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Sample records for admission glasgow coma

  1. Physician knowledge of the Glasgow Coma Scale.

    PubMed

    Riechers, Ronald G; Ramage, Anthony; Brown, William; Kalehua, Audrey; Rhee, Peter; Ecklund, James M; Ling, Geoffrey S F

    2005-11-01

    Appropriate triage is critical to optimizing outcome from battle related injuries. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is the primary means by which combat casualties, who have suffered head injury, are triaged. For the GCS to be reliable in this critical role, it must be applied accurately. To determine the level of knowledge of the GCS among military physicians with exposure and/or training in the scale we administered a prospective, voluntary, and anonymous survey to physicians of all levels of training at military medical centers with significant patient referral base. The main outcome measures were correct identification of title and categories of the GCS along with appropriate scoring of each category. Overall performance on the survey was marginal. Many were able to identify what "GCS" stands for, but far fewer were able to identify the titles of the specific categories, let alone identify the specific scoring of each category. When evaluated based on medical specialties, those in surgical specialties outperformed those in the medical specialties. When comparing the different levels of training, residents and fellows performed better than attending staff or interns. Finally, those with Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) certification performed significantly better than those without the training. Physician knowledge of the GCS, as demonstrated in this study, is poor, even in a population of individuals with specific training in the use of the scale. It is concluded that, to optimize outcome from combat related head injury, methods for improving accurate quantitation of neurologic state need to be explored.

  2. [How do physicians code the motoric variable of the Glasgow-Coma-Score?].

    PubMed

    Woischneck, D; Stah, W; Kapapa, T

    2015-06-01

    A mere 14% gave the right answer according the guidelines: Code the "best motoric answer" of the "upper limb". 86% coded the Glasgow-Coma-Score for the motoric variable falsely and inconsistently. Additionally, the rate of correct answers were higher in physicians in training (37.5%) than in qualified and certified emergency doctors (5%). Emergency doctors post training stated in 68% instances that the variable should be coded according to the neurological results at the upper or lower extremity. Furthermore, they stated that the worst neurological result should be coded (43%). From our data, it appears that the coding of the motoric variable is not done according to the guidelines or is done inconsistently. There are compelling reasons for coding the worst result. However, this procedure is contrary to the guidelines presented by literature. These guideline have never been withdrawn. Emergency doctors obviously code the motoric variable of the Glasgow-Coma-Score with knowledge about the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injuries. The Glasgow-Coma-Score is used for coding the level of consciousness at the site of accident, on admission, for prognosis, in clinical studies and in forensic controversies. Its sensitivity for depth of coma depends on the quality of coding the motoric answer. We interviewed 165 emergency doctors (in training and post training) about the guidelines for coding the motoric variable of the Glasgow-Coma-Score.

  3. Full Outline of Unresponsiveness score and the Glasgow Coma Scale in prediction of pediatric coma

    PubMed Central

    Jamal, Atahar; Sankhyan, Naveen; Jayashree, Murlidharan; Singhi, Sunit; Singhi, Pratibha

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: This study was done to compare the admission Full Outline of Unresponsiveness (FOUR) score and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) as predictors of outcome in children with impaired consciousness. METHODS: In this observational study, children (5–12 years) with impaired consciousness of <7 days were included. Children with traumatic brain injury, on sedatives or neuromuscular blockade; with pre-existing cerebral palsy, mental retardation, degenerative brain disease, vision/hearing impairment; and seizure within last 1 hour were excluded. Primary outcomes: comparison of area under curve (AUC) of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes: comparison of AUC of ROC curve for mortality and poor outcome on Pediatric Overall Performance Category Scale at 3 months. RESULTS: Of the 63 children, 20 died during hospital stay. AUC for in-hospital mortality for GCS was 0.83 (CI 0.7 to 0.9) and FOUR score was 0.8 (CI 0.7 to 0.9) [difference between areas –0.0250 (95%CI 0.0192 to 0.0692), Z statistic 1.109, P=0.2674]. AUC for mortality at 3 months for GCS was 0.78 (CI 0.67 to 0.90) and FOUR score was 0.74 (CI 0.62 to 0.87) (P=0.1102) and AUC for poor functional outcome for GCS was 0.82 (CI 0.72 to 0.93) and FOUR score was 0.79 (CI 0.68 to 0.9) (P=0.2377), which were also comparable. Inter-rater reliability for GCS was 0.96 and for FOUR score 0.98. CONCLUSION: FOUR score was as good as GCS in prediction of in-hospital and 3-month mortality and functional outcome at 3 months. FOUR score had a good inter-rater reliability. PMID:28123622

  4. Glasgow Coma Scale Scores, Early Opioids, and 4-year Psychological Outcomes among Combat Amputees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    Morphine and fentanyl are frequently used for anal- gesia after trauma, but there is debate over the advantages and disadvantages of these opioids. Among...combat amputees, intra- venous (IV) morphine (vs IV fentanyl) after injury was associ- ated with reduced likelihood of posttraumatic stress disorder...documented Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores and/or morphine , fentanyl, or no opi- oid treatment within hours of injury. We found that (1) GCS scores were

  5. Poisoning severity score, Glasgow coma scale, corrected QT interval in acute organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Akdur, Okhan; Durukan, Polat; Ozkan, Seda; Avsarogullari, Levent; Vardar, Alper; Kavalci, Cemil; Ikizceli, Ibrahim

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate effectiveness of the poisoning severity score (PSS), Glasgow coma scale (GCS), and corrected QT (QTc) interval in predicting outcomes in acute organophosphates (OP) poisoning. Over a period of 2 years, 62 patients with OP poisoning were admitted to emergency department (ED) of Erciyes University Medical School Hospital. The age, sex, cause of contact, compound involved, time elapsed between exposure and admission to the ED, duration of hospital stay, and cardiac manifestations at the time of presentation were recorded. GCS and poisoning severity score (PSS) was calculated for each patient. Electrocardiogram (ECG) analysis included the rate, rhythm, ST-T abnormalities, conduction defects, and measurement of PR and QT intervals. Sixty-two patients with OP poisoning presented to our ED from January 2007 to December 2008 from which 54 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 34.1 +/- 14.8 years. Of the cases, 53.7% were female. Twenty-six patients had a prolonged QTc interval. Mean PSS of men and women was 1.8 +/- 1.0. No statistically significant correlation was found between the PSS and QTc intervals of the cases. A significant correlation was determined between the GCS and PSS of grade 3 and grade 4 cases. GCS is a parameter that helps clinician to identify advanced grade OP poisoning patients in the initial assessment in the ED. However, ECG findings, such as prolonged QTc interval, are not effective in determination of short-term prognosis and show no relationship with PSS.

  6. Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-15

    Prehospital Heart Rate and Blood Pressure Increase the Positive Predictive Value of the Glasgow Coma Scale for High-Mortality Traumatic Brain Injury...pressures have both been associated with higher mortality for patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). We undertook a retrospective analysis of 1384...pressure; Glasgow Coma Scale; heart rate; prehospital; traumatic brain injury Introduction The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) was developed to stan-dardize the

  7. Representing the Glasgow Coma Scale in IT: Proper Specification is Required for Assessment Scales.

    PubMed

    Goossen, William; Oemig, Frank

    2014-01-01

    In healthcare a huge amount of assessment scales and score systems are in use to abbreviate and summarize the results of clinical observations to interpret a patient's condition in a valid and reliable manner. It is challenging to convey the information in a semantic interoperable form to other systems. A bad approach would be to invent individual models for each of them. Within this paper we would like to demonstrate that a generic model is sufficient by demonstrating the realization with the Glasgow Coma Scale.

  8. Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test: applicability and relation with the Glasgow Coma Scale.

    PubMed

    Fürbringer e Silva, Silvia Cristina; de Sousa, Regina Marcia Cardoso

    2007-01-01

    Restrictions in the application of the Galveston Orientation and Amnesia Test and questionings about the relationship between conscience and post-traumatic amnesia motivated this study, which aims to identify, through the Glasgow Coma Scale scores, when to initiate the application of this amnesia test, as well to verify the relationship between the results of these two indicators. The longitudinal prospective study was carried at a referral center for trauma care in São Paulo - Brazil. The sample consisted of 73 victims of blunt traumatic brain injury, admitted at this institution between January 03rd and May 03rd 2001. Regarding the applicability, the test could be applied in patients with a Glasgow Coma Scale score > 12; however, the end of post traumatic amnesia was verified in patients who scored > 14 on the scale. A significant relationship (r s = 0.65) was verified between these measures, although different kinds of relationship between the end of the amnesia and changes in consciousness were observed.

  9. Assessment of nurse’s knowledge about Glasgow coma scale at a university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Wesley Cajaíba; Vancini-Campanharo, Cássia Regina; Lopes, Maria Carolina Barbosa Teixeira; Okuno, Meiry Fernanda Pinto; Batista, Ruth Ester Assayag

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To assess knowledge of nurses of emergency services and intensive care units about Glasgow Coma Scale. Methods This cross-sectional analytical study included 127 nurses of critical units of an university hospital. We used structured interview with 12 questions to evaluate their knowledge about the scale. Association of Knowledge with professionals’ sociodemographic variables were verified by the Fisher-test, χ2 and likelihood ratio. Results Most of participants were women mean aged 31.1 years, they had graduated more than 5 years previously, and had 1 to 3 years of work experience. In the assessment of best score possible for Glasgow scale (question 3) nurses who had graduate more than 5 years ago presented a lower percentage success rate (p=0.0476). However, in the question 7, which evaluated what interval of the scale indicated moderate severity of brain trauma injury, those with more years of experience had higher percentage of correct answers (p=0.0251). In addition, nurses from emergency service had more correct answers than nurses from intensive care unit (p=0.0143) in the same question. Nurses graduated for more than 5 years ago had a lower percentage of correct answers in question 7 (p=0.0161). Nurses with more work experience had a better score (p=0.0119) to identify how assessment of motor response should be started. Conclusion Number of year since graduation, experience, and work at critical care units interfered in nurses’ knowledge about the scale, which indicates the need of training. PMID:27462896

  10. Assessing Nurses Knowledge of Glasgow Coma Scale in Emergency and Outpatient Department

    PubMed Central

    Basauhra Singh, Harvinderjit Kaur a/p; Thambinayagam, Hari Chandran a/l; Zakaria, Mohd Idzwan bin; Cheng, Siew Ting; Tang, Li Yoong; Azahar, Nurul Hafizan

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of level of consciousness using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) is a tool requiring knowledge that is important in detecting early deterioration in a patient's level of consciousness. Critical thinking used with the skill and knowledge in assessing the GCS is the foundation of all nursing practice. This study aims to explore the knowledge and competence in assessing the GCS among staff nurses working in the Emergency and Outpatient Departments. This is a quantitative descriptive cross-sectional study design using the GCS Knowledge Questionnaire. Convenience sampling method was used. Nurses in these Departments were asked to partake in the survey. Data collected was analyzed using the Statistical Package of Social Sciences (SPSS) version 20. Descriptive and Pearson's chi square was used. Result showed that 55.56% of nurses had poor knowledge followed by 41.48% and 2.96% with satisfactory knowledge and good knowledge, respectively. The result on the association between knowledge and education level showed a significant association between the two variables (X2 = 18.412, df = 3, n = 135, and p < 0.05). There was also a significant correlation between knowledge and age group (X2 = 11.085, df = 2, n = 135, and p < 0.05). Overall, this study supports that good knowledge and skill are important in assessing GCS level. PMID:28044104

  11. [Teaching-learning strategies in nursing--analysis using the Glasgow Coma Scale].

    PubMed

    Morita, Ana Beatriz Pinto da Silva; Koizumi, Maria Sumie

    2009-09-01

    Using the Glasgow Coma Scale (ECGI) as a subject, this paper aims to analyze and verify the apprehension of knowledge towards the teaching-learning and self-learning offered to nursing workers, and to check the degree of knowledge acquired during the process and possible results stemming from the nursing student/nursing worker association. This descriptive, quantitative-based study counted on the participation of 62 currently enrolled students in the first semester of the 4th year of nursing. The following teaching-learning strategies were used: expositive classes with the use of slides and videotape, and a basic text. Among participants, 41.9% were nursing workers; 61.3% informed to have taken care of patients with high alteration of the consciousness level, predominantly located in their working group. Statistically, there has been a successful improvement in the percentage of correct actions after the expositive class and videotape. Self-learning results showed no alteration either. Intergroup correlations displayed no disparity in the degree of acquired knowledge.

  12. Analysis of blood trace elements and biochemical indexes levels in severe craniocerebral trauma adults with Glasgow Coma Scale and injury severity score.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guangtao; Hu, Bo; Chen, Guiqian; Yu, Xiaojun; Luo, Jianming; Lv, Junyao; Gu, Jiang

    2015-04-01

    We aimed to investigate the correlation between the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), the injury severity score (ISS) and serum levels of trace elements (TE) in severe trauma patients to analyze alteration of the levels of trace elements and serum biochemical indexes in the period of admission from 126 adult cases of severe brain trauma with traffic accidents. Multi-trace elements for patients in the trauma-TE groups were used. The results indicated that all patients presented an acute trace elements deficiency syndrome (ATEDs) after severe trauma, and the correlation between ISS and serum levels of Fe, Zn, and Mg was significant. Compared to the normal control group, levels of the trace elements in serum were significantly decreased after trauma, suggesting that enhancement of immunity to infection and multiple organ failure (MOF) via the monitoring and supplement of trace elements will be a good strategy to severe traumatic patients in clinics.

  13. Flame burn admissions and fire fatalities in Scotland with particular reference to the Strathclyde (Glasgow) region, and their prevention.

    PubMed

    Sarhadi, N S; Reid, W H; Murray, G D; Williamson, J

    2001-11-01

    Scotland has the highest rate of fire fatalities in the UK. Nearly 50% of the population and fire deaths in Scotland are in the Strathclyde region. The data from the burns unit at Glasgow Royal Infirmary were studied to find the number of admissions due to flame burns and see how it compared with the fire deaths. During 1981-1993, amongst 2771 admissions to the burns unit, 1181 (43%) were due to flame burns and out of these flame burn victims, 69% were adults, 16% elderly and 15% children. The distribution of cases according to the total body surface area (TBSA) involvement was 866 (73%) with 1-15%, 165 (14%) with 16-30%, and 150 (13%) with > or =31% TBSA burns. The annual number of flame burn admissions declined during 1981-1993. In the Glasgow region 50% of the domestic fires leading to non-fatal burns or to death were started by misuse of smoking materials. Chip pan fires were responsible for 8% of admissions to the burns unit. The annual number of fire fatalities when reviewed for a longer period 1973-1995 also showed a decreasing trend. Further educational and legislative measures to prevent flame burns are discussed.

  14. Comparison of outcome predictions by the Glasgow coma scale and the Full Outline of UnResponsiveness score in the neurological and neurosurgical patients in the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Kishor; Bhandari, Sanjeeb Sudarshan; Shrestha, Ninadini; Acharya, Subhash Prasad; Marhatta, Moda Nath

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of level of consciousness is very important in predicting patient's outcome from neurological illness. Glasgow coma scale (GCS) is the most commonly used scale, and Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) score is also recently validated as an alternative to GCS in the evaluation of the level of consciousness. We carried out a prospective study in 97 patients aged above 16 years. We measured GCS and FOUR score within 24 h of Intensive Care Unit admission. The mean GCS and the FOUR scores were lower among nonsurvivors than among the survivors and were statistically significant (P < 0.001). Discrimination for GCS and FOUR score was fair with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.79 and 0.82, respectively. The cutoff point with best Youden index for GCS and FOUR score was 6.5 each. Below the cutoff point, mortality was higher in both models (P < 0.001). The Hosmer-Lemeshow Chi-square coefficient test showed better calibration with FOUR score than GCS. A positive correlation was seen between the models with Spearman's correlation coefficient of 0.91 (P < 0.001). PMID:27630460

  15. Coma / Vegetative State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Vegetative State Legal Issues Sleeping Problems Anxiety & Stress Concussion / Mild TBI Living with Traumatic Brain Injury Speech & ... Conscious States After Severe Brain Injury Brain Trauma, Concussion, and Coma What Is the Glasgow Coma Scale? ...

  16. Impact of Glasgow Coma Scale score and pupil parameters on mortality rate and outcome in pediatric and adult severe traumatic brain injury: a retrospective, multicenter cohort study.

    PubMed

    Emami, Pedram; Czorlich, Patrick; Fritzsche, Friederike S; Westphal, Manfred; Rueger, Johannes M; Lefering, Rolf; Hoffmann, Michael

    2017-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Prediction of death and functional outcome is essential for determining treatment strategies and allocation of resources for patients with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The aim of this study was to evaluate, by using pupillary status and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, if patients with severe TBI who are ≤ 15 years old have a lower mortality rate and better outcome than adults with severe TBI. METHODS A retrospective cohort analysis of patients suffering from severe TBI registered in the Trauma Registry of the German Society for Trauma Surgery between 2002 and 2013 was undertaken. Severe TBI was defined as an Abbreviated Injury Scale of the head (AIShead) score of ≥ 3 and an AIS score for any other part of the body that does not exceed the AIShead score. Only patients with complete data (GCS score, age, and pupil parameters) were included. To assess the impact of GCS score and pupil parameters, the authors also used the recently introduced Eppendorf-Cologne Scale and divided the study population into 2 groups: children (0-15 years old) and adults (16-55 years old). Each patient's outcome was measured at discharge from the trauma center by using the Glasgow Outcome Scale. RESULTS A total of 9959 patients fulfilled the study inclusion criteria; 888 (8.9%) patients were ≤ 15 years old (median 10 years). The overall mortality rate and the mortality rate for patients with a GCS of 3 and bilaterally fixed and dilated pupils (19.9% and 16.3%, respectively) were higher for the adults than for the pediatric patients (85% vs 80.9%, respectively), although cardiopulmonary resuscitation rates were significantly higher in the pediatric patients (5.6% vs 8.8%, respectively). In the multivariate logistic regression analysis, no motor response (OR 3.490, 95% CI 2.240-5.435) and fixed pupils (OR 4.197, 95% CI 3.271-5.386) and bilateral dilated pupils (OR 2.848, 95% CI 2.282-3.556) were associated with a higher mortality rate. Patients ≤ 15 years old had a

  17. Tripartite Stratification of the Glasgow Coma Scale in Children with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury and Mortality: An Analysis from a Multi-Center Comparative Effectiveness Study.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sarah; Thomas, Neal J; Gertz, Shira J; Beca, John; Luther, James F; Bell, Michael J; Wisniewski, Stephen R; Hartman, Adam L; Tasker, Robert C

    2017-02-27

    The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score has not been validated in children younger than 5 years and the clinical circumstances at the time of assignment can limit its applicability. This study describes the distribution of GCS scores in the population, the relationship between injury characteristics with the GCS score, and the association between the tripartite stratification of the GCS on mortality in children with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). The first 200 children from a multi-center comparative effectiveness study in severe TBI (inclusion criteria: age 0-18 years, GCS ≤8 at the time of intracranial pressure [ICP] monitoring) were analyzed. After tripartite stratification of GCS scores (Group A, GCS 3; Group B, GCS 4 - 5; and Group C, GCS 6 - 8), analyses of variance and chi-square testing were performed. Mean age was 7.61 years ±5.33 and mortality was 19.1%. There was no difference in etiology or type/mechanism of injury between groups. However, groups demonstrated differences in neuromuscular blockade, endotracheal intubation, pre-hospital events (cardiac arrest and apnea), coagulopathy, and pupil response. Mortality between groups was different (42.2% Group A, 22.6% Group B, and 3.8% Group C; p < 0.001), and adding pupil response improved mortality associations. In children younger than 5 years of age, a similar relationship between GCS and mortality was observed. Overall, GCS score at the time of ICP monitor placement is strongly associated with mortality across the pediatric age range. Development of models with GCS and other factors may allow identification of subtypes of children after severe TBI for future studies.

  18. Reshaping Care for Older People: Trends in emergency admissions to hospital during a period of simultaneous interventions in Glasgow City, April 2011-March 2015.

    PubMed

    Levin, Kate A; Crighton, Emilia M

    2016-12-01

    This study describes trends in emergency admissions (EAs) in Glasgow City during a period when interventions were designed and implemented, aimed at shifting the balance from institutional to community-based care. Standardised monthly rates of EAs between April 2011 and March 2015 were calculated, for residents of Glasgow City aged 65 years and over. Multilevel zero-inflated Negative Binomial models for EAs nested by datazone were created, adjusting for sex, 5-year age group, area-level deprivation (SIMD quintile), season, month and month squared. Models were also run for EAs by cause, for three causes: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), falls and dementia. The rate of EAs first rose then fell during the study period. When modelled, RRs for month (RR for month 12 relative to month 1 and 95% CI=1.02 (0.99, 1.06)) and month squared (RR=0.999 (0.998, 0.999)) indicated a rise in admissions until February 2012, followed by a fall. Risk of admission was greater for males and increased with increasing age group. The risk of going into hospital for those from SIMD 5 (most affluent) was 0.58 (0.56, 0.59) relative to those from SIMD 1 (most deprived). Socioeconomic inequalities were particularly great for COPD-related admissions, where RR for SIMD 5 was 0.25 (0.23, 0.28) times that of SIMD 1. An interaction term between month and SIMD was not significant for any outcome. For dementia-related EAs there was a suggestion that inequalities may be reducing over time. EAs for those aged 65 years and more reduced during the Change Fund period, with similar relative reductions observed across all deprivation quintiles.

  19. What Is the Glasgow Coma Scale?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and some adverse effects will probably never go away, especially memory and emotional problems, but that's manageable given how bad it could and should have been. I also have a friend that received a far more serious TBI than I did and she's ...

  20. Coma blisters sans coma.

    PubMed

    Heinisch, Silke; Loosemore, Michael; Cusack, Carrie A; Allen, Herbert B

    2012-09-01

    Coma blisters (CBs) are self-limited lesions that occur in regions of pressure during unconscious states classically induced by barbiturates. We report a case of CBs sans coma that were histologically confirmed in a 41-year-old woman who developed multiple tense abdominal bullae with surrounding erythema following a transatlantic flight. Interestingly, the patient was fully conscious and denied medication use or history of medical conditions. A clinical diagnosis of CBs was confirmed by histopathologic findings of eccrine gland necrosis, a hallmark of these bulIous lesions.

  1. Risk factors for nosocomial nontraumatic coma: sepsis and respiratory failure

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ye-Ting; Wang, Shao-Dan; Wang, Guang-Sheng; Chen, Xiao-Dong; Tong, Dao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background Coma’s are a major cause of clinical deterioration or death. Identification of risks that predispose to coma are important in managing patients; however, the risk factors for nosocomial nontraumatic coma (NNC) are not well known. Our aim was to investigate the risk factors in patients with NNC. Methods A retrospective case–control design was used to compare patients with NNC and a control group of patients without coma in a population-based cohort of 263 participants from the neurological intensive care unit in Shuyang County People’s Hospital of Northern China. Coma was diagnosed by a Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤8. Adjusted odds ratios for patients with NNC were derived from multivariate logistic regression analyses. Results A total of 96 subjects had NNC. The prevalence of NNC was 36.5% among the subjects. Among these, 82% had acute cerebrovascular etiology. Most of the NNC usually occurred at day 3 after admission to the neurological intensive care unit. Patients with NNC had higher hospital mortality rates (67.7% vs 3%, P<0.0001) and were more likely to have a central herniation (47.9% vs 0%, P<0.001) or uncal herniation (11.5% vs 0%, P<0.001) than those without NNC. Multiple logistic regression showed that systemic inflammatory response syndrome-positive sepsis (odds ratio =4, 95% confidence interval =1.875−8.567, P<0.001) and acute respiratory failure (odds ratio =3.275, 95% confidence interval =1.014−10.573, P<0.05) were the factors independently associated with a higher risk of NNC. Conclusion Systemic inflammatory response syndrome-positive sepsis and acute respiratory failure are independently associated with an increased risk of NNC. This information may be important for patients with NNC. PMID:27713634

  2. Coma recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimancescu, M. D.

    1978-01-01

    Arousal from coma is defined as a function of the reticular activating system that is located between the spinal cord and the diencephalon core of the brain stem. This system receives information from all the sensory functions of the body for distribution to the various parts of the cortex in order to maintain normal activities. Multimodal, neurosensory stimulation techniques are outlined that are designed to help the patient recover from the comatose state.

  3. Prognostic value of EEG in different etiological types of coma.

    PubMed

    Khaburzania, M; Beridze, M

    2013-06-01

    Study aimed at evaluation of prognostic value of standard EEG in different etiology of coma and the influence of etiological factor on the EEG patterns and coma outcome. Totally 175 coma patients were investigated. Patients were evaluated by Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), clinically and by 16 channel electroencephalography. Auditory evoked potentials studied by EEG -regime for evoked potentials in patients with vegetative state (VS). Patients divided in 8 groups according to coma etiology. All patients were studied for photoreaction, brainstem reflexes, localization of sound and pain, length of coma state and outcome. Brain injury visualized by conventional CT. Outcome defined as death, VS, recovery with disability and without disability. Disability was rated by Disability Rating Scale (DRS). Recovered patients assessed by Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) scale. Statistics performed by SPSS-11.0. From 175 coma patients 55 patients died, 23 patients found in VS, 97 patients recovered with and without disability. In all etiological groups of coma the background EEG patterns were established. Correspondence analysis of all investigated factors revealed that sound localization had the significant association with EEG delta and theta rhythms and with recovery from coma state (Chi-sqr. =31.10493; p= 0.000001). Among 23 VS patients 9 patients had the signs of MCS and showed the long latency waves (p300) after binaural stimulation. The high amplitude theta frequencies in frontal and temporal lobes significantly correlated with prolongation of latency of cognitive evoked potentials (r=+0.47; p<0.01). Etiological factor had the significant effect on EEG patterns' association with coma outcome only in hemorrhagic and traumatic coma (chi-sqr.=12.95; p<0.005; chi-sqr.=7.92; p<0.03 respectively). Significant correlations established between the delta and theta EEG patterns and coma outcome. Low amplitude decreased power delta and theta frequencies correlated with SND in survived

  4. Efficacy of Nasya (nasal medication) in coma: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Ramteke, Rajkala S.; Patil, Panchakshari D.; Thakar, Anup B.

    2016-01-01

    For emergency conditions, Ayurveda has never been given importance in recent times. However, there are certain emergency conditions where biomedicine has limitations but, Ayurveda can provide solution. Classics have many references regarding management of acute conditions like syncope, coma, episodic conditions of bronchial asthma, epilepsy, etc., In the present study, a 61 year female patient had a two year history of hypertension and was suffering with coma. She was treated with an Ayurvedic treatment modality. Nasya (nasal medication) of Trikaṭu cūrṇa (powder) for seven days, followed by dhūmapāna (~fumigation) with saṅkhyāsthāpana (consciousness restorative) drugs for seven days was administered. The outcome of this management was appreciable, as it resulted in positive changes in Glasgow Coma Scale (GSCS) from 3 to 11. PMID:27621522

  5. Applicability of different scoring systems in outcome prediction of patients with mixed drug poisoning-induced coma

    PubMed Central

    Eizadi Mood, Nastaran; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Khalili-Dehkordi, Zahra

    2011-01-01

    Background: Mixed drugs poisoning (MDP) is common in the emergency departments. Because of the limited number of intensive care unit beds, recognition of risk factors to divide the patients into different survival groups is necessary. Poisoning due to ingestion of different medications may have additive or antagonistic effects on different parameters included in the scoring systems; therefore, the aim of the study was to compare applicability of the different scoring systems in outcomes prediction of patients admitted with MDP-induced coma. Methods: This prospective, observational study included 93 patients with MDP-induced coma. Clinical and laboratory data conforming to the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II), Modified APACHE II Score (MAS), Mainz Emergency Evaluation Scores (MEES) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) were recorded for all patients on admission (time0) and 24 h later (time24). The outcome was recorded in two categories: Survived with or without complication and non-survived. Discrimination was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and area under the ROC curve (AUC). Results: The mortality rate was 9.7%. Mean of each scoring system was statistically significant between time0 and time24 in the survivors. However, it was not significant in non-survivors. Discrimination was excellent for GCS24 (0.90±0.05), APACHE II24 (0.89±0.01), MAS24 (0.86±0.10), and APACHE II0 (0.83±0.11) AUC. Conclusion: The GCS24, APACHE II24, MAS24, and APACHE II0 scoring systems seem to predict the outcome in comatose patients due to MDP more accurately. GCS and MAS may have superiority over the others in being easy to perform and not requiring laboratory data. PMID:22223905

  6. 78 FR 59807 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-30

    ... airspace at the Glasgow VHF Omni-Directional Radio Range/Distance Measuring Equipment (VOR/DME) navigation... the surface, at the Glasgow VOR/DME navigation aid, Glasgow, MT, to accommodate IFR aircraft under... within the scope of that authority as it establishes controlled airspace at the Glasgow VOR/DME,...

  7. [Visual constructive deficits and coma depth].

    PubMed

    Buzón Reyes, J M; León-Carrión, J; Murillo, F; Forastero, P; De Serdio, M L; Domínguez-Morales, M R; Muñoz Sánchez, M A; Morales Ortiz, M

    1992-01-01

    The present study has the purpose of relating the capacities of visual retention with the Benton Visual Retention Test and the level of coma depth, which is measured with the GCS (Glasgow Coma Scale). 31 subject suffering cranioencephalic damage admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) have been studied. GCS scores were obtained during their stay in the intensive care unit and the Benton Visual Retention Test was administered after hospital discharge. The procedure followed consists in comparing the performance of subjects with higher GCS scores to subjects with lower values when executing administration. A of form C of BVRT. We could conclude as follows: firstly that BVRT is a useful tool to detect the existence of brain damage; secondly, indexes of brain damage presence with BVRT are: a low figure in correct design, more errors, less errors in distortion and rotation; more errors in the left visual hemifield. Thirdly, the depth of coma is a good prognosis index on BVRT execution and in consequence of visuo-constructive abilities.

  8. EEG and Coma.

    PubMed

    Ardeshna, Nikesh I

    2016-03-01

    Coma is defined as a state of extreme unresponsiveness, in which a person exhibits no voluntary movement or behavior even to painful stimuli. The utilization of EEG for patients in coma has increased dramatically over the last few years. In fact, many institutions have set protocols for continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring for patients in coma due to potential causes such as subarachnoid hemorrhage or cardiac arrest. Consequently, EEG plays an important role in diagnosis, managenent, and in some cases even prognosis of coma patients.

  9. Sign of coma.

    PubMed

    Skjaerlund, J M

    1988-06-15

    The oblique focusing defect of spherical lenses, known as coma, is described by Seidel as the second of five correction terms (third order) to the Gauss theory. The concept is clear for a refracting surface that is free of spherical aberration; however, the impossibility of eliminating spherical aberration from a single lens with spherical surfaces can confuse the understanding of the second aberration, coma. A way of understanding the comatic effect even in the presence of spherical aberration is described. Confusion over the sign of coma, as indicated by mistakes in optics textbooks, is addressed. This paper suggests corrections to some interpretations of coma found in the literature.

  10. [Coma in type 2 diabete mellitus on metformin treatment].

    PubMed

    Renard, C; Tellal, S; Fevre, G; Ragot, C; Vest, P; Foissaud, V; Renaudeau, C

    2003-01-01

    Non traumatic coma in diabete mellitus has two origins : hypo- or hyperglycemia. Coma with hyperglycemia can be due to ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar state or lactic acidosis. The present observation reports on a type 2 diabete mellitus patient presenting with a coma while the patient was on metformin and glibenclamide treatment. On admission, biologicals tests showed major acidosis, hyperglycemia and hyperosmolarity. No metformine accumulation was demonstrated by analytical measure. In this case, the association of hyperosmolar state and metabolic acidosis prove the difficulty of the differential diagnosis.

  11. [Coma in France today].

    PubMed

    Do, Chung Hi

    2015-01-01

    Comas result from acute life-threatening neurological failure. To understand coma, it is firstly necessary to define it, to cite the aetiologies and their epidemiology and to describe the chronic disorders of consciousness. It is also important to address the challenges and principles of treatment during the acute phase.

  12. Anions in Cometary Comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven B.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of IP/Halley. The anions 0-, OH-, C-, CH- and CN- have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu (Chaizy et al. 1991). Organic molecular anions are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been explored. We present details of the first attempt to model the chemistry of anions in cometary comae. Based on the combined chemical and hydro dynamical model of Rodgers & Charnley (2002), we investigate the role of large carbon-chain anions in cometary coma chemistry. We calculate the effects of these anions on coma thermodynamics, charge balance and examine their impact on molecule formation.

  13. The child in coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewinn, E. B.

    1978-01-01

    Children in coma continue to pose medical, social, economic, ethical, moral, and legal problems. Modern life-support technology has aggravated these problems. Coma is viewed as a pathological state of unconsciousness from which the patient has not achieved arousal, and which calls for vigorous action to help him regain consciousness. There are two variables that have an especially important bearing on the ability to achieve arousal. These are: the character of the brain injury that caused the coma, and environmental factors that affect the patient after the injury.

  14. What Is a Coma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Quizzes Kids' Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Video: Am I Normal? ( ... Emergency Room? What Happens in the Operating Room? What Is a Coma? KidsHealth > For Kids > What Is ...

  15. Nontraumatic spinal cord injury at the neurological intensive care unit: spectrum, causes of admission and predictors of mortality

    PubMed Central

    Grassner, Lukas; Marschallinger, Julia; Dünser, Martin W.; Novak, Helmut F.; Zerbs, Alexander; Aigner, Ludwig; Trinka, Eugen; Sellner, Johann

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Nontraumatic spinal cord injuries (NTSCIs) form a heterogeneous group of diseases, which may evolve into a life-threatening condition. We sought to characterize spectrum, causes of admission and predictors of death in patients with NTSCI treated at the neurological intensive care unit (NICU). Methods: We performed a retrospective observational analysis of NTSCI cases treated at a tertiary care center between 2001 and 2013. Among the 3937 NICU admissions were 93 patients with NTSCI (2.4%). Using multivariate logistic regression analysis, we examined predictors of mortality including demographics, etiology, reasons for admission and GCS/SAPS (Glasgow Coma Scale/Simplified Acute Physiology Score) scores. Results: Infectious and inflammatory/autoimmune causes made up 50% of the NTSCI cases. The most common reasons for NICU admission were rapidly progressing paresis (49.5%) and abundance of respiratory insufficiency (26.9%). The mortality rate was 22.6% and 2.5-fold higher than in the cohort of all other patients treated at the NICU. Respiratory insufficiency as the reason for NICU admission [odds ratio (OR) 4.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.38–17.9; p < 0.01], high initial SAPS scores (OR 1.04; 95% CI 1.003–1.08; p = 0.04), and the development of acute kidney injury throughout the stay (OR 7.25, 1.9–27.5; p = 0.004) were independent risk factors for NICU death. Conclusions: Patients with NTSCI account for a subset of patients admitted to the NICU and are at risk for adverse outcome. A better understanding of predisposing conditions and further knowledge of management of critically ill patients with NTSCI is mandatory. PMID:27006696

  16. Glasgow Coma Scores, Early Opioids, and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Among Combat Amputees

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-04-01

    with nonamputees with serious extremity injuries. We hypothesized that an extended period of impaired consciousness or early treatment with morphine ... morphine within hours of injury had a significantly lower prevalence of PTSD (6.3%) and mood disorders (15.6%) compared to patients treated with fentanyl...only (prevalence of PTSD = 41.2%, prevalence of mood disorder = 47.1%). GCS scores and morphine and fentanyl treatments were not significantly

  17. EEG as an Indicator of Cerebral Functioning in Postanoxic Coma.

    PubMed

    Juan, Elsa; Kaplan, Peter W; Oddo, Mauro; Rossetti, Andrea O

    2015-12-01

    Postanoxic coma after cardiac arrest is one of the most serious acute cerebral conditions and a frequent cause of admission to critical care units. Given substantial improvement of outcome over the recent years, a reliable and timely assessment of clinical evolution and prognosis is essential in this context, but may be challenging. In addition to the classic neurologic examination, EEG is increasingly emerging as an important tool to assess cerebral functions noninvasively. Although targeted temperature management and related sedation may delay clinical assessment, EEG provides accurate prognostic information in the early phase of coma. Here, the most frequently encountered EEG patterns in postanoxic coma are summarized and their relations with outcome prediction are discussed. This article also addresses the influence of targeted temperature management on brain signals and the implication of the evolution of EEG patterns over time. Finally, the article ends with a view of the future prospects for EEG in postanoxic management and prognostication.

  18. Capturing the Coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image shows comet Tempel 1, as seen by the Deep Impact spacecraft on June 21, 2005. It was taken using the clear filter of the spacecraft's medium resolution imager camera. The spacecraft was 11,564,081.7 kilometers (7,185,920 miles) away from the comet. Twelve images were combined together, and a logarithmic stretch was applied to enhance the coma of the comet.

  19. Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Atlas Image mosaic, covering 34' x 34' on the sky, of the Coma cluster, aka Abell 1656. This is a particularly rich cluster of individual galaxies (over 1000 members), most prominently the two giant ellipticals, NGC 4874 (right) and NGC 4889 (left). The remaining members are mostly smaller ellipticals, but spiral galaxies are also evident in the 2MASS image. The cluster is seen toward the constellation Coma Berenices, but is actually at a distance of about 100 Mpc (330 million light years, or a redshift of 0.023) from us. At this distance, the cluster is in what is known as the 'Hubble flow,' or the overall expansion of the Universe. As such, astronomers can measure the Hubble Constant, or the universal expansion rate, based on the distance to this cluster. Large, rich clusters, such as Coma, allow astronomers to measure the 'missing mass,' i.e., the matter in the cluster that we cannot see, since it gravitationally influences the motions of the member galaxies within the cluster. The near-infrared maps the overall luminous mass content of the member galaxies, since the light at these wavelengths is dominated by the more numerous older stellar populations. Galaxies, as seen by 2MASS, look fairly smooth and homogeneous, as can be seen from the Hubble 'tuning fork' diagram of near-infrared galaxy morphology. Image mosaic by S. Van Dyk (IPAC).

  20. Shocking Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric; Millman, Sierra

    2007-01-01

    Marilee Jones's career had been a remarkable success. She joined Massachusetts Institute of Technology's (MIT's) admissions office in 1979, landing a job in Cambridge at a time when boys ruled the sandbox of the admissions profession. Her job was to help MIT recruit more women, who then made up less than one-fifth of the institute's students. She…

  1. 78 FR 67024 - Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-08

    ... Federal Aviation Administration 14 CFR Parts 71 Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT AGENCY... a final rule published in the Federal Register of September 30, 2013, that establishes Class E... aid, Glasgow, MT. A favorable comment from the National Business Aviation Association (NBAA)...

  2. Bacteriology of aspiration pneumonia in patients with acute coma.

    PubMed

    Lauterbach, Enise; Voss, Frederik; Gerigk, Roland; Lauterbach, Michael

    2014-12-01

    Loss of protective airway reflexes in patients with acute coma puts these patients at risk of aspiration pneumonia complicating the course of the primary disease. Available data vary considerably with regard to bacteriology, role of anaerobic bacteria, and antibiotic treatment. Our objective was to research the bacteriology of aspiration pneumonia in acute coma patients who were not pre-treated with antibiotics or hospitalized within 30 days prior to the event. We prospectively analyzed 127 patient records from adult patients admitted, intubated and ventilated to a tertiary medical intensive care unit with acute coma. Bacteriology and antibiotic resistance testing from tracheal aspirate sampled within 24 h after admission, blood cultures, ICU scores (APACHE II, SOFA), hematology, and clinical chemistry were assessed. Patients were followed up until death or hospital discharge. The majority of patients with acute coma suffered from acute cardiovascular disorders, predominantly myocardial infarction, followed by poisonings, and coma of unknown cause. In a majority of our patients, microaspiration resulted in overt infection. Most frequently S. aureus, H. influenzae, and S. pneumoniae were isolated. Anaerobic bacteria (Bacteroides spec., Fusobacteria, Prevotella spec.) were isolated from tracheal aspirate in a minority of patients, and predominantly as part of a mixed infection. Antibiotic monotherapy with a 2nd generation cephalosporin, or a 3rd generation gyrase inhibitor, was most effective in our patients regardless of the presence of anaerobic bacteria.

  3. Dwarfs in Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for larger poster version

    This false-color mosaic of the central region of the Coma cluster combines infrared and visible-light images to reveal thousands of faint objects (green). Follow-up observations showed that many of these objects, which appear here as faint green smudges, are dwarf galaxies belonging to the cluster. Two large elliptical galaxies, NGC 4889 and NGC 4874, dominate the cluster's center. The mosaic combines visible-light data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (color coded blue) with long- and short-wavelength infrared views (red and green, respectively) from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope.

  4. Chemistry in cometary comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irvine, W. M.; Dickens, J. E.; Lovell, A. J.; Schloerb, F. P.; Senay, M.; Bergin, E. A.; Jewitt, D.; Matthews, H. E.

    1998-01-01

    Significant gas-phase chemistry occurs in the comae of bright comets, as is demonstrated here for the case of Comet Hale-Bopp. The abundance ratio of the two isomers, hydrogen cyanide and hydrogen isocyanide, is shown to vary with heliocentric distance in a way that is consistent with production of HNC by ion-molecule chemistry initiated by the photoionization of water. Likewise, the first maps of emission from HCO+ show an abundance and an extended distribution that are consistent with the same chemical model.

  5. Contemporary approach to neurologic prognostication of coma after cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Ben-Hamouda, Nawfel; Taccone, Fabio S; Rossetti, Andrea O; Oddo, Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Coma after cardiac arrest (CA) is an important cause of admission to the ICU. Prognosis of post-CA coma has significantly improved over the past decade, particularly because of aggressive postresuscitation care and the use of therapeutic targeted temperature management (TTM). TTM and sedatives used to maintain controlled cooling might delay neurologic reflexes and reduce the accuracy of clinical examination. In the early ICU phase, patients' good recovery may often be indistinguishable (based on neurologic examination alone) from patients who eventually will have a poor prognosis. Prognostication of post-CA coma, therefore, has evolved toward a multimodal approach that combines neurologic examination with EEG and evoked potentials. Blood biomarkers (eg, neuron-specific enolase [NSE] and soluble 100-β protein) are useful complements for coma prognostication; however, results vary among commercial laboratory assays, and applying one single cutoff level (eg, > 33 μg/L for NSE) for poor prognostication is not recommended. Neuroimaging, mainly diffusion MRI, is emerging as a promising tool for prognostication, but its precise role needs further study before it can be widely used. This multimodal approach might reduce false-positive rates of poor prognosis, thereby providing optimal prognostication of comatose CA survivors. The aim of this review is to summarize studies and the principal tools presently available for outcome prediction and to describe a practical approach to the multimodal prognostication of coma after CA, with a particular focus on neuromonitoring tools. We also propose an algorithm for the optimal use of such multimodal tools during the early ICU phase of post-CA coma.

  6. Individual Organ Failure and Concomitant Risk of Mortality Differs According to the Type of Admission to ICU – A Retrospective Study of SOFA Score of 23,795 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bingold, Tobias M.; Lefering, Rolf; Zacharowski, Kai; Meybohm, Patrick; Waydhas, Christian; Rosenberger, Peter; Scheller, Bertram

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Organ dysfunction or failure after the first days of ICU treatment and subsequent mortality with respect to the type of intensive care unit (ICU) admission is poorly elucidated. Therefore we analyzed the association of ICU mortality and admission for medical (M), scheduled surgery (ScS) or unscheduled surgery (US) patients mirrored by the occurrence of organ dysfunction/failure (OD/OF) after the first 72h of ICU stay. Methods For this retrospective cohort study (23,795 patients; DIVI registry; German Interdisciplinary Association for Intensive Care Medicine (DIVI)) organ dysfunction or failure were derived from the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (excluding the Glasgow Coma Scale). SOFA scores were collected on admission to ICU and 72h later. For patients with a length of stay of at least five days, a multivariate analysis was performed for individual OD/OF on day three. Results M patients had the lowest prevalence of cardiovascular failure (M 31%; ScS 35%; US 38%), and the highest prevalence of respiratory (M 24%; ScS 13%; US 17%) and renal failure (M 10%; ScS 6%; US 7%). Risk of death was highest for M- and ScS-patients in those with respiratory failure (OR; M 2.4; ScS 2.4; US 1.4) and for surgical patients with renal failure (OR; M 1.7; ScS 2.7; US 2.4). Conclusion The dynamic evolution of OD/OF within 72h after ICU admission and mortality differed between patients depending on their types of admission. This has to be considered to exclude a systematic bias during multi-center trials. PMID:26241475

  7. 78 FR 41337 - Proposed Establishment of Class E Airspace; Glasgow, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-10

    .../Distance Measuring Equipment (VOR/DME) navigation aid, Glasgow, MT, to facilitate vectoring of Instrument... route domestic airspace extending upward from 1,200 feet above the surface at the Glasgow VOR/DME... controlled airspace the Glasgow VOR/ DME, Glasgow, MT. This proposal will be subject to an...

  8. Development of an objective tool for the diagnosis of myxedema coma.

    PubMed

    Chiong, Yien V; Bammerlin, Elaine; Mariash, Cary N

    2015-09-01

    Myxedema coma, a rare entity, with a reported 25%-65% mortality had no objective criteria for making the diagnosis when we began our study. We developed an objective screening tool for myxedema coma to more easily identify patients and examine the best treatment method in future prospective studies to reduce the mortality of this entity. We conducted a retrospective chart review to find all patients aged ≥18 years admitted with myxedema coma from January 1, 2005 through June 13, 2010 at Indiana University Health Methodist Hospital. On the basis of both our retrospective chart review and on literature accounts, we identified 6 criteria to diagnose myxedema coma. We identified 10 patients initially diagnosed with myxedema coma and established a control group consisting of 13 patients identified with altered mental status and increased thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) levels. The 6 variables we created for the screening tool were heart rate, temperature, Glasgow coma scale, TSH, free thyroxine, and precipitating factors. The screening tool has a sensitivity and specificity of about 80%. We ran a logistic regression model using the 10 study patients and 13 controls with the 6 variables. No variables alone significantly contributed to the model. However, the overall model was highly significant (P = 0.012), providing strong support for a scoring system that uses these variables simultaneously. This screening tool enables physicians to rapidly diagnose myxedema coma to expedite treatment. A more refined diagnostic tool may be used in future clinical studies designed to determine the optimal treatment.

  9. Serum Total Cholinesterase Activity on Admission Is Associated with Disease Severity and Outcome in Patients with Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Hong; Li, An-Min; He, Sai-Lin; Yao, Xu-Dong; Zhu, Jing; Zhang, Zhi-Wen; Sheng, Zhi-Yong; Yao, Yong-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Background Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is one of the leading causes of neurological disability. In this retrospective study, serum total cholinesterase (ChE) activities were analyzed in 188 patients for diagnostic as well as predictive values for mortality. Methods and Findings Within 72 hours after injury, serum ChE activities including both acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase were measured. Disease severity was evaluated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, Glasgow Coma Score, length of coma, post-traumatic amnesia and injury feature. Neurocognitive and functional scores were assessed using clinical records. Of 188 patients, 146 (77.7%) survived and 42 (22.3%) died within 90 days. Lower ChE activities were noted in the non-survivors vs. survivors (5.94±2.19 vs. 7.04±2.16 kU/L, p=0.023), in septic vs. non-infected patients (5.93±1.89 vs. 7.31±2.45 kU/L, p=0.0005) and in patients with extremely severe injury vs. mild injury (6.3±1.98 vs. 7.57±2.48 kU/L, p=0.049). The trajectories of serum ChE levels were also different between non-survivors and survivors, septic and non-infected patients, mild and severely injured patients, respectively. Admission ChE activities were closely correlated with blood cell counts, neurocognitive and functional scores both on admission and at discharge. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the area under the curve for ChE was inferior to that for either APACHE II or white blood cell (WBC) count. However, at the optimal cutoff value of 5 kU/L, the sensitivity of ChE for correct prediction of 90-day mortality was 65.5% and the specificity was 86.4%. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that lower ChE activity (<5 kU/L) was more closely correlated with poor survival than higher ChE activity (>5 kU/L) (p=0.04). After adjusting for other variables, ChE was identified as a borderline independent predictor for mortality as analyzed by Binary logistic regression (P=0.078). Conclusions

  10. Comae Berenicids and related activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseki, Masahiro

    2011-12-01

    The Comae Berenicids have been considered as a winter shower but lower meteor activities continue the whole year round in this region. It might be called the meteors of Coma Sororum Medusae (CSM) instead of Comae Berenicids (COM). The CSM radiant passes the zenith twice in lower latitudes of the northern hemisphere and CSM activities vary with the altitude of the radiant. December Leonis Minorids (DLM) and September varepsilon-Perseids (SPE) are distinct from the CSM background meteors, but July Pegasids (JPE), delta-Aurigids (DAU) and nu-Aurigids (NAU) are buried in this complex. The conglomeration of DLM, COM and JCO (January Comae Berenicids) has caused confusion in meteor observations as to whether they are three distinct sources or should be considered as one. A simple model of meteor stream structure shows the clear profile of their activities. Although their radiant drifts are overlapping, they might have different parent objects.

