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Sample records for admiralty inlet puget

  1. Study of the Acoustic Effects of Hydrokinetic Tidal Turbines in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Brian Polagye; Jim Thomson; Chris Bassett; Jason Wood; Dom Tollit; Robert Cavagnaro; Andrea Copping

    2012-03-30

    Hydrokinetic turbines will be a source of noise in the marine environment - both during operation and during installation/removal. High intensity sound can cause injury or behavioral changes in marine mammals and may also affect fish and invertebrates. These noise effects are, however, highly dependent on the individual marine animals; the intensity, frequency, and duration of the sound; and context in which the sound is received. In other words, production of sound is a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for an environmental impact. At a workshop on the environmental effects of tidal energy development, experts identified sound produced by turbines as an area of potentially significant impact, but also high uncertainty. The overall objectives of this project are to improve our understanding of the potential acoustic effects of tidal turbines by: (1) Characterizing sources of existing underwater noise; (2) Assessing the effectiveness of monitoring technologies to characterize underwater noise and marine mammal responsiveness to noise; (3) Evaluating the sound profile of an operating tidal turbine; and (4) Studying the effect of turbine sound on surrogate species in a laboratory environment. This study focuses on a specific case study for tidal energy development in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington (USA), but the methodologies and results are applicable to other turbine technologies and geographic locations. The project succeeded in achieving the above objectives and, in doing so, substantially contributed to the body of knowledge around the acoustic effects of tidal energy development in several ways: (1) Through collection of data from Admiralty Inlet, established the sources of sound generated by strong currents (mobilizations of sediment and gravel) and determined that low-frequency sound recorded during periods of strong currents is non-propagating pseudo-sound. This helped to advance the debate within the marine and hydrokinetics acoustic

  2. Admiralty Inlet Advanced Turbulence Measurements: May 2015

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kilcher, Levi

    2015-05-18

    This data is from measurements at Admiralty Head, in Admiralty Inlet (Puget Sound) in May of 2015. The measurements were made using Inertial Motion Unit (IMU) equipped ADVs mounted on a 'StableMoor' (Manufacturer: DeepWater Buoyancy) buoy and a Tidal Turbulence Mooring (TTM). These platforms position ADV heads above the seafloor to make mid-depth turbulence measurements. The inertial measurements from the IMU allows for removal of mooring motion in post processing. The mooring and buoy motion has been removed from the stream-wise and vertical velocity signals (u, w). The lateral (v) velocity has some 'persistent motion contamination' due to mooring sway. The TTM was deployed with one ADV, it's position was: 48 09.145', -122 41.209' The StableMoor was deployed twice, the first time it was deployed in 'wing-mode' with two ADVs ('Port' and 'Star') at: 48 09.166', -122 41.173' The second StableMoor deployment was in 'Nose' mode with one ADV at: 48 09.166', -122 41.174' Units ----- - Velocity data (_u, urot, uacc) is in m/s. - Acceleration (Accel) data is in m/s^2. - Angular rate (AngRt) data is in rad/s. - The components of all vectors are in 'ENU' orientation. That is, the first index is True East, the second is True North, and the third is Up (vertical). - All other quantities are in the units defined in the Nortek Manual. Motion correction and rotation into the ENU earth reference frame was performed using the Python-based open source DOLfYN library (http://lkilcher.github.io/dolfyn/). Details on motion correction can be found there. Additional details on TTM measurements at this site can be found in the included Marine Energy Technology Symposium paper.

  3. Admiralty Inlet Advanced Turbulence Measurements: June 2014

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kilcher, Levi

    2014-06-30

    This data is from measurements at Admiralty Head, in Admiralty Inlet (Puget Sound) in June of 2014. The measurements were made using Inertial Motion Unit (IMU) equipped ADVs mounted on Tidal Turbulence Mooring's (TTMs). The TTM positions the ADV head above the seafloor to make mid-depth turbulence measurements. The inertial measurements from the IMU allows for removal of mooring motion in post processing. The mooring motion has been removed from the stream-wise and vertical velocity signals (u, w). The lateral (v) velocity has some 'persistent motion contamination' due to mooring sway. Each ttm was deployed with two ADVs. The 'top' ADV head was positioned 0.5m above the 'bottom' ADV head. The TTMs were placed in 58m of water. The position of the TTMs were: ttm01 : (48.1525, -122.6867) ttm01b : (48.15256666, -122.68678333) ttm02b : (48.152783333, -122.686316666) Deployments TTM01b and TTM02b occurred simultaneously and were spaced approximately 50m apart in the cross-stream direction. Units ----- - Velocity data (_u, urot, uacc) is in m/s. - Acceleration (Accel) data is in m/s^2. - Angular rate (AngRt) data is in rad/s. - The components of all vectors are in 'ENU' orientation. That is, the first index is True East, the second is True North, and the third is Up (vertical). - All other quantities are in the units defined in the Nortek Manual. Motion correction and rotation into the ENU earth reference frame was performed using the Python-based open source DOLfYN library (http://lkilcher.github.io/dolfyn/). Details on motion correction can be found there. Additional details on TTM measurements at this site can be found in the included Marine Energy Technology Symposium paper.

  4. Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collar, Craig

    2015-09-14

    This document represents the final report for the Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project, located in Puget Sound, Washington, United States. The Project purpose was to license, permit, and install a grid-connected deep-water tidal turbine array (two turbines) to be used as a platform to gather operational and environmental data on tidal energy generation. The data could then be used to better inform the viability of commercial tidal energy generation from technical, economic, social, and environmental standpoints. This data would serve as a critical step towards the responsible advancement of commercial scale tidal energy in the United States and around the world. In late 2014, Project activities were discontinued due to escalating costs, and the DOE award was terminated in early 2015. Permitting, licensing, and engineering design activities were completed under this award. Final design, deployment, operation, and monitoring were not completed. This report discusses the results and accomplishments achieved under the subject award.

  5. 33 CFR 334.1210 - Admiralty Inlet, entrance; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... prohibited. (ii) The regulations in this paragraph shall be enforced by the Commander, Naval Base, Seattle... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admiralty Inlet, entrance; naval..., entrance; naval restricted area. (a) Admiralty Inlet, entrance; naval restricted area—(1) The...

  6. Numerical Simulation of Admiralty Inlet, WA, with Tidal Hydrokinetic Turbine Siting Application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thyng, Kristen M.

    Tidal hydrokinetic energy has been recognized as a potential source of sustainable, renewable energy. In order to properly site turbines for commercial-scale development, the complex flow conditions in a potential deployment region must be understood. Viable locations for turbines are limited by many factors, including underwater space that is above the bottom boundary layer, below shipping traffic, within areas of strong currents, and yet avoids additional fatiguing stresses. The primary area of interest in the Puget Sound for commercial tidal energy development is Admiralty Inlet, which includes potentially disruptive flow features such as vortices and strong turbulence. This dissertation seeks to increase the body of knowledge of these features both from an oceanographic perspective and as they pertain to turbine site characterization. The primary means of studying Admiralty Inlet in this document is through numerical simulation of the region using the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). The model output is found to compare well with field data, capturing eddy fields, turbulence properties, relative tidal phases, and illuminating many flow features. Horizontal velocities in the simulation are, on average, approximately 75% the size of those found in the data. This speed deficiency is inherited from the forcing model in which the Admiralty Inlet simulation is nested. The model output also shows that the flow field of this fjord-like estuary is largely affected by a headland on the northeast side of the Inlet. Vortices generated by this headland, Admiralty Head, are found to vary considerably depending on the tidal cycle. The eddies can persist beyond the half-cycle of generation to significantly affect the horizontal speed and other flow field properties in the subsequent half-cycle. Detailed analysis of the vertical vorticity governing equation shows that advection, tilting, stretching, and boundary generation are the most significant processes dictating the

  7. Admiralty Inlet Hub-Height Turbulence Measurements from June 2012

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kilcher, Levi

    2012-06-18

    This data is from measurements at Admiralty Head, in admiralty inlet. The measurements were made using an IMU equipped ADV mounted on a mooring, the 'Tidal Turbulence Mooring' or 'TTM'. The inertial measurements from the IMU allows for removal of mooring motion in post processing. The mooring motion has been removed from the stream-wise and vertical velocity signals (u, w). The lateral (v) velocity may have some 'persistent motion contamination' due to mooring sway. The ADV was positioned 11m above the seafloor in 58m of water at 48.1515N, 122.6858W. Units ----- - Velocity data (_u, urot, uacc) is in m/s. - Acceleration (Accel) data is in m/s^2. - Angular rate (AngRt) data is in rad/s. - The components of all vectors are in 'ENU' orientation. That is, the first index is True East, the second is True North, and the third is Up (vertical). - All other quantities are in the units defined in the Nortek Manual. Motion correction and rotation into the ENU earth reference frame was performed using the Python-based open source DOLfYN library (http://lkilcher.github.io/dolfyn/). Details on motion correction can be found there. For additional details on this dataset see the included Marine Energy Technology Symposium paper.

  8. Acoustic Environment of Admiralty Inlet: Broadband Noise Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.; Jones, Mark E.

    2011-09-30

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the highly endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines at Admiralty Inlet. Of particular concern is the potential for blade strike or other negative interactions between the SRKW and the tidal turbine. A variety of technologies including passive and active monitoring systems are being considered as potential tools to determine the presence of SRKW in the vicinity of the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for the determination of design and operation specifications of all marine and hydrokinetic energy capture technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array (VLA) with four calibrated hydrophones. The sound pressure level (SPL) power spectrum density was estimated based on the fast Fourier transform. This study describes the first broadband SPL measurements for this site at different depths with frequency ranging from 10 kHz to 480 kHz in combination with other information. To understand the SPL caused by this bedload transport, three different pressure sensors with temperature and conductivity were also assembled on the VLA to measure the conditions at the hydrophone deployment depth. The broadband SPL levels at frequency ranges of 3 kHz to 7 kHz as a function of depth were estimated. Only the hydrophone at an average depth of 40 m showed the strong dependence of SPL with distance from the bottom, which was possibly caused by the cobbles shifting on the seabed. Automatic Identification System data were also studied to understand the SPL measurements.

  9. A modeling study of tidal energy extraction and the associated impact on tidal circulation in a multi-inlet bay system of Puget Sound

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Taiping; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2017-03-25

    Previously, a major focus of tidal energy studies in Puget Sound were the deep channels such as Admiralty Inlet that have a larger power potential. Our paper focuses on the possibility of extracting tidal energy from minor tidal channels of Puget Sound by using a hydrodynamic model to quantify the power potential and the associated impact on tidal circulation. The study site is a multi-inlet bay system connected by two narrow inlets, Agate Pass and Rich Passage, to the Main Basin of Puget Sound. A three-dimensional hydrodynamic model was applied to the study site and validated for tidal elevations andmore » currents. Here, we examined three energy extraction scenarios in which turbines were deployed in each of the two passages and concurrently in both. Extracted power rates and associated changes in tidal elevation, current, tidal flux, and residence time were examined. Maximum instantaneous power rates reached 250 kW, 1550 kW, and 1800 kW, respectively, for the three energy extraction scenarios. Model results suggest that with the level of energy extraction in the three energy extraction scenarios, the impact on tidal circulation is very small. It is worth investigating the feasibility of harnessing tidal energy from minor tidal channels of Puget Sound.« less

  10. Mercury in Sediment, Water, and Biota of Sinclair Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington, 1989-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Keys, Morgan E.; Scholting, Kelly L.

    2010-01-01

    Historical records of mercury contamination in dated sediment cores from Sinclair Inlet are coincidental with activities at the U.S. Navy Puget Sound Naval Shipyard; peak total mercury concentrations occurred around World War II. After World War II, better metallurgical management practices and environmental regulations reduced mercury contamination, but total mercury concentrations in surface sediment of Sinclair Inlet have decreased slowly because of the low rate of sedimentation relative to the vertical mixing within sediment. The slopes of linear regressions between the total mercury and total organic carbon concentrations of sediment offshore of Puget Sound urban areas was the best indicator of general mercury contamination above pre-industrial levels. Prior to the 2000-01 remediation, this indicator placed Sinclair Inlet in the tier of estuaries with the highest level of mercury contamination, along with Bellingham Bay in northern Puget Sound and Elliott Bay near Seattle. This indicator also suggests that the 2000/2001 remediation dredging had significant positive effect on Sinclair Inlet as a whole. In 2007, about 80 percent of the area of the Bremerton naval complex had sediment total mercury concentrations within about 0.5 milligrams per kilogram of the Sinclair Inlet regression. Three areas adjacent to the waterfront of the Bremerton naval complex have total mercury concentrations above this range and indicate a possible terrestrial source from waterfront areas of Bremerton naval complex. Total mercury concentrations in unfiltered Sinclair Inlet marine waters are about three times higher than those of central Puget Sound, but the small numbers of samples and complex physical and geochemical processes make it difficult to interpret the geographical distribution of mercury in marine waters from Sinclair Inlet. Total mercury concentrations in various biota species were compared among geographical locations and included data of composite samples, individual

  11. Biological Sampling and Analysis in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2007 Puget Sound Biota Study

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2008-10-09

    Evaluating spatial and temporal trends in contaminant residues in Puget Sound fish and macroinvertebrates are the objectives of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP). In a cooperative effort between the ENVironmental inVESTment group (ENVVEST) and Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife, additional biota samples were collected during the 2007 PSAMP biota survey and analyzed for chemical residues and stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N). Approximately three specimens of each species collected from Sinclair Inlet, Georgia Basin, and reference locations in Puget Sound were selected for whole body chemical analysis. The muscle tissue of specimens selected for chemical analyses were also analyzed for δ13C and δ15N to provide information on relative trophic level and food sources. This data report summarizes the chemical residues for the 2007 PSAMP fish and macro-invertebrate samples. In addition, six Spiny Dogfish (Squalus acanthias) samples were necropsied to evaluate chemical residue of various parts of the fish (digestive tract, liver, embryo, muscle tissue), as well as, a weight proportional whole body composite (WBWC). Whole organisms were homogenized and analyzed for silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, nickel, lead, zinc, mercury, 19 polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, PCB homologues, percent moisture, percent lipids, δ13C, and δ15N.

  12. Water Velocities and the Potential for the Movement of Bed Sediments in Sinclair Inlet of Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gartner, Jeffrey W.; Prych, E.A.; Tate, G.B.; Cacchione, D.A.; Cheng, R.T.; Bidlake, W.R.; Ferreira, J.T.

    1998-01-01

    Sinclair Inlet is a small embayment of Puget Sound in the State of Washington. The inlet, about 6.5 kilometers long and 1.5 kilometers wide, is the site of Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. There are concerns that bed sediments in the inlet may have been contaminated as a result of activities at the shipyard, and that these sediments could be resuspended by tide- and wind-driven currents and transported within the inlet or out of the inlet to other parts of Puget Sound. This study was conducted to provide information concerning the potential for sediment resuspension in the inlet. To obtain the necessary data, vertical profiles of water current from about 2 meters above the bed to 2 meters below the water surface were monitored with acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) at three locations during a 6.5-week winter period and a 4.5-week summer period in 1994. In addition, during the winter period, water velocites between 0.19 and 1.20 meters above the bed were measured with current meters using an instrument package called Geoprobe, which was deployed near one of the ADCPs. Other instruments on the Geoprobe measured light transmissivity, and a camera periodically took photographs of the bottom. Instruments on the Geoprobe and on the ADCPs also measured conductivity (for determining salinity), temperature, and pressure (for determinining tide). Samples of bed sediment and water samples for determining suspended-sediment concentration were collected at each of the current-measurement stations. Wind speed and direction were measured at three stations during a 12-month period, and tide was measured at one of these stations. Water currents measured at the three locations in Sinclair Inlet were relatively weak. Typical speeds were 5 to 10 centimeters per second, and the RMS (root-mean-square) speeds were less than 8 centimeters per second. Tidal and residual currents were of similar magnitude. Residual currents near the bottom typically were flowing in the opposite

  13. Contaminant Concentrations in Storm Water Entering the Sinclair/Dyes Inlet Subasin of the Puget Sound, USA, During Storm Event and Baseflow Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; May, Christopher W.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Johnston, Robert K.; Leisle, D. E.; Beckwith, B.; Sherrell, Gerald; Mettallo, David; Pingree, Ryan

    2007-03-29

    The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washington’s 1998 303(d) due to fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for the contaminant mass balance calculations conducted for the watershed. This paper summarizes the contaminant concentrations in representative streams and outfalls discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets during 18 storm events and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. This paper serves as a portion of the report titled, “Surface and Stormwater Quality Assessment for Sinclair and Dyes Inlet, Washington” (Brandenberger et al. 2007).

  14. Ambient Monitoring for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2010 Regional Mussel Watch (AMB02)

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2010-10-20

    The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF) and Naval Base Kitsap-Bremerton (Shipyard) located in Bremerton, WA are committed to a culture of continuous process improvement for all aspects of Shipyard operations, including reducing the releases of hazardous materials and waste in discharges from the Shipyard. Under the Project ENVVEST Final Project Agreement, a cooperative project among PSNS&IMF, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and local stakeholders (US Navy, EPA and Ecology 2002) has been helping to improve the environmental quality of the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet Watershed (ENVVEST 2006). An ambient monitoring program for sediment, water, and indigenous mussels began in 2009 to assess the status and trend of ecological resources, assess the effectiveness of cleanup and pollution control measures, and determine if discharges from all sources are protective of beneficial uses including aquatic life. This document presents the 2010 chemical residue data and stable isotopes of carbon (δ13C) and nitrogen (δ15N) for the regional mussel watch stations located in Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, Rich Passage, Agate Passage, Liberty Bay, and Keyport Lagoon. Indigenous bivalves were collected from a small boat and/or from along the shoreline, measured, composited, and analyzed for a suite of trace metals and organic contaminants. The trace metals included silver, arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, mercury, nickel, lead, and zinc. The organic contaminants included the list of NOAA Status and Trends 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and suite of parent and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). These chemical residue data provide the first year of the biota ambient monitoring.

  15. Contaminant Concentrations in Storm Water Entering the Sinclair/Dyes Inlet Subasin of the Puget Sound, USA During Storm Event and Baseflow Conditions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    Contaminant Concentrations in Storm Water Entering the Sinclair/Dyes Inlet Subasin of the Puget Sound, USA During Storm Event and Baseflow Conditions...Washington’s 1998 303(d) list due to fecal coliform contamination in surface waters, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish...tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination that lacked sufficient data for

  16. Ambient Monitoring for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, Washington: Chemical Analyses for 2012 Regional Mussel Watch

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Kuo, Li-Jung; Suslick, Carolynn R.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2012-09-01

    Under the Project ENVVEST Final Project Agreement, the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard & Intermediate Maintenance Facility (PSNS&IMF), Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology), and local stakeholders have worked collaboratively to improve the environmental quality of Sinclair and Dyes Inlets. A regional mussel monitoring program began in 2010 to assess the status and trend of ecological resources, assess the effectiveness of cleanup and pollution control measures, and determine if discharges from all sources are protective of beneficial uses including aquatic life. The program collected indigenous mussels to represent a time-integrated measure of bioavailable metals and organic chemicals present in the water column. This document supplements the 2010 indigenous mussel data with 2012 data to provide two years of data on the chemical residue of mussels present in the inter-tidal regions of Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, Rich Passage, Agate Passage, Liberty Bay, and Keyport Lagoon. The 2012 data set added one station at PSNS&IMF and one market samples from Penn Cove. Indigenous mussels were collected from a small boat and/or from along the shoreline, measured, composited, and analyzed for percent lipids, percent moisture, stable isotopes of carbon and nitrogen, and a suite of trace metals and organic contaminants. The trace metals included silver (Ag), arsenic (As), cadmium (Cd), copper (Cu), mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn). The organic contaminants included the list of NOAA Status and Trends 20 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB) congeners and suite of parent and methylated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The average lengths between the 2010 and 2012 data were generally less than 30% relative percent difference (RPD). Generally, the metals concentrations were lower in 2012 than 2010 with some notable exceptions in Sinclair Inlet and Rich Passage where increases in Ag, Hg, Pb, Cu, and Zn exceeded

  17. Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect

    Collar, Craig W

    2012-11-16

    Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy's Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program's goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others

  18. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate Scale Water Quality Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon S.; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-10-01

    The Salish Sea, including Puget Sound, is a large estuarine system bounded by over seven thousand miles of complex shorelines, consists of several subbasins and many large inlets with distinct properties of their own. Pacific Ocean water enters Puget Sound through the Strait of Juan de Fuca at depth over the Admiralty Inlet sill. Ocean water mixed with freshwater discharges from runoff, rivers, and wastewater outfalls exits Puget Sound through the brackish surface outflow layer. Nutrient pollution is considered one of the largest threats to Puget Sound. There is considerable interest in understanding the effect of nutrient loads on the water quality and ecological health of Puget Sound in particular and the Salish Sea as a whole. The Washington State Department of Ecology (Ecology) contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to develop a coupled hydrodynamic and water quality model. The water quality model simulates algae growth, dissolved oxygen, (DO) and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound to inform potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or control human impacts to DO levels in the sensitive areas. The project did not include any additional data collection but instead relied on currently available information. This report describes model development effort conducted during the period 2009 to 2012 under a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) cooperative agreement with PNNL, Ecology, and the University of Washington awarded under the National Estuary Program

  19. Tidal Residual Eddies and their Effect on Water Exchange in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2013-08-30

    Tidal residual eddies are one of the important hydrodynamic features in tidally dominant estuaries and coastal bays, and they could have significant effects on water exchange in a tidal system. This paper presents a modeling study of tides and tidal residual eddies in Puget Sound, a tidally dominant fjord-like estuary in the Pacific Northwest coast, using a three-dimensional finite-volume coastal ocean model. Mechanisms of vorticity generation and asymmetric distribution patterns around an island/headland were analyzed using the dynamic vorticity transfer approach and numerical experiments. Model results of Puget Sound show that a number of large twin tidal residual eddies exist in the Admiralty Inlet because of the presence of major headlands in the inlet. Simulated residual vorticities near the major headlands indicate that the clockwise tidal residual eddy (negative vorticity) is generally stronger than the anticlockwise eddy (positive vorticity) because of the effect of Coriolis force. The effect of tidal residual eddies on water exchange in Puget Sound and its sub-basins were evaluated by simulations of dye transport. It was found that the strong transverse variability of residual currents in the Admiralty Inlet results in a dominant seaward transport along the eastern shore and a dominant landward transport along the western shore of the Inlet. A similar transport pattern in Hood Canal is caused by the presence of tidal residual eddies near the entrance of the canal. Model results show that tidal residual currents in Whidbey Basin are small in comparison to other sub-basins. A large clockwise residual circulation is formed around Vashon Island near entrance of South Sound, which can potentially constrain the water exchange between the Central Basin and South Sound.

  20. Simulation of annual biogeochemical cycles of nutrient balance, phytoplankton bloom(s), and DO in Puget Sound using an unstructured grid model

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-08-14

    Nutrient pollution from rivers, nonpoint source runoff, and nearly 100 wastewater discharges is a potential threat to the ecological health of Puget Sound with evidence of hypoxia in some basins. However, the relative contributions of loads entering Puget Sound from natural and anthropogenic sources, and the effects of exchange flow from the Pacific Ocean are not well understood. Development of a quantitative model of Puget Sound is thus presented to help improve our understanding of the annual biogeochemical cycles in this system using the unstructured grid Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model framework and the Integrated Compartment Model (CE-QUAL-ICM) water quality kinetics. Results based on 2006 data show that phytoplankton growth and die-off, succession between two species of algae, nutrient dynamics, and dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound are strongly tied to seasonal variation of temperature, solar radiation, and the annual exchange and flushing induced by upwelled Pacific Ocean waters. Concentrations in the mixed outflow surface layer occupying approximately 5–20 m of the upper water column show strong effects of eutrophication from natural and anthropogenic sources, spring and summer algae blooms, accompanied by depleted nutrients but high dissolved oxygen levels. The bottom layer reflects dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations of upwelled Pacific Ocean water modulated by mixing with biologically active surface outflow in the Strait of Juan de Fuca prior to entering Puget Sound over the Admiralty Inlet. The effect of reflux mixing at the Admiralty Inlet sill resulting in lower nutrient and higher dissolved oxygen levels in bottom waters of Puget Sound than the incoming upwelled Pacific Ocean water is reproduced. Finally, by late winter, with the reduction in algal activity, water column constituents of interest, were renewed and the system appeared to reset with cooler temperature, higher nutrient, and higher dissolved oxygen waters from the Pacific

  1. Simulation of annual biogeochemical cycles of nutrient balance, phytoplankton bloom(s), and DO in Puget Sound using an unstructured grid model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Sackmann, Brandon; Long, Wen; Mohamedali, Teizeen; Roberts, Mindy

    2012-09-01

    Nutrient pollution from rivers, nonpoint source runoff, and nearly 100 wastewater discharges is a potential threat to the ecological health of Puget Sound with evidence of hypoxia in some basins. However, the relative contributions of loads entering Puget Sound from natural and anthropogenic sources, and the effects of exchange flow from the Pacific Ocean are not well understood. Development of a quantitative model of Puget Sound is thus presented to help improve our understanding of the annual biogeochemical cycles in this system using the unstructured grid Finite-Volume Coastal Ocean Model framework and the Integrated Compartment Model (CE-QUAL-ICM) water quality kinetics. Results based on 2006 data show that phytoplankton growth and die-off, succession between two species of algae, nutrient dynamics, and dissolved oxygen in Puget Sound are strongly tied to seasonal variation of temperature, solar radiation, and the annual exchange and flushing induced by upwelled Pacific Ocean waters. Concentrations in the mixed outflow surface layer occupying approximately 5-20 m of the upper water column show strong effects of eutrophication from natural and anthropogenic sources, spring and summer algae blooms, accompanied by depleted nutrients but high dissolved oxygen levels. The bottom layer reflects dissolved oxygen and nutrient concentrations of upwelled Pacific Ocean water modulated by mixing with biologically active surface outflow in the Strait of Juan de Fuca prior to entering Puget Sound over the Admiralty Inlet. The effect of reflux mixing at the Admiralty Inlet sill resulting in lower nutrient and higher dissolved oxygen levels in bottom waters of Puget Sound than the incoming upwelled Pacific Ocean water is reproduced. By late winter, with the reduction in algal activity, water column constituents of interest, were renewed and the system appeared to reset with cooler temperature, higher nutrient, and higher dissolved oxygen waters from the Pacific Ocean.

  2. Utility of aeromagnetic studies for mapping of potentially active faults in two forearc basins: Puget Sound, Washington, and Cook Inlet, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, R.W.; Blakely, R.J.; Haeussler, P.J.; Wells, R.E.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic surveys over forearc basins can detect faults and folds in weakly magnetized sediments, thus providing geologic constraints on tectonic evolution and improved understanding of seismic hazards in convergent-margin settings. Puget Sound, Washington, and Cook Inlet, Alaska, provide two case histories. In each lowland region, shallow-source magnetic anomalies are related to active folds and/or faults. Mapping these structures is critical for understanding seismic hazards that face the urban regions of Seattle, Washington, and Anchorage, Alaska. Similarities in aeromagnetic anomaly patterns and magnetic stratigraphy between the two regions suggest that we can expect the aeromagnetic method to yield useful structural information that may contribute to earth-hazard and energy resource investigations in other forearc basins.

  3. Using Nitrate δ15N and δ18O Values to Identify Potential Sources of Nutrient Inputs to a Highly Impacted Inlet in South Puget Sound, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wetzig, Y.; Roepke, E.; Perkins, J.; Fox-Dobbs, K.

    2015-12-01

    Quartermaster Harbor (QMH) is a restricted inlet on Vashon Island in Puget Sound. Environmental issues in QMH include poor water quality, limited flux, and annual toxic algal blooms related to high nutrient loading. Natural and anthropogenic nitrogen compounds may enter QMH through a number of sources. Previous work found seasonally elevated groundwater and surface marine water concentration of nitrate ([NO3-]). We aimed to identify potential NO3- source(s) using N and O stable isotope values of NO3- in both freshwater and marine water samples. In October, 2014 we collected freshwater samples from three tributary streams to QMH, and a residential well adjacent to QMH. We also collected paired surface and deep ( ~1m above sediment) marine samples at 5 sites along an 8000m transect from the mouth of the inlet to the inner harbor. Each sample was analyzed for [NO3-], and δ15NNO3 and δ18ONO3 values. Possible NO3- sources that may have discreet δ15N and δ18O values include septic seepage, marine NO3-, and natural (terrestrial) NO3-. All deep marine sample δ15NNO3 values were similarly low (~2 ‰), but the surface values increased by ~8 ‰ from the inlet mouth to inner harbor. Marine sample δ18ONO3 values were invariant (~1 ‰ range), except for one high surface value. The deep [NO3-] decreased slightly towards the inner harbor, and were consistently higher than paired surface concentration, which decreased dramatically. The uniformity of [NO3-] and isotopic values in deep marine samples may be explained by groundwater recharge. The isotopic values of NO3- in the creeks were not characteristic of a specific anthropogenic source, but one creek had a very high [NO3-]. The only isotopic evidence for an anthropogenic NO3- source (septic) was found in the two surface marine samples from the inner harbor, and the well water sample. Seasonal sampling and additional sites will yield a more complete understanding of the relative contributions of NO3- sources to QMH.

  4. Lapita colonization of the admiralty islands?

    PubMed

    Kennedy, J

    1981-08-14

    Archeological research in the Admiralty Islands provides evidence of occupation by 3500 years ago and suggests settlement by obsidian-using maritime colonists, whose Lapita pottery style underwent gradual modification within the Admiralties.

  5. Retreat of the Puget lobe of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugerud, R. A.

    2010-12-01

    Systematic geomorphic mapping from high-resolution, digital lidar topography (e.g., http://pubs.usgs.gov/of/2009/1033/) is improving our understanding of the retreat of the Cordilleran ice sheet at the end of the last glaciation of northwest Washington. This history is of interest both because it provides a stratigraphic framework for earthquake-hazards studies and as an example of the interaction of grounded marine ice with rising sea level. The spatial distribution of outwash flats outlines a four-stage history of ice-margin retreat. Main stage is marked by drainage from the south margin of the Puget Lobe to the Chehalis valley via multiple channels. Russell stage began when ice retreated sufficiently for drainage to coalesce to a single path via Black Lake south of Olympia. Bretz stage began with a drop in local base level as ice-marginal drainage switched to a path across the Chimacum Peninsula southeast of Port Townsend. Whulge stage began when ice retreated from Admiralty Inlet, Glacial Lake Bretz drained, and Puget Sound became marine. A 5th, Sumas stage could be defined but ongoing work in the Bellingham area indicates that we don’t yet fully understand Sumas complexities. An apparently-folded outwash flat west of Bremerton provides what may be our best constraint on the frequency of large earthquakes on the Seattle fault (≥23 m differential uplift in ~16,000 years, or one 7-9 m uplift event per ~5,000 yrs); the weakest link in this argument is the assumption of southwards drainage from the retreating Puget Lobe. Several lines of evidence indicate that the Puget Lobe stagnated and melted in place: widespread dead-ice features; absence of end moraines between Olympia and central Whidbey Island; peculiarities in the outfall of Glacial Lake Bretz; and re-orientation of ice flow on northern Whidbey Island from N-S to NE-SW. Stagnation was likely caused by collapse of the Juan de Fuca lobe, which beheaded the Puget Lobe. Collapse was probably the result of a

  6. Southern Salish Sea Habitat Map Series: Admiralty Inlet

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cochrane, Guy R.; Dethier, Megan N.; Hodson, Timothy O.; Kull, Kristine K.; Golden, Nadine E.; Ritchie, Andrew C.; Moegling, Crescent; Pacunski, Robert E.; Cochrane, Guy R.

    2015-01-01

    This publication includes four map sheets, explanatory text, and a descriptive pamphlet. Each map sheet is published as a portable document format (PDF) file. ESRI ArcGIS compatible geotiffs (for example, bathymetry) and shapefiles (for example video observation points) will be available for download in the data catalog associated with this publication (Cochrane, 2015). An ArcGIS Project File with the symbology used to generate the map sheets is also provided. For those who do not own the full suite of ESRI GIS and mapping software, the data can be read using ESRI ArcReader, a free viewer that is available at http://www.esri.com/software/arcgis/arcreader/index.html.

  7. 77 FR 25157 - Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, WA; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-27

    ...: Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project. f. Location: On the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound... would not occupy any federal lands. g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act, 16 U.S.C. 791(a)-828(c). h... Description: The proposed Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project would consist of: (1) Two...

  8. Orcas in Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    de Fuca Strait, Puget Sound and the Strait of Georgia ) for a considerable time of the year, predominantly from early spring until late fall (Ford and...the south- ern part of Georgia Strait, Boundary Passage, the southern Gulf Islands and the eastern end of Juan de Fuca Strait (Heimlich- Boran 1988...Figure 2. Distribution of SRKW during September 2006 in Puget Sound and the southern Strait of Georgia (Advanced Satellite Productions, Orca Network

  9. 77 FR 17466 - Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County, WA; Notice of Application Tendered for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... Inlet Pilot Tidal Project. f. Location: On the east side of Admiralty Inlet in Puget Sound, Washington... not occupy any federal lands. g. Filed Pursuant to: Federal Power Act 16 U.S.C. 791(a)-828(c). h... Admiralty Inlet Pilot Tidal Project would consist of (1) two 19.7-foot-diameter Open-Centre...

  10. 36 CFR 228.80 - Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. 228.80 Section 228.80 Parks, Forests, and Public... Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. (a) Mineral activities on valid mining claims in the Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments must be conducted...

  11. 36 CFR 228.80 - Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. 228.80 Section 228.80 Parks, Forests, and Public... Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska. (a) Mineral activities on valid mining claims in the Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments must be conducted...

  12. Fleet Logistics Center, Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) Naval Supply Systems Command,Fleet Logistics Center, Puget Sound,467 W Street , Bremerton ,WA,98314-5100 8... Bremerton , WA Established: October 1967 Name Changes: Naval Supply Center Puget Sound, Fleet and Industrial Supply Center Puget...or Sasebo) deployed Ships in the Western Pacific (WestPac) Naval Base Kitsap at Bremerton and Bangor (NBK at Bremerton or Bangor) Navy Region

  13. Puget Sound telecommuting demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Quaid, M.; Heifetz, L.; Farley, M.; Christensen, D.; Ulberg, C.; Gordon, A.; Spain, D.; Whitaker, B.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the Puget Sound Telecommuting demonstration project. This is a part-time work and transportation alternative that substitutes the normal work commute with the choice of working at home or at an office close to home. According to Link Resources, a research and consulting firm located in New York, there were 4.6 million part-time home telecommuters in the United States in 1991. This figure, which included only company employees who work at home during normal business hours, is up from 3.4 million in 1990, an increase of 35 percent in one year. Part-time telecommuters average 2.5 days per week at home. (There are also about 876,000 full-time telecommuters in the US.) The study done by Link Resources estimates that 4.5 percent of the civilian work force age 18 or older is telecommuting. The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) began exploring telecommuting as an alternate route to work for Washington, first through The Governor`s Conference on Telecommuting in June 1989. The conference raised corporate and government awareness of telecommuting, and set the stage for further investigation. In 1990, WSEO launched the Puget Sound Telecommuting Demonstration to explore the environmental, organizational, and personal sides of telecommuting. This report presents the interim research results.

  14. Puget Sound telecommuting demonstration

    SciTech Connect

    Quaid, M.; Heifetz, L.; Farley, M.; Christensen, D. ); Ulberg, C.; Gordon, A.; Spain, D.; Whitaker, B. )

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the Puget Sound Telecommuting demonstration project. This is a part-time work and transportation alternative that substitutes the normal work commute with the choice of working at home or at an office close to home. According to Link Resources, a research and consulting firm located in New York, there were 4.6 million part-time home telecommuters in the United States in 1991. This figure, which included only company employees who work at home during normal business hours, is up from 3.4 million in 1990, an increase of 35 percent in one year. Part-time telecommuters average 2.5 days per week at home. (There are also about 876,000 full-time telecommuters in the US.) The study done by Link Resources estimates that 4.5 percent of the civilian work force age 18 or older is telecommuting. The Washington State Energy Office (WSEO) began exploring telecommuting as an alternate route to work for Washington, first through The Governor's Conference on Telecommuting in June 1989. The conference raised corporate and government awareness of telecommuting, and set the stage for further investigation. In 1990, WSEO launched the Puget Sound Telecommuting Demonstration to explore the environmental, organizational, and personal sides of telecommuting. This report presents the interim research results.

  15. Circulation exchange patterns in Sinclair Inlet, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Noble, Marlene A.; Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Paulson, Anthony J.; Gartner, Anne L.

    2013-01-01

    In 1994, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the U.S. Navy, deployed three sets of moorings in Sinclair Inlet, which is a relatively small embayment on the western side of Puget Sound (fig. 1). This inlet is home to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. One purpose of the measurement program was to determine the transport pathways and fate of contaminants known to be present in Sinclair Inlet. Extensive descriptions of the program and the resultant information about contaminant pathways have been reported in Gartner and others (1998). This report primarily focused on the bottom boundary layer and the potential for resuspension and transport of sediments on the seabed in Sinclair Inlet as a result of tides and waves. Recently (2013), interest in transport pathways for suspended and dissolved materials in Sinclair Inlet has been rekindled. In particular, the USGS scientists in Washington and California have been asked to reexamine the datasets collected in the earlier study to refine not only our understanding of transport pathways through the inlet, but to determine how those transport pathways are affected by subtidal currents, local wind stress, and fresh water inputs. Because the prior study focused on the bottom boundary layer and not the water column, a reanalysis of the datasets could increase our understanding of the dynamic forces that drive transport within and through the inlet. However, the early datasets are limited in scope and a comprehensive understanding of these transport processes may require more extensive datasets or the development of a detailed numerical model of transport processes for the inlet, or both.

  16. Final Definite Project Report and Final Environmental Assessment, Keystone Harbor Channel Deepening, Admiralty Inlet, Washington

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-10-01

    impacts are expected. DISTRIBUTION/AVAILABILITY OF ABSTRACT 21 ABSTRACT SECURITY CLASSIFICATION UNCLASSIFIED/UNLIMITED 0 SAME AS RPT. 03 DTIC USERS...would not increase the channel shoaling rate or the cost of regular maintenance dredging, o would have no significant impacts to environmental features...TABLE OF CONTENTS (cont.) ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT FINDING OF NO SIGNIFICANT IMPACT Number PLATES 1 Project Plan and Typical Cross-Section 2

  17. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  18. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  19. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  20. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  1. 27 CFR 9.151 - Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Puget Sound. 9.151 Section... Sound. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Puget Sound.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundary of the Puget Sound viticultural area...

  2. Recent 137Cs deposition in sediments of Admiralty Bay, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Christian J; Santos, Isaac R; Patchineelam, Sambasiva R; Schaefer, Carlos; Silva-Filho, Emmanoel V

    2010-05-01

    Cesium-137, radium-226 and lead-210 profiles of a 25 cm sediment core give an indication of recent changes in land-ocean interactions at a polar coastal environment (Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica). The linear sedimentation accumulation rate at the study site calculated from the unsupported (210)Pb profile was 6.7 mm/year from 1965 to 2005. A 3.5-fold increase in (137)Cs concentrations was observed in the top layer of this sediment core. This sharp increase seems to indicate a recent redistribution of fallout radionuclides previously deposited on soil, vegetation and snow. These results imply enhanced land-ocean interactions at this site likely as a result of climate change. Because our results are based on a single core, additional investigations are needed to confirm our observations.

  3. 33 CFR 167.1323 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Puget Sound. 167.1323 Section 167.1323 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1323 In Puget Sound and...

  4. 33 CFR 167.1323 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Puget Sound. 167.1323 Section 167.1323 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1323 In Puget Sound and...

  5. 33 CFR 167.1323 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Puget Sound. 167.1323 Section 167.1323 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1323 In Puget Sound and...

  6. 33 CFR 167.1323 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Puget Sound.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Puget Sound. 167.1323 Section 167.1323 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1323 In Puget Sound and...

  7. An Evaluation of Contaminant Flux Rates from Sediments of Sinclair Inlet, WA, Using a Benthic Flux Sampling Device

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    adja- cent to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS) in Sinclair Inlet may contain elevated levels of trace metals and organic compounds ( GeoEngineers ... GeoEngineers , 1989; Weston, 1990). Based on this information, our measurements were focused on flux rates for the trace metals listed in table 1. In addition...34 Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry, 9:1487-1502. GeoEngineers , Inc. 1989. "Environmental Services Dredging Project, Pier D, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard

  8. An impedance study on admiralty brass dezincification originated by microbiologically influenced corrosion.

    PubMed

    Ibars, J R; Polo, J L; Moreno, D A; Ranninger, C; Bastidas, J M

    2004-09-30

    In this article we describe a field study of biofouling and microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) of admiralty brass heat exchanger tubes in contact with running fresh water on the river Tagus close to Almaraz nuclear power plant in Spain. Dezincification originated by biofouling and MIC was studied using impedance, polarization resistance, gravimetric, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements. Close correlation was observed between the biofilms formed and the corrosion process (dezincification) using the different experimental techniques. Impedance data showed a capacitive behavior including two time constants. Kramers-Kronig (KK) transforms were used to validate impedance data. The admiralty tubes' impedance data satisfied the KK relations.

  9. 78 FR 58530 - Puget Sound Energy, Inc.;

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...: Puget Sound Energy, Inc. e. Name of Project: Baker River Hydroelectric Project f. Location: Baker...

  10. Revealing archaeal diversity patterns and methane fluxes in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, and their association to Brazilian Antarctic Station activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayama, C. R.; Kuhn, E.; Araújo, A. C. V.; Alvalá, P. C.; Ferreira, W. J.; Vazoller, R. F.; Pellizari, V. H.

    2011-03-01

    The study of Antarctic archaeal communities adds information on the biogeography of this group and helps understanding the dynamics of biogenic methane production in such extreme habitats. Molecular methods were combined to methane flux determinations in Martel Inlet, Admiralty Bay, to assess archaeal diversity, to obtain information about contribution of the area to atmospheric methane budget and to detect possible interferences of the Antarctic Brazilian Station Comandante Ferraz (EACF) wastewater discharge on local archaeal communities and methane emissions. Methane fluxes in Martel Inlet ranged from 3.2 to 117.9 μmol CH 4 m -2 d -1, with an average of 51.3±8.5 μmol CH 4 m -2 d -1 and a median of 57.6 μmol CH 4 m -2d -1. However, three negative fluxes averaging -11.3 μmol CH 4 m -2 d -1 were detected in MacKellar Inlet, indicating that Admiralty Bay can be either a source or sink of atmospheric methane. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) showed that archaeal communities at EACF varied with depth and formed a group separated from the reference sites. Granulometric analysis indicated that differences observed may be mostly related to sediment type. However, an influence of wastewater input could not be discarded, since higher methane fluxes were found at CF site, suggesting stimulation of local methanogenesis. DGGE profile of the wastewater sample grouped separated from all other samples, suggesting that methanogenesis stimulation may be due to changes in environmental conditions rather than to the input of allochtonous species from the wastewater. 16S ribosomal DNA clone libraries analysis showed that all wastewater sequences were related to known methanogenic groups belonging to the hydrogenotrophic genera Methanobacterium and Methanobrevibacter and the aceticlastic genus Methanosaeta. EACF and Botany Point sediment clone libraries retrieved only groups of uncultivated Archaea, with predominance of Crenarchaeota representatives (MCG, MG1, MBG

  11. 33 CFR 167.1322 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario Strait.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario Strait. 167.1322 Section 167.1322 Navigation and Navigable... Coast § 167.1322 In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario...

  12. 33 CFR 167.1322 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario Strait.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario Strait. 167.1322 Section 167.1322 Navigation and Navigable... Coast § 167.1322 In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario...

