illumina sequences at 97% similarity, using the culture sequences as a reference database. For each amphibian species, we cultured, on average, 0.59% to 1.12% of each individual's bacterial community. However, the average percentage of bacteria that were culturable for each amphibian species was higher, with averages ranging from 2.81% to 7.47%. Furthermore, most of the dominant operational taxonomic units (OTUs), families, and phyla were represented in our cultures. These results open up new research avenues for understanding the functional roles of these dominant bacteria in host health. PMID:26162880

  8. Stable Isotope Probing: Linking Functional Activity to Specific Members of Microbial Communities

    SciTech Connect

    Kreuzer-Martin, Helen W.

    2007-03-12

    Abstract Linking organisms or groups of organisms to specific functions within natural environments is a fundamental challenge in microbial ecology. Advances in technology for manipulating and analyzing nucleic acids have made it possible to characterize the members of microbial communities without the intervention of laboratory culturing. Results from such studies have shown that the vast majority of soil organisms have never been cultured, highlighting the risks of culture-based approaches in community analysis. The development of culture-independent techniques for following the flow of substrates through microbial communities therefore represents an important advance. These techniques, collectively known as stable isotope probing (SIP), involve introducing a stable isotope-labeled substrate into a microbial community and following the fate of the substrate by detecting the appearance of the isotope in diagnostic molecules such as fatty acids and nucleic acids. The molecules in which the isotope label appears provide identifying information about the organism that incorporated the substrate. SIP allows direct observations of substrate assimilation in minimally disturbed communities, and thus represents an exciting new tool for linking microbial identity and function. The use of lipids or nucleic acids as the diagnostic molecule brings different strengths and weaknesses to the experimental approach, and necessitates the use of significantly different instrumentation and analytical techniques. This mini-review provides an overview of the lipid and nucleic acid approaches, discusses their strengths and weaknesses, gives examples of applications in various settings, and looks at prospects for the future of SIP technology.

  9. Strategies for Working with Asian Americans in Mental Health: Community Members' Policy Perspectives and Recommendations.

    PubMed

    Weng, Suzie S; Spaulding-Givens, Jennifer

    2017-01-04

    This qualitative study used snowball sampling of individuals known to provide informal assistance to Asian American community members with their mental health problems in a locality in the South where there has been an exponential increase of the Asian American population. The major themes found include: (1) the existence of cultural, language, knowledge, and transportation barriers and the importance of policy in addressing them; (2) the impact of the model minority myth and the need for inclusive policymaking; and (3) the unique service and policy needs of immigrants. Findings demonstrate the importance and value of including diverse Asian American individuals in mental health policymaking efforts.

  10. Every Member of the U.S. Astronomical Community Can Apply for NASA Keck Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelino, Dawn M.

    2017-01-01

    NASA time on the W. M. Keck telescopes is open to every member of the U.S. astronomical community. In fact, it is the only way for PIs from non Keck partner institutions to gain access to these two 10 meter telescopes. I will provide information and tips on how to apply for NASA Keck time through the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute (NExScI), as well as how to access public Keck data through the NASA-Keck joint Keck Observatory Archive (KOA).

  11. Longitudinal Changes in Psychological States in Online Health Community Members: Understanding the Long-Term Effects of Participating in an Online Depression Community

    PubMed Central

    Conway, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Background Major depression is a serious challenge at both the individual and population levels. Although online health communities have shown the potential to reduce the symptoms of depression, emotional contagion theory suggests that negative emotion can spread within a community, and prolonged interactions with other depressed individuals has potential to worsen the symptoms of depression. Objective The goals of our study were to investigate longitudinal changes in psychological states that are manifested through linguistic changes in depression community members who are interacting with other depressed individuals. Methods We examined emotion-related language usages using the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count (LIWC) program for each member of a depression community from Reddit. To measure the changes, we applied linear least-squares regression to the LIWC scores against the interaction sequence for each member. We measured the differences in linguistic changes against three online health communities focusing on positive emotion, diabetes, and irritable bowel syndrome. Results On average, members of an online depression community showed improvement in 9 of 10 prespecified linguistic dimensions: “positive emotion,” “negative emotion,” “anxiety,” “anger,” “sadness,” “first person singular,” “negation,” “swear words,” and “death.” Moreover, these members improved either significantly or at least as much as members of other online health communities. Conclusions We provide new insights into the impact of prolonged participation in an online depression community and highlight the positive emotion change in members. The findings of this study should be interpreted with caution, because participating in an online depression community is not the sole factor for improvement or worsening of depressive symptoms. Still, the consistent statistical results including comparative analyses with different communities could indicate that the

  12. 2006 Workplace and Gender Relations Survey of Active Duty Members: Administration, Datasets, and Codebook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    Communications ..................................................................................................................B-1 C. Annotated...by Service ........................................................................................19 E-mail Communication Timeline...opinions of the entire Department of Defense (DoD) community on a wide range of personnel issues. Human Relations Surveys are in-depth studies of topics

  13. Administrative Staff Members' Job Competency and Their Job Satisfaction in a Korean Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Jisun; Shin, Jung Cheol

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore the impact of administrative staff's job competency on their job satisfaction in a Korean research university. We conceptualized job satisfaction into three subcomponents: satisfaction in the job field, in the workplace, and with the actual task. In the regression analysis, we included demographics, inner…

  14. Status limbo: analysis of nurse faculty member reports of administrator response to workplace bullying complaints.

    PubMed

    Dzurec, Laura Cox

    2013-01-01

    Increasing concern about bullying among adults in workplaces is notable internationally. Unlike blatant physical bullying, workplace bullying often involves bullies' dismissive, demeaning, and typically surreptitious, one-on-one communications with their intended victims. These communications challenge recognition when they are examined beyond the interpersonal margins of the bully-victim dyad. Thus, they tend to elude formal, administrative reproach, despite the negative, long-term outcomes they herald for workplace employees--those immediately involved as victims and those who are bystanders--and for employing organizations and the consumers they serve. This article offers a hermeneutic analysis of workplace bullying victims' narrative reports of administrator responses to their complaints of having been bullied at work. Analysis demonstrated respondent perceptions of the variability and unevenness of administrative responses to their reports and, more broadly, respondents' collective sense of administrative abandonment. That sense is characterized in this report as status limbo, a term employed by Facebook users to represent a state of perceived neglect and oblivion.

  15. Member Perceptions of Informal Science Institution Graduate Certificate Program: Case Study of a Community of Practice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ball, Lois A.

    This research attempted to understand the experiences of a cohort of informal and formal science educators and informal science institution (ISI) community representatives during and after completion of a pilot graduate certificate program. Informal science educators (ISEs) find limited opportunities for professional development and support which influence their contributions to America's science literacy and school science education. This emergent design nested case study described how an innovative program provided professional development and enabled growth in participants' abilities to contribute to science literacy. Data were collected through interviews, participant observations, and class artifacts. The program by design and constituency was the overarching entity that accounted for members' experiences. Three principal aspects of the ISI certificate program and cohort which influenced perceptions and reported positive outcomes were (1) the cohort's composition and their collaborative activities which established a vigorous community of practice and fostered community building, mentoring, and networking, (2) long term program design and implementation which promoted experiential learning in a generative classroom, and (3) ability of some members who were able to be independent or autonomous learners to embrace science education reform strategies for greater self-efficacy and career advancement. This research extends the limited literature base for professional development of informal science educators and may benefit informal science institutions, informal and formal science educators, science education reform efforts, and public education and science-technology-society understanding. The study may raise awareness of the need to establish more professional development opportunities for ISEs and to fund professional development. Further, recognizing and appreciating informal science educators as a diverse committed community of professionals who positively

  16. A Descriptive Study to Determine the Opinions of Community Band Members regarding the Effectiveness of Comprehensive Musicianship

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Augustin, Cathy

    2010-01-01

    Various comprehensive musicianship teaching methods have been used in school instrumental programs throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. The intention of this study was to determine the attitudes of adult community band members on the use of comprehensive musicianship teaching methods within rehearsals. Members of the South of the…

  17. "Role Models Can't Just Be on Posters": Re/membering Barriers to Indigenous Community Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Brooke; Higgins, Marc; Korteweg, Lisa

    2013-01-01

    Current Canadian scholarly literature, education policy, and curricular documents encourage the participation of Indigenous community members as a key component of Indigenous Education reform. Guided by sharing circles conducted with Indigenous Elders, families, teachers, and support workers, we present community voices and experiences of…

  18. What Are Fair Study Benefits in International Health Research? Consulting Community Members in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Njue, Maureen; Kombe, Francis; Mwalukore, Salim; Molyneux, Sassy; Marsh, Vicki

    2014-01-01

    Background Planning study benefits and payments for participants in international health research in low- income settings can be a difficult and controversial process, with particular challenges in balancing risks of undue inducement and exploitation and understanding how researchers should take account of background inequities. At an international health research programme in Kenya, this study aimed to map local residents' informed and reasoned views on the effects of different levels of study benefits and payments to inform local policy and wider debates in international research. Methods and Findings Using a relatively novel two-stage process community consultation approach, five participatory workshops involving 90 local residents from diverse constituencies were followed by 15 small group discussions, with components of information-sharing, deliberation and reflection to situate normative reasoning within debates. Framework Analysis drew inductively and deductively on voice- recorded discussions and field notes supported by Nvivo 10 software, and the international research ethics literature. Community members' views on study benefits and payments were diverse, with complex contextual influences and interplay between risks of giving ‘too many’ and ‘too few’ benefits, including the role of cash. While recognising important risks for free choice, research relationships and community values in giving ‘too many’, the greatest concerns were risks of unfairness in giving ‘too few’ benefits, given difficulties in assessing indirect costs of participation and the serious consequences for families of underestimation, related to perceptions of researchers' responsibilities. Conclusions Providing benefits and payments to participants in international research in low-income settings is an essential means by which researchers meet individual-level and structural forms of ethical responsibilities, but understanding how this can be achieved requires a careful

  19. Paresthesias Among Community Members Exposed to the World Trade Center Disaster

    PubMed Central

    Marmor, Michael; Shao, Yongzhao; Bhatt, D. Harshad; Stecker, Mark M.; Berger, Kenneth I.; Goldring, Roberta M.; Rosen, Rebecca L.; Caplan-Shaw, Caralee; Kazeros, Angeliki; Pradhan, Deepak; Wilkenfeld, Marc; Reibman, Joan

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Paresthesias can result from metabolic disorders, nerve entrapment following repetitive motions, hyperventilation pursuant to anxiety, or exposure to neurotoxins. We analyzed data from community members exposed to the World Trade Center (WTC) disaster of September 11, 2001, to evaluate whether exposure to the disaster was associated with paresthesias. Methods: Analysis of data from 3141 patients of the WTC Environmental Health Center. Results: Fifty-six percent of patients reported paresthesias at enrollment 7 to 15 years following the WTC disaster. After controlling for potential confounders, paresthesias were associated with severity of exposure to the WTC dust cloud and working in a job requiring cleaning of WTC dust. Conclusions: This study suggests that paresthesias were commonly associated with WTC-related exposures or post-WTC cleaning work. Further studies should objectively characterize these paresthesias and seek to identify relevant neurotoxins or paresthesia-inducing activities. PMID:28157767

  20. National Archives and Records Administration Community College Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Archives and Records Service (GSA), Washington, DC.

    Information is provided on the U.S. National Archives' Community College Program (CCP). First, a program announcement is provided, which indicates that the CCP provides reproductions of primary sources to community, technical and junior college instructors teaching occupational and transfer degree programs. This announcement lists the kinds of…

  1. Competency-Based Community Education Administration. Volume III: The Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paddock, Susan C.; And Others

    This manual is the result of a two-year study by Arizona State University involving identification and assessment of competencies needed in community education. The goal of the study is to help community educators (1) identify competencies needed for superintendents, principals, coordinators, and directors; (2) establish priority rankings for…

  2. For Community College Administrators, Staff and Faculty Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todaro, Julie Beth

    2000-01-01

    Lists a number of popular and useful master sites that librarians use when searching for community college resources and performing "comparisons shopping" on search engines. Subject directories tend to provide lists of community colleges by state and the four to six national organizations. (VWC)

  3. Reflections and Challenges for the Public Administration Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bouckaert, Geert

    2013-01-01

    The question of whether the field of public administration education is prepared for the future of the public sector in Europe is a complex one, which needs to be unpacked to give a grounded answer. Unpacking this question means that there needs to be discussions on not just what educating the field of public administration means, but also…

  4. Collaboration among community members, local health service providers, and researchers in an urban research center in Harlem, New York.

    PubMed

    Galea, S; Factor, S H; Bonner, S; Foley, M; Freudenberg, N; Latka, M; Palermo, A G; Vlahov, D

    2001-01-01

    The Urban Research Center at the Center for Urban Epidemiologic Studies brings together community members and researchers working in Harlem, New York. A Community Advisory Board (CAB) composed of community members, service providers, public health professionals, and researchers was formed to assist the Center's research and interventions and to guide community partnerships. Through a collaborative process, the CAB identified three public health problems-substance use, infectious diseases, and asthma-as action priorities. To deal with substance use, the Center created a Web-based resource guide for service providers and a "survival guide" for substance users, designed to improve access to community services. To deal with infectious diseases, the Center is collaborating with local community-based organizations on an intervention that trains injection drug users to serve as peer mentors to motivate behavior change among other injection drug users. To deal with asthma, the Center is collaborating with community child care providers on an educational intervention to increase asthma awareness among day care teaching staff, enhance communication between staff and families, and improve the self-management skills of children with asthma. The Center's experience has demonstrated that active communities and responsive researchers can establish partnerships that improve community health.

  5. Causes of schizophrenia reported by urban African American lay community members.

    PubMed

    Compton, Michael T; Esterberg, Michelle L; Broussard, Beth

    2008-01-01

    Although mental health professionals' "etiologic beliefs" concerning schizophrenia have evolved in accordance with diathesis-stress and neurodevelopmental models, little is known about etiologic attributions in nonclinical general population samples in the United States. Yet, course and outcome for people with the illness may be indirectly influenced by beliefs about causes in the larger community. Because of very limited research in this area, especially among African Americans in particular, this descriptive study investigated the causes of schizophrenia reported by 127 urban African Americans from the general population. The aim of this study was to assess the most commonly reported causes of schizophrenia, as well as the frequency of endorsing items from a list of 30 factors, some of which are congruent with current psychiatric conceptualizations of schizophrenia, whereas others are not. Results of this report complement previously reported findings from the same setting involving family members of patients with schizophrenia [Esterberg ML, Compton MT. Causes of schizophrenia reported by family members of urban African American hospitalized patients with schizophrenia. Compr Psychiatry 2006;47:221-226]. The 5 most commonly reported causes were disturbance of brain biochemistry (49.6%), drug/alcohol abuse (42.5%), hereditary factors (40.9%), brain injury (40.2%), and avoidance of problems in life (37.8%). The mean number of likely or very likely causes endorsed by participants was 7.5 +/- 5.7. Some 47.9% reported one or more esoteric factors as a cause. Of the 6 esoteric factors, possession by evil spirits (28.3%), radiation (20.2%), and punishment by God (19.7%) were most common. Esoteric causes were more commonly chosen by male participants, those with 12 years of education or less, and participants who reported never having known someone with schizophrenia. Future research should seek to better understand how esoteric beliefs about causation affect attitudes

  6. The Economics of Perception: Potential Effect regarding Institutional Uses of Recovered Facilities and Administrative Costs upon a Faculty Member's Decision to Engage in Sponsored Research Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatfield, Anne Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    There is one aspect of sponsored research associated with higher education's research enterprise that often places the institution's research administrators and the institution's faculty members in conflict with each other; the recovery of Facilities and Administrative (F&A) costs associated with sponsored research projects (Sedwick, 2009;…

  7. Board/Administrator Relations. A Manual for Workshop Leaders. Keys to School Boardsmanship. A Program of Continuing Education for School Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jongeward, Ray E.

    The materials in this manual are designed to help workshop leaders prepare for and present a workshop for school board members on relations between school boards and administrators. Four elements basic to the establishment of effective relationships are reviewed: clarification of the roles and goals of the board and the administrators; effective…

  8. Administrative Evaluation of Online Faculty in Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darling, Douglas Duane

    2012-01-01

    Policy and procedure haven't kept up with institutional practices at community colleges. With over 5.5 million college students taking online courses, 29% of college students are taking an online course. As student numbers taking online courses have increased, so have the number of faculty teaching online. The purpose of this study is to…

  9. The Role of the District Administration within Professional Learning Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horton, James; Martin, Barbara N.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative inquiry was to examine the role of the superintendent in assessing the readiness for change in the implementation and support for Professional Learning Communities. The study findings revealed four major themes. They were: (1) the changing dynamics of leadership; (2) a sense of collective efficacy and responsibility…

  10. School Administrators and Ethical Decision-Making in Rural Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kallio, Brenda R.

    2003-01-01

    With the advent of globalization and the growing concept that schools are marketplaces of ideas, educational administrators need guidance in ethical decision making. Moral dilemma is defined, ethical models are presented, and a process is described in which facts, resolution options, and values are reflected upon and decisions made based on…

  11. Network correlates of sexual health advice seeking and substance use among members of the Los Angeles House and Ball communities

    PubMed Central

    Holloway, Ian W.; Schrager, Sheree M.; Wong, Carolyn F.; Dunlap, Shannon L.; Kipke, Michele D.

    2014-01-01

    House and Ball communities (HBCs), represent a prime context for human immunodeficiency virus prevention with African American young men who have sex with men and transgender persons. This study sought to understand the composition and function of social support and sexual networks of HBC members in Los Angeles, California (N = 263). Participants were recruited using venue-based sampling and asked to report on sexual health advice seeking, alcohol use and illicit substance use. Participants were more likely to seek sexual health advice from social support network members compared with sexual network members [odds ratio (OR): 2.50, P < 0.001]. HBC members were more likely to get drunk (OR: 1.57; P < 0.05) and use illicit substances (OR: 1.87; P < 0.10) with House members and sexual network members compared with non-House members and social support network members. Health promotion programs tailored for the HBC should encourage open communication regarding sexual health; these interventions must include information about the role of substance use in sexual risk taking. PMID:24452228

  12. Network correlates of sexual health advice seeking and substance use among members of the Los Angeles House and Ball communities.

    PubMed

    Holloway, Ian W; Schrager, Sheree M; Wong, Carolyn F; Dunlap, Shannon L; Kipke, Michele D

    2014-04-01

    House and Ball communities (HBCs), represent a prime context for human immunodeficiency virus prevention with African American young men who have sex with men and transgender persons. This study sought to understand the composition and function of social support and sexual networks of HBC members in Los Angeles, California (N = 263). Participants were recruited using venue-based sampling and asked to report on sexual health advice seeking, alcohol use and illicit substance use. Participants were more likely to seek sexual health advice from social support network members compared with sexual network members [odds ratio (OR): 2.50, P < 0.001]. HBC members were more likely to get drunk (OR: 1.57; P < 0.05) and use illicit substances (OR: 1.87; P < 0.10) with House members and sexual network members compared with non-House members and social support network members. Health promotion programs tailored for the HBC should encourage open communication regarding sexual health; these interventions must include information about the role of substance use in sexual risk taking.

  13. Increasing the Usage of a School District Web Site by Training Staff and Community Members in Its Use and Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willome, Mike

    This goal of this project was to create a public school district World Wide Web site that staff and community members would use more frequently. The project included three solutions. First, 33 one-on-one and small-group training sessions were conducted to increase awareness and improve Web services. A Web-site advisory committee, which developed…

  14. The Reliance on and Demand for Adjunct Faculty Members in America's Rural, Suburban, and Urban Community Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlier, Hara D.; Williams, Mitchell R.

    2011-01-01

    Drawing on a survey of chief academic officers at 347 community colleges nationwide, this study examined the impact of institutional type (rural, suburban, urban) on reliance on and demand for adjunct faculty members. Findings indicated that rural institutions rely less on adjuncts, whereas both rural and urban institutions report high levels of…

  15. Incorporating Traditional Healing into an Urban American Indian Health Organization: A Case Study of Community Member Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartmann, William E.; Gone, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    Facing severe mental health disparities rooted in a complex history of cultural oppression, members of many urban American Indian (AI) communities are reaching out for indigenous traditional healing to augment their use of standard Western mental health services. Because detailed descriptions of approaches for making traditional healing available…

  16. Network Correlates of Sexual Health Advice Seeking and Substance Use among Members of the Los Angeles House and Ball Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holloway, Ian W.; Schrager, Sheree M.; Wong, Carolyn F.; Dunlap, Shannon L.; Kipke, Michele D.

    2014-01-01

    House and Ball communities (HBCs), represent a prime context for human immunodeficiency virus prevention with African American young men who have sex with men and transgender persons. This study sought to understand the composition and function of social support and sexual networks of HBC members in Los Angeles, California (N = 263). Participants…

  17. Remembering Nancy. 25 Members of the Montessori Community Share Their Reflections on the Death of the AMS Founder.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turner, Joy; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-five members of the Montessori community share their memories of Dr. Nancy McCormick Rambusch, charismatic founder of the American Montessori movement, early childhood professional, and innovative educator, who died of pancreatic cancer on October 27, 1994. Rambusch's work of 40 years now flowers as an institutionalized educational program…

  18. The In-Service Training of Teachers in the Twelve Member States of the European Community. Education Policy Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackburn, V.; Moisan, C.

    Improvement in the quality of education is a concern shared by all the Member States of the European Community. The in-service training of teachers is a critical factor in the pursuit of this objective. Increasingly rapid changes in society (economic, technological, social, and cultural) mean that teachers are constantly faced with new syllabuses…

  19. Whither Utility and Duty? A Case for Virtue in Community College Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Propheter, Geoffrey; Jez, Su Jin

    2012-01-01

    Recent improprieties by community college administrators have scarred the public trust. Efforts to secure against maladministration are firmly rooted in utilitarian and deontological ethics. In this article, the authors argue that these common approaches cannot remedy maladministration in the community college because utilitarianism and deontology…

  20. Minimum Qualifications for Faculty and Administrators in California Community Colleges [Tenth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Chancellor's Office, 2014

    2014-01-01

    This 10th edition of "Minimum Qualifications for Faculty and Administrators in California Community Colleges" is an update of the disciplines lists including those adopted by the Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges at their regularly scheduled meeting on Nov. 2, 2013. It incorporates changes that resulted from…

  1. 77 FR 24139 - State Community Development Block Grant Program: Administrative Rule Changes

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... more regional approach that encourages smart growth and sustainable development. HUD Response. Section... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 24 CFR Part 570 RIN 2506-AC22 State Community Development Block Grant Program: Administrative Rule Changes AGENCY: Office of the Assistant Secretary for Community Planning and Development,...

  2. Roles of Urban Indigenous Community Members in Collaborative Field-Based Teacher Preparation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lees, Anna

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative case study explored a community-university partnership for teacher preparation with an urban Indigenous community organization. The study examined the roles of Indigenous community partners as co-teacher educators working to better prepare teachers for the needs of urban Indigenous children and communities. The author collected…

  3. The Scattered Members of an Invisible Republic: Virtual Communities and Paul Ricoeur's Hermeneutics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnett, Gary

    2002-01-01

    Discussion of virtual communities focuses on Paul Ricoeur's hermeneutic theories which accounts for temporal and spatial distance in the exchange of the community's texts. Topics include virtual communities and computer mediated communication studies; the linguistic aspects of virtual communities; and empirical hermeneutics. (Contains 61…

  4. Health professionals as stigmatisers of tuberculosis: insights from community members and patients with TB in an urban district in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Dodor, Emmanuel Atsu; Kelly, Shona; Neal, Keith

    2009-05-01

    Health professionals are in a power category within any social setting so when they identify and label diseases with negative attributes, it can be recognised by society with discriminatory consequences for individuals affected in the community. This article reports how activities of health professionals, as perceived and construed by community members can be a basis of stigmatisation of patients with tuberculosis (TB) in society. One hundred individual interviews and 22 focus groups were held with community members and patients with TB, and the generated data analysed using the grounded theory techniques and procedures. Through examination of the words and statements of the participants, five inter-related ways by which activities of health professionals may expose patients with TB to stigmatisation in the community were identified: isolation and exclusionary practices; behaviours of health professionals towards patients with TB; public health discourse; food safety and hygiene practices and prohibition of full burial rites to those who died from TB. These activities are mirrored in the attitudes and behaviours of community members, and often become the basis of stigmatisation of individuals affected by TB in society. This may considerably contribute to diagnostic delay and low case finding in Ghana. Because, for fear of stigmatisation, community members who may be experiencing symptoms suggestive of TB may fail to go to the hospital. The stigma attached to TB in society may also contribute to the poor adherence to treatment seen among patients with TB in Ghana. To help to improve case finding and defaulter rate, the TB control programme should organise regular refresher courses in TB control and management for health professionals, and address the fear of infection by developing a national guidelines on how to prevent transmission of TB to health professionals within the hospital setting.

  5. Advancing Community-Based Falls Prevention Programs for Older Adults—The Work of the Administration for Community Living/Administration on Aging

    PubMed Central

    Kulinski, Kristie; DiCocco, Casey; Skowronski, Shannon; Sprowls, Phantane

    2017-01-01

    The mission of the Administration for Community Living (ACL) is to maximize the independence, well-being, and health of older adults, people with disabilities across the lifespan, and their families and caregivers. In direct alignment with this mission is ACL’s support of evidence-based falls prevention programs in communities throughout the United States. Since 2014, the Administration on Aging (AoA), part of ACL, has invested nearly $14 million in entities such as state agencies, nonprofits, and universities to expand access to proven community-based falls prevention programs. The initiatives supported by ACL/AoA bring to bear two primary goals—(1) to significantly increase the number of older adults and older adults with disabilities at risk for falls who participate in evidence-based community programs to reduce falls and falls risks; and (2) to implement innovative funding arrangements, including contracts, partnerships, and collaborations with one or more sustainability partners to support these programs during and beyond the grant period. Support from ACL/AoA has significantly increased the availability of evidence-based falls prevention programs in funded communities, as well as enhanced the network’s sustainable delivery infrastructure to promote continued access to these critical programs beyond the scope of grant funding. This article highlights the successful rollout of ACL/AoA’s falls prevention initiative. PMID:28217688

  6. Communication and the Sense of Community Among the Members of an Immigrant Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Regis, Humphrey A.

    1988-01-01

    The likelihood of friends and acquaintances providing desired information predicted the sense of community Trinidadian immigrants displayed toward Jamaican immigrants in Washington, D.C. The volume of information secured from immigrant community-oriented radio programs predicted the sense of community Jamaican immigrants displayed toward…

  7. Sustainable Leadership in an Elementary School: How One School Principal and Members of the School Community View the Sustainability of Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, M. Pamela

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research was to examine how one principal of an urban elementary school and selected members of the school community perceived the sustainability of the principal's leadership. One goal of this study was to enhance the understanding of how principals and members of the school community may perceive the ability…

  8. Helping members of a community-based health insurance scheme access quality inpatient care through development of a preferred provider system in rural Gujarat.

    PubMed

    Ranson, M Kent; Sinha, Tara; Gandhi, Fenil; Jayswal, Rupal; Mills, Anne J

    2006-01-01

    We describe and analyse the experience of piloting a preferred provider system (PPS) for rural members of Vimo SEWA, a fixed-indemnity, community-based health insurance (CBHI) scheme run by the Self-Employed Women's Association (SEWA). The objectives of the PPS were (i) to facilitate access to hospitalization by providing financial benefits at the time of service utilization; (ii) to shift the burden of compiling a claim away from members and towards Vimo SEWA staff; and (iii) to direct members to inpatient facilities of acceptable quality. The PPS was launched between August and October 2004, in 8 subdistricts covering 15,000 insured. The impact of the scheme was analysed using data from a household survey of claimants and qualitative data from in-depth interviews and focus group discussions. The PPS appears to have been successful in terms of two of the three primary objectives--it has transferred much of the burden of compiling a health Insurance claim onto Vimo SEWA staff, and it has directed members to inpatient facilities with acceptable levels of technical quality (defined in terms of structural Indicators). However, even under the PPS, user fees pose a financial barrier, as the insured have to mobilize funds to cover the costs of medicines, supplies, registration fee, etc. before receipt of cash payment from Vimo SEWA. Other barriers to the success of the PPS were the geographic Inaccessibility of some of the selected hospitals, lack of awareness about the PPS among members and a variety of administrative problems. This pilot project provides useful lessons relating to strategic purchasing by CBHI schemes and, more broadly, managed care in India. In particular, the pragmatic approach taken to assessing hospitals and identifying preferred providers is likely to be useful elsewhere.

  9. Extracellular Lipase and Protease Production from a Model Drinking Water Bacterial Community Is Functionally Robust to Absence of Individual Members.

    PubMed

    Willsey, Graham G; Wargo, Matthew J

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria secrete enzymes into the extracellular space to hydrolyze macromolecules into constituents that can be imported for microbial nutrition. In bacterial communities, these enzymes and their resultant products can be modeled as community property. Our goal was to investigate the impact of individual community member absence on the resulting community production of exoenzymes (extracellular enzymes) involved in lipid and protein hydrolysis. Our model community contained nine bacteria isolated from the potable water system of the International Space Station. Bacteria were grown in static conditions individually, all together, or in all combinations of eight species and exoproduct production was measured by colorimetric or fluorometric reagents to assess short chain and long chain lipases, choline-specific phospholipases C, and proteases. The exoenzyme production of each species grown alone varied widely, however, the enzyme activity levels of the mixed communities were functionally robust to absence of any single species, with the exception of phospholipase C production in one community. For phospholipase C, absence of Chryseobacterium gleum led to increased choline-specific phospholipase C production, correlated with increased growth of Burkholderia cepacia and Sphingomonas sanguinis. Because each individual species produced different enzyme activity levels in isolation, we calculated an expected activity value for each bacterial mixture using input levels or known final composition. This analysis suggested that robustness of each exoenzyme activity is not solely mediated by community composition, but possibly influenced by bacterial communication, which is known to regulate such pathways in many bacteria. We conclude that in this simplified model of a drinking water bacterial community, community structure imposes constraints on production and/or secretion of exoenzymes to generate a level appropriate to exploit a given nutrient environment.

  10. Extracellular Lipase and Protease Production from a Model Drinking Water Bacterial Community Is Functionally Robust to Absence of Individual Members

    PubMed Central

    Willsey, Graham G.; Wargo, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria secrete enzymes into the extracellular space to hydrolyze macromolecules into constituents that can be imported for microbial nutrition. In bacterial communities, these enzymes and their resultant products can be modeled as community property. Our goal was to investigate the impact of individual community member absence on the resulting community production of exoenzymes (extracellular enzymes) involved in lipid and protein hydrolysis. Our model community contained nine bacteria isolated from the potable water system of the International Space Station. Bacteria were grown in static conditions individually, all together, or in all combinations of eight species and exoproduct production was measured by colorimetric or fluorometric reagents to assess short chain and long chain lipases, choline-specific phospholipases C, and proteases. The exoenzyme production of each species grown alone varied widely, however, the enzyme activity levels of the mixed communities were functionally robust to absence of any single species, with the exception of phospholipase C production in one community. For phospholipase C, absence of Chryseobacterium gleum led to increased choline-specific phospholipase C production, correlated with increased growth of Burkholderia cepacia and Sphingomonas sanguinis. Because each individual species produced different enzyme activity levels in isolation, we calculated an expected activity value for each bacterial mixture using input levels or known final composition. This analysis suggested that robustness of each exoenzyme activity is not solely mediated by community composition, but possibly influenced by bacterial communication, which is known to regulate such pathways in many bacteria. We conclude that in this simplified model of a drinking water bacterial community, community structure imposes constraints on production and/or secretion of exoenzymes to generate a level appropriate to exploit a given nutrient environment. PMID:26599415

  11. 48 CFR 252.225-7047 - Exports by Approved Community Members in Performance of the Contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... eligible exporters, and certain government and industry facilities in Australia or the United Kingdom that are approved and listed by the U.S. Government. “Australia Community member” means an Australian government authority or nongovernmental entity or facility on the Australia Community list accessible at...

  12. 48 CFR 252.225-7047 - Exports by Approved Community Members in Performance of the Contract.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... eligible exporters, and certain government and industry facilities in Australia or the United Kingdom that are approved and listed by the U.S. Government. “Australia Community member” means an Australian government authority or nongovernmental entity or facility on the Australia Community list accessible at...