  11. Observations of FK Comae stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bopp, B. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations on the FK Comae stars are described. FK Com, UZ Lib and HD 199178 are compared and related as a group of stars. The crucial observational tests of the proposed evolutionary status of these stars are noted.

  12. The impact of physical therapy in patients with severe traumatic brain injury during acute and post-acute rehabilitation according to coma duration

    PubMed Central

    Lendraitienė, Eglė; Petruševičienė, Daiva; Savickas, Raimondas; Žemaitienė, Ieva; Mingaila, Sigitas

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of study was to evaluate the impact of physical therapy on the recovery of motor and mental status in patients who sustained a severe traumatic brain injury, according to coma duration in acute and post-acute rehabilitation. [Subjects and Methods] The study population comprised patients with levels of consciousness ranging from 3 to 8 according to Glasgow Coma Scale score. The patients were divided into 2 groups based on coma duration as follows: group 1, those who were in a coma up to 1 week, and group 2, those who were in a coma for more than 2 weeks. The recovery of the patients’ motor function was evaluated according to the Motor Assessment Scale and the recovery of mental status according to the Mini-Mental State Examination. [Results] The evaluation of motor and mental status recovery revealed that the patients who were in a coma up to 1 week recovered significantly better after physical therapy during the acute rehabilitation than those who were in a coma for longer than 2 weeks. [Conclusion] The recovery of motor and mental status of the patients in acute rehabilitation was significantly better for those in a coma for a shorter period. PMID:27512262

  13. NSCA light pollution seminar, Glasgow, 1999 November 25

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizon, R.

    2000-04-01

    In July 1999 I was invited to speak at a seminar on 'Light Pollution in Scotland', to be held in Glasgow in November. The event was organised by the National Society for Clean Air and Protection of the Environment (NSCA).The Glasgow Central Hotel saw the gathering of over 100 local authority planners and environmental health officers from all over Scotland, and the CfDS presence included Dennis Proudman, of Taynuilt, Argyll, who has done much to spread awareness of the problem of light pollution in the Argyll area, not least with his series of articles in the Oban Times.

  14. The Physical Tourist Physics in Glasgow: A Heritage Tour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Sean F.

    2006-12-01

    I trace the history of the physical and applied sciences, and particularly physics, in Glasgow. Among the notable individuals I discuss are Joseph Black (1728 1799), James Watt (1736 1819), William John Macquorn Rankine (1820 1872), William Thomson, Lord Kelvin (1824 1907), John Kerr (1824 1907), Frederick Soddy (1877 1956), John Logie Baird (1888 1946), and Ian Donald (1910 1987), as well as physics-related businesses.The locations, centering on the city center and University of Glasgow, include sites both recognizable today and transformed from past usage, as well as museums and archives related to the history and interpretation of physics.

  15. Physiologic and prognostic significance of "alpha coma".

    PubMed Central

    Iragui, V J; McCutchen, C B

    1983-01-01

    A patient with posthypoxic "alpha coma" is described whose EEGs were recorded before coma, within two hours following the onset of coma and after recovery. The differences observed between the alpha activity during coma and that seen before and after suggest that the alpha activity during coma and the physiologic alpha rhythm are different phenomena. This case, as well as others reported, also suggests that "alpha coma" resolving in the first 24 hours following hypoxia may have a better prognosis than "alpha coma" detected after the first day, and stresses the need for EEG monitoring begun in the immediate period following hypoxia in order to assess accurately the prognostic significance of this EEG pattern in the early stages of postanoxic encephalopathy. The aetiology of "alpha coma" also affects outcome. The survival rate appears higher in patients with respiratory arrest than in those with combined cardiopulmonary arrest. PMID:6886700

  16. The radiology of nontraumatic coma.

    PubMed

    Moody, D M; Buonanno, F S; McWhorter, J M

    1984-11-01

    This article describes a logical approach to the neuroimaging evaluation of patients with coma. The decision tree analysis provides an efficient method and attempts to convey the logical sequential concepts of analysis of CCT findings in patients presenting in stupor or coma. The sequential approach tabulated serves as a good mnemonic for clinicians faced daily with decisions to be made in the evaluation and management of comatose patients. The approach also provides a framework for subsequent statistical (Bayesian or other) analysis of efficacy, cost effectiveness, and impact on clinical practice and health care delivery.

  17. Emotional and Behavioural Development in Glasgow Primary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pritchett, Rachel; Nowek, Gail; Neill, Cróna; Minnis, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Studies examining the well-being of British children find that about 5-10% are at risk of developing problems. This study aimed to examine the emotional and behavioural development of six to eight year olds in an area of socio-economic deprivation in Glasgow (Scotland) and compare this with UK norms. Furthermore, it aimed to look at overlap…

  18. Territorialities in Scotland: Perceptions of Young People in Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Christopher Peter; Deuchar, Ross

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an exploratory, small-scale qualitative research enquiry into the perceptions and experiences of young people in communities afflicted by deprivation in Glasgow, Scotland's largest city. The context within which we address this focus contains a culture reputed to involve sectarianism, territoriality and gangs.…

  19. Evolution of Cerebral Atrophy in a Patient with Super Refractory Status Epilepticus Treated with Barbiturate Coma

    PubMed Central

    George, Pravin; Nattanmai, Premkumar; Ahrens, Christine; Hantus, Stephen; Sarwal, Aarti

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Status epilepticus is associated with neuronal breakdown. Radiological sequelae of status epilepticus include diffusion weighted abnormalities and T2/FLAIR cortical hyperintensities corresponding to the epileptogenic cortex. However, progressive generalized cerebral atrophy from status epilepticus is underrecognized and may be related to neuronal death. We present here a case of diffuse cerebral atrophy that developed during the course of super refractory status epilepticus management despite prolonged barbiturate coma. Methods. Case report and review of the literature. Case. A 19-year-old male with a prior history of epilepsy presented with focal clonic seizures. His seizures were refractory to multiple anticonvulsants and eventually required pentobarbital coma for 62 days and midazolam coma for 33 days. Serial brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed development of cerebral atrophy at 31 days after admission to our facility and progression of the atrophy at 136 days after admission. Conclusion. This case highlights the development and progression of generalized cerebral atrophy in super refractory status epilepticus. The cerebral atrophy was noticeable at 31 days after admission at our facility which emphasizes the urgency of definitive treatment in patients who present with super refractory status epilepticus. Further research into direct effects of therapeutic coma is warranted. PMID:28182114

  20. Unhealthy Glasgow: a case for ecological public health?

    PubMed

    Hanlon, Phil

    2015-10-01

    Ecological public health has been proposed as an approach appropriate for addressing the multiple transitions that currently affect human health and sustainability. The paper draws on the author's experience in public health in Glasgow to analyse the health challenges faced by this postindustrial Scottish city. Like other such cities, it not only faces multiple health challenges but also demonstrates a currently unexplained excess mortality that has been dubbed the 'Glasgow Effect'. To explore this troubled mixture, the paper outlines four historical waves of public health challenge and response in Glasgow over the last century, and proposes that a fifth is emerging. The challenge now is how to negotiate environmental sustainability with social, political and economic sustainability to enhance health for all. The paper suggests that gains made by past approaches still need to be protected and can be included within ecological public health, but they lack the wider vision, coherence and capacity required if cities are to address the scale and range of contemporary conditions. A number of lessons are offered for the ecological public health perspective.

  1. Comet coma sample return instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Brownlee, Don E.; Burnett, Donald S.; Tsou, Peter; Uesugi, K. T.

    1994-01-01

    The sample collection technology and instrument concept for the Sample of Comet Coma Earth Return Mission (SOCCER) are described. The scientific goals of this Flyby Sample Return are to return to coma dust and volatile samples from a known comet source, which will permit accurate elemental and isotopic measurements for thousands of individual solid particles and volatiles, detailed analysis of the dust structure, morphology, and mineralogy of the intact samples, and identification of the biogenic elements or compounds in the solid and volatile samples. Having these intact samples, morphologic, petrographic, and phase structural features can be determined. Information on dust particle size, shape, and density can be ascertained by analyzing penetration holes and tracks in the capture medium. Time and spatial data of dust capture will provide understanding of the flux dynamics of the coma and the jets. Additional information will include the identification of cosmic ray tracks in the cometary grains, which can provide a particle's process history and perhaps even the age of the comet. The measurements will be made with the same equipment used for studying micrometeorites for decades past; hence, the results can be directly compared without extrapolation or modification. The data will provide a powerful and direct technique for comparing the cometary samples with all known types of meteorites and interplanetary dust. This sample collection system will provide the first sample return from a specifically identified primitive body and will allow, for the first time, a direct method of matching meteoritic materials captured on Earth with known parent bodies.

  2. Comet coma sample return instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albee, A. L.; Brownlee, Don E.; Burnett, Donald S.; Tsou, Peter; Uesugi, K. T.

    The sample collection technology and instrument concept for the Sample of Comet Coma Earth Return Mission (SOCCER) are described. The scientific goals of this Flyby Sample Return are to return to coma dust and volatile samples from a known comet source, which will permit accurate elemental and isotopic measurements for thousands of individual solid particles and volatiles, detailed analysis of the dust structure, morphology, and mineralogy of the intact samples, and identification of the biogenic elements or compounds in the solid and volatile samples. Having these intact samples, morphologic, petrographic, and phase structural features can be determined. Information on dust particle size, shape, and density can be ascertained by analyzing penetration holes and tracks in the capture medium. Time and spatial data of dust capture will provide understanding of the flux dynamics of the coma and the jets. Additional information will include the identification of cosmic ray tracks in the cometary grains, which can provide a particle's process history and perhaps even the age of the comet. The measurements will be made with the same equipment used for studying micrometeorites for decades past; hence, the results can be directly compared without extrapolation or modification. The data will provide a powerful and direct technique for comparing the cometary samples with all known types of meteorites and interplanetary dust. This sample collection system will provide the first sample return from a specifically identified primitive body and will allow, for the first time, a direct method of matching meteoritic materials captured on Earth with known parent bodies.

  3. Lesson of the month 2: a case of coma in a Parkinson's patient: a combination of fatigue, dehydration and high protein diet over the New Year period?

    PubMed

    Arulanantham, Nirmalan; Lee, Ralph Wing Fung; Hayton, Tom

    2014-08-01

    Although motor fluctuation can often be severe in Parkinson's disease (PD), it is rare for an 'off period' to result in coma. The case presented here is of a patient with longstanding PD who was admitted to our hospital with a Glasgow Coma Scale of three after missing just one or two doses of her medication. Investigation for infective, neurovascular and metabolic causes of coma were negative and the patient recovered very rapidly following reinstitution of dopaminergic therapy via nasogastric tube. This case highlights how florid the presentation of motor fluctuations in PD can be and the importance of restarting treatment as quickly as possible. Guidance is provided on how to administer dopaminergic medications in patients who are unable to swallow.

  4. Effect of Admission Hyperglycemia on 6-Month Functional Outcome in Patients with Spontaneous Cerebellar Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Chuanyuan; Hu, Xin; Wang, Jiajing; You, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Background Cerebellar hemorrhage (CH) has a quite different treatment strategy and prognostic factors compared with supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The prognostic role of hyperglycemia has been discussed mainly in cases of supratentorial hemorrhage; it remains to be elucidated following CH. We aimed to determine the association of hyperglycemia on admission with 6-month functional outcome in CH patients. Material/Methods We retrospectively analyzed 77 patients with acute CH between September 2010 and April 2015 in West China Hospital. Blood glucose level was measured when the patients were admitted. Primary outcome was 6-month functional outcome, which could comprehensively reflect the patient’s recovery of physical and social ability after stroke and was assessed by the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Association of hyperglycemia with functional outcome was identified in logistic regression models. Results There were 50 (64.9%) patients with poor functional outcomes. Patients with poor outcome were much older (P<0.001) and had a significantly higher glucose level on admission (P<0.001), a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (P<0.001), a larger hematoma (P=0.003), and a higher incidence of intraventricular extension (P=0.002), brainstem compression (P=0.013), and hydrocephalus (P=0.023). Multivariate analysis showed that hyperglycemia (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.07–2.08, P=0.017 when glucose level was analyzed as a continuous variable; OR 7.46, 95% CI 1.41–39.51, P=0.018 when glucose level was dichotomized by the critical threshold of 6.78 mmol/L) emerged as an independent predictor for adverse functional outcome at 6 months. Conclusions To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on the relationship between hyperglycemia and long-term functional outcome after CH. The study combined with previous pertinent reports definitely indicates the poor effect of hyperglycemia on both supra- and infratentorial ICH independent of hemorrhage site

  5. Effect of Admission Hyperglycemia on 6-Month Functional Outcome in Patients with Spontaneous Cerebellar Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Tao, Chuanyuan; Hu, Xin; Wang, Jiajing; You, Chao

    2017-03-08

    BACKGROUND Cerebellar hemorrhage (CH) has a quite different treatment strategy and prognostic factors compared with supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). The prognostic role of hyperglycemia has been discussed mainly in cases of supratentorial hemorrhage; it remains to be elucidated following CH. We aimed to determine the association of hyperglycemia on admission with 6-month functional outcome in CH patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS We retrospectively analyzed 77 patients with acute CH between September 2010 and April 2015 in West China Hospital. Blood glucose level was measured when the patients were admitted. Primary outcome was 6-month functional outcome, which could comprehensively reflect the patient's recovery of physical and social ability after stroke and was assessed by the modified Rankin scale (mRS). Association of hyperglycemia with functional outcome was identified in logistic regression models. RESULTS There were 50 (64.9%) patients with poor functional outcomes. Patients with poor outcome were much older (P<0.001) and had a significantly higher glucose level on admission (P<0.001), a lower Glasgow Coma Scale score (P<0.001), a larger hematoma (P=0.003), and a higher incidence of intraventricular extension (P=0.002), brainstem compression (P=0.013), and hydrocephalus (P=0.023). Multivariate analysis showed that hyperglycemia (OR 1.50, 95% CI 1.07-2.08, P=0.017 when glucose level was analyzed as a continuous variable; OR 7.46, 95% CI 1.41-39.51, P=0.018 when glucose level was dichotomized by the critical threshold of 6.78 mmol/L) emerged as an independent predictor for adverse functional outcome at 6 months. CONCLUSIONS To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study focusing on the relationship between hyperglycemia and long-term functional outcome after CH. The study combined with previous pertinent reports definitely indicates the poor effect of hyperglycemia on both supra- and infratentorial ICH independent of hemorrhage site

  6. Evoked potentials for the prediction of vegetative state in the acute stage of coma.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Catherine; Luauté, Jacques

    2005-01-01

    For comatose patients in intensive care units, it is important to anticipate their functional outcome as soon and as reliably as possible. Among clinical variables the Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) and the patient's pupil reactivity are the strongest predictive variables. Evoked potentials help to assess objectively brain function. Over the past 20 years, numerous studies have assessed their prognostic utility in terms of awakening from coma. Fewer studies, however, have focused upon the utility of evoked potentials in predicting progression to the vegetative state. In this area evoked potentials appear to have a highly predictive value. In anoxic coma the abolition of somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) is related to a poor outcome, defined as death or survival in a vegetative state, with a 100% specificity. Following traumatic brain injury, the predictive value for unfavourable outcome is 98.5% when there are no focal injuries likely to abolish SEP cortical components. In contrast, the presence of event-related evoked potentials, and particularly mismatched negativity (MMN), is a strong predictor of awakening and precludes comatose patients from moving to a permanent vegetative state (PVS).

  7. Initial Diagnosis and Management of Coma.

    PubMed

    Traub, Stephen J; Wijdicks, Eelco F

    2016-11-01

    Coma represents a true medical emergency. Drug intoxications are a leading cause of coma; however, other metabolic disturbances and traumatic brain injury are also common causes. The general emergency department approach begins with stabilization of airway, breathing, and circulation, followed by a thorough physical examination to generate a limited differential diagnosis that is then refined by focused testing. Definitive treatment is ultimately disease-specific. This article presents an overview of the pathophysiology, causes, examination, and treatment of coma.

  8. How do you know when your patient is "waking up": coma recovery assessment in a complex continuing care setting.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa M; Savage, Julie; McKee, Hilary; Flament, Marie-Pierre; D'Onofrio, Silvia; Eckert, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Coma, vegetative state (VS) and minimally conscious state (MCS) are disastrous outcomes following severe traumatic brain injury. Due to the extent of the resultant neurological deficits including hemisphere damage, loss of cellular integrity, altered and abnormal movements such as flexor and extensor patterns, and alterations in cranial nerve function, it can become difficult for the interprofessional team to identify when a patient is emerging from their coma. The Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), commonly used to assess patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) is not comprehensive or sensitive enough to provide concrete evidence that a patient is emerging from VS to an MCS. The purpose of this paper is to present a case study of a patient who has emerged from a persistent VS to promote a deeper understanding of what is involved when working with this clientele. Challenges in assessment of cognitive functioning, the development of successful communication through the use of technology and the goals of therapy amongst the various health team members will be provided. Collaborative support with the family will also be discussed. Members of the interprofessional team explored the literature to determine coma recovery assessment tools and best evidence guidelines to direct their interventions with this patient.

  9. "The Glasgow effect?"- the result of the geographical patterning of deprived areas?

    PubMed

    Livingston, Mark; Lee, Duncan

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this research was to examine whether the excess mortality found in Glasgow, compared to other cities in the UK ("Glasgow effect"), could be attributed to patterns of the distribution of deprived neighbourhoods within the cities. Data on mortality and deprivation at a neighbourhood scale were used to examine the impact of the patterning of neighbourhood deprivation on mortality in Glasgow, Liverpool and Manchester. Analysis using a combination of GIS and statistical approaches, including a Moran׳s I test and Conditional Auto Regressive models to capture residual spatial autocorrelation, was carried out. The pattern of deprivation was found to be more dispersed in Glasgow compared to the other cities. The impact of surrounding deprivation at two different scales shows strong impact on neighbourhood health outcomes in Glasgow and Liverpool but not in Manchester, suggesting that patterning is not a major contribution to the excess mortality in Glasgow.

  10. Featured Image: A Comet's Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    This series of images (click for the full view!) features the nucleus of comet 67P/Churymov-Gerasimenko. The images were taken with the Wide Angle Camera of RosettasOSIRIS instrument asRosetta orbited comet 67P. Each column represents a different narrow-band filter that allows us to examine the emission of a specific fragment species, and the images progress in time from January 2015 (top) to June 2015 (bottom). In a recent study, Dennis Bodewits (University of Maryland) and collaborators used these images to analyze the comets inner coma, the cloud of gas and dust produced around the nucleus as ices sublime. OSIRISs images allowed the team to explore how the 67Ps inner coma changed over time as the comet approached the Sun marking the first time weve been able to study such an environment at this level of detail. To read more about what Bodewits and collaborators learned, you can check out their paper below!CitationD. Bodewits et al 2016 AJ 152 130. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/5/130

  11. Amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Syed; Ayoub, Walaa; Hassan, Mona; Wisgerhof, Max

    2014-01-01

    A 62-year-old man was found to have bradycardia, hypothermia and respiratory failure 3 weeks after initiation of amiodarone therapy for atrial fibrillation. Thyroid-stimulating hormone was found to be 168 μIU/mL (nl. 0.3–5 μIU/mL) and free thyroxine (FT4) was <0.2 ng/dL (nl. 0.8–1.8 ng/dL). He received intravenous fluids, vasopressor therapy and stress dose steroids; he was intubated and admitted to the intensive care unit. He received 500 μg of intravenous levothyroxine in the first 18 h of therapy, and 150 µg intravenous daily thereafter. Haemodynamic improvement, along with complete recovery of mental status, occurred after 48 h. Twelve hours after the initiation of therapy, FT4 was 0.96 ng/dL. The patient was maintained on levothyroxine 175 (g POorally daily. A thyroid ultrasound showed diffuse heterogeneity. The 24 hour excretion of iodine was 3657 (mcg (25–756 ( mcg). The only two cases of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma in the literature report patient death despite supportive therapy and thyroid hormone replacement. This case represents the most thoroughly investigated case of amiodarone-induced myxoedema coma with a history significant for subclinical thyroid disease. PMID:24729111

  12. Coma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment Once an individual is out of immediate danger, the medical care team focuses on preventing infections ... Treatment Once an individual is out of immediate danger, the medical care team focuses on preventing infections ...

  13. Disruption of posteromedial large-scale neural communication predicts recovery from coma

    PubMed Central

    de Pasquale, Francesco; Vuillaume, Corine; Riu, Beatrice; Loubinoux, Isabelle; Geeraerts, Thomas; Seguin, Thierry; Bounes, Vincent; Fourcade, Olivier; Demonet, Jean-Francois; Péran, Patrice

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We hypothesize that the major consciousness deficit observed in coma is due to the breakdown of long-range neuronal communication supported by precuneus and posterior cingulate cortex (PCC), and that prognosis depends on a specific connectivity pattern in these networks. Methods: We compared 27 prospectively recruited comatose patients who had severe brain injury (Glasgow Coma Scale score <8; 14 traumatic and 13 anoxic cases) with 14 age-matched healthy participants. Standardized clinical assessment and fMRI were performed on average 4 ± 2 days after withdrawal of sedation. Analysis of resting-state fMRI connectivity involved a hypothesis-driven, region of interest–based strategy. We assessed patient outcome after 3 months using the Coma Recovery Scale–Revised (CRS-R). Results: Patients who were comatose showed a significant disruption of functional connectivity of brain areas spontaneously synchronized with PCC, globally notwithstanding etiology. The functional connectivity strength between PCC and medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) was significantly different between comatose patients who went on to recover and those who eventually scored an unfavorable outcome 3 months after brain injury (Kruskal-Wallis test, p < 0.001; linear regression between CRS-R and PCC-mPFC activity coupling at rest, Spearman ρ = 0.93, p < 0.003). Conclusion: In both etiology groups (traumatic and anoxic), changes in the connectivity of PCC-centered, spontaneously synchronized, large-scale networks account for the loss of external and internal self-centered awareness observed during coma. Sparing of functional connectivity between PCC and mPFC may predict patient outcome, and further studies are needed to substantiate this potential prognosis biomarker. PMID:26561296

  14. Coma blisters with hypoxemic respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Abhishek; Bansal, Meghana; Conner, Kelly

    2012-03-15

    A 24-year-old woman with quadriplegia was admitted with respiratory failure because of pneumonia. She was on multiple medications including diazepam, oxycodone, and amitriptyline, known to be associated with coma blisters, though she did not overdose on any of them. On hospital day 2, she developed multiple blisters on both sides of her right forearm and hand. Skin biopsy showed eccrine gland degeneration consistent with coma blisters. It was felt that hypoxemia from her pneumonia contributed to the development of these blisters, which occurred on both pressure and non-pressure bearing areas of the arm. Coma blisters are self-limited skin lesions that occur at sites of maximal pressure, mostly in the setting of drug overdose. However, coma blisters may occur with metabolic and neurological conditions resulting in coma.

  15. Seeking the Admission Hybrid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucido, Jerome A.

    2012-01-01

    When one thinks of seminal publications in college admission, the first piece that comes to mind is B. Alden Thresher's "College Admissions in the Public Interest" (1966). Thresher's work, relevant to this day, is credited with being the foundational document of the admission profession. McDonough and Robertson's 1995 study, commissioned by NACAC,…

  16. Outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in Glasgow Royal Infirmary: microbiological aspects.

    PubMed Central

    Timbury, M. C.; Donaldson, J. R.; McCartney, A. C.; Fallon, R. J.; Sleigh, J. D.; Lyon, D.; Orange, G. V.; Baird, D. R.; Winter, J.; Wilson, T. S.

    1986-01-01

    The bacteriological investigation of an outbreak of Legionnaires' disease in Glasgow Royal Infirmary affecting 16 patients is described. Most of the patients had been treated in high-dependency areas on two floors of the hospital supplied by the same two air-conditioned ventilation systems. The source of infection was traced to contamination of a cooling tower from which a plume of spray discharged into the intake vents of the two ventilation systems. Rubber grommets within the cooling tower probably provided a nidus of infection there. The control and management of the outbreak are discussed: a policy of frankness about the course and progress of the investigations was adopted and helped to allay anxiety on the part of both staff and media. PMID:3540109

  17. Plasma processes in the inner coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cravens, T. E.

    1991-01-01

    The physical processes that determine the plasma behavior in the inner coma region of active comets are reviewed. Results of observations of the plasma and fields inside the cometopause of Comets Halley and Giacobini-Zinner by instruments on board several spacecraft are presented. Several plasma populations are found to exist in the inner coma. The characteristics of a particular population are largely determined by how far upstream the population was created. All particle populations in the inner coma are strongly affected by collisional processes, such as charge-transfer, ion-neutral chemistry, ion-neutral friction, and thermal cooling. Plasma processes, in the form of magnetohydrodynamics, are also important in the inner coma.

  18. Models for Cometary Comae Containing Negative Ions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordiner, M. A.; Charnley, S. B.

    2012-01-01

    The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of IP/Halley. The anions O(-), OH(-), C(-), CH(-) and CN(-) have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu [I]. Organic molecular anions such as C4H(-) and C6H(-) are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been fully explored. We present details of our new models for the chemistry of cometary comae that include atomic and molecular anions. We calculate the impact of these anions on the charge balance and examine their importance for cometary coma chemistry.

  19. Gurnis, McComas receive Macelwane Medals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Richard; Gurnis, Michael; Burch, James L.; McComas, David J.

    Michael Gurnis and David J. McComas were honored as recipients of James B. Macelwane Medals at the AGU 1993 Spring Meeting in Baltimore last May. The medal recognizes significant contributions to the geophysical sciences by a young scientist of outstanding ability. Richard O'Connell presented Gurnis' medal, and James L. Burch presented McComas' medal. Citations and responses are presented below.

  20. Pupillary evaluation for differential diagnosis of coma

    PubMed Central

    Tokuda, Y; Nakazato, N; Stein, G

    2003-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the usefulness of bedside evaluation of pupils in determining the aetiology of coma by adopting a probabilistic approach. Patients and methods: One hundred and fifteen consecutive patients presenting with coma were enrolled in this prospective cohort during the 12 month study period in the emergency room of a community teaching hospital. Patients underwent structured clinical examinations and laboratory and imaging tests. Assignment of aetiology of coma was based on strict adherence to predetermined criteria and achieved by consensus of the two physician investigators. One year follow up was obtained in all patients. Results: Aetiology of coma was determined in 98% of the patients. It was metabolic in 69 patients (60%) and structural in 46 patients (40%). Metabolic causes included drug overdose, acute alcohol intoxication, hypoglycaemia, sepsis, and pneumonia. Structural causes included intracerebral haemorrhage, subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebral infarction, subdural haematoma, and epidural haematoma. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed light reflex loss (likelihood ratio for positive test result 3.59) and anisocoria (likelihood ratio for positive test result 9.0) as independent predictors of structural origin. Conclusions: In this prospective study of patients presenting to the emergency room of a community based teaching hospital with coma, in about 60% the coma is of metabolic origins and in about 40% of structural origins. Light reflex loss and anisocoria suggest a structural aetiology. PMID:12566553

  1. Chemical and Hydrodynamical Models of Cometary Comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Multi-fluid modelling of the outflowing gases which sublimate from cometary nuclei as they approach the Sun is necessary for understanding the important physical and chemical processes occurring in this complex plasma. Coma chemistry models can be employed to interpret observational data and to ultimately determine chemical composition and structure of the nuclear ices and dust. We describe a combined chemical and hydrodynamical model [1] in which differential equations for the chemical abundances and the energy balance are solved as a function of distance from the cometary nucleus. The presence of negative ions (anions) in cometary comae is known from Giotto mass spectrometry of 1P/Halley. The anions O(-), OH(-), C(-), CH(-) and CN(-) have been detected, as well as unidentified anions with masses 22-65 and 85-110 amu [2]. Organic molecular anions such as C4H(-) and C6H(-) are known to have a significant impact on the charge balance of interstellar clouds and circumstellar envelopes and have been shown to act as catalysts for the gas-phase synthesis of larger hydrocarbon molecules in the ISM, but their importance in cometary comae has not yet been fully explored. We present details of new models for the chemistry of cometary comae that include atomic and molecular anions and calculate the impact of these anions on the coma physics and chemistry af the coma.

  2. Reversible coma and Duret hemorrhage after intracranial hypotension from remote lumbar spine surgery: case report.

    PubMed

    Bonow, Robert H; Bales, James W; Morton, Ryan P; Levitt, Michael R; Zhang, Fangyi

    2016-03-01

    Intracranial hypotension is a rare condition caused by spontaneous or iatrogenic CSF leaks that alter normal CSF dynamics. Symptoms range from mild headaches to transtentorial herniation, coma, and death. Duret hemorrhages have been reported to occur in some patients with this condition and are traditionally believed to be associated with a poor neurological outcome. A 73-year-old man with a remote history of spinal fusion presented with syncope and was found to have small subdural hematomas on head CT studies. He was managed nonoperatively and discharged with a Glasgow Coma Scale score of 15, only to return 3 days later with obtundation, fixed downward gaze, anisocoria, and absent cranial nerve reflexes. A CT scan showed Duret hemorrhages and subtle enlargement of the subdural hematomas, though the hematomas remained too small to account for his poor clinical condition. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine revealed a large lumbar pseudomeningocele in the area of prior fusion. His condition dramatically improved when he was placed in the Trendelenburg position and underwent repair of the pseudomeningocele. He was kept flat for 7 days and was ultimately discharged in good condition. On long-term follow-up, his only identifiable deficit was diplopia due to an internuclear ophthalmoplegia. Intracranial hypotension is a rare condition that can cause profound morbidity, including tonsillar herniation and brainstem hemorrhage. With proper identification and treatment of the CSF leak, patients can make functional recoveries.

  3. Clinical monitoring scales in acute brain injury: assessment of coma, pain, agitation, and delirium.

    PubMed

    Riker, Richard R; Fugate, Jennifer E

    2014-12-01

    Serial clinical examination represents the most fundamental and basic form of neurological monitoring, and is often the first and only form of such monitoring in patients. Even in patients subjected to physiological monitoring using a range of technologies, the clinical examination remains an essential tool to follow neurological progress. Key aspects of the clinical examination have now been systematized into scoring schemes, and address consciousness, pain, agitation, and delirium (PAD). The Glasgow Coma Scale has been the traditional tool to measure consciousness, but the full outline of unresponsiveness (FOUR) score has recently been validated in a variety of settings, and at present, both represent clinically useful tools. Assessment of PAD in neurologically compromised patients present special challenges. For pain, the Numeric Rating Scale is the preferred initial approach, with either the Behavioral Pain Scale or the Critical Care Pain Observation Tool in subjects who are not able to respond. The Nociception Coma Scale-Revised may be useful in patients with severe disorders of consciousness. Conventional sedation scoring tools for critical care, such as the Richmond Area Sedation Scale (RASS) and Sedation-Agitation Scale (SAS) may provide reasonable tools in some neurocritical care patients. The use of sedative drugs and neuromuscular blockers may invalidate the use of some clinical examination tools in others. The use of sedation interruption to assess neurological status can result in physiological derangement in unstable patients (such as those with uncontrolled intracranial hypertension), and is not recommended.

  4. What Admissions Officials Think

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Over the past two decades, college admissions has become a prime-time preoccupation. Most people know at least something about the process, especially if they have a teenager in high school and a college guide on their coffee table. Nonetheless, widespread public misconceptions persist about admissions requirements, the selection process, and the…

  5. The Administration of Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Clifford C.

    1978-01-01

    Among all the tasks of the admissions officer in developing a successful marketing program, the hardest may be that of convincing other college administrators of the importance of admissions to the institution's survival. Discussed are long-range planning, budgeting, staff selection and training, and implementing a plan. (Author/LBH)

  6. Technology in International Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    In a relatively short time, technology applications have become an essential feature of the admissions business. They make the jobs of international admissions professionals easier in many ways, allowing for more robust communication with applicants and counselors, a streamlined application process, and quicker access to information about…

  7. Coma Cluster: Hot and Cool Mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizaka, Chiharu; Mineshige, Shin

    1996-06-01

    ASCA has revealed a rather complex temperature structure in the intraclus ter medium (ICM) around the Coma cluster. Significantly, hot parts (with kT g eq 10 keV) are located far ( ~ 1 Mpc) distant from both the center of the Coma cluster and the galaxy group NGC 4839. There also exist relatively cool re gions (with kT <~ 5 keV). Using N-body + Hydrodynamic simulations, w e have demonstrated that such an observed temperature distribution is naturally accounted for if the subgroup NGC 4839 passed through the center of the Coma c luster about 1 Gyr ago, which was first proposed by Burns et al. When the subc luster passed through the Coma cluster, the ICM in the subcluster was compresse d due to the ram pressure by the ICM in the Coma, and there formed a bow shock with an arc shape just between the two centers. The ICM has thus been heated th ere, emitting hard radiation. A part of the ICM is reflected by the shock front , and flows backward (with respect to the! direction of the subcluster motio n) around the Coma cluster center, being cooled due to an adiabatic expansion. After detouring the center, cooled gas collides with each other at the opposit e side of the Coma cluster (to the place of the subcluster), producing another hot region. These simulate d features are in good agreement with what ASCA found. Further, we present rath er unique features in the temperature profiles that can be caused by a merger ( or an encounter) with a subgroup of galaxies.

  8. Libraries as 'everyday' settings: the Glasgow MCISS project.

    PubMed

    Whitelaw, Sandy; Coburn, Jonathan; Lacey, Marion; McKee, Martin J; Hill, Carol

    2016-03-22

    A settings-based approach is now well-established in health promotion, initially undertaken in conventional places like schools and workplaces, but more recently being expressed in a wider range of what Torp et al. call 'everyday' settings. In this context, libraries have emerged as another potential setting whose ubiquity and accessibility suggests that they may be particularly effective in addressing health inequalities. Drawing on a case study-the Glasgow Macmillan Cancer Information and Support Services Library project-this paper reports on the potential for seeing 'libraries as settings' and in the context of a set of associated theoretical resources, specifically scrutinizes the nature of initiative implementation. Data were drawn from multiple sources: semi-structured interviews and focus groups with strategic partners and stakeholders, operational staff, project volunteers, service users and members of the general public. Qualitative data were complemented by quantitative insights from surveys with members of the partnership, libraries staff and volunteers. Despite some concerns associated with potentially hostile cultural and financial contexts that might threaten longer term sustainability, insights suggested that in pragmatic terms, the project was attracting sizable 'footfall' and successfully addressing a range of needs. Additionally, the formal implementation processes associated with project implementation were considered to have been highly successful in embedding the model into the library culture. In summary, there is evidence that libraries have the potential to be considered as supportive settings and could act as a model for an emergent vision of what libraries do.

  9. Glasgow women medical students: some facts and figures.

    PubMed

    Timbury, M C; Timbury, G C

    1971-04-24

    A questionaire was sent to 343 women medical undergraduates at the University of Glasgow, and 317 replied. Of the respondents, 36% had a member of their family in medicine and 15% had either one or both parents a doctor: 45% had a working mother. Half of all the students had doubts about medicine as a career, and the proportion of these rose with seniority. Doubts were mainly due to the length of the medical course but the girls also recognized the difficulty of combining a medical career with family life. There was a significant correlation between having doubts about a medical career and having a mother who worked.Half the girls said they would prefer to work in hospital after qualification-the favourite specialties being paediatrics and obstetrics; only a quarter said they would like to do general practice. The need for careers advice which links actual career openings and the wish of most women to combine medical work with marriage and child-rearing is emphasized. The majority of the students saw a doctor's primary role as the giving of advice and reassurance.

  10. Alexander Robertson (1834-1908): Glasgow's pioneer aphasiologist and epileptologist.

    PubMed

    Eadie, Mervyn

    2015-01-01

    Alexander Robertson (1834-1908) was a Glasgow physician whose professional career was involved mainly with institutional-based practice but who published significant insights into the anatomical background to aphasia (1867) and the mechanisms of focal epileptogenesis (1869). His aphasiology ideas, including his suggestion that disconnection between cerebral centers involved in speech was responsible for the phenomenon, made him one of the earliest members of the late-nineteenth-century school of aphasia diagram makers. His view of epileptogenesis was that contralateral convulsing arose from irritation in a local area of pathology on the surface of the cerebral cortex after the irritation spread to a cortical motor center and then down the motor pathway to the striatum, while spreading within the cortex itself caused loss of consciousness. This interpretation contains much of the essence of the present-day understanding of cortical epileptogenesis. The origin of this interpretation is often attributed to John Hughlings Jackson, but Robertson published the idea in full a year or two prior to Jackson. However, Robertson's original insights were hardly noticed at the time they were published and have since almost entirely been ignored.

  11. Usefulness of standard EEG in predicting the outcome of patients with disorders of consciousness after anoxic coma.

    PubMed

    Boccagni, Cristina; Bagnato, Sergio; Sant Angelo, Antonino; Prestandrea, Caterina; Galardi, Giuseppe

    2011-10-01

    Although standard EEG is performed routinely in patients with disorders of consciousness after coma, its prognostic value is still debated. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the role of standard EEG in predicting the recovery of cognitive functioning in patients affected by severe disturbances of consciousness after coma caused by cerebral anoxia. A standard EEG was recorded at admission to our Rehabilitation Department in 15 patients experiencing impaired consciousness because of cerebral anoxia. We quantified EEG abnormalities using the Synek scale (1988). Cognitive functioning was measured with the levels of cognitive functioning scale at the time of admission and after 3 months of recovery. EEG scores were significantly correlated with both levels of cognitive functioning scores at admission (P = 0.004) and change in levels of cognitive functioning score after 3 months (P < 0.001). The first correlation confirms the relationship between EEG and cognitive functioning, while the second correlation indicates the prognostic value of EEG in cognitive outcome. In conclusion, standard EEG is a simple and readily available tool with significant prognostic value in patients with disorders of consciousness after coma caused by cerebral anoxia.

  12. Diagnosis of reversible causes of coma.

    PubMed

    Edlow, Jonathan A; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Traub, Stephen J; Wijdicks, Eelco F M

    2014-12-06

    Because coma has many causes, physicians must develop a structured, algorithmic approach to diagnose and treat reversible causes rapidly. The three main mechanisms of coma are structural brain lesions, diffuse neuronal dysfunction, and, rarely, psychiatric causes. The first priority is to stabilise the patient by treatment of life-threatening conditions, then to use the history, physical examination, and laboratory findings to identify structural causes and diagnose treatable disorders. Some patients have a clear diagnosis. In those who do not, the first decision is whether brain imaging is needed. Imaging should be done in post-traumatic coma or when structural brain lesions are probable or possible causes. Patients who do not undergo imaging should be reassessed regularly. If CT is non-diagnostic, a checklist should be used use to indicate whether advanced imaging is needed or evidence is present of a treatable poisoning or infection, seizures including non-convulsive status epilepticus, endocrinopathy, or thiamine deficiency.

  13. Space Radar Image of Missouri River, Glasgow, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color L-band image of an area near Glasgow, Missouri, centered at about 39.2 degrees north latitude and 92.8 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 50th orbit on October 3, 1994. The false-color composite was made by displaying the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in red; the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) return in green; and the sum of the two channels in blue. The area shown is approximately 37 kilometers by 25 kilometers (23 miles by 16 miles). The radar data, coupled with pre-flood aerial photography and satellite data and post-flood topographic and field data, are being used to evaluate changes associated with levee breaks in landforms, where deposits formed during the widespread flooding in 1993 along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The distinct radar scattering properties of farmland, sand fields and scoured areas will be used to inventory floodplains along the Missouri River and determine the processes by which these areas return to preflood conditions. The image shows one such levee break near Glasgow, Missouri. In the upper center of the radar image is a region covered by several meters of sand, shown as blue regions below the bend in the river. West (left) of this dark area, a blue gap in the levee tree canopy can be seen, showing the area where the levee failed. Radar data such as these can help scientists more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm

  14. An Exploration of Smoking Behavior of African Male Immigrants Living in Glasgow

    PubMed Central

    Ezika, Ejiofor Augustine

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The aim of this research study was to explore the smoking behavior of adult African male immigrant smokers living in Glasgow to inform and contribute to primary health promotion frameworks. METHODS 25 adult African male immigrant smokers living in Glasgow were recruited via consecutive sampling by soliciting for participation through the use of flyers, posters and word of mouth. Data collection occurred via semi-structured face-to-face interviews. The interviews were audio taped, after which verbatim transcription was carried out and the data analyzed thematically. RESULTS The participants’ smoking habits were influenced by cold weather environment as well as societal norms that appear to make the smoking habit more acceptable in Glasgow than Africa. It appears the more educated the participants were, the fewer cigarettes they smoked. However, there was only a slight difference in the number of cigarettes smoked between participants with a degree and those with a postgraduate degree. CONCLUSION The participants’ smoking habits in Glasgow appear to have increased because of environmental variables associated with living in Glasgow, specifically the cold weather environment and high acceptability of smoking habits in Glasgow. PMID:25741179

  15. Some new insights into the history of the Glasgow time ball and time guns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarke, David; Kinns, Roger

    2012-03-01

    The 1857 time ball machinery at the Glasgow Sailors' Home was supplied by Alexander McKenzie, mechanist, using a design that had much in common with the 1853 Edinburgh apparatus. It was operated using electrical connections to a mean time clock in the Home. This clock required adjustment by hand each day to compensate for its losing rate. Such manual intervention and lack of independent verification of accuracy under-mined the authority of the signal. The relative prestige of the Glasgow and Edinburgh Observatories was an important issue. There was no telegraphic link between Glasgow Observatory and the City until the end of 1863, but it had been demonstrated as early as October 1855 that a time ball could be dropped by telegraph from Edinburgh. Another Edinburgh initiative in September 1863 using time guns fired from Edinburgh caused offence in Glasgow and the trials were terminated in February 1864. Professor Grant, Director of Glasgow Observatory, argued successfully that a system of slave clocks controlled from Glasgow Observatory would be far superior to either a time ball or time guns which only provided a signal once per day. He won the debate in March 1864.

  16. The Three Sources of Gas in the Comae of Comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W. F.

    1995-01-01

    Surface water ice on a comet nucleus is the major source of coma gas. Dust, entrained by coma gas, fragments and vaporizes, forming a second, distributed source of coma gas constituents. Ice species more volatile than water ice below the surface of the nucleus are a third source of coma gas. Vapors from these ices, produced by heat penetrating into the nucleus, diffuse through pores outward into the coma. The second and third sources provide minor, but sometimes easily detectible, gaseous species in the coma. We present mixing ratios of observed minor coma constituents relative to water vapor as a function of heliocentric and cometocentric distances and compare these ratios with model predictions, assuming the sources of the minor species are either coma dust or volatile ices in the nucleus.

  17. Thrombin Generation in the Glasgow Myocardial Infarction Study

    PubMed Central

    Smid, Machiel; Dielis, Arne W. J. H.; Spronk, Henri M. H.; Rumley, Ann; van Oerle, Rene; Woodward, Mark; ten Cate, Hugo; Lowe, Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombin is a key protease in coagulation also implicated in complex pathology including atherosclerosis. To address the role of thrombin in relation to myocardial infarction (MI) we explored thrombin generation analysis in plasma from patients and controls that had participated in the Glasgow MI Study (GLAMIS). Methods Thrombin generation at 1 and 2 pM TF and with and without thrombomodulin (TM) was performed on plasmas from 356 subjects (171 cases, 185 age and sex matched controls) from GLAMIS collected between 3 and 9 months after the MI event. Results Although thrombin generation was slightly delayed in cases (lag time increased from 3.3 to 3.6 min) at the highest trigger, the overall potential to generate thrombin was increased by 7% for the ETP and by 15% for the peak height (both at the 1 pM TF trigger) in cases. Addition of TM did not reveal differences. Furthermore, an increased thrombin generation was associated with MI [normalized ETP: adjusted OR for the highest percentile = 2.4 (95% CI 1.3–4.5) and normalized peak height: adjusted OR = 2.6 (1.3–5.0)] at the lowest trigger; normalized ETP and peak height being 2.1 (1.1–3.8) and 2.0 (1.0–4.1) at the higher 2 pM trigger. Conclusion In GLAMIS, patients with a previous MI had an increased thrombin generation compared to controls. The absence of a clear difference in TM reduction suggests an unaltered anticoagulant activity in these patients. Further research is needed in order to unravel the underlying mechanisms of enhanced thrombin generation after MI. PMID:23826181

  18. Student Admission and Attendance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majestic, Ann L.

    1988-01-01

    Considers the North Carolina statutes that define the process for admitting students to public schools and ensuring their attendance. Examines cases relating to issues of school admission and compulsory attendance. (MLF)

  19. Hospice Admission Assessment.

    PubMed

    Moon, Paul J

    2017-04-01

    Hospice admission assessment is a pivotal encounter for patient/family and hospice representative. For patient/family, the admission is the threshold by which a particular level of care can commence and, symbolically, a certain marker in health status trajectory is reached. For hospice representative, the admission episode is an occasion to inaugurate an ambience that can serve to frame future hospice care experiences for the patient/family. Through a narrative lens, hospice admission assessment can be seen as experiential time and space, where patient's and family's stories are mindfully and deliberately witnessed and explored. Through the practice of narrative mining, the hospice representative can better understand others' offered stories of reality, which will better inform the plan of palliation and hospice care.

  20. New red jewels in Coma Berenices

    SciTech Connect

    Terrien, Ryan C.; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Deshpande, Rohit; Bender, Chad F.; Hearty, Frederick R.; Schneider, Donald P.; Cargile, Phillip A.; Pepper, Joshua; Rodriguez, Joseph E.; Siverd, Robert J.; Stassun, Keivan G.; Cottaar, Michiel; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Jackson, Kelly M.; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Majewski, Steven R.; Nidever, David L.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; and others

    2014-02-20

    We have used Sloan Digital Sky Survey-III (SDSS-III) Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE) radial velocity observations in the near-infrared H-band to explore the membership of the nearby (86.7 ± 0.9 pc) open cluster Coma Berenices (Melotte 111), concentrating on the poorly populated low-mass end of the main sequence. Using SDSS-III APOGEE radial velocity measurements, we confirm the membership of eight K/M dwarf members, providing the first confirmed low-mass members of the Coma Berenices cluster. Using R ∼ 2000 spectra from IRTF-SpeX, we confirm the independently luminosity classes of these targets, and find their metallicities to be consistent with the known solar mean metallicity of Coma Berenices and of M dwarfs in the solar neighborhood. In addition, the APOGEE spectra have enabled measurement of vsin i for each target and detection for the first time of the low-mass secondary components of the known binary systems Melotte 111 102 and Melotte 111 120, as well as identification of the previously unknown binary system 2MASS J12214070+2707510. Finally, we use Kilodegree Extremely Little Telescope photometry to measure photometric variability and rotation periods for a subset of the Coma Berenices members.

  1. Coma blisters in two postoperative patients.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Anna H; Farooq, Uzma; Choudhary, Sonal; Yin, Natalie; Nolan, Bridgit; Shiman, Michael; Milikowski, Clara; Izakovic, Jan; Elgart, George W

    2013-05-01

    Coma blisters are self-limited cutaneous bullae that occur in the setting of loss of consciousness because of a drug, illness, or accident, with the most common settings being barbiturate overdose and neurological disorders. The etiology behind coma blisters is poorly understood and is not related to underlying infections or autoimmune conditions. The clinical presentation consists of bullae, erosions, and violaceous plaques usually involving sites of pressure. The skin lesions usually occur within 48-72 hours of the start of a coma and resolve within 2-4 weeks. We present one case of a 5-month-old infant with severe valvular disease who required surgical repair. He was placed on extra corporeal membrane oxygenation and developed multiple tense coma blisters during the course of therapy. Skin biopsy revealed a noninflammatory subepidermal blister with necrosis of the overlying epidermis and necrosis of the eccrine ducts. We also present a second case of an 18-year-old female patient who underwent surgical resection of a benign mandibular tumor. She subsequently developed bullae on both arms 4 days after surgery. The skin biopsy showed a necrotic epidermis, a subepidermal blister, and diffuse necrosis of the eccrine coils.