  13. 33 CFR 167.1322 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario Strait.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario Strait. 167.1322 Section 167.1322 Navigation and Navigable... Coast § 167.1322 In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario...

  14. 33 CFR 167.1322 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario Strait.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario Strait. 167.1322 Section 167.1322 Navigation and Navigable... Coast § 167.1322 In Puget Sound and its approaches: Approaches to Puget Sound other than Rosario...

  15. 36 CFR 228.80 - Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...: (1) If, in the judgment of the authorized officer, environmental impacts unforeseen at the time of... valid mining claims in the Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments must be conducted in... proposed operations, including access; and (2) The potential adverse impacts on the identified...

  16. 36 CFR 228.80 - Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...: (1) If, in the judgment of the authorized officer, environmental impacts unforeseen at the time of... valid mining claims in the Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments must be conducted in... proposed operations, including access; and (2) The potential adverse impacts on the identified...

  17. 36 CFR 228.80 - Operations within Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments, Alaska.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...: (1) If, in the judgment of the authorized officer, environmental impacts unforeseen at the time of... valid mining claims in the Misty Fjords and Admiralty Island National Monuments must be conducted in... proposed operations, including access; and (2) The potential adverse impacts on the identified...

  18. Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound: A Research Plan in Support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    ground- water flow into Puget Sound (Staubitz and others, 1997; Washington Department of Natural Resources, 1998 ). Little is known of inputs of...that simulate marine circulation (Kawase, 1998 ); • Watershed and ground- water models that simulate freshwater discharge to Puget Sound for different...Bookheim, J. Carlton, J. Chapman, J. Cordell, L. Harris, T. Klinger , A. Kohn, C. Lambert, G. Lambert, K. Li, D. Secord and J.Toft. 1998 . Puget Sound

  19. Log Books and the Law of Storms: Maritime Meteorology and the British Admiralty in the Nineteenth Century.

    PubMed

    Naylor, Simon

    2015-12-01

    This essay contributes to debates about the relationship between science and the military by examining the British Admiralty's participation in meteorological projects in the first half of the nineteenth century. It focuses on attempts to transform Royal Navy log books into standardized meteorological registers that would be of use to both science and the state. The essay begins with a discussion of Admiralty Hydrographer Francis Beaufort, who promoted the use of standardized systems for the observation of the weather at sea. It then examines the application of ships' logs to the science of storms. The essay focuses on the Army engineer William Reid, who studied hurricanes while stationed in Barbados and Bermuda. Reid was instrumental in persuading the Admiralty to implement a naval meteorological policy, something the Admiralty Hydrographer had struggled to achieve. The essay uses the reception and adoption of work on storms at sea to reflect on the means and ends of maritime meteorology in the mid-nineteenth century.

  20. Numerical simulation of groundwater flow at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Naval Base Kitsap, Bremerton, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Joseph L.; Johnson, Kenneth H.; Frans, Lonna M.

    2016-08-18

    Information about groundwater-flow paths and locations where groundwater discharges at and near Puget Sound Naval Shipyard is necessary for understanding the potential migration of subsurface contaminants by groundwater at the shipyard. The design of some remediation alternatives would be aided by knowledge of whether groundwater flowing at specific locations beneath the shipyard will eventually discharge directly to Sinclair Inlet of Puget Sound, or if it will discharge to the drainage system of one of the six dry docks located in the shipyard. A 1997 numerical (finite difference) groundwater-flow model of the shipyard and surrounding area was constructed to help evaluate the potential for groundwater discharge to Puget Sound. That steady-state, multilayer numerical model with homogeneous hydraulic characteristics indicated that groundwater flowing beneath nearly all of the shipyard discharges to the dry-dock drainage systems, and only shallow groundwater flowing beneath the western end of the shipyard discharges directly to Sinclair Inlet.Updated information from a 2016 regional groundwater-flow model constructed for the greater Kitsap Peninsula was used to update the 1997 groundwater model of the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. That information included a new interpretation of the hydrogeologic units underlying the area, as well as improved recharge estimates. Other updates to the 1997 model included finer discretization of the finite-difference model grid into more layers, rows, and columns, all with reduced dimensions. This updated Puget Sound Naval Shipyard model was calibrated to 2001–2005 measured water levels, and hydraulic characteristics of the model layers representing different hydrogeologic units were estimated with the aid of state-of-the-art parameter optimization techniques.The flow directions and discharge locations predicted by this updated model generally match the 1997 model despite refinements and other changes. In the updated model, most

  1. Inlet Geomorphology Evolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    APR 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Inlet Geomorphology Evolution 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b...Std Z39-18 Coastal Inlets Research Program Inlet Geomorphology Evolution The Inlet Geomorphology Evolution work unit of the CIRP evaluates

  2. Otolith research for Puget Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Larsen, K.; Reisenbichler, R.

    2007-01-01

    Otoliths are hard structures located in the brain cavity of fish. These structures are formed by a buildup of calcium carbonate within a gelatinous matrix that produces light and dark bands similar to the growth rings in trees. The width of the bands corresponds to environmental factors such as temperature and food availability. As juvenile salmon encounter different environments in their migration to sea, they produce growth increments of varying widths and visible 'checks' corresponding to times of stress or change. The resulting pattern of band variations and check marks leave a record of fish growth and residence time in each habitat type. This information helps Puget Sound restoration by determining the importance of different habitats for the optimal health and management of different salmon populations. The USGS Western Fisheries Research Center (WFRC) provides otolith research findings directly to resource managers who put this information to work.

  3. Inlet Engineering Toolbox

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-31

    ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center,CIRP - The Coastal Inlets Research Program,3909 Halls Ferry Road,Vicksburg,MS,39180... Coastal Inlets Research Program Inlet Engineering Toolbox The Inlet Engineering Toolbox (IET) Work Unit develops desktop PC and web-based tools to...aid in studies of the consequences of engineering actions at coastal inlets and adjacent beaches. District scientists and engineers need rapid

  4. Chapter 19: Geology and petroleum potential of the east Barents Sea Basins and Admiralty Arch

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klett, T.R.; Pitman, J.K.

    2011-01-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) recently assessed the potential for undiscovered oil and gas resources of the East Barents Basins and Novaya Zemlya Basins and Admiralty Arch Provinces as part of the USGS Circum-Arctic Resource Appraisal. These two provinces are located NE of Scandinavia and the northwestern Russian Federation, on the Barents Sea Shelf between Novaya Zemlya to the east and the Barents Platform to the west. Three assessment units (AUs) were defined in the East Barents Basins for this study - Kolguyev Terrace Assessment Unit (AU), South Barents Basin and Ludlov Saddle AU, and North Barents Basin AU. A fourth, defined as Novaya Zemlya Basins and Admiralty Arch AU, is coincident with the Novaya Zemlya basins and Admiralty Arch Province. These AUs, all lying north of the Arctic Circle, were assessed for undiscovered, technically recoverable resources resulting in total estimated mean volumes of approximately 7.4 billion barrels of crude oil, 318 trillion cubic feet of natural gas and 1.4 billion barrels of natural gas liquids. ?? 2011 The Geological Society of London.

  5. Georgia Basin-Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report 2014

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characterization Report, 2012 was undertaken to characterize the air quality within the Georgia Basin/Puget Sound region,a vibrant, rapidly growing, urbanized area of the Pacific Northwest. The Georgia Basin - Puget Sound Airshed Characteri...

  6. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  7. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  8. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  9. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1395 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Thirteenth District § 80.1395 Puget Sound and adjacent waters. The 72 COLREGS shall apply on all waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters, including Lake...

  11. 35. Photo of concrete arch culvert constructed by Puget Sound ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photo of concrete arch culvert constructed by Puget Sound Construction Company, 1911, for the Northern Pacific Railroad, over flume. Photo by Brian C. Morris, Puget Power, 1989. - Puget Sound Power & Light Company, White River Hydroelectric Project, 600 North River Avenue, Dieringer, Pierce County, WA

  12. Coastal Inlets Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-09

    FEB 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Coastal Inlets Research Program 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...S) AND ADDRESS(ES) U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center,CIRP - The Coastal Inlets Research Program,3909 Halls Ferry Road,Vicksburg,MS...CIRP.aspx Coastal Inlets Research Program The Coastal Inlets Research Program (CIRP) is a R&D Program funded through the Operations & Maintenance

  13. Results of an in-situ mussel bioassay in the Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Houkal, D.; Rummel, B.; Shephard, B.

    1995-12-31

    As part of an ecological evaluation in the Puget Sound, Washington, an in situ bioassay using the blue mussel (Mytilus galloprovincialis) was conducted to determine the effect of sediment-borne chemicals on bioaccumulation and growth of shellfish. The assay included four sample stations from a contaminated embayment (Sinclair Inlet) and one station from a reference site (Holmes Harbor). At each station, 300 mussels were deployed 1 meter above the sediment surface and maintained for a period of 3 months. The length and total weight of each mussel was measured at the beginning of the exposure period and the length, total weight, tissue weight, and shell weight of each mussel was measured at the end of the exposure period. Composite tissue samples from 100 mussels were collected at the beginning and end of the exposure period and analyzed for semivolatile organic chemicals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, inorganic chemicals, organotin, and lipids. Water quality measurements (including temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen, and chlorophyll a) were made at each station every two weeks during the assay to characterize environmental factors influencing mussel bioaccumulation and growth. Weight growth was similar among stations in Sinclair Inlet, but was significantly greater in all Sinclair Inlet stations compared to the Holmes Harbor reference station. Length growth was statistically indistinguishable among stations in Sinclair Inlet. Only one Sinclair Inlet station had a significantly greater length growth compared to the Holmes Harbor reference station. The influence of water quality on mussel growth is presented. The correlation between sediment chemistry and bioaccumulation is discussed.

  14. Metals Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets,Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Miller, Martin C.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2004-09-29

    Sinclair and Dyes Inlets near Bremerton, Washington, are on the State of Washington's 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue. This Metals Verification Study was conducted to address the 303(d) segments that are listed for metal contaminants in marine sediment, because significant cleanup and source control activities have been conducted in the Inlets since the data supporting the 1998 303(d) listings were collected. The study was designed to obtain present-day sediment metals concentrations throughout Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage, with stations spatially distributed to support 303(d) listing updates and also watershed-level water quality and contaminant transport modeling efforts. A total of 160 surface sediment samples from Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage were screened for copper, lead, and zinc using X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF). 40 samples (25%) were selected for confirmatory metals analysis by ICP-MS for cadmium, silver, and arsenic in addition to copper, lead, and zinc. Regression relationships between the ICP-MS and XRF datasets were developed to estimate copper, lead, and zinc concentrations in all samples. The XRF results for copper, lead, and zinc correlated well with ICP-MS results, and predicted concentrations were calculated for all samples. The results of the Metals Verification Study show that sediment quality in Sinclair Inlet has improved markedly since implementation of cleanup and source control actions, and that the distribution of residual contaminants is limited to nearshore areas already within the actively managed Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Superfund Site where further source control actions and monitoring are under way. Outside of Sinclair Inlet, the target metals met state sediment quality standards.

  15. Committee for the Relief of Distressed Seamen: correspondence from the Admiralty in 1818–19

    PubMed Central

    Cook, G C

    2007-01-01

    The Seamen's Hospital Society, which was to become a great Victorian charity, with the object of caring for both the physical and spiritual health of seafarers (most merchant seamen) in the Port of London, was founded at a meeting on 8 March 1821. However, it is not widely known that it had a temporary predecessor—The Committee for the Relief of Distressed (Destitute) Seamen. Ready cooperation was received from the Admiralty in most of its affairs, but “disposal” of many of these “redundant” mariners proved to be a somewhat difficult matter. PMID:17267679

  16. 77 FR 20379 - Puget Sound Energy, Inc.,

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Puget Sound Energy, Inc., v. All Jurisdictional Sellers of Energy and/or Capacity at Wholesale Into Electric Energy and/or Capacity, Markets in the Pacific Northwest,...

  17. The Geomorphology of Puget Sound Beaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    caused by the streamlined hills ( drumlins ) left by the glacier. In most locations the Lowland fill is elevated more than 100 m above present sea level...holiday 1996/97 storms. Wash. Geol. 25:17–31. Goldstein, B. 1994. Drumlins of the Puget Lowland, Washington State, USA. Pages 299–311 in Subglacial

  18. Development of An Empirical Water Quality Model for Stormwater Based on Watershed Land Use in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Cullinan, Valerie I.; May, Christopher W.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Judd, Chaeli; Johnston, Robert K.

    2007-03-29

    The Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed is located on the west side of Puget Sound in Kitsap County, Washington, U.S.A. (Figure 1). The Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), U.S Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the Washington State Department of Ecology (WA-DOE), Kitsap County, City of Bremerton, City of Bainbridge Island, City of Port Orchard, and the Suquamish Tribe have joined in a cooperative effort to evaluate water-quality conditions in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and correct identified problems. A major focus of this project, known as Project ENVVEST, is to develop Water Clean-up (TMDL) Plans for constituents listed on the 303(d) list within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed. Segments within the Sinclair and Dyes Inlet watershed were listed on the State of Washington’s 1998 303(d) because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue (WA-DOE 2003). Stormwater loading was identified by ENVVEST as one potential source of sediment contamination, which lacked sufficient data for a contaminant mass balance calculation for the watershed. This paper summarizes the development of an empirical model for estimating contaminant concentrations in all streams discharging into Sinclair and Dyes Inlets based on watershed land use, 18 storm events, and wet/dry season baseflow conditions between November 2002 and May 2005. Stream pollutant concentrations along with estimates for outfalls and surface runoff will be used in estimating the loading and ultimately in establishing a Water Cleanup Plan (TMDL) for the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed.

  19. 5. Photocopy titled 'Map of Naval Ammunition Depot, Bremerton (Puget ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy titled 'Map of Naval Ammunition Depot, Bremerton (Puget Sound), Wash.' dated June 30, 1947. Buildings 103 and 104 are shaded and located left of center near top of map. HABS film is an 8x10' high-contrast negative made from original map in the collection of the Department of Public Works, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA. - Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Munitions Storage Bunker, Naval Ammunitions Depot, North of Campbell Trail, Bremerton, Kitsap County, WA

  20. 76 FR 13696 - Admiralty Holding Co., American Consolidated Management Group, Inc., DnC Multimedia Corp., Dorsey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION Admiralty Holding Co., American Consolidated Management Group, Inc., DnC Multimedia Corp., Dorsey Trailers, Inc. (n/k/a DT Liquidation, Inc.), and ElectraCapital, Inc. (a/k/a Electra Capital, Inc.); Order of Suspension of Trading March...

  1. Organics Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Kohn, Nancy P.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Niewolny, Laurie A.; Johnston, Robert K.

    2006-09-28

    Sinclair and Dyes Inlets near Bremerton, Washington, are on the State of Washington 1998 303(d) list of impaired waters because of fecal coliform contamination in marine water, metals in sediment and fish tissue, and organics in sediment and fish tissue. Because significant cleanup and source control activities have been conducted in the inlets since the data supporting the 1998 303(d) listings were collected, two verification studies were performed to address the 303(d) segments that were listed for metal and organic contaminants in marine sediment. The Metals Verification Study (MVS) was conducted in 2003; the final report, Metals Verification Study for Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Washington, was published in March 2004 (Kohn et al. 2004). This report describes the Organics Verification Study that was conducted in 2005. The study approach was similar to the MVS in that many surface sediment samples were screened for the major classes of organic contaminants, and then the screening results and other available data were used to select a subset of samples for quantitative chemical analysis. Because the MVS was designed to obtain representative data on concentrations of contaminants in surface sediment throughout Sinclair Inlet, Dyes Inlet, Port Orchard Passage, and Rich Passage, aliquots of the 160 MVS sediment samples were used in the analysis for the Organics Verification Study. However, unlike metals screening methods, organics screening methods are not specific to individual organic compounds, and are not available for some target organics. Therefore, only the quantitative analytical results were used in the organics verification evaluation. The results of the Organics Verification Study showed that sediment quality outside of Sinclair Inlet is unlikely to be impaired because of organic contaminants. Similar to the results for metals, in Sinclair Inlet, the distribution of residual organic contaminants is generally limited to nearshore areas already within the

  2. Attic Inlet Technology Update

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Attic inlets are a popular addition for new construction and energy saving retrofits. Proper management of attic inlets is necessary to get maximum benefits from the system and reduce the likelihood of moisture-related problems in the structure. Solar energy levels were determined for the continen...

  3. Stepped inlet optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.

    2001-01-01

    An optical panel includes stacked optical waveguides having stepped inlet facets collectively defining an inlet face for receiving image light, and having beveled outlet faces collectively defining a display screen for displaying the image light channeled through the waveguides by internal reflection.

  4. Supersonic Elliptical Ramp Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamson, Eric E. (Inventor); Fink, Lawrence E. (Inventor); Fugal, Spencer R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A supersonic inlet includes a supersonic section including a cowl which is at least partially elliptical, a ramp disposed within the cowl, and a flow inlet disposed between the cowl and the ramp. The ramp may also be at least partially elliptical.

  5. Juvenile Pacific Salmon in Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    of assessment used to implement the ESA. The loss or endangerment of an ESU is considered significant to the evolutionary persistence of a species ...Sound Species Assessment1 1992 2002 Chinook salmon Total 29 27 Critical 4 5 Depressed 8 14 Healthy 10 4 Unknown 7 3 Not Rated 0 1 Extinct 0...Critical 1 1 Depressed 14 19 Healthy 16 8 Unknown 29 31 Not Rated 0 1 Extinct 0 0 Species Assessment1 1992 2002 Table 2 continued/ Within Puget

  6. High-resolution seismic reflection imaging of growth folding and shallow faults beneath the Southern Puget Lowland, Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Odum, Jackson K.; Stephenson, William J.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Marine seismic reflection data from southern Puget Sound, Washington, were collected to investigate the nature of shallow structures associated with the Tacoma fault zone and the Olympia structure. Growth folding and probable Holocene surface deformation were imaged within the Tacoma fault zone beneath Case and Carr Inlets. Shallow faults near potential field anomalies associated with the Olympia structure were imaged beneath Budd and Eld Inlets. Beneath Case Inlet, the Tacoma fault zone includes an ∼350-m wide section of south-dipping strata forming the upper part of a fold (kink band) coincident with the southern edge of an uplifted shoreline terrace. An ∼2 m change in the depth of the water bottom, onlapping postglacial sediments, and increasing stratal dips with increasing depth are consistent with late Pleistocene to Holocene postglacial growth folding above a blind fault. Geologic data across a topographic lineament on nearby land indicate recent uplift of late Holocene age. Profiles acquired in Carr Inlet 10 km to the east of Case Inlet showed late Pleistocene or Holocene faulting at one location with ∼3 to 4 m of vertical displacement, south side up. North of this fault the data show several other disruptions and reflector terminations that could mark faults within the broad Tacoma fault zone. Seismic reflection profiles across part of the Olympia structure beneath southern Puget Sound show two apparent faults about 160 m apart having 1 to 2 m of displacement of subhorizontal bedding. Directly beneath one of these faults, a dipping reflector that may mark the base of a glacial channel shows the opposite sense of throw, suggesting strike-slip motion. Deeper seismic reflection profiles show disrupted strata beneath these faults but little apparent vertical offset, consistent with strike-slip faulting. These faults and folds indicate that the Tacoma fault and Olympia structure include active structures with probable postglacial motion.

  7. 77 FR 60081 - Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 110 RIN 1625-AA01 Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA... of the Port (COTP) Puget Sound zone. DATES: Comments and related material must be received by the... Service Puget Sound, Waterways Management Division, Sector Puget Sound, Coast Guard; telephone...

  8. Beaches and Bluffs of Puget Sound and the Northern Straits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    Report No. 2007-04. Published by Seattle District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Seattle, Washington. Kriete, B. 2007. Orcas in Puget Sound. Puget Sound...rehabilitation efforts have taken place along with cleanup of contaminated sites in the Duwamish River estuary (Simenstad et al. 2005). Examples of stream

  9. 33 CFR 110.230 - Puget Sound Area, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound Area, Wash. 110.230... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.230 Puget Sound Area, Wash. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... shores of Whidbey Island. (4) Port Gardner General Anchorage, Possession Sound. Beginning at a...

  10. 33 CFR 110.230 - Puget Sound Area, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound Area, Wash. 110.230... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.230 Puget Sound Area, Wash. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... shores of Whidbey Island. (4) Port Gardner General Anchorage, Possession Sound. Beginning at a...

  11. Redesigning Space for Interdisciplinary Connections: The Puget Sound Science Center

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMarais, Alyce; Narum, Jeanne L.; Wolfson, Adele J.

    2013-01-01

    Mindful design of learning spaces can provide an avenue for supporting student engagement in STEM subjects. Thoughtful planning and wide participation in the design process were key in shaping new and renovated spaces for the STEM community at the University of Puget Sound. The finished project incorporated Puget Sound's mission and goals as well…

  12. 33 CFR 110.230 - Puget Sound Area, Wash.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound Area, Wash. 110.230... ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Anchorage Grounds § 110.230 Puget Sound Area, Wash. (a) The anchorage grounds—(1... shores of Whidbey Island. (4) Port Gardner General Anchorage, Possession Sound. Beginning at a...

  13. Bioaccumulation of potentially toxic trace elements in benthic organisms of Admiralty Bay (King George Island, Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Majer, Alessandra Pereira; Petti, Mônica Angélica Varella; Corbisier, Thais Navajas; Ribeiro, Andreza Portella; Theophilo, Carolina Yume Sawamura; Ferreira, Paulo Alves de Lima; Figueira, Rubens Cesar Lopes

    2014-02-15

    Data about the concentration, accumulation and transfer of potentially toxic elements in Antarctic marine food webs are essential for understanding the impacts of these elements, and for monitoring the pollution contribution of scientific stations, mainly in Admiralty Bay due to the 2012 fire in the Brazilian scientific station. Accordingly, the concentration of As, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn was measured in eight benthic species collected in the 2005/2006 austral summer and the relationship between concentration and trophic position (indicated by δ(15)N values) was tested. A wide variation in metal content was observed depending on the species and the element. In the studied trophic positions, it was observed bioaccumulation for As, Cd and Pb, which are toxic elements with no biological function. In addition, Cd showed a positive relationship between concentration and trophic level suggesting the possible biomagnification of this element.

  14. Organic carbon stocks in permafrost-affected soils from Admiralty Bay, Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simas, F.N.B.; Schaefer, C.E.G.R.; Mendonça, E.S.; Silva, I.R.; Santana, R.M.; Ribeiro, A.S.S.

    2007-01-01

    Recent works show that organic matter accumulation in some soils from coastal Antarctica is higher than previously expected. The objective of the present work was to estimate the organic C stocks for soils from maritime Antarctica. Cryosols from subpolar desert landscapes presented the lowest organic C stocks. Ornithogenic soils are the most important C reservoirs in terrestrial ecosystems in this part of Antarctica. Although these soils correspond to only 2.5 % of the ice-free areas at Admiralty Bay, they contain approximately 20 % of the estimated C stock. Most of the organic C in the studied soils is stored in the active layer but in some cases the C is also stored in the permafrost.

  15. Ichthyophonus in Puget Sound rockfish from the San Juan Islands archipelago and Puget Sound, Washington, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Halos, D.; Hart, S.A.; Hershberger, P.; Kocan, R.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro explant cultures identified Ichthyophonus in 10.9% of 302 Puget Sound rockfish Sebastes emphaeus sampled from five sites in the San Juan Islands archipelago and Puget Sound, Washington, in 2003. None of the infected fish exhibited visible lesions and only a single fish was histologically positive. Significantly more females were infected (12.4%) than males (6.8%), and while infected males were only detected at two of the five sites, infected females were identified at all sites, with no significant differences in infection prevalence. Genomic sequences of Ichthyophonus isolates obtained from Puget Sound rockfish, Pacific herring Clupea pallasii, and Yukon River Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha were identical in both the A and B regions of the small subunit 18S ribosomal DNA but were different from Ichthyophonus sequences previously isolated from four different species of rockfish from the northeastern Pacific Ocean. Ichthyophonus in Puget Sound rockfish may not have been previously detected because the infection is subclinical in this species and earlier investigators did not utilize in vitro techniques for diagnosis of ichthyophoniasis. However, since clinical ichthyophoniasis has recently been identified in several other species of northeast Pacific rockfishes, it is hypothesized that this either is an emerging disease resulting from changing marine conditions or the result of introduction by infected southern species that appear during periodic El Nin??o events. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2005.

  16. Coastal habitats in Puget Sound: A research plan in support of the Puget Sound Nearshore Partnership

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gelfenbaum, Guy; Mumford, Tom; Brennan , Jim; Case, Harvey; Dethier, Megan; Fresh, Kurt; Goetz, Fred; van Heeswijk, Marijke; Leschine, Thomas M.; Logsdon, Miles; Myers, Doug; Newton, Jan; Shipman, Hugh; Simenstad, Charles A.; Tanner, Curtis; Woodson, David

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this research plan is to identify high-priority research goals and objectives and delineate the critical questions and information gaps that need to be addressed to provide natural-resource managers and policy- and decisionmakers with tools to effectively undertake restoration planning and adaptive management of the nearshore ecosystems of Puget Sound.

  17. Inlet Geomorphology Evolution Work Unit

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-30

    Coastal Inlets Research Program Inlet Geomorphology Evolution Work Unit The Inlet Geomorphology Evolution work unit of the CIRP develops methods...morphologic response. Presently, the primary tool of the Inlet Geomorphology Evolution work unit is the Sediment Mobility Tool (SMT), which allows the user

  18. Inlet starting predictions for sidewall-compression scramjet inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trexler, Carl A.

    1988-01-01

    While inlet capture, total pressure recovery, and compression are important performance parameters in the design of scramjet inlets, the inlet must be capable of starting. An analytical, inviscid method has been developed that provides first order starting information for sidewall-compression scramjet inlets and trends have been established for some of the parameters that affect inlet starting. These parameters include sidewall contraction ratio, cowl position, Mach number, sweep angle, fuel injection struts, and sidewall and strut compression angles. Results from the parametric study are compared with data from both no-strut and two-strut inlet models.

  19. PAH bioconcentration in Mytilus sp from Sinclair Inlet, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, J.; Young, D.; Ozretich, R.; Echols, S.

    1995-12-31

    Approximately 20 polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were measured by GC/MS in seawater and whole soft tissues of the intertidal mussel Mytilus sp. collected in July 1991 within and around Puget Sound`s Sinclair Inlet. Low variability was observed in the water concentrations collected over three days at control sites, yielding reliable values for the exposure levels experienced by this bioindicator mollusk. Mean water concentrations of acenaphthene, phenanthrene, and fluoranthene in the control region were 2.7 {+-} 0.8, 2.8 {+-} 0.8, and 3.1 {+-} 0.7 ng/liter, respectively. Levels measured near sites of vessel activity were higher but much more variable; this reduced the reliability of the tissue/water bioconcentration factors (BCF) obtained from these samples. An empirical model relating values of Log BCF and Log Kow for the control zone samples supports the utility of this estuarine bioindicator for monitoring general levels of PAH in nearshore surface waters.

  20. 75 FR 2833 - Safety Zones; Hydroplane Races Within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. (a) Location. The following areas are..., Puget Sound, Acting. BILLING CODE 9110-04-P...

  1. Glaciomarine sedimentation and landforms in Admiralty Bay, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magrani, Fabio; Ayres Neto, Arthur; Vieira, Rosemary

    2015-04-01

    This work consists on the integration and interpretation of high-resolution seismic profiles, geological sampling and multibeam bathymetry in order to analyze and understand the evolution of the deglaciation of Admiralty Bay, South Shetland Islands, Antarctica, since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Data were obtained from three expeditions to Antarctica between 2009 and 2013, totaling 500 km of seismic lines and five geological cores. The characterization of the bottom geology was performed by analyzing the echocharacters and the sedimentary thickness of the glaciomarine deposits. Its correlation with the collected samples provided interpretation of the depositional paleoenvironments, allowing the reconstruction and evolution of the glaciers since the LGM and the recognition of glaciomarine processes. Multibeam bathymetry also provided records of submarine landforms related to glacial events and changes in positions of glaciers in the region. In this way, we ought to answer the question: which glaciomarine records are present in Admiralty Bay that can broaden our understanding of the evolution of its deglaciation during the advances and retreats of glaciers that once dominated the fjord, and its sedimentary processes? Four different echocharacters have been identified. Echoes I and II show good resolution and are characterized by continuous and sharp echoes with sub-parallel reflections and the presence of glaciomarine muds. Very prolonged echoes and absence of sub-parallel reflectors characterizes Echoes III and IV. Eco III is associated with the shallower portions of the bay, with little sediment thickness, sandier content and presence of ice rafted debris. Eco IV is associated with morainical banks and grounding zones. Seabed landform features show that the region experienced major glacial advance, with subsequent rapid retreat of the glaciers in the deeper parts of the fjord, followed by slower retreat, with the presence of several recessional moraines in the

  2. Attic inlet technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rising fuel costs have driven development of alternative heat sources for poultry growers. Attic inlets are employed to pre-heat incoming ventilation air to reduce fuel usage. Attic temperatures are at least 10 °F warmer than the outside temperature at least 80% of the time and offers a source of...

  3. Coastal Inlets Research Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    Tech Report: Fate of fines through the dredging process Inlet Geomorphology FY14 Plans  CHETN: Nearshore Berm Working Meeting Summary of Future... Geomorphology FY13 Accomplishments Release 3D Sediment Resource Tool Nearshore Berm Publications Ft Myers Nearshore• Integrated to GMS • Designed to provide 3D

  4. Jet Inlet Efficiency

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-08

    AFRL-RW-EG-TR-2014-044 Jet Inlet Efficiency Nigel Plumb Taylor Sykes -Green Keith Williams John Wohleber Munitions Aerodynamics Sciences...CONTRACT NUMBER N/A 5b. GRANT NUMBER N/A 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER N/A 6. AUTHOR(S) Nigel Plumb Taylor Sykes -Green Keith Williams John

  5. Notification: Review of Puget Sound Action Agenda Grants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OA-FY13-0341, June 26, 2013. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Inspector General, plans to begin preliminary research for an audit of Puget Sound Action Agenda grants in July 2013.

  6. Redesigning space for interdisciplinary connections: the Puget Sound Science Center.

    PubMed

    Demarais, Alyce; Narum, Jeanne L; Wolfson, Adele J

    2013-01-01

    Mindful design of learning spaces can provide an avenue for supporting student engagement in STEM subjects. Thoughtful planning and wide participation in the design process were key in shaping new and renovated spaces for the STEM community at the University of Puget Sound. The finished project incorporated Puget Sound's mission and goals as well as attention to pedagogical principles, and led to connections and integration throughout the learning environment, specifically at the biochemistry and molecular life sciences intersections.

  7. Conceptual Model for Assessing Restoration of Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-10-01

    29 A.18. Simulation: The final step is to view an animation that simulates these prescribed processes as they...Puget Sound nearShore PartnerShiP Technical Report 3 A.19. Expected events: As the model animation simulates the removal of the bulkhead forward in...among upland, sediments, and biology. (See Figure 12 for abbreviation defintions .) 16 Puget Sound nearShore PartnerShiP Technical Report 3 beach

  8. Development of Sediment Quality Values for Puget Sound. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    Everett Harbor A-138 Table A-8 Duwamish River II A-140 Figure A-i Locations of Commencement Bay stations sampled for benthic macroinvertebrates and sediment...As noted in "Recommended protocols for sampling and analyzing subtidal benthic macroinvertebrate assemblages in Puget Sound" [Puget Sound Estuary...Example confidence limits for benthic AET determined for lead 102 v vt i ... I, TABLES Number Page 1 Approaches reviewed for establishing sediment quality

  9. Plant and bird presence strongly influences the microbial communities in soils of Admiralty Bay, Maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Lia C R S; Yeargeau, Etienne; Balieiro, Fabiano C; Piccolo, Marisa C; Peixoto, Raquel S; Greer, Charles W; Rosado, Alexandre S

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the environmental factors that shape microbial communities is crucial, especially in extreme environments, like Antarctica. Two main forces were reported to influence Antarctic soil microbes: birds and plants. Both birds and plants are currently undergoing relatively large changes in their distribution and abundance due to global warming. However, we need to clearly understand the relationship between plants, birds and soil microorganisms. We therefore collected rhizosphere and bulk soils from six different sampling sites subjected to different levels of bird influence and colonized by Colobanthus quitensis and Deschampsia antarctica in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Maritime Antarctic. Microarray and qPCR assays targeting 16S rRNA genes of specific taxa were used to assess microbial community structure, composition and abundance and analyzed with a range of soil physico-chemical parameters. The results indicated significant rhizosphere effects in four out of the six sites, including areas with different levels of bird influence. Acidobacteria were significantly more abundant in soils with little bird influence (low nitrogen) and in bulk soil. In contrast, Actinobacteria were significantly more abundant in the rhizosphere of both plant species. At two of the sampling sites under strong bird influence (penguin colonies), Firmicutes were significantly more abundant in D. antarctica rhizosphere but not in C. quitensis rhizosphere. The Firmicutes were also positively and significantly correlated to the nitrogen concentrations in the soil. We conclude that the microbial communities in Antarctic soils are driven both by bird and plants, and that the effect is taxa-specific.

  10. Plant and Bird Presence Strongly Influences the Microbial Communities in Soils of Admiralty Bay, Maritime Antarctica

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Lia C. R. S.; Yeargeau, Etienne; Balieiro, Fabiano C.; Piccolo, Marisa C.; Peixoto, Raquel S.; Greer, Charles W.; Rosado, Alexandre S.

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the environmental factors that shape microbial communities is crucial, especially in extreme environments, like Antarctica. Two main forces were reported to influence Antarctic soil microbes: birds and plants. Both birds and plants are currently undergoing relatively large changes in their distribution and abundance due to global warming. However, we need to clearly understand the relationship between plants, birds and soil microorganisms. We therefore collected rhizosphere and bulk soils from six different sampling sites subjected to different levels of bird influence and colonized by Colobanthus quitensis and Deschampsia antarctica in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Maritime Antarctic. Microarray and qPCR assays targeting 16S rRNA genes of specific taxa were used to assess microbial community structure, composition and abundance and analyzed with a range of soil physico-chemical parameters. The results indicated significant rhizosphere effects in four out of the six sites, including areas with different levels of bird influence. Acidobacteria were significantly more abundant in soils with little bird influence (low nitrogen) and in bulk soil. In contrast, Actinobacteria were significantly more abundant in the rhizosphere of both plant species. At two of the sampling sites under strong bird influence (penguin colonies), Firmicutes were significantly more abundant in D. antarctica rhizosphere but not in C. quitensis rhizosphere. The Firmicutes were also positively and significantly correlated to the nitrogen concentrations in the soil. We conclude that the microbial communities in Antarctic soils are driven both by bird and plants, and that the effect is taxa-specific. PMID:23840411

  11. New data on the occurrence of Acanthocephala in some fish in Admiralty Bay (South Shetland Islands).

    PubMed

    Zdzitowiecki, Krzysztof; Laskowski, Zdzisław

    2013-12-01

    New data on the infection with Acanthocephala of 33 fish caught in Admiralty Bay in November 2007 to January 2008 are given. These fish belong to 5 species: Notothenia rossii (22 immature specimens), Lindbergichthys nudifrons (n = 7), Trematomus bernacchii (n = 1), T. newnesi (n = 1) and Harpagifer antarcticus (n = 2). Three species of Echinorhynchida: Aspersentis megarhynchus, Metacanthocephalus dalmori and M. johnstoni and four species of Polymorphida: Corynosoma arctocephali, C. bullosum, C. hamanni and C. pseudohamanni, were found. Prevalence of N. rossii and L. nudifrons was 100%. The mean abundance of infection of N. rossii (125.09) was larger than that of Notothenia coriiceps (82.93). Data of infection of N. rossii in 2007 was almost identical with that in 1979 (mean abundance 118.66). The most abundant in this host were A. megarhynchus, M. johnstoni, C. hamanni and C. pseudohamanni (mean abundances 36.36, 29.77, 13.86 and 44.73, respectively). In total Echinorhynchida were more abundant than Polymorphida in 2007/08 (66.18 versus 58.91). Reverse situation was in 1979 (mean abundance 47.36 for Echinorhynchida and 71.3 for Polymorphida. Only 7 L. nudifrons were examined in 2007/08 and Echinorhynchida were more numerous in this host (mean abundance 26.71) than Polymorphida (10.29). Single specimens of other fish were infected with a few Acanthocephala belonging to species recorded in the same hosts with those found in 1978/79.

  12. Inlet nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Knight, R.C.; Precechtel, D.R.; Smith, B.G.

    1985-09-09

    An inlet nozzle assembly for directing coolant into the duct tube of a fuel assembly attached thereto. The nozzle assembly includes a shell for housing separable components including an orifice plate assembly, a neutron shield block, a neutron shield plug, and a diffuser block. The orifice plate assembly includes a plurality of stacked plates of differently configurated and sized openings for directing coolant therethrough in a predesigned flow pattern.

  13. Puget Sound area electric reliability plan. Draft environmental impact statement

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power & Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound`s power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  14. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Draft Environmental Impact State.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) identifies the alternatives for solving a power system problem in the Puget Sound area. This Plan is undertaken by Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), Puget Sound Power Light, Seattle City Light, Snohomish Public Utility District No. 1 (PUD), and Tacoma Public Utilities. The Plan consists of potential actions in Puget Sound and other areas in the State of Washington. A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, there is more demand for power than the electric system can supply in the Puget Sound area. This high demand, called peak demand, occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies, the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both. The plan to balance Puget Sound's power demand and supply has these purposes: The plan should define a set of actions that would accommodate ten years of load growth (1994--2003). Federal and State environmental quality requirements should be met. The plan should be consistent with the plans of the Northwest Power Planning Council. The plan should serve as a consensus guideline for coordinated utility action. The plan should be flexible to accommodate uncertainties and differing utility needs. The plan should balance environmental impacts and economic costs. The plan should provide electric system reliability consistent with customer expectations. 29 figs., 24 tabs.

  15. Petrology and geobarometry of Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt granitoids near Petersburg, southeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Hammarstrom, J.M. ); Brew, D.A. )

    1993-04-01

    The Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt (ARB) of southeastern Alaska is an approximately 400 mile long northwest-trending belt of Late Cretaceous ([approximately]95 Ma) calcalkalic plutons that extends from Juneau to Ketchikan. The ARB is bounded on the east by the younger Coast plutonic complex sill and on the west by the mid-Cretaceous Muir-Chichagof plutonic belt. Near Petersburg, the ARB consists of a variety of plutons that include equigranular and porphyritic quartz diorite, tonalite, quartz monzodiorite, and granodiorite. Minerals in these plutons are: hornblende, biotite, plagioclase, potassium feldspar, quartz, apatite, zircon, titanite, and ilmenite [+-] epidote, minor allanite, magnetite, grossular-almandine garnet, clinopyroxene, and locally trace amounts of sulfide minerals. New geochemical data for six samples from three plutons near Petersburg overlap data for the rest of the ARB, which is metaluminous to slightly peraluminous. The central ARB granitoids are moderately LREE-enriched with slightly negative to slightly positive europium anomalies. High strontium (700 to 800 ppm) and low rubidium contents in central ARB plutons overlap compositions of ARB plutons to the north and south, and magmatic epidote-bearing plutons elsewhere. Pressure estimates for pluton emplacement based on hornblende geobarometry (6 to 9 kbars) are compatible with pressure estimates for plutons to the south and for metamorphic aureole assemblages around ARB plutons elsewhere in the western metamorphic belt of southeastern Alaska. These data support the chemical consanguinity of plutons along the length of the magmatic arc now preserved as the ARB and suggest that the whole ARB has been uplifted and eroded to expose plutons emplaced at relatively deep crustal levels.

  16. Bacterial diversity in rhizosphere soil from Antarctic vascular plants of Admiralty Bay, maritime Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Lia C R S; Peixoto, Raquel S; Cury, Juliano C; Sul, Woo Jun; Pellizari, Vivian H; Tiedje, James; Rosado, Alexandre S

    2010-08-01

    The Antarctic is a pristine environment that contributes to the maintenance of the global climate equilibrium. The harsh conditions of this habitat are fundamental to selecting those organisms able to survive in such an extreme habitat and able to support the relatively simple ecosystems. The DNA of the microbial community associated with the rhizospheres of Deschampsia antarctica Desv (Poaceae) and Colobanthus quitensis (Kunth) BartI (Caryophyllaceae), the only two native vascular plants that are found in Antarctic ecosystems, was evaluated using a 16S rRNA multiplex 454 pyrosequencing approach. This analysis revealed similar patterns of bacterial diversity between the two plant species from different locations, arguing against the hypothesis that there would be differences between the rhizosphere communities of different plants. Furthermore, the phylum distribution presented a peculiar pattern, with a bacterial community structure different from those reported of many other soils. Firmicutes was the most abundant phylum in almost all the analyzed samples, and there were high levels of anaerobic representatives. Also, some phyla that are dominant in most temperate and tropical soils, such as Acidobacteria, were rarely found in the analyzed samples. Analyzing all the sample libraries together, the predominant genera found were Bifidobacterium (phylum Actinobacteria), Arcobacter (phylum Proteobacteria) and Faecalibacterium (phylum Firmicutes). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first major bacterial sequencing effort of this kind of soil, and it revealed more than expected diversity within these rhizospheres of both maritime Antarctica vascular plants in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, which is part of the South Shetlands archipelago.

  17. 40 CFR 81.32 - Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.32 Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Puget...

  18. 40 CFR 81.32 - Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions § 81.32 Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Puget...

  19. 40 CFR 81.32 - Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.32 Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Washington) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound Intrastate Air...

  20. 40 CFR 81.32 - Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.32 Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Washington) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound Intrastate Air...

  1. 40 CFR 81.32 - Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Quality Control Regions § 81.32 Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The Puget Sound Intrastate Air Quality Control Region (Washington) consists of the territorial area encompassed by the... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound Intrastate Air...

  2. 33 CFR 110.230 - Anchorages, Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Puget Sound Zone, WA. 110.230 Section 110.230 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Port Puget Sound Zone, WA. (a) Anchorage grounds. All coordinates are expressed in North American Datum... Traffic Service Puget Sound is designated as the COTP's authorized representative. All vessels should...

  3. 33 CFR 334.1244 - Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel Depot, Manchester, Washington; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel... REGULATIONS § 334.1244 Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel Depot, Manchester, Washington; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of Puget Sound surrounding the Manchester Fuel Depot Point A, a point along...

  4. 33 CFR 165.1303 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... § 165.1303 Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a... Light to New Dungeness Light and all points in the Puget Sound area north and south of these lights....

  5. 77 FR 21866 - Safety Zone; Sunken Vessel, Puget Sound, Everett, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Sunken Vessel, Puget Sound, Everett, WA..., Waterways Management Division, Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound; Coast Guard; telephone 206-217-6045; email SectorPugetSoundWWM@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing the docket, call Renee V. Wright,...

  6. 33 CFR 110.230 - Anchorages, Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Puget Sound Zone, WA. 110.230 Section 110.230 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Port Puget Sound Zone, WA. (a) Anchorage grounds. All coordinates are expressed in North American Datum... Traffic Service Puget Sound is designated as the COTP's authorized representative. All vessels should...

  7. 75 FR 45055 - Security Zone; 2010 Seattle Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-02

    ... Vessels, Puget Sound, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The U.S. Coast... vessels while underway in the Puget Sound Captain of the Port (COTP) Area of Responsibility (AOR). These... remaining in the security zones unless authorized by the COTP, Puget Sound or Designated...

  8. 78 FR 9811 - Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 110 RIN 1625-AA01 Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA... anchorages in Puget Sound and decreases the size of five general anchorage areas. These administrative... predictability within the anchorages of the Captain of the Port (COTP) Puget Sound zone. DATES: This rule...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1303 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... § 165.1303 Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a... Light to New Dungeness Light and all points in the Puget Sound area north and south of these lights....