  13. Initial Teacher Training in the Member States of the European Community. Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    EURYDICE Central Unit, Brussels (Belgium).

    The educational systems among the European Community nations vary considerably and this variety, which is the result of historic and cultural factors, constitutes a great wealth which should be preserved. It is also in the interest of everyone to draw benefit from the experiences and projects of partner countries within the Community. Educational…

  14. Yup'ik culture and context in Southwest Alaska: community member perspectives of tradition, social change, and prevention.

    PubMed

    Ayunerak, Paula; Alstrom, Deborah; Moses, Charles; Charlie, James; Rasmus, Stacy M

    2014-09-01

    This paper provides an introduction to key aspects of Yup'ik Inuit culture and context from both historical and contemporary community member perspectives. Its purpose is to provide a framework for understanding the development and implementation of a prevention initiative centered on youth in two communities in Southwest Alaska as part of collaboration with the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the National Institutes of Health. This paper is written from the perspective of elders and local prevention workers from each of the two prevention communities. The co-authors discuss their culture and their community from their own perspectives, drawing from direct experience and from ancestral knowledge gained through learning and living the Yuuyaraq or the Yup'ik way of life. The authors of this paper identity key aspects of traditional Yup'ik culture that once contributed to the adaptability and survivability of their ancestors, particularly through times of hardship and social disruption. These key processes and practices represent dimensions of culture in a Yup'ik context that contribute to personal and collective growth, protection and wellbeing. Intervention development in Yup'ik communities requires bridging historical cultural frames with contemporary contexts and shifting focus from reviving cultural activities to repairing and revitalizing cultural systems that structure community.

  15. Yup’ik Culture and Context in Southwest Alaska: Community Member Perspectives of Tradition, Social Change, and Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Ayunerak, Paula; Alstrom, Deborah; Moses, Charles; Charlie, James

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an introduction to key aspects of Yup’ik Inuit culture and context from both historical and contemporary community member perspectives. Its purpose is to provide a framework for understanding the development and implementation of a prevention initiative centered on youth in two communities in Southwest Alaska as part of collaboration with the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the National Institutes of Health. This paper is written from the perspective of elders and local prevention workers from each of the two prevention communities. The co-authors discuss their culture and their community from their own perspectives, drawing from direct experience and from ancestral knowledge gained through learning and living the Yuuyaraq or the Yup’ik way of life. The authors of this paper identity key aspects of traditional Yup’ik culture that once contributed to the adaptability and survivability of their ancestors, particularly through times of hardship and social disruption. These key processes and practices represent dimensions of culture in a Yup’ik context that contribute to personal and collective growth, protection and wellbeing. Intervention development in Yup’ik communities requires bridging historical cultural frames with contemporary contexts and shifting focus from reviving cultural activities to repairing and revitalizing cultural systems that structure community. PMID:24771075

  16. Results of community deliberation about social impacts of ecological restoration: comparing public input of self-selected versus actively engaged community members.

    PubMed

    Harris, Charles C; Nielsen, Erik A; Becker, Dennis R; Blahna, Dale J; McLaughlin, William J

    2012-08-01

    Participatory processes for obtaining residents' input about community impacts of proposed environmental management actions have long raised concerns about who participates in public involvement efforts and whose interests they represent. This study explored methods of broad-based involvement and the role of deliberation in social impact assessment. Interactive community forums were conducted in 27 communities to solicit public input on proposed alternatives for recovering wild salmon in the Pacific Northwest US. Individuals identified by fellow residents as most active and involved in community affairs ("AE residents") were invited to participate in deliberations about likely social impacts of proposed engineering and ecological actions such as dam removal. Judgments of these AE participants about community impacts were compared with the judgments of residents motivated to attend a forum out of personal interest, who were designated as self-selected ("SS") participants. While the magnitude of impacts rated by SS participants across all communities differed significantly from AE participants' ratings, in-depth analysis of results from two community case studies found that both AE and SS participants identified a large and diverse set of unique impacts, as well as many of the same kinds of impacts. Thus, inclusion of both kinds of residents resulted in a greater range of impacts for consideration in the environmental impact study. The case study results also found that the extent to which similar kinds of impacts are specified by AE and SS group members can differ by type of community. Study results caution against simplistic conclusions drawn from this approach to community-wide public participation. Nonetheless, the results affirm that deliberative methods for community-based impact assessment involving both AE and SS residents can provide a more complete picture of perceived impacts of proposed restoration activities.

  17. Faculty and Administrator Beliefs Regarding Assessment of Student Learning Outcomes: A Community College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strollo, Toni Marie

    2011-01-01

    This study examined higher education faculty and academic administrator (AO) beliefs regarding the value of assessment of student learning outcomes (ASLO) as a means for improving teaching and learning at a Southeastern community college known for its commitment as a learning college and as an exemplar for such efforts. Faculty and AOs at this…

  18. A Survey of Faculty and Administrator Emeritus Programs at Community Colleges: Eligibility, Coverage, and Benefits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petrowsky, Michael C.

    This report discusses the results of a survey that examined the emeritus status of faculty and administrators at 24 community colleges across the country, with particular reference to such issues as emeritus eligibility, benefits, and coverage. It discusses the definition of emeritus in the second section. In the third segment, the rationale of…

  19. The Supervision and Career Advancement of Women in Community College Administration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donohue-Mendoza, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    This study explores the specific issue of supervision as an important administrative gate keeping function that facilitates or impedes women's career advancement, and promotes gender equity at the executive leadership level in community colleges. The very nature of supervision mirrors the historical purpose of higher education, employee learning…

  20. Preparing School Administrators to Lead Technology Rich Professional Learning Communities in the Digital Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branch, Mary Grace

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the coaching experiences of educational administrators in an attempt to gain greater understanding of how they develop the necessary skills to implement, lead, and support technology rich professional learning communities (PLCs). Participants came from a mix of urban, rural, and suburban school districts. Using semi-structured…

  1. Servant First: A Multicase Study Exploring Servant Leadership in Community College Instructional Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Marvin Lee

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the application of servant leadership principles to community college instructional administration. The study conducted was a multicase research design. The conceptual framework for the study was based on Greenleaf's work in servant leadership as expressed in 10 characteristics of servant leaders…

  2. Minimum Qualifications for Faculty and Administrators in California Community Colleges. [Fifth Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Community Colleges, Sacramento. Office of the Chancellor.

    This document is the fifth edition of Minimum Qualifications for Faculty and Administrators in California Community Colleges and it updates information presented in the last edition. The document is divided into the following sections: disciplines requiring a Mater's degree, disciplines in which a Master's degree is not generally expected for…

  3. The Accreditation Process in Mississippi from the Perspective of Community College Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hollingsworth, Stacey Smith

    2010-01-01

    Research studies show that potential barriers may hinder a successful accreditation process. This research study examined perceptions of Mississippi's community/junior college administrators relating to the accreditation process in general, their communication with the regional accrediting agency, and their institution's facilitation of the…

  4. 77 FR 35965 - Federal Home Loan Bank Members Selected for Community Support Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    .... Association. Black Mountain Savings Bank, S.S.B....... Black Mountain North Carolina. Harrington Bank, FSB... Union Saint Joseph Michigan. Seaway Community Bank Saint Clair Michigan. First Catholic Federal...

  5. Hiring Diverse Faculty Members in Community Colleges: A Case Study in Ethical Decision Making

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fujimoto, Eugene Oropeza

    2012-01-01

    As the diversity of students on college campuses continues to increase, the racial and ethnic diversity among faculty members continues to lag (Jayakumar, Howard, Allen, & Han, 2009; Turner, Myers, & Creswell, 1999). An often overlooked segment of this problem is the 2-year-college setting. With increasing numbers of students of color achieving…

  6. A Community of Practice That Supported the Transition from Doctoral Student to Faculty Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Robin J.; Hemphill, Michael A.; Beaudoin, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    Professional collaboration is an important aspect of any field. It allows for individuals to share ideas and be part of a team. The TPSR Alliance has been a space for such professional collaborations where members have been able to both benefit from and contribute to it by sharing research and practices revolving around developing responsible…

  7. 77 FR 23539 - WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding European Communities and Certain Member States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-19

    ... the meaning of Articles 1 and 2 of the Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures (``SCM... obligations under the SCM Agreement. On December 1, 2011, the EU transmitted a document (``EU Notification... resolve the dispute. Article 7.8 of the SCM Agreement provides that a Member found to maintain...

  8. A Handbook for Community Involvement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Georgia State Dept. of Education, Atlanta. Office of Administrative Services.

    To help Georgia school administrators, educators, and community members, this handbook suggests ideas and plans for strengthening school-community relations and increasing community involvement in schools. The first section lays out the four steps district administrators should take in developing a systemwide community involvement program,…

  9. Perceptions of the Role of Short-Term Volunteerism in International Development: Views from Volunteers, Local Hosts, and Community Members

    PubMed Central

    Loiseau, Bethina; Sibbald, Rebekah; Raman, Salem A.; Darren, Benedict; Loh, Lawrence C.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Short-term international volunteer trips traditionally involve volunteers from high-income countries travelling to low- and middle-income countries to assist in service-related development activities. Their duration typically ranges from 7 to 90 days. The city of La Romana, Dominican Republic, receives hundreds of short-term international volunteers annually. They participate in activities aimed at improving conditions faced by a marginalized ethnic-Haitian community living in bateyes. Methods. This qualitative analysis examined perceptions of short-term international volunteerism, held by three key stakeholder groups in La Romana: local hosts, international volunteers, and community members. Responses from semistructured interviews were recorded and analysed by thematic analysis. Results. Themes from the 3 groups were broadly categorized into general perceptions of short-term volunteerism and proposed best practices. These were further subdivided into perceptions of value, harms, and motivations associated with volunteer teams for the former and best practices around volunteer composition and selection, partnership, and skill sets and predeparture training for the latter. Conclusion. Notable challenges were associated with short-term volunteering, including an overemphasis on the material benefits from volunteer groups expressed by community member respondents; misalignment of the desired and actual skill sets of volunteers; duplicate and uncoordinated volunteer efforts; and the perpetuation of stereotypes suggesting that international volunteers possess superior knowledge or skills. Addressing these challenges is critical to optimizing the conduct of short-term volunteerism. PMID:27382372

  10. Leaving the Dark Side for the Light: Twelve Strategies for Effective Transition from Academic Administrator to Faculty Member

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sale, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Copious literature is available to provide nascent administrators with guidelines and advice for being a successful administrator. Likewise, faculty new to academia have many available resources both from the literature and from campus-based support services, such as new faculty development programs, mentors, and special internal funding programs.…

  11. Interactions with community members and institutions: Preventive pathways for child maltreatment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yiwen; Maguire-Jack, Kathryn

    2016-12-01

    Parents interact with their environment in important ways that may impact their ability to parent their children positively. The current study uses data from the age 3 wave of the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study to investigate whether neighborhood processes and community participation relate to internal control, and whether these three variables are associated with child maltreatment behaviors. Using structural equation modeling, the direct and indirect effects of the environment (neighborhood disorder, social control, and social cohesion) and community participation on child maltreatment are tested. The mediating variable tested is internal control. The results show that neighborhood processes and community participation are associated with child neglect, physical child abuse, and psychological aggression but that these associations are driven through their effect on internal control.

  12. Relationship between Community Drug Administration Strategy and Changes in Trachoma Prevalence, 2007 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Cowling, Carleigh; Hayen, Andrew; Watt, Gabrielle; Mak, Donna B.; Lambert, Stephen; Taylor, Hugh; Kaldor, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Australia is the only high income country with persisting endemic trachoma. A national control program involving mass drug administration with oral azithromycin, in place since 2006, has some characteristics which differ from programs in low income settings, particularly in regard to the use of a wider range of treatment strategies, and more regular assessments of community prevalence. We aimed to examine the association between treatment strategies and trachoma prevalence. Methods Through the national surveillance program, annual data from 2007–2013 were collected on trachoma prevalence and treatment with oral azithromycin in children aged 5–9 years from three Australian regions with endemic trachoma. Communities were classified for each year according to one of four trachoma treatment strategies implemented (no treatment, active cases only, household and community-wide). We estimated the change in trachoma prevalence between sequential pairs of years and across multiple years according to treatment strategy using random-effects meta-analyses. Findings Over the study period, 182 unique remote Aboriginal communities had 881 annual records of both trachoma prevalence and treatment. From the analysis of pairs of years, the greatest annual fall in trachoma prevalence was in communities implementing community-wide strategies, with yearly absolute reductions ranging from -8% (95%CI -17% to 1%) to -31% (-26% to -37%); these communities also had the highest baseline trachoma prevalence (15.4%-43.9%). Restricting analyses to communities with moderate trachoma prevalence (5–19%) at initial measurement, and comparing community trachoma prevalence from the first to the last year of available data for the community, both community-wide and more targeted treatment strategies were associated with similar absolute reductions (-11% [-8% to -13%] and -7% [-5% to -10%] respectively). Results were similar stratified by region. Interpretation Consistent with previous

  13. Community health agency administrators' access to public health data for program planning, evaluation, and grant preparation.

    PubMed

    Lane, Sandra D; Cashman, Donna M; Keefe, Robert H; Narine, Lutchmie; Ducre, Bradford; Chesna, Sharon; Hall, Meghan; Oliver, David

    2017-02-01

    The Affordable Care Act mandates that public health data be made available for community agency use. Having access to such data allows community agencies to tailor interventions, evaluations, and funding requests more effectively. This study, jointly undertaken by Syracuse University faculty and students with the New York State Perinatal Association, sought to understand community agencies' access to requests for governmental data, as well as to identify areas for improving data access. Results from this survey of administrators from 43 agencies in New York State found that only one-half of their requests for data were successful. Difficulties in obtaining access to needed data included fiscal and staffing constraints of the state-level agencies that house the data, as well as possible overinterpretation of confidentiality policies. In addition, some of community agency respondents reported that their staff lacked skills in data analysis and would benefit from training in epidemiology and quantitative evaluation.

  14. Member Perceptions of Informal Science Institution Graduate Certificate Program: Case Study of a Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ball, Lois A.

    2012-01-01

    This research attempted to understand the experiences of a cohort of informal and formal science educators and informal science institution (ISI) community representatives during and after completion of a pilot graduate certificate program. Informal science educators (ISEs) find limited opportunities for professional development and support which…

  15. A Planned Giving Primer for Rockingham Community College Foundation Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinberg, Barry M.

    This document provides an explanation of various ways individuals, groups, and corporations can financially support Rockingham Community College through planned giving, previously known as "deferred giving." Planned giving, which is defined as a deliberate, well-thought-out act of contributing an asset or assets to a charitable organization, has…

  16. The Development of a Handbook for Technical Advisory Committee Members at Delgado Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlee, Brian

    Research has suggested that in order to survive in the 1990's, community colleges must increase public awareness of their role in society, encourage employer-specific programs and services, and initiate closer working relationships with industry. One strategy to accomplish these objectives is through the establishment of a Technical Advisory…

  17. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program…

  18. Contracts with Community College Adjunct Faculty Members: Potential Supplemental Benefits to Increase Satisfaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Kimberly Ann

    2016-01-01

    During the 21st century Great Recession, college enrollments increased as displaced workers trained to advance their skills (Baum & Ma, 2012). At the same time, state funding to community colleges declined (Baum & Ma, 2012; Ehrenberg, 2012). Although higher enrollments increased tuition revenues, they were insufficient to cover the gap…

  19. Lighting the Way: Keweenaw Bay Ojibwa Community College Serves as a Beacon Light for Tribal Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Benton, Sherrole

    2015-01-01

    On the shores of Lake Superior, the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC), a small cluster of Ojibwa (also known as Chippewa), keep their fires alive in the face of daunting pressures to let go of their ways. After the ravages of war, colonization, and territorial loss, KBIC continues to make a stand for their people and future generations. Their…

  20. 78 FR 8131 - Federal Home Loan Bank Members Selected for Community Support Review

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Credit Union Enderlin North Dakota. BlackRidge Bank Fargo North Dakota. The Citizens State Bank of Finley... Dakota. Farmers State Bank Hosmer South Dakota. Sunrise Bank Dakota Onida South Dakota. Black Hills... Union Wichita Kansas. Pony Express Community Bank--Elwood, KS.. St. Joseph Missouri. Carson...

  1. Role Perceptions of School Administration Team Members Concerning Inclusion of Children with Disabilities in Elementary General Schools in Israel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shani, Michal; Koss, Cathie

    2015-01-01

    In an ideal school, where inclusion is implemented successfully, staff members collaborate and create an inclusive environment in their schools. In order to achieve such a sustainable environment of inclusion, pedagogical, organisational and psychological restructuring should occur, and a strong inclusion-oriented leadership has to be activated.…

  2. Perceptions of School Administration Team Members Concerning Inclusion in Israel: Are They in Congruence with the Ecological Sustainable Perspective?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shani, Michal; Ram, Drorit

    2015-01-01

    Based on an ecological perspective, inclusive education should involve two essential components: a shared ideology of providing a culturally responsive educational system where the needs of every child are met and a school policy geared towards the implementation of inclusion practices, with collaborations among staff members who create…

  3. A civic engagement paradigm for reforming health administration education and recreating the community.

    PubMed

    Renick, Oren; Metzler, Leanne; Murray, Jennifer; Renick, Judy

    2005-01-01

    The education of students of health administration has traditionally combined both the theoretical and practical to enhance and balance the learning experience. Classroom exposure to the principles of management, law, organizations, and finance is coupled with problem solving, practicum, internship, and administrative residency experiences. However, just as recent years have seen the developmentof courses from managed care and alternative delivery systems to total quality management and continuous quality improvement, there is also emerging an awareness of the need to enhance the practical side of the learning equation. Perhaps this need is finding expression in curricular opportunities for students to learn from a participatory model known as civic engagement (CE). CE is a way of integrating academic study and community service to strengthen learning while promoting civic and personal responsibility to strengthen communities. Based on experiences with graduate and undergraduate students spanning the last ten years at Texas State University--San Marcos (Texas State), it is suggested that a CE paradigm has been developed within the Department of Health Administration that merits consideration by other programs of health administration. As a model for change, it has the potential for reforming both health administration education and most other higher education disciplines as well.

  4. A profile of women CEOs/administrators in community and migrant health centers.

    PubMed

    Samuels, M E; Shi, L; Cochran, C R; Glover, S; Beattie, C M

    1999-01-01

    Most of the current research on women executives has focused on models in which few women achieve the highest position (e.g. hospital CEOs). This article looks at the nation's Community and Migrant Health Centers where substantial numbers of women hold the highest executive position. A national profile of women Community and Migrant Health Centers (C/MHCs) Chief Executive Officers/Administrators is provided in terms of their personal and work characteristics, as well as their values and beliefs regarding successful C/MHC attributes and important managerial practices. The study compares C/MHC Chief Executive Officers/Administrators based on gender. The study found that 41 percent of the CEO/Administrators were women and that they shared similar values and beliefs about functions/critical managerial factors and managerial characteristics of C/MHCs with their male colleagues. However, the study did find a comparable salary differential of over $11,000 in favor of male Chief Executive Officers/Administrators. The article reviews the literature of female executives in health care and concludes with recommendations for further study using the C/MHCs CEO/Administrators as a model study population.

  5. ENGAGING COMMUNITIES TO STRENGTHEN RESEARCH ETHICS IN LOW-INCOME SETTINGS: SELECTION AND PERCEPTIONS OF MEMBERS OF A NETWORK OF REPRESENTATIVES IN COASTAL KENYA

    PubMed Central

    Kamuya, Dorcas M; Marsh, Vicki; Kombe, Francis K; Geissler, P Wenzel; Molyneux, Sassy C

    2013-01-01

    There is wide agreement that community engagement is important for many research types and settings, often including interaction with ‘representatives’ of communities. There is relatively little published experience of community engagement in international research settings, with available information focusing on Community Advisory Boards or Groups (CAB/CAGs), or variants of these, where CAB/G members often advise researchers on behalf of the communities they represent. In this paper we describe a network of community members (‘KEMRI Community Representatives’, or ‘KCRs’) linked to a large multi-disciplinary research programme on the Kenyan Coast. Unlike many CAB/Gs, the intention with the KCR network has evolved to be for members to represent the geographical areas in which a diverse range of health studies are conducted through being typical of those communities. We draw on routine reports, self-administered questionnaires and interviews to: 1) document how typical KCR members are of the local communities in terms of basic characteristics, and 2) explore KCR's perceptions of their roles, and of the benefits and challenges of undertaking these roles. We conclude that this evolving network is a potentially valuable way of strengthening interactions between a research institution and a local geographic community, through contributing to meeting intrinsic ethical values such as showing respect, and instrumental values such as improving consent processes. However, there are numerous challenges involved. Other ways of interacting with members of local communities, including community leaders, and the most vulnerable groups least likely to be vocal in representative groups, have always been, and remain, essential. PMID:23433404

  6. Meeting the needs of a community: teaching evidence-based youth violence prevention initiatives to members of strategic communities.

    PubMed

    Ruffolo, Daria C; Andresen, Pamela A; Winn, Keith L

    2013-01-01

    Youth violence is among the most serious health threats in the nation today. Violence disproportionately affects young people and people of color. Although the national rates of violent injury and homicide have shown a decline in most regions of the United States over the past 15 years, the rates of violence and related injuries among youth remain unacceptably high. The prevention of youth violence has been a priority of health departments nationwide, including the Cook County Department of Public Health. The goal of this project was to provide key community leaders, social service workers, and nurses within suburban Cook County with educational sessions on Blueprints for Violence Prevention, an initiative to promote evidence-based youth violence prevention programs.

  7. Improving Medication Administration Safety in a Community Hospital Setting Using Lean Methodology.

    PubMed

    Critchley, Sandy

    2015-01-01

    Virtually all health care organizations have goals of improving patient safety, but despite clear goals and considerable investments, gains have been limited. This article explores a community hospital's resounding success using Lean methodology to improve medication administration safety with process changes designed by engaged employees and leaders with the knowledge and skill to effect improvements. This article inspires an interdisciplinary approach to quality improvement using reproducible strategies.

  8. Sometimes more is more: iterative participatory design of infographics for engagement of community members with varying levels of health literacy

    PubMed Central

    Suero-Tejeda, Niurka; Bales, Michael E; Merrill, Jacqueline A; Yoon, Sunmoo; Woollen, Janet; Bakken, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Objective To collaborate with community members to develop tailored infographics that support comprehension of health information, engage the viewer, and may have the potential to motivate health-promoting behaviors. Methods The authors conducted participatory design sessions with community members, who were purposively sampled and grouped by preferred language (English, Spanish), age group (18–30, 31–60, >60 years), and level of health literacy (adequate, marginal, inadequate). Research staff elicited perceived meaning of each infographic, preferences between infographics, suggestions for improvement, and whether or not the infographics would motivate health-promoting behavior. Analysis and infographic refinement were iterative and concurrent with data collection. Results Successful designs were information-rich, supported comparison, provided context, and/or employed familiar color and symbolic analogies. Infographics that employed repeated icons to represent multiple instances of a more general class of things (e.g., apple icons to represent fruit servings) were interpreted in a rigidly literal fashion and thus were unsuitable for this community. Preliminary findings suggest that infographics may motivate health-promoting behaviors. Discussion Infographics should be information-rich, contextualize the information for the viewer, and yield an accurate meaning even if interpreted literally. Conclusion Carefully designed infographics can be useful tools to support comprehension and thus help patients engage with their own health data. Infographics may contribute to patients’ ability to participate in the Learning Health System through participation in the development of a robust data utility, use of clinical communication tools for health self-management, and involvement in building knowledge through patient-reported outcomes. PMID:26174865

  9. Perceptions of sitting posture among members of the community, both with and without non-specific chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Kieran; O'Keeffe, Mary; O'Sullivan, Leonard; O'Sullivan, Peter; Dankaerts, Wim

    2013-12-01

    Physiotherapists perceive upright, lordotic sitting postures to be important in the management of non-specific chronic low back pain (NSCLBP). Little is known about the perceptions of the wider community about seated posture, despite this being an important consideration before attempting to change seated posture. This study investigated perceptions of the best and worst sitting postures among members of the community, both with (n = 120) and without (n = 235) NSCLBP. Participants with NSCLBP perceived posture to be more important (p < 0.001), and reported thinking about their posture significantly more frequently (p < 0.001), than those without NSCLBP. 54% of participants selected a "neutral" lordotic sitting posture as their best posture, which was more frequent than any other posture (p < 0.001). Sitting postures which were "straight", and were perceived to keep the head, neck and shoulders in good alignment were preferred. However, what people considered "straight" varied considerably. 78% selected a slumped sitting posture as their worst posture, which was more frequent than any other posture (p < 0.001). The choice of best and worst sitting postures was not significantly influenced by gender, the presence of NSCLBP, or measures of pain, disability or back pain beliefs. Interestingly, a very upright sitting posture was the second most popular selection as both the best (19%) and worst (15%) posture. Overall, lordotic lumbar postures were strongly favoured among members of the community, which is broadly in line with the previously reported perceptions of physiotherapists.

  10. Virtual users support forum: do community members really want to help you?

    PubMed

    Gabbiadini, Alessandro; Mari, Silvia; Volpato, Chiara

    2013-04-01

    The survival of a virtual community is guaranteed by the users' creation of content. However, the literature has found that the percentage of users who create innovative content is very modest. The content contribution process can also be interpreted as a social collective action in which we-intentions play a primary role. Nevertheless, some people choose not to participate in the collective action, but to benefit from the community's resources and to maximize individual outcomes. In this study (N=250), we investigated the effects of the free-riding tendency, conceived as the willingness to maximize personal outcomes. The specific setting was a virtual support forum, the most common type of web platform, generally used instrumentally by web users to find information and solutions to specific problems. We used the theory of planned behavior theoretical framework, plus social influence variables to test the effect of the free-riding tendency as a drawback for contributions, considering both the role of individual and we-intentions on the observed behavior. Findings showed that neither we-intentions nor I-intentions predicted the actual contribution behavior. Both types of intentions and contribution behavior were negatively influenced only by the free-riding tendency construct. Considerations and future developments of these results are discussed.

  11. Investigating local sustainable environmental perspectives of Kenyan community members and teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quigley, Cassie F.; Dogbey, James; Che, S. Megan; Hallo, Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    Efforts to conserve and preserve the environment in developing or marginalized locales frequently involve a one-way transfer of knowledge and materials from a source in a more developed location. This situation often degenerates into a short-term donor project which risks little to no long-term impacts on local or indigenous relationships with the environment. This research study with educators in Narok, Kenya investigates the current perspectives of local key stakeholders on the environment and sustainability with the purpose of sharing these understandings among local groups to generate a locally constructed meaning of environmental conservation and sustainability. It is the researchers' aim that through locally constructed meanings of environmental hazards and conservation, the Maasai community will empower themselves to transform their relationship with their environment and begin to construct and enact sustainable alternatives to destructive environmental practices. The approach used in this study is a qualitative study of representative stakeholders' environmental perspectives called photovoice. Two major themes emerged during the data analysis: How do we co-habit? and How do we modernize? This community demonstrated a complex understandings including navigate traditional practices, made connections to a larger system, and describing positive ways in which humans influence our environment.

  12. Barriers and facilitators to Veterans Administration collaboration with community providers: the Lodge Project for homeless veterans.

    PubMed

    Cretzmeyer, Margaret; Moeckli, Jane; Liu, William Ming

    2014-01-01

    Since 2009, the U.S. Veterans Administration has made concentrated efforts to end homelessness among veterans. As part of these efforts, the Iowa City, Iowa, VA Health Care System in collaboration with local community providers deployed a supportive housing program aimed at homeless veterans. Called the Lodge program, it is intended to serve a Mid-Western mid-size city and its surrounding rural communities. This article presents qualitative findings from a mixed-method, two-year formative evaluation of the Lodge's implementation. Primary barriers to the effectiveness of the Lodge program were regulations hindering cooperation between service programs, followed by problems regarding information sharing and client substance abuse. Facilitators included personal communication and cooperation between individuals within and among service groups. The feasibility of implementing a Lodge program in a more rural community than Iowa City was also discussed.

  13. Knowledge of Staff Members of Residential Care Facilities for Individuals with Intellectual Disability on Medication Administration via Enteral Feeding Tube

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joos, E.; Mehuys, E.; Van Bocxlaer, J.; Remon, J. P.; Van Winckel, M.; Boussery, K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Guidelines for the safe administration of drugs through enteral feeding tube (EFT) are an important tool to minimise the risk of errors. This study aimed to investigate knowledge of these guidelines among staff of residential care facilities (RCF) for people with ID. Method: Knowledge was assessed using a 13-item self-administered…

  14. The Community of Practice among Mathematics and Mathematics Education Faculty Members at an Urban Minority Serving Institution in the U.S.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sack, Jacqueline; Quander, Judith; Redl, Timothy; Leveille, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Using narrative inquiry as a research method, four mathematics and mathematics education faculty members explored the integration of theoretical perspectives into their personal narratives as they developed a community of practice. Initially their focus was strictly on improving their students' mathematical knowledge. As their community of…

  15. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members.

    PubMed

    McMahon, Tracey R; Hanson, Jessica D; Griese, Emily R; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-07-03

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program effectiveness, few teen pregnancy prevention programs have published on recommendations for adapting these programs to address the specific needs of Northern Plains American Indian youth. We employed a mixed-methods analysis of 24 focus groups and 20 interviews with a combined total of 185 urban and reservation-based American Indian youth and elders, local health care providers, and local school personnel to detail recommendations for the cultural adaptation, content, and implementation of a teen pregnancy prevention program specific to this population. Gender differences and urban /reservation site differences in the types of recommendations offered and the potential reasons for these differences are discussed.

  16. Teen Pregnancy Prevention Program Recommendations from Urban and Reservation Northern Plains American Indian Community Members

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Tracey R.; Hanson, Jessica D.; Griese, Emily R.; Kenyon, DenYelle Baete

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines over the past few decades, the United States has one of the highest rates of teen pregnancy compared to other industrialized nations. American Indian youth have experienced higher rates of teen pregnancy compared to the overall population for decades. Although it's known that community and cultural adaptation enhance program effectiveness, few teen pregnancy prevention programs have published on recommendations for adapting these programs to address the specific needs of Northern Plains American Indian youth. We employed a mixed-methods analysis of 24 focus groups and 20 interviews with a combined total of 185 urban and reservation-based American Indian youth and elders, local health care providers, and local school personnel to detail recommendations for the cultural adaptation, content, and implementation of a teen pregnancy prevention program specific to this population. Gender differences and urban /reservation site differences in the types of recommendations offered and the potential reasons for these differences are discussed. PMID:26550005

  17. Community support and disclosure of HIV serostatus to family members by public-sector antiretroviral treatment patients in the Free State Province of South Africa.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Edwin; van Loon, Francis; van Rensburg, Dingie; Meulemans, Herman

    2009-05-01

    Recent studies have indicated that the support of close relatives is fundamental in coping with HIV/AIDS and in accessing the emotional and material support necessary for sustained adherence to treatment. Because disclosure to family members is imperative to ensure their support, identifying tools or resources that can minimize the possible risks and maximize the potential benefits of disclosure should be useful in improving the lives of people living with HIV/AIDS. Where health systems require strengthening, engaging the community in HIV/AIDS care could potentially create an environment that encourages disclosure to family members. This study investigated the impact of community support initiatives (community health workers and treatment support groups), patient characteristics (age, gender, and education), and time since first diagnosis on the disclosure of serostatus to family members by a sample of 268 public-sector antiretroviral treatment patients in a province of South Africa between August 2004 and July 2007. Whereas gender, age, and education only weakly influenced disclosure, there was a strong and stable positive association between community support and disclosure to family members. The immediate and long-term impact of community support on the disclosure by seropositive patients to family members indicates that initiatives such as community health workers and HIV support groups run by people living with HIV/AIDS should be strengthened, especially for those patients who cannot disclose their status to immediate family and close friends.

  18. The organization and administration of community college non-credit workforce education and training cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozachyn, Karen P.