  2. On the enigma of FK Comae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walter, F.; Basri, G.

    1981-01-01

    Stellar chromospheric and coronal activity appears ubiquitous among late type stars to the left of the TR-wind boundary line (Linksy and Haisch 1979). The level of activity as measured by the X-ray surface flux is linearly proportional to the stellar angular velocity, with the exception of slowly rotating dwarfs (Walter 1981, 1982; Walter and Bowyer 1981). The peculiar rapidly rotating G giant FK Comae (Merrill 1948) appears to fit into this pattern. Line widths indicate V sin i = 120 + or - 20 km s(-1) (Bopp and Stencel 1981). FK Comae has strong Ca II H and K and H alpha emission, strong transition region UV lines (Bopp and Stencel 1981), and an X-ray surface flux in good agreement with its rapid rotation (Walter 1981). Yet, FK Comae is an enigmatic star. It is a rapid rotator, but it is not clear why it is a rapid rotator. There is no direct evidence for duplicity; indeed, the upper limit of 20 km s(-1) on the K velocity puts tight constraints on any binary configuration, especially if sin i approx 1, as indicated by the large V sin i. Bopp and Stencel (1981) have suggested that FK Comae is an example of a coalesced W UMa system (Webbink 1976), wherein the orbital angular momentum has become rotational angular momentum of the coalesced star.

  3. Coma Patient Monitoring System Using Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankalp, Meenu

    2011-12-01

    COMA PATIENT MONITORING SYSTEM provides high quality healthcare services in the near future. To provide more convenient and comprehensive medical monitoring in big hospitals since it is tough job for medical personnel to monitor each patient for 24 hours.. The latest development in patient monitoring system can be used in Intensive Care Unit (ICU), Critical Care Unit (CCU), and Emergency Rooms of hospital. During treatment, the patient monitor is continuously monitoring the coma patient to transmit the important information. Also in the emergency cases, doctor are able to monitor patient condition efficiently to reduce time consumption, thus it provides more effective healthcare system. So due to importance of patient monitoring system, the continuous monitoring of the coma patient can be simplified. This paper investigates about the effects seen in the patient using "Coma Patient Monitoring System" which is a very advanced product related to physical changes in body movement of the patient and gives Warning in form of alarm and display on the LCD in less than one second time. It also passes a sms to a person sitting at the distant place if there exists any movement in any body part of the patient. The model for the system uses Keil software for the software implementation of the developed system.

  4. Better Glasgow outcome score, cerebral perfusion pressure and focal brain oxygenation in severely traumatized brain following direct regional brain hypothermia therapy: A prospective randomized study

    PubMed Central

    Idris, Zamzuri; Zenian, Mohd Sofan; Muzaimi, Mustapha; Hamid, Wan Zuraida Wan Abdul

    2014-01-01

    Background: Induced hypothermia for treatment of traumatic brain injury is controversial. Since many pathways involved in the pathophysiology of secondary brain injury are temperature dependent, regional brain hypothermia is thought capable to mitigate those processes. The objectives of this study are to assess the therapeutic effects and complications of regional brain cooling in severe head injury with Glasgow coma scale (GCS) 6-7. Materials and Methods: A prospective randomized controlled pilot study involving patients with severe traumatic brain injury with GCS 6 and 7 who required decompressive craniectomy. Patients were randomized into two groups: Cooling and no cooling. For the cooling group, analysis was made by dividing the group into mild and deep cooling. Brain was cooled by irrigating the brain continuously with cold Hartmann solution for 24-48 h. Main outcome assessments were a dichotomized Glasgow outcome score (GOS) at 6 months posttrauma. Results: A total of 32 patients were recruited. The cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling. There were 63.2% of patients in cooling group attained good GOS at 6 months compared to only 15.4% in noncooling group (P = 0.007). Interestingly, the analysis at 6 months post-trauma disclosed mild-cooling-treated patients did better than no cooling (70% vs. 15.4% attained good GOS, P = 0.013) and apparently, the deep-cooling-treated patients failed to be better than either no cooling (P = 0.074) or mild cooling group (P = 0.650). Conclusion: Data from this pilot study imply direct regional brain hypothermia appears safe, feasible and maybe beneficial in treating severely head-injured patients. PMID:25685201

  5. Patient notification exercise following a dentist's admission of the periodic use of unsterilized equipment.

    PubMed

    Roy, K M; Ahmed, S; Cameron, S O; Shaw, L; Yirrell, D; Goldberg, D

    2005-06-01

    During 2001, Greater Glasgow National Health Service (NHS) Board undertook a patient notification exercise in a Glasgow dental practice following the admission, by the dentist, of the use of unsterilized dental equipment on patients. Four thousand and eighty-nine exposed patients were identified; of these, 1696 contacted the NHS helpline and 1005 were counselled and screened for hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and human immunodeficiency virus. One patient showed evidence of previous HBV infection and 13 had antibodies to HCV. Molecular investigation of the HCV isolates indicated no significant associations. The investigation found no evidence of patient-to-patient transmission of HCV among patients attending the practice of a dentist who admitted periodically using unsterilized equipment.

  6. A pediatric FOUR score coma scale: interrater reliability and predictive validity.

    PubMed

    Czaikowski, Brianna L; Liang, Hong; Stewart, C Todd

    2014-04-01

    The Full Outline of UnResponsiveness (FOUR) Score is a coma scale that consists of four components (eye and motor response, brainstem reflexes, and respiration). It was originally validated among the adult population and recently in a pediatric population. To enhance clinical assessment of pediatric intensive care unit patients, including those intubated and/or sedated, at our children's hospital, we modified the FOUR Score Scale for this population. This modified scale would provide many of the same advantages as the original, such as interrater reliability, simplicity, and elimination of the verbal component that is not compatible with the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), creating a more valuable neurological assessment tool for the nursing community. Our goal was to potentially provide greater information than the formally used GCS when assessing critically ill, neurologically impaired patients, including those sedated and/or intubated. Experienced pediatric intensive care unit nurses were trained as "expert raters." Two different nurses assessed each subject using the Pediatric FOUR Score Scale (PFSS), GCS, and Richmond Agitation Sedation Scale at three different time points. Data were compared with the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category (PCPC) assessed by another nurse. Our hypothesis was that the PFSS and PCPC should highly correlate and the GCS and PCPC should correlate lower. Study results show that the PFSS is excellent for interrater reliability for trained nurse-rater pairs and prediction of poor outcome and in-hospital mortality, under various situations, but there were no statistically significant differences between the PFSS and the GCS. However, the PFSS does have the potential to provide greater neurological assessment in the intubated and/or sedated patient based on the outcomes of our study.

  7. The Admissions Equity Struggle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freedman, Eric

    2012-01-01

    It has been a long, litigious road from Heman Sweatt, an African-American mail carrier who wanted to attend the prestigious, all-White law school at the University of Texas at Austin in 1946, to Abigail Fisher, a White high school student who failed to win undergraduate admission to the same university a half-century later. Depending on what the…

  8. Another collision for the Coma cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vikhlinin, A.; Forman, W.; Jones, C.

    1996-01-01

    The wavelet transform analysis of the Rosat position sensitive proportional counter (PSPC) images of the Coma cluster are presented. The analysis shows, on small scales, a substructure dominated by two extended sources surrounding the two bright clusters NGC 4874 and NGC 4889. On scales of about 2 arcmin to 3 arcmin, the analysis reveals a tail of X-ray emission originating near the cluster center, curving to the south and east for approximately 25 arcmin and ending near the galaxy NGC 4911. The results are interpreted in terms of a merger of a group, having a core mass of approximately 10(exp 13) solar mass, with the main body of the Coma cluster.

  9. [Hysterical pseudo-coma: A case report].

    PubMed

    Chouaib, N; Chouaib, H; Belyamani, L; Otheman, Y; Bichra, M Z

    2015-09-01

    Hysterical pseudo-coma corresponds to a state of clinical sleep with contrasting waking electroencephalogram. It can last several hours or even several days in the absence of an underlying organic disease. In psychiatry, this disorder is currently part of the "dissociative disorder not otherwise specified". Through this case report, we describe the evolution of a hysterical pseudo-coma that lasted four days in a 28-year-old man. The normality of biological, radiological and electroencephalographic assessments, and responsiveness of the patient during the implementation of a nasogastric tube, led us to suspect a mental origin. An adapted psychiatric care allowed the patient to recover his autonomy after three days of hospitalization. This had prevented the escalation of explorations and invasive treatments. However, the search for organic comorbidity and its management remains a priority.

  10. The UCD Population of the Coma Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiboucas, Kristin; Ferguson, Peter; Tully, R. Brent; Carter, David; Phillipps, Steven; Peng, Eric

    2015-08-01

    UCDs are super massive star clusters found largely in dense regions but have also been found around individual galaxies and in smaller groups. Their origin is still under debate but consensus is that they formed either during major galaxy mergers as mergers of super massive star clusters, are simply the high mass end of the globular cluster luminosity function and formed in the same way as globular clusters, or that they formed from the threshing of galaxies and are remnant nuclear star clusters, which themselves may have formed from the mergers of globular star clusters within galaxies.We are attempting to disentangle these competing formation scenarios with a large survey of UCDs in the Coma cluster. Using ACS two-passband imaging from the HST/ACS Coma Cluster Treasury Survey, we are using colors and sizes to identify the UCD cluster members. With a large size limited sample of the UCD population within the core region of the Coma cluster, we intend to use the population size, properties, and spatial distribution, and comparison with the Coma globular cluster and nuclear star cluster populations to discriminate between the threshing and globular cluster scenarios. In particular, previously we have found a possible correlation of UCD colors with host galaxy and a possible excess of UCDs around a non-central giant galaxy with an unusually large globular cluster population, both suggestive of a globular cluster origin. With a larger sample size and additional imaging fields that encompass the region around this giant galaxy, we are investigating whether the color correlation with host persists and whether the unusual giant galaxy hosts a similarly large UCD population consistent with, or in excess of, the bright end of the GCLF. We present initial results from the survey.

  11. Admissions Criteria in Teacher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwanke, Dean

    1981-01-01

    A review of the literature on the topic of admissions criteria in teacher education is presented. Bibliographic annotations review surveys, studies, models, and guidelines on various aspects of admissions criteria, as well as attracting and retaining quality students. (JN)

  12. Parenteral penicillin for children with meningococcal disease before hospital admission: case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Harnden, Anthony; Ninis, Nelly; Thompson, Matthew; Perera, Rafael; Levin, Michael; Mant, David; Mayon-White, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact on mortality and morbidity of parenteral penicillin given to children before admission to hospital with suspected meningococcal disease. Design Retrospective comparison of fatal and non-fatal cases. Setting England, Wales, and Northern Ireland; December 1997 to February 1999. Participants 158 children aged 0-16 years (26 died, 132 survived) in whom a general practitioner had made the diagnosis of meningococcal disease before hospital admission. Results Administration of parenteral penicillin by general practitioners was associated with increased odds ratios for death (7.4, 95% confidence interval 1.5 to 37.7) and complications in survivors (5.0, 1.7 to 15.0). Children who received penicillin had more severe disease on admission (median Glasgow meningococcal septicaemia prognostic score (GMSPS) 6.5 v 4.0, P = 0.002). Severity on admission did not differ significantly with time taken to reach hospital. Conclusions Children who were given parenteral penicillin by a general practitioner had more severe disease on reaching hospital than those who were not given penicillin before admission. The association with poor outcome may be because children who are more severely ill are being given penicillin before admission. PMID:16554335

  13. Large scale structure of the globular cluster population in Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, Alexander T.; O'Neill, Conor; Madrid, Juan P.

    2016-01-01

    A search for globular cluster candidates in the Coma Cluster was carried out using Hubble Space Telescope data taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys. We combine different observing programs including the Coma Treasury Survey in order to obtain the large scale distribution of globular clusters in Coma. Globular cluster candidates were selected through careful morphological inspection and a detailed analysis of their magnitude and colors in the two available wavebands, F475W (Sloan g) and F814W (I). Color Magnitude Diagrams, radial density plots and density maps were then created to characterize the globular cluster population in Coma. Preliminary results show the structure of the intergalactic globular cluster system throughout Coma, among the largest globular clusters catalogues to date. The spatial distribution of globular clusters shows clear overdensities, or bridges, between Coma galaxies. It also becomes evident that galaxies of similar luminosity have vastly different numbers of associated globular clusters.

  14. A CO2-rich coma model applied to the neutral coma of Comet West

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, G. F.; Swift, M. B.; Huntress, W. T.

    1982-01-01

    Models of the cometary coma in which the dominant volatile is CO2 have been constructed for a range of heliocentric distances. Model coma abundances of C2, C3, and CN are compared with the abundances observed in Comet West and are found to be in good agreement. Furthermore, the variation with heliocentric distance of C2, C3, and CN model abundances agree well with the observed variation in Comet West. The present work lends detailed support to a previous suggestion that a substance more volatile than water, such as CO2, controls the evaporation of the nucleus of Comet West. The implications for cometary formation are briefly discussed.

  15. Predictive value of neurological examination for early cortical responses to somatosensory evoked potentials in patients with postanoxic coma.

    PubMed

    Bouwes, Aline; Binnekade, Jan M; Verbaan, Bart W; Zandbergen, Eveline G J; Koelman, Johannes H T M; Weinstein, Henry C; Hijdra, Albert; Horn, Janneke

    2012-03-01

    Bilateral absence of cortical N20 responses of median nerve somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) predicts poor neurological outcome in postanoxic coma after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Although SEP is easy to perform and available in most hospitals, it is worthwhile to know how neurological signs are associated with SEP results. The aim of this study was to investigate whether specific clinical neurological signs are associated with either an absent or a present median nerve SEP in patients after CPR. Data from the previously published multicenter prospective cohort study PROPAC (prognosis in postanoxic coma, 2000-2003) were used. Neurological examination, consisting of Glasgow Coma Score (GCS) and brain stem reflexes, and SEP were performed 24, 48, and 72 h after CPR. Positive predictive values for predicting absent and present SEP, as well as diagnostic accuracy were calculated. Data of 407 patients were included. Of the 781 SEPs performed, N20 s were present in 401, bilaterally absent in 299, and 81 SEPs were technically undeterminable. The highest positive predictive values (0.63-0.91) for an absent SEP were found for absent pupillary light responses. The highest positive predictive values (0.71-0.83) for a present SEP were found for motor scores of withdrawal to painful stimuli or better. Multivariate analyses showed a fair diagnostic accuracy (0.78) for neurological examination in predicting an absent or present SEP at 48 or 72 h after CPR. This study shows that neurological examination cannot reliably predict absent or present cortical N20 responses in median nerve SEPs in patients after CPR.

  16. ULTRA-COMPACT DWARFS IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Chiboucas, Kristin; Tully, R. Brent; Marzke, R. O.; Phillipps, S.; Price, J.; Peng, Eric W.; Trentham, Neil; Carter, David; Hammer, Derek E-mail: tully@ifa.hawaii.edu E-mail: S.Phillipps@bristol.ac.uk E-mail: peng@pku.edu.cn E-mail: dxc@astro.livjm.ac.uk

    2011-08-20

    We have undertaken a spectroscopic search for ultra-compact dwarf galaxies (UCDs) in the dense core of the dynamically evolved, massive Coma cluster as part of the Hubble Space Telescope/Advanced Camera for Surveys (HST/ACS) Coma Cluster Treasury Survey. UCD candidates were initially chosen based on color, magnitude, degree of resolution within the ACS images, and the known properties of Fornax and Virgo UCDs. Follow-up spectroscopy with Keck/Low-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer confirmed 27 candidates as members of the Coma cluster, a success rate >60% for targeted objects brighter than M{sub R} = -12. Another 14 candidates may also prove to be Coma members, but low signal-to-noise spectra prevent definitive conclusions. An investigation of the properties and distribution of the Coma UCDs finds these objects to be very similar to UCDs discovered in other environments. The Coma UCDs tend to be clustered around giant galaxies in the cluster core and have colors/metallicity that correlate with the host galaxy. With properties and a distribution similar to that of the Coma cluster globular cluster population, we find strong support for a star cluster origin for the majority of the Coma UCDs. However, a few UCDs appear to have stellar population or structural properties which differentiate them from the old star cluster populations found in the Coma cluster, perhaps indicating that UCDs may form through multiple formation channels.

  17. Hyperammonemic Coma in an Adult due to Ornithine Transcarbamylase Deficiency.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Daniel L; Galbreath, David A; Patel, Bhavesh M; Ingall, Timothy J; Khatib, Amer; Johnson, Daniel J

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To report an unusual cause of coma in an adult. Design. Case report. Setting. University teaching hospital. Patient. A previously healthy 53-year-old man initially presented with altered mental status and progressed to coma. He was found to be substantially hyperammonemic and did not improve with lactulose therapy and continuous venovenous hemodialysis. Results. Biochemical testing revealed previously undiagnosed ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency, and the patient responded to arginine, sodium phenylacetate, and sodium benzoate. Conclusion. Even in adult patients with no known history, inborn errors of metabolism must be considered in the differential diagnosis of unexplained coma. Defects of the urea cycle can present with an unprovoked hyperammonemic coma.

  18. University of Glasgow at TREC 2012: Experiments with Terrier in Medical Records, Microblog, and Web Tracks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    Univ. of Glasgow, 2003. [2] G. Amati, E. Ambrosi, M. Bianchi, C. Gaibisso, and G. Gambosi. FUB, IASI -CNR and Univ. of Tor Vergata at TREC 2007 Blog track...In Proc. of TREC, 2007. [3] G. Amati, G. Amodeo, M. Bianchi, G. Marcone, C. Gaibisso, A. Celi, C. De Nicola and M. Flammini. FUB, IASI -CNR, UNIVAQ

  19. Contested Urban Spaces: Exploring the Analytics of Young Persons' Experiences of Living in Glasgow's Deprived Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holligan, Chris; Deuchar, Ross

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports findings from an exploratory study of mainly young people's verbally articulated perceptions of urban life in Glasgow, Scotland. The focus is upon areas of deprivation where territory and social capital is contested and whose meanings are possibly only partially grasped by our informants. Their personal knowledge of violence and…

  20. Mortality in Glasgow and Edinburgh: a paradigm of inequality in health.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, G C; Ecob, R

    1992-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim was to describe, predict, and interpret mortality in Glasgow and Edinburgh. DESIGN--The study was an analysis of all cause and cause specific mortality data for quinquennia based on census years between 1931 and 1981, linking age and sex specific mortality rates by year of birth, for people dying between the ages of 25 and 74 years. SETTING--Glasgow and Edinburgh, Scotland. MAIN RESULTS--Age and sex specific mortality rates declined steadily in Edinburgh and Glasgow during the period 1931-1981, with rates always being lower in Edinburgh than in Glasgow. Since 1961 log mortality rates have tended to rise linearly with age in both cities. In 1979-83, the population of Glasgow reached a given all cause mortality rate 3.9 years earlier in men and 3.6 years earlier in women than did the population of Edinburgh. These differences have increased, and are predicted to increase further, especially in men. CONCLUSIONS--The current 40% cross sectional difference in mortality rates between the cities is largely determined by levels of mortality in early adulthood which provide a baseline for the subsequent rise in log mortality. Disease specific epidemiology provides a limited view of inequalities in health, and a partial basis for health promotion. Campaigns to alter disease risk profiles in adults should be complemented by measures operating earlier in life to reduce susceptibility to risk. Maternal and child health require greater priority in public health policy, particularly in areas of socioeconomic disadvantage. PMID:1479319

  1. Nonpolytropic model for the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusco-Femiano, R.; Hughes, John P.

    1994-01-01

    In this article we demonstrate, for the first time, how a physically motivated static model for both the gas and galaxies in the Coma Cluster of galaxies can jointly fit all available X-ray and optical imaging and spectroscopic data. The principal assumption of this nonpolytropic model (Cavaliere & Fusco-Femiano 1981, hereafter CFF), is that the intracluster gas temperature is proportional to the square of the galaxy velocity dispersion everywhere throughout the cluster; no other assumption about the gas temperature distribution is required. After demonstrating that the CFF nonpolytropic model is an adequate representation of the gas and galaxy distributions, the radial velocity dispersion profile, and the gas temperature distribution, we derive the following information about the Coma Cluster: 1. The central temperature is about 9 keV and the central density is 2.8 x 10(exp -3)/cm(exp 3) for the X-ray emitting plasma; 2. The binding mass of the cluster is approximately 2 x 10(exp 15) solar mass within 5 Mpc for (H(sub 0) = 50 km/sec/Mpc), with a mass-to-light ratio of approximately 160 solar mass/solar luminosity; 3. The contribution of the gas to the total virial mass increases with distance from the cluster center, and we estimate that this ratio is no greater than approximately 50% within 5 Mpc. The ability of the CFF nonpolytropic model to describe the current X-ray and optical data for the Coma Cluster suggests that a significant fraction of the thermal energy contained in the hot gas in this as well as other rich galaxy clusters may have come from the interaction between the galaxies and the ambient cluster medium. interaction between the galaxies and the ambient cluster medium.

  2. Thermodynamics of the Coma Cluster Outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Mantz, A.; Matsushita, K.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Sanders, J. S.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, T.; Takei, Y.; Walker, S. A.

    2013-09-01

    We present results from a large mosaic of Suzaku observations of the Coma Cluster, the nearest and X-ray brightest hot (~8 keV), dynamically active, non-cool core system, focusing on the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium on large scales. For azimuths not aligned with an infalling subcluster toward the southwest, our measured temperature and X-ray brightness profiles exhibit broadly consistent radial trends, with the temperature decreasing from about 8.5 keV at the cluster center to about 2 keV at a radius of 2 Mpc, which is the edge of our detection limit. The southwest merger significantly boosts the surface brightness, allowing us to detect X-ray emission out to ~2.2 Mpc along this direction. Apart from the southwestern infalling subcluster, the surface brightness profiles show multiple edges around radii of 30-40 arcmin. The azimuthally averaged temperature profile, as well as the deprojected density and pressure profiles, all show a sharp drop consistent with an outwardly-propagating shock front located at 40 arcmin, corresponding to the outermost edge of the giant radio halo observed at 352 MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The shock front may be powering this radio emission. A clear entropy excess inside of r 500 reflects the violent merging events linked with these morphological features. Beyond r 500, the entropy profiles of the Coma Cluster along the relatively relaxed directions are consistent with the power-law behavior expected from simple models of gravitational large-scale structure formation. The pressure is also in agreement at these radii with the expected values measured from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich data from the Planck satellite. However, due to the large uncertainties associated with the Coma Cluster measurements, we cannot yet exclude an entropy flattening in this system consistent with that seen in more relaxed cool core clusters.

  3. THERMODYNAMICS OF THE COMA CLUSTER OUTSKIRTS

    SciTech Connect

    Simionescu, A.; Werner, N.; Urban, O.; Allen, S. W.; Fabian, A. C.; Sanders, J. S.; Walker, S. A.; Mantz, A.; Matsushita, K.; Sasaki, T.; Sato, T.; Nulsen, P. E. J.; Takei, Y.

    2013-09-20

    We present results from a large mosaic of Suzaku observations of the Coma Cluster, the nearest and X-ray brightest hot ({approx}8 keV), dynamically active, non-cool core system, focusing on the thermodynamic properties of the intracluster medium on large scales. For azimuths not aligned with an infalling subcluster toward the southwest, our measured temperature and X-ray brightness profiles exhibit broadly consistent radial trends, with the temperature decreasing from about 8.5 keV at the cluster center to about 2 keV at a radius of 2 Mpc, which is the edge of our detection limit. The southwest merger significantly boosts the surface brightness, allowing us to detect X-ray emission out to {approx}2.2 Mpc along this direction. Apart from the southwestern infalling subcluster, the surface brightness profiles show multiple edges around radii of 30-40 arcmin. The azimuthally averaged temperature profile, as well as the deprojected density and pressure profiles, all show a sharp drop consistent with an outwardly-propagating shock front located at 40 arcmin, corresponding to the outermost edge of the giant radio halo observed at 352 MHz with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope. The shock front may be powering this radio emission. A clear entropy excess inside of r{sub 500} reflects the violent merging events linked with these morphological features. Beyond r{sub 500}, the entropy profiles of the Coma Cluster along the relatively relaxed directions are consistent with the power-law behavior expected from simple models of gravitational large-scale structure formation. The pressure is also in agreement at these radii with the expected values measured from Sunyaev-Zel'dovich data from the Planck satellite. However, due to the large uncertainties associated with the Coma Cluster measurements, we cannot yet exclude an entropy flattening in this system consistent with that seen in more relaxed cool core clusters.

  4. Multifactorial hypoglycaemic coma in female bodybuilder.

    PubMed

    Sein Anand, Jacek; Chodorowski, Zygmunt; Wiśniewski, Marek

    2005-01-01

    A 31-year-old female bodybuilder who was admitted to the Clinic because of deep coma and hypoglycaemia was presented. For last six weeks she had been preparing for a competition doing aerobic and anaerobic exercises, ingesting rich-protein and low-carbohydrate diet and administering a low dose of somatotropin every day. Even for the regional competitions there is a need for exact doping check among young athletes. Growth hormone in a small dosage taken together with low-carbohydrate and rich-protein diet can provoke deep hypoglicemia among people who use it for doping purposes.

  5. [The coma awakening unit, between intensive care and rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Mimouni, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    After intensive care and before classic neurological rehabilitation is possible, patients in an altered state of consciousness are cared for at early stages in so-called coma awakening units. The care involves, on the one hand, the complex support of the patient's awakening from coma as a neurological and existential process, and on the other, support for their families.

  6. [Complete recovery from transient coma in bilateral paramedian thalamic infarctions].

    PubMed

    Casado, J L; Arenas, C; Serrano, V; Moreno Rojas, A; Gil-Néciga, E; Gil-Peralta, A

    1995-01-01

    Bilateral paramedian thalamic infarcts (BPTI) can begin clinically with transient coma, after which symptoms of fluctuating hypersomnolence, irrational behaviour, or amnesic states may be observed. We present two patients with BPTI who began with coma, recovering spontaneously in under eight hours, with no accompanying symptoms.

  7. X ray archeology in the Coma cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Simon D. M.; Briel, Ulrich G.; Henry, J. Patrick

    1993-01-01

    Images of X-ray emission from hot gas within the Coma cluster of galaxies are presented. These maps, made with the Rosat satellite, have high signal to noise ratio and allow cluster structure to be analyzed in unprecedented detail. They show greater structural irregularity than could be anticipated from earlier observations of Coma. Emission is detected from a number of bright cluster galaxies in addition to the two known previously. In four cases there is evidence that these galaxies lie at the center of an extended subconcentration within the cluster, possibly the remnant of their associated groups. For at least two galaxies the images show direct evidence for ongoing disruption of their gaseous atmosphere. The luminosity associated with these galaxies is comparable to that detected around similar ellipticals in much poorer environments. Emission is easily detected and appears to become more regular at large radii. The data show that this archetype of a rich and regular galaxy cluster was formed by the merging of several distinct subunits which are not yet fully destroyed.

  8. Observational data needs useful for modeling the coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huebner, W. F.; Giguere, P. T.

    1981-01-01

    A computer model of comet comae is described; results from assumed composition of frozen gases are summarized and compared to coma observations. Restrictions on relative abundance of some frozen constituents are illustrated. Modeling, when tightly coupled to observational data, can be important for comprehensive analysis of observations, for predicting undetected molecular species and for improved understanding of coma and nucleus. To accomplish this, total gas production rates and relative elemental abundances of H:C:N:O:S are needed as a function of heliocentric distance of the comet. Also needed are relative column densitites and column density profiles with well defined diaphragm range and pointing position on the coma. Production rates are less desirable since they are model dependent. Total number (or upper limits) of molecules in the coma and analysis of unidentified spectral lines are needed also.

  9. Coma blisters in 2 children on anticonvulsant medication.

    PubMed

    Basu, Anna; Brown, Sara; Kirkham, Nigel; Ramesh, Venkateswaran; Leech, Suzy; Devlin, Anita

    2009-08-01

    Blister formation and eccrine sweat gland necrosis have been recognized to occur in states of impaired consciousness and were first reported following barbiturate intoxication. Their etiology is complex and cannot simply be explained by pressure effects. Now that barbiturates are less frequently used, clinicians are likely to be less aware of the phenomenon of coma blister formation; however, newer drugs have also been associated with the occurrence of coma blisters. We describe 2 new associations of coma blisters and anticonvulsants in children. In the first child, blisters recurred on multiple occasions along with obtundation and edema. Our aims are to alert clinicians to the occurrence of coma blisters in children sedated on anticonvulsant medications and to report the new finding of recurrent coma blisters.

  10. Brain methanethiol and ammonia concentrations in experimental hepatic coma and coma induced by injections of various combinations of these substances.

    PubMed

    Zieve, L; Doizaki, W M; Lyftogt, C

    1984-11-01

    In normal rats in a coma induced by NH+4 alone or by methanethiol alone, the brain and blood levels of ammonia or methanethiol are much higher than those observed in rats in experimental hepatic coma. When various smaller dosage combinations of NH+4, methanethiol, and octanoic acid were injected simultaneously, coma occurred at lower brain and blood concentrations of ammonia and methanethiol. Brain ammonia and methanethiol concentrations in normal rats receiving 0.75 mmol NH+4 plus 0.15 mmol octanoic acid plus 18 mumol methanethiol were comparable with those observed in 24 rats in hepatic coma after fulminant hepatic failure caused by acute massive ischemic liver necrosis. The normal rats became comatose. In these rats and in the rats in hepatic coma, the ammonia level in the brain was increased threefold and the methanethiol level in the brain was increased fivefold. Because these levels of ammonia and methanethiol were sufficient to induce coma in normal rats, they should also have been sufficient to induce coma in rats with damaged livers. Therefore, the accumulation of ammonia and methanethiol in the central nervous system after the acute massive ischemic necrosis may have been sufficient to account for the coma that ensued, without the involvement of other factors.

  11. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis presenting as schizophrenia with an alpha coma pattern in a child.

    PubMed

    Kartal, Ayşe; Kurt, Ayşegül Neşe Çitak; Gürkaş, Esra; Aydin, Kurşad; Serdaroğlu, Ayşe

    2014-10-01

    Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis, a progressive neurodegenerative disorder of the central nervous system, can present atypically with uncharacteristic electroencephalographic (EEG) features at its onset albeit typically with progressive mental deterioration, behavioral changes, and myoclonic jerks. An atypical presentation of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis can lead to a delay in diagnosis, thus hindering early treatment. Herein, we describe a 14-year-old girl who presented with insomnia, amnesia, auditory and visual hallucinations. The patient's electroencephalography on admission showed an alpha coma pattern. In spite of antipsychiatric treatment (olanzapine 20 mg/d) for 3 months, a progressive deterioration in neurologic function was observed. Subacute sclerosing panencephalitis was suspected and diagnosis was confirmed by increased titers of measles antibodies in the cerebrospinal fluid. The attention of pediatricians should be drawn to psychiatric symptoms as possible initial presentations of subacute sclerosing panencephalitis in order to avoid needless diagnostic and treatment procedures.

  12. Self-induced drug intoxication in baclofen: of the calm hypotonic coma in the status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Thill, Chloé; Di Constanzo, Laurence; Pessey, François; Aries, Philippe; Montelescaut, Étienne; Sapin, Jeanne; Vaillant, Catherine; Drouillard, Isabelle

    2016-06-01

    Baclofen is an agonist of peripheral and central B gamma-aminobutyric acid receptors, whose activation causes a myorelaxation and a powerfull depression of the central nervous system. Moreover, it has an action against addiction, in reducing craving. Commercialized since 1975 in France, to control muscle spasticity due to medullar affection or multiple sclerosis, it receives a temporary recommendation of use in march 2014, as a last-line adjuvant treatment in alcohol withdrawal. Beyond its therapeutic use, baclofen is involved in many self-induced intoxications. We report the case of a patient who develops, after a massive ingestion of baclofen (supposed dose ingested: 1 200 mg), a hypotonic and calm coma, requiring her admission in our intensive care unit, and then a status epilepticus.

  13. ROSAT observations of Coma Cluster galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dow, K. L.; White, S. D. M.

    1995-01-01

    The approximately 86 ks ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) image of the Coma Cluster is deeper than any previous X-ray observation of a galaxy cluster. We search for X-ray emission from 35 individual galaxies in a magnitude-limited sample, all of which lie within 20 arcmins of the optical axis in at least one of the four Coma pointings. We detect seven galaxies in the 0.4-2.4 keV band at a significance level exceeding 3 sigma, and a further four at above 2 sigma. Although we can set only upper limits on the individual flux from each of the other galaxies, we are able to measure their mean flux by stacking the observations. The X-ray luminosities of the seven detections range from 6.2 x 10(exp 40) to 1.5 x 10(exp 42) ergs/s (0.4-2.4 keV for H(sub 0) = 50 km/s/Mpc). For galaxies with a blue absolute magnitude of about -21 we find a mean X-ray luminosity of 1.3 x 10(exp 40) ergs/s. The ratio of X-ray to optical luminosity is substantially smaller for such subjects than for the brightest galaxies in the cluster. The X-ray luminosities of the four brightest galaxies are ill-defined, however, because of ambiguity in distinguishing galaxy emission from cluster emission. Each object appears to be related to significant structure in the diffuse intracluster medium. We also investigate emission in the softer 0.2-0.4 keV band where detections are less significant because of the higher background, and we discuss the properties of a number of interesting individual sources. The X-ray luminosities of the Coma galaxies are similar to those of galaxies in the Virgo Cluster and in other regions with relatively low galaxy density. We conclude that large-scale environmental effects do not significantly enhance or suppress the average X-ray emission from galaxies, but that individual objects vary in luminosity substantially in a way which may depend on the detailed history of their environment.

  14. Coma, metabolic acidosis, and methemoglobinemia in a patient with acetaminophen toxicity.

    PubMed

    Kanji, Hussein D; Mithani, Shazma; Boucher, Paul; Dias, Valerian C; Yarema, Mark C

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of early coma, metabolic acidosis and methemoglobinemia after substantial acetaminophen toxicity in the absence of hepatic failure. A 77-year-old female presented to the emergency department with a decreased level of consciousness. She was found unresponsive by a family member in her bed, and was reported to be acting normally when she was last seen eight hours earlier. Laboratory results on arrival were: pH 7.19, sodium 139 mmol/L, chloride 106 mmol/L, potassium 3.3 mmol/L, CO2 8 mmol/L, and an anion gap of 25. Both venous lactate (10.2 mmol/L) and methemoglobin (9.4 %) were elevated. The patient's acetaminophen concentration was markedly elevated at 7138 µmol/L (1078 µg/ml). Hepatic enzymes and coagulation tests were normal [alanine transaminase (ALT) 8 U/L, international normalized ratio (INR) 1.0]. Intravenous N-acetylcysteine (NAC) was initiated at a dose of 150 mg/kg over 15 minutes, followed by 50 mg/kg over the next four hours, followed by 100 mg/kg over the next 16 hours. Twenty-four hours after admission, the anion gap metabolic acidosis had resolved, and the methemoglobin was 2.1%. Aminotransferases peaked at 44 U/L and INR peaked at 1.9. A urine 5-oxoproline assay performed five days after admission was negative, suggesting no evidence of a 5-oxoprolinase deficiency. We describe the pathophysiology and discuss the literature on acetaminophen-induced coma and metabolic acidosis in the absence of hepatic injury; and propose mechanisms for associated methemoglobinemia. 

  15. Meeting Report: BAA Out of London Weekend, 2007 August 31 to September 2, Glasgow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clackson, T.

    2008-02-01

    In 2007 the BAA travelled north of the Border to visit 'Bonnie Scotland' for the annual Out-of-London weekend. The BAA last held a weekend in Scotland in 1994 and the offer from the Astronomical Society of Glasgow (ASG) to host the 2007 event was very welcome. The ASG recently celebrated its centenary and is an active society with over 140 members. They were both pleased and a little daunted when their offer was accepted by the BAA.

  16. Disability after severe head injury: observations on the use of the Glasgow Outcome Scale.

    PubMed Central

    Jennett, B; Snoek, J; Bond, M R; Brooks, N

    1981-01-01

    The nature of the neurological and mental disabilities resulting from severe head injuries are analysed in 150 patients. Mental handicap contributed more significantly to overall social disability than did neurological deficits. This social handicap is readily described by the Glasgow Outcome Scale, an extended version of which is described and compared with alternatives. Comments are made about the quality of life in disabled survivors. PMID:6453957

  17. Knowledge of health information and services in a random sample of the population of Glasgow.

    PubMed

    Moynihan, M; Jones, A K; Stewart, G T; Lucas, R W

    1980-01-01

    A RANDOM sample of adults in Glasgow was surveyed by trained interviewers to determine public knowledge on four topics chosen specifically for each of four age groups. The topics were: Welfare rights and services; Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) and individual action that can reduce risk; The dangers of smoking in pregnancy; and fluoride and its functions and the connections between good health and habitual behaviour.

  18. Flumazenil, naloxone and the 'coma cocktail'.

    PubMed

    Sivilotti, Marco L A

    2016-03-01

    Flumazenil and naloxone are considered to be pharmacologically ideal antidotes. By competitive binding at the molecular target receptors, they are highly specific antagonists of two important drug classes, the benzodiazepines and opioids, respectively. Both antidotes enjoy rapid onset and short duration after parenteral administration, are easily titrated and are essentially devoid of agonist effects. Yet only naloxone is widely used as a component of the 'coma cocktail', a sequence of empirical treatments to correct altered mental status, while experts discourage the use of flumazenil for such patients. This review contrasts the history, indications, published evidence and novel applications for each antidote in order to explain this disparity in the clinical use of these 'ideal' antidotes.

  19. SOCCER: Comet Coma Sample Return Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albee, A. L.; Uesugi, K. T.; Tsou, Peter

    1994-01-01

    Comets, being considered the most primitive bodies in the solar system, command the highest priority among solar system objects for studying solar nebula evolution and the evolution of life through biogenic elements and compounds. Sample Of Comet Coma Earth Return (SOCCER), a joint effort between NASA and the Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (ISAS) in Japan, has two primary science objectives: (1) the imaging of the comet nucleus and (2) the return to Earth of samples of volatile species and intact dust. This effort makes use of the unique strengths and capabilities of both countries in realizing this important quest for the return of samples from a comet. This paper presents an overview of SOCCER's science payloads, engineering flight system, and its mission operations.

  20. Endozepine-4 levels are increased in hepatic coma

    PubMed Central

    Malaguarnera, Giulia; Vacante, Marco; Drago, Filippo; Bertino, Gaetano; Motta, Massimo; Giordano, Maria; Malaguarnera, Michele

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the serum levels of endozepine-4, their relation with ammonia serum levels, the grading of coma and the severity of cirrhosis, in patients with hepatic coma. METHODS: In this study we included 20 subjects with Hepatic coma, 20 subjects with minimal hepatic encephalopathy (MHE) and 20 subjects control. All subjects underwent blood analysis, Child Pugh and Model for End - stage liver disease (MELD) assessment, endozepine-4 analysis. RESULTS: Subjects with hepatic coma showed significant difference in endozepine-4 (P < 0.001) and NH3 levels (P < 0.001) compared both to MHE and controls patients. Between NH3 and endozepine-4 we observed a significant correlation (P = 0.009; Pearson correlation 0.570). There was a significant correlation between endozepine-4 and MELD (P = 0.017; Pearson correlation = 0.529). In our study blood ammonia concentration was noted to be raised in patients with hepatic coma, with the highest ammonia levels being found in those who were comatose. We also found a high correlation between endozepine-4 and ammonia (P < 0.001). In patients with grade IV hepatic coma, endozepine levels were significantly higher compared to other groups. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that an increased level of endozepine in subjects with higher levels of MELD was observed. In conclusion, data concerning involvement of the GABA-ergic system in HE coma could be explained by stage-specific alterations. PMID:26290636

  1. Which EEG patterns in coma are nonconvulsive status epilepticus?

    PubMed

    Trinka, Eugen; Leitinger, Markus

    2015-08-01

    Nonconvulsive status epilepticus (NCSE) is common in patients with coma with a prevalence between 5% and 48%. Patients in deep coma may exhibit epileptiform EEG patterns, such as generalized periodic spikes, and there is an ongoing debate about the relationship of these patterns and NCSE. The purposes of this review are (i) to discuss the various EEG patterns found in coma, its fluctuations, and transitions and (ii) to propose modified criteria for NCSE in coma. Classical coma patterns such as diffuse polymorphic delta activity, spindle coma, alpha/theta coma, low output voltage, or burst suppression do not reflect NCSE. Any ictal patterns with a typical spatiotemporal evolution or epileptiform discharges faster than 2.5 Hz in a comatose patient reflect nonconvulsive seizures or NCSE and should be treated. Generalized periodic diacharges or lateralized periodic discharges (GPDs/LPDs) with a frequency of less than 2.5 Hz or rhythmic discharges (RDs) faster than 0.5 Hz are the borderland of NCSE in coma. In these cases, at least one of the additional criteria is needed to diagnose NCSE (a) subtle clinical ictal phenomena, (b) typical spatiotemporal evolution, or (c) response to antiepileptic drug treatment. There is currently no consensus about how long these patterns must be present to qualify for NCSE, and the distinction from nonconvulsive seizures in patients with critical illness or in comatose patients seems arbitrary. The Salzburg Consensus Criteria for NCSE [1] have been modified according to the Standardized Terminology of the American Clinical Neurophysiology Society [2] and validated in three different cohorts, with a sensitivity of 97.2%, a specificity of 95.9%, and a diagnostic accuracy of 96.3% in patients with clinical signs of NCSE. Their diagnostic utility in different cohorts with patients in deep coma has to be studied in the future. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Status Epilepticus".

  2. The Changing College Admissions Scene.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sjogren, Cliff

    1983-01-01

    Discusses the status of college admissions and some of the forces that influenced college admissions policies during each of four three-year periods: the Sputnik Era (1957-60), the Postwar Baby Boom Era (1964-67), the "New Groups" Era (1971-74), and the Stable Enrollment Era (1978-81). (PGD)

  3. Optimal Admission to Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albaek, Karsten

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses admission decisions when students from different high school tracks apply for admission to university programmes. I derive a criterion that is optimal in the sense that it maximizes the graduation rates of the university programmes. The paper contains an empirical analysis that documents the relevance of theory and illustrates…

  4. Valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma and unrecognised portosystemic shunt.

    PubMed

    Nzwalo, Hipólito; Carrapatoso, Leonor; Ferreira, Fátima; Basilio, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    Hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is a rare and potentially fatal complication of valproic acid treatment. The clinical presentation of hyperammonaemic encephalopathy is wide and includes seizures and coma. We present a case of hyperammonaemic coma precipitated by sodium valproate use for symptomatic epilepsy in a patient with unrecognised portosystemic shunt, secondary to earlier alcoholism. The absence of any stigmata of chronic liver disease and laboratory markers of liver dysfunction delayed the recognition of this alcohol-related complication. The portal vein bypass led to a refractory, valproic acid-induced hyperammonaemic coma. The patient fully recovered after dialysis treatment.

  5. An Atypical Case of Myxedema Coma with Concomitant Nonconvulsive Seizure

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Pratik; Varallo-Rodriguez, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Hypothyroidism is a prevalent condition in the general population that is treatable with appropriately dosed thyroid hormone replacement medication. Infrequently, patients will present with myxedema coma, characterized by hypothermia, hypotension, bradycardia, and altered mental status in the setting of severe hypothyroidism. Myxedema coma has also been known to manifest in a number of unusual and dangerous forms. Here, we present the case of a woman we diagnosed with an uncharacteristic expression of myxedema coma and nonconvulsive seizure complicated by a right middle cerebral artery infarct. PMID:27872766

  6. The Unseen Founders Of Quaternary Science - The Men Of Glasgow, Scotland (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rose, J.

    2010-12-01

    Louis Agassiz (1807-1873) and Charles Lyell (1797-1875) are widely regarded as the founders of Quaternary Science, and there is no doubt that they played their part: Agassiz in 1840 presented and promoted his case for the wide-scale fluctuations of glaciers, and Lyell, through his books and contacts, did much to introduce the subject which we now know as climate change. However there are a number of individuals who contributed to the founding of Quaternary Science who are not so readily recognised and a remarkable fact is that a significant proportion were men without academic training or background who come from, or worked in Glasgow or the adjacent region of central Scotland. First amongst the Glaswegians was James Smith (1782-1867) who, in 1836 presented a paper to the Geological Society of London (where it was duly ignored) in which he suggested, on the basis of fossils dredged from the bed of the Clyde and experience of sailing around Iceland, that the climate of Scotland had been as cold as that of Iceland in the recent past. In 1841, Charles Maclaren (1782-1866) a journalist from Edinburgh, but using information based on raised shorelines near Glasgow proposed what we now know as the glacio-eustatic theory in which the variations in glacier extent control the level of the sea. Perhaps the most important of all was James Croll (1821- 1890) who worked on the theory of ice ages, based on orbital forcing, while janitor at the Andersonian Institute and Museum in Glasgow between 1859-1867. This work was the true precursor to the Milankovitch theory which provides the explanation for the major predictable elements of climate change. Robert Jack (1845-1921) from Irvine, southwest of Glasgow, while doing fieldwork for the British Geological Survey near Loch Lomond close to Glasgow, described in 1874 evidence for non-glacial conditions between tills and clearly recognised that climate could change from glacial to temperate and then glacial climate, before returning to

  7. Third-order coma-free point in two-mirror telescopes by a vector approach.

    PubMed

    Ren, Baichuan; Jin, Guang; Zhong, Xing

    2011-07-20

    In this paper, two-mirror telescopes having the secondary mirror decentered and/or tilted are considered. Equations for third-order coma are derived by a vector approach. Coma-free condition to remove misalignment-induced coma was obtained. The coma-free point in two-mirror telescopes is found as a conclusion of our coma-free condition, which is in better agreement with the result solved by Wilson using Schiefspiegler theory.

  8. Sublimating grains model of cometary coma.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faggi, S.; Tozzi, G. P.; Brucato, J. R.

