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Sample records for admit variable zoning

  1. Incompatible quantum measurements admitting a local-hidden-variable model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quintino, Marco Túlio; Bowles, Joseph; Hirsch, Flavien; Brunner, Nicolas

    2016-05-01

    The observation of quantum nonlocality, i.e., quantum correlations violating a Bell inequality, implies the use of incompatible local quantum measurements. Here we consider the converse question. That is, can any set of incompatible measurements be used in order to demonstrate Bell inequality violation? Our main result is to construct a local hidden variable model for an incompatible set of qubit measurements. Specifically, we show that if Alice uses this set of measurements, then for any possible shared entangled state and any possible dichotomic measurements performed by Bob, the resulting statistics are local. This represents significant progress towards proving that measurement incompatibility does not imply Bell nonlocality in general.

  2. Zone edge effects with variable rate irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable rate irrigation (VRI) systems may offer solutions to enhance water use efficiency by addressing variability within a field. However, the design of VRI systems should be considered to maximize application uniformity within sprinkler zones, while minimizing edge effects between such zones alo...

  3. The spacetime models with dust matter that admit separation of variables in Hamilton-Jacobi equations of a test particle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osetrin, Konstantin; Filippov, Altair; Osetrin, Evgeny

    2016-01-01

    The characteristics of dust matter in spacetime models, admitting the existence of privilege coordinate systems are given, where the single-particle Hamilton-Jacobi equation can be integrated by the method of complete separation of variables. The resulting functional form of the 4-velocity field and energy density of matter for all types of spaces under consideration is presented.

  4. Application of Variable Life Adjusted Displays (VLAD) on Victorian Admitted Episodes Dataset (VAED)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The need to improve patient safety has been identified as a major priority for health reform in developed countries, including Australia. We investigated the implementation and appropriateness of Variable Life Adjusted Displays as a quality control procedure to monitor “in-control” versus “out-of-control” processes in Victorian public hospitals. Methods Victorian Admitted Episode Data from Department of Human Services, Victoria for 2004–7 were used. The VLAD is a plot of a cumulative sum of the difference in expected outcome (range 0–1) and observed outcome (0 or 1) for sequential separations. Three outcomes were assessed: in-hospital mortality for acute myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure. Logistic regression was used to obtain a realistic measure of expected mortality over the period 2004–5, adjusting for covariates and comorbidities, to estimate expected mortality risk for the separations between 2005–7. VLAD were plotted for the years 2005–7, by the 11 hospitals with the highest frequency of separations. Signalling limits for 30%, 50% and 75% risk decrease and risk increase were determined and plotted for each VLAD utilizing risk-adjusted cumulative sum techniques. This is a likelihood-ratio test statistic for signalling. If the VLAD signalled by intersecting with a limit, the limit was reset. Results The three logit models displayed reasonable fit to the observed data. There were n = 2999 separations in the AMI model, n = 3598 in the HF model and n = 1922 in the stroke model. The number of separations plotted by VLAD ranged from n = 126 to n = 648. No signals were observed in 64%, 55% and 18% of VLAD for AMI, HF and stroke respectively. For AMI and HF 9% of hospitals signalled at least once for each of 30%, 50% and 75% risk increase, whereas this was 45% for stroke. Hospitals signalling at least once for risk decrease ranged from 18% to 36% across the levels of risk and outcomes. No VLAD signalled

  5. Earth's rotation variability triggers explosive eruptions in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sottili, Gianluca; Palladino, Danilo M.; Cuffaro, Marco; Doglioni, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    The uneven Earth's spinning has been reported to affect geological processes, i.e. tectonism, seismicity and volcanism, on a planetary scale. Here, we show that changes of the length of day (LOD) influence eruptive activity at subduction margins. Statistical analysis indicates that eruptions with volcanic explosivity index (VEI) ≥3 alternate along oppositely directed subduction zones as a function of whether the LOD increases or decreases. In particular, eruptions in volcanic arcs along contractional subduction zones, which are mostly E- or NE-directed, occur when LOD increases, whereas they are more frequent when LOD decreases along the opposite W- or SW-directed subduction zones that are rather characterized by upper plate extension and back-arc spreading. We find that the LOD variability determines a modulation of the horizontal shear stresses acting on the crust up to 0.4 MPa. An increase of the horizontal maximum stress in compressive regimes during LOD increment may favour the rupture of the magma feeder system wall rocks. Similarly, a decrease of the minimum horizontal stress in extensional settings during LOD lowering generates a larger differential stress, which may enhance failure of the magma-confining rocks. This asymmetric behaviour of magmatism sheds new light on the role of astronomical forces in the dynamics of the solid Earth.

  6. Lagrangian variability of the Eastern Tropical Pacific Oxygen Minimum Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bettencourt, João; López, Cristóbal; Hernández-García, Emilio; Montes, Ivonne; Sudre, Joël; Dewitte, Boris; Paulmier, Aurélien; Garçon, Véronique

    2013-04-01

    We study the variability of the Eastern Tropical Pacific Oxygen Minimum Zone (OMZ) developed off Peru, using Lagrangian tools based on the dynamical systems theory. We focus on the identification of dynamical mechanisms, pathways and barriers to transport water masses with high/low oxygen content inside and outside the OMZ, using the concept of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) and residence times. The finite-size Lyapunov exponent (FSLE) is used to identify the relevant LCSs within the OMZ area. Our preliminary results show that the core of the OMZ is characterized by weak circulation while the boundaries of the OMZ have shorter residence times with a complex spatial distribution, consisting of filaments with low and high residence time. Incursions of low residence time into the OMZ core also present a filament shape. In addition, the middepth mean FSLE and dissolved O2 fields indicate a clear correlation between the northern and southern OMZ boundaries and high mean FSLE zones. These zones, so-called 'corridors', are thought to signal the pathways of mesoscale eddies from where they were originated - the coastal upwelling areas. The instantaneous FSLE field is organized into thin regions of high values within a low FSLE background field. These high FSLE regions are related to the boundaries of mesoscale and submesoscale eddies and fronts occupying the Eastern Tropical Pacific, released in the near shore upwelling zones. On the boundaries of the OMZ, these high FSLE lines are seen to separate waters with dissimilar dissolved oxygen content. Eddies of extreme low dissolved oxygen concentrations that penetrate the OMZ tend to remain coherent and do not mix with the surrounding waters; this is due to the existence of LCSs that form barriers around the eddies. This mechanism could contribute to the maintenance of the OMZ off Peru.

  7. Variability Among US Intensive Care Units in Managing the Care of Patients Admitted With Preexisting Limits on Life-Sustaining Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Joanna L.; Harhay, Michael O.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Quill, Caroline M.; Halpern, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    treatment limitations established (11.2% [95% CI, 1.9%–57.3%]) and reversal of treatment limitations during or following ICU admission (20.2% [95% CI, 1.8%–76.2%]). The observed variability could not be consistently explained using measurable center-level characteristics. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Intensive care units vary dramatically in how they manage care for patients admitted with treatment limitations. Among patients who survive, escalations in the aggressiveness of care are more common during the ICU stay than are de-escalations in aggressiveness. This study cannot directly measure whether care received was consistent with patients’ preferences but suggests that ICU culture and physicians’ practice styles contribute to the aggressiveness of care. PMID:25822402

  8. Vertical Variability in Saturated Zone Hydrochemistry Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    G. Patterson; P. Striffler

    2007-02-17

    The differences in the saturated zone hydrochemistry with depth at borehole NC-EWDP-22PC reflect the addition of recharge along Fortymile Wash. The differences in water chemistry with depth at borehole NC-EWDP-19PB appear to indicate that other processes are involved. Water from the lower part of NC-EWDP-19PB possesses chemical characteristics that clearly indicate that it has undergone cation exchange that resulted in the removal of calcium and magnesium and the addition of sodium. This water is very similar to water from the Western Yucca Mountain facies that has previously been thought to flow west of NC-EWDP-19PB. Water from the lower zone in NC-EWDP-19PB also could represent water from the Eastern Yucca Mountain facies that has moved through clay-bearing or zeolitized aquifer material resulting in the altered chemistry. Water chemistry from the upper part of the saturated zone at NC-EWDP-19PB, both zones at NC-EWDP-22PC, and wells in the Fortymile Wash facies appears to be the result of recharge through the alluvium south of Yucca Mountain and within the Fortymile Wash channel.

  9. Vertical variability in saturated zone hydrochemistry near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, G.L.; Striffler, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    The differences in the saturated zone hydrochemistry with depth at borehole NC-EWDP-22PC reflect the addition of recharge along Fortymile Wash. The differences in water chemistry with depth at borehole NC-EWDP-19PB appear to indicate that other processes are involved. Water from the lower part of NC-EWDP-19PB possesses chemical characteristics that clearly indicate that it has undergone cation exchange that resulted in the removal of calcium and magnesium and the addition of sodium. This water is very similar to water from the Western Yucca Mountain facies that has previously been thought to flow west of NC-EWDP-19PB. Water from the lower zone in NC-EWDP-19PB also could represent water from the Eastern Yucca Mountain fades that has moved through day-bearing or zeolitized aquifer material resulting in the altered chemistry. Water chemistry from the upper part of the saturated zone at NC-EWDP-19PB, both zones at NC-EWDP-22PC, and wells in the Fortymile Wash facies appears to be the result of recharge through the alluvium south of Yucca Mountain and within the Fortymile Wash channel.

  10. How Well Does Zone Sampling Based On Soil Electrical Conductivity Maps Represent Soil Variability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    How Well Does Zone Sampling Based On Soil Electrical Conductivity Maps Represent Soil Variability. Dale L. Shaner A study was conducted determined if ECa-directed zone sampling could predict soil texture and soil organic matter (SOM) patterns of samples taken by a more intensive grid sample method...

  11. Auroral zone effects on hydrogen geocorona structure and variability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. E.; Biddle, A. P.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Killeen, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    The effect of diurnal and magnetospheric modulations on the structure of the hydrogen geocorona is analyzed on the basis of recent observations. Particular attention is given to the enhancement of neutral escape by plasma effects, including the recently observed phenomenon of low-altitude ion acceleration. It is found that, while significant fluxes of neutral H should be produced by transverse ion acceleration in the auroral zone, the process is probably insufficient to account for the observed polar depletion of hydrogen atoms. Analysis of recent exospheric temperature measurements from the Dynamics Explorer-2 satellite suggest that neutral heating in and near the high latitude cusp may be the major contributor to depleted atomic hydrogen densities at high latitudes. Altitude profiles of the production rates for escaping neutral hydrogen atoms during periods of maximum, minimum, and typical solar activity are provided.

  12. Environmental and economic benefits of variable rate nitrogen fertilization in a nitrate vulnerable zone.

    PubMed

    Basso, Bruno; Dumont, Benjamin; Cammarano, Davide; Pezzuolo, Andrea; Marinello, Francesco; Sartori, Luigi

    2016-03-01

    Agronomic input and management practices have traditionally been applied uniformly on agricultural fields despite the presence of spatial variability of soil properties and landscape position. When spatial variability is ignored, uniform agronomic management can be both economically and environmentally inefficient. The objectives of this study were to: i) identify optimal N fertilizer rates using an integrated spatio-temporal analysis of yield and site-specific N rate response; ii) test the sensitivity of site specific N management to nitrate leaching in response to different N rates; and iii) demonstrate the environmental benefits of variable rate N fertilizer in a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone. This study was carried out on a 13.6 ha field near the Venice Lagoon, northeast Italy over four years (2005-2008). We utilized a validated crop simulation model to evaluate crop response to different N rates at specific zones in the field based on localized soil and landscape properties under rainfed conditions. The simulated rates were: 50 kg N ha(-1) applied at sowing for the entire study area and increasing fractions, ranging from 150 to 350 kg N ha(-1) applied at V6 stage. Based on the analysis of yield maps from previous harvests and soil electrical resistivity data, three management zones were defined. Two N rates were applied in each of these zones, one suggested by our simulation analysis and the other with uniform N fertilization as normally applied by the producer. N leaching was lower and net revenue was higher in the zones where variable rates of N were applied when compared to uniform N fertilization. This demonstrates the efficacy of using crop models to determine variable rates of N fertilization within a field and the application of variable rate N fertilizer to achieve higher profit and reduce nitrate leaching. PMID:26747986

  13. Variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of a super-high arch dam.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhongwen; Gu, Chongshi; Qin, Dong

    2016-01-01

    This study determines dam deformation similarity indexes based on an analysis of deformation zoning features and panel data clustering theory, with comprehensive consideration to the actual deformation law of super-high arch dams and the spatial-temporal features of dam deformation. Measurement methods of these indexes are studied. Based on the established deformation similarity criteria, the principle used to determine the number of dam deformation zones is constructed through entropy weight method. This study proposes the deformation zoning method for super-high arch dams and the implementation steps, analyzes the effect of special influencing factors of different dam zones on the deformation, introduces dummy variables that represent the special effect of dam deformation, and establishes a variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of super-high arch dams. Based on different patterns of the special effect in the variable-intercept panel model, two panel analysis models were established to monitor fixed and random effects of dam deformation. Hausman test method of model selection and model effectiveness assessment method are discussed. Finally, the effectiveness of established models is verified through a case study. PMID:27386345

  14. Booming during a bust: Asynchronous population responses of arid zone lizards to climatic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, John L.; Kovac, Kelli-Jo; Brook, Barry W.; Fordham, Damien A.

    2012-04-01

    The productivity of arid environments and the reproductive success of vertebrates in these systems, are typically thought to be primarily influenced by rainfall patterns. Data from our 15 year study at an Australian arid zone site reveals asynchronous demographic responses to rainfall and other climatic variables among different lizard species. We show that, in addition to precipitation, key demographic rates (fecundity, recruitment and survival) are correlated strongly with temporal variability in temperature, during and prior to the breeding season, and also to the density of sympatric lizard species. There were nine-fold fluctuations through time in the relative abundance of two similar-sized Ctenotus species, and asynchronous recruitment success and survival among other species, despite the absence of direct anthropogenic affects Understanding the drivers and magnitude of the substantial natural variability in arid-zone lizard assemblages is integral to predicting and interpreting their responses to future land use or climate-change scenarios.

  15. Seasonal and interannual variability of pigment concentrations across a California Current frontal zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. C.; Strub, P. T.

    1990-01-01

    The seasonal and interannual variability of the latitudinal position of the California Current frontal zone was investigated by examining satellite images of phytoplankton pigment from the coastal-zone color scanner for the periods 1979-1983 and 1986. The pigment concentrations associated with the zonal front were also determined. A general seasonal cycle of pigment concentrations is was established. It was found that variations in the frontal structure are controlled primarily by changes in pigment concentration north of the front. Seasonal variations were found to be minimal south of the front, where pigment concentrations remain low throughout the spring, summer, and fall.

  16. On geoeffective solar variability signature in Northern temperate climate zone at specific atmospheric levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrica, Venera; Pirloaga, Razvan; Stefan, Cristiana; Demetrescu, Crisan

    2015-04-01

    Solar signals at Schwabe (11 years) and Hale (22 years) solar cycles timescales in the reanalyzed temperature data from NCEP/NCAR database for Northern temperate climate zone at specific levels in troposphere and stratosphere will be discussed by means of long-term statistical correlations between stratospheric and tropospheric temperature and solar variability proxies (indices). It seems that the 11-year signal is more pronounced in the troposphere, while the 22-year signal becomes important in the stratosphere. In this study features of these signals will be also discussed on several continental scales of the Northern temperate zone. The seasonal dependence of the long-term correlations is discussed as well.

  17. ADMIT: ALMA Data Mining Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, Douglas N.; Xu, Lisa; Looney, Leslie; Teuben, Peter J.; Pound, Marc W.; Rauch, Kevin P.; Mundy, Lee G.; Kern, Jeffrey S.

    2015-01-01

    ADMIT (ALMA Data Mining Toolkit) is a toolkit for the creation and analysis of new science products from ALMA data. ADMIT is an ALMA Development Project written purely in Python. While specifically targeted for ALMA science and production use after the ALMA pipeline, it is designed to be generally applicable to radio-astronomical data. ADMIT quickly provides users with a detailed overview of their science products: line identifications, line 'cutout' cubes, moment maps, emission type analysis (e.g., feature detection), etc. Users can download the small ADMIT pipeline product (< 20MB), analyze the results, then fine-tune and re-run the ADMIT pipeline (or any part thereof) on their own machines and interactively inspect the results. ADMIT will have both a GUI and command line interface available for this purpose. By analyzing multiple data cubes simultaneously, data mining between many astronomical sources and line transitions will be possible. Users will also be able to enhance the capabilities of ADMIT by creating customized ADMIT tasks satisfying any special processing needs. Future implementations of ADMIT may include EVLA and other instruments.

  18. Admit: Alma Data Mining Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, Douglas; Looney, Leslie; Xu, Lisa; Pound, Marc W.; Teuben, Peter J.; Rauch, Kevin P.; Mundy, Lee; Kern, Jeffrey S.

    2015-06-01

    ADMIT (ALMA Data Mining Toolkit) is a toolkit for the creation and analysis of new science products from ALMA data. ADMIT is an ALMA Development Project written purely in Python. While specifically targeted for ALMA science and production use after the ALMA pipeline, it is designed to be generally applicable to radio-astronomical data. ADMIT quickly provides users with a detailed overview of their science products: line identifications, line 'cutout' cubes, moment maps, emission type analysis (e.g., feature detection), etc. Users can download the small ADMIT pipeline product (<20MB), analyze the results, then fine-tune and re-run the ADMIT pipeline (or any part thereof) on their own machines and interactively inspect the results. ADMIT will have both a GUI and command line interface available for this purpose. By analyzing multiple data cubes simultaneously, data mining between many astronomical sources and line transitions will be possible. Users will also be able to enhance the capabilities of ADMIT by creating customized ADMIT tasks satisfying any special processing needs. Future implementations of ADMIT may include EVLA and other instruments.

  19. Long-term variability of oceanic frontal zones associated with large-scale atmospheric forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazmin, A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Global satellite sea surface temperature (SST) measurements and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis wind data for the period of 1982-2009 have been used to study the relationship between long-term variability of oceanic frontal zones (OFZ) and large-scale atmospheric forcing. Statistically significant positive correlations between the maximum magnitude of the meridional gradient of zonally averaged SST and meridional shear of zonal wind (which is an estimate of the Ekman convergence intensity) were found for all subpolar and subtropical OFZ of the World Ocean. Variability of the latitudinal position of OFZ cores may be associated with Ekman advection variability due to zonal wind variations. Strengthening of zonal wind results in a shift of subpolar OFZ cores to the south/north in the Northern/Southern hemispheres.

  20. Modeling improved ISCO treatment of low permeable zones via viscosity modification: assessment of system variables.

    PubMed

    Kananizadeh, Negin; Chokejaroenrat, Chanat; Li, Yusong; Comfort, Steven

    2015-02-01

    A major challenge to successfully using in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for groundwater treatment is achieving uniform contact between the oxidant and contaminants in a heterogeneous aquifer. Viscosity modification technology, where a water-soluble polymer is mixed with remedial fluids, has been introduced in recent years to improve oxidant coverage of the target zone (i.e., sweep efficiency) and thus, treatment efficacy. In this work, we developed a numerical model to simulate the remedial fluid coverage from an ISCO injection with viscosity modification. Specifically, solution mixtures of xanthan and NaMnO4 were injected into a two-dimensional (2D) transport flow box that contained heterogeneous layers. Xanthan solutions were simulated as shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluids, where viscosity is a function of shear rate, polymer and NaMnO4 concentrations. Reactive transport of the polymer, NaMnO4, TCE, and reaction products were simultaneously modeled using advection dispersion reaction (ADR) equations coupled with the simulated flow field. The numerical model was validated using experimental data from the 2D cell experiments. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate the relative contributions of system variables, such as polymer and permanganate concentrations, flow rate, permeability contrast, and different geometry settings. Results showed that higher concentration of permanganate and slower flow rate of the shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluids improved the oxidants ability to enter low permeable zones and react with the TCE. Higher permeability contrast decreased the velocity of the xanthan-MnO4(-) mixture inside the low permeable zone (LPZ), which increased TCE oxidation and product recovery. Changing the architecture of the LPZ from one zone to two smaller zones separated by a transmissive zone increased the overall product recovery. Thus, viscosity modification can improve both the sweeping efficiencies and TCE removal. PMID:25528134

  1. Modeling improved ISCO treatment of low permeable zones via viscosity modification: Assessment of system variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kananizadeh, Negin; Chokejaroenrat, Chanat; Li, Yusong; Comfort, Steven

    2015-02-01

    A major challenge to successfully using in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) for groundwater treatment is achieving uniform contact between the oxidant and contaminants in a heterogeneous aquifer. Viscosity modification technology, where a water-soluble polymer is mixed with remedial fluids, has been introduced in recent years to improve oxidant coverage of the target zone (i.e., sweep efficiency) and thus, treatment efficacy. In this work, we developed a numerical model to simulate the remedial fluid coverage from an ISCO injection with viscosity modification. Specifically, solution mixtures of xanthan and NaMnO4 were injected into a two-dimensional (2D) transport flow box that contained heterogeneous layers. Xanthan solutions were simulated as shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluids, where viscosity is a function of shear rate, polymer and NaMnO4 concentrations. Reactive transport of the polymer, NaMnO4, TCE, and reaction products were simultaneously modeled using advection dispersion reaction (ADR) equations coupled with the simulated flow field. The numerical model was validated using experimental data from the 2D cell experiments. Sensitivity analysis was conducted to investigate the relative contributions of system variables, such as polymer and permanganate concentrations, flow rate, permeability contrast, and different geometry settings. Results showed that higher concentration of permanganate and slower flow rate of the shear-thinning non-Newtonian fluids improved the oxidants ability to enter low permeable zones and react with the TCE. Higher permeability contrast decreased the velocity of the xanthan-MnO4- mixture inside the low permeable zone (LPZ), which increased TCE oxidation and product recovery. Changing the architecture of the LPZ from one zone to two smaller zones separated by a transmissive zone increased the overall product recovery. Thus, viscosity modification can improve both the sweeping efficiencies and TCE removal.

  2. Quantifying catchment scale soil variability in Marshall Gulch, Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleran, M.; Rasmussen, C.

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying regolith variation, both chemical and physical yields insights to the evolution of the subsurface. In this study we aim to quantify soil variability within a forested catchment, Marshall Gulch, AZ. Marshall Gulch (MG) lies within the Coronado National Forest, part of the Jemez River Basin-Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory (CZO). MG is 5-hectare, mixed-conifer forested catchment situated on granitic parent material, with a mean elevation of 2400m, mean annual temperature of 8°C and mean annual precipitation of 75 cm. To ensure samples sites capture landscape variability, principal component analysis (PCA) were run on NAIP imagery and additional ancillary data from the study area. The PCA determined input layers of soil depth, slope, soil wetness index, NDVI and NAIP bands 3/2 as the variables needed to capture the landscape variability of MG. A conditioned Latin Hyper Cube (cLHC) model was then utilized to randomly determine 20 sample locations within the catchment to equally represent the six input layers, as determined from the PCA. Regolith profiles were described and sampled at all 20 locations. At each sample site a soil pit was dug to refusal (paralithic contact) and sampled according to genetic horizon. Each sample was then analyzed using methods of X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), particle size, color, pH, EC, C/N isotopes, and loss on ignition (LOI) to characterize chemical and physical soil properties. By quantifying chemical denudation and mineralogical variability of the collected soils, we establish a proxy for regolith weathering both on the profile scale (1m2) as well as the catchment scale (50k m2). GIS spatial techniques enable us to produce maps depicting the variability of soil properties. We confidently extrapolate our findings (pH, depth to paralithic contact, color, mineralogy etc.) throughout the entirety of the MG field site, generating a high-resolution understanding of the processes shaping

  3. Energy Simulation of Integrated Multiple-Zone Variable Refrigerant Flow System

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Rice, C Keith; Baxter, Van D

    2013-01-01

    We developed a detailed steady-state system model, to simulate the performance of an integrated five-zone variable refrigerant flow (VRF)heat pump system. The system is multi-functional, capable of space cooling, space heating, combined space cooling and water heating, and dedicated water heating. Methods were developed to map the VRF performance in each mode, based on the abundant data produced by the equipment system model. The performance maps were used in TRNSYS annual energy simulations. Using TRNSYS, we have successfully setup and run cases for a multiple-split, VRF heat pump and dehumidifier combination in 5-zone houses in 5 climates that control indoor dry-bulb temperature and relative humidity. We compared the calculated energy consumptions for the VRF heat pump against that of a baseline central air source heat pump, coupled with electric water heating and the standalone dehumidifiers. In addition, we investigated multiple control scenarios for the VRF heat pump, i.e. on/off control, variable indoor air flow rate, and using different zone temperature setting schedules, etc. The energy savings for the multiple scenarios were assessed.

  4. Assessment of surf zone environmental variables in a southwestern Atlantic sandy beach (Monte Hermoso, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Menéndez, M Clara; Fernández Severini, Melisa D; Buzzi, Natalia S; Piccolo, M Cintia; Perillo, Gerardo M E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the temporal dynamics (monthly/tidal) of water temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a (chlo-a), suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate organic carbon (POC), and dissolved nutrients in the surf zone of Monte Hermoso sandy beach, Argentina. We also aimed to understand the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed variability. Sampling was carried out approximately monthly (September 2009-November 2010), and all samples were collected in a fixed station during high and low tide. Water temperature showed a clear seasonal variability (July: 9 °C-December: 26.5 °C) and a thermal amplitude of 17.5 °C. Salinity ranged from 33 to 37, without a pronounced seasonality. SPM (10-223 mg L(-1)) and POC concentrations (399-6445 mg C m(-3)) were high in surf zone waters. Chlo-a (0.05-9.16 μg L(-1)) was low and did not evidence the occurrence of surf diatom accumulations. Dissolved nutrient concentration was quite fluctuating. None of the variables seemed to be affected by tidal stage. The results showed how fluctuating the physico-chemical and biological variables can be in this particular system. The observed variability can be related with local beach conditions but also with regional processes. The study area is highly influenced by a neighbor estuary and as a consequence, could be vulnerable to their seasonal and inter-annual dynamics. All of these characteristics must be considered for further studies and planning of the uses of natural resources and should be taken into account in any environmental monitoring program conducted in a similar beach system. PMID:27473110

  5. Temperature and acidification variability reduce physiological performance in the intertidal zone porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Adam W; Miller, Nathan A; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2014-11-15

    We show here that increased variability of temperature and pH synergistically negatively affects the energetics of intertidal zone crabs. Under future climate scenarios, coastal ecosystems are projected to have increased extremes of low tide-associated thermal stress and ocean acidification-associated low pH, the individual or interactive effects of which have yet to be determined. To characterize energetic consequences of exposure to increased variability of pH and temperature, we exposed porcelain crabs, Petrolisthes cinctipes, to conditions that simulated current and future intertidal zone thermal and pH environments. During the daily low tide, specimens were exposed to no, moderate or extreme heating, and during the daily high tide experienced no, moderate or extreme acidification. Respiration rate and cardiac thermal limits were assessed following 2.5 weeks of acclimation. Thermal variation had a larger overall effect than pH variation, though there was an interactive effect between the two environmental drivers. Under the most extreme temperature and pH combination, respiration rate decreased while heat tolerance increased, indicating a smaller overall aerobic energy budget (i.e. a reduced O2 consumption rate) of which a larger portion is devoted to basal maintenance (i.e. greater thermal tolerance indicating induction of the cellular stress response). These results suggest the potential for negative long-term ecological consequences for intertidal ectotherms exposed to increased extremes in pH and temperature due to reduced energy for behavior and reproduction. PMID:25392458

  6. Short-term spatial and temporal variability in greenhouse gas fluxes in riparian zones.

    PubMed

    Vidon, P; Marchese, S; Welsh, M; McMillan, S

    2015-08-01

    Recent research indicates that riparian zones have the potential to contribute significant amounts of greenhouse gases (GHG: N2O, CO2, CH4) to the atmosphere. Yet, the short-term spatial and temporal variability in GHG emission in these systems is poorly understood. Using two transects of three static chambers at two North Carolina agricultural riparian zones (one restored, one unrestored), we show that estimates of the average GHG flux at the site scale can vary by one order of magnitude depending on whether the mean or the median is used as a measure of central tendency. Because the median tends to mute the effect of outlier points (hot spots and hot moments), we propose that both must be reported or that other more advanced spatial averaging techniques (e.g., kriging, area-weighted average) should be used to estimate GHG fluxes at the site scale. Results also indicate that short-term temporal variability in GHG fluxes (a few days) under seemingly constant temperature and hydrological conditions can be as large as spatial variability at the site scale, suggesting that the scientific community should rethink sampling protocols for GHG at the soil-atmosphere interface to include repeated measures over short periods of time at select chambers to estimate GHG emissions in the field. Although recent advances in technology provide tools to address these challenges, their cost is often too high for widespread implementation. Until technology improves, sampling design strategies will need to be carefully considered to balance cost, time, and spatial and temporal representativeness of measurements. PMID:26169979

  7. Effects of Atlantic warm pool variability over climate of South America tropical transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricaurte Villota, Constanza; Romero-Rodríguez, Deisy; Andrés Ordoñez-Zuñiga, Silvio; Murcia-Riaño, Magnolia; Coca-Domínguez, Oswaldo

    2016-04-01

    Colombia is located in the northwestern corner of South America in a climatically complex region due to the influence processes modulators of climate both the Pacific and Atlantic region, becoming in a transition zone between phenomena of northern and southern hemisphere. Variations in the climatic conditions of this region, especially rainfall, have been attributed to the influence of the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), but little is known about the interaction within Atlantic Ocean and specifically Caribbean Sea with the environmental conditions of this region. In this work We studied the influence of the Atlantic Warm Pool (AWP) on the Colombian Caribbean (CC) climate using data of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) between 1900 - 2014 from ERSST V4, compared with in situ data SIMAC (National System for Coral Reef Monitoring in Colombia - INVEMAR), rainfall between 1953-2013 of meteorological stations located at main airports in the Colombian Caribbean zone, administered by IDEAM, and winds data between 2003 - 2014 from WindSat sensor. The parameters analyzed showed spatial differences throughout the study area. SST anomalies, representing the variability of the AWP, showed to be associated with Multidecadal Atlantic Oscillation (AMO) and with the index of sea surface temperature of the North-tropical Atlantic (NTA), the variations was on 3 to 5 years on the ENSO scale and of approximately 11 years possibly related to solar cycles. Rainfall anomalies in the central and northern CC respond to changes in SST, while in the south zone these are not fully engage and show a high relationship with the ENSO. Finally, the winds also respond to changes in SST and showed a signal approximately 90 days possibly related to the Madden-Julian Oscillation, whose intensity depends on the CC region being analyzed. The results confirm that region is a transition zone in which operate several forcing, the variability of climate conditions is difficult to attribute only one, as ENSO

  8. Intraseasonal variability of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone during austral summer and winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaziello, Ana Carolina Nóbile; Carvalho, Leila M. V.; Gandu, Adilson W.

    2015-12-01

    The Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone (A-ITCZ) exhibits variations on several time-scales and plays a crucial role in precipitation regimes of northern South America and western Africa. Here we investigate the variability of the A-ITCZ on intraseasonal time-scales during austral summer (November-March) and winter (May-September) based on a multivariate index that describes the main atmospheric features of the A-ITCZ and retains its variability on interannual, semiannual, and intraseasonal time-scales. This index is the time coefficient of the first combined empirical orthogonal function mode of anomalies (annual cycle removed) of precipitation, and zonal and meridional wind components at 850 hPa from the climate forecast system reanalysis (1979-2010). We examine associations between the intraseasonal variability of the A-ITCZ and the activity of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). We show that during austral summer intraseasonal variability of the A-ITCZ is associated with a Rossby wave train in the Northern Hemisphere. In austral winter this variability is associated with the propagation of a Rossby wave in the Southern Hemisphere consistent with the Pacific-South American pattern. Moreover, we show that intense A-ITCZ events on intraseasonal time-scales are more frequent during the phase of MJO characterized by convection over western Pacific and suppression over the Indian Ocean. These teleconnection patterns induce anomalies in the trade winds and upper level divergence over the equatorial Atlantic that modulate the intensity of the A-ITCZ.

  9. Spatial variability of available soil microelements in an ecological functional zone of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Ye, Huichun; Shen, Chongyang; Huang, Yuanfang; Huang, Wenjiang; Zhang, Shiwen; Jia, Xiaohong

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the spatial variability of soil microelements and its influencing factors is of importance for a number of applications such as scientifically formulated fertilizer and environmental protection. This study used descriptive statistics and geostatistics to investigate the spatial variability of available soil Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn contents in agricultural topsoil (0-20 cm) in an ecological functional zone located at Yanqing County, Beijing, China. Kriging method was applied to map the spatial patterns of available soil Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn contents. Results showed that the available soil Cu had a widest spatial correlation distance (e.g., 9.6 km), which for available soil Fe, Mn, and Zn were only 1.29, 2.58, and 0.99 km, respectively. The values of C 0/sill for available soil Fe and Zn were 0.12 and 0.11, respectively, demonstrating that the spatial heterogeneity was mainly due to structural factors. The available soil Mn and Cu had the larger values of C 0/sill (i.e., 0.50 and 0.44 for Mn and Cu, respectively), which showed a medium spatial correlation. Mapping of the spatial patterns of the four microelements showed that the decrease trend of available soil Fe and Mn were from northeast to southwest across the study area. The highest amount of available soil Cu was distributed in the middle of the study area surrounding urban region which presented as a "single island". The highest amount of available soil Zn was mainly distributed in the north and south of the study area. One-way analysis of variance for the influencing factors showed that the lithology of parental materials, soil organic matter, and pH were important factors affecting spatial variability of the available microelements. The topography only had a significant influence on the spatial variability of available soil Fe and Mn contents, parental materials, and the land use types had little influence on the spatial variability. PMID:25619696

  10. The Barents Sea frontal zones and water masses variability (1980-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oziel, L.; Sirven, J.; Gascard, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    The polar front separates the warm and saline Atlantic Water entering the southern Barents Sea from the cold and fresh Arctic Water located in the north. These water masses can mix together (mainly in the center of the Barents Sea), be cooled by the atmosphere and receive salt because of brine release; these processes generate dense water in winter, which then cascades into the Arctic Ocean to form the Arctic Intermediate Water. To study the interannual variability and evolution of the frontal zones and the corresponding variations of the water masses, we have merged data from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute and have built a new database, which covers the 1980-2011 period. The summer data were interpolated on a regular grid. A probability density function is used to show that the polar front splits into two branches east of 32° E where the topographic constraint weakens. Two fronts can then be identified: the Northern Front is associated with strong salinity gradients and the Southern Front with temperature gradients. Both fronts enclose the denser Barents Sea Water. The interannual variability of the water masses is apparent in the observed data and is linked to that of the ice cover. The frontal zones variability is found by using data from a general circulation model. The link with the atmospheric variability, represented here by the Arctic Oscillation, is not clear. However, model results suggest that such a link could be validated if winter data were taken into account. A strong trend appears: the Atlantic Water (Arctic Water) occupies a larger (smaller) volume of the Barents Sea. This trend amplifies during the last decade and the model study suggests that this could be accompanied by a northwards displacement of the Southern Front in the eastern part of the Barents Sea. The results are less clear for the Northern Front. The observations show that the volume of the Barents Sea Water

  11. Mapping and Assessing Variability in the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone, the Pack Ice and Coastal Polynyas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeve, Julienne; Jenouvrier, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Sea ice variability within the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and polynyas plays an important role for phytoplankton productivity and krill abundance. Therefore mapping their spatial extent, seasonal and interannual variability is essential for understanding how current and future changes in these biological active regions may impact the Antarctic marine ecosystem. Knowledge of the distribution of different ice types to the total Antarctic sea ice cover may also help to shed light on the factors contributing towards recent expansion of the Antarctic ice cover in some regions and contraction in others. The long-term passive microwave satellite data record provides the longest and most consistent data record for assessing different ice types. However, estimates of the amount of MIZ, consolidated pack ice and polynyas depends strongly on what sea ice algorithm is used. This study uses two popular passive microwave sea ice algorithms, the NASA Team and Bootstrap to evaluate the distribution and variability in the MIZ, the consolidated pack ice and coastal polynyas. Results reveal the NASA Team algorithm has on average twice the MIZ and half the consolidated pack ice area as the Bootstrap algorithm. Polynya area is also larger in the NASA Team algorithm, and the timing of maximum polynya area may differ by as much as 5 months between algorithms. These differences lead to different relationships between sea ice characteristics and biological processes, as illustrated here with the breeding success of an Antarctic seabird.

  12. Century-scale movement of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone linked to solar variability

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poore, R.Z.; Quinn, T.M.; Verardo, S.

    2004-01-01

    The abundance of the planktic foraminifer Globigerinoides sacculifer in Gulf of Mexico (GOM) sediments is a proxy for the influx of Caribbean surface waters (the Loop Current) into the GOM. Penetration of the Loop Current into the GOM is related to the position of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ): northward migration of the ITCZ results in increased incursion of the Loop Current into the GOM; southward migration of the ITCZ results in decreased penetration of the Loop Current into the GOM. Abundance variations of G. sacculifer in a sediment core from the Pigmy Basin in the GOM show distinct century-scale cyclicity over the last 5,000 years. The periodicity of these abundance variations is similar to the century-scale periodicity observed in proxy records of solar variability, which suggests that the average position of the ITCZ and thus Holocene century-scale variability in the Caribbean-GOM region is linked to solar variability. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  13. Variability in Shallow Subduction Zone Locking Inferred From Earthquake Activity Near Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, A.; Newman, A. V.; Thomas, A. M.; Farmer, G. T.

    2006-12-01

    At the collisional plate interface of subduction zones, the majority of the world's large and great earthquakes are produced. Thus, to understand the processes that control earthquake generation here, it is important to improve our characterization of activity along the interface. We evaluate ~1000 earthquakes recorded in the shallow subduction environment of the Middle America Trench (MAT) near Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, in terms of its frequency-magnitude distribution (Log10N=a-bM) of the microseismicity. Globally, earthquake distributions have b-values near 1, meaning a 10-fold decrease in activity with each unit magnitude, M increase, and can be used to characterize the strength of locking. The unique geometry of Nicoya over the active seismogenic interface gives us a rare opportunity to explore the region with unparalleled precision. From more than 7000 earthquakes recorded by the 1999-2001 CRSEIZE project, we estimated magnitudes, and precisely relocated events using a locally derived 3D V_p and V_p/V_s velocity model (DeShon et al., 2006). Using geometric constraints and events with lowest horizontal error (<2 km σ), we created a subset of best resolved slab and interface activity. Using a methodology similar to Wiemer et al. (2001), we determined the mean and spatial variability of b. We find that generally the interface below Nicoya has b=1.4, much higher than subduction zone averages of b=0.5 to 0.8 ( Bayrak et al., 2002), thus inferring a generally weak interface. More interestingly, there was strong spatial variability in b (and hence coupling). A well resolved zone of lower b (~1), is observed offshore the central Nicoya coast, in a region previously identified as strongly coupled by modeling of GPS observed deformation (Norabuena et al., 2004). Extremely high values are on either side (b > 2), near previous large interface earthquakes in 1990 and 1992. We infer that the low b-value area offshore central Nicoya identifies a more strongly

  14. Validating modelled variable surface saturation in the riparian zone with thermal infrared images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaser, Barbara; Klaus, Julian; Frei, Sven; Frentress, Jay; Pfister, Laurent; Hopp, Luisa

    2015-04-01

    Variable contributing areas and hydrological connectivity have become prominent new concepts for hydrologic process understanding in recent years. The dynamic connectivity within the hillslope-riparian-stream (HRS) system is known to have a first order control on discharge generation and especially the riparian zone functions as runoff buffering or producing zone. However, despite their importance, the highly dynamic processes of contraction and extension of saturation within the riparian zone and its impact on runoff generation still remain not fully understood. In this study, we analysed the potential of a distributed, fully coupled and physically based model (HydroGeoSphere) to represent the spatial and temporal water flux dynamics of a forested headwater HRS system (6 ha) in western Luxembourg. The model was set up and parameterised under consideration of experimentally-derived knowledge of catchment structure and was run for a period of four years (October 2010 to August 2014). For model evaluation, we especially focused on the temporally varying spatial patterns of surface saturation. We used ground-based thermal infrared (TIR) imagery to map surface saturation with a high spatial and temporal resolution and collected 20 panoramic snapshots of the riparian zone (ca. 10 by 20 m) under different hydrologic conditions. These TIR panoramas were used in addition to several classical discharge and soil moisture time series for a spatially-distributed model validation. In a manual calibration process we optimised model parameters (e.g. porosity, saturated hydraulic conductivity, evaporation depth) to achieve a better agreement between observed and modelled discharges and soil moistures. The subsequent validation of surface saturation patterns by a visual comparison of processed TIR panoramas and corresponding model output panoramas revealed an overall good accordance for all but one region that was always too dry in the model. However, quantitative comparisons of

  15. Unsaturated zone hydrology and cave drip discharge water response: Implications for speleothem paleoclimate record variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowska, Monika; Baker, Andy; Treble, Pauline C.; Andersen, Martin S.; Hankin, Stuart; Jex, Catherine N.; Tadros, Carol V.; Roach, Regina

    2015-10-01

    High-frequency, spatially-dense discharge monitoring was conducted over fifteen months to characterise unsaturated zone flow at Harrie Wood Cave (HWC), in the Snowy Mountains, Yarrangobilly (SE Australia). The cave was formed in the Late Silurian Yarrangobilly Limestone, a fractured rock associated with very low primary porosity due to past diagenesis. Over our monitoring period we simultaneously measured rainfall, soil moisture saturation and drip discharge rate at fourteen sites to characterise infiltration-discharge relationships. All drip discharge sites exhibited non-Gaussian distributions, indicating long periods where low discharge predominates, punctuated by short infrequent periods of high discharge. However, there was significant variability in discharge between sites and consequently no spatial correlation in the cave. We investigated the depth-discharge relationship at HWC and found a moderate relationship between depth and drip discharge lag (response) times to soil moisture content, but only weak relationships between depth and mean and maximum discharge. This highlights that the karst architecture plays an important role in controlling drip discharge dynamics. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Agglomerative Hierarchal Clustering (AHC) were used to classify similar drip types, revealing five unique drip regimes. Two-phase flow and non-linear response to recharge behaviour were observed, suggesting secondary porosity is controlling unsaturated zone flow in mature limestone environments with low primary porosity. Using the data presented here, the first coupled conceptual and box hydrological flow model was developed. This study highlights the heterogeneous nature of hydrological flow in karst and the need to understand unsaturated zone hydrology at the individual drip discharge level, to inform speleothem studies for high-resolution paleoclimate reconstruction.

  16. Modeling of the variability of fatigue crack growth using cohesive zone elements.

    PubMed

    Beaurepaire, P; Schuëller, G I

    2011-08-01

    By its nature, metal fatigue has random characteristics, leading to extensive scatter in the results. Both initiation and propagation of a fatigue crack can be seen as random processes. This manuscript develops a numerical analysis using cohesive zone elements allowing the use of one single model in the finite element simulation of the complete fatigue life. The present formulation includes a damage evolution mechanism that reflects gradual degradation of the cohesive strength under cyclic loading. The uncertainties inherent to the fatigue process are assumed to be caused by the variability of the material properties, which are modeled using random fields. An extrapolation scheme is proposed to reduce the computational time. First, the accuracy of the proposed formulation is assessed considering a deterministic crack growth problem. Second, the effect of randomness in the material properties on the total fatigue life of a structure is then analyzed. PMID:22049246

  17. Variable Holocene deformation above a shallow subduction zone extremely close to the trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Taylor, Frederick W.; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Lavier, Luc L.; Frohlich, Cliff; Wallace, Laura M.; Wu, Chung-Che; Sun, Hailong; Papabatu, Alison K.

    2015-06-01

    Histories of vertical crustal motions at convergent margins offer fundamental insights into the relationship between interplate slip and permanent deformation. Moreover, past abrupt motions are proxies for potential tsunamigenic earthquakes and benefit hazard assessment. Well-dated records are required to understand the relationship between past earthquakes and Holocene vertical deformation. Here we measure elevations and 230Th ages of in situ corals raised above the sea level in the western Solomon Islands to build an uplift event history overlying the seismogenic zone, extremely close to the trench (4-40 km). We find marked spatiotemporal heterogeneity in uplift from mid-Holocene to present: some areas accrue more permanent uplift than others. Thus, uplift imposed during the 1 April 2007 Mw 8.1 event may be retained in some locations but removed in others before the next megathrust rupture. This variability suggests significant changes in strain accumulation and the interplate thrust process from one event to the next.

  18. Variability of concentration and composition of hydrocarbons in frontal zones of the Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.

    2015-07-01

    The distribution and composition of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HC) in dissolved and particulate forms, as well as in bottom sediments, was studied along the route of a vessel and at stations. It was found that the widest variability of HC concentrations in surface waters was characteristic for the frontal zones of the Yenisei River mouth (4.8-69 µg/L) and for the western branch of the St. Anna Trough (5.5-80.4 µg/L). The increased concentrations of aliphatic HC coincide with those of chlorophyll and particulate matter, as well as with the growth of the intensity of fluorescence, and are caused by natural processes. This is confirmed by HC composition. Bottom sediments are characterized by low HC concentrations, both in terms of dry mass (14 µg/g on average, with the maximum of 36.8 µg/g at station 5018 in the layer of 3-17 cm) and within Corg compositions (0.88%). Natural terrigenous homologues are prevailing in alkane composition of the sediments. The marginal filters of the Ob and Yenisei rivers were compared. It is shown that oil HC transferred by the rivers are deposited in the zone of marginal filters without reaching the open waters of the Kara Sea.

  19. [Spatial variability and management zone of soil major nutrients in tobacco fields in Qiannan mountainous region].

    PubMed

    Wu, De-Chuan; Luo, Hong-Xiang; Song, Ze-Min; Guo, Guang-Dong; Chen, Yong-An; Li, Yu-Xiang; Jiang, Yu-Ping; Li, Zhang-Hai

    2014-06-01

    Spatial variability and management zone of soil major nutrients in tobacco fields in Qian-nan mountainous region were analyzed using geostatistics and fuzzy c-mean algorithm. Results indicated that the level of soil organic matter (OM) was moderate, and alkalytic nitrogen (AN), available phosphorus (AP) and available potassium (AK) were rich according to tobacco soil nutrient classification standards. Coefficients of variation (CV) of OM, AN, AP and AK were moderate. Contents of OM, AN, AP and AK fitted log-normal distributions. Correlation analysis showed moderate correlations between OM and AN, AP and AK. OM and AN were best described by Gaussian semivariogram models, while AP and AK were described by exponential models. The four nutrients displayed moderate spatial autocorrelation. There were significant differences among lag distances of four soil nutrients. OM, AN, AP and AK in the majority of studied regions varied at moderate to very rich levels, and deficiencies of OM, AN, AP and AK only accounted for 0.93%, 0.53%, 0.24% and 7.91% of the total studied region, respectively. Based on the results, the studied region was divided into two management zones (MZ), namely MZ1 and MZ2, accounting for 69. 8% and 30. 2% of the studied region respectively. The soil levels of OM, AN, AP and AK in MZ1 were significantly lower than those in MZ2 (P < 0.01). PMID:25223027

  20. Quantifying soil and critical zone variability in a forested catchment through digital soil mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleran, M.; Levi, M.; Rasmussen, C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying catchment-scale soil property variation yields insights into critical zone evolution and function. The objective of this study was to quantify and predict the spatial distribution of soil properties within a high-elevation forested catchment in southern Arizona, USA, using a combined set of digital soil mapping (DSM) and sampling design techniques to quantify catchment-scale soil spatial variability that would inform interpretation of soil-forming processes. The study focused on a 6 ha catchment on granitic parent materials under mixed-conifer forest, with a mean elevation of 2400 m a.s.l, mean annual temperature of 10 °C, and mean annual precipitation of ~ 85 cm yr-1. The sample design was developed using a unique combination of iterative principal component analysis (iPCA) of environmental covariates derived from remotely sensed imagery and topography, and a conditioned Latin hypercube sampling (cLHS) scheme. Samples were collected by genetic horizon from 24 soil profiles excavated to the depth of refusal and characterized for soil mineral assemblage, geochemical composition, and general soil physical and chemical properties. Soil properties were extrapolated across the entire catchment using a combination of least-squares linear regression between soil properties and selected environmental covariates, and spatial interpolation or regression residual using inverse distance weighting (IDW). Model results indicated that convergent portions of the landscape contained deeper soils, higher clay and carbon content, and greater Na mass loss relative to adjacent slopes and divergent ridgelines. The results of this study indicated that (i) the coupled application of iPCA and cLHS produced a sampling scheme that captured the greater part of catchment-scale soil variability; (ii) application of relatively simple regression models and IDW interpolation of residuals described well the variance in measured soil properties and predicted spatial correlation of soil

  1. The Dynamic Hyporheic Zone: Variability of Groundwater-Surface Water Exchange at Multiple Temporal Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binley, A. M.; Dudley-Southern, M. J.

    2014-12-01

    The pathways of exchange of surface water and groundwater can have a significant influence on the delivery of nutrient-rich groundwater to streams. Many studies have revealed how the spatial variability of physical properties (sediment permeability, bedform structures, etc.) at the interface of groundwater and surface water can impact on flow pathways and residence times of hyporheic exchange flow. Here we explore the temporal variability of flow pathways at this interface. We focus on observations made on a study reach of the River Leith, UK but also provide evidence of dynamic exchanges at a number of other study sites. Under baseflow conditions, the study reach of the River Leith shows a predominance of upwelling of groundwater to the river, and in some sections of the reach a significant groundwater discharge zone in evident. However, from observations of piezometric heads made over a two year study period, repeated reversal of flow direction was observed during storm events. By deploying novel miniature electrode sensors in the river bed we were able to monitor the migration of surface water during these events. Penetration of river water to depths of 30cm was observed during monitored events, which support the reported reversal of hydraulic gradients. We, therefore, observed event-driven hyporheic exchange flow. The duration and frequency of such events may have significant impact on the biogeochemistry of shallow river bed sediments within this reach. Furthermore, temporal variability of exchange is not limited to such events: changes in regional groundwater flow pathways over longer time scales may have a significant impact on the location of localised upwelling; at much shorter timescales we see evidence of diurnal fluctuations in hydraulic heads due to evapotranspiration processes. We report on similar observations at companion study sites and discuss implications on the management of water quality in these groundwater fed systems.

  2. Spatial and temporal variability of clouds and precipitation over Germany: multiscale simulations across the "gray zone"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthlott, C.; Hoose, C.

    2015-11-01

    This paper assesses the resolution dependance of clouds and precipitation over Germany by numerical simulations with the COnsortium for Small-scale MOdeling (COSMO) model. Six intensive observation periods of the HOPE (HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment) measurement campaign conducted in spring 2013 and 1 summer day of the same year are simulated. By means of a series of grid-refinement resolution tests (horizontal grid spacing 2.8, 1 km, 500, and 250 m), the applicability of the COSMO model to represent real weather events in the gray zone, i.e., the scale ranging between the mesoscale limit (no turbulence resolved) and the large-eddy simulation limit (energy-containing turbulence resolved), is tested. To the authors' knowledge, this paper presents the first non-idealized COSMO simulations in the peer-reviewed literature at the 250-500 m scale. It is found that the kinetic energy spectra derived from model output show the expected -5/3 slope, as well as a dependency on model resolution, and that the effective resolution lies between 6 and 7 times the nominal resolution. Although the representation of a number of processes is enhanced with resolution (e.g., boundary-layer thermals, low-level convergence zones, gravity waves), their influence on the temporal evolution of precipitation is rather weak. However, rain intensities vary with resolution, leading to differences in the total rain amount of up to +48 %. Furthermore, the location of rain is similar for the springtime cases with moderate and strong synoptic forcing, whereas significant differences are obtained for the summertime case with air mass convection. Domain-averaged liquid water paths and cloud condensate profiles are used to analyze the temporal and spatial variability of the simulated clouds. Finally, probability density functions of convection-related parameters are analyzed to investigate their dependance on model resolution and their impact on cloud formation and subsequent precipitation.

  3. Distribution and variability of redox zones controlling spatial variability of arsenic in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer, southeastern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharif, M.U.; Davis, R.K.; Steele, K.F.; Kim, B.; Hays, P.D.; Kresse, T.M.; Fazio, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    historic flushing of As and Fe from hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) by microbially-mediated reductive dissolution and aging of HFO to crystalline phases. Hydrogeochemical data suggests that the groundwater in the area falls in the mildly reducing (suboxic) to relatively highly reducing (anoxic) zone, and points to reductive dissolution of HFO as the dominant As release mechanism. Spatial variability of gypsum solubility and simultaneous SO42- reduction with co-precipitation of As and sulfide is an important limiting process controlling the concentration of As in groundwater in the area. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Distribution and variability of redox zones controlling spatial variability of arsenic in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer, southeastern Arkansas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharif, M. U.; Davis, R. K.; Steele, K. F.; Kim, B.; Hays, P. D.; Kresse, T. M.; Fazio, J. A.

    2008-07-01

    flushing of As and Fe from hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) by microbially-mediated reductive dissolution and aging of HFO to crystalline phases. Hydrogeochemical data suggests that the groundwater in the area falls in the mildly reducing (suboxic) to relatively highly reducing (anoxic) zone, and points to reductive dissolution of HFO as the dominant As release mechanism. Spatial variability of gypsum solubility and simultaneous SO42- reduction with co-precipitation of As and sulfide is an important limiting process controlling the concentration of As in groundwater in the area.

  5. A coral-based reconstruction of Intertropical Convergence Zone variablity over Central America since 1707

    SciTech Connect

    Linsley, B.K.; Dunbar, R.B.; Mucciarone, D.A.; Wellington, G.M.

    1994-05-15

    Seasonal movements of the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) control precipitation patterns and cloud cover throughout the tropics. In this study the authors have reconstructed seasonal and interannual variability of the eastern Pacific ITCZ from 1984 to 1707 using subseasonal {delta}{sup 18}O analyses on a massive coral from Secas Island (7{degrees}59{prime}N, 82{degrees}3{prime}W) in the Gulf of Chiriqui, Panama. The land area that drains into the Gulf of Chiriqui has served to amplify the rainfall effect on nearshore surface waters and coral {delta}{sup 18}O{sub ppt} composition. During the protracted wet season in Panama, the {delta}{sup 18}O of precipitation ({delta}{sup 18}O{sub ppt}) is reduced on average by 10{per_thousand} and sea surface salinity (SSS) along the western coast is reduced up to 11{per_thousand}. Calibration of the coral {delta}{sup 18}O{sub ppt} from Secas Island against instrumental sea surface temperature (SST), SSS, precipitation and {delta}{sup 18}O{sub ppt} data indicate that seasonal rainfall induced variations in seawater {delta}{sup 18}O are responsible for {approximately}80% of the annual {delta}{sup 18}O variance. The regularity of the reconstructed seasonal ITCZ cycle indicates that over the length of the record the zone of maximum rainfall in the eastern Pacific has always expanded north to at least Panama in every northern hemisphere summer. Significant interannual and interdecadal {delta}{sup 18}O oscillations occur at average periods near 9, 3-7 (ENSO band), 17 and 33 years (listed in order of decreasing variance). As the Gulf of Chiriqui coral {delta}{sup 18}O time series is the first paleoclimatic record of past variations in the ITCZ, other seasonal-resolution reconstructions of the past behavior of the ITCZ are required to test whether the interannual and long-term variability observed in the eastern Pacific ITCZ is more than regional in scale. 79 refs., 13 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Characterization of the variability of the South Pacific Convergence Zone using satellite and reanalysis wind products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, Autumn; Lee, Tong; Jo, Young-Heon; Yan, Xiao-hai

    2016-04-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the largest rain band worldwide during austral summer, is important to atmospheric circulation (including cyclone genesis) and ocean circulation. Previous studies of the SPCZ have focused on parameters such as outgoing longwave radiation or precipitation. However, wind convergence is fundamental causing the variations of these parameters. In this study, the SPCZ variability is examined using ocean surface wind products derived from NASA's QuickSCAT (1999-2009) and ESA's ASCAT (2007 onward) satellite scatterometers and ERA-Interim atmospheric reanalysis (1981 onward). From these products, indices were developed to characterize the SPCZ strength, area, and centroid location. Excellent agreement is found in terms of the temporal variations of the indices derived from the satellites and reanalysis wind products, despite some small differences in the time-mean SPCZ strength. The SPCZ strength, area, and centroid latitude have a dominant seasonal cycle. In contrast, the SPCZ centroid longitude is dominated by intraseasonal variability due to the influence by the Madden-Julian Oscillation. The SPCZ indices are all correlated with El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices. Interannual and intraseasonal variations of SPCZ strength during strong El Niño are approximately twice as large as the respective seasonal variations. SPCZ strength depends more on the intensity of El Niño rather than the central- vs. eastern-Pacific type. The longer ERA-Interim product is also used to examine decadal variations of the SPCZ indices. The change from positive to negative Pacific Decadal Oscillation phase around 1999 resulted in a westward shift of the SPCZ centroid longitude, much smaller interannual swing in centroid latitude, and a decrease in SPCZ area. This study improves the understanding of the variations of the SPCZ on multiple time scales and reveals the variations of SPCZ strength not reported previously. The diagnostics analyses can be

  7. Individual variability in the core interthreshold zone as related to body physique, somatotype, and physical constitution.