    Community colleges are struggling financially due to underfunding. Recent state budget cuts coupled with the elimination of federal stimulus money has exacerbated the issue as these funding streams had contributed to operating costs (Moltz, 2011). In response to these budget cuts, community colleges are challenged to improve, increase, and develop revenue producing programs. These factors heighten the need for community colleges to examine their non-credit workforce organizations. The community college units charged with delivering non-credit workforce education and training programs are historically ancillary to the academic divisions that deliver certificate, technical degree, and transfer degree programs. The perceptions of these units are that they are the community college's 'step child' (Grubb, Bradway, and Bell, 2002). This case study examined the organization and administration of community college non-credit workforce education and training units, utilizing observation, interviews, and document analysis. Observational data focused on the physical campus and the unit. Interviews were conducted onsite with decision-making personnel of the division units that deliver non-credit workforce education and training within each community college. Document analysis included college catalogues, program guides, marketing material, and website information. The study was grounded in the review of literature associated with the evolution of the community college, as well as the development of workforce education and training including funding, organizational structure and models, management philosophies, and effectiveness. The findings of the study report that all five units were self-contained and were organized and operated uniquely within the organization. Effectiveness was measured differently by each institution. However, two common benchmarks were revenue and student evaluations. Another outcome of this study is the perceived lack of college-wide alignment between

  19. Cooperative medical insurance and the cost of care in Shandong, PR China: perspectives of patients and community members.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, Mohammad Afzal; Raulli, Alexandra; Yan, Wang; Dong, Han; Aiguo, Zhang; Ping, Dong

    2015-03-01

    This research was conducted to identify the cost of care associated with utilization of village clinics and membership of the New Cooperative Medical Scheme (NCMS) in 2 counties of Shandong province, PR China. A total of 397 community members and 297 patients who used the village clinics were interviewed. The average cost for primary care treatment of 1 episode of illness was about 55 yuan (about US$8). Although more than 50% of people had NCMS membership, many consider the monetary reimbursements as insufficient. The low insurance reimbursement rates and inability to pay out-of-pocket expenses compromise access to care. Delays can cause more serious illnesses with potential to overburden the secondary care at the township and county hospitals. Those rural people who have not yet enjoyed the benefits of China's economic development may not benefit from recent health care reform and finance mechanisms unless schemes such as the NCMS provide more substantial subsidies.

  20. Lysine fortification reduces anxiety and lessens stress in family members in economically weak communities in Northwest Syria.

    PubMed

    Smriga, Miro; Ghosh, Shibani; Mouneimne, Youssef; Pellett, Peter L; Scrimshaw, Nevin S

    2004-06-01

    Lysine is a limiting amino acid in diets based on wheat as the staple. In experimental animals, prolonged dietary lysine inadequacy increases stress-induced anxiety. If observed in humans, such a result would have a strong implication for the relationship between nutrition and communal quality of life and mental health. As part of a 3-month randomized double-blind study, we tested whether lysine fortification of wheat reduces anxiety and stress response in family members in poor Syrian communities consuming wheat as a staple food. In the lysine-fortified group, the plasma cortisol response to the blood drawing as a cause of stress was reduced in females, as was sympathetic arousal in males as measured by skin conductance. Lysine fortification also significantly reduced chronic anxiety as measured by the trait anxiety inventory in males. These results suggest that some stress responses in economically weak populations consuming cereal-based diets can be improved with lysine fortification.

  1. 'We are afraid of them': attitudes and behaviours of community members towards tuberculosis in Ghana and implications for TB control efforts.

    PubMed

    Dodor, Emmanuel Atsu; Kelly, Shona

    2009-03-01

    One major set back to the success of TB control globally is the stigma attached to the disease in most societies. This article explores community's understanding of, and attitudes and behaviours towards TB and examines the implications for disease control efforts. Individual in-depth interviews and focus groups were held with community members and the generated data analysed using Grounded Theory techniques and procedures. At the core of feelings towards TB in the community is the fear of infection leading to imposition of socio-physical distance and participatory restrictions on those suffering from the disease. Because of fear of infection, most of the community members were of the view that TB patients should not be part of the society and said they will not marry a TB patient or encourage any family member to enter such a relationship. They also pointed out that TB patients should not sell in the community and would not be allowed to represent them at any public function because they can infect others. Whenever it becomes unavoidable for the community members to interact with someone with TB, they indicated that they would cover their mouth with a handkerchief, turn their head or sit in the opposite direction of the wind from the TB patient to avoid inhaling the air. When a TB patient joins the community members at any function, he/she is expected to abide by certain 'codes of conduct'. The stigmatising attitudes and behaviours of the community members towards the disease and its sufferers may lead individuals with very obvious signs and symptoms of TB to attribute it to other non-stigmatising conditions or hide the diagnosis from others as well as default from treatment.

  2. Packaging effective community service delivery: the utility of mandates and contracts in obtaining administrative cooperation.

    PubMed

    Woodard, K L

    1994-01-01

    Voluntary agreements, mandates, and contracts integrate networks of social service organizations, allowing them to function as coordinated wholes. The author reviews the history of contracting and mandating in the public sector. It is hypothesized that contracted relationships formalize agreements between local organizations dependent on others. Mandated relationships are perceived to be important by policy-makers at a state or federal level. The differential acceptance and rejection of these relationships in the community is explored. Data from social service agencies are used to compare administrators' assessments of the effectiveness of mandated and contracted relationships used to coordinate a group of agencies delivering services to children. When a mandated relationship has been formalized into a contract by a local administrator the perceived effectiveness of that relationship is higher than any other relationship in the community. If the mandated relationship has not been formalized by a contract this relationship is perceived to be the least effective. Important mandated inter-organizational ties without monetary incentives are less likely to work. Local administrators having developed the contracted ties see these ties as producing a higher level of performance.

  3. Frequency, Nature, and Correlates of Hate Crime Victimization Experiences in an Urban Sample of Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Community Members.

    PubMed

    Burks, Alixandra C; Cramer, Robert J; Henderson, Craig E; Stroud, Caroline H; Crosby, James W; Graham, James

    2015-09-17

    The present study examines two central research questions. First, we sought to add to current knowledge on the frequency and types of hate crime experiences in an urban sample. Also, drawing on existing frameworks for sexual minority specific (SMS) stress, we examined internalized SMS stress (defined by internalized homophobia and acceptance concerns regarding one's minority status) as a mediator of the association between hate crime victimization (i.e., objective or social SMS stress) and mental health symptoms (i.e., symptoms of depression, anxiety, and general stress). Participants were 336 self-identified lesbian, gay, and bisexual (LGB) community members who elected to participate in research at a community health agency in an urban southwestern United States jurisdiction. Results suggested (a) approximately one third of the sample reported lifetime hate crime victimization, with the most common types characterized by interpersonal, as opposed to property, crimes; (b) approximately half of participants reported their most recent victimization to law enforcement; and (c) internalized SMS stress mediated the relation between hate crime victimization and overall mental health symptoms. Findings are discussed with respect to implications of the unique nature of hate crimes in an urban setting, as well as theoretical and practical implications of SMS stress findings.

  4. Effects of Bacterial Community Members on the Proteome of the Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacterium Nitrosomonas sp. Strain Is79

    PubMed Central

    Sedlacek, Christopher J.; Nielsen, Susanne; Greis, Kenneth D.; Haffey, Wendy D.; Revsbech, Niels Peter; Ticak, Tomislav; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microorganisms in the environment do not exist as the often-studied pure cultures but as members of complex microbial communities. Characterizing the interactions within microbial communities is essential to understand their function in both natural and engineered environments. In this study, we investigated how the presence of a nitrite-oxidizing bacterium (NOB) and heterotrophic bacteria affect the growth and proteome of the chemolithoautotrophic ammonia-oxidizing bacterium (AOB) Nitrosomonas sp. strain Is79. We investigated Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 in co-culture with Nitrobacter winogradskyi, in co-cultures with selected heterotrophic bacteria, and as a member of the nitrifying enrichment culture G5-7. In batch culture, N. winogradskyi and heterotrophic bacteria had positive effects on the growth of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79. An isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics approach was used to investigate the effect of N. winogradskyi and the co-cultured heterotrophic bacteria from G5-7 on the proteome of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79. In co-culture with N. winogradskyi, several Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 oxidative stress response proteins changed in abundance, with periplasmic proteins increasing and cytoplasmic proteins decreasing in abundance. In the presence of heterotrophic bacteria, the abundance of proteins directly related to the ammonia oxidation pathway increased, while the abundance of proteins related to amino acid synthesis and metabolism decreased. In summary, the proteome of Nitrosomonas sp. Is79 was differentially influenced by the presence of either N. winogradskyi or heterotrophic bacteria. Together, N. winogradskyi and heterotrophic bacteria reduced the oxidative stress for Nitrosomonas sp. Is79, which resulted in more efficient metabolism. IMPORTANCE Aerobic ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms play an important role in the global nitrogen cycle, converting ammonia to

  5. Diel metabolomics analysis of a hot spring chlorophototrophic microbial mat leads to new hypotheses of community member metabolisms

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Young-Mo; Nowack, Shane; Olsen, Millie; ...

    2015-04-17

    Dynamic environmental factors such as light, nutrients, salt, and temperature continuously affect chlorophototrophic microbial mats, requiring adaptative and acclimative responses to stabilize composition and function. Quantitative metabolomics analysis can provide insights into metabolite dynamics for understanding community response to such changing environmental conditions. In this study, we quantified volatile organic acids, polar metabolites (amino acids, glycolytic and citric acid cycle intermediates, nucleobases, nucleosides, and sugars), wax esters, and polyhydroxyalkanoates, resulting in the identification of 104 metabolites and related molecules in thermal chlorophototrophic microbial mat cores collected over a diel cycle in Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park. A limited number ofmore » predominant taxa inhabiting this community and their functional potentials have been previously identified through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses and in situ metabolisms and metabolic interactions among these taxa have been hypothesized. Our metabolomics results confirmed the diel cycling of photorespiration (e.g. glycolate) and fermentation (e.g. acetate, propionate, and lactate) products, the carbon storage polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates, and dissolved gases (e.g. H2 and CO2) in the waters overlying the mat, which were hypothesized to occur in major mat chlorophototrophic community members. In addition, we have formulated the following new hypotheses: 1) the morning hours are a time of biosynthesis of amino acids, DNA, and RNA; 2) Synechococcus spp. produce CH4 via metabolism of phosphonates, and photo-inhibited cells may also produce lactate via fermentation as an alternate metabolism; 3) glycolate and lactate are exchanged among Synechococcus and Roseiflexus spp.; and 4) fluctuations in many metabolite pools (e.g. wax esters) at different times of day result from species found at different depths within the mat responding to temporal differences

  6. Confirming the Environmental Concerns of Community Members Utilizing Participatory-Based Research in the Houston Neighborhood of Manchester

    PubMed Central

    Sansom, Garett; Berke, Philip; McDonald, Thomas; Shipp, Eva; Horney, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    In the last few decades, there has been an increase in community-based participatory research being conducted within the United States. Recent research has demonstrated that working with local community organizations, interest groups, and individuals can assist in the creation of, and sustainability in, health initiatives, adoption of emergency protocols, and potentially improve health outcomes for at-risk populations. However little research has assessed if communal concerns over environmental contaminants would be confirmed through environmental research. This cross-sectional study collected survey data and performed surface water analysis for heavy metals in a small neighborhood in Houston, TX, which is characterized by industrial sites, unimproved infrastructure, nuisance flooding, and poor air quality. Surveys were completed with 109 residents of the Manchester neighborhood. Water samples were taken from thirty zones within the neighborhood and assessed for arsenic (As), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), silver (Ag), and mercury (Hg). Survey results showed that the vast majority of all respondents were concerned over proximity to industry and waste facilities, as well as exposure to standing surface water. Barium was discovered in every sample and many of the zones showed alarming levels of certain metals. For example, one zone, two blocks from a public park, showed levels of arsenic at 180 (μg/L), barium at 3296 (μg/L), chromium at 363 (μg/L), lead at 1448 (μg/L), and mercury at 10 (μg/L). These findings support the hypothesis that neighborhood members are aware of the issues affecting their community and can offer researchers valuable assistance in every stage of study design and execution. PMID:27563915

  7. Diel metabolomics analysis of a hot spring chlorophototrophic microbial mat leads to new hypotheses of community member metabolisms

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Young-Mo; Nowack, Shane; Olsen, Millie; Becraft, Eric; Wood, Jason M.; Thiel, Vera; Klapper, Isaac; Kuhl, Michael; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Bryant, Donald A.; Ward, David M.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2015-04-17

    Dynamic environmental factors such as light, nutrients, salt, and temperature continuously affect chlorophototrophic microbial mats, requiring adaptative and acclimative responses to stabilize composition and function. Quantitative metabolomics analysis can provide insights into metabolite dynamics for understanding community response to such changing environmental conditions. In this study, we quantified volatile organic acids, polar metabolites (amino acids, glycolytic and citric acid cycle intermediates, nucleobases, nucleosides, and sugars), wax esters, and polyhydroxyalkanoates, resulting in the identification of 104 metabolites and related molecules in thermal chlorophototrophic microbial mat cores collected over a diel cycle in Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park. A limited number of predominant taxa inhabiting this community and their functional potentials have been previously identified through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses and in situ metabolisms and metabolic interactions among these taxa have been hypothesized. Our metabolomics results confirmed the diel cycling of photorespiration (e.g. glycolate) and fermentation (e.g. acetate, propionate, and lactate) products, the carbon storage polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates, and dissolved gases (e.g. H2 and CO2) in the waters overlying the mat, which were hypothesized to occur in major mat chlorophototrophic community members. In addition, we have formulated the following new hypotheses: 1) the morning hours are a time of biosynthesis of amino acids, DNA, and RNA; 2) Synechococcus spp. produce CH4 via metabolism of phosphonates, and photo-inhibited cells may also produce lactate via fermentation as an alternate metabolism; 3) glycolate and lactate are exchanged among Synechococcus and Roseiflexus spp.; and 4) fluctuations in many metabolite pools (e.g. wax esters) at different times of day result from species found at different depths within the mat responding to temporal differences in their

  8. Confirming the Environmental Concerns of Community Members Utilizing Participatory-Based Research in the Houston Neighborhood of Manchester.

    PubMed

    Sansom, Garett; Berke, Philip; McDonald, Thomas; Shipp, Eva; Horney, Jennifer

    2016-08-23

    In the last few decades, there has been an increase in community-based participatory research being conducted within the United States. Recent research has demonstrated that working with local community organizations, interest groups, and individuals can assist in the creation of, and sustainability in, health initiatives, adoption of emergency protocols, and potentially improve health outcomes for at-risk populations. However little research has assessed if communal concerns over environmental contaminants would be confirmed through environmental research. This cross-sectional study collected survey data and performed surface water analysis for heavy metals in a small neighborhood in Houston, TX, which is characterized by industrial sites, unimproved infrastructure, nuisance flooding, and poor air quality. Surveys were completed with 109 residents of the Manchester neighborhood. Water samples were taken from thirty zones within the neighborhood and assessed for arsenic (As), barium (Ba), cadmium (Cd), chromium (Cr), lead (Pb), selenium (Se), silver (Ag), and mercury (Hg). Survey results showed that the vast majority of all respondents were concerned over proximity to industry and waste facilities, as well as exposure to standing surface water. Barium was discovered in every sample and many of the zones showed alarming levels of certain metals. For example, one zone, two blocks from a public park, showed levels of arsenic at 180 (μg/L), barium at 3296 (μg/L), chromium at 363 (μg/L), lead at 1448 (μg/L), and mercury at 10 (μg/L). These findings support the hypothesis that neighborhood members are aware of the issues affecting their community and can offer researchers valuable assistance in every stage of study design and execution.

  9. Diel metabolomics analysis of a hot spring chlorophototrophic microbial mat leads to new hypotheses of community member metabolisms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Mo; Nowack, Shane; Olsen, Millie T.; Becraft, Eric D.; Wood, Jason M.; Thiel, Vera; Klapper, Isaac; Kühl, Michael; Fredrickson, James K.; Bryant, Donald A.; Ward, David M.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic environmental factors such as light, nutrients, salt, and temperature continuously affect chlorophototrophic microbial mats, requiring adaptive and acclimative responses to stabilize composition and function. Quantitative metabolomics analysis can provide insights into metabolite dynamics for understanding community response to such changing environmental conditions. In this study, we quantified volatile organic acids, polar metabolites (amino acids, glycolytic and citric acid cycle intermediates, nucleobases, nucleosides, and sugars), wax esters, and polyhydroxyalkanoates, resulting in the identification of 104 metabolites and related molecules in thermal chlorophototrophic microbial mat cores collected over a diel cycle in Mushroom Spring, Yellowstone National Park. A limited number of predominant taxa inhabit this community and their functional potentials have been previously identified through metagenomic and metatranscriptomic analyses and in situ metabolisms, and metabolic interactions among these taxa have been hypothesized. Our metabolomics results confirmed the diel cycling of photorespiration (e.g., glycolate) and fermentation (e.g., acetate, propionate, and lactate) products, the carbon storage polymers polyhydroxyalkanoates, and dissolved gasses (e.g., H2 and CO2) in the waters overlying the mat, which were hypothesized to occur in major mat chlorophototrophic community members. In addition, we have formulated the following new hypotheses: (1) the morning hours are a time of biosynthesis of amino acids, DNA, and RNA; (2) photo-inhibited cells may also produce lactate via fermentation as an alternate metabolism; (3) glycolate and lactate are exchanged among Synechococcus and Roseiflexus spp.; and (4) fluctuations in many metabolite pools (e.g., wax esters) at different times of day result from species found at different depths within the mat responding to temporal differences in their niches. PMID:25941514

  10. Final Report. Solar Assist for Administration Building and Community Gym/Pool

    SciTech Connect

    Synder, Randy; Bresette, Joseph

    2015-06-23

    Tonto Apache Tribe applied to the Department of Energy’s “Tribal Energy Program” for the “Community Scale Clean Energy Projects” in Indian Country in 2013 to implement a solar project to reduce energy use in two tribal buildings. Total estimated project cost was $804,140, with the Department and Tribe each providing 50% of the project costs. Photovoltaic systems totaling 75 kW on the Administration Building and 192 kW on the Gymnasium were installed. We used roof tops and installed canopies in adjacent parking areas for mounting the systems. The installed systems were designed to offset 65% of the facilities electric load.

  11. Serving the Needs of Struggling Developmental Education Students: The Development of a Program Planning Guidebook for Community College Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnet, Kimberly Jean

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation describes the process of creating a guidebook that developmental education administrators can use to build their capacity as leaders, learners, and program planners. The guidebook is the product of a qualitative study designed to better understand how community college administrators who have program planning responsibilities for…

  12. Updating the Iowa Lakes Community College Administrative Flow Chart to Reflect the Formal and Informal Structures Used to Effect Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schorzmann, Eugene F.

    The formal and informal administrative structures and channels of authority at Iowa Lakes Community College were investigated through a questionnaire administered to the college's board of directors, central administration, department chairpersons, student services staff, student senate, and faculty. The questionnaire asked respondents to identify…

  13. A unique resource mutualism between the giant Bornean pitcher plant, Nepenthes rajah, and members of a small mammal community.

    PubMed

    Greenwood, Melinda; Clarke, Charles; Lee, Ch'ien C; Gunsalam, Ansou; Clarke, Rohan H

    2011-01-01

    The carnivorous pitcher plant genus Nepenthes grows in nutrient-deficient substrates and produce jug-shaped leaf organs (pitchers) that trap arthropods as a source of N and P. A number of Bornean Nepenthes demonstrate novel nutrient acquisition strategies. Notably, three giant montane species are engaged in a mutualistic association with the mountain treeshrew, Tupaia montana, in which the treeshrew defecates into the pitchers while visiting them to feed on nectar secretions on the pitchers' lids.Although the basis of this resource mutualism has been elucidated, many aspects are yet to be investigated. We sought to provide insights into the value of the mutualism to each participant. During initial observations we discovered that the summit rat, R. baluensis, also feeds on sugary exudates of N. rajah pitchers and defecates into them, and that this behavior appears to be habitual. The scope of the study was therefore expanded to assess to what degree N. rajah interacts with the small mammal community.We found that both T. montana and R. baluensis are engaged in a mutualistic interaction with N. rajah. T .montana visit pitchers more frequently than R. baluensis, but daily scat deposition rates within pitchers do not differ, suggesting that the mutualistic relationships are of a similar strength. This study is the first to demonstrate that a mutualism exists between a carnivorous plant species and multiple members of a small mammal community. Further, the newly discovered mutualism between R. baluensis and N. rajah represents only the second ever example of a multidirectional resource-based mutualism between a mammal and a carnivorous plant.

  14. Los Angeles Free-Net: an experiment in interactive telecommunication between lay members of the Los Angeles community and health care experts.

    PubMed Central

    Bluming, A; Mittelman, P S

    1996-01-01

    The Los Angeles Free-Net, an interactive community information resource, was established in part to help community members become more effective consumers of health care services. By providing timely, expert answers to anonymously asked medical questions at no charge, we hope to decrease unnecessary physician-patient encounters, encourage effective preventive-health measures, and improve the overall results of health care in our community. Although it is too early to assess health care benefits from this system, the following observations may help guide the development of similar systems around the nation: (1) A small annual registration fee generates both moral and financial public support. (2) Demographic information from registered users can help direct attempts at enfranchising all members of the community. (3) Toll-free access, free public-instruction sessions, moderated forums, extensive volunteer help, and encryption security are encouraged, while Internet censorship is difficult and counterproductive. (4) Access to Internet resources is important, but the strength of a community system lies primarily in the sharing of expertise and resources among members of the community. (5) A critical mass of available physicians to answer questions must be matched with a critical level of question input for this type of interactive medical information resource to function in a time-sensitive fashion. PMID:8826627

  15. Challenges of Knowledge Management and Creation in Communities of Practice Organisations of Deaf and Non-Deaf Members: Requirements for a Web Platform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas Guilhermino Trindade, Daniela; Guimaraes, Cayley; Antunes, Diego Roberto; Garcia, Laura Sanchez; Lopes da Silva, Rafaella Aline; Fernandes, Sueli

    2012-01-01

    This study analysed the role of knowledge management (KM) tools used to cultivate a community of practice (CP) in its knowledge creation (KC), transfer, learning processes. The goal of such observations was to determine requirements that KM tools should address for the specific CP formed by Deaf and non-Deaf members of the CP. The CP studied is a…

  16. Academic Freedom, Tenure, and Responsibility for Faculty Members in Texas Public Community and Senior Colleges and Universities. Policy Paper 1. Revised Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Coll. and Univ. System, Austin. Coordinating Board.

    Modifications are presented to a 1967 document that contained recommendations concerning academic freedom, academic responsibility, and tenure for faculty members in Texas public community and senior colleges and universities. The recommended standards constitute patterns or guidelines and are not binding on any institution and may be varied in…

  17. Assessing the Student, Faculty, and Community Partner in Academic Service-Learning: A Categorization of Surveys Posted Online at Campus Compact Member Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, Susan; Anderson-Lain, Karen

    2014-01-01

    Service-learning is an instructional strategy used by faculty at hundreds of institutions, including those that are members of Campus Compact, an organization committed to service-learning and community/civic engagement. For this study, researchers examined a variety of online survey assessment tools used in service-learning projects. The…

  18. A Study of the Relationship of Highly Effective California Community Colleges and Their Board of Trustee Members' Characteristics, Behaviors, and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulff, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Among the identified highly effective California community colleges, the purpose of the study was to ascertain the degree of importance for the six competencies of board effectiveness as determined by the Chait et al. (1993, 1996) Board Self-Assessment Questionnaire (BSAQ) as self-reported by board members. Methodology: The design for…

  19. 75 FR 80562 - Council on Underserved Communities, Establishment of and Request for Nominations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    .... Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION: Notice of creation of Council on Underserved Communities... small businesses in underserved urban and rural communities. With this notice SBA is also requesting... interest to small businesses in underserved communities. Its members provide an essential...

  20. 76 FR 9626 - Community Advantage Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-18

    ... ADMINISTRATION Community Advantage Pilot Program AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA). ACTION: Notice... Advantage'' to provide 7(a) loan guaranties to small businesses in underserved markets, including Veterans and members of the military community. The Community Advantage Pilot Program will allow...

  1. Understanding abortion-related stigma and incidence of unsafe abortion: experiences from community members in Machakos and Trans Nzoia counties Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Yegon, Erick Kiprotich; Kabanya, Peter Mwaniki; Echoka, Elizabeth; Osur, Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The rate of unsafe abortions in Kenya has increased from 32 per 1000 women of reproductive age in 2002 to 48 per 1000 women in 2012. This is one of the highest in Sub-Saharan Africa. In 2010, Kenya changed its Constitution to include a more enabling provision regarding the provision of abortion services. Abortion-related stigma has been identified as a key driver in silencing women's ability to reproductive choice leading to seeking to unsafe abortion. We sought to explore abortion-related stigma at the community level as a barrier to women realizing their rights to a safe, legal abortion and compare manifestations of abortion stigma at two communities from regions with high and low incidence of unsafe abortion. Methods A qualitative study using 26 focus group discussions with general community members in Machakos and Trans Nzoia Counties. We used thematic and content analysis to analyze and compare community member's responses regarding abortion-related stigma. Results Although abortion is recognized as being very common within communities, community members expressed various ways that stigmatize women seeking an abortion. This included being labeled as killers and are perceived to be a bad influence for women especially young women. Women reported that they were poorly treated by health providers in health facilities for seeking abortion especially young unmarried women. Institutionalization of stigma especially when Ministry of Health withdrew of standards and guidelines only heightened how stigma presents at the facilities and drives women seeking an abortion to traditional birth attendants who offer unsafe abortions leading to increased morbidity and mortality as a result of abortion-related complications. Conclusion Community members located in counties in regions with high incidence of unsafe abortion also reported higher levels of how they would stigmatize a woman seeking an abortion compared to community members from counties in low incidence

  2. An outbreak of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection in a boarding school in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China)

    PubMed Central

    Kwok-ming, Poon; Yuen-kong, Wan; Shuk-kwan, Chuang; Lai-key, Kwok; Sik-on, Pak

    2014-01-01

    Background In November 2012, an outbreak of community-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (CA-MRSA) skin and soft tissue infections affecting students at a boarding school in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China) was detected. Methods A case was defined as any student or staff notified with MRSA infection from 25 October 2012 to 5 July 2013 with the clinical isolate being of staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec type IV or V and positive for Panton-Valentine leukocidin gene. We conducted field investigations, advised on control measures and enhanced surveillance for skin and soft tissue infections at the school. Decolonization therapies were offered to all cases and contacts, and carrier screening was conducted. Results There were five cases; two (40%) were hospitalized and three (60%) required surgical treatments. Initial screening comprised 240 students and 81 staff members. Overall, four cases (80%) plus eight other students (3.3%) were carriers, with eight of 12 (66.7%) from the same dormitory. All staff members screened negative. After intensified control measures, the number of students screened positive for CA-MRSA decreased from nine to one with no more cases identified in the school. Conclusion Identification of carriers, decolonization therapy, monitoring of cases and contacts and strengthening of environmental and personal hygiene were control measures that helped contain this CA-MRSA outbreak in a boarding school in Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (China). PMID:24734211

  3. [Features of the regulation of legal relations in the field of sanitary and epidemiological welfare in the Eurasian Economic Community member-states].

    PubMed

    Eremin, G B; Iakubova, I Sh; Mel'tser, A V; Cherniakina, T S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was identification of both general trends and approaches, and the differences in the regulation of relations in the field of sanitary and epidemiological welfare of the population, determination of the necessary measures to harmonize legislation states in the countries - members of the Eurasian Economic Community (EurAsEC) in the noted sphere. As a result of the present research recommendations about unification and harmonization of legislations in member states of EurAsEC are developed for formation of uniform economic policy in noted sphere.

  4. Community Support for Building Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Charles W.

    1975-01-01

    A DeKalb, Illinois, school district involved students and community members in passing a bond tax rate and in school planning. An old hospital converted into an administrative center produces rental income. (MLF)

  5. African American community members sustain favorable blood pressure outcomes through 12-month telephone motivational interviewing (MI) maintenance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Community approaches offer promise for addressing disparities experienced by African Americans in hypertension prevalence, treatment, and control. HUB City Steps, a community-based participatory research lifestyle intervention, tracked participants through a 12-month MI maintenance phase following a...

  6. College Advisor, Student, and Senior Staff Member Perceptions of Academic Advising Modalities and Types: A Community College Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marvin, Daniel C.

    2013-01-01

    Institutions of higher learning, their senior staff members, and advisors are always striving to create advising modalities and utilize matching advising types that work best for the individual student. This qualitative single-case study was conducted to examine perceptions of the students, advisors, and senior staff members of the advising…

  7. Development of a linked perinatal data resource from state administrative and community-based program data.

    PubMed

    Hall, Eric S; Goyal, Neera K; Ammerman, Robert T; Miller, Megan M; Jones, David E; Short, Jodie A; Van Ginkel, Judith B

    2014-01-01

    To demonstrate a generalizable approach for developing maternal-child health data resources using state administrative records and community-based program data. We used a probabilistic and deterministic linking strategy to join vital records, hospital discharge records, and home visiting data for a population-based cohort of at-risk, first time mothers enrolled in a regional home visiting program in Southwestern Ohio and Northern Kentucky from 2007 to 2010. Because data sources shared no universal identifier, common identifying elements were selected and evaluated for discriminating power. Vital records then served as a hub to which other records were linked. Variables were recoded into clinically significant categories and a cross-set of composite analytic variables was constructed. Finally, individual-level data were linked to corresponding area-level measures by census tract using the American Communities Survey. The final data set represented 2,330 maternal-infant pairs with both home visiting and vital records data. Of these, 56 pairs (2.4 %) did not link to either maternal or infant hospital discharge records. In a 10 % validation subset (n = 233), 100 % of the reviewed matches between home visiting data and vital records were true matches. Combining multiple data sources provided more comprehensive details of perinatal health service utilization and demographic, clinical, psychosocial, and behavioral characteristics than available from a single data source. Our approach offers a template for leveraging disparate sources of data to support a platform of research that evaluates the timeliness and reach of home visiting as well as its association with key maternal-child health outcomes.

  8. Impact of an Ivermectin Mass Drug Administration on Scabies Prevalence in a Remote Australian Aboriginal Community

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Thérèse M.; Speare, Richard; Cheng, Allen C.; McCarthy, James; Carapetis, Jonathan R.; Holt, Deborah C.; Currie, Bart J.; Page, Wendy; Shield, Jennifer; Gundjirryirr, Roslyn; Bundhala, Leanne; Mulholland, Eddie; Chatfield, Mark; Andrews, Ross M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Scabies is endemic in many Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities, with 69% of infants infected in the first year of life. We report the outcomes against scabies of two oral ivermectin mass drug administrations (MDAs) delivered 12 months apart in a remote Australian Aboriginal community. Methods Utilizing a before and after study design, we measured scabies prevalence through population census with sequential MDAs at baseline and month 12. Surveys at months 6 and 18 determined disease acquisition and treatment failures. Scabies infestations were diagnosed clinically with additional laboratory investigations for crusted scabies. Non-pregnant participants weighing ≥15 kg were administered a single 200 μg/kg ivermectin dose, repeated after 2–3 weeks if scabies was diagnosed, others followed a standard alternative algorithm. Principal Findings We saw >1000 participants at each population census. Scabies prevalence fell from 4% at baseline to 1% at month 6. Prevalence rose to 9% at month 12 amongst the baseline cohort in association with an identified exposure to a presumptive crusted scabies case with a higher prevalence of 14% amongst new entries to the cohort. At month 18, scabies prevalence fell to 2%. Scabies acquisitions six months after each MDA were 1% and 2% whilst treatment failures were 6% and 5% respectively. Conclusion Scabies prevalence reduced in the six months after each MDA with a low risk of acquisition (1–2%). However, in a setting where living conditions are conducive to high scabies transmissibility, exposure to presumptive crusted scabies and population mobility, a sustained reduction in prevalence was not achieved. Clinical Trial Registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trial Register (ACTRN—12609000654257). PMID:26516764

  9. The use of National Youth Service Corp members to build AIDS competent communities in rural Edo State Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Omorodion, Francisca; Akpede, Ese; Maticka-Tyndale, Eleanor; Agbontean-Eghafona, Kokunre; Onokerhoraye, Andrew

    2012-06-01

    This paper focuses on the community component of a larger action research project on HIV Prevention for Rural Youth (HP4RY), funded by the Global Health Research Initiative (Canada). It began with ethnographic research in 10 communities selected using geographic representative sampling and random assignment to one of three research arms. Using the AIDS Competent Community (ACC) model developed by Catherine Campbell, the ethnographic research identified factors in six domains that contributed to youth vulnerability to HIV infection. This was followed by recruitment, training and deployment of three overlapping cohorts of young adults (n = 40) serving in Nigeria's National Youth Service Corp (NYSC), to mobilize youth and adults in the communities to increase communities' AIDS competence over a nearly 2 year period. Monthly reports of these Corpers, observations of a Field Coordinator, and community feedback supported the conclusion that communities moved towards greater AIDS competence and reduction in youth vulnerability to HIV infection.