    Billion years of space weathering produces a crust of organic matter (see e.g. Kanuchova et al. 2012) that will be released when a comet enter for the first time in the inner Solar System. New comets, coming form the Oort Colud at their first passage close to the Sun, are particularly important because they are not differentiated by the Solar radiation and they are supposed to have a large quantity of ice organic matter close to the surface. When a comet approach to the Sun, its activity is driven by the sublimation of these nucleus ices: if the heliocentric distances, R_H , is greater than 3 AU the sublimation of CO and CO_2 ices is the main source of comet activity, otherwise at shorter distances, the sublimation of water become the most important mechanism of activity. These gases, escaping from the nucleus, drag in the coma grains that can be refractory dust (silicates, carbon), water ice and/or organic ices. Oort comets at their first passage in the inner Solar System, should produce an halo of organic or water icy particles. Our group has been monitoring new, inbound, bright Oort comets (C/2011 F1, C/2012 S1, C/2012 K1, C/2013 V5, C/2012 F3, C/2013 US10, C/2013 X1) to search for these icy grains. The method consists in detecting the cloud of sublimating grains in the inner coma by using the Sigma Af function (Tozzi et al. 2007) directly from images. However this over-population of grains, beside the sublimation, can be also due to short time activity (outburst) or too big grains expanding at very slow velocity, as it has been found in comet 67P/C-G (Tozzi eta al, 2011, A&A, 531, 54). To disentangle between the phenomena it is necessary to monitor the comet both at short timescale, for the outbursts (by repeating the observations after few nights), and at long term (weeks-months). If the cloud does not expand with the decreasing of the heliocentric distance there is high probability that we are in presence of organic and/or water ice grains. We can disentangle

  9. Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, Glenn C.; Clark, Benton C.; Knocke, Philip C.; OHara, Bonnie J.; Adams, Larry; Niemann, Hasso B.; Alexander, Merle; Veverka, Joseph; Goldstein, Raymond; Huebner, Walter; Morrison, David (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Cometary exploration remains of great importance to virtually all of space science. Because comets are presumed to be remnants of the early solar nebula, they are expected to provide fundamental knowledge as to the origin and development of the solar system as well as to be key to understanding of the source of volatiles and even life itself in the inner solar system. Clearly the time for a detailed study of the composition of these apparent messages from the past has come. A comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, is now being studied as a candidate for the new Discovery program. This mission is a highly-focussed and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission. The C4 mission will concentrate on measurements that will produce an understanding of the composition and physical makeup of a cometary nucleus. The core science goals of the C4 mission are 1) to determine the chemical, elemental, and isotopic composition of a cometary nucleus and 2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. A related goal is to obtain temporal information about the development of the cometary coma as a function of time and orbital position. The four short-period comets -- Tempel 1, Tempel 2, Churyumov-Gerasimenko, and Wirtanen -which all appear to have acceptable dust production rates, were identified as candidate targets. Mission opportunities have been identified beginning as early as 1998. Tempel I with a launch in 1999, however, remains the baseline comet for studies of and planning the C4 mission. The C4 mission incorporates two science instruments and two engineering instruments in the payload to obtain the desired measurements. The science instruments include an advanced version of the Cometary Ice and Dust Experiment (CIDEX), a mini-CIDEX with a sample collection system, an X-ray Fluorescence Spectrometer and a Pyrolysis-Gas Chromatograph, and a simplified version of the Neutral

  10. [Treatment of diabetic coma and precoma with continuous low-dose insulin infusions (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Luft, D; Schubert, W R; Reichenmiller, H E

    1976-11-26

    13 patients, nine women and four men, aged 22 to 83 years, were treated for diabetic coma or precoma between September 1974 and January 1976. Ten patients were known diabetics and six of them had been treated with insulin. On admission blood sugar was 32.4 +/- 3.3 mmol/l (5.84 +/- 0.6 g/l). The capillary blood pH was 7.15 +/- 0.06 (n = 13). Treatment consisted of continuous insulin infusion (6 IU soluble insulin/hour), physiological saline, potassium substitution and sodium bicarbonate (if the pH was below 7.15). In the first hours of treatment 98 +/- 12IU of insulin, 6.5 +/- 0.5 litres of fluid, 168 +/- 22 mmol of potassium and 237 +/- 55 mmol NaHCO3 were required. During the first 4 hours of the insulin infusion the blood sugar decrease per hour was 3.55 mmol/l (0.64 g/l). Hypokalaemia during treatment occurred in one case, hypoglycaemia was not observed. A preceding treatment with insulin and severe acidosis did not influence therapeutic success. Twelve patients were treated successfully, one patient died 6 hours after admission following mesenteric arterial embolism.

  11. 28 CFR 549.42 - Involuntary admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SERVICES Administrative Safeguards for Psychiatric Treatment and Medication § 549.42 Involuntary admission... voluntarily consent either to psychiatric admission or to medication, is subject to judicial...

  12. 32 CFR 242.5 - Admission procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... HEALTH SCIENCES § 242.5 Admission procedures. (a) Application—(1) Civilians. Civilians seeking admission to the School of Medicine shall make direct application following instructions published in...

  13. The Cores of Elliptical Galaxies in Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucey, John

    1995-07-01

    The cores of galaxies are astrophysically unique. They canhost high energy nuclei, star formation and perhaps even blackholes. HST observations have established that the cores ofellipticals are related to their global properties, and so canbe used as diagnostics of the physical processes occurring atthe time of formation. HST images of galaxy cores havedistinguished two different types of core luminosity profiles:`soft' and `hard' types. It is suggested that luminous, slowlyrotating galaxies have `soft' cores and the less luminousdisky galaxies have `hard' cores. This can be interpreted interms of a formation scenario based on a merger hierarchy inwhich the low luminosity systems experience highly dissipativemergers, but as the luminous systems are assembled the mergersbecome increasingly stellar. In this picture, the type of corea galaxy generates is intimately related to its evolutionaryhistory, i.e. the degree of interaction/merging experiencedand the availability of cold gas. In turn, this should notonly depend on luminosity but also on the galaxy's localenvironment. Here we propose to test the gaseous/stellarmerger picture by imaging a set of Coma cluster ellipticalsfrom a wide range of cluster radii. In the gas poorenvironment of the cluster core there may be insufficent coldgas for the low luminosity galaxies to form `hard' cores.Similarly, at the cluster turnround radius even luminousgalaxies may have experienced a dissipative core formation andpossess

  14. The sizes, albedos, and comae of Centaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trilling, David; Mueller, Michael; Noll, Keith; Stansberry, John

    2008-03-01

    The small bodies of the Solar System retain the best information about the era of planet formation and the subsequent evolution of our planetary system. As escaped KBOs that wander close(r) to Earth and to the Sun, we have the opportunity to study KBOs with a sensitivity and resolution that is not generally available in the main Kuiper Belt. Centaurs are both dynamically transitional --- as former Kuiper Belt Objects and potentially future comets --- and physically so, as some display cometary activity that is absent in the Kuiper Belt. We propose here to observe 27 Centaurs with Spitzer to address these fundamental questions about this interesting transitional population. We will determine their physical properties --- size and albedo --- as a probe of their fundamental nature. We will carry out a coma search. This program will more than double the number of Centaurs observed with Spitzer and create a sample of nearly 50 targets in which we can look for correlations among physical properties and derive a true size distribution for Centaurs that can be compared to the best-known KBO and Jupiter family comet size distributions. If any Centaurs in our sample are observed to be binaries in a companion HST program, we will derive their densities, and compare Centaur densities to KBO densities. We will look for common properties among active Centaurs. The results will reveal the physical properties of this interesting transitional population, and help constrain the suggested link between Kuiper Belt Objects and Jupiter family comets.

  15. Cometary Matter Analyser (COMA/CRAF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buechler, K.; Igenbergs, E.; Klein, J. W.; Krueger, F. R.; Kuczera, H.; Morfill, G.; Palme, H.; Roessler, K.; Weishaupt, U.; Zerrull, R.; Schmidt, R.; Strazulla, G.; Brownlee, D.; Clark, B.; Hanner, M.; Johnson, R.; Utterback, N.; Zinner, E.

    1994-01-01

    This project was part of an international program under which the chemical composition of cometary dust particles was to be measured 'in situ' during a rendezvous and flyby mission of a Mariner Mark 2 space probe and a comet (depending on the time of launch). Two necessary tasks, preliminary hardware development and interface definition, have been completed within the projects submitted for approval. As a result a model close to the flight configuration has been created, which was to be made available to the flight hardware contractor and his purposes. The Comet Rendezvous and Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) mission was abandoned after joint resolution adopted by NASA and the Federal Ministry for Research and Technology in 1992. Since an instrument like CoMA is an important contribution both to future cometary rendezvous missions, such as ROSETTA, as well as for accompanying laboratory activities, this project was terminated in a 'qualified conclusion'. In the process, components suitable for the laboratory developed from the preliminary units were produced and put into operation.

  16. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terukina, Ayumu; Lombriser, Lucas; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C.

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |fR0| < 6 × 10-5, which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales.

  17. Testing chameleon gravity with the Coma cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Terukina, Ayumu; Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Lombriser, Lucas; Bacon, David; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C. E-mail: lucas.lombriser@port.ac.uk E-mail: david.bacon@port.ac.uk E-mail: bob.nichol@port.ac.uk

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel method to test the gravitational interactions in the outskirts of galaxy clusters. When gravity is modified, this is typically accompanied by the introduction of an additional scalar degree of freedom, which mediates an attractive fifth force. The presence of an extra gravitational coupling, however, is tightly constrained by local measurements. In chameleon modifications of gravity, local tests can be evaded by employing a screening mechanism that suppresses the fifth force in dense environments. While the chameleon field may be screened in the interior of the cluster, its outer region can still be affected by the extra force, introducing a deviation between the hydrostatic and lensing mass of the cluster. Thus, the chameleon modification can be tested by combining the gas and lensing measurements of the cluster. We demonstrate the operability of our method with the Coma cluster, for which both a lensing measurement and gas observations from the X-ray surface brightness, the X-ray temperature, and the Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect are available. Using the joint observational data set, we perform a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis of the parameter space describing the different profiles in both the Newtonian and chameleon scenarios. We report competitive constraints on the chameleon field amplitude and its coupling strength to matter. In the case of f(R) gravity, corresponding to a specific choice of the coupling, we find an upper bound on the background field amplitude of |f{sub R0}| < 6 × 10{sup −5}, which is currently the tightest constraint on cosmological scales.

  18. 22 CFR 229.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Admission. 229.300 Section 229.300 Foreign... and Recruitment Prohibited § 229.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient to which §§...

  19. 22 CFR 229.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Admission. 229.300 Section 229.300 Foreign... and Recruitment Prohibited § 229.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient to which §§...

  20. 22 CFR 146.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Admission. 146.300 Section 146.300 Foreign... Recruitment Prohibited § 146.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient to which §§ 146.300...

  1. 10 CFR 1042.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Admission. 1042.300 Section 1042.300 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... Prohibited § 1042.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient to which §§ 1042.300 through...

  2. 44 CFR 68.9 - Admissible evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 44 Emergency Management and Assistance 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admissible evidence. 68.9 Section 68.9 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY, DEPARTMENT OF... admissible. (b) Documentary and oral evidence shall be admissible. (c) Admissibility of non-expert...

  3. College Admissions Policies for the 1970's.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY.

    The papers included in this collection are (1) "Problems and Issues Confronting the Admissions Community" by Clyde Vroman; (2) "Frozen Assumptions in Admissions" by B. Alden Thresher; (3) "The Effect of Federal Programs on Admissions Policies" by John F. Morse; (4) "State Plans for Higher Education and Their Influence on Admissions" by Charles W.…

  4. 45 CFR 618.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 618.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by...

  5. Assessment of daytime outdoor comfort levels in and outside the urban area of Glasgow, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Eduardo; Drach, Patricia; Emmanuel, Rohinton; Corbella, Oscar

    2013-07-01

    To understand thermal preferences and to define a preliminary outdoor comfort range for the local population of Glasgow, UK, an extensive series of measurements and surveys was carried out during 19 monitoring campaigns from winter through summer 2011 at six different monitoring points in pedestrian areas of downtown Glasgow. For data collection, a Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station equipped with temperature and humidity sensors, cup anemometer with wind vane, silicon pyranometer and globe thermometer was employed. Predictions of the outdoor thermal index PET (physiologically equivalent temperature) correlated closely to the actual thermal votes of respondents. Using concurrent measurements from a second Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station placed in a rural setting approximately 15 km from the urban area, comparisons were drawn with regard to daytime thermal comfort levels and urban-rural temperature differences (∆Tu-r) for the various sites. The urban sites exhibited a consistent lower level of thermal discomfort during daytime. No discernible effect of urban form attributes in terms of the sky-view factor were observed on ∆Tu-r or on the relative difference of the adjusted predicted percentage of dissatisfied (PPD*).

  6. Urban heat island and differences in outdoor comfort levels in Glasgow, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krüger, Eduardo; Drach, Patricia; Emmanuel, Rohinton; Corbella, Oscar

    2013-04-01

    From extensive outdoor comfort campaigns, preliminary outdoor comfort ranges have been defined for the local population of Glasgow, UK, in terms of two thermal indices: `Temperature Humidity Sun Wind' (THSW) and `Physiological Equivalent Temperature' (PET). A series of measurements and surveys was carried out from winter through summer 2011 during 19 monitoring campaigns. For data collection, a Davis Vantage Pro2 weather station was used, which was equipped with temperature and humidity sensors, cup anemometer with wind vane, silicon pyranometer and globe thermometer. From concurrent measurements using two weather stations, one located close to the city core and another located at a rural setting, approximately at a 15-km distance from the urban area of Glasgow, comparisons were made with regard to thermal comfort levels and to urban-rural temperature differences for different periods of the year. It was found that the two selected thermal indices (THSW and PET) closely correlate to the actual thermal sensation of respondents. Moreover, results show that the urban site will have fewer days of cold discomfort, more days of `neutral' thermal sensation and slightly higher warm discomfort. The most frequent urban heat island intensity was found to be around 3° C, whereas the fraction of cooling to heating degree-hours for a T base of 65 °F was approximately 1/12th.

  7. The importance of empathy in the enablement of patients attending the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Mercer, Stewart W; Reilly, David; Watt, Graham C M

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patient enablement in general practice is known to be limited by consultation length. However, the processes within the consultation that lead to enablement are not well understood. AIMS: To investigate patient enablement in a setting where time is less of a constraint than in primary care, in order to determine the importance of other factors in enablement. DESIGN OF STUDY: Exploratory questionnaire-based study. SETTING: Two hundred consecutive outpatients attending four doctors at the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital, an NHS-funded integrated complementary and orthodox medicine unit. METHOD: Information was collected on enablement and a range of other factors, including the patients expectations, their perception of the doctors empathy, and the doctors own confidence in the doctor-patient relationship. RESULTS: Although there were many factors that correlated with enablement, multi-regression analysis showed patients expectation, doctor's empathy (as perceived by the patient), and doctor's own confidence in the therapeutic relationship to be the three key factors. Together they accounted for 41% of the variation in enablement, with empathy being the single most important factor (66% of the explained variation in enablement). CONCLUSION: Patient enablement at the Glasgow Homoeopathic Hospital is mainly related to the patients perception of the doctor's empathy. PMID:12434958

  8. Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models and medical education at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen.

    PubMed

    Olszewski, Margaret Maria

    2011-09-01

    In the 1860s, Dr. Louis Thomas Jérôme Auzoux introduced a set of papier-mâché teaching models intended for use in the botanical classroom. These botanical models quickly made their way into the educational curricula of institutions around the world. Within these institutions, Auzoux's models were principally used to fulfil educational goals, but their incorporation into diverse curricula also suggests they were used to implement agendas beyond botanical instruction. This essay examines the various uses and meanings of Dr. Auzoux's botanical teaching models at the universities of Glasgow and Aberdeen in the nineteenth century. The two main conclusions of this analysis are: (1) investing in prestigious scientific collections was a way for these universities to attract fee-paying students so that better medical accommodation could be provided and (2) models were used to transmit different kinds of botanical knowledge at both universities. The style of botany at the University of Glasgow was offensive and the department there actively embraced and incorporated ideas of the emerging new botany. At Aberdeen, the style of botany was defensive and there was some hesitancy when confronting new botanical ideas.

  9. Health status and health behaviours in neighbourhoods: A comparison of Glasgow, Scotland and Hamilton, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Kathi; Eyles, John; Ellaway, Anne; Macintyre, Sally; Macdonald, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Health status has been demonstrated to vary by neighbourhood socioeconomic status (SES). However, neighbourhood effects may vary between countries. In this study, neighbourhood variations in health outcomes are compared across four socially contrasting neighbourhoods in Glasgow, Scotland and Hamilton, Ontario Canada. Data came from the 2001 wave of the West of Scotland Twenty-07 Longitudinal Study and a 2000/2001 cross-sectional survey conducted in Hamilton. The results of the comparison point to important variations in the relationship between neighbourhood SES and health. While both cities display a socioeconomic gradient with respect to various measures of health and health behaviours, for some outcome measures the high SES neighbourhoods in Glasgow display distributions similar to those found in the low SES neighbourhoods in Hamilton. Our results suggest that a low SES neighbourhood in one country may not mean the same for health as a low SES neighbourhood in another country. As such, country context may explain the distribution of health status and health behaviours among socially contrasting neighbourhoods, and neighbourhood variations in health may be context specific. PMID:20022285

  10. Immunohistochemical investigation of the coma blister and its pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kashiwagi, Masayuki; Ishigami, Akiko; Hara, Kenji; Matsusue, Aya; Waters, Brian; Takayama, Mio; Tokunaga, Itsuo; Nishimura, Akiyoshi; Kubo, Shin-ichi

    2013-01-01

    The erythematous patches and vesicles that are observed in coma patients, usually from an overdose of medication, are known as coma blisters. However, it is unknown whether the degenerated sweat gland is a necrosis or apoptosis. We immunohistochemically examined such skin lesions to investigate the characteristics and pathogenesis of the coma blister. Skin lesions were obtained from a forensic autopsy case, a woman in her thirties, of caffeine intoxication. Those lesions were observed in the left femoral, the lower left thigh, and the right knee. Histologically, the skin lesions showed that the keratinocytes had necrosed and the epidermis was thin in some areas. Eccrine sweat gland degeneration was observed. Obvious inflammatory cell infiltrations were not detected. Immunohistochemically, we stained each skin lesion against CD3, CD8, CD45RO, cytokeratin, 70 kD heat shock protein, ubiquitin, 150 kD oxygen regulated protein, and caspase-cleaved keratin 18 neo-epitope M30. They were also stained with an in situ apoptosis detection kit. Degenerated sweat glands featured CD45RO and M30 immunoreactivity. Immunohistochemical staining for CD45RO, CK-L, and M30 might be useful to observe sweat gland degeneration in the coma blister. Therefore, the apoptosis might be related to coma blisters and sweat gland degenerations.

  11. Distribution of gas in the inner comae of comets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael

    1990-01-01

    In order to understand the physical and chemical processes which produce the observed spatial morphology of the cometary coma, it is necessary to analyze observational data with physically meaningful models. Thus, a coupled program of theoretical modeling and complementary observational data analysis was undertaken regarding the spatial distributions of neutral gases in the coma. More, specifically, the particular topics of interest are: (1) the theoretical modeling of the nonequilibrium dynamics of the inner coma with emphasis on the region of the coma from the transition from collisional fluid flow out to the free-flow region and on observable conditions in the coma (i.e., density, outflow speed, and temperature); and (2) the model analysis of an important set of long-slit CCD spectra of comets. The side-by-side development of models along with the observation and analysis of data is an important and integral part of this project. The scientific community has in hand valuable observational and in situ data regarding one comet, Halley. It is important to use Halley as the benchmark by which other remotely observed comet data can be understood. Therefore, the self-consistant analysis of data with appropriate models is of the utmost importance. The data analysis work includes the analysis of the spatial profiles of (OI), NH2, CN, and C2.

  12. Updates from the British Association of Dermatologists 85th annual meeting, 5-8 July 2005, Glasgow, U.K.

    PubMed

    Eedy, D J; English, J S C; Coulson, I H

    2006-06-01

    The conference highlighted the progress made in understanding recent biological, epidemiological and therapeutic advances in dermatology. Here we provide a synopsis of the main research and clinical findings presented at the meeting of the British Association of Dermatologists (BAD) held during 5-8 July 2005, in Glasgow, U.K., drawing attention to the most important advances and summaries. The BAD meeting was held at the Scottish Exhibition and Conference Centre, Glasgow (Fig. 1). The annual dinner was held in the wonderful setting of Stirling Castle, with Dr Robin Graham-Brown as host.

  13. EXTINCTION IN THE COMA OF COMET 17P/HOLMES

    SciTech Connect

    Lacerda, Pedro; Jewitt, David

    2012-11-20

    On 2007 October 29, the outbursting comet 17P/Holmes passed within 0.''79 of a background star. We recorded the event using optical, narrowband photometry and detect a 3%-4% dip in stellar brightness bracketing the time of closest approach to the comet nucleus. The detected dimming implies an optical depth {tau} Almost-Equal-To 0.04 at 1.''5 from the nucleus and an optical depth toward the nucleus center {tau}{sub n} < 13.3. At the time of our observations, the coma was optically thick only within {rho} {approx}< 0.''01 from the nucleus. By combining the measured extinction and the scattered light from the coma, we estimate a dust red albedo p{sub d} = 0.006 {+-} 0.002 at {alpha} = 16 Degree-Sign phase angle. Our measurements place the most stringent constraints on the extinction optical depth of any cometary coma.

  14. Spectroscopic Investigations of Fragment Species in the Coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, Paul D.; Cochran, Anita L.; Combi, Michael R.

    2004-01-01

    The content of the gaseous coma of a comet is dominated by fragment species produced by photolysis of the parent molecules issuing directly from the icy nucleus of the comet. Spectroscopy of these species provides complementary information on the physical state of the coma to that obtained from observations of the parent species. Extraction of physical parameters requires detailed molecular and atomic data together with reliable high-resolution spectra and absolute fluxes of the primary source of excitation, the Sun. The large database of observations, dating back more than a century, provides a means to assess the chemical and evolutionary diversity of comets.

  15. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension: An Etiology for Consciousness Disorder and Coma.

    PubMed

    Collange, Olivier; Wolff, Valérie; Cebula, Hélène; Pradignac, Alain; Meyer, Alain; Kindo, Michel; Diemunsch, Pierre; Proust, François; Mertes, Paul-Michel; Kremer, Stéphane

    2016-11-15

    We report 3 cases of spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) associated with consciousness disorder and coma. In patients, SIH was suspected on a computed tomography scan and diagnosed by cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Spinal MRI confirmed cerebrospinal fluid leakage. SIH should be seen as an underestimated cause of consciousness disorder and coma, especially in patients with a history of orthostatic headache, spinal injury, or oculomotor signs. Computed tomography scans should be examined for signs of SIH before operating on patients with a spontaneous subdural hematoma. Brain and spine MRI should be performed when SIH is suspected. Our 3 patients have shown good recovery without any neurological sequelae.

  16. HCO+ in the coma of comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, A. J.; Schloerb, F. P.; Bergin, E. A.; Dickens, J. E.; Devries, C. H.; Senay, M. C.; Irvine, W. M.; Ferris, J. P. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Maps of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) in the millimeter-wave emission of the ion HCO+ revealed a local minimum near the nucleus position, with a maximum about 100,000 km in the antisolar direction. These observed features of the HCO+ emission require a low abundance of HCO+ due to enhanced destruction in the inner coma of the comet, within a region of low electron temperature (Te). To set constraints on the formation of HCO+ in the coma, as well as the location and magnitude of the transition to higher Te, the data are compared with the results of ion-molecule chemistry models.

  17. Complete recovery after severe myxoedema coma complicated by status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Fjølner, Jesper; Søndergaard, Esben; Kampmann, Ulla; Nielsen, Søren

    2015-03-25

    We report a case of life-threatening myxoedema presenting with hypothermia, hypotension, bradycardia, pericardial effusion and deep coma. The condition was complicated by prolonged status epilepticus. The optimal treatment strategy has been debated over the years and the literature is briefly reviewed. Treatment with l-thyroxine (LT4) monotherapy without initial loading dose and with no l-triiodothyronine (LT3) treatment was successful with full recovery after hospitalisation for more than a month. Myxoedema coma is a rare, reversible condition with a high mortality and should be considered as a differential diagnosis in medical emergencies.

  18. Emergency Neurological Life Support: Approach to the Patient with Coma.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Robert D; Cadena, Rhonda S; Pineda, Jose

    2015-12-01

    Coma is an acute failure of neuronal systems governing arousal and awareness and represents a medical emergency. When encountering a comatose patient, the clinician must have an organized approach to detect easily remediable causes, prevent ongoing neurologic injury, and determine a hierarchical plan for diagnostic tests, treatments, and neuromonitoring. Coma was chosen as an Emergency Neurological Life Support protocol because timely medical and surgical interventions can be life-saving, and the initial work-up of such patients is critical to establishing a correct diagnosis.

  19. Coma due to cannabis toxicity in an infant.

    PubMed

    Appelboam, Andrew; Oades, Patrick J

    2006-06-01

    In young children, cannabis ingestion resulting in coma is very rare. Only nine cases have been reported in the literature and most have occurred in inquisitive toddlers. We review the cases to date and report the youngest recorded case of coma due to cannabis ingestion in an 11-month-old girl. This case highlights the importance of considering toxicological causes and the parental recreational drug history in young children who present with an altered level of consciousness. Child protection considerations are also discussed.

  20. Hco+ in the Coma of Comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovell, A. J.; Schloerb, F. P.; Bergin, E. A.; Dickens, J. E.; De Vries, C. H.; Senay, M. C.; Irvine, W. M.

    1997-05-01

    Maps of comet C/1995 O1 (Hale-Bopp) in the millimeter-wave emission of the ion HCO^+ revealed a local minimum near the nucleus position, with a maximum about 100,000 km in the antisolar direction. These observed features of the HCO^+ emission require a low abundance of HCO^+ due to enhanced destruction in the inner coma of the comet, within a region of low electron temperature (T_e). To set constraints on the formation of HCO^+ in the coma, as well as the location and magnitude of the transition to higher T_e, the data are compared with the results of ion-molecule chemistry models.

  1. The Drumchapel Project: A Study of ICT Usage by School Pupils and Teachers in a Secondary School in a Deprived Area of Glasgow

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLelland, Dorothy; Crawford, John

    2004-01-01

    The Drumchapel Project was a joint exploratory project between Glasgow Caledonian University, a 1992 university, and Drumchapel High School, a secondary school in a deprived area of Glasgow. The initial aim was to explore ICT skill levels among the school pupils but an information literacy agenda emerged in the course of the Project. Focus groups…

  2. The preoperative sensitive-modified Glasgow prognostic score is superior to the modified Glasgow prognostic score in predicting long-term survival for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Rui; Zhang, Fei; Sun, Peng; Wu, Jing; Yan, Hong; Wu, Ai-Ran; Zhang, Min; Jiang, Yu-Lu; Lu, Yan-Hong; Xu, Qiu-Yan; Zhan, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Rong-Xin; Qian, Li-Ting; He, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the prognostic significance of the preoperative sensitive-modified Glasgow prognostic score (S-mGPS) and its superiority in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Clinicopathologic characteristics, preoperative albumin and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were retrospectively collected in 442 patients who underwent transthoracic esophagectomy. The S-mGPS was calculated before surgery based on optimal cutoff values of 45.6 g/L for albumin and 10.0 mg/L for CRP. 360, 74 and 8 cases were assigned an mGPS of 0, 1 and 2, respectively. In contrast, the S-mGPS was 0 in 114, 1 in 258 and 2 in 70 patients. Of the 360 patients with an mGPS of 0, 246 migrated to the S-mGPS-1 group. Both mGPS and S-mGPS were significantly correlated with tumor length, depth of invasion, pathological tumor-node-metastasis (pTNM) stage and adjuvant treatment. In addition, they were significantly associated with disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) in univariate analysis. Furthermore, multivariate Cox regression analysis identified S-mGPS as an independent prognostic indicator for both DFS [hazard ratio (HR), 1.577; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.149-2.163; P = 0.005] and OS (HR, 1.762; 95% CI, 1.250-2.484; P = 0.001), but not mGPS (HR, 0.957; 95% CI, 0.692-1.323; P = 0.790 for DFS and HR, 1.089; 95% CI, 0.781-1.517; P = 0.615 for OS, respectively). Moreover, subgroup analysis revealed that the prognostic impact of the S-mGPS was especially striking in pTNM stage II patients. The preoperative S-mGPS is superior to the mGPS as a prognostic predictor in patients with resectable ESCC. PMID:27528228

  3. Audit of the Forensic Psychiatry Liaison Service to Glasgow Sheriff Court 1994 to 1998.

    PubMed

    White, T; Ramsay, L; Morrison, R

    2002-01-01

    This study seeks to describe the demographic, offence, and diagnostic details of subjects referred by the Procurator Fiscal at Glasgow Sheriff Court to the Forensic Psychiatry Liaison between 1994 and 1997. The initial outcome of the assessment and an assessment of medical time involved is presented. This study is a retrospective review of audit forms completed between 1993 and 1994 and once more in 1997. The referral criteria, age structure and offence pattern was broadly similar to that reported in court diversion schemes in England. A primary diagnosis of alcohol and/or drug dependence was seen in one third of referrals during both years of the audit. A marked increase (250%) in referrals between 1994 and 1997 resulted in a marked reduction of those admitted to hospital, and an increase in the percentage who had 'no psychiatric diagnosis'. The need for ongoing liaison between the Procurators Fiscal and the Forensic Psychiatrists involved would appear important in modifying referral criteria.

  4. Levi Myers (1767-1822): An eighteenth century Glasgow medical graduate from South Carolina.

    PubMed

    Collins, Kenneth

    2016-05-01

    Levi Myers, a native of Georgetown, South Carolina, was the first Jewish medical graduate at the University of Glasgow, obtaining the MD, in 1787. Myers had been registered for studies at the University of Edinburgh for three years, from 1785/1786 to 1787/1788, after some years of training with a physician in Charleston, South Carolina. Recent studies of Jewish life in Edinburgh have revealed the evidence of a settled group of Jewish inhabitants in the city during the last quarter of the eighteenth century, during the time of Myers' sojourn in Edinburgh and thirty years before the formal inauguration of Scotland's first Jewish community. This paper examines the context of Myers' studies in Edinburgh as an American medical student and as a Jew.

  5. Modelling lead bioaccessibility in urban topsoils based on data from Glasgow, London, Northampton and Swansea, UK.

    PubMed

    Appleton, J D; Cave, M R; Wragg, J

    2012-12-01

    Predictive linear regression (LR) modelling between bioaccessible Pb and a range of total elemental compositions and soil properties was executed for the Glasgow, London, Northampton and Swansea urban areas in order to assess the potential for developing a national urban bioaccessible Pb dataset for the UK. LR indicates that total Pb is the only highly significant independent variable for estimating the bioaccessibility of Pb. Bootstrap resampling shows that the relationship between total Pb and bioaccessible Pb is broadly the same in the four urban areas. The median bioaccessible fraction ranges from 38% in Northampton to 68% in London and Swansea. Results of this study can be used as part of a lines of evidence approach to localised risk assessment but should not be used to replace bioaccessibility testing at individual sites where local conditions may vary considerably from the broad overview presented in this study.

  6. Hegel in Glasgow: Idealists and the Emergence of Adult Education in the West of Scotland, 1866-1927

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Robert; Turner, Robert

    2006-01-01

    This paper considers how Hegel's philosophical idealism influenced the thinking and practical activities of four successive holders of the Chair of Moral Philosophy in the University of Glasgow between 1866 and 1927. It argues that their activities were shaped by Hegelian concepts of citizenship, which engendered a commitment to encouraging the…

  7. Predicting or Guessing: The Progress of Scottish Wider Access Programme (SWAP) Students at the University of Glasgow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, Lynn

    2000-01-01

    Comparison of the first-year performance of 100 adults who entered the University of Glasgow via the Scottish Wider Access Programme (SWAP) with 89 who attended both SWAP and preuniversity summer school found few differences in persistence. However, patterns of prediction emerged, which could form the basis for interventions for those whose…

  8. Case Study: A Distance Education Contribution to a Social Strategy To Combat Poverty: Open University Community Education Courses in Glasgow.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farnes, N. C.

    This project located in Glasgow, Scotland, is concerned with the use of distance teaching for a non-formal community education program that is a component of a social change strategy to combat poverty. The study shows that the use of distance learning courses in non-formal community education is successful in attracting, at a reasonable cost per…

  9. Sulfur and nitrogen reactions for cometary comae ion chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, A. D.; Anicich, V. G.

    1992-01-01

    The low pressure reactions of sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, and hydrazine with H2O+ and H3O+ were studied by the ion cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potentially important for sulphur chemistry in cometary comae. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels are presented.

  10. Map-based trigonometric parallaxes of open clusters: Coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gatewood, George

    1995-01-01

    This is the fourth study in a series to determine the direct trigonometric parallaxes of four of the nearest open star clusters, the Hyades, the Pleiades, the Praesepe, and the nearby cluster in Coma (Gatewood et al. 1990; Gatewood et al. 1992); Gatewood & Kiewiet de Jonge 1994). The results for the open star cluster in Coma are compared with those of the other three clusters, and the members are found to be significantly subluminous. The trigonometric parallax of the cluster is estimated from that of three members studied with the Multichannel Astrometric Photometer (MAP) at the Thaw Refractor of the University of Pittsburgh's Allegheny Observatory. The weighted mean parallax of the cluster is +13.53 +/- 0.54 mass (0.00054 min), corresponding to a distance modulus of 4.34 +/- 0.09 mag. The U-B excess of the Coma cluster members may be used to adjust the observed absolute magnitudes and the B-V measurements as suggested by Sandage & Eggen (1959). The agreement obtained in this manner suggests that, like subdwarf stars, the stars of the Coma cluster appear subluminous because of line blanketing. One of the three members observed in this study was recognized as a member by its parallax and is the faintest known member of the cluster.

  11. PCA/HEXTE Observations of Coma and A2319

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rephaeli, Yoel

    1998-01-01

    The Coma cluster was observed in 1996 for 90 ks by the PCA and HEXTE instruments aboard the RXTE satellite, the first simultaneous, pointing measurement of Coma in the broad, 2-250 keV, energy band. The high sensitivity achieved during this long observation allows precise determination of the spectrum. Our analysis of the measurements clearly indicates that in addition to the main thermal emission from hot intracluster gas at kT=7.5 keV, a second spectral component is required to best-fit the data. If thermal, it can be described with a temperature of 4.7 keV contributing about 20% of the total flux. The additional spectral component can also be described by a power-law, possibly due to Compton scattering of relativistic electrons by the CMB. This interpretation is based on the diffuse radio synchrotron emission, which has a spectral index of 2.34, within the range allowed by fits to the RXTE spectral data. A Compton origin of the measured nonthermal component would imply that the volume-averaged magnetic field in the central region of Coma is B =0.2 micro-Gauss, a value deduced directly from the radio and X-ray measurements (and thus free of the usual assumption of energy equipartition). Barring the presence of unknown systematic errors in the RXTE source or background measurements, our spectral analysis yields considerable evidence for Compton X-ray emission in the Coma cluster.

  12. Modeling Coma Gas Jets in Comet Hale-Bopp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lederer, S. M.; Campins, H.

    2001-01-01

    We present an analysis of OH, CN, and C2 jets observed in Comet Hale-Bopp. The relative contributions from and composition of the coma gas sources, and the parameters describing the active areas responsible for the gas jets will be discussed. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  13. A preliminary model of the coma of 2060 Chiron

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boice, Daniel C.; Konno, I.; Stern, S. Alan; Huebner, Walter F.

    1992-01-01

    We have included gravity in our fluid dynamic model with chemical kinetics of dusty comet comae and applied it with two dust sizes to 2060 Chiron. A progress report on the model and preliminary results concerning gas/dust dynamics and chemistry is given.

  14. Sulfur and nitrogen reactions for cometary comae ion chemistry.

    PubMed

    Sen, A D; Anicich, V G

    1992-01-01

    The low pressure reactions of sulfur dioxide, carbon disulfide, and hydrazine with H2O+ and H3O+ were studied by the ion cyclotron resonance technique. These reactions are potentially important for sulphur chemistry in cometary comae. Rate coefficients and branching ratios of product channels are presented.

  15. Coma chemical composition at the Abydos landing site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morse, A.; Sheridan, S.; Morgan, G.; Andrews, D.; Barber, S.; Wright, I.

    2015-10-01

    The Ptolemy instrument, onboard the Rosetta Philae Lander, made measurements of the chemical composition of the coma mid-bounce, just after the non-nominal landing on the surface, and subsequently at the Abydos landing site. This presentation will discuss Ptolemy's operations throughout this 45 hour period and the results obtained.

  16. Color gradients in the coma of P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meech, Karen

    1988-01-01

    Some important information relevant to the understanding of the gas/dust dynamics near the surface of a comet nucleus concerns knowledge of the grain composition and scattering properties as well as the particle size distribution of dust in the coma. Ground based measurements of light scattered from the dust comae can provide some information about the physical grain properties, in particular about the mean optically dominant grain size. Optical spectra of continua of nine comets presented by Jewitt and Meech, 1986, show that all of the scattered light is reddened with respect to the Sun. There is significant scatter in the amount of reddening seen for different comets. In the near IF regions, the reddening decreases until near 2 to 3 micrometers where the reflectivity is nearly neutral. It is of particular interest to see if there are any observable changes in the grain size distribution during outburst. Although no coma colar changes were observed during the Nov. 1985 outbursts, a color gradient within the coma has been observed in Halley. Radial color gradients in J, H, and K images of Halley as reported by Campins have not been observed by the author.

  17. 32 CFR 242.5 - Admission procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... HEALTH SCIENCES § 242.5 Admission procedures. (a) Application—(1) Civilians. Civilians seeking admission... conditionally select candidates to fill available class spaces. Those conditionally selected shall be the...

  18. 18 CFR 1317.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Admission. 1317.300 Section 1317.300 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1317.300 Admission. (a) General....

  19. 18 CFR 1317.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Admission. 1317.300 Section 1317.300 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1317.300 Admission. (a) General....

  20. 38 CFR 23.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admission. 23.300 Section 23.300 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS (CONTINUED... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 23.300 Admission. (a) General....

  1. 18 CFR 1317.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Admission. 1317.300 Section 1317.300 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1317.300 Admission. (a) General....

  2. 36 CFR 1211.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Admission. 1211.300 Section 1211.300 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL ARCHIVES AND RECORDS ADMINISTRATION GENERAL RULES... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1211.300 Admission. (a) General....

  3. An Economic Model for Selective Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haglund, Alma

    1978-01-01

    The author presents an economic model for selective admissions to postsecondary nursing programs. Primary determinants of the admissions model are employment needs, availability of educational resources, and personal resources (ability and learning potential). As there are more applicants than resources, selective admission practices are…

  4. 17 CFR 12.33 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... REPARATIONS Discovery § 12.33 Admissions. (a) Request for admissions. Any party may, within the time permitted... truth of any matters set forth in the request that relate to statements or opinions of fact or of the...) Reply. Each matter of which an admission is requested shall be separately set forth. The matter...

  5. Admission to Medical Education in Ten Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burn, Barbara B., Ed.

    As part of a study of access and admission to higher education in Germany and the United States, a group of papers on medical admissions in various countries was commissioned. The papers presented in this book reveal wide differences in admissions policies and procedures. Barbara Burn examines some of the major issues in a foreword: representation…

  6. The Journal of College Admission Ethics Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveland, Elaina C., Ed.; Raynor, Joyce, Ed.

    This book is the first significant body of literature on ethics in college admission published by the National Association for College Admission Counseling. The series is a select compilation of articles on ethics published in the Journal of College Admission in 1998 and 1999. The book is a source of information for the beginning and experienced…

  7. Reducing admissions for people with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Allan, Belinda

    Reversing the rise in emergency hospital admissions is an NHS priority. These admissions impact on elective capacity and waiting times and are unsustainable. The risk of hospitalisation for people with diabetes is almost twice that for others. Commissioners need to address admissions associated with diabetes and new guidance offers best-practice solutions.

  8. The Role of Noncognitive Assessment in Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoerle, Heather

    2014-01-01

    Confident that understanding and employing new approaches to assessment is a top priority for admissions professionals, the Secondary School Admission Test Board (SSATB) recently launched a Think Tank on the Future of Admission Assessment, with a two-year timeline and a charge to educate its membership and inspire greater innovation in admissions…

  9. Merit and Competition in Selective College Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Killgore, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Using interview data from 34 admissions officers at 17 elite colleges, this paper compares two perspectives shaping admissions policy. Admissions officers apply a "merit" perspective that relies on indicators of student academic and nonacademic achievement. They also employ a "competition" perspective that evaluates student characteristics…

  10. Toward a Sociology of Law School Admissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erlanger, Howard S.

    1984-01-01

    The law school admission process plays a major role in determining the social class origins and ethnic composition of the bar, and perhaps also the nonlegal skills lawyers will have. Research is incomplete; consideration of admission criteria, the composition and processes of admissions committees, and applicant self-selection is advisable. (MSE)

  11. 29 CFR 36.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 36.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or...

  12. 10 CFR 1042.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1042.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission,...

  13. 10 CFR 1042.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ENERGY (GENERAL PROVISIONS) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1042.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission,...

  14. 29 CFR 36.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 36.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or...

  15. 29 CFR 36.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Secretary of Labor NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 36.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or...

  16. 7 CFR 501.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Admission. 501.2 Section 501.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.2 Admission. Admission to...

  17. 7 CFR 501.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Admission. 501.2 Section 501.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.2 Admission. Admission to...

  18. 7 CFR 501.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Admission. 501.2 Section 501.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.2 Admission. Admission to...

  19. 7 CFR 501.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Admission. 501.2 Section 501.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.2 Admission. Admission to...

  20. 7 CFR 501.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admission. 501.2 Section 501.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON U.S. MEAT ANIMAL RESEARCH CENTER, CLAY CENTER, NEBRASKA § 501.2 Admission. Admission to...

  1. The Evolution of College Admission Requirements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beale, Andrew V.

    2012-01-01

    The development of college admissions requirements during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries was basically the story of the admission policies and practices at Harvard College. Candidates for admission were examined on their ability to read and translate Latin and Greek, and a careful check was made of their character and background. With…

  2. Equivalences between nonuniform exponential dichotomy and admissibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Linfeng; Lu, Kening; Zhang, Weinian

    2017-01-01

    Relationship between exponential dichotomies and admissibility of function classes is a significant problem for hyperbolic dynamical systems. It was proved that a nonuniform exponential dichotomy implies several admissible pairs of function classes and conversely some admissible pairs were found to imply a nonuniform exponential dichotomy. In this paper we find an appropriate admissible pair of classes of Lyapunov bounded functions which is equivalent to the existence of nonuniform exponential dichotomy on half-lines R± separately, on both half-lines R± simultaneously, and on the whole line R. Additionally, the maximal admissibility is proved in the case on both half-lines R± simultaneously.

  3. The functional intraoral Glasgow scale in floor of mouth carcinoma: longitudinal assessment of 62 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Ellabban, Mohamed A; Shoaib, Taimur; Devine, John; McMahon, Jeremy; Morley, Stephen; Adly, Osama A; Farrag, Sherif H; Moati, Taha A; Soutar, David

    2013-03-01

    The functional integrity of the floor of the mouth (FOM) is essential in maintaining tongue mobility, deglutition, and control and disposal of saliva. The present study focused on reporting oral function using functional intraoral Glasgow scale (FIGS) in patients who had surgical ablation and reconstruction of FOM carcinoma with or without chemo-radiotherapy. The study included patients who had surgical treatment of floor of mouth cancer in two regional head and neck units in Glasgow, UK between January 2006 and August 2007. Patients were assessed using FIGS before surgery, 2 months, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. It is a five-point scale self-questionnaire to allow patients to self-assess speech, chewing and swallowing. The maximum total score is 15 points. The influence of socio-demographic parameters, tumour characteristics and surgical parameters was addressed in the study. A total of 62 consecutive patients were included in the study; 41 (66.1 %) were males and 21 (33.9 %) were females. The patients' mean age at the time of diagnosis was 60.6 years. Fifty (80.6 %) patients had unilateral origin of FOM tumours and 10 (19.4 %) had bilateral origin. Peroral approach was the most common approach used in 35 (56.4 %) patients. The mean preoperative FIGS score was 14. Two months after surgery, it droped to 9.4 then started to increase gradually thereafter and recorded 10.1 at 6 months and 11 at 1 year. Unilateral FOM resection recorded better score than bilateral and lateral FOM tumours than anterior at 1 year postoperatively. Furthermore, direct closure showed better functional outcome than loco-regional and free flaps. The FIGS is a simple and comprehensive way of assessing a patient's functional impairment following surgery in the FOM. Tumour site and size, surgical access, surgical resection and method of reconstruction showed significant influence on oral function following surgical resection. A well-designed rehabilitation programme is required to improve

  4. An Exploratory Study Identifying a Possible Response Shift Phenomena of the Glasgow Hearing Aid Benefit Profile

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Jonathan; Watts, Tessa; Davies, Ruth; Manchaiah, Vinaya; Slater, Julie

    2016-01-01

    A then-test technique was used to investigate the possibility of a response shift in the Glasgow hearing aid benefit profile (GHABP). Following completion of part 1 of the GHABP, 16 adults were invited for hearing-aid follow up appointments. In accordance with then-test technique, participants were asked to think back to before they had their hearing-aids fitted and the GHABP part 1 was completed again to re-establish the disability and handicap scores. These scores were then compared with the initial GHABP part I scores. Paired T testing and Wilcoxon Rank tests were carried out to investigate the statistical significance of the response shift effect. Statistically significant differences were seen between initial and retrospective GHABP (disability) scores using t test. No significant differences could be seen between the initial and retrospective handicap scores. Results suggest participants may have demonstrated a possible response shift phenomenon with the disability construct of the GHABP questionnaire, related to a possible re-calibration effect or a denial of disability effect. This exploratory study suggests that the GHABP questionnaire may be subject to a response shift phenomena. We suggest that further more robust studies are completed to verify this and recommend that this could have psychological impact on participants when explaining the results of the outcome measure and may affect hearing aid use. There is also potential for this phenomenon to affect global GHABP scores specifically when demonstrating to stakeholders the overall success of an audiology service. PMID:27942371

  5. A study of issues in administering library services to nursing studies students at Glasgow Caledonian University.

    PubMed

    Crawford, John

    2002-06-01

    Glasgow Caledonian University has had a Scottish Office pre-registration nursing and midwifery contract since 1996. Nursing studies students seemed dissatisfied with the library service and there were frequent complaints. A major study was undertaken during 2000 consisting of: an initial lis-link enquiry, separate analysis of returns from nursing studies students of the Library's annual general satisfaction survey (conducted every February), separate analysis of returns from nursing studies students of the Library's opening hours planning survey, and four focus groups held in October 2000. These studies showed the concerns of nursing studies students to be similar to other students but more strongly felt. The four main issues were textbook availability, journal availability, opening hours and staff helpfulness. Working conditions, placement requirements, study requirements and domestic circumstances were all found to be important factors. IT skill levels tended to be low but there is a growing appreciation of the need for training in this area. Concluded that: Library's services to nursing studies students have become enmeshed with the problems of delivery and assessment of education for nurses. Greatly extended opening hours are essential including evening opening during vacations. The problem of access to textbooks is so severe that conventional solutions are not going to work. Programmes of core text digitization and the promotion of e-books are needed. Reciprocal access programmes with local hospital libraries is essential.

  6. [Multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma].

    PubMed

    Ltaief, Z; Ben-Hamouda, N; Suys, T; Daniel, R T; Rossetti, A O; Oddo, M

    2014-12-10

    Management of neurocritical care patients is focused on the prevention and treatment of secondary brain injury, i.e. the number of pathophysiological intracerebral (edema, ischemia, energy dysfunction, seizures) and systemic (hyperthermia, disorders of glucose homeostasis) events that occur following the initial insult (stroke, hemorrhage, head trauma, brain anoxia) that may aggravate patient outcome. The current therapeutic paradigm is based on multimodal neuromonitoring, including invasive (intracranial pressure, brain oxygen, cerebral microdialysis) and non-invasive (transcranial doppler, near-infrared spectroscopy, EEG) tools that allows targeted individualized management of acute coma in the early phase. The aim of this review is to describe the utility of multimodal neuromonitoring for the critical care management of acute coma.

  7. Energy balance and photochemical processes in the inner coma

    SciTech Connect

    Huebner, W.F.; Keady, J.J.

    1982-01-01

    Energy balance and multifluid flow in the coma are described. Expansion cooling, radiative cooling, photodissociative heating, chemical heating, and relative multifluid flow are the processes determining the energy budget. In the fluid dynamics, fast atomic and molecular hydrogen are considered as separate fluids with larger collision mean free paths than the cold bulk fluid that has a larger mean molecular weight. The transition from fluid flow to free molecular flow is approximated. The model predicts hydrogen and bulk fluid flow velocities in general agreement with observations. The effects of the temperature profile and the fast hydrogen flow on the chemistry in the inner coma are investigated. Results from a model approximating conditions in Halley's comet are presented.

  8. University of Glasgow at TREC 2014: Experiments with Terrier in Contextual Suggestion, Temporal Summarisation and Web Tracks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    University of Glasgow at TREC 2014: Experiments with Terrier in Contextual Suggestion, Temporal Summarisation and Web Tracks Richard McCreadie... Web track, building upon our Terrier Information Retrieval Platform. In par- ticular, for the Contextual Suggestion track, we propose a novel bundled...structured nature of news articles to enhance summary coverage. For the TREC Web track, we investigated a novel risk-sensitive learning to rank

  9. Radical formation in the coma from photodissociation of ice grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, William M.; Gerth, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Long ago visual observations of comets suggested that there are jets in comets but it has only been recently that A'Hearn et al. have proven that some of these jets are due to emission from the CN radical. Recent studies in the lab have shown that CN radicals can be ejected directly into the gas phase from the photolysis of frozen vapors if the parent molecular has been excited to repulsive excited state. This later observation suggests that the jets that have been observed may be due to photodissociation of icy grains in the coma. A theory of radical formation from icy grains is presented. It is shown that direct formation of free radicals in the coma is an effective way to produce radicals from icy grains in the coma. The model predicts that icy grains could produce from 6 to 800,000 OH radicals/s per grain depending upon whether the radius of the grain is 0.3 to 100 micron.