    PubMed

    Kakitsuba, Naoshi; Mekjavic, Igor B; Katsuura, Tetsuo

    2009-11-01

    For evaluating the effect of body physique, somatotype, and physical constitution on individual variability in the core interthreshold zone (CIZ), data from 22 healthy young Japanese male subjects were examined. The experiment was carried out in a climatic chamber in which air temperature was maintained at 20-24 degrees C. The subjects' body physique and the maximum work load were measured. Somatotype was predicted from the Heath-Carter Somatotype method. In addition, factors reflecting physical constitution, for example, susceptibility to heat and cold, and quality of sleep were obtained by questionnaire. The subjects wore a water-perfused suit which was perfused with water at a temperature of 25 degrees C and at a rate of 600 cc/min, and exercised on an ergometer at 50% of their maximum work rate for 10-15 min until their sweating rate increased. They then remained continuously seated without exercise until shivering increased. Rectal temperature (T(re)) and skin temperatures at four sites were monitored by thermistors, and sweating rate was measured at the forehead with a sweat rate monitor. Oxygen uptake was monitored with a gas analyzer. The results showed individual variability in the CIZ. According to the reciprocal cross-inhibition (RCI) theory, thermoafferent information from peripheral and core sensors is activated by T(re), mean skin temperature (T(sk)), and their changes. Since T(sk) was relatively unchanged, the data were selected to eliminate the influence of the core cooling rate on the sensor-to-effector pathway before RCI, and the relationship between the CIZ and the various factors was then analyzed. The results revealed that susceptibility to heat showed a good correlation with the CIZ, indicating that individual awareness of heat may change the CIZ due to thermoregulatory behavior. PMID:20009375

  8. Temporal and spatial variability of fecal indicator bacteria in the surf zone off Huntington Beach, CA.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, L K; McGee, C D; Robertson, G L; Noble, M A; Jones, B H

    2006-06-01

    Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations measured in the surf zone off Huntington Beach, CA from July 1998-December 2001 were analyzed with respect to their spatial patterns along 23 km of beach, and temporal variability on time scales from hourly to fortnightly. The majority of samples had bacterial concentrations less than, or equal to, the minimum detection limit, but a small percentage exceeded the California recreational water standards. Areas where coliform bacteria exceeded standards were more prevalent north of the Santa Ana River, whereas enterococci exceedances covered a broad area both north and south of the river. Higher concentrations of bacteria were associated with spring tides. No temporal correspondence was found between these bacterial events and either the timing of cold water pulses near shore due to internal tides, or the presence of southerly swell in the surface wave field. All three fecal indicator bacteria exhibited a diel cycle, but enterococci rebounded to high nighttime values almost as soon as the sun went down, whereas coliform levels were highest near the nighttime low tide, which was also the lower low tide. PMID:16616361

  9. Temporal and spatial variability of fecal indicator bacteria in the surf zone off Huntington Beach, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfeld, L.K.; McGee, C.D.; Robertson, G.L.; Noble, M.A.; Jones, B.H.

    2006-01-01

    Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations measured in the surf zone off Huntington Beach, CA from July 1998-December 2001 were analyzed with respect to their spatial patterns along 23 km of beach, and temporal variability on time scales from hourly to fortnightly. The majority of samples had bacterial concentrations less than, or equal to, the minimum detection limit, but a small percentage exceeded the California recreational water standards. Areas where coliform bacteria exceeded standards were more prevalent north of the Santa Ana River, whereas enterococci exceedances covered a broad area both north and south of the river. Higher concentrations of bacteria were associated with spring tides. No temporal correspondence was found between these bacterial events and either the timing of cold water pulses near shore due to internal tides, or the presence of southerly swell in the surface wave field. All three fecal indicator bacteria exhibited a diel cycle, but enterococci rebounded to high nighttime values almost as soon as the sun went down, whereas coliform levels were highest near the nighttime low tide, which was also the lower low tide. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Variable Holocene deformation above a shallow subduction zone extremely close to the trench

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Taylor, Frederick W.; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Lavier, Luc L.; Frohlich, Cliff; Wallace, Laura M.; Wu, Chung-Che; Sun, Hailong; Papabatu, Alison K.

    2015-01-01

    Histories of vertical crustal motions at convergent margins offer fundamental insights into the relationship between interplate slip and permanent deformation. Moreover, past abrupt motions are proxies for potential tsunamigenic earthquakes and benefit hazard assessment. Well-dated records are required to understand the relationship between past earthquakes and Holocene vertical deformation. Here we measure elevations and 230Th ages of in situ corals raised above the sea level in the western Solomon Islands to build an uplift event history overlying the seismogenic zone, extremely close to the trench (4–40 km). We find marked spatiotemporal heterogeneity in uplift from mid-Holocene to present: some areas accrue more permanent uplift than others. Thus, uplift imposed during the 1 April 2007 Mw 8.1 event may be retained in some locations but removed in others before the next megathrust rupture. This variability suggests significant changes in strain accumulation and the interplate thrust process from one event to the next. PMID:26123872

  11. Variable Holocene deformation above a shallow subduction zone extremely close to the trench.

    PubMed

    Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Taylor, Frederick W; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Lavier, Luc L; Frohlich, Cliff; Wallace, Laura M; Wu, Chung-Che; Sun, Hailong; Papabatu, Alison K

    2015-01-01

    Histories of vertical crustal motions at convergent margins offer fundamental insights into the relationship between interplate slip and permanent deformation. Moreover, past abrupt motions are proxies for potential tsunamigenic earthquakes and benefit hazard assessment. Well-dated records are required to understand the relationship between past earthquakes and Holocene vertical deformation. Here we measure elevations and (230)Th ages of in situ corals raised above the sea level in the western Solomon Islands to build an uplift event history overlying the seismogenic zone, extremely close to the trench (4-40 km). We find marked spatiotemporal heterogeneity in uplift from mid-Holocene to present: some areas accrue more permanent uplift than others. Thus, uplift imposed during the 1 April 2007 Mw 8.1 event may be retained in some locations but removed in others before the next megathrust rupture. This variability suggests significant changes in strain accumulation and the interplate thrust process from one event to the next. PMID:26123872

  12. Variability in the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone and Pack Ice in Observations and NCAR CESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeve, J. C.; Campbell, G. G.; Holland, M. M.; Landrum, L.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice around Antarctica reached another record high extent in September 2014, recording a maximum extent of more than 20 million km2 for the first time since the modern satellite data record began in October 1978. This follows previous record maxima in 2012 and 2013, resulting in an overall increase in Antarctic September sea ice extent of 1.3% per decade since 1979. Several explanations have been put forward to explain the increasing trends, such as anomalous short-term wind patterns that both grow and spread out the ice, and freshening of the surface ocean layer from increased melting of floating ice from the continent. These positive trends in Antarctic sea ice are at odds with climate model forecasts that suggest the sea ice should be declining in response to increasing greenhouse gases and stratospheric ozone depletion. While the reasons for the increases in total extent remain poorly understood, it is likely that these changes are not just impacting the total ice extent, but also the distribution of pack ice, the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and polynyas, with important ramifications for phytoplankton productivity that in turn impact zooplankton, fish, sea birds and marine mammals. This study evaluates changes in the distribution of the pack ice, polynyas and the marginal ice zone around Antarctica from two sea ice algorithms, the NASA Team and the Bootstrap. These results are further compared with climate model simulations from the CESM large ensemble output. Seasonal analysis of the different ice types using NASA Team and Bootstrap shows that during ice advance, the ice advances as pack ice, with a seasonal peak in September (broader peak for Bootstrap), and as the pack ice begins to retreat, it first converts to a wide area of MIZ, that reaches its peak around November (NASA Team) or December (Bootstrap). CESM also shows a similar seasonal cycle, with a peak in the pack ice in August, and a December/January peak in the MIZ. Seasonal variability and trends are

  13. Variability of seismic source spectra derived from cohesive-zone models of symmetrical and asymmetrical ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Y.; Shearer, P. M.

    2014-12-01

    Earthquake stress drops are often estimated from far-field body-wave spectra using measurements of seismic moment, corner frequency, and a specific theoretical model of rupture behavior. Perhaps, the most widely-used model is from Madariaga (1976), who performed finite-difference calculations for a singular crack radially expanding at a constant speed and showed that fc=kβ/afc = k beta/a, where fcfc is spherically averaged corner frequency, βbeta is the shear-wave speed, aa is the radius of the circular source, and kk = 0.32 and 0.21 for P and S waves, respectively, assuming the rupture speed VrVr = 0.9βbeta. Since stress in the Madariaga model is singular at the rupture front, the finite mesh size and smoothing procedures may have affected the resulting corner frequencies. Here we investigate the behavior of source spectra derived from dynamic models of radially expanding rupture with a cohesive zone that prevents a stress singularity at the rupture front. We find that in the small-scale yielding limit where the cohesive-zone size becomes much smaller than the source dimension, P- and S-wave corner frequencies of far-field body-wave spectra are systematically larger than those predicted by Madariaga (1976). In particular, the model with rupture speed VrVr = 0.9βbeta shows that kk = 0.38 for P waves and kk = 0.26 for S waves, which are 19 and 24 percent larger, respectively, than those of Madariaga (1976). Thus for these ruptures, the application of the Madariaga model overestimates stress drops by a factor of 1.7. We further address the validity of a standard assumption on a symmetrical circular source applied to real earthquakes. Our results suggest that up to a factor of two differences in the spherical average of corner frequencies are expected simply from the variability in source geometry and rupture styles, translating into a factor of eight differences in estimated stress drops. In addition, the large dependence of corner frequency on take-off angle

  14. Nutrients Seasonal Variability and Carbonate System Dynamics in the Laptev Sea coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savelieva, Nina; Pipko, Irina; Semiletov, Igor

    2010-05-01

    The Arctic ocean has the broadest shelf in the World ocean: the continental shelves occupy about 36% of the Arctic oceanic area. Morever, greater than 90% of all organic carbon burial occurs in sediments depositing on deltas, continental shelves , and upper continental slopes, and the significant portion of organic carbon withdraw is occurred over the Siberian shelf (Macdonald et al., 2008). The coastal zone plays an important role in the East Siberian Arctic land-shelf-basin system, because the major transport of fresh water, dissolved and solid material into the Arctic Ocean is determined by 1) the riverine discharges, and 2) coastal erosion. Production in the Arctic is highly seasonal, and it is important to consider the magnitude of seasonal variations in nutrients. Here we present the results (nutrients, parameters of the carbonate system, and oxygen) obtained during ice-covered season (April of 2002 and 2007) and open water season (September of 2000 and 2005) over the south-eastern part of the Laptev Sea which is under strong influence of the Lena river and coastal erosion. High spatial-temporal variability in nutrients (ammonium, nitrates, nitrites, phosphate, and silicates) and carbonate parameters (pH, Talk, and pCO2) distributions has been found. We suggest that relatively high (vs entire oligotrophic Laptev and East Siberian seas) productivity of the coastal zone is related not only to the influence of the river inputs, but also the coastal erosion, enriching the coastal waters in nutrients and terrestrial organic matter and to the close coupling between the water and sediment, assuring a rapid reutilization of regenerated elements. Highest anomalies of all parameters (for instance: pCO2 up to 4000mkatm) are associated with the areas strongly affected by coastal erosion. References Macdonald R.W., Anderson L.G., Christensen J.P., Miller L.A., Semiletov I.P., and R. Stein, 2008. The Arctic Ocean: budgets and fluxes, In "Carbon and Nutrient Fluxes in

  15. Variable power distribution for zoned regeneration of an electrically heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Bhatia, Garima [Bangalore, IN; Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2012-04-03

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with multiple zones, an electric heater and a control module. The electrical heater includes heater segments, which each correspond with a respective one of the zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and is proximate with the PM filter. The control module selectively applies a first energy level to a first one of the zones via a first one of the heater segments to initiate regeneration in the first zone. The control module also selectively applies a second energy level that is less than the first energy level to a second one of the zones via a second one of the heater segments to initiate regeneration in the second zone.

  16. Spatial and temporal variability of water salinity in an ephemeral, arid-zone river, central Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costelloe, Justin F.; Grayson, Rodger B.; McMahon, Thomas A.; Argent, Robert M.

    2005-10-01

    This study describes the spatial and temporal variability of water salinity of the Neales-Peake, an ephemeral river system in the arid Lake Eyre basin of central Australia. Saline to hypersaline waterholes occur in the lower reaches of the Neales-Peake catchment and lie downstream of subcatchments containing artesian mound springs. Flood pulses are fresh in the upper reaches of the rivers (<200 mg l-1). In the salt-affected reaches, flood pulses become increasingly saline during their recession. It is hypothesized that leakage from the Great Artesian Basin deposits salt at the surface. This salt is then transported by infrequent runoff events into the main river system over long periods of time. The bank/floodplain store downstream of salt-affected catchments contains high salt concentrations, and this salt is mobilized during the flow recession when bank/floodplain storage discharges into the channel. The salinity of the recession increases as the percentage of flow derived from this storage increases. A simple conceptual model was developed for investigating the salt movement processes during flow events. The model structure for transport of water and salt in the Neales-Peake catchment generated similar spatial and temporal patterns of salt distribution in the floodplain/bank storage and water flow as observed during flow events in 2000-02. However, more field-data collection and modelling are required for improved calibration and description of salt transport and storage processes, particularly with regard to the number of stores required to represent the salt distribution in the upper zone of the soil profile.

  17. Holocene climate variability in the winter rainfall zone of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeab, S.; Stuut, J.-B. W.; Schneider, R. R.; Siebel, W.

    2012-06-01

    We established a multi-proxy time series comprising analyses of major elements in bulk sediments, Sr and Nd isotopes, grain size of terrigenous fraction, and δ18O and δ13C in tests of Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral) from a marine sediment sequence recovered off the Orange River. The records reveal coherent patterns of variability that reflect changes in wind strength, precipitation over the river catchments, and upwelling of cold and nutrient-rich coastal waters off Western South Africa. The wettest episode of the Holocene in the Winter Rainfall Zone (WRZ) of South Africa occurred during the "Little Ice Age" (700-100 yr BP). Wet phases were accompanied by strengthened coastal water upwellings, a decrease of Agulhas water leakage into the Southern Atlantic, and a reduced dust incursion over Antarctica. A continuous aridification trend in the WRZ and a weakening of the Southern Benguela Upwelling System (BUS) between 9000 and 5500 yr BP parallel with evidence of a poleward shift of the austral mid-latitude westerlies and an enhanced leakage of warm Agulhas water into the Southeastern Atlantic. The temporal relationship between precipitation changes in the WRZ, the thermal state of the coastal surface water, and variation of dust incursion over Antarctica suggests a causal link that most likely was related to latitudinal shifts of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies and changes in the amount of Agulhas water leakage into the Southern BUS. Our results of the mid-Holocene time interval may serve as an analogue to a possible long-term consequence of the current and future southward shift of the westerlies that may result in a decline of rainfall over Southwest Africa and a weakened upwelling with implication for phytoplankton productivity and fish stocks. Furthermore, warming of the coastal surface water as a result of warm Agulhas water incursion into the Southern BUS may affect coastal fog formation that is critical as moisture source for the endemic flora of

  18. Holocene climate variability in the winter rainfall zone of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeab, S.; Stuut, J.-B. W.; Schneider, R. R.; Siebel, W.

    2013-10-01

    We established a multi-proxy time series comprising analyses of major elements in bulk sediments, Sr and Nd isotopes, grain size of terrigenous fraction, and δ18O and δ13C in tests of Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral) from a marine sediment sequence recovered off the Orange River. The records reveal coherent patterns of variability that reflect changes in wind strength, precipitation over the river catchments, and upwelling of cold and nutrient-rich coastal waters off western South Africa. The wettest episode of the Holocene in the winter rainfall zone (WRZ) of South Africa occurred during the "Little Ice Age" (700-100 cal years BP) most likely in response to a northward shift of the austral westerlies. Wet phases and strengthened coastal water upwellings are companied by a decrease of Agulhas water leakage into the South Atlantic and a reduced dust incursion over Antarctica, as indicated in previous studies. A continuous aridification trend in the WRZ and a weakening of the southern Benguela Upwelling System (BUS) between 9000 and 5500 cal years BP parallel with increase of dust deposition over Antarctica and an enhanced leakage of warm Agulhas water into the eastern South Atlantic. The temporal relationship between precipitation changes in the WRZ, the thermal state of the coastal surface water, and leakage of warm water in the South Atlantic, and variation of dust incursion over Antarctica suggests a causal link that most likely was related to latitudinal shifts of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies. Our results of the mid-Holocene time interval may serve as an analogue to a possible long-term consequence of the current and future southward shift of the westerlies. Furthermore, warming of the coastal surface water as a result of warm Agulhas water incursion into the southern BUS may affect coastal fog formation.

  19. Holocene climate variability in the Winter Rainfall Zone of South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weldeab, S.; Stuut, J.-B. W.; Schneider, R. R.; Siebel, W.

    2013-05-01

    We established a multi-proxy time series comprising analyses of major elements in bulk sediments, Sr and Nd isotopes and grain size of terrigenous fraction, and δ18O and δ13C in tests of Neogloboquadrina pachyderma (sinistral) from a marine sediment sequence recovered off the Orange River. The records reveal coherent patterns of variability that reflect changes in wind strength, precipitation over the river catchments, and upwelling of cold and nutrient-rich coastal waters off western South Africa. The wettest episode of the Holocene in the Winter Rainfall Zone (WRZ) of South Africa occurred during the "Little Ice Age" (700-100 yr BP). Wet phases were accompanied by strengthened coastal water upwellings, a decrease of Agulhas water leakage into the southern Atlantic, and a reduced dust incursion over Antarctica. A continuous aridification trend in the WRZ and a weakening of the southern Benguela Upwelling System (BUS) between 9000 and 5500 yr BP parallel with increase of dust deposition over Antarctica and an enhanced leakage of warm Agulhas water into the southeastern Atlantic. The temporal relationship between precipitation changes in the WRZ, the thermal state of the coastal surface water, and leakage of warm water in southern Atlantic, and variation of dust incursion over Antarctica suggests a causal link that most likely was related to latitudinal shifts of the Southern Hemisphere westerlies. Our results of the mid-Holocene time interval may serve as an analogue to a possible long-term consequence of the current and future southward shift of the westerlies that may result in a decline of rainfall over southwest Africa and a weakened upwelling with implication for phytoplankton productivity and fish stocks. Furthermore, warming of the coastal surface water as a result of warm Agulhas water incursion into the southern BUS may affect coastal fog formation that is critical as moisture source for the endemic flora of the Namaqualand.

  20. How Well Does Zone Sampling Based On Soil Electrical Conductivity Maps Represent Soil Variability

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zone soil sampling is a method in which a field sampling is based on identifying homogenous areas using an easy to measure ancillary attribute such as apparent soil electrical conductivity (ECa). This study determined if ECa-directed zone sampling in two fields in northeastern Colorado could correc...

  1. Spatial variability of time-constant slip rates on the San Jacinto fault zone, southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blisniuk, K.; Oskin, M. E.; Sharp, W. D.; Meriaux, A. B.; Rockwell, T. K.; Fletcher, K.; Owen, L. A.

    2011-12-01

    In southern California, the San Andreas (SAF) and San Jacinto fault (SJF) zones account for 70-80% of the relative dextral motion between the Pacific and North American plates, with some studies suggesting that the SJF zone may be the dominant structure. However, few slip rate measurements are available for the SJF zone, making it difficult to evaluate the partitioning of deformation across the plate boundary. To more reliably constrain the late Quaternary slip history of the SJF zone, we measured the displacement of well-preserved alluvial fans along the Clark and Coyote Creek fault strands of the SJF zone using field mapping and high-resolution LiDAR topographic data, and dated the fans using U-series on pedogenic carbonate clast-coatings and in situ cosmogenic 10Be. Our results from four sites along the Clark fault strand and two sites along the Coyote Creek fault strand indicate that late Quaternary slip rates have fluctuated along their length but have remained constant since the late Pleistocene. Slip rates along the Clark fault strand over the past 50-30 kyr decrease southward over a distance of ~60 km from ~13 mm/yr at Anza, to 8.9 ± 2.0 mm/yr at Rockhouse Canyon, and 1.5 ± 0.4 mm/yr near the SE end of the Santa Rosa Mountains, probably due to transfer of slip from the Clark fault strand to the Coyote Creek fault strand and nearby zones of distributed deformation. Slip rates of up to ~14 to 18 mm/yr summed across the southern SJF zone suggest that since the latest Pleistocene, the SJF zone may rival the southern SAF zone in accommodating deformation across the Pacific-North America Plate boundary.

  2. Measuring spatial variability of vapor flux to characterize vadose-zone VOC sources: Flow-cell experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mainhagu, J.; Morrison, C.; Truex, M.; Oostrom, M.; Brusseau, M. L.

    2014-10-01

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local-extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local-extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  3. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-08-05

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. We found that the results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  4. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-08-05

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. Amore » well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. We found that the results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.« less

  5. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, C.; Truex, M.; Oostrom, M.; Brusseau, M.L.

    2014-01-01

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points. PMID:25171394

  6. Measuring spatial variability of vapor flux to characterize vadose-zone VOC sources: flow-cell experiments.

    PubMed

    Mainhagu, J; Morrison, C; Truex, M; Oostrom, M; Brusseau, M L

    2014-10-15

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local-extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local-extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points. PMID:25171394

  7. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-10-20

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. The results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  8. Redox-variability and controls in subduction zones from an iron-isotope perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebel, O.; Sossi, P. A.; Bénard, A.; Wille, M.; Vroon, P. Z.; Arculus, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    An ongoing controversy in mantle geochemistry concerns the oxidation state of the sources of island arc lavas (IAL). Three key factors control oxidation-reduction (redox) of IAL sources: (i) metasomatism of the mantle wedge by fluids and/or melts, liberated from the underlying subducted slab; (ii) the oxidation state of the wedge prior to melting and metasomatism; and (iii) the loss of melt from IAL sources. Subsequently, magmatic differentiation by fractional crystallisation, possible crustal contamination and degassing of melts en route to and at the surface can further modify the redox states of IAL. The remote nature of sub-arc processes and the complex interplay between them render direct investigations difficult. However, a possible gauge for redox-controlled, high-temperature pre-eruptive differentiation conditions is variations in stable Fe isotope compositions (expressed here as δ57Fe) in erupting IAL because Fe isotopes can preserve a record of sub-surface mass transfer reactions involving the major element Fe. Here we report Fe isotope compositions of bulk IAL along the active Banda arc, Indonesia, which is well known for a prominent subducted sediment input. In conjunction with other arc rocks, δ57Fe in erupted Banda IAL indicates that fractional crystallisation and possibly crustal contamination primarily control their Fe isotope signatures. When corrected for fractional crystallisation and filtered for contamination, arc magmas that had variable sediment melt contributions in their sources show no resolvable co-variation of δ57Fe with radiogenic isotope tracers. This indicates that crustal recycling in the form of subducted sediment does not alter the Fe isotope character of arc lavas, in agreement with mass balance estimates. Primitive sources of IAL, however, are clearly isotopically lighter than those sourced beneath mid-ocean ridges, indicating either preferential Fe3+-depletion in the mantle wedge by prior, δ57Fe-heavy melt extraction, and

  9. Influence of riparian seepage zones on nitrate variability in two agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian seepage zones are one of the primary pathways of groundwater transport to headwater streams. While seeps have been recognized for their contributions to streamflow, there is little information on how seeps affect stream water quality. The objective of this study was to examine the influence...

  10. Quantifying soil and critical zone variability in a forested catchment through digital soil mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying catchment scale soil property variation yields insights into critical zone evolution and function. The objective of this study was to quantify and predict the spatial distribution of soil properties within a high elevation forested catchment in southern AZ, USA using a combined set of di...

  11. Discriminatory power of MicroResp analyses across variable spatial scales in semiarid ecological zones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indirect assessment of enzymatic activity potential via substrate induced respiration is a common tool used to evaluate variability in soil microbial activity induced by environmental or management variables. The MicroResp™ method for total soil sample catabolic profiling has been employed to estima...

  12. Persistent decadal-scale rainfall variability in the tropical South Pacific Convergence Zone through the past six centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maupin, C. R.; Partin, J. W.; Shen, C.-C.; Quinn, T. M.; Lin, K.; Taylor, F. W.; Banner, J. L.; Thirumalai, K.; Sinclair, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    Modern Pacific decadal variability (PDV) has global impacts; hence records of PDV from the pre-instrumental period are needed to better inform models that are used to project future climate variability. We focus here on reconstructing rainfall in the western tropical Pacific (Solomon Islands; ~ 9.5° S, ~160° E), a region directly influenced by PDV, using cave deposits (stalagmite). A relationship is developed between δ18O variations in the stalagmite and local rainfall amount to produce a 600 yr record of rainfall variability from the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). We present evidence for large (~1.5 m), abrupt, and periodic changes in total annual rainfall amount on decadal to multidecadal timescales since 1423 ± 5 CE (Common Era) in the Solomon Islands. The timing of the decadal changes in rainfall inferred from the 20th century portion of the stalagmite δ18O record coincides with previously identified decadal shifts in PDV-related Pacific ocean-atmosphere behavior (Clement et al., 2011; Deser et al., 2004). The Solomons record of PDV is not associated with variations in external forcings, but rather results from internal climate variability. The 600 yr Solomon Islands stalagmite δ18O record indicates that decadal oscillations in rainfall are a persistent characteristic of SPCZ-related climate variability.

  13. [Shell Variability of the Terrestrial Mollusk Chondrula tridens (Pulmonata, Enidae) in the Forest-Steppe Zone of the Volga Upland].

    PubMed

    Komarova, E V; Smirnov, D G; Stoiko, T G

    2015-01-01

    Shell variability of the steppe mollusk Chondrula tridens from 18 micropopulations in the forest-steppe zone of the Volga Upland was studied. It was found that larger specimens of Ch. tridens with well-developed teeth inhabit the central and eastern parts of the territory. Specimens in the northwestern part of the upland are characterized by small shells, the highest degree of roundness, and mostly reduced teeth in the mouth. The main factors that determine variability in the size and proportions of shells are the average daily temperatures increasing from the northwest to the south, the reduction in the total precipitation, the decrease in the soil moisture content, and, possibly, the increased content of carbonates in the soil. PMID:26852480

  14. Seasonal Variability in Vadose zone biodegradation at a crude oil pipeline rupture site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sihota, Natasha J.; Trost, Jared J.; Bekins, Barbara; Berg, Andrew M.; Delin, Geoffrey N.; Mason, Brent E.; Warren, Ean; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Understanding seasonal changes in natural attenuation processes is critical for evaluating source-zone longevity and informing management decisions. The seasonal variations of natural attenuation were investigated through measurements of surficial CO2 effluxes, shallow soil CO2 radiocarbon contents, subsurface gas concentrations, soil temperature, and volumetric water contents during a 2-yr period. Surficial CO2 effluxes varied seasonally, with peak values of total soil respiration (TSR) occurring in the late spring and summer. Efflux and radiocarbon data indicated that the fractional contributions of natural soil respiration (NSR) and contaminant soil respiration (CSR) to TSR varied seasonally. The NSR dominated in the spring and summer, and CSR dominated in the fall and winter. Subsurface gas concentrations also varied seasonally, with peak values of CO2 and CH4 occurring in the fall and winter. Vadose zone temperatures and subsurface CO2 concentrations revealed a correlation between contaminant respiration and temperature. A time lag of 5 to 7 mo between peak subsurface CO2 concentrations and peak surface efflux is consistent with travel-time estimates for subsurface gas migration. Periods of frozen soils coincided with depressed surface CO2 effluxes and elevated CO2 concentrations, pointing to the temporary presence of an ice layer that inhibited gas transport. Quantitative reactive transport simulations demonstrated aspects of the conceptual model developed from field measurements. Overall, results indicated that source-zone natural attenuation (SZNA) rates and gas transport processes varied seasonally and that the average annual SZNA rate estimated from periodic surface efflux measurements is 60% lower than rates determined from measurements during the summer.

  15. Analysis of the variability of temperature gradient in the ocean frontal zones based on satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartushinsky, A. V.; Sidorenko, A. Y.

    2013-10-01

    AVHRR MCSST data for the periods 1982-2000 (mean weekly data) were used to calculate mean gradient fields in the ocean for different periods of time. Three-month averaged sea surface temperature gradients (SSTG) and their mean seasonal variations have been studied for 25 points in the large-scale oceanic fronts zones. Major oceanic fronts in the Atlantic and Pacific have been identified and compared in literature. In the North Atlantic and Pacific, the areas under study were the North Polar Front and Subpolar Fronts. In the South Atlantic and Pacific we studied the region of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) and the fronts formed by this current, known as the South Polar Front, and the Subantarctic Front. SSTG were also calculated for El Niño (Southeast Pacific) and Benguela Current (Southeast Atlantic). In warm periods seasonal SSTG in the North Atlantic markedly increased and exhibit some interannual cycles. The correlation between the North Atlantic Oscillation index and seasonal SSTG for a single point in the Gulf Stream zone can be the key point for evaluation of heat transfer by the currents to the coast of East Europe. In the Southern Atlantic, the SSTG values are low during the cold period (summer in the southern hemisphere) in the ACC zone and increase in the warm season (winter in the southern hemisphere). It also exhibits interannual cycles. In the Northwest Pacific for some points in the Subpolar Front the SSTG values are high in the cold period (winter). Here at seven points in the spring of 1993 and 2000 the calculations disclosed significant increase of the gradient. In these years, the anomalous SSTG in Subpolar Front and South Polar Front were found to vary synchronously in both hemispheres, with maximum intensity in spring (North Pacific) and in summer (South Pacific). Mean annual SSTG in the El Niño zone and south oscillation index have been found to exhibit some correlation. Major jet currents periodically form high-gradient temperature

  16. Quantitative Analysis of Spatial Variability of Neo-tectonic Indices along the Sabzpushan Fault Zone within the Zagros Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nezamzadeh, I.; Faghih, A.; Oveisi, B.

    2014-12-01

    The evaluation of geomorphic indices of active tectonics using remote sensing and GIS offer an appropriate method to obtain quantitative data, which is crucial for determining the seismic potential of a fault zone in semiarid areas where tectonic rates are low-to-moderate and quaternary dating is limited. In this study, we investigate poorly understood Sabzpushan Fault Zone (SFZ) within the central part of the Zagros Mountains for spatial variability of neo-tectonic indices. This fault zone is characterized by differential uplift, high neo-tectonic signature and seismic activities in recent past. Field studies have revealed that the SFZ is dividable into three morpho-tectonic segments (northern, middle and southern) with en-echelon array. The neo-tectonic activity of each segment is obtained through DEM analysis using geomorphic indices including the mountain front sinuosity, hypsometric integral, asymmetry factor, stream length-gradient index and valley floor width to valley height ratio. The results illustrate differentiation in the states of activity between those segments at which the middle segment show the highest value. For instance, the mean value of stream-gradient index (SL) of the middle segment is 597.7, whereas this index is 387.5 and 535.4 for the northern and southern segments respectively. This pattern of variation is consistent with recent seismicity, preserved fault scarps, triangular facets and deeply incised valleys along the middle segment of the SFZ.

  17. Seasonal variability of the oxygen minimum zone off Peru in a high-resolution regional coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Oscar; Dewitte, Boris; Montes, Ivonne; Garçon, Veronique; Ramos, Marcel; Paulmier, Aurélien; Pizarro, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    In addition to being one of the most productive upwelling systems, the oceanic region off Peru is embedded in one of the most extensive oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the world ocean. The dynamics of the OMZ off Peru remain uncertain, partly due to the scarcity of data and to the ubiquitous role of mesoscale activity on the circulation and biogeochemistry. Here we use a high-resolution coupled physical/biogeochemical model simulation to investigate the seasonal variability of the OMZ off Peru. The focus is on characterizing the seasonal cycle in dissolved O2 (DO) eddy flux at the OMZ boundaries, including the coastal domain, viewed here as the eastern boundary of the OMZ, considering that the mean DO eddy flux in these zones has a significant contribution to the total DO flux. The results indicate that the seasonal variations of the OMZ can be interpreted as resulting from the seasonal modulation of the mesoscale activity. Along the coast, despite the increased seasonal low DO water upwelling, the DO peaks homogeneously over the water column and within the Peru Undercurrent (PUC) in austral winter, which results from mixing associated with the increase in both the intraseasonal wind variability and baroclinic instability of the PUC. The coastal ocean acts therefore as a source of DO in austral winter for the OMZ core, through eddy-induced offshore transport that is also shown to peak in austral winter. In the open ocean, the OMZ can be divided vertically into two zones: an upper zone above 400 m, where the mean DO eddy flux is larger on average than the mean seasonal DO flux and varies seasonally, and a lower part, where the mean seasonal DO flux exhibits vertical-zonal propagating features that share similar characteristics than those of the energy flux associated with the annual extratropical Rossby waves. At the OMZ meridional boundaries where the mean DO eddy flux is large, the DO eddy flux has also a marked seasonal cycle that peaks in austral winter (spring

  18. Systematically variable planktonic carbon metabolism along a land-to-lake gradient in a Great Lakes coastal zone

    PubMed Central

    Weinke, Anthony D.; Kendall, Scott T.; Kroll, Daniel J.; Strickler, Eric A.; Weinert, Maggie E.; Holcomb, Thomas M.; Defore, Angela A.; Dila, Deborah K.; Snider, Michael J.; Gereaux, Leon C.; Biddanda, Bopaiah A.

    2014-01-01

    During the summers of 2002–2013, we measured rates of carbon metabolism in surface waters of six sites across a land-to-lake gradient from the upstream end of drowned river-mouth Muskegon Lake (ML) (freshwater estuary) to 19 km offshore in Lake Michigan (LM) (a Great Lake). Despite considerable inter-year variability, the average rates of gross production (GP), respiration (R) and net production (NP) across ML (604 ± 58, 222 ± 22 and 381 ± 52 µg C L−1 day−1, respectively) decreased steeply in the furthest offshore LM site (22 ± 3, 55 ± 17 and −33 ± 15 µg C L−1day−1, respectively). Along this land-to-lake gradient, GP decreased by 96 ± 1%, whereas R only decreased by 75 ± 9%, variably influencing the carbon balance along this coastal zone. All ML sites were consistently net autotrophic (mean GP:R = 2.7), while the furthest offshore LM site was net heterotrophic (mean GP:R = 0.4). Our study suggests that pelagic waters of this Great Lakes coastal estuary are net carbon sinks that transition into net carbon sources offshore. Reactive and dynamic estuarine coastal zones everywhere may contribute similarly to regional and global carbon cycles. PMID:25954055

  19. Long-term spatio-temporal precipitation variability in arid-zone Australia and implications for groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acworth, R. Ian; Rau, Gabriel C.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; Jensen, Evan; Leggett, Keith

    2016-06-01

    Quantifying dryland groundwater recharge as a function of climate variability is becoming increasingly important in the face of a globally depleted resource, yet this remains a major challenge due to lack of adequate monitoring and the complexity of processes involved. A previously unpublished and unique dataset of high density and frequency rainfall measurements is presented, from the Fowlers Gap Arid Zone Research Station in western New South Wales (Australia). The dataset confirms extreme spatial and temporal variability in rainfall distribution which has been observed in other dryland areas and is generally explained by the dominance of individual storm cells. Contrary to previous observations, however, this dataset contains only a few localised storm cells despite the variability. The implications of spatiotemporal rainfall variability on the estimation of groundwater recharge is assessed and show that the most likely recharge mechanism is through indirect and localised, rather than direct, recharge. Examples of rainfall and stream gauge height illustrate runoff generation when a spatially averaged threshold of 15-25 mm (depending on the antecedent moisture conditions) is exceeded. Preliminary assessment of groundwater levels illustrates that the regional water table is much deeper than anticipated, especially considering the expected magnitude of indirect and localised recharge. A possible explanation is that pathways for indirect and localised recharge are inhibited by the large quantities of Aeolian dust observed at the site. Runoff readily occurs with water collecting in surface lakes which slowly dry and disappear. Assuming direct groundwater recharge under these conditions will significantly overestimate actual recharge.

  20. Long-term spatio-temporal precipitation variability in arid-zone Australia and implications for groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acworth, R. Ian; Rau, Gabriel C.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; Jensen, Evan; Leggett, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Quantifying dryland groundwater recharge as a function of climate variability is becoming increasingly important in the face of a globally depleted resource, yet this remains a major challenge due to lack of adequate monitoring and the complexity of processes involved. A previously unpublished and unique dataset of high density and frequency rainfall measurements is presented, from the Fowlers Gap Arid Zone Research Station in western New South Wales (Australia). The dataset confirms extreme spatial and temporal variability in rainfall distribution which has been observed in other dryland areas and is generally explained by the dominance of individual storm cells. Contrary to previous observations, however, this dataset contains only a few localised storm cells despite the variability. The implications of spatiotemporal rainfall variability on the estimation of groundwater recharge is assessed and show that the most likely recharge mechanism is through indirect and localised, rather than direct, recharge. Examples of rainfall and stream gauge height illustrate runoff generation when a spatially averaged threshold of 15-25 mm (depending on the antecedent moisture conditions) is exceeded. Preliminary assessment of groundwater levels illustrates that the regional water table is much deeper than anticipated, especially considering the expected magnitude of indirect and localised recharge. A possible explanation is that pathways for indirect and localised recharge are inhibited by the large quantities of Aeolian dust observed at the site. Runoff readily occurs with water collecting in surface lakes which slowly dry and disappear. Assuming direct groundwater recharge under these conditions will significantly overestimate actual recharge.

  1. Defining an Abrasion Index for Lunar Surface Systems as a Function of Dust Interaction Modes and Variable Concentration Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected issues were encountered during the Apollo era of lunar exploration due to detrimental abrasion of materials upon exposure to the fine-grained, irregular shaped dust on the surface of the Moon. For critical design features involving contact with the lunar surface and for astronaut safety concerns, operational concepts and dust tolerance must be considered in the early phases of mission planning. To systematically define material selection criteria, dust interaction can be characterized by two-body or three-body abrasion testing, and subcategorically by physical interactions of compression, rolling, sliding and bending representing specific applications within the system. Two-body abrasion occurs when a single particle or asperity slides across a given surface removing or displacing material. Three-body abrasion occurs when multiple particles interact with a solid surface, or in between two surfaces, allowing the abrasives to freely rotate and interact with the material(s), leading to removal or displacement of mass. Different modes of interaction are described in this paper along with corresponding types of tests that can be utilized to evaluate each configuration. In addition to differential modes of abrasion, variable concentrations of dust in different zones can also be considered for a given system design and operational protocol. These zones include: (1) outside the habitat where extensive dust exposure occurs, (2) in a transitional zone such as an airlock or suitport, and (3) inside the habitat or spacesuit with a low particle count. These zones can be used to help define dust interaction frequencies, and corresponding risks to the systems and/or crew can be addressed by appropriate mitigation strategies. An abrasion index is introduced that includes the level of risk, R, the hardness of the mineralogy, H, the severity of the abrasion mode, S, and the frequency of particle interactions, F.

  2. Defining an abrasion index for lunar surface systems as a function of dust interaction modes and variable concentration zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W.

    2011-11-01

    Unexpected issues were encountered during the Apollo era of lunar exploration due to detrimental abrasion of materials upon exposure to the fine-grained, irregular shaped dust on the surface of the Moon. For critical design features involving contact with the lunar surface and for astronaut safety concerns, operational concepts and dust tolerance must be considered in the early phases of mission planning. To systematically define material selection criteria, dust interaction can be characterized by two-body or three-body abrasion testing, and sub-categorically by physical interactions of compression, rolling, sliding, and bending representing specific applications within the system. Two-body abrasion occurs when a single particle or asperity slides across a given surface removing or displacing material. Three-body abrasion occurs when multiple particles interact with a solid surface, or in between two surfaces, allowing the abrasives to freely rotate and interact with the material(s), leading to removal or displacement of mass. Different modes of interaction are described in this paper along with corresponding types of tests that can be utilized to evaluate each configuration. In addition to differential modes of abrasion, variable concentrations of dust in different zones can also be considered for a given system design and operational protocol. These zones include (1) outside the habitat where extensive dust exposure occurs, (2) in a transitional zone such as an airlock or suitport, and (3) inside the habitat or spacesuit with a low particle count. These zones can be used to help define dust interaction frequencies, and corresponding risks to the systems and/or crew can be addressed by appropriate mitigation strategies. An abrasion index is introduced that includes the level of risk, R, the hardness of the mineralogy, H, the severity of the abrasion mode, S, and the frequency of particle interactions, F.

  3. Climatological perspectives, oceanographic and meteorological, on variability in the subtropical convergence zone in the northwestern Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanson, Howard P.; Cornillon, Peter; Halliwell, George R., Jr.; Halliwell, Vicki

    1991-01-01

    The large-scale climatological environment of the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX) is described, with emphasis on the largest scales. Both long-term and annual sea surface temperature (SST) variability is discussed; a climatology of the west-central North Atlantic, derived from various sets of data obtained during the intensive phases of January-March, is presented, and the meteorological and oceanographic context for FASINEX is thus established. Surface marine observations and SST variability are discussed, and the marine meteorology of the FASINEX area is examined in terms of the surface pressure and winds, the sea-air temperature difference, and the cloud cover. Near 28 deg N in February is found to be a favorable time and place to observe large mean temperature gradients and downward Ekman pumping. The large-scale processes that set up the favorable environment for frontal activity are not limited to the winter months.

  4. Assessment of the spatial variability in tall wheatgrass forage using LANDSAT 8 satellite imagery to delineate potential management zones.

    PubMed

    Cicore, Pablo; Serrano, João; Shahidian, Shakib; Sousa, Adelia; Costa, José Luis; da Silva, José Rafael Marques

    2016-09-01

    Little information is available on the degree of within-field variability of potential production of Tall wheatgrass (Thinopyrum ponticum) forage under unirrigated conditions. The aim of this study was to characterize the spatial variability of the accumulated biomass (AB) without nutritional limitations through vegetation indexes, and then use this information to determine potential management zones. A 27-×-27-m grid cell size was chosen and 84 biomass sampling areas (BSA), each 2 m(2) in size, were georeferenced. Nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers were applied after an initial cut at 3 cm height. At 500 °C day, the AB from each sampling area, was collected and evaluated. The spatial variability of AB was estimated more accurately using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), calculated from LANDSAT 8 images obtained on 24 November 2014 (NDVInov) and 10 December 2014 (NDVIdec) because the potential AB was highly associated with NDVInov and NDVIdec (r (2)  = 0.85 and 0.83, respectively). These models between the potential AB data and NDVI were evaluated by root mean squared error (RMSE) and relative root mean squared error (RRMSE). This last coefficient was 12 and 15 % for NDVInov and NDVIdec, respectively. Potential AB and NDVI spatial correlation were quantified with semivariograms. The spatial dependence of AB was low. Six classes of NDVI were analyzed for comparison, and two management zones (MZ) were established with them. In order to evaluate if the NDVI method allows us to delimit MZ with different attainable yields, the AB estimated for these MZ were compared through an ANOVA test. The potential AB had significant differences among MZ. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that NDVI obtained from LANDSAT 8 images can be reliably used for creating MZ in soils under permanent pastures dominated by Tall wheatgrass. PMID:27510986

  5. Multiple-Zone Variable Refrigerant Flow System Modeling and Equipment Performance Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Rice, C Keith

    2012-01-01

    We developed a variable refrigerant flow (VRF) vapor compression system model, which has five indoor units, one outdoor unit and one water heater. The VRF system can run simultaneous space conditioning (cooling or heating) and water heating. The indoor units and outdoor unit use fin-&-tube coil heat exchangers, and the water heater uses a tube-in-tube heat exchanger. The fin-&-tube coil heat exchangers are modeled using a segment-by-segment approach and the tube-in-tube water heater is modeled using a phase-by-phase approach. The compressor used is a variable-speed rotary design. We calibrated our model against a manufacturer s product literature. Based on the vapor compression system model, we investigated the methodology for generating VRF equipment performance maps, which can be used for energy simulations in TRNSYS and EnergyPlus, etc. In the study, the major independent variables for mapping are identified and the deviations between the simplified performance map and the actual equipment system simulation are quantified.

  6. An Assessment of Actual and Potential Building Climate Zone Change and Variability From the Last 30 Years Through 2100 Using NASA's MERRA and CMIP5 Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Chandler, William S.; Hoell, James M.; Westberg, David; Zhang, Taiping

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the US, residential and commercial building infrastructure combined consumes about 40% of total energy usage and emits about 39% of total CO2 emission (DOE/EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2013"). Building codes, as used by local and state enforcement entities are typically tied to the dominant climate within an enforcement jurisdiction classified according to various climate zones. These climate zones are based upon a 30-year average of local surface observations and are developed by DOE and ASHRAE. Establishing the current variability and potential changes to future building climate zones is very important for increasing the energy efficiency of buildings and reducing energy costs and emissions in the future. Objectives: This paper demonstrates the usefulness of using NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric data assimilation to derive the DOE/ASHRAE building climate zone maps and then using MERRA to define the last 30 years of variability in climate zones for the Continental US. An atmospheric assimilation is a global atmospheric model optimized to satellite, atmospheric and surface in situ measurements. Using MERRA as a baseline, we then evaluate the latest Climate Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP) climate model Version 5 runs to assess potential variability in future climate zones under various assumptions. Methods: We derive DOE/ASHRAE building climate zones using surface and temperature data products from MERRA. We assess these zones using the uncertainties derived by comparison to surface measurements. Using statistical tests, we evaluate variability of the climate zones in time and assess areas in the continental US for statistically significant trends by region. CMIP 5 produced a data base of over two dozen detailed climate model runs under various greenhouse gas forcing assumptions. We evaluate the variation in building climate zones for 3 different decades using an ensemble and quartile

  7. Investigating Rainfall Variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone using the Geochemistry of Stalagmites from the Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhon, N.; Quinn, T. M.; Partin, J. W.; Edwards, R. L.; Cheng, H.

    2015-12-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), which extends southeastward from New Guinea to Tahiti, is the largest perennial rainfall feature in the Southern Hemisphere. The position of the SPCZ and its associated rainfall varies significantly on multidecadal timescales, as documented by instrumental and climate proxy data. For example, stalagmite δ18O records (rainfall proxy) from Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu (Partin et al., 2013) and Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands (Maupin et al., 2014), document large (~1‰), abrupt changes in stalagmite δ18O on multidecadal timescales over the past 600 years that arise from internal variability in the climate system. The proxy data agree with the type of rainfall changes observed in the instrumental record, such as the change across 1976/77, but the older changes are larger in relative magnitude. We expand on these earlier studies of rainfall variability in the SPCZ system using stable isotope variations in stalagmites from two other locations in the Solomon Islands (Munda, New Georgia, 8.3°S, 157.3°E; Suku, Nggela Pile (9.8° S, 160.2° E). These stalagmites range in age from about 400 CE to 1850 CE, based on U-Th dating, and have relatively fast growth rates (60 to 300 µm/yr). Stalagmite δ18O time series were generated from sub-samples milled every 500 µm, or approximately 1 to 8 years per data point. Initial results from these two new Solomon Island stalagmites not only confirm the presence of multidecadal variability in stalagmite δ18O identified in previous studies, but suggest that the same amplitude of variability has occurred over several windows of time during the past 1600 years. When complete, these new proxy rainfall records from Munda and Suku will further constrain the pattern and mechanism of SPCZ rainfall variability in western tropical Pacific region.

  8. Model Parameter Variability for Enhanced Anaerobic Bioremediation of DNAPL Source Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, X.; Gerhard, J. I.; Barry, D. A.

    2005-12-01

    The objective of the Source Area Bioremediation (SABRE) project, an international collaboration of twelve companies, two government agencies and three research institutions, is to evaluate the performance of enhanced anaerobic bioremediation for the treatment of chlorinated ethene source areas containing dense, non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPL). This 4-year, 5.7 million dollars research effort focuses on a pilot-scale demonstration of enhanced bioremediation at a trichloroethene (TCE) DNAPL field site in the United Kingdom, and includes a significant program of laboratory and modelling studies. Prior to field implementation, a large-scale, multi-laboratory microcosm study was performed to determine the optimal system properties to support dehalogenation of TCE in site soil and groundwater. This statistically-based suite of experiments measured the influence of key variables (electron donor, nutrient addition, bioaugmentation, TCE concentration and sulphate concentration) in promoting the reductive dechlorination of TCE to ethene. As well, a comprehensive biogeochemical numerical model was developed for simulating the anaerobic dehalogenation of chlorinated ethenes. An appropriate (reduced) version of this model was combined with a parameter estimation method based on fitting of the experimental results. Each of over 150 individual microcosm calibrations involved matching predicted and observed time-varying concentrations of all chlorinated compounds. This study focuses on an analysis of this suite of fitted model parameter values. This includes determining the statistical correlation between parameters typically employed in standard Michaelis-Menten type rate descriptions (e.g., maximum dechlorination rates, half-saturation constants) and the key experimental variables. The analysis provides insight into the degree to which aqueous phase TCE and cis-DCE inhibit dechlorination of less-chlorinated compounds. Overall, this work provides a database of the numerical

  9. Mapping Variable Width Riparian Zones Utilizing Open Source Data: A Robust New Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abood, S. A.; Maclean, A.

    2013-12-01

    Riparian buffers are dynamic, transitional ecosystems between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems with well-defined vegetation and soil characteristics. Previous approaches to riparian buffer delineation have primarily utilized fixed width buffers. However, these methodologies only take the watercourse into consideration and ignore critical geomorphology, associated vegetation and soil characteristics. Utilizing spatial data readily available from government agencies and geospatial clearinghouses, such as DEMs and the National Hydrography Dataset, the Riparian Buffer Delineation Model (RBDM) offers advantages by harnessing the geospatial modeling capabilities of ArcMap GIS, incorporating a statistically valid sampling technique along the watercourse to accurately map the critical 50-year plain, and delineating a variable width riparian buffer. Options within the model allow incorporation of National Wetlands Inventory (NWI), Soil Survey Data (SSURGO), National Land Cover Data (NLCD) and/or Cropland Data Layer (CDL) to improve the accuracy and utility of the riparian buffers attributes. This approach recognizes the dynamic and transitional natures of riparian buffers by accounting for hydrologic, geomorphic and vegetation data as inputs into the delineation process. By allowing the incorporation of land cover data, decision makers acquire a useful tool to assist in managing riparian buffers. The model is formatted as an ArcMap toolbox for easy installation and does require a Spatial Analyst license. Variable width riparian buffer utilizing 50-year flood height and 10m DEM. RBDM Inputs

  10. The Weddell-Scotia marginal ice zone: Physical oceanographic conditions, geographical and seasonal variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muench, R. D.; Huber, B. A.; Gunn, J. T.; Husby, D. M.; Mountain, D. G.

    1992-03-01

    Physical oceanographic conditions were measured in the Weddell and Scotia Sea marginal ice zones (MIZ's) during 1983, 1986 and 1988. The field work encompassed spring, autumn and mid-winter periods and included retreating, advancing and steady-state ice edges. Observed upper ocean structures, which typify MIZ's and reflect input of low salinity water from melting ice, included low salinity upper layers, lenses and fronts. An upper mixed layer was always present and was generally more fully developed in autumn and winter than at other times of year. Conditions in the deeper waters reflected regional oceanographic processes and significant differences were present between the Weddell and Scotia seas. Weddell Sea Water is a major source of water for the southern Scotia Sea, however, the upper Scotia Sea was dominated by warmer, less saline waters from Drake Passage. The colder, denser Weddell water appeared to have mixed isopycnally with deeper water in the Scotia Sea, present there at depths exceeding 500 m. The Scotia Sea was dominated by strong gradients and energetic mesoscale features, with currents exceeding 50 cm/s. The northwestern Weddell Sea had, in contrast, current speeds well below about 5 cm/s and small to negligible lateral water property gradients. Our observations suggest that the Weddell western boundary current was weaker than has been estimated in the past. In addition, we found scant evidence of deep winter convection in the Scotia Sea, a process which has been hypothesized in the past to contribute to deep water formation. No evidence was found during winter 1988 in the Scotia Sea of the modified water known as Weddell-Scotia Confluence water.

  11. Turbulent, Extreme Multi-zone Model for Simulating Flux and Polarization Variability in Blazars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    The author presents a model for variability of the flux and polarization of blazars in which turbulent plasma flowing at a relativistic speed down a jet crosses a standing conical shock. The shock compresses the plasma and accelerates electrons to energies up to γmax >~ 104 times their rest-mass energy, with the value of γmax determined by the direction of the magnetic field relative to the shock front. The turbulence is approximated in a computer code as many cells, each with a uniform magnetic field whose direction is selected randomly. The density of high-energy electrons in the plasma changes randomly with time in a manner consistent with the power spectral density of flux variations derived from observations of blazars. The variations in flux and polarization are therefore caused by continuous noise processes rather than by singular events such as explosive injection of energy at the base of the jet. Sample simulations illustrate the behavior of flux and linear polarization versus time that such a model produces. The variations in γ-ray flux generated by the code are often, but not always, correlated with those at lower frequencies, and many of the flares are sharply peaked. The mean degree of polarization of synchrotron radiation is higher and its timescale of variability shorter toward higher frequencies, while the polarization electric vector sometimes randomly executes apparent rotations. The slope of the spectral energy distribution exhibits sharper breaks than can arise solely from energy losses. All of these results correspond to properties observed in blazars.