  10. Guiding Principles for Student Leadership Development in the Doctor of Pharmacy Program to Assist Administrators and Faculty Members in Implementing or Refining Curricula

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Cynthia J.; Janke, Kristin K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To assist administrators and faculty members in colleges and schools of pharmacy by gathering expert opinion to frame, direct, and support investments in student leadership development. Methods. Twenty-six leadership instructors participated in a 3-round, online, modified Delphi process to define doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) student leadership instruction. Round 1 asked open-ended questions about leadership knowledge, skills, and attitudes to begin the generation of student leadership development guiding principles and competencies. Statements were identified as guiding principles when they were perceived as foundational to the instructional approach. Round 2 grouped responses for agreement rating and comment. Group consensus with a statement as a guiding principle was set prospectively at 80%. Round 3 allowed rating and comment on guidelines, modified from feedback in round 2, that did not meet consensus. The principles were verified by identifying common contemporary leadership development approaches in the literature. Results. Twelve guiding principles, related to concepts of leadership and educational philosophy, were defined and could be linked to contemporary leadership development thought. These guiding principles describe the motivation for teaching leadership, the fundamental precepts of student leadership development, and the core tenets for leadership instruction. Conclusions. Expert opinion gathered using a Delphi process resulted in guiding principles that help to address many of the fundamental questions that arise when implementing or refining leadership curricula. The principles identified are supported by common contemporary leadership development thought. PMID:24371345

  11. The Implementation of Professional Learning Communities Components and Perceptions of Self-Efficacy by Teachers and School Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curry, Nathan Dean

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was be to determine if there were differences in the implementation of professional learning communities components between elementary and secondary teachers and administrators. This study examined the relationship between demographic characteristics and teacher implementation of professional learning…

  12. Welcome to Babylon: Junior Writing Program Administrators and Writing across Communities at the University of New Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kells, Michelle Hall

    2012-01-01

    Writing program administrators need to be as concerned about sustaining the cultural ecologies of our communities as we are about the material economies of our institutions--we need to attend to the diverse linguistic and rhetorical ecologies within which twenty-first century student writers are exercising agency. In order to respond productively,…

  13. US EPA Administrator Delivers Remarks at Atlanta Conference on College Students Helping Underserved Communities Address Environmental Problems

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    ATLANTA - Today, U.S. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy provided opening remarks at the EPA Region 4 conference about the College/Underserved Community Partnership Program (CUPP) at the Sam Nunn Federal Center in Atlanta, Ga. Through CUPP, college and

  14. A Review of the Major Issues and Problems of Welfare Reform; A Background Paper Developed for the Community Services Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Technical Assistance Research Programs, Inc., Washington, DC.

    This background paper was developed for the Community Services Administration (CSA) in order to provide background information concerning welfare reform. It examines possible public assistance strategies, such as the following: (1) broad-based cash transfer (negative income tax, wage rate subsidies, demogrants, and family allowances), (2)…

  15. Attitudes about Globalization, Internationalization, and the Role of Student Affairs Administrators in Internationalizing Florida's Community and State Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burdzinski, Donna R.

    2014-01-01

    This study had a three-fold purpose: first, to assess the attitudes of student affairs administrators working in the Florida College System (FCS) about globalization, internationalization, and their strategies for effecting internationalization efforts at their community/state colleges. This study also investigated the relationship between student…

  16. Editor's Choice: An Open Memo to Community College Faculty and Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly-Kleese, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Suggests that it is appropriate to view the community college as a discourse community in its own right, and as a part of the larger discourse community of higher education. Argues that this shift in judgment might increase perceptions of community college competence, thus moving them into positions of legitimate power. (Contains 14 references.)…

  17. Benefits and Risks in Secondary Use of Digitized Clinical Data: Views of Community Members Living in a Predominantly Ethnic Minority Urban Neighborhood

    PubMed Central

    Lucero, Robert J.; Kearney, Joan; Cortes, Yamnia; Arcia, Adriana; Appelbaum, Paul; Fernández, Roberto Lewis; Luchsinger, Jose

    2015-01-01

    Background There is potential to increase the speed of scientific discovery and implement personalized health care by using digitized clinical data collected on the patient care experience. The use of these data in research raises concerns about the privacy and confidentiality of personal health information. This study explored community members’ views on the secondary use of digitized clinical data to (1) recruit participants for clinical studies; (2) recruit family members of persons with an index condition for primary studies; and (3) conduct studies of information related to stored biospecimens. Methods A qualitative descriptive design was used to examine the bioethical issues outlined from the perspective of urban-dwelling community members. Focus groups were used for data collection, and emergent content analysis was employed to organize and interpret the data. Results Thirty community members attended one of four focus groups ranging in size from 4 to 11 participants. Five critical themes emerged from the focus-group material: (1) perceived motivators for research participation; (2) objective or “real-life” barriers to research participation; (3) a psychological component of uncertainty and mistrust; (4) preferred mechanisms for recruitment and participation; and (5) cultural characteristics that can impact understanding and willingness to engage in research. Conclusions The overriding concern of community members regarding research participation and/or secondary clinical and nonclinical use of digitized information was that their involvement would be safe and the outcome would be meaningful to them and to others. According to participants, biospecimens acquired during routine clinical visits or for research are no longer possessions of the participant. Although the loss of privacy was a concern for participants, they preferred that researchers access their personal health information using a digitized clinical file rather than through a paper

  18. Experiences of a Community-Based Lymphedema Management Program for Lymphatic Filariasis in Odisha State, India: An Analysis of Focus Group Discussions with Patients, Families, Community Members and Program Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Cassidy, Tali; Worrell, Caitlin M.; Little, Kristen; Prakash, Aishya; Patra, Inakhi; Rout, Jonathan; Fox, LeAnne M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Globally 68 million people are infected with lymphatic filariasis (LF), 17 million of whom have lymphedema. This study explores the effects of a lymphedema management program in Odisha State, India on morbidity and psychosocial effects associated with lymphedema. Methodology/Principal Findings Focus groups were held with patients (eight groups, separated by gender), their family members (eight groups), community members (four groups) and program volunteers (four groups) who had participated in a lymphedema management program for the past three years. Significant social, physical, and economic difficulties were described by patients and family members, including marriageability, social stigma, and lost workdays. However, the positive impact of the lymphedema management program was also emphasized, and many family and community members indicated that community members were accepting of patients and had some improved understanding of the etiology of the disease. Program volunteers and community members stressed the role that the program had played in educating people, though interestingly, local explanations and treatments appear to coexist with knowledge of biomedical treatments and the mosquito vector. Conclusions/Significance Local and biomedical understandings of disease can co-exist and do not preclude individuals from participating in biomedical interventions, specifically lymphedema management for those with lymphatic filariasis. There is a continued need for gender-specific psychosocial support groups to address issues particular to men and women as well as a continued need for improved economic opportunities for LF-affected patients. There is an urgent need to scale up LF-related morbidity management programs to reduce the suffering of people affected by LF. PMID:26849126

  19. [Contributions by integrative community therapy to users of Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS) and family members: thematic oral history].

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Mariana Albernaz Pinheiro de; Dias, Maria Djair; Miranda, Francisco Arnoldo Nunes de; Ferreira Filha, Maria de Oliveira

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze contributions by integrative community therapy to behavior changes in users of Psychosocial Care Centers (CAPS). This was a comprehensive-interpretative study with a qualitative approach, based on thematic oral history. The study site was the Caminhar Center in João Pessoa, Paraíba State, Brazil. The study material was produced with interviews conducted with six subjects and was discussed using thematic analysis as proposed by Minayo, providing the basis for two major thematic lines: integrative community therapy as a liberating praxis and changes that make the difference. The subjects' stories revealed significant changes in the personal, professional, and community fields, based on their inclusion in the integrative community therapy circles, a strategy that promoted the recovery of processes of natural socialization that constitute human life. The use of integrative community therapy was clearly related to proposals for the participants' psychosocial integration and rehabilitation.

  20. Peace-building and reconciliation dividends of integrated health services delivery in post-conflict Burundi: qualitative assessments of providers and community members.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Cathryn; Edward, Anbrasi

    2015-01-01

    While demonstrating causality remains challenging, several 'health-peace' mechanisms have been proposed to describe how health systems contribute to peace-building and stability in post-conflict settings. A qualitative study was undertaken in southern Burundi to identify drivers of social tension and reconciliation in the catchment area of Village Health Works, a health services organisation. Key informant interviews and focus group discussions were conducted in early 2014 with a total of one hundred and twenty community members and staff representing a range of conflict and recovery experience. Themes emerging from these interviews indicated mechanisms at the individual, household, community, and regional levels through which health provision mitigates tensions and promotes social cohesion. This peace dividend was amplified by the clinic's integrated model, which facilitates further community interaction through economic, agricultural and education programmes. Land pressure and the marginalisation of repatriated refugees were cited as drivers of local tension.

  1. Enhancing Teaching and Administration through Scholarship. New Directions for Community Colleges, Number 76.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaughan, George B., Ed.; Palmer, James C., Ed.

    1991-01-01

    This collection of essays examines the importance of scholarship to the community college and suggests approaches that community college leaders can take to promote a sense of professionalism built around scholarly work. In Chapter 1, "Scholarship and the Community College Professional: Focusing the Debate," George B. Vaughan suggests a broad…

  2. The utility of administrative data in helping the clinician understand and treat community-acquired pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, David

    2005-03-01

    We illustrate the benefits and limitations of administrative data when trying to understand diseases such as CAP. Administrative data provide an understanding of care provided or risk factors in unselected patients under actual practice conditions. Administrative data can supplement understandings gained from randomized trials in a timely and cost-efficient manner using data previously collected. As the use of administrative data increases, the type of data collected will change to reflect these new uses. Administrative data use may represent a practical solution in monitoring quality of care for entire populations.

  3. "Why Can't We Get More Minority Applicants for Our Openings?" African American Leadership at Rural and Least Culturally Diverse Community College Administrations: Staying or Leaving

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, Margaret Marie

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the leadership experiences of 10 African American educational administrators and managers who are serving at or have served at one of four Northern California public community colleges that are located in rural communities and/or have minimal administrative cultural and racial diversity. Rural-serving community…

  4. Study of the Relationship between Leader-Member Exchange (LMX) and Individual Objective Performance within a University Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aikens, Shontarius D.

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the relationship between leader-member exchange (LMX) and individual objective performance. While the LMX literature suggests a positive correlation between LMX and performance, a closer look at the research examined showed that the performance measurements were based on subjective measurements rather than objective…

  5. Destructive Behaviors among Members of the Black Community with a Special Focus on Males: Causes and Methods of Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirk, Alton R.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses the relationship between stress, depression, homicide, and suicide within the psychosocial context of an ethnic minority group; examines the relationship between mental health and destructive behavior among Blacks; and suggests some possible methods of intervention as well as prevention of destructive behaviors among members of the Black…

  6. Community Health Coalitions in Context: Associations between Geographic Context, Member Type and Length of Membership with Coalition Functions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sánchez, V.; Sanders, M.; Andrews, M. L.; Hale, R.; Carrillo, C.

    2014-01-01

    The coalition literature recognizes context (geography, demographics and history) as a variable of interest, yet few coalition evaluation studies have focused on it. This study explores the association between geographic context and structures (e.g. member type) with functional characteristics (e.g. decision making or levels of conflict) in a…

  7. Evaluation of Community-Based Program as a Model for Early Childhood Education Programs and Social Action Programs Involving Children, Parents, and Community Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koyen, Gary V.

    The Community-Based Program (CBP) Model was developed to achieve several major goals: 1) to provide learning experiences to children that are functional for them at the time, 2) to emphasize family and community participation and development, 3) to emphasize broad service delivery to the family (as opposed to educational service to one child), and…

  8. Impacts of American Agricultural Education Student Teachers on Eleven Community Members in a New South Wales, Australia Community: A Qualitative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Tera; Stephens, Carrie; Hart, William

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influences of American agricultural education student teachers on a rural community in New South Wales, Australia. The study analyzed interviews with eleven participants of the American student teacher program in a rural New South Wales community. Results of the study were formulated by two…

  9. Changes in Wuchereria bancrofti infection in a highly endemic community following 10 rounds of mass administration of diethylcarbamazine.

    PubMed

    Ramaiah, K D; Vanamail, P; Das, P K

    2007-03-01

    Mass drug administration (MDA) is the principal strategy of the programme to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (LF). Evaluation of MDA in highly endemic 'sentinel' communities is necessary to understand its impact on LF infection. This study examined the changes in Wuchereria bancrofti infection following 10 rounds of annual mass administration of diethylcarbamazine (DEC) in a highly endemic community. The mean number of DEC treatments received per adult in the community was 7.4+/-2.0. Following 10 rounds of DEC administration, the number of microfilaria (mf) carriers fell from 565 to 55. None of the pre-MDA amicrofilaraemic individuals showed circulating filarial antigen (CFA). However, 54.5% of the pre-MDA microfilaraemic individuals were positive for CFA. All the pre-MDA high intensity mf carriers continued to be positive for CFA, and some of them also showed blood mf. These patients are the most difficult to be cured by MDA and were distributed in 8.2% of the households. All the children born during the last 7 years of the MDA programme were negative for CFA. The study suggests that six to seven DEC treatments per individual suppresses microfilaraemia, except in some people with heavy infection, and repeated MDA has very good potential to prevent infection in children.

  10. Notes from the Field: Developing a Support Group for Older Lesbian and Gay Community Members Who Have Lost a Partner.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Anne K; Waters, Petra; Herrick, Christie D; Pelon, Sally

    2014-12-01

    While bereavement support groups have been shown to be helpful in assisting older adults with spousal loss, many lesbian and gay older adults would not be comfortable in these groups. Lack of recognition of same sex relationships and fear of judgment are barriers that some older lesbian and gay people face when considering these services. In this report we discuss a community-university collaboration to develop a support group for the older lesbian and gay community in our area. We share lessons we learned in developing and conducting a group for older lesbian and gay adults experiencing partner loss.

  11. Advisory Council Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Illinois State Board of Vocational Education and Rehabilitation, Springfield. Div. of Vocational and Technical Education.

    The pamphlet is directed toward the new member of a career education advisory council. It explains why advisory councils are needed and why an individual should join one. An advisory council is defined as a group of persons selected to collectively advise regarding career education efforts within the community, whose members are predominantly from…

  12. The Organization and Administration of Community College Non-Credit Workforce Education and Training Cuts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozachyn, Karen P.

    2013-01-01

    Community colleges are struggling financially due to underfunding. Recent state budget cuts coupled with the elimination of federal stimulus money has exacerbated the issue as these funding streams had contributed to operating costs (Moltz, 2011). In response to these budget cuts, community colleges are challenged to improve, increase, and develop…

  13. Corporate Social Responsibility: Case Study of Community Expectations and the Administrative Systems, Niger Delta

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogula, David

    2012-01-01

    Poor community-company relations in the Niger Delta have drawn attention to the practice of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in the region. Since the 1960s, transnational oil corporations operating in the Niger Delta have adopted various CSR strategies, yet community-company relations remain adversarial. This article examines community…

  14. Leadership Competencies of Branch Campus Administrators in Multi-Campus Community College Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conover, Kitty S.

    2009-01-01

    Community college leaders are retiring faster than replacements are being prepared creating what is predicted to be a leadership crisis. To keep community colleges functioning in their critical role of providing wider access to higher education and workforce training and re-training, future leaders need to have the skills to lead complex…

  15. A Study of Coordinated Service Provision and Administrative Procedures in Selected University Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemson Univ., SC. Strom Thurmond Inst. of Government and Public Affairs.

    This study investigated the existence of coordinated/consolidated services between colleges and universities and their communities by surveying 27 university communities of similar size and/or characteristics to Clemson University (South Carolina). The report begins with the profiles of the universities selected: their size in acreage, enrollment,…

  16. Utilising a Blended Ethnographic Approach to Explore the Online and Offline Lives of Pro-Ana Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyke, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    The article critically interrogates contemporary discourses and practices around "anorexia nervosa" through an ethnographic study that moves between two sites: an online pro-anorexia (pro-ana) community, and a Local Authority-funded eating disorder prevention project located in schools and youth centres in the north of England. The…

  17. Adaptation of a Cancer Clinical Trials Education Program for African American and Latina/o Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelto, Debra J.; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Njoku, Ogo; Rodriguez, Maria Carina; Villagra, Cristina; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Riley, Natasha E.; Behar, Alma I.; Jandorf, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The pilot study reported in this article culturally and linguistically adapted an educational intervention to promote cancer clinical trials (CCTs) participation among Latinas/os and African Americans. The single-session slide presentation with embedded videos, originally developed through a campus-community partnership in Southern California, was…

  18. Community Development by American Indian Tribes: Five Case Studies of Establishing Policy for Tribal Members with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dwyer, Kathy; Fowler, LaDonna; Seekins, Tom; Locust, Carol; Clay, Julie

    2000-01-01

    The Tribal Disability Actualization Process used culturally appropriate deliberation processes and particpatory action research in considering policies for American Indians with disabilities. Talking circles on five reservations were used to achieve consensus on the needs of people with disabilities and derive community-driven solutions that are…

  19. Inclusion and Social Justice for Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender Members of the Learning Community in Queensland State Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelson, Matthew Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Although schools are meant to be safe learning environments for all children, some children are not afforded equal access to the protection of their safety and security. Every day, children who might be same-sex attracted are confronted with a unique set of challenges that are not being adequately addressed by the administrators of educational…

  20. Critical Issues Facing America's Community Colleges: A Summary of the Community Colleges Futures Assembly 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Dale F.; Basham, Matthew J.

    2007-01-01

    Three focus groups consisting of 42 board of trustee members, community college presidents, senior administrators, and faculty members developed critical issues facing community colleges with respect to instructional planning and services; planning, governance, finance; and workforce development. Thereafter, the delegation of more than 200 voted…

  1. Colleague, 1988. An Annual Collection of Articles on Academic and Administrative Issues Facing Community Colleges of the State University of New York. [Inaugural Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colleague, 1988

    1988-01-01

    This collection of articles, written for and by State University of New York (SUNY) community college educators, includes the thoughts of a college president on teaching and the perceptions of a faculty member about student services, as well as a variety of articles on student services, teaching methods, community outreach, and inmate education.…

  2. Perceptions of veterinary admissions committee members of undergraduate credits earned from community colleges or online compared to traditional 4-year institutions

    PubMed Central

    Kogan, L.R.; Stewart, S.M.; Schoenfeld-Tacher, R.; Hellyer, P.W.

    2015-01-01

    Veterinary admission committees are asked to create and implement a fair, reliable, and valid system to select the candidates most likely to succeed in veterinary school from a large pool of applicants. Although numerous studies have explored grade point average (GPA) as a predictive value of later academic success, there has been little attention paid to how and where an applicant acquires his/her undergraduate coursework. Quality of academic program is an important component of applicant files, and it is suggested that the source of a candidate’s coursework might influence admissions committee decisions, perhaps even outside of the committee’s immediate awareness. Options for undergraduate education include taking classes at a traditional four-year institution, a community college, or online. This study provides an overview of the current state of online courses and community colleges in the US as a foundation to explore the views of veterinary admissions committee members pertaining to coursework completed at traditional residential 4-year schools or at community colleges and whether they are delivered on campus or online (at either type of institution). Survey participants reported a pattern of preference for traditional four-year residential coursework compared to online or community college courses. These results are interesting given the exponential growth of students taking online courses and data showing community colleges are providing a successful gateway to obtaining a four-year degree. This also points to the need for admission committees to discuss potential biases since the information about type of school and/or course may not be consistently available for all applicants. Finally, at a time when admitting a diverse class of students is a goal of many programs, it is of special concern that there are potential biases against courses taken online or from community colleges - venues that tend to draw a more diverse population than traditional 4

  3. Obama Administration to Partner with 27 Communities to Boost Neighborhood Revitalization through Local Food Enterprises

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Local Foods, Local Places helps people access healthy local food and supports new businesses in neighborhoods that need investment, said EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy. The program is good for the environment, public health and the economy. By helping

  4. Missions, Values, and "Flying Monkeys": Critical Issues for Community Colleges Today and in 2019

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendoza, Pilar; Basham, Matthew J.; Campbell, Dale F.; O'Daniels, Tina M.; Malcolm, Zaria; Felton, Shawn; Lebesch, Anna; Douma, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    A focus group (N = 36) consisting of board of trustee members, community college presidents, senior administrators, administrators, and faculty members from community colleges around the United States developed the top six critical issues faced with respect to instructional planning and services; planning, governance, and finance; and workforce…

  5. Is There a Role for Community Health Workers in Tobacco Cessation Programs? Perceptions of Administrators and Health Care Professionals

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Studies have shown that with appropriate training, Community Health Workers (CHWs) can be actively involved in health promotion and disease prevention (including tobacco cessation). This study examined the perceptions of administrators and health care professionals regarding the actual and potential role(s) of CHWs in a tobacco cessation program (TCP) within a universal health care system. Methods: This study was part of a larger exploratory, cross-sectional comprehensive assessment of the implementation of the TCP through the primary care public health system in 7 towns in the state of Paraná, Brazil. Questionnaires were administered to 84 administrators at different levels (regional, municipal, and health units) and 80 health care professionals who were directly involved in the TCP. For this study, we assessed the perceptions of administrators and health care professionals on the actual and potential role(s) of CHWs in the TCP. Results: The overall response rate was 56.2%. Although 48.4% of respondents indicated that CHWs already participated in the TCP, there was a wide range in the participants’ responses regarding their involvement (33.3% among regional administrators and 65% among health care professionals). Identification/referral of patients and promotion of the TCP in the community were the most frequent CHWs’ activities reported. Overall, respondents were very receptive about trained CHWs having multiple roles in the TCP, except for delivery of a brief intervention. Conclusion: With appropriate training, health care administrators and health care professionals are very receptive regarding the involvement of CHWs in a TCP delivered through a public health system. PMID:24420327

  6. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Roles for Candidate Phyla and Other Microbial Community Members in Biogeochemical Transformations in Oil Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ping; Tom, Lauren; Singh, Andrea; Thomas, Brian C.; Baker, Brett J.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Andersen, Gary L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Oil reservoirs are major sites of methane production and carbon turnover, processes with significant impacts on energy resources and global biogeochemical cycles. We applied a cultivation-independent genomic approach to define microbial community membership and predict roles for specific organisms in biogeochemical transformations in Alaska North Slope oil fields. Produced water samples were collected from six locations between 1,128 m (24 to 27°C) and 2,743 m (80 to 83°C) below the surface. Microbial community complexity decreased with increasing temperature, and the potential to degrade hydrocarbon compounds was most prevalent in the lower-temperature reservoirs. Sulfate availability, rather than sulfate reduction potential, seems to be the limiting factor for sulfide production in some of the reservoirs under investigation. Most microorganisms in the intermediate- and higher-temperature samples were related to previously studied methanogenic and nonmethanogenic archaea and thermophilic bacteria, but one candidate phylum bacterium, a member of the Acetothermia (OP1), was present in Kuparuk sample K3. The greatest numbers of candidate phyla were recovered from the mesothermic reservoir samples SB1 and SB2. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome for an organism from the candidate phylum Parcubacteria (OD1) that was abundant in sample SB1. Consistent with prior findings for members of this lineage, the OD1 genome is small, and metabolic predictions support an obligately anaerobic, fermentation-based lifestyle. At moderate abundance in samples SB1 and SB2 were members of bacteria from other candidate phyla, including Microgenomates (OP11), Atribacteria (OP9), candidate phyla TA06 and WS6, and Marinimicrobia (SAR406). The results presented here elucidate potential roles of organisms in oil reservoir biological processes. PMID:26787827

  7. School/Community-Based Management. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawaii State Dept. of Education, Honolulu.

    School/Community-Based Management (SCBM) improves the quality of education by providing schools with administrative flexibility and by empowering each school's community to make and implement decisions that will directly affect its members and students. To help individual school communities that are considering adopting SCBM understand how shared…

  8. Classification algorithms to improve the accuracy of identifying patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia using administrative data.

    PubMed

    Yu, O; Nelson, J C; Bounds, L; Jackson, L A

    2011-09-01

    In epidemiological studies of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) that utilize administrative data, cases are typically defined by the presence of a pneumonia hospital discharge diagnosis code. However, not all such hospitalizations represent true CAP cases. We identified 3991 hospitalizations during 1997-2005 in a managed care organization, and validated them as CAP or not by reviewing medical records. To improve the accuracy of CAP identification, classification algorithms that incorporated additional administrative information associated with the hospitalization were developed using the classification and regression tree analysis. We found that a pneumonia code designated as the primary discharge diagnosis and duration of hospital stay improved the classification of CAP hospitalizations. Compared to the commonly used method that is based on the presence of a primary discharge diagnosis code of pneumonia alone, these algorithms had higher sensitivity (81-98%) and positive predictive values (82-84%) with only modest decreases in specificity (48-82%) and negative predictive values (75-90%).

  9. Evaluation of Leadership Styles and Emotional Intelligence on Job Satisfaction of Community College Faculty Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leiba, Alwyn

    2016-01-01

    Investigation of leadership styles and emotional intelligence (EI) factors have on job satisfaction could help address leadership issues within community college leadership teams. The purpose of this quantitative, nonexperimental study was to determine what effective leadership styles, in conjunction with level of EI, have in relation to job…

  10. Community Needs Assessment for Office Administration and Technology Program: Health Unit Coordinator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pezzoli, Jean A.; Johnson, Nancy; Lum, Kuuipo

    In order to determine the potential employment demand and skills needed for health unit coordinators and other clerical workers in the medical field, Maui Community College (MCC) in Hawaii conducted a survey of 120 local health care providers in the spring semester of 1998. Forty respondents provided MCC with the following details: (1) 92 percent…

  11. ADMINISTRATION AND INNOVATION, PAPERS FROM THE COMMUNITY COLLEGE PRESIDENTS' INSTITUTE (6TH, 1966).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WEBER, JOHN

    AT THIS 1966 INSTITUTE, THE FOLLOWING PRESENTATIONS WERE GIVEN--(1) AN INTRODUCTION TO THE SYSTEMS APPROACH, A PROCESS OF PLANNING, DESIGN, DEVELOPMENT, IMPLEMENTATION, EVALUATION, AND REVISION OF THE INSTRUCTIONAL PROGRAM (OAKLAND COMMUNITY COLLEGE), (2) A DESCRIPTION OF MANAGEMENT AND METHOD IN THE USE OF THE SYSTEMS CONCEPT (OAKLAND COMMUNITY…

  12. Exploring the Relationship between Special Education Teachers and Professional Learning Communities: Implications of Research for Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blanton, Linda P.; Perez, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    School accountability reports reveal that wide achievement gaps exist among different subgroups of students in PK-12 schools. Research findings reveal that general and special education teachers improve their classroom practices when working in professional learning communities (PLCs). In addition, research shows that special education teachers…

  13. Program Assessments: Identifying the Enabling Factors and Barriers That Affect Community College Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corll, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Discussions concerning the issue of program assessments have been ongoing for three decades. Current studies focused on the administrator's responsibilities within the post-secondary educational fields continue to overlook program assessments as a role that must be fulfilled. The deans and program directors at ABC College are expected to perform a…

  14. Career Development of Latinas in Mid-Level Community College Administration: A Phenomenological Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-De Jesus, Naydeen Tyffane

    2012-01-01

    Glass ceilings have been identified by scholars throughout the past 20 years as barriers to the upward career mobility of women and of people of color. There is an indication that glass ceiling barriers exist in the higher education sector. Latinas, as a subgroup of women of color, occupy many of the mid-level administrative positions in community…

  15. THURSDAY: EPA Administrator in Toledo for State of the Union: Cabinet in Your Community Events

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON- On Thursday, January 14, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy, in follow-up to the State of the Union, will participate in a series of interconnected events regarding the green energy economy in Toledo, Ohio. McCarthy's first stop will be Owe

  16. Defining the Functional Potential and Active Community Members of a Sediment Microbial Community in a High-Arctic Hypersaline Subzero Spring

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Chih-Ying; Mykytczuk, Nadia C. S.; Yergeau, Étienne; Lamarche-Gagnon, Guillaume; Greer, Charles W.

    2013-01-01

    The Lost Hammer (LH) Spring is the coldest and saltiest terrestrial spring discovered to date and is characterized by perennial discharges at subzero temperatures (−5°C), hypersalinity (salinity, 24%), and reducing (≈−165 mV), microoxic, and oligotrophic conditions. It is rich in sulfates (10.0%, wt/wt), dissolved H2S/sulfides (up to 25 ppm), ammonia (≈381 μM), and methane (11.1 g day−1). To determine its total functional and genetic potential and to identify its active microbial components, we performed metagenomic analyses of the LH Spring outlet microbial community and pyrosequencing analyses of the cDNA of its 16S rRNA genes. Reads related to Cyanobacteria (19.7%), Bacteroidetes (13.3%), and Proteobacteria (6.6%) represented the dominant phyla identified among the classified sequences. Reconstruction of the enzyme pathways responsible for bacterial nitrification/denitrification/ammonification and sulfate reduction appeared nearly complete in the metagenomic data set. In the cDNA profile of the LH Spring active community, ammonia oxidizers (Thaumarchaeota), denitrifiers (Pseudomonas spp.), sulfate reducers (Desulfobulbus spp.), and other sulfur oxidizers (Thermoprotei) were present, highlighting their involvement in nitrogen and sulfur cycling. Stress response genes for adapting to cold, osmotic stress, and oxidative stress were also abundant in the metagenome. Comparison of the composition of the functional community of the LH Spring to metagenomes from other saline/subzero environments revealed a close association between the LH Spring and another Canadian high-Arctic permafrost environment, particularly in genes related to sulfur metabolism and dormancy. Overall, this study provides insights into the metabolic potential and the active microbial populations that exist in this hypersaline cryoenvironment and contributes to our understanding of microbial ecology in extreme environments. PMID:23563939

  17. Administrative Synergy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hewitt, Kimberly Kappler; Weckstein, Daniel K.

    2012-01-01

    One of the biggest obstacles to overcome in creating and sustaining an administrative professional learning community (PLC) is time. Administrators are constantly deluged by the tyranny of the urgent. It is a Herculean task to carve out time for PLCs, but it is imperative to do so. In this article, the authors describe how an administrative PLC…

  18. Exploring attitudes, beliefs, and communication preferences of Latino community members regarding BRCA1/2 mutation testing and preventive strategies

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Anita Yeomans; Gammon, Amanda; Coxworth, James; Simonsen, Sara E.; Arce-Laretta, Maritza

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To inform development of a culturally sensitive hereditary breast and ovarian cancer communication initiative and related clinical genetic services. Methods Five focus groups were conducted with 51 female and male Latinos. Educational materials were designed to communicate information about hereditary breast or ovarian cancer and availability of relevant clinical services or prevention strategies. Focus groups explored participants’ knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs about hereditary breast and ovarian cancer, BRCA1/2 testing, and communication preferences for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer health messages. Results Overall, awareness of familial breast and ovarian cancer and availability of genetic risk assessment was low. Once informed, participants held favorable attitudes toward risk assessment and counseling services. Critical themes of the research highlighted the need to provide bilingual media products and use of a variety of strategies to increase awareness about hereditary cancer risk and availability of clinical genetic services. Important barriers were identified regarding family cancer history communication and cancer prevention services. Strategies were suggested for communicating cancer genetic information to increase awareness and overcome these barriers; these included both targeted and tailored approaches. Conclusion This research suggests that cancer genetic communication efforts should consider community and cultural perspectives as well as health care access issues before widespread implementation. PMID:20061960

  19. Sulfoquinovose degraded by pure cultures of bacteria with release of C3-organosulfonates: complete degradation in two-member communities.