  10. Truncation of the krebs cycle during hypoglycemic coma.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Garnette R; Tyson, Randy L; Auer, Roland N

    2008-07-01

    There is a misconception that hypoglycemic nerve cell death occurs easily, and can happen in the absence of coma. In fact, coma is the prerequisite for neuronal death, which occurs via metabolic excitatory amino acid release. The focus on nerve cell death does not explain how most brain neurons and all glia survive. Brain metabolism was interrogated in rats during and following recovery from 40 min of profound hypoglycemia using ex vivo (1)H MR spectroscopy to determine alterations accounting for survival of brain tissue. As previously shown, a time-dependent increase in aspartate was equaled by a reciprocal decrease in glutamate/glutamine. We here show that the kinetics of aspartate formation during the first 30 min (0.36 +/- 0.03 micromol g(-1) min(-1)) are altered such that glutamate, via aspartate aminotransferase, becomes the primary source of carbon when glucose-derived pyruvate is unavailable. Oxaloacetate is produced directly from alpha-ketoglutarate, so that reactions involving the six-carbon intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid cycle are bypassed. These fundamental observations in basic metabolic pathways in effect redraw the tricarboxylic acid cycle from a tricarboxylic to a dicarboxylic acid cycle during hypoglycemia. The basic neurochemical alterations according to the chemical equilibrium of mass action augments flux through a truncated Krebs cycle that continues to turn during hypoglycemic coma. This explains the partial preservation of energy charge and brain cell survival during periods of glucose deficiency.

  11. Cometary coma chemical composition (C4) mission. [Abstract only

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carle, G. C.; Clark, B. C.; Niemann, H. B.; Alexander, M.; Knocke, P. C.; O'Hara, B. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cometary missions are of enormous fundamental importance for many different space science disciplines, including exobiology. Comets are presumed relics of the earliest, most primitive material in the solar nebula and are related to the planetesimals. They undoubtedly provided a general enrichment of volatiles to the inner solar system (contributing to atmospheres and oceans) and may have been key to the origin of life. A Discovery class, comet rendezvous mission, the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission, was selected for further study by NASA earlier this year. The C4 Mission is a highly focused and usefully-limited subset of the Cometary Rendezvous Asteroid Flyby (CRAF) Mission, concentrating exclusively on measurements which will lead to an understanding of the chemical composition and make-up of the cometary nucleus. The scientific goals of the Cometary Coma Chemical Composition (C4) Mission are to rendezvous with a short-period comet and (1) to determine the elemental, chemical, and isotopic composition of the nucleus and (2) to characterize the chemical and isotopic nature of its atmosphere. Further, it is a goal to obtain preliminary data on the development of the coma (dust and gas composition) as a function of time and orbital position.

  12. Disconnection of the Ascending Arousal System in Traumatic Coma

    PubMed Central

    Edlow, Brian L.; Haynes, Robin L.; Takahashi, Emi; Klein, Joshua P.; Cummings, Peter; Benner, Thomas; Greer, David M.; Greenberg, Steven M.; Wu, Ona; Kinney, Hannah C.; Folkerth, Rebecca D.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic coma is associated with disruption of axonal pathways throughout the brain but the specific pathways involved in humans are incompletely understood. In this study, we used high angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) to map the connectivity of axonal pathways that mediate the 2 critical components of consciousness – arousal and awareness – in the postmortem brain of a 62-year-old woman with acute traumatic coma and in 2 control brains. HARDI tractography guided tissue sampling in the neuropathological analysis. HARDI tractography demonstrated complete disruption of white matter pathways connecting brainstem arousal nuclei to the basal forebrain and thalamic intralaminar and reticular nuclei. In contrast, hemispheric arousal pathways connecting the thalamus and basal forebrain to the cerebral cortex were only partially disrupted, as were the cortical “awareness pathways.” Neuropathologic examination, which utilized β-amyloid precursor protein and fractin immunomarkers, revealed axonal injury in the white matter of the brainstem and cerebral hemispheres that corresponded to sites of HARDI tract disruption. Axonal injury was also present within the grey matter of the hypothalamus, thalamus, basal forebrain, and cerebral cortex. We propose that traumatic coma may be a subcortical disconnection syndrome related to the disconnection of specific brainstem arousal nuclei from the thalamus and basal forebrain. PMID:23656993

  13. The coma cluster after lunch: Has a galaxcy group passed through the cluster core?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Jack O.; Roettiger, Kurt; Ledlow, Michael; Klypin, Anatoly

    1994-01-01

    We propose that the Coma cluster has recently undergone a collision with the NGC 4839 galaxy group. The ROSAT X-ray morphology, the Coma radio halo, the presence of poststarburst galaxies in the bridge between Coma and NGC 4839, the usually high velocity dispersion for the NGC 4839 group, and the position of a large-scale galaxy filament to the NE of Coma are all used to argue that the NGC 4839 group passed through the core of Coma approximately 2 Gyr ago. We present a new Hydro/N-body simulation of the merger between a galaxy group and a rich cluster that reproduces many of the observed X-ray and optical properties of Coma/NGC 4839.

  14. 45 CFR 2555.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Admission. 2555.300 Section 2555.300 Public... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 2555.300 Admission. (a) General. No..., by any recipient to which §§ 2555.300 through 2555.310 apply, except as provided in §§ 2555.225...

  15. 6 CFR 17.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Admission. 17.300 Section 17.300 Domestic... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 17.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the... which §§ 17.300 through 17.310 apply, except as provided in §§ 17.225 and 17.230. (b)...

  16. 40 CFR 5.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Admission. 5.300 Section 5.300... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 5.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis... which §§ 5.300 through §§ 5.310 apply, except as provided in §§ 5.225 and 5.230. (b)...

  17. 15 CFR 8a.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admission. 8a.300 Section 8a.300... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 8a.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the... which §§ 8a.300 through §§ 8a.310 apply, except as provided in §§ 8a.225 and §§ 8a.230. (b)...

  18. 45 CFR 2555.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Admission. 2555.300 Section 2555.300 Public... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 2555.300 Admission. (a) General. No..., by any recipient to which §§ 2555.300 through 2555.310 apply, except as provided in §§ 2555.225...

  19. 14 CFR 1253.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Admission. 1253.300 Section 1253.300... in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1253.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the... which §§ 1253.300 through §§ 1253.310 apply, except as provided in §§ 1253.225 and §§ 1253.230....

  20. Effects of Urban Morphology on Intra-Urban Temperature Differences: Two Squares in Glasgow City Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drach, P. R. C.; Emmanuel, R.

    2014-12-01

    The perspective of climate change increases the necessity of tackling the urban over heating effects, by developing strategies to mitigate/adapt to changes. Analysing the influence of urban form on intra-urban temperature dynamics could be a helpful way of reducing its negative consequences. Also, it would help untangle the urban effect from the effect caused by atmospheric conditions. The present paper presents the effect of atmospheric conditions as exemplified by atmospheric stability (modified Pasquill-Gifford-Turner classification system) and urban morphology as measured by the Sky View Factor (SVF) on intra-urban variations in air temperature in a cold climate city, in and around the mature urban area of Glasgow, UK (55° 51' 57.294"N, 4° 15' 0.2628"W). The aim is to highlight their combined importance and to make preliminary investigations on the local warming effect of urban morphology under specific atmospheric stability classes. The present work indicates that the maximum intra-urban temperature differences (i.e. temperature difference between the coolest and the warmest spots in a given urban region) is strongly correlated with atmospheric stability. The spatial patterns in local temperature variations consistently show that water bodies and urban parks have lower temperature variations. Thus, greenery and urban materials could play an important role in influencing the local climate in cold cities. The knowledge of urban morphology's influence on local temperature variations could be an important tool for devising appropriate planning/design strategies to face urban overheating in the coming years as the background climate continues to warm.

  1. Quaternary geologic map of the Glasgow 1° x 2° quadrangle, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fullerton, David S.; Colton, Roger B.; Bush, Charles A.

    2012-01-01

    The Glasgow quadrangle encompasses approximately 16,084 km2 (6,210 mi2). The northern boundary is the Montana/Saskatchewan (U.S./Canada) boundary. The quadrangle is in the Northern Plains physiographic province and it includes the Boundary Plateau, Peerless Plateau, and Larb Hills. The primary river is the Milk River. The map units are surficial deposits and materials, not landforms. Deposits that comprise some constructional landforms (for example, ground-moraine deposits, end-moraine deposits, and stagnation-moraine deposits, all composed of till) are distinguished for purposes of reconstruction of glacial history. Surficial deposits and materials are assigned to 23 map units on the basis of genesis, age, lithology or composition, texture or particle size, and other physical, chemical, and engineering characteristics. It is not a map of soils that are recognized in pedology or agronomy. Rather, it is a generalized map of soils recognized in engineering geology, or of substrata or parent materials in which pedologic or agronomic soils are formed. Glaciotectonic (ice-thrust) structures and deposits are mapped separately, represented by a symbol. The surficial deposits are glacial, ice-contact, glaciofluvial, alluvial, lacustrine, eolian, colluvial, and mass-movement deposits. Residuum, a surficial material, also is mapped. Till of late Wisconsin age is represented by three map units. Till of Illinoian age is also represented locally but is widespread in the subsurface. This map was prepared to serve as a database for compilation of a Quaternary geologic map of the United States and Canada (scale 1:1,000,000). Letter symbols for the map units are those used for the same units in the Quaternary Geologic Atlas of the United States map series.

  2. A lead isotopic study of the human bioaccessibility of lead in urban soils from Glasgow, Scotland.

    PubMed

    Farmer, John G; Broadway, Andrew; Cave, Mark R; Wragg, Joanna; Fordyce, Fiona M; Graham, Margaret C; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Bewley, Richard J F

    2011-11-01

    The human bioaccessibility of lead (Pb) in Pb-contaminated soils from the Glasgow area was determined by the Unified Bioaccessibility Research Group of Europe (BARGE) Method (UBM), an in vitro physiologically based extraction scheme that mimics the chemical environment of the human gastrointestinal system and contains both stomach and intestine compartments. For 27 soils ranging in total Pb concentration from 126 to 2160 mg kg(-1) (median 539 mg kg(-1)), bioaccessibility as determined by the 'stomach' simulation (pH ~1.5) was 46-1580 mg kg(-1), equivalent to 23-77% (mean 52%) of soil total Pb concentration. The corresponding bioaccessibility data for the 'stomach+intestine' simulation (pH ~6.3) were 6-623 mg kg(-1) and 2-42% (mean 22%) of soil Pb concentration. The soil (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios ranged from 1.057 to 1.175. Three-isotope plots of (208)Pb/(206)Pb against (206)Pb/(207)Pb demonstrated that (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios were intermediate between values for source end-member extremes of imported Australian Pb ore (1.04)--used in the manufacture of alkyl Pb compounds (1.06-1.10) formerly added to petrol--and indigenous Pb ores/coal (1.17-1.19). The (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratios of the UBM 'stomach' extracts were similar (<0.01 difference) to those of the soil for 26 of the 27 samples (r=0.993, p<0.001) and lower in 24 of them. A slight preference for lower (206)Pb/(207)Pb ratio was discernible in the UBM. However, the source of Pb appeared to be less important in determining the extent of UBM-bioaccessible Pb than the overall soil total Pb concentration and the soil phases with which the Pb was associated. The significant phases identified in a subset of samples were carbonates, manganese oxides, iron-aluminium oxyhydroxides and clays.

  3. Temporal variation in major trauma admissions

    PubMed Central

    Kieffer, WKM; Michalik, DV; Gallagher, K; McFadyen, I; Bernard, J; Rogers, BA

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Trauma is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in the UK. Since the inception of the trauma networks, little is known of the temporal pattern of trauma admissions. Methods Trauma Audit and Research Network data for 1 April 2011 to 31 March 2013 were collated from two large major trauma centres (MTCs) in the South East of England: Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust (BSUH) and St George's University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (SGU). The number of admissions and the injury severity score by time of admission, by weekdays versus weekend and by month/season were analysed. Results There were 1,223 admissions at BSUH and 1,241 at SGU. There was significant variation by time of admission; there were more admissions in the afternoons (BSUH p<0.001) and evenings (SGU p<0.001). There were proportionally more admissions at the weekends than on weekdays (BSUH p<0.001, SGU p=0.028). There was significant seasonal variation in admissions at BSUH (p<0.001) with more admissions in summer and autumn. No significant seasonal variation was observed at SGU (p=0.543). Conclusions The temporal patterns observed were different for each MTC with important implications for resource planning of trauma care. This study identified differing needs for different MTCs and resource planning should be individualised to the network. PMID:26741676

  4. Investigation into the reasons for preventable drug related admissions to a medical admissions unit: observational study

    PubMed Central

    Howard, R; Avery, A; Howard, P; Partridge, M

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To describe the drugs and types of medicine management problems most frequently associated with preventable drug related admissions to an acute medical admissions unit. Design: Observation study. Setting: Medical admissions unit in a teaching hospital in Nottingham, UK. Participants: 4093 patients seen by pharmacists on the medical admissions unit between 1 January and 30 June 2001. Main outcome measures: Proportion of admissions that were drug related and preventable, classification of the underlying causes of preventable drug related admissions, and identification of drugs most commonly associated with preventable drug related admissions. Results: Of the admissions seen by pharmacists, 265 (6.5%) were judged to be drug related and 178 (67%) of these were judged to be preventable. Preventable admissions were mainly due to problems with prescribing (63 cases (35%)), monitoring (46 cases (26%)), and adherence to medication (53 cases (30%)). The drugs most commonly implicated were NSAIDs, antiplatelets, antiepileptics, hypoglycaemics, diuretics, inhaled corticosteroids, cardiac glycosides, and beta-blockers. Conclusions: Potentially preventable drug related morbidity was associated with 4.3% of admissions to a medical admissions unit. In 91% of cases these admissions were related to problems with either prescribing, monitoring, or adherence. PMID:12897361

  5. Formation of C3 and C2 in Cometary Comae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hölscher, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    Comets are remnants from the Solar System formation. They reside at large distances from the Sun and are believed to store deep freeze imprints of the chemical and physical conditions at the time the Solar System formed. The main ice component of a comet is H2O followed by CO and CO2 with additional small amounts of molecules with varying complexity. Comets also contain large amounts of dust. If a comet approaches the Sun the ices begin to sublimate giving rise to the cometary coma. The molecules producing the coma can be observed in the infrared, the radio wavelength range and at optical wavelengths. To constrain the formation of the Solar System, models require knowledge of the composition for a statistically significant number of comets. This favors optical observations of e.g. C3 (tricarbon) and C2 (dicarbon) since these species allow observations even of relatively faint comets and do not require space missions (infrared observations). However, one has to link these observed photodissociation product species (daughter species) to the molecules that originally sublimated from the comet nucleus surface, i.e. the so-called parent molecules, as e.g. C2H2 (acetylene) for C2. However, for C3 no parent molecules have been identified so far. This thesis investigates the formation of C3 and C2 radicals in cometary comae due to photodissociation of observed and in the literature proposed hydrocarbon parent molecules. For this purpose a one-dimensional multi-fluid coma chemistry model has been improved and applied. This work added new photo reactions to the model, updated the hydrocarbon photo rate coefficients and quantified their uncertainty. A sensitivity analysis has been carried out to determine the reactions whose uncertainty most affect the model output uncertainty. Special attention should be paid to these so-called key reactions in future laboratory experiments and quantum chemical computations to reduce the model output uncertainty more effectively. This will

  6. 28 CFR 54.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 54.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be...

  7. 14 CFR 1253.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Aeronautics and Space NATIONAL AERONAUTICS AND SPACE ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex... basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient...

  8. Lexical Profiles of Thailand University Admission Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cherngchawano, Wirun; Jaturapitakkul, Natjiree

    2014-01-01

    University Admission Tests in Thailand are important documents which reflect Thailand's education system. To study at a higher education level, all students generally need to take the University Admission Tests designed by the National Institute of Educational Testing Service (NIETS). For the English test, vocabulary and reading comprehension is…

  9. 7 CFR 15a.21 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Admission. 15a.21 Section 15a.21 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited §...

  10. 7 CFR 15a.21 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Admission. 15a.21 Section 15a.21 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited §...

  11. 45 CFR 618.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on... shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by...

  12. 45 CFR 618.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on... shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by...

  13. 45 CFR 618.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on... shall, on the basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by...

  14. 7 CFR 503.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Admission. 503.2 Section 503.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.2 Admission. No person will be admitted to PIADC,...

  15. 7 CFR 503.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Admission. 503.2 Section 503.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.2 Admission. No person will be admitted to PIADC,...

  16. 7 CFR 503.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admission. 503.2 Section 503.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.2 Admission. No person will be admitted to PIADC,...

  17. 7 CFR 503.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Admission. 503.2 Section 503.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.2 Admission. No person will be admitted to PIADC,...

  18. Unethical Admissions: Academic Integrity in Question.

    PubMed

    Ansah, Richard Hannis; Aikhuele, Daniel O; Yao, Liu

    2016-11-28

    The increasing unethical practices of graduates' admissions have heightened concerns about the integrity of the academy. This article informs this important subject that affects the students, admission systems, and the entire scientific community, thus, representing an approach against scholarly black market activities including falsified documents and unethical practices by consultants and students' recruitment agencies.

  19. 7 CFR 503.2 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Admission. 503.2 Section 503.2 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.2 Admission. No person will be admitted to PIADC,...

  20. Profile in Action: Linking Admission and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cortes, Carla M.

    2013-01-01

    A profile-oriented retention strategy embraces the admission process as a powerful lever in improving retention and completion rates and recognizes that the student profile can be shaped by changes in admission policies or priorities--even within the current market position of the institution. In addition, the student body can be oriented toward…

  1. Grade Inflation and Law School Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wongsurawat, Winai

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the evidence on whether grade inflation has led to an increasing emphasis on standardized test scores as a criterion for law school admissions. Design/methodology/approach: Fit probabilistic models to admissions data for American law schools during the mid to late 1990s, a period during which…

  2. Strategies and Trends in Admissions Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fincher, Cameron

    1975-01-01

    Noting that the technical service rendered by the national testing agencies may be an undesirable tradeoff for the active involvement of admissions workers in admissions research, the author suggests that the use of decision theory, quasi-actuarial assessment, quasi-experimental design, and program evaluation strategies would place admissions…

  3. Alphabetical Order Effects in School Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurajda, Štepán; Münich, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    If school admission committees use alphabetically sorted lists of applicants in their evaluations, one's position in the alphabet according to last name initial may be important in determining access to selective schools. Jurajda and Münich (2010) "Admission to Selective Schools, Alphabetically". "Economics of Education…

  4. Why Do We Stay in Admissions?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piersol, Marion Kandel; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Admission counselors (n=200) completed surveys about employment, title, on-the-job training, travel, and availability and satisfaction with certain responsibilities. Most satisfying admission responsibilities were program organization and implementation, applicant review and decision, and formal presentations. Least satisfying were telemarketing,…

  5. An Admissions Race that's Already Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Mitchell L.

    2008-01-01

    The author recently spent a year and a half in the admissions office of a highly selective Eastern college as an ethnographer, seeking to understand just how admissions officers make their decisions. He accompanied them on recruitment trips to high schools and college fairs, helped manage their offices' relentless current of visitors and mail, and…

  6. College Admission Professionals: Who Are We Now?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rapelye, Janet Lavin

    1999-01-01

    Reflects on roles that admission professionals hold within the academic community. Explains that admission professionals are educators and business managers; bring in revenue; and serve as advisors to the president, as spokespeople to alumni/ae, and if fortunate, as counselors to students. Suggests that counselors focus on students because they…

  7. 49 CFR 25.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Office of the Secretary of Transportation NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 25.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be...

  8. 40 CFR 5.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex... of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient...

  9. 45 CFR 86.21 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex... of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient...

  10. 22 CFR 146.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Relations DEPARTMENT OF STATE CIVIL RIGHTS NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 146.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be...

  11. 28 CFR 54.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 54.300 Admission. (a) General. No person shall, on the basis of sex, be...

  12. 43 CFR 41.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Lands: Interior Office of the Secretary of the Interior NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex... basis of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient...

  13. 45 CFR 86.21 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex... of sex, be denied admission, or be subjected to discrimination in admission, by any recipient...

  14. Admission to Law School: New Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shultz, Marjorie M.; Zedeck, Sheldon

    2012-01-01

    Standardized tests have been increasingly controversial over recent years in high-stakes admission decisions. Their role in operationalizing definitions of merit and qualification is especially contested, but in law schools this challenge has become particularly intense. Law schools have relied on the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) and an INDEX…

  15. The kinetics and dynamics of the coma of Halley's comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    This grant to the University of Michigan supported the efforts of Michael R. Combi to serve as a co-investigator in collaboration with a larger effort by the principal investigator, William Smyth of Atmospheric and Environmental Research, Inc. The overall objective of this project was to analyze in a self-consistent manner unique optical O((sup 1)D) and NH2 ultra-high resolution line profile data of excellent quality and other supporting lower-resolution spectral data for the coma of comet P/Halley by using highly developed and physically-based cometary coma models in order to determine and explain in terms of physical processes the actual dynamics and photochemical kinetics that occur in the coma. The justification for this work is that it provides a valuable and underlying physical base from which to interpret significantly different types of coma observations in a self-consistent manner and hence bring into agreement (or avoid) apparent inconsistencies that arise from non-physically based interpretations. The level of effort for the Michigan component amounted to less than three person-months over a planned period of three years. The period had been extended at no extra cost to four years because the Michigan grant and the AER contract did not have coincident time periods. An effort of somewhat larger scope was undertaken by the PI. The importance of the O((sup 1)D) profiles is that they provide a direct trace of the water distribution in comets. The line profile shape is produced by the convolution of the outflow velocity and thermal dispersion of the parent water molecules with the photokinetic ejection of the oxygen atoms upon photodissociation of the parent water molecules. Our understanding of the NH2 and its precursor ammonia are important for comet-to-comet composition variations as they relate to the cosmo-chemistry of the early solar nebula. Modeling of the distribution of NH2 is necessary in order to infer the ammonia production rates from NH2

  16. A Fatal Adverse Effect of Barbiturate Coma Therapy: Dyskalemia

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyun Mook; Baek, Jin Wook; Lee, Sang Pyung

    2016-01-01

    The management guideline for traumatic brain injury (TBI) recommends high-dose barbiturate therapy to control increased intracranial pressure refractory to other therapeutic options. High-dose barbiturate therapy, however, may cause many severe side effects; the commonly recognized ones include hypotension, immunosuppression, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and prolonged decrease of cortical activity. Meanwhile, dyskalemia remains relatively uncommon. In this study, we report the case of a hypokalemic patient with severe rebound hyperkalemia, which occurred as a result of barbiturate coma therapy administered for TBI treatment. PMID:27857927

  17. Evolution of near UV Halley's spectrum in the inner coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rousselot, Phillippe; Clairemidi, Jacques; Vernotte, F.; Moreels, Guy

    1992-01-01

    A direct way to observe the photodissociation of water vapor in a cometary coma is to detect the OH prompt emission. This emission is shifted of delta lambda = 4 nm with respect to the OH 309 nm fluorescence band. The extended data set obtained with the three-channel spectrometer on-board Vega 2 reveals at short distance of the nucleus (i.e., less than 600 km) an excess of emission on the right wing of the OH band which may be interpreted as being mainly due to prompt emission.

  18. Automated surface photometry for the Coma Cluster galaxies: The catalog

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Okamura, S.; Tarusawa, K.

    1995-01-01

    A homogeneous photometry catalog is presented for 450 galaxies with B(sub 25.5) less than or equal to 16 mag located in the 9.8 deg x 9.8 deg region centered on the Coma Cluster. The catalog is based on photographic photometry using an automated surface photometry software for data reduction applied to B-band Schmidt plates. The catalog provides accurate positions, isophotal and total magnitudes, major and minor axes, and a few other photometric parameters including rudimentary morphology (early of late type).

  19. Induction of burst suppression or coma using intravenous anesthetics in refractory status epilepticus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Bong Su; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Shin, Jeong-Won; Moon, Jang Sup; Byun, Jung-Ick; Lim, Jung-Ah; Moon, Hye Jin; Kim, Young-Soo; Lee, Soon-Tae; Chu, Kon; Lee, Sang Kun

    2015-05-01

    General anesthetic-induced coma therapy has been recommended for the treatment of refractory status epilepticus (RSE). However, the influence of electroencephalographic (EEG) burst suppression (BS) on outcomes still remains unclear. This study investigated the impact of intravenous anesthetic-induced BS on the prognosis of RSE using a retrospective analysis of all consecutive adult patients who received intravenous anesthetic treatment for RSE at the Seoul National University Hospital between January 2006 and June 2011. Twenty-two of the 111 episodes of RSE were enrolled in this study. Of the 22 RSE patients, 12 (54.5%) were women and 18 (81.4%) exhibited generalized convulsive status epilepticus. Sixteen patients (72.7%) were classified as having acute symptomatic etiology, including three patients with anoxic encephalopathy, and others with remote symptomatic etiology. Only two patients (9.1%) had a favorable Status Epilepticus Severity Score (0-2) at admission. All patients received midazolam (MDZ) as a primary intravenous anesthetic drug for RSE treatment; three (13.6%) received MDZ and propofol, and one (4.5%) received MDZ and pentobarbital. The rates of mortality and poor outcome at discharge were 13.6% (n=3) and 54.5% (n=12), respectively. While BS was achieved in six (27.5%) patients, it was not associated with mortality or poor outcome. Induced BS was associated with prolonged hospital stay in subgroup analysis when excluding anoxic encephalopathy. Our results suggest that induction of BS for treating RSE did not affect mortality or outcome at discharge and may lead to an increased length of hospital stay.

  20. Analysis of CCD images of the coma of comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    The modeling analysis objective of this project is to make use of the skill acquired in the development of Monte Carlo particle trajectory models for the distributions of gas species in cometary comae as a basis for a new dust coma model. This model will include a self-consistent picture of the time-dependent dusty-gas dynamics of the inner coma and the three-dimensional time-dependent trajectories of the dust particles under the influence of solar gravity and solar radiation pressure in the outer coma. Our purpose is to use this model as a tool to analyze selected images from two sets of data of the comet P/Halley with the hope that we can help to understand the effects of a number of important processes on the spatial morphology of the observed dust coma. The study will proceed much in the same way as our study of the spatially extended hydrogen coma where we were able to understand the spatial morphology of the Lyman-alpha coma in terms of the partial thermalization of the hot H atoms produced by the photodissociation of cometary H2O and OH. The processes of importance to the observed dust coma include: (1) the dust particle size distribution function; (2) the terminal velocities of various sized dust particles in the inner coma; (3) the radiation scattering properties of dust particles, which are important both in terms of the observed scattered radiation and the radiation pressure acceleration on dust particles; (4) the fragmentation and/or vaporization of dust particles; (5) the relative importance of CHON and silicate dust particles as they contribute both to the dusty-gas dynamics in the inner coma (that produce the dust particle terminal velocities) and to the observed spatial morphology of the outer dust coma; and (6) the time and direction dependence of the source of dust.

  1. Proceedings of a symposium on the neurobiology of the basal ganglia. Glasgow, United Kingdom, July 1999.

    PubMed

    2000-05-01

    Glasgow University in July 1999 as part of the Summer Meeting of the Anatomical Society of Great Britain and Ireland. The invited speakers were chosen to be wide ranging and contributions encompassed evolution, circuitry and receptors of the basal ganglia, striatal remodelling after dopamine loss, striatal functioning in humans with Huntington's disease and in primate models after midbrain fetal transplants, and the genetics of basal ganglia disorders. Short presentations and posters of current results supplemented the main presentations and some are also included amongst these reviews.

  2. Oncological Outcomes and Complications After Volume Replacement Oncoplastic Breast Conservations—The Glasgow Experience

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Weiguang; Stallard, Sheila; Doughty, Julie; Mallon, Elizabeth; Romics, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Oncoplastic breast conservation surgery (OBCS) combines the principles of surgical oncology and plastic surgery. OBCS has now become a growing option for the treatment of breast cancer and forms a part of breast-conserving therapy (BCT). We sought to investigate and report our experience in two breast units in Glasgow (Victoria Infirmary and Western Infirmary) on volume replacement OBCS. MATERIALS AND METHODS Details of patients treated with volume replacement OBCS were identified from a prospectively recorded database from November 2010 to October 2015. The clinical records included in the oncoplastic dataset were analyzed for demographics, tumor, treatment characteristics, and recurrences. The data were analyzed for follow-up to determine the pattern and timing of recurrence up to April 2016. The primary outcome of this study was tumor-free margin resection rates, and the secondary outcomes were locoregional and distant recurrence rates as these correlate with the overall oncological safety of volume replacement oncoplastic breast surgery (OPBS). RESULTS A total of 30 volume replacement oncoplastic breast conservation procedures have been carried out in this time period. The mean age of the former group was 51 years. Twice as many patients presented symptomatically than had tumors detected on screening. The mean preoperative tumor size on radiology was 25.4 mm. Patients underwent 13 thoracoepigastric flaps, 5 lateral intercostal artery perforator (LICAP) flaps, 2 thoracodorsal artery perforator (TDAP) flaps, 1 lateral thoracic artery perforator (LTAP) flap, 1 crescent flap volume replacement surgery, and 8 matrix rotations. Two patients had neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Fourteen patients had adjuvant chemotherapy, and all patients were treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. Twenty-two patients were treated with hormonal therapy and four patients were treated with Herceptin. The rate of incomplete excision was 10%. Median follow-up time was 48.5 months. Only

  3. Is lead in tap water still a public health problem? An observational study in Glasgow.

    PubMed Central

    Watt, G. C.; Britton, A.; Gilmour, W. H.; Moore, M. R.; Murray, G. D.; Robertson, S. J.; Womersley, J.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between tap water lead and maternal blood lead concentrations and assess the exposure of infants to lead in tap water in a water supply area subjected to maximal water treatment to reduce plumbosolvency. DESIGN: Postal questionnaire survey and collection of kettle water from a representative sample of mothers; blood and further water samples were collected in a random sample of households and households with raised water lead concentrations. SETTING: Loch Katrine water supply area, Glasgow. SUBJECTS: 1812 mothers with a live infant born between October 1991 and September 1992. Blood lead concentrations were measured in 342 mothers. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mean geometric blood lead concentrations and the prevalence of raised tap water lead concentration. RESULTS: 17% of households had water lead concentration of 10 micrograms/l (48.3 nmol/l) or more in 1993 compared with 49% of households in 1981. Tap water lead remained the main correlate or raised maternal blood lead concentrations and accounted for 62% and 76% of cases of maternal blood lead concentrations above 5 and 10 micrograms/dl (0.24 and 0.48 mumol/l) respectively. The geometric mean maternal blood lead concentration was 3.65 micrograms/dl (0.18 mumol/l) in a random sample of mothers and 3.16 micrograms/dl (0.15 mumol/l) in mothers whose tap water lead concentrations were consistently below 2 micrograms/l (9.7 nmol/l). No mother in the study had a blood lead concentration above 25 micrograms/dl (1.21 mumol/l). An estimated 13% of infants were exposed via bottle feeds to tap water lead concentrations exceeding the World Health Organisation's guideline of 10 micrograms/l (48.3 nmol/l). CONCLUSIONS: Tap water lead and maternal blood led concentrations in the Loch Katrine water supply area have fallen substantially since the early 1980s. Maternal blood lead concentrations are well within limits currently considered safe for human health. Tap water lead is still a public health

  4. Neighbourhood demolition, relocation and health. A qualitative longitudinal study of housing-led urban regeneration in Glasgow, UK

    PubMed Central

    Egan, Matt; Lawson, Louise; Kearns, Ade; Conway, Ellie; Neary, Joanne

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a qualitative longitudinal study to explore how adult residents of disadvantaged urban neighbourhoods (Glasgow, UK) experienced neighbourhood demolition and relocation. Data from 23 households was collected in 2011 and 2012. Some participants described moves to new or improved homes in different neighbourhoods as beneficial to their and their families’ wellbeing. Others suggested that longstanding illnesses and problems with the new home and/or neighbourhood led to more negative experiences. Individual-level contextual differences, home and neighbourhood-level factors and variations in intervention implementation influence the experiences of residents involved in relocation programmes. PMID:25814338

  5. [Meningococcal disease admissions in a paediatric intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Mação, Patrícia; Januário, Gustavo; Ferreira, Sofia; Dias, Andrea; Dionísio, Teresa; Pinto, Carla; Carvalho, Leonor

    2014-01-01

    Introdução: A infecção meningocócica tem uma elevada mortalidade e morbilidade em crianças. O tratamento agressivo do choque, a referenciação precoce, o transporte secundário especializado e a vacinação são factores com impacto potencial na redução da mortalidade. Foram objectivos caracterizar as crianças com doença invasiva meningocócica admitidas em cuidados intensivos, avaliar parâmetros de gravidade e mortalidade. Material e Métodos: Estudo observacional, cujo método de colheita de dados foi retrospectivo. Foram constituídos dois períodos, de seis anos cada, de acordo com o ano de admissão (A: 2000-2005 e B: 2006-2011) e nestes compararam-se índices de gravidade, disfunção orgânica e mortalidade. Resultados: Foram admitidas 70 crianças com doença invasiva meningocócica. Quando comparadas com as outras causas verificouse uma redução nas admissões por doença invasiva meningocócica (período A: 3,4%; período B: 1,5%; p = 0,001). A ocorrência de meningite foi de 41% no período A e de 29% no período B (p = 0,461). Tiveram púrpura rapidamente progressiva 78% no período A e 50% no período B (p = 0,0032). As crianças do período A tiveram disfunção multi-órgão (80%), coagulação intravascular disseminada (76%) e coma (22%) mais frequentemente que as crianças do período B (29%, 29%, 0%; p < 0,05). A mortalidade foi 26% no período A e 0% no período B (p = 0,006) e a mortalidade estandardizada pelo PRISM foi 1,3 e 0 no período A e B respectivamente. Discussão: A redução do número de admissões por doença menigocócica invasiva pode ser explicada pela introdução da vacina anti-meningocócica C em 2006. Pensa-se que a redução da mortalidade observada, possa ser atribuível à melhoria da estabilização inicial e ao transporte secundário. Conclusão: Nos últimos anos houve uma redução significativa no número de admissões e na mortalidade por doença invasiva meningocócica.

  6. Diagnosis of myxedema coma complicated by renal failure: a case report.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Akiteru; Sangen, Ryusho; Furumura, Yoshiki; Usuda, Daisuke; Kasamaki, Yuji; Kanda, Tsugiyasu

    2017-04-01

    Myxedema coma, caused by severe lack of thyroid hormone, is characterized by deterioration of mental status, hypothermia, hypotension, hyponatremia, and hypoventilation. We describe an 84-year-old woman who presented with renal failure and new onset severe hypothyroidism leading to challenges in the recognition of myxedema coma.

  7. [Use of amantadine sulfate (PK-MERZ) during emergence from coma: results of a multicenter study].

    PubMed

    Belkin, A A; Shchegolev, A V; Kondrat'ev, A N; Bubnova, I D

    2008-01-01

    The paper gives the results of the first multicenter study of the efficiency of using amantadine sulfate (PK-Merz) in patients with acute cerebral disease during coma emergence. The study has shown a positive effect of this drug at coma emergence, which manifested itself as clinical improvement and a better outcome of the disease. Full objectivism of the findings requires further studies.

  8. Spectroscopy of Ultra-diffuse Galaxies in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadowaki, Jennifer; Zaritsky, Dennis; Donnerstein, R. L.

    2017-04-01

    We present spectra of five ultra-diffuse galaxies (UDGs) in the vicinity of the Coma cluster obtained with the Multi-object Double Spectrograph on the Large Binocular Telescope. We confirm four of these as members of the cluster, quintupling the number of spectroscopically confirmed systems. Like the previously confirmed large (projected half-light radius >4.6 kpc) UDG, DF44, the systems we targeted all have projected half-light radii > 2.9 {kpc}. As such, we spectroscopically confirm a population of physically large UDGs in the Coma cluster. The remaining UDG is located in the field, about 45 Mpc behind the cluster. We observe Balmer and Ca ii H and K absorption lines in all of our UDG spectra. By comparing the stacked UDG spectrum against stellar population synthesis models, we conclude that, on average, these UDGs are composed of metal-poor stars ([Fe/H] ≲ ‑1.5). We also discover the first UDG with [O ii] and [O iii] emission lines within a clustered environment, demonstrating that not all cluster UDGs are devoid of gas and sources of ionizing radiation.

  9. X-ray archaeology in the Coma cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Simon D. M.; Briel, Ulrich G.; Henry, J. P.

    1993-01-01

    We present images of X-ray emission from hot gas within the Coma cluster of galaxies. These maps, made with the ROSAT satellite, have much higher SNR than any previous X-ray image of a galaxy cluster, and allow cluster structure to be analyzed in unprecedented detail. They show greater structural irregularity than might have been anticipated from earlier observations of Coma. Emission is detected from a number of bright cluster galaxies in addition to the two known previously. In four cases, there is evidence that these galaxies lie at the center of an extended subconcentration within the cluster, possibly the remnant of their associated groups. For at least two galaxies, the images show direct evidence for ongoing disruption of their gaseous atmosphere. The luminosity associated with these galaxies is comparable to that detected around similar ellipticals in much poorer environments. Emission is easily detected to the limit of our field, about 1 deg from the cluster center, and appears to become more regular at large radii. The data show clearly that this archetype of a rich and regular galaxy cluster was, in fact, formed by the merging of several distinct subunits which are not yet fully destroyed.

  10. [Cerebral manifestations in the hepatic coma syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Funovics, J

    1975-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy has been investigated in a two-stage devascularization model in the rat with portavacal shunt and hepatic artery ligation. There is a significant increase in brain octopamine and phenylethanolamine and a decrease in brain norepinephrine (NE) 6 to 9 hours after hepatic artery ligation. The depletion of NE seems the sequel of diminished synthesis in the presence of an unaltered turnover rate, due to a blockade of tyrosine hydroxylase either by accumulation of false neurochemical transmitters or by phenylalanine. It is most marked in the cortex and midbrain. The high-energy phosphate compounds, ATP, phosphocreatine and glucose-6-phosphate are not diminished in hepatic coma, nor is glucose, indicating that other mechanism are involved in the pathogenesis of metabolic state by the increased ammonia level. "intestinal sterilization" and total colectomy have no significant effect on the ammonia level, but cause a decrease in the level or aromatic precursor amino acids in the plasma and brain, with normalization of the level of cerebral transmitters. These results permit the formulation of a unified concept of the hepatic coma syndrome and its clinical manifestations such as flapping tremor, the hyperdynamic cardiovascular state and the hepatorenal syndrome. Moreover, they form the basis for the introduction of a new therapeutic principle in the management of hepatic encephalopathy by L-dopa or modified amino acid solutions, which act by altering the central and peripheral neurotransmitters.

  11. Coma blisters in children: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Laura; Schena, Donatella; Colato, Chiara; Biban, Paolo; Girolomoni, Giampiero

    2013-12-01

    Coma-induced blisters is a rare condition associated with prolonged impairment of conscious level, which is relatively well-known in adults following overdose with barbiturates. However, it has been very rarely described in children. A case of coma-bullae occurring in an 11-year-old child with meningoencephalitis is herein reported. The bullous lesions occurred on the limbs and trunks, and evolved into necrotic ulcers in a few days. No correlation with any drug overdosage was found. A skin biopsy revealed epidermal and eccrine sweat gland necrosis with abundant neutrophils, and thrombosis of the vessels in the lower dermis. A comprehensive review of the literature showed that only 5 cases of coma-bullae in children have been published so far. Coma blistering resolves spontaneously within days or weeks. Diagnosis of coma-bullae may require careful clinical-pathologic correlation to exclude other blistering diseases in children.

  12. Gas Dynamics and Kinetics in the Cometary Coma: Theory and Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Combi, Michael R.; Harris, Walter M.; Smyth, William H.

    2005-01-01

    Our ability to describe the physical state of the expanding coma affects fundamental areas of cometary study both directly and indirectly. In order to convert measured abundances of gas species in the coma to gas production rates, models for the distribution and kinematics of gas species in the coma are required. Conversely, many different types of observations, together with laboratory data and theory, are still required to determine coma model attributes and parameters. Accurate relative and absolute gas production rates and their variations with time and from comet to comet are crucial to our basic understanding of the composition and structure of cometary nuclei and their place in the solar system. We review the gas dynamics and kinetics of cometary comae from both theoretical and observational perspectives, which are important for understanding the wide variety of physical conditions that are encountered.

  13. Analysis for simplified optics coma effection on spectral image inversion of coded aperture spectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yangyang; Lv, Qunbo; Li, Weiyan; Xiangli, Bin

    2015-09-01

    As a novel spectrum imaging technology was developed recent years, push-broom coded aperture spectral imaging (PCASI) has the advantages of high throughput, high SNR, high stability etc. This coded aperture spectral imaging utilizes fixed code templates and push-broom mode, which can realize the high-precision reconstruction of spatial and spectral information. But during optical lens designing, manufacturing and debugging, it is inevitably exist some minor coma errors. Even minor coma errors can reduce image quality. In this paper, we simulated the system optical coma error's influence to the quality of reconstructed image, analyzed the variant of the coded aperture in different optical coma effect, then proposed an accurate curve of image quality and optical coma quality in 255×255 size code template, which provide important references for design and development of push-broom coded aperture spectrometer.

  14. Observed medical and surgical complications of prolonged barbiturate coma for refractory status epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Newey, Christopher R.; Wisco, Dolora; Nattanmai, Premkumar; Sarwal, Aarti

    2016-01-01

    Background: Refractory status epilepticus is often treated with third-line therapy, such as pentobarbital coma. However, its use is limited by side effects. Recognizing and preventing major and minor adverse effects of prolonged pentobarbital coma may increase good outcomes. This study retrospectively reviewed direct and indirect medical and surgical pentobarbital coma. Methods: Retrospective chart review of all patients with refractory status epilepticus treated with pentobarbital over a 1 year period at a large tertiary care center. We collected baseline data, EEG data, and complications that were observed. Results: Overall, nine patients [median age 46.4 (IQR 21.7, 75.5) years] were induced with pentobarbital coma median 11 (IQR 3, 33) days after seizure onset for a median of 9 (IQR 3.5, 45.4) days. A total of four to eight concurrent antiepileptics were tried prior to the pentobarbital coma. Phenobarbital, due to recurrence of seizures on weaning pentobarbital coma, was required in seven patients. Observed complications included peripheral neuropathy (77.8%), cerebral atrophy (33.3%), volume overload (44.4%), renal/metabolic (77.8%), gastrointestinal (66.6%), endocrine (55.6%), cardiac/hemodynamic/vascular (77.8%), respiratory (100%), and infectious (77.8%). The number of complications trended with duration of induced coma but was nonsignificant. Median ICU length of stay was 40 (IQR 28, 97.5) days. Overall, five patients were able to follow commands after a median 37 (IQR 25.5, 90) days from coma onset. There were eight patients that were discharged from hospital with three remaining in a prolonged unresponsive state. There was one patient that died prior to discharge. Conclusions: This study highlights the high morbidity in patients with refractory status epilepticus requiring pentobarbital coma. Anticipating and addressing the indirect and direct complications in prolonged pentobarbital coma may improve survival and functional outcomes in patients with

  15. Lunar phases and psychiatric hospital admissions.

    PubMed

    Gorvin, J J; Roberts, M S

    1994-12-01

    To assess the lunar hypothesis as predictive of mental health emergencies and antisocial behavior, the relation of the lunar hypothesis and the occurrence of psychiatric hospital admissions of developmentally disabled adults was examined. The full moon phase of the lunar cycle did not explain a higher rate of hospital admission and accounted for only .007% of the variance. A critique of the methodology in prior research led to the suggestion that more immediate stressors and environmental factors are more plausible contributing factors to hospital admission.

  16. Distribucion de Hidrogeno Neutro EN Galaxias Espirales de Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bravo-Alfaro, H.; van Gorkom, J. H.; Balkowski, C.; Cayatte, V.

    1998-11-01

    We have carried out a study of environmental effects on the properties and evolution of galaxies in clusters. We have studied the HI content of spiral galaxies in two nearby clusters, Abell~262 and Abell~1656 (Coma), from 21cm observations obtained with the Westerbork Synthesis Radio Telescope and with the Very Large Array. These observations have provided us the HI images of a sample of 11 galaxies in Abell~262, and 19 in Coma. We have computed the HI content and analyzed the HI distribution of detected galaxies, what enabled us to study the environmental effects on cluster galaxies, as well as the possible involved physical mechanisms. We confirm the tendency of HI deficient galaxies to be closer to the cluster core. We also estimate in a quantitative fashion the role that ram pressure stripping can play in the central cluster region, where the intra--cluster medium shows its most hostile density and temperature conditions. Most of galaxies showing a perturbed neutral hydrogen distribution are likely affected by ram pressure. Five star--bursting galaxies and one post--starburst were detected among the 19 HI detected objects in Coma. We conclude, from the analysis of their HI distribution and from the correlations of their positions in the cluster and U--V colors with the HI deficiency, that some cluster galaxies may follow an evolutionary sequence: galaxies would first become blue because of the interaction with the ICM, what trigger a burst of star--formation. Galaxies appear at this stage as HI deficient. The next step in this sequence would be the PSB stage, where galaxies arrive once they quench most of their HI reservoir and the star--formation stops in a short time-scale. The deep neutral gas stripping explain why these galaxies are hardly detected in HI. None of the closest galaxies to NGC~4839 have been detected in our observations around the Southwest group, what hints a previous passage across the cluster core with the consequence of a stripping process

  17. SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF SUBHALOS IN THE COMA CLUSTER

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Toru; Matsushita, Kyoko; Sato, Kosuke; Okabe, Nobuhiro E-mail: matusita@rs.kagu.tus.ac.jp

    2015-06-10

    We observed three massive subhalos in the Coma cluster with Suzaku. These subhalos, labeled “ID 1,” “ID 2,” and “ID 32,” were detected with a weak-lensing survey using Subaru/Suprime-Cam, and are located at the projected distances of 1.4 r{sub 500}, 1.2 r{sub 500}, and 1.6 r{sub 500} from the center of the Coma cluster, respectively. The subhalo “ID 1” has a compact X-ray excess emission close to the center of the weak-lensing mass contour, and the gas mass to weak-lensing mass ratio is about 0.001. The temperature of the emission is about 3 keV, which is slightly lower than that of the surrounding intracluster medium (ICM) and that expected for the temperature versus mass relation of clusters of galaxies. The subhalo “ID 32” shows an excess emission whose peak is shifted toward the opposite direction from the center of the Coma cluster. The gas mass to weak-lensing mass ratio is also about 0.001, which is significantly smaller than regular galaxy groups. The temperature of the excess is about 0.5 keV and significantly lower than that of the surrounding ICM and far from the temperature versus mass relation of clusters. However, there is no significant excess X-ray emission in the “ID 2” subhalo. Assuming an infall velocity of about 2000 km s{sup −1}, at the border of the excess X-ray emission, the ram pressures for “ID 1” and “ID 32” are comparable to the gravitational restoring force per area. We also studied the effect of the Kelvin–Helmholtz instability to strip the gas. Although we found X-ray clumps associated with the weak-lensing subhalos, their X-ray luminosities are much lower than the total ICM luminosity in the cluster outskirts.

  18. 43 CFR 4.1141 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... directed serves on the requesting party— (1) A sworn statement denying specifically the relevant matters of which an admission is requested; (2) A sworn statement setting forth in detail the reasons why he...

  19. 43 CFR 4.1141 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... directed serves on the requesting party— (1) A sworn statement denying specifically the relevant matters of which an admission is requested; (2) A sworn statement setting forth in detail the reasons why he...