  10. 33 CFR 334.1244 - Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel Depot, Manchester, Washington; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel... REGULATIONS § 334.1244 Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel Depot, Manchester, Washington; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of Puget Sound surrounding the Manchester Fuel Depot Point A, a point along...

  11. 75 FR 33696 - Safety Zone: July Firework Display in Captain of the Port, Puget Sound AOR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Port, Puget Sound AOR AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard...: July Firework Display in Captain of the Port, Puget Sound AOR. (a) Safety Zone. The following area is a..., Captain, U.S. Coast Guard, Captain of the Port, Puget Sound. BILLING CODE 9110-04-P...

  12. 33 CFR 334.1244 - Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel Depot, Manchester, Washington; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel... REGULATIONS § 334.1244 Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel Depot, Manchester, Washington; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of Puget Sound surrounding the Manchester Fuel Depot Point A, a point along...

  13. 76 FR 23185 - Hydroplane Races Within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 Hydroplane Races Within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of... will enforce the Special Local Regulation, Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound... Ensign Anthony P. LaBoy, Sector Puget Sound Waterways Management Division, Coast Guard; telephone...

  14. 33 CFR 167.1320 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1320 In Puget Sound and its approaches: General. The traffic separation scheme in Puget Sound and its approaches consists of three parts:...

  15. 33 CFR 165.1303 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... § 165.1303 Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a... Light to New Dungeness Light and all points in the Puget Sound area north and south of these lights....

  16. 33 CFR 165.1333 - Security Zones, Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week moving vessels, Puget Sound, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Fleet Week moving vessels, Puget Sound, WA. 165.1333 Section 165.1333 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.1333 Security Zones, Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week moving vessels, Puget Sound... each designated participating vessel while each such vessel is in the Sector Puget Sound Captain of...

  17. 33 CFR 167.1320 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1320 In Puget Sound and its approaches: General. The traffic separation scheme in Puget Sound and its approaches consists of three parts:...

  18. 76 FR 40617 - Security Zone; 2011 Seattle Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ... Vessels, Puget Sound, Washington AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The U.S... unless authorized by the Captain of the Port (COTP), Puget Sound or Designated Representative. DATES... rule, call or e-mail Ensign Anthony P. LaBoy, Sector Puget Sound, Waterways Management Division,...

  19. 33 CFR 167.1320 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1320 In Puget Sound and its approaches: General. The traffic separation scheme in Puget Sound and its approaches consists of three parts:...

  20. 33 CFR 334.1244 - Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel Depot, Manchester, Washington; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel... REGULATIONS § 334.1244 Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel Depot, Manchester, Washington; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of Puget Sound surrounding the Manchester Fuel Depot Point A, a point along...

  1. 78 FR 57485 - Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ... Puget Sound AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The Coast... cargo in the navigable waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters. Entry into this zone is prohibited... or email LTJG Johnny Zeng, Sector Puget Sound Waterways Management Division, Coast Guard;...

  2. 33 CFR 165.1303 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... § 165.1303 Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a... Light to New Dungeness Light and all points in the Puget Sound area north and south of these lights....

  3. 77 FR 20817 - Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Notice of Initiation of Proceeding and Refund Effective Date

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Notice of Initiation of Proceeding and Refund... determine the justness and reasonableness of the proposed rate reduction by Puget Sound Energy, Inc. Puget Sound Energy, Inc., 138 FERC ] 61,236 (2012). The refund effective date in Docket No....

  4. 33 CFR 334.1244 - Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel Depot, Manchester, Washington; naval restricted area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel... REGULATIONS § 334.1244 Puget Sound, Manchester Fuel Depot, Manchester, Washington; naval restricted area. (a) The area. The waters of Puget Sound surrounding the Manchester Fuel Depot Point A, a point along...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1303 - Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Puget Sound and adjacent waters... § 165.1303 Puget Sound and adjacent waters, WA—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a... Light to New Dungeness Light and all points in the Puget Sound area north and south of these lights....

  6. 77 FR 44475 - Security Zones; Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Vessels, Puget Sound, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY... Anthony P. LaBoy, Sector Puget Sound, Waterways Management Division, U.S. Coast Guard; telephone 206-217-6323, email SectorPugetSoundWWM@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing the docket, call Renee...

  7. 33 CFR 167.1320 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: General.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches... Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1320 In Puget Sound and its approaches: General. The traffic separation scheme in Puget Sound and its approaches consists of three parts:...

  8. 76 FR 43710 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-21

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget... Natural History, University of Puget Sound has completed an inventory of human remains, in consultation... History, University of Puget Sound. Disposition of the human remains to the Indian tribes stated below...

  9. Flexural Origin of the Puget Basins: Implications for the Seattle Fault and Puget Basin Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosson, R. S.; Symons, N. P.

    2001-12-01

    At least five distinct basins of varying depth, including the Seattle basin, form a semi-circular ring around the eastern Olympic Mts. Although the Seattle basin has been postulated to result from a northward vergent thrust on the Seattle fault, other basins have a less clear relationship to faulting. A purely thrust origin for the Seattle basin requires uplift, which is not observed, south of the Seattle fault to isostatically balance the large mass deficiency of the Seattle basin. High-resolution P-wave velocity imaging of the Puget region using earthquakes, data from the recent SHIPS experiments, and data from earlier explosion experiments shows that the Puget basins are underlain by approximately 15 km of "tectonically" strong Crescent formation (part of the Coast Range Terrain - CRT). Low velocity core rocks of the eastern Olympics are emplaced beneath the CRT in a radial pattern that mirrors the pattern of the Puget basins, strongly suggesting that the basins are genetically related to the Olympic structure. A model of basin formation that is consistent with gravity and seismic data, and that explains the observed radial pattern is elastic flexural down-warp in response to uplift and subsequent erosion of the CRT in the central Olympic Mts. The CRT is now erosionally removed from the Olympic core, exposing the underlying accretionary wedge complex. The available information on timing of the Olympic uplift generally agrees with the inferred timing of basin subsidence. Since the "lever arm" which forced the basins downward is removed by erosion from the eastern Olympics, basin subsidence has probably stopped, and isostatic rebound of the Seattle and other basins should play a role in current tectonics. Relative uplift of the Seattle basin, consistent with isostatic rebound, explains the north-side-up mechanism of the June 1997 M 4.9 earthquake near Bremerton, the north-side-up pattern of faults trenched on southern Bainbridge Island, and possibly the uplift of

  10. Broadband Acoustic Environment at a Tidal Energy Site in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinshan; Deng, Zhiqun; Martinez, Jayson J.; Carlson, Thomas J.; Myers, Joshua R.; Weiland, Mark A.

    2012-04-04

    Admiralty Inlet has been selected as a potential tidal energy site. It is located near shipping lanes, is a highly variable acoustic environment, and is frequented by the endangered southern resident killer whale (SRKW). Resolving environmental impacts is the first step to receiving approval to deploy tidal turbines. Several monitoring technologies are being considered to determine the presence of SRKW near the turbines. Broadband noise level measurements are critical for determining design and operational specifications of these technologies. Acoustic environment data at the proposed site was acquired at different depths using a cabled vertical line array from three different cruises during high tidal period in February, May, and June 2011. The ambient noise level decreases approximately 25 dB re 1 μPa per octave from frequency ranges of 1 kHz to 70 kHz, and increases approximately 20 dB re 1 μPa per octave for the frequency from 70 kHz to 200 kHz. The difference of noise pressure levels in different months varies from 10 to 30 dB re 1 μPa for the frequency range below 70 kHz. Commercial shipping and ferry vessel traffic were found to be the most significant contributors to sound pressure levels for the frequency range from 100 Hz to 70 kHz, and the variation could be as high as 30 dB re 1 μPa. These noise level measurements provide the basic information for designing and evaluating both active and passive monitoring systems proposed for deploying and operating for tidal power generation alert system.

  11. 33 CFR 165.1301 - Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters in Northwestern Washington-Regulated Navigation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters... Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1301 Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters in Northwestern... northwestern Washington waters under the jurisdiction of the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound: Puget...

  12. 33 CFR 165.1317 - Security and Safety Zone; Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. 165.1317 Section 165.1317... Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension... be enforced only upon notice by the Captain of the Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget...

  13. 33 CFR 165.1317 - Security and Safety Zone; Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. 165.1317 Section 165.1317... Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension... be enforced only upon notice by the Captain of the Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget...

  14. 33 CFR 165.1317 - Security and Safety Zone; Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. 165.1317 Section 165.1317... Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension... be enforced only upon notice by the Captain of the Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget...

  15. 33 CFR 165.1301 - Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters in Northwestern Washington-Regulated Navigation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters... Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1301 Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters in Northwestern... northwestern Washington waters under the jurisdiction of the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound: Puget...

  16. 33 CFR 165.1301 - Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters in Northwestern Washington-Regulated Navigation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters... Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1301 Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters in Northwestern... northwestern Washington waters under the jurisdiction of the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound: Puget...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1301 - Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters in Northwestern Washington-Regulated Navigation Area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters... Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1301 Puget Sound and Adjacent Waters in Northwestern... northwestern Washington waters under the jurisdiction of the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound: Puget...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1317 - Security and Safety Zone; Large Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Passenger Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. 165.1317 Section 165.1317... Vessel Protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension... be enforced only upon notice by the Captain of the Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget...

  19. Spatial extent of degraded sediment quality in Puget Sound (Washington State, U.S.A.) based upon measures of the sediment quality triad.

    PubMed

    Long, Edward R; Dutch, Margaret; Aasen, Sandra; Welch, Kathy; Hameedi, M Jawed

    2005-12-01

    A survey was designed and conducted to determine the severity, spatial patterns, and spatial extent of degraded sediment quality in Puget Sound (Washington State, USA). A weight of evidence compiled from results of chemical analyses, toxicity tests, and benthic infaunal analyses was used to classify the quality of sediments. Sediment samples were collected from 300 locations within a 2363 km(2) area extending from the US/Canada border to the inlets of southern Puget Sound and Hood Canal. Degraded conditions, as indicated with a combination of high chemical concentrations, significant toxicity, and adversely altered benthos, occurred in samples that represented about 1% of the total area. These conditions invariably occurred in samples collected within urbanized bays and industrial waterways, especially near the urban centers of Everett, Seattle, Tacoma, and Bremerton. Sediments with high quality (as indicated by no toxicity, no contamination, and the presence of a relatively abundant and diverse infauna) occurred in samples that represented a majority (68%) of the total study area. Sediments in which results of the three kinds of analyses were not in agreement were classified as intermediate in quality and represented about 31% of the total area. Relative to many other estuaries and marine bays of the USA, Puget Sound sediments ranked among those with minimal evidence of toxicant-induced degradation.

  20. High Prevalence of Gammaproteobacteria in the Sediments of Admiralty Bay and North Bransfield Basin, Northwestern Antarctic Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Franco, Diego C; Signori, Camila N; Duarte, Rubens T D; Nakayama, Cristina R; Campos, Lúcia S; Pellizari, Vivian H

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms dominate most Antarctic marine ecosystems, in terms of biomass and taxonomic diversity, and play crucial role in ecosystem functioning due to their high metabolic plasticity. Admiralty Bay is the largest bay on King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula) and a combination of hydro-oceanographic characteristics (bathymetry, sea ice and glacier melting, seasonal entrance of water masses, turbidity, vertical fluxes) create conditions favoring organic carbon deposition on the seafloor and microbial activities. We sampled surface sediments from 15 sites across Admiralty Bay (100-502 m total depth) and the adjacent North Bransfield Basin (693-1147 m), and used the amplicon 454-sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags to compare the bacterial composition, diversity, and microbial community structure across environmental parameters (sediment grain size, pigments and organic nutrients) between the two areas. Marine sediments had a high abundance of heterotrophic Gammaproteobacteria (92.4% and 83.8% inside and outside the bay, respectively), followed by Alphaproteobacteria (2.5 and 5.5%), Firmicutes (1.5 and 1.6%), Bacteroidetes (1.1 and 1.7%), Deltaproteobacteria (0.8 and 2.5%) and Actinobacteria (0.7 and 1.3%). Differences in alpha-diversity and bacterial community structure were found between the two areas, reflecting the physical and chemical differences in the sediments, and the organic matter input.

  1. High Prevalence of Gammaproteobacteria in the Sediments of Admiralty Bay and North Bransfield Basin, Northwestern Antarctic Peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Diego C.; Signori, Camila N.; Duarte, Rubens T. D.; Nakayama, Cristina R.; Campos, Lúcia S.; Pellizari, Vivian H.

    2017-01-01

    Microorganisms dominate most Antarctic marine ecosystems, in terms of biomass and taxonomic diversity, and play crucial role in ecosystem functioning due to their high metabolic plasticity. Admiralty Bay is the largest bay on King George Island (South Shetland Islands, Antarctic Peninsula) and a combination of hydro-oceanographic characteristics (bathymetry, sea ice and glacier melting, seasonal entrance of water masses, turbidity, vertical fluxes) create conditions favoring organic carbon deposition on the seafloor and microbial activities. We sampled surface sediments from 15 sites across Admiralty Bay (100–502 m total depth) and the adjacent North Bransfield Basin (693–1147 m), and used the amplicon 454-sequencing of 16S rRNA gene tags to compare the bacterial composition, diversity, and microbial community structure across environmental parameters (sediment grain size, pigments and organic nutrients) between the two areas. Marine sediments had a high abundance of heterotrophic Gammaproteobacteria (92.4% and 83.8% inside and outside the bay, respectively), followed by Alphaproteobacteria (2.5 and 5.5%), Firmicutes (1.5 and 1.6%), Bacteroidetes (1.1 and 1.7%), Deltaproteobacteria (0.8 and 2.5%) and Actinobacteria (0.7 and 1.3%). Differences in alpha-diversity and bacterial community structure were found between the two areas, reflecting the physical and chemical differences in the sediments, and the organic matter input. PMID:28210255

  2. Seismic reflection images beneath Puget Sound, western Washington State: The Puget Lowland thrust sheet hypothesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, T.L.; Johnson, S.; Potter, C.; Stephenson, W.; Finn, C.

    1997-01-01

    Seismic reflection data show that the densely populated Puget Lowland of western Washington state is underlain by subhorizontal Paleogene and Neogene sedimentary rocks deformed by west and northwest trending faults and folds. From south to north beneath the Lowland, features seen on the seismic data include: the horizontally-stratified, 3.5 km thick Tacoma sedimentary basin; the Seattle uplift with south dipping (???20??) strata on its south flank and steeply (50?? to 90??) north dipping strata and the west-trending Seattle fault on its north flank; the 7.5 km thick, northward-thinning Seattle sedimentary basin; the antiformal Kingston arch; and the northwest trending, transpressional Southern Whidbey Island fault zone (SWIF). Interpreting the uplifts as fault-bend and fault-propagation folds leads to the hypothesis that the Puget Lowland lies on a north directed thrust sheet. The base of the thrust sheet may lie at 14 to 20 km depth within or at the base of a thick block of basaltic Crescent Formation; its edges may be right-lateral strike-slip faults along the base of the Cascade Range on the east and the Olympic Mountains on the west. Our model suggests that the Seattle fault has a long-term slip rate of about 0.25 mm/year and is large enough to generate a M7.6 to 7.7 earthquake.

  3. The 1980 land cover for the Puget Sound region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, R. D.; Westerlund, F. V.; Eby, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Both LANDSAT imagery and the video information communications and retrieval software were used to develop a land cover classifiction of the Puget Sound of Washington. Planning agencies within the region were provided with a highly accurate land cover map registered to the 1980 census tracts which could subsequently be incorporated as one data layer in a multi-layer data base. Many historical activities related to previous land cover mapping studies conducted in the Puget Sound region are summarized. Valuable insight into conducting a project with a large community of users and in establishing user confidence in a multi-purpose land cover map derived from LANDSAT is provided.

  4. Puget Sound acidity levels drop after ASARCO shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1987-07-01

    The levels of acidity in Puget Sound region rainfall have decreased significantly since the shutdown of the ASARCO copper smelter in Tacoma, Washington, according to a study funded by the US Environmental Protection Agency. Results indicate that sulfate and hydrogen ion concentrations obtained from samples taken before the closure were significantly different than those collected after the shutdown. Rainwater samples collected downwind during smelter operation were also significantly different from those collected upwind. Sulfur dioxide is considered to be one of the principal contributors to acid rain. The smelter was a major source of sulfur dioxide emissions in the Puget Sound region before it shut down in March 1985.

  5. Annual Report: 2010-2011 Storm Season Sampling For NON-DRY DOCK STORMWATER MONITORING FOR PUGET SOUND NAVAL SHIPYARD, BREMERTON, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Metallo, David; Johnston, Robert K.; Gebhardt, Christine; Hsu, Larry

    2012-09-01

    This interim report summarizes the stormwater monitoring conducted for non-dry dock outfalls in both the confined industrial area and the residential areas of Naval Base Kitsap within the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (referred to as the Shipyard). This includes the collection, analyses, and descriptive statistics for stormwater sampling conducted from November 2010 through April 2011. Seven stormwater basins within the Shipyard were sampled during at least three storm events to characterize non-dry dock stormwater discharges at selected stormwater drains located within the facility. This serves as the Phase I component of the project and Phase II is planned for the 2011-2012 storm season. These data will assist the Navy, USEPA, Ecology and other stakeholders in understanding the nature and condition of stormwater discharges from the Shipyard and inform the permitting process for new outfall discharges. The data from Phase I was compiled with current stormwater data available from the Shipyard, Sinclair/Dyes Inlet watershed, and Puget Sound in order to support technical investigations for the Draft NPDES permit. The permit would require storm event sampling at selected stormwater drains located within the Shipyard. However, the data must be considered on multiple scales to truly understand potential impairments to beneficial uses within Sinclair and Dyes Inlets.

  6. Dioxin and furan concentrations in Puget Sound crabs. Puget Sound Estuary Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Dioxin and furan concentrations were measured in crabs collected from eleven areas of potential chemical contamination and one reference area in Puget Sound in the spring of 1991. While recreationally harvestable Dungeness crabs were the target species, red rock and graceful crabs were also analyzed because they were the only species which could be collected in some areas. Both crab muscle and hepatopancreatic tissues were analyzed for the presence of dioxins and furans. The results of these analyses were evaluated using EPA's human health risk assessment guidance. While dioxins and furans were present in low concentrations in all samples, it appears that only the very heavy consumer of crab muscle and hepatopancreas would see a very sizeable increase in the risk of developing cancer from these chemicals.

  7. Native Shellfish in Nearshore Ecosystems of Puget Sound

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    and in southern Puget Sound and were a subsistence fishery for native Americans (Steele 1957). They are primarily a subtidal species ( Hertlein 1959...reports/CommercialOyster- CultivationandEelgrass.pdf Hertlein , L.G. 1959. Notes on California oysters. Veliger 2:5- 10. Houghton, J.P. 1973. The

  8. Land cover classification for Puget Sound, 1974-1979

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eby, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Digital analysis of LANDSAT data for land cover classification projects in the Puget Sound region is surveyed. Two early rural and urban land use classifications and their application are described. After acquisition of VICAR/IBIs software, another land use classification of the area was performed, and is described in more detail. Future applications are considered.

  9. Educating for Action: More Success Stories from Puget Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steelquist, Robert; Gordon, David

    Through its Public Involvement and Education (PIE) Model Projects Fund, the Puget Sound Water Quality Authority has helped local organizations provide education and public involvement programs that help solve local environmental problems. This catalog describes 96 projects successful in addressing the issue of water quality. The projects are…

  10. Integrated decision support tools for Puget Sound salmon recovery planning

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a set of tools to provide decision support for community-based salmon recovery planning in Salish Sea watersheds. Here we describe how these tools are being integrated and applied in collaboration with Puget Sound tribes and community stakeholders to address restora...

  11. TBCC Inlet Experiments and Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, Dave; Slater, John; Dippold, Vance; Lee, Jinho; Sanders, Bobby; Weir, Lois

    2007-01-01

    A research plan is being implemented at NASA to investigate inlet mode transition for turbine-based combined-cycle (TBCC) propulsion for the hypersonic community. Unresolved issues have remained on how to design an inlet system to supply both a turbine engine and a ram/scramjet flowpath that operate with both high performance and stability. The current plan is aimed at characterizing the design, performance and operability of TBCC inlets through a series of experiments and analyses. A TBCC inlet has been designed that is capable of high performance (near MIL-E-5008B recovery) with smooth transitioning characteristics. Traditional design techniques were used in an innovative approach to balance the aerodynamic and mechanical constraints to create a new TBCC inlet concept. The inlet was designed for top-end Mach 7 scramjet speeds with an over/under turbine that becomes cocooned beyond its Mach 4 peak design point. Conceptually, this propulsion system was picked to meet the needs of the first stage of a two-stage to orbit vehicle. A series of increasing fidelity CFD-based tools are being used throughout this effort. A small-scale inlet experiment is on-going in the GRC 1'x1' Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT). Initial results from both the CFD analyses and test are discussed showing that high performance and smooth mode transitions are possible. The effort validates the design and is contributing to a large-scale inlet/propulsion test being planned for the GRC 10' x10' SWT. This large-scale effort provide the basis for a Combined Cycle Engine Testbed, (CCET), that will be able to address integrated propulsion system and controls objectives.

  12. Western Fisheries Research Center--Forage fish studies in Puget Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liedtke, Theresa L.

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at the Western Fisheries Research Center are working with other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Centers to better understand the interconnected roles of forage fishes throughout the ecosystem of Puget Sound, Washington. Support for these studies primarily is from the USGS Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound (CHIPS) program, which supports studies of the nearshore areas of Puget Sound. Human perturbations in the nearshore area such as shoreline armoring or urban development can affect the nearshore habitats critical to forage fish.

  13. Conversion of environmental data to a digital-spatial database, Puget Sound area, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uhrich, M.A.; McGrath, T.S.

    1997-01-01

    Data and maps from the Puget Sound Environmental Atlas, compiled for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the Puget Sound Water Quality Authority, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, have been converted into a digital-spatial database using a geographic information system. Environmental data for the Puget Sound area,collected from sources other than the Puget SoundEnvironmental Atlas by different Federal, State, andlocal agencies, also have been converted into thisdigital-spatial database. Background on the geographic-information-system planning process, the design and implementation of the geographic information-system database, and the reasons for conversion to this digital-spatial database are included in this report. The Puget Sound Environmental Atlas data layers include information about seabird nesting areas, eelgrass and kelp habitat, marine mammal and fish areas, and shellfish resources and bed certification. Data layers, from sources other than the Puget Sound Environmental Atlas, include the Puget Sound shoreline, the water-body system, shellfish growing areas, recreational shellfish beaches, sewage-treatment outfalls, upland hydrography,watershed and political boundaries, and geographicnames. The sources of data, descriptions of the datalayers, and the steps and errors of processing associated with conversion to a digital-spatial database used in development of the Puget Sound Geographic Information System also are included in this report. The appendixes contain data dictionaries for each of the resource layers and error values for the conversion of Puget SoundEnvironmental Atlas data.

  14. Lake Tapps tephra: An early Pleistocene stratigraphic marker in the Puget Lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Westgate, J.A.; Easterbrook, D.J.; Naeser, N.D.; Carson, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    The rhyolitic Lake Tapps tephra was deposited about 1.0 myr ago, shortly after culmination of the early phase of the Salmon Springs Glaciation in the Puget Lowland. It is contained within sediments that were deposited in ponds or lakes in front of the reteating glacier. An herb-dominated tundra existed in the southern Puget Lowland at that time. Lake Tapps tephra is most likely the product of an eruption that in part was phreatomagmatic. It forms an early Pleistocene stratigraphic marker across the southern sector of the Puget Lowland and provides a link between Puget lobe sediments of the Cordilleran Ice Sheet and sediments deposited by Olympic alpine glaciers. ?? 1987.

  15. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01

    A specific need exists in the Puget Sound area for balance between east-west transmission capacity and the increasing demand to import power generated east of the Cascades. At certain times of the year, and during certain conditions, there is more demand for power in the Puget Sound area than the transmission system and existing generation can reliably supply. This high demand, called peak demand occurs during the winter months when unusually cold weather increases electricity use for heating. The existing power system can supply enough power if no emergencies occur. However, during emergencies the system will not operate properly. As demand grows, the system becomes more strained. To meet demand, the rate of growth of demand must be reduced or the ability to serve the demand must be increased, or both.

  16. Hazardous material transportation risks in the Puget Sound Region

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.B.; Rhoads, R.E.; Franklin, A.L.; Cole, B.M.; Rau, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes results of a study performed for the Transportation Systems Center (TSC) of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), to determine public safety risks of transporting hazardous material (HM) in the Central Puget Sound Region (CPSR) of Washington State. Results of this study were used in a regional assessment of hazardous material transportation conducted for the Materials Transportation Bureau (MTB) of DOT by the Puget Sound Council of Governments (PSCOG) and the DOT Transportation Systems Center (TSC). Additional hazardous material studies have also been conducted by the DOT in New Orleans, Louisiana, San Francisco, California, Niagara County, New York, Indianapolis, Indiana, Memphis, Tennessee, and the State of Massachusetts. 15 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Active shortening of the Cascadia forearc and implications for seismic hazards of the Puget Lowland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Blakely, R.J.; Stephenson, W.J.; Dadisman, S.V.; Fisher, M.A.

    2004-01-01

    Margin-parallel shortening of the Cascadia forearc is a consequence of oblique subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate beneath North America. Strike-slip, thrust, and oblique crustal faults beneath the densely populated Puget Lowland accommodate much of this north-south compression, resulting in large crustal earthquakes. To better understand this forearc deformation and improve earthquake hazard, assessment, we here use seismic reflection surveys, coastal exposures of Pleistocene strata, potential-field data, and airborne laser swath mapping to document and interpret a significant structural boundary near the City of Tacoma. This boundary is a complex structural zone characterized by two distinct segments. The northwest trending, eastern segment, extending from Tacoma to Carr Inlet, is formed by the broad (??? 11.5 km), southwest dipping (??? 11??-2??) Rosedale monocline. This monocline raises Crescent Formation basement about 2.5 km, resulting in a moderate gravity gradient. We interpret the Rosedale monocline as a fault-bend fold, forming above a deep thrust fault. Within the Rosedale monocline, inferred Quaternary strata thin northward and form a growth triangle that is 4.1 to 6.6 km wide at its base, suggesting ??? 2-3 mm/yr of slip on the underlying thrust. The western section of the >40-km-long, north dipping Tacoma fault, extending from Hood Canal to Carr Inlet, forms the western segment of the Tacoma basin margin. Structural relief on this portion of the basin margin may be several kilometers, resulting in steep gravity and aeromagnetic anomalies. Quaternary structural relief along the Tacoma fault is as much as 350-400 m, indicating a minimum slip rate of about 0.2 mm/yr. The inferred eastern section of the Tacoma fault (east of Carr Inlet) crosses the southern part of the Seattle uplift, has variable geometry along strike, and diminished structural relief. The Tacoma fault is regarded as a north dipping backthrust to the Seattle fault, so that slip on a

  18. Pollution monitoring of Puget Sound with honey bees

    SciTech Connect

    Bromenshenk, J.J.; Carlson, S.R.; Simpson, J.C.; Thomas, J.M.

    1985-02-08

    To show that honey bees are effective biological monitors of environmental contaminants over large geographic areas, beekeepers of Puget Sound, Washington, collected pollen and bees for chemical analysis. From these data, kriging maps of arsenic, cadmium, and fluoride were generated. Results, based on actual concentrations of contaminants in bee tissues, show that the greatest concentrations of contaminants occur close to Commencement Bay and that honey bees are effective as large-scale monitors. 27 references, 2 figures.

  19. Design and Analysis Tools for Supersonic Inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Folk, Thomas C.

    2009-01-01

    Computational tools are being developed for the design and analysis of supersonic inlets. The objective is to update existing tools and provide design and low-order aerodynamic analysis capability for advanced inlet concepts. The Inlet Tools effort includes aspects of creating an electronic database of inlet design information, a document describing inlet design and analysis methods, a geometry model for describing the shape of inlets, and computer tools that implement the geometry model and methods. The geometry model has a set of basic inlet shapes that include pitot, two-dimensional, axisymmetric, and stream-traced inlet shapes. The inlet model divides the inlet flow field into parts that facilitate the design and analysis methods. The inlet geometry model constructs the inlet surfaces through the generation and transformation of planar entities based on key inlet design factors. Future efforts will focus on developing the inlet geometry model, the inlet design and analysis methods, a Fortran 95 code to implement the model and methods. Other computational platforms, such as Java, will also be explored.

  20. 33 CFR 165.1332 - Safety Zones; annual firework displays within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... displays within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. 165.1332 Section 165.1332... within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. (a) Safety Zones. The following areas are designated safety zones: (1) All waters of Puget Sound, Washington, extending to a 450 yard...

  1. 75 FR 43821 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ..., Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Correction of Notice of Enforcement... authorized by the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound or Designated Representative. DATES: This safety zone will... displays within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. A previous notice...

  2. 33 CFR 165.1332 - Safety Zones; annual firework displays within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... displays within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. 165.1332 Section 165.1332... within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. (a) Safety Zones. The following areas are designated safety zones: (1) All waters of Puget Sound, Washington, extending to a 450 yard...

  3. 76 FR 70882 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-16

    ..., Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule; correction. SUMMARY... Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility... on this rule, call or email Ensign Anthony P. LaBoy, USCG Sector Puget Sound Waterways...

  4. 33 CFR 3.65-10 - Sector Puget Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sector Puget Sound Marine... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-10 Sector Puget Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Puget Sound's office is located in Seattle, WA....

  5. 33 CFR 165.1321 - Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA. 165.1321 Section 165.1321 Navigation and... the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The Captain of the Port Puget Sound will enforce the security zones established by this section only upon...

  6. 78 FR 7265 - Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-01

    ... Puget Sound, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The... military cargo in the navigable waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters. Entry into this zone is... Puget Sound Waterways Management Division, Coast Guard; telephone 206-217-6045, email...

  7. 33 CFR 3.65-10 - Sector Puget Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sector Puget Sound Marine... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-10 Sector Puget Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Puget Sound's office is located in Seattle, WA....

  8. 78 FR 11981 - Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... Puget Sound, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The... military cargo in the navigable waters of Puget Sound and adjacent waters. Entry into this zone is... Ensign Nathaniel P. Clinger, Sector Puget Sound Waterways Management Division, Coast Guard; telephone...

  9. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington 165.1313 Section 165.1313 Navigation and... Sound and adjacent waters, Washington (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The tank... Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget Sound will cause notice of the enforcement of the tank...

  10. 76 FR 61263 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-04

    ... Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule... of the Port, Puget Sound or Designated Representative. DATES: This rule is effective November 3, 2011... this rule, call or e-mail Ensign Anthony P. LaBoy, USCG Sector Puget Sound Waterways...

  11. 33 CFR 165.1321 - Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA. 165.1321 Section 165.1321 Navigation and... the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The Captain of the Port Puget Sound will enforce the security zones established by this section only upon...

  12. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington 165.1313 Section 165.1313 Navigation and... Sound and adjacent waters, Washington (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The tank... Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget Sound will cause notice of the enforcement of the tank...

  13. 33 CFR 165.1321 - Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA. 165.1321 Section 165.1321 Navigation and... the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The Captain of the Port Puget Sound will enforce the security zones established by this section only upon...

  14. 33 CFR 165.1332 - Safety Zones; annual firework displays within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... displays within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. 165.1332 Section 165.1332... within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. (a) Safety Zones. The following areas are designated safety zones: (1) All waters of Puget Sound, Washington, extending to a 450 yard...

  15. 75 FR 33698 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-15

    ... Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule... firework displays at various locations in the Captain of the Port (COTP), Puget Sound Area of... enforcement is prohibited unless authorized by the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound or...

  16. 78 FR 29023 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule... locations in the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. When these safety zones are... P. Clinger, Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound, Waterways Management Division, U.S. Coast...

  17. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington 165.1313 Section 165.1313 Navigation and... Sound and adjacent waters, Washington (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The tank... Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget Sound will cause notice of the enforcement of the tank...

  18. 33 CFR 165.1332 - Safety Zones; annual firework displays within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... displays within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. 165.1332 Section 165.1332... within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. (a) Safety Zones. The following areas are designated safety zones: (1) All waters of Puget Sound, Washington, extending to a 450 yard...

  19. 33 CFR 165.1321 - Security Zone; Protection of Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    .... Captain of the Port Puget Sound will cause notice of the enforcement of these security zone to be made by... Military Cargo, Captain of the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA. 165.1321 Section 165.1321 Navigation and... the Port Zone Puget Sound, WA. (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The Captain...

  20. 78 FR 8063 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... locations in the Captain of the Port (COTP), Puget Sound Area of Responsibility (AOR). When these safety... or email ENS Nathaniel P. Clinger, Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound, Waterways Management Division,...

  1. 33 CFR 165.1313 - Security zone regulations, tank ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Port Puget Sound. Captain of the Port Puget Sound will cause notice of the enforcement of the tank ship... ship protection, Puget Sound and adjacent waters, Washington 165.1313 Section 165.1313 Navigation and... Sound and adjacent waters, Washington (a) Notice of enforcement or suspension of enforcement. The...

  2. An Analysis of Microbial Pollution in the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet Watershed

    SciTech Connect

    May, Christopher W.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

    2005-09-21

    This assessment of fecal coliform sources and pathways in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets is part of the Project ENVironmental InVESTment (ENVVEST) being conducted by the Navy's Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility in cooperation with the US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington State Department of Ecology, the Suquamish Tribe, Kitsap County, the City of Bremerton, the City of Port Orchard, and other local stakeholders. The goal of this study was to identify microbial pollution problems within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed and to provide a comprehensive assessment of fecal coliform (FC) contamination from all identifiable sources in the watershed. This study quantifies levels of contamination and estimated loadings from known sources within the watersheds and describes pollutant transport mechanisms found in the study area. In addition, the effectiveness of pollution prevention and mitigation measures currently in place within the Sinclair-Dyes Inlet watershed are discussed. This comprehensive study relies on historical data collected by several cooperating agencies, in addition to data collected during the study period from spring 2001 through summer 2005. This report is intended to provide the technical information needed to continue current water quality cleanup efforts and to help implement future efforts.

  3. 77 FR 56838 - Puget Sound Energy, Inc. v. All Jurisdictional Sellers, et al.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Puget Sound Energy, Inc. v. All Jurisdictional Sellers, et al.; Notice of... compliance filing in response to the Commission's June 13, 2012 Order, Puget Sound Energy, Inc. v. All... serve a copy of that document on the Applicant and all the parties in this proceeding. The...

  4. 77 FR 56838 - Puget Sound Energy, Inc. v. All Jurisdictional Sellers, et al.; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-14

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Puget Sound Energy, Inc. v. All Jurisdictional Sellers, et al.; Notice of..., Puget Sound Energy, Inc. v. All Jurisdictional Sellers, et al., Order Approving Settlement Subject to... intervene or protest must serve a copy of that document on the Applicant and all the parties in...

  5. 33 CFR 165.1333 - Security Zones, Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week moving vessels, Puget Sound, WA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Security Zones, Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week moving vessels, Puget Sound, WA. 165.1333 Section 165.1333 Navigation and Navigable Waters... Coast Guard District § 165.1333 Security Zones, Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week moving vessels, Puget...

  6. 77 FR 40521 - Security Zones, Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA87 Security Zones, Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week Moving... Coast Guard published a NPRM, Security Zones, Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound... Final Rule (TFR), Security Zone; 2011 Seattle Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound,...

  7. 77 FR 30891 - Hydroplane Races Within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    .... USCG-2009-0996] Hydroplane Races Within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility... of Responsibility for the Tastin' n' Racin' hydroplane event in Lake Sammamish, WA on June 9th and... Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility 33 CFR 100.1308. The...

  8. 76 FR 48179 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Sound, Tacoma, WA AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The Slater Museum of Natural History, University of Puget Sound has completed an inventory of a human remain, in consultation..., University of Puget Sound. Disposition of the human remain to the Indian tribes stated below may occur if...

  9. 75 FR 35018 - Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order June 15... Procedure of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2) (2010), Puget...

  10. 77 FR 37600 - Safety Zone; Arctic Drilling and Support Vessels, Puget Sound, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... Sound, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is... their lead towing vessels while those vessels are underway in the Puget Sound Captain of the Port Zone... Sound; Coast Guard; telephone 206-217-6323, email SectorPugetSoundWWM@uscg.mil . If you have...

  11. 75 FR 39011 - Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Puget Sound Energy, Inc.; Notice of Petition for Declaratory Order June 29... Procedure of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (Commission), 18 CFR 385.207(a)(2) (2010), Puget...

  12. 33 CFR 167.1321 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Rosario Strait.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Rosario Strait. 167.1321 Section 167.1321 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1321 In Puget Sound and...

  13. 33 CFR 167.1321 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Rosario Strait.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Rosario Strait. 167.1321 Section 167.1321 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1321 In Puget Sound and...

  14. 33 CFR 167.1321 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Rosario Strait.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Rosario Strait. 167.1321 Section 167.1321 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1321 In Puget Sound and...

  15. 76 FR 47996 - Security Zone; 2011 Seattle Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, WA; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-08

    ... Sound, WA; Correction AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule; correction. SUMMARY: On... questions on this correction document, call or e-mail ENS Anthony P. LaBoy, Coast Guard Sector Puget Sound, Waterways Management Division; telephone 206-217- 6323, e-mail SectorPugetSoundWWM@uscg.mil . Correction...

  16. 33 CFR 167.1321 - In Puget Sound and its approaches: Rosario Strait.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false In Puget Sound and its approaches: Rosario Strait. 167.1321 Section 167.1321 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF... Traffic Separation Schemes and Precautionary Areas Pacific West Coast § 167.1321 In Puget Sound and...

  17. IPAC-Inlet Performance Analysis Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnhart, Paul J.

    1997-01-01

    A series of analyses have been developed which permit the calculation of the performance of common inlet designs. The methods presented are useful for determining the inlet weight flows, total pressure recovery, and aerodynamic drag coefficients for given inlet geometric designs. Limited geometric input data is required to use this inlet performance prediction methodology. The analyses presented here may also be used to perform inlet preliminary design studies. The calculated inlet performance parameters may be used in subsequent engine cycle analyses or installed engine performance calculations for existing uninstalled engine data.

  18. Centrifugal pump inlet pressure site affects measurement.

    PubMed

    Augustin, Simon; Horton, Alison; Butt, Warwick; Bennett, Martin; Horton, Stephen

    2010-09-01

    During extracorporeal life support (ECLS), blood is exposed to a myriad of unphysiological factors that can affect outcome. One aspect of this is the sub-atmospheric pressure generated by the ECLS pump and imparted to blood elements along the pump inlet line. This pressure can be measured on the inlet line close to the pump head by adding a connector, or at the venous cannula connection site. We compared the two measurement sites located at both points; between the venous cannula-inlet tubing and inlet tubing-pump, with a range of cannulae and flows. We also investigated the effects on inlet pressure from pump afterload and increasing inlet tubing length.

  19. Method for Determining Optimum Injector Inlet Geometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trinh, Huu P. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method for determining the optimum inlet geometry of a liquid rocket engine swirl injector includes obtaining a throttleable level phase value, volume flow rate, chamber pressure, liquid propellant density, inlet injector pressure, desired target spray angle and desired target optimum delta pressure value between an inlet and a chamber for a plurality of engine stages. The method calculates the tangential inlet area for each throttleable stage. The method also uses correlation between the tangential inlet areas and delta pressure values to calculate the spring displacement and variable inlet geometry of a liquid rocket engine swirl injector.

  20. Geoenvironments from the vicinity of Arctowski Station, Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica: vulnerability and valuation assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaefer, Carlos Ernesto G.R.; Santana, Rogério Mercandelle; Simas, Felipe Nogueira Bello; Francelino, Márcio R.; Filho, Elpídio Inácio Fernandes; Albuquerque, Miriam Abreu; Calijuri, Maria Lúcia

    2007-01-01

    The use of a geographic information system (GIS) allows the mapping and quantification of biotic and physical features of importance to the environmental planning of Antarctic areas. In this paper we examined the main aspects of the geoenvironments of Arctowski Station vicinity (Admiralty bay, Maritime Antartica), by means of a photointerpretation of an orthomosaic at 1:6000 scale, produced by non-conventional aerial photographs obtained by the Brazilian Cryosols project. We carried out a preliminary environmental valuation and vulnerability assessment of the area. Hence, geoenvironments were classified and ranked according with their biological valuation and vulnerability (fragility), mapping 20 units covering approximately 150 ha. The most fragile geoenvironmental units were former and present penguin rookeries with different vegetation covers, all very prone to degradation by over-trampling and human perturbations. The relationships between each geoenvironment were also explored, emphasizing the ecological aspects and their valuation. In quantitative terms, the most vulnerable and fragile units (classes 4 and 5) occupy nearly 22 % of the total area, being highly concentrated near the coastal areas. There, ornithogenic input is an important factor favoring the vegetation development.

  1. Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA). Management Plan Report (MPR), Unconfined, Open-Water Disposal of Dredged Material. Phase 1 (Central Puget Sound)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    additional sediment loading. Key Regulatory Authorities. Section 404 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act (FWPCA) Amendments of 1972 established a...continue. Puget Sound Pollution and Contaminated Sediments. The past practice of cis- charging untreated or only partially treated industrial and municipal...degradation over time of the water and sediment quality in some areas of Puget Sound. Increasing scientific evidence about the harmful effects of pollution

  2. Meeting Review: Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumgardner, Darrel; Huebert, Barry; Wilson, Chuck

    1991-01-01

    Proceedings from the Airborne Aerosol Inlet Workshop are presented. The two central topics of discussion were the role of aerosols in atmospheric processes and the difficulties in characterizing aerosols. The following topics were discussed during the working sessions: airborne observations to date; identification of inlet design issues; inlet modeling needs and directions; objectives for aircraft experiments; and future laboratory and wind tunnel studies.

  3. Interdecadal change in the deep Puget sound benthos

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, F.H.

    2003-01-01

    Data from quantitative samples of the benthos at a 200-m site in central Puget Sound, collected twice yearly in most years between 1963 and 1992, were evaluated to determine the extent to which species composition in a continental-shelf depth community exhibits long-term persistence. Study results showed that the most abundant species were consistently present over the 30-year period. However, measures of species composition (e.g., similarity, diversity) reveal a subtle, gradual change in the community over time. Among the changes are (1) multi-year periods of greatly increased abundance of the common species; (2) an overall increase in the total abundance of the benthic community beginning in the mid-1970s; (3) periods of increased abundance, during the late 1970s and early 1980s, of two species that are tolerant of organic enrichment; and (4) the steady decline in abundance of the large burrowing echinoderm, Brisaster latifrons as a consequence of the lack of recruitment to the site since 1970. Despite the conspicuousness of these changes, there are no observed environmental factors that readily explain them. Circumstantial evidence suggests that climate-related change in Puget Sound circulation beginning in the mid-1970s, organic enrichment associated with a nearby large source of primary-treated sewage, and the influence of changes in the abundance of the large echinoderms on the smaller species are potential agents of change. The principle reasons for our inability to identify causes of long-term change in the Puget Sound benthos are (a) inconsistent long-term monitoring of environmental variables, (b) the lack of quantitative information about long-term changes in plankton and fish populations, (c) lack of knowledge of specific predator/prey and competitive interactions in soft bottom benthos, (d) unknown influence of moderate levels of contamination on biota; and (e) lack of understanding of possible linkages between climate regime shifts and fluctuations in

  4. Optimal control of a supersonic inlet to minimize frequency of inlet unstart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehtinen, B.; Zeller, J. R.; Geyser, L. C.

    1978-01-01

    A preliminary investigation into the use of modern control theory for the design of controls for a supersonic inlet is described. In particular, the task of controlling a mixed-compression supersonic inlet is formulated as a linear optimal stochastic control and estimation problem. An inlet can exhibit an undesirable instability due to excessive inlet normal shock motion. For the optimal control formulation of the inlet problem, a non quadratic performance index, which is equal to the expected frequency of inlet unstarts, is used. This physically meaningful performance index is minimized for a range of inlet disturbance and measurement noise covariances.