    PubMed

    Denger, Karin; Huhn, Thomas; Hollemeyer, Klaus; Schleheck, David; Cook, Alasdair M

    2012-03-01

    Sulfoquinovose (SQ, 6-deoxy-6-sulfoglucose) was synthesized chemically. An HPLC-ELSD method to separate SQ and other chromophore-free sulfonates, e.g. 2,3-dihydroxypropane-1-sulfonate (DHPS), was developed. A set of 10 genome-sequenced, sulfonate-utilizing bacteria did not utilize SQ, but an isolate, Pseudomonas putida SQ1, from an enrichment culture did so. The molar growth yield with SQ was half of that with glucose, and 1 mol 3-sulfolactate (mol SQ)(-1) was formed during growth. The 3-sulfolactate was degraded by the addition of Paracoccus pantotrophus NKNCYSA, and the sulfonate sulfur was recovered quantitatively as sulfate. Another isolate, Klebsiella oxytoca TauN1, could utilize SQ, forming 1 mol DHPS (mol SQ)(-1) ; the molar growth yield with SQ was half of that with glucose. This DHPS could be degraded by Cupriavidus pinatubonensis JMP134, with quantitative recovery of the sulfonate sulfur as sulfate. We presume that SQ can be degraded by communities in the environment.

  20. Comprehensive Index for Community Health Assessment of Typical District Administrative Units in Maharashtra State, India

    PubMed Central

    Doke, Prakash Prabhakarrao

    2016-01-01

    Background: Health administrators require status of health of different administrative units under them. Use of large number of indicators may create confusion and uncertainty about health status. Availability of a comprehensive index is certainly useful. Objective: To evolve one comprehensive health index for a district as unit and measure district wise disparity. Materials and Methods: Ten indicators from categories of health outcomes, health system, determinants of health, and utilization of services were considered. Data for districts in Maharashtra State were obtained from different sources.For each indicator the best performing district was given score of 100 and other districts were given marks proportionately. Results: The comprehensive index for the state was 0.52. The district scoring lowest value of 0.36 was a tribal district and scoring highest value of 0.66 was a nontribal district. Conclusion: Computing such index of districts for monitoring and allocation of resources may be useful managerial tool. PMID:27890979

  1. Colleague 1989. An Annual Collection of Articles on Academic and Administrative Issues Facing Community Colleges of the State University of New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany.

    Designed as a means of communicating creative ideas in community college education, this second edition of Colleague contains 11 articles on instructional and administrative issues facing the community colleges of the State University of New York. The collection includes: (1) "Professional Growth and Development: An In-House Effort," by Alvin J.…

  2. EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy Joins Senator Booker, Mayor Baraka and ICC to Visit Newarks Community Air Pollution Project Which Utilizes EPA Science

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (New York, N.Y.) Today, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy joined Senator Cory Booker, Mayor Ras J. Baraka and Isella Ramirez of Ironbound Community Corporation at the Ironbound Community Corporation Family Success Center to v

  3. A Comparative Case Study Analysis of Administrators Perceptions on the Adaptation of Quality and Continuous Improvement Tools to Community Colleges in the State of Michigan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattis, Ted B.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether community college administrators in the state of Michigan believe that commonly known quality and continuous improvement tools, prevalent in a manufacturing environment, can be adapted to a community college model. The tools, specifically Six Sigma, benchmarking and process mapping have played a…

  4. Colleague 1990. An Annual Collection of Articles on Academic and Administrative Issues Facing Community Colleges of the State University of New York.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    State Univ. of New York, Albany.

    Designed as a means of communicating creative ideas in community college education, this journal contains 12 articles on instructional and administrative issues facing the community colleges of the State University of New York. This collection includes the following: (1) "Egalitarian Education in an Elitist Environment," by Eduardo J.…

  5. EPA Administrator to visit Fresno for high-speed rail groundbreaking

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Tuesday, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy will travel to Fresno, Calif. to join California Governor Jerry Brown, California High-Speed Rail Authority board members, and other government, community and tran

  6. Administration of Triclabendazole Is Safe and Effective in Controlling Fascioliasis in an Endemic Community of the Bolivian Altiplano

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Fidel; Angles, René; Barrientos, René; Barrios, Gary; Valero, María Adela; Hamed, Kamal; Grueninger, Heiner; Ault, Steven K.; Montresor, Antonio; Engels, Dirk; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Gabrielli, Albis Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Background The Bolivian northern Altiplano is characterized by a high prevalence of Fasciola hepatica infection. In order to assess the feasibility, safety and efficacy of large-scale administration of triclabendazole as an appropriate public health measure to control morbidity associated with fascioliasis, a pilot intervention was implemented in 2008. Materials and Methods Schoolchildren from an endemic community were screened for fascioliasis and treated with a single administration of triclabendazole (10 mg/kg). Interviews to assess the occurrence of adverse events were conducted on treatment day, one week later, and one month after treatment. Further parasitological screenings were performed three months after treatment and again two months later (following a further treatment) in order to evaluate the efficacy of the intervention. Results Ninety infected children were administered triclabendazole. Adverse events were infrequent and mild. No serious adverse events were reported. Observed cure rates were 77.8% after one treatment and 97.8% after two treatments, while egg reduction rates ranged between 74% and 90.3% after one treatment, and between 84.2% and 99.9% after two treatments. The proportion of high-intensity infections (≥400 epg) decreased from 7.8% to 1.1% after one treatment and to 0% after two treatments. Conclusion Administration of triclabendazole is a feasible, safe and efficacious public health intervention in an endemic community in the Bolivian Altiplano, suggesting that preventive chemotherapy can be applied to control of fascioliasis. Further investigations are needed to define the most appropriate frequency of treatment. PMID:22880138

  7. Community Rates of IgG4 Antibodies to Ascaris Haemoglobin Reflect Changes in Community Egg Loads Following Mass Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Vlaminck, Johnny; Supali, Taniawati; Geldhof, Peter; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Fischer, Peter U.; Weil, Gary J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Conventional diagnostic methods for human ascariasis are based on the detection of Ascaris lumbricoides eggs in stool samples. However, studies of ascariasis in pigs have shown that the prevalence and the number of eggs detected in the stool do not correlate well with exposure of the herd to the parasite. On the other hand, an ELISA test measuring antibodies to Ascaris suum haemoglobin (AsHb) has been shown to be useful for estimating transmission intensity on pig farms. In this study, we further characterized the AsHb antigen and screened samples from a population-based study conducted in an area that is endemic for Ascaris lumbricoides in Indonesia to assess changes in AsHb antibody rates and levels in humans following mass drug administration (MDA). Methodology/Principal findings We developed and evaluated an ELISA to detect human IgG4 antibodies to AsHb. We tested 1066 plasma samples collected at different times from 599 subjects who lived in a village in rural Indonesia that was highly endemic for ascariasis. The community received 6 rounds of MDA for lymphatic filariasis with albendazole plus diethylcarbamazine between 2002 and 2007. While the AsHb antibody assay was not sensitive for detecting all individuals with Ascaris eggs in their stools, the percentage of seropositive individuals decreased rapidly following MDA. Reductions in antibody rates reflected decreased mean egg output per person both at the community level and in different age groups. Two years after the last round of MDA the community egg output and antibody prevalence rate were reduced by 81.6% and 78.9% respectively compared to baseline levels. Conclusion/Significance IgG4 antibody levels to AsHb appear to reflect recent exposure to Ascaris. The antibody prevalence rate may be a useful indicator for Ascaris transmission intensity in communities that can be used to assess the impact of control measures on the force of transmission. PMID:26991326

  8. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Roles for Candidate Phyla and Other Microbial Community Members in Biogeochemical Transformations in Oil Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ping; Tom, Lauren; Singh, Andrea; Thomas, Brian C.; Baker, Brett J.; Piceno, Yvette M.; Andersen, Gary L.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2016-01-19

    Oil reservoirs are major sites of methane production and carbon turnover, processes with significant impacts on energy resources and global biogeochemical cycles. We applied a cultivation-independent genomic approach to define microbial community membership and predict roles for specific organisms in biogeochemical transformations in Alaska North Slope oil fields. Produced water samples were collected from six locations between 1,128 m (24 to 27°C) and 2,743 m (80 to 83°C) below the surface. Microbial community complexity decreased with increasing temperature, and the potential to degrade hydrocarbon compounds was most prevalent in the lower-temperature reservoirs. Sulfate availability, rather than sulfate reduction potential, seems to be the limiting factor for sulfide production in some of the reservoirs under investigation. Most microorganisms in the intermediate- and higher-temperature samples were related to previously studied methanogenic and nonmethanogenic archaea and thermophilic bacteria, but one candidate phylum bacterium, a member of theAcetothermia(OP1), was present in Kuparuk sample K3. The greatest numbers of candidate phyla were recovered from the mesothermic reservoir samples SB1 and SB2. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome for an organism from the candidate phylumParcubacteria(OD1) that was abundant in sample SB1. Consistent with prior findings for members of this lineage, the OD1 genome is small, and metabolic predictions support an obligately anaerobic, fermentation-based lifestyle. At moderate abundance in samples SB1 and SB2 were members of bacteria from other candidate phyla, includingMicrogenomates(OP11),Atribacteria(OP9), candidate phyla TA06 and WS6, andMarinimicrobia(SAR406). The results presented here elucidate potential roles of organisms in oil reservoir biological processes. The activities of microorganisms in oil reservoirs impact petroleum

  9. Genome-Resolved Metagenomic Analysis Reveals Roles for Candidate Phyla and Other Microbial Community Members in Biogeochemical Transformations in Oil Reservoirs

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Ping; Tom, Lauren; Singh, Andrea; ...

    2016-01-19

    Oil reservoirs are major sites of methane production and carbon turnover, processes with significant impacts on energy resources and global biogeochemical cycles. We applied a cultivation-independent genomic approach to define microbial community membership and predict roles for specific organisms in biogeochemical transformations in Alaska North Slope oil fields. Produced water samples were collected from six locations between 1,128 m (24 to 27°C) and 2,743 m (80 to 83°C) below the surface. Microbial community complexity decreased with increasing temperature, and the potential to degrade hydrocarbon compounds was most prevalent in the lower-temperature reservoirs. Sulfate availability, rather than sulfate reduction potential, seems to bemore » the limiting factor for sulfide production in some of the reservoirs under investigation. Most microorganisms in the intermediate- and higher-temperature samples were related to previously studied methanogenic and nonmethanogenic archaea and thermophilic bacteria, but one candidate phylum bacterium, a member of theAcetothermia(OP1), was present in Kuparuk sample K3. The greatest numbers of candidate phyla were recovered from the mesothermic reservoir samples SB1 and SB2. We reconstructed a nearly complete genome for an organism from the candidate phylumParcubacteria(OD1) that was abundant in sample SB1. Consistent with prior findings for members of this lineage, the OD1 genome is small, and metabolic predictions support an obligately anaerobic, fermentation-based lifestyle. At moderate abundance in samples SB1 and SB2 were members of bacteria from other candidate phyla, includingMicrogenomates(OP11),Atribacteria(OP9), candidate phyla TA06 and WS6, andMarinimicrobia(SAR406). The results presented here elucidate potential roles of organisms in oil reservoir biological processes. The activities of microorganisms in oil reservoirs impact petroleum resource quality and the global carbon cycle. In conclusion, we show that

  10. Tic disorders: administrative prevalence and co-occurrence with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in a German community sample.

    PubMed

    Schlander, M; Schwarz, O; Rothenberger, A; Roessner, V

    2011-09-01

    Coexistence of tics and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) has important clinical and scientific implications. Existing data on the co-occurrence of tic disorders, Tourette Syndrome (TS), and ADHD are largely derived from small-scale studies in selected samples and therefore heterogeneous. The Nordbaden project captures the complete outpatient claims data of more than 2.2 million persons, representing 82% of the regional population in 2003. Based upon the number of diagnosed cases of tic disorders, TS, and ADHD, we determined 12-months administrative prevalence rates as well as rates of co-occurrence. Both tic disorders and ADHD were diagnosed most often in the age group 7-12 years (any tic disorder: 0.8%; ADHD: 5.0%). With increasing age, the administrative prevalence difference in favor of males disappeared, with tic disorders being somewhat more frequently reported in females than males in the age groups above 30 years. The highest rate of ADHD co-occurring with tic disorders was found in adolescents (age 13-18 years, 15.1%). Tic disorders were observed in 2.3% of patients with ADHD. Administrative prevalence rates of tic disorders and TS were substantially lower compared to rates found in community-based epidemiological studies, suggesting that a large number of cases remain undetected and untreated under present conditions of routine outpatient care.

  11. The other side of the broken window: a methodology that translates building permits into an ecometric of investment by community members.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Daniel Tumminelli; Montgomery, Barrett W

    2015-03-01

    Much research has focused on physical disorder in urban neighborhoods as evidence that the community does not maintain local norms and spaces. Little attention has been paid to the opposite: indicators of proactive investment in the neighborhood's upkeep. This manuscript presents a methodology that translates a database of approved building permits into an ecometric of investment by community members, establishing basic content, criteria for reliability, and construct validity. A database from Boston, MA contained 150,493 permits spanning 2.5 years, each record including the property to be modified, permit type, and date issued. Investment was operationalized as the proportion of properties in a census block group that underwent an addition or renovation, excluding larger developments involving the demolition or construction of a building. The reliability analysis found that robust measures could be generated every 6 months, and that longitudinal analysis could differentiate between trajectories across neighborhoods. The validity analysis supported two hypotheses: investment was best predicted by homeownership and median income; and maintained an independent relationship with measures of physical disorder despite controlling for demographics, implying that it captures the other end of a spectrum of neighborhood maintenance. Possible uses for the measure in research and policy are discussed.

  12. Statement, Photos and Audio from EPA Administrator in Durango, CO

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Today, EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy visited Durango, CO to inspect response efforts relating to the release of waste water from Gold King mine, and meet with state, local and tribal officials and community members. Tomorrow, Administrator McCarthy will

  13. Community and household socioeconomic factors associated with pesticide-using, small farm household members' health: a multi-level, longitudinal analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Longitudinal studies using multi-level models to examine health inequalities in lower and middle income countries (LMICs) are rare. We explored socio-economic gradients in health among small farm members participating in a pesticide-related health and agriculture program in highland Ecuador. Methods We profiled 24 communities through key informant interviews, secondary data (percent of population with unsatisfied basic needs), and intervention implementation indicators. Pre (2005) and post (2007) surveys of the primary household and crop managers included common questions (education, age, and the health outcome - digit span scaled 0-10)) and pesticide-related practice questions specific to each. Household assets and pesticide use variables were shared across managers. We constructed multi-level models predicting 2007 digit span for each manager type, with staged introduction of predictor variables. Results 376 household managers (79% of 2005 participants) and 380 crop managers (76% of 2005 participants) had complete data for analysis. The most important predictor of 2007 digit span was 2005 digit span: β (Standard Error) of 0.31(0.05) per unit for household and 0.17(0.04) for crop managers. Household asset score was next most important: 0.14(0.06) per unit for household and 0.14(0.05) for crop managers. Community percent with unsatisfied basic needs was associated with reductions in 2007 digit span: -0.04(0.01) per percent for household and -0.03(0.01) for crop managers. Conclusions The important roles of life endowments and/or persistent neurotoxicity were exemplified by limited change in the health outcome. Gradients by household assets and community deprivation were indicative of ongoing, structural inequities within this LMIC. PMID:22094171

  14. The Accuracy of Perceptions of Education Finance Information: How Well Local Leaders Understand Local Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Luca, Barbara M.; Hinshaw, Steven A.; Ziswiler, Korrin

    2013-01-01

    The purpose for this research was to determine the accuracy of the perceptions of school administrators and community leaders regarding education finance information. School administrators and community leaders in this research project included members of three groups: public school administrators, other public school leaders, and leaders in the…

  15. Community Health

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Environmental Health Resources for Community Members site provides tools and information to help local leaders and members of the community protect public health by understanding and addressing environmental conditions.

  16. Community-wide outbreak of Neisseria gonorrhoeae conjunctivitis in Konso district, North Omo administrative region.

    PubMed

    Mikru, F S; Molla, T; Ersumo, M; Henriksen, T H; Klungseyr, P; Hudson, P J; Kindan, T T

    1991-01-01

    We describe a large outbreak of severe pustular conjunctivitis due to Neiserria gonorrhoeae. Over 9,000 cases occurred during 8 months in 1987-1988 in one district in North Omo, Ethiopia. Both sexes and all age groups were affected, particularly children under 5 years of age; only a small minority were neonates. Despite a highly successful cure rate for individual cases, the outbreak continued for a number of months. Several epidemiologic approaches were used to monitor the outbreak and identify the mechanism of transmission. The epidemic curve suggested person-to-person transmission. Routine surveillance data showed that there was no concurrent genital gonorrhea outbreak and genital transmission could not explain a community-wide outbreak. In the setting of intense crowding and relative lack of water, peak transmission of illness coincided with two periods following the rains, suggesting that flies were important in transmission. A case-control study identified lack of face-washing as a household risk factor. Eighty seven of one-hundred and forty six (59%) control houses with children were judged to contain children with clean faces, while only 102 of 216 (47%) case households contained children with clean faces (p less than .05). Our recommendations include measures to improve personal hygiene.

  17. Mistakes Board Members Make.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caruso, Nicholas D., Jr.

    2001-01-01

    Board members should avoid 10 common errors: losing patience, behaving badly, challenging the board after a vote, acting like inspectors, micromanaging school administrators, springing surprise questions at meetings, putting politics before children, representing special interests, violating executive session, and putting the board before family…

  18. Administrative Ecology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarity, Augustus C., III; Maulding, Wanda

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how all four facets of administrative ecology help dispel the claims about the "impossibility" of the superintendency. These are personal ecology, professional ecology, organizational ecology, and community ecology. Using today's superintendency as an administrative platform, current literature describes a preponderance of…

  19. America vuelve a la escuela: Participe y colabore! Informacion para familias y miembros de la comunidad (America Goes Back to School: Get Involved! Stay Involved! Information for Families and Community Members).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partnership for Family Involvement in Education (ED), Washington, DC.

    This Spanish-language brochure provides several tips for families and for community members to help them encourage student achievement and success. The tips are grouped into three categories: (1) "Help our children read well and independently by the end of third grade"; (2) "Help our children learn to meet high math and science standards and take…

  20. MEDIA ADVISORY: EPA Administrator to Visit Fresno, Phoenix for high-speed rail groundbreaking, American Meteorological Society annual meeting

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Today, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Administrator Gina McCarthy will travel to Fresno, Calif. to join California Governor Jerry Brown, California High-Speed Rail Authority board members, and other government, community and tran

  1. Elastomeric member

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, L.O.

    1985-07-30

    An energy storage device is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member disposed within a tubular housing, which elastomeric member is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section, and transition end sections, attached to rigid end piece assemblies of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member, a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing. Each of the transition sections are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond there between. During manufacture, the sleeves are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section to provide the correct profile and helix angle. 12 figs.

  2. Elastomeric member

    DOEpatents

    Hoppie, Lyle O.

    1985-01-01

    An energy storage device (10) is disclosed consisting of a stretched elongated elastomeric member (16) disposed within a tubular housing (14), which elastomeric member (16) is adapted to be torsionally stressed to store energy. The elastomeric member (16) is configured in the relaxed state with a uniform diameter body section (74), and transition end sections (76, 78), attached to rigid end piece assemblies (22, 24) of a lesser diameter. The profile and deflection characteristic of the transition sections (76, 78) are such that upon stretching of the elastomeric member (16), a substantially uniform diameter assembly results, to minimize the required volume of the surrounding housing (14). Each of the transition sections (76, 78) are received within and bonded to a woven wire mesh sleeve (26, 28) having helical windings at a particular helix angle to control the deflection of the transition section. Each sleeve (26, 28) also contracts with the contraction of the associated transition section to maintain the bond therebetween. During manufacture, the sleeves (26, 28) are forced against a forming surface and bonded to the associated transition section (76, 78) to provide the correct profile and helix angle.

  3. Unraveling the Physiological Roles of the Cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD and Other Black Band Disease Community Members through Genomic Analysis of a Mixed Culture

    PubMed Central

    Den Uyl, Paul A.; Richardson, Laurie L.; Jain, Sunit

    2016-01-01

    Black band disease (BBD) is a cyanobacterial-dominated polymicrobial mat that propagates on and migrates across coral surfaces, necrotizing coral tissue. Culture-based laboratory studies have investigated cyanobacteria and heterotrophic bacteria isolated from BBD, but the metabolic potential of various BBD microbial community members and interactions between them remain poorly understood. Here we report genomic insights into the physiological and metabolic potential of the BBD-associated cyanobacterium Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 and six associated bacteria that were also present in the non-axenic culture. The essentially complete genome of Geitlerinema sp. BBD 1991 contains a sulfide quinone oxidoreductase gene for oxidation of sulfide, suggesting a mechanism for tolerating the sulfidic conditions of BBD mats. Although the operon for biosynthesis of the cyanotoxin microcystin was surprisingly absent, potential relics were identified. Genomic evidence for mixed-acid fermentation indicates a strategy for energy metabolism under the anaerobic conditions present in BBD during darkness. Fermentation products may supply carbon to BBD heterotrophic bacteria. Among the six associated bacteria in the culture, two are closely related to organisms found in culture-independent studies of diseased corals. Their metabolic pathways for carbon and sulfur cycling, energy metabolism, and mechanisms for resisting coral defenses suggest adaptations to the coral surface environment and biogeochemical roles within the BBD mat. Polysulfide reductases were identified in a Flammeovirgaceae genome (Bacteroidetes) and the sox pathway for sulfur oxidation was found in the genome of a Rhodospirillales bacterium (Alphaproteobacteria), revealing mechanisms for sulfur cycling, which influences virulence of BBD. Each genomic bin possessed a pathway for conserving energy from glycerol degradation, reflecting adaptations to the glycerol-rich coral environment. The presence of genes for detoxification

  4. Partnering to Move Students into College and Community-Oriented Careers: The Administration of Justice Department at East Los Angeles College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kisker, Carrie B.; Hauser, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Community colleges' partnerships with other organizations give students opportunities to gain a realistic understanding of what will be expected of them upon graduation, and they help create a seamless path from college to career. This chapter describes how the Administration of Justice (AJ) Department at East Los Angeles College has partnered…

  5. Florida State Board of Education Administrative Rules for the Operation of Florida's Community/Junior Colleges, Chapter 6A-14. 1982 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Florida State Dept. of Education, Tallahassee.

    Rules of the Florida State Department of Education that govern the administration of the state's community and junior colleges are presented. The rules cover absences, acceleration mechanisms, accounting, accountability, accreditation, admission requirements, adult general education, adult high schools, annual contracts, area served, athletic…

  6. Examining Perceptions of Administrators, Teachers, Parents, and Community Residents about Advantages and Disadvantages of Consolidating Two High Schools in a School District in Central Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackell, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    This mixed methods triangulation approach examined the perceptions of administrators, teachers, parents, and community residents about a consideration of a secondary school consolidation in a school district in central Pennsylvania. These groups are referred to as "stakeholders" in this study. The purpose of this research was to develop…

  7. Funding and Administrative Coordination of the Baja Field Studies Program at Glendale Community College during the Years 1974 to 1983: A Historical Investigation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mercade, Jose A.

    Glendale Community College's (GCC's) Baja Field Studies Program began in 1974 as a faculty-initiated overseas field program in marine biology and developed into a college-wide, interdisciplinary program offering different courses under the leadership of a program coordinator. As changes in funding and administration took place due to the altered…

  8. Actions Speak Louder than Words: A Case Study of the Perceptions of African American Women Administrators of Community at William Paterson University of New Jersey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howe-Barksdale, Sydney

    2007-01-01

    Globalization and privatization have begun to destabilize the patterns of university professional work and campus community. African American Women Administrators battle the unique challenges of racial and gender discrimination as well as the intersection of these issues. AAWAs face feelings of isolation and lack of trust, and struggles over power…

  9. Impact of School Sense of Community within a Faith-Based University: Administrative and Academic Staff Perceptions on Institutional Mission and Values

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Cowman, Shaun E.; Milner, Lauren A.; Gutierrez, Robert E.; Drake, Peter A.

    2009-01-01

    Academic staff (n = 305) and administrative staff (n = 595) at a large urban, Catholic, and religious order teaching university completed on-line school sense of community, social desirability, and mission-identity plus mission-driven activity measures. Partial correlates (controlling for social desirability) indicated that for both faculty and…

  10. A Model To Marry Recruitment and Retention: A Case Study of Prototype Development in the New Administration of Justice Program @ Blue Ridge Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Donna L.; Levin, Bernard H.

    This paper presents findings on predictive models used to identify student characteristics associated with persistence and success in the Administration of Justice (ADJ) program at Blue Ridge Community College (Virginia). Data mining was used to discover patterns and relationships in the data, and analysis was performed using the SPSS program,…

  11. Supporting members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Life Supporting Members L. Thomas Aldrich Thomas D. Barrow Hugh J . A. Chivers Allan V. Cox Samuel S. Goldich Pembroke J. Hart A. Ivan Johnson Helmut E. Landsberg Paolo Lanzano Murli H. Manghnani L. L. Nettleton Charles B. Officer Hyman Orlin Ned A. Ostenso Erick O. Schonstedt Waldo E. Smith Athelstan Spilhaus A. F. Spilhaus, Jr. John W. Townsend, Jr. James A. Van Allen Leonard W. Weis Charles A. Whitten J. Tuzo Wilson

  12. Sociological Factors in Rural Communities That Impact the Entrance and Upward Mobility of Female Administrators and Administrative Aspirants in Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hite, Steven J.; And Others

    Research indicates that female teachers who attempt to enter and advance in administrative positions encounter obstacles ranging from sex-role stereotyping to direct prejudice and discrimination. While these obstacles have been researched for a number of years, there has been little focus on the barriers experienced by women in rural districts.…

  13. Evaluating the potential impact of mass praziquantel administration for HIV prevention in Schistosoma haematobium high-risk communities.

    PubMed

    Ndeffo Mbah, Martial L; Gilbert, Jennifer A; Galvani, Alison P

    2014-06-01

    Genital infection with Schistosoma haematobium is prevalent in sub-Saharan Africa. Epidemiological studies have observed that genital schistosomiasis is associated with an increased odd of HIV infection among women. We used mathematical modeling to explore the potential impact of mass preventive chemotherapy against schistosomiasis on HIV transmission in three sub-Saharan Africa countries: Angola, Kenya, and Zambia. We developed a model of female genital schistosomiasis (FGS) and HIV transmission dynamics, fitting it to data of HIV and S. haematobium prevalences as well as co-infection. We simulated targeted mass drug administration (MDA) with praziquantel to school-age children and mass treatment of the entire community. We estimated that, in S. haematobium high-risk communities, targeted annual treatment of school-age children could reduce HIV prevalence by 20% (95% CI: 12-31%) in Angola, 16% (95% CI: 10-32%) in Kenya, and 6% (95% CI: 3-18%) in Zambia after the first 20 years of intervention; and would reduce HIV incidence by 15% (95% CI: 13-32%) in Angola, 22% (95% CI: 18-42%) in Kenya, and 9% (95% CI: 3-22%) in Zambia. Extending the intervention to adults could reduce HIV prevalence by an additional 2.2% (95% CI: 0.2-12.0%) in Angola, 1.8% (95% CI: 0.1-5.2%) in Kenya, and 0.3% (95% CI: 0.1-2.1%) in Zambia; and would reduce HIV incidence by an additional 1.8% (95% CI: 0.0-14.4%) in Angola, 6.1% (95% CI: 0.5-12.6%) in Kenya, and 0.8% (95% CI: 0.0-2.7%) in Zambia. We showed that the exacerbation of HIV transmission due to FGS and the probability of developing FGS as a result of childhood infection with S. haematobium, were the most important factors in determining the effectiveness of praziquantel MDA for reducing HIV transmission. Praziquantel MDA may be an innovative measure for reducing schistosomiasis and HIV transmission in sub-Saharan Africa, the effectiveness of which varies with HIV prevalence.

  14. A community engaged curriculum for public service psychiatry fellowship training.

    PubMed

    Sowers, Wesley; Marin, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Transforming the mental health system into a recovery oriented, integrated system of care requires a psychiatric work force that understands the relationship between recovery processes and community living. Fellowship programs in public and community psychiatry contribute to this transformation by educating psychiatrists about recovery, system dynamics, leadership, effective administration and community involvement. This paper describes a novel approach to fellowship programming that accomplishes these aims through an organizational strategy that emphasizes community engagement. After describing the administrative background for the program, we describe how the content curriculum and teaching process focus on the engagement of community members-both service users and service providers-as participating faculty. The faculty includes over 100 consumers, family members, advocacy group representatives, clinicians, and administrators. We present evaluation data obtained from 45 of the 100 community and university faculty who participated in the first 2 years' of the fellowship and conclude with a critique and recommendations for further progress in community engaged fellowship training.

  15. Productivity and the Future of the Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosand, Joseph P.

    Faculty members, administrators, and board members must work together to find acceptable resolutions of the problems created by under and overproduction if they hope to retain the autonomy of their colleges. Underproduction is illustrated in insufficient attention to community employment needs, inadequate quality control in career programs, poor…

  16. The Michigan Model Pilot: Increasing the Number of Female Administrators in Michigan Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michigan State Dept. of Education, Lansing.

    The Michigan Model provides a 3-year plan for school districts to increase the number of women in administration. Nineteen objectives address six key role groups--three external to the school district (professional educational organizations, local community groups, and parent/community members) and three internal to the district…

  17. Understanding housing and health through the lens of transitional housing members in a high-incarceration Baltimore City neighborhood: the GROUP Ministries Photovoice Project to promote community redevelopment.

    PubMed

    Grieb, Suzanne M Dolwick; Joseph, Rachel M; Pridget, Anton; Smith, Horace; Harris, Richard; Ellen, Jonathan

    2013-05-01

    In this study we used photovoice to better understand transitional housing residents' perceptions of housing and health at the individual and community levels. Discussion sessions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed through a modified constant comparison approach. The results demonstrate that participants had a rich understanding of the complex connections between housing, neighborhood, and health that were intimately tied to the spatial concentration of incarceration in their community. The men identified social and physical sources of stress that manifest in a community-wide sense of hopelessness; however, utilization of community social networks and social capital provide opportunities for addressing these issues locally.

  18. Junior and Community College Research, Texas, 1977-78. The Seventh Annual Report to the Texas Association of Junior and Community College Instructional Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, R. Eugene, Ed.

    The first of three studies presented in this report investigated the role of the academic dean/dean of instruction as related to the effectiveness of educational leadership in junior colleges. Using the Educational Administrative Style Diagnosis Test and the Educational Administrative Appropriateness Test, 60 deans, representing 47 Texas community…

  19. The Impact of Roles on the Evaluation of Administrative Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macindoe, Ian; Houge, Donald

    1980-01-01

    Judgments about the effectiveness of community mental health center (CMHC) directors are affected by the roles the judges have in relation to the centers. CMHC executives were similar to clinical colleagues and different from governing board members in the importance they placed on things that characterize the effective CMHC administrator. (Author)

  20. Right Here, Right Now: Career Advancement of Generation X Female Mid-Level Administrators in Community Colleges in the Southeast

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Terri Suzanne Holston

    2012-01-01

    Community colleges in the United States are facing what some researchers are calling a "crisis" (Piland & Wolf, 2003; Shults, 2001). The current generation of community college leaders, those born to the birth cohort known as the Baby Boomers, are eligible to retire early in the 21st century. These retirements will leave a…

  1. School Administrator and Parent Perceptions of School, Family, and Community Partnerships in Middle School: A Mixed Methods Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Jackie

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify, analyze, and compare the perceptions of parents and school administrators in regard to school-family partnerships in three middle schools in the State of Louisiana. The study investigated the similarities and dissimilarities between parent and school administrator perceptions, probed to determine…

  2. The Female as Administrator: An Assessment and Comparison of Perceptions of Certain Groups of the El Camino College Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Janet Carol Gelder

    A study was conducted at El Camino College in Torrance, California to assess and compare the perceptions of students, faculty, and administrators toward women as administrators. The study focused on double-standard conflicts, promotional possibilities, advancement aspirations, and parity perceptions. Questionnaires were administered to all faculty…

  3. Characterization of the Dominant and Rare Members of a Young Hawaiian Soil Bacterial Community with Small-Subunit Ribosomal DNA Amplified from DNA Fractionated on the Basis of Its Guanine and Cytosine Composition

    PubMed Central

    Nüsslein, Klaus; Tiedje, James M.