  12. Estimating the Relative Sociolinguistic Salience of Segmental Variables in a Dialect Boundary Zone

    PubMed Central

    Llamas, Carmen; Watt, Dominic; MacFarlane, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    One way of evaluating the salience of a linguistic feature is by assessing the extent to which listeners associate the feature with a social category such as a particular socioeconomic class, gender, or nationality. Such ‘top–down’ associations will inevitably differ somewhat from listener to listener, as a linguistic feature – the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant, for instance – can evoke multiple social category associations, depending upon the dialect in which the feature is embedded and the context in which it is heard. In a given speech community it is reasonable to expect, as a consequence of the salience of the linguistic form in question, a certain level of intersubjective agreement on social category associations. Two metrics we can use to quantify the salience of a linguistic feature are (a) the speed with which the association is made, and (b) the degree to which members of a speech community appear to share the association. Through the use of a new technique, designed as an adaptation of the Implicit Association Test, this paper examines levels of agreement among 40 informants from the Scottish/English border region with respect to the associations they make between four key phonetic variables and the social categories of ‘Scotland’ and ‘England.’ Our findings reveal that the participants exhibit differential agreement patterns across the set of phonetic variables, and that listeners’ responses vary in line with whether participants are members of the Scottish or the English listener groups. These results demonstrate the importance of community-level agreement with respect to the associations that listeners make between social categories and linguistic forms, and as a means of ranking the forms’ relative salience. PMID:27574511

  13. Estimating the Relative Sociolinguistic Salience of Segmental Variables in a Dialect Boundary Zone.

    PubMed

    Llamas, Carmen; Watt, Dominic; MacFarlane, Andrew E

    2016-01-01

    One way of evaluating the salience of a linguistic feature is by assessing the extent to which listeners associate the feature with a social category such as a particular socioeconomic class, gender, or nationality. Such 'top-down' associations will inevitably differ somewhat from listener to listener, as a linguistic feature - the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant, for instance - can evoke multiple social category associations, depending upon the dialect in which the feature is embedded and the context in which it is heard. In a given speech community it is reasonable to expect, as a consequence of the salience of the linguistic form in question, a certain level of intersubjective agreement on social category associations. Two metrics we can use to quantify the salience of a linguistic feature are (a) the speed with which the association is made, and (b) the degree to which members of a speech community appear to share the association. Through the use of a new technique, designed as an adaptation of the Implicit Association Test, this paper examines levels of agreement among 40 informants from the Scottish/English border region with respect to the associations they make between four key phonetic variables and the social categories of 'Scotland' and 'England.' Our findings reveal that the participants exhibit differential agreement patterns across the set of phonetic variables, and that listeners' responses vary in line with whether participants are members of the Scottish or the English listener groups. These results demonstrate the importance of community-level agreement with respect to the associations that listeners make between social categories and linguistic forms, and as a means of ranking the forms' relative salience. PMID:27574511

  14. Spatial and temporal variability in nitrous oxide and methane emissions in urban riparian zones of the Pearl River Delta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taiping; Huang, Xinyu; Yang, Yue; Li, Yuelin; Dahlgren, Randy A

    2016-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability in nitrous oxide and methane emissions were quantified in three seasons using closed chambers in three riparian zone locations of three branches of the Pearl River, Guangzhou, China. The sampling sites were selected in a rapidly developing urban area of Guangzhou and represented a pollution gradient. The results show that urban riparian landscapes can be large source areas for CH4 and N2O, with fluxes of -0.035∼32.30 mg m(-2) h(-1) and -5.49∼37.31 μg m(-2) h(-1), respectively. River water quality, sediment texture, and NH4-N and NO3-N concentrations correlated with N2O and CH4 emission rates. The riparian zones of the more seriously polluted tributaries showed higher greenhouse gas fluxes than that of the less polluted main stem of the Pearl River. Rain events increased emissions of CH4 by 6.5∼21.3 times and N2O by 2.2∼5.7 times. The lower concentrations of heavy metals increased the activity of denitrifying enzymes while inhibited the methane producing pathways. This work demonstrates that rapidly developing urban areas are an important source of greenhouse gas emissions, which is conditioned by various environmental factors. PMID:26377967

  15. High variability of stress accumulation, seismic and aseismic release mode along the Peru-Ecuador subduction zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocquet, J.; Villegas, J. C.; Chlieh, M.; Mothes, P. A.; Rolandone, F.; Jarrín, P.; Cisneros, D.; Vallee, M.

    2013-12-01

    Most geodetic measurements of interseismic strain along subduction zones have led to the view of coupled asperities of variable size usually separated by narrower zones of low coupling. Along the western margin of South America, fast convergence of the oceanic Nazca plate has repeatedly produced M>8 earthquakes and three of the ten largest megathrust earthquakes since 1900. Contrasting with this behavior, the segment comprised between central Peru and central Ecuador has not experienced any great earthquake for at least five centuries. New GPS measurements in Peru and Ecuador first highlight that a along a ~1000km long segment, convergence is predominantly accommodated by aseismic creep along the plate interface, with possible coupling occurring at shallow depth, close to the trench. This area is bounded by highly locked segments, which produced M>8.5 earthquakes in central Peru and northern Ecuador. While the observed low interseismic coupling explains the lack of great earthquakes, this area has experienced two earthquakes that share the characteristics of tsunamigenic earthquakes, indicating a correlation between the mode of stress accumulation along the plate interface and its release. Finally, we have observed several episodes of slow slip, sometimes associated with intense, micro to moderate seismicity. These observations suggest a specific behavior for this segment, which contrasts with the behavior of the neighboring segments.

  16. A Coupled Formulation for Vadose Zone Transport of Multiple Gas Species With Plant Exchange Under Variable Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothoff, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Most plants require a balance between water availability and oxygen availability in the rooting zone. Procedures for raising plants under microgravity conditions, such as might be encountered in long-term space missions, face a special challenge: water redistribution is not affected by gravity, leading to difficulty in maintaining both water and oxygen levels in the rooting zone because flow is dominated by capillary properties. The plant substrate used for microgravity conditions is typically a coarse material that drains extremely rapidly under the fluctuating gravity conditions (0 to 1.8 G) experienced on KC-135 aircraft during flight parabolas. To evaluate control strategies for meeting plant water uptake and respiration needs under microgravity and to characterize flow redistribution under fluctuating gravity, a single formulation considering partial to full saturation was developed to cover this range of conditions. The fully coupled system of equations considers N>1 gaseous species, including water, that are all constituents in the liquid phase and in equilibrium between the gas and liquid phases where both phases are present. Plants are considered as separate quasi steady continua. Plant uptake and respiration, when considered, are defined using (possibly age dependent) transfer functions characterized by root length density. The formulation avoids complexities arising from switching variables when going from very dry to saturated conditions by using variables that are continuous throughout the domain: liquid pressure and N-1 mass fraction variables, expressed as partial capillary pressure. The mass fractions of all species in both phases are recovered from the standard equilibrium conditions used to define the partial capillary pressures. The use of partial capillary pressure state variables is inspired by mass balance considerations near saturation (where capillary pressure is almost zero), because mass balance convergence rates are dominated by the phase

  17. Spatial-temporal variability of soil CO2 emissions within urban areas in forest-steppe zone of Central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzhanov, Dmitrii; Vasenev, Viacheslav; Sotnikova, Julia; Tembo, Allan; Valentini, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Global climate change is of the most important environmental problems. It is widely assumed that increasing concentration of greenhouse gases (GHG) is one of the main reasons of global warming. Carbon dioxide (CO2) plays a key role in climate change because of considerable natural and anthropogenic fluxes. In comparison to all the other GHG CO2 makes the most considerable contribution to global warming (more than 60%). Land-use change and following alteration of carbon cycle is one the main reasons of global warming. Land use and management is the key factor distinguishing carbon stocks and fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems. Urbanization is one the most rapid current land-use change trends. Urbanization results in fundamental transformations in matter and energy fluxes, vegetation and soil cover. Urban soil is the key element in urban ecosystems. They are principally different from natural ones in respect of physical, chemical and biological features and fluxes. Urban soils can play a considerable role in carbon budget. Carbon stocks of urban soil can be considerable, although soil respiration is also high because of intensive mineralization of turf-sand substrates, used for urban soils' construction. Urbanization effect on soil carbon stocks and fluxes varies between bioclimatic zones. Central Chernozemic region in general and Kursk city in particular provide a promising study, because natural regional soil cover represented by grey forest soils and chernozems. Relative carbon stocks in chernozems and grey forest soils are among the highest in the world, although soil respiration in these soils is also very intensive. The current study aims to study the main factors behind spatial and temporal variability of CO2 emission from urban soil in forest-steppe conditions of Central Chernozemic region. We monitored CO2 fluxes on the three different functional zones in Kursk city: recreational, residential and industrial (15 replicas per each zone). Monitoring plots were

  18. Alongfront Variability of Precipitation Associated with a Midlatitude Frontal Zone: TRMM Observations and MM5 Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Han, Mei; Braun, Scott A.; Persson, P. Ola; Bao, Jian-Wen

    2009-01-01

    On 19 February 2001, the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite observed complex alongfront variability in the precipitation structure of an intense cold-frontal rainband. The TRMM Microwave Imager brightness temperatures suggested that, compared to the northern and southern ends of the rainband, a greater amount of precipitation ice was concentrated in the middle portion of the rainband where the front bowed out. A model simulation conducted using the fifth-generation Pennsylvania State University National Center for Atmospheric Research (PSU NCAR) Mesoscale Model (MM5) is examined to explain the distribution of precipitation associated with the cold-frontal rainband. The simulation reveals that the enhanced precipitation ice production and the implied mean ascent along the central part of the front were associated with a synergistic interaction between a low-level front and an upper-level front associated with an intrusion of high-PV stratospheric air. The low-level front contributed to an intense bow-shaped narrow cold-frontal rainband (NCFR). The upper-level front was dynamically active only along the central to northern portion of the NCFR, where the upper-level PV advection and Q-vector convergence were most prominent. The enhanced mean ascent associated with the upper-level front contributed to a wide cold-frontal rainband (WCFR) that trailed or overlapped with the NCFR along its central to northern segments. Because of the combination of the forcing from both lower- and upper-level fronts, the ascent was deepest and most intense along the central portion of the front. Thus, a large concentration of precipitation ice, attributed to both the NCFR and WCFR, was produced.

  19. Variability of ionospheric scintillation near the equatorial anomaly crest of the Indian zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, S.; Chakraborty, S. K.

    2013-04-01

    Multistation observations of ionosphere scintillation at VHF (250 MHz) and GNSS L1 frequency from three locations - (i) Bokkhali (BOK) (geographic 21.6° N, 88.2° E, dip 31.48°, (ii) Raja Peary Mohan College Centre (RPMC) (geographic 22.66° N, 88.4° E, dip 33.5°) and (iii) Krishnath College Centre (KNC), Berhampore (geographic 24.1° N, 88.3° E, dip 35.9°) - at ~ 1° latitudinal separations near the northern crest of the equatorial ionization anomaly (EIA) of the Indian longitude sector are investigated in conjunction with total electron content (TEC) data and available ionosonde data near the magnetic equator to study fine structure in spatial and temporal variability patterns of scintillation occurrences. The observations are carried out in the autumnal equinoctial months of a high solar activity year (2011). In spite of smaller latitudinal/spatial separation among the observing stations, conspicuous differences are reflected in the onset time, duration, fade rate and fade depth of VHF scintillations as well as in spectral features. Scintillations are mostly associated with depletion in TEC around the anomaly crest and occurrence of ESF near the magnetic equator at an earlier time. Not only the strength of EIA, but also the locations of observing stations with respect to the post-sunset resurgence peak of EIA seem to play dominant role in dictating the severity of scintillation activity. A secondary enhancement in diurnal TEC in the post-sunset period seems to accentuate the irregularity activities near the anomaly crest, and a threshold value of the same may fruitfully be utilized for the prediction of scintillation around the locations. An idea regarding latitudinal extent of scintillation is developed by considering observations at L1 frequency from the GPS and GLONASS constellation of satellites. A critical value of h'F near the magnetic equator for the occurrence of simultaneous scintillation at the three centres is suggested. The observations are

  20. Children's Motives for Admitting to Prosocial Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yayoi; Lee, Kayo

    2016-01-01

    There has been extensive research on children's moral evaluation of lying in prosocial situations. Current knowledge regarding the concept of lying has been derived from studies showing that cultural differences exist, whereby non-Western children tend to rate lie telling more positively than Western children do. These findings suggest that there are different views about whether children should publicize their prosocial behaviors and that children have universal motives when they admit to engaging in prosocial behavior. A gender difference has also been found in relation to prosocial behavior. However, previous studies did not investigate in detail children's motives for admission or non-admission to prosocial behavior, and if there is a gender difference. Therefore, this study examined the diversity in and development of motives for admitting or not admitting to engaging in prosocial behavior, with the aim of clarifying these behaviors as a function of children's grade level in school, and how such motives differ with age and gender. Questionnaires from 1345 elementary and junior high school students in Japan were analyzed. Results showed that children's communication tendency with regard to prosocial behavior reports peaked in the fourth grade of elementary school and gradually decreased thereafter. From the third grade of elementary school onwards, children reported that they refrained from admitting prosocial behaviors. Younger children more likely cited honesty as a crucial motive for admitting to prosocial behaviors. Girls were more likely to endorse honesty as a motive than boys were. Moreover, among younger children, girls feared others' negative evaluation and wanted to comply with modesty norms when not admitting. Further research is needed to examine the developmental process for motives behind prosocial behaviors. PMID:26925025

  1. Children's Motives for Admitting to Prosocial Behavior.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yayoi; Lee, Kayo

    2016-01-01

    There has been extensive research on children's moral evaluation of lying in prosocial situations. Current knowledge regarding the concept of lying has been derived from studies showing that cultural differences exist, whereby non-Western children tend to rate lie telling more positively than Western children do. These findings suggest that there are different views about whether children should publicize their prosocial behaviors and that children have universal motives when they admit to engaging in prosocial behavior. A gender difference has also been found in relation to prosocial behavior. However, previous studies did not investigate in detail children's motives for admission or non-admission to prosocial behavior, and if there is a gender difference. Therefore, this study examined the diversity in and development of motives for admitting or not admitting to engaging in prosocial behavior, with the aim of clarifying these behaviors as a function of children's grade level in school, and how such motives differ with age and gender. Questionnaires from 1345 elementary and junior high school students in Japan were analyzed. Results showed that children's communication tendency with regard to prosocial behavior reports peaked in the fourth grade of elementary school and gradually decreased thereafter. From the third grade of elementary school onwards, children reported that they refrained from admitting prosocial behaviors. Younger children more likely cited honesty as a crucial motive for admitting to prosocial behaviors. Girls were more likely to endorse honesty as a motive than boys were. Moreover, among younger children, girls feared others' negative evaluation and wanted to comply with modesty norms when not admitting. Further research is needed to examine the developmental process for motives behind prosocial behaviors. PMID:26925025

  2. Multidecadal to Millenial-Scale Variability of Productivity and Oxygenation in the Main Peruvian Upwelling Zone Since the Late Pleistocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, D. A.; Sifeddine, A.; Skilbeck, C. G.; Salvatteci, R.

    2011-12-01

    Mud-belts containing laminated or near-laminated sedimentary sequences exist in the central Peruvian continental margin beneath the oxygen minimum zone (12 - 14°S, 150 - 400 m), an area where upwelling-favorable alongshore winds are active year-round. The sediments here are dominated by siliceous and phosphatic biogenic remains, organic matter aggregates and lithogenic particles. Sediment cores collected in these belts record past climatic and biogeochemical conditions associated to the Peruvian upwelling system, providing decadal or even sub-decadal time-resolution for the reconstruction of past variabilities. We have examined paleorecords of past productivity and oxygenation in these continental margin sediments since the Last Glacial Maximum (0 - 22Ky BP), as inferred from stratigraphy (absence of bioturbation), geochemical and isotopic proxies, the latter for the past millenium. Laminated sequences are best preserved for the LGM, the Bolling/Allerod period, the early Holocene and the last millennium. In these sequences, the Mo:Al ratio, a proxy for anoxic conditions in the sediments is higher, suggesting an intensification of the oxygen minimum zone. Here also siliceous sedimentation is dominant and carbonate preservation is enhanced. For the past millennium, multiproxy records indicate a less intense OMZ and lower productivity during the Little Ice Age. There is a correspondence between the periods of high (low) lithogenic input and low (high) siliceous productivity with global/Northern Hemisphere cool (warm) climatic conditions since the deglaciation. The main mechanism driving this behavior for the Peruvian upwelling system appears to be the southward/northward migration of the ITCZ, modulating the inland precipitation and the alongshore wind field off Peru. Nevertheless, recent studies in other eastern boundary upwelling systems suggest that local land-sea pressure gradients under hemispheric warming or cooling modulate upwelling and biological

  3. Over 30% of patients with splenic marginal zone lymphoma express the same immunoglobulin heavy variable gene: ontogenetic implications.

    PubMed

    Bikos, V; Darzentas, N; Hadzidimitriou, A; Davis, Z; Hockley, S; Traverse-Glehen, A; Algara, P; Santoro, A; Gonzalez, D; Mollejo, M; Dagklis, A; Gangemi, F; Bosler, D S; Bourikas, G; Anagnostopoulos, A; Tsaftaris, A; Iannitto, E; Ponzoni, M; Felman, P; Berger, F; Belessi, C; Ghia, P; Papadaki, T; Dogan, A; Degano, M; Matutes, E; Piris, M A; Oscier, D; Stamatopoulos, K

    2012-07-01

    We performed an immunogenetic analysis of 345 IGHV-IGHD-IGHJ rearrangements from 337 cases with primary splenic small B-cell lymphomas of marginal-zone origin. Three immunoglobulin (IG) heavy variable (IGHV) genes accounted for 45.8% of the cases (IGHV1-2, 24.9%; IGHV4-34, 12.8%; IGHV3-23, 8.1%). Particularly for the IGHV1-2 gene, strong biases were evident regarding utilization of different alleles, with 79/86 rearrangements (92%) using allele (*)04. Among cases more stringently classified as splenic marginal-zone lymphoma (SMZL) thanks to the availability of splenic histopathological specimens, the frequency of IGHV1-2(*)04 peaked at 31%. The IGHV1-2(*)04 rearrangements carried significantly longer complementarity-determining region-3 (CDR3) than all other cases and showed biased IGHD gene usage, leading to CDR3s with common motifs. The great majority of analyzed rearrangements (299/345, 86.7%) carried IGHV genes with some impact of somatic hypermutation, from minimal to pronounced. Noticeably, 75/79 (95%) IGHV1-2(*)04 rearrangements were mutated; however, they mostly (56/75 cases; 74.6%) carried few mutations (97-99.9% germline identity) of conservative nature and restricted distribution. These distinctive features of the IG receptors indicate selection by (super)antigenic element(s) in the pathogenesis of SMZL. Furthermore, they raise the possibility that certain SMZL subtypes could derive from progenitor populations adapted to particular antigenic challenges through selection of VH domain specificities, in particular the IGHV1-2(*)04 allele. PMID:22222599

  4. ADMIT: The ALMA Data Mining Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuben, P.; Pound, M.; Mundy, L.; Rauch, K.; Friedel, D.; Looney, L.; Xu, L.; Kern, J.

    2015-09-01

    ADMIT (ALMA Data Mining ToolkiT), a toolkit for the creation of new science products from ALMA data, is being developed as an ALMA Development Project. It is written in Python and, while specifically targeted for a uniform analysis of the ALMA science products that come out of the ALMA pipeline, it is designed to be generally applicable to (radio) astronomical data. It first provides users with a detailed view of their science products created by ADMIT inside the ALMA pipeline: line identifications, line ‘cutout' cubes, moment maps, emission type analysis (e.g., feature detection). Using descriptor vectors the ALMA data archive is enriched with useful information to make archive data mining possible. Users can also opt to download the (small) ADMIT pipeline product, then fine-tune and re-run the pipeline and inspect their hopefully improved data. By running many projects in a parallel fashion, data mining between many astronomical sources and line transitions will also be possible. Future implementations of ADMIT may include EVLA and other instruments.

  5. Photophysiological variability and its influence on primary production in the NW Africa-Canary Islands coastal transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiras, F. G.; Arbones, B.; Montero, M. F.; Barton, E. D.; Arístegui, J.

    2016-05-01

    Photophysiological variability and its influence on primary production were studied in the NW Africa-Canary Islands coastal transition zone. The region showed strong mesoscale activity, in which upwelling filaments and island eddies interacted to cause significant vertical displacements of the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). Oligotrophic stations both in the open ocean and within anticyclonic eddies were characterised by low values of integrated chlorophyll (33 ± 4 mg chl a m- 2) and dominance of pico- and nanophytoplankton, while stations associated with filaments and cyclonic eddies showed moderate chl a values (50 ± 17 mg m- 2). Shelf stations affected by upwelling exhibited the highest chl a (112 ± 36 mg m- 2) with microphytoplankton dominance. Photosynthetic variables in the three groups of stations showed similar depth gradients, with maximum photosynthetic rates (PmB) decreasing with depth and maximum quantum yields (ϕm) increasing with depth. However, the increase with depth of ϕm was not so evident in shelf waters where nutrients were not depleted at the surface. Primary production (PP) displayed a coast-ocean gradient similar to that of chl a, with highest values (2.5 ± 1.2 g C m- 2 d- 1) at the eutrophic shelf stations and lowest (0.36 ± 0.11 g C m- 2 d- 1) at the oligotrophic stations. Nevertheless, integrated PP at the oligotrophic stations was not related to integrated chl a concentration but was positively (r = 0.95) correlated to carbon fixation at the DCM and negatively (r = - 0.85) correlated to the depth of the DCM, suggesting that light, and not phytoplankton biomass, was the main factor controlling PP in oligotrophic environments. It is concluded that downward displacements of the DCM, either by convergence fronts or downwelling at the core of anticyclones can significantly reduce PP in the oligotrophic ocean.

  6. Subpixel variability of MODIS albedo retrievals and its importance for ice sheet surface melting in southwestern Greenland's ablation zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moustafa, S.; Rennermalm, A. K.; Roman, M. O.; Koenig, L.; Smith, L. C.; Schaaf, C.; Wang, Z.; Mioduszewski, J.

    2013-12-01

    On the Greenland ice sheet, albedo declined across 70% of its surface since 2000, with the greatest reduction in the lower 600 m of the southwestern ablation zone. Because albedo plays a prominent role in the ice sheet surface energy balance, its decline has resulted in near doubling of meltwater production. To characterize ice sheet albedo, Moderate Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) surface albedo products are typically used. However, it is unclear how the spatial variability of albedo within a MODIS pixel influences surface melting and whether it can be considered a linear function of albedo. In this study, high spatiotemporal resolution measurements of spectral albedo and ice sheet surface ablation were collected along a ~ 1.3 km transect during June 2013 within the Akuliarusiarsuup Kuua (AK) River watershed in southwest Greenland. Spectral measurements were made at 325-1075 nm using a Analytical Spectral Devices (ASD) spectroradiometer, fitted with a Remote Cosine Receptor (RCR). In situ albedo measurements are compared with the daily MODIS albedo product (MCD43A) to analyze how space, time, surface heterogeneity, atmospheric conditions, and solar zenith angle geometry govern albedo at different scales. Finally, analysis of sub-pixel albedo and ablation reveal its importance on meltwater production in the lower parts of the ice sheet margin.

  7. Influence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer in a semi-arid critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Rios, Xavier; Brooks, Paul D.; Troch, Peter A.; McIntosh, Jennifer; Rasmussen, Craig

    2016-03-01

    The critical zone (CZ) is the heterogeneous, near-surface layer of the planet that regulates life-sustaining resources. Previous research has demonstrated that a quantification of the influxes of effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) to the CZ can predict its structure and function. In this study, we quantify how climate variability in the last 3 decades (1984-2012) has affected water availability and the temporal trends in EEMT. This study takes place in the 1200 km2 upper Jemez River basin in northern New Mexico. The analysis of climate, water availability, and EEMT was based on records from two high-elevation SNOTEL stations, PRISM data, catchment-scale discharge, and satellite-derived net primary productivity (MODIS). Results from this study indicated a decreasing trend in water availability, a reduction in forest productivity (4 g C m-2 per 10 mm of reduction in precipitation), and decreasing EEMT (1.2-1.3 MJ m2 decade-1). Although we do not know the timescales of CZ change, these results suggest an upward migration of CZ/ecosystem structure on the order of 100 m decade-1, and that decadal-scale differences in EEMT are similar to the differences between convergent/hydrologically subsidized and planar/divergent landscapes, which have been shown to be very different in vegetation and CZ structure.

  8. Phenotypic variability confirmed by nuclear ribosomal DNA suggests a possible natural hybrid zone of Triatoma brasiliensis species complex.

    PubMed

    Costa, Jane; Bargues, Maria Dolores; Neiva, Vanessa Lima; Lawrence, Gena G; Gumiel, Marcia; Oliveira, Genova; Cabello, Pedro; Lima, Marli Maria; Dotson, Ellen; Provance, David William; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Mateo, Lucia; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Dujardin, Jean Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma occurs in Pernambuco state, Brazil, which is situated between the distribution areas of Triatoma brasiliensis brasiliensis (north) and Triatoma juazeirensis (south). T. b. macromelasoma displays greater variations in its chromatic phenotype than either T. b. brasiliensis or T. juazeirensis, and patterns reminiscent of one or the other. Experimental crosses from each of these members of the T. brasiliensis species complex generated fertile offspring suggesting that viable hybrids could be present in nature, despite their significant genetic distances. Considering the geographical position of occurrence of the T. b. macromelasoma (in Pernambuco) it was proposed to be an area capable of supporting natural hybridization between T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis. Since phenotypic variability is expected, this study investigated the existence of intermediate chromatic phenotypes for T. b. macromelasoma in various locations in areas between the T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis occurrences. Thirteen different color patterns were for the first time characterized and nine of those displayed intermediate phenotypes. Molecular analysis performed using ribosomal DNA intergenic region, grouped all within the T. brasiliensis complex. The intermediate chromatic phenotypes, molecular analysis and experimental crosses all support the distinction of a zone of hybridization that gave rise to the T. b. macromelasoma through homoploidal evolution. PMID:26520796

  9. Variability of the Oxygen Minimum Zone during the Holocene in the Gulf of California, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Pina, K. G.; Gonzalez-Yajimovich, O.; Huerta-Diaz, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the southern portion of the Gulf of California (GoC) can be caused by changes in primary productivity or by advection of water masses with low oxygen concentrations. To discern the acting mechanism, multiple and gravity cores (NH01-22 and NH01-25) comprising the Holocene (~4800 and ~6600 years, respectively) were collected in the OMZ of the GoC during the CALMEX NH-01 cruise. Sediments were collected on the eastern slopes of Pescadero (PB) and Carmen (CB) Basins, intersecting in both cases the GoC's distinct OMZ. The cores were sectioned at 1-cm intervals and analyzed for total Mo (MoTotal), total Al and Fe-pyrite. With these values, Mo enrichment factors (EFMo) and degrees of pyritization (DOP) were calculated for each sediment interval. Average DOP values for CB and PB were 38%±11% (n=306) and 28.6%±6.5% (n=259), respectively, indicating that the sediments are not limited by the availability of reactive Fe. Higher average MoTOTAL values were measured in CB (0.22±0.04 μmol g-1) relative to PB (0.09±0.02 μmol g-1). As a result, EFMo values were high (14.5±3.4, range of 6.6-35.6) in CB and significantly lower in PB (4.5±1.1, range of 2.7-12.0). For CB, EFMO values are comparable to regions such as the west coast of Baja California, Mexico (EFMO=20±9) and the euxinic Black Sea (EFMO=27±8) and Saanich Inlet, British Columbia (EFMO=39±35) zones. In PB EFMO values were similar to those reported for well oxygenated marginal basins (e.g., Japan Sea; EFMO=2.5±1.5). DOP values for CB and PB are generally <40%, characteristic of oxic sedimentary environments. The DOP and EFMO conflicting results could indicate that the sediments are not completely pyritized because Fe is also associated with acid volatile sulfides (unlikely), or that values <40% are not necessarily associated with oxic sedimentary environments. However, for both basins, the persistence of laminations, the EFMo levels and the DOP values suggest variable

  10. Oxygen minimum zone of the open Arabian Sea: variability of oxygen and nitrite from daily to decadal time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banse, K.; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Narvekar, P. V.; Postel, J. R.; Jayakumar, D. A.

    2013-09-01

    The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea is the thickest of the three oceanic OMZs, which is of global biogeochemical significance because of denitrification in the upper part leading to N2 and N2O production. The residence time of the OMZ water is believed to be less than a decade. The upper few hundred meters of this zone are nearly anoxic but non-sulfidic and still support animal (metazoan) pelagic life, possibly as a result of episodic injections of O2 by physical processes. The very low O2 values obtained with the new STOX sensor in the eastern tropical South Pacific probably also characterize the Arabian Sea OMZ, but there is no apparent reason as to why the temporal trends of the historic data should not hold. We report on discrete measurements of dissolved O2 and NO2-, besides temperature and salinity, made between 1959 and 2004 well below the tops of the sharp pycno- and oxyclines near 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 m depth. We assemble nearly all O2 determinations (originally, 849 values, 695 in the OMZ) by the visual endpoint detection of the iodometric Winkler procedure, which in our data base yields about 0.04 mL L-1 (∼2 μM) O2 above the endpoint from modern automated titration methods. We find 632 values acceptable (480 from 150 stations in the OMZ). The data are grouped in zonally-paired boxes of 1° lat. and 2° long. centered at 8°, 10°, 12°, 15°, 18°, 20°, and 21° N along 65° E and 67° E. The latitudes of 8-12° N, outside the OMZ, are only treated in passing. The principal results are as follows: (1) an O2 climatology for the upper OMZ reveals a marked seasonality at 200 to 500 m depth with O2 levels during the northeast monsoon and spring intermonsoon season elevated over those during the southwest monsoon season (median difference, 0.08 mL L-1 [3.5 μM]). The medians of the slopes of the seasonal regressions of O2 on year for the NE and SW monsoon seasons are -0.0043 and -0.0019 mL L-1 a-1, respectively (-0.19 and -0.08 μM a

  11. Interannual Variability in Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopic Signatures of Size-Fractionated POM from the South Florida Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. L.; Anderson, W. T.; Jochem, F. J.; Fourqurean, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Environmental conditions in South Florida coastal waters have been of local and national concern over the past 15 years. Attention has focused on the ecosystem impacts of salinity increases, seagrass die-off, increased algal bloom frequency, waste water influence, groundwater discharge, and exchange between Florida Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in water quality and productivity levels may be reflected in the isotopic signatures of coastal zone primary producers. Recent work with seagrasses in South Florida has demonstrated high seasonal and spatial variability in C and N isotopic signatures and decoupling between the two isotopic systems as they vary. To better understand the sources of seasonal and spatial fluctuation, size fractionated POM (particulate organic matter) samples have been collected on a quarterly basis since Sept. 2002. Fractions collected include >150μ m, 50-150μ m, and 0.1-50μ m using Nitex mesh sieves and a portable pump system deployed from a small boat at 10 sites around the Florida Keys and Florida Bay. It was hypothesized that planktonic groups respond more quickly to changes in water quality then seagrasses, and thus variations may be more clearly attributed to environmental parameters. Significant spatial and temporal variability is evident both within site between size fractions and between sites. Seasonal oscillations of up to 4‰ were observed in N isotopic values and 6‰ in C isotopic values of the 50-150μ m size fraction, which is dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates. δ 13C values are depleted in the late winter/early spring sampling period possibly reflecting decreased productivity stress on available C pools. 13C depletion is generally coincident with δ 15N enrichment in the late winter/early spring, possibly demonstrating changes in DIN pools (NO3- and NH4+ concentrations) or changes in decomposition or denitrification rates. Broad groupings appear to separate Atlantic coral reef sites

  12. The Indian Monsoon Variability during the Holocene: New Speleothem Records from the Core Monsoon Zone of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, A.; Stott, L.; Cannariato, K.; Cheng, H.; Edwards, R.

    2007-12-01

    The Indian summer monsoon (ISM) brings 80% of India and Southeast Asia's annual precipitation and is vital to sustaining the region's agriculture, which supports nearly a quarter of the world's population. Although considerable efforts have been focused to improve its seasonal to inter-annual predictive capabilities, the potential for decade to century scale departures from the normal monsoon precipitation pattern poses one of the most significant risks to human health and welfare in the ISM dominated regions. Meteorological records of ISM (available since 1850 AD) document droughts on inter-annual to sub-decadal timescales but are too short to asses whether longer and/or more severe intervals of monsoon failures occurred during the Holocene. The goals of our work are to characterize the full spectrum of the longer-term monsoon variability, particularly on the societal time-scales, and to compare this with the instrumental and historic record from the last century in order to evaluate the potential for larger or more extended periods of monsoon failure. We are approaching these goals by using precisely dated and near-annually resolved oxygen isotope records of the speleothems collected from a suite of caves throughout the core monsoon zone of India. We present new, well-dated, speleothem records from north, central, and north-east India that document past monsoon variations spanning much of the Holocene. To a large extent, our records confirm the previous marine based reconstructions of ISM that suggest that the episodes of rapid monsoon changes in Holocene coincided with major shifts in North Atlantic temperatures. Our data also suggest that significant century-scale decreases in monsoon rainfall also took place during the early to mid-Holocene, a period of generally enhanced monsoon strength. The centennial scale departures in our reconstructions appear to be more severe than any change observed in last 150 years. Our ISM reconstructions during the Late Holocene

  13. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Nitrate Concentration below the Root Zone in an Almond Orchard and its Implications for Potential Groundwater Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Couvreur, V.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial and Temporal Variability in Nitrate Concentration below the Root Zone in an Almond Orchard and its Implications for Potential Groundwater Contamination S. Baram1, M. Read1, D. Smart2, T. Harter1, J Hopmans11Department of Land, Air & Water Resources University of California Davis 2Department of Viticulture and Enology University of California Davis Estimates of water and fertilizer losses below the root zone of nitrogen (N) intensive agricultural orchard crops are major concern in groundwater protection. However, microscopic and macroscopic heterogeneity in unsaturated soils make accurate loss estimates very challenging. In this study we aimed to examine field scale variability in nitrate (NO3-) losses below the root zone (>250cm) of a 15 years old almond orchard in Madera county California. Based on a soil variability survey, tensiometers and solution samplers were installed at 17 locations around the 40 acre orchard. The hydraulic potential and the NO3- concentrations were monitored over two growing seasons. Nitrate concentrations varied spatially and temporarily, and ranged from below to more than 30 times higher than the drinking water contamination standard of >10 mg NO3--N L-1. Principal component analysis of the relations between the NO3- concentration, presence of a hard pan in the subsurface, its depth and thickness, and the fertigation and irrigation events indicated that none of these factors explained the observed variability in pore-water NO3- concentrations, with hard pan being the most dominant factor. Throughout the irrigation season minimal leaching was observed, yet post-harvest and preseason flooding events led to deep drainage. Due to the high spatial and temporal variability in the NO3- concentration and the potential for deep drainage following a wet winter or flooding event we conclude that the most efficient way to protect ground water is by transitioning to high frequency low nitrogen fertigation which would retain NO3-in the active

  14. The nearshore zone during coastal upwelling: Daily variability and coupling between primary and secondary production off central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, William T.; Arcos, Dagoberto F.; McManus, George B.; Dam, Hans; Bellantoni, Diane; Johnson, Thomas; Tiselius, Peter

    The nearshore region of central Chile is important for spawning of sardine ( Sardinops sagax) anchovy ( Engraulis ringens) and jack mackerel ( Trachurus murphyii) and the importance of fisheries for these species has led to an interest in factors controlling the area's productivity. We studied daily variations in productivity at a nearshore station (25m depth) off Dichato, Chile (36°30‧S) during January 1986 to understand how wind-driven variability in the hydrography is translated into pulses of primary and secondary production of the plankton. During the study period, we observed three complete cycles of upwelling favourable/unfavourable winds. Water column destratification, as indicated by the surface-to-bottom gradient of sigma-t, lagged the wind by about one day. During active upwelling, cold water (<11.5°C) of high nitrate and low oxygen concentration (20-25μM and 1-2ml 1 -1 respectively) was found near the surface. During subsequent relaxation of upwelling, the water column became stratified as temperature, oxygen and chlorophyll increased. The size and taxonomic composition of the phytoplankton varied from one event to the next. Over the course of the study, from 15-100% of the chlorophyll could pass a 20μm mesh screen. Chain-forming diatoms, microflagellates, and the autotrophic ciliate Mesodinium rubrum dominated the first, second and third events, respectively. In rank order of abundance, Paracalanus parvus, Centropages brachiatus, Oithona spp., Acartia tonsa, Oncaea spp., Calanoides patagoniensis and Calanus chilensis dominated the copepod community. Changes in abundance of most species did not closely follow the upwelling cycle. Possibly, vertical movements or other behavioural responses caused zooplankton distributions to be uncorrelated with movements of the surface Ekman layer. Fecundity of several of the important copepod species was measured using the egg ratio and bottle incubation techniques. Compared to values reported in the literature

  15. Oxygen minimum zone of the open Arabian Sea: variability of oxygen and nitrite from daily to decadal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banse, K.; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Narvekar, P. V.; Postel, J. R.; Jayakumar, D. A.

    2014-04-01

    The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea is the thickest of the three oceanic OMZ. It is of global biogeochemical significance because of denitrification in the upper part leading to N2 and N2O production. The residence time of OMZ water is believed to be less than a decade. The upper few hundred meters of this zone are nearly anoxic but non-sulfidic and still support animal (metazoan) pelagic life, possibly as a result of episodic injections of O2 by physical processes. We report on discrete measurements of dissolved O2 and NO2-, temperature and salinity made between 1959 and 2004 well below the tops of the sharp pycnocline and oxycline near 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 m depth. We assemble nearly all O2 determinations (originally there were 849 values, 695 of which came from the OMZ) by the visual endpoint detection of the iodometric Winkler procedure, which in our data base yields about 0.04 mL L-1 (~ 2 μM) O2 above the endpoint from modern automated titration methods. We acknowledge that much lower (nanomolar) O2 values have been measured recently with the STOX (Switchable Trace amount OXygen) sensor in the eastern tropical South Pacific, and that similar conditions may also prevail in the Arabian Sea OMZ. In spite of the error in O2 measurements at vanishingly low levels, we argue that the temporal trends of the historic data should still hold. We find 632 values acceptable (480 from 150 stations in the OMZ). The data are grouped in zonally paired boxes of 1° lat. and 2° long. centered at 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, 20, and 21° N along 65 and 67° E. The latitudes of 8-12° N, outside the OMZ, are treated in passing. The principal results are as follows: (1) an O2 climatology for the upper OMZ reveals a marked seasonality at 200 to 500 m depth with O2 levels during the northeast monsoon and spring intermonsoon seasons elevated over those during the southwest monsoon season (median difference, 0.08 mL L-1 [~ 3.5 μM]). The medians of the slopes of the

  16. Variability of physicochemical and mineralogical characteristics of biological soil crusts at local scale in the Sahelian zone of western Niger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancès, B.; Gommeaux, G.; Marin, B.; Ponthieu, M.; Ralahimanana, C.; Ayachi, S.; Malam Issa, O.

    2012-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) are organo-mineral complexes resulting from the colonisation of soil surface by living microorganisms, mainly cyanobacteria. Their form, structure and composition vary depending on characteristics related to soils, biological composition and external factors (climate conditions and land uses). This study focussed on the influence of soil characteristics and human activities on BSC properties. BSC samples from Banizoumbou (Niger) taken on protected (ungrazed) and opened (grazed) fallow lands were analysed. BSC characteristics were investigated by using chemical and mineralogical techniques, microscopic and image analysis approach as well as measurements of chlorophyll a content. Hydrophobicity measurements were also performed by the water drop penetration time method. On the basis of their colour, two types of crusts have been identified : black BSC, which occur in protected and unprotected fallow, and red BSC, which only occur in depression zones of the protected fallow. The black crusts are dominated by quartz grains trapped in the network of the filaments of Cyanobacteria. A sandy texture and a reverse grading of mineral particles are typical of physical soil crusts called sieving crusts. The dark surface coloration of the BSC is related to the high density of filamentous Cyanobacteria. Black crusts samples from protected fallow exhibit high biomass related to high cover, whereas samples from grazed fallow lands showed low biomass related to low surface cover. In both cases, hydrophobicity measurements revealed that these BSC are wettable to slightlty water repellent. However, higher values of hydrophobicity were observed on ungrazed samples compared to their grazed counterpart. This variability is likely due to the difference of cover between the two types of samples. This type of BSC corresponds to a later successional stage than the red-coloured BSC. The red BSC has a loamy-sandy texture and a normal grading typical of physical

  17. Spatial and temporal variability of nitrate and nitrous oxide concentrations in the unsaturated zone at a corn field in the US Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, C.

    2011-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in reactive nitrogen in the environment as a result of human activity. Reactive nitrogen of anthropogenic origin now equals that derived from natural terrestrial nitrogen fixation and is expected to exceed it by the end of the decade. Nitrogen is applied to crops as fertilizer and impacts the environment through water quality impairments (mostly as nitrate) and as greenhouse gas emissions (as nitrous oxide). Research on environmental impacts resulting from nitrogen application in the form of fertilizers has focused disproportionately on the degradation of water quality from agricultural non-point sources. The impacts of this degradation are registered both locally, with runoff and percolation of agrochemicals into local surface water and groundwater, and on a larger scale, such as the increase in the anoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico attributed to nitrate from the Mississippi River. Impacts to the global climate from increased production of nitrous oxide as a result of increased fertilization are equally significant. Nitrous oxide is a greenhouse gas with a warming potential that is approximately 300 times greater than carbon dioxide. Direct emissions of nitrous oxide from the soil have been expressed as 1% of the applied nitrogen. Indirect emissions due to runoff, leaching and volatilization of the nitrogen from the field have been expressed as 0.75% of the applied nitrogen. Many studies have focused on processes governing nitrogen fluxes in the soil, surface water and groundwater systems. However, research on the biogeochemical processes regulating nitrogen fluxes in the unsaturated zone and consequent impacts on nitrate and nitrous oxide concentrations in groundwater are lacking. Our study explores the spatial and temporal variability of nitrate and nitrous oxide concentrations in the vadose zone at a 15 acre corn field in the US Midwest and links it to the concentrations found in the groundwater at the field site. Results

  18. The Prediction of Teacher Morale Using the Supervisory Conference Rating, the Zones of Indifference Instrument and Selected Personal Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackbourn, Joe M.; Wilkes, Sam T.

    A prediction equation for teacher morale was developed from the responses of 236 teachers in a large school system in Mississippi. The Supervisory Conference Rating (SCR) was used to measure teachers' perceptions of the supervisory conference following observation by the principal. The Zones of Indifference of these teachers were measured with the…

  19. On the spatial variability of the hyporheic zone: in-situ investigation of porosity and grain size using diving bells and 3D photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frings, R. M.; Vollmer, S.

    2012-04-01

    In order to improve the ecological status of rivers, lakes and other water bodies, recent legislation, such as the European Water Framework Directive, requires for each water body an assessment of its suitability as habitat for organisms. Such an assessment, though, is not easy. This is especially true for the lowest part of the water body: the substrate or hyporheic zone. Even if it is known which kind of hyporheic zone is preferred by an organism, it remains difficult to determine where it can be found, because it is often impossible to observe the hyporheic zone from the banks or shores. It has become common to classify an entire water body as suitable or unsuitable as habitat, using only limited field observations of the hyporheic zone. This is a doubtful practice, which disregards the huge spatial variability of this zone. The objective of this study was to quantify the spatial variability in hyporheic-zone characteristics in the river Rhine. We focused on two basic characteristics: grain size and porosity, the latter being a primary control on the transport of nutrients, heat, oxygen and organic matter. A diving bell (caisson) was used to obtain access to the river bed, which enabled undisturbed sampling of the hyporheic zone. Between 1968 and 2009 6436 sediment samples were taken and sieved to determine their grain size distribution. Furthermore, in 2009 and 2011 about 100 porosity measurements were carried out, using a novel technique based on a combination of field measurements using three-dimensional photogrammetry and laboratory measurements using the water displacement method. The measurements revealed a strong cross-sectional variability in porosity and grain size. Each river cross-section contains spots with high porosity (order 0.40) and spots with low porosity (order 0.10). The large cross-sectional variability made it impossible to recognize systematic streamwise porosity trends from the data. Therefore we investigated if porosity was correlated to

  20. Physical and biogeochemical spatial scales of variability in the East Australian Current separation zone from shelf glider measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, A.; Roughan, M.; Jones, E.; White, D.

    2015-12-01

    In contrast to physical processes, biogeochemical processes are inherently patchy in the ocean, which affects both the observational sampling strategy and the representativeness of sparse measurements in data assimilating models. In situ observations from multiple glider deployments are analyzed to characterize spatial scales of variability in both physical and biogeochemical properties, using an empirical statistical model. We find that decorrelation ranges are strongly dependent on the balance between local dynamics and mesoscale forcing. The shortest horizontal (5-10 km) and vertical (45 m) decorrelation ranges are for chlorophyll a fluorescence. Whereas those variables that are a function of regional ocean and atmosphere dynamics (temperature and dissolved oxygen) result in anisotropic patterns with longer ranges along (28-37 km) than across the shelf (8-19 km). Variables affected by coastal processes (salinity and colored dissolved organic matter) have an isotropic range similar to the baroclinic Rossby radius (10-15 km).

  1. Variability in forearc deformation during subduction: Insight from geodynamic models and application to the Calabria subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Schellart, Wouter; Duarte, Joao

    2015-04-01

    In nature subducting slabs and overriding plate segments bordering subduction zones are generally embedded within larger plates. Such large plates can impose far-field boundary conditions that impact the style of subduction and overriding plate deformation. Here we present 3D dynamic analogue models of subduction, in which the far-field boundary conditions at the trailing edges of the subducting plate (SP) and overriding plate (OP) are varied. Four configurations are presented: Free (both plates free), SP-Fixed, OP-Fixed and SP-OP-Fixed. We investigate their impact on the kinematics and dynamics of subduction, with a special focus on overriding plate deformation. Our models indicate that in natural (narrow) subduction zones, assuming a homogeneous overriding plate, the formation of backarc basins (e.g., Tyrrhenian Sea, Aegean Sea, Scotia Sea) is generally expected to occur at a comparable location (300-500 km from the trench), irrespective of the boundary condition. Furthermore, our models indicate that the style of forearc deformation (shortening or extension) is determined by the mobility of the overriding plate through controlling the force normal to the subduction zone interface (trench suction). Our geodynamic model that uses the SP-OP-Fixed set-up is comparable to the Calabria subduction zone with respect to subduction kinematics, slab geometry, trench curvature and accretionary wedge configuration. Furthermore, it provides explanation for the natural observations of both backarc extension in the Tyrrhenian Sea and forearc extension in the Calabria region, which have been active since the Miocene. We explain the observations as a consequence of subduction of the narrow Calabrian slab and the immobility of the subducting African plate and overriding Eurasian plate. This setting forced subduction to be accommodated almost entirely by slab rollback (not trenchward overriding plate motion), while trench retreat was accommodated almost entirely by backarc and

  2. Variability of the Tropical Atlantic and Pacific SSS Minimum Zones and Their Relations to the ITCZ and SPCZ (1979-2013)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, Thierry; Tchilibou, Michel; Alory, Gael; Reverdin, Gilles; Arnault, Sabine

    2015-04-01

    This study focuses on the time-space variability of the low Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) waters located from the West to the East within about 2N-12N in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans and within about 6S-16S in the western Pacific. The analysis is based on a combination of in situ SSS observations collected in the last 3.5 decades from voluntary observing ships, TAO/TRITON and PIRATA moorings, Argo floats and (few) CTD profiles. We show that the mean positions of the Atlantic and Pacific low SSS waters are tightly related to the local minimum in Evaporation minus Precipitation (E-P) budget linked to the Inter Tropical Convergence Zones (ITCZ) and South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). We also show that the meridional position of the SSS minima varies both at seasonal time scale, with an overall poleward displacement in summer (or winter in the western Pacific ITCZ), and at interannual time scale in relation with ENSO and the Atlantic meridional mode, with however subtle differences in timing between the western, central and eastern basins. The role of the ITCZ- and SPCZ-related E-P budget in these seasonal and interannual changes is examined. We further document long-term meridional migrations of these low SSS waters in the last 3.5 decades and discuss whether or not they are consistent with documented decadal variability and/or expected global change effects.

  3. Chlorophyll-a Variability in the Southern Ocean Mixed Layer and Euphotic Zone From Elephant Seals and Profiling Floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, M. M.; Gille, S. T.; Franks, P. J. S.; Johnson, K. S.; Girton, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Ocean contains some of the ocean's deepest mixed layers. Because deep mixed layers can transport phytoplankton below the euphotic zone, light levels depend on mixed-layer depth (MLD), and phytoplankton growth is hypothesized to be co-limited by iron and light. Estimates of Chl-a fluorescence, particle backscattering and hydrographic profiles collected by southern elephant seals, EM-APEX, and biogeochemical Argo floats are used to evaluate the extent to which MLD influences phytoplankton bloom development and the vertical structure of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in the Southern Ocean. We find that surface Chl-a (i.e., mean Chl-a for the upper light penetration depth) is a relatively good proxy of phytoplankton biomass (i.e., depth-integrated Chl-a) within the euphotic zone but gives an inadequate representation of biomass within the mixed layer, particularly in the summer. Although nearly vertically homogeneous Chl-a within the mixed layer prevails in seasonal mean profiles, subsurface Chl-a maxima are not uncommon from spring through fall. Deep Chl-a maxima that correlate with particle backscattering in summer and fall are found near the base of the mixed layer, closer to the nutrient maximum than the light maximum, suggesting that nutrient limitation (i.e., essentially iron) can play a greater role than light limitation in governing productivity.

  4. Influence of management of variables, sampling zones and land units on LR analysis for landslide spatial prevision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, R.; Sorriso-Valvo, M.

    2013-09-01

    Several authors, according to different methodological approaches, have employed logistic Regression (LR), a multivariate statistical analysis adopted to assess the spatial probability of landslide, even though its fundamental principles have remained unaltered. This study aims at assessing the influence of some of these methodological approaches on the performance of LR, through a series of sensitivity analyses developed over a test area of about 300 km2 in Calabria (southern Italy). In particular, four types of sampling (1 - the whole study area; 2 - transects running parallel to the general slope direction of the study area with a total surface of about 1/3 of the whole study area; 3 - buffers surrounding the phenomena with a 1/1 ratio between the stable and the unstable area; 4 - buffers surrounding the phenomena with a 1/2 ratio between the stable and the unstable area), two variable coding modes (1 - grouped variables; 2 - binary variables), and two types of elementary land (1 - cells units; 2 - slope units) units have been tested. The obtained results must be considered as statistically relevant in all cases (Aroc values > 70%), thus confirming the soundness of the LR analysis which maintains high predictive capacities notwithstanding the features of input data. As for the area under investigation, the best performing methodological choices are the following: (i) transects produced the best results (0 < P(y) ≤ 93.4%; Aroc = 79.5%); (ii) as for sampling modalities, binary variables (0 < P(y) ≤ 98.3%; Aroc = 80.7%) provide better performance than ordinated variables; (iii) as for the choice of elementary land units, slope units (0 < P(y) ≤ 100%; Aroc = 84.2%) have obtained better results than cells matrix.

  5. Variability of suspended particulate matter concentrations and organic compounds in frontal zones of the Atlantic and Southern oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.; Kravchishina, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and particulate forms of the organic compounds (hydrocarbons, lipids, and chlorophyll a) were determined in the surface water layers of the Atlantic and Southern oceans during February to May of 2012 and 2014. It was found that the distribution of concentrations of the studied components is mainly affected by the location of frontal zones. When ice cover forms in the Southern Ocean, the changes in water temperature and phytoplankton development at the ice-water interface result in an increase of the concentrations of SPM, chlorophyll a, and, to a lesser extent, of lipids and hydrocarbons in the surface water layer. The occasional sharp increase of hydrocarbon concentrations caused by anthropogenic pollution was registered at local parts of water areas in the east of the Atlantic Ocean, as well as in the North and Baltic seas.

  6. Variable post-Paleozoic deformation detected by seismic reflection profiling across the northwestern "prong" of New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; Devera, J.A.; Denny, F.B.; Woolery, E.W.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution shallow seismic reflection profiles across the northwesternmost part of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and northwestern margin of the Reelfoot rift, near the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers in the northern Mississippi embayment, reveal intense structural deformation that apparently took place during the late Paleozoic and/or Mesozoic up to near the end of the Cretaceous Period. The seismic profiles were sited on both sides of the northeast-trending Olmsted fault, defined by varying elevations of the top of Mississippian (locally base of Cretaceous) bedrock. The trend of this fault is close to and parallel with an unusually straight segment of the Ohio River and is approximately on trend with the westernmost of two groups of northeast-aligned epicenters ("prongs") in the NMSZ. Initially suspected on the basis of pre-existing borehole data, the deformation along the fault has been confirmed by four seismic reflection profiles, combined with some new information from drilling. The new data reveal (1) many high-angle normal and reverse faults expressed as narrow grabens and anticlines (suggesting both extensional and compressional regimes) that involved the largest displacements during the late Cretaceous (McNairy); (2) a different style of deformation involving probably more horizontal displacements (i.e., thrusting) that occurred at the end of this phase near the end of McNairy deposition, with some fault offsets of Paleocene and younger units; (3) zones of steeply dipping faults that bound chaotic blocks similar to that observed previously from the nearby Commerce geophysical lineament (CGL); and (4) complex internal deformation stratigraphically restricted to the McNairy, suggestive of major sediment liquefaction or landsliding. Our results thus confirm the prevalence of complex Cretaceous deformations continuing up into Tertiary strata near the northern terminus of the NMSZ. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Multiwaveband Variability of Blazars from Turbulent Plasma Passing through a Standing Shock: The Mother of Multi-zone Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2011-09-01

    Multi-wavelength light curves of bright gamma-ray blazars (e.g., 3C 454.3) are compared with the model proposed by Marscher and Jorstad. In this scenario, much of the optical and high-energy radiation in a blazar is emitted near the 43 GHz core of the jet as seen in VLBA images, parsecs from the central engine. The main physical features are a turbulent ambient jet plasma that passes through a standing recollimation shock in the jet. The model allows for short time-scales of optical and gamma-ray variability by restricting the highest-energy electrons radiating at these frequencies to a small fraction of the turbulent cells, perhaps those with a particular orientation of the magnetic field relative to the shock front. Because of this, the volume filling factor at high frequencies is relatively low, while that of the electrons radiating below about 10 THz is near unity. Such a model is consistent with the (1) red-noise power spectra of flux variations, (2) shorter time-scales of variability at higher frequencies, (3) frequency dependence of polarization and its variability, and (4) breaks in the synchrotron spectrum by more than the radiative loss value of 0.5. Simulated light curves are generated by a numerical code that (as of May 2011) includes synchrotron radiation as well as inverse Compton scattering of seed photons from both a dust torus and a Mach disk at the jet axis. The latter source of seed photons produces more pronounced variability in gamma-ray than in optical light curves, as is often observed. More features are expected to be added to the code by the time of the presentation. This research is supported in part by NASA through Fermi grants NNX08AV65G and NNX10AO59G, and by NSF grant AST-0907893.

  8. Evaluating the role of soil variability on groundwater pollution and recharge at regional scale by integrating a process-based vadose zone model in a stochastic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; Comegna, Alessandro; Dragonetti, Giovanna; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Zdruli, Pandi

    2013-04-01

    Interpreting and predicting the evolution of water resources and soils at regional scale are continuing challenges for natural scientists. Examples include non-point source (NPS) pollution of soil and surface and subsurface water from agricultural chemicals and pathogens, as well as overexploitation of groundwater resources. The presence and build up of NPS pollutants may be harmful for both soil and groundwater resources. The accumulation of salts and trace elements in soils can significantly impact crop productivity, while loading of salts, nitrates, trace elements and pesticides into groundwater supplies can deteriorate a source of drinking and irrigation water. Consequently, predicting the spatial distribution and fate of NPS pollutants in soils at applicative scales is now considered crucial for maintaining the fragile balance between crop productivity and the negative environmental impacts of NPS pollutants, which is a basis of sustainable agriculture. Soil scientists and hydrologists are regularly asked to assist state agencies to understand these critical environmental issues. The most frequent inquiries are related to the development of mathematical models needed for analyzing the impacts of alternative land-use and best management use and management of soil and water resources. Different modelling solutions exist, mainly differing on the role of the vadose zone and its horizontal and vertical variability in the predictive models. The vadose zone (the region from the soil surface to the groundwater surface) is a complex physical, chemical and biological ecosystem that controls the passage of NPS pollutants from the soil surface where they have been deposited or accumulated due to agricultural activities, to groundwater. Physically based distributed hydrological models require the internal variability of the vadose zone be explored at a variety of scales. The equations describing fluxes and storage of water and solutes in the unsaturated zone used in these

  9. Alternative algebras admitting derivations with invertible values and invertible derivations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaygorodov, I. B.; Popov, Yu S.