  20. 43 CFR 4.1141 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... directed serves on the requesting party— (1) A sworn statement denying specifically the relevant matters of which an admission is requested; (2) A sworn statement setting forth in detail the reasons why he...

  1. Marketing in Admissions: The Information System Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wofford, O. Douglas; Timmerman, Ed

    1982-01-01

    A marketing information system approach for college admissions is outlined that includes objectives, information needs and sources, a data collection format, and information evaluation. Coordination with other institutional information systems is recommended. (MSE)

  2. The Parent Role in College Admission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krugman, Mary K.

    1990-01-01

    Discusses techniques secondary school counselors can use to help parents understand and negotiate the college admissions process, including encouraging parental self-assessment; assisting parents to assess student; giving parents special tips; and maintaining open and ethical communication. (ABL)

  3. 28 CFR 549.42 - Involuntary admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... SERVICES Administrative Safeguards for Psychiatric Treatment and Medication § 549.42 Involuntary admission. A court determination is necessary for involuntary hospitalization for psychiatric treatment. A sentenced inmate, not currently committed for psychiatric treatment, who is not able or willing...

  4. Immigration, moving house and psychiatric admissions.

    PubMed

    Johansson, L M; Sundquist, J; Johansson, S E; Bergman, B

    1998-08-01

    This study was designed to elucidate psychiatric admission rates for native Swedes and foreign-born individuals during the period 1991-1994, when Sweden had a great influx of refugees. During the same period, and even earlier, psychiatric in-patient care had been reduced. Tests of differences between Swedes and foreign-born individuals in first psychiatric admission rates were performed using Poisson regressions, and the risk of a readmission was assessed using a proportional hazard model. Foreign-born individuals and native Swedes, both males and females, showed a similar admission pattern with regard to the number of admissions. Foreign-born males under 55 years of age and foreign-born females under 35 years of age had significantly higher admission rates than native Swedes. In total, native Swedes, both males and females, were hospitalized for a significantly longer period than the foreign-born subjects. About 43% of the patients were readmitted. The risk of a readmission was significantly increased among those with a high rate of internal migration. The high admission rates for young foreign-born individuals might be explained by a high incidence of mental illness owing to the trauma of being violently forced to migrate, acculturation difficulties, or unsatisfactory social circumstances such as high unemployment. The shorter hospitalization time could be due to undertreatment or less serious mental illness.

  5. A spectroscopic and photometric study of FK Comae in 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huenemoerder, David P.; Ramsey, Lawrence W.; Buzasi, Derek L.; Nations, Harold L.

    1993-01-01

    Results of an observational campaign, coordinated between visual photometry, optical spectroscopy, and UV spectroscopy, to elucidate the characteristics of FK Comae are presented. The photometry showed complicated but systematic behavior. Photospheric absorption lines were distorted by a Doppler-shifted bump caused by dark starspots resulting in small apparent radial velocity variations. No radial velocity variations characteristic of orbital motion were seen to a level of 3 km/s. Broad emission in H-alpha was modulated at the photospheric rotational amplitude, implying an origin no farther from the rotational axis than 1 stellar radius. The strengths of Ca II lines are modulated in phase with H-alpha but do not have velocity-modulated wings like H-alpha.

  6. Thermal instability in the inner coma of a comet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milikh, G. M.; Sharma, A. S.

    1995-01-01

    The spacecraft and ground based observations of comet Halley inner coma showed a localized ion density depletion region whose origin is not well understood. Although it has been linked to a thermal instability associated with negative ions, the photodetachment lifetime of negative ions (approximately 1 sec) is too short compared to the electron attachment time scale (approximately 100 sec) for this process to have a significant effect. A mechanism for the ion density depletion based on the thermal instability of the cometary plasma due to the excitation of rotational and vibrational levels of water molecules is proposed. The electron energy losses due to these processes peak near 4000 K (0.36 eV) and at temperatures higher than this value a localized cooling leads to further cooling (thermal instability) due to the increased radiation loss. The resulting increase in recombination leads to an ion density depletion and the estimates for this depletion at comet Halley agree with the observations.

  7. Immunovirological correlates in human rabies treated with therapeutic coma.

    PubMed

    Hunter, M; Johnson, N; Hedderwick, S; McCaughey, C; Lowry, K; McConville, J; Herron, B; McQuaid, S; Marston, D; Goddard, T; Harkess, G; Goharriz, H; Voller, K; Solomon, T; Willoughby, R E; Fooks, A R

    2010-07-01

    A 37-year-old woman was admitted to hospital and over the next 5 days developed a progressive encephalitis. Nuchal skin biopsy, analyzed using a Rabies TaqMan(c) PCR, demonstrated rabies virus RNA. She had a history in keeping with exposure to rabies whilst in South Africa, but had not received pre- or post-exposure prophylaxis. She was treated with a therapeutic coma according to the "Milwaukee protocol," which failed to prevent the death of the patient. Rabies virus was isolated from CSF and saliva, and rabies antibody was demonstrated in serum (from day 11 onwards) and cerebrospinal fluid (day 13 onwards). She died on day-35 of hospitalization. Autopsy specimens demonstrated the presence of rabies antigen, viral RNA, and viable rabies virus in the central nervous system.

  8. Molecular parentage of radical species in the comae of comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin K.

    Understanding the chemical composition of comets is of great interest to the scientific community. In this work, an integral field unit (IFU) spectrograph is used to detect emissions of C2, C3, CH, CN, and NH2. The azimuthal average profile (line integral of the column density as a function of radial distance from the center of the nucleus) is simulated by the Haser model. The Haser model simulates the outgassing and photo-dissociate of molecular species in the coma. In this work, the lifetime of the parent molecule in the photo-dissociation chain is set as a free parameter. The best fit parent lifetimes for observations of comets 4P/Faye, 10P/Tempel 2, and C/2009 P1 Garradd are obtained. The results are compared to parent lifetimes cited in other studies. HCN as a likely dominant parent for CN is eliminated. Constraints on likely parent molecules for C3 and NH 2 are discussed.

  9. Ram Pressure Stripping and Morphological Transformation in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregg, Michael; West, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The two largest spiral galaxies in the Coma cluster, NGC4911 and NGC4921, exhibit signs of being vigorously ram-pressure stripped by the hot intracluster medium. HST ACS and WFC3 images have revealed galactic scale shock fronts, giant "Pillars of Creation", rivulets of dust, and spatially coherent star formation in these grand design spirals. All evidence points to these galaxies being stressed by a global external source which can only be the hot intracluster medium (ICM). Inspired by these examples, we have obtained HST WFC3 imaging of five additional large spirals to search for and investigate the effects of ram pressure stripping across the wider Coma cluster. The results are equally spectacular as the first two examples. The geometry of the interactions in some cases allows us to estimate the various time scales involved, including gas flows out of the disk leading to creation of the ICM, and the attendant triggered star formation in the galaxy disks. The global star formation patterns and wholesale tidal stripping of matter yield insights into the spatial and temporal ISM-ICM interactions driving the evolution of galaxies in clusters and ultimately transforming their morphologies from spiral to S0. These processes, much more common in the early Universe, led to the wholesale morphological transformation of Hubble types during the assembly of rich clusters, when the intergalactic populations and hot ICM were first being created and laid down from such stripping and destruction of their member galaxies.We also report on two instrumental aspects of WFC3: 1) using the filter pair F350LP and F600LP to create an extremely broad pseudo Blue-Red color to achieve the greatest observing efficiency with HST, and 2) a WFC3 CCD effect which leads to apparent quantization of background counts, making automatic sky determination challenging when using drizzlepac routines.

  10. Ice aggregates in the coma of Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelley, M.; Kolokolova, L.

    2014-07-01

    Comet 103P/Hartley 2 is a hyperactive comet: the comet's total water production rate implies almost the entire surface is strongly active. Surprisingly, flyby images of this comet from Deep Impact instead show many discrete locations of activity, similar to images of other ''normal-activity'' comets like 9P/Tempel 1 and 81P/Wild 2. However, Hartley 2 does possess a coma rich in water ice, even at 1.1 au, and rich in very large particles, with sizes of order centimeters and greater. These latter properties present a possible solution to Hartley 2's hyperactivity: icy particles, whether large or small, increase the total sublimating surface area yielding an effectively high water production rate for the nucleus size. However, the analyses of the large particles by Kelley et al. (2013) and of the ice by Protopapa et al. (2014) only account for a few percent of the comet's total water production rate, leaving over 90 % to come directly from the nucleus. Both investigations necessarily assume grain sublimation rates based on spherical ice grains, even though their analyses suggest the grains around Hartley 2 are aggregates. We are investigating whether aggregates of water ice can provide the sublimation rates necessary to solve the problem of comet Hartley 2's hyperactivity. By combining observations of Hartley 2's icy particles (total brightness, color, 1- to 3-micron spectra) with models of light scattered by icy aggregates, we seek to constrain their sizes, albedos, temperatures, and compositions, allowing us to better estimate the coma's total water production rate. In this presentation, we use the T-matrix method to simulate light scattering by aggregates of water ice, taking the results of Protopapa et al. (2014) as an initial guide, and compare our results to spectra of Hartley 2's ice taken by Deep Impact.

  11. Analysis of dust in the coma of comet 67P using VIRTIS-M observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinaldi, G.; Tozzi, G. P.; Fink, U.; Doose, L.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Leyrat, C.; Piccioni, G.; Blecka, M.; Ciarniello, M.; Irwin, P.; Combi, M.; Palomba, E.; Migliorini, A.; Capria, M. T.; Faggi, S.; Tosi, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a preliminary overview of the analysis on the dust spectrophotometry in the inner coma of comet 67/P that was obtained during the escort phase (started on December 2014) with the imaging spectrometer VIRTIS-M onboard the Rosetta mission [1]. The morphology and behavior of the dust coma has been monitored by VIRTIS-M from the arrival at the comet (~August 2014) throughout the early escort phase. The data reveal intricate details and numerous radial jets coming from different regions on the surface. On March 15, 2015, VIRTIS-M performed a set of 22 coma observations, each about 23 minutes in duration and offset from the nucleus by about 1 km. The 22 observations lasted about 12 hours and thus covered a complete rotation of the comet. The maps of the dust distribution in the coma reveal three major structures: a roughly uniform background dusty coma, several enhanced radiance jet features and a region that shows a thermal radiation component between 3.5 and 5.0 μm. (Figure 1 and Figure 2) The jets features can be traced back to several region of the comet, neck,body and head. We shall analyse the three major structures to provide the basis to understand coma composition and properties and the relation between gas and dust. We will discuss the morphology of the background coma, the jet and the enhanced thermal radiation. We will also examine correlations between the water vapor column density and the coma/ jet /thermal radiation intensity. For the thermal radiation component there are several explanations, viz: stray instrumental scattered light or instrumental ghosts from heated part of the nucleus, or thermal rad iation emanating from the nucleus and scattered by the dust in closest proximity or a region of small particles in the coma heated by solar radiation.

  12. The dust coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko as seen by OSIRIS onboard Rosetta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubiana, C.; Bertini, I.; Bodewits, D.; Davidsson, B.; Güttler, C.; Lara, L. M.; Moreno, F.; Cremonese, G.; La Forgia, F.; Oklay, N.; Pajola, M.; Sierks, H.

    2015-10-01

    The dust coma of 67P was detected and monitored by OSIRIS, the scientific camera onboard Rosetta, since the beginning of the post-hibernation operations in March 2014. A complete description of the coma during the approach phase to the comet was presented in [5], including the detection of a sudden cometary outburst at the end of April 2014. OSIRIS images acquired at the end of the approach (July 2014) and during the escort phase were used to characterize dust particles present in the comet's inner coma ([4], [3], [2], [1]).

  13. Late-onset ornithine transcarbamylase deficiency: a potentially fatal yet treatable cause of coma.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, David C; Sugumar, Hariharan; Simpson, Marion A; Walker, Susan P; Dewey, Helen M; Reade, Michael C

    2009-09-01

    Hyperammonaemia due to ornithine transcarbamylase (OTC) deficiency is a well-described cause of coma in neonates. Rarely, adults with this disorder may also present with coma. Here we describe the first reported case, to our knowledge, in a pregnant woman. She was successfully treated with metabolic therapy and, contrary to usual paediatric practice, renal replacement therapy. We review the biochemistry of OTC deficiency and other urea cycle disorders, and discuss the physiological rationale and evidence base for treatment of this condition. We highlight the need to consider hyperammonaemia in the differential diagnosis of coma.

  14. The "Admissions" Side of BCCAT: An Update. Special Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer, 2008

    2008-01-01

    To spearhead increased emphasis on admissions, the British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) formed an Admissions Committee in Fall 2003. The committee recognized the importance of institutional autonomy in determining admissions policies and processes at each institution. Following initiation of the Student Transitions Project…

  15. Assessing Practical Intelligence in Business School Admissions: A Supplement to the Graduate Management Admissions Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hedlund, Jennifer; Wilt, Jeanne M.; Nebel, Kristina L.; Ashford, Susan J.; Sternberg, Robert J.

    2006-01-01

    The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) is the most widely used measure of managerial potential in MBA admissions. GMAT scores, although predictive of grades in business school, leave much of the variance in graduate school performance unexplained. The GMAT also produces disparities in test scores between groups, generating the potential for…

  16. Major Research Efforts of the Law School Admission Council. Law School Admission Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hart, Frederick M.; Evans, Franklin R.

    Research conducted by the Law School Admission Council since the development of the Law School Admission Test (LSAT) in 1948 is described. An overview of the research topics is provided, and relevant published reports are cited in 61 footnotes. The following topics of study are discussed: (1) use and validity of traditional predictors of law…

  17. Multiple hospital admissions in a calendar year.

    PubMed

    Newton, J; Goldacre, M

    1993-09-01

    Hospital in-patient workload is routinely measured as episodes of care. We report on the extent to which counts of episodes of care differ from counts of patients treated in different specialties and in different age groups. Linked records of hospital care in a population of 1.9 million people, collected over an 11-year period (1976-1986), were analysed. The all-ages multiple admission ratio (the number of admissions per 100 people admitted in the same specialty and year) varied between specialties from 102 to 171. Medical specialties tended to have higher ratios than surgical ones. The influence of age on multiple admission ratios varied between specialties, although in general the ratios increased with increasing age. There were progressive but small increases in multiple admission ratios over the period studied in a number of specialties but, by and large, stability over time was more striking than any change. The information presented could be used to estimate person-based admission rates from available episode-based data where the former are not available. This should be helpful both in managing hospital resources and in purchasing care on behalf of resident populations. Purchasers in particular should be aware of numbers of people being treated as well as the numbers of episodes of care provided.

  18. Streaming Clumps Ejection Model and the Heterogeneous Inner Coma of Comet Wild 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B. C.; Economou, T. E.; Green, S. F.; Sandford, S. A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2004-01-01

    The conventional concept of cometary comae is that they are dominated by fine particulates released individually by sublimation of surface volatiles and subsequent entrainment in the near-surface gas. It has long been recognized that such particulates could be relatively large, with early estimates that objects perhaps up to one meter in size may be levitated from the surface of the typical cometary nucleus. However, the general uniformity and small average particulate size of observed comae and the relatively smooth, monotonic increases and decreases in particle density during the Giotto flythrough of comet Halley s coma in 1986 reinforced the view that the bulk of the particles are released at the surface, are fine-sized and inert. Jets have been interpreted as geometrically constrained release of these particulates. With major heterogeneities observed during the recent flythrough of the inner coma of comet Wild 2, these views deserve reconsideration.

  19. Cometary science. Time variability and heterogeneity in the coma of 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Hässig, M; Altwegg, K; Balsiger, H; Bar-Nun, A; Berthelier, J J; Bieler, A; Bochsler, P; Briois, C; Calmonte, U; Combi, M; De Keyser, J; Eberhardt, P; Fiethe, B; Fuselier, S A; Galand, M; Gasc, S; Gombosi, T I; Hansen, K C; Jäckel, A; Keller, H U; Kopp, E; Korth, A; Kührt, E; Le Roy, L; Mall, U; Marty, B; Mousis, O; Neefs, E; Owen, T; Rème, H; Rubin, M; Sémon, T; Tornow, C; Tzou, C-Y; Waite, J H; Wurz, P

    2015-01-23

    Comets contain the best-preserved material from the beginning of our planetary system. Their nuclei and comae composition reveal clues about physical and chemical conditions during the early solar system when comets formed. ROSINA (Rosetta Orbiter Spectrometer for Ion and Neutral Analysis) onboard the Rosetta spacecraft has measured the coma composition of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko with well-sampled time resolution per rotation. Measurements were made over many comet rotation periods and a wide range of latitudes. These measurements show large fluctuations in composition in a heterogeneous coma that has diurnal and possibly seasonal variations in the major outgassing species: water, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. These results indicate a complex coma-nucleus relationship where seasonal variations may be driven by temperature differences just below the comet surface.

  20. Libraries for Life: Democracy, Diversity, Delivery. IFLA Council and General Conference: Conference Programme and Proceedings (68th, Glasgow, Scotland, August 18-24, 2002).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions, The Hague (Netherlands).

    This document presents the program and proceedings from the 68th International Federation of Library Associations and Institutions (IFLA) Conference held in Glasgow, Scotland, August 18-24, 2002. Topics of presentations include: library services for parliaments; needs assessment; the effects of September 11th on information provision and privacy;…

  1. Reliability and Validity of the Dutch Version of the Glasgow Anxiety Scale for People with an Intellectual Disability (GAS-ID)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hermans, H.; Wieland, J.; Jelluma, N.; Van der Pas, F.; Evenhuis, H.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In the Netherlands, no self-report screening questionnaire for anxiety in people with intellectual disabilities (ID) was available yet. Therefore, we have translated the Glasgow Anxiety Scale for people with an Intellectual Disability (GAS-ID) into Dutch and studied its reliability and validity in adults with borderline, mild or…

  2. Seeking to Institutionally Embed Lessons from a Funded Project: Experiences from the Digital Libraries in the Classroom Spoken Word Project at Glasgow Caledonian University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donald, David; Wallace, Iain

    2007-01-01

    The Joint Information Systems Committee and the National Science Foundation programme, Digital Libraries in the Classroom (DLiC), addresses implications for the learning of the revolution in scholarly communication. What are the obstacles to undergraduates "'writing' on and for the Internet"? Glasgow Caledonian University (GCU) is a…

  3. [Medical examination prior to trade school admission].

    PubMed

    Hursidić-Radulović, Azra; Decković-Vukres, Vlasta

    2005-01-01

    Regulation on medical examination prior to apprenticeship is built in the Act on Trades and Crafts. Medical examinations of the students before admission to secondary craft schools have been done regularly since 1993. Between 11,000 and 14,000 students are admitted to secondary craft schools in the Republic of Croatia annually. According to statistics, about 10% of students have obvious health problems, about 5% of students have healt problems which vitally limit their capacity in particular crafts. This statistic refers to about 3% of the examined students. Medical examinations of students prior to admission to craft schools represent a particular sort of health capacity examinations. The paper includes applications for the most freqent trades and crafts, and findings of the craft school admission examinations.

  4. [Involuntary admission of addict during early pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Hondius, Adger J K; Stikker, Tineke E; Wennink, J M B Hanneke; Honig, Adriaan

    2012-01-01

    A 30-year-old cocaine-dependent woman was 16 weeks pregnant. Because of possible endangerment of the fetus, an involuntary provisional admission was authorized. Of particular interest is the application of the Dutch Act on Formal Admissions to Psychiatric Hospitals for the primary diagnosis 'addiction' and the fact that the fetus was regarded as a legal 'other'. In severe cases of addiction combined with pregnancy an earlier intervention is needed and arrangement of accelerated legal custody of the newborn before birth should be considered. For the protection of the unborn, we advocate a stricter application of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child. Information for addicted women with preconception counselling can help prevent a compulsory admission.

  5. A practical tool for simulating the presence of gas comae in thermophysical modelling of cometary nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidsson, B.; Skorov, Y.

    Ideally, thermophysical modelling of cometary nuclei should be made in parallel with modelling of the coma, due to the strong nucleus-coma coupling. Furthermore, the coma model should include a suitable treatment of the non - equilibrium Knudsen layer adjacent to the surface, which s impossible with a purely hydrodynamicali description. Only then is it possible to fully account for surface heating due to backscattered recondensing coma molecules, and to evaluate the surface gas density needed as boundary condition in the thermophysical equations for the nucleus. However, due to the vast complexity of the problem and the extreme hardware requirements associated with such unified models, most thermophysical models of comets developed so far use oversimplified assumptions regarding coma properties, which may introduce substantial errors. We present a practical tool for simulating the presence of a gas coma in parallel with thermophysical models, emphasising both reasonable accuracy and practicality. The tool is in form of interpolation tables and approximate analytical expressions for surface gas density, surface gas pressure, percentage of recondensing backflux, and surface cooling by diffusely scattered coma molecules. These quantities are given as functions of surface temperature and temperature gradient, for porous ice-dust mixtures. The interpolation tables have been obtained by first considering a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo model of Knudsen flow in a sublimating porous medium, thus obtaining the transmission distribution function for molecules entering the coma. Then, the Knudsen layer collision-dominated flow has been considered using another Direct Simulation Monte Carlo model. The latter model includes a Variable HardSphere description of intermolecular collisions a d takes rotational degrees ofn freedom into account according to the Larsen-Borgnakke model. Examples of practical applications of the interpolation tables are presented.

  6. Post-perihelion coma monitoring of comet Hale-Bopp at ESO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boehnhardt, H.; Bonfils, X.; Petit, Y.; Hainaut, O.; Delahodde, C.; Jorda, L.; Rauer, H.; Colas, F.; Manfroid, J.; Marchis, F.; Schulz, R.; Tanabe, R.; Tozzi, G. P.

    2002-11-01

    The post-perihelion coma activity of Comet C/1995 O1 Hale-Bopp is monitored at ESO telescopes in La Silla and Paranal since Sept. 1997. Imaging through broadband filters in the visible and near-IR wavelength ranges allows to investigate the evolution of the dust coma, namely the appearance of jets, fans, shells and clouds. Long-term evolution: the comet had a porcupine-like embedded fan coma in autumn 1997 that evolved into a northern fan plus shell pattern in 1998 and remains like this since. Thus, the evolution of the coma structure post-perihelion was similar to that pre-perihelion at about the same heliocentric distances, but is occurred in reversed order. This long-term evolution can be characterized by quasi-continuous dust emission from a few (minimum 4) active regions (producing the fan structures) on the nucleus that is modulated by occasional, repetitive and short-term activity increases (generating shell features in the coma). Outbursts: a number of outbursts and unusual activity patterns occurred in the coma of the comet post-perihelion that are documented through the appearance of complex "palm-tree-like" structures of temporary nature in association with outbursts in the visual lightcurve of the comet and a series of 3 dust clouds resembling "mini-comets" and passing through the northern coma at projected velocities of 30-50m/s. The similarity of coma patterns and cometary viewing geometry from Earth before and after perihelion suggests that some nuclear regions had enhanced long-term activity, possibly driven by super-volatile ices at larger (>10AU) heliocentric distances and that the orientation of the rotation axis of the nucleus did not change much over the past 7 years.

  7. Robust control of burst suppression for medical coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westover, M. Brandon; Kim, Seong-Eun; Ching, ShiNung; Purdon, Patrick L.; Brown, Emery N.

    2015-08-01

    Objective. Medical coma is an anesthetic-induced state of brain inactivation, manifest in the electroencephalogram by burst suppression. Feedback control can be used to regulate burst suppression, however, previous designs have not been robust. Robust control design is critical under real-world operating conditions, subject to substantial pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameter uncertainty and unpredictable external disturbances. We sought to develop a robust closed-loop anesthesia delivery (CLAD) system to control medical coma. Approach. We developed a robust CLAD system to control the burst suppression probability (BSP). We developed a novel BSP tracking algorithm based on realistic models of propofol pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics. We also developed a practical method for estimating patient-specific pharmacodynamics parameters. Finally, we synthesized a robust proportional integral controller. Using a factorial design spanning patient age, mass, height, and gender, we tested whether the system performed within clinically acceptable limits. Throughout all experiments we subjected the system to disturbances, simulating treatment of refractory status epilepticus in a real-world intensive care unit environment. Main results. In 5400 simulations, CLAD behavior remained within specifications. Transient behavior after a step in target BSP from 0.2 to 0.8 exhibited a rise time (the median (min, max)) of 1.4 [1.1, 1.9] min; settling time, 7.8 [4.2, 9.0] min; and percent overshoot of 9.6 [2.3, 10.8]%. Under steady state conditions the CLAD system exhibited a median error of 0.1 [-0.5, 0.9]%; inaccuracy of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; oscillation index of 1.8 [0.9, 3.4]%; and maximum instantaneous propofol dose of 4.3 [2.1, 10.5] mg kg-1. The maximum hourly propofol dose was 4.3 [2.1, 10.3] mg kg-1 h-1. Performance fell within clinically acceptable limits for all measures. Significance. A CLAD system designed using robust control theory achieves clinically acceptable

  8. 'Is she alive? Is she dead?' Representations of chronic disorders of consciousness in Douglas Coupland's Girlfriend in a Coma.

    PubMed

    Colbeck, Matthew

    2016-09-01

    Depictions of coma have come to dominate literary and filmic texts over the last half century, a phenomenon coinciding with advancements in medical technology that have led to remarkable increases in the survival rates of patients with chronic disorders of consciousness. Authors of coma fiction are preoccupied with the imagined subjective experience of coma, often creating complex, dream-like worlds from which the protagonist must escape if survival is to be achieved. However, such representations appear to conflict with medical case studies and patient narratives that reveal that most often survivors of coma have no recollection of the coma itself. Providing a close reading of Douglas Coupland's Girlfriend in a Coma (1998) against the context of medical literature and diagnoses, this article examines how the coma patient is represented, often depicting the realities of a prolonged vegetative state, in contrast with other popular representations of coma. It explores how the author develops a work of 'fantastic' fiction (a genre defined by the structuralist critic Tzvetan Todorov), using the condition of coma as a metaphor for a postmodern existential crisis, while simultaneously employing mimetic techniques that raise important medical, ethical and philosophical questions surrounding the ontological status of the comatose patient. It is argued that coma fiction, even in its misrepresentation of the condition, can help us to engage with and interrogate how we think about chronic disorders of consciousness, thereby providing a valuable insight into our attitudes towards illness and mortality.

  9. MMN and novelty P3 in coma and other altered states of consciousness: a review.

    PubMed

    Morlet, Dominique; Fischer, Catherine

    2014-07-01

    In recent decades, there has been a growing interest in the assessment of patients in altered states of consciousness. There is a need for accurate and early prediction of awakening and recovery from coma. Neurophysiological assessment of coma was once restricted to brainstem auditory and primary cortex somatosensory evoked potentials elicited in the 30 ms range, which have both shown good predictive value for poor coma outcome only. In this paper, we review how passive auditory oddball paradigms including deviant and novel sounds have proved their efficiency in assessing brain function at a higher level, without requiring the patient's active involvement, thus providing an enhanced tool for the prediction of coma outcome. The presence of an MMN in response to deviant stimuli highlights preserved automatic sensory memory processes. Recorded during coma, MMN has shown high specificity as a predictor of recovery of consciousness. The presence of a novelty P3 in response to the subject's own first name presented as a novel (rare) stimulus has shown a good correlation with coma awakening. There is now a growing interest in the search for markers of consciousness, if there are any, in unresponsive patients (chronic vegetative or minimally conscious states). We discuss the different ERP patterns observed in these patients. The presence of novelty P3, including parietal components and possibly followed by a late parietal positivity, raises the possibility that some awareness processes are at work in these unresponsive patients.

  10. Feeding impairs chill coma recovery in the migratory locust (Locusta migratoria).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jonas Lembcke; Findsen, Anders; Overgaard, Johannes

    2013-10-01

    Low temperature causes loss of neuromuscular function in a wide range of insects, such that the animals enter a state known as chill coma. The ability to recover from chill coma (chill coma recovery time) is often a popular phenotype to characterise chill tolerance in insects. Chill coma in insects has been shown to be associated with a decrease in haemolymph volume and a marked increase in [K(+)], causing dissipation of K(+) equilibrium potential and resting membrane potential. High potassium diet (wheat) has also previously been shown to increase haemolymph [K(+)] in Locusta migratoria leading to sluggish behaviour. The present study combined these two independent stressors of ion and water homeostasis, in order to investigate the role of K(+)- and water-balance during recovery from chill coma, in the chill sensitive insect L. migratoria. We confirmed that cold shock elicits a fast increase in haemolymph [K(+)] which is likely caused by a water shift from the haemolymph to the muscles and other tissues. Recovery of haemolymph [K(+)] is however not only reliant on recovery of haemolymph volume, as the recovery of water and K(+) is decoupled. Chill coma recovery time, after 2h at -4 °C, differed significantly between fasted animals and those fed on high K(+) diet. This difference was not associated with an increased disturbance of haemolymph [K(+)] in the fed animals, instead it was associated with a slowed recovery of muscle [K(+)], muslce water, haemolymph [Na(+)] and K(+)equilibrium potential in the fed animals.

  11. Reestablishment of ion homeostasis during chill-coma recovery in the cricket Gryllus pennsylvanicus

    PubMed Central

    MacMillan, Heath A.; Williams, Caroline M.; Staples, James F.; Sinclair, Brent J.

    2012-01-01

    The time required to recover from cold-induced paralysis (chill-coma) is a common measure of insect cold tolerance used to test central questions in thermal biology and predict the effects of climate change on insect populations. The onset of chill-coma in the fall field cricket (Gryllus pennsylvanicus, Orthoptera: Gryllidae) is accompanied by a progressive drift of Na+ and water from the hemolymph to the gut, but the physiological mechanisms underlying recovery from chill-coma are not understood for any insect. Using a combination of gravimetric methods and atomic absorption spectroscopy, we demonstrate that recovery from chill-coma involves a reestablishment of hemolymph ion content and volume driven by removal of Na+ and water from the gut. Recovery is associated with a transient elevation of metabolic rate, the time span of which increases with increasing cold exposure duration and closely matches the duration of complete osmotic recovery. Thus, complete recovery from chill-coma is metabolically costly and encompasses a longer period than is required for the recovery of muscle potentials and movement. These findings provide evidence that physiological mechanisms of hemolymph ion content and volume regulation, such as ion-motive ATPase activity, are instrumental in chill-coma recovery and may underlie natural variation in insect cold tolerance. PMID:23184963

  12. A Giant Warm Baryonic Halo for the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Max; Lieu, Richard; Joy, Marshall K.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several deep PSPC observations of the Coma cluster unveil a very large-scale halo of soft X-ray emission, substantially in excess of the well know radiation from the hot intra-cluster medium. The excess emission, previously reported in the central cluster regions through lower-sensitivity EUVE and ROSAT data, is now evident out to a radius of 2.5 Mpc, demonstrating that the soft excess radiation from clusters is a phenomenon of cosmological significance. The spectrum at these large radii cannot be modeled non-thermally, but is consistent with the original scenario of thermal emission at warm temperatures. The mass of this plasma is at least on par with that of the hot X-ray emitting plasma, and significantly more massive if the plasma resides in low-density filamentary structures. Thus the data lend vital support to current theories of cosmic evolution, which predict greater than 50 percent by mass of today's baryons reside in warm-hot filaments converging at clusters of galaxies.

  13. A Massive Warm Baryonic Halo in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Massimiliano; Joy, Marshall K.; Lieu, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Several deep PSPC observations of the Coma Cluster reveal a very large scale halo of soft X-ray emission, substantially in excess of the well-known radiation from the hot intracluster medium. The excess emission, previously reported in the central region of the cluster using lower sensitivity Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) and ROSAT data, is now evident out to a radius of 2.6 Mpc, demonstrating that the soft excess radiation from clusters is a phenomenon of cosmological significance. The X-ray spectrum at these large radii cannot be modeled nonthermally but is consistent with the original scenario of thermal emission from warm gas at approx. 10(exp 6) K. The mass of the warm gas is on par with that of the hot X-ray-emitting plasma and significantly more massive if the warm gas resides in low-density filamentary structures. Thus, the data lend vital support to current theories of cosmic evolution, which predict that at low redshift approx. 30%-40% of the baryons reside in warm filaments converging at clusters of galaxies.

  14. Dwarf galaxies in the Coma cluster - I. Velocity dispersion measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kourkchi, E.; Khosroshahi, H. G.; Carter, D.; Karick, A. M.; Mármol-Queraltó, E.; Chiboucas, K.; Tully, R. B.; Mobasher, B.; Guzmán, R.; Matković, A.; Gruel, N.

    2012-03-01

    We present the study of a large sample of early-type dwarf galaxies in the Coma cluster observed with DEIMOS on the Keck II to determine their internal velocity dispersion. We focus on a subsample of 41 member dwarf elliptical galaxies for which the velocity dispersion can be reliably measured, 26 of which were studied for the first time. The magnitude range of our sample is -21 < MR < -15 mag. This paper (Paper I) focuses on the measurement of the velocity dispersion and their error estimates. The measurements were performed using penalized pixel fitting (PPXF) and using the calcium triplet absorption lines. We use Monte Carlo bootstrapping to study various sources of uncertainty in our measurements, namely statistical uncertainty, template mismatch and other systematics. We find that the main source of uncertainty is the template mismatch effect which is reduced by using templates with a range of spectral types. Combining our measurements with those from the literature, we study the Faber-Jackson relation (L∝σα) and find that the slope of the relation is α= 1.99 ± 0.14 for galaxies brighter than MR≃-16 mag. A comprehensive analysis of the results combined with the photometric properties of these galaxies is reported in Paper II.

  15. Coma and the Etiology of Violence, Part 1

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Carl C.

    1986-01-01

    Coma and the etiology of violence are explored by the author through a review of the literature. Animal studies, post-traumatic psychic disorder studies, post-traumatic anger and violence studies, tumor and lesion of the limbic system studies, temporal lobe epilepsy studies, and episodic dysfunction syndrome studies, minimal brain studies are reviewed in Part 1 of this article. Part 2, to be published in a later issue of the journal, will conclude the review with clinical surveys on violent individuals and studies on clinical treatment of violence. These studies reveal the etiologic significance of central nervous system dysfunction in the production of violent behavior. Because central nervous system factors are involved in some instances of violent behavior, physicians clearly have a role in the early identification of potentially violent subjects and in the intervention or treatment of individuals who have been violent toward others. Studies have consistently found that lower socioeconomic groups are more predisposed to brain injury from trauma, and several studies have indicated that this is true for segments of the black community. Therefore, investigations in the relationship between central nervous system injury and violence should be a major goal of the black community. Black physicians should assume a lead role in these inquiries and in the prevention and treatment of violence, specifically black-on-black murder. PMID:3100816

  16. Myxedema Coma: A New Look into an Old Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, Vivek; Misgar, Raiz Ahmad; Ghosh, Sujoy; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Roychowdhury, Pradip; Pandit, Kaushik; Mukhopadhyay, Satinath; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2011-01-01

    Myxedema crisis is a severe life threatening form of decompensated hypothyroidism which is associated with a high mortality rate. Infections and discontinuation of thyroid supplements are the major precipitating factors while hypothermia may not play a major role in tropical countries. Low intracellular T3 leads to cardiogenic shock, respiratory depression, hypothermia and coma. Patients are identified on the basis of a low index of suspicion with a careful history and examination focused on features of hypothyroidism and precipitating factors. Arrythmias and coagulation disorders are increasingly being identified in myxedema crisis. Thyroid replacement should be initiated as early as possible with careful attention to hypotension, fluid replacement and steroid replacement in an intensive care facility. Studies have shown that replacement of thyroid hormone through ryles tube with a loading dose and maintenance therapy is as efficacious as intravenous therapy. In many countries T3 is not available and oral therapy with T4 can be used effectively without major significant difference in outcomes. Hypotension, bradycardia at presentation, need for mechanical ventilation, hypothermia unresponsive to treatment, sepsis, intake of sedative drugs, lower GCS and high APACHE II scores and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores more than 6 are significant predictors of mortality in myxedema crisis. Early intervention in hypothyroid patients developing sepsis and other precipitating factors and ensuring continued intake of thyroid supplements may prevent mortality and morbidity associated with myxedema crisis. PMID:21941682

  17. 40 CFR 89.604 - Conditional admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., the importer must store the nonroad engine at a location where the Administrator has reasonable access...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Importation of Nonconforming Nonroad Engines § 89.604 Conditional admission. (a) A nonroad engine offered for importation under §...

  18. The National Center Test for University Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watanabe, Yoshinori

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the National Center Test for University Admissions, a unified national test in Japan, which is taken by 500,000 students every year. It states that implementation of the Center Test began in 1990, with the English component consisting only of the written section until 2005, when the listening section was first implemented…

  19. 34 CFR 106.15 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... higher education, and public institutions of undergraduate higher education. (e) Public institutions of undergraduate higher education. Subpart C does not apply to any public institution of undergraduate higher... 34 Education 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Admissions. 106.15 Section 106.15 Education...

  20. 34 CFR 106.15 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... higher education, and public institutions of undergraduate higher education. (e) Public institutions of undergraduate higher education. Subpart C does not apply to any public institution of undergraduate higher... 34 Education 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Admissions. 106.15 Section 106.15 Education...

  1. 34 CFR 106.15 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... higher education, and public institutions of undergraduate higher education. (e) Public institutions of undergraduate higher education. Subpart C does not apply to any public institution of undergraduate higher... 34 Education 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Admissions. 106.15 Section 106.15 Education...

  2. 34 CFR 106.15 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... higher education, and public institutions of undergraduate higher education. (e) Public institutions of undergraduate higher education. Subpart C does not apply to any public institution of undergraduate higher... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admissions. 106.15 Section 106.15 Education...

  3. 34 CFR 106.15 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... higher education, and public institutions of undergraduate higher education. (e) Public institutions of undergraduate higher education. Subpart C does not apply to any public institution of undergraduate higher... 34 Education 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Admissions. 106.15 Section 106.15 Education...

  4. PREP: Outreach to Online Learners through Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gupton, Preeti

    2016-01-01

    Librarians have collaborated with academic departments within their institutions for decades now, working with professors and administrators to bring information literacy skills to students. The librarians at National American University decided to extend this collaboration to a non-academic unit, the admissions department of the university. The…

  5. 18 CFR 1317.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Admissions. 1317.220 Section 1317.220 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...

  6. 18 CFR 1317.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Admissions. 1317.220 Section 1317.220 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...

  7. 18 CFR 1317.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Admissions. 1317.220 Section 1317.220 Conservation of Power and Water Resources TENNESSEE VALLEY AUTHORITY NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE...

  8. Open Admissions: The Pros and Cons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barzun, Jacques; And Others

    The Council for Basic Education sponsored an all-day symposium on open admissions in 1971. This booklet contains the full text of the addresses given on that occasion, as well as the major part of the discussion among the panelists and answers to questions from the audience. The aim of the symposium was not only to provide information about…

  9. Foreign Language, the Classics, and College Admissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LaFleur, Richard A.

    1993-01-01

    This article reports the results of a survey, funded by the American Classical League (ACL) and conducted during 1990-91, that assessed attitudes toward high school foreign-language study, in particular the study of Latin and Greek, in the college admissions process. (21 references) (VWL)

  10. Beyond Admission: The Challenge for Access.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roger, Angela; Sutherland, Margaret

    1992-01-01

    The Scottish Wider Access Programme (SWAP) aims to increase adults' access to higher education. Interviews with SWAP students and educators revealed that SWAP had been invaluable in preparing nontraditional students for admission to higher education. Issues include improving teaching methods geared toward mature students, providing support…

  11. The Admissions Criteria of Secondary Free Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of an analysis of the admissions criteria used by the first two waves of secondary Free Schools in England. The type of criteria and their ranked order is explored and their potential impact on the school composition is considered. The findings demonstrate the diversity of criteria being used by this new type of…

  12. 15 CFR 8a.220 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admissions. 8a.220 Section 8a.220 Commerce and Foreign Trade Office of the Secretary of Commerce NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN... institution. (c) Application of §§ 8a.300 through .310. Except as provided in paragraphs (d) and (e) of...

  13. Reporting Subscores from College Admission Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyren, Per-Erik

    2009-01-01

    The added value of reporting subscores on a college admission test (SweSAT) was examined in this study. Using a CTT-derived objective method for determining the value of reporting subscores, it was concluded that there is added value in reporting section scores (Verbal/Quantitative) as well as subtest scores. These results differ from a study of…

  14. 40 CFR 5.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Admission. 5.300 Section 5.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of...

  15. 40 CFR 5.300 - Admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Admission. 5.300 Section 5.300 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of...

  16. "Stealth Applicants" Are Changing the Admissions Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Eric

    2008-01-01

    Jeff Rickey is a numbers guy. But three years ago, a colleague asked him about something he'd never counted: applicants who came out of nowhere. The question intrigued Mr. Rickey, dean of admissions and financial aid at Earlham College in Indiana. He found that 17 percent of the college's applicants that year had not called, taken a tour, or…

  17. 10 CFR 2.708 - Admissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Admissions. 2.708 Section 2.708 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE FOR DOMESTIC LICENSING PROCEEDINGS AND ISSUANCE OF ORDERS Rules for Formal... the request is directed serves on the requesting party either: (i) A sworn statement...

  18. EARLY SCHOOL ADMISSIONS PROJECT, PROMISING PRACTICES.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltimore City Public Schools, MD.

    THE EXPERIMENTAL PROJECT ATTEMPTS TO DETERMINE WHETHER EARLY ADMISSION TO SCHOOL CAN OVERCOME BARRIERS TO LEARNING WHICH ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS SEEM TO IMPOSE. A DEPRIVED CHILD OFTEN DOES NOT RECEIVE ATTENTION, AFFECTION, OR GUIDANCE WITHIN HIS HOME. THE YOUNG CHILD SHOULD BE HELPED TO DEVELOP A WHOLESOME SELF-CONCEPT, TO ACQUIRE THE DRIVE TO…

  19. Predicting Academic Success Using Admission Profiles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidovitch, Nitza; Soen, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This study, conducted at a tertiary education institution in Israel, following two previous studies, was designed to deal again with a question that is a topic of debate in Israel and worldwide: Is there justification for the approach that considers restrictive university admission policies an efficient tool for predicting students' success at the…

  20. Hospital admissions before and after shipyard closure.

    PubMed Central

    Iversen, L.; Sabroe, S.; Damsgaard, M. T.

    1989-01-01

    To determine the effect of job loss on health an investigation was made of admissions to hospitals in 887 men five years before and three years after the closure of a Danish shipyard. The control group comprised 441 men from another shipyard. The information on hospital admissions was obtained from the Danish national register of patients. The relative risk of admission in the control group dropped significantly in terms of the number of men admitted from the study group from 1.29 four to five years before closure to 0.74 in the three years after closure. This was especially true of admissions due to accidents (1.33 to 0.46) and diseases of the digestive system (4.53 to 1.03). For diseases of the circulatory system, particularly cardiovascular diseases, the relative risk increased from 0.8 to 1.60, and from 1.0 to 2.6 respectively. These changes in risk of illness after redundancy are probably a consequence of a change from the effects of a high risk work environment to the effects of psychosocial stresses such as job insecurity and unemployment. PMID:2511968

  1. University Admissions. Policy Note. Number 3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Group of Eight (NJ1), 2012

    2012-01-01

    University admissions, like many other aspects of the higher education sector, are going through a time of significant change. From 2012, universities will receive full funding under the Commonwealth Grants Scheme (CGS) for as many places as they offer. Previously, the Government limited the number of funded places, with a tolerance band for…

  2. Differential Prediction Generalization in College Admissions Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aguinis, Herman; Culpepper, Steven A.; Pierce, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "differential prediction generalization" in the context of college admissions testing. Specifically, we assess the extent to which predicted first-year college grade point average (GPA) based on high-school grade point average (HSGPA) and SAT scores depends on a student's ethnicity and gender and whether this…

  3. The Probabilistic Admissible Region with Additional Constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roscoe, C.; Hussein, I.; Wilkins, M.; Schumacher, P.

    The admissible region, in the space surveillance field, is defined as the set of physically acceptable orbits (e.g., orbits with negative energies) consistent with one or more observations of a space object. Given additional constraints on orbital semimajor axis, eccentricity, etc., the admissible region can be constrained, resulting in the constrained admissible region (CAR). Based on known statistics of the measurement process, one can replace hard constraints with a probabilistic representation of the admissible region. This results in the probabilistic admissible region (PAR), which can be used for orbit initiation in Bayesian tracking and prioritization of tracks in a multiple hypothesis tracking framework. The PAR concept was introduced by the authors at the 2014 AMOS conference. In that paper, a Monte Carlo approach was used to show how to construct the PAR in the range/range-rate space based on known statistics of the measurement, semimajor axis, and eccentricity. An expectation-maximization algorithm was proposed to convert the particle cloud into a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) representation of the PAR. This GMM can be used to initialize a Bayesian filter. The PAR was found to be significantly non-uniform, invalidating an assumption frequently made in CAR-based filtering approaches. Using the GMM or particle cloud representations of the PAR, orbits can be prioritized for propagation in a multiple hypothesis tracking (MHT) framework. In this paper, the authors focus on expanding the PAR methodology to allow additional constraints, such as a constraint on perigee altitude, to be modeled in the PAR. This requires re-expressing the joint probability density function for the attributable vector as well as the (constrained) orbital parameters and range and range-rate. The final PAR is derived by accounting for any interdependencies between the parameters. Noting that the concepts presented are general and can be applied to any measurement scenario, the idea

  4. Reinforced Concrete Condition Assessment in Architectural Heritage. The Lion Chambers (Glasgow, UK) and the Theatre E. Duni (Matera, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guida, A.; Dimitrijevic, B.; Pagliuca, A.

    2012-04-01

    The research objective is to provide new qualitative information on the strength of reinforced concrete structures of two prominent examples of modern architecture by using innovative, non-invasive testing techniques. The first one is Lion Chambers in Glasgow (Scotland, United Kingdom) designed by the architects Salmon, Son and Gillespie and completed in 1907. It was the second example of the use of François Hennebique's reinforced concrete system in a building in Glasgow and one of the earliest in Britain. The second example is Duni Theatre in Matera (Southern Italy), designed by the architect Ettore Stella and completed in 1949. The tests on the internal reinforced concrete columns were undertaken by using "SonReb" (SONic + REBound) method that enables assessing the concrete resistance by combining the speed of ultrasound waves and the index of surface bounce through a scleorometric test. In fact, the sclerometer index only gives information regarding the surface layer of the building's structure. In fact, due to the effects of the natural ageing, catalysed by the presence of humidity, surface layers of concrete are affected over time by carbonatation, which increases surface rigidity, providing as a result a greatly "altered" rebound index (much greater than one would have under normal conditions). On the other hand, the ultrasound speed, on the contrary to resistance, is inversely proportional to the age of the concrete (this seems to be due to the cracks that occur and reduce the speed). The hardening process continues over time with a consequent increase in resistance, which diminishes with the passage of time. The paper provides the results of the tests run on the structure of the Lion Chambers and the Duni Theatre. The tests carried out are the basis of a diagnostic project that is possible to implement and monitor to guarantee a deeper knowledge, with the goal of attaining a level of thorough understanding aimed at the preservation of "Modern Architecture

  5. Modelling shallow urban geology using reservoir modelling techniques: voxel-based lithology and physical properties of the greater Glasgow area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kingdon, Andrew; Williams, John D. O.; Williamson, J. Paul; Lark, R. Murray; Dobbs, Marcus R.; Kearsey, Timothy; Finlayson, Andrew; Campbell, S. Diarmad G.

    2013-04-01

    Conventional 3D geological models of lithostratigraphy undertaken by BGS have facilitated a significant step forward in understanding of the 3D sedimentological and structural controls in the subsurface of the UK. However, when lithostratigraphic units are mapped or modelled in 3D, intra-unit variability is often not recognized and may be substantial, particularly in sedimentologically heterogeneous successions. Because of this BGS has been testing voxel grid-based approaches in urban areas with high borehole density. A city-scale lithology model of shallow, unconsolidated sediments in Glasgow, Scotland has been developed as a test of the applicability of these techniques to aid geological understanding and possible future applications. This is of particular significance in this location due to the complex fluvial and glacial history of the superficial geology which alternates between inter-fingering sedimentary packages and short-scale variability of subsurface materials. The model has been created by developing a stochastic model of clastic geology on a voxel support, based on upscaling of observed borehole lithology, independent of lithostratigraphy. Multiple realisations of lithology were generated, each honouring the borehole observations. Lithology information has therefore been used to both develop a model of the distribution of lithology throughout the grid, but also to develop an understanding of the associated uncertainty by providing estimates of the probability with which a particular lithology occurs at a given node. This lithological model compares well with 'traditional' deterministic lithostratigraphic 3D models created in the same area, and with field-based geological maps. This lithological voxel model has been used as a matrix through which physical property data can be attributed within the grid by stochastic modelling and simulation of the variability of properties within the lithological units. Several different property datasets have been

  6. Guideposts of an Effective Admissions Program for the Private School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Raymond E.