  5. Puget Sound Dissolved Oxygen Modeling Study: Development of an Intermediate-Scale Hydrodynamic Model

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Labiosa, Rochelle G.; Kim, Taeyun

    2010-11-30

    The Washington State Department of Ecology contracted with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to develop an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic and water quality model to study dissolved oxygen and nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound and to help define potential Puget Sound-wide nutrient management strategies and decisions. Specifically, the project is expected to help determine 1) if current and potential future nitrogen loadings from point and non-point sources are significantly impairing water quality at a large scale and 2) what level of nutrient reductions are necessary to reduce or dominate human impacts to dissolved oxygen levels in the sensitive areas. In this study, an intermediate-scale hydrodynamic model of Puget Sound was developed to simulate the hydrodynamics of Puget Sound and the Northwest Straits for the year 2006. The model was constructed using the unstructured Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model. The overall model grid resolution within Puget Sound in its present configuration is about 880 m. The model was driven by tides, river inflows, and meteorological forcing (wind and net heat flux) and simulated tidal circulations, temperature, and salinity distributions in Puget Sound. The model was validated against observed data of water surface elevation, velocity, temperature, and salinity at various stations within the study domain. Model validation indicated that the model simulates tidal elevations and currents in Puget Sound well and reproduces the general patterns of the temperature and salinity distributions.

  6. A preliminary assessment of the Nactus pelagicus species group (Squamata: Gekkonidae) in New Guinea and a new species from the Admiralty Islands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zug, George R.; Fisher, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    The Slender-toed Geckos (Nactus) currently have four recognized species in New Guinea, and these species divide into two sister clades: a pelagicus clade and a vankampeni clade (Heinicke et al. 2010). The latter contains three dwarf species. The former consists of five bisexual populations, of which numerous New Guinea populations are uncharacterized nomenclaturally and lumped under the epithet ‘pelagicus.’ This report and description of a new species of the pelagicus group from Manus Island in the Admiralty Islands encourages us to offer a preliminary assessment of morphology and diversity in New Guinea ‘pelagicus’ populations.

  7. Land-use planning for nearshore ecosystem services—the Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrd, Kristin

    2011-01-01

    The 2,500 miles of shoreline and nearshore areas of Puget Sound, Washington, provide multiple benefits to people—"ecosystem services"—including important fishing, shellfishing, and recreation industries. To help resource managers plan for expected growth in coming decades, the U.S. Geological Survey Western Geographic Science Center has developed the Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model (PSEPM). Scenarios of urban growth and shoreline modifications serve as model inputs to develop alternative futures of important nearshore features such as water quality and beach habitats. Model results will support regional long-term planning decisions for the Puget Sound region.

  8. Factors regulating excystment of Alexandrium in Puget Sound, WA, USA

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Stephanie K.; Bill, Brian D.; Hay, Levi R.; Emenegger, Jennifer; Eldred, Kiara C.; Greengrove, Cheryl L.; Masura, Julie E.; Anderson, Donald M.

    2015-01-01

    Factors regulating excystment of a toxic dinoflagellate in the genus Alexandrium were investigated in cysts from Puget Sound, Washington State, USA. Experiments were carried out in the laboratory using cysts collected from benthic seedbeds to determine if excystment is controlled by internal or environmental factors. The results suggest that the timing of germination is not tightly controlled by an endogenous clock, though there is a suggestion of a cyclical pattern. This was explored using cysts that had been stored under cold (4 °C), anoxic conditions in the dark and then incubated for 6 weeks at constant favorable environmental conditions. Excystment occurred during all months of the year, with variable excystment success ranging from 31–90%. When cysts were isolated directly from freshly collected sediments every month and incubated at the in situ bottom water temperature, a seasonal pattern in excystment was observed that was independent of temperature. This pattern may be consistent with secondary dormancy, an externally modulated pattern that prevents excystment during periods that are not favorable for sustained vegetative growth. However, observation over more annual cycles is required and the duration of the mandatory dormancy period of these cysts must be determined before the seasonality of germination can be fully characterized in Alexandrium from Puget Sound. Both temperature and light were found to be important environmental factors regulating excystment, with the highest rates of excystment observed for the warmest temperature treatment (20 °C) and in the light. PMID:26109923

  9. Physiographic and land cover attributes of the Puget Lowland and the active streamflow gaging network, Puget Sound Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher; Sevier, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Geospatial information for the active streamflow gaging network in the Puget Sound Basin was compiled to support regional monitoring of stormwater effects to small streams. The compilation includes drainage area boundaries and physiographic and land use attributes that affect hydrologic processes. Three types of boundaries were used to tabulate attributes: Puget Sound Watershed Characterization analysis units (AU); the drainage area of active streamflow gages; and the catchments of Regional Stream Monitoring Program (RSMP) sites. The active streamflow gaging network generally includes sites that represent the ranges of attributes for lowland AUs, although there are few sites with low elevations (less than 60 meters), low precipitation (less than 1 meter year), or high stream density (greater than 5 kilometers per square kilometers). The active streamflow gaging network can serve to provide streamflow information in some AUs and RSMP sites, particularly where the streamflow gage measures streamflow generated from a part of the AU or that drains to the RSMP site, and that part of the AU or RSMP site is a significant fraction of the drainage area of the streamgage. The maximum fraction of each AU or RSMP catchment upstream of a streamflow gage and the maximum fraction of any one gaged basin in an AU or RSMP along with corresponding codes are provided in the attribute tables.

  10. Empirical, probabilistic, and modelling approaches to assess cross-media impacts to marine sediments at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard

    SciTech Connect

    Rohrer, W.L.; Vita, C.L.; Schrock, W.; Leicht, G.

    1996-12-31

    Dredge spoils, industrial fill, and liquid wastes from the 1940s to 1970s have resulted in inorganic and organic contamination of soils, groundwater, and marine sediments near the U.S.S. Missouri and Charleston Beach parking lots at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS), in Bremerton, Washington. Extensive collection of environmental data from several studies including the recently completed Remedial Investigation conducted under CERCLA have confirmed contaminant levels above federal risk screening levels and state regulatory criteria for several heavy metals and organic compounds, including pesticides and PCBs. Although the correlation between contamination in marine sediments and those in on-shore fill appears to be strong, there is little evidence that a viable transport pathway currently exists from soils to groundwater and thence to sediments. Several methods used to estimate chemical mass flux from soil to groundwater to sediments and marine waters of Sinclair Inlet are corroborative in this regard. Nonetheless, this result is vexing because present groundwater concentrations exceed ARARs, yet are below levels of concern in terms of mass flux to marine waters. Despite the marginal risks posed by groundwater, various remedial alternatives, including perimeter containment using a subsurface waste-stabilized containment wall, were evaluated to determine whether chemical flux could be reduced to levels below those observed at the present time. Three-dimensional flow modelling and transport modelling also confirmed that chemical fluxes were limited in magnitude and could be addressed with more conventional remedial approaches.

  11. Thickness of unconsolidated deposits of the Puget Sound aquifer system, Washington and British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, M.A.

    1996-01-01

    The Puget-Willamette Lowland is located in western Washington, western Oregon, and a small part of southwestern British Columbia, Canada. The Puget-Willamette Lowland study area is composed of two distinct subareas, the Puget Sound Lowland and the Willamette Lowland. This report presents the results of mapping the thickness of the unconsolidated deposits in the Puget Sound Lowland. The thickness of the unconsolidated deposits ranges from a discontinuous veneer in areas of bedrock outcrop to more than 3,600 feet. Available information shows that the unconsolidated deposits are thickest in the Fraser-Whatcom, Everett, Seattle, and Tacoma Basins. The mapped thickness of the unconsolidated deposits in the Tacoma Basin is probably underestimated because of the scarcity of wells penetrating the full thickness of the unconsolidated deposits and the lack of sufficient marine-seismic data.

  12. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix B : Local Generation Evaluation : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    The information and data contained in this Appendix was extracted from numerous sources. The principle sources used for technical data were Bonneville Power Administration's 1990 Resource Program along with its technical appendix, and Chapter 8 of the Draft 1991 Northwest Conservation and Electric Power Plan. All cost data is reported 1988 dollars unless otherwise noted. This information was supplemented by other data developed by Puget Sound utilities who participated on the Local Generation Team. Identifying generating resources available to the Puget Sound area involved a five step process: (1) listing all possible resources that might contribute power to the Puget Sound area, (2) characterizing the technology/resource status, cost and operating characteristics of these resources, (3) identifying exclusion criteria based on the needs of the overall Puget Sound Electric Reliability Plan study, (4) applying these criteria to the list of resources, and (5) summarizing of the costs and characteristics of the final list of resources. 15 refs., 20 tabs.

  13. 77 FR 5747 - Security Zones, Seattle's Seafair Fleet Week Moving Vessels, Puget Sound, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-06

    ... Anthony P. LaBoy, Sector Puget Sound, Waterways Management Division, U.S. Coast Guard; telephone (206) 217...Boy at the telephone number or email address indicated under the FOR FUTHER INFORMATION...

  14. 77 FR 36260 - Proposed Information Collection; Comment Request; Puget Sound Recreational Shellfish Harvesting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-18

    ... recreational shellfish harvesting through statistical estimation of models; and (3) the potential changes in... Sound Recreational Shellfish Harvesting Project AGENCY: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration..., affecting local growers and restricting commercial and recreational harvest opportunities. The Puget...

  15. Aeroacoustic performance of a scoop inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    A low speed wind tunnel test demonstrated the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a scoop inlet. Engine noise is directed upward by the extended lower lip of the scoop inlet. In addition, more of the scoop airflow comes in from above the inlet than below, leading to relatively higher surface velocities on the upper lip and lower surface velocities on the lower lip. These lower velocities on the lower lip result in a higher attainable angle of attack before internal flow separation occurs.

  16. Waves, Currents, & Bathymetric Evolution Near Inlets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-30

    Jessup , A., R. Holman, C. Chickadel, S. Elgar; G. Farquharson, M . Haller, A. Kurapov, T. Özkan- Haller, B. Raubenheimer, J. Thomson, DARLA: Data...remotely sensed observations ( Jessup et al. 2012). Figure 1. Array of in situ wave and current sensors (white circles) deployed at New River...the inlet channel in depths from 1 to 10 m ]. (ii) Katama Inlet A numerical model for the water levels and flows in a two-inlet system was developed

  17. Axisymmetric inlet minimum weight design method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadell, Shari-Beth

    1995-01-01

    An analytical method for determining the minimum weight design of an axisymmetric supersonic inlet has been developed. The goal of this method development project was to improve the ability to predict the weight of high-speed inlets in conceptual and preliminary design. The initial model was developed using information that was available from inlet conceptual design tools (e.g., the inlet internal and external geometries and pressure distributions). Stiffened shell construction was assumed. Mass properties were computed by analyzing a parametric cubic curve representation of the inlet geometry. Design loads and stresses were developed at analysis stations along the length of the inlet. The equivalent minimum structural thicknesses for both shell and frame structures required to support the maximum loads produced by various load conditions were then determined. Preliminary results indicated that inlet hammershock pressures produced the critical design load condition for a significant portion of the inlet. By improving the accuracy of inlet weight predictions, the method will improve the fidelity of propulsion and vehicle design studies and increase the accuracy of weight versus cost studies.

  18. Radial inlet guide vanes for a combustor

    DOEpatents

    Zuo, Baifang; Simons, Derrick; York, William; Ziminsky, Willy S

    2013-02-12

    A combustor may include an interior flow path therethrough, a number of fuel nozzles in communication with the interior flow path, and an inlet guide vane system positioned about the interior flow path to create a swirled flow therein. The inlet guide vane system may include a number of windows positioned circumferentially around the fuel nozzles. The inlet guide vane system may also include a number of inlet guide vanes positioned circumferentially around the fuel nozzles and adjacent to the windows to create a swirled flow within the interior flow path.

  19. Planar Inlet Design and Analysis Process (PINDAP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Gruber, Christopher R.

    2005-01-01

    The Planar Inlet Design and Analysis Process (PINDAP) is a collection of software tools that allow the efficient aerodynamic design and analysis of planar (two-dimensional and axisymmetric) inlets. The aerodynamic analysis is performed using the Wind-US computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program. A major element in PINDAP is a Fortran 90 code named PINDAP that can establish the parametric design of the inlet and efficiently model the geometry and generate the grid for CFD analysis with design changes to those parameters. The use of PINDAP is demonstrated for subsonic, supersonic, and hypersonic inlets.

  20. Mapping southern Puget Sound delta fronts after 2001 earthquake

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; van den Ameele, Edward J.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Bernhardt, Walter; Lee, Homa; Palmer, Steve

    2001-01-01

    A moment magnitude 6.8 earthquake struck southern Puget Sound (Figure 1) on February 28, 2001, causing an estimated $0.7–$1.4 billion in damages to buildings and roadways in the region [Williams et al., 2001]. The earthquake source was 52 km deep, and the epicenter was located close to the Nisqually River delta in the same location as the epicenter of the magnitude 7.1 earthquake of 1949 (http://www.geophys.washington.edu/seis/pnsn/info_ general/). These deep earthquakes occurred in the eastward-dipping subducting slab of the Juan de Fuca plate and typically caused less damage than shallower, crustal events of the same magnitude. Details of the seismology and effects of the earthquake can be found at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/activity/latest/ eq_01_02_28.html.

  1. Low flight speed acoustic results for a supersonic inlet with auxiliary inlet doors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodward, R. P.; Glaser, F. W.; Lucas, J. G.

    1982-01-01

    A model supersonic inlet with auxiliary inlet doors and bounday layer bleeds was acoustically tested in simulated low speed flight up to Mach 0.2 in the NASA Lewis 9x15 Anechoic Wind Tunnel and statically in the NASA Lewis Anechoic Chamber. A JT8D refan model was used as the noise source. Data were also taken for a CTOL inlet and for an annular inlet with simulated centerbody support struts. Inlet operation with open auxiliary doors increased the blade passage tone by about 10 dB relative to the closed door configuration although noise radiation was primarily through the main inlet rather than the doors. Numerous strong spikes in the noise spectra were associated with the bleed system, and were strongly affected by the centerbody location. The supersonic inlet appeared to suppress multiple pure tone (MPT) generation at the fan source. Inlet length and the presence of support struts were shown not to cause this MPT suppression.

  2. Upper crustal structure in Puget Lowland, Washington: Results from the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation in Puget Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, T.M.; Parsons, T.; Blakely, R.J.; Christensen, N.I.; Fisher, M.A.; Wells, R.E.; ten Brink, U.S.; Pratt, T.L.; Crosson, R.S.; Creager, K.C.; Symons, N.P.; Preston, L.A.; Van Wagoner, T.; Miller, K.C.; Snelson, C.M.; Trehu, A.M.; Langenheim, V.E.; Spence, G.D.; Ramachandran, K.; Hyndman, R.A.; Mosher, D.C.; Zelt, B.C.; Weaver, C.S.

    2001-01-01

    A new three-dimensional (3-D) model shows seismic velocities beneath the Puget Lowland to a depth of 11 km. The model is based on a tomographic inversion of nearly one million first-arrival travel times recorded during the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation in Puget Sound (SHIPS), allowing higher-resolution mapping of subsurface structures than previously possible. The model allows us to refine the subsurface geometry of previously proposed faults (e.g., Seattle, Hood Canal, southern Whidbey Island, and Devils Mountain fault zones) as well as to identify structures (Tacoma, Lofall, and Sequim fault zones) that warrant additional study. The largest and most important of these newly identified structures lies along the northern boundary of the Tacoma basin; we informally refer to this structure here as the Tacoma fault zone. Although tomography cannot provide information on the recency of motion on any structure, Holocene earthquake activity on the Tacoma fault zone is suggested by seismicity along it and paleoseismic evidence for abrupt uplift of tidal marsh deposits to its north. The tomography reveals four large, west to northwest trending low-velocity basins (Tacoma, Seattle, Everett, and Port Townsend) separated by regions of higher velocity ridges that are coincident with fault-bounded uplifts of Eocene Crescent Formation basalt and pre-Tertiary basement. The shapes of the basins and uplifts are similar to those observed in gravity data; gravity anomalies calculated from the 3-D tomography model are in close agreement with the observed anomalies. In velocity cross sections the Tacoma and Seattle basins are asymmetric: the basin floor dips gently toward a steep boundary with the adjacent high-velocity uplift, locally with a velocity "overhang" that suggests a basin vergent thrust fault boundary. Crustal fault zones grow from minor folds into much larger structures along strike. Inferred structural relief across the Tacoma fault zone increases by several

  3. Control of Toxic Chemicals in Puget Sound, Phase 3: Study of Atmospheric Deposition of Air Toxics to the Surface of Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Brandenberger, Jill M.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Kuo, Li-Jung; Crecelius, Eric A.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Gill, Gary A.; Garland, Charity R.; Williamson, J. B.; Dhammapala, R.

    2010-07-05

    The results of the Phase 1 Toxics Loading study suggested that runoff from the land surface and atmospheric deposition directly to marine waters have resulted in considerable loads of contaminants to Puget Sound (Hart Crowser et al. 2007). The limited data available for atmospheric deposition fluxes throughout Puget Sound was recognized as a significant data gap. Therefore, this study provided more recent or first reported atmospheric deposition fluxes of PAHs, PBDEs, and select trace elements for Puget Sound. Samples representing bulk atmospheric deposition were collected during 2008 and 2009 at seven stations around Puget Sound spanning from Padilla Bay south to Nisqually River including Hood Canal and the Straits of Juan de Fuca. Revised annual loading estimates for atmospheric deposition to the waters of Puget Sound were calculated for each of the toxics and demonstrated an overall decrease in the atmospheric loading estimates except for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and total mercury (THg). The median atmospheric deposition flux of total PBDE (7.0 ng/m2/d) was higher than that of the Hart Crowser (2007) Phase 1 estimate (2.0 ng/m2/d). The THg was not significantly different from the original estimates. The median atmospheric deposition flux for pyrogenic PAHs (34.2 ng/m2/d; without TCB) shows a relatively narrow range across all stations (interquartile range: 21.2- 61.1 ng/m2/d) and shows no influence of season. The highest median fluxes for all parameters were measured at the industrial location in Tacoma and the lowest were recorded at the rural sites in Hood Canal and Sequim Bay. Finally, a semi-quantitative apportionment study permitted a first-order characterization of source inputs to the atmosphere of the Puget Sound. Both biomarker ratios and a principal component analysis confirmed regional data from the Puget Sound and Straits of Georgia region and pointed to the predominance of biomass and fossil fuel (mostly liquid petroleum products such

  4. Sources and sinks of filtered total mercury and concentrations of total mercury of solids and of filtered methylmercury, Sinclair Inlet, Kitsap County, Washington, 2007-10

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paulson, Anthony J.; Dinicola, Richard S.; Noble, Marlene A.; Wagner, Richard J.; Huffman, Raegan L.; Moran, Patrick W.; DeWild, John F.

    2012-01-01

    The majority of filtered total mercury in the marine water of Sinclair Inlet originates from salt water flowing from Puget Sound. About 420 grams of filtered total mercury are added to Sinclair Inlet each year from atmospheric, terrestrial, and sedimentary sources, which has increased filtered total mercury concentrations in Sinclair Inlet (0.33 nanograms per liter) to concentrations greater than those of the Puget Sound (0.2 nanograms per liter). The category with the largest loading of filtered total mercury to Sinclair Inlet included diffusion of porewaters from marine sediment to the water column of Sinclair Inlet and discharge through the largest stormwater drain on the Bremerton naval complex, Bremerton, Washington. However, few data are available to estimate porewater and stormwater releases with any certainty. The release from the stormwater drain does not originate from overland flow of stormwater. Rather total mercury on soils is extracted by the chloride ions in seawater as the stormwater is drained and adjacent soils are flushed with seawater by tidal pumping. Filtered total mercury released by an unknown freshwater mechanism also was observed in the stormwater flowing through this drain. Direct atmospheric deposition on the Sinclair Inlet, freshwater discharge from creek and stormwater basins draining into Sinclair Inlet, and saline discharges from the dry dock sumps of the naval complex are included in the next largest loading category of sources of filtered total mercury. Individual discharges from a municipal wastewater treatment plant and from the industrial steam plant of the naval complex constituted the loading category with the third largest loadings. Stormwater discharge from the shipyard portion of the naval complex and groundwater discharge from the base are included in the loading category with the smallest loading of filtered total mercury. Presently, the origins of the solids depositing to the sediment of Sinclair Inlet are uncertain, and

  5. Evaluation of contaminant flux rates from sediments of Sinclair Inlet, WA, using a benthic flux sampling device. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Chadwick, D.B.; Lieberman, S.H.; Reimers, C.E.; Young, D.

    1993-02-01

    A Benthic Flux Sampling Device (BFSD) was demonstrated on site to determine the mobility of contaminants in sediments off the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard (PSNS) in Sinclair Inlet, WA. Quantification of toxicant flux from the sediments will support ongoing assessment studies and facilitate the design of appropriate remediation strategies, if required. In general, where release of contaminants was found, the measured rates do not represent a significant source relative to other major inputs such as sewer discharges, nonpoint source runoff, and marinas. They may, however, represent an exposure pathway for benthic biota with a subsequent potential for toxicological effects and/or bioaccumulation. Environmental assessment, CIVAPP:Toxicity, CIVAPP:Marine chemistry, Hazardous waste.

  6. Wave and Wind Effects on Inlet Circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raubenheimer, B.; Wargula, A.; Orescanin, M. M.; Hopkins, J.; Elgar, S.

    2014-12-01

    Observations and numerical simulations of the water circulation and morphological change in two separate, well-mixed inlets will be compared with each other. Tides, winds, waves, and currents were measured from May 1 to 28, 2012 in and near New River Inlet, NC. Offshore significant wave heights were 0 to 3 m, and wind speeds ranged from 0 to 16 m/s. The long, narrow inlet is about 1000 m wide where it opens onto the ebb shoal, narrows to 100 m wide about 1000 m inland, and connects to the Intracoastal Waterway (which connects to additional ocean inlets about 12 and 36 km north and south, respectively) about 3000 m inland. Tides in the inlet are progressive and inlet flows are in phase with water depths. Measurements also were collected during the summers of 2011-2014, including during Hurricanes Irene and Sandy (offshore significant wave heights > 5 m and winds > 15 m/s), in Katama Bay, MA, which connects to Vineyard Sound via Edgartown Channel and to the Atlantic Ocean via Katama Inlet. During this period, Katama Inlet migrated east about 1000 m, narrowed from 400 to 100 m wide, changed depth from 7 to 2 m, and lengthened from 200 to 1000 m. Tidal flows in Katama Inlet are forced by sea level gradients resulting from the 3-hr phase lag between tides in Vineyard Sound and the Atlantic Ocean. Analyses of the momentum balances suggest that waves drive flows into the mouths of the inlets during storms. The timing of the storms relative to ebb and flood, and wind effects, may affect the discharge and sediment transport through the inlet. Winds and waves also drive alongshore flows on the ebb shoals. Lateral flows at bends in New River Inlet, which may be important to the along-inlet transfer of momentum and to mixing, are affected by winds. The importance of connections to additional inlets in multi-inlet systems will be discussed. Funded by ONR, ASD(R&E), NSF, Sea Grant, and NDSEG.

  7. 33 CFR 117.757 - Townsend Inlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Townsend Inlet. 117.757 Section 117.757 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.757 Townsend Inlet. The draw...

  8. 33 CFR 117.757 - Townsend Inlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Townsend Inlet. 117.757 Section 117.757 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.757 Townsend Inlet. The draw...

  9. 33 CFR 117.757 - Townsend Inlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Townsend Inlet. 117.757 Section 117.757 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.757 Townsend Inlet. The draw...

  10. 33 CFR 117.714 - Corson Inlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Corson Inlet. 117.714 Section 117.714 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.714 Corson Inlet. The draw of the Corson...

  11. 33 CFR 117.757 - Townsend Inlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Townsend Inlet. 117.757 Section 117.757 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.757 Townsend Inlet. The draw...

  12. 33 CFR 117.714 - Corson Inlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Corson Inlet. 117.714 Section 117.714 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.714 Corson Inlet. The draw of the Corson...

  13. 33 CFR 117.714 - Corson Inlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Corson Inlet. 117.714 Section 117.714 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.714 Corson Inlet. The draw of the Corson...

  14. 33 CFR 117.714 - Corson Inlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Corson Inlet. 117.714 Section 117.714 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.714 Corson Inlet. The draw of the Corson...

  15. 33 CFR 117.714 - Corson Inlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Corson Inlet. 117.714 Section 117.714 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.714 Corson Inlet. The draw of the Corson...

  16. 33 CFR 117.757 - Townsend Inlet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Townsend Inlet. 117.757 Section 117.757 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.757 Townsend Inlet. The draw...

  17. External-Compression Supersonic Inlet Design Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2011-01-01

    A computer code named SUPIN has been developed to perform aerodynamic design and analysis of external-compression, supersonic inlets. The baseline set of inlets include axisymmetric pitot, two-dimensional single-duct, axisymmetric outward-turning, and two-dimensional bifurcated-duct inlets. The aerodynamic methods are based on low-fidelity analytical and numerical procedures. The geometric methods are based on planar geometry elements. SUPIN has three modes of operation: 1) generate the inlet geometry from a explicit set of geometry information, 2) size and design the inlet geometry and analyze the aerodynamic performance, and 3) compute the aerodynamic performance of a specified inlet geometry. The aerodynamic performance quantities includes inlet flow rates, total pressure recovery, and drag. The geometry output from SUPIN includes inlet dimensions, cross-sectional areas, coordinates of planar profiles, and surface grids suitable for input to grid generators for analysis by computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods. The input data file for SUPIN and the output file from SUPIN are text (ASCII) files. The surface grid files are output as formatted Plot3D or stereolithography (STL) files. SUPIN executes in batch mode and is available as a Microsoft Windows executable and Fortran95 source code with a makefile for Linux.

  18. Electrically heated particulate matter filter with recessed inlet end plugs

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Ament, Frank [Troy, MI

    2012-02-21

    A particulate matter (PM) filter includes filter walls having inlet ends and outlet ends. First adjacent pairs of the filter walls define inlet channels. Second adjacent pairs of the filter walls define outlet channels. Outlet end plugs are arranged in the inlet channels adjacent to the output ends. Inlet end plugs arranged in the outlet channels spaced from the inlet ends.

  19. Historical record of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) in marine sediment cores from Admiralty Bay, King George Island, Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Martins, César C; Bícego, Márcia C; Rose, Neil L; Taniguchi, Satie; Lourenço, Rafael A; Figueira, Rubens C L; Mahiques, Michel M; Montone, Rosalinda C

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the first results of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and spheroidal carbonaceous particles (SCPs) in sediment cores of Admiralty Bay, Antarctica. These markers were used to assess the local input of anthropogenic materials (particulate and organic compounds) as a result of the influence of human occupation in a sub-Antarctic region and a possible long-range atmospheric transport of combustion products from sources in South America. The highest SCPs and PAHs concentrations were observed during the last 30 years, when three research stations were built in the area and industrial activities in South America increased. The concentrations of SCPs and PAHs were much lower than those of other regions in the northern hemisphere and other reported data for the southern hemisphere. The PAH isomer ratios showed that the major sources of PAHs are fossil fuels/petroleum, biomass combustion and sewage contribution generally close to the Brazilian scientific station.

  20. 75 FR 82208 - Notice of Availability of a Draft Framework for Ranking the Relative Importance of Puget Sound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-29

    ... available scientific information regarding the status and structure of Puget Sound Chinook salmon populations and their habitat. It builds on the work of the Puget Sound technical recovery team, which... technical recovery teams to develop scientific advice for salmon and steelhead recovery throughout...

  1. 76 FR 55261 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ..., Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation... Port, Puget Sound area of responsibility on September 10, 2011 for the Mukilteo Lighthouse Festival in... necessary to prevent injury and to protect life and property of the maritime public from the...

  2. 76 FR 33646 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-09

    ..., Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation... Port, Puget Sound area of responsibility during the dates and times noted below. This action is necessary to prevent injury and to protect life and property of the maritime public from the...

  3. 75 FR 38021 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ..., Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation... Port, Puget Sound area of responsibility during the dates and times noted below. This action is necessary to prevent injury and to protect life and property of the maritime public from the...

  4. 76 FR 63841 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ..., Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation... display in the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound area of responsibility during the dates and times noted below. This action is necessary to prevent injury and to protect life and property of the...

  5. 77 FR 55143 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-07

    ..., Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation... and time noted below. This action is necessary to prevent injury and to protect life and property of... established for Annual Fireworks Displays within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

  6. 33 CFR 100.1308 - Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. 100.1308 Section 100.1308... Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. (a) Location. The following areas are designated... event in accordance with 33 CFR 100. The Captain of the Port will provide notice of the enforcement...

  7. 33 CFR 100.1308 - Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. 100.1308 Section 100.1308... Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. (a) Location. The following areas are designated... hydroplane event in accordance with 33 CFR 100. The Captain of the Port will provide notice of...

  8. 33 CFR 3.65-10 - Sector Puget Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.65-10 Section 3.65-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-10 Sector Puget Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. Sector Puget Sound's office is located in Seattle, WA....

  9. 76 FR 17339 - Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races Within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule... the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility in the Federal Register (75 FR 2833). On... Area of Responsibility. This action is necessary in order to restrict vessel movement in the...

  10. 77 FR 33308 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-06

    ..., Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation... Port, Puget Sound area of responsibility during the dates and times noted below. This action is... Sound or Designated Representative. DATES: The regulations in 33 CFR 165.1332 will be enforced...

  11. 77 FR 38179 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-27

    ..., Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation... Port, Puget Sound area of responsibility during the dates and times noted below. This action is... Sound or his Designated Representative. DATES: The regulations in 33 CFR 165.1332 for the...

  12. 33 CFR 100.1308 - Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. 100.1308 Section 100.1308... Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. (a) Location. The following areas are...

  13. 33 CFR 100.1308 - Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. 100.1308 Section 100.1308... Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of Responsibility. (a) Location. The following areas are...

  14. 75 FR 38415 - Safety Zones; Multiple Firework Displays in Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final... movement in the proximity of firework discharge sites being held in the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound... and opportunity to comment when the agency for good cause finds that those procedures...

  15. 76 FR 6402 - Notice of Availability of a Draft Framework for Ranking the Relative Importance of Puget Sound...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ... for Ranking the Relative Importance of Puget Sound Chinook Salmon Populations and Watersheds for ESU... comment period for a draft technical framework for ranking recovery potential of populations of Puget... Register of December 29, 2010, concerning the availability of a draft technical framework for...

  16. Research on Supersonic Inlet Bleed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, David O.; Vyas, Manan A.; Slater, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Phase I data results of the Fundamental Inlet Bleed Experiments project at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) are presented which include flow coefficient results for two single-hole boundary-layer bleed configurations. The bleed configurations tested are round holes at inclination angles of 90deg and 20deg both having length-to-diameter ratios of 2.0. Results were obtained at freestream Mach numbers of 1.33, 1.62, 1.98, 2.46, and 2.92 and unit Reynolds numbers of 0.984, 1.89, and 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Approach boundary-layer data are presented for each flow condition and the flow coefficient results are compared to existing multi-hole data obtained under similar conditions. For the 90deg hole, the single and multi-hole distributions agree fairly well with the exception that under supercritical operation, the multi-hole data chokes at higher flow coefficient levels. This behavior is also observed for the 20deg hole but to a lesser extent. The 20deg hole also shows a markedly different characteristic at subcritical operation. Also presented are preliminary results of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis of both configurations at the Mach 1.33 and a unit Reynolds number of 2.46 10(exp 7)/m. Comparison of the results shows the agreement to be very good.

  17. Distribution of Pacific lamprey Entosphenus tridentatus in watersheds of Puget Sound Based on smolt monitoring data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hayes, Michael C.; Hays, Richard; Rubin, Stephen P.; Chase, Dorothy M.; Hallock, Molly; Cook-Tabor, Carrie; Luzier, Christina W.; Moser, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    Lamprey populations are in decline worldwide and the status of Pacific lamprey (Entosphenus tridentatus) is a topic of current interest. They and other lamprey species cycle nutrients and serve as prey in riverine ecosystems. To determine the current distribution of Pacific lamprey in major watersheds flowing into Puget Sound, Washington, we sampled lamprey captured during salmonid smolt monitoring that occurred from late winter to mid-summer. We found Pacific lamprey in 12 of 18 watersheds and they were most common in southern Puget Sound watersheds and in watersheds draining western Puget Sound (Hood Canal). Two additional species, western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni) and river lamprey (L. ayresii) were more common in eastern Puget Sound watersheds. Few Pacific lamprey macrophthalmia were found, suggesting that the majority of juveniles migrated seaward during other time periods. In addition, “dwarf” adult Pacific lamprey (< 300 mm) were observed in several watersheds and may represent an alternate life history for some Puget Sound populations. Based on genetic data, the use of visual techniques to identify lamprey ammocoetes as Entosphenus or Lampetra was successful for 97% (34 of 35) of the samples we evaluated.

  18. Assessing the Health of Puget Sound's Pelagic Food Web at Multiple Trophic Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, L. D.; Greene, C. M.; Rice, C. A.; Hall, J. E.; Baxter, A. E.; Naman, S. M.; Chamberlin, J.

    2012-12-01

    Puget Sound is an estuarine fjord in the northwestern United State surrounded by variable upland uses, ranging from industrial and urban to agricultural to forested lands. The quality of Puget Sound's ecosystem is under scrutiny because of the biological resources that depend on its function. In 2011, we undertook a study of the Sound's pelagic food web that measured water quality, microbial parameters, and abundance of higher trophic levels including gelatinous zooplankton, forage fish, and salmon. More than 75 sites spanning the latitudinal expanse of Puget Sound and the range of developed and agricultural land uses were sampled monthly from April to October. Strong relationships between water quality and microbial parameters suggest that microbes may modulate water quality indicators, such as dissolved inorganic nitrogen and pH, and that land use may be an influential factor. Basins within Puget Sound exhibit distinct biological profiles at the microbial and macrobiotic levels, emphasizing that Puget Sound is not a homogenous water body and suggesting that informative food web indicators may vary across the basins.

  19. Development of a Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound and Northwest Straits

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang P.

    2007-12-10

    The hydrodynamic model used in this study is the Finite Volume Coastal Ocean Model (FVCOM) developed by the University of Massachusetts at Dartmouth. The unstructured grid and finite volume framework, as well as the capability of wetting/drying simulation and baroclinic simulation, makes FVCOM a good fit to the modeling needs for nearshore restoration in Puget Sound. The model domain covers the entire Puget Sound, Strait of Juan de Fuca, San Juan Passages, and Georgia Strait at the United States-Canada Border. The model is driven by tide, freshwater discharge, and surface wind. Preliminary model validation was conducted for tides at various locations in the straits and Puget Sound using National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tide data. The hydrodynamic model was successfully linked to the NOAA oil spill model General NOAA Operational Modeling Environment model (GNOME) to predict particle trajectories at various locations in Puget Sound. Model results demonstrated that the Puget Sound GNOME model is a useful tool to obtain first-hand information for emergency response such as oil spill and fish migration pathways.

  20. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a research study conducted in support of the small-scale demonstration of an active flow control system for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) inlet. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet circumferential distortion was assessed using a 2.5% scale model of a 35% boundary-layer-ingesting flush-mounted, offset, diffusing inlet. This experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at flight Mach numbers with a model inlet specifically designed for this type of testing. High mass flow actuators controlled the flow through distributed control jets providing the active flow control. A vortex generator point design configuration was also tested for comparison purposes and to provide a means to examine a hybrid vortex generator and control jets configuration. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were determined by 40 total pressure measurements on 8 rake arms each separated by 45 degrees and were located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum free-stream Mach number of 0.85 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the flow control jets alone can reduce circumferential distortion (DPCP(sub avg)) from 0.055 to about 0.015 using about 2.5% of inlet mass flow. The vortex generators also reduced the circumferential distortion from 0.055 to 0.010 near the inlet mass flow design point. Lower inlet mass flow settings with the vortex generator configuration produced higher distortion levels that were reduced to acceptable levels using a hybrid vortex generator/control jets configuration that required less than 1% of the inlet mass flow.

  1. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2006-01-01

    This paper gives an overview of a research study conducted in support of the small-scale demonstration of an active flow control system for a boundary-layer-ingesting (BLI) inlet. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet circumferential distortion was assessed using a 2.5% scale model of a 35% boundary-layer-ingesting flush-mounted, offset, diffusing inlet. This experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley 0.3-meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel at flight Mach numbers with a model inlet specifically designed for this type of testing. High mass flow actuators controlled the flow through distributed control jets providing the active flow control. A vortex generator point design configuration was also tested for comparison purposes and to provide a means to examine a hybrid vortex generator and control jets configuration. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were determined by 40 total pressure measurements on 8 rake arms each separated by 45 degrees and were located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum free-stream Mach number of 0.85 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the flow control jets alone can reduce circumferential distortion (DPCPavg) from 0.055 to about 0.015 using about 2.5% of inlet mass flow. The vortex generators also reduced the circumferential distortion from 0.055 to 0.010 near the inlet mass flow design point. Lower inlet mass flow settings with the vortex generator configuration produced higher distortion levels that were reduced to acceptable levels using a hybrid vortex generator/control jets configuration that required less than 1% of the inlet mass flow.

  2. Wind- and Tide-Driven Cross-Inlet Circulation at New River Inlet, NC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wargula, A.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2014-12-01

    The importance of cross-channel wind forcing to inlet circulation is examined using observations of winds, waves, water levels, and currents collected in and near New River Inlet, NC during May 2012. Although the direct effect of local wind forcing may be neglected in the subtidal along-inlet momentum balance, which is dominated by the pressure gradient, wave radiation stress gradient, and bottom friction, cross-inlet winds may have a significant effect on along-inlet dynamics by driving cross-inlet flows (approximately 0.1 to 0.3 m/s), which can mix lateral and vertical gradients in momentum and water properties. New River Inlet is 1000 m wide at the mouth and tapers to 100 m wide about 1000 m away from the mouth after two sharp 90° bends. Five colocated pressure gages and current profilers were deployed from the shallow (2-3 m water depth) ebb shoal outside the mouth through the deep (5-10 m depth) inlet channel to 200 m beyond the first 90° bend. The inlet is well mixed, and along-inlet tidal currents ranged from +/- 1.5 m/s, offshore significant wave heights from 0.5 to 2.5 m, and wind speeds from 0 to 16 m/s. Time series of currents and winds were lowpass-filtered to examine subtidal wind effects. At the first 90° bend, both surface and bottom cross-inlet flows were correlated (r2 = 0.6) with cross-inlet wind velocity. On the shallow ebb shoal, the cross-inlet flows also were correlated with cross-inlet wind velocity (r2 = 0.6). Cross-inlet flows exhibited a two-layer response to the wind inside the inlet and a depth-uniform response outside the mouth. The observations will be used to examine the momentum balance governing temporal and spatial variations in cross-inlet wind effects on inlet circulation. Funding provided by the Office of Naval Research, the Assistant Secretary of Defense for Research and Engineering, and a National Defense Science and Engineering Graduate Fellowship.

  3. The Origin of Inlet Buzz in a Mach 1.7 Low Boom Inlet Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Bernhard H.; Weir, Lois

    2014-01-01

    Supersonic inlets with external compression, having a good level performance at the critical operating point, exhibit a marked instability of the flow in some subcritical operation below a critical value of the capture mass flow ratio. This takes the form of severe oscillations of the shock system, commonly known as "buzz". The underlying purpose of this study is to indicate how Detached Eddy Simulation (DES) analysis of supersonic inlets will alter how we envision unsteady inlet aerodynamics, particularly inlet buzz. Presented in this paper is a discussion regarding the physical explanation underlying inlet buzz as indicated by DES analysis. It is the normal shock wave boundary layer separation along the spike surface which reduces the capture mass flow that is the controlling mechanism which determines the onset of inlet buzz, and it is the aerodynamic characteristics of a choked nozzle that provide the feedback mechanism that sustains the buzz cycle by imposing a fixed mean corrected inlet weight flow. Comparisons between the DES analysis of the Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMCO) N+2 inlet and schlieren photographs taken during the test of the Gulfstream Large Scale Low Boom (LSLB) inlet in the NASA 8x6 ft. Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) show a strong similarity both in turbulent flow field structure and shock wave formation during the buzz cycle. This demonstrates the value of DES analysis for the design and understanding of supersonic inlets.

  4. Gas Turbine Engine Inlet Wall Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Florea, Razvan Virgil (Inventor); Matalanis, Claude G. (Inventor); Stucky, Mark B. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A gas turbine engine has an inlet duct formed to have a shape with a first ellipse in one half and a second ellipse in a second half. The second half has an upstream most end which is smaller than the first ellipse. The inlet duct has a surface defining the second ellipse which curves away from the first ellipse, such that the second ellipse is larger at an intermediate location. The second ellipse is even larger at a downstream end of the inlet duct leading into a fan.

  5. Aeroacoustic performance of a scoop inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Results of a low speed wind tunnel test program are presented which demonstrate the aerodynamic and acoustic performance of a scoop inlet. Engine noise that would normally propagate toward the ground is directed upward by the extended lower lip of the scoop inlet. In addition, more of the scoop airflow comes in from above the inlet than below, leading to relatively higher surface velocities on the upper lip and lower surface velocities on the lower lip. These lower velocities on the lower lip result in a higher attainable angle of attack before internal flow separation occurs.

  6. Boundary conditions for unsteady supersonic inlet analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, David W.; Paynter, Gerald C.

    1994-06-01

    New bleed and compressor face boundary conditions have been developed to improve the accuracy of unsteady supersonic inlet calculations. The new bleed boundary conditions relate changes in the bleed hole discharge coefficient to changes in the local flow conditions; the local bleed flow rate can more than double as a shock moves forward over a bleed band in response to inlet flow disturbances. The effects of inlet flow disturbances on the flow at the compressor face are represented more realistically with this new boundary condition than with traditional fixed static pressure or mass flow conditions.

  7. Abrupt uplift within the past 1700 years at Southern Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bucknam, R.C.; Hemphill-Haley, E.; Leopold, E.B.

    1992-01-01

    Shorelines rose as much as 7 meters along southern Puget Sound and Hood Canal between 500 and 1700 years ago. Evidence for this uplift consists of elevated wave-cut shore platforms near Seattle and emerged, peat-covered tidal flats as much as 60 kilometers to the southwest. The uplift was too rapid for waves to leave intermediate shorelines on even the best preserved platform. The tidal flats also emerged abruptly; they changed into freshwater swamps and meadows without first becoming tidal marshes. Where uplift was greatest, it adjoined an inferred fault that crosses Puget Sound at Seattle and it probably accompanied reverse slip on that fault 1000 to 1100 years ago. The uplift and probable fault slip show that the crust of the North America plate contains potential sources of damaging earthquakes in the Puget Sound region.

  8. Incidence of Ichthyophonus hoferi in Puget Sound fishes and its increase with age of Pacific herring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Stick, K.; Bui, B.; Carroll, C.; Fall, B.; Mork, C.; Perry, J.A.; Sweeney, E.; Wittouck, J.; Winton, J.; Kocan, R.

    2002-01-01

    A recent decrease in the mean age of adult Pacific herring Clupea pallasi in Puget Sound was associated with a high prevalence of Ichthyophonus hoferi, a protistan parasite that can be highly pathogenic to Pacific herring. In Puget Sound, high intensities of I. hoferiinfection may be maintained in older cohorts of Pacific herring because the prevalence ofI. hoferi increased with age from 12% among juveniles to 58% among the oldest, age-6 and older cohorts. Low intensities of I. hoferi infection in the region may be maintained in alternative fish hosts, such as surf smelt Hypomesus pretiosus, Puget Sound rockfishSebastes emphaeus, Pacific tomcod Microgadus proximus, and speckled sanddabCithanichthys stigmaeus.