    2014-10-01

    We prove an analogue of the Bergen-Herstein-Lanski theorem for alternative algebras: describe all alternative algebras that admit derivations with invertible values. We also prove an analogue of Moens' theorem for alternative algebras (a finite-dimensional alternative algebra over a field of characteristic zero is nilpotent if and only if it admits an invertible Leibniz derivation).

  10. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  11. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  12. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  13. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  14. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  15. Variable deep structure of a midcontinent fault and fold zone from seismic reflection: La Salle deformation belt, Illinois basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Deformation within the United States mid-continent is frequently expressed as quasilinear zones of faulting and folding, such as the La Salle deformation belt, a northwest-trending series of folds cutting through the center of the Illinois basin. Seismic reflection profiles over the southern La Salle deformation belt reveal the three-dimensional structural style of deformation in the lower Paleozoic section and uppermost Precambrian(?) basement. Individual profiles and structural contour maps show for the first time that the folds of the La Salle deformation belt are underlain at depth by reverse faults that disrupt and offset intrabasement structure, offset the top of interpreted Precambrian basement, and accommodate folding of overlying Paleozoic strata. The folds do not represent development of initial dips by strata deposited over a preexisting basement high. Rather, the structures resemble subdued "Laramide-style" forced folds, in that Paleozoic stratal reflectors appear to be flexed over a fault-bounded basement uplift with the basement-cover contact folded concordantly with overlying strata. For about 40 km along strike, the dominant faults reverse their dip direction, alternating between east and west. Less well expressed antithetic or back thrusts appear to be associated with the dominant faults and could together describe a positive flower structure. The overall trend of this part of the La Salle deformation belt is disrupted by along-strike discontinuities that separate distinct fold culminations. Observations of dual vergence and along-strike discontinuities suggest an original deformation regime possibly involving limited transpression associated with distant late Paleozoic Appalachian-Ouachita mountain building. Moderate-magnitude earthquakes located west of the western flank of the La Salle deformation belt have reverse and strike-slip mechanisms at upper trustai depths, which might be reactivating deep basement faults such as observed in this study

  16. Surgeons and suture zones: Hybridization among four surgeonfish species in the Indo-Pacific with variable evolutionary outcomes.

    PubMed

    DiBattista, Joseph D; Whitney, Jonathan; Craig, Matthew T; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Rocha, Luiz A; Feldheim, Kevin A; Berumen, Michael L; Bowen, Brian W

    2016-08-01

    Closely related species can provide valuable insights into evolutionary processes through comparison of their ecology, geographic distribution and the history recorded in their genomes. In the Indo-Pacific, many reef fishes are divided into sister species that come into secondary contact at biogeographic borders, most prominently where Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean faunas meet. It is unclear whether hybridization in this contact zone represents incomplete speciation, secondary contact, an evolutionary dead-end (for hybrids) or some combination of the above. To address these issues, we conducted comprehensive surveys of two widely-distributed surgeonfish species, Acanthurus leucosternon (N=141) and A. nigricans (N=412), with mtDNA cytochrome b sequences and ten microsatellite loci. These surgeonfishes are found primarily in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, respectively, but overlap at the Christmas and Cocos-Keeling Islands hybrid zone in the eastern Indian Ocean. We also sampled the two other Pacific members of this species complex, A. achilles (N=54) and A. japonicus (N=49), which are known to hybridize with A. nigricans where their ranges overlap. Our results indicate separation between the four species that range from the recent Pleistocene to late Pliocene (235,000-2.25million years ago). The Pacific A. achilles is the most divergent (and possibly ancestral) species with mtDNA dcorr≈0.04, whereas the other two Pacific species (A. japonicus and A. nigricans) are distinguishable only at a population or subspecies level (ΦST=0.6533, P<0.001). Little population structure was observed within species, with evidence of recent population expansion across all four geographic ranges. We detected sharing of mtDNA haplotypes between species and extensive hybridization based on microsatellites, consistent with later generation hybrids but also the effects of allele homoplasy. Despite extensive introgression, 98% of specimens had concordance between mtDNA lineage and

  17. Variability in pigment concentration in warm-core rings as determined by coastal zone color scanner satellite imagery from the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Moliner, Graciela; Yoder, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A time series of coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) derived chlorophyll (CZCS-chl) and sea surface temperature (SST) satellite imagery was developed for the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). Warm-core rings (WCR) were identified by both the warmer SST signal as well as the low pigment concentrations of their cores. The variation in pigment concentrations and SST observed in satellite imagery over the geographic range and life span of four WCRs is investigated. The hypotheses are that pigment concentration increase during the lifetime of the WCR is a response to processes such as convective overturn, upwelling, edge enhancement due to increased vertical mixing, active convergence, or lateral exchange. Empirical orthogonal function analysis (EOF) is used to investigate the relationship between SST and pigment patterns observed in the presence of a WCR. The first two EOF modes explain more than 80% of the variability observed in all four WCRs and in both (SST and pigment) data sets. The results of this study show that, at the synoptic scales of staellite data, the variability observed in the WCRs is greater at the periphery of the rings. These results show that advective entrainment, rather than processes at ring center (e.g., shoaling of the pycnocline/nutricline in response to frictional decay) or at the periphery due to other processes such as vertical mixing, is the mechanism responsible for the observed variability.

  18. Refining a relativistic, hydrodynamic solver: Admitting ultra-relativistic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, J. P.; Hughes, P. A.

    2009-09-01

    We have undertaken the simulation of hydrodynamic flows with bulk Lorentz factors in the range 102-106. We discuss the application of an existing relativistic, hydrodynamic primitive variable recovery algorithm to a study of pulsar winds, and, in particular, the refinement made to admit such ultra-relativistic flows. We show that an iterative quartic root finder breaks down for Lorentz factors above 102 and employ an analytic root finder as a solution. We find that the former, which is known to be robust for Lorentz factors up to at least 50, offers a 24% speed advantage. We demonstrate the existence of a simple diagnostic allowing for a hybrid primitives recovery algorithm that includes an automatic, real-time toggle between the iterative and analytical methods. We further determine the accuracy of the iterative and hybrid algorithms for a comprehensive selection of input parameters and demonstrate the latter’s capability to elucidate the internal structure of ultra-relativistic plasmas. In particular, we discuss simulations showing that the interaction of a light, ultra-relativistic pulsar wind with a slow, dense ambient medium can give rise to asymmetry reminiscent of the Guitar nebula leading to the formation of a relativistic backflow harboring a series of internal shockwaves. The shockwaves provide thermalized energy that is available for the continued inflation of the PWN bubble. In turn, the bubble enhances the asymmetry, thereby providing positive feedback to the backflow.

  19. Variability of the Arabian Sea upwelling and intensity of the oxygen minimum zone over the late Pleistocene and Holocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaye, Birgit; Böll, Anna; Rixen, Tim; Emeis, Kay-Christian; Ramaswamy, Venkitasubramani

    2016-04-01

    The northern Arabian Sea is one of the main oceanic regions with a permanent low oxygen layer at intermediate water depth that results in water column denitrification. While glacial/interglacial variations in the Arabian Sea oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) are relatively well studied, little is known about the spatial and temporal extent of mid-water oxygen throughout the Holocene. We compared alkenone derived sea surface temperatures of the last 25 kyrs from a core in the northern Arabian Sea with a core from the monsoonal upwelling area off Oman. The difference between the two temperature reconstructions indicates that monsoonal upwelling occurred during warm interstadials and during the entire Holocene. δ15N curves show that denitrification also matched with monsoonal upwelling. Comparison of δ15N records from different locations in the Arabian Sea reveal a Holocene shift in the location of the core OMZ from the northwestern (early Holocene) to the northeastern Arabian Sea (late Holocene). This shift was caused by (i) spatial differences in oxygen demand, caused by changes in SW- and NE-monsoon intensities and associated productivity changes, as well as (ii) changes in mid-water ventilation facilitated by sea level rise and inflow of Persian Gulf and Red Sea Water leading and changes of ventilation by Indian Ocean Central Water .

  20. Deriving variable travel times and aerobic respiration in the hyporheic zone using electrical conductivity as natural tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, Michael; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Schmidt, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Determining oxygen consumption (respiration) rates is important for characterizing the ecological functioning of a stream. It is known, that respiration is strongly temperature dependent, but the variability over time and the effects of changing hydrologic conditions are still scarce. Existing respiration measuring methods mostly utilize ex situ respiration chambers, which do not necessarily represent the actual conditions in a riverbed. We present an approach of transient in situ measurements, which utilize changes in the natural stream-EC signal as tracer for the advective transport in the streambed and combine these with precise oxygen measurements. LTC Logger and optode based oxygen logger were installed in the stream and at 45cm depth beside an in-stream gravel bar. Streambed adapted probe rods with a screened section of 2 cm ensuring a minimized flow-through volume hold the loggers which were programmed to 5min interval measuring interval. Diurnal changes in the EC signal are considered to be quasi-conservative and were tracked in the subsurface. A windowed cross correlation approach was utilized to derive a time-resolved advective travel-time. Assuming a one dimensional flow-path from the stream into the sediment, the time-shift in the EC signal is interpreted as the peak travel time of a tracer breakthrough curve. Additionally a moving average filter of variable length was applied to the stream EC signal, to account for dispersion and further maximize the correlation. For obtaining an experimental respiration rate, the physical transport conditions are then applied to the oxygen data, assuming a first order decay. The results show that the natural EC signal is applicable as tracer, as long as the measurements show distinctive fluctuations. The cross correlation revealed transient travel times with a range between 1-7h (mean 4h) at the upstream and 8-18h (mean 11h) at the downstream location of the gravel bar. There are strong indications, that the stream

  1. Variability of Residence Time tracer Concentrations at the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory during the California Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, A.; Thaw, M.; Stacy, E.; Hunsaker, C. T.; Bibby, R. K.; Deinhart, A.; Schorzman, K.; Egnatuk, C. M.; Conklin, M. H.; Esser, B.

    2015-12-01

    California water supply from high elevation snow melt is vulnerable to climate change and prolonged drought conditions. Reduced snow pack and earlier snow melt will result in a greater reliance on man-made reservoirs and subsurface catchment storage. To gain insight into the subsurface storage volume of high elevation catchments, we studied the residence time distribution of surface water leaving the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. Since October 2014, we have collected monthly samples of two residence time tracers with contrasting half-lives: sulfur-35 (87.5 days) and tritium (12.32 years). Upstream catchment area at the three nested sampling locations is 1 km2 (P301 sub-catchment), 4 km2 (Providence Creek) and ~50 km2 (Big Creek). Samples were analyzed at LLNL by low level liquid scintillation counting and noble gas mass spectrometry after helium accumulation. Variations in tracer concentrations in precipitation, both for tritium (11-24 pCi/L) and sulfur-35 (24-100 mBq/L), complicate straightforward interpretation of residence times. Sulfur-35 concentrations show that last year precipitation contributes 1% - 10% of total stream flow, even during peak snowmelt. Tritium concentrations in stream flow vary between 40% and 60% of the initial concentration in precipitation (15.5 pCi/L), indicating that water leaving the catchment has a residence time on the order of years to decades. Additional analyses of sodium-22 (2.6 year half-life) will aid in deconvoluting the residence time distribution. These low tracer concentrations can be attributed to current severe drought conditions, resulting in low discharge rates and longer residence times. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675107

  2. CO2 flux and seasonal variability in the turbidity maximum zone and surrounding area in the Changjiang River estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuegang; Song, Jinming; Yuan, Huamao; Li, Ning; Duan, Liqin; Qu, Baoxiao

    2015-01-01

    The turbidity maximum zone (TMZ) is one of the most important regions in an estuary. However, the high concentration of suspended material makes it difficult to measure the partial pressure of CO2 ( pCO2) in these regions. Therefore, very little data is available on the pCO2 levels in TMZs. To relatively accurately evaluate the CO2 flux in an example estuary, we studied the TMZ and surrounding area in the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary. From seasonal cruises during February, August, November 2010, and May 2012, the pCO2 in the TMZ and surrounding area was calculated from pH and total alkalinity (TA) measured in situ, from which the CO2 flux was calculated. Overall, the TMZ and surrounding area acted as a source of atmosphere CO2 in February and November, and as a sink in May and August. The average FCO2 was -9, -16, 5, and 5 mmol/(m2·d) in May, August, November, and February, respectively. The TMZ's role as a source or sink of atmosphere CO2 was quite different to the outer estuary. In the TMZ and surrounding area, suspended matter, phytoplankton, and pH were the main factors controlling the FCO2, but here the influence of temperature, salinity, and total alkalinity on the FCO2 was weak. Organic carbon decomposition in suspended matter was the main reason for the region acting as a CO2 source in winter, and phytoplankton production was the main reason the region was a CO2 sink in summer.

  3. Evaluating the role of soil variability on groundwater pollution and recharge at regional scale by integrating a process-based vadose zone model in a stochastic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; Comegna, Alessandro; Dragonetti, Giovanna; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Zdruli, Pandi

    2013-04-01

    Interpreting and predicting the evolution of water resources and soils at regional scale are continuing challenges for natural scientists. Examples include non-point source (NPS) pollution of soil and surface and subsurface water from agricultural chemicals and pathogens, as well as overexploitation of groundwater resources. The presence and build up of NPS pollutants may be harmful for both soil and groundwater resources. The accumulation of salts and trace elements in soils can significantly impact crop productivity, while loading of salts, nitrates, trace elements and pesticides into groundwater supplies can deteriorate a source of drinking and irrigation water. Consequently, predicting the spatial distribution and fate of NPS pollutants in soils at applicative scales is now considered crucial for maintaining the fragile balance between crop productivity and the negative environmental impacts of NPS pollutants, which is a basis of sustainable agriculture. Soil scientists and hydrologists are regularly asked to assist state agencies to understand these critical environmental issues. The most frequent inquiries are related to the development of mathematical models needed for analyzing the impacts of alternative land-use and best management use and management of soil and water resources. Different modelling solutions exist, mainly differing on the role of the vadose zone and its horizontal and vertical variability in the predictive models. The vadose zone (the region from the soil surface to the groundwater surface) is a complex physical, chemical and biological ecosystem that controls the passage of NPS pollutants from the soil surface where they have been deposited or accumulated due to agricultural activities, to groundwater. Physically based distributed hydrological models require the internal variability of the vadose zone be explored at a variety of scales. The equations describing fluxes and storage of water and solutes in the unsaturated zone used in these

  4. Composition and intraspecific chemical variability of the essential oil from Artemisia herba-alba growing wild in a Tunisian arid zone.

    PubMed

    Mighri, Hédi; Akrout, Ahmed; El-jeni, Hajer; Zaidi, Slah; Tomi, Félix; Casanova, Joseph; Neffati, Mohamed

    2010-11-01

    The intraspecific chemical variability of essential oils (50 samples) isolated from the aerial parts of Artemisia herba-alba Asso growing wild in the arid zone of Southeastern Tunisia was investigated. Analysis by GC (RI) and GC/MS allowed the identification of 54 essential oil components. The main compounds were β-thujone and α-thujone, followed by 1,8-cineole, camphor, chrysanthenone, trans-sabinyl acetate, trans-pinocarveol, and borneol. Chemometric analysis (k-means clustering and PCA) led to the partitioning into three groups. The composition of two thirds of the samples was dominated by α-thujone or β-thujone. Therefore, it could be expected that wild plants of A. herba-alba randomly harvested in the area of Kirchaou and transplanted by local farmers for the cultivation in arid zones of Southern Tunisia produce an essential oil belonging to the α-thujone/β-thujone chemotype and containing also 1,8-cineole, camphor, and trans-sabinyl acetate at appreciable amounts. PMID:21072770

  5. The Effect of Variable Greenschist Alteration on the Offset Zone of the Lac Des Iles Pd Deposit, Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    The recently discovered Offset zone of the Mine Block Intrusion of the Lac des Iles Complex hosts Pd deposits with unusually high Pd/Pt and Pd/Ir ratios in rocks that range from relatively unaltered mineralized norite to chlorite-actinolite-talc schist. Questions remain as to the degree the deposit is magmatic or has been upgraded by later fluid activity. Quantitative assessment of the effect of progressive alteration using mineral modes was done using total silicate H2O as a monitor of reaction progress (ξ = moles H2O added to form alteration minerals). Major mineral modal variations define three reaction regions: (1) ξ = 0.00 - 0.03, characterized by epidote/clinozoisite formation and some amphibole, (2) ξ = 0.03 - 0.23, characterized by precipitation of chlorite, amphibole, quartz muscovite/sericite and calcite after plagioclase + pyroxene and (3) ξ = 0.23 - 0.28, characterized by the production of talc after earlier formed amphibole. Epidote occurs as an incongruent product from the destruction of plagioclase that is itself lost as the reaction proceeds. Pyroxene is altered at about twice the rate of plagioclase, resulting in pyroxene-rich protoliths to be more altered than those relatively enriched in plagioclase. Major elements variations largely reflect variations in the plagioclase/pyroxene ratio of the protolith but suggest mainly a loss of Na with reaction progress. Base metal sulfides chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite and pentlandite show decreasing abundance with reaction progress, dissolving incongruently to pyrite and magnetite as intermediate reaction products. Millerite is overall low but increase slightly. A more limited data set on the platinum-group minerals suggests that PGE-arsenides increase whereas PGE-sulfides and PGE-Bi-tellurides decrease with reaction progress. Assuming ore element concentrations in the protolith were constant and similar to relatively fresh norites, Pd increases modestly, by 5%, whereas Pt decreases by about 65% in the most

  6. The Lac Des Iles Palladium Deposit, Ontario, Canada part I. The effect of variable alteration on the Offset Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, Alan; Djon, Lionnel; Tchalikian, Arnaud; Corkery, John

    2014-06-01

    The recently discovered Offset Zone of the Mine Block Intrusion of the Lac des Iles Complex hosts palladium mineralization with unusually high Pd/Pt and Pd/Ir ratios in rocks that range from relatively unaltered norite to amphibolites and chlorite-actinolite-talc schist. Quantitative assessment of the effect of progressive alteration using mineral modes was done using total silicate H2O as a monitor of reaction progress ( ξ = moles H2O added to form alteration minerals per 100 g of rock). Major mineral modal variations define three reaction regions: (1) ξ = 0.00-0.03, characterized by epidote/clinozoisite formation and some amphibole; (2) ξ = 0.03-0.23, characterized by formation of chlorite, amphibole, quartz muscovite/sericite, and calcite after plagioclase + pyroxene; and (3) ξ = 0.23-0.28, characterized by the formation of talc after earlier formed amphibole. Epidote occurs as an incongruent product from the destruction of plagioclase that is itself lost as the reaction proceeds. Pyroxene is altered at about twice the rate of plagioclase, resulting in pyroxene-rich protoliths to be more altered than those relatively enriched in plagioclase. Major elements variations largely reflect variations in the plagioclase/pyroxene ratio of the protolith, but compositional trends suggest a loss of Na with reaction progress. The base metal sulfides chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and pentlandite show decreasing abundance with reaction progress, forming pyrite (± magnetite) as an intermediate reaction product that also is lost as the reaction proceeds. Millerite is overall low but increases slightly. A more limited data set on the platinum-group minerals suggests that platinum-group element (PGE)-arsenides increase whereas PGE-sulfides and PGE-Bi-tellurides decrease with reaction progress. Assuming ore element concentrations in the protolith were constant and similar to relatively fresh norites, Pd increases modestly, by 5 %, whereas Pt decreases by about 65 % in the most

  7. Short-term variability in euphotic zone biogeochemistry and primary productivity at Station ALOHA: A case study of summer 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Samuel T.; Barone, Benedetto; Ascani, Francois; Bidigare, Robert R.; Church, Matthew J.; Valle, Daniela A.; Dyhrman, Sonya T.; Ferrón, Sara; Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.; Juranek, Laurie W.; Kolber, Zbigniew S.; Letelier, Ricardo M.; Martínez-García, Sandra; Nicholson, David P.; Richards, Kelvin J.; Rii, Yoshimi M.; Rouco, Mónica; Viviani, Donn A.; White, Angelicque E.; Zehr, Jonathan P.; Karl, David M.

    2015-08-01

    Time-series observations are critical to understand the structure, function, and dynamics of marine ecosystems. The Hawaii Ocean Time-series program has maintained near-monthly sampling at Station ALOHA (22°45'N, 158°00'W) in the oligotrophic North Pacific Subtropical Gyre (NPSG) since 1988 and has identified ecosystem variability over seasonal to interannual timescales. To further extend the temporal resolution of these near-monthly time-series observations, an extensive field campaign was conducted during July-September 2012 at Station ALOHA with near-daily sampling of upper water-column biogeochemistry, phytoplankton abundance, and activity. The resulting data set provided biogeochemical measurements at high temporal resolution and documents two important events at Station ALOHA: (1) a prolonged period of low productivity when net community production in the mixed layer shifted to a net heterotrophic state and (2) detection of a distinct sea-surface salinity minimum feature which was prominent in the upper water column (0-50 m) for a period of approximately 30 days. The shipboard observations during July-September 2012 were supplemented with in situ measurements provided by Seagliders, profiling floats, and remote satellite observations that together revealed the extent of the low productivity and the sea-surface salinity minimum feature in the NPSG.

  8. Influence of Variable Environmental Conditions on Presence and Concentration of Energetic Chemicals Near Soil Surface in the Vadoze Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anaya, A. A.; Padilla, I. Y.

    2008-12-01

    Many explosive-related compounds (ERCs) are found near the soil-atmospheric surface in sites containing buried explosive devices, such as landmines and unexploded ordnance, detonation-residual, and munitions residues from explosive manufacturing facilities. Accurate assessment of the fate and transport processes is essential for predicting their movement to the surface, groundwater, or any other important environmental compartment. The transport processes controlling the direction and magnitude of the movement, and chemical and physical processes controlling the fate of the chemicals vary with environmental conditions. This research addresses the effect of variable rainfall, evaporation, temperature, and solar radiation on fate and transport of 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4-Dinitrotoluene (DNT), and other related chemicals in partially saturated soil. Experiments have been conducted in a laboratory-scale 3D SoilBed placed inside an environmental chamber equipped with rainfall and solar radiation simulators, and temperature control settings. The SoilBed was packed with a sandy soil. Experiments have been conducted by burying a TNT/DNT source, simulating a landmine, and applying different rainfall and light radiation cycles while monitoring DNT, TNT, and other related ERCs solute concentrations temporally and spatially within the SoilBed. Experiments include different source characteristics, rainfall intensities, temperatures, and radiation cycles to evaluate their effect on the detection and movement of ERC in soils in both aqueous and vapor phases. Temporal and spatial data has been analyzed comparatively and quantitatively. Comparative analysis was developed using surfer®- and voxler®-generated images and 3D visualization models applying spatial interpolation and masking methods. Single and multi-variable statistical analysis has been employed to determine the most important factors affecting the fate, transport and detection of ERC near soil

  9. Interdecadal-decadal climate variability from multicoral oxygen isotope records in the South Pacific Convergence Zone region since 1650 A.D.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linsley, Braddock K.; Zhang, Peipei; Kaplan, Alexey; Howe, Stephen S.; Wellington, Gerard M.

    2008-06-01

    In the South Pacific, interdecadal-decadal oceanic and atmospheric variability, referred to as the Interdecadal Pacific Oscillation (IPO), is most pronounced in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) salinity front region. Here we have used annual average oxygen isotope (δ18O) time series from five coral cores collected from Fiji and Tonga in this region to construct a Fiji-Tonga Interdecadal-Decadal Pacific Oscillation (F-T IDPO) index of low-frequency (>9 and <55 years) climate variability back to 1650 A.D. We first demonstrate the consistency between this F-T IDPO index and a mean sea level (MSL) pressure-based SPCZ position index (SPI) (1891-2000), thus verifying the ability of coral δ18O to record past interdecadal-decadal climatic variations in this region back to 1891. The F-T IDPO index is then shown to be synchronous with the IPO index (1856-2000), suggesting that this coral-based index effectively represents the interdecadal-decadal scale climate variance back to 1650. The regularity of the F-T IDPO index indicates that interdecadal-decadal variability in the SPCZ region has been relatively constant over the past 350 years with a mean frequency of ˜20 years (variance peaks near 11 and 35 years). There is a consistent antiphase correlation of the F-T IDPO index and the interdecadal-decadal components in equatorial Pacific coral δ18O series from Maiana and Palmyra. This observation indicates that the eastward expansion (westward contraction) of the eastern salinity front of the Western Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP) occurs simultaneously (±<1 year) with the westward (eastward) shift of the SPCZ salinity front during positive IPO (negative IPO) phases. This is the same relationship observed during the phases of the El Niño Southern Oscillation.

  10. Influence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) in a semi-arid critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Rios, X.; Brooks, P. D.; Troch, P. A.; McIntosh, J.; Rasmussen, C.

    2015-08-01

    The Critical Zone (CZ) is the heterogeneous, near-surface layer of the planet that regulates life-sustaining resources. Previous research has demonstrated that a quantification of the influxes of effective energy and mass (EEMT) to the CZ can predict its structure and function. In this study, we quantify how climate variability in the last three decades (1984-2012) has affected water availability and the temporal trends in EEMT. This study takes place in the 1200 km2 upper Jemez River Basin in northern New Mexico. The analysis of climate, water availability, and EEMT was based on records from two high elevation SNOTEL stations, PRISM data, catchment scale discharge, and satellite derived net primary productivity (MODIS). Records from the two SNOTEL stations showed clear increasing trends in winter and annual temperatures (+1.0-1.3 °C decade-1; +1.2-1.4 °C decade-1, respectively), decreasing trends in winter and annual precipitation (-41.6-51.4 mm decade-1; -69.8-73.2 mm decade-1, respectively) and maximum Snow Water Equivalent (SWE; -33.1-34.7 mm decade-1). The water partitioning fluxes at the basin scale showed statistically significant decreasing trends in precipitation (-61.7 mm decade-1), discharge (-17.6 mm decade-1) and vaporization (-45.7 mm decade-1). Similarly Q50, an indicator of snowmelt timing, is occurring 4.3 days decade-1 earlier. Results from this study indicated a decreasing trend in water availability, a reduction in forest productivity (4 g C m-2 per 10 mm of reduction in Precipitation) and EEMT (1.2-1.3 MJ m2 decade-1). These changes in EEMT point towards a hotter, drier and less productive ecosystem which may alter critical zone processes in high elevation semi-arid systems.

  11. Fluids preserved in variably altered graphitic pelitic schists in the Dufferin Lake Zone, south-central Athabasca Basin, Canada: implications for graphite loss and uranium deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Marjolaine; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Ansdell, Kevin; Annesley, Irvine R.; Kotzer, Tom; Jiricka, Dan; Cuney, Michel

    2016-06-01

    The Athabasca Basin (Canada) contains the highest grade unconformity-type uranium deposits in the world. Underlying the Athabasca Group sedimentary rocks of the Dufferin Lake Zone are variably graphitic, pelitic schists (VGPS), altered to chlorite and hematite (Red/Green Zone: RGZ). They were locally bleached near the unconformity during paleoweathering and/or later fluid interaction. Overall, graphite was lost from the RGZ and the bleached zone relative to the original VGPS. Fluid inclusions were examined in different generations of quartz veins, using microthermometry and Raman spectroscopy, to characterize and compare the different fluids that interacted with the RGZ and the VGPS. In the VGPS, CH4-, and N2-rich fluid inclusions, which homogenize into the vapor phase between -100 and -74 °C, and -152 and -125 °C, respectively, and CO2-rich fluid inclusions, homogenizing either into vapor or liquid between 20 and 28 °C, are present. Carbonic fluids could be the result of the breakdown of graphite to CH4 + CO2, whereas N2-rich fluid is interpreted to be the result of breakdown of feldspars/micas to NH4 ++N2. In the RGZ, the presence of fluid inclusions with low ice melting temperature (-38 to -16 °C) reflect the presence of CaCl2, and fluid inclusions with halite daughter minerals that dissolve between 190 and 240 °C indicate the presence of highly saline fluids. These fluids are interpreted to be derived from the Athabasca Basin. The circulation of carbonic fluids and brines occurred during two different events related to different P-T conditions of trapping. The carbonic fluids interacted with basement rocks during retrograde metamorphism of the basement rocks before deposition of the Athabasca Basin, whereas the brines circulated after the deposition of the Athabasca Basin. These latter fluids are similar to brines related to uranium mineralization at McArthur River and thus, in addition to possibly being related to graphite depletion in the RGZ, they could

  12. Fluids preserved in variably altered graphitic pelitic schists in the Dufferin Lake Zone, south-central Athabasca Basin, Canada: implications for graphite loss and uranium deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Marjolaine; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Ansdell, Kevin; Annesley, Irvine R.; Kotzer, Tom; Jiricka, Dan; Cuney, Michel

    2015-12-01

    The Athabasca Basin (Canada) contains the highest grade unconformity-type uranium deposits in the world. Underlying the Athabasca Group sedimentary rocks of the Dufferin Lake Zone are variably graphitic, pelitic schists (VGPS), altered to chlorite and hematite (Red/Green Zone: RGZ). They were locally bleached near the unconformity during paleoweathering and/or later fluid interaction. Overall, graphite was lost from the RGZ and the bleached zone relative to the original VGPS. Fluid inclusions were examined in different generations of quartz veins, using microthermometry and Raman spectroscopy, to characterize and compare the different fluids that interacted with the RGZ and the VGPS. In the VGPS, CH4-, and N2-rich fluid inclusions, which homogenize into the vapor phase between -100 and -74 °C, and -152 and -125 °C, respectively, and CO2-rich fluid inclusions, homogenizing either into vapor or liquid between 20 and 28 °C, are present. Carbonic fluids could be the result of the breakdown of graphite to CH4 + CO2, whereas N2-rich fluid is interpreted to be the result of breakdown of feldspars/micas to NH4 ++N2. In the RGZ, the presence of fluid inclusions with low ice melting temperature (-38 to -16 °C) reflect the presence of CaCl2, and fluid inclusions with halite daughter minerals that dissolve between 190 and 240 °C indicate the presence of highly saline fluids. These fluids are interpreted to be derived from the Athabasca Basin. The circulation of carbonic fluids and brines occurred during two different events related to different P-T conditions of trapping. The carbonic fluids interacted with basement rocks during retrograde metamorphism of the basement rocks before deposition of the Athabasca Basin, whereas the brines circulated after the deposition of the Athabasca Basin. These latter fluids are similar to brines related to uranium mineralization at McArthur River and thus, in addition to possibly being related to graphite depletion in the RGZ, they could

  13. Growing season variability of net ecosystem CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration of a sphagnum mire in the broad-leaved forest zone of European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, A.; Volkova, E.; Karataeva, T.; Novenko, E.

    2013-09-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 and evapotranspiration (ET) of a karst-hole sphagnum peat mire situated at the boundary between broad-leaved and forest-steppe zones in the central part of European Russia in the Tula region was described using results from field measurements. NEE and ET were measured using a portable measuring system consisting of a transparent ventilated chamber combined with an infrared CO2/H2O analyzer, LI-840A (Li-Cor, USA) along a transect from the southern peripheral part of the mire to its center under sunny clear-sky weather conditions in the period from May to September of 2012 and in May 2013. The results of the field measurements showed significant spatial and temporal variability of NEE and ET that was mainly influenced by incoming solar radiation and ground water level. The seasonal patterns of NEE and ET within the mire were quite different. During the entire growing season the central part of the mire was a sink of CO2 for the atmosphere. NEE reached maximal values in June-July (-6.8 ± 4.2 μmol m-2 s-1). The southern peripheral part of the mire, due to strong shading by the surrounding forest, was a sink of CO2 for the atmosphere in June-July only. ET reached maximal values in the well-lighted central parts of the mire in May (0.34 ± 0.20 mm h-1) mainly because of high air and surface temperatures and the very wet upper peat horizon and sphagnum moss. Herbaceous species made the maximum contribution to the total gross primary production (GPP) in both the central and the peripheral parts of the mire. The contribution of sphagnum to the total GPP of these plant communities was relatively small and ranged on sunny days of July-August from -1.1 ± 1.1 mgC g-1 of dry weight (DW) per hour in the peripheral zone of the mire to -0.6 ± 0.2 mgC g-1 DW h-1 at the mire center. The sphagnum layer made the maximum contribution to total ET at the mire center (0.25 ± 0.10 mm h-1) and the herbaceous

  14. Time Dependent Multi Zone Modeling of X-ray and Gamma-ray Variability of the TeV Blazar Mrk 421.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, Giovanni; Chen, X.

    2010-02-01

    We present a new time-dependent multi-zone code and its first application to study the SSC emission of Blazar Mrk 421. The code couples Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo methods. All the light travel time effects are fully considered, internal and external. It has long been realized that simple one-zone homogeneous models are not adequate to describe several aspects of the phenomenology, in particular those pertaining to the complex multiwavelength variability. Progress has been made by several groups but important trade-offs have always been necessary, such as neglecting internal light travel time or the inclusion of IC losses in the electron evolution. Our code fully accounts for all the relevant effects, and it also affords us significant freedom w.r.t. geometry and "variability". This latter is implemented as a shock traveling along the jet, with electrons being injected as it sweeps the blob. Results are compared with the 2001 observations of Mrk 421. We also analyzed cases including a pre-existing cospatial electron population contributing to the SED, and external radiation field. It seems to be possible to achieve adequate fits to the observations, but a there remain several open issues, such as a systematic soft X-ray intraband lag, and a delay of the gamma-ray flare with respect to the X-ray flare. The two principal challenges are: 1. The simulated VHE spectrum is always softer than the observed one. 2. The correlation between the TeV gamma-ray and X-ray does not reproduce the (super)quadratic relationship observed in multiple occasions. In fact we have not been able to reproduce anything close to it in this first suite of models. We will report also on the extension of the code, and case studies, to jet-in-jet and spine-layer configurations, as well as to the study of red blazars. We acknowledge support from Chandra Award AR9-0016X

  15. Unraveling the Drivers of Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogeochemical Cycling at Aquifer-River Interfaces - The LEVERHULME Hyporheic Zone Research Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    While there has been substantial improvement of understanding hyporheic exchange flow and residence time controls on biogeochemical turnover rates, there is little knowledge of the actual drivers of the spatial and temporal variability of interlinked biogeochemical cycles. Previous research has mainly focused on bedform controlled hyporheic exchange and the transformation of surface solutes along a hyporheic flow path but failed to explain observations of spatially and temporally variable nutrient turnover in streambeds with higher structural heterogeneity and autochthonous carbon and nitrogen sources. The "Leverhulme Hyporheic Zone Research Network" has developed an interdisciplinary strategy for investigating the physical controls on hyporheic exchange fluxes and residence time distributions, heat and reactive solute transport along biogeographical and catchment gradients. This strategy combines smart tracer applications with distributed sensor networks in multi-scale nested monitoring schemes and numerical model studies to investigate the interactions between physico-chemical process dynamics and hyporheic microbial, invertebrate and macrophyte ecology. Investigations integrating the process knowledge from mesocosms to artificial channels and stream reaches highlight the impact of small-scale streambed structure on spatial patterns of hyporheic exchange flow, residence time distribution and the development of biogeochemical hotspots. Manipulation studies inhibiting flow through dominant hyporheic exchange flow paths allowed to quantify the functional significance, sensitivity and resilience of biogeochemical, microbial and ecological functioning of identified hyporheic hotspots to environmental change. Further discharge and stage manipulations proved to not only control in-channel macrophyte growth but also temperature patterns and residence time distributions as well as microbial metabolic activity and biogeochemical processing rates, highlighting the potential

  16. Unraveling the Drivers of Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogeochemical Cycling at Aquifer-River Interfaces - The LEVERHULME Hyporheic Zone Research Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, S.; Ward, A. S.; Zarnetske, J. P.; Martí Roca, E.; Larned, S.; Milner, A.; Datry, T.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Schmidt, C.; Blaen, P.; Kurz, M. J.; Klaar, M. J.; Drummond, J. D.; Knapp, J.; Folegot, S.; Hannah, D. M.; Romeijn, P.; Blume, T.; Lewandowski, J.; Maruedo, A.; Ledger, M.; Lee-Cullin, J. A.; O'Callaghan, M.; Keller, T.; Vieweg, M.

    2014-12-01

    While there has been substantial improvement of understanding hyporheic exchange flow and residence time controls on biogeochemical turnover rates, there is little knowledge of the actual drivers of the spatial and temporal variability of interlinked biogeochemical cycles. Previous research has mainly focused on bedform controlled hyporheic exchange and the transformation of surface solutes along a hyporheic flow path but failed to explain observations of spatially and temporally variable nutrient turnover in streambeds with higher structural heterogeneity and autochthonous carbon and nitrogen sources. The "Leverhulme Hyporheic Zone Research Network" has developed an interdisciplinary strategy for investigating the physical controls on hyporheic exchange fluxes and residence time distributions, heat and reactive solute transport along biogeographical and catchment gradients. This strategy combines smart tracer applications with distributed sensor networks in multi-scale nested monitoring schemes and numerical model studies to investigate the interactions between physico-chemical process dynamics and hyporheic microbial, invertebrate and macrophyte ecology. Investigations integrating the process knowledge from mesocosms to artificial channels and stream reaches highlight the impact of small-scale streambed structure on spatial patterns of hyporheic exchange flow, residence time distribution and the development of biogeochemical hotspots. Manipulation studies inhibiting flow through dominant hyporheic exchange flow paths allowed to quantify the functional significance, sensitivity and resilience of biogeochemical, microbial and ecological functioning of identified hyporheic hotspots to environmental change. Further discharge and stage manipulations proved to not only control in-channel macrophyte growth but also temperature patterns and residence time distributions as well as microbial metabolic activity and biogeochemical processing rates, highlighting the potential

  17. Variability of the Tropical Atlantic and Pacific SSS Minimum Zones in the Last Three Decades and Their Relations to the ITCZ and NECC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcroix, T. C.; Tchilibou, M. L.; Alory, G.; Reverdin, G. P.; Arnault, S.

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on the time-space variability of the low Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) waters located from the West to the East within about 2°N-12°N in the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The analysis is based on a combination of in situ SSS observations collected in the last three decades from voluntary observing ships, TAO/TRITON and PIRATA moorings, Argo floats and (few) CTD profiles. We show that the mean position of the Atlantic and Pacific low SSS waters is tightly related to the local minimum in Evaporation minus Precipitation (E-P) budget linked to the Inter Tropical Convergence Zones (ITCZ) and to salt transport by the eastward flowing North Equatorial Counter Current (NECC). We also show via EOF analyses that the meridional position of this SSS minimum varies both at seasonal time scale, with a northernmost position in boreal summer, and at interannual time scale in relation with ENSO and the Atlantic meridional mode, with however subtle differences in timing between the western, central and eastern basins. The role of the ITCZ-related E-P budget and NECC-related salt advection in these seasonal and interannual changes is examined. We further document the long-term meridional migration of these low SSS waters in the last three decades and discuss whether or not it is consistent with the expected global change effects.

  18. Using radium isotopes to estimate cross-shelf mixing rates: Spatial and temporal variability of radium isotopes in the surf zone and coastal ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbert, S. L.; Hammond, D. E.

    2002-12-01

    Evaluating the impact and fate of surface water runoff and associated contaminants requires knowledge of the rates of mixing and transport in the coastal zone. The distribution of naturally-occurring radium isotopes is being explored as a tracer to evaluate these rates. Two types of sampling have been utilized to study these processes: shore-based sampling in the surf zone and offshore sampling on transects from 0.5 to 15 km from the coast. Shoreline samples were collected every other hour for 10-12 hours at several locations between Huntington Beach and Santa Monica, California, during a range of seasons and tidal amplitudes. The 223Ra and 224Ra concentrations are related to the tides, with higher concentrations during low tide and lower concentrations at high tide. However, the 223Ra/223Ra ratio remains relatively constant. This indicates that the two isotopes co-vary and probably have a coherent source. As the tidal range while sampling increased, the average isotope concentration decreased, apparently reflecting increased offshore mixing rates. Six offshore transects have been obtained in the Huntington Beach area. Vertical profiles indicate that in most cases, the short-lived radium isotopes are primarily confined to the mixed layer. Results show that on the time scale of a few days, the system appears to be in steady state. During spring, higher concentrations in offshore surface waters were observed. This difference appears to result from confinement of the radium input to a shallower mixed layer, because integrated isotope inventories are remarkably consistent and suggest that the input does not vary greatly with time. Fits to a one-dimensional exponential function indicate that the two short-lived isotopes have quite similar horizontal scale distances. This is unexpected because a 1-D diffusion-reaction formulation predicts that scale distances should differ by a factor of 1.6. In contrast to the Huntington Beach region, three transects at Hermosa Beach

  19. Outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Alice Mânica; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Silva, Denise Rossato

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units and assess their clinical and demographic profiles. Methods Retrospective, analytical, observational study, wherein the outcomes for patients diagnosed with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit of university hospital from January 2010 until February 2011 were evaluated. Results Thirty-four patients' medical records were included. Twenty-six (76.5%) patients received some type of ventilatory support, of whom 21 (61.8%) used invasive mechanical ventilation and 11 (32.4%) used noninvasive ventilation at some point during their stay at the intensive care unit. Regarding mortality, 12 (35.3%) patients died during hospitalization at the intensive care unit, totaling 15 (44.1%) deaths during the entire hospitalization period; 19 (55.9%) patients were discharged from the hospital. The analysis of the variables showed that the patients who died had remained on invasive mechanical ventilation for a longer period 5.0 (0.25 to 15.0) days than the survivors (1.0 (0 to 1.0) days) (p=0.033) and underwent dialysis during their stay at the intensive care unit (p=0.014). Conclusions The mortality of patients with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit is associated with the time spent on invasive mechanical ventilation and the need for dialysis. PMID:23887754

  20. Admitting Failure (With a Little Help from My Friends)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Teachers who are no longer considered novices can have a difficult time admitting failures. There is an expectation that teachers should be "on" all the time, but disorientation can happen even to veteran teachers--or maybe especially to veteran teachers--if expectations are too high. Sarah Cooper, an experienced teacher and dean of…

  1. A Profile of the Newly-Admitted Nursing Home Resident.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erber, Joan T.; Dye, Carol J.

    1982-01-01

    Recently admitted nursing home residents received a battery of psychological tests and were rated on a number of behavioral indices. Results revealed the morale/anxiety dimension was independent of cognitive competency, internally controlled residents were rated high by others in behavioral competency, and self-rating scales measure something…

  2. Nitrate and Nitrite Variability at the Seafloor of an Oxygen Minimum Zone Revealed by a Novel Microfluidic In-Situ Chemical Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Mustafa; Beaton, Alexander D; Dengler, Marcus; Mowlem, Matthew C; Sohl, Frank; Sommer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) is a promising technology that allows the development of miniaturized chemical sensors. In contrast to the surging interest in biomedical sciences, the utilization of LOC sensors in aquatic sciences is still in infancy but a wider use of such sensors could mitigate the undersampling problem of ocean biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the first underwater test of a novel LOC sensor to obtain in situ calibrated time-series (up to 40 h) of nitrate+nitrite (ΣNOx) and nitrite on the seafloor of the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone, offshore Western Africa. Initial tests showed that the sensor successfully reproduced water column (160 m) nutrient profiles. Lander deployments at 50, 100 and 170 m depth indicated that the biogeochemical variability was high over the Mauritanian shelf: The 50 m site had the lowest ΣNOx concentration, with 15.2 to 23.4 μM (median=18.3 μM); while at the 100 site ΣNOx varied between 21.0 and 30.1 μM over 40 hours (median = 25.1 μM). The 170 m site had the highest median ΣNOx level (25.8 μM) with less variability (22.8 to 27.7 μM). At the 50 m site, nitrite concentration decreased fivefold from 1 to 0.2 μM in just 30 hours accompanied by decreasing oxygen and increasing nitrate concentrations. Taken together with the time series of oxygen, temperature, pressure and current velocities, we propose that the episodic intrusion of deeper waters via cross-shelf transport leads to intrusion of nitrate-rich, but oxygen-poor waters to shallower locations, with consequences for benthic nitrogen cycling. This first validation of an LOC sensor at elevated water depths revealed that when deployed for longer periods and as a part of a sensor network, LOC technology has the potential to contribute to the understanding of the benthic biogeochemical dynamics. PMID:26161958

  3. Nitrate and Nitrite Variability at the Seafloor of an Oxygen Minimum Zone Revealed by a Novel Microfluidic In-Situ Chemical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Mustafa; Beaton, Alexander D.; Dengler, Marcus; Mowlem, Matthew C.; Sohl, Frank; Sommer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) is a promising technology that allows the development of miniaturized chemical sensors. In contrast to the surging interest in biomedical sciences, the utilization of LOC sensors in aquatic sciences is still in infancy but a wider use of such sensors could mitigate the undersampling problem of ocean biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the first underwater test of a novel LOC sensor to obtain in situ calibrated time-series (up to 40 h) of nitrate+nitrite (ΣNOx) and nitrite on the seafloor of the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone, offshore Western Africa. Initial tests showed that the sensor successfully reproduced water column (160 m) nutrient profiles. Lander deployments at 50, 100 and 170 m depth indicated that the biogeochemical variability was high over the Mauritanian shelf: The 50 m site had the lowest ΣNOx concentration, with 15.2 to 23.4 μM (median=18.3 μM); while at the 100 site ΣNOx varied between 21.0 and 30.1 μM over 40 hours (median = 25.1μM). The 170 m site had the highest median ΣNOx level (25.8 μM) with less variability (22.8 to 27.7 μM). At the 50 m site, nitrite concentration decreased fivefold from 1 to 0.2 μM in just 30 hours accompanied by decreasing oxygen and increasing nitrate concentrations. Taken together with the time series of oxygen, temperature, pressure and current velocities, we propose that the episodic intrusion of deeper waters via cross-shelf transport leads to intrusion of nitrate-rich, but oxygen-poor waters to shallower locations, with consequences for benthic nitrogen cycling. This first validation of an LOC sensor at elevated water depths revealed that when deployed for longer periods and as a part of a sensor network, LOC technology has the potential to contribute to the understanding of the benthic biogeochemical dynamics. PMID:26161958

  4. Thermal variability within the hyporheic zone of an Alpine stream gravel bar is influenced by solar radiation and other climatic factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boodoo, Kyle; Schelker, Jakob; Battin, Tom

    2016-04-01

    Gravel bars with largely unsubmerged surface areas exposed to the atmosphere are recipient to high levels of incoming radiation during the day, particularly during summer months. Transfer of heat from the atmosphere downward into the hyporheic zone (HZ) below a gravel bar (GB) can thus possibly lead to the alteration of the vertical temperature profile within its HZ, with implications for physical and biogeochemical processes therein. Here we present results from the analysis of seasonal, high frequency spatio-temporal data including, vertical hyporheic temperature, physical parameters and climatic data for a GB located within an Alpine cold water stream (Oberer Seebach, Austria). Vertical temperature profiles throughout the GB were analyzed together with corresponding climatic data for different seasons to elucidate the spatio-temporal variability of HZ temperature gradients in relation to air temperature, incoming global radiation and stream discharge.Initial analyses indicate a clear seasonal difference between Summer and Autumn temperature profiles throughout the GB, with a strongly developed, exponentially decreasing temperature-depth gradient throughout the GB during summer months. In contrast, this observed gradient substantially weakened or collapsed during autumn months. Furthermore, the highest absolute temperatures and steepest depth gradients within the HZ occurred during summer days, coinciding with the falling hydrograph,where hyporheic temperatures exceeded that of both surface water and groundwater. These findings point to the effect of solar radiation and/or air temperature as a contributor to GB temperatures, possibly influencing diurnal and seasonal GB temperature profiles.Overall, our results suggest that not only the mixing of groundwater and streamwater, but also heat transfer associated with solar radiation and/or air temperature may act as an important driver of HZ temperature, particularly during summer months. This may have implications

  5. Spatial patterns of interaction among climate variability and change, soil water deficit and transpiration in small mountain catchments of Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, K.; Tague, C.

    2011-12-01

    In snow-dominated mountain systems, a warming climate alters soil water deficit through changing the timing and magnitude of moisture inputs as precipitation and snowmelt and through changes in the timing and magnitude of evapotranspiration losses. The net effect of climate warming on soil water deficit and associated ecosystem processes ultimately depends on the interaction between changes in inputs and outputs and on vegetation, micro-climate and soil properties that control the sensitivity of soil water to changes in input/output drivers. In mountain environments, steep spatial gradients result in substantial variation in atmospheric forcing and vegetation and soil properties over relatively short spatial scales, which necessitate providing finer-scale assessment of climate change impact. Measurements of soil moisture and forest responses to climate are often made at plot scales but are limited in spatial coverage. Coupled eco-hydrologic models, applied at relatively fine (m) scales provide a method of extrapolating findings from local measurements and exploring hillslope and watershed scale impacts of climate warming on moisture deficit. In this study, we use RHESSys (Regional hydro-ecologic simulation system) combined with spatially intensive monitoring of coupled ecohydrologic variables at the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory (SSCZO), located in the Sierra National Forest, California. We initially use the model to identify clusters of distinctive water deficit behavior as summarized by indices of summertime soil moisture and transpiration recessions. The resulting clusters demonstrate that both elevational differences in energy availability and topographic controls on drainage are 1st order controls on spatial patterns of summertime moisture deficit and tree transpiration. We then use these initial model clusters to guide soil moisture and sapflux data collection. The collected data are used to characterize soil moisture deficit and transpiration for

  6. The challenge of admitting the very elderly to intensive care.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Yên-Lan; Angus, Derek C; Boumendil, Ariane; Guidet, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    The aging of the population has increased the demand for healthcare resources. The number of patients aged 80 years and older admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) increased during the past decade, as has the intensity of care for such patients. Yet, many physicians remain reluctant to admit the oldest, arguing a "squandering" of societal resources, that ICU care could be deleterious, or that ICU care may not actually be what the patient or family wants in this instance. Other ICU physicians are strong advocates for admission of a selected elderly population. These discrepant opinions may partly be explained by the current lack of validated criteria to select accurately the patients (of any age) who will benefit most from ICU hospitalization. This review describes the epidemiology of the elderly aged 80 years and older admitted in the ICU, their long-term outcomes, and to discuss some of the solutions to cope with the burden of an aging population receiving acute care hospitalization. PMID:21906383

  7. Etiology and prognostic factors of sepsis among children and adolescents admitted to the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Pedro, Taís da Costa São; Morcillo, André Moreno; Baracat, Emílio Carlos Elias

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine the etiology and clinical disease progression variables of sepsis associated with the prognosis of patients admitted to a pediatric intensive care unit. Methods Prospective and retrospective case series. Data were collected from the medical records of patients diagnosed with sepsis who were admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit of a general hospital from January 2011 to December 2013. Bacteria were identified in blood and fluid cultures. Age, sex, vaccination schedule, comorbidities, prior antibiotic use, clinical data on admission, and complications during disease progression were compared in the survival and death groups at a 5% significance level. Results A total of 115 patients, with a mean age of 30.5 months, were included in the study. Bacterial etiology was identified in 40 patients. Altered peripheral perfusion on admission and diagnosis of severe sepsis were associated with complications. A greater number of complications occurred in the group of patients older than 36 months (p = 0.003; odds ratio = 4.94). The presence of complications during hospitalization was associated with death (odds ratio = 27.7). The main etiological agents were Gram-negative bacteria (15/40), Staphylococcus aureus (11/40) and Neisseria meningitidis (5/40). Conclusion Gram-negative bacteria and Staphylococcus aureus predominated in the etiology of sepsis among children and adolescents admitted to an intensive care unit. The severity of sepsis and the presence of altered peripheral perfusion on admission were associated with complications. Moreover, the presence of complications was a factor associated with death. PMID:26465245

  8. Physician experience and outcomes among patients admitted to general internal medicine teaching wards

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Finlay A.; Youngson, Erik; Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Kassam, Narmin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physician scores on examinations decline with time after graduation. However, whether this translates into declining quality of care is unknown. Our objective was to determine how physician experience is associated with negative outcomes for patients admitted to hospital. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving all patients admitted to general internal medicine wards over a 2-year period at all 7 teaching hospitals in Alberta, Canada. We used files from the Alberta College of Physicians and Surgeons to determine the number of years since medical school graduation for each patient’s most responsible physician. Our primary outcome was the composite of in-hospital death, or readmission or death within 30 days postdischarge. Results: We identified 10 046 patients who were cared for by 149 physicians. Patient characteristics were similar across physician experience strata, as were primary outcome rates (17.4% for patients whose care was managed by physicians in the highest quartile of experience, compared with 18.8% in those receiving care from the least experienced physicians; adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72–1.06). Outcomes were similar between experience quartiles when further stratified by physician volume, most responsible diagnosis or complexity of the patient’s condition. Although we found substantial variability in length of stay between individual physicians, there were no significant differences between physician experience quartiles (mean adjusted for patient covariates and accounting for intraphysician clustering: 7.90 [95% CI 7.39–8.42] d for most experienced quartile; 7.63 [95% CI 7.13–8.14] d for least experienced quartile). Interpretation: For patients admitted to general internal medicine teaching wards, we saw no negative association between physician experience and outcomes commonly used as proxies for quality of inpatient care. PMID:26283716

  9. Ultraviolet-Visible and Fluorescence Analyses Reveal the Spatial and Seasonal Variability of Dissolved Organic Matter through the Vadose Zone to Groundwater at the Rifle, Colorado River Floodplain Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Gilbert, B.; Kim, Y.; Williams, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex and poorly understood mixture of natural organic compounds that play important roles in terrestrial C transport and biogeochemical cycles, and its reactivity makes it sensitive to seasonal variations and longer term climate change. As a component within the LBNL Science Focus Area 2.0, this study is designed to determine the spatial and temporal variability of DOM concentrations and characteristics throughout the vadose zone and groundwater within a semi-arid floodplain at Rifle, Colorado. Three sets of vertically stratified pore water samplers and wells were installed along a groundwater flow transect. These installations allowed acquisition of vertically- and temporally-resolved pore water samples from the vadose zone, capillary fringe, and saturated zone from April 2013 to May 2014. Ultraviolet-visible absorbance (UVA) and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy are being applied to trace the changes in DOM characteristics. Initial results indicate that the aromatic C contents (%) of DOM vary with depth and season and exhibit patterns distinct from groundwater. EEM analysis identified fulvic- and humic-like substances as the major fluorescent components of DOM in pore water samples. The concentrations of fulvic- and humic-like matter decreases with depth within the vadose zone, and increases from Spring and Summer to Fall, then decreases in Winter. The trend is consistent with UVA results. Microbial by-product-like components in DOM show higher concentrations in the vadose zone, and decrease from Spring to Winter. Fulvic- and humic-like substances are the only detectable fluorophore components in the groundwater samples. The results from both UVA and EEM suggest that (1) aromatic C or fulvic- and humic-like matter are preferentially adsorbed within shallower sediments during transport; and (2) microbial transformations of DOM composition may occur in the vadose zone, particularly during late Spring

  10. Vulnerabilities of children admitted to a pediatric inpatient care unit☆

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Larissa Natacha; Breigeiron, Márcia Koja; Hallmann, Sofia; Witkowski, Maria Carolina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the vulnerabilities of children admitted to a pediatric inpatient unit of a university hospital. METHODS: Cross-sectional, descriptive study from April to September 2013 with36 children aged 30 days to 12 years old, admitted to medical-surgical pediatric inpatient units of a university hospital and their caregivers. Data concerning sociocultural, socioeconomic and clinical context of children and their families were collected by interview with the child caregiver and from patients, records, and analyzed by descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Of the total sample, 97.1% (n=132) of children had at least one type of vulnerability, the majority related to the caregiver's level of education, followed by caregiver's financial situation, health history of the child, caregiver's family situation, use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs by the caregiver, family's living conditions, caregiver's schooling, and bonding between the caregiver and the child. Only 2.9% (n=4) of the children did not show any criteria to be classified in a category of vulnerability. CONCLUSIONS: Most children were classified has having a social vulnerability. It is imperative to create networks of support between the hospital and the primary healthcare service to promote healthcare practices directed to the needs of the child and family. PMID:25511001

  11. Variability of the horizontal gradients of the air and the water surface temperatures in the vernal frontal zone period of Lake Ladoga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumenko, M. A.; Guzivaty, V. V.; Karetnikov, S. G.