    1980-01-01

    Describes fundamental guideposts for an effective private school admissions program. Included are a clear statement of purpose, informative literature, clearly stated admission requirements, standardized testing, a cooperative faculty, image positioning and a recruiting plan. (RC)

  7. [Prognostic value of the trigemino-facial reflex in severe post-traumatic comas].

    PubMed

    Mabin, D; Mimassi, N; Besson, G; L'Azou, D; Chevalier, F; Tea, S

    1982-12-01

    The blink reflex (BR) study has been carried out on 40 severe head injury cases (average age 24.3 years). The recording was conducted several times between the 2nd and the 12th day and was repeated during the first month and beyond in prolonged comas. 23 patients did not respond even to high intensity stimuli. 17 patients displayed delayed and low amplitude latency responses: one of the components, early R1 or late R2 could be missing. The existence of a detectable focalized hemispheric lesion had no effect on the disappearance of the delayed lateral response. No BR was observed in mesencephalic, protubering comas and in 4 cases of subcortical and diencephalic comas. BR was observed in subcortical or diencephalic comas and in 5 cases of mesencephalic comas. The evolution of patients who did not display any electrical response during the first recording was unfavourable in 15 cases. Among the 5/8 remaining comatose cases, the BR was missing on the 2nd day and back on the 7th day. Among the 17 patients who displayed BR their evolution proved to be very favourable or favourable in 13 cases. In all the patients who survived beyond a month the response latencies proved normal, yet their amplitude was considerably lowered. The lack of BR is temporary but it is an element of unfavourable prognosis if it persists beyond a span of 8 days.

  8. The distribution of early- and late-type galaxies in the Coma cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doi, M.; Fukugita, M.; Okamura, S.; Turner, E. L.

    1995-01-01

    The spatial distribution and the morohology-density relation of Coma cluster galaxies are studied using a new homogeneous photmetric sample of 450 galaxies down to B = 16.0 mag with quantitative morphology classification. The sample covers a wide area (10 deg X 10 deg), extending well beyond the Coma cluster. Morphological classifications into early- (E+SO) and late-(S) type galaxies are made by an automated algorithm using simple photometric parameters, with which the misclassification rate is expected to be approximately 10% with respect to early and late types given in the Third Reference Catalogue of Bright Galaxies. The flattened distribution of Coma cluster galaxies, as noted in previous studies, is most conspicuously seen if the early-type galaxies are selected. Early-type galaxies are distributed in a thick filament extended from the NE to the WSW direction that delineates a part of large-scale structure. Spiral galaxies show a distribution with a modest density gradient toward the cluster center; at least bright spiral galaxies are present close to the center of the Coma cluster. We also examine the morphology-density relation for the Coma cluster including its surrounding regions.

  9. Disruption of comA homolog in Ralstonia solanacearum does not impair its twitching motility.

    PubMed

    Barman, Anjan; Buragohain, Chandrika; Ray, Suvendra Kumar

    2017-01-13

    Ralstonia solanacearum is an important phyto-pathogenic bacterium. The bacterium exhibits type IV pili meditated twitching motility that has been implicated in the process of natural transformation in it. A comA gene homolog, alike in several other naturally competent bacteria, has been already reported in this bacterium. However, there are no report of direct link between comA and twitching motility during the natural transformation process in this pathogen. In order to figure out any connection between comA and twitching motility, we created an insertion mutation in comA gene homolog of R. solanacearum F1C1 strain. As anticipated, the insertion mutant (CBRS01 strain) was inefficient for natural transformation. CBRS01 strain was found to be proficient for twitching motility alike the wild-type F1C1. This is interesting since recent findings of Salzer et al. (2016;Environ Microbiol;18:65-74) showed deficiency of twitching motility due to comEC gene (comA homolog) mutation in another naturally competent Gram-negative bacterium Thermus thermophilus. Additionally, we also found CBRS01 strain to be proficient for extracellular cellulase activity and virulence on tomato seedlings. Our findings in this work indicate that an R. solanacearum strain inefficient in undergoing natural transformation can, however, be proficient in exhibiting twitching motility.

  10. Jet Morphology and Coma Analysis of 103P/Hartley 2: Temporal Evolution and Interspecies Comparisons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Charles M.; Pierce, Donna M.; Cochran, Anita L.

    2014-11-01

    We present our results on an expanded study of the jet and coma behavior of comet 103P/Hartley 2 (a continuation of original results presented in Vaughan et al. 2012). We observed Hartley 2 pre- and post-perihelion in 2010 using the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph on the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. Data for CN, C2, C3, CH, and NH2 were collected over six nights from 15 July to 10 November. The spectral data were used to create coma maps for each of the observed species, and the maps were processed using radial and azimuthal division techniques to create enhanced images of the coma to examine coma morphological features. To compliment the ongoing investigation of Hartley 2 as studied by the EPOXI flyby mission, we use findings from other researchers (Belton et al. 2012; Syal et al. 2012; Thomas et al. 2012) to identify dust jet locations on the nucleus and compare the computed jet directions to the radical densities in the coma at our observation times. We also calculate production rates and mixing ratios with water for suspected parent species. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellows program (Award No. DGE-0947419) and NASA’s Planetary Atmospheres program (Award No. NNX14AH18G).

  11. Dark energy and the structure of the Coma cluster of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernin, A. D.; Bisnovatyi-Kogan, G. S.; Teerikorpi, P.; Valtonen, M. J.; Byrd, G. G.; Merafina, M.

    2013-05-01

    Context. We consider the Coma cluster of galaxies as a gravitationally bound physical system embedded in the perfectly uniform static dark energy background as implied by ΛCDM cosmology. Aims: We ask if the density of dark energy is high enough to affect the structure of a large and rich cluster of galaxies. Methods: We base our work on recent observational data on the Coma cluster, and apply our theory of local dynamical effects of dark energy, including the zero-gravity radius RZG of the local force field as the key parameter. Results: 1) Three masses are defined that characterize the structure of a regular cluster: the matter mass MM, the dark-energy effective mass MDE (<0), and the gravitating mass MG (=MM + MDE). 2) A new matter-density profile is suggested that reproduces the observational data well for the Coma cluster in the radius range from 1.4 Mpc to 14 Mpc and takes the dark energy background into account. 3) Using this profile, we calculate upper limits for the total size of the Coma cluster, R ≤ RZG ≈ 20 Mpc, and its total matter mass, MM ≲ MM(RZG) = 6.2 × 1015 M⊙. Conclusions: The dark energy antigravity affects the structure of the Coma cluster strongly at large radii R ≳ 14 Mpc and should be considered when its total mass is derived.

  12. Abundant molecular oxygen in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko.

    PubMed

    Bieler, A; Altwegg, K; Balsiger, H; Bar-Nun, A; Berthelier, J-J; Bochsler, P; Briois, C; Calmonte, U; Combi, M; De Keyser, J; van Dishoeck, E F; Fiethe, B; Fuselier, S A; Gasc, S; Gombosi, T I; Hansen, K C; Hässig, M; Jäckel, A; Kopp, E; Korth, A; Le Roy, L; Mall, U; Maggiolo, R; Marty, B; Mousis, O; Owen, T; Rème, H; Rubin, M; Sémon, T; Tzou, C-Y; Waite, J H; Walsh, C; Wurz, P

    2015-10-29

    The composition of the neutral gas comas of most comets is dominated by H2O, CO and CO2, typically comprising as much as 95 per cent of the total gas density. In addition, cometary comas have been found to contain a rich array of other molecules, including sulfuric compounds and complex hydrocarbons. Molecular oxygen (O2), however, despite its detection on other icy bodies such as the moons of Jupiter and Saturn, has remained undetected in cometary comas. Here we report in situ measurement of O2 in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko, with local abundances ranging from one per cent to ten per cent relative to H2O and with a mean value of 3.80 ± 0.85 per cent. Our observations indicate that the O2/H2O ratio is isotropic in the coma and does not change systematically with heliocentric distance. This suggests that primordial O2 was incorporated into the nucleus during the comet's formation, which is unexpected given the low upper limits from remote sensing observations. Current Solar System formation models do not predict conditions that would allow this to occur.

  13. THE SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION OF OH AND CN RADICALS IN THE COMA OF COMET ENCKE

    SciTech Connect

    Ihalawela, Chandrasiri A.; Pierce, Donna M.; Dorman, Garrett R.; Cochran, Anita L. E-mail: ci856509@ohio.edu E-mail: grd33@msstate.edu

    2011-11-10

    Multiple potential parent species have been proposed to explain CN abundances in comet comae, but the parent has not been definitively identified for all comets. This study examines the spatial distribution of CN radicals in the coma of comet Encke and determines the likelihood that CN is a photodissociative daughter of HCN in the coma. Comet Encke is the shortest orbital period (3.3 years) comet known and also has a low dust-to-gas ratio based on optical observations. Observations of CN were obtained from 2003 October 22 to 24, using the 2.7 m telescope at McDonald Observatory. To determine the parent of CN, the classical vectorial model was modified by using a cone shape in order to reproduce Encke's highly aspherical and asymmetric coma. To test the robustness of the modified model, the spatial distribution of OH was also modeled. This also allowed us to obtain CN/OH ratios in the coma. Overall, we find the CN/OH ratio to be 0.009 {+-} 0.004. The results are consistent with HCN being the photodissociative parent of CN, but we cannot completely rule out other possible parents such as CH{sub 3}CN and HC{sub 3}N. We also found that the fan-like feature spans {approx}90 Degree-Sign , consistent with the results of Woodney et al..

  14. The relationship between nutritional status and the Glasgow prognostic score in patients with cancer of the esophagus and stomach.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Jacqueline Braga; Maurício, Sílvia Fernandes; Bering, Tatiana; Correia, Maria Isabel T D

    2013-01-01

    A relationship between weight loss and inflammation has been described in patients with cancer. In the present study, the relationship between subjective global assessment (SGA) and the severity of inflammation, as defined by Glasgow prognostic score (GPS), as well as the relationship of both of these measures with the presence of complications and survival time, was assessed. In addition, we compared the diagnosis given by SGA with parameters of nutritional assessment, such as body mass index, triceps skinfold, midarm circumference (MAC), midarm muscle circumference (MAMC), phase angle (PA), adductor pollicis muscle thickness (APMT), and handgrip strength (HGS). According to the SGA, the nutritional status was associated with the GPS (P < 0.05), and both the SGA and GPS were associated with the presence of complications. However, the GPS [area under the curve (AUC): 0.77, P < 0.05, confidence interval (CI) = 0.580, 0.956] seems to be more accurate in identifying complications than the SGA (AUC: 0.679, P < 0.05, CI = 0.426, 0.931). Only GPS was associated with survival time. Comparing the different nutritional assessment methods with the SGA suggested that the MAC, MAMC, APMT, PA, and HGS parameters may be helpful in differentiating between nourished and malnourished patients, if new cutoffs are adopted.

  15. Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) can be a useful indicator to determine prognosis of patients with colorectal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Nozoe, Tadahiro; Matono, Rumi; Ijichi, Hideki; Ohga, Takefumi; Ezaki, Takahiro

    2014-01-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), an inflammation-based score, has been used to predict the biologic behavior of malignant tumors. The aim of the current study was to elucidate a further significance of GPS in colorectal carcinoma. Correlation of GPS and modified GPS (mGPS), which are composed of combined score provided for serum elevation of C-reactive protein and hypoalbuminemia examined before surgical treatment, with clinicopathologic features was investigated in 272 patients with colorectal carcinoma. Survival of GPS 1 patients was significantly worse than that of GPS 0 patients (P= 0.009), and survival of GPS 2 patients was significantly worse than that of GPS 1 patients (P < 0.0001). Similarly, survival of mGPS 1 patients was significantly worse than that of mGPS 0 patients (P = 0.009), and survival of mGPS 2 patients was significantly worse than that of mGPS 1 patients (P = 0.0006). Multivariate analysis demonstrated that GPS (P < 0.0001) as well as tumor stage (P= 0.004) and venous invasion (P = 0.011) were factors independently associated with worse prognosis. Both GPS and mGPS could classify outcome of patients with a clear stratification, and could be applied as prognostic indicators in colorectal carcinoma.

  16. Possibilities for Implementing Fracture Liaison Service in Poland in the Light of a Visit to Glasgow Western Infirmary.

    PubMed

    Amarowicz, Jarosław; Czerwiński, Edward

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis remains one of the top challenges for health services all over the world. Osteoporotic changes in bone structure along with the aging of society result in rapid growth of osteoporotic fractures. Statistics show that approximately 25% of women and 20% of men will suffer a subsequent fracture within 5 years of an initial one. In order to deal with the problem, a novel program in secondary fracture prevention was developed in Scotland in the late 1990's. The system was based on a coordinator and focused on identifying, diagnosing and treating patients with osteoporotic fractures. After just a few years, the system, known as Fracture Liaison Services (FLS), proved to be a cost-effective success. For the last several years, FLS has been implemented in countries all over the world. The Glasgow Western Infirmary, where the program started, continues to be one of the top exemplary facilities in the United Kingdom. Each year the Bone Metabolism Unit proves its effectiveness by providing 4000 DXA scans and taking care of 2500 fractures a year. In 2015, the European Foundation of Osteoporosis and Musculoskeletal Diseases successfully implemented a coordinator-based Fracture Liaison Service in Poland.

  17. Reclaiming the Educational Role of Chief Admission Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDonough, Patricia; Robertson, Larry

    1995-01-01

    Describes changes that have occurred in high schools, colleges, and the entrepreneurial admission sector. Relates the evolution of the admission officer's job since the early 1960s and the profession's rapid growth. Details the hybrid role of marketer and educator for chief admissions officers, and issues a call for professional standards. (RJM)

  18. Female and Male Admission to Graduate School: An Illustrative Inquiry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, Scott E.; Jones, Lyle V.

    1976-01-01

    Female and male admission rates to four graduate programs at a university were compared over a two year time period to assess possible sex bias in admission procedures. The overall results showed that sex played only a modest role in admission decisions. (Author/DEP)

  19. Behind the Scenes, Admissions Offices Conquer Mounds of Mail

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farrell, Elizabeth F.

    2008-01-01

    If coming back to work after winter break seems daunting, consider the plight of college-admissions officials. While most high-school students are breathing a sigh of relief after finally submitting their applications, those on the receiving end are rolling up their sleeves. January is crunch time for many admissions offices. Admissions officers…

  20. 45 CFR 618.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Preference in admission. 618.305 Section 618.305 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 618.305 Preference in admission....

  1. 45 CFR 618.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Preference in admission. 618.305 Section 618.305 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 618.305 Preference in admission....

  2. 45 CFR 618.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Preference in admission. 618.305 Section 618.305 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 618.305 Preference in admission....

  3. 45 CFR 618.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Preference in admission. 618.305 Section 618.305 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION... Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 618.305 Preference in admission....

  4. The Roles of Testing and Diversity in College Admissions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Marguerite; Shore, Arnold

    In order to understand the roles of test scores and diversity characteristics (including race and ethnicity) in the admission process, National Board researchers interviewed admissions directors who worked at selective public and private institutions are well as admissions consultants in the summer and fall of 1999. This report presents an…

  5. Equity of Access. New Approaches to Minority Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bingham, Rebecca Saady

    1978-01-01

    One new approach to the admission of minorities to medical schools is that of the Simulated Minority Admission Exercises (SMAE). It sensitizes admission committee members to the different backgrounds of minority applicants and teaches them to evaluate them more effectively. (Author/AM)

  6. 49 CFR 511.34 - Requests for admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... for the admission, for the purposes of the pending proceeding only, of the truth of any matters within... served upon any party after filing of the answer. Each matter as to which an admission is requested shall be separately set forth. (b) Procedure for response. The matter as to which an admission is...

  7. 6 CFR 17.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preference in admission. 17.305 Section 17.305... OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 17.305 Preference in admission. A...

  8. 18 CFR 1317.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Preference in admission... NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1317.305 Preference in admission....

  9. 49 CFR 1114.3 - Admissibility of business records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Admissibility of business records. 1114.3 Section... § 1114.3 Admissibility of business records. Any writing or record, whether in the form of an entry in a... be admissible as evidence thereof if it appears that it was made in the regular course of...

  10. 49 CFR 1114.3 - Admissibility of business records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admissibility of business records. 1114.3 Section... § 1114.3 Admissibility of business records. Any writing or record, whether in the form of an entry in a... be admissible as evidence thereof if it appears that it was made in the regular course of...

  11. 49 CFR 1114.3 - Admissibility of business records.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Admissibility of business records. 1114.3 Section... § 1114.3 Admissibility of business records. Any writing or record, whether in the form of an entry in a... be admissible as evidence thereof if it appears that it was made in the regular course of...

  12. 42 CFR 456.122 - Evaluation criteria for admission review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Evaluation criteria for admission review. 456.122...: Review of Need for Admission 1 § 456.122 Evaluation criteria for admission review. The UR plan must provide that— (a) The committee develops written medical care criteria to assess the need for...

  13. Eliminating Standardized Tests in College Admissions: The New Affirmative Action?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zwick, Rebecca

    1999-01-01

    Eliminating the Scholastic Aptitude Test for college admissions might seem a form of covert affirmative action. Although it is possible to design a workable admissions policy that excludes standardized tests (as 15 percent of colleges have done), banishing admissions tests to further a social-policy goal indirectly is unsound policy. (Contains 25…

  14. Assisted living nursing practice: admission assessment.

    PubMed

    Mitty, Ethel; Flores, Sandi

    2007-01-01

    Admission assessment, generally conducted by a registered nurse, is autonomous, without opportunity for dialogue with colleagues and other health care professionals and bounded by the nurse's knowledge and skills, state regulations, facility practices, and marketing. The fact that some states permit admission and retention of nursing home level-of-care residents and provision of end-of-life care means that the assessment has to be able to predict the resident's likely trajectory of well-being as well as chronic illness exacerbation. The nurse must have a clear perspective on staff competencies and judge whether additional education or training will be necessary. This article reviews assessment standards of practice as put forth by the American Assisted Living Nurses Association as part of its application for recognition of assisted living nursing as specialty nursing practice by the American Nurses Association. The role of the Licensed Practical Nurse/Licensed Vocational Nurse in resident assessment is also discussed.

  15. Lasers, the Price of Admission in 2045

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-04-01

    altitude. Water vapor, pollutants , and other particles in the air , which are more prevalent at lower altitudes, cause absorption and scattering. These...AU/ACSC/DAYTON, J/AY15 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY LASERS, THE PRICE OF ADMISSION IN 2045 by John G. Dayton, Maj, USAF...the Degree of MASTER OF OPERATIONAL ARTS AND SCIENCE Advisors: Lt Col Paul P. Clemans, Maj Thomas E. Kiesling Maxwell Air Force Base, Alabama

  16. Characteristics of delayed admission to stroke unit.

    PubMed

    Silvestrelli, Giorgio; Parnetti, Lucilla; Tambasco, Nicola; Corea, Francesco; Capocchi, Giuseppe

    2006-01-01

    Early admission to stroke unit (SU) and factors that may cause admission delay represent relevant issues to obtain an optimal management of acute stroke. This study was aimed at recording timing from clinical onset to admission to our SU and to identify the reasons for delay. We prospectively examined acute stroke patients consecutively admitted to the Perugia SU. Baseline characteristics of stroke patients, stroke type and etiology, time from symptom onset to arrival in the SU were obtained from the Hospital-Based Perugia Stroke Registry. 60.8% of 2,213 consecutive stroke patients admitted to the SU arrived within 6 hrs and 39.2% after 6 hrs. Underestimation of symptoms was the cause of delay in 48.7% of cases. Younger age, especially for females, ischemic stroke, mild and/or unspecific symptoms and the underestimation of symptoms seem to be the main reasons for delayed arrival in the SU. To increase the proportion of stroke patients arriving in the SU within 3 hr of symptom onset, it is necessary to improve public and general practitioner awareness of stroke through educational programs.

  17. Complexity in College Admission: Fact or Urban Myth. Research Findings of Parent and Student Perceptions of Complexity in College Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Board Advocacy & Policy Center, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In September 2007, the College Board formed the Task Force on Admissions in the 21st Century in response to a request from the Guidance and Admission Assembly Council (GAA Council) to more closely examine the high-school-to-college transition process. Each spring, at the conclusion of the college admission cycle, there is much discussion in the…

  18. A Role for Marketing in College Admissions. Papers Presented at the Colloquium on College Admissions, May 16-l8, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Entrance Examination Board, New York, NY.

    This collection stresses the need for informed and more sophisticated marketing techniques for college admissions officers to help them cope with the decreasing number of prospective college students. The importance of the college admissions office is increasing as admissions becomes a more crucial element to the colleges' financial well-being.…

  19. Effects of the Economy on the Admission Process: 2008-09. National Association for College Admission Counseling, September 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Association for College Admission Counseling, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The 2008-09 college admission cycle took place during a period of heightened economic uncertainty. When added to the annual uncertainty of the admission process--for both students seeking college admission offers and colleges seeking to predict their annual enrollment yield--the economic environment caused great concern among colleges and students…

  20. Polarimetry of grains in the coma of P/Halley. II - Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollfus, A.

    1989-04-01

    Physical properties of solid grains in the coma of P/Halley were derived on the basis of optical polarimetry data on the coma continuum obtained by Dollfus and Suchail (1987) and by an analysis of relevant polarization measurements recorded throughout the world. Results of polarimetry in the visible light indicate the presence of large particles, very rough and dark. These rather rough grains are mixed with the cloud of small particles analyzed with the spacecraft impact detectors. The presence of circular and deviated linear polarizations on some areas in the coma indicates elongated grains oriented by gas streams or jets, either in the population of small particles or among the large flakes. It is speculated that the source of the Brownlee particles and of the large grains assumed to produce the zodiacal light are the large cometary fluffy aggregates which are identified by polarimetry, after transportation inward in the solar system by the Poynting-Robertson effect.

  1. Using an integral-field unit spectrograph to study radical species in cometary coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Pierce, Donna M.; Vaughan, Charles M.; Cochran, Anita

    2015-01-01

    We have observed several comets using an integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. Full-coma spectroscopic images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3, CN, NH2). Various coma enhancements were used to identify and characterize coma morphological features. The azimuthal average profiles and the Haser model were used to determine production rates and possible parent molecules. Here, we present the work completed to date, and we compare our results to other comet taxonomic surveys. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellows program (Award No. DGE-0947419), NASA's Planetary Atmospheres program (Award No. NNX14AH18G), and the Fund for Astrophysical Research, Inc.

  2. Using an integral-field unit spectrograph to study radical species in cometary coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Benjamin; Pierce, Donna; Cochran, Anita; Vaughan, Charles

    2014-11-01

    We have observed several comets using an integral-field unit spectrograph (the George and Cynthia Mitchell Spectrograph) on the 2.7m Harlan J. Smith telescope at McDonald Observatory. Full-coma spectroscopic images were obtained for various radical species (C2, C3, CN, NH2). Various coma enhancements were used to identify and characterize coma morphological features. The azimuthal average profiles and the Haser model were used to determine production rates and possible parent molecules. Here, we present the work completed to date, and we compare our results to other comet taxonomic surveys. This work was funded by the National Science Foundation Graduate K-12 (GK-12) STEM Fellows program (Award No. DGE-0947419), NASA’s Planetary Atmospheres program (Award No. NNX14AH18G), and the Fund for Astrophysical Research, Inc.

  3. ALP conversion and the soft X-ray excess in the outskirts of the Coma cluster

    SciTech Connect

    Kraljic, David; Rummel, Markus; Conlon, Joseph P. E-mail: Markus.Rummel@physics.ox.ac.uk

    2015-01-01

    It was recently found that the soft X-ray excess in the center of the Coma cluster can be fitted by conversion of axion-like-particles (ALPs) of a cosmic axion background (CAB) to photons. We extend this analysis to the outskirts of Coma, including regions up to 5 Mpc from the center of the cluster. We extract the excess soft X-ray flux from ROSAT All-Sky Survey data and compare it to the expected flux from ALP to photon conversion of a CAB. The soft X-ray excess both in the center and the outskirts of Coma can be simultaneously fitted by ALP to photon conversion of a CAB. Given the uncertainties of the cluster magnetic field in the outskirts we constrain the parameter space of the CAB. In particular, an upper limit on the CAB mean energy and a range of allowed ALP-photon couplings are derived.

  4. Low encounter speed comet COMA sample return missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsou, P.; Yen, C. W.; Albee, A. L.

    1994-01-01

    Comets, being considered the most primitive bodies in the solar system, command the highest priority among solar-system objects for studying solar nebula evolution and the evolution of life through biogenic elements and compounds. The study of comets, and more especially, of material from them, provides an understanding of the physical, chemical, and mineralogical processes operative in the formation and earliest development of the solar systems. These return samples will provide valuable information on comets and serve as a rosetta stone for the analytical studies conducted on interplanetary dust particles over the past two decades, and will provide much needed extraterrestrial samples for the planetary materials community since the Apollo program. Lander sample return missions require rather complex spacecraft, intricate operations, and costly propulsion systems. By contrast, it is possible to take a highly simplified approach for sample capture and return in the case of a comet. In the past, we have considered Earth free-return trajectory to the comet, in which passive collectors intercept dust and volatiles from the cometary coma. However, standard short period cometary free-return trajectories results in the comet to the spacecraft encounter speeds in the range of 10 km/s. At these speeds the kinetic energy of the capture process can render significant modification of dust structure, change of solid phase as well as the lost of volatiles components. This paper presents a class of new missions with trajectories with significant reduction of encounter speeds by incorporating gravity assists and deep space maneuvering. Low encounter speed cometary flyby sample return will enable a marked increase in the value of the return science. Acquiring thousands of samples from a known comet and thousands of images of a comet nucleus would be space firsts. Applying new approach in flight mechanics to generate a new class of low encounter speed cometary sample return

  5. Prognosis of patients in coma after acute subdural hematoma due to ruptured intracranial aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Torné, Ramon; Rodríguez-Hernández, Ana; Romero-Chala, Fabián; Arikan, Fuat; Vilalta, Jordi; Sahuquillo, Juan

    2016-04-01

    Acute subdural hematomas (aSDH) secondary to intracranial aneurysm rupture are rare. Most patients present with coma and their functional prognosis has been classically considered to be very poor. Previous studies mixed good-grade and poor-grade patients and reported variable outcomes. We reviewed our experience by focusing on patients in coma only and hypothesized that aSDH might worsen initial mortality but not long-term functional outcome. Between 2005 and 2013, 440 subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) patients were admitted to our center. Nineteen (4.3%) were found to have an associated aSDH and 13 (2.9%) of these presented with coma. Their prospectively collected clinical and outcome data were reviewed and compared with that of 104 SAH patients without aSDH who presented with coma during the same period. Median aSDH thickness was 10mm. Four patients presented with an associated aneurysmal cortical laceration and only one had good recovery. Overall, we observed good long-term outcomes in both SAH patients in coma with aSDH and those without aSDH (38.5% versus 26.4%). Associated aSDH does not appear to indicate a poorer long-term functional prognosis in SAH patients presenting with coma. Anisocoria and brain herniation are observed in patients with aSDH thicknesses that are smaller than those observed in trauma patients. Despite a high initial mortality, early surgery to remove the aSDH results in a good outcome in over 60% of survivors. Aneurysmal cortical laceration appears to be an independent entity which shows a poorer prognosis than other types of aneurysmal aSDH.

  6. Deep UV Luminosity Functions at the Infall Region of the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hammer, D. M.; Hornschemeier, A. E.; Salim, S.; Smith, R.; Jenkins, L.; Mobasher, B.; Miller, N.; Ferguson, H.

    2011-01-01

    We have used deep GALEX observations at the infall region of the Coma cluster to measure the faintest UV luminosity functions (LFs) presented for a rich galaxy cluster thus far. The Coma UV LFs are measured to M(sub uv) = -10.5 in the GALEX FUV and NUV bands, or 3.5 mag fainter than previous studies, and reach the dwarf early-type galaxy population in Coma for the first time. The Schechter faint-end slopes (alpha approximately equal to -1.39 in both GALEX bands) are shallower than reported in previous Coma UV LF studies owing to a flatter LF at faint magnitudes. A Gaussian-plus-Schechter model provides a slightly better parametrization of the UV LFs resulting in a faint-end slope of alpha approximately equal to -1.15 in both GALEX bands. The two-component model gives faint-end slopes shallower than alpha = -1 (a turnover) for the LFs constructed separately for passive and star forming galaxies. The UV LFs for star forming galaxies show a turnover at M(sub UV) approximately equal to -14 owing to a deficit of dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma with stellar masses below M(sub *) = 10(sup 8) solar mass. A similar turnover is identified in recent UV LFs measured for the Virgo cluster suggesting this may be a common feature of local galaxy clusters, whereas the field UV LFs continue to rise at faint magnitudes. We did not identify an excess of passive galaxies as would be expected if the missing dwarf star forming galaxies were quenched inside the cluster. In fact, the LFs for both dwarf passive and star forming galaxies show the same turnover at faint magnitudes. We discuss the possible origin of the missing dwarf star forming galaxies in Coma and their expected properties based on comparisons to local field galaxies.

  7. Chill-coma recovery time, age and sex determine lipid profiles in Ceratitis capitata tissues.

    PubMed

    Pujol-Lereis, Luciana Mercedes; Fagali, Natalia Soledad; Rabossi, Alejandro; Catalá, Ángel; Quesada-Allué, Luis Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The remodeling of membrane composition by changes in phospholipid head groups and fatty acids (FA) degree of unsaturation has been associated with the maintenance of membrane homeostasis under stress conditions. Overall lipid levels and the composition of cuticle lipids also influence insect stress resistance and tissue protection. In a previous study, we demonstrated differences in survival, behavior and Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase gene expression between subgroups of Ceratitis capitata flies that had a reversible recovery from chill-coma and those that developed chilling-injury. Here, we analyzed lipid profiles from comparable subgroups of 15 and 30-day-old flies separated according to their recovery time after a chill-coma treatment. Neutral and polar lipid classes of chill-coma subgroups were separated by thin layer chromatography and quantified by densitometry. FA composition of polar lipids of chill-coma subgroups and non-stressed flies was evaluated using gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry. Higher amounts of neutral lipids such as triglycerides, diacylglycerol, wax esters, sterol esters and free esters were found in male flies that recovered faster from chill-coma compared to slower flies. A multivariate analysis revealed changes in patterns of storage and cuticle lipids among subgroups both in males and females. FA unsaturation increased after cold exposure, and was higher in thorax of slower subgroups compared to faster subgroups. The changes in neutral lipid patterns and FA composition depended on recovery time, sex, age and body-part, and were not specifically associated with the development of chilling-injury. An analysis of phospholipid classes showed that the phosphatidylcholine to lysophosphatidylcholine ratio (PC/LPC) was significantly higher, or showed a tendency, in subgroups that may have developed chilling-injury compared to those with a reversible recovery from coma.

  8. Influence of alcohol use on mortality and expenditure during hospital admission: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shu-Hui; Hsu, Shiun-Yuan; Kuo, Pao-Jen; Rau, Cheng-Shyuan; Cheng, Ya-Ai; Hsieh, Ching-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study was designed to investigate the effect of alcohol intoxication on clinical presentation of hospitalised adult trauma patients at a Level I trauma centre using propensity score matching. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Taiwan. Participants Detailed data of 929 hospitalised adult trauma patients with alcohol intoxication, aged 20–65 years, and 10 104 corresponding patients without alcohol intoxication were retrieved from the Trauma Registry System between 1 January 2009 and 31 December 2014. Alcohol intoxication was defined as a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) ≥50 mg/dL. Main outcome measures In-hospital mortality and expenditure. Results Patients with alcohol intoxication presented with significantly higher short-term mortality (OR: 3.0, 95% CI 2.0 to 4.4; p<0.001) than patients without alcohol intoxication. However, on comparison with propensity score-matched patients with respect to sex, age, comorbidity, Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS), injury region based on Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) and Injury Severity Score (ISS), alcohol intoxication did not significantly influence mortality (OR: 0.8, 95% CI 0.5 to 1.4; p=0.563). This implied that the higher mortality of alcohol-intoxicated patients was attributable to patient characteristics such as a higher injury severity rather than alcohol intoxication. Even on comparison with sex-matched, age-matched and comorbidity-matched patients without alcohol intoxication, patients with alcohol intoxication still had significantly higher total expenditure (17.4% higher), cost of operation (40.3% higher), cost of examination (52.8% higher) and cost of pharmaceuticals (38.3% higher). Conclusions The associated higher mortality of adult trauma patients with alcohol intoxication was completely attributable to other patient characteristics and associated injury severity rather than the effects of alcohol. However, patients with alcohol intoxication incurred significantly higher expenditure than

  9. Analysis of hydrogen H-alpha observations of the coma of Comet P/Halley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smyth, William H.; Marconi, M. L.; Scherb, Frank; Roesler, Fred L.

    1993-01-01

    The Monte Carlo Particle Trajectory Model of Combi and Smyth (1988) is used here to analyze observations of the H-alpha coma of Comet Halley. The solar excitation mechanism for the H-alpha emissions line is described. The H2O production rates derived for the H-alpha brightness measurements are shown to be very consistent with the H2O production rates determined from other Comet Halley observations of the H, O, and OH comae. Revised H2O production rates determined from 6300 A brightness measurements are presented.

  10. Inner coma imaging of Comet Levy (1990c) with the Hubble Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, H. A.; A'Hearn, M. F.; Feldman, P. D.; Arpigny, C.; Baum, W. A.; Brandt, J. C.; Light, R. M.; Westphal, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    HST observations of Comet Levy at geocentric and heliocentric distances of about 1 AU show a highly asymmetrical coma in which the sunward-facing hemisphere is brighter than the tailward one by a factor of 2; this is in keeping with dayside volatile sublimation. Radial brightness profiles perpendicular to the sun-comet line are found to be highly symmetric about the nucleus. Detailed image analysis reveals indications of a hemispherical dust arc which propagates through the coma at an average projected velocity of about 0.16 km/sec. It is suggested that periodic occurrences of such dust arcs could account for the temporal variability in IUE continuum photometry.

  11. Two-mirror telescope design with third-order coma insensitive to decenter misalignment.

    PubMed

    Scaduto, Lucimara Cristina Nakata; Sasian, Jose; Stefani, Mario Antonio; Neto, Jarbas Caiado de Castro

    2013-03-25

    Misalignments always occur in real optical systems. These misalignments do not generate new aberration forms, but they change the aberration field dependence. Two-mirror telescopes have been used in several applications. We analyze a two-mirror telescope configuration that has negligible sensitivity to decenter misalignments. By applying the wave aberration theory for plane-symmetric optical systems it is shown that the asphericity in the secondary mirror, if properly chosen, can compensate for any decenter perturbation allowing third-order coma unchanged across the field of view. For any two-mirror system it is possible to find a configuration in which decenter misalignments do not generate field-uniform coma.

  12. [Coma diabeticum and intrauterine fetal death. Therapeutic considerations on hand of a clinical case (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Muck, B R

    1975-09-01

    We report about a thirty year old woman in the 34th week of pregnancy, who was hospitalized with ketoacid coma diabeticum. The intrauterine death of the fetus was diagnostisized. Neither the pathological glucose tolerance nor the metabolic disorder had been previously recognized. In the patient history though we find concrete signs of a possible pathological glucose tolerance. We describe our therapy of the coma. In the following we discuss the frequency of carbohydrate metabolism disorders in pregnant women and screening methods for diabets.

  13. Effect of sodium succinate on gas exchange in rats with barbiturate-induced coma.

    PubMed

    Shefer, T V; Ivnitskii, Yu Yu; Malakhovskii, V N

    2003-04-01

    Injection of sodium succinate in doses of 5 or 10 mmol/kg (but not 1 mmol/kg) intensified oxygen consumption in rats with sodium thiopental-induced coma. Injection of SDH inhibitor (sodium malonate) inhibited gas exchange and abolished the effect of sodium succinate. The effect of succinate on rat survival was positive, while that of malonate was negative, but manifested only as a trend. The critical role of succinate oxidation in preventing lethal complications of barbiturate-induced coma is proved.

  14. Origin of metal ions in the coma of P/Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiss, J.; Bochsler, P.; Ogilvie, K. W.; Coplan, M. A.

    1986-01-01

    During the crossing of the ICE spacecraft through the coma of the comet Giacobini-Zinner, ions with a mass/charge ratio 24 + or - 1 were unexpectedly found. Na(+) and/or Mg(+) would fit into this mass range. Processes that could lead to high metal ion abundances in cometary comas are discussed and it is concluded that evaporation or sputtering from silicate grains are not likely to be responsible. A remaining possibility is the occurrence of alkali metals in the icy phase as a result of either cometary differentiation or cocondensation of these elements with the icy component prior to the accretion of cometary bodies.

  15. Variation in rates of hospital admission for appendicitis in Wales.

    PubMed Central

    West, R R; Carey, M J

    1978-01-01

    In a study designed to investigate the variations in rates of admission to hospital for appendicitis in Wales Hospital Activity Analysis listings were analysed according to the sex and age of the patients and the month and day of the week of admission. The incidence of hospitalisation was greatest among boys aged 10-14 and girls aged 15-19. The number of admissions was higher on weekdays than at weekends, but there were no seasonal variations. Durations of stay differed between the 17 health districts. We conclude that admission rates vary mainly because of differing hospital admission policies. Admission is not wholly governed by the sudden onset of abdominal pain; other factors include the threshold of consultation of each patient, the referral habits of general practitioners, the availability of hospital beds, and the degree to which doctors and patients expect admission. PMID:656866

  16. Therapeutic options to enhance coma arousal after traumatic brain injury: state of the art of current treatments to improve coma recovery.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Giulia

    2014-04-01

    Traumatic brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability. Optimizing the recovery from coma is a priority in seeking to improve patients' functional outcomes. Standards of care have not been established: pharmacological interventions, right median nerve and sensory stimulation, dorsal column stimulation (DCS), deep brain stimulation, transcranial magnetic stimulation, hyperbaric oxygen therapy and cell transplantation have all been utilized with contrasting results. The aim of this review is to clarify the indications for the various techniques and to guide the clinical practice towards an earlier coma arousal. A systematic bibliographic search was undertaken using the principal search engines (Pubmed, Embase, Ovid and Cochrane databases) to locate the most pertinent studies. Traumatic injury is a highly individualized process, and subsequent impairments are dependent on multiple factors: this heterogeneity influences and determines therapeutic responses to the various interventions.

  17. Coma imaging of comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf at Calar Alto in late July to mid August 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boehnhardt, Hermann; Vanysek, Vladimir; Birkle, K.; Hopp, U.

    1992-01-01

    Comet P/Brorsen-Metcalf was observed on 1989/07/28+30 and on 1989/08/04+12(+14) with the 3.5 m telescope and the 0.8 m Schmidt camera at Calar Alto/Spain. The images exhibit a narrow plasma tail pointing into anti-solar direction. On 1989/07/30 a triple tail was found which can be interpreted as tail ray event. The coma isophotes show prominent asymmetries with the nucleus located on the tailward side of the isophote foci and with a slightly higher brightness in the Northern Hemisphere of the coma. A strong curved jet feature was detected in the coma on 1989/07/30. The jet extended at least 30,000 km into the sunward coma hemisphere. The rotation period of about 1.3 days, estimated from the curvature of the coma jet, needs verification by other observations.

  18. The predictive and prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score in metastatic colorectal carcinoma patients receiving bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Maillet, Marianne; Dréanic, Johann; Dhooge, Marion; Mir, Olivier; Brezault, Catherine; Goldwasser, François; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2014-11-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), based on C-reactive protein and albumin levels, has shown its prognostic value in metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC) patients receiving conventional cytotoxic therapy. Bevacizumab, a monoclonal antibody to vascular epidermal growth factor, improves the overall survival in mCRC. The aim of the present study was to assess the prognostic value of GPS in mCRC patients receiving antivascular epidermal growth factor therapy. From August 2005 to August 2012, consecutive patients with mCRC who received chemotherapy plus bevacizumab were eligible for the present analysis. The clinical stage, C-reactive protein, albumin and the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status were recorded at the time of initiation of bevacizumab. Patients received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy plus bevacizumab in accordance with the digestive oncology multidisciplinary staff proposal and in line with the French recommendations for the treatment of mCRC. Eighty patients were eligible (colon n = 59, rectum n = 21), with a median follow-up of 14 months (range 1-58 months). Chemotherapy given with bevacizumab and 5-fluorouracil was oxaliplatin (n = 41, 51%) or irinotecan (n = 27, 34%). At baseline, 56, 31 and 13% of patients had a GPS of 0 (n = 45), 1 (n = 25) and 2 (n = 10), respectively. The median progression-free survival in these groups was 10.1, 6.5 and 5.6 months (P = 0.16), respectively. The median overall survival was 20.1, 11.4 and 6.5 months, respectively (P = 0.004). Our study confirmed the prognostic value of GPS in mCRC patients receiving chemotherapy plus bevacizumab. Given the poor survival observed in patients with an GPS of 2, studies dedicated to these patients could identify optimal treatment modalities.

  19. Prognostic value of the Glasgow Prognostic Score in metastatic colorectal cancer in the era of anti-EGFR therapies.

    PubMed

    Dréanic, Johann; Maillet, Marianne; Dhooge, Marion; Mir, Olivier; Brezault, Catherine; Goldwasser, François; Chaussade, Stanislas; Coriat, Romain

    2013-01-01

    The Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS), combination of C-reactive protein and albumin, has proven its prognostic value in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients receiving conventional cytotoxic therapy. More recently, anti-EGFR therapies have been validated in mCRC and roll forward the patients' overall survival (OS). We aimed to evaluate the prognostic accuracy of the GPS in patients receiving anti-EGFR therapy in addition to conventional chemotherapy. From January 2007 to February 2012, consecutive mCRC patients who received 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy plus cetuximab were included in the present analysis. Patients were eligible for the study if they met the following criteria: advanced pathologically proven MCRC, age >18 years, adequate renal function (creatinine clearance >40 ml/min), C-reactive protein and albumin and performance status evaluation before treatment initiation. A total of 49 patients received cetuximab plus 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy (colon, n = 34; rectum, n = 15) and were treated with a median follow-up of 35 months (16.5-74.7). Median age was 48 years old. In addition to cetuximab, patients received oxaliplatin- (n = 34, 60%) or irinotecan (n = 15, 30%)-based chemotherapy. At time of diagnosis, 55, 29 and 16% of patients had a GPS of 0 (n = 27), 1 (n = 14) and 2 (n = 8), respectively. Fifty-five, 29 and 14 % of patients add one, two or ≥3 metastatic sites, respectively. Considering two groups (GPS = 0 and GPS ≥1), median progression-free survivals were significantly different (p = 0.0084). Median OS in the GPS 0, 1 and 2 groups were 38.2, 14 and 12.1 months, respectively (p = 0.0093). The results of the present study confirm that the GPS is still a simple and effective prognostic factor in the era of cetuximab therapy in mCRC patients.

  20. Association between pretreatment Glasgow prognostic score and gastric cancer survival and clinicopathological features: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Shu-Yi; Chen, Shuang-Qian; Yang, Shuai-Long; Wan, Lu; Xiong, Bin

    2016-01-01

    Background Glasgow prognostic score (GPS) is widely known as a systemic inflammatory-based marker. The relationship between pretreatment GPS and gastric cancer (GC) survival and clinicopathological features remains controversial. The aim of the study was to conduct a meta-analysis of published studies to evaluate the association between pretreatment GPS and survival and clinicopathological features in GC patients. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and BioMed databases for relevant studies. Combined analyses were used to assess the association between pretreatment GPS and overall survival, disease-free survival, and clinicopathological parameters by Stata Version 12.0. Results A total of 14 studies were included in this meta-analysis, including 5,579 GC patients. The results indicated that pretreatment high GPS (HGPS) predicted poor overall survival (hazard ratio =1.51, 95% CI: 1.37–1.66, P<0.01) and disease-free survival (hazard ratio =1.45, 95% CI: 1.26–1.68, P<0.01) in GC patients. Pretreatment HGPS was also significantly associated with advanced tumor–node–metastasis stage (odds ratio [OR] =3.09, 95% CI: 2.11–4.53, P<0.01), lymph node metastasis (OR =4.60, 95% CI: 3.23–6.56, P<0.01), lymphatic invasion (OR =3.04, 95% CI: 2.00–4.62, P<0.01), and venous invasion (OR =3.56, 95% CI: 1.81–6.99, P<0.01). Conclusion Our meta-analysis indicated that pretreatment HGPS could be a predicative factor of poor survival outcome and clinicopathological features for GC patients. PMID:27390529

  1. Wavelet frames and admissibility in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Führ, Hartmut

    1996-12-01

    This paper is concerned with the relations between discrete and continuous wavelet transforms on k-dimensional Euclidean space. We start with the construction of continuous wavelet transforms with the help of square-integrable representations of certain semidirect products, thereby generalizing results of Bernier and Taylor. We then turn to frames of L2(Rk) and to the question, when the functions occurring in a given frame are admissible for a given continuous wavelet transform. For certain frames we give a characterization which generalizes a result of Daubechies to higher dimensions.

  2. Coma as a presenting sign of Datura stramonium seed tea poisoning.

    PubMed

    Diker, D; Markovitz, D; Rothman, M; Sendovski, U

    2007-07-01

    Datura stramonium is a hallucinogenic plant that causes serious poisoning. Consumption of any part of the plant may result in a severe anticholinergic reaction that may lead to toxicity and occasionally cause diagnostic difficulties. We report two patients with coma as a presenting sign of intoxication following intentional Datura seed tea ingestion and we review the leading clues for its diagnosis and treatment.

  3. Communication Opportunities via Special Messaging Technology for Two Post-Coma Persons with Multiple Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Buonocunto, Francesca; Sacco, Valentina; Colonna, Fabio; Navarro, Jorge; Lanzilotti, Crocifissa; de Pace, Claudia; Megna, Marisa; Oliva, Doretta

    2011-01-01

    This study extended the assessment of a special messaging technology with two additional post-coma adults who had emerged from a minimally conscious state, but showed multiple disabilities including profound motor and communication impairments. For each participant, the study involved an ABAB design, in which the A represented baseline phases and…

  4. Spatial and temporal variations in the column density distribution of comet Halley's CN coma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schulz, Rita; Schlosser, W.; Meisser, W.; Koczet, P.; Celnik, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Mean radial column density profiles of comet P/Halley's CN coma were derived by combining photographic and photoelectric observations. The shape of the profiles as well as their temporal variations were analyzed in detail and compared with the results of other CN observations of the comet.

  5. Modeling Cometary Coma with a Three Dimensional, Anisotropic Multiple Scattering Distributed Processing Code

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luchini, Chris B.

    1997-01-01

    Development of camera and instrument simulations for space exploration requires the development of scientifically accurate models of the objects to be studied. Several planned cometary missions have prompted the development of a three dimensional, multi-spectral, anisotropic multiple scattering model of cometary coma.

  6. Spatial variation in automated burst suppression detection in pharmacologically induced coma.

    PubMed

    An, Jingzhi; Jonnalagadda, Durga; Moura, Valdery; Purdon, Patrick L; Brown, Emery N; Westover, M Brandon

    2015-01-01

    Burst suppression is actively studied as a control signal to guide anesthetic dosing in patients undergoing medically induced coma. The ability to automatically identify periods of EEG suppression and compactly summarize the depth of coma using the burst suppression probability (BSP) is crucial to effective and safe monitoring and control of medical coma. Current literature however does not explicitly account for the potential variation in burst suppression parameters across different scalp locations. In this study we analyzed standard 19-channel EEG recordings from 8 patients with refractory status epilepticus who underwent pharmacologically induced burst suppression as medical treatment for refractory seizures. We found that although burst suppression is generally considered a global phenomenon, BSP obtained using a previously validated algorithm varies systematically across different channels. A global representation of information from individual channels is proposed that takes into account the burst suppression characteristics recorded at multiple electrodes. BSP computed from this representative burst suppression pattern may be more resilient to noise and a better representation of the brain state of patients. Multichannel data integration may enhance the reliability of estimates of the depth of medical coma.