  9. The Peel Inlet-Harvey Estuary Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Warren; Black, Ronald

    1979-01-01

    Describes how the department of physics of the Western Australian Institute of Technology (WAIT) has been involved in the Peel Inlet-Harvey Estuary study. An appendix which presents the departmental approach to curriculum matters is also included. (HM)

  10. Computational analysis of ramjet engine inlet interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Beverly; Thomas, Scott

    1992-01-01

    A computational analysis of a ramjet engine at Mach 3.5 has been conducted and compared to results obtained experimentally. This study focuses on the behavior of the inlet both with and without combustor backpressure. Increased backpressure results in separation of the body side boundary layer and a resultant static pressure rise in the inlet throat region. The computational results compare well with the experimental data for static pressure distribution through the engine, inlet throat flow profiles, and mass capture. The computational analysis slightly underpredicts the thickness of the engine body surface boundary layer and the extent of the interaction caused by backpressure; however, the interaction is observed at approximately the same level of backpressure both experimentally and computationally. This study demonstrates the ability of two different Navier-Stokes codes, namely RPLUS and PARC, to calculate the flow features of this ramjet engine and to provide more detailed information on the process of inlet interaction and unstart.

  11. Noise suppression with high Mach number inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lumsdaine, E.; Cherng, J. G.; Tag, I.

    1976-01-01

    Experimental results were obtained for two types of high Mach number inlets, one with a translating centerbody and a fixed geometry inlet (collapsing cowl) with no centerbody. The aerodynamic and acoustic performance of these inlets was examined. The effects of area ratio, length/diameter ratio, and lip geometry were among several parameters investigated. The translating centerbody type inlet was found to be superior to the collapsing cowl both acoustically and aerodynamically, particularly for area ratios greater than 1.5. Comparison of length/diameter ratio and area ratio effects on performance near choked flow showed the latter to be more significant. Also, greater high frequency noise attenuation was achieved by increasing Mach number from low to high subsonic values.

  12. Sample inlet tube for ion source

    DOEpatents

    Prior, David [Hermiston, OR; Price, John [Richland, WA; Bruce, Jim [Oceanside, CA

    2002-09-24

    An improved inlet tube is positioned within an aperture through the device to allow the passage of ions from the ion source, through the improved inlet tube, and into the interior of the device. The inlet tube is designed with a larger end and a smaller end wherein the larger end has a larger interior diameter than the interior diameter of the smaller end. The inlet tube is positioned within the aperture such that the larger end is pointed towards the ion source, to receive ions therefrom, and the smaller end is directed towards the interior of the device, to deliver the ions thereto. Preferably, the ion source utilized in the operation of the present invention is a standard electrospray ionization source. Similarly, the present invention finds particular utility in conjunction with analytical devices such as mass spectrometers.

  13. Small inlet optical panel and a method of making a small inlet optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; Slobodin, David

    2001-01-01

    An optical panel having a small inlet, and a method of making a small inlet optical panel, are disclosed, which optical panel includes a individually coating, stacking, and cutting a first plurality of stacked optical waveguides to form an outlet face body with an outlet face, individually coating, stacking, and cutting a second plurality of stacked optical waveguides to form an inlet face body with an inlet face, and connecting an optical coupling element to the first plurality and to the second plurality, wherein the optical coupling element redirects light along a parallel axis of the inlet face to a parallel axis of the outlet face. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the inlet face is disposed obliquely with and askew from the outlet face.

  14. Effect of inlet disturbances on fan inlet noise during a static test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bekofske, K. L.; Sheer, R. E., Jr.; Wang, J. C. F.

    1977-01-01

    Measurements of fan rotor inlet noise taken during static test situations are at variance with aircraft engine flight data. In particular, static tests generally yield a significantly higher tone at blade passage frequency than that measured during flight. To explain this discrepancy, the extent of the influence of inlet ground vortices and large-scale inlet turbulence on the forward-radiated fan noise measured at a static test facility was investigated. While such inlet disturbances were generated intentionally in an anechoic test chamber, far-field acoustic measurements and inlet flow-field hot-film mappings of a fan rotor were obtained. Experimental results indicate that the acoustic effect of such disturbances appears to be less severe for supersonic than for subsonic tip speeds. Further, a reverse flow that occurs on the exterior cowl in static test facilities appears to be an additional prime candidate for creating inlet disturbances and causing variance between flight and static acoustic data.

  15. Inlet Processes at Eel Pond, Falmouth, Massachusetts.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-10-01

    7 D -A147 548 INLET PROCESSES AT EEL POND FALMOUTH MRSS CHUSETi7 jV 1/2.COASTAL ENGINEERING RESEARCH CENTER YICKSBURG MS A E DEWRLL ET AL. OCT 84...42 c. Sediment Transport. ................... 42 d . Aerial Photograph: 21 November 1938. .......... 46 e. Aerial Photograph...Structural Changes to Inlet Hydraulics. ......... 59 c. Predicted Channel Stability .. .............. 69 d . Longshore Transport Estimates

  16. Multiducted Inlet Combustor Research and Development.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-10-01

    qualitative data from the multi-ducted inlet combustor configuration for flow analysis and matematical modeling purposes. The major portion of the support...data on multi-ducted inlet combustor configurations. These efforts will provide the information necessary to perform flow field analysis and aid in the...instrumentation, test program, data reduction, data presentation, flow field analysis and math modelling efforts, and conclusions and recommendations. SECTION 2

  17. Boundary conditions for unsteady supersonic inlet analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, David W.; Paynter, Gerald C.

    1994-06-01

    New bleed and compresor face boundary conditions have been developed to improve the accuracy of unsteady supersonic inlet calculations. The new bleed boundary condition relates changes in the bleed hole discharge coefficient to change the local flow conditions; the local bleed flow rate can more than double as a shock moves forward over a bleed band in response to inlet flow disturbances. The stability margin of the inlet is strongly dependent on the throat bleed configuration since the locally rapid increase in bleed flow has a stong effect on the motion of the normal shock. The new compressor face boundary condition accounts for changes in the unsteady flow conditions at the compressor face by specifying the compressor face corrected mass flow or Mach number either as a constant or as a linear function of the stagnation conditions. The effects of inlet flow disturbances on the flow at the compressor face are represented more realistically with this new boundary condition than with traditional fixed static pressure or mass flow conditions. Euler calculations of the dynamic response of an inlet flow to a flow disturbance at the compressor face with 20- and 90-deg throat bleed hole angles are reported. These results indicate that an extra margin of stability for the inlet is obtained with 90-deg bleed holes because the increase in bleed flow rate as the shock moves forward over a bleed is much larger for 90-deg holes than for 20-deg holes.

  18. Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R.; Allan, Brian G.; Gorton, Susan A.

    2008-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to provide the first demonstration of an active flow control system for a flush-mounted inlet with significant boundary-layer-ingestion in transonic flow conditions. The effectiveness of the flow control in reducing the circumferential distortion at the engine fan-face location was assessed using a 2.5%-scale model of a boundary-layer-ingesting offset diffusing inlet. The inlet was flush mounted to the tunnel wall and ingested a large boundary layer with a boundary-layer-to-inlet height ratio of 35%. Different jet distribution patterns and jet mass flow rates were used in the inlet to control distortion. A vane configuration was also tested. Finally a hybrid vane/jet configuration was tested leveraging strengths of both types of devices. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow rates through the duct and the flow control actuators. The distortion and pressure recovery were measured at the aerodynamic interface plane. The data show that control jets and vanes reduce circumferential distortion to acceptable levels. The point-design vane configuration produced higher distortion levels at off-design settings. The hybrid vane/jet flow control configuration reduced the off-design distortion levels to acceptable ones and used less than 0.5% of the inlet mass flow to supply the jets.

  19. General Investigation of Tidal Inlets: Stability of Selected United States Tidal Inlets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    years, the US Army Corps of Engineers, through its Civil Works program, has sponsored research into the behavior and character- istics of tidal inlets...73 5 50 Siletz, OR 7-39 to 2-76 4 51 Netarts, OR 7-53 to 7-73 4 Report Organizacion 8. Previous research on tidal inlet stability is summarized in Part...I. 1928. "Inlets on Sandy Coasts," Proceedings of the American Society of Civil Engineers, Vol LIV, pp 505-553. Bruun, P. 1967. Tidal Inlets and

  20. Two-dimensional symmetrical inlets with external compression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruden, P

    1950-01-01

    The purpose of inlets like, for instance, those of air-cooled radiators and scoops is to take a certain air quantity out of the free stream and to partly convert the free-stream velocity into pressure. In the extreme case this pressure conversion may occur either entirely in the interior of the inlet (inlet with internal compression) or entirely in the free stream ahead of the inlet (inlet with external compression). In this report a theory for two-dimensional inlets with external compression is developed and illustrated by numerical examples. Intermediary forms between inlets with internal and external compression which can be derived from the latter are briefly discussed.

  1. 33 CFR 80.703 - Little River Inlet, SC to Cape Romain, SC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Inlet, a line drawn parallel with the general trend of the highwater shoreline across Hog Inlet; thence... the general trend of the highwater shoreline across Midway Inlet, Pawleys Inlet, and North Inlet....

  2. Site response and attenuation in the Puget Lowland, Washington State

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pratt, T.L.; Brocher, T.M.

    2006-01-01

    Simple spectral ratio (SSR) and horizontal-to-vertical (HN) site-response estimates at 47 sites in the Puget Lowland of Washington State document significant attenuation of 1.5- to 20-Hz shear waves within sedimentary basins there. Amplitudes of the horizontal components of shear-wave arrivals from three local earthquakes were used to compute SSRs with respect to the average of two bedrock sites and H/V spectral ratios with respect to the vertical component of the shear-wave arrivals at each site. SSR site-response curves at thick basin sites show peak amplifications of 2 to 6 at frequencies of 3 to 6 Hz, and decreasing spectra amplification with increasing frequency above 6 Hz. SSRs at nonbasin sites show a variety of shapes and larger resonance peaks. We attribute the spectral decay at frequencies above the amplification peak at basin sites to attenuation within the basin strata. Computing the frequency-independent, depth-dependent attenuation factor (Qs,int) from the SSR spectral decay between 2 and 20 Hz gives values of 5 to 40 for shallow sedimentary deposits and about 250 for the deepest sedimentary strata (7 km depth). H/V site responses show less spectral decay than the SSR responses but contain many of the same resonance peaks. We hypothesize that the H/V method yields a flatter response across the frequency spectrum than SSRs because the H/V reference signal (vertical component of the shear-wave arrivals) has undergone a degree of attenuation similar to the horizontal component recordings. Correcting the SSR site responses for attenuation within the basins by removing the spectral decay improves agreement between SSR and H/V estimates.

  3. Puget Sound Dredged Disposal Analysis (PSDDA). Final Environmental Impact Statement Unconfined Open-Water Disposal for Dredged Material, Phase 2. (North and South Puget Sound)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    recent years, as public policy has been to protect environmentally important tidal areas, wetlands , and marshes. Consequently, nearshore disposal options...Material into Puget Sound 4-24 (5) Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands 4-24 (6) Executive Order 11988, Flood Plain Management 4-24 v vii...TABLE OF CONTENTS (con.) Paragraph Page (5) Executive Order 11990, Protection of Wetlands !i-l,7 (6) Executive Order 11988, Flood Plain Management 4-47 (7

  4. Inlet contour and flow effects on radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ville, J. M.; Silcox, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental investigation of sound radiation from inlets with different contours with and without flow is being conducted to study the possibility of reducing noise radiated by aircraft engines. For each inlet configuration, complex directivity patterns and complex pressure reflection coefficients are measured as a function of a single space-time structure of the wave (up to a frequency of 4000Hz and an azimuthal wave number 6) and of flow velocity (up to Mach number 0.4) in a cylindrical duct located downstream the inlet. Experimental results of radiation from an unflanged duct are compared with theory. Effect of inlet contour and flow are deduced by comparing respectively unflanged duct and bellmouth measurements and, no flow and flow measurements with the bellmouth. Results are presented which indicate that the contour effect is significant near the cut-on frequency of a mode and emphasize the necessity for taking into account the inlet geometry in a radiation prediction. These results show also that internal flow has a weak effect on the amplitude of the directivity pattern

  5. Analysis of Buzz in a Supersonic Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2012-01-01

    A dual-stream, low-boom supersonic inlet designed for use on a small, Mach 1.6 aircraft was tested experimentally in the 8- by 6-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel (SWT) at the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The tests showed that the inlet had good recovery and stable operation over large mass flow range. The inlet went into buzz at mass flows well below that needed for engine operation, and the experiments generated a wealth of data during buzz. High frequency response pressure measurements and high-speed schlieren videos were recorded for many buzz events. The objective of the present work was to use computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to predict some of the experimental data taken during buzz, compare those predictions to the experimental data, and to use both datasets to explain the physics of the buzz cycle. The calculations were done with the Wind-US CFD code using a second-order time-accurate differencing scheme and the SST turbulence model. Computed Mach number contours were compared with schlieren images, and ensemble-averaged unsteady pressures were compared to data. The results showed that the buzz cycle consisted partly of spike buzz, an unsteady oscillation of the main shock at the spike tip while the inlet pressure dropped, and partly of choked flow while the inlet repressurized. Most of the results could be explained by theory proposed by Dailey in 1954, but did not support commonly used acoustic resonance explanations.

  6. 78 FR 17224 - Environmental Impact Statement; Proposed South Puget Sound Prairie Habitat Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-20

    ... taylori) is a native butterfly that was once widespread throughout prairies in association with golden... locations: one where the butterfly naturally occurs, and the other where it has been reintroduced. Both... marmorata affinus), western toad (Bufo boreas), mardon skipper (Polites mardon), Puget blue...

  7. Geographic patterns of fishes and jellyfish in Puget Sound surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Casimir A.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Greene, Correigh M.; Karr, James R.

    2012-01-01

    We explored patterns of small pelagic fish assemblages and biomass of gelatinous zooplankton (jellyfish) in surface waters across four oceanographic subbasins of greater Puget Sound. Our study is the first to collect data documenting biomass of small pelagic fishes and jellyfish throughout Puget Sound; sampling was conducted opportunistically as part of a juvenile salmon survey of daytime monthly surface trawls at 52 sites during May–August 2003. Biomass composition differed spatially and temporally, but spatial differences were more distinct. Fish dominated in the two northern basins of Puget Sound, whereas jellyfish dominated in the two southern basins. Absolute and relative abundance of jellyfish, hatchery Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, and chum salmon O. keta decreased with increasing latitude, whereas the absolute and relative abundance of most fish species and the average fish species richness increased with latitude. The abiotic factors with the strongest relationship to biomass composition were latitude, water clarity, and sampling date. Further study is needed to understand the spatial and temporal heterogeneity in the taxonomic composition we observed in Puget Sound surface waters, especially as they relate to natural and anthropogenic influences.

  8. Marine Education--Survey of the Washington Coast and Puget Sound.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clearing: Nature and Learning in the Pacific Northwest, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Provides guidelines for planning a trip to a beach. Also provides a map showing marine education sites in Washington state, particularly those on the Pacific coast, Puget Sound, and the San Juan Islands. A brief description accompanies each site shown. (JN)

  9. 78 FR 12234 - Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 110 RIN 1625-AA01 Anchorages; Captain of the Port Puget Sound Zone, WA Correction In rule document 2013-03121, appearing on pages 9811-9814 in the issue of Tuesday, February...

  10. A High Resolution Hydrodynamic Model of Puget Sound to Support Nearshore Restoration Feasibility Analysis and Design

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing

    2011-01-01

    Estuarine and coastal hydrodynamic processes are sometimes neglected in the design and planning of nearshore restoration actions. Despite best intentions, efforts to restore nearshore habitats can result in poor outcomes if circulation and transport which also affect freshwater-saltwater interactions are not properly addressed. Limitations due to current land use can lead to selection of sub-optimal restoration alternatives that may result in undesirable consequences, such as flooding, deterioration of water quality, and erosion, requiring immediate remedies and costly repairs. Uncertainty with achieving restoration goals, such as recovery of tidal exchange, supply of sediment and nutrients, and establishment of fish migration pathways, may be minimized by using numerical models designed for application to the nearshore environment. A high resolution circulation and transport model of the Puget Sound, in the state of Washington, was developed to assist with nearshore habitat restoration design and analysis, and to answer the question “can we achieve beneficial restoration outcomes at small local scale, as well as at a large estuary-wide scale?” The Puget Sound model is based on an unstructured grid framework to define the complex Puget Sound shoreline using a finite volume coastal ocean model (FVCOM). The capability of the model for simulating the important nearshore processes, such as circulation in complex multiple tidal channels, wetting and drying of tide flats, and water quality and sediment transport as part of restoration feasibility, are illustrated through examples of restoration projects in Puget Sound.

  11. Enumeration and phylogenetic analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading marine bacteria from Puget Sound sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Geiselbrecht, A.D.; Herwig, R.P.; Deming, J.W.; Staley, J.T.

    1996-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are primarily released into the environment through anthropomorphic sources. PAH degradation has been known to occur in marine sediments. This paper describes the enumeration, isolation, and preliminary characterization of PAH-degrading strains from Puget Sound sediments. 38 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Ways of the Lushootseed People: Ceremonies & Traditions of Northern Puget Sound Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United Indians of All Tribes Foundation, Seattle, WA.

    The book is an attempt to create an appreciation of the complex Lushootseed language, spoken by American Indians in the area between Puget Sound and the Cascade Mountains northward to the Skagit River Valley. The book is divided into two parts: readings about Lushootseed life and a brief description of the Lushootseed language. The readings, taken…

  13. Numerical simulation of scramjet inlet flow fields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, Ajay

    1986-01-01

    A computer program was developed to analyze supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) inlet flow fields. The program solves the three-dimensional Euler or Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes equations in full conservation form by either the fully explicit or explicit-implicit, predictor-corrector method of MacCormack. Turbulence is modeled by an algebraic eddy-viscosity model. The analysis allows inclusion of end effects which can significantly affect the inlet flow field. Detailed laminar and turbulent flow results are presented for a symmetric-wedge corner, and comparisons are made with the available experimental results to allow assessment of the program. Results are then presented for two inlet configurations for which experimental results exist at the NASA Langley Research Center.

  14. Miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve

    DOEpatents

    Keville, R.F.; Dietrich, D.D.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve having a fast pulse rate and is battery operated with variable flow capability is disclosed. The low power (<1.6 watts), high pulse rate (<2 milliseconds), variable flow inlet valve is utilized for mass spectroscopic applications or other applications where pulsed or continuous flow conditions are needed. The inlet valve also has a very minimal dead volume of less than 0.01 std/cc. The valve can utilize, for example, a 12 Vdc input/750 Vdc, 3 mA output power supply compared to conventional piezo electric valves which require preloading of the crystal drive mechanism and 120 Vac, thus the valve of the present invention is smaller by a factor of three. 6 figs.

  15. Miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve

    DOEpatents

    Keville, Robert F.; Dietrich, Daniel D.

    1998-03-24

    A miniature piezo electric vacuum inlet valve having a fast pulse rate and is battery operated with variable flow capability. The low power (<1.6 watts), high pulse rate (<2 milliseconds), variable flow inlet valve is utilized for mass spectroscopic applications or other applications where pulsed or continuous flow conditions are needed. The inlet valve also has a very minimal dead volume of less than 0.01 std/cc. The valve can utilize, for example, a 12 Vdc input/750 Vdc, 3 mA output power supply compared to conventional piezo electric valves which require preloading of the crystal drive mechanism and 120 Vac, thus the valve of the present invention is smaller by a factor of three.

  16. Easily constructed, economical seawater intake and supply system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bouck, G.R.

    1981-01-01

    A water intake system was designed and installed in Admiralty Inlet, Puget Sound, Washington. The dual system consisted of polyvinylchloride (PVC) pipes, a concrete pit and pumps located on shore at zero tide; and cables attached laterally to the pipelines and terminally between a shoreward anchor and to a seaward intake sled held in place with an 1800 kg Dansforth anchor. The overall construction costs were much lower than those for concrete-lined ductile iron pipe. Nearly three years after its construction, this system has withstood tides and storms without apparent adverse effect. Its application to lakes or rivers is equally possible.

  17. Quantifying benthic nitrogen fluxes in Puget Sound, Washington: a review of available data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sheibley, Richard W.; Paulson, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding benthic fluxes is important for understanding the fate of materials that settle to the Puget Sound, Washington, seafloor, as well as the impact these fluxes have on the chemical composition and biogeochemical cycles of marine waters. Existing approaches used to measure benthic nitrogen flux in Puget Sound and elsewhere were reviewed and summarized, and factors for considering each approach were evaluated. Factors for selecting an appropriate approach for gathering information about benthic flux include: availability of resources, objectives of projects, and determination of which processes each approach measures. An extensive search of literature was undertaken to summarize known benthic nitrogen fluxes in Puget Sound. A total of 138 individual flux chamber measurements and 38 sets of diffusive fluxes were compiled for this study. Of the diffusive fluxes, 35 new datasets were located, and new flux calculations are presented in this report. About 65 new diffusive flux calculations are provided across all nitrogen species (nitrate, NO3-; nitrite, NO2-; ammonium, NH4+). Data analysis of this newly compiled benthic flux dataset showed that fluxes beneath deep (greater than 50 meters) water tended to be lower than those beneath shallow (less than 50 meters) water. Additionally, variability in flux at the shallow depths was greater, possibly indicating a more dynamic interaction between the benthic and pelagic environments. The overall range of bottom temperatures from studies in the Puget Sound area were small (5–16 degrees Celsius), and only NH4+ flux showed any pattern with temperature. For NH4+, flux values and variability increased at greater than about 12 degrees Celsius. Collection of additional study site metadata about environmental factors (bottom temperature, depth, sediment porosity, sediment type, and sediment organic matter) will help with development of a broader regional understanding benthic nitrogen flux in the Puget Sound.

  18. Inlet Housing for a Partial-Admission Turbine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moye, Ralph; Myers, William; Baker, Kevin

    2004-01-01

    An inlet housing for a partial-admission turbine has been designed to cause the inlet airflow to make a smooth transition from an open circular inlet to an inlet slot. The smooth flow is required for purposes of measuring inlet flow characteristics and maximizing the efficiency of the turbine. A partial-admission turbine is a turbine in which the inlet slot occupies less than a complete circle around the rotor axis. In this case, the inlet slot occupies a 90 arc. The present special inlet-housing design is needed because the "bull nose" shape of a conventional turbine inlet housing fails to provide the required smooth transition in a partial-admission configuration and thereby gives rise to a loss of turbine efficiency and inaccuracies in inlet flow measurements. Upon entering the inlet housing through the circular opening, the flow encounters a "tongue"-shaped passageway, which serves as a ramp that diverts the flow to the first of two straight passages. This first passageway occupies a 90 arc and has a length equal to two passage heights. Instrumentation rakes for measuring the characteristics of the inlet flow are installed in this passageway. Just past the first straight passageway is the second one, which is narrower and leads to the 90 turbine inlet slot. This passageway is used to smooth the flow immediately prior to its passage through the turbine inlet slot. The length of this second passageway equals the length of the chord of a turbine vane. The inlet housing incorporates small ports for measuring static pressures at various locations of the flow, and incorporates bosses for the installation of the instrumentation rakes. The inlet housing also includes a flange at its inlet end for attachment to a circular inlet duct and a flange at its outlet end for attachment to the outer casing of the turbine.

  19. Puget Sound Reinforcement Project : Planning for Peak Power Needs : Scoping Report, Part A, Summary of Public Comments.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1990-07-01

    This report summarizes public participation in the environmental scoping process for the Puget Sound Reinforcement Project, a Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Puget Sound area utilities study of voltage stability in northwestern Washington state. The environmental scoping phase of the Puget Sound project consisted of a series of public meetings and a public comment period. The content of these meetings is summarized in 2.0, Public Involvement. In 3.0, Comment Summary, the report summarizes comments received via meetings, mail and phone. The report ends with a description of the next steps in the project. Chapter 4.0, describes the decision process to be used by BPA and area utilities. Chapter 5.0 describes opportunities for public participation in decisions to be made about the future reliability of Puget Sound's electricity supply.

  20. Design and operation considerations for attic inlets

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improving energy efficiency and environmental control in poultry facilities is essential for profitability. Increases in energy costs have prompted evaluation of solar energy systems and passive solar systems such as attic inlets have been adopted as a means to reduce fuel usage. Successful implem...

  1. Early marine life history of juvenile Pacific salmon in two regions of Puget Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffy, Elisabeth J.; Beauchamp, David A.; Buckley, Raymond M.

    2005-07-01

    Puget Sound could differentially represent either a simple migration corridor or an important rearing environment during the potentially critical early marine residence period for different species of Pacific salmon. Recent declines in various stocks of Puget Sound salmon could reflect degraded rearing conditions or changes in temporal-spatial utilization patterns by juvenile salmon in Puget Sound, and these patterns could vary between habitats and regions of Puget Sound in response to different environmental conditions or hatchery practices. In April-September 2001 and 2002, we evaluated spatial and temporal differences in distribution and size structure among juvenile chum, pink, coho, and chinook salmon at delta and nearshore habitats in a northern and southern region of Puget Sound, Washington. Water was consistently warmer (8-18.8 °C) and less saline (0.0-27.7) in the northern (N) than in the southern region (S: 9.5-14.6 °C, 13.0-30.4). Salinities were lower and water temperatures more variable in delta sites than exposed nearshore marine sites. Peak densities of juvenile salmon coincided at delta and nearshore sites within sampling regions but differed between regions. Nearshore densities were highest during April-June with pink and chum salmon generally preceding chinook and coho salmon, and peak catch rates of most species occurred in May. A second, late pulse of chinook salmon also occurred during July at northern sites. Juvenile chinook salmon were predominantly of hatchery origin in the southern region (98%), and of mixed origin in the northern region (44% marked hatchery fish) during 2002. The lengths of chinook and chum salmon in nearshore regions increased steadily through time, whereas pink and coho salmon varied inconsistently. Mean sizes of juvenile salmon were slightly but consistently smaller at delta than nearshore sites and at northern versus southern sites. Hatchery chinook salmon were slightly larger than their unmarked counterparts

  2. Early marine life history of juvenile Pacific salmon in two regions of Puget Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duffy, E.J.; Beauchamp, D.A.; Buckley, R.M.

    2005-01-01

    Puget Sound could differentially represent either a simple migration corridor or an important rearing environment during the potentially critical early marine residence period for different species of Pacific salmon. Recent declines in various stocks of Puget Sound salmon could reflect degraded rearing conditions or changes in temporal-spatial utilization patterns by juvenile salmon in Puget Sound, and these patterns could vary between habitats and regions of Puget Sound in response to different environmental conditions or hatchery practices. In April-September 2001 and 2002, we evaluated spatial and temporal differences in distribution and size structure among juvenile chum, pink, coho, and chinook salmon at delta and nearshore habitats in a northern and southern region of Puget Sound, Washington. Water was consistently warmer (8-18.8??C) and less saline (0.0-27.7) in the northern (N) than in the southern region (S: 9.5-14.6??C, 13.0-30.4). Salinities were lower and water temperatures more variable in delta sites than exposed nearshore marine sites. Peak densities of juvenile salmon coincided at delta and nearshore sites within sampling regions but differed between regions. Nearshore densities were highest during April-June with pink and chum salmon generally preceding chinook and coho salmon, and peak catch rates of most species occurred in May. A second, late pulse of chinook salmon also occurred during July at northern sites. Juvenile chinook salmon were predominantly of hatchery origin in the southern region (98%), and of mixed origin in the northern region (44% marked hatchery fish) during 2002. The lengths of chinook and chum salmon in nearshore regions increased steadily through time, whereas pink and coho salmon varied inconsistently. Mean sizes of juvenile salmon were slightly but consistently smaller at delta than nearshore sites and at northern versus southern sites. Hatchery chinook salmon were slightly larger than their unmarked counterparts. Extended

  3. Assessing the effects of anthropogenic stressors on Puget Sound flatfish populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lyndal L.; Landahl, John T.; Kubin, Leslie A.; Horness, Beth H.; Myers, Mark S.; Collier, Tracy K.; Stein, John E.

    1998-03-01

    Puget Sound is an estuary in the northwestern United States which serves as the habitat for a number of recreationally and commercially important species of flatfish. Over the past 100 years, there has been substantial urban and industrial development within this region, resulting in heavy inputs of chemical contaminants at selected sites, as well as significant loss or alteration of marine habitat. Studies show that feral flatfish in Puget Sound are experiencing a range of biological effects due to chemical contaminant exposure, including reproductive dysfunction, altered immune competence, and development of toxicopathic diseases, and there is some evidence of reduced survival in fish from urban areas of Puget Sound from increased infectious and toxicopathic disease. Puget Sound sole are also subject to other anthropogenic stressors, such as fishing pressure or alteration of nearshore nursery habitats. The cumulative impact of these stressors on flatfish abundance in Puget Sound, however, is poorly understood. In a series of field and laboratory studies, we determined vital rates and other life history parameters in English sole ( Pleuronectes vetulus) subpopulations from urban and non-urban sites in Puget Sound, and are using this information to estimate potential population level impacts of anthropogenic stressors, with age and stage-based Leslie-matrix models. Initial results suggest that declines in the fecundity component of the model, as observed in field studies of fish from contaminated sites, could reduce the size of sub-populations in these areas if the loss of recruits is not offset by density-dependent changes in recruitment, immigration, or other compensating mechanisms. Studies on flatfish species from a variety of sites in Europe and North America suggest that contaminant-related disease and reproductive impairment are widespread in this group of fish, although substantial differences in sensitivity have been observed, even among closely related

  4. 33 CFR 334.1240 - Sinclair Inlet; naval restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1240 Sinclair Inlet..., longitude 122°37′23″ West on the north shore of Sinclair Inlet; and latitude 47°32′52″ North, longitude 122°36′58″ West, on the south shore of Sinclair Inlet. (2) Area No. 2. That area of Sinclair Inlet to...

  5. Solar assist and filter construction for dryer inlet

    SciTech Connect

    Commander, B.C.

    1981-07-21

    An air inlet construction for a domestic clothes dryer is described including a pair of selectively usable air inlet ports. One of the air inlet ports opens outwardly to the area immediately adjacent and exterior of the dryer and the other inlet port opens into the interior of a non-domestically heated portion of the building in which the dryer is disposed, but which portion is subject to being heated by solar energy during the daylight hours.

  6. Flow Control in a Compact Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, John C.

    2011-12-01

    An experimental investigation of flow control, via various control jets actuators, was undertaken to eliminate separation and secondary flows in a compact inlet. The compact inlet studied was highly aggressive with a length-to-diameter ratio of 1.5. A brand new facility was designed and built to enable various actuation methodologies as well as multiple measurement techniques. Techniques included static surface pressure, total pressure, and stereoscopic particle image velocimetry. Experimental data were supplemented with numerical simulations courtesy of Prof. Kenneth Jansen, Dr. Onkar Sahni, and Yi Chen. The baseline flow field was found to be dominated by two massive separations and secondary flow structures. These secondary structures were present at the aerodynamic interface plane in the form of two counter-rotating vortices inducing upwash along centerline. A dominant shedding frequency of 350 Hz was measured both at the aerodynamic interface plane and along the lower surface of the inlet. Flow control experiments started utilizing a pair of control jets placed in streamwise locations where flow was found to separate. Tests were performed for a range of inlet Mach numbers from 0.2 to 0.44. Steady and unsteady static pressure measurements along the upper and lower walls of the duct were performed for various combinations of actuation. The parameters that were tested include the control jets momentum coefficient, their blowing ratio, the actuation frequency, as well as different combinations of jets. It was shown that using mass flux ratio as a criterion to define flow control is not sufficient, and one needs to provide both the momentum coefficient and the blowing ratio to quantify the flow control performance. A detailed study was undertaken on controlling the upstream separation point for an inlet Mach number of 0.44. Similar to the baseline flow field, the flow field associated with the activation of a two-dimensional control jet actuator was dominated by

  7. 49 CFR 178.337-8 - Openings, inlets, and outlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... used to transport chlorine. The requirements for inlets and outlets on chlorine cargo tanks are in... equalization of pressure. (b) Inlets and discharge outlets on chlorine tanks. The inlet and discharge outlets on a cargo tank used to transport chlorine must meet the requirements of § 178.337-1(c)(2) and...

  8. 49 CFR 178.337-8 - Openings, inlets, and outlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... used to transport chlorine. The requirements for inlets and outlets on chlorine cargo tanks are in... equalization of pressure. (b) Inlets and discharge outlets on chlorine tanks. The inlet and discharge outlets on a cargo tank used to transport chlorine must meet the requirements of § 178.337-1(c)(2) and...

  9. 49 CFR 178.337-8 - Openings, inlets, and outlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... used to transport chlorine. The requirements for inlets and outlets on chlorine cargo tanks are in... equalization of pressure. (b) Inlets and discharge outlets on chlorine tanks. The inlet and discharge outlets on a cargo tank used to transport chlorine must meet the requirements of § 178.337-1(c)(2) and...

  10. 49 CFR 178.337-8 - Openings, inlets, and outlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... used to transport chlorine. The requirements for inlets and outlets on chlorine cargo tanks are in... equalization of pressure. (b) Inlets and discharge outlets on chlorine tanks. The inlet and discharge outlets on a cargo tank used to transport chlorine must meet the requirements of § 178.337-1(c)(2) and...

  11. 49 CFR 178.337-8 - Openings, inlets, and outlets.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... used to transport chlorine. The requirements for inlets and outlets on chlorine cargo tanks are in... equalization of pressure. (b) Inlets and discharge outlets on chlorine tanks. The inlet and discharge outlets on a cargo tank used to transport chlorine must meet the requirements of § 178.337-1(c)(2) and...

  12. Geochemistries of arsenic, antimony, mercury, and related elements in sediments of puget sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crecelius, E.A.; Bothner, Michael H.; Carpenter, R.

    1975-01-01

    The natural distributions of arsenic, antimony mercury, chromium, cobalt, iron, aluminum, and carbon in the surface sediments of Puget Sound are perturbed by two major anthropogenic sources of trace metals: a copper smelter near Tacoma, Wash., that discharges large amounts of arsenic and antimony, and a chlor-alkali plant in Bellingham, Wash., which, in the recent past, discharged significant amounts of mercury. Arsenic and antimony inputs from the smelter over the past 80 years are evident in sediment cores whose accumulation rates have been determined by the lead-210 technique. An arsenic budget for Puget Sound reveals the importance of atmospheric input resulting from smokestack emissions of the smelter. Chemical extraction studies of sediments showed that more than 82% of the mercury was associated with easily oxidizable organic matter, whereas about 50% of both arsenic and antimony was associated with extractable iron and aluminum compounds.

  13. High-resolution lidar topography of the Puget Lowland, Washington - A bonanza for earth science

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haugerud, R.A.; Harding, D.J.; Johnson, S.Y.; Harless, J.L.; Weaver, C.S.; Sherrod, B.L.

    2003-01-01

    More than 10,000 km2 of high-resolution, public-domain topography acquired by the Puget Sound Lidar Consortium is revolutionizing investigations of active faulting, continental glaciation, landslides, and surficial processes in the seismically active Puget Lowland. The Lowland-the population and economic center of the Pacific Northwest-presents special problems for hazards investigations, with its young glacial topography, dense forest cover, and urbanization. Lidar mapping during leaf-off conditions has led to a detailed digital model of the landscape beneath the forest canopy. The surface thus revealed contains a rich and diverse record of previously unknown surface-rupturing faults, deep-seated landslides, uplifted Holocene and Pleistocene beaches, and subglacial and periglacial features. More than half a dozen suspected postglacial fault scarps have been identified to date. Five scarps that have been trenched show evidence of large, Holocene, surface-rupturing earthquakes.

  14. Approaches for evaluating the effects of bivalve filter feeding on nutrient dynamics in Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher P.

    2014-01-01

    Marine bivalves such as clams, mussels, and oysters are an important component of the food web, which influence nutrient dynamics and water quality in many estuaries. The role of bivalves in nutrient dynamics and, particularly, the contribution of commercial shellfish activities, are not well understood in Puget Sound, Washington. Numerous approaches have been used in other estuaries to quantify the effects of bivalves on nutrient dynamics, ranging from simple nutrient budgeting to sophisticated numerical models that account for tidal circulation, bioenergetic fluxes through food webs, and biochemical transformations in the water column and sediment. For nutrient management in Puget Sound, it might be possible to integrate basic biophysical indicators (residence time, phytoplankton growth rates, and clearance rates of filter feeders) as a screening tool to identify places where nutrient dynamics and water quality are likely to be sensitive to shellfish density and, then, apply more sophisticated methods involving in-situ measurements and simulation models to quantify those dynamics.

  15. Land-level changes from a late Holocene earthquake in the northern Puget lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelsey, H.M.; Sherrod, B.; Johnson, S.Y.; Dadisman, S.V.

    2004-01-01

    An earthquake, probably generated on the southern Whidbey Island fault zone, caused 1-2 m of ground-surface uplift on central Whidbey Island ???2800-3200 yr ago. The cause of the uplift is a fold that grew coseismically above a blind fault that was the earthquake source. Both the fault and the fold at the fault's tip are imaged on multichannel seismic refection profiles in Puget Sound immediately east of the central Whidbey Island site. Uplift is documented through contrasting histories of relative sea level at two coastal marshes on either side of the fault. Late Holocene shallow-crustal earthquakes of Mw = 6.5-7 pose substantial seismic hazard to the northern Puget Lowland. ?? 2004 Geological Society of America.

  16. Sediment load from major rivers into Puget Sound and its adjacent waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Czuba, Jonathan A.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Czuba, Christiana R.; Grossman, Eric E.; Curran, Christopher A.; Gendaszek, Andrew S.; Dinicola, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Each year, an estimated load of 6.5 million tons of sediment is transported by rivers to Puget Sound and its adjacent waters—enough to cover a football field to the height of six Space Needles. This estimated load is highly uncertain because sediment studies and available sediment-load data are sparse and historically limited to specific rivers, short time frames, and a narrow range of hydrologic conditions. The largest sediment loads are carried by rivers with glaciated volcanoes in their headwaters. Research suggests 70 percent of the sediment load delivered to Puget Sound is from rivers and 30 percent is from shoreline erosion, but the magnitude of specific contributions is highly uncertain. Most of a river's sediment load occurs during floods.

  17. Influence of inlet conditions on vortex characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Essiptchouk, A.

    2011-09-01

    Vortex chambers are normally used for arc stabilization in linear plasma torches. In the present work, the effect of uniformity of the gas inlet channel distribution on the stabilizing characteristics of a swirled flow is studied numerically. The formation of a complex flow pattern with a toroidal recirculating flow area inside the vortex chamber is observed. For some regimes, two local maxima of the tangential velocity are observed in the middle section of the chamber. It is shown that an increment of the number of gas inlet channels leads to a more uniform gas input with disappearance of the second maximum, which increases the velocity amplification coefficient and, correspondingly, results in a better stabilizing effect. The obtained profiles of the radial distribution of the tangential velocity are compared with the results of Oseen's equation for an unconfined vortex.

  18. Shell condition and survival of Puget Sound pteropods are impaired by ocean acidification conditions.

    PubMed

    Busch, D Shallin; Maher, Michael; Thibodeau, Patricia; McElhany, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We tested whether the thecosome pteropod Limacina helicina from Puget Sound, an urbanized estuary in the northwest continental US, experiences shell dissolution and altered mortality rates when exposed to the high CO2, low aragonite saturation state (Ωa) conditions that occur in Puget Sound and the northeast Pacific Ocean. Five, week-long experiments were conducted in which we incubated pteropods collected from Puget Sound in four carbon chemistry conditions: current summer surface (∼460-500 µatm CO2, Ωa≈1.59), current deep water or surface conditions during upwelling (∼760 and ∼1600-1700 µatm CO2, Ωa≈1.17 and 0.56), and future deep water or surface conditions during upwelling (∼2800-3400 µatm CO2, Ωa≈0.28). We measured shell condition using a scoring regime of five shell characteristics that capture different aspects of shell dissolution. We characterized carbon chemistry conditions in statistical analyses with Ωa, and conducted analyses considering Ωa both as a continuous dataset and as discrete treatments. Shell dissolution increased linearly as aragonite saturation state decreased. Discrete treatment comparisons indicate that shell dissolution was greater in undersaturated treatments compared to oversaturated treatments. Survival increased linearly with aragonite saturation state, though discrete treatment comparisons indicated that survival was similar in all but the lowest saturation state treatment. These results indicate that, under starvation conditions, pteropod survival may not be greatly affected by current and expected near-future aragonite saturation state in the NE Pacific, but shell dissolution may. Given that subsurface waters in Puget Sound's main basin are undersaturated with respect to aragonite in the winter and can be undersaturated in the summer, the condition and persistence of the species in this estuary warrants further study.

  19. Pesticides and PCBs in Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and O. kisutch) from Puget Sound, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, S.M.; West, J.E.

    1995-12-31

    The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife initiated a long-term study to monitor levels of contaminants in two species of Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and O. kisutch) and other marine fishes of Puget Sound. The study is one component of the Puget Sound Ambient Monitoring Program (PSAMP), a multi-agency effort to assess the environmental health of Puget Sound. Here the authors summarize results from their ongoing study of O. tshawytscha and O. kisutch. Samples of muscle tissue were collected for chemical analyses from adult salmon that were purchased from licensed fish buyers or treaty tribal fisherman. From 1992 through 1994, both salmon species were sampled at seven fishing areas in marine waters and river mouths of Puget Sound. 4,4-DDE and 4,4-DDD, metabolites of the pesticide DDT, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBS) were consistently detected in both species and were consistently higher in O. tshawytscha. Low to moderate concentrations of DDT metabolites (3 to 59 ug/kg wet weight) were detected in the salmon samples but were seldom detected in other fish species sampled by PSAMP. Total PCBs concentrations (Arochlor 1254 + 1260) ranged from 10 to 211 ug/kg wet weight in 0. tshawytscha, with many samples containing PCBs concentrations similar to those detected in benthic flatfish, (Pleuronectes vetulus), sampled from urbanized embayments. A stepwise linear regression model was used to identify parameters correlated with accumulation of PCBs and DDT metabolites in salmon. In addition to species differences, factors such as fish age, percent lipids and sampling location may affect the accumulation of these contaminants. Results of this study are contrasted with contaminant levels previously reported for Canadian and Alaskan Pacific salmon. Possible sources of contaminants are outlined.