    2012-11-01

    Every year, the during springtime heating conditions, the seasonal thermal frontal zone appears in Lake Ladoga. It features high horizontal water temperature gradients. The coastal waters, stably stratified in density, interact with the waters of the open lake that are unstably stratified because of the free convection developing in the temperature range between 0°C and the maximum density of the water at 4°C. In Lake Ladoga, the advance of the vernal frontal zone lasts about 7-8 weeks from mid-May to the beginning of July. Both the water temperature and air temperature distributions over the water's surface show that large spatial temperature ranges exist in the vernal front reaching more than 11°C. We investigated the spatial horizontal gradients of the water's surface and the air temperature using a spatial grid with a resolution of 5 km. The surface water temperature and the air temperature gradients were compared with each other as well as with the temperatures in the region of varying depths. During the spring peak of the frontal activity in Lake Ladoga, most of the fronts feature mean temperatures greater than 4°C. This indicates that the thermal bar marks the offshore edge of the most extensive frontal zone.

  12. 76 FR 60602 - Proposed Collection of Information: Annual Letters-Certificates of Authority (A) and Admitted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Admitted Reinsurer (B) AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and... Admitted Reinsurer (B).'' DATES: Written comments should be received on or before November 28, 2011... (A) and Admitted Reinsurer (B). OMB Number: 1510-0057. Form Number: None. Abstract: This letter...

  13. Overriding plate deformation and variability of fore-arc deformation during subduction: Insight from geodynamic models and application to the Calabria subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, João. C.

    2015-10-01

    In nature, subducting slabs and overriding plate segments bordering subduction zones are generally embedded within larger plates. Such large plates can impose far-field boundary conditions that influence the style of subduction and overriding plate deformation. Here we present dynamic laboratory models of progressive subduction in three-dimensional space, in which the far-field boundary conditions at the trailing edges of the subducting plate (SP) and overriding plate (OP) are varied. Four configurations are presented: Free (both plates free), SP-Fixed, OP-Fixed, and SP-OP-Fixed. We investigate their impact on the kinematics and dynamics of subduction, particularly focusing on overriding plate deformation. The results indicate that the variation in far-field boundary conditions has an influence on the slab geometry, subduction partitioning, and trench migration partitioning. Our models also indicate that in natural (narrow) subduction zones, assuming a homogeneous overriding plate, the formation of back-arc basins (e.g., Tyrrhenian Sea, Aegean Sea, and Scotia Sea) is generally expected to occur at a comparable location (250-700 km from the trench), irrespective of the boundary condition. In addition, our models indicate that the style of fore-arc deformation (shortening or extension) is influenced by the mobility of the overriding plate through controlling the force normal to the subduction zone interface (trench suction). Our geodynamic model that uses the SP-OP-Fixed setup is comparable to the Calabria subduction zone with respect to subduction kinematics, slab geometry, trench curvature, and accretionary configuration. Furthermore, the model can explain back-arc and fore-arc extension at the Calabria subduction zone since the latest middle Miocene as a consequence of subduction of the narrow Calabrian slab and the immobility of the subducting African plate and overriding Eurasian plate. This setting induced strong trench suction, driving fore-arc extension, and

  14. Characterization of Older Emergency Department Patients Admitted to Psychiatric Units

    PubMed Central

    Stiffler, Kirk A.; Kohli, Erol; Chen, Oriana; Frey, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many older patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) with psychiatric complaints require admission to geropsychiatric units (GPUs). The medical evaluation needed prior to this is not understood. Our goal was to understand ED evaluation practices for patients admitted to the GPU through the ED and understand the medical problems identified after admission. Methods Via retrospective chart review, we abstracted demographics, medical history, ED complaint, evaluation, length of stay, and diagnosis. The number of patients later transferred from the GPU and the reasons for such transfers were also recorded. Results Of 100 patients reviewed, the average age was 78 years. Admission diagnoses were agitation/mania (30%), depression/suicidal ideation (28%), change in mental status/confusion (12%) and other (30%). Most had at least one prior psychiatric and medical diagnosis (77%, 60%). Common ED tests ordered were basic metabolic panel (BMP) (96%), complete blood count (CBC) (94%), urinalysis (UA) (89%), electrocardiogram (EKG) (69%), alcohol level (62%), urine toxicology (61%), chest X-ray (51%), and CT scan of the head (71%). Abnormal findings included urinalysis (24.7%), CBC (23.4%), toxicology (23%), BMP (21.9%), head CT (21.1%), chest X-ray (13.7%), ECG changes (10.1%), and alcohol (4.8%). Five of the 100 GPU admissions were later transferred to a medical floor. Conclusion Most GPU admissions have previous psychiatric and medical issues and are admitted for agitation/mania or depression/suicidal ideation. A certain percentage of patients are transferred out due to medical issues despite ED evaluation. However, it is unlikely that further ED testing would reduce this percentage. Further research of medical screening for geropsychiatric patients may elucidate ideal medical clearance procedures. PMID:26491495

  15. Variability in the vertical flux of microorganisms and biogenic material in the epipelagic zone of a North Pacific central gyre station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Gordon T.

    1989-09-01

    Free-floating particle interceptor trap arrays were deployed at a single station (26°N, 155°W) in the North Pacific central gyre for three consecutive periods (I: 24-31 March 1986; II: 31 March to 12 April 1986; III: 14-17 April 1986). Temporal changes in plankton biomass and biogenic vertical fluxes coincided with a 10 day storm that produced up to 35 kn winds and 3.5 m swells. Mean wind speed increased during the study period as did suspended adenosine triphosphate (sus-ATP) concentrations in the upper 120 m. Vertical fluxes of total particulate carbon (PC), ATP, diatoms, dinoflagellates, bacteria, mastigotes and fecal pellets were greatest during the post-storm period, whereas ciliate fluxes were nearly equal in all three trap sets. Aloricate ciliates were the dominant taxonomic group, accounting for 45-79% of the total microbial biomass in the traps. Carbon estimates revealed that most of the PC flux was amorphous material and that fecal pellets and microorganisms represented a small proportion of the PC flux; 0.2-1.2 and 6.0-8.0% of total PC, respectively. Relative abundances, diversity, equitability and taxon rank order of diatoms, dinoflagellates, aloricate ciliates and tintinnid ciliates varied between trap sets, depths and taxonomic groups. Findings from this study support the hypothesis that physical forcing by the storm stimulated planktonic production and altered assemblage structure in the epipelagic zone and consequently stimulated efflux of biogenic materials and organisms from this zone.

  16. Origins of streamflow in a crystalline basement catchment in a sub-humid Sudanian zone: The Donga basin (Benin, West Africa): Inter-annual variability of water budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Séguis, L.; Kamagaté, B.; Favreau, G.; Descloitres, M.; Seidel, J.-L.; Galle, S.; Peugeot, C.; Gosset, M.; Le Barbé, L.; Malinur, F.; Van Exter, S.; Arjounin, M.; Boubkraoui, S.; Wubda, M.

    2011-05-01

    SummaryDuring the last quarter of the 20th century, West Africa underwent a particularly intense and generalized drought. During this period, the biggest drops in streamflow were observed in the Sudanian zone rather than in the Sahelian zone, but the reasons are still poorly understood. In 2000, a meso-scale hydrological observatory was set up in the sub-humid Sudanian zone of the Upper Ouémé Valley (Benin). Three embedded catchments of 12-586 km 2 located on a crystalline bedrock were intensively instrumented to document the different terms of the water budget and to identify the main streamflow generating processes and base-flow mechanisms at different scales. Geophysical, hydrological and geochemical data were collected throughout the catchments from 2002 to 2006. Crossing these data helped define their hydrological functioning. The region has seasonal streamflow, and the permanent groundwater in the weathered mantle does not drain to rivers, instead, seasonal perched groundwaters are the major contributor to annual streamflow. The perched groundwaters are mainly located in seasonally waterlogged sandy layers in the headwater bottom-lands called bas-fonds in French-speaking West Africa of 1st order streams. During the period 2003-2006, regolith groundwater recharge ranged between 10% and 15% of the annual rainfall depth. Depletion of permanent groundwater during the dry season is probably explained by local evapotranspiration which was seen not to be limited to gallery forests. During the 4-year study period, a reduction of 20% in annual rainfall led to a 50% reduction in streamflow. This reduction was observed in the two components of the flow: direct runoff and drainage of perched groundwater. Thanks to the comprehensive dataset obtained, the results obtained for the Donga experimental catchment are now being extrapolated to the whole upper Ouémé valley, which can be considered as representative of sub-humid Sudanian rivers flowing on a crystalline

  17. Interactions between seasonality and oceanic forcing drive the phytoplankton variability in the tropical-temperate transition zone (~ 30°S) of Eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbrecht, Linda H.; Schaeffer, Amandine; Roughan, Moninya; Armand, Leanne K.

    2015-04-01

    The East Australian Current (EAC) has been shown to be warming rapidly, which is expected to cause latitudinal shifts in phytoplankton abundance, distribution and composition along the east Australian coast. Yet a lack of phytoplankton information exists northward of 34°S. Here, we provide the first detailed taxonomic time-series survey (monthly sampling for about one annual cycle, 2011-2012) in the east Australian tropical-temperate transition zone (~ 30°S, upstream of the EAC separation point at ~ 31-32°S). All phytoplankton (categorised depending on their association with specific water-types) show a seasonal signal with abundance maxima (minima) during summer (winter). This seasonal signal is most pronounced in the seasonal/bloom category and least expressed by deep-water taxa, which prefer cold, saline and dense bottom water independent of the season. Different extents of EAC encroachment onto the continental shelf drive the cross-shelf phytoplankton composition and distribution, such that a weak EAC is associated with phytoplankton community being organised along 'depth' and 'distance from the coast' gradients with high phytoplankton abundances inshore. A strong EAC favours the occurrence of warm-water taxa offshore and an increase in diatom abundance on the mid-shelf (53% shelf width). We conclude that the phytoplankton community in the tropical-temperate transition zone of Eastern Australia is driven by an interaction of intrinsic seasonal cycles and primarily EAC-driven oceanic forcing. Our findings benefit studies located in Western Boundary Current systems worldwide, in which warming and strengthening of these currents are predicted to severely impact phytoplankton dynamics.

  18. Modelling vegetation water-use and groundwater recharge as affected by climate variability in an arid-zone Acacia savanna woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Eamus, Derek; Cleverly, James; Boulain, Nicolas; Cook, Peter; Zhang, Lu; Cheng, Lei; Yu, Qiang

    2014-11-01

    For efficient and sustainable utilisation of limited groundwater resources, improved understanding of how vegetation water-use responds to climate variation and the corresponding controls on recharge is essential. This study investigated these responses using a modelling approach. The biophysically based model WAVES was calibrated and validated with more than two years of field experimental data conducted in Mulga (Acacia aneura) in arid central Australia. The validated model was then applied to simulate vegetation growth (as changes in overstory and understory leaf area index; LAI), vegetation water-use and groundwater recharge using observed climate data for the period 1981-2012. Due to large inter-annual climatic variability, especially precipitation, simulated annual mean LAI ranged from 0.12 to 0.35 for the overstory and 0.07 to 0.21 for the understory. These variations in simulated LAI resulted in vegetation water-use varying greatly from year-to-year, from 64 to 601 mm pa. Simulated vegetation water-use also showed distinct seasonal patterns. Vegetation dynamics affected by climate variability exerted significant controls on simulated annual recharge, which was greatly reduced to 0-48 mm compared to that (58-672 mm) only affected by climate. Understanding how climate variability and land use/land cover change interactively impact on groundwater recharge significantly improves groundwater resources management in arid and semi-arid regions.

  19. Pattern of ocular trauma admitted in a tertiary hospital.

    PubMed

    Quayum, M A; Akhanda, A H

    2009-01-01

    Ocular trauma is an important cause of ocular morbidity. This prospective study was conducted to identify primarily the population at risk, sources of eye injuries and the common barriers for their early management. Cases were selected randomly during the period Aug/2006 to March/2008 among the patients admitted in the department of ophthalmology, Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, with the history of ocular injury. A total of 100 eyes in 97 patients were included in the study. Age ranges were 1.5 years to 75 years. Male were 78.35% (n=76) & female were 21.65% (n=21). 56.00% (n=56) injuries were accidental occupational injuries. Common sources of eye injury included sharp objects used in occupational activities 43% (n=43), blunt objects 23% (n=23), Chemicals 7% (n=7), Projectile objects 8%, (n=8), Bird-beak 5% (n=5), agricultural trauma 3% (n=3) and miscellaneous 11% (n=11). Young adult males engaged in industrial, mechanical, agricultural or domestic works are at particular risk for ophthalmic trauma. Poverty, ignorance, indigenous treatment, remote communications and lack of supervised and collaborative management seems to be the possible barriers for the early management of ocular injuries. Preventive measures are recommended to adopt not only in the workplaces but also in domestic, recreational, sports and transport settings. PMID:19182740

  20. A Fiji multi-coral δ18O composite approach to obtaining a more accurate reconstruction of the last two-centuries of the ocean-climate variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dassié, Emilie P.; Linsley, Braddock K.; Corrège, Thierry; Wu, Henry C.; Lemley, Gavin M.; Howe, Steve; Cabioch, Guy

    2014-12-01

    The limited availability of oceanographic data in the tropical Pacific Ocean prior to the satellite era makes coral-based climate reconstructions a key tool for extending the instrumental record back in time, thereby providing a much needed test for climate models and projections. We have generated a unique regional network consisting of five Porites coral δ18O time series from different locations in the Fijian archipelago. Our results indicate that using a minimum of three Porites coral δ18O records from Fiji is statistically sufficient to obtain a reliable signal for climate reconstruction, and that application of an approach used in tree ring studies is a suitable tool to determine this number. The coral δ18O composite indicates that while sea surface temperature (SST) variability is the primary driver of seasonal δ18O variability in these Fiji corals, annual average coral δ18O is more closely correlated to sea surface salinity (SSS) as previously reported. Our results highlight the importance of water mass advection in controlling Fiji coral δ18O and salinity variability at interannual and decadal time scales despite being located in the heavy rainfall region of the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The Fiji δ18O composite presents a secular freshening and warming trend since the 1850s coupled with changes in both interannual (IA) and decadal/interdecadal (D/I) variance. The changes in IA and D/I variance suggest a re-organization of climatic variability in the SPCZ region beginning in the late 1800s to period of a more dominant interannual variability, which could correspond to a southeast expansion of the SPCZ.

  1. Effects of bottom water dissolved oxygen variability on copper and lead fractionation in the sediments across the oxygen minimum zone, western continental margin of India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Jayachandran, Saranya; Madan, Ritu; Sarkar, Arindam; Linsy, P; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the effect of varying bottom-water oxygen concentration on geochemical fractionation (operational speciation) of Cu and Pb in the underneath sediments across the oxygen minimum zone (Arabian Sea) in the west coast of India. Both, Cu and Pb were redistributed among the different binding phases of the sediments with changing dissolved oxygen level (from oxic to hypoxic and close to suboxic) in the bottom water. The average lability of Cu-sediment complexes gradually decreased (i.e., stability increased) with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom water. Decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration increased Cu association with sedimentary organic matter. However, Pb association with Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxide phases in the sediments gradually decreased with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentration of the overlying bottom water (due to dissolution of Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase). The lability of Pb-sediment complexes increased with the decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration. This study suggests that bottom-water oxygen concentration is one of the key factors governing stability and lability of Cu and Pb complexes in the underneath sediment. Sedimentary organic matter and Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phases were the major hosting phases for Cu and Pb respectively in the study area. Increasing lability of Pb-complexes in bottom sediments may lead to positive benthic fluxes of Pb at low oxygen environment. PMID:27267721

  2. Assessment of Spatial Variability of Heavy Metals in Metropolitan Zone of Toluca Valley, Mexico, Using the Biomonitoring Technique in Mosses and TXRF Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zarazúa-Ortega, Graciela; Poblano-Bata, Josefina; Tejeda-Vega, Samuel; Ávila-Pérez, Pedro; Zepeda-Gómez, Carmen; Ortiz-Oliveros, Huemantzin; Macedo-Miranda, Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing atmospheric deposition of heavy metals using the epiphytic moss genera Fabronia ciliaris collected from six urban sites in the Metropolitan Zone of the Toluca Valley in Mexico. The concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, and Pb were determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique. Results show that the average metal concentration decrease in the following order: Fe (8207 mg/Kg) > Ca (7315 mg/Kg) > K (3842 mg/Kg) > Ti (387 mg/Kg) > Mn, Zn (191 mg/Kg) > Sr (71 mg/Kg) > Pb (59 mg/Kg) > Cu, V (32 mg/Kg) > Cr (24 mg/Kg) > Rb (13 mg/Kg) > Ni (10 mg/Kg). Enrichment factors show a high enrichment for Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb which provides an evidence of anthropogenic impact in the industrial and urban areas, mainly due to the intense vehicular traffic and the fossil fuel combustion. Monitoring techniques in mosses have proved to be a powerful tool for determining the deposition of heavy metals coming from diverse point sources of pollution. PMID:23853536

  3. Assessment of spatial variability of heavy metals in Metropolitan Zone of Toluca Valley, Mexico, using the biomonitoring technique in mosses and TXRF analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarazúa-Ortega, Graciela; Poblano-Bata, Josefina; Tejeda-Vega, Samuel; Ávila-Pérez, Pedro; Zepeda-Gómez, Carmen; Ortiz-Oliveros, Huemantzin; Macedo-Miranda, Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing atmospheric deposition of heavy metals using the epiphytic moss genera Fabronia ciliaris collected from six urban sites in the Metropolitan Zone of the Toluca Valley in Mexico. The concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, and Pb were determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique. Results show that the average metal concentration decrease in the following order: Fe (8207 mg/Kg) > Ca (7315 mg/Kg) > K (3842 mg/Kg) > Ti (387 mg/Kg) > Mn, Zn (191 mg/Kg) > Sr (71 mg/Kg) > Pb (59 mg/Kg) > Cu, V (32 mg/Kg) > Cr (24 mg/Kg) > Rb (13 mg/Kg) > Ni (10 mg/Kg). Enrichment factors show a high enrichment for Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb which provides an evidence of anthropogenic impact in the industrial and urban areas, mainly due to the intense vehicular traffic and the fossil fuel combustion. Monitoring techniques in mosses have proved to be a powerful tool for determining the deposition of heavy metals coming from diverse point sources of pollution. PMID:23853536

  4. A Method for Determining the Nominal Occular Hazard Zone for Gaussian Beam Laser Rangers with a Firmware Controlled Variable Focal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picco, C. E.; Shavers, M. R.; Victor, J. M.; Duron, J. L.; Bowers, W. h.; Gillis, D. B.; VanBaalen, M.

    2009-01-01

    LIDAR systems that maintain a constant beam spot size on a retroreflector in order to increase the accuracy of bearing and ranging data must use a software controlled variable position lens. These systems periodically update the estimated range and set the position of the focusing lens accordingly. In order to precisely calculate the r NOHD for such a system, the software method for setting the variable position lens and gaussian laser propagation can be used to calculate the irradiance at any point given the range estimation. NASA s Space Shuttle LIDAR, called the Trajectory Control Sensor (TCS), uses this configuration. Analytical tools were developed using Excel and VBA to determine the radiant energy to the International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers eyes while viewing the shuttle on approach and departure. Various viewing scenarios are considered including the use of through-the-lens imaging optics and the window transmissivity at the TCS wavelength. The methodology incorporates the TCS system control logic, gaussian laser propagation, potential failure mode end states, and guidance from American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers (ANSI Z136.1-2007). This approach can be adapted for laser safety analyses of similar LIDAR systems.

  5. Scientists Admitting to Plagiarism: A Meta-analysis of Surveys.

    PubMed

    Pupovac, Vanja; Fanelli, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of anonymous surveys asking scientists whether they ever committed various forms of plagiarism. From May to December 2011 we searched 35 bibliographic databases, five grey literature databases and hand searched nine journals for potentially relevant studies. We included surveys that asked scientists if, in a given recall period, they had committed or knew of a colleague who committed plagiarism, and from each survey extracted the proportion of those who reported at least one case. Studies that focused on academic (i.e. student) plagiarism were excluded. Literature searches returned 12,460 titles from which 17 relevant survey studies were identified. Meta-analysis of studies reporting committed (N = 7) and witnessed (N = 11) plagiarism yielded a pooled estimate of, respectively, 1.7% (95% CI 1.2-2.4) and 30% (95% CI 17-46). Basic methodological factors, including sample size, year of survey, delivery method and whether survey questions were explicit rather than indirect made a significant difference on survey results. Even after controlling for these methodological factors, between-study differences in admission rates were significantly above those expected by sampling error alone and remained largely unexplained. Despite several limitations of the data and of this meta-analysis, we draw three robust conclusions: (1) The rate at which scientists report knowing a colleague who committed plagiarism is higher than for data fabrication and falsification; (2) The rate at which scientists report knowing a colleague who committed plagiarism is correlated to that of fabrication and falsification; (3) The rate at which scientists admit having committed either form of misconduct (i.e. fabrication, falsification and plagiarism) in surveys has declined over time. PMID:25352123

  6. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) calibration and its application as a tool to study the Oxygen Minimum Zone variability during the Holocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Pina, K. G.; Gonzalez-Yajimovich, O.; Huerta-Diaz, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) is a non destructive analytical technique widely used to estimate the elemental composition of sedimentary records. This analytical technique measure a number of elements in a sample with a resolution similar or better than conventional destructive methods, is quick and requires minimal analytical effort.We tested the precision and reliability of a handheld XRF instrument (DELTA Premium-XRF analyzer) and developed a methodological calibration of the equipment considered to be a potential tool for paleo-environmental investigations, i.e., in the reconstruction of past oxygen concentrations by analyzing redox sensitive trace metals like Mo, which is sequestered from the water column and transferred to the underlying sediments under anoxic and sulfidic conditions (euxinic).Calibration of the instrument was performed using eight certified standards and twelve in-house standards to create a calibration curve and its linear regression model (Pearson, r2=0.98 and p<0.001). Once the XRF was calibrated, the total concentrations of Mo were determined in gravity and multiple cores (NH01-20, 21, 22 and NH01-25, 26, 27) recovered during the CALMEX NH-01 cruise in the eastern slopes of Carmen and Pescadero basins (Gulf of California, Mexico). These sites are intersected by an Oxygen Minimum Zone promoting excellent sediment preservation. All cores were sampled every 1 cm to obtain high-resolution records of the last ~10,000 years. We conclude that handheld XRF enables precise and exact determinations of Mo concentrations in sediments, applied to the characterization of past euxinic environments.

  7. Bio-indicator bacteria & environmental variables of the coastal zones: The example of the Güllük Bay, Aegean Sea, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kalkan, Samet; Altuğ, Gülşen

    2015-06-15

    In this study bio-indicator bacteria and environmental variable parameters were investigated in the coastal areas of the Güllük Bay, Aegean Sea, Turkey. The seawater samples which were taken from surface (0-30cm) were tested regarding total and fecal coliform, streptococci and nutrients from May to February in 2012-2013. The primary hydrographic parameters were recorded using multiparameter (YSI 556) in situ at the sampling stations. The highest fecal pollution stress and indicator bacteria values were observed in the period between June and August. The finding showed that bacterial pollution sources of the study area, especially in the summer season, under the control of increasing anthropogenic activities. The finding showed that terrestrial pollution sources carry a potential risk for public and ecosystem health and the sustainable use of living sources. Precautions should be formulated and put into action immediately in order to protect the region from bacteriological risks. PMID:25956440

  8. In-situ measurements of pore water stable isotope composition in a semi-arid environment with implications for spatio-temporal variability of unsaturated zone processes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaj, Marcel; Beyer, Matthias; Koeniger, Paul; Hamutoko, Yosefina; Himmelsbach, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Northern Namibia is a region with high population growth, limited water resources and a transboundary aquifer system where groundwater recharge and groundwater flow processes are not yet well understood. Our study is an interdisciplinary approach to improve the understanding of links between hydrological, geochemical and ecological processes to estimate areas that contribute to recharge a shallow aquifer system. To determine the spatial variability of infiltration and evapotranspiration processes within the critical interface and between the atmosphere and the groundwater nine plots in an area of 9,000 m2 were investigated. Stable isotopes (deuterium, δ2H, and oxygen-18, δ18O) of soil pore water were measured directly in the field using a LGR-DLT100 and commercially available soil gas probes (BGL-30, UMS). Additionally, soil moisture and temperature were recorded. After drift correction of the isotope data the long term precision using a quality check standard for 221 measurement points of a two week period was between 6.3 - 7.4 o for δ2H and 1.3 - 3.6 o for δ18O. Each point was measured with six repetitions were the mean standard deviation for all quality check standards was 1.3 - 1.6 o for δ2H and 0.23 - 0.30 o for δ18O. It could be observed that the quality of the measurements decreased with increasing number of measurements due to a memory effect of the probes enhanced by organic contamination of the membrane pores. However, results support the applicability of an in-situ system for the determination of stable isotopes in soil pore water. Spatially and temporal variability affected by intermitted light rainfall events can be deduced with the observed data.

  9. On variable density surface water groundwater interaction: A theoretical analysis of mixed convection in a stably-stratified fresh surface water saline groundwater discharge zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massmann, Gudrun; Simmons, Craig; Love, Andrew; Ward, James; James-Smith, Julianne

    2006-10-01

    SummaryUnderstanding the discharge behaviour of saline groundwater into fresh surface water can be critical for the effective management of water resources. While variable density flow has been studied intensely in a number of settings, the role it plays on the discharge behaviour of saline groundwater into freshwater streams is often neglected when calculating salt loads into a stream. The aim of this study was to determine what role variable-density flow behaviour plays in surface water/groundwater interaction in a stably-stratified fresh surface water/saline groundwater interface. The mixed convection ratio M, a measure of the ratio of density driven flow to advective driven flow, was defined for a matrix of one-dimensional numerical simulations that employed both varying hydraulic and density gradients. Vertical salt breakthrough into the surface water only occurred in the advection dominated cases ( M < 1) and the salt flux into the surface water increased with increasing groundwater concentration until M reached a value of 1. Beyond this, when the flow was driven by the density difference between the two fluids ( M > 1) vertical discharge of salt into surface water did not occur and the saltwater/freshwater interface migrated downwards with increasing density differences between the two fluids. This study therefore shows that there is a critical concentration difference that maximises salt loads to a surface water body and that a density-invariant approach to estimate the salt flux into the surface water (as the product of flow velocity determined through a potentiometric analysis and groundwater concentration) may be inadequate, especially where large density differences exist between the fresher surface water body and the underlying saline groundwater. The study is a purely theoretical approach and conclusions were drawn from simplified 1D simulations. Hence, further laboratory and modelling work is needed to confirm and test the plausibility of these

  10. Rapid Ascent of Aphyric Mantle Melts through the Overriding Crust in Subduction Zones: Evidence from Variable Uranium-Series Disequilibria, Amorphous Hydrous Alteration Microtextures in Crystal Rims, and Two-Pyroxene Pseudo-Decompression Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellmer, G. F.; Freymuth, H.; Hsieh, H. H.; Hwang, S. L.; Iizuka, Y.; Miller, C. A.; Rubin, K. H.; Sakamoto, N.; Yurimoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic hazard mitigation at subduction zones critically depends on knowledge of magma generation and ascent processes and timescales. Two diametrically opposite scenarios are presently debated: One paradigm is the generation of low-silica (basaltic) melts in the mantle wedge, followed by protracted sub-liquidus magma ascent and evolution through crystal growth and fractionation in crustal reservoirs, which are tapped during volcanic eruptions. In contrast, a diametrically opposite model favours the generation of higher silica melts in the mantle or in a lower crustal hot zone, followed by rapid decompression to the surface under super-liquidus conditions. In the latter case, crystals are picked up during magma ascent, and are in the process of dissolving. We present multiple lines of evidence that point to crystal uptake as the principal processes by which arc melts acquire their crystal cargo: (i) variable 234U-238U disequilibria in mineral separates; (ii) hydrous mineral rims with amorphous alteration textures; and (iii) two-pyroxene pseudo-decompression paths; cf. Zellmer et al. (2014a,b,c), doi: 10.1144/SP385.3 and 10.1144/SP385.9 and 10.1144/SP410.1. These observations point to a scarcity of true phenocrysts in many arc magmas, and thus to decompression of aphyric melts that take up their crystal cargo during ascent. The data imply that many hydrous wedge melts are more silica-rich than basalts and achieve super-liquidus conditions during rapid ascent from great depth.

  11. Geochemical variability of hydrothermal emissions between three Pacific volcanic arc systems: Alaskan-Aleutian and Cascadian, North America and Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackstock, J. M.; Horton, T. W.; Gravley, D. M.; Deering, C. D.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of the source, transport, and fate of hydrothermal fluids in the upper crust informs our understanding and interpretation of ore-forming processes, volcanogenic hazards, geothermal resources, and volatile cycling. Co-variation between fluid inclusion CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios is an established tracer of magmatic, meteoric, and crustal fluid end-members. Yet, this tracer has had limited application to macroscopic fluid reservoirs accessible via geothermal wells and hydrothermal features (e.g. pools). In this study, we compared the covariance CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios of gases collected throughout the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand (TVZ), the Alaska-Aleutian Volcanic Arc, USA (AAVA), and the Cascadian Volcanic Arc, USA (CVA) with corresponding δ13C and 3He/4He values. Our findings show that there is good agreement between these proxies for different end-member contributions at coarse scales. However, some samples classified as meteoric water according to the CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios also show more positive δ13C values (~ -7.0 per mil) and relatively higher 3He/4He ratios indicative of magmatic input from primarily mantle sources. This unexpected result may be related to magmatic fluids, CO2 in particular, mixing with predominantly meteoric derived waters. The potential to identify magmatic CO2 in groundwater samples overlying geothermal systems in differing volcanic arc settings using simple and cost-effective gas ratios is a promising step forward in the search for ';surface blind' but developable geothermal systems and volcanic monitoring. 3He/4He anomalies also support this inference and underscore the potential decoupling of thermal anomalies and magmatic-derived fluids in the Earth's crust. The general agreement between the co-variation of CO2/CH4 and N2/Ar ratios with other isotope and geochemical proxies for magmatic, meteoric, and crustal end-members is encouraging to employ expanded use of these ratios for both the exploration and monitoring of

  12. Interannual variability in sea-ice thickness in the pack-ice zone off Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Fuko; Tamura, Takeshi; Shimoda, Haruhito; Uto, Shotaro; Simizu, Daisuke; Tateyama, Kazutaka; Hoshino, Seita; Ozeki, Toshihiro; Fukamachi, Yasushi; Ushio, Shuki; Ohshima, Kay I.

    2016-03-01

    Under the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) program, sea-ice thickness has been routinely monitored off Lützow-Holm Bay (East Antarctica) during the summer (mid-December to early January) since 2000/01, using an electromagnetic induction (EM) instrument onboard the icebreaker Shirase. Analysis of these data over a 10-year period, combined with visual observations using a simplified form of the ASPeCt (Antarctic Sea ice Processes and Climate) protocol, suggests a strong interannual variability in sea-ice thickness in this region. For the repeat pack-ice observation area, where the sea-ice thickness averaged over the nine seasons is ∼1.9 m, mean thicknesses of observed sea-ice in 2010/11 and 2011/12 are exceptionally large, at ∼3.3 and ∼5.8 m, respectively. This result is strongly related to regional patterns of sea ice dynamics. Ice convergence caused by anomalous northerly winds was particularly high in 2011/12, suggesting that the extremely thick ice observed in that season resulted largely from sea-ice deformation processes (including pressure ridging). Longer-term analysis of data from the past 34 years confirms that sea-ice conditions and thickness off Lützow-Holm Bay in summer are determined mainly by the large-scale pattern of atmospheric pressure in December.

  13. Estimates of the width of the wetting zone along a fracture subjected to an episodic infiltration event in variably saturated, densely welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1988-05-31

    A central issue to be addressed within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) is the role which fractures will play as the variably saturated, fractured rock mass surrounding the waste package responds to heating, cooling, and episodic infiltration events. Understanding the role of fractures during such events will, in part, depend on our ability to make geophysical measurements of perturbations in the moisture distribution in the vicinity of fractures. In this study we first examine the details of the perturbation in the moisture distribution in and around a fracture subjected to an episodic infiltration event, and then integrate that behavior over the scale at which moisture measurements are likely to be made during the Engineered Barrier Design Test of the NNWSI project. To model this system we use the TOUGH hydrothermal code and fracture and matrix properties considered relevant to the welded ash flow tuff found in the Topopah Spring member at Yucca Mountain as well as in the Grouse Canyon member within G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site. Our calculations provide insight into the anticipated spatial and temporal resolution obtainable through the use of the geophysical techniques being considered. These calculations should prove useful both in planning the implementation of these methods as well as in the interpretation of their results. 41 refs., 28 figs.

  14. A Semester Late: A Phenomenological Study Examining the Experiences of Spring Admits in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth-Francis, Chrissy

    2013-01-01

    More than 25% of new college students begin their higher education careers outside of the traditional fall start date (National Student Clearinghouse, 2012). This study examines the social, personal, and academic experiences of spring admits at a large, private research institution in the western United States. In this study, a spring admit is…

  15. The College Selection Process of Freshmen Admitted to UC Davis: The Range of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Bonnie L.

    Considerations in selecting a college were studied with a random sample of 768 freshmen admitted to the University of California (UC), Davis, in fall 1984. Major findings are: freshmen admitted to UC Davis had considerable breadth of knowledge about many other colleges and academic programs; over 80 percent applied to colleges besides UC Davis;…

  16. Differences between Newly Admitted Nursing Home Residents in Rural and Nonrural Areas in a National Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolin, Jane Nelson; Phillips, Charles D.; Hawes, Catherine

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: Previous research in specific locales indicates that individuals admitted to rural nursing homes have lower care needs than individuals admitted to nursing homes in urban areas, and that rural nursing homes differ in their mix of short-stay and chronic-care residents. This research investigates whether differences in acuity are a function…

  17. A virtual psychiatric ward for orientating patients admitted for the first time.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wai-Chi; Choi, Kup-Sze; Chung, Wai-Yee

    2010-12-01

    Misconceptions about psychiatric wards frequently cause newly admitted mental patients to stay away from these wards despite their need for treatment. Although ward orientation is typically conducted by nurses in an attempt to help patients to adapt to the new environment, it is considered time-consuming, and the method of orientation and the explanations given may vary among different nurses. This situation calls for a more effective and standardized approach to orientating mental patients on their first admission. To this end, a computer-based interactive virtual environment was developed based on a real psychiatric ward by using virtual reality (VR) technologies. It enables the patient to navigate around to gain understanding about the ward through a virtual guided tour. The effectiveness of this VR orientation approach was investigated by a randomized controlled trial with consecutive sampling. Fifty-four Chinese participants were randomly assigned to undergo ward orientation by either using the VR-based approach or reading text-based electronic information sheets about the ward with a computer. Subjective and objective measures were obtained respectively using the Chinese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire and the heart-rate variability measurement before and after the intervention. In addition, a test on the level of understanding about the ward was administered at the end of the session. The results showed that the VR orientation approach is helpful in reducing patients' anxiety while also improving their level of understanding about the ward. PMID:21142988

  18. Suicide mortality of suicide attempt patients discharged from emergency room, nonsuicidal psychiatric patients discharged from emergency room, admitted suicide attempt patients, and admitted nonsuicidal psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae W; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K; Hong, Jin P

    2012-06-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients admitted for suicide attempt, and psychiatric inpatients admitted for other reasons were examined. The records of 3,897 patients who were treated at a general hospital in Seoul, Korea, from July 2003 to December 2006 were reviewed. Forty-three of the 3,897 subjects died by suicide during the 2.5-year observation period. Compared to the general Korean population, the suicide mortality rate was 82-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, admitted; 54-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, discharged; 21-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, admitted; and 11-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, discharged. In all four groups, diagnosis of a depressive disorder and suicide attempt at presentation were each significant independent risk factors for suicide completion. These results highlight the need for suicide prevention strategies for depressed patients who present to the ER or are admitted to a psychiatric ward after a suicide attempt. PMID:22380459

  19. Does drinking water influence hospital-admitted sialolithiasis on an epidemiological level in Denmark?

    PubMed Central

    Schrøder, Stine; Homøe, Preben; Wagner, Niels; Vataire, Anne-Lise; Lundager Madsen, Hans Erik; Bardow, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Sialolithiasis, or salivary stones, is not a rare disease of the major salivary glands. However, the aetiology and incidence remain largely unknown. Since sialoliths are comprised mainly of calcium phosphate salts, we hypothesise that drinking water calcium levels and other elements in drinking water could play a role in sialolithiasis. Owing to substantial intermunicipality differences in drinking water composition, Denmark constitutes a unique environment for testing such relations. Design An epidemiological study based on patient data extracted from the National Patient Registry and drinking water data from the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland retrieved as weighted data on all major drinking water constituents for each of the 3364 waterworks in Denmark. All patient cases with International Statistical Classification of Diseases 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes for sialolithiasis registered between the years 2000 and 2010 were included in the study (n=3014) and related to the drinking water composition on a municipality level (n=98). Primary and secondary outcome measures Multiple regression analysis using iterative search and testing among all demographic and drinking water variables with sialolithiasis incidence as the outcome in search of possible relations among the variables tested. Results The nationwide incidence of hospital-admitted sialolithiasis was 5.5 cases per 100 000 citizens per year in Denmark. Strong relations were found between the incidence of sialolithiasis and the drinking water concentration of calcium, magnesium and hydrogen carbonate, however, in separate models (p<0.001). Analyses also confirmed correlations between drinking water calcium and magnesium and their concentration in saliva whereas this was not the case for hydrogen carbonate. Conclusions Differences in drinking water calcium and magnesium may play a role in the incidence of sialolithiasis. These findings are of interest because many countries have started

  20. Evaluation of a global internal-tide resolving and submesoscale admitting ocean simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubelmann, C.; Menemenlis, D.; Fu, L. L.; Zhao, Z.

    2014-12-01

    We will present ongoing evaluation of a global ocean and sea ice configuration of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology general circulation model (MITgcm) that has 0.75 to 2.2 km horizontal grid spacing and 1-m thick vertical levels near the surface. Surface boundary conditions are from the 0.14-degree European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) atmospheric operational model analysis, starting in 2011, including atmospheric pressure forcing. The simulation also includes tidal forcing. A unique feature of this simulation is that we save hourly output of full 3-dimensional model prognostic variables, making it a remarkable tool for the study of ocean processes and for the simulation of satellite observations. Although this initial simulation was run without ocean data constraints, it already presents very interesting features and interactions between an exceptionally wide range of scales. The simulation resolves geostrophic eddies and internal tides and admits submesoscale variability and unbalanced dynamics such as internal waves at non-tidal frequencies.We will present some evaluation of these different components based on altimetry observations and moorings. As a first result, the internal tides for the major tidal components have overall realistic amplitudes and spatial patterns compared to independent analyses from altimetry, although some discrepancies arise in equatorial regions. Despite discrepancies with observations, this simulation already constitutes an extremely useful tool for ocean process studies and for satellite observation system experiments, for example, in preparation for the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) mission. As a preliminary exercise, the simulation has been tested in the SWOT simulator developed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Fu et al., in this session). Some illustrations of the challenges will be presented.

  1. Predicting Healthcare Utilization by Patients Admitted for COPD Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Kaza, Anupama Murthy; Balasubramanian, Nithilavalli; Chandrasekaran, Siddhuraj

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare utilization, especially length of hospital stay and ICU admission, for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) determine overall outcomes in terms of morbidity, mortality and cost burden. Predicting prolonged hospital stay (PHS) and prolonged intensive care (PIC) for AECOPD is useful for rational allocation of resources in healthcare centres. Aim To characterize the pattern of healthcare utilization by COPD patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation, and to identify clinical and laboratory predictors of ‘prolonged hospital stay’ (PHS) and ‘prolonged intensive care’(PIC) Materials and Methods This study attempted through retrospective data analysis, to identify risk factors and evolve prediction models for increased healthcare utilization namely PHS and PIC for AECOPD. The data were extracted from 255 eligible admissions for AECOPD by 166 patients from Aug 2012 to July 2013. Logistic regression analysis was used for identifying predictors and models were tested with area under receiver operating characteristic curve. Results Independent predictors of prolonged hospital stay (≥ 6 days) were chronic respiratory failure at baseline, low saturation at admission, high HbA1c level and positive isolates in sputum culture. Independent predictors of prolonged intensive care (for ≥ 48 hours) were past history of pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic respiratory failure at baseline, low saturation at admission, high leukocyte count and positive culture isolates in sputum. Prediction models evolved from variables available at admission showed AUC 0.805 (95% CI 0.729 – 0.881) and 0.825 (95% CI 0.75 – 0.90) for PHS and ICU admissions respectively. Conclusion Our prediction models derived from simple and easily available variables show good discriminative properties in predicting PHS and PIC for AECOPD. When prospectively validated, these models are useful for rational allocation of services especially in resource

  2. Population characteristics of feral cats admitted to seven trap-neuter-return programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jennifer L; Levy, Julie K

    2006-08-01

    Internationally, large populations of feral cats constitute an important and controversial issue due to their impact on cat overpopulation, animal welfare, public health, and the environment, and to disagreement about what are the best methods for their control. Trap-neuter-return (TNR) programs are an increasingly popular alternative to mass euthanasia. The objective of this study was to determine the population characteristics of feral cats admitted to large-scale TNR programs from geographically diverse locations in the United States. Data from 103,643 feral cats admitted to TNR programs from 1993 to 2004 were evaluated. All groups reported more intact females (53.4%) than intact males (44.3%); only 2.3% of the cats were found to be previously sterilized. Overall, 15.9% of female cats were pregnant at the time of surgery. Pregnancy was highly seasonal and peaked between March and April for all of the groups. The average prenatal litter size was 4.1+/-0.1 fetuses per litter. Cryptorchidism was observed in 1.3% of male cats admitted for sterilization. A total of 0.4% of cats was euthanased because of the presence of debilitating conditions, and 0.4% died during the TNR clinics. Remarkably similar populations of cats with comparable seasonal variability were seen at each program, despite their wide geographical distribution. These results suggest that it is feasible to safely sterilize large numbers of feral cats and that the experiences of existing programs are a consistent source of information upon which to model new TNR programs. PMID:16603400

  3. Variability in warm-season atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns over subtropical South America: relationships between the South Atlantic convergence zone and large-scale organized convection over the La Plata basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, Kyle S.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2016-03-01

    Warm-season precipitation variability over subtropical South America is characterized by an inverse relationship between the South Atlantic convergence zone (SACZ) and precipitation over the central and western La Plata basin of southeastern South America. This study extends the analysis of this "South American Seesaw" precipitation dipole to relationships between the SACZ and large, long-lived mesoscale convective systems (LLCSs) over the La Plata basin. By classifying SACZ events into distinct continental and oceanic categories and building a logistic regression model that relates LLCS activity across the region to continental and oceanic SACZ precipitation, a detailed account of spatial variability in the out-of-phase coupling between the SACZ and large-scale organized convection over the La Plata basin is provided. Enhanced precipitation in the continental SACZ is found to result in increased LLCS activity over northern, northeastern, and western sections of the La Plata basin, in association with poleward atmospheric moisture flux from the Amazon basin toward these regions, and a decrease in the probability of LLCS occurrence over the southeastern La Plata basin. Increased oceanic SACZ precipitation, however, was strongly related to reduced atmospheric moisture and decreased probability of LLCS occurrence over nearly the entire La Plata basin. These results suggest that continental SACZ activity and large-scale organized convection over the northern and eastern sections of the La Plata basin are closely tied to atmospheric moisture transport from the Amazon basin, while the warm coastal Brazil Current may also play an important role as an evaporative moisture source for LLCSs over the central and western La Plata basin.

  4. 15 CFR 30.52 - Foreign Trade Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... requirements contained in CBP regulations 19 CFR 146, “Foreign Trade Zones.”) When foreign goods are admitted... CFR 146.32(a), the applicant for admission shall present CBP-214 to the Port Director and shall... statistical purposes. (Use the instructions and definitions provided in 19 CFR 146 for completing these...

  5. 15 CFR 30.52 - Foreign Trade Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... requirements contained in CBP regulations 19 CFR 146, “Foreign Trade Zones.”) When foreign goods are admitted... CFR 146.32(a), the applicant for admission shall present CBP-214 to the Port Director and shall... statistical purposes. (Use the instructions and definitions provided in 19 CFR 146 for completing these...

  6. 15 CFR 30.52 - Foreign Trade Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... requirements contained in CBP regulations 19 CFR 146, “Foreign Trade Zones.”) When foreign goods are admitted... CFR 146.32(a), the applicant for admission shall present CBP-214 to the Port Director and shall... statistical purposes. (Use the instructions and definitions provided in 19 CFR 146 for completing these...

  7. 15 CFR 30.52 - Foreign Trade Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... requirements contained in CBP regulations 19 CFR 146, “Foreign Trade Zones.”) When foreign goods are admitted... CFR 146.32(a), the applicant for admission shall present CBP-214 to the Port Director and shall... statistical purposes. (Use the instructions and definitions provided in 19 CFR 146 for completing these...

  8. THE ZONES PROJECTS: UNDERSTANDING SOYBEAN YIELD VARIABILITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two regional projects funded by the North Central Soybean Research Program and the United Soybean Board are entitled Mapping of Soil and Field Characteristics to Understand Soybean Yield and Using Remotely Sensed Data to Diagnose Soybean Yield Limiting Factors. These projects were developed in resp...

  9. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-01-01

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  10. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, W.D.; Rudduck, R.C.; Yu, J.S.

    1987-02-27

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector. 2 figs.

  11. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-08-02

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  12. Geophysics applications in critical zone science: emerging topics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Martinez, G.; Guber, A.; Walthall, C. L.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical studies have resulted in remarkable advances in characterization of critical zone. The geophysics applications uncover the relationships between structure and function in subsurface as they seek to define subsurface structural units with individual properties of retention and transmission of water, energy, solutes, electrical charge, etc. Several focal points of the research have emerged as the knowledge base of the critical zone geophysics grows. Time-lapse or multiple geophysical surveys admittedly improve the subsurface characterization. One of intriguing possibilities here is to use the temporal variation in geophysical parameters among time-lapse surveys directly to model spatial variation in soil properties affecting soil-water contents. Because critical phenomena causing erratic routing have been recently discovered in hillslope subsurface flow networks, it remains to be seen whether the time-lapse imagery depicts the same flow network if weather conditions are seemingly similar. High-frequency network observations usually reveal the temporal stability patterns in soil variables, including water contents, CO2 fluxes, etc. It becomes clear that these patterns can be described with spatiotemporal geostatistics models, and the opportunity arises to infer the spatial correlation structure of soil parameters from temporal variations of soil dynamic variables. There are indications that the spatial correlation structures of the geophysical parameters and soil/plant variables can be similar even though the correlations between these parameters are low. This may open additional avenues for mapping sparsely measured soil and plant variables. Fallacies of scale in geophysical depicting subsurface structural units and patterns are far from being understood. Soil state variables affect geophysical retrieval in nonlinear ways, and therefore scale effects in retrievals are warranted. For this reason, the strength and type of dependencies between geophysical

  13. Climate change and dead zones.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Andrew H; Gedan, Keryn B

    2015-04-01

    Estuaries and coastal seas provide valuable ecosystem services but are particularly vulnerable to the co-occurring threats of climate change and oxygen-depleted dead zones. We analyzed the severity of climate change predicted for existing dead zones, and found that 94% of dead zones are in regions that will experience at least a 2 °C temperature increase by the end of the century. We then reviewed how climate change will exacerbate hypoxic conditions through oceanographic, ecological, and physiological processes. We found evidence that suggests numerous climate variables including temperature, ocean acidification, sea-level rise, precipitation, wind, and storm patterns will affect dead zones, and that each of those factors has the potential to act through multiple pathways on both oxygen availability and ecological responses to hypoxia. Given the variety and strength of the mechanisms by which climate change exacerbates hypoxia, and the rates at which climate is changing, we posit that climate change variables are contributing to the dead zone epidemic by acting synergistically with one another and with recognized anthropogenic triggers of hypoxia including eutrophication. This suggests that a multidisciplinary, integrated approach that considers the full range of climate variables is needed to track and potentially reverse the spread of dead zones. PMID:25385668

  14. Winter Storm Zones on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Barnes, J. R.; Bridger, A. F. C.; Cuzzi, Jeffrey N. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Preferred regions of weather activity in Mars' winter middle latitudes-so called 'storm zones' are found in a general circulation model of Mars' atmospheric circulation. During northern winter, these storm zones occur in middle latitudes in the major planitia (low-relief regions) of the western and eastern hemisphere. In contrast, the highlands of the eastern hemisphere are mostly quiescent. Compared to Earth's storm zones where diabatic heating associated with land-sea thermal contrasts is crucial, orography on Mars is fundamental to the regionalization of weather activity. Future spacecraft missions aimed at assessing Mars' climate and its variability need to include such regions in observation strategies.

  15. Burn-Center Quality Improvement: Are Burn Outcomes Dependent On Admitting Facilities and Is There a Volume-Outcome “Sweet-Spot”?

    PubMed Central

    HRANJEC, TJASA; TURRENTINE, FLORENCE E.; STUKENBORG, GEORGE; YOUNG, JEFFREY S.; SAWYER, ROBERT G.; CALLAND, JAMES F.

    2012-01-01

    Risk factors of mortality in burn patients such as inhalation injury, patient age, and percent of total body surface area (%TBSA) burned have been identified in previous publications. However, little is known about the variability of mortality outcomes between burn centers and whether the admitting facilities or facility volumes can be recognized as predictors of mortality. De-identified data from 87,665 acute burn observations obtained from the National Burn Repository between 2003 and 2007 were used to estimate a multivariable logistic regression model that could predict patient mortality with reference to the admitting burn facility/facility volume, adjusted for differences in age, inhalation injury, %TBSA burned, and an additional factor, percent full thickness burn (%FTB). As previously reported, all three covariates (%TBSA burned, inhalation injury, and age) were found to be highly statistically significant risk factors of mortality in burn patients (P value < 0.0001). The additional variable, %FTB, was also found to be a statistically significant determinant, although it did not greatly improve the multivariable model. The treatment/admitting facility was found to be an independent mortality predictor, with certain hospitals having increased odds of death and others showing a protective effect (decreased odds ratio). Hospitals with high burn volumes had the highest risk of mortality. Mortality outcomes of patients with similar risk factors (%TBSA burned, inhalation injury, age, and %FTB) are significantly affected by the treating facility and their admission volumes. PMID:22546129

  16. Variables Separation in Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obukhov, Valery

    2004-12-01

    To solve the problem of exact integration of the field equations or equations of motion of matter in curved spacetimes one can use a class of Riemannian metrics for which the simplest equations of motion can be integrated by the complete separation of variables method. Here, we consider the particular case of the class of Stäckel metrics. These metrics admit integration of the Hamilton Jacobi equation for test particle by the complete separation of variables method. It appears that the other important equations of motion (Klein Gordon Fock, Dirac,Weyl) in curved spacetimes can be integrated by complete separation of variables method only for the metrics, belonging to the class of Stäckel spaces.

  17. Reaction zone structure for strong, weak overdriven, and weak underdriven oblique detonations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powers, Joseph M.; Gonthier, Keith A.

    1992-01-01

    A simple dynamic systems analysis is used to give examples of strong, weak overdriven, and weak underdriven oblique detonations. Steady oblique detonations consisting of a straight lead shock attached to a solid wedge followed by a resolved reaction zone structure are admitted as solutions to the reactive Euler equations. This is demonstrated for a fluid that is taken to be an inviscid, calorically perfect ideal gas that undergoes a two-step irreversible reaction with the first step exothermic and the second step endothermic. This model admits solutions for a continuum of shock wave angles for two classes of solutions identified by a Rankine-Hugoniot analysis: strong and weak overdriven waves. The other class, weak underdriven, is admitted for eigenvalue shock-wave angles. Chapman-Jouguet waves, however, are not admitted. These results contrast those for a corresponding onestep model that, for detonations with a straight lead shock, only admits strong, weak overdriven, and Chapman-Jouguet solutions.

  18. Effect of climate, intra and inter-annual variability, on nutrients emission (C,N, P) in stream water: lessons from an agricultural long term observatory of the temperate zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Remi, Dupas; Patrick, Durand; Ophélie, Fovet; Gerard, Gruau; Anne, Jaffrezic; Guillaume, Humbert; Philippe, Merot; Gu, Sen

    2016-04-01

    Agriculture greatly contributes to modify C, N and P cycles, particularly in animal breeding regions due to high inputs. Climatic conditions, intra and inter-annual variabilities, modify nutrient stream water emissions, acting in time on transfer and transformation, accumulation and mobilization processes, connecting and disconnecting in time different compartments (soil, riparian areas, groundwater). In agricultural catchments, nutrient perturbations are dominated by agricultural land use, and decoupling human activities and climate effects is far from easy. Climate change generally appears as a secondary driver compared to land use. If studied, generally only one nutrient is considered. Only long term, high frequency and multiple element data series can decouple these two drivers. The Kervidy-Naizin watershed belongs to the AgrHyS environmental research observatory (http://www6.inra.fr/ore_agrhys_eng), itself included in RBV (French catchment network of the CZO). On this catchment, 6 years of daily data on DOC, NO3, SRP, TP concentrations allow us to analyze the effect of seasonal and inter-annual climatic variabilities on water quality (C, N, P). Different papers have been published on the effect of climate on nitrate (Molenat et al, 2008), SRP and TP (Dupas et al, 2015) and DOC (Humbert et al, 2015). We will present first results comparing the effect of climate on these three major solute forms of C, N and P. While C and P dynamics are very close and controlled by fluctuation of water table downslope, i.e. in riparian areas, mobilizing C and P in time, nitrate dynamics is controlled by GW dynamics upslope acting as the major N reservoir. As example, the dryness conditions in summer appears a key factor of the C and P emissions in autumn. All the three solute forms interact when anoxic conditions are observed in riparian zones. These basic processes explain how climatic variability can influence and explain interactions between C, N and P emissions in stream

  19. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, M.S.

    1994-08-01

    The zone refining process was applied to Pu metal containing known amounts of impurities. Rod specimens of plutonium metal were melted into and contained in tantalum boats, each of which was passed horizontally through a three-turn, high-frequency coil in such a manner as to cause a narrow molten zone to pass through the Pu metal rod 10 times. The impurity elements Co, Cr, Fe, Ni, Np, U were found to move in the same direction as the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. The elements Al, Am, and Ga moved in the opposite direction of the molten zone as predicted by binary phase diagrams. As the impurity alloy was zone refined, {delta}-phase plutonium metal crystals were produced. The first few zone refining passes were more effective than each later pass because an oxide layer formed on the rod surface. There was no clear evidence of better impurity movement at the slower zone refining speed. Also, constant or variable coil power appeared to have no effect on impurity movement during a single run (10 passes). This experiment was the first step to developing a zone refining process for plutonium metal.