    1998-01-01

    The small-subunit ribosomal DNA (rDNA) diversity was found to be very high in a Hawaiian soil community that might be expected to have lower diversity than the communities in continental soils because the Hawaiian soil is geographically isolated and only 200 years old, is subjected to a constant climate, and harbors low plant diversity. Since an underlying community structure could not be revealed by analyzing the total eubacterial rDNA, we first fractionated the DNA on the basis of guanine-plus-cytosine (G+C) content by using bis-benzimidazole and equilibrium centrifugation and then analyzed the bacterial rDNA amplified from a fraction with a high biomass (63% G+C fraction) and a fraction with a low biomass (35% G+C fraction). The rDNA clone libraries were screened by amplified rDNA restriction analysis to determine phylotype distribution. The dominant biomass reflected by the 63% G+C fraction contained several dominant phylotypes, while the community members that were less successful (35% G+C fraction) did not show dominance but there was a very high diversity of phylotypes. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed taxa belonging to the groups expected for the G+C contents used. The dominant phylotypes in the 63% G+C fraction were members of the Pseudomonas, Rhizobium-Agrobacterium, and Rhodospirillum assemblages, while all of the clones sequenced from the 35% G+C fraction were affiliated with several Clostridium assemblages. The two-step rDNA analysis used here uncovered more diversity than can be detected by direct rDNA analysis of total community DNA. The G+C separation step is also a way to detect some of the less dominant organisms in a community. PMID:9546163

  4. Why don't some women attend antenatal and postnatal care services?: a qualitative study of community members' perspectives in Garut, Sukabumi and Ciamis districts of West Java Province, Indonesia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Antenatal, delivery and postnatal care services are amongst the recommended interventions aimed at preventing maternal and newborn deaths worldwide. West Java is one of the provinces of Java Island in Indonesia with a high proportion of home deliveries, a low attendance of four antenatal services and a low postnatal care uptake. This paper aims to explore community members' perspectives on antenatal and postnatal care services, including reasons for using or not using these services, the services received during antenatal and postnatal care, and cultural practices during antenatal and postnatal periods in Garut, Sukabumi and Ciamis districts of West Java province. Methods A qualitative study was conducted from March to July 2009 in six villages in three districts of West Java province. Twenty focus group discussions (FGDs) and 165 in-depth interviews were carried out involving a total of 295 respondents. The guidelines for FGDs and in-depth interviews included the topics of community experiences with antenatal and postnatal care services, reasons for not attending the services, and cultural practices during antenatal and postnatal periods. Results Our study found that the main reason women attended antenatal and postnatal care services was to ensure the safe health of both mother and infant. Financial difficulty emerged as the major issue among women who did not fulfil the minimum requirements of four antenatal care services or two postnatal care services within the first month after delivery. This was related to the cost of health services, transportation costs, or both. In remote areas, the limited availability of health services was also a problem, especially if the village midwife frequently travelled out of the village. The distances from health facilities, in addition to poor road conditions were major concerns, particularly for those living in remote areas. Lack of community awareness about the importance of these services was also found, as some

  5. Latino Communities and Schools: Tapping Assets for Student Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerra, Patricia L.; Valverde, Leonard A.

    2008-01-01

    Schools with a large proportion of minority students often experience lack of support from the state and from their parents and communities. Administrators in these schools can build support among parents and community members by identifying and acknowledging the assets students and their parents can bring to school and by redefining the school…

  6. Community Attitudes toward Mass Drug Administration for Control and Elimination of Neglected Tropical Diseases after the 2014 Outbreak of Ebola Virus Disease in Lofa County, Liberia

    PubMed Central

    Bogus, Joshua; Gankpala, Lincoln; Fischer, Kerstin; Krentel, Alison; Weil, Gary J.; Fischer, Peter U.; Kollie, Karsor; Bolay, Fatorma K.

    2016-01-01

    The recent outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) interrupted mass drug administration (MDA) programs to control and eliminate neglected tropical diseases in Liberia. MDA programs treat entire communities with medication regardless of infection status to interrupt transmission and eliminate lymphatic filariasis and onchocerciasis. Following reports of hostilities toward health workers and fear that they might be spreading EVD, it was important to determine whether attitudes toward MDA might have changed after the outbreak. We surveyed 140 community leaders from 32 villages in Lofa County, Liberia, that had previously participated in MDA and are located in an area that was an early epicenter of the EVD outbreak. Survey respondents reported a high degree of community trust in the MDA program, and 97% thought their communities were ready to resume MDA. However, respondents predicted that fewer people would comply with MDA after the EVD epidemic than before. The survey also uncovered fears in the community that EVD and MDA might be linked. Respondents suggested that MDA programs emphasize to people that the medications are identical to those previously distributed and that MDA programs have nothing to do with EVD. PMID:26666700

  7. Can We Stop Mass Drug Administration for Trachoma Prior to 3 Annual Rounds in Hypoendemic Communities? Results from PRET Ziada Trial in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Yohannan, Jithin; Munoz, Beatriz; Mkocha, Harran; Gaydos, Charlotte; Bailey, Robin; Lietman, Thomas; Quinn, Thomas; West, Sheila K

    2013-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization recommends at least 3 annual mass drug administration (MDA)rounds of Azithromycin at 80% coverage to eliminate trachoma in communities where prevalence is greater than 10% in children aged 1 to 9 years. However, stopping MDA prior to 3 rounds, if monitoring indicates absence of infection with C. trachomatis, may be more cost effective in low prevalence settings. Trial design 1:1 community randomized, double blinded trial Trial Methods 16 communities with estimated trachoma prevalence between 10–20% were randomized into one of two treatment groups: Usual care of 3 rounds of MDA; Cessation Rule group where if the estimated prevalence of infection fell below 5% after one or two rounds of MDA, that community would cease to receive any further MDA. The primary outcome was the prevalence of C. Trachomatis infection in children ages under five years at 36 months. Results There was no significant difference in baseline characteristics or prevalence of infection or trachoma between the two randomization arms. None of the communities assigned to the cessation arm ever met criteria to stop MDA, so all 16 communities received 2 rounds of MDA and were scheduled to go on for a third round. For this reason, the trial was stopped after the 18 month survey. At 18 months there was no difference in infection prevalence (2.9% versus 4.7%, p=0.25) or trachoma prevalence (6.5% versus 9.4%, p=0.14) between the usual care group and cessation group respectively. Conclusion In this trial, communities with low (10–20%) initial prevalence of trachoma could not stop MDA before 3 annual rounds with 80% coverage. PMID:23392481

  8. Soil-transmitted helminthiases and health behaviors among schoolchildren and community members in a west-central border area of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Anantaphruti, Malinee T; Waikagul, Jitra; Maipanich, Wanna; Nuamtanong, Supaporn; Pubampen, Somchit

    2004-06-01

    The prevalence of soil-transmitted helminthic infections and health behaviors related to infections in schoolchildren and villagers of a community (4 hamlets) was studied in Hauy Kayeng subdistrict, Thong Pha Phum district, in the north of Kanchanaburi Province. The intestinal helminth infection rate of the schoolchildren was 15.6%. Hookworm infection was the most prominent (9.8%), followed by Trichuris trichiura (6.2%), and Ascaris lumbricoides (2.2%). The community showed higher prevalence rates and was infected with more types of intestinal helminths than the schoolchildren. Thirty-five point two percent (35.2%) of the residents were infected with soil-transmitted helminths, 30.5% with hookworm, 3.4% with A. lumbricoides and 2.2% with T. trichiura. Almost all hookworm cases (94.3%) were light intensity infections, while only 1.3% were heavy infections. Moreover, the hookworm infection rate in the community was found to be much higher when a stool culture method was used (39.1%). With this technique, 2.3% Strongyloides stercoralis infections were detected in the community population. Examination of the health behavior of the study samples showed that approximately 75% always defecated in a toilet. Schoolchildren who always wore shoes comprised 67%, which was lower than the community, at 85%.

  9. Junior and Community College Research, Texas, 1980-81. The 1981 Research Report to the Texas Association of Junior and Community College Instructional Administrators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Association of Junior and Community Coll. Instructional Administrators.

    Reports and abstracts are presented for research conducted during 1981 on community college education in Texas. Four institutional research reports are provided first: an evaluation of the effectiveness of the developmental studies program at North Harris County College; a study of retention patterns at Amarillo College by Stanley Adelman and Kay…

  10. Examining Extension's Capacity in Community Resource and Economic Development: Viewpoints of Extension Administrators on the Role of Community Resource and Economic Development in the Extension Portfolio

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbanowitz, Seth C.; Wilcox, Michael D., Jr.

    2013-01-01

    The survey-based research reported here offers insights on community, resource, and economic development (CRED) Extension programming at the national and regional level. The results present a national picture of CRED programming, research, and potential future programming opportunities that Extension could capitalize on. The research shows that…

  11. Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    Art in context of community is the theme of this newsletter. The theme is introduced in an editorial "Community-Enlarging the Definition" (Kit Grauer). Related articles include: (1) "The Children's Bridge is not Destroyed: Heart in the Middle of the World" (Emil Robert Tanay); (2) "Making Bridges: The Sock Doll…

  12. Administration for Children and Families

    MedlinePlus

    ... Speeches Videos What is the Administration for Children & Families? The Administration for Children and Families (ACF) is ... Visit the Office of Community Services Website The Family Room Blog RSS Feed Building Community, Building Hope: ...

  13. A Case Study of an Undergraduate Engineering Peer Tutoring Group: An Investigation of the Structure of a Community of Practice and the Value Members Gain from Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke Douglas, Tameka Sharona

    2010-01-01

    "Shaping the Future", the 1996 report to the National Science Foundation (NSF), called for the research community to identify and characterize practical solutions for developing "supportive" and "excellent" learning experiences for all students in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (SME). The recommendation was that we "start with…

  14. Closing the Achievement Gap: Perceptions of Faculty Members and School Leaders of Small Learning Community Implementation in an Urban High School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitman, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary high school reforms are centered on small school size as an approach to ameliorate disengagement and underachievement of minority and economically disadvantaged students in urban comprehensive high schools. A common strategy is to reconfigure high schools into smaller subunits known as Small Learning Communities (SLCs). Although…

  15. Perceptions of Community Members and Healthcare Workers on Male Involvement in Prevention of Mother-To-Child Transmission Services in Khayelitsha, Cape Town, South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Ladur, Alice Norah; Colvin, Christopher J.; Stinson, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Involving male partners of pregnant women accessing PMTCT programs has the potential to improve health outcomes for women and children. This study explored community members’ (men and women) and healthcare workers’ perceptions of male involvement in the prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV in Khayelitsha, South Africa. Two focus group discussions were held with 25 men of unknown HIV status and one focus group discussion held with 12 HIV-positive women in the community. In depth interviews were conducted with four HIV-positive couples and five service providers purposely sampled from the community and a health facility, respectively. Both men and women interviewed in this study were receptive towards male involvement in PMTCT. However, men were reluctant to engage with health services due to stigma and negative attitudes from nurses. This study also found HIV testing, disclosure and direct health worker engagement with men increases male involvement in PMTCT. Using men in the media and community to reach out to fellow men with prevention messages tailored to suit specific audiences may reduce perceptions of antenatal care as being a woman`s domain. PMID:26218065

  16. [Nature of animal husbandry in the community systems and the administrative and legal status of the veterinary medical services in agroindustrial complexes].

    PubMed

    Kostadinov, I; Iliev, I

    1985-01-01

    A characteristic is given of the public, private, and auxiliary system of animal breeding within the structure of the community systems. Important integrational links are stated to exist between these three categories of farms. On the base of the contractual system with private animal breeding a solid trend concerning the stock production seems to be established. In connection with the new character of animal husbandry the changes that have taken place in the territorial community structure and the implementation of the system of providing the supply of meat, milk, eggs, and fish of own resources have substantiated the necessity to stabilize the administrative and juridical statute of the veterinary service on the agro-industrial complexes with a view to guaranteeing the more effective veterinary service with all categories of farms. A suggestion is made to transfer the veterinary establishments from the agro-industrial complexes to the community systems, with responsibilities and rights of their own for the entire and dependable veterinary service in aid of the community systems.

  17. Factors Influencing Administration of Hepatitis B Vaccine to Community-Dwelling Teenagers Aged 12-18 with an Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Chia-Feng; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The study aims to determine hepatitis B vaccination coverage rates among community-dwelling teenagers with an intellectual disability in Taiwan and to identify the possible influencing factors of their vaccination. The present paper was part of the results of the "2007 National Survey on Healthy Behaviors and Preventive Health Utilizations of…

  18. Mission, Enrollment and Staffing Patterns, Funding Procedures, and Administration and Governance. The North Carolina Community College Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Junius A.; And Others

    The study described in this report was conducted by by the Research Triangle Institute as an inquiry into the staffing patterns, funding allocation formulas and procedures, enrollment trends, and mission and governance of the North Carolina Community College System (NCCCS) and its 58 institutions. Section I of the report provides an introduction…

  19. The Perceptions of Administrators in the Implementation of Professional Learning Communities: A Case Study in an Oklahoma School District

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaques, Shelley

    2010-01-01

    In January of 2002, President George Bush implemented the No Child left behind act that required all students to be proficient on state standards by the year 2014. One way a school district in Oklahoma met these new requirements was through the implementation of the principles of a Professional Learning Community. This case study was designed…

  20. Handbook on Volunteers in Army Community Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of the Army, Washington, DC.

    This handbook has been prepared for the purpose of offering guidance and assistance in the development and administration of a volunteer program within Army Community Service. It contains eight chapters. Chapter 1 is the Introduction. Chapter 2, Volunteers Are Partners and Team Members, considers the importance of attitudes, agreement on volunteer…

  1. Short communication: Modulation of the small intestinal microbial community composition over short-term or long-term administration with Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qiong; Pan, Mingfang; Huang, Renhui; Tian, Ximei; Tao, Xueying; Shah, Nagendra P; Wei, Hua; Wan, Cuixiang

    2016-09-01

    The small intestinal (SI) microbiota has an essential role in the maintenance of human health. However, data about the indigenous bacteria in SI as affected by probiotics are limited. In our study, the short-term and long-term effects of a probiotic candidate, Lactobacillus plantarum ZDY2013, on the SI microbiota of C57BL/6J mice were investigated by the Illumina HiSeq (Novogene Bioinformatics Technology Co., Ltd., Tianjin, China) platform targeting the V4 region of the 16S rDNA. A total of 858,011 sequences in 15 samples were read. The α diversity analysis revealed that oral administration with L. plantarum ZDY2013 for 3 wk led to a significant increase in the richness and diversity of the SI bacterial community. Principal coordinate analysis and unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means analysis showed a clear alteration in the SI microbiota composition after 3 wk of L. plantarum ZDY2013 treatment, although these changes were not found 6 wk after ceasing L. plantarum ZDY2013 administration. Species annotation showed that the dominant phyla in SI microbiota were Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Proteobacteria, and Verrucomicrobia. Interestingly, operational taxonomic unit cluster analysis showed that administration with L. plantarum ZDY2013 for 3 wk significantly increased the abundance of Proteobacteria, but decreased that of Bacteroidetes. Linear discriminant analysis coupled with effect size identified 18 bacterial taxa (e.g., Ruminococcus spp. and Clostridium spp.) that overgrew in the SI microbiota of the mice administered with L. plantarum ZDY2013 for 3 wk, and most of them belonged to the phyla Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria. However, only one bacterial taxon (e.g., Nocardioides spp.) was over-represented in the SI microbiota of mice 6 wk after L. plantarum ZDY2013 administration. Overall, this study shows that oral administration with probiotic results in an important but transient alteration in the microbiota of SI.

  2. Identification of members of the metabolically active microbial populations associated with Beggiatoa species mat communities from Gulf of Mexico cold-seep sediments.

    PubMed

    Mills, Heath J; Martinez, Robert J; Story, Sandra; Sobecky, Patricia A

    2004-09-01

    In this study, the composition of the metabolically active fraction of the microbial community occurring in Gulf of Mexico marine sediments (water depth, 550 to 575 m) with overlying filamentous bacterial mats was determined. The mats were mainly composed of either orange- or white-pigmented Beggiatoa spp. Complementary 16S ribosomal DNA (crDNA) was obtained from rRNA extracted from three different sediment depths (0 to 2, 6 to 8, and 10 to 12 cm) that had been subjected to reverse transcription-PCR amplification. Domain-specific 16S PCR primers were used to construct 12 different 16S crDNA libraries containing 333 Archaea and 329 Bacteria clones. Analysis of the Archaea clones indicated that all sediment depths associated with overlying orange- and white-pigmented microbial mats were almost exclusively dominated by ANME-2 (95% of total Archaea clones), a lineage related to the methanogenic order Methanosarcinales. In contrast, bacterial diversity was considerably higher, with the dominant phylotype varying by sediment depth. An equivalent number of clones detected at 0 to 2 cm, representing a total of 93%, were related to the gamma and delta classes of Proteobacteria, whereas clones related to delta-Proteobacteria dominated the metabolically active fraction of the bacterial community occurring at 6 to 8 cm (79%) and 10 to 12 cm (85%). This is the first phylogenetics-based evaluation of the presumptive metabolically active fraction of the Bacteria and Archaea community structure investigated along a sediment depth profile in the northern Gulf of Mexico, a hydrocarbon-rich cold-seep region.

  3. Guiding and supporting adolescents living with HIV in sub-Saharan Africa: The development of a curriculum for family and community members

    PubMed Central

    Winskell, Kate; Miller, Kim S.; Allen, Kristi Ann; Obong’o, Christopher O.

    2016-01-01

    Although HIV-related deaths declined globally by 30% between 2005 and 2012, those among adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) rose by 50%. This discrepancy is primarily due to failure to address the specific needs of ALHIV and resulting poor clinical outcomes related to late diagnosis and poor adherence to antiretroviral therapy. The Families Matter! Program (FMP) is an evidence-based intervention for parents and caregivers of 9–12 year-olds that promotes positive parenting practices and effective parent–child communication about sexuality and sexual risk reduction. It is delivered to groups of participants at the community level through a series of six weekly three-hour sessions. Recognizing family and community members’ need for guidance on issues specific to ALHIV, we developed a seventh FMP session to address their needs. Key themes treated in the curriculum for this session include: stigma and mental health, disclosure, ART adherence and self-care, and responsible sexual relationships. In developing the curriculum, we drew on narratives about growing up with HIV contributed by young Africans to a 2013 scriptwriting competition. We describe the data-driven process of developing this curriculum with a view to informing the development of much-needed interventions to serve this vulnerable population. PMID:27141147

  4. Anthelminthic drug safety and drug administration in the control of soil-transmitted helminthiasis in community campaigns.

    PubMed

    Urbani, Carlo; Albonico, Marco

    2003-05-01

    Helminth infections are now recognised as being a major health priority worldwide. Morbidity due to these infections can be controlled at a reasonable cost by means of periodic chemotherapy using effective drugs. Deworming campaigns targeted at high risk groups, such as school-age children, pre-school children and women of child-bearing age, are the mainstay of the control strategy launched by WHO. Anthelminthic drugs can be delivered effectively through the school system, women's associations or other community-based interventions, each of which often lack health personnel supervision. The safety of anthelminthic drugs is, therefore, of paramount importance and side effects have to be recognised and monitored, especially when generic drugs are widespread. Four anthelminthic drugs are considered to provide appropriate single dose treatment against soil-transmitted helminthiasis: albendazole, levamisole, mebendazole and pyrantel. Side effects, at the dosage recommended for deworming, have been described as negligible and self-limiting. However, a limited number of reports have associated more severe adverse reactions to the distribution of anthelminthic medicines. Even if the available information cannot confirm a cause-effect relationship, it is essential that these effects are known. Ministries of Health can then set up efficient and safe delivery, monitoring and referral systems, in order to minimise the risk and maximise the benefit of periodic anthelminthic chemotherapy in communities where soil-transmitted helminthiasis is endemic.

  5. 76 FR 50272 - Senior Executive Service (SES) Performance Review Board; Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... RECORDS ADMINISTRATION Senior Executive Service (SES) Performance Review Board; Members AGENCY: National Archives and Records Administration. ACTION: Notice; SES Performance Review Board. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given of the appointment of members of the National Archives and Records Administration...

  6. Prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths after mass albendazole administration in an indigenous community of the Manu jungle in Peru.

    PubMed

    Cabada, Miguel M; Lopez, Martha; Arque, Eulogia; Clinton White, A

    2014-06-01

    Few data are available on the epidemiology of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) in indigenous populations of the Peruvian Amazon. While albendazole is being increasingly used in deworming campaigns, few data exist on the impact of mass drug administration in isolated populations. We studied the prevalence of STHs, anemia, and malnutrition in a Matsigenka ethnic group from the Peruvian Amazon. Participants had received two doses of albendazole on consecutive days, 3 months before and again 2 weeks before data collection. Overall, 290 subjects were included. Most were female (53.7%) and 63.9% were ≤19 years old. Half of the participants had helminth infections. Trichiuris (30.2%), hookworm (19.1%), Ascaris (17.7%), and Strongyloides (5.6%) were the most common helminths. Other helminth ova included Capillaria hepatica and Fasciola-like eggs. Subjects of 5-19 years (51.8 %) and 20-35 years (68.6 %) old had helminths more often than those under 5 years (38%) and older than 35 years (41.5%) (P  =  0.02). Anemia was detected in 41% of children and this was more common in children under 5 years that in those of 5-19 years [odd ratio (OR) = 5.68; 95% CI: 2.71-11.88]. Overall, 72.1% of children were malnourished. Stunting was common in children (70.7%), but wasting was not (2.9%). Despite repeated albendazole administration, this population continued to have a high prevalence of STHs, anemia, and malnutrition. In addition, we detected unusual organisms and organisms that do not respond to albendazole. Further studies are needed to assess the rationale and efficacy of mass chemotherapy for STHs in the Amazon.

  7. Prevalence of soil-transmitted helminths after mass albendazole administration in an indigenous community of the Manu jungle in Peru

    PubMed Central

    Cabada, Miguel M; Lopez, Martha; Arque, Eulogia; Clinton White, A

    2014-01-01

    Few data are available on the epidemiology of soil-transmitted helminths (STHs) in indigenous populations of the Peruvian Amazon. While albendazole is being increasingly used in deworming campaigns, few data exist on the impact of mass drug administration in isolated populations. We studied the prevalence of STHs, anemia, and malnutrition in a Matsigenka ethnic group from the Peruvian Amazon. Participants had received two doses of albendazole on consecutive days, 3 months before and again 2 weeks before data collection. Overall, 290 subjects were included. Most were female (53.7%) and 63.9% were ≤19 years old. Half of the participants had helminth infections. Trichiuris (30.2%), hookworm (19.1%), Ascaris (17.7%), and Strongyloides (5.6%) were the most common helminths. Other helminth ova included Capillaria hepatica and Fasciola-like eggs. Subjects of 5–19 years (51.8 %) and 20–35 years (68.6 %) old had helminths more often than those under 5 years (38%) and older than 35 years (41.5%) (P  =  0.02). Anemia was detected in 41% of children and this was more common in children under 5 years that in those of 5–19 years [odd ratio (OR)  =  5.68; 95% CI: 2.71–11.88]. Overall, 72.1% of children were malnourished. Stunting was common in children (70.7%), but wasting was not (2.9%). Despite repeated albendazole administration, this population continued to have a high prevalence of STHs, anemia, and malnutrition. In addition, we detected unusual organisms and organisms that do not respond to albendazole. Further studies are needed to assess the rationale and efficacy of mass chemotherapy for STHs in the Amazon. PMID:24934795

  8. 7 CFR 7.4 - Selection of committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Selection of committee members. 7.4 Section 7.4... CONSERVATION STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.4 Selection of committee members. State committee... community committee members shall be elected in accordance with § 7.9 of this part....

  9. Pattern of community compliance with spaced, single-dose, mass administrations of diethylcarbamazine or ivermectin, for the elimination of lymphatic filariasis from rural areas of southern India.

    PubMed

    Vanamail, P; Ramaiah, K D; Subramanian, S; Pani, S P; Yuvaraj, J; Das, P K

    2005-04-01

    Current programmes to eliminate lymphatic filariasis (LF) are largely based on annual mass administrations of single doses of antifilarial drugs. The level and pattern of compliance by the target population are important determinants of the success of such mass drug administrations (MDA). Community compliance was therefore investigated during a study in southern India of the effects, on Wuchereria bancrofti microfilaraemia and transmission, of spaced MDA based on diethylcarbamazine (DEC) or ivermectin (IVM). During six rounds of MDA, the frequency of compliance in the target populations, in the five study villages given DEC and the five given IVM, ranged from 55%-77%. Analysis of the relevant cohort data indicated that about 30% of the villagers had complied with treatment during all six rounds, but 3.5% of those in the DEC arm and 4.0% of those in the IVM arm had never complied with treatment. Most of the villagers (>90%) had received treatment at least once, however, and >60% had each received treatment in at least four of the six rounds. Overall, there was a significant negative correlation (r=-0.78; P=0.008) between the size of the village, in terms of the number of villagers, and the mean frequency of compliance over the six rounds of MDA. The pattern of community compliance was found to be 'semi-systematic', laying between random and systematic. In terms of the elimination of LF, a semi-systematic pattern of compliance is worse than random compliance but better than systematic. The relevance of the levels and patterns of compliance to LF control or elimination is discussed.

  10. Bacillus anthracis-Like Bacteria and Other B. cereus Group Members in a Microbial Community Within the International Space Station: A Challenge for Rapid and Easy Molecular Detection of Virulent B. anthracis

    PubMed Central

    van Tongeren, Sandra P.; Roest, Hendrik I. J.; Degener, John E.; Harmsen, Hermie J. M.

    2014-01-01

    For some microbial species, such as Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of the disease anthrax, correct detection and identification by molecular methods can be problematic. The detection of virulent B. anthracis is challenging due to multiple virulence markers that need to be present in order for B. anthracis to be virulent and its close relationship to Bacillus cereus and other members of the B. cereus group. This is especially the case in environments where build-up of Bacillus spores can occur and several representatives of the B. cereus group may be present, which increases the chance for false-positives. In this study we show the presence of B. anthracis-like bacteria and other members of the B. cereus group in a microbial community within the human environment of the International Space Station and their preliminary identification by using conventional culturing as well as molecular techniques including 16S rDNA sequencing, PCR and real-time PCR. Our study shows that when monitoring the microbial hygiene in a given human environment, health risk assessment is troublesome in the case of virulent B. anthracis, especially if this should be done with rapid, easy to apply and on-site molecular methods. PMID:24945323

  11. Bacillus anthracis-like bacteria and other B. cereus group members in a microbial community within the International Space Station: a challenge for rapid and easy molecular detection of virulent B. anthracis.

    PubMed

    van Tongeren, Sandra P; Roest, Hendrik I J; Degener, John E; Harmsen, Hermie J M

    2014-01-01

    For some microbial species, such as Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agent of the disease anthrax, correct detection and identification by molecular methods can be problematic. The detection of virulent B. anthracis is challenging due to multiple virulence markers that need to be present in order for B. anthracis to be virulent and its close relationship to Bacillus cereus and other members of the B. cereus group. This is especially the case in environments where build-up of Bacillus spores can occur and several representatives of the B. cereus group may be present, which increases the chance for false-positives. In this study we show the presence of B. anthracis-like bacteria and other members of the B. cereus group in a microbial community within the human environment of the International Space Station and their preliminary identification by using conventional culturing as well as molecular techniques including 16S rDNA sequencing, PCR and real-time PCR. Our study shows that when monitoring the microbial hygiene in a given human environment, health risk assessment is troublesome in the case of virulent B. anthracis, especially if this should be done with rapid, easy to apply and on-site molecular methods.

  12. Knowledge and valuation of Andean agroforestry species: the role of sex, age, and migration among members of a rural community in Bolivia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Agroforestry is a sustainable land use method with a long tradition in the Bolivian Andes. A better understanding of people’s knowledge and valuation of woody species can help to adjust actor-oriented agroforestry systems. In this case study, carried out in a peasant community of the Bolivian Andes, we aimed at calculating the cultural importance of selected agroforestry species, and at analysing the intracultural variation in the cultural importance and knowledge of plants according to peasants’ sex, age, and migration. Methods Data collection was based on semi-structured interviews and freelisting exercises. Two ethnobotanical indices (Composite Salience, Cultural Importance) were used for calculating the cultural importance of plants. Intracultural variation in the cultural importance and knowledge of plants was detected by using linear and generalised linear (mixed) models. Results and discussion The culturally most important woody species were mainly trees and exotic species (e.g. Schinus molle, Prosopis laevigata, Eucalyptus globulus). We found that knowledge and valuation of plants increased with age but that they were lower for migrants; sex, by contrast, played a minor role. The age effects possibly result from decreasing ecological apparency of valuable native species, and their substitution by exotic marketable trees, loss of traditional plant uses or the use of other materials (e.g. plastic) instead of wood. Decreasing dedication to traditional farming may have led to successive abandonment of traditional tool uses, and the overall transformation of woody plant use is possibly related to diminishing medicinal knowledge. Conclusions Age and migration affect how people value woody species and what they know about their uses. For this reason, we recommend paying particular attention to the potential of native species, which could open promising perspectives especially for the young migrating peasant generation and draw their interest in

  13. 75 FR 71785 - Senior Executive Service: Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    .... Carver, Chief Financial Officer and Associate Administrator for Performance Management. 3. James E... ADMINISTRATION Senior Executive Service: Performance Review Board Members AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of Members for the FY 2010 Performance Review Board. SUMMARY: Title 5 U.S.C....

  14. Community College Faculty Behaviors Impacting Transfer Student Success: A Qualitative Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliott, Diana B.

    In 1988, a study was conducted to examine the perspectives of community college students, faculty, and administrators concerning faculty behaviors that enhance students' ability to persist in college and transfer to a four-year institution. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 21 faculty members and 16 administrators to elicit…

  15. The Big Talent Hunt: How Leading Public School Districts Recruit Teachers. An Education U.S.A. Management and Policy Report Prepared for School Administrators and School Board Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National School Public Relations Association, Washington, DC.

    This report, designed specifically for school executives and board of education members, contains information about teacher recruitment. According to the U.S. Office of Education, the nation's teacher preparation institutions now turn out about 145,000 graduates annually, but the need for additional teachers is about 196,660 per year. This major…

  16. Dental students' HIV/AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, and intentions: impact of the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration's community-based dental partnership program.

    PubMed

    Hamershock, Rose A; Rajabiun, Serena; Fox, Jane E; Mofidi, Mahyar; Abel, Stephen N; York, Jill A; Kunzel, Carol; Sanogo, Moussa; Mayfield, Theresa G

    2014-08-01

    Access to oral health care for vulnerable populations is one of the concerns addressed by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration HIV/AIDS Bureau's Community-Based Dental Partnership Program (CBDPP). The program introduces dental students and residents at several dental schools to care for vulnerable patients through didactic and clinical work in community-based dental settings. This study of the dental students and residents in this program answered three questions: 1) What are their HIV knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors? 2) How has participation in the CBDPP impacted their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors? 3) Has the intervention affected their work placement decisions and attitudes after graduation, particularly with respect to treating people living with HIV and other underserved populations? A total of 305 first- through fourth-year dental students and first- and second-year residents at five dental schools across the United States completed surveys before and after a community-based rotation and following graduation. Response rates at each of the five schools ranged from 82.4 to 100 percent. The results showed an increase in the participants' knowledge and positive attitudes regarding treatment for patients with HIV and other vulnerable populations post-rotation compared to pre-rotation. Results after graduation found that most respondents were practicing in private settings or in academic institutions as residents but were willing to treat a diverse patient population. These findings support the role of training programs, such as the CBDPP, for expanding the dental workforce to treating vulnerable populations including people living with HIV/AIDS.