  20. Shell Condition and Survival of Puget Sound Pteropods Are Impaired by Ocean Acidification Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Busch, D. Shallin; Maher, Michael; Thibodeau, Patricia; McElhany, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We tested whether the thecosome pteropod Limacina helicina from Puget Sound, an urbanized estuary in the northwest continental US, experiences shell dissolution and altered mortality rates when exposed to the high CO2, low aragonite saturation state (Ωa) conditions that occur in Puget Sound and the northeast Pacific Ocean. Five, week-long experiments were conducted in which we incubated pteropods collected from Puget Sound in four carbon chemistry conditions: current summer surface (∼460–500 µatm CO2, Ωa≈1.59), current deep water or surface conditions during upwelling (∼760 and ∼1600–1700 µatm CO2, Ωa≈1.17 and 0.56), and future deep water or surface conditions during upwelling (∼2800–3400 µatm CO2, Ωa≈0.28). We measured shell condition using a scoring regime of five shell characteristics that capture different aspects of shell dissolution. We characterized carbon chemistry conditions in statistical analyses with Ωa, and conducted analyses considering Ωa both as a continuous dataset and as discrete treatments. Shell dissolution increased linearly as aragonite saturation state decreased. Discrete treatment comparisons indicate that shell dissolution was greater in undersaturated treatments compared to oversaturated treatments. Survival increased linearly with aragonite saturation state, though discrete treatment comparisons indicated that survival was similar in all but the lowest saturation state treatment. These results indicate that, under starvation conditions, pteropod survival may not be greatly affected by current and expected near-future aragonite saturation state in the NE Pacific, but shell dissolution may. Given that subsurface waters in Puget Sound’s main basin are undersaturated with respect to aragonite in the winter and can be undersaturated in the summer, the condition and persistence of the species in this estuary warrants further study. PMID:25162395

  1. Disposal Site Selection Technical Appendix. Phase 2. (North and South Puget Sound)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-09-01

    used with the assumption of a net capture efficiency of 100%. Therefore, "densities" reported herein specifically refer to an index of estimated...Coomes, J.M. Helseth, L.R. Hinchey, G.A. Cannon, and C.A. Barnes. May 1984. Synthesis of Current Measurements in Puget Sound, Washington Volume 1: Index to...the water column. Also the microlayer is biologically important as a rearing area for marine organisms. Microtox . A laboratory test using luminescent

  2. Large Eddy Simulation of Supersonic Inlet Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    SIMULATION OF SUPERSONIC INLET FLOWS 6. AUTHOR(S) PROF. PARVIZ MOIN PROF. SANJIVA K. LELE 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) STANFORD... Parviz Moin and Sanjiva K. Lele Stanford University Mechanical Engineering, Flow Physics & Computation Division Stanford, CA 94305-3030 Prepared...monitor. I am thankful to Professor Sanjiva Lele and Profes- sor Parviz Moin, and Keith Lucas for useful discussions! I am grateful to Professor Peter

  3. Gasdynamic Inlet Isolation in Rotating Detonation Engine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    ISOLATION IN ROTATING DETONATION ENGINE by Wei Han Eugene Lim December 2010 Thesis Co-Advisors: Jose O. Sinibaldi Christopher M. Brophy...COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Gasdynamic Inlet Isolation in Rotating Detonation Engine 6. AUTHOR(S) Wei Han Eugene Lim 5. FUNDING...DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The Rotating Detonation Engine (RDE) concept represents the next-generation of detonation -based

  4. Investigation of "6X" Scramjet Inlet Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alter, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    This work represents an initial attempt to determine what, if any, issues arise from scaling demonstration supersonic combustion scramjets to a flight scale making the engine a viable candidate for both military weapon and civilian access to space applications. The original vehicle sizes tested and flown to date, were designed to prove a concept. With the proven designs, use of the technology for applications as weapon systems or space flight are only possible at six to ten times the original scale. To determine effects of scaling, computations were performed with hypersonic inlets designed to operate a nominal Mach 4 and Mach 5 conditions that are possible within the eight foot high temperature tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The total pressure recovery for these inlets is about 70%, while maintaining self start conditions, and providing operable inflow to combustors. Based on this study, the primary scaling effect detected is the strength of a vortex created along the cowl edge causing adverse boundary layer growth in the inlet.

  5. Environmental Awareness and Public Support for Protecting and Restoring Puget Sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safford, Thomas G.; Norman, Karma C.; Henly, Megan; Mills, Katherine E.; Levin, Phillip S.

    2014-04-01

    In an effort to garner consensus around environmental programs, practitioners have attempted to increase awareness about environmental threats and demonstrate the need for action. Nonetheless, how beliefs about the scope and severity of different types of environmental concerns shape support for management interventions are less clear. Using data from a telephone survey of residents of the Puget Sound region of Washington, we investigate how perceptions of the severity of different coastal environmental problems, along with other social factors, affect attitudes about policy options. We find that self-assessed environmental understanding and views about the seriousness of pollution, habitat loss, and salmon declines are only weakly related. Among survey respondents, women, young people, and those who believe pollution threatens Puget Sound are more likely to support policy measures such as increased enforcement and spending on restoration. Conversely, self-identified Republicans and individuals who view current regulations as ineffective tend to oppose governmental actions aimed at protecting and restoring Puget Sound. Support for one policy measure—tax credits for environmentally-friendly business practices—is not significantly affected by political party affiliation. These findings demonstrate that environmental awareness can influence public support for environmental policy tools. However, the nature of particular management interventions and other social forces can have important mitigating effects and need to be considered by practitioners attempting to develop environment-related social indicators and generate consensus around the need for action to address environmental problems.

  6. Airborne Measurements of Hydrocarbons and Aerosols in the Puget Sound Airshed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jobson, T.; Laulainen, N.; Laskin, A.; Cowin, J.; Barchet, R.; Barrie, L.; Westberg, H.; Covert, D.; Alexander, M.; Spicer, C.; Joseph, D.

    2002-12-01

    In August 2001, a gas and aerosol measurement campaign was undertaken in Puget Sound from south of Seattle north to the Canadian border. The US DOE Gulfstream 1 aircraft was used to measure meteorological parameters, aerosols and their gaseous precursors. The objectives of this study were to better understand the transport and formation of ozone and particulate matter in the Puget Sound airshed and to develop air quality and meteorological databases for evaluating air quality models used in predicting air quality within this area. The study was coordinated with the Canadian Pacific 2001 study. Real time measurements were made of aerosol number distributions from 3 to 3000 nm diameter and of selected gaseous precursors using standard instrumentation as well as a new proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer. Reactive hydrocarbon compounds, nitrogen oxides, sulphur dioxide, carbon monoxide and ozone were measured on horizontal transects and vertical profiles around Puget Sound in morning and afternoon. Using these observations, this paper will highlight common air quality features as well as some of the complexities related to air quality in a mountain-ringed basin.

  7. Environmental awareness and public support for protecting and restoring Puget sound.

    PubMed

    Safford, Thomas G; Norman, Karma C; Henly, Megan; Mills, Katherine E; Levin, Phillip S

    2014-04-01

    In an effort to garner consensus around environmental programs, practitioners have attempted to increase awareness about environmental threats and demonstrate the need for action. Nonetheless, how beliefs about the scope and severity of different types of environmental concerns shape support for management interventions are less clear. Using data from a telephone survey of residents of the Puget Sound region of Washington, we investigate how perceptions of the severity of different coastal environmental problems, along with other social factors, affect attitudes about policy options. We find that self-assessed environmental understanding and views about the seriousness of pollution, habitat loss, and salmon declines are only weakly related. Among survey respondents, women, young people, and those who believe pollution threatens Puget Sound are more likely to support policy measures such as increased enforcement and spending on restoration. Conversely, self-identified Republicans and individuals who view current regulations as ineffective tend to oppose governmental actions aimed at protecting and restoring Puget Sound. Support for one policy measure-tax credits for environmentally-friendly business practices-is not significantly affected by political party affiliation. These findings demonstrate that environmental awareness can influence public support for environmental policy tools. However, the nature of particular management interventions and other social forces can have important mitigating effects and need to be considered by practitioners attempting to develop environment-related social indicators and generate consensus around the need for action to address environmental problems.

  8. Multibeam mapping of the major deltas of southern Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gardner, James V.; van den Ameele, E. J.; Dartnell, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A magnitude 6.8 earthquake struck southern Puget Sound, Washington, USA on February 28, 2001 causing an estimated $0.7 billion to $1.4 billion in damages to the surrounding area (Williams et al, 2001). The epicenter was close to the Nisqually delta, one of three major deltas in southern Puget Sound (Figure 1). The Nisqually delta is a wildlife refuge but the other two deltas, the Duwamish delta in Seattle and the Puyallup delta in Tacoma, support extensive infrastructure, including major port facilities at the delta edges. Teams of geologists inspected the area immediately after the earthquake and reported liquefaction features and areas of vertical ground displacement in the Ports of Seattle and Tacoma as well as the presence of "mud plumes" in the waters of Puget Sound. A joint NOAA/USGS cruise was rapidly assembled in March 2001 (3/19/01 to 3/30/01) to map the bathymetry of the delta fronts using the high-resolution multibeam systems of the NOAA Ship Rainier. The mapping discovered a variety of submarine failures on the Puyallup and Duwamish delta fronts that may be related to the earthquake.

  9. 7. View north at back (canal side) of culvert inlet, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View north at back (canal side) of culvert inlet, with canal bank completely removed. Background to foreground: back of inlet headwall with tops of high inlet barrels exposed; vertical transition wall between high inlet barrels and low, interior, inlet barrels; tops of low interior barrels; vertical heartening planks and low cutoff wall at site of former canal edge of canal bank; dewatered canal bed and plank sheathing on top of culvert barrels beneath canal bed. - Delaware & Raritan Canal, Ten Mile Run Culvert, 1.5 miles South of Blackwells Road, East Millstone, Somerset County, NJ

  10. Variable geometry for supersonic mixed-compression inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, N. E.; Latham, E. A.; Smeltzer, D. B.

    1974-01-01

    Study of two-dimensional and axisymmetric supersonic mixed-compression inlet systems has shown that the geometry of both systems can be varied to provide adequate transonic airflow to satisfy the airflow demand of most jet engines. Collapsing geometry systems for both types of inlet systems provide a generous amount of transonic airflow for any design Mach number inlet system. However, the mechanical practicality of collapsing centerbodies for axisymmetric inlet systems is doubtful. Therefore, translating centerbody axisymmetric inlets with auxiliary airflow systems to augment the transonic airflow capability are an attractive alternative. Estimates show that the capture mass-flow ratio at Mach number 1.0 can be increased approximately 0.20 for a very short axisymmetric inlet system designed for Mach number 2.37. With this increase in mass-flow ratio, even variable-cycle engine transonic airflow demand can be matched without oversizing the inlet at the design Mach number.

  11. Mixing and cycling of uranium, thorium and 210Pb in Puget Sound sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, R.; Peterson, M. L.; Bennett, J. T.; Somayajulu, B. L. K.

    1984-10-01

    Activity profiles of excess 234Th, excess 210Pb, 232Th, 230Th, 234U and 238U, and 228/232Th ratios determined in eight box cores of sediment from six sites in central Puget Sound provide new insights into the dynamic nature of solid phase mixing in surface sediments, the exchange of 228Ra and other soluble species across the sediment-water interface, and the cycling of U, Th and 210Pb in this coastal zone. Comparison of excess 234Th inventories in sediments with its production rate in the overlying water column indicates a mean residence time of at most 14 days for particles in the central Puget Sound water column. Surface sediment horizons with excess 234Th have no excess 228Th which might be used to ascertain sediment accumulation rates over the past decade. Instead, deficiencies of 228Th due to loss of soluble 228Ra from pore water to the overlying water persist to 20-30 cm, revealing that exchange of soluble chemicals between pore and overlying waters reaches these depths in the extensively bioturbated sediments of Puget Sound. Solid phase U isotope concentrations tend to increase by up to a factor of two with depth in sediments, as a result of dissolved U being biologically pumped down into sediments where it is partially removed when conditions become mildly reducing. 232Th and 230Th activities and 230/232Th ratios are constant with depth in sediments, indicating constant detrital phase compositions and essentially no authigenic 230Th. Steady state 210Pb depositional activities in and fluxes to Puget Sound sediments average only about onehalf those for sediments of the open Washington coast north of the Columbia River mouth, primarily because of a much lower supply of dissolved 210Pb in sea waters adverting into Puget Sound. Excess 234Th profiles in sediments reveal much more detail about the depth dependency, dynamic nature and recent history of solid phase mixing processes than excess 210Pb profiles. At least six of eight 234Th profiles show that mixing

  12. Noise radiation directivity from a wind-tunnel inlet with inlet vanes and duct wall linings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, P. T.; Phillips, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    The acoustic radiation patterns from a 1/15th scale model of the Ames 80- by 120-Ft Wind Tunnel test section and inlet have been measured with a noise source installed in the test section. Data were acquired without airflow in the duct. Sound-absorbent inlet vanes oriented parallel to each other, or splayed with a variable incidence relative to the duct long axis, were evaluated along with duct wall linings. Results show that splayed vans tend to spread the sound to greater angles than those measured with the open inlet. Parallel vanes narrowed the high-frequency radiation pattern. Duct wall linings had a strong effect on acoustic directivity by attenuating wall reflections. Vane insertion loss was measured. Directivity results are compared with existing data from square ducts. Two prediction methods for duct radiation directivity are described: one is an empirical method based on the test data, and the other is a analytical method based on ray acoustics.

  13. Extended Abstracts from the Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound (CHIPS) 2006 Workshop

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Gelfenbaum, Guy; Fuentes, Tracy L.; Duda, Jeffrey J.; Grossman, Eric E.; Takesue, Renee K.

    2010-01-01

    Puget Sound is the second largest estuary in the United States. Its unique geology, climate, and nutrient-rich waters produce and sustain biologically productive coastal habitats. These same natural characteristics also contribute to a high quality of life that has led to a significant growth in human population and associated development. This population growth, and the accompanying rural and urban development, has played a role in degrading Puget Sound ecosystems, including declines in fish and wildlife populations, water-quality issues, and loss and degradation of coastal habitats. In response to these ecosystem declines and the potential for strategic large-scale preservation and restoration, a coalition of local, State, and Federal agencies, including the private sector, Tribes, and local universities, initiated the Puget Sound Nearshore Ecosystem Restoration Project (PSNERP). The Nearshore Science Team (NST) of PSNERP, along with the U.S. Geological Survey, developed a Science Strategy and Research Plan (Gelfenbaum and others, 2006) to help guide science activities associated with nearshore ecosystem restoration. Implementation of the Research Plan includes a call for State and Federal agencies to direct scientific studies to support PSNERP information needs. In addition, the overall Science Strategy promotes greater communication with decision makers and dissemination of scientific results to the broader scientific community. On November 14-16, 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey sponsored an interdisciplinary Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound (CHIPS) Research Workshop at Fort Worden State Park, Port Townsend, Washington. The main goals of the workshop were to coordinate, integrate, and link research on the nearshore of Puget Sound. Presented research focused on three themes: (1) restoration of large river deltas; (2) recovery of the nearshore ecosystem of the Elwha River; and (3) effects of urbanization on nearshore ecosystems. The more than 35 presentations

  14. Investigation of REST-Class Hypersonic Inlet Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gollan, Rowan; Ferlemann, Paul G.

    2011-01-01

    Rectangular-to-elliptical shape-transition (REST) inlets are of interest for use on scramjet engines because they are efficient and integrate well with the forebody of a planar vehicle. The classic design technique by Smart for these inlets produces an efficient inlet but the complex three-dimensional viscous effects are only approximately included. Certain undesirable viscous features often occur in these inlets. In the present work, a design toolset has been developed which allows for rapid design of REST-class inlet geometries and the subsequent Navier-Stokes analysis of the inlet performance. This gives the designer feedback on the complex viscous effects at each design iteration. This new tool is applied to design an inlet for on-design operation at Mach 8. The tool allows for rapid investigation of design features that was previously not possible. The outcome is that the inlet shape can be modified to affect aspects of the flow field in a positive way. In one particular example, the boundary layer build-up on the bodyside of the inlet was reduced by 20% of the thickness associated with the classically designed inlet shape.

  15. Effects of chemical contaminants on growth, age-structure, and reproduction of Mytilus edulis complex from Puget sound, Washington.

    PubMed

    Kagley, Anna N; Kardong, Kyle E; Snider, Robert G; Casillas, Edmundo

    2014-07-01

    Bivalves are used as sentinel species to detect chemical contaminants in the marine environment, but biological effects on indigenous populations that result from chemical exposure are largely unknown. We assessed age-weight, length-weight relationships, age structure, and reproductive status (i.e. fecundity, egg size) of the blue mussel Mytilus edulis complex from six sites in central Puget Sound, Washington, and one site in the relatively pristine area of northern Puget Sound. Results of this study suggest that mussels from urban areas of Puget Sound exhibit a lower growth rate, altered population age-structure, and potential reproductive impairment as a result of exposure to chemical contaminants. These findings support the use of mussels as sentinel species to assess the biological effects of contaminants on invertebrate populations.

  16. Geomorphic Analysis of Mattituck Inlet and Goldsmith Inlet, Long Island, New York

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Militello et al. (2000). c. Site-specific inlet studies: Gofseyeff (1952), Czerniak (1977), Schmeltz et al. (1982), Militello and Kraus (2001), Kraus et al...New York, 11952-9500. Czerniak , M. T. (1977). "Ilet interaction and stability theory verification," Proceedings Coastal Sediments 󈨑, ASCE, 754-773

  17. Localization and imaging of gangliosides in mouse brain tissue sections by laserspray ionization inlet[S

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Alicia L.; Lietz, Christopher B.; Wager-Miller, James; Mackie, Ken; Trimpin, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    A new ionization method for the analysis of fragile gangliosides without undesired fragmentation or salt adduction is presented. In laserspray ionization inlet (LSII), the matrix/analyte sample is ablated at atmospheric pressure, and ionization takes place in the ion transfer capillary of the mass spectrometer inlet by a process that is independent of a laser wavelength or voltage. The softness of LSII allows the identification of gangliosides up to GQ1 with negligible sialic acid loss. This is of importance to the field of MS imaging, as undesired fragmentation has made it difficult to accurately map the spatial distribution of fragile ganglioside lipids in tissue. Proof-of-principle structural characterization of endogenous gangliosides using MSn fragmentation of multiply charged negative ions on a LTQ Velos and subsequent imaging of the GD1 ganglioside is demonstrated. This is the first report of multiply charged negative ions using inlet ionization. We find that GD1 is detected at higher levels in the mouse cortex and hippocampus compared with the thalamus. In LSII with the laser aligned in transmission geometry relative to the inlet, images were obtained in approximately 60 min using an inexpensive nitrogen laser. PMID:22262808

  18. Influence of Inlet / Shoal Complex on Adjacent Shorelines via Inlet Sink Method

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    placing dredged material onto adjacent beaches in moderate quantities (~200-500K cu yd) since the 1970 ’s (Dredging Information System (DIS...southward to Matanzas Inlet. Analysis of the ebb shoal volume change between surveys was made within a GIS framework using an area mask (Fig. 6

  19. Effect of replacing surface inlets with blind or gravel inlets on sediment and phosphorus subsurface drainage losses.

    PubMed

    Feyereisen, Gary W; Francesconi, Wendy; Smith, Douglas R; Papiernik, Sharon K; Krueger, Erik S; Wente, Christopher D

    2015-03-01

    Open surface inlets that connect to subsurface tile drainage systems provide a direct pathway for movement of sediment, nutrients, and agrochemicals to surface waters. This study was conducted to determine the reduction in drainage effluent total suspended sediment (TSS) and phosphorus (P) concentrations and loads when open surface inlets were replaced with blind (in gravel capped with 30 cm of soil) or gravel (in very coarse sand/fine gravel) inlets. In Indiana, a pair of closed depressions in adjacent fields was fitted with open inlet tile risers and blind inlets in 2005 and monitored for flow and water chemistry. Paired comparisons on a storm event basis during the growing season for years 2006 to 2013 showed that TSS loads were 40.4 and 14.4 kg ha event for tile risers and blind inlets, respectively. Total P (TP) and soluble reactive P (SRP) loads were 66 and 50% less for the blind inlets, respectively. In Minnesota, TSS and SRP concentrations were monitored for 3 yr before and after modification of 24 open inlets to gravel inlets in an unreplicated large-field on-farm study. Median TSS concentrations were 97 and 8.3 mg L and median SRP concentrations were 0.099 and 0.064 mg L for the open inlet and gravel inlet periods, respectively. Median TSS and SRP concentrations were elevated for snowmelt vs. non-snowmelt seasons for open and gravel inlets. Both replacement designs reduced suspended sediment and P concentrations and loads. The Indiana study suggests blind inlets will be effective beyond a 10-yr service life.

  20. Effects on inlet technology on cruise speed selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bangert, L. H.; Santman, D. M.; Horie, G.; Miller, L. D.

    1980-01-01

    The impact of cruise speed on technology level for certain aircraft components is examined. External-compression inlets were compared with mixed compression, self starting inlets at cruise Mach numbers of 2.0 and 2.3. Inlet engine combinations that provided the greatest aircraft range were identified. Results show that increased transonic to cruise corrected air flow ratio gives decreased range for missions dominated by supersonic cruise. It is also found important that inlets be designed to minimize spillage drag at subsonic cruise, because of the need for efficient performance for overland operations. The external compression inlet emerged as the probable first choice at Mach 2.0, while the self starting inlet was the probable first choice at Mach 2.3. Airframe propulsion system interference effects were significant, and further study is needed to assess the existing design methods and to develop improvements.

  1. Method of making a small inlet optical panel

    DOEpatents

    Veligdan, James T.; Slobodin, David E.

    2004-02-03

    An optical panel having a small inlet, and a method of making a small inlet optical panel, are disclosed, which optical panel includes a individually coating, stacking, and cutting a first plurality of stacked optical waveguides to form an outlet face body with an outlet face, individually coating, stacking, and cutting a second plurality of stacked optical waveguides to form an inlet face body with an inlet face, and connecting an optical coupling element to the first plurality and second plurality of stacked optical waveguides, wherein the optical coupling element redirects light along a parallel axis of the inlet face to a parallel axis of the outlet face. In the preferred embodiment of the present invention, the inlet face is disposed obliquely with and askew from the outlet face.

  2. CFD numerical simulation of Archimedes spiral inlet hydrocyclone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Wei, L.; Chang, B. H.; Xing, J. L.; Jia, K.

    2013-12-01

    For traditional linear type inlet, hydrocyclone has an unstable inner field, high turbulence intensity and low separation efficiency, this paper proposes an inlet mode that uses an Archimedes spiral hydrocyclone. A Mixture liquid-solid multiphase flow model combined with the kinetic theory of granular flow was used to simulate the high concentration water-sand-air three-phase flow in a hydrocyclone. We analyzed the pressure field, velocity field and turbulent kinetic energy and compared with traditional linear type inlet hydrocyclone inner field. The results show that Archimedes spiral inlet hydrocyclone's pressure field is evenly distributed. The Archimedes spiral inlet hydrocyclone can guide and accelerate the mixture flow and produce small forced vortex and less short circuit flow. The particles easily go to the outer vortex and are separated. The Archimedes spiral inlet hydrocyclone has effectively improved the stability of inner flow field and separation efficiency.

  3. Zonal analysis of two high-speed inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dilley, A. D.; Switzer, G. F.; Eppard, W. M.

    1991-01-01

    Using a zonal technique, thin layer Navier-Stokes solutions for two high speed inlet geometries are presented and compared with experimental data. The first configuration consists of a 3-D inlet preceded by a sharp flat plate. Results with two different grids demonstrate the importance of adequate grid refinement in high speed internal flow computations. The fine grid solution has reasonably good agreement with experimental heat transfer and pressure values inside the inlet. The other configuration consists of a 3-D inlet mounted on a research hypersonic forebody. Numerical results for this configuration have good agreement with experimental pressure data along the forebody, but not inside the inlet. A more refined grid calculation is currently being done to better predict the flowfield in the inlet.

  4. Boundary-layer-ingesting inlet flow control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Lewis R. (Inventor); Allan, Brian G. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A system for reducing distortion at the aerodynamic interface plane of a boundary-layer-ingesting inlet using a combination of active and passive flow control devices is disclosed. Active flow control jets and vortex generating vanes are used in combination to reduce distortion across a range of inlet operating conditions. Together, the vortex generating vanes can reduce most of the inlet distortion and the active flow control jets can be used at a significantly reduced control jet mass flow rate to make sure the inlet distortion stays low as the inlet mass flow rate varies. Overall inlet distortion, measured and described as average SAE circumferential distortion descriptor, was maintained at a value of 0.02 or less. Advantageous arrangements and orientations of the active flow control jets and the vortex generating vanes were developed using computational fluid dynamics simulations and wind tunnel experimentations.

  5. An Integrated Watershed and Receiving Water Model for Fecal Coliform Fate and Transport in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, WA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Adams Kitsap County Surface and Storm Water Management: D. Tucker, S. Olsen, and M. Heine Ktisap County Natural Resources: K. Folkerts, D. Nash, and P...Nelson. Kitsap County Health District: S. Whitford, J. Zimny, J. Kiess, S. Ultican, and M. Fohna City of Port Orchard: D. Cole City of...State Department of Health: F. Meriwether and G. Combs U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Engineer Research and Development Center: C. LaHatte Suquamish

  6. Sinclair and Dyes Inlets Toxicity Study: An Assessment of Copper Bioavailability and Toxicity in Surface Waters Adjacent to the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard and Intermediate Maintenance Facility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    galloprovincialis) and echinoderm (Strongylocentrotus purpuratus ) embryonic development : Conceptual, regulatory and environmental implications...Technical Coordinator, with contributions from members of the working group. The work plans were developed in cooperation with the Washington State...galloprovincialis) embryos in 48-hour embryo-larval development tests using protocols recommended by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for

  7. An Integrated Watershed and Receiving Water Model for Fecal Coliform Fate and Transport in Sinclair and Dyes Inlets, Puget Sound, WA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    29 2-11. Predicted (Pred) and observed (Obs) FC geomean concentrations for industrial, urban , rural...Overland Flow NURP National Urban Runoff Program NWS National Weather Service OBM Optical Brightener Monitoring OWTS Onsite Waste Treatment System...imaging system deployed on Landsats 4 and 5) TMDL Total Maximum Daily Load TSS Total Suspended Solids U/I Urban or Industrial Stormwater Outfalls

  8. NASCRIN - NUMERICAL ANALYSIS OF SCRAMJET INLET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumar, A.

    1994-01-01

    The NASCRIN program was developed for analyzing two-dimensional flow fields in supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) inlets. NASCRIN solves the two-dimensional Euler or Navier-Stokes equations in conservative form by an unsplit, explicit, two-step finite-difference method. A more recent explicit-implicit, two-step scheme has also been incorporated in the code for viscous flow analysis. An algebraic, two-layer eddy-viscosity model is used for the turbulent flow calculations. NASCRIN can analyze both inviscid and viscous flows with no struts, one strut, or multiple struts embedded in the flow field. NASCRIN can be used in a quasi-three-dimensional sense for some scramjet inlets under certain simplifying assumptions. Although developed for supersonic internal flow, NASCRIN may be adapted to a variety of other flow problems. In particular, it should be readily adaptable to subsonic inflow with supersonic outflow, supersonic inflow with subsonic outflow, or fully subsonic flow. The NASCRIN program is available for batch execution on the CDC CYBER 203. The vectorized FORTRAN version was developed in 1983. NASCRIN has a central memory requirement of approximately 300K words for a grid size of about 3,000 points.

  9. Tools and methods for evaluating and refining alternative futures for coastal ecosystem management—the Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byrd, Kristin B.; Kreitler, Jason R.; Labiosa, William B.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey Puget Sound Ecosystem Portfolio Model (PSEPM) is a decision-support tool that uses scenarios to evaluate where, when, and to what extent future population growth, urban growth, and shoreline development may threaten the Puget Sound nearshore environment. This tool was designed to be used iteratively in a workshop setting in which experts, stakeholders, and decisionmakers discuss consequences to the Puget Sound nearshore within an alternative-futures framework. The PSEPM presents three possible futures of the nearshore by analyzing three growth scenarios developed out to 2060: Status Quo—continuation of current trends; Managed Growth—adoption of an aggressive set of land-use management policies; and Unconstrained Growth—relaxation of land-use restrictions. The PSEPM focuses on nearshore environments associated with barrier and bluff-backed beaches—the most dominant shoreforms in Puget Sound—which represent 50 percent of Puget Sound shorelines by length. This report provides detailed methodologies for development of three submodels within the PSEPM—the Shellfish Pollution Model, the Beach Armoring Index, and the Recreation Visits Model. Results from the PSEPM identify where and when future changes to nearshore ecosystems and ecosystem services will likely occur within the three growth scenarios. Model outputs include maps that highlight shoreline sections where nearshore resources may be at greater risk from upland land-use changes. The background discussed in this report serves to document and supplement model results displayed on the PSEPM Web site located at http://geography.wr.usgs.gov/pugetSound/.

  10. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in outmigrant juvenile Chinook salmon from the lower Columbia River and Estuary and Puget Sound, Washington.

    PubMed

    Sloan, Catherine A; Anulacion, Bernadita F; Bolton, Jennie L; Boyd, Daryle; Olson, O Paul; Sol, Sean Y; Ylitalo, Gina M; Johnson, Lyndal L

    2010-02-01

    Previous studies have examined the presence, distribution, and concentrations of toxic contaminants in two major waterways in the Pacific Northwest: the lower Columbia River and Estuary (LCR&E) and Puget Sound, Washington. However, those studies have not reported on the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in juvenile Chinook salmon (Onchorynchus tshawytscha). Populations of Chinook salmon from the LCR&E and Puget Sound are declining, and some stocks are currently listed as "threatened" under the Endangered Species Act. Bioaccumulation of contaminants, including PBDEs, by juvenile Chinook salmon in the LCR&E and Puget Sound is of concern due to the potential toxicity of the contaminants and associated sublethal effects in fish. In this article, we present the concentrations of PBDEs measured in gutted bodies and stomach contents of outmigrant juvenile Chinook salmon collected at six sites in the LCR&E and four sites in Puget Sound. For comparison, we also analyzed gutted bodies of juvenile Chinook salmon from eight hatcheries in the LCR&E as well as samples of the hatchery fish feeds. The mean summation SigmaPBDE concentrations measured in bodies of juvenile Chinook salmon from the different sites ranged from 350 to 2800 ng/g lipid weight, whereas those in stomach contents ranged from less than the quantitation limit (<2 ng/g wet weight) to 39 ng/g wet weight. The levels of PBDEs in the hatchery fish were significantly lower than those measured in the salmon samples collected from the LCR&E and Puget Sound. These results show that outmigrant juvenile Chinook salmon in the LCR&E and Puget Sound have been exposed to PBDEs in the environment and that these chemicals are bioaccumulating in their tissues; thus, the potential effects of PBDEs on these salmon should be further investigated.

  11. The role of oblique strike-slip faulting in the tectonics of the Puget Lowlands and throughout the Pacific Northwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keranen, K. M.

    2015-12-01

    Upper-plate seismicity in the Puget Lowland, away from and oblique to known fault structures, challenges our understanding of active tectonics and seismic hazards of the region. The challenge arises in part from the thick glacial sediments and extensive water bodies that obscure active faults. Multichannel seismic reflection data in waterways, combined with aeromagnetic and gravity data, can effectively map fault structures throughout the Puget Lowland. Seismic reflection data indicate a NE-SW zone of recent high-angle faulting and shallow sediment deformation crossing the Seattle Uplift and the Seattle Basin, distinct from previously interpreted E-W fault systems including the main Seattle Fault. These NE-SW faults correlate with a zone of active seismicity, cut or deform sediments at the seafloor, and trend across the central Puget Lowland at an oblique angle to major regional structures. Aeromagnetic data show that the trend continues southeastward across the Seattle Uplift and connects deformation of shallow sediment in the Puget Sound with deformation of shallow sediment in Hood Canal. Two additional zones of faulting have NW-SE trend and cut through the Seattle Basin and Kingston Arch. Though strike-slip motion is a new interpretation for deformation along the southern edge of the Seattle Basin, it is not anomalous in the Puget Lowland; it is observed to the north along the southern Whidbey Island Fault (Sherrod et al., 2008) and Darrington-Devils Mountain Fault (Personius et al., 2014) and to the south along the Mount St. Helens seismic zone. Strike-slip motion accompanying regional compression and thrust-faulting occurs elsewhere in the Pacific Northwest including in south-central Washington (Blakely et al., 2014). Oblique strike-slip faults may contribute more significantly to deformation and seismicity within the Puget Lowland than previously recognized. Future work will evaluate the impact of deformation along these structures in tectonic models and

  12. Tidally averaged circulation in Puget Sound sub-basins: Comparison of historical data, analytical model, and numerical model

    SciTech Connect

    Khangaonkar, Tarang; Yang, Zhaoqing; Kim, Tae Yun; Roberts, Mindy

    2011-07-20

    Through extensive field data collection and analysis efforts conducted since the 1950s, researchers have established an understanding of the characteristic features of circulation in Puget Sound. The pattern ranges from the classic fjordal behavior in some basins, with shallow brackish outflow and compensating inflow immediately below, to the typical two-layer flow observed in many partially mixed estuaries with saline inflow at depth. An attempt at reproducing this behavior by fitting an analytical formulation to past data is presented, followed by the application of a three-dimensional circulation and transport numerical model. The analytical treatment helped identify key physical processes and parameters, but quickly reconfirmed that response is complex and would require site-specific parameterization to include effects of sills and interconnected basins. The numerical model of Puget Sound, developed using unstructured-grid finite volume method, allowed resolution of the sub-basin geometric features, including presence of major islands, and site-specific strong advective vertical mixing created by bathymetry and multiple sills. The model was calibrated using available recent short-term oceanographic time series data sets from different parts of the Puget Sound basin. The results are compared against (1) recent velocity and salinity data collected in Puget Sound from 2006 and (2) a composite data set from previously analyzed historical records, mostly from the 1970s. The results highlight the ability of the model to reproduce velocity and salinity profile characteristics, their variations among Puget Sound subbasins, and tidally averaged circulation. Sensitivity of residual circulation to variations in freshwater inflow and resulting salinity gradient in fjordal sub-basins of Puget Sound is examined.

  13. Investigation on inlet recirculation characteristics of double suction centrifugal compressor with unsymmetrical inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ce; Wang, Yingjun; Lao, Dazhong; Tong, Ding; Wei, Longyu; Liu, Yixiong

    2016-08-01

    The inlet recirculation characteristics of double suction centrifugal compressor with unsymmetrical inlet structures were studied in numerical method, mainly focused on three issues including the amounts and differences of the inlet recirculation in different working conditions, the circumferential non-uniform distributions of the inlet recirculation, the recirculation velocity distributions of the upstream slot of the rear impeller. The results show that there are some differences between the recirculation of the front impeller and that of the rear impeller in whole working conditions. In design speed, the recirculation flow rate of the rear impeller is larger than that of the front impeller in the large flow range, but in the small flow range, the recirculation flow rate of the rear impeller is smaller than that of the front impeller. In different working conditions, the recirculation velocity distributions of the front and rear impeller are non-uniform along the circumferential direction and their non-uniform extents are quite different. The circumferential non-uniform extent of the recirculation velocity varies with the working conditions change. The circumferential non-uniform extent of the recirculation velocity of front impeller and its distribution are determined by the static pressure distribution of the front impeller, but that of the rear impeller is decided by the coupling effects of the inlet flow distortion of the rear impeller, the circumferential unsymmetrical distribution of the upstream slot and the asymmetric structure of the volute. In the design flow and small flow conditions, the recirculation velocities at different circumferential positions of the mean line of the upstream slot cross-section of the rear impeller are quite different, and the recirculation velocities distribution forms at both sides of the mean line are different. The recirculation velocity distributions in the cross-section of the upstream slot depend on the static pressure

  14. Survey of inlet noise reduction concepts for gas turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansing, D. L.; Chestnutt, D.

    1976-01-01

    An overview is given of advanced concepts for the suppression of noise in the inlets of gas turbine engines. Inlet geometric and operating parameters are presented and design criteria for suppression methods are discussed. Noise suppression concepts are described, the directions of current research are reviewed. Problem areas requiring further work are indicated. Well established approaches to inlet noise reduction - namely, acoustic liners and high subsonic Mach number inlets which are the focus of considerable current research activity are considered along with the acoustic absorption and watet vapor injection.

  15. SUPIN: A Computational Tool for Supersonic Inlet Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.

    2016-01-01

    A computational tool named SUPIN is being developed to design and analyze the aerodynamic performance of supersonic inlets. The inlet types available include the axisymmetric pitot, three-dimensional pitot, axisymmetric outward-turning, two-dimensional single-duct, two-dimensional bifurcated-duct, and streamline-traced inlets. The aerodynamic performance is characterized by the flow rates, total pressure recovery, and drag. The inlet flow-field is divided into parts to provide a framework for the geometry and aerodynamic modeling. Each part of the inlet is defined in terms of geometric factors. The low-fidelity aerodynamic analysis and design methods are based on analytic, empirical, and numerical methods which provide for quick design and analysis. SUPIN provides inlet geometry in the form of coordinates, surface angles, and cross-sectional areas. SUPIN can generate inlet surface grids and three-dimensional, structured volume grids for use with higher-fidelity computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis. Capabilities highlighted in this paper include the design and analysis of streamline-traced external-compression inlets, modeling of porous bleed, and the design and analysis of mixed-compression inlets. CFD analyses are used to verify the SUPIN results.

  16. CFD Models of a Serpentine Inlet, Fan, and Nozzle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, R. V.; Arend, D. J.; Castner, R. S.; Slater, J. W.; Truax, P. P.

    2010-01-01

    Several computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes were used to analyze the Versatile Integrated Inlet Propulsion Aerodynamics Rig (VIIPAR) located at NASA Glenn Research Center. The rig consists of a serpentine inlet, a rake assembly, inlet guide vanes, a 12-in. diameter tip-turbine driven fan stage, exit rakes or probes, and an exhaust nozzle with a translating centerbody. The analyses were done to develop computational capabilities for modeling inlet/fan interaction and to help interpret experimental data. Three-dimensional Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) calculations of the fan stage were used to predict the operating line of the stage, the effects of leakage from the turbine stream, and the effects of inlet guide vane (IGV) setting angle. Coupled axisymmetric calculations of a bellmouth, fan, and nozzle were used to develop techniques for coupling codes together and to investigate possible effects of the nozzle on the fan. RANS calculations of the serpentine inlet were coupled to Euler calculations of the fan to investigate the complete inlet/fan system. Computed wall static pressures along the inlet centerline agreed reasonably well with experimental data but computed total pressures at the aerodynamic interface plane (AIP) showed significant differences from the data. Inlet distortion was shown to reduce the fan corrected flow and pressure ratio, and was not completely eliminated by passage through the fan

  17. Historical Patterns and Drivers of Spatial Changes in Recreational Fishing Activity in Puget Sound, Washington

    PubMed Central

    Beaudreau, Anne H.; Whitney, Emily J.

    2016-01-01

    Small-scale fisheries are the primary users of many coastal fish stocks; yet, spatial and temporal patterns of recreational and subsistence fishing in coastal marine ecosystems are poorly documented. Knowledge about the spatial distribution of fishing activities can inform place-based management that balances species conservation with opportunities for recreation and subsistence. We used a participatory mapping approach to document changes in spatial fishing patterns of 80 boat-based recreational anglers from 1950 to 2010 in Puget Sound, Washington, USA. Hand-drawn fishing areas for salmon, rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs were digitized and analyzed in a Geographic Information System. We found that recreational fishing has spanned the majority of Puget Sound since the 1950s, with the heaviest use limited to small areas of central and northern Puget Sound. People are still fishing in the same places they were decades ago, with relatively little change in specific locations despite widespread declines in salmon and bottomfish populations during the second half of the 20th century. While the location of core fishing areas remained consistent, the size of those areas and intensity of use changed over time. The size of fishing areas increased through the 2000s for salmon but declined after the 1970s and 1980s for rockfishes, flatfishes, and crabs. Our results suggest that the spatial extent of recreational bottomfishing increased after the 1960s, when the availability of motorized vessels and advanced fish-finding technologies allowed anglers to expand their scope beyond localized angling from piers and boathouses. Respondents offered a wide range of reasons for shifts in fishing areas over time, reflecting substantial individual variation in motivations and behaviors. Changes in fishing areas were most commonly attributed to changes in residence and declines in target species and least tied to fishery regulations, despite the implementation of at least 25 marine

  18. Potential Cascadia Tsunami Deposits From a Tidal Marsh at Hood Canal, Puget Sound, Washington

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrison-Laney, C.

    2015-12-01

    Two candidate Cascadia tsunami deposits are found in tidal marsh sediments near Lynch Cove, at the head of Hood Canal. The deposits are suggestive of tsunami deposits in their tabular form, distribution in the marsh, sediment type, and microfossil content. The deposits are traceable in channel bank exposures, dug pits, and sediment cores on the outer edges of the marsh, and thin landward to an inland extent of at least 200 m. The deposits are made up of mud to fine sand, and are similar in appearance and grain size to the broad adjacent tidal flat. The deposits also contain tidal flat diatoms, and are notably different from the diatoms in the marsh sediments below and above the deposits. Radiocarbon ages of plant fossils show that the younger deposit (Layer A) postdates A.D. 1680, and may therefore represent the A.D. 1700 Cascadia tsunami. The older deposit (Layer B) has a two sigma age of A.D. 1170-1220, which overlaps in time with coseismic subsidence at the mouth of the Columbia River (subsidence of Soil W, A.D. 1000-1190), and with adjusted age estimates for deep-sea turbidites (turbidite T3, A.D. 960-1180). It is unknown whether Cascadia subduction zone tsunamis have left a geological record in Puget Sound. A recent unpublished simulation by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, NOAA, of a Cascadia tsunami propagating into Puget Sound predicts maximum water levels of over 4 m for some high water "hot spots" at the heads of narrow waterways. The marsh near Lynch Cove is a simulation "hot spot" with predicted water levels over 3 m. Narrow, wave-amplifying waterways, together with an available sediment supply, and predicted high water levels suggest that Cascadia tsunamis could leave behind a geologic record in Puget Sound, given conditions favorable for deposit preservation. Alternatively, one or both of the deposits may represent tsunamis generated by slides or fault displacement in Hood Canal.

  19. Metagenomic Profiling of Microbial Composition and Antibiotic Resistance Determinants in Puget Sound

    PubMed Central

    Port, Jesse A.; Wallace, James C.; Griffith, William C.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2012-01-01

    Human-health relevant impacts on marine ecosystems are increasing on both spatial and temporal scales. Traditional indicators for environmental health monitoring and microbial risk assessment have relied primarily on single species analyses and have provided only limited spatial and temporal information. More high-throughput, broad-scale approaches to evaluate these impacts are therefore needed to provide a platform for informing public health. This study uses shotgun metagenomics to survey the taxonomic composition and antibiotic resistance determinant content of surface water bacterial communities in the Puget Sound estuary. Metagenomic DNA was collected at six sites in Puget Sound in addition to one wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) that discharges into the Sound and pyrosequenced. A total of ∼550 Mbp (1.4 million reads) were obtained, 22 Mbp of which could be assembled into contigs. While the taxonomic and resistance determinant profiles across the open Sound samples were similar, unique signatures were identified when comparing these profiles across the open Sound, a nearshore marina and WWTP effluent. The open Sound was dominated by α-Proteobacteria (in particular Rhodobacterales sp.), γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes while the marina and effluent had increased abundances of Actinobacteria, β-Proteobacteria and Firmicutes. There was a significant increase in the antibiotic resistance gene signal from the open Sound to marina to WWTP effluent, suggestive of a potential link to human impacts. Mobile genetic elements associated with environmental and pathogenic bacteria were also differentially abundant across the samples. This study is the first comparative metagenomic survey of Puget Sound and provides baseline data for further assessments of community composition and antibiotic resistance determinants in the environment using next generation sequencing technologies. In addition, these genomic signals of potential human impact can be used to guide

  20. Inlet and airframe compatibility for a V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft with top-mounted inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durston, D. A.; Smeltzer, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and inlet-pressure data were obtained for 9.5% force and pressure models of a V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft configuration with top-mounted twin inlets. Data are presented from wind tunnel tests conducted at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 at angles of attack up to 27-deg and angles of sideslip up to 12-deg. Trimmed aerodynamic characteristics and inlet performance were compared for three different leading-edge extension (LEX) configurations. The effects of wing leading- and trailing-edge flaps on the inlet were also determined. Maneuver performance was calculated from combined force and inlet-pressure data. The largest of the three LEX sizes tested gave the best airplane maneuver performance. Wing flap deflections improved inlet recovery at all Mach numbers.

  1. Inlet and airframe compatibility for a V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft with top-mounted inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durston, D. A.; Smeltzer, D. B.