  20. Stressful life events, hopelessness, and suicidal intent in patients admitted with attempted suicide in a tertiary care general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, SV; Faye, AD; Gore, SP; Shah, HR; Kamath, RM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suicide is a psychiatric emergency. Stressors in life and social variables (like marital status, family, and social support) are among the determinants of suicide. Hopelessness and suicidal intent are among the psychological variables that have shown promise in the prediction of suicide. Aims and Objectives: To assess stressful life events, hopelessness, suicidal intent, and sociodemographic variables in patients of attempted suicide. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients admitted with attempted suicide were interviewed. Presumptive Stressful Life Event Scale, Beck Hopelessness Scale, and Beck Suicidal Intent Scale were used along with a semistructured pro forma for interview. Data were analyzed with statistical tests. Results: Sixty-six percent of the participants were females, 72% were less than 30 years of age. Sixty-six percent of the patients had stressful life event score between 101 and 200 with the mean score of 127. The stressful life event score in those who considered they are in need of psychiatric help was significantly high. Most of the patients had mild (34%) and moderate (40%) degrees of hopelessness, and the mean score was 9.64. The mean suicidal intent in the participants was 25.14, when correlated with hopelessness score significant positive correlation was found. Conclusion: Lethality of the attempt increases with the increase in hopelessness. PMID:27089109

  1. Long-term persistence of MRSA in re-admitted patients

    PubMed Central

    Biertz, F.; Ziesing, S.; Gastmeier, P.; Chaberny, I. F.

    2010-01-01

    Background A better knowledge of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) persistence in hospitalised patients may impact on specific prevention strategies. We have investigated the persistence of MRSA-carriage in patients admitted and re-admitted to a university hospital. Patients and methods Between January 2002 and October 2005 all MRSA-positive patients admitted to the university hospital of Hannover Medical School were assessed at first admission and all subsequent re-admissions. Patients re-admitted at least once were analysed for the persistence or loss of MRSA. The association of possible factors influencing the persistence of MRSA colonisation or infection (age group, gender, decolonisation therapy during first hospital stay due to MRSA positivity and colonisation of different anatomical sites) was analysed using univariate, multivariate and time-dependent analyses. Results A total of 1,032 patients who had tested positive at least once for MRSA were admitted to our hospital during the study period, accounting for 2,038 admissions. Of these patients, 403 (39.1%) were admitted more than once (from two times to 21 times), and 238 (59.1%) of the re-admitted patients remained MRSA positive during all subsequent admissions. Fifty-five (13.6%) patients tested MRSA negative at their last admission, and 61 (15.1%) tested MRSA negative at at least two consecutive admissions. In 27 (6.7%) patients, the MRSA status differed more than once between subsequent admissions. Overall, the half-life time (HLT) of MRSA persistence was 549 days, with the duration of persistence dependent on the colonisation of different anatomical sites (HLT only wounds 117 days; HLT mouth, throat, bronchial secretions 627 days; HLT nose, wounds and other body sites 801 days; p < 0.01) and was prolonged if more than one body site was MRSA-positive (HR 2.18, 95% confidence interval 1.52–3.15). Conclusion A detailed knowledge of the dynamics of the loss of MRSA infection could

  2. Study of cases of hypertension admitted at Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Sanjib; Shrestha, Ananta; Bhattarai, Prabeen; Paudel, Badri

    2004-06-01

    Hundred cases of hypertension admitted to medical ward at Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital were studied and analysed. They constituted 9.4% of the total admitted patients in the medical ward. Association of hypertension with other diseases is highlighted. Thirty two percent of these hypertensives were diabetic and 22.0% of hypertensives also had Chronic obstructive airway disease (COAD). Different types of complications of hypertension seen in the studied subjects are mentioned. Only 19.0% of hypertensives had their blood pressure controlled and the rest were uncontrolled hypertensives. PMID:15449651

  3. A comparison of outcomes among hospital survivors with and without severe comorbidity admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Williams, T A; McConigley, R; Leslie, G D; Dobbs, G J; Phillips, M; Davies, H; Aoun, S

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the experiences of patients with severe comorbidity discharged from Intensive Care Units (ICUs). This project aimed to determine the effects of an ICU stay for patients with severe comorbidity by comparing 1) quality of life (QOL), 2) the symptom profile of hospital survivors and 3) health service use after hospital discharge for patients admitted to ICU with and without severe comorbidity. A case-control study was used. Patients with severe comorbidity were matched to a contemporaneous cohort of ICU patients by age and severity of illness. Assessment tools were the Medical Outcome Study 36-item short-form and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C15-PAL questionnaires for QOL and the Symptom Assessment Scale for symptom distress. A proportional odds assumption was performed using an ordinal regression model. The difference in QOL outcome was the dependent variable for each pair. Health service use after discharge from ICU was monitored with patient diaries. Patients aged 18+ years admitted to an ICU in a metropolitan teaching hospital between 2011 and 2012 were included. We recruited 30 cases and 30 controls. QOL improved over the six months after hospital discharge for patients with and without severe comorbidity (P <0.01) within the groups but there was no difference found between the groups (P >0.3). There was no difference in symptoms or health service use between patients with and without severe comorbidity. ICU admission for people with severe comorbidity can be appropriate to stabilise the patient's condition and is likely to be followed by some overall improvement over the six months after hospital discharge. PMID:25735690

  4. How CAGE, RAPS4-QF, and AUDIT Can Help Practitioners for Patients Admitted with Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Emergency Departments?

    PubMed Central

    Brousse, Georges; Arnaud, Benjamin; Geneste, Julie; Pereira, Bruno; De Chazeron, Ingrid; Teissedre, Frederique; Perrier, Christophe; Schwan, Raymund; Malet, Laurent; Schmidt, Jeannot; Llorca, Pierre Michel; Cherpitel, Cheryl J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To help clinicians to identify the severity of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) from optimal thresholds found for recommended scales. Especially, taking account of the high prevalence of alcohol dependence among patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) for acute alcohol intoxication (AAI), we propose to define thresholds of severity of dependence based on the AUDIT score. Methods: All patients admitted to the ED with AAI (blood alcohol level >0.8 g/L), in a 2-month period, were assessed using the CAGE, RAPS-QF, and AUDIT, with the alcohol dependence/abuse section of the mini international neuropsychiatric interview (MINI) used as the gold standard. To explore the relation between the AUDIT and the MINI the sum of the positive items on the MINI (dependence) as a quantitative variable and as an ordinal parameter were analyzed. From the threshold score found for each scale we proposed intervals of severity of AUDs. Results: The mean age of the sample (122 males, 42 females) was 46 years. Approximately 12% of the patients were identified with alcohol abuse and 78% with dependence (DSM-IV). Cut points were determined for the AUDIT in order to distinguish mild and moderate dependence from severe dependence. A strategy of intervention based on levels of severity of AUD was proposed. Conclusion: Different thresholds proposed for the CAGE, RAPS4-QF, and AUDIT could be used to guide the choice of intervention for a patient: brief intervention, brief negotiation interviewing, or longer more intensive motivational intervention. PMID:25009509

  5. Profile of patients admitted to a triage dermatology clinic at a tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Bertanha, Fernanda; Nelumba, Erica Judite Pimentel; Freiberg, Alyne Korukian; Samorano, Luciana Paula; Festa Neto, Cyro

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge of epidemiological data on skin diseases is important in planning preventive strategies in healthcare services. Objective To assess data from patients admitted to a triage dermatology clinic. Methods A retrospective study was performed of patients admitted over a one-year period to the Triage Dermatology Clinic at the Hospital das Clínicas of the University of São Paulo Medical School. Data were obtained from record books. The variables analyzed were: patient age, gender, dermatologic disease (initial diagnosis), origin (from where the patient was referred) and destination (where the patient was referred to). Results A total of 16,399 patients and 17,454 diseases were identified for analysis. The most frequent skin disorders were eczema (18%), cutaneous infections (13.1%), erythematous squamous diseases (6.8%) and malignant cutaneous neoplasms (6.1%). Atopic dermatitis was the most common disease in children. Acne was more common among children and adults, as were viral warts. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma were more common in the elderly. Contact dermatitis and acne predominated in women. The most frequent origins were: the primary/secondary health system (26.6%), other outpatient specialties (25.5%), emergency care (14.9%); while the destinations were: discharged (27.5%), follow-up in our Dermatology Division (24.1%), return (14.1%) and the primary/secondary health system (20.7%). Conclusion Understanding the incidence of skin diseases is fundamental in making decisions regarding resource allocation for clinical care and research. Thus, we believe our findings can contribute to improving public health policies. PMID:27438199

  6. Clinical and Therapeutic Profiles of Heart Failure Patients admitted to a Tertiary Hospital, Aseer Region, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Assiri, Abdullah S

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the clinical and therapeutic profiles of heart failure (HF) cases admitted to Aseer Central Hospital (ACH), Saudi Arabia. Methods: A retrospective cohort of 300 consecutive patients admitted with the diagnosis of HF to ACH from 1 June 2007 to 31 May 2009 were included in the study. Data on demographic variables, aetiologic factors, risk factors, and therapeutic profiles of patients with HF were collected and analysed. Results: The patients’ mean age was 67.4 ± 13.7 years and 68.7% of them were male. The commonest aetiologies for HF were ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and hypertension in 38.3% and 33.3% of patients, respectively. A total of 61.3% of patients were diabetics. Other risk factors for HF included renal failure in 9.7%, atrial fibrillation in 13%, and anaemia in 48.3% of patients. Echocardiography was performed in 98.7% of cases: the average ejection fraction (EF) was 33% ± 17. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin 2 receptor blockers were used in 68.3% of cases, β-blockers in 51.6% of cases and digoxin in 28.3% of cases. Conclusion: The major causes of HF in our study were IHD and hypertension. Diabetes and anaemia were common risk factors. The cohort constituted an intermediate HF risk group (ejection fraction (EF) 33%). Important therapeutic agents like angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor I, β-blockers and digoxin were underutilised. Fostering such therapy in practice will lead to a better outcome in the management of HF patients. Anaemia was a significant risk factor in our HF patients and should be managed properly. PMID:21969895

  7. Admission Rhetoric and Academic Self-Efficacy: The Importance of First Communications for Conditionally Admitted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Joyce; Heaney, April

    2013-01-01

    This article advocates for increased attention on the college admission letter to strengthen conditionally admitted students' academic self-efficacy as they begin the college experience. Although first communications are often considered perfunctory, the language of admission materials has strong potential to help at-risk students begin…

  8. Outcomes and Predictors of Mortality for Patients with Acute Leukemia Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Danielle; Christian, Michael; Ibrahimova, Narmin; Kumar, Vikram; Jacob, Gabriella; Kiss, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objectives were to describe the management and outcomes of acute leukemia (AL) patients admitted to the ICU and to identify predictors of ICU mortality. Methods. Data was retrospectively collected from the medical records of all patients with AML or ALL admitted to the Mount Sinai Hospital ICU from August 2009 to December 2012. Results. 151 AL patients (117 AML, 34 ALL) were admitted to the ICU. Mean age was 54 (SD 15) years, median APACHE II score was 27 (IQR 22–33), and 50% were female. While in ICU, 128 (85%) patients had sepsis and 56 (37%) had ARDS. The majority of patients required invasive organ support: 94 (62%) required mechanical ventilation while 23 (15%) received renal replacement therapy. Multivariable analysis identified SOFA score (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01–1.38) and invasive ventilation (OR 9.64, 95% CI 3.39–27.4) as independent predictors of ICU mortality. Ninety-four (62%) patients survived to ICU discharge. Only 39% of these 94 patients discharged were alive 12 months after ICU admission. Conclusions. AL patients admitted to the ICU had a 62% ICU survival rate; yet only 25% of cohort patients were alive 12 months after ICU admission. Higher admission SOFA scores and invasive ventilation are independently associated with a greater risk of dying in the ICU. PMID:27445524

  9. Characteristics of Youths with Hearing Loss Admitted to Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Janet C.; Schiller, James A.; Guthmann, Debra

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of youths with hearing loss admitted to substance abuse treatment facilities. Intake data on 4,167 youths (28% female; 3% reporting a hearing loss) collected via the Global Appraisal of Individual Need-I assessment was used for the analyses. Information on demographics, environmental…

  10. Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy: A Brief Intervention for Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted After a Suicide Attempt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Cox, Daniel W.; Greene, Farrah N.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no empirically based inpatient intervention for individuals who have attempted suicide exists. We present an overview of a novel psychotherapeutic approach, Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), currently under development and empirical testing for inpatients who have been admitted for a recent suicide attempt. PACT is adapted from an…

  11. Cortisol Predicts Behavioral Dysregulation and Length of Stay among Children Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luebbe, Aaron M.; Elledge, L. Christian; Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Stoppelbein, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in behavioral regulation system (BRS) and stress response system (SRS) functioning may reflect greater biological sensitivity to context. The current study tested whether children's cortisol, a measure of the SRS, was related to observed dysregulated behavior, an indicator of the BRS, in a sample of children admitted for…

  12. Surveillance for West Nile Virus in Clinic-admitted Raptors, Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Gail; Edwards, Eric; Scherpelz, Judy; Bowen, Richard; Komar, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, 13.5% of clinic-admitted raptors in northern Colorado tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV). Clinic-admitted–raptor surveillance detected WNV activity nearly 14 weeks earlier than other surveillance systems. WNV surveillance using live raptor admissions to rehabilitation clinics may offer a novel surveillance method and should be considered along with other techniques already in use. PMID:17479898

  13. Enquiry about the Needs of Children Whose Mothers Are Admitted to Psychiatric Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderson, J.; McCune, N.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess whether children's needs are taken into consideration in female patients who are admitted to an adult psychiatric hospital. A retrospective case note audit of 100 female inpatients aged between 18 and 55 years over a 6-month period were randomly selected. The medical and nursing case notes of patients with…

  14. The geodesic flow of a generic metric does not admit nontrivial integrals polynomial in momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruglikov, Boris; Matveev, Vladimir S.

    2016-06-01

    Any smooth geodesic flow is locally Liouville integrable with smooth integrals. We show that generically this fails if we require, in addition, that the integrals are polynomial (or, more generally, analytic) in momenta. Consequently we obtain that a generic real-analytic metric does not admit, even locally, a real-analytic integral.

  15. Lorentzian Manifolds Admitting Isotropic Hypersurfaces Solutions of EINSTEIN’S Field Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burdet, Guy; Papacostas, Taxiarchis; Perrin, Martine

    1994-03-01

    All spaces solutions of Einstein’s field equations, admitting an isotropic (null) hypersurface (hereafter referred under the acronymus “ishyps”) are determined in a geometric way. We consider in more details two sub-cases, the generalized Robinson-Bertotti, and the pp-waves spaces.

  16. Supporting Conditionally-Admitted Students: A Case Study of Assessing Persistence in a Learning Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heaney, April; Fisher, Rick

    2011-01-01

    Using Astin's I-E-O model as a framework, this article explores the effects of a variety of factors on first-year persistence for conditionally-admitted students participating in a learning community at a public land-grant university. Since the learning community began in 2002, program administrators have collected survey, interview, and academic…

  17. Predictors of Service Disengagement in First-Admitted Adolescents with Psychosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schimmelmann, Benno Graf; Conus, Philippe; Schacht, Melanie; McGorry, Patrick; Lambert, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the risk and predictors of service disengagement in adolescents with first-episode psychosis (FEP) receiving their first treatment in a long-standing early intervention and prevention centre. Method: The Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centre (EPPIC) in Australia admitted 157 adolescents, ages 15 to 18, with FEP…

  18. My So-Called Choice: The Trappings of School Choice for Non-Admits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenbloom, Susan Rakosi

    2010-01-01

    Exploratory research investigates how students in a neighborhood high school navigate the complex school choice admissions process in New York City. Four years of in-depth, longitudinal interviews with thirty minority youth explores how their status as "non-admits" (students rejected from all schools) shapes their perceptions of peers and…

  19. 78 FR 42863 - Adjustment of Status to That of Person Admitted for Permanent Residence

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY 8 CFR Part 245 Adjustment of Status to That of Person Admitted for Permanent Residence CFR Correction 0 In Title 8 of the Code of Federal Regulations, revised as of January 1, 2013, on page 568,...

  20. Admitting At-Risk Students into Principal Preparation Programs: Is It Worth the Risk?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Bobby G.; Nelson, Jacquelyn S.; Nelson, C. Van

    This study investigated the situations of at-risk students considered for becoming principals, examining whether it was worth the risk of admitting them into principal preparation programs. Students had undergraduate grade point averages (UGPAs) of at least 2.85 over the last 2 years of the undergraduate program. If they did not meet GPA…

  1. Admitting At-Risk Students into a Principal Preparation Program: Predicting Success.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Bobby G.; Nelson, Jacquelyn S.; Nelson, C. Van

    2001-01-01

    Study of graduation rates of at-risk students admitted to a master's degree program at a doctoral-degree-granting university found that the best predictor of degree completion was the product of the undergraduate GPA multiplied by the GRE Verbal score. (Contains 41 references.)

  2. College Choice of Minority Students Admitted to Institutions in the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Confer, Christopher; Mamiseishvili, Ketevan

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the factors that affected minority students' choice to enroll at private four-year faith-based institutions in the Council of Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) in the United States. The study utilized the data from the College Board's Admitted Student Questionnaire PLUS (ASQ PLUS) survey. The final sample included 283…

  3. Medicare Cost Differences between Nursing Home Patients Admitted with and without Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Bruce; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Fahlman, Cheryl; Quinn, Charlene C.; Burton, Lynda; Zuckerman, Illene H.; Hebel, J. Rich; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Singhal, Puneet K.; Magaziner, Jay

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective in this study was to compare Medicare costs of treating older adults with and without dementia in nursing home settings. Design and Methods: An expert panel established the dementia status of a stratified random sample of newly admitted residents in 59 Maryland nursing homes between 1992 and 1995. Medicare expenditures…

  4. Self-Admitted Pretensions of Mac Users on a Predominantly PC University Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; Wood, Whitney L. Muhlenkamp; Firmin, Ruth L.; Wood, Jordan C.

    2010-01-01

    The present qualitative research study addressed the overall research question of college students' pretention dynamics in the context of a university setting. Thirty-five Mac users were interviewed on a university campus that exclusively supports PC machines. Mac users shared four self-admitted pretensions related to using Macintosh computers.…

  5. Comparison Between Emergency Department and Inpatient Nurses’ Perceptions of Boarding of Admitted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pulliam, Bryce C.; Liao, Mark Y.; Geissler, Theodore M.; Richards, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The boarding of admitted patients in the emergency department (ED) is a major cause of crowding and access block. One solution is boarding admitted patients in inpatient ward (W) hallways. This study queried and compared ED and W nurses’ opinions toward ED and W boarding. It also assessed their preferred boarding location if they were patients. Methods: A survey administered to a convenience sample of ED and W nurses was performed in a 631-bed academic medical center (30,000 admissions/year) with a 68-bed ED (70,000 visits/ year). We identified nurses as ED or W, and if W, whether they had previously worked in the ED. The nurses were asked if there were any circumstances where admitted patients should be boarded in ED or W hallways. They were also asked their preferred location if they were admitted as a patient. Six clinical scenarios were then presented, and the nurses’ opinions on boarding based on each scenario were queried. Results: Ninety nurses completed the survey, with a response rate of 60%; 35 (39%) were current ED nurses (cED), 40 (44%) had previously worked in the ED (pED). For all nurses surveyed 46 (52%) believed admitted patients should board in the ED. Overall, 52 (58%) were opposed to W boarding, with 20% of cED versus 83% of current W (cW) nurses (P < 0.0001), and 28% of pED versus 85% of nurses never having worked in the ED (nED) were opposed (P < 0.001). If admitted as patients themselves, 43 (54%) of all nurses preferred W boarding, with 82% of cED versus 33% of cW nurses (P < 0.0001) and 74% of pED versus 34% nED nurses (P = 0.0007). The most commonly cited reasons for opposition to hallway boarding were lack of monitoring and patient privacy. For the 6 clinical scenarios, significant differences in opinion regarding W boarding existed in all but 2 cases: a patient with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but requiring oxygen, and an intubated, unstable sepsis patient. Conclusion: Inpatient nurses and those who have

  6. Length of stay and hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital by family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chuck K.; Chambers, Catharine; Fang, Dianne; Mazowita, Garey; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare length of stay and total hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital under the care of family physicians who were their usual health care providers in the community (group A) and patients admitted to the same inpatient service under the care of family physicians who were not their usual health care providers (group B). Design Retrospective observational study. Setting A large urban hospital in Vancouver, BC. Participants All adult admissions to the family practice inpatient service between April 1, 2006, and June 30, 2008. Main outcome measures Ratio of length of stay to expected length of stay and total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit. Multivariate linear regression was performed to determine the effect of admitting group (group A vs group B) on the natural logarithm transformations of the outcomes. Results The median acute length of stay was 8.0 days (interquartile range [IQR] 4.0 to 13.0 days) for group A admissions and 8.0 days (IQR 4.0 to 15.0 days) for group B admissions. The median (IQR) total hospital costs were $6498 ($4035 to $11 313) for group A admissions and $6798 ($4040 to $12 713) for group B admissions. After adjustment for patient characteristics, patients admitted to hospital under the care of their own family physicians did not significantly differ in terms of acute length of stay to expected length of stay ratio (percent change 0.6%, P = .942) or total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit (percent change −2.0%, P = .722) compared with patients admitted under the care of other family physicians. Conclusion These findings suggest that having networks of family physicians involved in hospital care for patients is not less efficient than having family physicians provide care for their own patients. PMID:22518905

  7. Quality of Life in Patients with Substance Use Disorders Admitted to Detoxification Compared with Those Admitted to Hospitals for Medical Disorders: Follow-Up Results

    PubMed Central

    Vederhus, John-Kåre; Pripp, Are Hugo; Clausen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) in patients admitted to a general hospital was compared with those admitted to a detoxification unit for the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD). This study combines data from two separate data collections: a cross-sectional study in a general hospital unit (somatic sample, N = 519) and a follow-up study in a detoxification unit (SUD sample, N = 140). A total of 659 patients recruited during 2008–2013 were included in this study. All patients completed a generic QoL questionnaire at inclusion, and the SUD sample also completed it at the six-month follow-up. SUD patients experienced comparably low physical QoL and had significantly lower psychological, social, and existential QoL domain scores when compared with the somatic sample. Mental distress and having a SUD were the major factors explaining variations in QoL, with both influencing QoL negatively. In the SUD sample, QoL improved moderately at the six-month follow-up with less improvement for the domain relationship to a partner. To facilitate the recovery of SUD patients, clinicians must view their patients’ situation holistically and invest efforts into the different life domains affected by poor QoL. PMID:27226719

  8. On the Limit Cycles for a Class of Continuous Piecewise Linear Differential Systems with Three Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Maurício Firmino Silva; Pessoa, Claudio; Pereira, Weber F.

    Lima and Llibre [2012] have studied a class of planar continuous piecewise linear vector fields with three zones. Using the Poincaré map, they proved that this class admits always a unique limit cycle, which is hyperbolic. The class studied in [Lima & Llibre, 2012] belongs to a larger set of planar continuous piecewise linear vector fields with three zones that can be separated into four other classes. Here, we consider some of these classes and we prove that some of them always admit a unique limit cycle, which is hyperbolic. However we find a class that does not have limit cycles.

  9. Spectrum of Opportunistic Infections and Risk Factors for In-Hospital Mortality of Admitted AIDS Patients in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bin; Sun, Jianjun; Cai, Rentian; Shen, Yinzhong; Liu, Li; Wang, Jiangrong; Zhang, Renfang; Shen, Jiayin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the frequency and the spectrum of major opportunistic infections (OIs), evaluate the major clinical factors associated with each specific OI, and identify the risk factors for in-hospital death among HIV patients in East China. A retrospective cohort study was made including all the HIV-infected patients who were admitted for the first time to the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center during June 1, 2013 to June 1, 2015. The demographic and clinical data were collected. Comparison of continuous variables was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and rank sum test. Person χ2 test and Fisher exact test were applied to analyze the categorical variables. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine the risk for the occurrence of in-hospital death. In total, 920 patients were enrolled with age of 41.59 ± 13.36 years and 91% male. Median CD4 was 34 (IQR, 13–94) cells/μL. Among these patients, 94.7% acquired OIs while the rest developed malignancies. Pneumocystis pneumonia and bacterial coinfection (42.1%) was found to be the most common OIs, followed by tuberculosis (31.4%), CMV (20.9%), Cryptococcosis (9.0%), and MAC infection (5.2%). Of the above 5 major OIs, CMV-infected patients had the lowest median CD4 cell count 22.50 (IQR, 7.50–82.00) while the patients with tuberculosis infection had the highest count 61.00 (IQR, 27.00–176.00). In-hospital death rate was 4.2 per 100 person-years among these patients. Of note, admitted patients with 2 types of OIs (2.20, 95% CI 1.39–3.48) and those patients who were 40-year old or older (1.75, 95% CI 1.10–2.78) had a higher risk of such death. Pneumocystis pneumonia and tuberculosis were still the leading causes for the admission of HIV-infected patients in East China, and these patients tended to have very low CD4 cell counts. It is believed that expanding the HIV screening test and pushing the infected ones get ART earlier is required for generating a more successful HIV management

  10. Spectrum of Opportunistic Infections and Risk Factors for In-Hospital Mortality of Admitted AIDS Patients in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Sun, Jianjun; Cai, Rentian; Shen, Yinzhong; Liu, Li; Wang, Jiangrong; Zhang, Renfang; Shen, Jiayin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the frequency and the spectrum of major opportunistic infections (OIs), evaluate the major clinical factors associated with each specific OI, and identify the risk factors for in-hospital death among HIV patients in East China.A retrospective cohort study was made including all the HIV-infected patients who were admitted for the first time to the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center during June 1, 2013 to June 1, 2015. The demographic and clinical data were collected. Comparison of continuous variables was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and rank sum test. Person χ test and Fisher exact test were applied to analyze the categorical variables. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine the risk for the occurrence of in-hospital death.In total, 920 patients were enrolled with age of 41.59 ± 13.36 years and 91% male. Median CD4 was 34 (IQR, 13-94) cells/μL. Among these patients, 94.7% acquired OIs while the rest developed malignancies. Pneumocystis pneumonia and bacterial coinfection (42.1%) was found to be the most common OIs, followed by tuberculosis (31.4%), CMV (20.9%), Cryptococcosis (9.0%), and MAC infection (5.2%). Of the above 5 major OIs, CMV-infected patients had the lowest median CD4 cell count 22.50 (IQR, 7.50-82.00) while the patients with tuberculosis infection had the highest count 61.00 (IQR, 27.00-176.00). In-hospital death rate was 4.2 per 100 person-years among these patients. Of note, admitted patients with 2 types of OIs (2.20, 95% CI 1.39-3.48) and those patients who were 40-year old or older (1.75, 95% CI 1.10-2.78) had a higher risk of such death.Pneumocystis pneumonia and tuberculosis were still the leading causes for the admission of HIV-infected patients in East China, and these patients tended to have very low CD4 cell counts. It is believed that expanding the HIV screening test and pushing the infected ones get ART earlier is required for generating a more successful HIV management strategy. PMID

  11. Evaluating the Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) System for Admitted Patients in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Delia L.; Mihalov, Leslie K.; Cohen, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) systems were developed to provide a reproducible assessment of a child’s clinical status while hospitalized. Most studies investigating the PEWS evaluate its usefulness in the inpatient setting. Limited studies evaluate the effectiveness and integration of PEWS in the pediatric emergency department (ED). The goal of this study was to explore the test characteristics of an ED-assigned PEWS score for intensive care unit (ICU) admission or clinical deterioration in admitted patients. Methods This was a prospective 12-month observational study of patients, aged 0 to 21 years, admitted from the ED of an urban, tertiary care children’s hospital. ED nurses were instructed in PEWS assignment and electronic medical record (EMR) documentation. Interrater reliability between nurses was evaluated. PEWS scores were measured at initial assessment (P0) and time of admission (P1). Patients were stratified into outcome groups: those admitted to the ICU either from the ED or as transfers from the floor and those admitted to the floor only. Clinical deterioration was defined as transfer to the ICU within 6 hours or within 6 to 24 hours of admission. PEWS scores and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were compared for patients admitted to the floor, ICU, and with clinical deterioration. Results The authors evaluated 12,306 consecutively admitted patients, with 99% having a PEWS documented in the EMR. Interrater reliability was excellent (intraclass coefficient 0.91). A total of 1,300 (10.6%) patients were admitted to the ICU and 11,066 (89.4%) were admitted to the floor. PEWS scores were higher for patients in the ICU group (P0 = 2.8, SD ± 2.4; P1 = 3.2, SD ± 2.4; p < 0.0001) versus floor patients (P0 = 0.7, SD ± 1.2; P1 = 0.5, SD ± 0.9; p < 0.0001). To predict the need for ICU admission, the optimal cutoff points on the ROC are P0 = 1 and P1 = 2, with areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of 0.79 and 0

  12. Prevalence and Predictors of Chronic Health Conditions of Inmates Newly Admitted to Maximum Security Prisons.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jennifer R; Befus, Montina; Mukherjee, Dhritiman V; Lowy, Franklin D; Larson, Elaine L

    2015-07-01

    This study estimated the prevalence of chronic medical conditions and risk predictors of 759 newly admitted inmates in two New York State maximum-security prisons. The most prevalent conditions were respiratory (34.1%), cardiovascular (17.4%), and sexually transmitted diseases (STD; 16.1%); least prevalent were HIV (3.6%), cancer (1.7%), and kidney disease (1.7%). Results of the multivariable logistic regression showed that females had higher risk for all conditions except cardiovascular and liver disease; individuals aged 40 years and older had significantly higher risk for all conditions except asthma and STD; non-Hispanic Black inmates had higher risk for respiratory disease and STD; cigarette smoking was associated with asthma; and obesity was significantly associated with diabetes, asthma, and cardiovascular conditions. These findings highlight the heavy burden of chronic illnesses among newly admitted inmates and the need to address adequate screening, prevention, and treatment services. PMID:26084947

  13. Prevalence and Predictors of Chronic Health Conditions of Inmates Newly Admitted to Maximum Security Prisons

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jennifer R.; Befus, Montina; Mukherjee, Dhritiman V.; Lowy, Franklin D.; Larson, Elaine L.

    2015-01-01

    This study estimated the prevalence of chronic medical conditions and risk predictors of 759 newly admitted inmates in two New York State maximum-security prisons. The most prevalent conditions were respiratory (34.1%), cardiovascular (17.4%), and sexually transmitted diseases (STD; 16.1%); least prevalent were HIV (3.6%), cancer (1.7%), and kidney disease (1.7%). Results of the multivariable logistic regression showed that females had higher risk for all conditions except cardiovascular and liver disease; individuals aged 40 years and older had significantly higher risk for all conditions except asthma and STD; non-Hispanic Black inmates had higher risk for respiratory disease and STD; cigarette smoking was associated with asthma; and obesity was significantly associated with diabetes, asthma, and cardiovascular conditions. These findings highlight the heavy burden of chronic illnesses among newly admitted inmates and the need to address adequate screening, prevention, and treatment services. PMID:26084947

  14. Zone separator for multiple zone vessels

    DOEpatents

    Jones, John B.

    1983-02-01

    A solids-gas contact vessel, having two vertically disposed distinct reaction zones, includes a dynamic seal passing solids from an upper to a lower zone and maintaining a gas seal against the transfer of the separate treating gases from one zone to the other, and including a stream of sealing fluid at the seal.

  15. Gravitational collapse in f (R) gravity for a spherically symmetric spacetime admitting a homothetic Killing vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakrabarti, Soumya; Banerjee, Narayan

    2016-05-01

    The gravitational collapse of a spherical distribution, in a class of f ( R) theories of gravity, where f ( R) is a power function of R , is discussed. The spacetime is assumed to admit a homothetic Killing vector. In the collapsing modes, some of the situations indeed hit a singularity, but they are all covered with an apparent horizon. Some peculiar cases are observed where the collapsing body settles to a constant radius at a given value of the radial coordinate.

  16. Neuro-oncological patients admitted in intensive-care unit: predictive factors and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Tabouret, E; Boucard, C; Devillier, R; Barrie, M; Boussen, S; Autran, D; Chinot, O; Bruder, N

    2016-03-01

    The prognosis of oncology patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) is considered poor. Our objective was to analyze the characteristics and predictive factors of death in the ICU and functional outcome following ICU treatment for neuro-oncology patients. A retrospective study was conducted on all patients with primary brain tumor admitted to our institutional ICU for medical indications. Predictive impact on the risk of death in the ICU was analyzed as well as the functional status was evaluated prior and following ICU discharge. Seventy-one patients were admitted to the ICU. ICU admission indications were refractory seizures (41 %) and septic shock (17 %). On admission, 16 % had multi-organ failure. Ventilation was necessary for 41 % and catecholamines for 13 %. Twenty-two percent of patients died in the ICU. By multivariate analysis, predictive factors associated with an increased risk of ICU death were: non-neurological cause of admission [p = 0.045; odds ratio (OR) 5.405], multiple organ failure (p = 0.021; OR 8.027), respiratory failure (p = 0.006; OR 9.615), and hemodynamic failure (p = 0.008; OR 10.111). In contrast, tumor type (p = 0.678) and disease control status (p = 0.380) were not associated with an increased risk of ICU death. Among the 35 evaluable patients, 77 % presented with a stable or improved Karnofsky performance status following ICU hospitalization compared with the ongoing status before discharge. In patients with primary brain tumor admitted to the ICU, predictive factors of death appear to be similar to those described in non-oncology patients. ICU hospitalization is generally not associated with a subsequent decrease in the functional status. PMID:26608523

  17. Profile of BC College Transfer Students Admitted to Simon Fraser University 2003/04 to 2007/08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Jacy; Chan, Liny; Chuang, Rachel

    2009-01-01

    This report presents data and analysis about students admitted to Simon Fraser University (SFU) who have BC College experience in the period 2003/04 to 2007/08. The first and second sections of the report focus on the profile of students admitted to SFU on the basis of BC College transfer including number of credits transferred, institution…

  18. 37 CFR 1.91 - Models or exhibits not generally admitted as part of application or patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section, a model, working model, or other physical exhibit may be required by the... admitted as part of application or patent. (a) A model or exhibit will not be admitted as part of the... including: (i) The fee set forth in § 1.17(h); and (ii) An explanation of why entry of the model or...

  19. 37 CFR 1.91 - Models or exhibits not generally admitted as part of application or patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... paragraph (a) of this section, a model, working model, or other physical exhibit may be required by the... admitted as part of application or patent. (a) A model or exhibit will not be admitted as part of the... including: (i) The fee set forth in § 1.17(h); and (ii) An explanation of why entry of the model or...

  20. Using the Admitted Class Evaluation Service (ACES) to Conduct Institution-Specific Admission or Placement Validity Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Emily J.

    2011-01-01

    Presented at the 23rd Annual Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCU) Conference in Atlanta, GA, in September 2011. Admitted Class Evaluation Service (ACES) is the College Board's free online service that predicts how admitted students will perform at a college or university generally, and how successful students will be in specific…

  1. Missed Opportunities for Nutritional Rehabilitation in Children Admitted to Surgical Wards

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Pooja; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Phatak, Ajay; Desai, Rajendra; Srivastava, Shirish

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malnutrition in children has serious health and economic consequences. We studied documentation of malnutrition, actual prevalence, and treatment given in children admitted to surgical wards. Methods. Retrospective study of 154 patients aged <5 yrs admitted to general surgical, orthopedic, and otorhinolaryngology wards. Records were evaluated for completeness of data, way of documentation, and data quality. Descriptive analysis was done. If malnutrition was not identified and/or proper action was not taken, it was defined as a “missed opportunity.” Results. Of 154 records audited, 100 (64.94%) were males, 108 (70.13%) were from general surgery ward, and 78 (50.65%) were residing in suburban area. The mean (SD) age of the study population was 2.32 (1.16) years whereas mean (SD) duration of stay was 5.84 (6.29) days. Weight and height were mentioned in 116 (75.32%) and 8 (5.19%) records, respectively, mostly by nonsurgical personnel. Documentation and treatment of malnutrition were poor. Out of 106 apparently correct weight records, 19 (17.93%) children were severely undernourished and 30 (28.30%) were moderately undernourished whereas 20 (18.87%) children were not undernourished but required nutritional attention. Conclusion. There is poor documentation of nutritional indicators of children admitted to surgical wards. From data that was available, it is apparent that malnutrition is at high levels. “Identification” and hence management of malnutrition need more attention. PMID:27429836

  2. Prospective study of the role of cardiac troponin T in patients admitted with unstable angina.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, P.; Collinson, P.; Moseley, D.; Greenwood, T.; Noble, M.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the prognostic significance and role in risk stratification of the biochemical marker troponin T in patients admitted with unstable angina. DESIGN--Single centre, blinded, prospective study of patients admitted with chest pain. SETTING--Coronary care unit of a district general hospital. SUBJECTS--460 patients admitted with chest pain and followed up for a median of three years. 183 patients had a final diagnosis of unstable angina. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cardiac death, need for coronary revascularisation, or readmission with non-fatal myocardial infarction as first events. RESULTS--62 (34%) unstable angina patients were troponin T positive. This group had significantly increased incidence rates of subsequent cardiac death (12 cases (19%) v 14 (12%)), coronary revascularisation (22 (35%) v 26 (21%)), death or revascularisation (33 (53%) v 40 (33%)), and death or non-fatal myocardial infarction (18 (29%) v 21 (17%)) compared with the troponin T negative group. In multiple logistic regression troponin T status was a highly significant predictor for the end points coronary revascularisation and cardiac death or revascularisation as first events. CONCLUSION--Troponin T in the serum of patients with unstable angina identifies a subgroup at higher risk of subsequent cardiac events and its measurement aids in risk factor stratification. The increased risk extends to two years after admission. Prospective randomised trials are required to identify optimum therapeutic strategies for this subgroup. PMID:8704534

  3. Outcome and periprocedural time management in referred versus directly admitted stroke patients treated with thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ralph; Reimann, Gernot; Weimar, Christian; Winkler, Angela; Berger, Klaus; Nordmeyer, Hannes; Hadisurya, Jeffrie; Brassel, Friedhelm; Kitzrow, Martin; Krogias, Christos; Weber, Werner; Busch, Elmar W.; Eyding, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background: After thrombectomy has shown to be effective in acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusion, the potential benefit of secondary referral for such an intervention needs to be validated. Aims: We aimed to compare consecutive stoke patients directly admitted and treated with thrombectomy at a neurointerventional centre with patients secondarily referred for such a procedure from hospitals with a stroke unit. Methods: Periprocedure times and mortality in 300 patients primarily treated in eight neurointerventional centres were compared with 343 patients referred from nine other hospitals in a prospective multicentre study of a German neurovascular network. Data on functional outcome at 3 months was available in 430 (76.4%) patients. Results: In-hospital mortality (14.8% versus 11.7%, p = 0.26) and 3 months mortality (21.9% versus 24.1%, p = 0.53) were not statistically different in both patient groups despite a significant shorter symptom to groin puncture time in directly admitted patients, which was mainly caused by a longer interfacility transfer time. We found a nonsignificant trend for better functional outcome at 3 months in directly admitted patients (modified Rankin Scale 0–2, 44.0% versus 35.7%, p = 0.08). Conclusions: Our results show that a drip-and-ship thrombectomy concept can be effectively organized in a metropolitan stroke network. Every effort should be made to speed up the emergency interfacility transfer to a neurointerventional centre in stroke patients eligible for thrombectomy after initial brain imaging. PMID:27006695

  4. Non-Derivable Item Set and Non-Derivable Literal Set Representations of Patterns Admitting Negation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kryszkiewicz, Marzena

    The discovery of frequent patterns has attracted a lot of attention of the data mining community. While an extensive research has been carried out for discovering positive patterns, little has been offered for discovering patterns with negation. The main hindrance to the progress of such research is huge amount of frequent patterns with negation, which exceeds the number of frequent positive patterns by orders of magnitude. In this paper, we examine properties of derivable and non-derivable patterns, including those with negated items. In particular, we establish important relationships among patterns admitting negation that have the same canonical variant. By analogy to frequent non-derivable itemsets, which constitute a concise lossless representation NDR of frequent positive patterns, we introduce frequent non-derivable literal sets lossless representation NDRL of frequent positive patterns admitting negation. Then we use the derived properties of literal sets to offer a concise representation NDIR of frequent patterns admitting negation that is built only from positive non-derivable itemsets. The relationships between the three representations are identified. The transformation of the new representations into not less concise lossless closure representations is discussed.

  5. Complex strain patterns developed at the frontal and lateral tips to shear zones and thrust zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coward, M. P.; Potts, G. J.

    Many of the complex strain patterns seen in shear zones and thrust zones, such as variable fabric orientations, refolded folds and fabrics, together with folds with hinges almost parallel to the main transport direction, can be explained in terms of differential movement within the shear zones. These strains are developed at the frontal and lateral tips of the zones as they propagate. Examples are taken from the Moine thrust zone of Scotland which show variations in strains particularly at the lateral tips. The form of differential movement described here may lead to complex strain paths and non-plane strain ellipsoids and the spatial variations in finite strain may be used to delineate zones of extensional and compressional flow and differential movement in the shear zones or thrusts.

  6. Epidemiology and Outcome of Chemical Burn Patients Admitted in Burn Unit of JNMC Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India: A 5-year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Md Sohaib; Ahmad, Imran; Khurram, M. Fahud; Kanungo, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the epidemiology, clinical variable of chemical burns, and their outcomes to prevent or reduce the frequency and morbidity of such injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on all the patients with chemical burns admitted at author's center between November 2008 and December 2013. All the patients were evaluated in terms of age, sex, total body surface area, etiology, treatment given, morbidity, mortality, final outcome, and then educated regarding specific preventive measures. Results: A total of 96 patients (2.4% of total burn admissions) (42 males and 54 females) were admitted to our hospital with chemical burn injuries. Most of the patients were in the age group of 16–30 years. Incidence in females was slightly higher than in males. Acid was found to be the most common cause of injury. We found 55% patients admitted had <10% total body surface area (TBSA) involvement, 35% had burns involving between 11 and 20% TBSA, and 4% had burns involving 21–30% TBSA, and 6% had burns in >30% TBSA. Morbidity was noticed in the form of skin defect in 80% of cases, soft tissue defect with exposed tendon, bone, or vessels in 16% of cases, and 4% of patients developed contracture and hypertrophic scar. Eighty-six percent of patients required operative intervention. A total of three deaths (3%) were recorded. Conclusion: It was found that chemical burns, though not very common, are deeper burns and can be accidental or non-accidental, and the high-risk age group is 16–25 years. Chemical burns are largely preventable and if properly managed have a good outcome. PMID:25810999

  7. Cross sectional study of contribution of clinical assessment and simple cardiac investigations to diagnosis of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients admitted with acute dyspnoea.

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, N. D.; McNeill, G.; Pringle, T.; Ogston, S.; Struthers, A. D.; Pringle, S. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the comparative contribution of clinical assessment, electrocardiography, and chest radiography to the diagnosis of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients admitted to a general medical ward with acute dyspnoea. DESIGN: Prospective cross sectional study. SETTING: Acute medical admissions ward of a teaching hospital. SUBJECTS: 71 randomly selected patients admitted with acute dyspnoea. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensitivity and specificity of each investigation and logistic regression analysis of each variable in identifying left ventricular systolic dysfunction. RESULTS: Clinical assessment in this cohort of patients with severe dyspnoea was generally sensitive (sensitivity 81%). Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of clinical assessment. In the first group (37 patients) the diagnosis of systolic dysfunction was clear, in the second (22) it was in doubt, and in the third (12) it was unlikely. The sensitivity of clinical assessment in identifying left ventricular systolic dysfunction was 81% and the specificity was 47%. The specificity of diagnosis was improved by electrocardiography (69%) and chest radiography (92%). Logistic regression analysis showed that isolated pulmonary crepitations were a comparatively poor predictor of left ventricular systolic dysfunction chi 2 = 10.215, P = 0.0014) but that a full clinical examination had reasonable predictive value (chi 2 = 24.82, P < 0.00001). The combination of clinical assessment and chest radiography improved the accuracy of diagnosis (chi 2 = 28.08, P < 0.00001), as did the combination of clinical assessment and electrocardiography (chi 2 = 32.41, P < 0.00001). CONCLUSION: Clinical assessment in patients admitted with acute dyspnoea is comparatively accurate. Patients with abnormal results on chest radiography, electrocardiography, and clinical examination have a high likelihood of having left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Echocardiography contributes little more to

  8. Safe laparoscopic clearance of the common bile duct in emergently admitted patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Plaudis, Haralds; Fokins, Vladimirs; Mukans, Maksims; Pupelis, Guntars

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Laparoscopic treatment of patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis is challenging due to mandatory recovery of the biliary drainage and clearance of the common bile duct (CBD). The aim of our study was to assess postoperative course of cholangitis and biliary sepsis after laparoscopic clearance of the CBD in emergently admitted patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis. Methods Emergently admitted patients who underwent laparoscopic clearance of the CBD were included prospectively and stratified in 2 groups i.e., cholangitis positive (CH+) or negative (CH-) group. Patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative imaging data, inflammatory response, surgical intervention, complication rate and outcomes were compared between groups. Results Ninety-nine of a total 320 patients underwent laparoscopic clearance of the CBD, of which, 60 belonged to the acute cholangitis group (CH+) and 39 to the cholangitis negative group (CH-). Interventions were done on average 4 days after admission, operation duration was 95-105 min, and the conversion rate was 3-7% without differences in the groups. Preoperative inflammatory response was markedly higher in the CH+ group. Inflammation signs on intraoperative choledochoscopy were more evident in patients with cholangitis. Postoperative inflammatory response did not differ between the groups. The overall complication rate was 8.3% and 5.1%, respectively. Laparoscopic clearance of the CBD resulted in 1 lethal case (CH+ group), resulting in 1% mortality rate and a similar 12-month readmission rate. Conclusions Single-stage laparoscopic intraoperative US and choledochoscopy-assisted clearance of the CBD is feasible in emergently admitted patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis. PMID:27212991

  9. [Determinants of induced abortion among poor women admitted to hospitals in a locality of northeastern Brazil].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, W; Misago, C; Correia, L L; Parente, J A; Oliveira, F C

    1996-02-01

    In Brazil, abortion is legally allowed only when it is necessary to save a woman's life or when pregnancy has occurred following rape. Despite this law, induced abortion is widely carried out. This study presents the findings as to the determinants of 2,084 abortions admitted to two major obstetric hospitals in Fortaleza, Brazil, between October 1992 and September 1993. Most of these women (2,074) have admitted an attempt to terminate pregnancy and 10 women were classified as induced abortion cases based on the findings of signs of intervention such as cervical laceration, perforation or foreign bodies in the vagina or uterus. The study findings indicate that self-administration of medicines plays an important role in terminating pregnancy. Among the 2,074 women who admitted to terminating the pregnancy 66% reported using misoprostol to induce abortion. Misoprostol, a prostaglandin E1 analogue indicated for ulcer treatment, has been widely used as an abortifacient by women in Brazil. Misoprostol has some uterine effects but it is not effective in inducing abortion. Among women who were hospitalized for complications resulting from abortion about 59.7% were 20 to 29 years old and 22.6% were aged less than 20. The majority of the women (91.6%) were Catholic and only 4.3% were illiterate. About 62% of the abortion cases lived alone or did not have a stable partner. Most of the women (59.2%) reported less than 2 live births and 11.8% had experienced a previous abortion; 61.1% of the women were not using a contraceptive method at the time of conception. The main reasons for this were "fear of side effects", "did not expect to have sexual intercourse" and "did not expect to get pregnant". The authors suggest that the situation of a high rate of self-inflicted abortion may be changed by the application of an appropriate contraceptive and reproductive health programme. PMID:9008918

  10. Predictors of major lower limb amputation among type II diabetic patients admitted for diabetic foot problems

    PubMed Central

    Yusof, Nazri Mohd; Rahman, Jamalludin Ab; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Che-Ahmad, Aminudin; Khalid, Kamarul Ariffin; Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli; Vijayasingham, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of amputations in Malaysia. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with type 2 DM (T2DM) who were admitted to a hospital, in order to reduce its likelihood. METHODS This cross-sectional study involved 218 patients with T2DM who were admitted to Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan, Kuantan, Malaysia, for diabetic foot problems from June 2011 to July 2012. A form was developed to document the patients’ profiles, comorbidities, complications, investigations, treatment and clinical outcomes. The predictors for major lower limb amputations were determined using univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 31 patients underwent major lower limb amputations (25 transtibial, 6 transfemoral). The following factors were found to be associated with the incidence of major lower limb amputations: T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, presentation with gangrene, diabetic foot conditions of Wagner grade 4 or 5, and necrotising fasciitis. Patients who underwent major amputations had significantly lower haemoglobin and albumin levels, and higher total white blood cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and C-reactive protein, urea and creatinine levels. However, only T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and albumin levels were significant on stepwise logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and low albumin levels were found to be significant predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with T2DM admitted for diabetic foot problems. PMID:26668408

  11. Weld heat-affected zone in Ti-6Al-4V alloys. Part 1: Computer simulation of the effect of weld variables on the thermal cycles in the HAZ

    SciTech Connect

    Shah, A.K.; Kulkarni, S.D.; Gopinathan, V.; Krishnan, R.

    1995-09-01

    The weld thermal cycles encountered in the HAZ of titanium alloys have been characterized using modified Rosenthal equations. The results are shown in the form of axonometric plots depicting the effect of two weld variables keeping the other variables fixed. Computer simulation results show that the heat input and the plate thickness are the major variables affecting the thermal cycles in the HAZ. The effects of changes in welding speed are reflecting in the variation in the heat input. The electrode radius has minimal effect and can be termed as the minor variable. Preheat or interpass temperatures have an intermediate effect. An increase in electrode radius or decrease in plate thickness requires large apparent displacement of the heat source above the plate surface to be incorporated in the analytical solutions. The melt pool width increases sharply with an increase in the heat input (a/v) or a decrease in plate thickness (d); however, preheat temperature (T{sub 0}) has negligible effect. The effect of weld variables on the effective heat input is also similar. The t{sub 8/5} parameter increases sharply with reducing plate thickness or increasing heat input.

  12. Vadose zone microbiology

    SciTech Connect

    Kieft, Thomas L.; Brockman, Fred J.

    2001-01-17

    The vadose zone is defined as the portion of the terrestrial subsurface that extends from the land surface downward to the water table. As such, it comprises the surface soil (the rooting zone), the underlying subsoil, and the capillary fringe that directly overlies the water table. The unsaturated zone between the rooting zone and the capillary fringe is termed the "intermediate zone" (Chapelle, 1993). The vadose zone has also been defined as the unsaturated zone, since the sediment pores and/or rock fractures are generally not completely water filled, but instead contain both water and air. The latter characteristic results in the term "zone of aeration" to describe the vadose zone. The terms "vadose zone," "unsaturated zone", and "zone of aeration" are nearly synonymous, except that the vadose zone may contain regions of perched water that are actually saturated. The term "subsoil" has also been used for studies of shallow areas of the subsurface immediately below the rooting zone. This review focuses almost exclusively on the unsaturated region beneath the soil layer since there is already an extensive body of literature on surface soil microbial communities and process, e.g., Paul and Clark (1989), Metting (1993), Richter and Markowitz, (1995), and Sylvia et al. (1998); whereas the deeper strata of the unsaturated zone have only recently come under scrutiny for their microbiological properties.

  13. On integrals for some class of ordinary difference equations admitting a Lax representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svinin, Andrei K.

    2016-03-01

    We consider two infinite classes of ordinary difference equations admitting Lax pair representation. Discrete equations in these classes are parameterized by two integers k≥slant 0 and s≥slant k+1. We describe the first integrals for these two classes in terms of special discrete polynomials. We show an equivalence between two difference equations belonging to different classes corresponding to the same pair (k, s). We show that solution spaces {{ N }}sk of different ordinary difference equations with a fixed value of s + k are organized in a chain of inclusions.