  17. The Perceived Efficacy by Educational Stakeholders of the Move to Smaller Learning Communities from Larger Comprehensive High Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butterfield, Jay V.

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the perceptions of key stakeholders, including teachers, board members, administrators, community members and parents in a larger suburban, formerly comprehensive high school that adopted a schools-within-a-school reform model (SWAS). The research illuminated similarities and differences in perceptions…

  18. Keeping "Community" in a Community Land Trust

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Karen A.; Galande, Mugdha

    2011-01-01

    This instrumental case study examined the role of grassroots community organizing in a community land trust (CLT) in a southern U.S. city. Twenty-nine homeowners, renters, board members, community members, and current and former CLT employees were interviewed. In addition, two focus groups of 11 and six participants composed of CLT residents and…

  19. Recruiting and Mentoring Minority Faculty Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vega, William; Yglesias, Kenneth; Murray, John P.

    2010-01-01

    For the foreseeable future, community colleges must seriously address hiring, retaining, and facilitating upward mobility for faculty members. Moreover, they should recruit a faculty corps that is more reflective of both the students they serve and the demographics of their college service area. It is critical for community colleges to employ and…

  20. Administrators: Nursing Home Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahl, Anne

    1976-01-01

    Responsibilities, skills needed, training needed, earnings, employment outlook, and sources of additional information are outlined for the administrator who holds the top management job in a nursing home. (JT)

  1. Building Public Confidence in Urban Schools: It Begins inside the District. A Guide for Administrators and Board Members. A Public Relations Executives Network Project of the Council of the Great City Schools, 2009-2010

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of the Great City Schools, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Effective organizational communication begins with employees, who should be communications ambassadors for a district. From administrators to teachers to school bus drivers to custodians, employees set the tone for a district. The informal conversations they have at church, the bowling alley, the barbershop and other venues can make or break the…

  2. The Administrative Team.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Association of Elementary School Principals, Westerville.

    Although needs of school districts vary with size, degree of teacher negotiation procedures, and type of community involvement, the administrative team model is presented as an effective, appropriate administrative organization. Based on an assumption that each level of authority in a school district possesses and exercises expertise and unique…

  3. Rural Administrative Leadership Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tift, Carolyn

    This resource book on rural administrative leadership is the result of 1988 interviews with school administrators involved in successful rural educational programs. The material is divided into eight chapters, each self-contained for separate use. Chapter 1, "Getting to Know the Community," addresses qualities of living and working in…

  4. 7 CFR 983.42 - Initial members and nomination of successor members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE PISTACHIOS GROWN IN CALIFORNIA, ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Administrative Committee § 983.42 Initial... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Initial members and nomination of successor members. 983.42 Section 983.42 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture...

  5. 77 FR 65674 - Solicitation for Members of the NOAA Science Advisory Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-30

    ... National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Solicitation for Members of the NOAA Science Advisory Board AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research, Commerce. ACTION: Notice of solicitation for members of the NOAA Science Advisory Board....

  6. Community History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Helen M.

    1997-01-01

    Recounts the experience of researching community history in Ivanhoe, Virginia, between 1987 and 1990. The Ivanhoe History Project involved community members in collecting photographs, memorabilia, and oral histories of their town. Subsequent published volumes won the W. D. Weatherford Award and inspired a quilt exhibit and a theatrical production.…

  7. ‘Why should I worry, since I have healthy feet?’ A qualitative study exploring barriers to use of footwear among rural community members in northern Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Kelemework, Abebe; Tora, Abebayehu; Amberbir, Tsigie; Agedew, Getnet; Asmamaw, Abiyu; Deribe, Kebede

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the influence of personal, cultural and socioeconomic factors related to footwear use and non-use in northern Ethiopia. Design A qualitative study was conducted using focus group discussions and in-depth individual interviews. Data were collected using semistructured interview guides. Setting The study was conducted in East and West Gojjam Zones, Amhara region, northwest Ethiopia. Participants A total of 91 individuals from 4 target groups participated in individual and group interviews: (1) non-affected community leaders including Idir (a form of social insurance) leaders, school principals, kebele (the lowest administrative unit) officials, health professionals, teachers, merchants and religious leaders; (2) affected men and women; (3) non-affected men and women not in leadership positions; and (4) school children (both male and female). Results Participants perceived a range of health benefits from donning footwear, including protection against injury and cold. Various types of shoes are available within the community, and their use varied depending on the nature of activities and the season. Personal and socioeconomic barriers hindered the desire to consistently use footwear. Widely established barefoot traditions and beliefs that footwear is uncomfortable, heavy and may weaken the feet have made the regular use of footwear uncommon. Economic constraints were also mentioned as hindering ownership and use of footwear. Distance from places where shoes could be bought also contributed to limited access. Cultural influences promoting gender inequality resulted in women being least able to access shoes. Conclusions We identified several individual, cultural and socioeconomic barriers that influence individuals’ decisions about and use of footwear in rural northern Ethiopia. Promoting education on the health benefits of footwear, curbing podoconiosis-related misconceptions and integrating these with economic empowerment programmes, may all

  8. School Board Members' Training Needs: A Determinative Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, J. Rex; Johnson, M. Claradine

    Although school board members are not always viewed as part of a school's administrative team, their role in policy formation and in other aspects of school administration requires attention to their competency levels. This research examined training needs for school board members, superintendents, and principals. The present report covers Kansas…

  9. 78 FR 52995 - Senior Executive Service: Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Senior Executive Service: Performance Review Board Members AGENCY: U. S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of Members for the FY 2014 Performance Review Board. SUMMARY: Title 5 U.S.C....

  10. 76 FR 64421 - Senior Executive Service: Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Senior Executive Service: Performance Review Board Members AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of Members for the FY 2011 Performance Review Board. SUMMARY: Title 5 U.S.C....

  11. 77 FR 70204 - Senior Executive Service: Performance Review Board Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SMALL BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Senior Executive Service: Performance Review Board Members AGENCY: U.S. Small Business Administration. ACTION: Notice of Members for the FY 2012 Performance Review Board. SUMMARY: Title 5 U.S.C....

  12. 7 CFR 7.11 - County committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false County committee members. 7.11 Section 7.11... CONSERVATION STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.11 County committee members. (a) County committee members elected in accordance with § 7.9 of this part shall hold office for a term of three years or...

  13. 5 CFR 890.302 - Coverage of family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Coverage of family members. 890.302... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Enrollment § 890.302 Coverage of family members. (a)(1) An enrollment for self and family includes all family members who are eligible to...

  14. 5 CFR 890.302 - Coverage of family members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Coverage of family members. 890.302... REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Enrollment § 890.302 Coverage of family members. (a)(1) An enrollment for self and family includes all family members who are eligible to...

  15. 11:20 AM MDT TODAY: EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy Holding Media Availability in Farmington, NM

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    FARMINGTON, NM - EPA Administrator Gina McCarthy will visit Farmington, NM today to inspect response efforts relating to the release of waste water from Gold King Mine, and meet with state, local and tribal officials and community members. McCarthy

  16. Assets-oriented community assessment.

    PubMed Central

    Sharpe, P A; Greaney, M L; Lee, P R; Royce, S W

    2000-01-01

    Determining how to promote community health requires that community health workers first assess where the community stands. The authors maintain that Healthy Communities initiatives are better served by assets-oriented assessment methods than by standard "problem-focused" or "needs-based" approaches. An assets orientation allows community members to identify, support, and mobilize existing community resources to create a shared vision of change, and encourages greater creativity when community members do address problems and obstacles. Images p207-a PMID:10968755

  17. User Working Group Members

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-04-29

    User Working Group Members   Mail for the entire group may be directed to:  larc-asdc-uwg@lists.nasa.gov   Member Status Affiliation E-mail Contact Bob Holz (Co-Chair in 2010) Co-Chair University of ...

  18. Collapsable seal member

    DOEpatents

    Sherrell, Dennis L.

    1990-01-01

    A hollow, collapsable seal member normally disposed in a natural expanded state offering fail-safe pressure sealing against a seating surface and adapted to be evacuated by a vacuum force for collapsing the seal member to disengage the same from said seating surface.

  19. PSI Member Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Professional Secretaries International, Kansas City, MO.

    A survey of 2,700 of the 27,000 members of Professional Secretaries International received 755 responses yielding the following profile of secretarial workers: (1) the average member is female, about 45 years old, married with no dependents living at home, and owns a single-family home in the suburbs; (2) most respondents have worked in office or…

  20. The community barometer: a breast health needs assessment tool for community-based organizations.

    PubMed

    Lounsbury, David; Rapkin, Bruce; Marini, Lisa; Jansky, Elizabeth; Massie, Mary Jane

    2006-10-01

    This article presents findings from the ACCESS Project focusing on the impact of an outreach initiative that used "data sharing" as a mechanism to establish a wide variety of academic-community partnerships for cancer awareness. The Community Barometer, a brief needs assessment tool developed for this purpose, was used to collect data from clients, and sometimes staff members, of a variety of community-based organizations in New York City. Over a 5-year period, Barometer data were collected from 1,001 women who were affiliated with 20 community-based organizations. Analysis of these data supported our hypothesis that community-based organizations are more likely than chance to serve women with similar needs and preferences for breast health education and screening and that customized or tailored programs were warranted. Four case studies are presented. Limitations of the instrument and its administration in community settings as well as future research objectives are discussed.

  1. Community Involvement in School: Social Relationships in a Bedroom Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Preston, Jane P.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative case study was to describe how community involvement in school is associated with the social relationships existing/lacking within a bedroom community. Thirty-five interviews with school council members, teachers, and community members highlighted that traditional forms of community involvement in school generate…

  2. Teacher & Administrator Training in Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ambron, Sueann, Ed.

    1986-01-01

    This report summarizes a November 1985 meeting at which members of the Apple Education Advisory Council addressed the issues involved in training teachers and administrators on the best ways to use computers in education. In their discussions, Advisory Council members first summarized the roles that are played by each type of organization involved…

  3. Educating Nurse Administrators: One Program's Answer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCloskey, Joanne C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Describes the master's program in nursing at the University of Iowa, which uses experienced nurse administrators as adjunct faculty members. Discusses core course content, the two-course sequence in nursing administration, and problems with the present curriculum. (CT)

  4. Perceptions of Illinois Community College Administrators on the Impact of the U.S. Economic Recession and State Financial Pressures on Programs for Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Barry Ray

    2011-01-01

    The United States economic recession is now in its third year and continues to have a serious impact on the American higher education system, including Illinois' public community colleges. Illinois community colleges are seeing increases in enrollments while at the same time seeing significant decreases in state funding. The purpose of this…

  5. THE CARE AND FEEDING OF THE COMMUNITY JUNIOR COLLEGE, PROCEEDINGS OF THE ANNUAL JUNIOR COLLEGE ADMINISTRATIVE TEAMS INSTITUTE (7TH, DAYTONA BEACH, AUGUST 13-15, 1967).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    WIEGMAN, ROBERT R.

    THIS CONFERENCE WAS ORGANIZED AROUND A 2-PART THEME, CONSISTING OF (1) THE JUNIOR COLLEGE'S COMMUNITY AND PUBLIC RELATIONS AND (2) SUPPORT FOR INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT, WITH EMPHASIS ON PRIVATE SOURCES OF FUNDS. SPECIFIC TOPICS INCLUDED PUBLICITY, THE IMAGE OF THE COLLEGE IN PRINT, COMMUNITY RELATIONS, THE MACHINERY FOR DEVELOPMENT, GIFTS, AND…

  6. Board Member Testifies at Cyber Safety Hearing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kingston, Mary

    2011-01-01

    House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Healthy Families and Communities unanimously expressed concern for the growing trend in cyberbullying during a hearing last June 24. The event, which featured National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) board member Barbara-Jane Paris and other witnesses, including TV personality Dr. Phil…

  7. Mothers of Gang Members Give Voice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, Gwendolyn; McEvoy, Alan

    1997-01-01

    Three mothers whose children were connected to Dallas (Texas) gangs told their stories at the Fourth Joint National Conference on Gangs, Schools, and Community. It is said that gang members come from dysfunctional families, usually from homes where fathers are not present or involved in children's upbringing. In spite of a great deal of research…

  8. Working Together More than Alone: Students' Evolving Perceptions of Self and Community within a Four-Year Educational Administration Doctoral Cohort

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ford, Lance; Vaughn, Courtney

    2011-01-01

    School administrators rarely have the opportunity to confer and share their challenges with colleagues. To address this problem in 2005 the Educational Administration Department (EAD) at Central University (a Midwestern PhD granting institution located in a thriving city of about 100,00 people) created a virtual/local doctoral cohort for 14 school…

  9. 77 FR 61007 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requesting nominations...

  10. 78 FR 64505 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requesting nominations...

  11. 76 FR 54777 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Tobacco Products Scientific Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requesting nominations...

  12. 75 FR 57807 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is...

  13. 76 FR 11491 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)...

  14. Serving Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Les, Ed.

    This book contains 15 articles about various aspects of community further education (FE) programs in Great Britain, including program rationales/benefits, administration, and delivery. The following articles are included: "Foreword" (Bradshaw); "Commitment to Community Is Good Business and Practical Politics" (Brook); "Can…

  15. Developing Learning Communities: Using Communities of Practice within Community Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawthom, Rebecca

    2011-01-01

    The idea that communities need to be inclusive is almost axiomatic. The process, whereby, community members engage in inclusive practices is far less understood. Similarly, UK universities are being encouraged to include the wider community and extent campus boundaries. Here, I suggest a particular theoretical lens which sheds light on engagement…

  16. Community Health Worker Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perales, Aurora Rodriguez

    An experienced community health worker describes her experiences in the field as a basis for recommended guidelines for the role, philosophy, aims, and goals of community health workers. The role of the community health worker as a member of the health care team is explored, and the problem of recognition for community health workers is considered…

  17. Faculty Perspectives on Administrator Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bess, James L.

    The sources of faculty perspectives on the personal effectiveness of administrators are analyzed. It is proposed that faculty will be predisposed to see administrators in different lights, depending on structural elements in decision making and the orientation of the faculty members. Attention is directed to Talcott Parson's theory for classifying…

  18. College Administration: Concepts and Techniques.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feltner, Bill D., Ed.

    Ten colleges participated in a project to: (1) help organize and strengthen administrative teams in developing two-year and four-year colleges throughout the Southeast; (2) to assist administrative teams in identifying specific roles for each team member and in developing an understanding of team responsibilities; and (3) to assist administrative…

  19. Key Obama officials leave administration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2013-01-01

    Secretary of the Interior Ken Salazar is one of the latest members of the Obama administration to announce that he is leaving his position near the start of President Obama's second term in office. Salazar, who has served as interior secretary since January 2009, intends to leave the department by the end of March, the department noted on 16 January. Salazar joins a number of other key officials who are planning to leave the administration. They include Environmental Protection Agency administrator Lisa Jackson, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration administrator Jane Lubchenco, and U.S. Geological Survey director Marcia McNutt.

  20. Community Mentoring: A Tool for Successful Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dodge, Kathryn E.

    2015-01-01

    Mentoring occurs in an ad hoc and largely invisible manner in communities. This mentoring happens through modeling, storytelling, and asking open-ended questions. If Extension specialists and agents were more conscious and intentional about teaching community members and leaders about community mentoring, they would be more successful in resolving…

  1. Online Knowledge Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Vries, Sjoerd; Bloemen, Paul; Roossink, Lonneke

    This paper describes the concept of online knowledge communities. The concept is defined, and six qualities of online communities are identified: members (user roles are clearly defined); mission (generally accepted goal-statement, ideas, beliefs, etc.); commitment (members give their loyalty to the mission); social interaction (frequent…

  2. Evaluating the Effectiveness of Community-Based Dementia Care Networks: The Dementia Care Networks' Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemieux-Charles, Louis; Chambers, Larry W.; Cockerill, Rhonda; Jaglal, Susan; Brazil, Kevin; Cohen, Carole; LeClair, Ken; Dalziel, Bill; Schulman, Barbara

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The Dementia Care Networks' Study examined the effectiveness of four community-based, not-for-profit dementia networks. The study involved assessing the relationship between the types of administrative and service-delivery exchanges that occurred among the networked agencies and the network members' perception of the effectiveness of…

  3. Community College Faculty Motivation for Basic Research, Teaching Research, and Professional Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardre, Patricia L.

    2012-01-01

    Community college faculty members often find themselves divided between what they want to do and what they can do. Knowing what motivates faculty to engage in professional development and scholarly productive activities provides critical information for administrators. The present study explored the motivational characteristics of community…

  4. Development of Recommendations To Improve Minority Faculty Hiring Procedures at Kansas City Kansas Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Charles E.

    In response to the small number of minority faculty at Kansas City Kansas Community College (KCKCC), a study was conducted to develop a set of recommendations to improve minority faculty hiring procedures and provide information and guidelines useful to administrative staff for recruiting minority faculty members. Criteria for establishing policy…

  5. Intelligence Studies in Higher Education: Integrating a Community of Practice Pedagogical Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrooks, Dennis A., II

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored faculty members' and senior level administrators' views of intelligence studies, communities of practice, and learning approaches. A focus group interview, individual interviews, and a review of documents were the sources of data for the study. Themes emerging from the investigation were strategies to connect…

  6. The Counselor as a Social Force: Identifying Counselor Role and Functions in the Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitehead, Everett

    School counselors face identity crises since they must respond to the conflicting demands of students, faculty members, administrators, commercial and industrial interests, parents, and the local community. In order to defend themselves against public criticism, counselors must find a way of illustrating their effectiveness. Data obtained from an…

  7. A Database Training Module for Nassau Community College Staff and Faculty.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Harriett Ziskin

    A training module developed following the Instructional System Design model was implemented at Nassau Community College (NCC) to teach its administration, faculty, and staff members computer skills that would enable them to use the available computer equipment more efficiently. Using this module, each trainee designed a file to be used for the…

  8. Community College Education for the Incarcerated: The Provision of Access, Persistence and Social Capital

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teeter, Christian B.

    2010-01-01

    This study details an investigation of community college studies for the incarcerated, focusing on the offerings of South Coast College for inmates within California. The study interviewed ten former inmates, each of whom studied with South Coast College while in prison, as well as faculty members, educational administrators, and a corrections…

  9. A Small Rural Community's Poor and Its Impact on Educational Opportunities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Jane Robertson

    The problems of Knowville, a small school district (K-12 enrollment: 408) in the central farming region of New York State were examined by a research team from Cornell University. Interviews were conducted with residents of the community, school board members, teachers, administrators, and students in the school. This Knowville case study report…

  10. California Basic Skills Initiative (BSI) Regional Networks as Self-Sustaining Communities of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullen, Adrienne Ann

    2011-01-01

    The Basic Skills Report for California Community Colleges (2007) stresses the importance of comprehensive training and development opportunities for all faculty (tenured and part-time), administrators and staff members who work with underprepared students. With such a large number of academically underprepared students entering the community…

  11. [Rural School Administrator's Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    AEL, Inc., Charleston, WV.

    This packet contains resources on five topics relevant to rural school administrators. "Assessing Parent Involvement: A Checklist for Rural Schools": discusses educator beliefs that support successful parent engagement programs, challenges and advantages of rural schools attempting to involve parents and community, and aspects of…

  12. Survey of NARC Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for Retarded Citizens, Arlington, TX. Research and Demonstration Inst.

    The booklet presents results from a survey completed by 5,316 members of the National Association of Retarded Citizens. Findings are discussed for the following topics (sample findings in parentheses): membership characteristics (the two largest classes of occupations were professional/technical and homemakers, households had an annual average…

  13. 77 FR 43335 - Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities; Agency Information Collection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Reporting Form for State Councils on Developmental Disabilities AGENCY: Administration for Community Living, Administration on Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: For the program of... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Community Living Administration on Intellectual and...

  14. Culturing captures members of the soil rare biosphere.

    PubMed

    Shade, Ashley; Hogan, Clifford S; Klimowicz, Amy K; Linske, Matthew; McManus, Patricia S; Handelsman, Jo

    2012-09-01

    The ecological significance of rare microorganisms within microbial communities remains an important, unanswered question. Microorganisms of extremely low abundance (the 'rare biosphere') are believed to be largely inaccessible and unknown. To understand the structure of complex environmental microbial communities, including the representation of rare and prevalent community members, we coupled traditional cultivation with pyrosequencing. We compared cultured and uncultured bacterial members of the same agricultural soil, including eight locations within one apple orchard and four time points. Our analysis revealed that soil bacteria captured by culturing were in very low abundance or absent in the culture-independent community, demonstrating unexpected accessibility of the rare biosphere by culturing.

  15. Obama Administration to Partner with 27 Communities to Boost Neighborhood Revitalization through Local Food Enterprises - Local Foods, Local Places Empowers Creative Economic Development in Rural and Urban Communities in 22 states

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    WASHINGTON - Today, on behalf of the White House Rural Council, six federal agencies joined together to announce the selection of 27 communities in 22 states that will participate in Local Foods, Local Places, a federal initiative that helps communi

  16. Obama Administration Partnering with Dallas,TX, and Other Communities to Boost Local Foods, Neighborhood Revitalization, Local Foods, Local Places encourages creative economic development in rural and urban communities in 22 states

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    DALLAS - (Jan. 26, 2016) Today, on behalf of the White House Rural Council, six federal agencies joined together to announce 27 communities selected to participate in Local Foods, Local Places (LFLP), a federal initiative helping people create walka

  17. Obama Administration Partnering with 27 Communities to Include Middleboro, Kentucky a to Boost Local Foods, Neighborhood Revitalization Local Foods, Local Places encourages creative economic development in rural and urban communities in 22 states

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (01/25/2016- ATLANTA) -Today, on behalf of the White House Rural Council, six federal agencies joined together to announce 27 communities selected to participate in Local Foods, Local Places, a federal initiative helping people create walkable, healt

  18. Obama Administration Partnering with 27 Communities to Include Winder, Georgia to Boost Local Foods, Neighborhood Revitalization Local Foods Local Places encourages creative economic development in rural and urban communities in 22 states

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (01/25/2016 - ATLANTA) -Today, on behalf of the White House Rural Council, six federal agencies joined together to announce 27 communities selected to participate in Local Foods, Local Places, a federal initiative helping people create walkable, heal

  19. Obama Administration Partnering with 27 Communities to Include Jackson, Tennessee to Boost Local Foods, Neighborhood Revitalization Local Foods, Local Places encourages creative economic development in rural and urban communities in 22 states

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    (01/25/2016 - ATLANTA) -Today, on behalf of the White House Rural Council, six federal agencies joined together to announce 27 communities selected to participate in Local Foods, Local Places, a federal initiative helping people create walkable, heal

  20. Preparing Administrators and Faculty of Cuyahoga Community College for a More Active Role in Implementing the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eppley, George

    This five-part report discusses the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act of 1973 (CETA), explains how it operates locally through the Cleveland Area Western Reserve Manpower Consortium (CAWRMC), and specifies ways in which Cuyahoga Community College (CCC) can play a greater role in the CETA system. Part I describes existing federal manpower…

  1. Policies and Procedures for Bachelor of Business Administration Degree through the External Plan of Study from Northwood Institute, Midland, in Cooperation with Lansing Community College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lansing Community Coll., MI.

    Information is provided for students interested in completing a bachelor's degree through a cooperative program between Lansing (Michigan) Community College (LCC) and Northwood Institute (Midland, Michigan). A 4-year program has been designed in which a student takes approximately 144 credit hours of course work at LCC and a minimum of 36 credit…

  2. Professional Learning Communities: A Promising Practice for Integrating Novice Special Education Teachers into the School Culture. Induction Insights. Supporting Special Education Teachers-Administrators [AII-09

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Center to Inform Policy and Practice in Special Education Professional Development, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Positive climates that encourage professional growth and teacher collaboration can bolster the impact of induction programs and may influence novice special education teachers' decisions to remain in teaching. As you plan induction programs, consider how Professional Learning Communities--the topic of this Brief--may be used to integrate special…

  3. In Good Standing: Veteran Educator and Higher Education Accreditor Belle Wheelan Offers Advice for Community College Administrators in Light of Recent Accreditation Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Community College Journal, 2013

    2013-01-01

    It's been a rough year for the City College of San Francisco (CCSF). After working to emerge from strict sanctions leveled by its accrediting board in July 2012, the college was notified earlier this summer that its accreditation would be revoked, effective in 2014. Though community college leaders and state officials vowed to return the…

  4. Evidence-Based Decision Making in Community Colleges: Findings from a Survey of Faculty and Administrator Data Use at Achieving the Dream Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jenkins, Davis; Kerrigan, Monica Reid

    2008-01-01

    Although there is increasing interest in evidence-based decision making in postsecondary education, there have been few large-scale empirical studies on the subject, and none of the research to date has examined in depth what specific data college faculty and administrators use in their jobs and the extent to which they use data analysis to design…

  5. Sow the Seeds of Victory! Posters from the Food Administration during World War I. The Constitution Community: The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1930).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simmons, Linda

    From the outbreak of World War I in Europe until the signing of the Versailles Treaty, President Woodrow Wilson's administration proposed and implemented an extraordinary number of programs that affected people in their everyday activities. In August 1917 Congress passed the Food and Fuel Control Act, also known as the Lever Act, which gave the…

  6. Supporting Members and Friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2005-10-01

    Thank you! Over the past year, AGU has received 12,104 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from the National Oceanographic Partnership Program and National Association of Geoscience Teachers. Together their generosity has benefited AGU non revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5,000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000 or more) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major gifts and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($200-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$199). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are among our most loyal Supporters.

  7. Supporting Members and Friends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-09-01

    Thank you! Over the past 20 months AGU has received a record 22,159 gifts, both large and small, from members and friends. The Union has also received corporate contributions, National Science Foundation grants, and support from four federal agencies (NASA, NOAA, EPA, and USGS). Together their generosity has benefited AGU non-revenue producing programs that are critical to our science and the future health of the Union. The following list gratefully acknowledges annual gifts of $100 or more and cumulative giving of $5000 or more. The 1919 Society ($100,000+) and Benefactors ($5,000-$99,999) recognize single major and cumulative contributions. Three circles acknowledge annual giving: President's Circle ($1,000 or more), Leadership Circle ($250-$999), and Supporters Circle ($100-$249). Supporting Life Members, who contribute a one-time gift of $1,200 in addition to lifetime dues, are recognized as our most loyal Supporters.

  8. [Comment on] BOSP members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    The new Board on Ocean Science and Policy (BOSP) (Eos, June 7, 1983, p. 402) met for the first time on May 4. John B. Slaughter, former director of the National Science Foundation and now chancellor of the University of Maryland in College Park, is the board's chairman. Other board members are D. James Baker, Jr. (University of Washington, Seattle); Kirk Bryan (Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton University); John P. Craven (University of Hawaii); Charles L. Drake (Dartmouth College); Paul M. Fye (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Edward D. Goldberg (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); G. Ross Heath (Oregon State University); Judith T. Kildow (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); John A. Knauss (University of Rhode Island); James J. McCarthy (Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University); H. William Menard (Scripps Institution of Oceanography); C. Barry Raleigh (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory); Roger Revelle (University of California, San Diego); David A. Ross (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); Brian J. Rothschild (University of Maryland); William M. Sackett (University of South Florida); John H. Steele (Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution); and Carl Wunsch (MIT). Wallace Broecker (Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory), an original board member, resigned after the first meeting. Broecker told Eos that combining the science and policy boards resulted in a new board whose mission is too broad. A new board member will be appointed in Broecker's place

  9. School Board Member Values and School District Policies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson-Howard, Debra

    Findings from a study to identify changes in school board political values and school district policy as a result of change in school board members following community dissatisfaction are presented in this paper. The narrow objective was to analyze change in board members' political values and subsequent policy changes resulting from social change…

  10. 77 FR 10755 - Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Risk Communication...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-23

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Request for Nominations for Voting Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Risk Communication Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requesting nominations for members to serve...

  11. 76 FR 45578 - Request for Nominations for Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Medical Imaging Drugs...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Request for Nominations for Members on a Public Advisory Committee; Medical Imaging Drugs Advisory Committee AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is requesting nominations for 12 members to...

  12. Integrating Community into the Classroom: Community Gardening, Community Involvement, and Project-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langhout, Regina Day; Rappaport, Julian; Simmons, Doretha

    2002-01-01

    Culturally relevant, ongoing project-based learning was facilitated in a predominantly African American urban elementary school via a community garden project. The project involved teachers, students, university members, and community members. This article evaluates the project through two classroom-community collaboration models, noting common…

  13. 7 CFR 905.150 - Eligibility requirements for public member and alternate member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) The public member shall be neither a producer nor a handler of Florida citrus fruit and shall have no direct financial interest in the production or marketing of citrus fruit (except as a consumer of... should be nominated by the Citrus Administrative Committee and should serve a 1-year term which...

  14. 7 CFR 905.150 - Eligibility requirements for public member and alternate member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) The public member shall be neither a producer nor a handler of Florida citrus fruit and shall have no direct financial interest in the production or marketing of citrus fruit (except as a consumer of... should be nominated by the Citrus Administrative Committee and should serve a 1-year term which...

  15. 7 CFR 905.150 - Eligibility requirements for public member and alternate member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) The public member shall be neither a producer nor a handler of Florida citrus fruit and shall have no direct financial interest in the production or marketing of citrus fruit (except as a consumer of... should be nominated by the Citrus Administrative Committee and should serve a 1-year term which...

  16. Report to Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler, William R.

    1971-01-01

    The presidents and president elect of the National Association of Women Deans and Counselors, the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators and the ACPA met to discuss recommendations and methods for creating a single National Association. Their recommendation are presented and reactions and comments are requested. (Author/CG)

  17. Community Services Brief.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Clearinghouse for Junior Colleges, Los Angeles, CA.

    This Brief reviews a variety of materials about two-year college community services programs. Specific topics include: their philosophy and definition, organization and administration, descriptions of noteworthy programs, and models for new community service programs. (Author/CK)

  18. A Study of Veterans Administration/Department of Defense Health Care Resources Sharing at Keller Army Community Hospital West Point, New York 10996

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-04-01

    potential to reduce the excess capacity of participating facilities. 6. Provide a mechanism for notifying participating facilities that the purchase...imminent. 7. Provide a mechanism for addressing joint acquisition of major equipment/services. 8. Demonstrate a potential cost savings for resources...VA) first expressed a desire to share medical resources with Keller Army Community Hospital (KACH), West Point, New York.1 The mechanics of Federal

  19. VisOHC: Designing Visual Analytics for Online Health Communities.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Bum Chul; Kim, Sung-Hee; Lee, Sukwon; Choo, Jaegul; Huh, Jina; Yi, Ji Soo

    2016-01-01

    Through online health communities (OHCs), patients and caregivers exchange their illness experiences and strategies for overcoming the illness, and provide emotional support. To facilitate healthy and lively conversations in these communities, their members should be continuously monitored and nurtured by OHC administrators. The main challenge of OHC administrators' tasks lies in understanding the diverse dimensions of conversation threads that lead to productive discussions in their communities. In this paper, we present a design study in which three domain expert groups participated, an OHC researcher and two OHC administrators of online health communities, which was conducted to find with a visual analytic solution. Through our design study, we characterized the domain goals of OHC administrators and derived tasks to achieve these goals. As a result of this study, we propose a system called VisOHC, which visualizes individual OHC conversation threads as collapsed boxes-a visual metaphor of conversation threads. In addition, we augmented the posters' reply authorship network with marks and/or beams to show conversation dynamics within threads. We also developed unique measures tailored to the characteristics of OHCs, which can be encoded for thread visualizations at the users' requests. Our observation of the two administrators while using VisOHC showed that it supports their tasks and reveals interesting insights into online health communities. Finally, we share our methodological lessons on probing visual designs together with domain experts by allowing them to freely encode measurements into visual variables.