    1982-01-01

    Aerodynamic force and inlet pressure data are obtained for 9.5% force and pressure models of a V/STOL fighter/attack aircraft configuration with top mounted twin inlets. Data are presented from tests conducted in the Ames Unitary Wind Tunnels at Mach numbers of 0.6, 0.9, and 1.2 at angles of attack up to 27 deg. and angles of sideslip up to 12 deg. Trimmed aerodynamic characteristics and inlet performance are compared for three different leading edge extension (LEX) configurations. The effects of wing leading and trailing-edge flaps on the inlet are also determined. Maneuver perfromance is calculated form combined force and inlet pressure data. The largest of the three LEX sizes tested gives the best airplane maneuver performance. Wing flap deflections improved inlet recovery at all Mach numbers.

  2. Inlet-engine matching for SCAR including application of a bicone variable geometry inlet. [Supersonic Cruise Aircraft Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wasserbauer, J. F.; Gerstenmaier, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Airflow characteristics of variable cycle engines (VCE) designed for Mach 2.32 can have transonic airflow requirements as high as 1.6 times the cruise airflow. This is a formidable requirement for conventional, high performance, axisymmetric, translating centerbody mixed compression inlets. An alternate inlet is defined where the second cone of a two cone centerbody collapses to the initial cone angle to provide a large off-design airflow capability, and incorporates modest centerbody translation to minimize spillage drag. Estimates of transonic spillage drag are competitive with those of conventional translating centerbody inlets. The inlet's cruise performance exhibits very low bleed requirements with good recovery and high angle of attack capability.

  3. Shock position sensor for supersonic inlets. [measuring pressure in the throat of a supersonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dustin, M. O. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    Static pressure taps or ports are provided in the throat of a supersonic inlet, and signals indicative of the pressure at each of the ports is fed to respective comparators. Means are also provided for directing a signal indicative of the total throat pressure to the comparators. A periodic signal is superimposed on the total throat pressure so that the signal from the static pressure tabs is compared to a varying scan signal rather than to total throat pressure only. This type of comparison causes each comparator to provide a pulse width modulated output which may vary from 0% 'time on' to 100% 'time on'. The pulse width modulated outputs of the comparators are summed, filtered, and directed to a controller which operates a bypass valve such as a door whereby air is dumped from the inlet to prevent the shock wave from being expelled out the front.

  4. Critical Propulsion Components. Volume 4; Inlet and Fan/Inlet Accoustics Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Several studies have concluded that a supersonic aircraft, if environmentally acceptable and economically viable, could successfully compete in the 21st century marketplace. However, before industry can commit to what is estimated as a 15 to 20 billion dollar investment, several barrier issues must be resolved. In an effort to address these barrier issues, NASA and Industry teamed to form the High-Speed Research (HSR) program. As part of this program, the Critical Propulsion Components (CPC) element was created and assigned the task of developing those propulsion component technologies necessary to: (1) reduce cruise emissions by a factor of 10 and (2) meet the ever-increasing airport noise restrictions with an economically viable propulsion system. The CPC-identified critical components were ultra-low emission combustors, low-noise/high-performance exhaust nozzles, low-noise fans, and stable/high-performance inlets. Propulsion cycle studies (coordinated with NASA Langley Research Center sponsored airplane studies) were conducted throughout this CPC program to help evaluate candidate components and select the best concepts for the more complex and larger scale research efforts. The propulsion cycle and components ultimately selected were a mixed-flow turbofan (MFTF) engine employing a lean, premixed, prevaporized (LPP) combustor coupled to a two-dimensional mixed compression inlet and a two-dimensional mixer/ejector nozzle. Due to the large amount of material presented in this report, it was prepared in four volumes; Volume 1: Summary, Introduction, and Propulsion System Studies, Volume 2: Combustor, Volume 3: Exhaust Nozzle, and Volume 4: Inlet and Fan/Inlet Acoustic Team.

  5. Improving commercial broiler attic inlet ventilation thorugh CFD analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of solar heated attic air is an area of increasing interest in commercial poultry production. Attic inlets satisfy the demand for alternative heating while being simple to implement in an existing poultry house. A number of demonstration projects have suggested that attic inlets may decrease...

  6. 33 CFR 334.1310 - Lutak Inlet, Alaska; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... areas. 334.1310 Section 334.1310 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1310 Lutak Inlet, Alaska; restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1) Army POL dock restricted area. (i) The waters of Lutak Inlet bounded...

  7. 33 CFR 334.1310 - Lutak Inlet, Alaska; restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... areas. 334.1310 Section 334.1310 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.1310 Lutak Inlet, Alaska; restricted areas. (a) The areas—(1) Army POL dock restricted area. (i) The waters of Lutak Inlet bounded...

  8. Aerodynamic and directional acoustic performance of a scoop inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbott, J. M.; Dietrich, D. A.

    1977-01-01

    Aerodynamic and directional acoustic performances of a scoop inlet were studied. The scoop inlet is designed with a portion of the lower cowling extended forward to direct upward any noise that is propagating out the front of the engine toward the ground. The tests were conducted in an anechoic wind tunnel facility at free stream velocities of 0, 18, 41, and 61 m/sec and angles of attack from -10 deg to 120 deg. Inlet throat Mach number was varied from 0.30 to 0.75. Aerodynamically, at a free stream velocity of 41 m/sec, the design throat Mach number (0.63), and an angle of attack of 50 deg, the scoop inlet total pressure recovery was 0.989 and the total pressure distortion was 0.15. The angles of attack where flow separation occurred with the scoop inlet were higher than those for a conventional symmetric inlet. Acoustically, the scoop inlet provided a maximum noise reduction of 12 to 15 db below the inlet over the entire range of throat Mach number and angle of attack at a free-stream velocity of 41 m/sec.

  9. Validation of WIND for a Series of Inlet Flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slater, John W.; Abbott, John M.; Cavicchi, Richard H.

    2002-01-01

    Validation assessments compare WIND CFD simulations to experimental data for a series of inlet flows ranging in Mach number from low subsonic to hypersonic. The validation procedures follow the guidelines of the AIAA. The WIND code performs well in matching the available experimental data. The assessments demonstrate the use of WIND and provide confidence in its use for the analysis of aircraft inlets.

  10. Isolated testing of highly maneuverable inlet con cepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norby, W. P.; Haeffele, B. A.; Burley, R. R.

    1986-01-01

    Ten percent scale models of a Mach 2.2 two dimensional inlet and a Mach 2.0 axisymmetric inlet were tested in the NASA Lewis Research Center 8'x6' Supersonic Wind Tunnel as part of a cooperative effort with the McDonnell Aircraft Company. The objective of this effort was to test methods designed to increase the maneuvering performance of fighter aircraft inlets. Maneuvering improvement concepts were tested up to 40-deg angle of attack for Mach numbers of 0.6 and 0.9, and up to 25 deg for Mach numbers 1.2 and 1.4. Maneuvering improvement concepts included a rotating cowl lip, auxiliary inlets aft of the inlet throat, and a retracting centerbody for the axisymmetric inlet. Test results show that the rotating cowl design was effective in improving subsonic maneuvering performance for both inlets. Auxiliary inlets did not produce significant performance increases for either model. The retracted centerbody resulted in some performance benefits at high angles of attack. None of the maneuvering improvement concepts were effective at Mach 1.2 and 1.4.

  11. 14 CFR 25.941 - Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.941 Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility. For airplanes using variable inlet or exhaust system geometry, or both... malfunctions) upon the aerodynamic control of the airplane may not result in any condition that would...

  12. 14 CFR 25.941 - Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.941 Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility. For airplanes using variable inlet or exhaust system geometry, or both... malfunctions) upon the aerodynamic control of the airplane may not result in any condition that would...

  13. 14 CFR 25.941 - Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.941 Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility. For airplanes using variable inlet or exhaust system geometry, or both... malfunctions) upon the aerodynamic control of the airplane may not result in any condition that would...

  14. 14 CFR 25.941 - Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.941 Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility. For airplanes using variable inlet or exhaust system geometry, or both... malfunctions) upon the aerodynamic control of the airplane may not result in any condition that would...

  15. 14 CFR 25.941 - Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 25.941 Inlet, engine, and exhaust compatibility. For airplanes using variable inlet or exhaust system geometry, or both... malfunctions) upon the aerodynamic control of the airplane may not result in any condition that would...

  16. Persistent organic pollutants in forage fish prey of rhinoceros auklets breeding in Puget Sound and the northern California Current.

    PubMed

    Good, Thomas P; Pearson, Scott F; Hodum, Peter; Boyd, Daryle; Anulacion, Bernadita F; Ylitalo, Gina M

    2014-09-15

    Organochlorine contaminants in upper trophic-level consumers inhabiting Puget Sound are consistently higher than in those species inhabiting other west coast locations. We analyzed persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in the six most common fish prey of rhinoceros auklets breeding on Protection Island (Puget Sound), Tatoosh Island (WA coast), and Destruction Island (WA coast). Wet-weight concentrations of POPs ranged widely (PCBs: 1.6-25.0 ng/g; DDTs: 0.2-56.0 ng/g; PBDEs:Puget Sound were 2-4 times more contaminated and had similar contaminant profiles compared to fish from the outer coast. Unexpectedly elevated PCB and PBDE concentrations in Chinook salmon from the outer coast likely reflected Columbia River. Calculating contaminant loads for auklet nestlings magnified differences observed between inland and outer coast fish prey. Monitoring of breeding auklets, their prey and other resident marine birds is needed to assess biomagnification impacts in the Puget Sound marine ecosystem.

  17. 75 FR 8566 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... Sound Area of Responsibility (AOR). When these safety zones are activated, and thus subject to... action is necessary to prevent injury and to protect life and property of the maritime public from...

  18. University of Puget Sound American Association of Colleges/Mellon Foundation Transfer Student Project: 1985-86 Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Copeland, Scott A.

    The University of Puget Sound's (UPS's) transfer student project was designed to aid black community college transfer students in pursuing a baccalaureate degree in business administration. Initially, Tacoma Community College (TCC) was targeted as the project partner because of its close proximity to UPS, its large minority population, and the…

  19. 33 CFR 165.T13-221 - Safety Zone; Arctic Drilling and Support Vessels, Puget Sound, Washington.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Safety Zone; Arctic Drilling and... EXPLORER, HARVEY SPIRIT, HARVY SISUAQ, AIVIQ, NANUQ, GUARDSMAN, KALMATH, ARTIC CHALLENGER, TUUQ, LAUREN... Sector Puget Sound Captain Of The Port (COTP) Zone as defined in 33 CFR 3.65-10. (b) Regulations....

  20. 78 FR 54587 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-05

    ..., Puget Sound Zone AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of regulation. SUMMARY: The... Sound Zone during the dates and times noted below. This action is necessary to prevent injury and to protect life and property of the maritime public from the hazards associated with the firework...

  1. U. of Puget Sound Freshman Orientation Mixes Outdoor Fun with Academic Work-and Helps Boost the Graduation Rate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collison, Michele N-K.

    1989-01-01

    An innovative orientation program for freshmen at the University of Puget Sound called Passages and Preludes mixes outdoor fun with academic work. They meet in small groups with faculty members who introduce them to college-level reading and writing. For another two days the students hike, sail, fish and canoe. (MLW)

  2. 75 FR 49847 - Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Safety Zones; Annual Firework Displays Within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of Responsibility AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of enforcement of...

  3. 33 CFR 165.1332 - Safety Zones; annual firework displays within the Captain of the Port, Puget Sound Area of...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zones; annual firework... Limited Access Areas Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 165.1332 Safety Zones; annual firework displays... from the following launch sites: Captain of the Port Puget Sound AOR Annual Firework Displays...

  4. 33 CFR 3.65-10 - Sector Puget Sound Marine Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Inspection Zone and Captain of the Port Zone. 3.65-10 Section 3.65-10 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... ZONES, AND CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-10 Sector Puget Sound Marine...″ N, longitude 124°43′45″ W, proceeding along the Canadian border east to the Montana-North...

  5. Puget Sound Operational Forecast System - A Real-time Predictive Tool for Marine Resource Management and Emergency Responses

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Chase, Jared M.; Wang, Taiping

    2009-12-01

    To support marine ecological resource management and emergency response and to enhance scientific understanding of physical and biogeochemical processes in Puget Sound, a real-time Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OFS) was developed by the Coastal Ocean Dynamics & Ecosystem Modeling group (CODEM) of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). PS-OFS employs the state-of-the-art three-dimensional coastal ocean model and closely follows the standards and procedures established by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) National Ocean Service (NOS). PS-OFS consists of four key components supporting the Puget Sound Circulation and Transport Model (PS-CTM): data acquisition, model execution and product archive, model skill assessment, and model results dissemination. This paper provides an overview of PS-OFS and its ability to provide vital real-time oceanographic information to the Puget Sound community. PS-OFS supports pacific northwest region’s growing need for a predictive tool to assist water quality management, fish stock recovery efforts, maritime emergency response, nearshore land-use planning, and the challenge of climate change and sea level rise impacts. The structure of PS-OFS and examples of the system inputs and outputs, forecast results are presented in details.

  6. Preliminary atlas of active shallow tectonic deformation in the Puget Lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barnett, Elizabeth A.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Sherrod, Brian L.; Weaver, Craig S.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Blakely, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    This atlas presents an up-to-date map compilation of the geological and geophysical observations that underpin interpretations of active, surface-deforming faults in the Puget Lowland, Washington. Shallow lowland faults are mapped where observations of deformation from paleoseismic, seismic-reflection, and potential-field investigations converge. Together, results from these studies strengthen the identification and characterization of regional faults and show that as many as a dozen shallow faults have been active during the Holocene. The suite of maps presented in our atlas identifies sites that have evidence of deformation attributed to these shallow faults. For example, the paleoseismic-investigations map shows where coseismic surface rupture and deformation produced geomorphic scarps and deformed shorelines. Other maps compile results of seismic-reflection and potential-field studies that demonstrate evidence of deformation along suspected fault structures in the subsurface. Summary maps show the fault traces derived from, and draped over, the datasets presented in the preceding maps. Overall, the atlas provides map users with a visual overview of the observations and interpretations that support the existence of active, shallow faults beneath the densely populated Puget Lowland.

  7. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan : Appendix E, Transmission Reinforcement Analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-04-01

    The purpose of this appendix to the draft environmental impact statement (EIS) report is to provide an update of the latest study work done on transmission system options for the Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Also included in the attachments to the EIS are 2 reports analyzing the voltage stability of the Puget Sound transmission system and a review by Power Technologies, Inc. of the BPA voltage stability analysis and reactive options. Five transmission line options and several reactive options are presently being considered as possible solutions to the PSAFRP by the Transmission Team. The first two line options would be built on new rights-of way adjacent (as much as possible) to existing corridors. The reactive options would optimize the existing transmission system capability by adding new stations for series capacitors and/or switchgear. The other three line options are rebuilds or upgrades of existing cross mountain transmission lines. These options are listed below and include a preliminary assessment of the additional transmission system reinforcement required to integrate the new facilities into the existing transmission system. Plans were designed to provide at least 500 MVAR reactive margin.

  8. Prevalence of viral erythrocytic necrosis in Pacific herring and epizootics in Skagit Bay, Puget Sound, Washington.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hershberger, P.K.; Elder, N.E.; Grady, C.A.; Gregg, J.L.; Pacheco, C.A.; Greene, C.; Rice, C.; Meyers, T.R.

    2009-01-01

    Epizootics of viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) occurred among juvenile Pacific herring Clupea pallasii in Skagit Bay, Puget Sound, Washington, during 2005-2007 and were characterized by high prevalences and intensities of cytoplasmic inclusion bodies within circulating erythrocytes. The prevalence of VEN peaked at 67% during the first epizootic in October 2005 and waned to 0% by August 2006. A second VEN epizootic occurred throughout the summer of 2007; this was characterized by disease initiation and perpetuation in the age-1, 2006 year-class, followed by involvement of the age-0, 2007 year-class shortly after the latter's metamorphosis to the juvenile stage. The disease was detected in other populations of juvenile Pacific herring throughout Puget Sound and Prince William Sound, Alaska, where the prevalences and intensities typically did not correspond to those observed in Skagit Bay. The persistence and recurrence of VEN epizootics indicate that the disease is probably common among juvenile Pacific herring throughout the eastern North Pacific Ocean, and although population-level impacts probably occur they are typically covert and not easily detected.

  9. Puget Sound Area Electric Reliability Plan. Appendix E: Transmission Reinforcement Analysis : Draft Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1991-09-01

    Five transmission line options and several reactive (voltage support) options are presently being considered as possible solutions to the PSAERP by the Transmission Team. The first two line options would be built on new rights-of way adjacent (as much as possible) to existing corridors. The reactive options would optimize the existing transmission system capability by adding new stations for series capacitors and/or switchgear. The other three line options are rebuilds or upgrades of existing cross mountain transmission lines. These options are listed below and include a preliminary assessment of the additional transmission system reinforcement required to integrate the new facilities into the existing transmission system. These options were derived from earlier study work that was summarized in Puget Sound Reinforcement Transmission Options'' and New Cross Mountain Transmission Line Alternative: The Crosstie'', which are attached. The initial Transmission Options study report recognized the value to system performance of adding an entirely new circuit rather than rebuilding an existing one. However, siting realities require that rebuild options be considered. Typically, the most attractive rebuild options would be the lowest capacity (lowest voltage) circuits. But because of corridor location, length and terminal proximity, the rebuild options listed below appear to be the most promising. Schematic diagrams and QV Curves of each option are also attached. It should be noted that Snoqualmie and Echo Lake refer to the same station east of Puget Sound and Naneum and Kittitas refer to the same station in the Ellensburg area. 100 figs., 20 tabs.

  10. Concentration and toxicity of sea-surface contaminants in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.T.; Crecelius, E.A.; Kocan, R.

    1986-04-01

    The Marine Research Laboratory conducted studies during CY 1985 to evaluate the effects of sea-surface contamination on the reproductive success of a valued marine species. Microlayer and bulk water samples were collected from a rural bay, central Puget Sound, and three urban bays and analyzed for a number of metal and organic contaminants as well as for densities of neuston and plankton organisms. Fertilized neustonic eggs of sand sole (Psettichthys melanostictus) were exposed to the same microlayer samples during their first week of embryonic and larval development. Also, we evaluated the effects of microlayer extracts on the growth of trout cell cultures. Compared to rural sites, urban bays generally contained lower densities of neustonic flatfish eggs during the spawning season. Also, in contrast to the rural sites or the one central Puget Sound site, approximately half of the urban bay microlayer samples resulted in significant increases in embryo mortality (up to 100%), kyphosis (bent spine abnormalities) in hatched larvae, increased anaphase aberrations in developing embryos, and decreased trout cell growth. The toxic samples generally contained high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic and/or chlorinated hydrocarbons and/or potentially toxic metals. In some cases, concentrations of contaminants on the sea surface exceeded water-quality criteria by several orders of magnitude. Several samples of subsurface bulk water collected below highly contaminated surfaces showed no detectable contamination or toxicity.

  11. Use of Advanced Meteorological Model Output for Coastal Ocean Modeling in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2011-06-01

    It is a great challenge to specify meteorological forcing in estuarine and coastal circulation modeling using observed data because of the lack of complete datasets. As a result of this limitation, water temperature is often not simulated in estuarine and coastal modeling, with the assumption that density-induced currents are generally dominated by salinity gradients. However, in many situations, temperature gradients could be sufficiently large to influence the baroclinic motion. In this paper, we present an approach to simulate water temperature using outputs from advanced meteorological models. This modeling approach was applied to simulate annual variations of water temperatures of Puget Sound, a fjordal estuary in the Pacific Northwest of USA. Meteorological parameters from North American Region Re-analysis (NARR) model outputs were evaluated with comparisons to observed data at real-time meteorological stations. Model results demonstrated that NARR outputs can be used to drive coastal ocean models for realistic simulations of long-term water-temperature distributions in Puget Sound. Model results indicated that the net flux from NARR can be further improved with the additional information from real-time observations.

  12. An evaluation of EPA`s proposed national sediment quality criteria applied to Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Gries, T.H.

    1994-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed national marine and freshwater sediment quality criteria for five chemicals of concern: acenaphthene, dieldrin, endrin, fluoranthene and phenanthrene. The criteria values EPA developed were based on an equilibrium partitioning approach and are normalized to the organic carbon of the sediment. The Department of Ecology compared the proposed national marine sediment criteria for the three PAH compounds to Washington`s Sediment Management Standards (173-204 WAC), most of which were derived using the empirical ``Apparent Effects Threshold`` approach. The number of stations in Puget Sound exceeding the State`s chemical Sediment Quality Standards (SQS) was 1.7--8.1 times greater those exceeding the proposed criteria. It also appeared from early results that the latter were less sensitive predictors of stations known to exhibit significant adverse biological effects. Thus, the proposed criteria may not be as effective as the SQS when used as a regulatory tool to screen for biological effects in Puget Sound. These and other findings will be presented which generally support the EPA Science Advisory Board recommendation to use proposed national criteria in conjunction with other chemical and biological sediment quality indicators to make regulatory decisions.

  13. Hydrography of and biogeochemical inputs to Liberty Bay, a small urban embayment in Puget Sound, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Takesue, Renee K.

    2011-01-01

    This multi-chapter report describes scientific and logistic understanding gained from a 2 year proof-of-concept study in Liberty Bay, a small urban embayment in central Puget Sound, Washington. The introductory chapter describes the regional and local setting, the high-level study goals, the site-specific urban stressors, and the interdisciplinary study approach. Subsequent data chapters describe detailed studies of various components of the Liberty Bay ecosystem: the aquatic environment (Chapter 2), surface and groundwater quantity and quality (Chapter 3), sediment quality (Chapter 4), eelgrass habitat (Chapter 5), carbon and nitrogen sources (Chapter 6), and a statistical model relating herring spawn probability to shoreline attributes (Chapter 7). The final chapter synthesizes knowledge about individual components into a system-wide understanding of how urbanization may affect the Liberty Bay ecosystem. The Liberty Bay study was conducted as part of the U.S. Geological Survey's Coastal Habitats in Puget Sound project, an interdisciplinary collaboration to understand physical and biological processes that affect nearshore ecosystems.

  14. Field and laboratory studies of the etiology of liver neoplasms in marine fish from Puget Sound.

    PubMed Central

    Malins, D C; McCain, B B; Myers, M S; Brown, D W; Krahn, M M; Roubal, W T; Schiewe, M H; Landahl, J T; Chan, S L

    1987-01-01

    A series of field studies was conducted between 1979 and 1985 in Puget Sound, Washington State, to investigate etiological relationships between prevalences of hepatic neoplasms in bottom-dwelling marine fish species, with emphasis on English sole (Parophrys vetulus), and concentrations of toxic chemicals in sediments and affected fish. Statistically significant (p less than or equal to 0.05) correlations have been found between the prevalences of hepatic neoplasms in English sole and the following parameters: sediment concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons, and concentrations of the metabolites of aromatic compounds in the bile of affected sole. A significant difference (p less than 0.001) was also found between the relative concentrations of aromatic free radicals in the liver microsomes of English sole with liver lesions compared to sole without liver lesions. Laboratory studies designed to evaluate the etiology of the liver neoplasms in English sole have also yielded evidence that is consistent with the view that high molecular weight aromatic hydrocarbons, e.g., benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), are hepatocarcinogens in English sole. The current status of a series of long-term (up to 18 months) exposures of English sole and rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) to selected fractions of Puget Sound sediment extracts, enriched with aromatic hydrocarbons and nitrogen-containing aromatic compounds, and to individual carcinogens (e.g., BaP) is discussed. Images FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. FIGURE 11. FIGURE 12. PMID:3297664

  15. Minimum Weight Design of a Generic Axisymmetric Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nadell, Shari-Beth

    1996-01-01

    A new minimum weight design method for high-speed axisymmetric inlets was demonstrated on a generic inlet. The method uses Classical Beam Theory and shell buckling to determine the minimum required equivalent isotropic thickness for a stiffened shell based on prescribed structural design requirements and load conditions. The optimum spacing and equivalent isotropic thickness of ring frame supports are computed to prevent buckling. The method thus develops a preliminary structural design for the inlet and computes the structural weight. Finite element analyses were performed on the resulting inlet design to evaluate the analytical results. Comparisons between the analytical and finite element stresses and deflections identified areas needing improvement in the analytical method. The addition of the deflection due to shear and a torsional buckling failure mode to the new method brought its results in line with those from the finite element analyses. Final validation of the new method will be made using data from actual inlets.

  16. Inlet flow field investigation. Part 1: Transonic flow field survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yetter, J. A.; Salemann, V.; Sussman, M. B.

    1984-01-01

    A wind tunnel investigation was conducted to determine the local inlet flow field characteristics of an advanced tactical supersonic cruise airplane. A data base for the development and validation of analytical codes directed at the analysis of inlet flow fields for advanced supersonic airplanes was established. Testing was conducted at the NASA-Langley 16-foot Transonic Tunnel at freestream Mach numbers of 0.6 to 1.20 and angles of attack from 0.0 to 10.0 degrees. Inlet flow field surveys were made at locations representative of wing (upper and lower surface) and forebody mounted inlet concepts. Results are presented in the form of local inlet flow field angle of attack, sideflow angle, and Mach number contours. Wing surface pressure distributions supplement the flow field data.

  17. Catalytically-Promoted Analyte Derivatization Inside a Gas Chromatographic Inlet

    PubMed Central

    Fowler, William K.; Gamble, Kelly J.; Wright, Amber R.

    2010-01-01

    Reported here is a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of catalyzing on-line derivatization reactions inside the inlet (i.e., the injection port) of a gas chromatograph (GC) with solid heterogeneous catalysts. The experiments described here entail the installation of candidate catalysts inside the GC inlet liner and the subsequent injection of analyte/reagent mixtures onto the catalyst beds. Two catalysts are identified, each of which clearly catalyzes one of the chosen model derivatization reactions in the inlet of a GC. This result supports our hypothesis that on-line derivatizations can, in principle, be reproducibly catalyzed inside the GC inlet by solid heterogeneous catalysts and that the presence of such catalysts in the inlet do not necessarily cause a serious loss of instrument performance or chromatographic efficiency. PMID:20822662

  18. Computational Analysis of a Low-Boom Supersonic Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2011-01-01

    A low-boom supersonic inlet was designed for use on a conceptual small supersonic aircraft that would cruise with an over-wing Mach number of 1.7. The inlet was designed to minimize external overpressures, and used a novel bypass duct to divert the highest shock losses around the engine. The Wind-US CFD code was used to predict the effects of capture ratio, struts, bypass design, and angles of attack on inlet performance. The inlet was tested in the 8-ft by 6-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center. Test results showed that the inlet had excellent performance, with capture ratios near one, a peak core total pressure recovery of 96 percent, and a stable operating range much larger than that of an engine. Predictions generally compared very well with the experimental data, and were used to help interpret some of the experimental results.

  19. Conceptual study of a turbojet/ramjet inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidner, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    An inlet concept for separate turbojet and ramjet engines was defined and compared with an equivalent inlet for a wraparound turboramjet engine. The comparison was made for a typical high altitude hypersonic cruise vehicle where the turbojet inlet capture area was required to be half as large as the ramjet inlet capture area at cruise. The use of a shorter nacelle having substantially lower cooling requirements at cruise for the inlet concept for separate turbojet and ramjet engines is suggested. The separate engine concept better isolates the turbojet from the ramjet, requires no special close off mechanisms within the turbojet, and avoids the circumferential heat load imposed by a wraparound ramjet. A more variable geometry is required.

  20. Results from computational analysis of a mixed compression supersonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saunders, J. D.; Keith, T. G.

    1991-01-01

    A numerical study was performed to simulate the critical flow through a supersonic inlet. This flow field has many phenomena such as shock waves, strong viscous effects, turbulent boundary layer development, boundary layer separations, and mass flow suction through the walls, (bleed). The computational tools used were two full Navier-Stokes (FNS) codes. The supersonic inlet that was analyzed is the Variable Diameter Centerbody, (VDC), inlet. This inlet is a candidate concept for the next generation supersonic involved effort in generating an efficient grid geometry and specifying boundary conditions, particularly in the bleed region and at the outflow boundary. Results for a critical inlet operation compare favorably to Method of Characteristics predictions and experimental data.

  1. Effect of replacing surface inlets with blind or gravel inlets on sediment and phosphorus subsurface drainage losses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Open surface inlets that connect to subsurface tile drainage systems provide a direct pathway for sediment, nutrients, and agrochemicals to surface waters. This study was conducted to determine whether modifying open inlets by burying them in gravel capped with 30 cm of sandy clay loam soil or in ve...

  2. Suspended sediment delivery to Puget Sound from the lower Nisqually River, western Washington, July 2010–November 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Curran, Christopher A.; Grossman, Eric E.; Magirl, Christopher S.; Foreman, James R.

    2016-05-26

    On average, the Nisqually River delivers about 100,000 metric tons per year (t/yr) of suspended sediment to Puget Sound, western Washington, a small proportion of the estimated 1,200,000 metric tons (t) of sediment reported to flow in the upper Nisqually River that drains the glaciated, recurrently active Mount Rainier stratovolcano. Most of the upper Nisqually River sediment load is trapped in Alder Lake, a reservoir completed in 1945. For water year 2011 (October 1, 2010‒September 30, 2011), daily sediment and continuous turbidity data were used to determine that 106,000 t of suspended sediment were delivered to Puget Sound, and 36 percent of this load occurred in 2 days during a typical winter storm. Of the total suspended-sediment load delivered to Puget Sound in the water year 2011, 47 percent was sand (particle size >0.063 millimeters), and the remainder (53 percent) was silt and clay. A sediment-transport curve developed from suspended-sediment samples collected from July 2010 to November 2011 agreed closely with a curve derived in 1973 using similar data-collection methods, indicating that similar sediment-transport conditions exist. The median annual suspended-sediment load of 73,000 t (water years 1980–2014) is substantially less than the average load, and the correlation (Pearson’s r = 0.80, p = 8.1E-9, n=35) between annual maximum 2-day sediment loads and normalized peak discharges for the period indicates the importance of wet years and associated peak discharges of the lower Nisqually River for sediment delivery to Puget Sound. The magnitude of peak discharges in the lower Nisqually River generally is suppressed by flow regulation, and relative to other free-flowing, glacier-influenced rivers entering Puget Sound, the Nisqually River delivers proportionally less sediment because of upstream sediment trapping from dams.

  3. 76 FR 3057 - Special Local Regulation; Hydroplane Races Within the Captain of the Port Puget Sound Area of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... place on the waterways of Dyes Inlet, Lake Washington, and Lake Sammamish, WA. Historically, these... three permanent safety zones on the waters of Port Angeles, Dyes Inlet and Lake Washington. The Port... permanent hydroplane race areas on the waters of Dyes Inlet, Lake Washington, and Lake Sammamish, WA...

  4. Unstart Coupling Mechanism Analysis of Multiple-Modules Hypersonic Inlet

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Cao, Shibin

    2013-01-01

    The combination of multiplemodules in parallel manner is an important way to achieve the much higher thrust of scramjet engine. For the multiple-modules scramjet engine, when inlet unstarted oscillatory flow appears in a single-module engine due to high backpressure, how to interact with each module by massflow spillage, and whether inlet unstart occurs in other modules are important issues. The unstarted flowfield and coupling characteristic for a three-module hypersonic inlet caused by center module II and side module III were, conducted respectively. The results indicate that the other two hypersonic inlets are forced into unstarted flow when unstarted phenomenon appears on a single-module hypersonic inlet due to high backpressure, and the reversed flow in the isolator dominates the formation, expansion, shrinkage, and disappearance of the vortexes, and thus, it is the major factor of unstart coupling of multiple-modules hypersonic inlet. The coupling effect among multiple modules makes hypersonic inlet be more likely unstarted. PMID:24348146

  5. Inlet Trade Study for a Low-Boom Aircraft Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, Christopher M.; Slater, John W.; Rallabhandi, Sriram K.

    2016-01-01

    Propulsion integration for low-boom supersonic aircraft requires careful inlet selection, placement, and tailoring to achieve acceptable propulsive and aerodynamic performance, without compromising vehicle sonic boom loudness levels. In this investigation, an inward-turning streamline-traced and axisymmetric spike inlet are designed and independently installed on a conceptual low-boom supersonic demonstrator aircraft. The airframe was pre-shaped to achieve a target ground under-track loudness of 76.4 PLdB at cruise using an adjoint-based design optimization process. Aircraft and inlet performance characteristics were obtained by solution of the steady-state Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Isolated cruise inlet performance including total pressure recovery and distortion were computed and compared against installed inlet performance metrics. Evaluation of vehicle near-field pressure signatures, along with under- and off-track propagated loudness levels is also reported. Results indicate the integrated axisymmetric spike design offers higher inlet pressure recovery, lower fan distortion, and reduced sonic boom. The vehicle with streamline-traced inlet exhibits lower external wave drag, which translates to a higher lift-to-drag ratio and increased range capability.

  6. Flow Simulation of Supersonic Inlet with Bypass Annular Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, HyoungJin; Kumano, Takayasu; Liou, Meng-Sing; Povinelli, Louis A.; Conners, Timothy R.

    2011-01-01

    A relaxed isentropic compression supersonic inlet is a new concept that produces smaller cowl drag than a conventional inlet, but incurs lower total pressure recovery and increased flow distortion in the (radially) outer flowpath. A supersonic inlet comprising a bypass annulus to the relaxed isentropic compression inlet dumps out airflow of low quality through the bypass duct. A reliable computational fluid dynamics solution can provide considerable useful information to ascertain quantitatively relative merits of the concept, and further provide a basis for optimizing the design. For a fast and reliable performance evaluation of the inlet performance, an equivalent axisymmetric model whose area changes accounts for geometric and physical (blockage) effects resulting from the original complex three-dimensional configuration is proposed. In addition, full three-dimensional calculations are conducted for studying flow phenomena and verifying the validity of the equivalent model. The inlet-engine coupling is carried out by embedding numerical propulsion system simulation engine data into the flow solver for interactive boundary conditions at the engine fan face and exhaust plane. It was found that the blockage resulting from complex three-dimensional geometries in the bypass duct causes significant degradation of inlet performance by pushing the terminal normal shock upstream.

  7. Minimum fan turbine inlet temperature mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in turbine temperature which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) minimum fan turbine inlet temperature (FTIT) mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of net propulsive force and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and partial afterburning power settings. The FTIT reductions for the supersonic tests are less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Subsonically at military power, FTIT reductions were above 70 R for either the left or right engines, and repeatable for the right engine. At partial afterburner and supersonic conditions, the level of FTIT reductions were at least 25 R and as much as 55 R. Considering that the turbine operates at or very near its temperature limit at these high power settings, these seemingly small temperature reductions may significantly lengthen the life of the turbine. In general, the minimum FTIT mode has performed well, demonstrating significant temperature reductions at military and partial afterburner power. Decreases of over 100 R at cruise flight conditions were identified. Temperature reductions of this magnitude could significantly extend turbine life and reduce replacement costs.

  8. Notification: Congressionally Requested Audit of Improper Funding of Advocacy Campaign for Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission Puget Sound Protection and Restoration Implementation Grant No. PA00J32201

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Project #OA-FY16-0178, May 13, 2016. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on an audit of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission (NWIFC) Puget Sound Protection and Restoration Implementation Grant No. PA00J32201.

  9. Notification: Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission’s Puget Sound Protection and Restoration Implementation cooperative agreements PA00J32201 and PA00J91201

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    May 27, 2016. The EPA OIG plans to begin preliminary research on the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission’s (NWIFC’s) Puget Sound Protection and Restoration Implementation cooperative agreements PA00J32201 and PA00J91201.

  10. Observations of Currents in Two Tidally Modulated Inlets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippmann, T. C.; Irish, J. D.; Hunt, J.

    2012-12-01

    Observations of currents obtained in two tidally modulated inlets are used to examine the spatial evolution of the vertical structure in hourly averaged mean flow and at tidal frequencies. Field experiments of 30 day duration were conducted at Hampton/Seabrook Harbor, NH, in the Fall of 2011 and again at New River Inlet, NC, in the spring of 2012. The temporal variation and vertical structure of the currents were observed with 600 khz and 1200 khz RDI Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) deployed on low-profile bottom tripods just outside and within the inlet mouth, and with a Nortek Aquadopp Profiler mounted on a jetted pipe on the flank of the inlet channel. Across-inlet current profiles were obtained at each site at various tidal stages with a 1200 khz RDI vessel-mounted ADCP onboard the personal watercraft (the Coastal Bathymetry Survey System, or CBASS) that transited the inlet multiple times at various spatial locations. Flows within the inlet were dominated by semi-diurnal tides, ranging from 2.5 to 4 m in elevation at Hampton/Seabrook Harbor with velocities exceeding 3 m/s, and tides ranging from 1 to 1.5 m in elevation at New River Inlet with velocities exceeding 2 m/s. Flows sampled with the CBASS will be used to examine the horizontal and vertical variation in mean currents (averaged over about 20 - 40 min) at various tidal stages. Currents sampled with the fixed instruments will be used to examine the temporal variation in amplitude and direction of mean currents (averaged over 30 - 60 min) as a function of depth, as well as the amplitude, phase, and rotational structure at tidal frequencies. Observations from the two field sites will be compared and discussed in terms of the spatial and temporal evolution from outside the river mouth to the inner inlet channels over the fortnightly sampling period.

  11. Feasibility study of inlet shock stability system of YF-12

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blausey, G. C.; Coleman, D. M.; Harp, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    The feasibility of self actuating bleed valves as a shock stabilization system in the inlet of the YF-12 is considered for vortex valves, slide valves, and poppet valves. Analytical estimation of valve performance indicates that only the slide and poppet valves located in the inlet cowl can meet the desired steady state stabilizing flows, and of the two the poppet valve is substantially faster in response to dynamic disturbances. The poppet valve is, therefore, selected as the best shock stability system for the YF-12 inlet.

  12. Distortion-rotor interaction noise produced by a drooped inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, E. B.; Moore, M. T.; Gliebe, P. R.

    1980-01-01

    The 'drooped' inlet used on most wing mounted engines produces a wall static pressure distortion at the fan face of about plus or minus 2%. The interaction of the fan rotor with this fixed distortion pattern produces blade passing frequency and harmonic tone levels in flight which contribute to forward radiated engine noise spectra. Data from a wind tunnel test, using both a drooped inlet and an inlet with no droop, show large changes in forward radiated noise levels over a limited fan speed range. An analytical model of this fan noise mechanism is developed and is used to account for the major features of the measured results.

  13. Cooling Air Inlet and Exit Geometries on Aircraft Engine Installations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Joseph; Corsiglia, Victor R.; Barlow, Philip R.

    1982-01-01

    A semispan wing and nacelle of a typical general aviation twin-engine aircraft was tested to evaluate the cooling capability and drag or several nacelle shapes; the nacelle shapes included cooling air inlet and exit variations. The tests were conducted in the Ames Research Center 40 x 80-ft Wind Tunnel. It was found that the cooling air inlet geometry of opposed piston engine installations has a major effect on inlet pressure recovery, but only a minor effect on drag. Exit location showed large effect on drag, especially for those locations on the sides of the nacelle where the suction characteristics were based on interaction with the wing surface pressures.

  14. High-speed inlet research program and supporting analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coltrin, Robert E.

    1990-01-01

    The technology challenges faced by the high speed inlet designer are discussed by describing the considerations that went into the design of the Mach 5 research inlet. It is shown that the emerging three dimensional viscous computational fluid dynamics (CFD) flow codes, together with small scale experiments, can be used to guide larger scale full inlet systems research. Then, in turn, the results of the large scale research, if properly instrumented, can be used to validate or at least to calibrate the CFD codes.

  15. Variable geometry inlet design for scram jet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guinan, Daniel P. (Inventor); Drake, Alan (Inventor); Andreadis, Dean (Inventor); Beckel, Stephen A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention relates to an improved variable geometry inlet for a scram jet engine having at least one combustor module. The variable geometry inlet comprises each combustor module having two sidewalls. Each of the sidewalls has a central portion with a thickness and a tapered profile forward of the central portion. The tapered profile terminates in a sharp leading edge. The variable geometry inlet further comprises each module having a lower wall and a movable cowl flap positioned forward of the lower wall. The movable cowl flap has a leading edge and the leading edges of the sidewalls intersect the leading edge of the cowl flap.

  16. Should we attempt global (inlet engine airframe) control design?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlin, C. M.

    1980-01-01

    The feasibility of multivariable design of the entire airplane control system is briefly addressed. An intermediate step in that direction is to design a control for an inlet engine augmentor system by using multivariable techniques. The supersonic cruise large scale inlet research program is described which will provide an opportunity to develop, integrate, and wind tunnel test a control for a mixed compression inlet and variable cycle engine. The integrated propulsion airframe control program is also discussed which will introduce the problem of implementing MVC within a distributed processing avionics architecture, requiring real time decomposition of the global design into independent modules in response to hardware communication failures.

  17. Estimation of additive forces and moments for supersonic inlets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, Stanley C., Jr.; Dillenius, Marnix F. E.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for estimating the additive forces and moments associated with supersonic, external compression inlets as a function of mass flow ratio has been developed. The technique makes use of a low order supersonic paneling method for calculating minimum additive forces at maximum mass flow conditions. A linear relationship between the minimum additive forces and the maximum values for fully blocked flow is employed to obtain the additive forces at a specified mass flow ratio. The method is applicable to two-dimensional inlets at zero or nonzero angle of attack, and to axisymmetric inlets at zero angle of attack. Comparisons with limited available additive drag data indicate fair to good agreement.

  18. Esophageal Rings and Stricture Related to a Circumferential Inlet Patch

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Larry

    2016-01-01

    Inlet patches are sometimes seen during upper endoscopy, usually in the proximal esophagus. Complications of inlet patches can cause a wide array of symptoms and complications. A man presented with dysphagia and was found to have 2 rings in the upper esophagus, just above and below a circumferential inlet patch. The more distal ring caused a stenosis, which produced the symptoms. Savary dilation and treatment with a proton pump inhibitor led to symptom resolution. Pathology was missed on the patient's first endoscopy, highlighting the importance of looking for pathology throughout the entire esophagus, not just in the distal esophagus. PMID:27807576

  19. Puget Lowland Ecoregion: Chapter 2 in Status and trends of land change in the Western United States--1973 to 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sorenson, Daniel G.

    2012-01-01

    The Puget Lowland Ecoregion covers an area of approximately 18,009 km² (6,953 mi²) within northwestern Washington (fig. 1) (Omernik, 1987; U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1997). The ecoregion is located between the Coast Range Ecoregion to the west, which includes the Olympic Mountains, and the North Cascades and the Cascades Ecoregions to the east, which include the Cascade Range. From the north, the ecoregion follows the Interstate 5 corridor, from the Canadian border south through Bellingham, Seattle, Olympia, and Longview, Washington, to the northern border of the Willamette Valley Ecoregion. The Puget Lowland Ecoregion borders the shoreline of the greater Puget Sound, a complex bay and saltwater estuary fed by spring freshwater runoff from the Olympic Mountains and Cascade Range watersheds. The ecoregion is situated in a continental glacial trough that has many islands, peninsulas, and bays. Relief is moderate, with elevations ranging from sea level to 460 m but averaging approximately 150 m (DellaSala and others, 2001). Proximity to the Pacific Ocean gives the Puget Lowland Ecoregion its mild maritime climate (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). Mean annual temperature is 10.5°C, with an average of 4.1°C in January and 17.7°C in July (Guttman and Quayle, 1996). Average annual precipitation ranges from 800 to 900 mm, but some areas in the rain shadow of the Olympic Mountains receive as little as 460 mm (DellaSala and others, 2001). Varying annual average precipitation greatly influences vegetation and soil type in the ecoregion. In the Puget Lowland Ecoregion, soils are dominated by Inceptisols in the north and Ultisols in the south (Jones, 2003). Before European settlement, most of the ecoregion was covered by coniferous forests, with species composition dependent on local climate (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, 1999). The World Wildlife Fund places the Puget Lowland Ecoregion in the Western Hemlock Vegetation Zone. Although this

  20. A Bayesian method for cluster detection with application to five cancer sites in Puget Sound

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Albert; Wakefield, Jon

    2015-01-01

    Cluster detection is an important public health endeavor and in this paper we describe and apply a recently developed Bayesian method. Commonly-used approaches are based on so-called scan statistics and suffer from a number of difficulties including how to choose a level of significance and how to deal with the possibility of multiple clusters. The basis of our model is to partition the study region into a set of areas which are either “null” or “non-null”, the latter corresponding to clusters (excess risk) or anti-clusters (reduced risk). We demonstrate the Bayesian method and compare with a popular existing approach, using data on breast, brain, lung, prostate and colorectal cancer, in the Puget Sound region of Washington St ate. We address the important issues of sensitivity to the priors, and the incorporation of covariates. The approach is implemented within the freely-available R package SpatialEpi. PMID:26841056

  1. Description of Existing Data for Integrated Landscape Monitoring in the Puget Sound Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiello, Danielle P.; Torregrosa, Alicia; Jason, Allyson L.; Fuentes, Tracy L.; Josberger, Edward G.