  14. Clostridium difficile ribotype 027 is most prevalent among inpatients admitted from long-term care facilities

    PubMed Central

    Archbald-Pannone, L.R.; Boone, J.H.; Carman, R.J.; Lyerly, D.M.; Guerrant, R.L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Intestinal inflammation was evaluated using faecal lactoferrin and ribotype in 196 hospitalized adults with Clostridium difficile infection to determine the impact of ribotype 027 in long-term care facilities (LTCFs). LTCF residents (n = 28) had greater antibiotic use (P = 0.049) and more ribotype 027 infection [odds ratio (OR): 4.87; 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.02–11.74; P < 0.01], compared to those admitted from home. Patients infected with ribotype 027 strains had worse six-month mortality (OR: 1.90; 95% CI: 1.08–3.34; P = 0.03) and more inflammation (95.26 vs 36.08 µg/mL; P = 0.006), compared to those infected with non-027 strains. This study was not designed to determine acquisition site, but, in this population, suggests that the location from which the patient has been admitted is strongly associated with ribotype 027 and more severe C. difficile disease. PMID:25228227

  15. Sexual aggression: perceptions of its likelihood of occurring and some correlates of self-admitted perpetration.

    PubMed

    Cornett, M B; Shuntich, R

    1991-10-01

    175 college undergraduate students completed a questionnaire which contained dating scenarios and questions designed to assess the participants' perceptions about the likelihood that sexual aggression would occur in the described dating situations and how justified sexual aggression would be in those situations. Also included were items to assess self-admitted sexual aggression, self-reported sexual victimization, attitudes toward certain affectionate behaviors, and enjoyment of several magazines including the "soft-core" sexually oriented publication Playboy. Analysis indicated that women made significantly higher estimates of the chances of sexual aggression occurring in the described dating situations. Relative to nonvictimized women, victimized women gave significantly higher estimates of the likelihood of sexual aggression and believed that sexual aggression was significantly more justified. Men rated sexual aggression as significantly more justified in a relationship in which the male had been paying all dating expenses relative to one in which dating expenses were shared. Women's ratings were not significantly different. Also, correlates of self-admitted male sexual aggression included greater rated enjoyment of Playboy magazine and less agreement with an item designed to measure attitudes toward physical affection. PMID:1766779

  16. Prevalence and characteristics of breakthrough pain in cancer patients admitted to a hospice.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, G; O'Doherty, C A; Collins, S

    2000-08-01

    A prospective survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence and characteristics of breakthrough pain in cancer patients admitted to a hospice. Of 414 consecutive admissions, 33 patients were confused or too unwell to take part and 136 were pain-free. The remaining 245 reported 404 pains (range 1-5 per patient); of these patients, 218 (89%) had breakthrough pain and identified 361 pains (range 1-5 per patient). Breakthrough pain was classified as somatic (46%) visceral (30%), neuropathic (10%) or mixed etiology (16%). Thirty-eight percent of pains were severe or excruciating. The average number of daily breakthrough pain episodes was 4 [corrected] (range 1-14); 49% occurred suddenly. Most (59%) were unpredictable, and 72% lasted less than 30 minutes. Seventy-five percent of patients were dissatisfied with their pain control. Breakthrough pain is common among patients admitted to our hospice. It is frequent, short lasting, often unpredictable and not necessarily related to chronic pain making treatment difficult. PMID:10989246

  17. Acute kidney injury among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Randall, D W; Brima, N; Walker, D; Connolly, J; Laing, C; Copas, A J; Edwards, S G; Batson, S; Miller, R F

    2015-11-01

    We describe the incidence, associations and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). We retrospectively analysed 223 admissions to an inner-London, University-affiliated ICU between 1999 and 2012, and identified those with AKI and performed multivariate analysis to determine associations with AKI. Of all admissions, 66% were affected by AKI of any severity and 35% developed stage 3 AKI. In multivariate analysis, AKI was associated with chronic kidney disease (odds ratio [OR] = 3.19; p = 0.014), a previous AIDS-defining illness (OR = 1.93; p = 0.039) and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, (OR = 3.49; p = 0.018, if > 30). No associations were demonstrated with use of anti-retroviral medication (including tenofovir), or an individual's HIV viral load or CD4 count. AKI was associated with higher inpatient mortality and longer duration of ICU admission. Among patients with stage 3 AKI, only 41% were alive 90 days after ICU admission. Among survivors, 74% regained good renal function, the remainder were dependent on renal replacement therapy or were left with significant ongoing renal dysfunction. Of note, many patients had baseline serum creatinine concentrations well below published reference ranges. AKI among HIV-infected patients admitted to ICU carries a poor prognosis. PMID:25411349

  18. Evaluation of a new restricted transfusion protocol in neonates admitted to the NICU

    PubMed Central

    Nayeri, Fatemeh; Nili, Firozeh; Ebrahim, Bita; Olomie Yazdi, Zohreh; Maliki, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although transfusion is a common procedure for treating anemia of prematurity, there is no specific protocol for blood transfusion in premature newborns. So in this study we investigate whether application of a strict protocol has any statistically significant effect on reduction of blood transfusion. Methods: In this study, first group admitted in NICU during 2005 - 2006 and the second group admitted during 2006 - 2007. Whereas in the first group the blood transfusion performed based on neonatologists' opinion following consultations with a pediatric hematologist, blood transfusion in the second group was based on the Shannon's protocol. Results: During 2005-2006, out of 206 cases, 71 cases (%34.5) underwent blood infusion. During 2006-2007, out of 211 cases, 56 (%26.5) received blood transfusion based on the Shannon's strict protocol. Although the number of cases decreased, no significant difference was found betweenthe two groups (p= 0.07). Conculsion: Applying strict criteria alone is not effective in reducing the frequency of transfusion in infants. PMID:25678998

  19. Comparison of communication skills between medical students admitted after interviews or on academic merits

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Selection of the best medical students among applicants is debated and many different methods are used. Academic merits predict good academic performance, but students admitted by other pathways need not be less successful. The aim of this study, was to compare communication skills between students admitted to medical school through interviews or on academic merits, respectively. Methods A retrospective cohort study. Communication skills at a surgical OSCE in 2008 were assessed independently by two observers using an evaluative rating scale. Correlations, t-tests and multivariate analyses by logistic regressions were employed. Academic merits were defined as upper secondary school grade point average (GPA) or scores from the Swedish Scholastic Assessment Test (SweSAT). Results The risk of showing unsatisfactory communicative performance was significantly lower among the students selected by interviews (OR 0.32, CI95 0.12-0.83), compared to those selected on the basis of academic merits. However, there was no significant difference in communication skills scores between the different admission groups; neither did the proportion of high performers differ. No difference in the result of the written examination was seen between groups. Conclusions Our results confirm previous experience from many medical schools that students selected in different ways achieve comparable results during the clinical semesters. However, selection through interview seems to reduce the number of students who demonstrate inferior communication skills at 4th year of medical school. PMID:22726308

  20. Hospital Organization and Importance of an Interventional Radiology Inpatient Admitting Service: Italian Single-Center 3-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-03-15

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p < 0.05). The results of the 3-year activity show that the activation of a COUIR with an inpatient admitting service, and the better organization of the patient pathway that came with it, evidenced more efficient use of resources, with the possibility for the hospital to save money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of Euro 1,009,095.35. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  1. Alcohol-Induced Impairment in Adolescents Admitted to Inpatient Treatment After Heavy Episodic Drinking: Effects of Age and Gender

    PubMed Central

    Mick, Inge; Gross, Cornelius; Lachnit, Andreas; Kalkbrenner, Manja; Hoppe, Linda; Reichert, Jörg; Zimmermann, Ulrich S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: In Germany and many other countries, the number of adolescent heavy episodic drinking–induced hospital admissions (HEDHA) in pediatric units markedly increased during the past decade. A low level of response to alcohol in young adults is associated with high risk for later development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs). Method: We performed a retrospective chart review of all 1,123 HEDHA cases in adolescents aged 11–17 years who were admitted to one of the pediatric inpatient units covering the cities of Dresden, Pirna, and Rostock, Germany, between 2000 and 2008. Blood alcohol concentration (BAC) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) measures on admission were documented in 846 cases. Results: The mean (SD) BAC was 155 (50) mg/100 ml full blood, and M (SD) GCS was 12.21 (3.02). These parameters were negatively correlated with each other (r = -.256, p < .001), indicating more impairment at higher BACs. To describe a numerical estimate of how severely a subject was compromised relative to his BAC, the GCS scores were inverted (making high scores indicate severe impairment) and divided by BAC. The resulting alcohol-induced impairment index (AIII) was significantly influenced by an interaction between age and gender, decreasing with age in boys but increasing in girls. Conclusions: During adolescence, alcohol-induced impairment develops differently in boys and girls, which may be because of the girls’ developmental edge. The high variability of observed AIII might help to predict the risk for later AUDs in the emergency department, simply by measuring BAC and GCS. PMID:25978837

  2. Can Selection of Mechanical Ventilation Mode Prevent Increased Intra-Abdominal Pressure in Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed Central

    Rafiei, Mohammad Reza; Aghadavoudi, Omid; Shekarchi, Babak; Sajjadi, Seyed Sajed; Masoudifar, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) results in dysfunction of vital organs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of mechanical ventilation mode on IAP. Methods: In a cohort study, a total of 60 patients aged 20-70 years who were admitted to the ICU and underwent mechanical ventilation were recruited. Mechanical ventilation included one of the three modes: Biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP) group, synchronize intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV) group, or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) group. For each patient, mechanical ventilation mode and its parameters, blood pressure, SpO2, and status of tube feeding and IAP were recorded. Results: Our findings indicate that the study groups were not significantly different in terms of anthropometric characteristics including age (64.5 ± 4, P = 0.1), gender (male/female 31/29, P = 0.63), and body mass index (24 ± 1.2, P = 0.11). Increase IAP was related to the type of respiratory mode with the more increased IAP observed in SIMV mode, followed by BIPAP and CPAP modes (P = 0.01). There were significant correlations between increased IAP and respiratory variables including respiratory rate, pressure support ventilation, and inspiratory pressure (P < 0.05). Tube feeding tolerance through NG-tube was lower in SIMV group, followed by BIPAP and CPAP groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: There is a significant relationship between respiratory modes and IAP; therefore, it is better to utilize those types of mechanical ventilation like CPAP and BIPAP mode in patients who are prone to Intra-abdominal hypertension. PMID:23930166

  3. Zone refining of plutonium metal

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate zone refining techniques for the purification of plutonium metal. The redistribution of 10 impurity elements from zone melting was examined. Four tantalum boats were loaded with plutonium impurity alloy, placed in a vacuum furnace, heated to 700{degrees}C, and held at temperature for one hour. Ten passes were made with each boat. Metallographic and chemical analyses performed on the plutonium rods showed that, after 10 passes, moderate movement of certain elements were achieved. Molten zone speeds of 1 or 2 inches per hour had no effect on impurity element movement. Likewise, the application of constant or variable power had no effect on impurity movement. The study implies that development of a zone refining process to purify plutonium is feasible. Development of a process will be hampered by two factors: (1) the effect on impurity element redistribution of the oxide layer formed on the exposed surface of the material is not understood, and (2) the tantalum container material is not inert in the presence of plutonium. Cold boat studies are planned, with higher temperature and vacuum levels, to determine the effect on these factors. 5 refs., 1 tab., 5 figs.

  4. Procalcitonin levels in acute exacerbation of COPD admitted in ICU: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Daubin, Cédric; Parienti, Jean-Jacques; Vabret, Astrid; Ramakers, Michel; Fradin, Sabine; Terzi, Nicolas; Freymuth, François; Charbonneau, Pierre; du Cheyron, Damien

    2008-01-01

    Background Antibiotics are recommended for severe acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) admitted to intensive care units (ICU). Serum procalcitonin (PCT) could be a useful tool for selecting patients with a lower probability of developing bacterial infection, but its measurement has not been investigated in this population. Methods We conducted a single center prospective cohort study in consecutive COPD patients admitted to the ICU for AECOPD between September 2005 and September 2006. Sputum samples or tracheal aspirates were tested for the presence of bacteria and viruses. PCT levels were measured at the time of admittance, six hours, and 24 hours using a sensitive immunoassay. Results Thirty nine AECOPD patients were included, 31 of which (79%) required a ventilator support at admission. The median [25%–75% interquartile range] PCT level, assessed in 35/39 patients, was: 0.096 μg/L [IQR, 0.065 to 0.178] at the time of admission, 0.113 μg/L [IQR, 0.074 to 0.548] at six hours, and 0.137 μg/L [IQR, 0.088 to 0.252] at 24 hours. The highest PCT (PCTmax) levels were less than 0.1 μg/L in 14/35 (40%) patients and more than 0.25 μg/L in 10/35 (29%) patients, suggesting low and high probability of bacterial infection, respectively. Five species of bacteria and nine species of viruses were detected in 12/39 (31%) patients. Among the four patients positive for Pseudomonas aeruginosa, one had a PCTmax less than 0.25 μg/L and three had a PCTmax less than 0.1 μg/L. The one patient positive for Haemophilus influenzae had a PCTmax more than 0.25 μg/L. The presence or absence of viruses did not influence PCT at time of admission (0.068 vs 0.098 μg/L respectively, P = 0.80). Conclusion The likelihood of bacterial infection is low among COPD patients admitted to ICU for AECOPD (40% with PCT < 0.1 μg/L) suggesting a possible inappropriate use of antibiotics. Further studies are necessary to assess the impact of a procalcitonin

  5. Association between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety levels of violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hocagil, Hilal; Izci, Filiz; Hocagil, Abdullah Cüneyt; Findikli, Ebru; Korkmaz, Sevda; Koc, Merve Iris

    2016-01-01

    Background Here we aimed to investigate sociodemographic characteristics, psychiatric history, and association between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety levels of violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic. Methods This study consists of 73 violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic who were literate and agreed to participate in the study. A sociodemographic data form created by us to investigate alcohol-substance abuse, suicide attempt, previous history of trauma, self and family history of psychiatric disorders and Beck Anxiety Inventory was given to the patients. Results Of the patients exposed to violence 63% (n=46) were female and 27% (n=27) were male. Of these patients, 68.5% (n=50) were married, 43.8% (n=25) were workers, 34.2% were housewives, 11% were unemployed, and 11% were civil servants. Of the violence-exposed patients, 56.2% (n=41) were primary school, 21.9% (n=16) were high school, and 21.9% (n=16) were university graduates. Smoking and alcohol use rates were 54.8% (n=40) and 17.8% (n=13), respectively. The most common trauma type was assault using physical force with a ratio of 78.1% (n=57). In addition, anxiety scores were high in 42.5% (n=31) and moderate in 9.6% (n=7) of the patients. Mentioned psychiatric disorder was present in 17.8% (n=13) of the patients and 19.2% (n=14) of the patients’ relatives. The correlation between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety scores revealed that married patients had higher anxiety scores (P<0.01) and patients assaulted by their parents had lower anxiety scores (P<0.00). Conclusion A total of 63% of the violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency room were females, 56.2% were primary school graduates, and 43.8% were factory workers; this result shows that low socioeconomical status and education level affect exposure to trauma especially in females. In addition, ~20% of the patients and patients’ relatives had a psychiatric disorder and 53.4% of perpetrators

  6. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine. The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management. The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine. The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to

  7. Predictors of disease severity in patients admitted to a cholera treatment center in urban Haiti.

    PubMed

    Valcin, Claude-Lyne; Severe, Karine; Riche, Claudia T; Anglade, Benedict S; Moise, Colette Guiteau; Woodworth, Michael; Charles, Macarthur; Li, Zhongze; Joseph, Patrice; Pape, Jean W; Wright, Peter F

    2013-10-01

    Cholera, previously unrecognized in Haiti, spread through the country in the fall of 2010. An analysis was performed to understand the epidemiological characteristics, clinical management, and risk factors for disease severity in a population seen at the GHESKIO Cholera Treatment Center in Port-au-Prince. A comprehensive review of the medical records of patients admitted during the period of October 28, 2010-July 10, 2011 was conducted. Disease severity on admission was directly correlated with older age, more prolonged length of stay, and presentation during the two epidemic waves seen in the observation period. Although there was a high seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), severity of cholera was not greater with HIV infection. This study documents the correlation of cholera waves with rainfall and its reduction in settings with improved sanitary conditions and potable water when newly introduced cholera affects all ages equally so that interventions must be directed throughout the population. PMID:24106188

  8. Injury patterns associated with direction of impact: drivers admitted to trauma centers.

    PubMed

    Dischinger, P C; Cushing, B M; Kerns, T J

    1993-09-01

    Clinical data on the nature and severity of injuries was linked with data from police crash reports for 3675 car or truck drivers admitted to trauma centers. Different patterns of injuries were noted for drivers in frontal compared with left lateral collisions. Injuries to the face and lower extremities were significantly greater in frontal collisions; thorax, abdominal, and pelvic injuries were significantly greater in lateral collisions. In addition, drivers in lateral collisions were found to have significantly more multiple injuries to the abdomen and thorax. Despite no difference in mean injury Severity Score, drivers in left lateral collisions had a significantly higher mortality rate; moreover, this increased mortality was not merely a reflection of the increased incidence of lateral collisions among older drivers. In conclusion, information on direction of impact has potential use for clinical decision making, since drivers in lateral collisions have a higher incidence of occult abdominal and thoracic injuries. PMID:8371306

  9. Children with dermatological conditions admitted to paediatric intensive care: analysis of a national clinical audit database.

    PubMed

    George, S M C; Sen, S M; Harrison, D A; McShane, P; Patel, K; Darley, C R

    2016-06-01

    There is little published literature about dermatological conditions in paediatric intensive care units (PICUs). The aim of this study was to describe the range of skin disorders in children admitted to PICUs in the UK and Ireland using data from a national audit. An analysis was conducted using data for 2002 - 2010 from the Paediatric Intensive Care Audit Network (PICANet). In total, 999 admissions of 882 children were identified, representing 0.8% of all PICU admissions. The most frequent dermatological conditions were skin infections, including cellulitis and necrotizing fasciitis, and inflammatory conditions. In 28% of cases, the dermatological diagnosis was considered the reason for PICU admission, in 35% it was a manifestation of systemic disease and in 37% it was considered incidental. Overall mortality was similar to the general PICU population, with 52 deaths (5.2%), but was greater in children with vascular/haematological conditions. PMID:26684929

  10. Patients with methamphetamine psychosis admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Japan. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, A; Sugiyama, A; Kuroki, N; Toda, S; Kato, N; Nakatani, Y; Horita, N; Kaneko, T

    1994-06-01

    To examine the clinical characteristics of methamphetamine (MAP) psychosis in Japan, we evaluated 104 patients with MAP psychosis (80 men and 24 women) admitted to the closed psychiatric units of Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital between 1988 and 1991. There has recently been a steep increase in the number of admissions for MAP psychosis, reflecting the growth of the epidemic of MAP abuse in Japan. Although more than half of the patients were discharged within one month, 16 patients were hospitalized for more than 3 months. Most of the patients showed paranoid psychotic state similar to schizophrenia, consistent with previous reports. Despite the abstinence from MAP and antipsychotic medication, psychotic symptoms tended to persist in some of the patients. The etiological role of MAP psychosis in the development of long-lasting psychotic state was discussed. PMID:8085475

  11. Interior solutions of fluid sphere in f(R,T) gravity admitting conformal killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zubair, M.; Sardar, I. H.; Rahaman, F.; Abbas, G.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the interior solutions of fluid Sphere in f(R,T) gravity admitting conformal killing vectors, where R is Ricci scalar and T is trace of energy momentum tensor. The solutions corresponding to isotropic and anisotropic configurations have been investigated explicitly. Further, the anisotropic case has been dealt by the utilization of linear equation of state. The results for both cases have been interpreted graphically. The equation of state parameter, integration constants and other parameters of the theory have been chosen to find the central density equal to standard value of central density of the compact objects. The energy conditions as well as stability of the solutions have been investigated in the background of f(R,T) gravity.

  12. Prevalence of unrecognized diabetes mellitus in patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdullatef, W K; Al-Aqeedi, R F; Dabdoob, W; Hajar, H A; Bener, A; Gehani, A A

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of unrecognized diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) as determined by elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and random plasma glucose (RPG) levels. This prospective study recruited 583 patients admitted with ACS without previous diagnosis of DM during 1-year period. Glycosylated hemoglobin was checked for most patients especially those with high values of FPG and or RPG. Patients were classified according to their glycemic state into 123 (21.1%) with DM, 82 (14.1%) with prediabetes, and 57(9.8%) with stress hyperglycemia, while 321 (55%) were classified as nondiabetics. Glycosylated hemoglobin estimation in the setting of ACS was helpful in the diagnosis of DM to eliminate the effect of stress-induced hyperglycemia that might accompany this condition. PMID:22550348

  13. Prevalence of Advance Directives Among Older Adults Admitted to Intensive Care Units and Requiring Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Gamertsfelder, Elise M; Seaman, Jennifer Burgher; Tate, Judith; Buddadhumaruk, Praewpannarai; Happ, Mary Beth

    2016-04-01

    Because older adults are at high risk for hospitalization and potential decisional incapacity, advance directives are important components of pre-hospital advanced care planning, as they document individual preferences for future medical care. The prevalence of pre-hospital advance directive completion in 450 critically ill older adults requiring mechanical ventilation from two Mid-Atlantic hospitals is described, and demographic and clinical predictors of pre-hospital advance directive completion are explored. The overall advance directive completion rate was 42.4%, with those in older age groups (75 to 84 years and 85 and older) having approximately two times the odds of completion. No significant differences in the likelihood of advance directive completion were noted by sex, race, or admitting diagnosis. The relatively low prevalence of advance directive completion among older adults with critical illness and high mortality rate (24%) suggest a need for greater awareness and education. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, 42(4), 34-41.]. PMID:26651862

  14. Differences in Psychopathology Between Immigrant and Native Adolescents Admitted to a Psychiatric Inpatient Unit.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Ana; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Inmaculada; Morer, Astrid; Martínez, Esteban; Lázaro, Luisa

    2015-12-01

    It has been postulated that immigrant children are at increased risk of mental health problems. This study examined differences in psychopathology between immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents admitted for the first time to a child and adolescent inpatient psychiatry unit. Participants were 234 adolescents (191 non-immigrants and 43 immigrants). There were significant differences between the two groups in relation to certain stressors: parental separation, family breakdown, being under state custody, physical and/or psychological maltreatment and sexual abuse. Differences between the main diagnoses of the two groups were found in relation to schizophrenia and anorexia nervosa. There are differences between immigrants and natives in terms of diagnosis, and these differences are influenced by ethnicity and stressors. Future studies should seek to identify protective factors in order to prevent mental health disorders in the immigrant population. PMID:25476167

  15. Prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in Patients Admitted with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prosdócimo, Ana Cláudia Giaxa; Lucina, Luciane Boreki; Marcia, Olandoski; Jobs, Priscila Megda João; Schio, Nicolle Amboni; Baldanzi, Fernanda Fachin; Costantini, Costantino Ortiz; Benevides-Pereira, Ana Maria Teresa; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Faria-Neto, José Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Background Burnout Syndrome is the extreme emotional response to chronic occupational stress, manifesting as physical and mental exhaustion. Although associated with higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, no study so far has evaluated whether the Burnout Syndrome could be a prevalent factor in non-elderly individuals active in the labor market, admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Objective To evaluate the prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome in non-elderly, economically active patients, hospitalized with ACS. Methods Cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary and private cardiology center, with economically active patients aged <65 years, hospitalized with diagnosis of ACS. The Burnout Syndrome was evaluated with the Burnout Syndrome Inventory (BSI), which assesses workplace conditions and four dimensions that characterize the syndrome: emotional exhaustion (EE), emotional distancing (EmD), dehumanization (De) and professional fulfillment (PF). The Lipp’s Stress Symptoms Inventory for Adults (LSSI) was applied to evaluate global stress. Results Of 830 patients evaluated with suspected ACS, 170 met the study criteria, 90% of which were men, overall average age was 52 years, and 40.5% had an average income above 11 minimum wages. The prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome was 4.1%. When we evaluated each dimension individually, we found high EE in 34.7%, high De in 52.4%, high EDi in 30.6%, and low PF in 5.9%. The overall prevalence of stress was 87.5%. Conclusion We found a low prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in an economically active, non-elderly population among patients admitted for ACS in a tertiary and private hospital. PMID:25517388

  16. Epidemiology and outcome of severe pneumococcal pneumonia admitted to intensive care unit: a multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) account for a high proportion of ICU admissions, with Streptococcus pneumoniae being the main pathogen responsible for these infections. However, little is known on the clinical features and outcomes of ICU patients with pneumococcal pneumonia. The aims of this study were to provide epidemiological data and to determine risk factors of mortality in patients admitted to ICU for severe S. pneumoniae CAP. Methods We performed a retrospective review of two prospectively-acquired multicentre ICU databases (2001-2008). Patients admitted for management of severe pneumococcal CAP were enrolled if they met the 2001 American Thoracic Society criteria for severe pneumonia, had life-threatening organ failure and had a positive microbiological sample for S. pneumoniae. Patients with bronchitis, aspiration pneumonia or with non-pulmonary pneumococcal infections were excluded. Results Two hundred and twenty two patients were included, with a median SAPS II score reaching 47 [36-64]. Acute respiratory failure (n = 154) and septic shock (n = 54) were their most frequent causes of ICU admission. Septic shock occurred in 170 patients (77%) and mechanical ventilation was required in 186 patients (84%); renal replacement therapy was initiated in 70 patients (32%). Bacteraemia was diagnosed in 101 patients. The prevalence of S. pneumoniae strains with decreased susceptibility to penicillin was 39.7%. Although antibiotherapy was adequate in 92.3% of cases, hospital mortality reached 28.8%. In multivariate analysis, independent risk factors for mortality were age (OR 1.05 (95% CI: 1.02-1.08)), male sex (OR 2.83 (95% CI: 1.16-6.91)) and renal replacement therapy (OR 3.78 (95% CI: 1.71-8.36)). Co-morbidities, macrolide administration, concomitant bacteremia or penicillin susceptibility did not influence outcome. Conclusions In ICU, mortality of pneumococcal CAP remains high despite adequate antimicrobial treatment. Baseline demographic data

  17. Evaluation of Different Methods for Removing Oral Biofilm in Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Maria Sonia; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Mattos, Fernanda Zanol; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Della Vedove; Segundo, Alex Semenoff; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Bandeca, Matheus Coêlho; Porto, Alessandra Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to evaluate the different methods for removing oral biofilm in combination with 0.12% chlorhexidine, in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of the General University Hospital. Materials and Methods: Initially, the patients were included in the study and underwent periodontal evaluation by means of the visible plaque index (VPI) and gingival bleeding index (GBI). The removal of visible biofilm, by a professional, was carried out using a toothbrush and dental floss, followed by the application of a 0.12% chlorhexidine solution. The patients were included in this randomized and controlled study into four groups (total n = 48), as follows: Chlorhexidine and gauze 12/12 h; chlorhexidine and gauze 24/24 h; chlorhexidine and brushing 12/12 h; chlorhexidine and brushing 24/24 h. The patients underwent the biofilm removal protocol for 7 days and then were subjected to a new clinical evaluation as to VPI and GBI. Data analysis was performed through stratification and arrangement of the records, in order to carry out the associations with health indicators used in the study, and the statistical tests used were Kappa and t-test for independent and paired samples. Results: A decrease in the VPI and GBI values when comparing baseline to the final evaluation for all groups was observed. Conclusion: Based on the methodology, it was possible to concluded that chlorhexidine associated with the mechanical action of the toothbrush or gauze in the times 12 h and 24 h in the ICU environment presented the same results as regards amount of visible biofilm. How to cite the article: Oliveira MS, Borges AH, Mattos FZ, Semenoff TA, Segundo AS, Tonetto MR, Bandeca MC, Porto AN. Evaluation of different methods for removing oral biofilm in patients admitted to the intensive care unit. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):61-4. PMID:25083034

  18. Predicting the Length of Stay of Patients Admitted for Intensive Care Using a First Step Analysis

    PubMed Central

    PEREZ, ADRIANA; CHAN, WENYAW; DENNIS, RODOLFO J.

    2006-01-01

    Predicting the Length of Stay of Patients Admitted for Intensive Care Using a First Step Analysis For patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU), the length of stay in different destinations after the first day of ICU admission, has not been systematically studied. We aimed to estimate the average length of stay (LOS) of such patients in Colombia, using a discrete time Markov process. We used the maximum likelihood method and Markov chain modeling to estimate the average LOS in the ICU and at each destination after discharge from intensive care. Six Markov models were estimated, describing the LOS in each one of the Cardiovascular, Neurological, Respiratory, Gastrointestinal, Trauma and Other diagnostic groups from the ultimate primary reason for admission to ICU. Possible destinations were: the intensive care unit, ward in the same hospital, the high dependency unit/intermediate care area in the same hospital, ward in other hospital, intensive care unit in other hospital, other hospital, other location same hospital, discharge from same hospital and death. The stationary property was tested and using a split-sample analysis, we provide indirect evidence about the appropriateness of the Markov property. It is not possible to use a unique Markov chain model for each diagnostic group. The length of stay varies across the ultimate primary reason for admission to intensive care. Although our Markov models shown to be predictive, the fact that current available statistical methods do not allow us to verify the Markov property test is a limitation. Clinicians may be able to provide information about the hospital LOS by diagnostic groups for different hospital destinations. PMID:18059977

  19. Characteristics and mortality of elderly patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a district hospital

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José Carlos Llamas; Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Fonseca, Javier; Santos, Margarita Luque; Jiménez, María de los Ángeles Ruiz-Cabello; Braniff, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study all the elderly patients (≥75 years) who were admitted in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Spanish hospital and identify factors associated with mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective, observational data collected prospectively in patients ≥75 years recruited from the ICU in the period of January 2004 to December 2010. Results: During the study period, 1661 patients were admitted to our unit, of whom 553 (33.3%) were older than 75 years. The mean age was 79.9 years, 317 (57.3%) were male, and the overall in-hospital mortality was 94 patients (17% confidence interval 14–20.3%). When comparing patients who survived to those who died, we found significant differences in mean age (P = 0.001), Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Simplified Acute Physiology Scoring II (SAPS II) on admission (P < 0.0001, postoperative patients (P = 0.001), and need for mechanical ventilation (P < 0.0001). Comparing age groups, we found statistically significant differences in SAPS II (P = 0.007), diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (P = 0.014), complicated postoperative period (P = 0.001), and pacemaker (P = 0.034). Mortality between the groups was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The survival between the group of 65 and 74 years and patients >75 years was not significant (P = 0.1390). Conclusions: The percentage of elderly patients in our unit is high, with low mortality rates. The age itself is not the sole determinant for admission to the ICU and other factors should be taken into account. PMID:27555692

  20. Mortality in Relation to Frailty in Patients Admitted to a Specialized Geriatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, An; Song, Xiaowei; Dong, Jiahui; Mitnitski, Arnold; Liu, Jian; Guo, Zhenhui; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background. In older adults admitted to intensive care units (ICUs), frailty influences prognosis. We examined the relationship between the frailty index (FI) based on deficit accumulation and early and late survival. Methods. Older patients (≥65 years) admitted to a specialized geriatric ICU at the Liuhuaqiao Hospital, Guangzhou, China between July–December 2011 (n = 155; age 82.7±7.1 y; 87.1% men) were followed for 300 days. The FI was calculated as the proportion present of 52 health deficits. FI performance was compared with that of several prognostic scores. Results. The 90-day death rate was 38.7% (n = 60; 27 died within 30 days). The FI score was correlated with the Glasgow Coma Scale, Karnofsky Scale, Palliative Performance Scale, Acute Physiology Score—APACHE II and APACHE IV (r 2 = 0.52 to 0.72, p < 0.001). Patients who died within 30 days had higher mean FI scores (0.41±0.11) than those who survived to 300 days (0.22±0.11; F = 38.91, p < 0.001). Each 1% increase in the FI from the previous level was associated with an 11% increase in the 30-day mortality risk (95% CI: 7%–15%) adjusting for age, sex, and the prognostic scores. The FI discriminated patients who died in 30 days from those who survived with moderately high accuracy (AUC = 0.89±0.03). No one with an FI score >0.46 survived past 90 days. Conclusion. ICU survival was strongly associated with the level of frailty at admission. An FI based on health deficit accumulation may help improve critical care outcome prediction in older adults. PMID:26400736

  1. Paradoxical Association of Smoking With In‐Hospital Mortality Among Patients Admitted With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed F.; Smith, Eric E.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared to those who never smoked, a paradoxical effect of smoking on reducing mortality in patients admitted with myocardial ischemia has been reported. We sought to determine if this effect was present in patients hospitalized with ischemic stroke. Methods and Results Using the local Get with the Guidelines‐Stroke registry, we analyzed 4305 consecutively admitted ischemic stroke patients (March 2002–December 2011). The sample was divided into smokers versus nonsmokers. The main outcome of interest was the overall inpatient mortality. Compared to nonsmokers, tobacco smokers were younger, more frequently male and presented with fewer stroke risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation. Smokers also had a lower average NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and fewer received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Patients in both groups had similar adherence to early antithrombotics, dysphagia screening prior to oral intake, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis. Smoking was associated with lower all‐cause in‐hospital mortality (6.6% versus 12.4%; unadjusted OR 0.46; CI [0.34 to 0.63]; P<0.001). In multivariable analysis, adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, CAD, atrial fibrillation, NIHSS, and tPA, smoking remained independently associated with lower mortality (adjusted OR 0.64; CI [0.42 to 0.96]; P=0.03). Conclusions Similar to myocardial ischemia, smoking was independently associated with lower inpatient mortality in acute ischemic stroke. This effect may be due to tobacco‐induced changes in cerebrovascular vasoreactivity, or may be due in part to residual confounding. Larger, multicenter studies are needed to confirm the finding and the effect on 30‐day and 1‐year mortality. PMID:23782919

  2. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  3. Holdridge life zone physical inconsistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, A., Sr.; Ochoa, A.

    2015-12-01

    Life zones is a very used classification system, developed by L.R. Holdridge in 1967, used to discern why plants have different adaptation mechanism to their surrounding environment. In this paper, the relation between potential evapotranspiration rate (ETr ), anual precipitation (P ) and biotemperature (Tb ) in the Holdridge triangle, is parametrized (P = (500/9)*ETr) to evaluate if the rain process is conserved in Colombia. Further, an adiabatic ascent of air with diurnal and interannual variability, and cluster analysis is view as a classification example of the advantage of using physical process to evaluate the plants adaptation mechanisms . The most inconsistency life zones are situated in the rainiest places of Colombian pacific costs in tropical latitudinal region, are non-exist places in holdridge triangle with annual biotemperature higher than 26◦ C, annual precipitation about 10.000mm and annual potential evapotranspiration rate about 0.1. The difference between Holdridge predicted precipitation and the precipitation measured with TRMM are about 5.000mm in these places. Classification systems based on an annual average, do not stablish adaptation as a function of diurnal variability, for example, the difference between valley sides vegetation could not being determined. This kind of limitations, added to a validation procces and the auscence of a physic procces in the variable interaction, make the Holdridge Life Zones a very useful tool, but physically inconsistent for caracterice vegetation as a function of precipitation. The rain process is very complex, depend of mass and energy exchanges and is still a controversial topic in atmospheric modeling, as a biotic pump.

  4. Factors affecting the discharge destination of hip fracture patients who live alone and have been admitted to an inpatient rehabilitation unit

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Iwai, Midori; Matsuoka, Hiroka; Nakashima, Daiki; Nakamura, Shugo; Kubo, Ayumi; Tomiyama, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] (1) The aim of this study was to examine relations between clinical and functional assessment and discharge destination and (2) to identify the optimal cutoff point for estimating discharge to home after inpatient rehabilitation. [Subjects] The subjects were 54 hip fracture patients (15 males, 39 females; mean age 81.3 ± 7.4 years) living alone. [Methods] The patients were classified into two groups: those discharged to home and those admitted to an institution. Age, gender, side of fracture, fracture type, number of comorbidities, Functional Independence Measure motor score, and Functional Independence Measure cognitive score were compared between groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted with discharge to home as the dependent variable and age, gender, side of fracture, fracture type, number of comorbidities, Functional Independence Measure motor score, and Functional Independence Measure cognitive score as independent variables. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify a cutoff point for classification of the patients into the two groups. [Results] Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the Functional Independence Measure cognitive score was a significant variable affecting the discharge destination. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that discharge to home was predicted accurately by a Functional Independence Measure cognitive score of 23.5. [Conclusion] Information from this study is expected to be useful for determining discharge plans and for the setting of treatment goals. PMID:27190457

  5. Adults with childhood-onset chronic conditions admitted to U.S. pediatric and adult intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Jeffrey D; Vasilevskis, Eduard E; Yoo, Erika J; Houtrow, Amy J; Boscardin, W John; Dudley, R Adams; Okumura, Megumi J

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To compare demographics, intensive care units (ICU) admission characteristics, and ICU outcomes among adults with childhood-onset chronic conditions (COCC) admitted to U.S. pediatric and adult ICUs. Materials and Methods Retrospective cross-sectional analyses of 6,088 adults aged 19–40 years admitted in 2008 to 70 pediatric ICUs that participated in the Virtual Pediatric Intensive Care Unit Performance Systems and 50 adult ICUs that participated in Project IMPACT. Results COCC were present in 53% of young adults admitted to pediatric units, compared to 9% of those in adult units. The most common COCC in both groups were congenital cardiac abnormalities, cerebral palsy, and chromosomal abnormalities. Adults with COCC admitted to pediatric units were significantly more likely to be younger, have lower functional status, and be non-trauma patients than those in adult units. The median ICU length-of-stay was 2 days and the intensive care unit mortality rate was 5% for all COCC patients with no statistical difference between pediatric or adult units. Conclusions There are marked differences in characteristics between young adults with COCC admitted to PICUs and adult ICUs. Barriers to accommodating these young adults may be reasons why many such adults have not transitioned from pediatric to adult critical care. PMID:25466316

  6. Fault damage zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young-Seog; Peacock, David C. P.; Sanderson, David J.

    2004-03-01

    Damage zones show very similar geometries across a wide range of scales and fault types, including strike-slip, normal and thrust faults. We use a geometric classification of damage zones into tip-, wall-, and linking-damage zones, based on their location around faults. These classes can be sub-divided in terms of fault and fracture patterns within the damage zone. A variety of damage zone structures can occur at mode II tips of strike-slip faults, including wing cracks, horsetail fractures, antithetic faults, and synthetic branch faults. Wall damage zones result from the propagation of mode II and mode III fault tips through a rock, or from damage associated with the increase in slip on a fault. Wall damage zone structures include extension fractures, antithetic faults, synthetic faults, and rotated blocks with associated triangular openings. The damage formed at the mode III tips of strike-slip faults (e.g. observed in cliff sections) are classified as wall damage zones, because the damage zone structures are distributed along a fault trace in map view. Mixed-mode tips are likely to show characteristics of both mode II and mode III tips. Linking damage zones are developed at steps between two sub-parallel faults, and the structures developed depend on whether the step is extensional or contractional. Extension fractures and pull-aparts typically develop in extensional steps, whilst solution seams, antithetic faults and synthetic faults commonly develop in contractional steps. Rotated blocks, isolated lenses or strike-slip duplexes may occur in both extensional and contractional steps. Damage zone geometries and structures are strongly controlled by the location around a fault, the slip mode at a fault tip, and by the evolutionary stage of the fault. Although other factors control the nature of damage zones (e.g. lithology, rheology and stress system), the three-dimensional fault geometry and slip mode at each tip must be considered to gain an understanding of

  7. Vadose zone effects on snowmelt generated streamflow

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Processes of evaporation, transpiration and absorption of water within the rood one constitute a secondary control on the amount and timing of snowmelt-generated streamflow. Even in relatively small watersheds the timing and amount of snowmelt inputs to the root zone may be highly variable due to u...

  8. Transient flow conditions in probabilistic wellhead protection: importance and ways to manage spatial and temporal uncertainty in capture zone delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enzenhoefer, R.; Rodriguez-Pretelin, A.; Nowak, W.

    2012-12-01

    "From an engineering standpoint, the quantification of uncertainty is extremely important not only because it allows estimating risk but mostly because it allows taking optimal decisions in an uncertain framework" (Renard, 2007). The most common way to account for uncertainty in the field of subsurface hydrology and wellhead protection is to randomize spatial parameters, e.g. the log-hydraulic conductivity or porosity. This enables water managers to take robust decisions in delineating wellhead protection zones with rationally chosen safety margins in the spirit of probabilistic risk management. Probabilistic wellhead protection zones are commonly based on steady-state flow fields. However, several past studies showed that transient flow conditions may substantially influence the shape and extent of catchments. Therefore, we believe they should be accounted for in the probabilistic assessment and in the delineation process. The aim of our work is to show the significance of flow transients and to investigate the interplay between spatial uncertainty and flow transients in wellhead protection zone delineation. To this end, we advance our concept of probabilistic capture zone delineation (Enzenhoefer et al., 2012) that works with capture probabilities and other probabilistic criteria for delineation. The extended framework is able to evaluate the time fraction that any point on a map falls within a capture zone. In short, we separate capture probabilities into spatial/statistical and time-related frequencies. This will provide water managers additional information on how to manage a well catchment in the light of possible hazard conditions close to the capture boundary under uncertain and time-variable flow conditions. In order to save computational costs, we take advantage of super-positioned flow components with time-variable coefficients. We assume an instantaneous development of steady-state flow conditions after each temporal change in driving forces, following

  9. Glucose Variability

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The proposed contribution of glucose variability to the development of the complications of diabetes beyond that of glycemic exposure is supported by reports that oxidative stress, the putative mediator of such complications, is greater for intermittent as opposed to sustained hyperglycemia. Variability of glycemia in ambulatory conditions defined as the deviation from steady state is a phenomenon of normal physiology. Comprehensive recording of glycemia is required for the generation of any measurement of glucose variability. To avoid distortion of variability to that of glycemic exposure, its calculation should be devoid of a time component. PMID:23613565

  10. Clinical profile and outcomes of women admitted to a psychiatric mother-baby unit.

    PubMed

    Christl, Bettina; Reilly, Nicole; Yin, Carolyn; Austin, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the clinical profile of women admitted to a psychiatric mother-baby unit as well as change in their clinical, parenting, attachment and quality of life outcomes. Data was collected from 191 mothers through self-report measures at admission and discharge. Change was analysed in terms of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score, parenting confidence, maternal attachment to the infant and overall functioning. Psychosocial factors impacting on symptom severity and recovery were examined. Most women (64.8 %) were admitted in the first 3 months after birth with an ICD-10 unipolar depressive episode (52.3 %) or anxiety disorder (25.7 %), and 47.6 % had comorbid diagnoses. Improvement from admission to discharge was seen with large effect sizes (≥one standard deviation, i.e. μ) in terms of clinical symptoms (EPDS, μ = 1.7), parenting confidence (Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale (KPCS), μ = 1.1) and attachment to their infant (Maternal Postpartum Attachment Scale (MPAS), μ = 0.9) as well as overall level of functioning (SF-14, μ = 1.9). The majority (73.3 %) recovered symptomatically, and this was associated with increasing maternal age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.129, p = 0.002) and lower levels of psychosocial risk at admission (OR = 0.963, p = 0.008). Improvement in parenting confidence was associated with increasing maternal age (OR = 1.17, p = 0.003). No predictive factors were found for improvement in maternal attachment after controlling for admission scores. In the short term, joint admission of mothers with their infants is highly beneficial in terms of clinical, functional and parenting outcomes, but follow up studies are needed to assess the longer term benefits for mother-infant dyads. The use of an observational tool to enhance our assessment of maternal-infant interaction and some measure of maternal emotional dysregulation-both important mediators of development of secure infant

  11. Causality of injury and outcome in patients admitted in a major trauma center in North India

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Devarshi; Meena, Sanjay; Sharma, Vineet; Singh, Girish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Context: Trauma in South Asia is an increasingly significant problem, particularly in light of increasing motorization. Societal changes are resulting in alterations in the epidemiology of trauma. Aims: To assess various epidemiological parameters that influence causation of injury in the patients admitted in a major trauma center in Northern India. Settings and Design: Prospective, cross-sectional, Hospital based study from August 2008 to July 2009. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of 748 patients chosen by random assortment was carried out over a period of 1 year (August 2008 to July 2009) and following parameters were noted: Age group, sex, mode of trauma, type of injury, place where the trauma occurred and factors leading to injury. The length of stay of patients, Kampala trauma score (KTS) and mortality depending on the arrival time in emergency department was also noted. Statistical Analysis: Data analysis was performed using SPSS Version 16. Results: Overall trauma was most common in the age group 15-30 years (Mean age: 29.43 ± 16.87 years), with male constituting 85.29% of the total patients. It was observed that road side injuries were the most frequent (66.71%) site of injuries, whereas household injuries (23.66%), farm site (6.28%), work place (1.60) were the next most common modes of trauma. Mean time of presentation of injured patient was 2.53 ± 4.92 days. About 48.13% patients were admitted after more than 24 h after the injury. Two wheelers (32.09) were found to be the most common mode of injury. Maximum injuries (65.31%) occurred in the rural setting. The overall length of hospital stay ranged from 2 days to 178 days (median15.6 days). Mortality is more in patients who arrive in night (between 9 pm and 5 pm). Conclusions: We conclude that the majority of injuries are preventable and the epidemiological trends differ from that of developed countries. Therefore, preventive strategies should be made on the basis of these epidemiological

  12. Some Aspects of the Physical Variability of the Caribbean Sea Relevant to Regional Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooers, C. N.

    2001-12-01

    The Caribbean Sea is the least studied portion of the Intra-Americas Sea (IAS), which is the combined Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, Straits of Florida, and the adjacent western North Atlantic. The upstream elements of the Gulf Stream System are the dominant features of the upper ocean circulation in the Caribbean Sea. The Trade Winds superimpose a coastal upwelling regime along the northern coast of South America and a coastal downwelling regime along the southern coasts of Cuba and Hispaniola. The inflow from the Atlantic through several Antillean passages is derived from tropical and subtropical sources and is relatively weak, shallow, and variable; the outflow to the Gulf of Mexico through the Yucatan Channel is relatively strong, deep, and variable. The variability includes mesoscale eddies and meanders as well as the seasonal cycle and year-to-year variability; it also includes lengthy plumes from the Orinoco and other rivers and lengthy filaments from coastal upwelling centers. Some of the mesoscale variability originates in the Eastern Caribbean; other components originate in the Western Caribbean, especially in the cyclonic Panama-Colombia Gyre. The upper ocean of the Caribbean Sea is not only under the influence of the Trade Winds and their seasonal and longer term variability but also two other, not mutually exclusive, sources of variability: the seasonal heating and precipitation cycles on one hand, and synoptic scale and mesoscale phenomena on the other hand. For example, there are wet and dry seasons, and the Eastern Caribbean is typically dry and the Western Caribbean typically wet, with a heavy rainfall zone off the coast of Central America. And the patterns of atmospheric deep convection and subsidence apparently account for the summertime intensification of an extensive "warm pool" concentrated in the Northwestern Caribbean, which is exported to the Gulf of Mexico. As another example, the weekly Tropical Easterly Waves (TEWs) are the predominant

  13. Prevalence of MRSA Nasal Carriage in Patients Admitted to a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkader, Jasmine Kulapurathu; Sugumar, Madhan; Rajagopal, Girija Kalarikkal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infections with MRSA, both community and hospital acquired, are well established and the source of infection is often a carrier. There are very few studies showing the magnitude of MRSA nasal colonization among healthy persons from the community. This study was conducted to detect the prevalence of MRSA nasal carriage in patients who did not have any known risk factors associated with HA- MRSA colonization, admitted to a tertiary care centre in Kerala. Materials and Methods Nasal swabs were collected from patients within 24 hours of admission. Specimen were inoculated on chromogenic agar (HiCrome MeReSa agar-HiMedia) for MRSA screening. Isolates were then subjected to antibiotic sensitivity tests, SCCmec typing and PVL gene detection. Results Out of 683 patients, 16 carried MRSA in their nares (2.3%). Of the 16 strains 13 (81.25 %) strain were SCCmec type III and one belonged to SCCmec type IV (6.25 %). Two strains failed to amplify SCCmec genes. Three strains carried genes for PVL toxin (18.75%). Conclusion With a better understanding of the complex epidemiology of MRSA it is increasingly apparent that demarcations between the HA and CA phenotypes are not as clear cut as previously thought. In this study of nasal carriage of MRSA in the community we have demonstrated prevalence consistent with published data. Most isolates however were shown to belong to the type conventionally assigned to HA-MRSA. PMID:27042461

  14. Inhaler technique: facts and fantasies. A view from the Aerosol Drug Management Improvement Team (ADMIT)

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Mark L; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Barnes, P J; Broeders, M; Corrigan, C J; Chawes, B L; Corbetta, L; Dubus, J C; Hausen, Th; Lavorini, F; Roche, N; Sanchis, J; Usmani, Omar S; Viejo, J; Vincken, W; Voshaar, Th; Crompton, G K; Pedersen, Soren

    2016-01-01

    Health professionals tasked with advising patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) how to use inhaler devices properly and what to do about unwanted effects will be aware of a variety of commonly held precepts. The evidence for many of these is, however, lacking or old and therefore in need of re-examination. Few would disagree that facilitating and encouraging regular and proper use of inhaler devices for the treatment of asthma and COPD is critical for successful outcomes. It seems logical that the abandonment of unnecessary or ill-founded practices forms an integral part of this process: the use of inhalers is bewildering enough, particularly with regular introduction of new drugs, devices and ancillary equipment, without unnecessary and pointless adages. We review the evidence, or lack thereof, underlying ten items of inhaler ‘lore’ commonly passed on by health professionals to each other and thence to patients. The exercise is intended as a pragmatic, evidence-informed review by a group of clinicians with appropriate experience. It is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the literature; rather, we aim to stimulate debate, and to encourage researchers to challenge some of these ideas and to provide new, updated evidence on which to base relevant, meaningful advice in the future. The discussion on each item is followed by a formal, expert opinion by members of the ADMIT Working Group. PMID:27098045

  15. Treatment of patients with immune thrombocytopenia admitted to the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Bavunoğlu, Işıl; Eşkazan, Ahmet Emre; Ar, Muhlis Cem; Cengiz, Mahir; Yavuzer, Serap; Salihoğlu, Ayşe; Öngören, Şeniz; Tunçkale, Aydın; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-08-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most frequent cause of acquired thrombocytopenia. In adult ITP patients, corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) are used as first-line treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate retrospectively the demographic and etiologic characteristics of patients with ITP admitted to the emergency room at our hospital. Seventy-five adult patients with ITP were included, and demographic data, bleeding characteristics, etiologic features and responses to treatments were evaluated retrospectively. Fifty-six patients (75 %) were female, and the median age was 43 years. Eighteen patients had a history of ITP, whereas in 57, thrombocytopenia was identified for the first time. During admission, the median platelet count was 5 × 10(9)/L. Cutaneous and/or mucosal bleeding was the most common clinical feature. High-dose dexamethasone was administered in 60 episodes, whereas IVIg and conventional-dose methylprednisolone were used in nine and six episodes, respectively. The overall response rate of the entire cohort following first-line treatments was 67 %, and complete remission was achieved in 31 patients, 19 patients achieved partial remission, and 25 patients were non-responders. In cases with life-threatening bleeding, concomitant infection, post-traumatic bleeding and need for emergency surgery, IVIg can be used as the first line of treatment option in addition to platelet transfusions. PMID:27129318

  16. The morbidity of Guillain-Barré syndrome admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Henderson, R D; Lawn, N D; Fletcher, D D; McClelland, R L; Wijdicks, E F M

    2003-01-14

    Patients with severe forms of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) require intensive care. Specific treatment, catheterization, and devices may increase morbidity in the intensive care unit (ICU). To understand the spectrum of morbidity associated with ICU care, the authors studied 114 patients with GBS. Major morbidity occurred in 60% of patients. Complications were uncommon if ICU stay was less than 3 weeks. Respiratory complications such as pneumonia and tracheobronchitis occurred in half of the patients and were linked to mechanical ventilation. Systemic infection occurred in one-fifth of patients and was more frequent with increasing duration of ICU admission. Direct complications of treatment and invasive procedures occurred infrequently. Life-threatening complications such as gastrointestinal bleeding and pulmonary embolism were very uncommon. Pulmonary morbidity predominates in patients with severe GBS admitted to the ICU. Attention to management of mechanical ventilation and weaning is important to minimize this complication of GBS. Other causes of morbidity in a tertiary center ICU are uncommon. PMID:12530364

  17. Factors Associated with Acute Malnutrition among Children Admitted to a Diarrhoea Treatment Facility in Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, Connor; Sultana, Tania; Ahmed, Tahmeed; Iqbal Hossain, M.

    2014-01-01

    To assess the risk factors for acute malnutrition (weight-for-height z-score (WHZ) < −2), a case-control study was conducted during June–September 2012 in 449 children aged 6–59 months (178 with WHZ < −2 and 271 comparing children with WHZ ≥ −2 and no edema) admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of icddr,b in Bangladesh. The overall mean ± SD age was 12.0 ± 7.6 months, 38.5% (no difference between case and controls). The mean ± SD WHZ of cases and controls was −3.24 ± 1.01 versus −0.74 ± 0.95 (P < 0.001), respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that children with acute malnutrition were more likely than controls to be older (age > 1 year) (adjusted OR (AOR): 3.1, P = 0.004); have an undernourished mother (body mass index < 18.5), (AOR: 2.8, P = 0.017); have a father with no or a low-paying job (AOR: 5.8, P < 0.001); come from a family having a monthly income of <10,000 taka, (1 US$ = 80 taka) (AOR: 2.9, P = 0.008); and often have stopped predominant breastfeeding before 4 months of age (AOR: 2.7, P = 0.013). Improved understanding of these characteristics enables the design and targeting of preventive-intervention programs of childhood acute malnutrition. PMID:24734048

  18. A two-year experience with premedical postbaccalaureate students admitted to medical school.

    PubMed

    Smith, S R

    1991-01-01

    To determine how well premedical postbaccalaureate students performed in and adjusted to medical school, the author examined the records for all 123 matriculants to the Brown University Program in Medicine in 1987-88 and 1988-89 and sent each student a questionnaire. More than one-third of the first-year students admitted to Brown were from premedical postbaccalaureate programs (that is, they had taken the traditional premedical course requirements after graduating from college). The postbaccalaureate students were older than the rest of their classmates, on average, and were more likely to have been non-science majors in college. Academic performances over the first two years were comparable in the two groups, and there was no significant difference between the groups in their self-reports of adequacy of preparation or involvement in extracurricular activities. The author concludes that, faced with a smaller applicant pool, medical schools may wish to consider premedical postbaccalaureate students as a valuable resource. PMID:1985680

  19. A prospective study of suicidal burns admitted to the Harare burns unit.

    PubMed

    Mzezewa, S; Jonsson, K; Aberg, M; Salemark, L

    2000-08-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain prospective information on suicidal (attempted suicide) burns patients admitted to the Harare burns unit during 1995-1998. Forty-seven patients, 42 females (89%) and five males (11%), evenly distributed throughout the period of study, were included. The median age was 25 years, range 13 to 50 years. Thirty were housewives (64%). Women married according to customary law were the group most at risk. All patients were burnt by flame after dousing themselves with paraffin or petrol. Conflict in love relationships was the most common circumstance leading to attempted suicide. The median Total Body Surface Area (TBSA) burnt was 60%, range 10-90%, for all patients, 25%, range 10-40%, for those who survived and 65%, range 20-95%, for those who died. Surgery was performed on 16 patients (34%). Mortality was 68%. The overall median hospital stay for all patients was 10 days, range 0-322 days, and 5 days, range 0-322 days, for those who died. PMID:10812268

  20. Acceptance of NCPAP in a sample of patients admitted for geriatric rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective Sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) is common in older people. Nasal continuous airway pressure (NCPAP) therapy is the treatment of choice for sleep apnea, but is not always accepted by patients. The rate of successful initiation of NCPAP is unknown in geriatric patients. Methods All patients admitted for geriatric rehabilitation were considered for sleep studies. Sleep apnea was assessed using an Edentrace (Nellcor, Hayward, CA) multi-channel recording system. SAS was defined as an apnea-hypopnea-index (AHI) of more than five events per hour plus excessive daytime sleepiness, or an AHI of more than fifteen events per hour regardless of reported sleepiness. Disability was assessed using the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. Results Two hundred sixty nine of 322 consecutive patients (84%) had adequate sleep studies and gave informed consent. SAS was found in 169 subjects (68%). There was no gender difference in the prevalence of SAS. Six subjects (4%) accepted NCPAP therapy. Individuals who accepted NCPAP were younger and less disabled (p < 0.03). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed disability as the only significant factor predicting NCPAP acceptance. Conclusion NCPAP should not be withheld in the elderly. However, initiation of treatment for SAS remains to be a great challenge in those patients. Geriatric assessment procedures may help better manage older subjects with sleep apnea syndrome. PMID:20156732

  1. Inhaler technique: facts and fantasies. A view from the Aerosol Drug Management Improvement Team (ADMIT).

    PubMed

    Levy, Mark L; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Barnes, P J; Broeders, M; Corrigan, C J; Chawes, B L; Corbetta, L; Dubus, J C; Hausen, Th; Lavorini, F; Roche, N; Sanchis, J; Usmani, Omar S; Viejo, J; Vincken, W; Voshaar, Th; Crompton, G K; Pedersen, Soren

    2016-01-01

    Health professionals tasked with advising patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) how to use inhaler devices properly and what to do about unwanted effects will be aware of a variety of commonly held precepts. The evidence for many of these is, however, lacking or old and therefore in need of re-examination. Few would disagree that facilitating and encouraging regular and proper use of inhaler devices for the treatment of asthma and COPD is critical for successful outcomes. It seems logical that the abandonment of unnecessary or ill-founded practices forms an integral part of this process: the use of inhalers is bewildering enough, particularly with regular introduction of new drugs, devices and ancillary equipment, without unnecessary and pointless adages. We review the evidence, or lack thereof, underlying ten items of inhaler 'lore' commonly passed on by health professionals to each other and thence to patients. The exercise is intended as a pragmatic, evidence-informed review by a group of clinicians with appropriate experience. It is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the literature; rather, we aim to stimulate debate, and to encourage researchers to challenge some of these ideas and to provide new, updated evidence on which to base relevant, meaningful advice in the future. The discussion on each item is followed by a formal, expert opinion by members of the ADMIT Working Group. PMID:27098045

  2. Chlamydiaceae in North Atlantic Seabirds Admitted to a Wildlife Rescue Center in Western France.

    PubMed

    Aaziz, R; Gourlay, P; Vorimore, F; Sachse, K; Siarkou, V I; Laroucau, K

    2015-07-01

    Birds are the primary hosts of Chlamydia psittaci, a bacterium that can cause avian chlamydiosis in birds and psittacosis in humans. Wild seabirds are frequently admitted to wildlife rescue centers (WRC) at European Atlantic coasts, for example, in connection with oil spills. To investigate the extent of chlamydial shedding by these birds and the resulting risk for animals in care and the medical staff, seabirds from a French WRC were sampled from May 2011 to January 2014. By use of a quantitative PCR (qPCR), 195 seabirds belonging to 4 orders, 5 families and 13 species were examined, of which 18.5% proved to be Chlamydiaceae positive. The highest prevalence of shedders was found in northern gannets (Morus bassanus) (41%), followed by European herring gulls (Larus argentatus) (14%) and common murres (Uria aalge) (7%). Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of qPCR-positive northern gannet samples revealed two variants of a strain closely related to C. psittaci. In European herring gulls and in one common murre, strains showing high sequence similarity to the atypical Chlamydiaceae-like C122 previously found in gulls were detected. Our study shows that seabirds from the northeastern Atlantic Ocean carry several chlamydial organisms, including C. psittaci-related strains. The staff in WRCs should take protective measures, particularly in the case of mass admissions of seabirds. PMID:25934619

  3. [Disease models and change in attitude of involuntarily admitted schizophrenic patients].