  20. VisOHC: Designing Visual Analytics for Online Health Communities

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Bum Chul; Kim, Sung-Hee; Lee, Sukwon; Choo, Jaegul; Huh, Jina; Yi, Ji Soo

    2015-01-01

    Through online health communities (OHCs), patients and caregivers exchange their illness experiences and strategies for overcoming the illness, and provide emotional support. To facilitate healthy and lively conversations in these communities, their members should be continuously monitored and nurtured by OHC administrators. The main challenge of OHC administrators' tasks lies in understanding the diverse dimensions of conversation threads that lead to productive discussions in their communities. In this paper, we present a design study in which three domain expert groups participated, an OHC researcher and two OHC administrators of online health communities, which was conducted to find with a visual analytic solution. Through our design study, we characterized the domain goals of OHC administrators and derived tasks to achieve these goals. As a result of this study, we propose a system called VisOHC, which visualizes individual OHC conversation threads as collapsed boxes–a visual metaphor of conversation threads. In addition, we augmented the posters' reply authorship network with marks and/or beams to show conversation dynamics within threads. We also developed unique measures tailored to the characteristics of OHCs, which can be encoded for thread visualizations at the users' requests. Our observation of the two administrators while using VisOHC showed that it supports their tasks and reveals interesting insights into online health communities. Finally, we share our methodological lessons on probing visual designs together with domain experts by allowing them to freely encode measurements into visual variables. PMID:26529688

  1. 5 CFR 894.306 - Are foster children eligible as family members?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Are foster children eligible as family....306 Are foster children eligible as family members? Yes, foster children may be eligible for coverage as family members under FEDVIP....

  2. Network Systems Administration Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lexington Community Coll., KY. Office of Institutional Research.

    In spring 1996, Lexington Community College (LCC) in Kentucky, conducted a survey to gather information on employment trends and educational needs in the field of network systems administration (NSA). NSA duties involve the installation and administration of network operating systems, applications software, and networking infrastructure;…

  3. Cryogenic support member

    DOEpatents

    Niemann, Ralph C.; Gonczy, John D.; Nicol, Thomas H.

    1987-01-01

    A cryogenic support member is comprised of a non-metallic rod having a depression in at least one end and a metallic end connection assembled to the rod. The metallic end connection comprises a metallic plug which conforms to the shape and is disposed in the depression and a metallic sleeve is disposed over the rod and plug. The plug and the sleeve are shrink-fitted to the depression in the rod to form a connection good in compression, tension and bending.

  4. An Investigation of Leadership in a Professional Learning Community: A Case Study of a Large, Suburban, Public Middle School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liebman, Howard; Maldonado, Nancy; Lacey, Candace H.; Thompson, Steve

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative case study investigated a large, suburban, public middle school focusing on educators' perceptions of leadership within their professional learning community. Participants included the principal, administrative team, and key faculty members. Data were collected using semi-structured interviews and were analyzed by hand coding and…

  5. Melt containment member

    SciTech Connect

    Rieken, Joel R.; Heidloff, Andrew J.

    2014-09-09

    A tubular melt containment member for transient containment of molten metals and alloys, especially reactive metals and alloys, includes a melt-contacting layer or region that comprises an oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide material that is less reactive as compared to the counterpart stoichiometric rare earth oxide. The oxygen-deficient (sub-stoichiometric) rare earth oxide can comprise oxygen-deficient yttria represented by Y.sub.2O.sub.3-x wherein x is from 0.01 to 0.1. Use of the oxygen-deficient rare earth oxide as the melt-contacting layer or region material reduces reaction with the melt for a given melt temperature and melt contact time.

  6. Personality characteristics of Wikipedia members.

    PubMed

    Amichai-Hamburger, Yair; Lamdan, Naama; Madiel, Rinat; Hayat, Tsahi

    2008-12-01

    Wikipedia is an online, free access, volunteer-contributed encyclopedia. This article focuses on the Wikipedians' (Wikipedia users) personality characteristics, studying Wikipedians' conceptions of Real-Me and BFI dimensions. To survey these aspects, we posted links to two online web questionnaires; one was targeted at Wikipedians and the second to non-Wikipedia users. One hundred and thirty-nine subjects participated in the study, of which 69 were active Wikipedia members. It was found that Wikipedia members locate their real me on the Internet more frequently as compared to non-Wikipedia members. Variance analysis revealed significant differences between Wikipedia members and non-Wikipedia members in agreeableness, openness, and conscientiousness, which were lower for the Wikipedia members. An interaction was found between Wikipedia membership and gender: introverted women were more likely to be Wikipedia members as compared with extroverted women. The results of this study are discussed with special emphasis on the understanding of the motivators of Wikipedia members.

  7. Training in the Community-Collaborative Context: A Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada, Racquel-María

    2014-01-01

    Emerging community-based methodologies call for collaboration with speech community members. Although motivated, community members may lack the tools or training to contribute actively. In response, many linguists deliver training workshops in documentation or preservation, while others train community members to record data. Although workshops…

  8. Building Safer Communities: The Integrated Community Safety Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fawcett, Ricky Lee; Kerr, Thomas A; Jordan, Steven Albert

    2001-03-01

    This paper discusses an integrated community safety approach to creating safer communities. It defines community broadly to include two categories of community members: “industry” and “neighbors.” Potential community members within the “industry” category include facilities, government/regulators, customers, stockholders, and suppliers. Within the “neighbors” category are towns, cities, counties, states; people/commodity flow systems; news media and special interest groups; environment; and families of employees. Each of these potential community members and its characteristics are discussed. The integrated community safety approach consists of three major activities: (1) define the boundaries of the community; (2) facilitate the sense of community; and (3) address the needs of the community. Defining the boundaries of the community includes determining the geographical and social boundaries; this is accomplished through conducting a hazard analysis and community involvement to identify all of the community members. Facilitating the sense of community includes conducting a capability/needs assessment and continuing community involvement to identify the issues and concerns of community members. Addressing the needs of the community involves master planning to consider safety issues in all community development actions and continuing community education and involvement. The integrated community safety approach is a workable approach for existing industries and their neighbors as well as new projects that industries and their neighbors might be considering. By using this socio-technical approach to integrating industry and all of its neighbors into a safer community, the integrated community safety approach will better assure the viability and safety of industry and its neighbors while maintaining or improving the overall quality of life.

  9. Job Satisfaction and its Influential Factors in Dental Academic Members in Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Seraj, B; Ghadimi, S; Mirzaee, M; Ahmadi, R; Bashizadeh, H; Ashofteh-Yazdi, K; SahebJamee, M; Kharazi, MJ; Jahanmehr, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Assessment of job satisfaction of the faculty members and its underlying factors may increase career fulfillment and raise the educational and research productivity, leading to higher quality of dental services at the community level, ultimately improving public oral health status. Aim: This study assessed job satisfaction and its influential factors in dental academic members in Tehran. Subjects and Methods: The job satisfaction level of 203 faculty members was assessed using a Likert scale questionnaire from 0 to 4, with 4 representing very satisfied and 0 not at all satisfied. The analysis of variance was used to compare the responses among dental faculty members of three different universities. The impact of age, gender, academic rank, employment status and the date of employment on the overall faculty job satisfaction was identified by multiple linear regression analysis. Results: The mean professional satisfaction score among faculty members was 1.5 (0.5) out of four. Among the studied underlying factors, only the date of employment was seen to have a statistically significant impact on the faculties’ overall job satisfaction (P= 0.05). There was no difference in job compensation observed between the three dental faculties. Dissatisfying aspects of the academic work included educational and research policies, monetary strategies, quality of leadership and administration, promotion and tenure policies, job security, educational environment, equipments, and facilities. The only satisfying factor was the interaction between faculty colleagues and students. Conclusion: Faculty members of Tehran Dental Schools are dissatisfied with their work environments in Tehran Dental Schools. Issues such as salary and remuneration, facilities, equipments, promotion and tenure policies are strongly believed to account for the dissatisfaction. PMID:24761236

  10. Community dynamics in social networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Gergely; Barabási, Albert-László; Vicsek, Tamás

    2007-06-01

    We study the statistical properties of community dynamics in large social networks, where the evolving communities are obtained from subsequent snapshots of the modular structure. Such cohesive groups of people can grow by recruiting new members, or contract by loosing members; two (or more) groups may merge into a single community, while a large enough social group can split into several smaller ones; new communities are born and old ones may disappear. We find significant difference between the behaviour of smaller collaborative or friendship circles and larger communities, eg. institutions. Social groups containing only a few members persist longer on average when the fluctuations of the members is small. In contrast, we find that the condition for stability for large communities is continuous changes in their membership, allowing for the possibility that after some time practically all members are exchanged.

  11. Engineering Administration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naval Personnel Program Support Activity, Washington, DC.

    This book is intended to acquaint naval engineering officers with their duties in the engineering department. Standard shipboard organizations are analyzed in connection with personnel assignments, division operations, and watch systems. Detailed descriptions are included for the administration of directives, ship's bills, damage control, training…

  12. Administrative IT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grayson, Katherine, Ed.

    2006-01-01

    When it comes to Administrative IT solutions and processes, best practices range across the spectrum. Enterprise resource planning (ERP), student information systems (SIS), and tech support are prominent and continuing areas of focus. But widespread change can also be accomplished via the implementation of campuswide document imaging and sharing,…

  13. Database Administrator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Pam

    2010-01-01

    The Internet and electronic commerce (e-commerce) generate lots of data. Data must be stored, organized, and managed. Database administrators, or DBAs, work with database software to find ways to do this. They identify user needs, set up computer databases, and test systems. They ensure that systems perform as they should and add people to the…

  14. 45 CFR 2520.40 - Under what circumstances may AmeriCorps members in my program raise resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... volunteers teach children to read; (2) Writing a grant proposal to a foundation to secure resources to... community and is delivered, in whole or in part, through the members of a community-based organization; (5... members. (c) AmeriCorps members may not: (1) Raise funds for living allowances or for an...

  15. 45 CFR 2520.40 - Under what circumstances may AmeriCorps members in my program raise resources?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... volunteers teach children to read; (2) Writing a grant proposal to a foundation to secure resources to... community and is delivered, in whole or in part, through the members of a community-based organization; (5... members. (c) AmeriCorps members may not: (1) Raise funds for living allowances or for an...

  16. Administrative Job Level Study and Factoring System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Community Coll., OR.

    The administrative job classification system and generic job descriptions presented in this report were developed at Portland Community College (PCC) as management tools. After introductory material outlining the objectives of and criteria used in the administrative job-level study, and offering information on the administrative job factoring…

  17. 7 CFR 1709.13 - Grant administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Grant administration. 1709.13 Section 1709.13... AGRICULTURE ASSISTANCE TO HIGH ENERGY COST COMMUNITIES General Requirements § 1709.13 Grant administration... provided in the RUS delegations of authority. Administration of RUS grants is governed by the provisions...

  18. 7 CFR 1709.13 - Grant administration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 11 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Grant administration. 1709.13 Section 1709.13... AGRICULTURE ASSISTANCE TO HIGH ENERGY COST COMMUNITIES General Requirements § 1709.13 Grant administration... provided in the RUS delegations of authority. Administration of RUS grants is governed by the provisions...

  19. Community and Virtual Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, David; Oldridge, Rachel; Vasconcelos, Ana

    2004-01-01

    Presents a literature review that covers the following topics related to virtual communities: (1) information and virtual community; (2) virtual communities and communities of practice; (3) virtual communities and virtual arenas, including virtual community networks; and (4) networked virtual communities. (Contains 175 references.) (MES)

  20. Community Development in Ireland.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Anna

    2003-01-01

    In the last decade, community development in Ireland has emphasized social and economic inclusion, regeneration, and civic participation. Continuing challenges include designation of diverse community representatives, demand for increased administrative efficiency, and management of mandates and accountability. There are more community development…

  1. Effect of repeated mass drug administration with praziquantel and track and treat of taeniosis cases on the prevalence of taeniosis in Taenia solium endemic rural communities of Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Braae, Uffe Christian; Magnussen, Pascal; Ndawi, Benedict; Harrison, Wendy; Lekule, Faustin; Johansen, Maria Vang

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of mass drug administration (MDA) with praziquantel administered to school-aged children (SAC) combined with 'track and treat' of taeniosis cases in the general population on the copro-antigen (Ag) prevalence of taeniosis. The study was conducted in 14 villages in Mbozi and Mbeya district, Tanzania. SAC made up 34% of the population and received MDA with praziquantel (40mg/kg) in 2012 (both districts) and in 2013 (Mbozi only). Three cross-sectional population-based surveys were performed in 2012 (R0), 2013 (R1), and 2014 (R2). In each survey approximately 3000 study subjects of all ages were tested for taeniosis using copro-Ag-ELISA. In total 9064 people were tested and copro-Ag-ELISA positive cases were offered treatment 6-8 months after sampling. The copro-Ag prevalence of taeniosis was significantly higher (Χ(2)-test, p=0.007) in Mbozi (3.0%) at R0 compared to Mbeya (1.5%). Twelve months after MDA in both districts (R1), the copro-Ag prevalence had dropped significantly in both Mbozi (2.0%, p=0.024) and in Mbeya (0.3%, p=0.004), but the significant difference between the districts persisted (Χ(2)-test, p<0.001). Ten months after the second round of MDA in Mbozi and 22 month after the first MDA (R2), the copro-Ag prevalence had dropped significantly again in Mbozi (0.8%, p<0.001), but had slightly increased in Mbeya (0.5%, p=0.051), with no difference between the two districts (Χ(2)-test, p=0.51). The taeniosis cases tracked and treated between round R0 and R2 represented 9% of the projected total number of taeniosis cases within the study area, based on the copro-Ag prevalence and village population data. Among SAC in Mbozi, infection significantly decreased at R1 (p=0.004, OR 0.12, CI: 0.02-0.41) and R2 (p=0.001, OR 0.24, CI: 0.09-0.53) when comparing to R0. In Mbeya infection significant decreased at R1 (p=0.013, OR 0.14, CI: 0.02-0.55), but no difference was found for R2 (p=0. 089), when comparing to R0 among SAC. This study

  2. The Transformation of a Florida Community College into a State College: A Case Study of the Impact on Institutional Culture, Mission, & Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    A case-study was designed to assess the extent of change at a selected Florida community college that transformed into a state college. The purpose of the investigation was to explore how the transformation influenced institutional culture, mission, and identity based on the perceptions of faculty members and administrators. Data collection…

  3. Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Reintegration of Service-Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Seth D. Messinger...SUBTITLE Developing a Meaningful Life: Social Reintegration of Service- Social Reintegration of Service Me Members and Veterans with Spinal Cord...communities and cultural identities that is key to long-term success . 15. SUBJECT TERMS Spinal Cord Injury, Community Reintegration , Qualitative

  4. Cultivating Political Powerhouses: TFA Corps Members Experiences That Shape Local Political Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobsen, Rebecca; White, Rachel; Reckhow, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, Teach for America (TFA) has invested in developing corps members as leaders. Although TFA asks corps members for a two-year commitment, TFA celebrates the achievements of alumni who have gone on to careers in politics, public policy, and advocacy. Thus, many community leaders see the arrival of TFA corps members as having a…

  5. 5 CFR 734.405 - Campaigning for a spouse or family member.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Campaigning for a spouse or family member... and Positions § 734.405 Campaigning for a spouse or family member. An employee covered under this subpart who is the spouse or family member of either a candidate for partisan political office, or...

  6. What Makes Users Rate (Share, Tag, Edit…)? Predicting Patterns of Participation in Online Communities.

    PubMed

    Fuglestad, Paul T; Dwyer, Patrick C; Moses, Jennifer Filson; Kim, John S; Mannino, Clelia Anna; Terveen, Loren; Snyder, Mark

    2012-02-01

    Administrators of online communities face the crucial issue of understanding and developing their user communities. Will new users become committed members? What types of roles are particular individuals most likely to take on? We report on a study that investigates these questions. We administered a survey (based on standard psychological instruments) to nearly 4000 new users of the MovieLens film recommendation community from October 2009 to March 2010 and logged their usage history on MovieLens. We found that general volunteer motivations, pro-social behavioral history, and community-specific motivations predicted both the amount of use and specific types of activities users engaged in after joining the community. These findings have implications for the design and management of online communities.

  7. What Makes Users Rate (Share, Tag, Edit…)? Predicting Patterns of Participation in Online Communities

    PubMed Central

    Fuglestad, Paul T.; Dwyer, Patrick C.; Moses, Jennifer Filson; Kim, John S.; Mannino, Clelia Anna; Terveen, Loren; Snyder, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Administrators of online communities face the crucial issue of understanding and developing their user communities. Will new users become committed members? What types of roles are particular individuals most likely to take on? We report on a study that investigates these questions. We administered a survey (based on standard psychological instruments) to nearly 4000 new users of the MovieLens film recommendation community from October 2009 to March 2010 and logged their usage history on MovieLens. We found that general volunteer motivations, pro-social behavioral history, and community-specific motivations predicted both the amount of use and specific types of activities users engaged in after joining the community. These findings have implications for the design and management of online communities. PMID:25356443

  8. 21 CFR 20.107 - Food and Drug Administration manuals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Food and Drug Administration manuals. 20.107... Administration manuals. (a) Food and Drug Administration administrative staff manuals and instructions that affect a member of the public are available for public disclosure. An index of all such manuals...

  9. Development and validation of a global positioning system-based "map book" system for categorizing cluster residency status of community members living in high-density urban slums in Blantyre, Malawi.

    PubMed

    MacPherson, Peter; Choko, Augustine T; Webb, Emily L; Thindwa, Deus; Squire, S Bertel; Sambakunsi, Rodrick; van Oosterhout, Joep J; Chunda, Treza; Chavula, Kondwani; Makombe, Simon D; Lalloo, David G; Corbett, Elizabeth L

    2013-05-15

    A significant methodological challenge in implementing community-based cluster-randomized trials is how to accurately categorize cluster residency when data are collected at a site distant from households. This study set out to validate a map book system for use in urban slums with no municipal address systems, where classification has been shown to be inaccurate when address descriptions were used. Between April and July 2011, 28 noncontiguous clusters were demarcated in Blantyre, Malawi. In December 2011, antiretroviral therapy initiators were asked to identify themselves as cluster residents (yes/no and which cluster) by using map books. A random sample of antiretroviral therapy initiators was used to validate map book categorization against Global Positioning System coordinates taken from participants' households. Of the 202 antiretroviral therapy initiators, 48 (23.8%) were categorized with the map book system as in-cluster residents and 147 (72.8%) as out-of-cluster residents, and 7 (3.4%) were unsure. Agreement between map books and the Global Positioning System was 100% in the 20 adults selected for validation and was 95.0% (κ = 0.96, 95% confidence interval: 0.84, 1.00) in an additional 20 in-cluster residents (overall κ = 0.97, 95% confidence interval: 0.90, 1.00). With map books, cluster residents were classified rapidly and accurately. If validated elsewhere, this approach could be of widespread value in that it would enable accurate categorization without home visits.

  10. Reconstruction of the inventory of materia medica used by members of the Jewish community of medieval Cairo according to prescriptions found in the Taylor-Schechter Genizah collection, Cambridge.

    PubMed

    Lev, Efraim; Amar, Zohar

    2006-12-06

    The Taylor-Schechter (T-S) collection at Cambridge University Library is the biggest of all Cairo Genizah collections in the world. The importance and the potential of research into the medical aspects of the Genizah documents were clear to researcher since the early 1960s. A few works have been published since, usually focusing on one subject, or even important single manuscripts. The current research concerned mainly with one aspect of the history of medicine of the Jewish community of Cairo (as a reflection of Eastern medieval societies), namely the practical uses of natural substances for medicine. The most interesting and original information is undoubtedly to be found in the 141 prescriptions, as they reflect the medical reality that actually existed. And indeed, 242 substances were recorded in the prescriptions identified: 195 substances of plants origin (80.6%), 27 inorganic materials (11.2%) and 20 substances of animal origin (8.2%) were recorded as being in practical used for medicinal purposes. The most frequently mentioned substances were the rose, myrobalan, sugar, almonds, and endive. The most prevalent ailments: eye diseases, headache, constipations (purgative), cough, skin diseases, stomach, fever, gynaecological problems, haemorrhoids, liver ailments, lice, swellings, dental trouble, ulcers, and problems of the urinary tract.

  11. How Many Administrators Are Too Many?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    For years, faculty members have pointed to the sluggish growth in the number of tenured professors and complained that university payrolls are filled with too many administrators. This, they maintain, adds unnecessary costs and takes the focus away from teaching and learning. But whether such "administrative bloat" is really occurring and how much…

  12. Administrative Assistants' Informal Learning and Related Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Hyun Jung; Kim, Jin-Mo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to identify the causal relationship among informal learning, leader-member exchange (LMX), empowerment, job characteristics and job self-efficacy and the impact on administrative assistants in corporations. The study aims at providing information for administrative assistants who have worked with their current…

  13. The challenges of reintegration for service members and their families.

    PubMed

    Danish, Steven J; Antonides, Bradley J

    2013-10-01

    The ongoing wars in Afghanistan and Iraq have posed a number of reintegration challenges to service members. Much of the research focuses on those service members experiencing psychological problems and being treated at the VA. In this article, we contend that much of the distress service members experience occurs following deployment and is a consequence of the difficulties encountered during their efforts to successfully reintegrate into their families and communities. We propose a new conceptual framework for intervening in this reintegration distress that is psycho-educational in nature as well as a new delivery model for providing such services. An example of this new intervention framework is presented.

  14. Community Accountability Conferencing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorsborne, Margaret

    Community Accountability Conferencing (CAC) was first introduced in Queensland, Australia schools in early 1994 after a serious assault in the school community. Some family members, students, and staff were dissatisfied with the solution of suspending the offenders. Seeking an alternative, comprehensive intervention strategy, the school community…

  15. Assessing Community Coalitions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drug Strategies, Washington, DC.

    This document presents a report on a 2-year study of community anti-drug coalitions in 11 cities that have community initiatives programs. Through an extensive review of the literature, conversations with prevention experts, and interviews with members of the programs, an examination was made of the lessons learned by the coalitions. Since formal…

  16. Life Expectancy of Kibbutz Members.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leviatan, Uri; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Data are presented demonstrating that the life expectancy of kibbutz members--both men and women--is higher than that of the overall Jewish population in Israel. These data add to and support other research findings illustrating the more positive mental health and well-being found among kibbutz members than among other comparative populations.…

  17. Impact on postpartum hemorrhage of prophylactic administration of oxytocin 10 IU via UnijectTM by peripheral health care providers at home births: design of a community-based cluster-randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemorrhage is the leading direct cause of maternal death globally. While oxytocin is the drug of choice for postpartum hemorrhage prevention, its use has generally been limited to health facilities. This trial assesses the effectiveness, safety, and feasibility of expanding the use of prophylactic intramuscular oxytocin to peripheral health care providers at home births in four predominantly rural districts in central Ghana. Methods This study is designed as a community-based cluster-randomized trial in which Community Health Officers are randomized to provide (or not provide) an injection of oxytocin 10 IU via the UnijectTM injection system within one minute of delivery of the baby to women who request their presence at home at the onset of labor. The primary aim is to determine if administration of prophylactic oxytocin via Uniject™ by this cadre will reduce the risk of postpartum hemorrhage by 50 % relative to deliveries which do not receive the prophylactic intervention. Postpartum hemorrhage is examined under three sequential definitions: 1) blood loss ≥500 ml (BL); 2) treatment for bleeding (TX) and/or BL; 3) hospital referral for bleeding and/or TX and/or BL. Secondary outcomes address safety and feasibility of the intervention and include adverse maternal and fetal outcomes and logistical concerns regarding assistance at home births and the storage and handling of oxytocin, respectively. Discussion Results from this trial will build evidence for the effectiveness of expanding the delivery of this established prophylactic intervention to peripheral settings. Complementary data on safety and logistical issues related to this intervention will assist policymakers in low-income countries in selecting both the best uterotonic and service delivery strategy for postpartum hemorrhage prevention. Results of this trial are expected in mid-2013. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01108289. PMID:22676921

  18. Discovering and Analyzing Deviant Communities: Methods and Experiments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    each community member. This information can be used to identify attack members ( bot nodes), command and control members (Command and Control nodes...each community member. This information can be used to identify attack members ( bot nodes), command and control members (Command and Control nodes...analysis. Sinkholing. Sinkholing is the current method of choice for botnet analysis and defense [3]. In this approach, the analyst deceives bots into

  19. Finland Becomes Eleventh ESO Member State

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2004-07-01

    Finland has become the eleventh member state of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) [1]. The formal accession procedure was carried through as planned and has now been completed. Following the signing of the corresponding Agreement earlier this year (ESO PR 02/04), acceptance by the Finnish Parliament and ratification by the Finnish President of the Agreement as well as the ESO Convention and the associated protocols in June [2] and the deposit of the instruments of accession today, Finland has now officially joined ESO. ESO warmly welcomes the new member country and its scientific community that is renowned for their expertise in many frontline areas. The related opportunities will contribute to strenghtening of pioneering research with the powerful facilities at ESO's observatories, to the benefit of Astronomy and Astrophysics as well as European science in general. ESO also looks forward to collaboration with the Finnish high-tech industry. For Finland, the membership in ESO is motivated by scientific and technological objectives as well as by the objective of improving the public understanding of science. The Finnish Government is committed to increasing the public research funding in order to improve the quality, impact and internationalisation of research. Membership in ESO offers unique facilities for astronomical research which would not otherwise be available for Finnish astronomers. Finland is also very interested in taking part in technological development projects in fields like ICT, optics and instrumentation. For young scientists and engineers, ESO is a challenging, international working and learning environment. Finland has already taken part in the educational programmes of ESO, and as a member this activity will be broadened and intensified. In Finland there are also several science journalists and a large community of amateur astronomers who will be very happy to take part in ESO's outreach activities.

  20. Telling the Community College Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slocum, Doris

    1978-01-01

    Points out the small amount of coverage community colleges receive through the media. Encourages community college administrators, faculty, and public relations personnel to reach out for national attention; suggests journal publications describing programs and successes as one possibility. (TP)

  1. High-Stakes Administrative Hiring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clement, Mary C.

    2009-01-01

    The risks are high when it comes to hiring a new principal. A principal is accountable for the safety, well-being and achievement of all the children in a school, as well as for representing the school to the community. With increasing demands on building administrators, the hiring of principals certainly may be considered high stakes. For several…

  2. Educational Administration and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bates, Richard

    2006-01-01

    After observing that texts in educational administration have largely failed to address the problem of the justice and fairness of social and educational arrangements, this article goes on to examine the necessary relationships between ethical leadership, community and the notion of social justice. Such relationships are argued to be necessarily…

  3. View from the Administrator's Office.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaub, Walter M.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) administrator Carol Browner's views on facilitating practical approaches that address major environmental issues in the United States. Examines issues of helping local communities, climate impact and prevention, water quality and quantity, and the EPA's changing role in society. (WRM)

  4. Oversight on Community Services Administration, Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment, and Adoption Opportunities, and Native American Programs Act. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Aging, Family and Human Services of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.

    Oversight hearings were conducted on April 23, 1981 in reference to social service block grants for the Community Services Administration, child abuse prevention and treatment and adoption programs, and Native American Programs Act. Testimonies for support of block grants advocated ability of States to decide how program resources can best be…

  5. Teamcenter community : administration tips and tricks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rangel, Gabriel

    2005-01-01

    This presentation covers what areas of prerequisites are important to understand and how one can improve performance and maintenance of an existing implementation. It will also cover tips and tricks for site migration and how to plan for upgrades.

  6. Life expectancy of kibbutz members.

    PubMed

    Leviatan, U; Cohen, J; Jaffe-Katz, A

    1986-01-01

    Data are presented demonstrating that the life expectancy (LE) of kibbutz members--both men and women--is higher than that of the overall Jewish population in Israel. Closer inspection of the death rates at various ages reveals that, from age thirty, those of kibbutz women are lower than those of the Jewish population. Although those of kibbutz men are actually higher until age forty-nine, nevertheless the LE of kibbutz members (based on death rates) surpasses that of Jews in Israel. These data add to and support other research findings illustrating the more positive mental health and well-being found among kibbutz members than among other comparative populations. Similarly, the factors contributing to kibbutz members' life expectancy evolve from this quality of life, especially as this quality of life affects old age.

  7. Quality of Life in Postmenopausal Female Members and Non-members of the Elderly Support Association

    PubMed Central

    Shirvani, Mina

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the quality of life (QOL) in postmenopausal members and non-members of the elderly support association in Borujen city, Iran. Methods This study was a cross-sectional descriptive study being applied to the participants were postmenopausal women of over 55 years. Thus, 40 postmenopausal members of the elderly support association of Borujen city and 40 non-members were randomly selected. The 36 item short-form health survey (SF-36), with the 4 psychological, social, physical-movement, and environmental domains, was completed. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results The mean total score of QOL of member of the association was significantly greater than non-members. Student's t-test showed a significant relationship between QOL and membership of the association (P < 0.05). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) showed that the mean QOL of postmenopausal women, according to membership and marital status (P < 0.01), housing (P < 0.01), and underlying disease (P < 0.01), was statistically significant. Conclusions According to the results, supportive measures, such as increasing the participation of the elderly in public life through proper preparations to join them and membership in peer groups such as support associations and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) can be greatly effective in improving QOL. The results showed that the QOL of the participants was at a moderate level and membership in support associations for the elderly was effected on the QOL in postmenopausal women. Moreover, considering the importance of the elderly in the community. PMID:28119895

  8. Safe administration of blood components.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Katy

    The transfusion process has many stages, each involving different members of staff in different locations. This gives rise to a significant potential for errors. Nurses are involved in many of these stages and therefore require knowledge, skills and competence in the process to ensure the safety of patients. This third article in our five-part series on blood transfusion discusses the safe administration of blood components and the key principles to which nurses must adhere.

  9. Leadership & Technology: What School Board Members Need To Know.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, Gerald D.; And Others

    Board members' role in technology implementation ranges from prompting development of technology plans to gathering community support for funding technology initiatives; they need substantial knowledge to enable them to ask the right questions, absorb new information, make good decisions, set appropriate policies, and lead confidently as…

  10. Faculty Members as Classroom Researchers: A Progress Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, K. Patricia; Angelo, Thomas A.

    1989-01-01

    Describes the Classroom Research Project, designed to help community college faculty members from the San Francisco Bay area to develop and test classroom assessment techniques. Discusses project activities, such as workshops and a summer institute, and progress toward the integration of the assessment of student learning into everyday teaching.…

  11. NASA Facts, Mars as a Member of the Solar System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Washington, DC. Educational Programs Div.

    Presented is one of a series of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) facts about the exploration of Mars. In this publication, emphasis is placed on the planet Mars as a member of the Solar System and a detailed description is given related to historical accounts of the planet's existence and its travels. The physical…

  12. 12 CFR 708b.206 - Share insurance communications to members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Share insurance communications to members. 708b.206 Section 708b.206 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING... STATUS Voluntary Termination or Conversion of Insured Status § 708b.206 Share insurance communications...

  13. Demographic and Behavioral Characteristics of Osher Lifelong Learning Institute Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Robert Jack; Brady, E. Michael; Thaxton, Steven P.

    2016-01-01

    The number of lifelong learning institutes (LLIs) is growing across the United States and it is important for educational planners and administrators to know about current demographic and behavioral characteristics of program participants. A 14-question survey was administered via SurveyMonkey to members who use computers in eight Osher Lifelong…

  14. Scholarship Reconsidered and Its Impact on the Faculty Member.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Gary T.

    Outside demands on universities to improve the manner in which they operate have placed increased pressure on faculty members to examine how they spend their time. Because administrators often resist any pressure to change the way they do business, faculty often find themselves in a situation of adjusting to a changing set of values and reward…

  15. 21 CFR 14.95 - Compensation of advisory committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Compensation of advisory committee members. 14.95 Section 14.95 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL... Product Radiation Safety Standards Committee (TEPRSSC) are not appointed as special Government...

  16. 50 CFR 600.210 - Terms of Council members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Terms of Council members. 600.210 Section 600.210 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Council Membership § 600.210 Terms...

  17. 50 CFR 600.210 - Terms of Council members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Terms of Council members. 600.210 Section 600.210 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Council Membership § 600.210 Terms...

  18. 50 CFR 600.245 - Council member compensation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Council member compensation. 600.245 Section 600.245 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Council Membership §...

  19. 50 CFR 600.250 - Council member training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Council member training. 600.250 Section 600.250 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Council Membership § 600.250...

  20. 50 CFR 600.210 - Terms of Council members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Terms of Council members. 600.210 Section 600.210 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE MAGNUSON-STEVENS ACT PROVISIONS Council Membership § 600.210 Terms...