  7. Dust in Cometary Comae: Present Understanding of the Structure and Composition of Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levasseur-Regourd, A. C.; Zolensky, M.; Lasue, J.

    2007-01-01

    In situ probing of a very few cometary comae has shown that dust particles present a low albedo and a low density, and that they consist of both rocky material and refractory organics. Remote observations of solar light scattered by cometary dust provide information on the properties of dust particles in the coma of a larger set of comets. The observations of the linear polarization in the coma indicate that the dust particles are irregular, with a size greater (on the average) than about one micron. Besides, they suggest, through numerical and experimental simulations, that both compact grains and fluffy aggregates (with a power law of the size distribution in the -2.6 to -3 range), and both rather transparent silicates and absorbing organics are present in the coma. Recent analysis of the cometary dust samples collected by the Stardust mission provide a unique ground truth and confirm, for comet 81P/Wild 2, the results from remote sensing observations. Future space missions to comets should, in the next decade, lead to a more precise characterization of the structure and composition of cometary dust particles.

  8. Abnormal intra-aural pressure waves associated with death in African children with acute nontraumatic coma

    PubMed Central

    Gwer, Samson; Kazungu, Michael; Chengo, Eddie; Ohuma, Eric O.; Idro, Richard; Birch, Tony; Marchbanks, Robert; Kirkham, Fenella J.; Newton, Charles R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: We explored the relationship between tympanic membrane displacement (TMD) measurements, a tool to monitor intracranial pressure noninvasively, and clinical features and death in children with acute coma in Kilifi, Kenya. Methods: Between November 2007 and September 2009, we made serial TMD measurements and clinical observations on children with acute coma (Blantyre coma score (BCS) ≤ 2) on the pediatric high dependency unit of Kilifi District Hospital, and on well children presenting to the hospital's outpatient department for routine follow-up. We examined middle ear function using tympanometry and measured cardiac pulse (CPA) and respiratory pulse pressure amplitudes (RPA) using the TMD analyzer. Results: We recruited 75 children (32 (43%) females; median age 3.3 (IQR: 2.0, 4.3) years). Twenty-one (28%) children died. Higher TMD measurements predicted death. Adjusting for diagnosis, every 50 nl rise in both semirecumbent and recumbent CPA was associated with increased odds of death associated with intracranial herniation (OR: 1.61, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.07, 2.41; P = 0.02 and OR: 1.35, 95% CI: 1.10, 1.66; P ≤ 0.01 respectively). Conclusion: Raised TMD pulse pressure measurements are associated with death and may be useful in detecting and monitoring risk of intracranial herniation and intracranial pressure in childhood coma. PMID:25790276

  9. Acute isoniazid intoxication: an uncommon cause of convulsion, coma and acidosis.

    PubMed

    Uzman, Sinan; Uludağ Yanaral, Tümay; Toptaş, Mehmet; Koç, Alparslan; Taş, Aytül; Bican, Gülşen

    2013-01-01

    Despite the widespread use, suicidal ingestion of isoniazid is a rare condition in Turkey. We reported a case of acute isoniazid intoxication associated with alcohol intake presenting with convulsion, coma and metabolic acidosis. The patient was treated successfully with intravenous pyridoxine administration. Early recognation and appropriate treatment in the intensive care unit is very important to prevent mortality in patients with acute isoniazid toxicity.

  10. VizieR Online Data Catalog: Subaru-UDGs in the Coma cluster (Yagi+, 2016)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, M.; Koda, J.; Komiyama, Y.; Yamanoi, H.

    2016-10-01

    We retrieved a wide W-C-RC band (R-band) survey of the Coma cluster of Suprime-Cam from the Subaru public archive (SMOKA; Baba et al. 2002ASPC..281..298B) between 2011 Mar 02 and 2011 Apr 01. (1 data file).

  11. Morfología de la Coma del Cometa Hale - Bopp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil-Hutton, R.; Caballero, M.; Coldwell, G.; Cañada, M.; Godoy, G.; Trozzo, C.; Gómez, G.

    Para lograr comprender plenamente los procesos físicos que se desarrollan en los núcleos cometarios y obtener un modelo que explique, no sólo su actividad, sino también sus efectos sobre la coma, es necesario obtener información detallada para el mayor número de cometas posible, siendo las características más interesantes para estudiar la ubicación de las regiones activas, la presencia de jets, las tasas de producción de gas y polvo y la interacción de la coma con el viento solar. En la actualidad, con técnicas de procesamiento de imágenes y tecnología CCD se pueden obtener este tipo de datos para cometas que ingresan al sistema solar interior y estudiar, de esta manera, la morfología de sus comas, tratando de correlacionar la actividad detectada con algún modelo teórico. En este trabajo se presenta un estudio parcial de la actividad desarrollada por el cometa Hale-Bopp, y sus efectos sobre la morfología de su coma, desde agosto de 1995 hasta la fecha en base a imágenes adquiridas con el telescopio de 0.76 m. de la Estación Astronómica Dr. Carlos Ulrrico Cesco.

  12. The Velocity Dispersion Function of Very Massive Galaxy Clusters: Abell 2029 and Coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohn, Jubee; Geller, Margaret J.; Zahid, H. Jabran; Fabricant, Daniel G.; Diaferio, Antonaldo; Rines, Kenneth J.

    2017-04-01

    Based on an extensive redshift survey for galaxy clusters Abell 2029 and Coma, we measure the luminosity functions (LFs) and stellar mass functions (SMFs) for the entire cluster member galaxies. Most importantly, we measure the velocity dispersion functions (VDFs) for quiescent members. The MMT/Hectospec redshift survey for galaxies in A2029 identifies 982 spectroscopic members; for 838 members, we derive the central velocity dispersion from the spectroscopy. Coma is the only other cluster surveyed as densely. The LFs, SMFs, and VDFs for A2029 and Coma are essentially identical. The SMFs of the clusters are consistent with simulations. The A2029 and Coma VDFs for quiescent galaxies have a significantly steeper slope than those of field galaxies for velocity dispersion ≲ 100 {km} {{{s}}}-1. The cluster VDFs also exceed the field at velocity dispersion ≳ 250 {km} {{{s}}}-1. The differences between cluster and field VDFs are potentially important tests of simulations and of the formation of structure in the universe.

  13. Prospective Cohort Study Evaluating the Prognostic Value of Simple EEG Parameters in Postanoxic Coma.

    PubMed

    Azabou, Eric; Fischer, Catherine; Mauguiere, François; Vaugier, Isabelle; Annane, Djillali; Sharshar, Tarek; Lofaso, Fréderic

    2016-01-01

    We prospectively studied early bedside standard EEG characteristics in 61 acute postanoxic coma patients. Five simple EEG features, namely, isoelectric, discontinuous, nonreactive to intense auditory and nociceptive stimuli, dominant delta frequency, and occurrence of paroxysms were classified yes or no. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of each of these variables for predicting an unfavorable outcome, defined as death, persistent vegetative state, minimally conscious state, or severe neurological disability, as assessed 1 year after coma onset were computed as well as Synek's score. The outcome was unfavorable in 56 (91.8%) patients. Sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and AUC of nonreactive EEG for predicting an unfavorable outcome were 84%, 80%, 98%, 31%, and 0.82, respectively; and were all very close to the ones of Synek score>3, which were 82%, 80%, 98%, 29%, and 0.81, respectively. Specificities for predicting an unfavorable outcome were 100% for isoelectric, discontinuous, or dominant delta activity EEG. These 3 last features were constantly associated to unfavorable outcome. Absent EEG reactivity strongly predicted an unfavorable outcome in postanoxic coma, and performed as accurate as a Synek score>3. Analyzing characteristics of some simple EEG features may easily help nonneurophysiologist physicians to investigate prognostic issue of postanoxic coma patient. In this study (a) discontinuous, isoelectric, or delta-dominant EEG were constantly associated with unfavorable outcome and (b) nonreactive EEG performed prognostic as accurate as a Synek score>3.

  14. Development of a Maximum Admissions Index for Freshman Admissions to the University of Washington.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunneborg, Clifford E.

    A new technique has been developed for admitting new freshman students at the University of Washington. Previously, an Admissions Index (AI) was used, in which the high school grade point average (HSGPA) was assigned twice the weight of the composite verbal and quantitative scores from the Washington Pre-College Test Battery (WPC). To offset the…

  15. An Evaluation of the Pharmacy College Admissions Test as a Tool for Pharmacy College Admissions Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Katherine A.; Secnik, Kristina; Boye, Mark E.

    2001-01-01

    Investigated the capacity of the Pharmacy College Admissions Test (PCAT) to predict success in pharmacy school. Found demographic differences in PCAT scores, and that the PCAT used in combination with pre-pharmacy grade point average is meaningful in assessing applicants to pharmacy school; applicants with PCAT composite percentile scores below 40…

  16. Challenges in College Admissions. A Report of a Survey of Undergraduate Admissions Policies, Practices, and Procedures.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breland, Hunter M.; And Others

    The report summarizes undergraduate admissions policies, practices, and procedures at two- and four-year colleges and universities as of 1992. Information was drawn from a national survey, the third of a series conducted since 1979. A total of 2,024 institutions responded to the survey. An introductory chapter describes the surveys, their…

  17. Students Selection for University Course Admission at the Joint Admissions Board (Kenya) Using Trained Neural Networks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wabwoba, Franklin; Mwakondo, Fullgence M.

    2011-01-01

    Every year, the Joint Admission Board (JAB) is tasked to determine those students who are expected to join various Kenyan public universities under the government sponsorship scheme. This exercise is usually extensive because of the large number of qualified students compared to the very limited number of slots at various institutions and the…

  18. Psychological implications of admission to critical care.

    PubMed

    Pattison, Natalie

    Admission to critical care can have far-reaching psychological effects because of the distinct environment. Critical care services are being re-shaped to address long-term sequelae, including post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety and depression. The long-term consequences of critical illness not only cost the individual, but also have implications for society, such as diminished areas of health-related quality-of-life in sleep, reduced ability to return to work and enjoy recreational activities (Audit Commission, 1999; Hayes et al, 2000). The debate around the phenomenon of intensive care unit (ICU) syndrome is discussed with reference to current thinking. After critical care, patients may experience amnesia, continued hallucinations or flashbacks, anxiety, depression, and dreams and nightmares. Nursing care for patients while in the critical care environment can have a positive effect on psychological well-being. Facilitating communication, explaining care and rationalizing interventions, ensuring patients are oriented as to time and place, reassuring patients about transfer, providing patients,where possible, with information about critical care before admission and considering anxiolytic use, are all practices that have a beneficial effect on patient care. Follow-up services can help patients come to terms with their experiences of critical illness and provide the opportunity for them to access further intervention if desired. Working towards providing optimal psychological care will have a positive effect on patients' psychological recovery and may also help physical recuperation after critical care.

  19. These are two images of the inner coma of Comet Hyakutake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These are two images of the inner coma of Comet Hyakutake made on April 3 and 4, 1996, using the NASA Hubble Space Telescope Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2). The first one, shown in red, was taken through a narrow-band red filter that shows only sunlight scattered by dust particles in the inner coma of the comet. The second one, shown in blue was taken with an ultraviolet 'Woods' filter image that shows the distribution of scattered ultraviolet radiation from hydrogen atoms in the inner coma. The coma is the head or dusty-gas atmosphere of a comet. The square field of view is 14,000 km on a side and the sun is toward the upper right corner of the image. Hydrogen atoms represent the most abundant gas in the whole coma of the comet. They are produced when solar ultraviolet light breaks up molecules of water, the major constitutent of the nucleus of the comet. These images were taken as part of an observing program to study water photochemistry in comets. Measurements of hydrogen (H) and hydroxyl (OH) in the coma (or atmosphere) of Comet Hyakutake were also made using the Goddard High Resolution Spectrograph (GHRS) and the Faint Object Spectrograph (FOS). A self-consistent analysis of all the data shows that the water production rate of the comet was between 7 and 8 tons per second on the April 3 and 4. A theoretical model was used in the analysis which accounts for the detailed physics and chemistry of the photochemical destruction of the water, the production of the H and OH, and their expansion in the coma (or atmosphere) of the comet. The model matched the velocity measurements of hydrogen atoms made using the high spectral resolution capabilities of the GHRS instrument. The importance of such a detailed model is that is permits the accurate calculation of the production rate of water from observations of H and OH. The inner yellow region near the center of the red dust image is dominated by the contribution from the dust which shows sunward directed spiral

  20. Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko during the Rosetta mission: numerical simulation of dusty gas coma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenishev, Valeriy; Combi, Michael; Rubin, Martin; Hansen, Kenneth; Gombosi, Tamas

    The Rosetta spacecraft is en route to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for a rendezvous, landing, and extensive orbital phase beginning in 2014. Having a limited amount of information regarding its coma, interpretation of measurements and safety consideration of the spacecraft will require modeling of the comet's environment. Such models should be able to simulate both the gas and dust phases of the coma as well as the interaction between them in a self-consistent manner. The relevant physical processes in the coma include photolytic reactions and interaction with the nucleus for the gas phase and drag by the gas, gravity of the nucleus, solar gravity and radiation pressure, and charging by the ambient plasma for the dust phase. Developing of such modeling capabilities will be able to link measurements obtained by different instruments onboard of spacecraft. Some examples of cometary comae simulations can be found in [1-3]. In this work we present our kinetic model of a dusty gas coma [4] with results of its application to the case of comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko at conditions corresponding to some stages the during the Rosetta mission. Based on the surface properties and local production rates obtained by MIRO, RSI and VIRTIS the model will be able to propagate the injected gas and dust into the coma linking the measurements to those obtained by ALICE, MIDAS and ROSINA for the gas phase and COSIMA and GIADA for the dust phase of the coma. A simultaneous simulation of the major components of the multi-phase coma will allow us to link observations of the gas and dust phases. In this work we present results of a numerical study of neutral/ionized multispecies gaseous and electrically charged dust environment of the comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko at a helio-centric distance of 1.3 AU. The simulation is performed in fully 3D geometry with a realistic nucleus model that describes its topological features and source distribution. Both, neutral and ionized components of the

  1. Loneliness and nursing home admission among rural older adults.

    PubMed

    Russell, D W; Cutrona, C E; de la Mora, A; Wallace, R B

    1997-12-01

    In this study, the authors tested the relation between loneliness and subsequent admission to a nursing home over a 4-year time period in a sample of approximately 3,000 rural older Iowans. Higher levels of loneliness were found to increase the likelihood of nursing home admission and to decrease the time until nursing home admission. The influence of extremely high loneliness on nursing home admission remained statistically significant after controlling for other variables, such as age, education, income, mental status, physical health, morale, and social contact, that were also predictive of nursing home admission. Several mechanisms are proposed to explain the link between extreme loneliness and nursing home admission. These include loneliness as a precipitant of declines in mental and physical health and nursing home placement as a strategy to gain social contact with others. Implications for preventative interventions are discussed.

  2. Multi-frequency analysis of neutralino dark matter annihilations in the Coma cluster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colafrancesco, S.; Profumo, S.; Ullio, P.

    2006-08-01

    We study the astrophysical implications of neutralino dark matter annihilations in galaxy clusters, with a specific application to the Coma cluster. We first address the determination of the dark halo models for Coma, starting from structure formation models and observational data, and we discuss in detail the role of sub-halos. We then perform a thorough analysis of the transport and diffusion properties of neutralino annihilation products, and investigate the resulting multi-frequency signals, from radio to gamma-ray frequencies. We also study other relevant astrophysical effects of neutralino annihilations, like the DM-induced Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect and the intracluster gas heating. As for the particle physics setup, we adopt a two-fold approach, resorting both to model-independent bottom-up scenarios and to benchmark, GUT-motivated frameworks. We show that the Coma radio-halo data (the spectrum and the surface brightness) can be nicely fitted by the neutralino-induced signal for peculiar particle physics models and for magnetic field values, which we outline in detail. Fitting the radio data and moving to higher frequencies, we find that the multi-frequency spectral energy distributions are typically dim at EUV and X-ray frequencies (with respect to the data), but show a non-negligible gamma-ray emission, depending on the amplitude of the Coma magnetic field. A simultaneous fit to the radio, EUV and HXR data is not possible without violating the gamma-ray EGRET upper limit. The best-fit particle physics models yields substantial heating of the intracluster gas, but not sufficient energy injection as to explain the quenching of cooling flows in the innermost region of clusters. Due to the specific multi-frequency features of the DM-induced spectral energy distribution in Coma, we find that supersymmetric models can be significantly and optimally constrained either in the gamma-rays or at radio and microwave frequencies.

  3. NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF DUST IN A COMETARY COMA: APPLICATION TO COMET 67P/CHURYUMOV-GERASIMENKO

    SciTech Connect

    Tenishev, Valeriy; Combi, Michael R.; Rubin, Martin

    2011-05-10

    The Rosetta spacecraft is en route to comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko for a rendezvous, landing, and extensive orbital phase beginning in 2014. With a limited amount of available observational data, planning of the mission as well as the interpretation of measurements obtained by instruments on board the spacecraft requires modeling of the dusty/gas environment of the comet. During the mission, the collision regime in the inner coma will change starting from transitional to fully collisionless. As a result, a physically correct model has to be valid at conditions that are far from equilibrium and account for the kinetic nature of the processes occurring in the coma. A study of the multi-species coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko is presented in our previous paper, where we describe our kinetic model and discuss the results of its application to cases that correspond to the different stages during the mission. In this work, we focus on numerical modeling of the dust phase in the coma of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko and its interaction with the surrounding gas. The basic phenomena that govern the dynamics and energy balance of the dust grains are outlined. The effect of solar radiation pressure and the nucleus gravity in limiting the maximum liftable mass of the grains is discussed. The distribution of the terminal velocity of the dust grains as a function of subsolar angle is derived in the paper. We have found that in the regions with high gradients of the gas density, spike-like features can form in the dust flow. The obtained results represent the state of the coma in the vicinity of the nucleus for a series of stages throughout the Rosetta mission. The implications of the model results for future measurements by the GIADA instrument are discussed.

  4. Underrepresented Minorities in Medical School Admissions: A Qualitative Study.

    PubMed

    Hadinger, Margaret A

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: This study explored Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino medical students' perceptions of the medical school admissions process. Previous research has explored other elements of the medical education continuum. However, little is known regarding minorities' perceptions of navigating the medical school admissions process. To address this gap in the literature, this exploratory study suggests a conceptual model describing why minorities apply to medical school and the influences affecting their admissions experience.

  5. Determination of the bioaccessibility of chromium in Glasgow soil and the implications for human health risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Broadway, Andrew; Cave, Mark R; Wragg, Joanna; Fordyce, Fiona M; Bewley, Richard J F; Graham, Margaret C; Ngwenya, Bryne T; Farmer, John G

    2010-12-15

    The Unified Bioaccessibility Method (UBM), which simulates the fluids of the human gastrointestinal tract, was used to assess the oral bioaccessibility of Cr in 27 Glasgow soils. These included several contaminated with Cr(VI), the most toxic form of Cr, from the past disposal of chromite ore processing residue (COPR). The extraction was employed in conjunction with the subsequent determination of the bioaccessible Cr by ICP-OES and Cr(VI) by the diphenylcarbazide complexation colorimetric procedure. In addition, Cr(III)-containing species were determined by (i) HPLC-ICP-MS and (ii) ICP-OES analysis of gel electrophoretically separated components of colloidal and dissolved fractions from centrifugal ultrafiltration of extracts. Similar analytical procedures were applied to the determination of Cr and its species in extracts of the <10 μm fraction of soils subjected to a simulated lung fluid test to assess the inhalation bioaccessibility of Cr. The oral bioaccessibility of Cr was typically greater by a factor of 1.5 in the 'stomach' (pH ~1.2) compared with the 'stomach+intestine' (pH ~6.3) simulation. On average, excluding two COPR-contaminated soil samples, the oral bioaccessibility ('stomach') was 5% of total soil Cr and, overall, similar to the soil Cr(VI) concentration. Chromium(VI) was not detected in the extracts, a consequence of pH- and soil organic matter-mediated reduction in the 'stomach' to Cr(III)-containing species, identified as predominantly Cr(III)-humic complexes. Insertion of oral bioaccessible fraction data into the SNIFFER human health risk assessment model identified site-specific assessment criteria (for residential land without plant uptake) that were exceeded by the soil total Cr (3680 mg kg(-1)) and Cr(VI) (1485 mg kg(-1)) concentration at only the most COPR-Cr(VI)-contaminated location. However, the presence of measurable Cr(VI) in the <10 μm fraction of the two most highly Cr(VI)-contaminated soils demonstrated that inhalation of Cr

  6. Accuracy of caregivers’ recall of hospital admissions: implications for research

    PubMed Central

    Burakevych, Nataliia; McKinlay, Christopher Joel Dorman; Alsweiler, Jane Marie; Harding, Jane Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Aim To determine the accuracy of caregivers’ recall of hospital admissions in early childhood. Methods Prospective cohort study of babies born at risk of neonatal hypoglycaemia at Waikato Hospital, New Zealand, a regional public hospital and sole provider of acute inpatient care to over 100,000 children. Caregivers’ recall of children’s hospital admissions up to 4.5 years were compared with medical records. Accuracy of recall was related to neonatal and socio-demographic characteristics. Results Out of 267 children, 179 (67%) visited hospital and 106 (40%) were admitted at least once. The most frequent reasons for admission were for respiratory (29%) and gastrointestinal (18%) problems. Of 106 children admitted to hospital, 27 (25%) caregivers did not recall the admission and only 37 (35%) accurately recalled the number of admissions. The accuracy of recall was lower for gastrointestinal (38%) and surgical (40%) problems, while recall of respiratory (64%) and ear, nose and throat (60%) admissions was more accurate. Low socio-economic status and multiple admissions were associated with less accurate recall of number of admissions. Conclusion Caregivers do not accurately report hospital admissions. Questionnaire data about use of hospital facilities should be interpreted cautiously, and may not be sufficiently accurate for use in research studies. PMID:26355393

  7. An initial assessment of spatial relationships between respiratory cases, soil metal content, air quality and deprivation indicators in Glasgow, Scotland, UK: relevance to the environmental justice agenda.

    PubMed

    Morrison, S; Fordyce, F M; Scott, E Marian

    2014-04-01

    There is growing interest in links between poor health and socio-environmental inequalities (e.g. inferior housing, crime and industrial emissions) under the environmental justice agenda. The current project assessed associations between soil metal content, air pollution (NO2/PM10) and deprivation and health (respiratory case incidence) across Glasgow. This is the first time that both chemical land quality and air pollution have been assessed citywide in the context of deprivation and health for a major UK conurbation. Based on the dataset 'averages' for intermediate geography areas, generalised linear modelling of respiratory cases showed significant associations with overall soil metal concentration (p = 0.0367) and with deprivation (p < 0.0448). Of the individual soil metals, only nickel showed a significant relationship with respiratory cases (p = 0.0056). Whilst these associations could simply represent concordant lower soil metal concentrations and fewer respiratory cases in the rural versus the urban environment, they are interesting given (1) possible contributions from soil to air particulate loading and (2) known associations between airborne metals like nickel and health. This study also demonstrated a statistically significant correlation (-0.213; p < 0.05) between soil metal concentration and deprivation across Glasgow. This highlights the fact that despite numerous regeneration programmes, the legacy of environmental pollution remains in post-industrial areas of Glasgow many decades after heavy industry has declined. Further epidemiological investigations would be required to determine whether there are any causal links between soil quality and population health/well-being. However, the results of this study suggest that poor soil quality warrants greater consideration in future health and socio-environmental inequality assessments.

  8. The inappropriateness of psycho-social models of risk behaviour for understanding HIV-related risk practices among Glasgow male prostitutes.

    PubMed

    Bloor, M J; McKeganey, N P; Finlay, A; Barnard, M A

    1992-01-01

    Much the most common models of HIV-related risk behaviour are those psychosocial models derived from studies of health behaviour and tested on large interview samples of American gay men. These models were not appropriate for understanding risk behaviour among 32 Glasgow male prostitutes. Whereas psycho-social models conceive of risk behaviour as volitional and individualistic, ethnographic data indicate that the male prostitutes' risk practices were constrained and emergent from the immediate circumstances of the sexual encounter. Unsafe sex was associated with client control. Safer sex was associated with countervailing prostitute strategies of influence. These data confirm the utility of self-empowerment approaches to health education.

  9. Preliminary development of a GIS-tool to assess threats to shallow groundwater quality from soil pollutants in Glasgow, UK (GRASP).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dochartaigh, B. É. Ó.; Fordyce, F. M.; Ander, E. L.; Bonsor, H. C.

    2009-04-01

    The protection of groundwater and related surface water quality is a key aspect of the European Union Water Framework Directive and environmental legislation in many countries worldwide. Globally, the protection of urban groundwater resources and related ecosystem services is of growing concern as urbanisation increases. Although urban areas are often where groundwater resources are most in need of protection, there is frequently a lack of information about threats to groundwater quality. Most studies of soil and groundwater contamination, although detailed, are site-specific, and city-wide overviews are generally lacking. The British Geological Survey (BGS) is currently undertaking the Clyde Urban Super-Project (CUSP), delivering multi-disciplinary geoscience products for the Glasgow conurbation. Under this project, a GIS-based prioritisation tool known as GRASP (GRoundwater And Soil Pollutants) has been trialled to aid urban planning and sustainable development by providing a broad-scale assessment of threats to groundwater quality across the conurbation. GRASP identifies areas where shallow groundwater quality is at greatest threat from the leaching and downward movement of potentially harmful metals in the soil. Metal contamination is a known problem in many urban centres including Glasgow, which has a long industrial heritage and associated contamination legacy, notably with respect to Cr. GRASP is based primarily upon an existing British Standard - International Standards Organisation methodology to determine the leaching potential of metals from soils, which has been validated for 11 metals: Al, Fe, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Mn, Pb and Zn (BS-ISO 15175:2004). However, the GRASP tool is innovative as it combines assessments of soil leaching potential with soil metal content data to highlight threats to shallow groundwater quality. The input parameters required for GRASP (soil pH, clay, organic matter, sesquioxide and metal content) are based upon a systematic

  10. Lithostratigraphy does not always equal lithology: lessons learned in communicating uncertainty from stochastic modelling glacial and post glacial deposits in Glasgow U.K.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearsey, Tim; Williams, John; Finlayson, Andrew; Williamson, Paul; Dobbs, Marcus; Kingdon, Andrew; Campbell, Diarmad

    2014-05-01

    Geological maps and 3D models usually depict lithostragraphic units which can comprise of many different types of sediment (lithologies). The lithostratigraphic units shown on maps and 3D models of glacial and post glacial deposits in Glasgow are substantially defined by the method of the formation and age of the unit rather than its lithological composition. Therefore, a simple assumption that the dominant lithology is the most common constituent of any stratigraphic unit is erroneous and is only 58% predictive of the actual sediment types seen in a borehole. This is problematic for non-geologist such as planners, regulators and engineers attempting to use these models to inform their decisions and can lead to such users viewing maps and models as of limited use in such decision making. We explore the extent to which stochastic modelling can help to make geological models more predictive of lithology in heterolithic units. Stochastic modelling techniques are commonly used to model facies variations in oil field models. The techniques have been applied to an area containing >4000 coded boreholes to investigate the glacial and fluvial deposits in the centre of the city of Glasgow. We test the predictions from this method by deleting percentages of the control data and re-running the simulations to determine how predictability varies with data density. We also explore the best way of displaying such stochastic models to and suggest that displaying the data as probability maps rather than a single definitive answer better illustrates the uncertainties inherent in the input data. Finally we address whether is it possible truly to be able to predict lithology in such geological facies. The innovative Accessing Subsurface Knowledge (ASK) network was recently established in the Glasgow are by the British Geological Survey and Glasgow City Council to deliver and exchange subsurface data and knowledge. This provides an idea opportunity to communicate and test a range of

  11. Hospital admissions among male drivers in Denmark

    PubMed Central

    Hannerz, H; Tuchsen, F

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To facilitate decisions about interventions and to establish baseline values for future evaluation of preventive efforts, the aim of the present study was to elucidate the disease pattern among male professional drivers in Denmark. The study differentiated between drivers of goods vehicles and drivers of passenger transport.
METHODS—Cohorts of all 20-59 year old Danish male professional drivers in the years 1981, 1986, 1991, and 1994 were formed, to calculate age standardised hospital admission ratios (SHRs) and time trends (1981-97) for many diagnostic aggregations.
RESULTS—SHRs for diseases in practically all systems and organs of the body were higher among professional drivers than they were in the male working population at large. Also drivers of passenger transport, compared with drivers of goods vehicles, had significantly high SHRs due to infectious and parasitic diseases, diseases of the circulatory system, and diseases of the respiratory system, and significantly lower rates of injury. For both driver groups, the SHRs for acute myocardial infarction increased with time whereas the SHR for acute gastritis decreased, and for drivers of passenger transport an increasing SHR for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, was found over time.
CONCLUSION—Drivers of passenger transport and drivers of goods vehicles differ in their disease patterns. The results support the hypothesis that preventive efforts are needed in both groups, but underline that different strategies are required for different categories of drivers.


Keywords: professional drivers; hospital admissions; surveillance system PMID:11245742

  12. Chill coma temperatures appear similar along a latitudinal gradient, in contrast to divergent chill coma recovery times, in two widespread ant species.

    PubMed

    Maysov, Andrey

    2014-08-01

    Populations of widely distributed ectotherms demonstrate different cold resistance corresponding to the local climate. However, efficiently thermoregulating ectotherms could avoid divergence in cold resistance. Two species of ants, previously shown to even out latitudinal differences of mean summer temperatures in their nests, were used to test this hypothesis by comparing the temperature dependence of cold resistance in three distant populations (from 50°, 60° and 67°N). The species differ in habitat preferences, one (Myrmica rubra) being less stenotopic than the other (M. ruginodis). Therefore, three different predictions were made about their cold resistance: along the latitudinal gradient, it might be similar within the two species (because of thermoregulation within nests/habitats) or similar only in M. rubra (as a result of thermoregulation among habitats), or divergent at least in M. rubra (no effect of thermoregulation). Among populations of both species, neither differences nor latitudinal trends in chill coma temperature were statistically significant after 11 months of standard conditions, with or without cold hardening. In contrast, recovery time significantly differed among populations in both species, although its latitudinal trends were strongly curvilinear: in M. rubra, the intermediate population tended towards the slowest recovery, and in M. ruginodis, it tended towards the fastest. After 22 months, the patterns remained the same, except that M. ruginodis showed a significant linear latitudinal trend in chill coma temperature (with no significant populational differences). Hence, thermoregulation, both within and among habitats, apparently does keep chill coma temperatures similar. Recovery rate demonstrates divergence, but its curvilinear trends suggest a connection with climates experienced by ancestral populations.

  13. The HST/ACS Coma Cluster Survey. II. Data Description and Source Catalogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammer, Derek; Verdoes Kleijn, Gijs; Hoyos, Carlos; den Brok, Mark; Balcells, Marc; Ferguson, Henry C.; Goudfrooij, Paul; Carter, David; Guzmán, Rafael; Peletier, Reynier F.; Smith, Russell J.; Graham, Alister W.; Trentham, Neil; Peng, Eric; Puzia, Thomas H.; Lucey, John R.; Jogee, Shardha; Aguerri, Alfonso L.; Batcheldor, Dan; Bridges, Terry J.; Chiboucas, Kristin; Davies, Jonathan I.; del Burgo, Carlos; Erwin, Peter; Hornschemeier, Ann; Hudson, Michael J.; Huxor, Avon; Jenkins, Leigh; Karick, Arna; Khosroshahi, Habib; Kourkchi, Ehsan; Komiyama, Yutaka; Lotz, Jennifer; Marzke, Ronald O.; Marinova, Irina; Matkovic, Ana; Merritt, David; Miller, Bryan W.; Miller, Neal A.; Mobasher, Bahram; Mouhcine, Mustapha; Okamura, Sadanori; Percival, Sue; Phillipps, Steven; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Price, James; Sharples, Ray M.; Tully, R. Brent; Valentijn, Edwin

    2010-11-01

    The Coma cluster, Abell 1656, was the target of an HST-ACS Treasury program designed for deep imaging in the F475W and F814W passbands. Although our survey was interrupted by the ACS instrument failure in early 2007, the partially completed survey still covers ~50% of the core high-density region in Coma. Observations were performed for 25 fields that extend over a wide range of cluster-centric radii (~1.75 Mpc or 1°) with a total coverage area of 274 arcmin2. The majority of the fields are located near the core region of Coma (19/25 pointings) with six additional fields in the southwest region of the cluster. In this paper, we present reprocessed images and SEXTRACTOR source catalogs for our survey fields, including a detailed description of the methodology used for object detection and photometry, the subtraction of bright galaxies to measure faint underlying objects, and the use of simulations to assess the photometric accuracy and completeness of our catalogs. We also use simulations to perform aperture corrections for the SEXTRACTOR Kron magnitudes based only on the measured source flux and its half-light radius. We have performed photometry for ~73,000 unique objects; approximately one-half of our detections are brighter than the 10σ point-source detection limit at F814W = 25.8 mag (AB). The slight majority of objects (60%) are unresolved or only marginally resolved by ACS. We estimate that Coma members are 5%-10% of all source detections, which consist of a large population of unresolved compact sources (primarily globular clusters but also ultra-compact dwarf galaxies) and a wide variety of extended galaxies from a cD galaxy to dwarf low surface brightness galaxies. The red sequence of Coma member galaxies has a color-magnitude relation with a constant slope and dispersion over 9 mag (-21 < M F814W < -13). The initial data release for the HST-ACS Coma Treasury program was made available to the public in 2008 August. The images and catalogs described in

  14. Jet morphology and coma analysis of comet 103P/Hartley 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaughan, Charles M.

    In 2010, comet 103P/Hartley 2 was observed pre- and post-perihelion using the George and Cynthia Mitchell Integral Field Spectrometer on the 2.7-m telescope at McDonald Observatory in Texas. Data for gaseous radicals C2, C3, CH, CN, and NH2 were collected over six nights from 15 July to 10 November. The spectral data were used to create coma maps for each of the observed species, and the maps were processed using radial and azimuthal mean division techniques to create enhanced images of the coma, revealing subtle morphological features. 340 enhanced coma images were created for each observation and species. Visual inspection reveals that the coma is heterogeneous between the five detected radicals, and statistical analyses verify this result. To compliment the ongoing investigation of Hartley 2 as studied by the EPOXI flyby mission, findings from other researchers (Belton et al., 2012; Syal et al., 2012; and Thomas et al., 2012) are used to characterize the nucleus spin state and identify dust jet locations on the nucleus. With rotational period measurements from EPOXI, dust jet vectors on the nucleus surface are rotated to relevant observation times in November to compare the computed jet directions with the radical densities in the coma. Dust jet sites on the smaller nucleus lobe show a stronger correlation with high radical concentrations than the dust sites on the larger nucleus lobe. Production rates for potential parentage of radical species are calculated using the radial outflow Haser model (Haser, 1957), which are compared to mixing ratios relative to water from separate campaigns to constrain parentage. NH3 is likely the sole producer of NH2, whereas CN may be produced from a combination of HCN, C2N2, and CH3CN. Traditional parentage of C2, C3, and CH do not yield acceptable fits or suitable mixing ratios with the Haser model, and it is possible that extended coma ices having relatively short scale lengths greatly contribute to production of these

  15. 28 CFR 54.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 54.305 Preference in admission. A recipient to... or predominantly members of one sex, if the giving of such preference has the effect...

  16. 14 CFR 1253.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1253.305 Preference in admission. A... students only or predominantly members of one sex, if the giving of such preference has the effect...

  17. The Confidence Game in Honors Admissions and Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guzy, Annmarie

    2013-01-01

    Annmarie Guzy, an expert with almost three decades of experience in post-secondary honors education, responds to Jerry Herron's essay, "Notes toward an Excellent Marxist-Elitist Honors Admissions Policy," which argues that "a well-conceived admissions policy tells us much more than whom to recruit; it becomes the basis for a…

  18. Evaluating the Predictive Validity of Graduate Management Admission Test Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sireci, Stephen G.; Talento-Miller, Eileen

    2006-01-01

    Admissions data and first-year grade point average (GPA) data from 11 graduate management schools were analyzed to evaluate the predictive validity of Graduate Management Admission Test[R] (GMAT[R]) scores and the extent to which predictive validity held across sex and race/ethnicity. The results indicated GMAT verbal and quantitative scores had…

  19. 6 CFR 17.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 17.305 Preference in admission. A recipient... only or predominantly members of one sex, if the giving of such preference has the effect...

  20. 14 CFR 1253.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited § 1253.305 Preference in admission. A... students only or predominantly members of one sex, if the giving of such preference has the effect...

  1. University Exceptional Admission during the Republic of China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tao, Li

    2014-01-01

    The stories of many universities' exceptive admission during the republic period of China were widely circulated. The typical example of these universities' exceptional admission was the very product of special historical condition, which had its own characteristics, but also conforms to the general rule, so it can be cited. To select special…

  2. Failure as a Criterion for Medical School Admission.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, David S.; Aronson, Stanley M.

    1980-01-01

    Admissions committees, it is suggested, should regard a failure experience as an opportunity to examine characteristics of candidates which may otherwise be inapparent. Current admissions criteria do not adequately address the social responsibilities and humanitarian goals of medical education. (Author/MLW)

  3. 14 CFR 125.315 - Admission to flight deck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 125.315 Admission to flight deck. (a) No person may admit any person to the flight deck of an airplane unless the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Admission to flight deck. 125.315...

  4. 14 CFR 125.315 - Admission to flight deck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 125.315 Admission to flight deck. (a) No person may admit any person to the flight deck of an airplane unless the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Admission to flight deck. 125.315...

  5. 14 CFR 125.315 - Admission to flight deck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 125.315 Admission to flight deck. (a) No person may admit any person to the flight deck of an airplane unless the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Admission to flight deck. 125.315...

  6. 14 CFR 125.315 - Admission to flight deck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 125.315 Admission to flight deck. (a) No person may admit any person to the flight deck of an airplane unless the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Admission to flight deck. 125.315...

  7. 14 CFR 125.315 - Admission to flight deck.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...,000 POUNDS OR MORE; AND RULES GOVERNING PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT Flight Operations § 125.315 Admission to flight deck. (a) No person may admit any person to the flight deck of an airplane unless the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Admission to flight deck. 125.315...

  8. 28 CFR 541.47 - Admission to control unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Admission to control unit. 541.47 Section... INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Control Unit Programs § 541.47 Admission to control unit. Staff shall provide an inmate admitted to a control unit with: (a) Notice of the projected duration...

  9. WICS: A Model for College and University Admissions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sternberg, Robert J.; Bonney, Christina R.; Gabora, Liane; Merrifield, Maegan

    2012-01-01

    This article outlines shortcomings of currently used university admissions tests and discusses ways in which they could potentially be improved, summarizing two projects designed to enhance college and university admissions. The projects were inspired by the augmented theory of successful intelligence, according to which successful intelligence…

  10. The Admission and Induction of Refugee Children into School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spafford, Tim; Bolloten, Bill

    1995-01-01

    Examines induction and admission practice for refugee school children into Britain's public schools, highlights the educational issues and concerns of newly-arrived refugee families, and discusses what schools can do to make their entry into the school system less problematic. The author explains how good admission and induction practices can…

  11. Environmental Scan of BC Post-Secondary Admissions: 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heath, Nick

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, British Columbia Council on Admissions and Transfer (BCCAT) commissioned an environmental scan on the possible need for system-wide work on institutional admissions processes and practices. This scan is intended to seek system input and to provide guidance on the choice of research projects and other related work in the coming year. This…

  12. Evaluating Admission Criteria Effects for Under-Represented Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childs, Ruth A.; Ferguson, Amanda K.; Herbert, Monique B.; Broad, Kathryn; Zhang, Jingshun

    2016-01-01

    The effects that admission criteria may have for under-represented groups are an important concern for programs seeking to improve access to post-secondary education. Using data from a large preservice teacher education program in the Canadian province of Ontario, we demonstrate two approaches to evaluating the effects of admission criteria. The…

  13. Strategic Enrollment Management's Ambassadors: The Changing Role of Admissions Counselors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mathis, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    Road runner. File jockey. Advisor. Public speaker. Recruiter. At any given time, an admissions counselor fits one, some, or all of these descriptors. While all of these descriptors indicate an important function within a college or university, none reflects the increasingly complex nature of the role of an admissions counselor in strategic…

  14. Disciplinary Logics in Doctoral Admissions: Understanding Patterns of Faculty Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Posselt, Julie R.

    2015-01-01

    Ph.D. attainment rates by race and gender vary widely across the disciplines, and previous research has found disciplinary variation in graduate admissions criteria and practices. To better understand how disciplines shape admissions preferences and practices, which in turn may shape student access to graduate education, this article uncovers…

  15. 7 CFR 15a.22 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Preference in admission. 15a.22 Section 15a.22 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and...

  16. 7 CFR 15a.22 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Preference in admission. 15a.22 Section 15a.22 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING OR BENEFITTING FROM FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and...

  17. 28 CFR 541.47 - Admission to control unit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admission to control unit. 541.47 Section 541.47 Judicial Administration BUREAU OF PRISONS, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE INSTITUTIONAL MANAGEMENT INMATE DISCIPLINE AND SPECIAL HOUSING UNITS Control Unit Programs § 541.47 Admission to control...

  18. 42 CFR 93.519 - Admissibility of evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest ORI Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions Hearing Process § 93.519 Admissibility of evidence. (a) The ALJ decides the admissibility of... of Witness). (i) Evidence about offers of compromise or settlement made in this action...

  19. 42 CFR 93.519 - Admissibility of evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RESEARCH MISCONDUCT Opportunity To Contest ORI Findings of Research Misconduct and HHS Administrative Actions Hearing Process § 93.519 Admissibility of evidence. (a) The ALJ decides the admissibility of... of Witness). (i) Evidence about offers of compromise or settlement made in this action...

  20. Assessing Academic Potential for University Admission: The Biographical Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enslin, P. A.; Button, A.; Chakane, M.; de Groot, M.; Dison, L.

    2006-01-01

    A Biographical Questionnaire (BQ) has been used in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of the Witwatersrand since the mid-80s, to identify potential to succeed at university among applicants who have not met the requirements for automatic admission. As the key instrument in a special admissions process, the BQ's history and assumptions are…

  1. 20 CFR 410.696 - Evidence admissible on review.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence admissible on review. 410.696 Section 410.696 Employees' Benefits SOCIAL SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FEDERAL COAL MINE HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT..., Administrative Review, Finality of Decisions, and Representation of Parties § 410.696 Evidence admissible...

  2. 42 CFR 418.25 - Admission to hospice care.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admission to hospice care. 418.25 Section 418.25... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM HOSPICE CARE Eligibility, Election and Duration of Benefits § 418.25 Admission to hospice care. (a) The hospice admits a patient only on the recommendation of the medical...

  3. Virginia Western Community College's Health Technology Admissions Evaluation System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Houston, Charles A.; Sellers, Harry

    Due to factors such as high enrollment demands, limited institutional space, and high program costs, certain admissions requirements in the guidance/selection of students for health technology programs at Virginia Western Community College (VWCC) have become necessary. A Health Technology Admissions Evaluation System was created to develop and…

  4. Communications Is from Mars, Admissions Is from Venus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scully, Maura King

    2010-01-01

    Marketing communications and admissions often have very different needs, priorities, and ways of conducting business, but the two units work toward the same end goal. Brad Ward of BlueFuego, a marketing company that specializes in social Web tools for educational institutions, explains that admissions doesn't necessarily need to [talk] to…

  5. Using Social Media "Smartly" in the Admissions Process

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrot, Teresa Valerio; Tipton, Stacia

    2010-01-01

    Admissions officers around the country are hearing consistent calls to enhance their social media presence. Whether the pressure is from administrators, influential alumni, or peers across institutions, social media are touted as the next big thing in admissions marketing. But are social media strategies truly "strategic," or are they merely…

  6. 45 CFR 3.41 - Admission to facilities or grounds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Admission to facilities or grounds. 3.41 Section 3... AND TRAFFIC ON THE NATIONAL INSTITUTES OF HEALTH FEDERAL ENCLAVE Facilities and Grounds § 3.41 Admission to facilities or grounds. The enclave is officially open to the public during normal working...

  7. Pawns or Professionals: The 21st Century Admission Counselor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Jean M.

    2005-01-01

    The National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC), originally established to serve as an advocate of ethical practices in the recruitment of students and awarding of scholarship dollars, now recognizes the ethical dilemmas admission counselors face in the current competitive marketplace. This article presents the details of a…

  8. A Revised Admissions Standard for One Community College Nursing Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lown, Maris A.

    2010-01-01

    Predicting success on the NCLEX-RN is of paramount importance to nursing programs as they are held accountable for this outcome by accrediting agencies and by boards of nursing. This action research study examined the relationship between the NET admission test, anatomy and physiology grades, grade point average (GPA) on admission to the program…

  9. Grading Standards, Student Ability and Errors in College Admission

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moen, Jarle; Tjelta, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Grades are important for admission of students in most higher education programs. Analyzing admission and student performance data at a major Norwegian business school, we find that the grading practice of teachers at regional colleges sending students to the school is affected by the average performance of the students being graded. Teachers at…

  10. 24 CFR 1720.425 - Presentation and admission of evidence.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Presentation and admission of evidence. 1720.425 Section 1720.425 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban... PRACTICE Adjudicatory Proceedings Discovery and Evidence § 1720.425 Presentation and admission of...

  11. 34 CFR 106.22 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Preference in admission. 106.22 Section 106.22... EDUCATION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and Recruitment Prohibited §...

  12. 10 CFR 5.305 - Preference in admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preference in admission. 5.305 Section 5.305 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION NONDISCRIMINATION ON THE BASIS OF SEX IN EDUCATION PROGRAMS OR ACTIVITIES RECEIVING FEDERAL FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE Discrimination on the Basis of Sex in Admission and...

  13. 8 CFR 1235.4 - Withdrawal of application for admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... 1235.4 Section 1235.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS INSPECTION OF PERSONS APPLYING FOR ADMISSION § 1235.4 Withdrawal of... construed as to give an alien the right to withdraw his or her application for admission. Permission...

  14. 8 CFR 1235.4 - Withdrawal of application for admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    .... 1235.4 Section 1235.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS INSPECTION OF PERSONS APPLYING FOR ADMISSION § 1235.4 Withdrawal of... construed as to give an alien the right to withdraw his or her application for admission. Permission...

  15. 8 CFR 235.4 - Withdrawal of application for admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 8 Aliens and Nationality 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Withdrawal of application for admission. 235.4 Section 235.4 Aliens and Nationality DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS... right to withdraw his or her application for admission. Permission to withdraw an application...

  16. 8 CFR 1235.4 - Withdrawal of application for admission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... 1235.4 Section 1235.4 Aliens and Nationality EXECUTIVE OFFICE FOR IMMIGRATION REVIEW, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE IMMIGRATION REGULATIONS INSPECTION OF PERSONS APPLYING FOR ADMISSION § 1235.4 Withdrawal of... construed as to give an alien the right to withdraw his or her application for admission. Permission...

  17. 33 CFR 5.15 - Admission to membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Admission to membership. 5.15... GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.15 Admission to membership. An applicant who is accepted for membership shall be enrolled in the Auxiliary and shall be issued a membership certificate and identification card....

  18. 33 CFR 5.15 - Admission to membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Admission to membership. 5.15... GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.15 Admission to membership. An applicant who is accepted for membership shall be enrolled in the Auxiliary and shall be issued a membership certificate and identification card....

  19. 33 CFR 5.15 - Admission to membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Admission to membership. 5.15... GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.15 Admission to membership. An applicant who is accepted for membership shall be enrolled in the Auxiliary and shall be issued a membership certificate and identification card....

  20. 33 CFR 5.15 - Admission to membership.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Admission to membership. 5.15... GUARD AUXILIARY § 5.15 Admission to membership. An applicant who is accepted for membership shall be enrolled in the Auxiliary and shall be issued a membership certificate and identification card....