    2008-01-01

    This report summarizes existing geospatial data and monitoring programs for the Puget Sound Basin in northwestern Washington. This information was assembled as a preliminary data-development task for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Puget Sound Integrated Landscape Monitoring (PSILM) pilot project. The PSILM project seeks to support natural resource decision-making by developing a 'whole system' approach that links ecological processes at the landscape level to the local level (Benjamin and others, 2008). Part of this effort will include building the capacity to provide cumulative information about impacts that cross jurisdictional and regulatory boundaries, such as cumulative effects of land-cover change and shoreline modification, or region-wide responses to climate change. The PSILM project study area is defined as the 23 HUC-8 (hydrologic unit code) catchments that comprise the watersheds that drain into Puget Sound and their near-shore environments. The study area includes 13 counties and more than four million people. One goal of the PSILM geospatial database is to integrate spatial data collected at multiple scales across the Puget Sound Basin marine and terrestrial landscape. The PSILM work plan specifies an iterative process that alternates between tasks associated with data development and tasks associated with research or strategy development. For example, an initial work-plan goal was to delineate the study area boundary. Geospatial data required to address this task included data from ecological regions, watersheds, jurisdictions, and other boundaries. This assemblage of data provided the basis for identifying larger research issues and delineating the study-area boundary based on these research needs. Once the study-area boundary was agreed upon, the next iteration between data development and research activities was guided by questions about data availability, data extent, data abundance, and data types. This report is not intended as an exhaustive

  2. Artificial transmission to and susceptibility of Puget Sound fish to viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    MacMillian, John R.; Mulcahy, Dan

    1979-01-01

    In Puget Sound, Wash., the incidence of viral erythrocytic necrosis (VEN) varied geographically from 0 to 17% in chum salmon (Oncorhynchus keta) and from 4 to 59% in Pacific herring (Clupea harengus pallasi). The disease was experimentally transmitted by intraperitoneal injection to chum, pink (O. gorbuscha), coho (O. kisutch), chinook (O. tshawytscha), sockeye (O. nerka), and Atlantic (Salmo salar) salmon, and rainbow (S. gairdneri), brown (S. trutta), and brook (Salvelinus fontinalis) trout. The disease was transmitted to chum salmon and brook trout by waterborne virus. Virus obtained from herring was experimentally transmitted into chum salmon by intraperitoneal injection. Key words: viral erythrocytic necrosis, fish disease, transmission

  3. Low-flow characteristics of streams in the Puget Sound region, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hidaka, F.T.

    1973-01-01

    Periods of low streamflow are usually the most critical factor in relation to most water uses. The purpose of this report is to present data on low-flow characteristics of streams in the Puget Sound region, Washington, and to briefly explain some of the factors that influence low flow in the various basins. Presented are data on low-flow frequencies of streams in the Puget Sound region, as gathered at 150 gaging stations. Four indexes were computed from the flow-flow-frequency curves and were used as a basis to compare the low-flow characteristics of the streams. The indexes are the (1) low-flow-yield index, expressed in unit runoff per square mile; (2) base-flow index, or the ratio of the median 7-day low flow to the average discharge; (3) slope index, or slope of annual 7-day low-flow-frequency curve; and (4) spacing index, or spread between the 7-day and 183-day low-flow-frequency curves. The indexes showed a wide variation between streams due to the complex interrelation between climate, topography, and geology. The largest low-flow-yield indexes determined--greater than 1.5 cfs (cubic feet per second) per square mile--were for streams that head at high altitudes in the Cascade and Olympic Mountains and have their sources at glaciers. The smallest low-flow-yield indexes--less than 0.5 cfs per square mile--were for the small streams that drain the lowlands adjacent to Puget Sound. Indexes between the two extremes were for nonglacial streams that head at fairly high altitudes in areas of abundant precipitation. The base-flow index has variations that can be attributed to a basin's hydrogeology, with very little influence from climate. The largest base-flow indexes were obtained for streams draining permeable unconsolidated glacial and alluvial sediments in parts of the lowlands adjacent to Puget Sound. Large volume of ground water in these materials sustain flows during late summer. The smallest indexes were computed for streams draining areas underlain by

  4. Reconnaissance survey of chemical contamination and biological effects in southern Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-01

    The report describes the results of a field survey south of the Tacoma Narrows bridge in southern Puget Sound. Environmental conditions were evaluated in two urban embayments, eight nonurban embayments and three areas of the main channel in the southern Sound. Stations were located in depositional areas where chemical contaminants would be expected to accumulate in the sediments. All stations were located away from known contaminant sources in order to provide integrative assessments of contamination over relatively large areas. Chemical contamination of the south Sound was evaluated by measuring chemical concentrations in subtidal bottom sediments. Bioaccumulation of chemical contaminants was evaluated by measuring chemical concentrations in flatfish muscle tissues and littleneck clam meats. Chemical-related biological effects were evaluated by conducting amphipod sediment bioassays and histopathological analyses on livers of English sole.

  5. Needs Assessment and Scoping Study for Sinking Ships as Diving Sites in Puget Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rubin, Steve; Grossman, Eric E.; Koontz, Lynne; Paulson, Anthony; Sexton, Natalie; Reisenbichler, Reg

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is growing interest in starting a program to sink ships in Puget Sound to create one or more underwater dive sites. Experience in other parts of the world has indicated that sunken vessels are highly popular with divers and could provide a basis for increased recreation and attraction of out-of-state divers with attendant economic benefits to the State. The Washington State legislature reviewed this possibility during the 2006 session and determined that more information is required before the legislature could determine if this activity is feasible or desirable. The legislature directed several State agencies to undertake a preliminary study of the feasibility. The Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW, lead State agency) in turn asked U.S. Geological Survey to conduct the study.

  6. Measurements of Turbulence at Two Tidal Energy Sites in Puget Sound, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jim; Polagye, Brian; Durgesh, Vibhav; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2012-06-05

    Field measurements of turbulence are pre- sented from two sites in Puget Sound, WA (USA) that are proposed for electrical power generation using tidal current turbines. Rapidly sampled data from multiple acoustic Doppler instruments are analyzed to obtain statistical mea- sures of fluctuations in both the magnitude and direction of the tidal currents. The resulting turbulence intensities (i.e., the turbulent velocity fluctuations normalized by the harmonic tidal currents) are typically 10% at the hub- heights (i.e., the relevant depth bin) of the proposed turbines. Length and time scales of the turbulence are also analyzed. Large-scale, anisotropic eddies dominate the energy spectra, which may be the result of proximity to headlands at each site. At small scales, an isotropic turbulent cascade is observed and used to estimate the dissipation rate of turbulent kinetic energy. Data quality and sampling parameters are discussed, with an emphasis on the removal of Doppler noise from turbulence statistics.

  7. INTERIOR GUEST BATH, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR GUEST BATH, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  8. INTERIOR INNKEEPER FAMILY ROOM, LOOKING NORTH. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR INNKEEPER FAMILY ROOM, LOOKING NORTH. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  9. INTERIOR BUNK ROOM C, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR BUNK ROOM C, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  10. INTERIOR BUNK ROOM A, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR BUNK ROOM A, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  11. INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  12. INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR GUEST BEDROOM, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  13. INTERIOR TOWER ROOM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER ROOM, LOOKING SOUTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  14. INTERIOR LIBRARY HALL, LOOKING WEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR LIBRARY HALL, LOOKING WEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  15. INTERIOR TOWER STAIRS FIRST LEVEL, LOOKING EAST. Oregon Inlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER STAIRS FIRST LEVEL, LOOKING EAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  16. INTERIOR BUNK ROOM C, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR BUNK ROOM C, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  17. INTERIOR TOWER ENTRANCE, LOOKING NORTH. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER ENTRANCE, LOOKING NORTH. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  18. INTERIOR HALL BY TOWER STAIRS, LOOKING SOUTH. Oregon Inlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR HALL BY TOWER STAIRS, LOOKING SOUTH. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  19. INTERIOR LIBRARY, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR LIBRARY, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  20. INTERIOR INNKEEPER FAMILY ROOM, LOOKING WEST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR INNKEEPER FAMILY ROOM, LOOKING WEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  1. INTERIOR BUNK ROOM B, LOOKING WEST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR BUNK ROOM B, LOOKING WEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  2. INTERIOR TOWER ENTRANCE HALL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. Oregon Inlet Coast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER ENTRANCE HALL, LOOKING NORTHWEST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  3. INTERIOR LIBRARY, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR LIBRARY, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  4. LOOKOUT TOWER DETAILS, SHEET 5 OF 6. Oregon Inlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOOKOUT TOWER DETAILS, SHEET 5 OF 6. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  5. STRUCTURAL FLOOR PLAN, SHEET 2 OF 6. Oregon Inlet ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    STRUCTURAL FLOOR PLAN, SHEET 2 OF 6. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  6. INTERIOR TOWER ROOM LOOKING NORTHEAST. Oregon Inlet Coast Guard ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR TOWER ROOM LOOKING NORTHEAST. - Oregon Inlet Coast Guard Station, Northern end of Pea Island, East side of State Road 1257, 0.3 mile North of North Carolina Highway 12, Rodanthe, Dare County, NC

  7. Three dimensional viscous analysis of a hypersonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, D. R.; Smith, G. E.; Liou, M.-F.; Benson, Thomas J.

    1989-01-01

    The flow fields in supersonic/hypersonic inlets are currently being studied at NASA Lewis Research Center using 2- and 3-D full Navier-Stokes and Parabolized Navier-Stokes solvers. These tools have been used to analyze the flow through the McDonnell Douglas Option 2 inlet which has been tested at Calspan in support of the National Aerospace Plane Program. Comparisons between the computational and experimental results are presented. These comparisons lead to better overall understanding of the complex flows present in this class of inlets. The aspects of the flow field emphasized in this work are the 3-D effects, the transition from laminar to turbulent flow, and the strong nonuniformities generated within the inlet.

  8. PIE Nacelle Flow Analysis and TCA Inlet Flow Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shieh, C. F.; Arslan, Alan; Sundaran, P.; Kim, Suk; Won, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation includes three topics: (1) Analysis of isolated boattail drag; (2) Computation of Technology Concept Airplane (TCA)-installed nacelle effects on aerodynamic performance; and (3) Assessment of TCA inlet flow quality.

  9. 28. Main water inlet and outlet pipes under central corridor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Main water inlet and outlet pipes under central corridor of filtration bed building. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Filtration Plant, South side of Armory Street between Edgehill Road & Whitney Avenue, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  10. Experimental and Numerical Investigation of Hypersonic Jaws Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Hao; Wang, Cheng-Peng; Cheng, Ke-Ming

    In order to obtain the flow field characteristics and the influence of boundary layer, numerical simulations and wind tunnel tests are conducted for two streamline traced Jaws inlets at Mach number 7. The inlets are designed based on a flow field with 8-7 planar shock wave (the ramp in pitch plane is inclined at 8° to the free stream and in yaw plane is inclined at 7° to the free stream, yielding planar shocks). In the study, the static pressure distributions were measured and analyzed along the plane-symmetric centerline of the inlet with and without the boundary layer correction, respectively. Results show that boundary layer correction can obviously weaken the viscous influence to the inlet, increasing the mass flow coefficient and improving total pressure recovery.

  11. Wave-driven fluxes through New River Inlet, NC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wargula, A.; Raubenheimer, B.; Elgar, S.

    2012-12-01

    The importance of wave forcing to inlet circulation is examined using observations of waves, water levels, and currents collected in and near New River Inlet, NC during April and May, 2012. A boat-mounted system was used to measure current profiles along transects across the inlet mouth during three 14-hr periods, providing information on cross-inlet current structure, as well as discharge. Additionally, an array of 13 colocated pressure gages and profilers were deployed along 2 km of the inlet channel (5 to 10 m water depths) and ebb shoal channel (2 to 3 m water depths) and 19 colocated pressure gages and acoustic Doppler velocimeters were deployed across and offshore of the ebb shoal (1 to 5 m water depths) (Figure 1). The inlet is well mixed and tidal currents ranged from +/- 1.5 m/s, maximum discharge rates at peak ebb and flood were about 700 to 900 m3/s, offshore significant wave heights Hsig were 0.5 to 2.5 m, and wind speeds ranged from 0 to 14 m/s. Time-integrated residual discharge over semi-diurnal tidal cycles with similar ranges was ebb dominant during calm conditions (May 11, net out-of-inlet discharge ~ 55 m3, Hsig ~ 0.5 m, NW winds ~ 3 m/s) and flood dominant during stormier conditions (May 14, net into-inlet discharge ~ 15 m3, Hsig ~ 1.2 m, S winds ~ 6.5 m/s). Low-pass filtered in situ profiler data suggest wave-forcing affects the fluxes into and out of the inlet. The observations will be used to examine the momentum balance governing the temporal and cross-inlet (channel vs. shoal) variation of these fluxes, as well as the effect of waves on ebb and flood flow dominance. Funding provided by the Office of Naval Research and a National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship.; Figure 1: Google Earth image of New River Inlet, NC. Colors are depth contours (scale on the right, units are m relative to mean sea level) and symbols are locations of colocated current meters and pressure gages.

  12. Mach 4 Test Results of a Dual-Flowpath, Turbine Based Combined Cycle Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albertson, Cindy w.; Emami, Saied; Trexler, Carl A.

    2006-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the performance of a turbine based combined cycle (TBCC) inlet concept, consisting of a low speed turbojet inlet and high speed dual-mode scramjet inlet. The main objectives of the study were (1) to identify any interactions between the low and the high speed inlets during the mode transition phase in which both inlets are operating simultaneously and (2) to determine the effect of the low speed inlet operation on the performance of the high speed inlet. Tests were conducted at a nominal freestream Mach number of 4 using an 8 percent scale model representing a single module of a TBCC inlet. A flat plate was installed upstream of the model to produce a turbulent boundary layer which simulated the full-scale vehicle forebody boundary layer. A flowmeter/back pressure device, with remote actuation, was attached aft of the high speed inlet isolator to simulate the back pressure resulting from dual-mode scramjet combustion. Results indicate that the inlets did not interact with each other sufficiently to affect inlet operability. Flow spillage resulting from a high speed inlet unstart did not propagate far enough upstream to affect the low speed inlet. Also, a low speed inlet unstart did not cause the high speed inlet to unstart. The low speed inlet improved the performance of the high speed inlet at certain conditions by diverting a portion of the boundary layer generated on the forebody plate.

  13. BPA/Puget Power Northwest Washington Transmission Project Final Environmental Impact Statement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1995-08-01

    Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and Puget Sound Power & Light Company (Puget Power) propose to upgrade the existing high-voltage transmission system in the Whatcom and Skagit counties area between the towns of Custer and Sedro Woolley, including some areas within the City of Bellingham, starting in 1995. A Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS) for the project was issued in November 1993, followed by a 45-day public comment period. Public response to the DEIS included the identification of several new transmission route alternatives in the Lake Whatcom area. BPA issued a Supplemental DEIS in April 1995 to provide a second public review-and-comment period. Rebuilding an existing 230-kV line to a double-circuit 230-kV transmission line was identified in the Supplemental DEIS as the Proposed Action. The Supplemental DEIS also examined in detail a North Shore Road alternative which was proposed by some members of the public. Public comments on the EIS were listed and responded to in the Supplemental DEIS. In May 1995, a second set of open houses and public meetings was held to review the Supplemental DEIS. Electromagnetic field (EMF) effects raised as an issue in the DEIS continued to be an issue of public concern in the meetings. The EIS has identified impacts that would generally be classified as low to moderate and localized. Effects on soils and water resources in sensitive areas (e.g., near Lake Whatcom) would be low to moderate; there would be little change in magnetic fields; noise levels would remain at existing levels; and land use and property value impacts would be minimal. Threatened and endangered species would not be adversely affected, and all proposed actions in wetlands would be covered by a Corps of Engineers Nationwide Permit. Visual and socioeconomic would be low to moderate. There would be no effect on cultural resources.

  14. Evidence for Late Holocene earthquakes on the Utsalady Point fault, Northern Puget Lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Nelson, A.R.; Personius, S.F.; Wells, R.E.; Kelsey, H.M.; Sherrod, B.L.; Okumura, K.; Koehler, R.; Witter, R.C.; Bradley, L.-A.; Harding, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    Trenches across the Utsalady Point fault in the northern Puget Lowland of Washington reveal evidence of at least one and probably two late Holocene earthquakes. The "Teeka" and "Duffers" trenches were located along a 1.4-km-long, 1-to 4-m-high, northwest-trending, southwest-facing, topographic scarp recognized from Airborne Laser Swath Mapping. Glaciomarine drift exposed in the trenches reveals evidence of about 95 to 150 cm of vertical and 200 to 220 cm of left-lateral slip in the Teeka trench. Radiocarbon ages from a buried soil A horizon and overlying slope colluvium along with the historical record of earthquakes suggest that this faulting occurred 100 to 400 calendar years B.P. (A.D. 1550 to 1850). In the Duffers trench, 370 to 450 cm of vertical separation is accommodated by faulting (???210 cm) and folding (???160 to 240 cm), with probable but undetermined amounts of lateral slip. Stratigraphic relations and radiocarbon ages from buried soil, colluvium, and fissure fill in the hanging wall suggest the deformation at Duffers is most likely from two earthquakes that occurred between 100 to 500 and 1100 to 2200 calendar years B.P., but deformation during a single earthquake is also possible. For the two-earthquake hypothesis, deformation at Teeka trench in the first event involved folding but not faulting. Regional relations suggest that the earthquake(s) were M ??? ???6.7 and that offshore rupture may have produced tsunamis. Based on this investigation and related recent studies, the maximum recurrence interval for large ground-rupturing crustal-fault earthquakes in the Puget Lowland is about 400 to 600 years or less.

  15. The southern Whidbey Island fault: An active structure in the Puget Lowland, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Potter, C.J.; Armentrout, J.M.; Miller, J.J.; Finn, C.; Weaver, C.S.

    1996-01-01

    Information from seismic-reflection profiles, outcrops, boreholes, and potential field surveys is used to interpret the structure and history of the southern Whidbey Island fault in the Puget Lowland of western Washington. This northwest-trending fault comprises a broad (as wide as 6-11 km), steep, northeast-dipping zone that includes several splays with inferred strike-slip, reverse, and thrust displacement. Transpressional deformation along the southern Whidbey Island fault is indicated by alongstrike variations in structural style and geometry, positive flower structure, local unconformities, out-of-plane displacements, and juxtaposition of correlative sedimentary units with different histories. The southern Whidbey Island fault represents a segment of a boundary between two major crustal blocks. The Cascade block to the northeast is floored by diverse assemblages of pre-Tertiary rocks; the Coast Range block to the southwest is floored by lower Eocene marine basaltic rocks of the Crescent Formation. The fault probably originated during the early Eocene as a dextral strike-slip fault along the eastern side of a continental-margin rift. Bending of the fault and transpressional deformation began during the late middle Eocene and continues to the present. Oblique convergence and clockwise rotation along the continental margin are the inferred driving forces for ongoing deformation. Evidence for Quaternary movement on the southern Whidbey Island fault includes (1) offset and disrupted upper Quaternary strata imaged on seismic-reflection profiles; (2) borehole data that suggests as much as 420 m of structural relief on the Tertiary-Quaternary boundary in the fault zone; (3) several meters of displacement along exposed faults in upper Quaternary sediments; (4) late Quaternary folds with limb dips of as much as ???9??; (5) large-scale liquefaction features in upper Quaternary sediments within the fault zone; and (6) minor historical seismicity. The southern Whidbey

  16. Active tectonics of the Seattle fault and central Puget sound, Washington - Implications for earthquake hazards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, S.Y.; Dadisman, S.V.; Childs, J. R.; Stanley, W.D.

    1999-01-01

    We use an extensive network of marine high-resolution and conventional industry seismic-reflection data to constrain the location, shallow structure, and displacement rates of the Seattle fault zone and crosscutting high-angle faults in the Puget Lowland of western Washington. Analysis of seismic profiles extending 50 km across the Puget Lowland from Lake Washington to Hood Canal indicates that the west-trending Seattle fault comprises a broad (4-6 km) zone of three or more south-dipping reverse faults. Quaternary sediment has been folded and faulted along all faults in the zone but is clearly most pronounced along fault A, the northernmost fault, which forms the boundary between the Seattle uplift and Seattle basin. Analysis of growth strata deposited across fault A indicate minimum Quaternary slip rates of about 0.6 mm/yr. Slip rates across the entire zone are estimated to be 0.7-1.1 mm/yr. The Seattle fault is cut into two main segments by an active, north-trending, high-angle, strike-slip fault zone with cumulative dextral displacement of about 2.4 km. Faults in this zone truncate and warp reflections in Tertiary and Quaternary strata and locally coincide with bathymetric lineaments. Cumulative slip rates on these faults may exceed 0.2 mm/yr. Assuming no other crosscutting faults, this north-trending fault zone divides the Seattle fault into 30-40-km-long western and eastern segments. Although this geometry could limit the area ruptured in some Seattle fault earthquakes, a large event ca. A.D. 900 appears to have involved both segments. Regional seismic-hazard assessments must (1) incorporate new information on fault length, geometry, and displacement rates on the Seattle fault, and (2) consider the hazard presented by the previously unrecognized, north-trending fault zone.

  17. Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    unlimited. Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths Tim T. Janssen Theiss Research, El Granada, CA 94018 t: 415 609 5359 ; e...river mouth processes, 2) better understand the role of current shear, wave inhomogeneity and nonlinearity in wave-current interaction through...DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Wave-Current Interaction in Coastal Inlets and River Mouths 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  18. Murrells Inlet, South Carolina Navigaton Project, General Design Memorandum.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-12-02

    Deposition control structures 91 2 J.Littoral drift accumulation areas 92 Equipment for removing and transporting sand 93 25 * Shore discharge point...en route to a deposition basin; a south jetty, approximately 2,300 feet long; and sand transition dikes connecting the jetty structures to the shore ...formed causing a contraction of the inlet throat, erosion of the opposite shore , and migraitiua of the inlet. The . predominant direction of littoral

  19. Integral Engine Inlet Particle Separator. Volume 2. Design Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    herein will be used in the design of integral inlet particle separators for future Army aircraft gas turbine engines . Apprupriate technical personnel...OF INTEGRAL GAS TURBINE ENGINE SOLID PARTICLE INLET SEPARATORS, PHASE I, FEASIBILITY STUDY AND DESIGN, Pratt and Whitney Aircraft ; USAAVLABS Technical...USAAVLABS Technical Report 70-36, U.S. Army Aviation Materiel Laboratories, Fort Eustis, Virginia, August 1970 AD 876 584. 13. ENGINES , AIRCRAFT

  20. Summary of investigations of engine response to distorted inlet conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biesiadny, T. J.; Braithwaite, W. M.; Soeder, R. H.; Abdelwahab, M.

    1986-01-01

    A survey is presented of experimental and analytical experience of the NASA Lewis Research Center in engine response to inlet temperature and pressure distortions. This includes a description of the hardware and techniques employed, and a summary of the highlights of experimental investigations and analytical modeling. Distortion devices successfully simulated inlet distortion, and knowledge was gained about compression system response to different types of distortion. A list of NASA research references is included.

  1. 33 CFR 334.1240 - Sinclair Inlet; naval restricted areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Sinclair Inlet westerly of a line drawn from the Bremerton Ferry Landing at latitude 47°33′48″ North, longitude 122°37′23″ West on the north shore of Sinclair Inlet; and latitude 47°32′52″ North, longitude 122... north and west of an area bounded by a line commencing at latitude 47°33′40″ North, longitude...

  2. Utilizing numerical techniques in turbofan inlet acoustic suppressor design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumeister, K. J.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical theories in conjunction with previously published analytical results are used to augment current analytical theories in the acoustic design of a turbofan inlet nacelle. In particular, a finite element-integral theory is used to study the effect of the inlet lip radius on the far field radiation pattern and to determine the optimum impedance in an actual engine environment. For some single mode JT15D data, the numerical theory and experiment are found to be in a good agreement.

  3. Large-Scale Low-Boom Inlet Test Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirt, Stefanie

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides a high level overview of the Large-Scale Low-Boom Inlet Test and was presented at the Fundamental Aeronautics 2011 Technical Conference. In October 2010 a low-boom supersonic inlet concept with flow control was tested in the 8'x6' supersonic wind tunnel at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). The primary objectives of the test were to evaluate the inlet stability and operability of a large-scale low-boom supersonic inlet concept by acquiring performance and flowfield validation data, as well as evaluate simple, passive, bleedless inlet boundary layer control options. During this effort two models were tested: a dual stream inlet intended to model potential flight hardware and a single stream design to study a zero-degree external cowl angle and to permit surface flow visualization of the vortex generator flow control on the internal centerbody surface. The tests were conducted by a team of researchers from NASA GRC, Gulfstream Aerospace Corporation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the University of Virginia

  4. High-speed inlet research program and supporting analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coltrin, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    A Mach 5 cruise aircraft was studied in a joint program effort. The propulsion system chosen for this aircraft was an over-under turbojet/ramjet system. The ramjet portion of the inlet is to be tested in NASA Lewis' 10 x 10 SWT. Goals of the test program are to obtain performance data and bleed requirements, and also to obtain analysis code validation data. Supporting analysis of the inlet using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code (PEPSIS) indicates that sidewall shock/boundary layer interactions cause large separated regions in the corners underneath the cowl. Such separations generally lead to inlet unstart, and are thus a major concern. As a result of the analysis, additional bleed regions were added to the inlet model sidewalls and cowl to control separations in the corners. A two-dimensional analysis incorporating bleed on the ramp is also presented. Supporting experiments for the Mach 5 programs were conducted in the Lewis' 1 x 1 SWT. A small-scale model representing the inlet geometry up to the ramp shoulder and cowl lip was tested to verify the accelerator plate test technique and to obtain data on flow migration in the ramp and sidewall boundary layers. Another study explored several ramp bleed configurations to control boundary layer separations in that region. Design of a two-dimensional Mach 5 cruise inlet represents several major challenges including multimode operation and dual flow, high temperatures, and three-dimensional airflow effects.

  5. Changes in bay circulation in an evolving multiple inlet system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orescanin, Mara M.; Elgar, Steve; Raubenheimer, Britt

    2016-08-01

    Observations and numerical model (ADCIRC) simulations are used to quantify the changes in circulation within the evolving, shallow, two-inlet tidal Katama system, Martha's Vineyard, MA. From 2011 to 2013, Katama Inlet, connecting Katama Bay to the Atlantic, became 5 times longer, 1/3 as wide, and 1/3 as deep as the inlet migrated and rotated. This morphological evolution caused a significant loss of energy throughout Katama Bay and Edgartown Channel, which connects the bay to Vineyard Sound. The decrease in energy as the inlet evolved between 2011 and 2013 was not monotonic. Model simulations suggest bathymetric changes caused by Hurricane Irene (August 2011) resulted in a temporary increase in circulation energy throughout the inlets and bay. Changes in the M4 and M6 tidal constituents, harmonics of the primary M2 tidal forcing, suggest the changes in the observed circulation patterns primarily were owing to changes in friction, and not to changes in advection resulting from the evolving inlet location, orientation, or geometry, consistent with previous results.

  6. Inlet Flow Control and Prediction Technologies for Embedded Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McMillan, Michelle L.; Mackie, Scott A.; Gissen, Abe; Vukasinovic, Bojan; Lakebrink, Matthew T.; Glezer, Ari; Mani, Mori; Mace, James L.

    2011-01-01

    Fail-safe, hybrid, flow control (HFC) is a promising technology for meeting high-speed cruise efficiency, low-noise signature, and reduced fuel-burn goals for future, Hybrid-Wing-Body (HWB) aircraft with embedded engines. This report details the development of HFC technology that enables improved inlet performance in HWB vehicles with highly integrated inlets and embedded engines without adversely affecting vehicle performance. In addition, new test techniques for evaluating Boundary-Layer-Ingesting (BLI)-inlet flow-control technologies developed and demonstrated through this program are documented, including the ability to generate a BLI-like inlet-entrance flow in a direct-connect, wind-tunnel facility, as well as, the use of D-optimal, statistically designed experiments to optimize test efficiency and enable interpretation of results. Validated improvements in numerical analysis tools and methods accomplished through this program are also documented, including Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes CFD simulations of steady-state flow physics for baseline, BLI-inlet diffuser flow, as well as, that created by flow-control devices. Finally, numerical methods were employed in a ground-breaking attempt to directly simulate dynamic distortion. The advances in inlet technologies and prediction tools will help to meet and exceed "N+2" project goals for future HWB aircraft.

  7. An Experimental Investigation of NACA Submerged Inlets at High Subsonic Speeds I: Inlets Forward of the Wing Leading Edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Charles F; Barclay, F Dorn

    1948-01-01

    This report covers the first part of an experimental investigation of NACA submerged inlets at four locations on the fuselage of a fighter airplane model for Mach numbers from 0.30 to 0.875. Data are presented showing the characteristics of the model without inlets and with inlets 16.7 percent of the root chord forward of the wing-root leading edge and equipped with small boundary-layer deflectors. The data show that variations in the mass of air entering the inlet had a large effect on the ram-recovery ratio. Representative values of ram-recovery ratio were 0.50 with zero flow, 0.90 with 0.6 mass-flow coefficient, and 0.95 with 1.00 mass-flow coefficient. Variations in Mach number and angle of attack, in general, caused less than a 0.03 variation in the ram-recovery ratio.

  8. Application of rotor mounted pressure transducers to analysis of inlet turbulence. [flow distortion in turbofan engine inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, D. B.

    1976-01-01

    Miniature pressure transducers installed near the leading edge of a fan blade were used to diagnose the non-uniform flow entering a subsonic tip speed turbofan on a static test stand. The pressure response of the blade to the inlet flow variations was plotted in a form which shows the space-time history of disturbances ingested by the rotor. Also, periodically sampled data values were auto- and cross-correlated as if they had been acquired from fixed hot wire anemometers at 150 equally spaced angles around the inlet. With a clean inlet and low wind, evidence of long, narrow turbulence eddies was easily found both in the boundary layer of the fan duct and outside the boundary layer. The role of the boundary layer was to follow and amplify disturbances in the outer flow. These eddies frequently moved around the inlet with a corkscrew motion as they passed through.

  9. Tidal Inlet Morphology Classification and Empirical Determination of Seaward and Down-Drift Extents of Tidal Inlets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    original Hayes (1979) diagram were not typical barrier island inlets. Some of them were fjords, and Bristol Bay and the Copper River Delta in Alaska included...shore that allows exchange of water between the ocean and bays , lagoons, and marsh and tidal creek systems, and for which the tidal current maintains...wave- dominated (Plum Island Sound, Essex Bay Inlet, and Newbury Port Harbor, all in Massachusetts) but lying close to the original line demarking tide

  10. Social and Economic Considerations for Coastal and Watershed Restoration in the Puget Sound, Washington: A Literature Review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stinchfield, Holly M.; Koontz, Lynne; Sexton, Natalie R.

    2009-01-01

    This literature review summarizes and synthesizes the available information regarding the impacts of socioeconomic factors on coastal and watershed restoration in the Puget Sound, Wash. Major topic areas which are explored include: institutions and restoration; beliefs, behaviors, and knowledge about restoration and the environment; stakeholder involvement in restoration, communication of restoration issues, and economic issues in restoration. The review revealed that socioeconomic factors play an important role in determining the designation, process, and success of restoration projects. Socioeconomic factors can facilitate or obstruct restoration, but few large-scale restoration projects emphasize them in either prioritization or monitoring procedures. Additionally, there are substantial gaps in the literature regarding restoration in the Puget Sound across all of the topics addressed in this review. The lack of research makes it difficult to provide a holistic view of the social and economic dimensions of restoration in the Sound but provides opportunity for future research.

  11. Combustion-derived substances in deep basins of Puget Sound: historical inputs from fossil fuel and biomass combustion.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Li-Jung; Louchouarn, Patrick; Herbert, Bruce E; Brandenberger, Jill M; Wade, Terry L; Crecelius, Eric

    2011-04-01

    Reconstructions of 250 years historical inputs of two distinct types of black carbon (soot/graphitic black carbon (GBC) and char-BC) were conducted on sediment cores from two basins of the Puget Sound, WA. Signatures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were also used to support the historical reconstructions of BC to this system. Down-core maxima in GBC and combustion-derived PAHs occurred in the 1940s in the cores from the Puget Sound Main Basin, whereas in Hood Canal such peak was observed in the 1970s, showing basin-specific differences in inputs of combustion byproducts. This system showed relatively higher inputs from softwood combustion than the northeastern U.S. The historical variations in char-BC concentrations were consistent with shifts in climate indices, suggesting an influence of climate oscillations on wildfire events. Environmental loading of combustion byproducts thus appears as a complex function of urbanization, fuel usage, combustion technology, environmental policies, and climate conditions.

  12. Analysis of an advanced ducted propeller subsonic inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iek, Chanthy; Boldman, Donald R.; Ibrahim, Mounir

    1992-01-01

    A time marching Navier-Stokes code called PARC (PARC2D for 2-D/axisymmetric and PARC3D for 3-D flow simulations) was validated for an advanced ducted propeller (ADP) subsonic inlet. The code validation for an advanced ducted propeller (ADP) subsonic inlet. The code validation was implemented for a non-separated flow condition associated with the inlet operating at angles-of-attack of 0 and 25 degrees. The inlet test data were obtained in the 9 x 15 ft Low Speed Wind Tunnel at NASA Lewis Research Center as part of a cooperative study with Pratt and Whitney. The experimental study focused on the ADP inlet performance for take-off and approach conditions. The inlet was tested at a free stream Mach number of 0.2, at angles-of-attack between O and 35 degrees, and at a maximum propeller speed of 12,000 RPM which induced a corrected air flow rate of about 46 lb/sec based on standard day conditions. The computational grid and flow boundary conditions (BC) were based on the actual inlet geometry and the funnel flow conditions. At the propeller face, two types of BC's were applied: a mass flow BC and a fixed flow properties BC. The fixed flow properties BC was based on a combination of data obtained from the experiment and calculations using a potential flow code. Comparison of the computational results with the test data indicates that the PARC code with the propeller face fixed flow properties BC provided a better prediction of the inlet surface static pressures than the predictions when the mass flow BC was used. For an angle-of-attack of 0 degrees, the PARC2D code with the propeller face mass flow BC provided a good prediction of inlet static pressures except in the region of high pressure gradient. With the propeller face fixed flow properties BC, the PARC2D code provided a good prediction of the inlet static pressures. For an angle-of-attack of 25 degrees with the mass flow BC, the PARC3D code predicted statis pressures which deviated significantly from the test data

  13. 30 CFR 77.303 - Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. 77.303... COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.303 Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. Thermal dryer systems which employ a hot gas inlet chamber shall be equipped with drop-out doors at the bottom of the inlet...

  14. 30 CFR 77.303 - Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. 77.303... COAL MINES Thermal Dryers § 77.303 Hot gas inlet chamber dropout doors. Thermal dryer systems which employ a hot gas inlet chamber shall be equipped with drop-out doors at the bottom of the inlet...

  15. Abundance, stock origin, and length of marked and unmarked juvenile Chinook salmon in the surface waters of greater Puget Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, C.A.; Greene, C.M.; Moran, P.; Teel, D.J.; Kuligowski, D.R.; Reisenbichler, R.R.; Beamer, E.M.; Karr, J.R.; Fresh, K.L.

    2011-01-01

    This study focuses on the use by juvenile Chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha of the rarely studied neritic environment (surface waters overlaying the sublittoral zone) in greater Puget Sound. Juvenile Chinook salmon inhabit the sound from their late estuarine residence and early marine transition to their first year at sea. We measured the density, origin, and size of marked (known hatchery) and unmarked (majority naturally spawned) juveniles by means of monthly surface trawls at six river mouth estuaries in Puget Sound and the areas in between. Juvenile Chinook salmon were present in all months sampled (April-November). Unmarked fish in the northern portion of the study area showed broader seasonal distributions of density than did either marked fish in all areas or unmarked fish in the central and southern portions of the sound. Despite these temporal differences, the densities of marked fish appeared to drive most of the total density estimates across space and time. Genetic analysis and coded wire tag data provided us with documented individuals from at least 16 source populations and indicated that movement patterns and apparent residence time were, in part, a function of natal location and time passed since the release of these fish from hatcheries. Unmarked fish tended to be smaller than marked fish and had broader length frequency distributions. The lengths of unmarked fish were negatively related to the density of both marked and unmarked Chinook salmon, but those of marked fish were not. These results indicate more extensive use of estuarine environments by wild than by hatchery juvenile Chinook salmon as well as differential use (e.g., rearing and migration) of various geographic regions of greater Puget Sound by juvenile Chinook salmon in general. In addition, the results for hatchery-generated timing, density, and length differences have implications for the biological interactions between hatchery and wild fish throughout Puget Sound. ?? American

  16. Contaminant Residues in Demersal Fish, Invertebrates, and Deployed Mussels in Selected Areas of the Puget Sound, WA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-29

    52pp. McCarty, L.S., et al., 1992, Residue-based interpretation of toxicology bioconcentration QSARs from aquatic bioassays: neutral narcotic...Suter, II, 1996, Toxicological benchmarks for Wildlife: 1996 Revision, ES/ER/TM-86/R3, ORNL, U.S. DOE, Oak Ridge, TN, 43pp + appendices. Shepard...concentrations for ecological risk assessment: Their toxicological basis and confirmatory literature. Appendix PP of RIFS for Operable Unit B, Puget

  17. Control of Inflow Distortion in a Scarf Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerhold, Carl H.; Clark, Lorenzo R.; Biedron, Robert T.

    2002-01-01

    The scarf inlet has the potential to reduce aircraft inlet noise radiation to the ground by reflecting it into the space above the engine. Without forward motion of the engine, the non-symmetry of the inlet causes inflow distortion which generates noise that is greater than the noise reduction of the scarf. However, acoustic evaluations of aircraft engines are often done on static test stands. A method to reduce inflow distortion by boundary layer suction is proposed and evaluated using a model of a high bypass ratio engine located in an anechoic chamber. The design goal of the flow control system is to make the inflow to the inlet circumferentially uniform and to eliminate reversed flow. This minimizes the inflow distortion and allows for acoustic evaluation of the scarf inlet on a static test stand. The inlet boundary layer suction effectiveness is evaluated both by aerodynamic and by acoustic measurements. Although the design goal is not met, the control system is found to have a beneficial effect on the engine operation, reducing blade stall and speed variation. This is quantified by two acoustic benefits, reduction both of the variability of tone noise and of the low frequency wideband noise due to the inflow distortion. It is felt that a compromise in the manufacture of the control hardware contributes to the inability of the control system to perform as expected from the analysis. The control system with sufficient authority is felt to have the potential to permit reliable acoustic testing in a static configuration of engines with non-symmetric inlets. Because the control system can improve operation of the engine, it may also have the potential to reduce noise and vibration and enhance engine longevity during low speed ground operations in the terminal area.

  18. Active Flow Control on a Boundary-Layer-Ingesting Inlet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorton, Susan Althoff; Owens, Lewis R.; Jenkins, Luther N.; Allan, Brian G.; Schuster, Ernest P.

    2004-01-01

    Boundary layer ingestion (BLI) is explored as means to improve overall system performance for Blended Wing Body configuration. The benefits of BLI for vehicle system performance benefit are assessed with a process derived from first principles suitable for highly-integrated propulsion systems. This performance evaluation process provides framework within which to assess the benefits of an integrated BLI inlet and lays the groundwork for higher-fidelity systems studies. The results of the system study show that BLI provides a significant improvement in vehicle performance if the inlet distortion can be controlled, thus encouraging the pursuit of active flow control (AFC) as a BLI enabling technology. The effectiveness of active flow control in reducing engine inlet distortion was assessed using a 6% scale model of a 30% BLI offset, diffusing inlet. The experiment was conducted in the NASA Langley Basic Aerodynamics Research Tunnel with a model inlet designed specifically for this type of testing. High mass flow pulsing actuators provided the active flow control. Measurements were made of the onset boundary layer, the duct surface static pressures, and the mass flow through the duct and the actuators. The distortion was determined by 120 total pressure measurements located at the aerodynamic interface plane. The test matrix was limited to a maximum freestream Mach number of 0.15 with scaled mass flows through the inlet for that condition. The data show that the pulsed actuation can reduce distortion from 29% to 4.6% as measured by the circumferential distortion descriptor DC60 using less than 1% of inlet mass flow. Closed loop control of the actuation was also demonstrated using a sidewall surface static pressure as the response sensor.

  19. Puget Sound Shorelines and the Impacts of Armoring-Proceedings of a State of the Science Workshop, May 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    : Shipman, Hugh; Dethier, Megan N.; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Fresh, Kurt L.; Dinicola, Richard S.

    2010-01-01

    The widespread extent and continued construction of seawalls and bulkheads on Puget Sound's beaches has emerged as a significant issue in shoreline management and coastal restoration in the region. Concerns about the impacts of shoreline armoring and managing the potential risks to coastal property are in many ways similar to those in other places, but Puget Sound also poses unique challenges related to its sheltered setting, glacially formed geology, rich estuarine ecology, and historical development pattern. The effects of armoring on shorelines are complex, involving both physical and biological science and requiring consideration of the cumulative impacts of small-scale activities over large scales of space and time. In addition, the issue is controversial, as it often places strongly held private interests in protecting shoreline property against broad public mandates to preserve shorelines for public uses and to protect environmental resources. Communities making difficult decisions about regulating shoreline activities and prioritizing restoration projects need to be informed by the best science available. To address these issues, a scientific workshop was convened in May 2009, specifically to bring local and national experts together to review the state of the science regarding the physical and biological impacts of armoring on sheltered shorelines such as those of Puget Sound.

  20. Analysis of streamflow-gaging network for monitoring stormwater in small streams in the Puget Sound Basin, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Konrad, Christopher P.; Voss, Frank D.

    2012-01-01

    The streamflow-gaging network in the Puget Sound basin was analyzed for its capacity to monitor stormwater in small streams. The analysis consisted of an inventory of active and inactive gages and an evaluation of the coverage and resolution of the gaging network with an emphasis on lowland areas. The active gaging network covers much of the Puget Lowland largely by gages located at sites on larger streams and rivers. Assessments of stormwater impacts and management will likely require streamflow information with higher spatial resolution than provided by the current gaging network. Monitoring that emphasizes small streams in combination with approaches for estimating streamflow at ungaged sites provides an alternative to expanding the current gaging network that can improve the spatial resolution of streamflow information in the region. The highest priority gaps in the gaging network are low elevation basins close to the Puget Sound shoreline and sites that share less than 10 percent of the drainage area of an active gage. Although small, lowland sites with long records of streamflow are particularly valuable to maintain in the region, other criteria for prioritizing sites in the gaging network should be based on the specific questions that stormwater managers need to answer.