    PubMed

    Ullrich, J; Ulmar, G; Starzinski, T

    1995-12-01

    The attitude to illness and therapy of 28 involuntary and 31 voluntary patients admitted to a state psychiatric hospital was investigated by means of a questionnaire at the time of admission and prior to discharge. Involuntary patients have less illness consciousness, and only 17.9% of them but 67.7% of the voluntary patients show insight into their illness; they favour a medical-somatic model of illness and express less positive therapy expectations. Their whole attitude proves to be dysfunctional concerning compliance with medical treatment. Attitudes of involuntary patients changed during the hospital stay and became similar to those of voluntary patients, which hardly changed. This attitudinal change extended to illness consciousness, insight into illness and therapy expectations, whereas models of illness were found to be very stable. One third of the involuntary patients stayed in hospital voluntarily for further treatment. It is discussed that patients attitudes to illness and therapy should be taken more often into consideration and integrated into the planning of therapy. PMID:8586351

  4. Profile of injury cases admitted to a tertiary level hospital in south India.

    PubMed

    Uthkarsh, Pallavi Sarji; Suryanarayana, S P; Gautham, M S; Shivraj, N S; Murthy, N S; Pruthvish, S

    2012-01-01

    Injuries now rank among the leading causes of morbidity and mortality the world over. Injuries are steadily increasing in developing countries like India. Systematic and scientific efforts in injury prevention and control are yet to begin in India. Data on injuries are very essential to plan preventive and control measures. The objective of this study is to know the profile of the injury cases admitted to M S Ramaiah hospital, Bangalore, India, using a cross-sectional study design for six months, i.e. from Oct 2008 to April 2009. The mean age of the study population was 35.3 years (SD = 15.38), 69.1% were injured in road traffic accidents (RTA), 28.7% due to falls and 2.2% due to burns. Nearly 14.4% were under the influence of alcohol. Nearly 73.6% of RTA cases were two-wheeler users, 48.5% had not followed sign boards and 56.5% had not obeyed the one-way rules, 63.5% of the two-wheeler users did not use helmets. Also, 38% of two wheelers had two pillion riders, whereas 57% of four-wheeler users had not used a seat belt. Among falls, 58% occurred at home, 49% occurred due to slippery surface. Road traffic accidents were the most common cause for injuries, in which two wheelers were most commonly involved. Strict enforcement of traffic rules and education on road safety are very essential to prevent injuries. PMID:21812707

  5. Morbidity and mortality of reptiles admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia, 1991 to 2000.

    PubMed

    Brown, Justin D; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2002-10-01

    Medical records from 694 reptiles admitted to the Wildlife Center of Virginia (WCV; Waynesboro, Virginia, USA) from 1991 to 2000 were reviewed to determine causes of morbidity and mortality. Eighteen species were represented but the majority of cases were four species; eastern box turtle (Terrapene carolina) (66%), eastern painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) (11%), common snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) (10%), and rat snake (Elaphe sp.) (6%). There was a significant increase in reptile cases during the study period both in absolute number and in proportion to the total caseload. Trauma (74%) was the most frequent cause of morbidity and mortality followed by unknown or undetermined (13%), aural abscessation (7%), infectious diseases (2%), and one nutritional disorder (0.1%). In addition, 3% of the cases were healthy animals that had been removed from the wild and consequently brought to the WCV. Causes of morbidity and mortality differed between the four most numerous species. Impact with a motor vehicle was the most frequent cause of trauma for eastern box turtles, eastern painted turtles, and common snapping turtles; however, garden-equipment-related trauma was the most frequent cause for rat snakes. Aural abscessation was only seen in eastern box turtles. Eighty percent of cases occurred between May and September and 65% occurred within the five counties closest to the WCV. The majority of morbidity and mortality was the result of human activities. The expanding human population in Virginia likely will continue to have an impact on the health of wild reptiles. PMID:12528435

  6. Assessment of the sexually abused female children admitted to a tertiary care hospital: Eight year experience

    PubMed Central

    Mollamahmutoglu, Leyla; Uzunlar, Ozlem; Kahyaoglu, Inci; Ozyer, Sebnem; Besli, Mustafa; Karaca, Mujdegul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the medical, social and legal characteristics of the child sexual abuse and to provide a perspective for gynecologists on this topic. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out of the medicolegal records of female children below the age of 18 referred to a tertiary teaching hospital and diagnosed as being exposed to sexual abuse within the family between the years of 2004 to 2012. Results: One hundred and thirty-nine cases were diagnosed as being exposed to sexual abuse during the 8 year period, 23 of them (16.5%) had been involved in sexual abuse within the family. Eleven out of 23 had been admitted as part of a legal process while the rest were reported by a third person. Conclusion: Since sexual abuse within the family is a taboo in Islamic societies, the diagnosis can take a long time. Recognition of sexually abused children, providing early performance of medicolegal examinations, and applying standardized medical guidelines are essential to protect these children. PMID:25225535

  7. Chlamydiaceae in North Atlantic Seabirds Admitted to a Wildlife Rescue Center in Western France

    PubMed Central

    Aaziz, R.; Gourlay, P.; Vorimore, F.; Sachse, K.; Siarkou, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    Birds are the primary hosts of Chlamydia psittaci, a bacterium that can cause avian chlamydiosis in birds and psittacosis in humans. Wild seabirds are frequently admitted to wildlife rescue centers (WRC) at European Atlantic coasts, for example, in connection with oil spills. To investigate the extent of chlamydial shedding by these birds and the resulting risk for animals in care and the medical staff, seabirds from a French WRC were sampled from May 2011 to January 2014. By use of a quantitative PCR (qPCR), 195 seabirds belonging to 4 orders, 5 families and 13 species were examined, of which 18.5% proved to be Chlamydiaceae positive. The highest prevalence of shedders was found in northern gannets (Morus bassanus) (41%), followed by European herring gulls (Larus argentatus) (14%) and common murres (Uria aalge) (7%). Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of qPCR-positive northern gannet samples revealed two variants of a strain closely related to C. psittaci. In European herring gulls and in one common murre, strains showing high sequence similarity to the atypical Chlamydiaceae-like C122 previously found in gulls were detected. Our study shows that seabirds from the northeastern Atlantic Ocean carry several chlamydial organisms, including C. psittaci-related strains. The staff in WRCs should take protective measures, particularly in the case of mass admissions of seabirds. PMID:25934619

  8. [An elderly man with known heart failure admitted with cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Fagerheim, Anne Kristine; Hardersen, Randolf; Nielsen, Erik Waage

    2010-07-01

    A 75-year-old man with post-MI heart failure and an ejection fraction of 15 % was treated with an ACE-inhibitor, spironolactone and a beta-blocker. He had reduced his intake of food and water due to an intercurrent illness the days before admission. He was admitted to our coronary care unit due to bradycardia and hypotension. On arrival his blood pressure was 60/40 mm Hg, and he was in a cardiogenic shock. The electrocardiogram showed broad QRS-complexes and large T waves. Serum-potassium was 9.1 mmol/L and he had acute renal failure with oliguria, probably caused by reduced cardiac output due to hypovolemia combined with taking an ACE inhibitor and spironolactone. Haemodialysis was started and during dialysis QRS complexes became more narrow and heart rate and blood pressure normalized. The patient was discharged 10 days later with normal potassium and creatinine levels. Patients treated with ACE-inhibitors and spironolactone should be monitored closely. During intercurrent illness dehydration may occur and this can lead to renal failure and hyperkalemia which can be life-threatening. The condition should be recognized and addressed promptly, and if indicated haemodialysis should be performed. PMID:20596117

  9. Knowledge of Common Problems of Newborn Among Primi Mothers Admitted in a Selected Hospital for Safe Confinement

    PubMed Central

    Leena, K. C.; Koshy, Deepthi A.; Thankachen, Denna; Thomas, Deepa; Varghese, Deepa R.; Fernandes, Delcy S.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Among the almost 3.9 million newborn deaths that occur worldwide, about 30% occur in India. Children are our future and utmost precious resources. After birth the health of the child depends upon the health care practice adopted by the family, especially by the mothers. Information about neonatal problems and newborn care practices will help in reducing mortality and morbidity during the neonatal period. This study was conducted to identify the knowledge of primi mothers with regard to the common problems of normal neonates. Materials and Methods: This descriptive study was carried out among the mothers of neonates in the Maternity Unit of a Medical College Hospital in Mangalore. A pretested structured knowledge questionnaire was used to collect information from 60 primi mothers, who were admitted for safe confinement for a one-month period. Results: The findings of the study show that the majority, that is, 27 (45%) of the primi mothers had a good knowledge of all the areas such as vomiting, regurgitation, diaper rash, umbilical cord infection, fever, constipation, and diarrhea. About 20 (33.3%) had very good knowledge and about 13 (21.67%) had an average level of knowledge on the common problems of newborns. Knowledge about vomiting was average among 34 (56.67%), poor in 21 (35%), and good in five (8.33%). Knowledge about diaper rash was average among 36 (60%), good among 21 (35%), and poor among three (5%). Knowledge on umbilical cord infection was average in 29 (48.33%), good in 27 (45%), and poor in 4 (6.67%). Knowledge on fever was good in 38 (63.33%), average in 19 (31.66%), and poor in three (5%). Knowledge on constipation and diarrhea were average in 38 (63.34%), good in 11 (18.33%), and poor in 11 (18.33%). No association was found between the knowledge of primi mothers and selected baseline variables, such as, age, education, religion, occupation, type of family or area of dwelling. Conclusion: The study concludes that there is a need to

  10. Spatial and temporal variability of rock fall in a (peri)glacial environment: a LiDAR-based, multi-year investigation of rock fall release zones and volumes, Kitzsteinhorn, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delleske, Robert; Hartmeyer, Ingo; Keuschnig, Markus; Götz, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    October). All scans (n = 41) were conducted using a RIEGL LMS-Z620. The resulting spatial resolution varies between 0.1 and 0.5 m and object distance (i.e. distance between scanner and rock face) ranges from 250 to 500 m. Post-processing of TLS data enabled to precisely identify rock fall release zones, rock fall volumes and surface changes of the Schmiedingerkees glacier (lowering rate of approximately 1.5 m per year). Since 2011 a total number of nine rock fall events with a volume exceeding 100 m³ have been recorded - with the largest reaching a volume of approx. 500 m³. All were triggered from areas that have been exposed by the retreating Schmiedingerkees glacier over the last 1-2 decades. Thus, glacial debuttressing and subsequent exposure to atmospheric influences might be considered as the dominant destabilizing factors. Temporal clustering of rock fall events over the first three seasons (2011 to 2013) tentatively indicates a bimodal occurrence pattern with a first maximum during snowmelt (May/June) and a second distinct peak during the warmest period of the year (August).

  11. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiling of imipenem in patients admitted to an intensive care unit in India: A nonrandomized, cross-sectional, analytical, open-labeled study

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, B.; Tripathi, Chakra Dhar; Gogia, Anoop Raj; Meshram, Girish Gulab; Kumar, Manu; Suraj, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Widespread use of imipenem in intensive care units (ICUs) in India has led to the development of numerous carbapenemase-producing strains of pathogens. The altered pathophysiological state in critically ill patients could lead to subtherapeutic antibiotic levels. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the variability in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of imipenem in critically ill patients admitted to an ICU in India. Materials and Methods: Plasma concentration of imipenem was determined in critically ill patients using high performance liquid chromatography, at different time points, by grouping them according to their locus of infection. The elimination half-life (t΍) and volume of distribution (Vd) values were also computed. The patients with imipenem trough concentration values below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and 5 times the MIC for the isolated pathogen were determined. Results: The difference in the plasma imipenem concentration between the gastrointestinal and the nongastrointestinal groups was significant at 2 h (P = 0.015) following drug dosing; while the difference was significant between the skin/cellulitis and nonskin/cellulitus groups at 2 h (P = 0.008), after drug dosing. The imipenem levels were above the MIC and 5 times the MIC for the isolated organism in 96.67% and 50% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The pharmacokinetic profile of imipenem does not vary according to the locus of an infection in critically ill patients. Imipenem, 3 g/day intermittent dosing, maintains a plasma concentration which is adequate to treat most infections encountered in patients admitted to an ICU. However, a change in the dosing regimen is suggested for patients infected with organisms having MIC values above 4 mg/L. PMID:26628823

  12. Simulation of high-resolution x-ray zone plates.

    PubMed

    Kurokhtin, Alexei N; Popov, Alexei V

    2002-02-01

    A full-wave approach to quantitative characterization of x-ray zone plate lenses is proposed. Distributed focusing efficiency eta(z) of a multifocus optical element is defined as the energy flux through the Airy disk of a reference perfect lens with variable focal length z. Maxima of this function characterize diffraction efficiencies and spatial resolution of the zone plate foci. The parabolic wave equation is used to take into account diffraction effects inside the optical element. Rough and fuzzy interface models are introduced to describe realistic zone profiles. Numerical simulation reveals the limited capability of zone width reduction to improve the zone plate imaging performance. The possibilities of second-order focus enhancement by optimization of the zone plate thickness, line-to-space ratio, and zone tilt are studied numerically. PMID:11822594

  13. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  14. Beyond Admission: Understanding Pre-College Variables and the Success of At-Risk Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mattson, Christopher Erik

    2007-01-01

    This study examined pre-college variables from an admission-office perspective and the ability of these variables to predict college grade point average (GPA) for students specially admitted into an academic support program for at-risk students. The research was conducted at a private, highly-selective, research university in the southwest United…

  15. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A resistance heated zoner, suitable for early zoning experiments with silicon, was designed and put into operation. The initial power usage and size was designed for an shown to be compatible with payload carriers contemplated for the Shuttle. This equipment will be used in the definition and development of flight experiments and apparatus for float zoning silicon and other materials in microgravity.

  16. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  17. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  18. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  19. 37 CFR 1.91 - Models or exhibits not generally admitted as part of application or patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Models or exhibits not generally admitted as part of application or patent. 1.91 Section 1.91 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions...

  20. 37 CFR 1.91 - Models or exhibits not generally admitted as part of application or patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Models or exhibits not generally admitted as part of application or patent. 1.91 Section 1.91 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions...

  1. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Elderly Patients Admitted to an Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit in Tropical Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Neo, Jong J.; Kong, Keng H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Data on hypovitaminosis D in elderly patients admitted to rehabilitation units in tropical countries are scarce. Objective. To assess the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its associated risk factors in elderly patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit in tropical Singapore. Methods. Prospective, cohort study of 134 subjects ≥ 65 years old admitted to a tertiary rehabilitation centre. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3) was measured on rehabilitation admission. Results. Mean age was 72.0 ± 5.7 years, and stroke was the commonest rehabilitation diagnosis (49.3%). Low 25OHD3 levels were present in 115 patients (85.6%) and 59 patients (44%) were deemed to be vitamin D deficient. The mean PTH level was significantly higher in patients with low 25OHD3 levels. (p = 0.002) Age, gender, vitamin D supplementation, premorbid ambulatory status, and admission/discharge Functional Independence Measure scores were not significantly associated with vitamin D deficiency. Malays/Indians (p = 0.013) and recurrent fallers (p = 0.029) were at significantly higher risk of vitamin D deficiency. Conclusions. Despite the tropical weather, vitamin D deficiency is common in elderly subjects admitted to a rehabilitation unit in Singapore. Routine assessment of vitamin D levels is recommended especially in those with a history of recurrent falls and patients of Indian/Malay ethnicity. PMID:26998361

  2. Profile of BC College Transfer Students Admitted to the University of British Columbia: 2003/04 to 2007/08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert-Maberly, Ashley

    2009-01-01

    This report examines the demographics, performance, and success of students who were admitted to the University of British Columbia's Vancouver campus on the basis of a minimum 24 transfer credits earned at a BC college during the five year period comprising the 2003/04 through 2007/08 academic years. The report mines familiar ground--similar…

  3. Comparison of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Health Problems Admitted to Specialist and Generic Inpatient Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, C. P.; O'Hara, J.; McCarthy, J.; Holt, G.; Eoster, F.; Costello, H.; Hammond, R.; Xenitidis, K.; Bouras, N.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the characteristics of service users with intellectual disabilities and mental health problems admitted to either a specialist or a generic inpatient unit in an area of South London. Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of consecutive admissions over a 5.5-year period were recorded using a questionnaire. Key…

  4. 29 CFR 102.20 - Answer to complaint; time for filing; contents; allegations not denied deemed admitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Answer to complaint; time for filing; contents; allegations not denied deemed admitted. 102.20 Section 102.20 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR... Prevention of Unfair Labor Practices 1 Answer § 102.20 Answer to complaint; time for filing;...

  5. 29 CFR 102.20 - Answer to complaint; time for filing; contents; allegations not denied deemed admitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Answer to complaint; time for filing; contents; allegations not denied deemed admitted. 102.20 Section 102.20 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR... Prevention of Unfair Labor Practices 1 Answer § 102.20 Answer to complaint; time for filing;...

  6. 29 CFR 102.20 - Answer to complaint; time for filing; contents; allegations not denied deemed admitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Answer to complaint; time for filing; contents; allegations not denied deemed admitted. 102.20 Section 102.20 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR... Prevention of Unfair Labor Practices 1 Answer § 102.20 Answer to complaint; time for filing;...

  7. 29 CFR 102.20 - Answer to complaint; time for filing; contents; allegations not denied deemed admitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Answer to complaint; time for filing; contents; allegations not denied deemed admitted. 102.20 Section 102.20 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR... Prevention of Unfair Labor Practices 1 Answer § 102.20 Answer to complaint; time for filing;...

  8. 29 CFR 102.20 - Answer to complaint; time for filing; contents; allegations not denied deemed admitted.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Answer to complaint; time for filing; contents; allegations not denied deemed admitted. 102.20 Section 102.20 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor NATIONAL LABOR... Prevention of Unfair Labor Practices 1 Answer § 102.20 Answer to complaint; time for filing;...

  9. 37 CFR 1.91 - Models or exhibits not generally admitted as part of application or patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Models or exhibits not generally admitted as part of application or patent. 1.91 Section 1.91 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions...

  10. Treatment needs, diagnoses and use of services for acutely admitted psychiatric patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We compared demography, diagnoses and clinical needs in acutely admitted psychiatric hospital patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway. Method All acutely admitted psychiatric patients in 1 psychiatric hospital in north-west Russia and 2 in northern Norway were in a three months period assessed with HoNOS and a Norwegian form developed to study acute psychiatric services (MAP). Data from a total of 841 patients were analysed (377 Norwegian, 464 Russian) with univariate and multivariate statistics. Results Russian patients were more often males who had paid work. 2/3 were diagnosed with alcohol and organic disorders, and 70% reported problems related to sleep. Depression was widespread, as were problems associated with occupation. Many more Norwegian patients were on various forms of social security and lived in community supported homes. They had a clinical profile of affective disorders, use of drugs, suicidality and problems with activities involved of daily life. Slightly more Norwegian patients were involuntary admitted. Conclusion Acutely admitted psychiatric patients in North West Russia and Northern Norwegian showed different clinical profiles: alcohol, depression and organic disorders characterised Russian patients, affective disorders, suicidality and use of drugs characterised the Norwegians. Whereas Norwegian patients are mainly referred from GPs the Russians come via 1.line psychiatric services (“dispensaries”). Average length of stay for Russian patients was 2.5 times longer than that of the Norwegian. PMID:23317010

  11. [Evaluation of the oropharyngeal tularemia cases admitted to our hospital from the provinces of Central Anatolia].

    PubMed

    Uyar, Melek; Cengiz, Buğra; Unlü, Murat; Celebi, Bekir; Kılıç, Selçuk; Eryılmaz, Adil

    2011-01-01

    Tularemia caused by the bacterium Francisella tularensis is a zoonotic infection which has re-emerged in Turkey in recent years as water-borne endemics. Oropharyngeal form is the most frequently reported form of the disease from Turkey. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and laboratory findings of oropharyngeal tularemia patients admitted to ear, nose & throat outpatient clinic between January-March 2010. A total of 10 patients (age range: 16-80 years, mean age: 43.9 years; nine were male) inhabiting in the provinces in Central Anatolia, Turkey, were admitted to our hospital with the complaints of fever, sore throat and painful cervical lump. They have been previously diagnosed as tonsillo-pharyngitis at different medical centers and empirical antibiotic therapy has initiated, however, their complaints have not recovered. Endoscopic laryngoscopic examination revealed that oropharynx, larynx and hypopharynx were normal. Physical examination of the neck yielded localized fixed masses with diameters between 2-7 cm. The lesions were localized at right submandibular (n= 4), upper jugular (n=3) and one of each at left posterior cervical, left submandibular and left jugulodigastric regions. The patients were hospitalized with the pre-diagnosis of "neck mass with unknown origin" for further investigation and treatment. The mean white blood cell count of the cases was 9730 (7500-15.100) cells/µl; the mean erythrocyte sedimantation rate was 68.7 (46-85) mm3/hours and the mean C-reactive protein level was 4.3 (1.5-7.4) µg/dl. Salmonella, Brucella, Toxoplasma gondii, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex virus, Epstein-Barr virus and viral hepatitis serology did not indicate acute infections. Serum and tissue samples were sent to Refik Saydam National Public Health Agency in order to test for tularemia, namely culture, microagglutination test (MAT), direct fluorescence antibody (DFA) test and in-house polymerase chain reaction (PCR). All of the patients

  12. [Investigation of the hepatitis E virus seroprevalence in cases admitted to Hacettepe University Medical Faculty Hospital].

    PubMed

    Aydın, Nesibe Nur; Ergünay, Koray; Karagül, Aydan; Pınar, Ahmet; Us, Dürdal

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), classified in Hepeviridae family, Hepevirus genus, is a non-enveloped virus with icosahedral capsid containing single-stranded positive sense RNA genome. HEV infections may be asymptomatic especially in children, however it may present as fulminant hepatitis in pregnant women, as well as chronic hepatitis in immunocompromised patients. There are four well-known genotypes of HEV that infect humans and many mammalian species. Genotype 1 and 2 are frequently responsible for water-borne infections transmitted by fecal-oral way in developing countries, while genotype 3 and 4 cause zoonotic infections in developed countries. Turkey is considered as an endemic country with a total seroprevalence rate of 6.3% for normal population, showing significant variation (0-73%) according to the regions and study groups. The aims of this study were to investigate the HEV seropositivity in cases admitted to Hacettepe University Medical Faculty Hospital (HUMFH), to evaluate the results according to the demographic features of patients, and to determine the current HEV seroprevalence in our region, contributing seroepidemiological data in Turkey. A total of 1043 serum samples (514 female, 529 male; age range: 1-90 years, mean age: 38.03) obtained from 327 blood donors (32 female, 295 male; age range: 19-59 years, mean age: 31.1) who were admitted to HUMFH Blood Center, and 716 sera (482 female, 234 male; age range: 1-90 years, mean age: 41.7) that were sent to HUMFH Central Laboratory from various outpatient/inpatient clinics, between November 2012 to November 2013, were included in the study. The presence of HEV-IgG antibodies in serum samples was detected by a commercial ELISA method (Euroimmun, Germany), and the presence of HEV-IgM antibodies was also investigated in the sera with IgG-positive results. The overall HEV-IgG seropositivity rate was determined as 4.4% (46/1043), and the seropositivity rates for blood donors and in/outpatients were as 0.92% (3

  13. Comparison of different methods for measurement of electrolytes in patients admitted to the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Sinan; Uysal, Hilal B.; Avcil, Mücahit; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Dağlı, Bekir; Bakış, Murat; Ömürlü, Imran K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether electrolyte levels measured by using blood gas analyzers (ABG) and auto-analyzers (AA) are equivalent and can be used interchangeably. Methods: This observational prospective study was conducted in 100 patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, Adnan Menderes University School of Medicine, Aydin, Turkey, between March and August 2014. Samples for both AA and ABG analyzers were collected simultaneously from invasive arterial catheters of patients. The electrolyte levels were measured by using 2 methods. Results: The mean sodium level measured by ABG was 136.1±6.3 mmol/L and 137.8±5.4 mmol/L for AA (p=0.001). The Pearson’s correlation coefficient was 0.561 (p<0.001). The Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement were -9.4 to 12.6 mmol/L. The mean potassium levels measured by ABG was 3.4±0.7 mmol/L and AA was 3.8±0.7 mmol/L (p=0.001). The Bland-Altman comparison limits were -0.58 to 1.24 and the associated Pearson’s correlation coefficient was 0.812 (p<0.001). Conclusion: The results of the 2 analyzing methods, in terms of sodium, were not equivalent and could not be used interchangeably. However, according to the statistical analyses results, by including, but not blindly trusting these findings, urgent and vital decisions could be made by the potassium levels obtained from the BGA, but a simultaneous follow-up sample had to be sent to the central laboratory for confirmation. PMID:26905347

  14. Management of severe sepsis in patients admitted to Asian intensive care units: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Jason; Du, Bin; Tang, Yao-Qing; Divatia, Jigeeshu V; Tan, Cheng Cheng; Gomersall, Charles D; Faruq, Mohammad Omar; Shrestha, Babu Raja; Gia Binh, Nguyen; Arabi, Yaseen M; Salahuddin, Nawal; Wahyuprajitno, Bambang; Tu, Mei-Lien; Wahab, Ahmad Yazid Haji Abd; Hameed, Akmal A; Nishimura, Masaji; Procyshyn, Mark; Chan, Yiong Huak

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the compliance of Asian intensive care units and hospitals to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s resuscitation and management bundles. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the impact of compliance on mortality and the organisational characteristics of hospitals that were associated with higher compliance. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 150 intensive care units in 16 Asian countries. Participants 1285 adult patients with severe sepsis admitted to these intensive care units in July 2009. The organisational characteristics of participating centres, the patients’ baseline characteristics, the achievement of targets within the resuscitation and management bundles, and outcome data were recorded. Main outcome measure Compliance with the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s resuscitation (six hours) and management (24 hours) bundles. Results Hospital mortality was 44.5% (572/1285). Compliance rates for the resuscitation and management bundles were 7.6% (98/1285) and 3.5% (45/1285), respectively. On logistic regression analysis, compliance with the following bundle targets independently predicted decreased mortality: blood cultures (achieved in 803/1285; 62.5%, 95% confidence interval 59.8% to 65.1%), broad spectrum antibiotics (achieved in 821/1285; 63.9%, 61.3% to 66.5%), and central venous pressure (achieved in 345/870; 39.7%, 36.4% to 42.9%). High income countries, university hospitals, intensive care units with an accredited fellowship programme, and surgical intensive care units were more likely to be compliant with the resuscitation bundle. Conclusions While mortality from severe sepsis is high, compliance with resuscitation and management bundles is generally poor in much of Asia. As the centres included in this study might not be fully representative, achievement rates reported might overestimate the true degree of compliance with recommended care and should be interpreted with caution. Achievement of targets for blood cultures

  15. Experiences of fathering a baby admitted to neonatal intensive care: a critical gender analysis.

    PubMed

    Deeney, Kathleen; Lohan, Maria; Spence, Dale; Parkes, Jackie

    2012-09-01

    More fathers than ever before attend at the birth of their child and, internationally, there is a palpable pressure on maternity and neonatal services to include and engage with fathers. It is, thus, more important than ever to understand how fathers experience reproductive and neonatal health services and to understand how fathers can be successfully accommodated in these environments alongside their partners. In this paper we advance a theoretical framework for re-thinking fatherhood and health services approaches to fatherhood based on Critical Studies on Men (CSM). We illustrate the importance of this feminist informed theoretical approach to understanding the gendered experiences of fathers in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) setting in Northern Ireland. Using a longitudinal follow-up research design, with two data collection points, a total of 39 in-depth semi-structured interviews was conducted with 21 fathers of infants admitted to the NICU between August 2008 and December 2009. The findings demonstrate: (i) how men are forging new gendered identities around the birth of their baby but, over time, acknowledge women as the primary caregivers; (ii) how social class is a key determinant of men's ability to enact hegemonic forms of 'involved fatherhood' in the NICU, and; (iii) how men also encounter resistance from their partners and health professionals in challenging a gender order which associates women with the competent care of infants. An understanding of these gendered experiences operating at both individual and structural levels is critical to leading change for the inclusion of fathers as equal parents in healthcare settings. PMID:22694990

  16. The outcomes of patients with severe dengue admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Ming; Chan, Khee-Siang; Yu, Wen-Liang; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Chao, Hui-Chun; Yeh, Chiu-Yin; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Outcomes of adult patients with dengue infections requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admissions remain unclear. We assessed the clinical manifestations and prognostic factors of patients critically ill with severe dengue. This retrospective study was done in a tertiary referral hospital with 96 adult ICU beds. All of the patients with laboratory-confirmed severe dengue infections and admitted to the ICU were enrolled between July 31 and November 31, 2015, during the large outbreak period. The medical records of all the recruited patients were reviewed for the following information: age, gender, clinical manifestations, disease severity scores, underlying conditions, laboratory examinations, and outcomes. The primary endpoint was to find the predictors of ICU mortality. During the study period, 4787 patients with dengue infections required ICU admission. One hundred forty-three (2.99%) were critically ill (mean age: 69.7 years). Hypertension (n = 90, 62.9%) and diabetes mellitus (n = 70, 49.0%) were the 2 most common underlying diseases. Eighty critically ill patients (55.9%) had cobacterial infections, and 33 had cobacteremia. The hematologic system failed most often, followed by thoracic and cardiovascular systems. Fever was the most common presentation (n = 112; 78.3%), followed by anorexia (n = 47; 32.9%) and abdominal pain (n = 46; 32.2%). Overall, 33 patients died (mortality rate: 23.1%). Multivariate analysis showed that ICU mortality was significantly associated with lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, lower platelet counts before ICU discharge, and more organ failures. The number of severe dengue patients who require ICU admission remains high. The mortality rate was associated with lower GCS scores, lower platelet counts, and more organ failures. In addition, more than half of the critically ill dengue patients had comorbid bacterial infections. PMID:27495047

  17. Acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Islambulchilar, M; Islambulchilar, Z; Kargar-Maher, M H

    2009-04-01

    The aim of our study was to investigate the etiological and demographical characteristics of acute adult poisoning cases admitted to a university hospital in Tabriz, Iran. This retrospective study was performed on 1342 poisoning admissions to a university hospital from 2003 to 2005, by data collection from the medical records of patients. Poisonings were 5.40% of the total admissions. There was a predominance of female patients (55.7%) compared to male patients (44.3%) with a female-to-male ratio of 1.2:1. Most poisonings occurred in the age range of 11-20 years (38.9%). Drugs were the most common cause of poisonings (60.8%). Among the drug poisonings, benzodiazepines (40.31%) were the most frequent agents, followed by antidepressants (31.98%). The seasonal distribution in poisoning patients suggested a peak in spring (28%) and summer (27.5%). In 9.8% of cases accidental and in 90.2% intentional poisonings were evident. Most suicide attempts were made by women (58.51%) and unmarried people (51.4%).The mean duration of hospitalization was 3.02 +/- 2.8 days. There were 28 (2.3%) deaths; the majority (13 cases) was due to pesticides. This was a university hospital-based study, so these results may not be representative of the general population. Despite this drawback, these data still provide important information on the characteristics of the poisoning in this part of Iran. To prevent such poisonings, the community education about the danger of central nervous system-acting drugs and reducing the exposure period of people to pesticides are recommended. PMID:19734268

  18. Prevalence and risk factors of pneumothorax among patients admitted to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    El-Nawawy, Ahmed Ahmed; Al-Halawany, Amina Sedky; Antonios, Manal Abdelmalik; Newegy, Reem Gamal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pneumothorax should be considered a medical emergency and requires a high index of suspicion and prompt recognition and intervention. Aims: The objective of the study was to evaluate cases developing pneumothorax following admission to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) over a 5-year period. Settings and Design: Case notes of all PICU patients (n = 1298) were reviewed, revealing that 135 cases (10.4%) developed pneumothorax, and these were compared with those patients who did not. The most common tool for diagnosis used was chest X-ray followed by a clinical examination. Subjects and Methods: Case notes of 1298 patients admitted in PICU over 1-year study. Results: Patients with pneumothorax had higher mortality rate (P < 0.001), longer length of stay (P < 0.001), higher need for mechanical ventilation (MV) (P < 0.001), and were of younger age (P < 0.001), lower body weight (P < 0.001), higher pediatric index of mortality 2 score on admission (P < 0.001), higher pediatric logistic organ dysfunction score (P < 0.001), compared to their counterpart. Iatrogenic pneumothorax (IP) represented 95% of episodes of pneumothorax. The most common causes of IP were barotrauma secondary to MV, central vein catheter insertion, and other (69.6%, 13.2%, and 17.2%, respectively). Compared to ventilated patients without pneumothorax, ventilated patients who developed pneumothorax had a longer duration of MV care (P < 0.001) and higher nonconventional and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation settings (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that pneumothorax is common in Alexandria University PICU patients, especially in those on MV and emphasized the importance of the strict application of protective lung strategies among ventilated patients to minimize the risk of pneumothorax.

  19. Intestinal parasitic infection among children and neonatus admitted to Ibn-Sina Hospital, Sirt, Libya.

    PubMed

    Kasssem, Hamed H; Zaed, Hana Abdalsalam; Sadaga, Gazala A

    2007-08-01

    A total of 350 stool samples from 196 males and 154 female children and neonatus admitted in Ibn-Sina hospital, Sirt, were examined from June 2001 to May 2002, to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites. Intestinal parasitic infections were identified in 196 (56%) of children and neonates. No intestinal helminthic parasites were detected but 13 intestinal protozoan parasites were detected. The most prevalent protozoan was Entamoeba histolytica /E. dispar (36.57%); Blastocystis hominis (12.57%), Giardia lamblia (10.29%), Isospora belli (3.14%) and Balantidium coli (0.86%), the latter was detected in non-Libyan children. The non-pathogenic ones were Entamoeba coli (15.14%), Endolimax nana (13.71%), Entamoeba hartmanni (4.29%), Chilomastix mesnilli (4.29%), Retortamonas intestinalis (3.43%), Dientamoeba fragilis (2%), Iodamoeba butschlii (0.86%) and Trichomonas hominis (0.86%). The result showed a significant difference exists between the prevalence of pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoan parasites (P < 0.05). High prevalence of E. histolytica/ E. dispar followed by E. coli, E. nana, B. hominis and G. lamblia in both sexes of children, while the prevalence of other intestinal parasites were low in both sexes, significantly different existed in the prevalence of intestinal parasites between males and females children (t = 24.68; P < 0.05). Age groups had no effect on the prevalence of intestinal parasites (F = 0.66; P < 0.05). Significant differences existed in the prevalence between single and multiple infections with pathogenic protozoa. The socio-economic status of children parents revealed that high prevalence in children from medium socio-economic status. The family size had no significant effect on the prevalence of the intestinal parasites. PMID:17985574

  20. Effect of White Noise on Sleep in Patients Admitted to a Coronary Care

    PubMed Central

    Farokhnezhad Afshar, Pouya; Bahramnezhad, Fatemeh; Asgari, Parvaneh; Shiri, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sleep disorders are a common problem in patients in the critical care unit. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of white noise on the quality of sleep in patients admitted to the CCU. Methods: The present study was single-blind, quasi-experimental study. A total of 60 patients were selected using the purposive sampling method. Quality of sleep was measured with PSQI on the first day in admission, then after three nights of admission without any intervention for control group and for the experimental group quality of sleep measured by white noise with intensity of 50-60 dB then Quality of sleep was measured with PSQI. Data were analyzed by SPSS 13 software. Results: The average total sleep time in the control group before the study reached from 7.08 (0.8) to 4.75 (0.66) hours after three nights of hospitalization, while in the experimental group, no significant changes were seen in the average sleep hours (6.69 ± 0.84 vs. 6.92 ± 0.89, P = 0.15).The average minutes of sleep in the control group before the study reached from 12.66 (7.51) to 25.83 (11.75) minutes after a three- night stay, while in the experimental group, no significant changes were observed in the average sleep duration (12.16 ± 7.50 vs. 11 ±6. 07, P = 0.16). Conclusion: The use of white noise is recommended as a method for masking environmental noises, improving sleep, and maintaining sleep in the coronary care unit. PMID:27354974

  1. Clinical predictors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia in patients admitted to the ED.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2012-09-01

    The identification of clinical characteristics that could identify patients at high risk for Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia would aid clinicians in the appropriate management of these life-threatening conditions, especially in patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) with community-onset infections. To determine clinical risk factors for P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia in patients with community-onset gram-negative bacteremia (GNB), a post hoc analysis of a nationwide bacteremia surveillance database including patients with microbiologically documented GNB was performed. Ninety-six patients with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia were compared with 1230 patients with Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia. A solid tumor or hematologic malignancy was more likely to be associated with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia, whereas concurrent neurologic disease was less frequently seen. In regards to the site of infection, pneumonia was more common in P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia, whereas a urinary tract infection was less frequently seen. Factors associated with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia in multivariate analysis included pneumonia (odds ratio [OR], 3.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.86-6.99), hematologic malignancy (OR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.26-5.84), male sex (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.31-3.58), solid tumor (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.15-3.12), and health-care-associated infection (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.48-2.41). Our data suggest that an initial empirical antimicrobial coverage of P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia should be seriously considered in patients with pneumonia, a hematologic malignancy, solid tumor, or health-care-associated infection, when GNB is suspected, even in community-onset infections. PMID:22030178

  2. Acute outcome of treating patients admitted with electrical storm in a tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Mukund A.; Namboodiri, Narayanan; Prasad BV, Srinivas; Abhilash, S.P.; Thajudeen, Anees; Ajith, Kumar V.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Electrical storm (ES) is a life threatening emergency. There is little data available regarding acute outcome of ES. Aims The study aimed to analyze the acute outcome of ES, various treatment modalities used, and the factors associated with mortality. Methods This is a retrospective observational study involving patients admitted with ES at our centre between 1/1/2007 and 31/12/2013. Results 41 patients (mean age 54.61 ± 12.41 years; 86.7% males; mean ejection fraction (EF) 44.51 ± 16.48%) underwent treatment for ES. Hypokalemia (14.63%) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) (14.63%) were the commonest identifiable triggers. Only 9 (21.95%) patients already had an ICD implanted. Apart from antiarrhythmic drugs (100%), deep sedation (87.8%), mechanical ventilation (24.39%) and neuraxial modulation using left sympathetic cardiac denervation (21.95%) were the common treatment modalities used. Thirty-three (80.49%) patients could be discharged after a mean duration of 14.2 ± 2.31 days. Eight (19.5%) patients died in hospital. The mortality was significantly higher in those with EF < 35% compared to those with a higher EF (8 (42.11% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.03)). There was no significant difference in mortality between those with versus without a structural heart disease (8 (21.1% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.32)). Comparison of mortality an ACS with ES versus ES of other aetiologies (3 (50%) vs 5 (14.29) %, p = 0.076)) showed a trend towards significance. Conclusion With comprehensive treatment, there is reasonable acute survival rate of ES. Hypokalemia and ACS are the commonest triggers of ES. Patients with low EF and ACS have higher mortality.

  3. Glycated hemoglobin screening identifies patients admitted for retreatment of tuberculosis at risk for diabetes in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Sariko, Margaretha L; Mpagama, Stellah G; Gratz, Jean; Kisonga, Riziki; Saidi, Queen; Kibiki, Gibson S; Heysell, Scott K

    2016-01-01

    Introduction World Health Organization recommendations of bidirectional screening for tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes have been met with varying levels of uptake by national TB programs in resource-limited settings. Methodology Kibong’oto Infectious Diseases Hospital (KIDH) is a referral hospital for TB from northern Tanzania, and the national referral hospital for multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB. Glycated hemoglobin (HgbA1c) testing was done on patients admitted to KIDH for newly diagnosed TB, retreatment TB, and MDR-TB, to determine the point prevalence of diabetes (HgbA1c ≥ 6.5%) and prediabetes (HgbA1c 5.7%– 6.4%). Results Of 148 patients hospitalized at KIDH over a single week, 59 (38%) had no prior TB treatment, 22 (15%) were retreatment cases, and 69 (47%) had MDR-TB. Only 3 (2%) had a known history of diabetes. A total of 144 (97%) had successful screening, of which 110 (77%) had an HgbA1c ≤ 5.6%, 28 (19%) had ≥ 5.7 < 6.5, and 6 (4%) had ≥ 6.5. Comparing subjects with prediabetes or diabetes to those with normal A1c levels, retreatment patients were significantly more likely to have a A1c ≥ 5.7% (odds ratio: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.2–9.0; p = 0.02) compared to those without prior TB treatment. No retreatment case was a known diabetic, thus the number needed to screen to diagnose one new case of diabetes among retreatment cases was 11. Conclusions Diabetes prevalence by HgbA1c was less common than expected, but higher HgA1c values were significantly more frequent among retreatment cases, allowing for a rational, resource-conscious screening approach. PMID:27131008

  4. Morbidity and mortality amongst infants of diabetic mothers admitted into Soba university hospital, Khartoum, Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Kheir, Abdelmoneim E.M.; Berair, Rabih; Gulfan, Islam G.I.; Karrar, Mohamed Z.; Mohammed, Zuhlel A.O.

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes during pregnancy is increasing and this is associated with an increased risk of complications in both mother and fetus. The aim of this research is to study the neonatal complications of maternal diabetes. This was a prospective observational study that was conducted in Soba university hospital between September 2010 and March 2011. All infants born to diabetic mothers during the study period were admitted to the neonatal care unit for evaluation. Data on sex, gestational age, and birth weight, mode of delivery, complications, investigations, birth injury, and length of hospital stay were recorded. Maternal data were retrieved from records. Data was analyzed using Minitab 15. A total of 50 infants of diabetic mothers (IDMs) were included in the study. Thirty infants (60%) were females and 20 (40%) were males. Forty two (84%) of the neonates were born by caesarian section, only 7(14%) were born by spontaneous vaginal delivery. Birth injury was observed in 4% of them. The mean gestational age was 37.2±2.051 weeks. The median birth weight was 3.5 kg. 14 (28%) of the babies were macrosomic, and 17 (34%) were large for gestational age (LGA). Congenital anomalies were found in 3 (6%), hypoglycemia in 6 (12%), hyperbillirubinaemia in 10 (20%), hypocalcaemia and hypomagnesaemia each occurred in 2%, transient tachypnea of the newborn occurred in 5 (10%) of the neonates and respiratory distress syndrome in 2%. Cardiomyopathy occurred in 2% and mortality was 4%. We concluded that macrosomia, LGA, and hyperbillirubinaemia were the commonest complications in IDMs, maternal glycaemic control was found to have a significant effect on a number of outcomes.

  5. Acute kidney injury in asphyxiated neonates admitted to a tertiary neonatal unit in Sudan

    PubMed Central

    Medani, Safaa A; Kheir, Abdelmoneim E M; Mohamed, Mazahir B

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a recognized complication of birth asphyxia. Early recognition of AKI is important in asphyxiated neonates as it helps in early intervention and appropriate management. The aim of this study was to determine the pattern of AKI in asphyxiated neonates and its relation to the grade of Hypoxic Ischemic Encephalopathy (HIE). This was a prospective hospital based study, conducted in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Gafaar Ibn Auf Children’s Specialized Hospital during the period between January 2013 and December 2013. A total of 85 full term asphyxiated neonates who were admitted in NICU and diagnosed as HIE were enrolled in this study. with 50 (58.8%) less than 7 days of age, 31(36.5%) between (8–15) days and 4(4.7%) between (16–28) days. Males were found to be more affected than females (58.9% and 41.1%) respectively. Spontaneous vaginal delivery was the mode of delivery in 48(56.4%), assisted vaginal delivery in 14(16.5%), emergency caesarian in 19(22.4%) and elective caesarian section in. Percentage of AKI in those babies was 54.1%(46). With 30(65%) from those had non-oliguric type. Ten babies (21.7%) had serum creatinine between (1.5 – 2mg/dl), 29 (63.04%) between (2 – 3mg/dl) and 7(15.22%) between (3–4mg/ dl). This means that the majority of patients presented in injury stage. Hyperkalemia was found in (37.6%), hyponatremia in (27.1%) and hypocalceamia in (25.8%). Most of the babies with AKI had stage (ii) HIE. All babies were treated conservatively and 4(8.6%) died. In conclusion AKI was observed to be a common complication in asphyxiated neonates.

  6. The outcomes of patients with severe dengue admitted to intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Ming; Chan, Khee-Siang; Yu, Wen-Liang; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Chao, Hui-Chun; Yeh, Chiu-Yin; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Outcomes of adult patients with dengue infections requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admissions remain unclear. We assessed the clinical manifestations and prognostic factors of patients critically ill with severe dengue.This retrospective study was done in a tertiary referral hospital with 96 adult ICU beds. All of the patients with laboratory-confirmed severe dengue infections and admitted to the ICU were enrolled between July 31 and November 31, 2015, during the large outbreak period. The medical records of all the recruited patients were reviewed for the following information: age, gender, clinical manifestations, disease severity scores, underlying conditions, laboratory examinations, and outcomes. The primary endpoint was to find the predictors of ICU mortality.During the study period, 4787 patients with dengue infections required ICU admission. One hundred forty-three (2.99%) were critically ill (mean age: 69.7 years). Hypertension (n = 90, 62.9%) and diabetes mellitus (n = 70, 49.0%) were the 2 most common underlying diseases. Eighty critically ill patients (55.9%) had cobacterial infections, and 33 had cobacteremia. The hematologic system failed most often, followed by thoracic and cardiovascular systems. Fever was the most common presentation (n = 112; 78.3%), followed by anorexia (n = 47; 32.9%) and abdominal pain (n = 46; 32.2%). Overall, 33 patients died (mortality rate: 23.1%). Multivariate analysis showed that ICU mortality was significantly associated with lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, lower platelet counts before ICU discharge, and more organ failures.The number of severe dengue patients who require ICU admission remains high. The mortality rate was associated with lower GCS scores, lower platelet counts, and more organ failures. In addition, more than half of the critically ill dengue patients had comorbid bacterial infections. PMID:27495047

  7. Dengue in Adults Admitted to a Referral Hospital in Hanoi, Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Walter R.; Fox, Annette; Pham, Khuong Thi; Le, Hoa Nguyen Minh; Tran, Ninh Thi Hai; Tran, Giang Van; Nguyen, Binh Thanh; Nguyen, My Van; Nguyen, Lien Thi; Yacoub, Sophie; Nguyen, Hoai Thi Thu; Nguyen, Ha Hong; Nguyen, Hien Duc; Wertheim, Heiman; Horby, Peter; Farrar, Jeremy; Trinh, Lien Thi Minh; Nguyen, Kinh Van

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of adult dengue virus (DENV) infection from Hanoi, Vietnam, is limited. In 2008, we prospectively studied 143 (77 male) confirmed (nonstructural 1 antigen enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay [ELISA], DENV polymerase chain reaction, paired serology) adult dengue patients of median age 23.5 (range 16–72) years. They were admitted to the National Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Hanoi, on median illness day (D) 5 (range 1–8). By D8, 141 (98.6%) were afebrile. Platelet counts and hematocrit (median, interquartile range [IQR]) nadired and peaked on D5 and D4, respectively: 40,000/μL (10,000–109,000/μL), 43.4% (34.9–49.7%). Four (2.8%) patients had severe dengue: 1) D10 shock (N = 1) and 2) aspartate aminotransferase (AST) ≥ 1,000 IU/L (N = 3, D5 and D7). Of 143 patients, 118 (82.5%) had ≥ 1 warning sign (World Health Organization [WHO] 2009 criteria): mucosal bleeding 66/143 (46.1%), soft tissue edema 54/143 (37.7%), and ultrasound detected plasma leakage (pleural effusions/ascites) 30/129 (23.25%). 138 (96.5%) patients received intravenous (IV) fluids: 3 L (IQR: 0.5–8.5 L). Most patients had non-severe dengue with warning signs. High rates of edema and plasma leakage may be explained partly by liberal use of IV fluids. Studies are needed on optimizing fluid management in non-severe adult dengue. PMID:25918201

  8. Clinical Features, Psychiatric Assessment, and Longitudinal Outcome of Suicide Attempters Admitted to a Tertiary Emergency Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Alcinéia Donizeti; Sponholz, Alcion; Mantovani, Célia; Pazin-Filho, Antônio; Passos, Afonso Dinis Costa; Botega, Neury José; Del-Ben, Cristina Marta

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize admissions to an emergency hospital due to suicide attempts and verify outcomes in 2 years. Data were collected from medical records and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. The sample consisted of 412 patients (58.7% women; mean age = 32.6 years old, SD = 14.3). Self-poisoning was the most frequent method (84.0%), and they were diagnosed mainly as depressive (40.3%) and borderline personality disorders (19.1%). Previous suicide attempts and current psychiatric treatment were reported by, respectively, 32.0% and 28.4%. Fifteen patients (3.6%, 9 males) died during hospitalization. At discharge, 79.3% were referred to community-based psychiatric services. Being male (OR = 2.11; 95% CI = 1.25-3.55), using violent methods (i.e., hanging, firearms, and knives) (OR = 1.96; 95% CI = 1.02-3.75) and psychiatric treatment history (OR = 2.58; 95% CI = 1.53-4.36) were predictors for psychiatric hospitalization. Of 258 patients followed for 2 years, 10 (3.9%) died (3 suicide), and 24 (9.3%) undertook new suicide attempts. Patients with a history of psychiatric treatment had higher risks of new suicide attempts (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.07-5.65). Suicide attempters admitted to emergency hospitals exhibit severe psychiatric disorders, and despite interventions, they continue to present high risks for suicide attempts and death. PMID:25961847

  9. Associations between sleep disturbance and suicidal ideation in adolescents admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sebastian G; Ali, Shahzad K; Simpson, Brittany; Britt, Victoria; McCall, W Vaughn

    2014-01-01

    The goals of our study were to: 1) describe the incidence of disturbances in sleep quality, sleep hygiene, sleep-related cognitions and nightmares; and 2) investigate the association between these sleep-related disturbances and suicidal ideation (SI), in adolescents admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Our sample consisted of 50 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 years (32 females and 18 males; 41 Caucasian and nine African American). Our cross-sectional design involved the administration of the Adolescent Sleep Wake Scale (ASWS), the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS), the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep-Short version for use with children (DBAS-C10), the Disturbing Dreams and Nightmare Scale (DDNSI), and the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire Jr (SIQ-JR). Analyses were conducted using Pearson correlations, as well as univariate and multivariate regression. Results indicated that our sample experienced sleep disturbances and SI to a greater degree than non-clinical samples. Sleep quality was correlated with nightmares, while sleep quality and nightmares were each correlated with SI. Sleep quality, dysfunctional beliefs, and nightmares each independently predicted SI. Our study was the first to use the four sleep measures with an adolescent psychiatric inpatient sample. It is important to develop sleep-related assessment tools in high-risk populations given the link between sleep disturbances and suicidality. Furthermore, a better understanding of the relationships between SI and sleep quality, sleep-related cognitions, and nightmares is needed to develop potential prevention and treatment options for suicidality in adolescents. PMID:24356389

  10. Multi-zone furnace system

    SciTech Connect

    Orbeck, G.A.

    1986-05-06

    A multi-zone furnace is described which consists of: a furnace chamber having at least one heat zone and at least one zone adjacent to the heat zone and disposed along the length of the furnace chamber; the heat zone having a hearth at a level different from the hearth level of the adjacent zone; a walking beam conveyor disposed in the furnace chamber and operative in a short stroke mode to convey a product along the hearth of the heat zone, and in a long stroke mode to convey a product from the heat zone to the adjacent zone.

  11. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  12. Behavior of the mass transfer zone in a biosorption column.

    PubMed

    Naja, Ghinwa; Volesky, Bohumil

    2006-06-15

    Modeling of the mass transfer zone behavior under variable conditions in a flow-through fixed-bed sorption column enabled the prediction of breakthrough curves for Cu2+ and Ca-preloaded Sargassum fluitans biomass. The mass transfer resistance, particle diffusion, and the axial dispersion were incorporated in the model. The dynamics of the mass transfer zone was described under variable sorption column operating conditions including different column lengths and fluid flow rates. Accurate estimation of the behavior of the mass transfer zone as it progressed through the column, reflected eventually in the breakthrough curve, assisted in its relevant interpretations. Furthermore, the proposed mathematical model of the biosorption process was capable of demonstrating the expanding and broadening of the mass transfer zone linked to the equilibrium sorption isotherm. The fundamental understanding of the mass transfer zone dynamics is particularly important for process scale-up where maintaining the process efficiency is critical. PMID:16830573

  13. Earthquake supercycle in subduction zones controlled by the downdip width of the seismogenic zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrendörfer, Robert; van Dinther, Ylona; Gerya, Taras; Dalguer, Luis Angel

    2015-04-01

    larger potential strength excess. It takes longer and more events to reach a critical stress state in the center of wider seismogenic zones. We conclude that such stress evolution along the dip of a wide seismogenic zone is the simplest mechanism governing supercycles. Our results show that earthquake size variability during a supercycle can be purely explained by the along-dip evolution of stress heterogeneities within an up- and downdip bounded homogeneous seismogenic zone. Additional a priori complexities, like previously suggested structural or frictional heterogeneities (Sieh et al. 2008) are not required to generate supercycles, although they are expected to complicate our simplest explanation of supercycles. We suggest that larger than thus far observed earthquakes could occur as part of a supercycle in subduction zones with a large seismogenic zone downdip width.

  14. Satellite-Derived Management Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepoutre, Damien; Layrol, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    The term "satellite-derived management zones" (SAMZ) denotes agricultural management zones that are subdivisions of large fields and that are derived from images of the fields acquired by instruments aboard Earth-orbiting satellites during approximately the past 15 years. "SAMZ" also denotes the methodology and the software that implements the methodology for creating such zones. The SAMZ approach is one of several products of continuing efforts to realize a concept of precision agriculture, which involves optimal variations in seeding, in application of chemicals, and in irrigation, plus decisions to farm or not to farm certain portions of fields, all in an effort to maximize profitability in view of spatial and temporal variations in the growth and health of crops, and in the chemical and physical conditions of soils. As used here, "management zone" signifies, more precisely, a subdivision of a field within which the crop-production behavior is regarded as homogeneous. From the perspective of precision agriculture, management zones are the smallest subdivisions between which the seeding, application of chemicals, and other management parameters are to be varied. In the SAMZ approach, the main sources of data are the archives of satellite imagery that have been collected over the years for diverse purposes. One of the main advantages afforded by the SAMZ approach is that the data in these archives can be reused for purposes of precision agriculture at low cost. De facto, these archives contain information on all sources of variability within a field, including weather, crop types, crop management, soil types, and water drainage patterns. The SAMZ methodology involves the establishment of a Web-based interface based on an algorithm that generates management zones automatically and quickly from archival satellite image data in response to requests from farmers. A farmer can make a request by either uploading data describing a field boundary to the Web site or else

  15. Assessment of medical resident's attention to the health literacy level of newly admitted patients

    PubMed Central

    Karsenty, Cecile; Landau, Michael; Ferguson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to assess communication at the bedside in the emergency room between residents and their patients in order to identify common communication gaps. We also intended to evaluate whether residents for whom English is a second language (ESL residents) communicate less effectively. Methods A scorable checklist was developed in order to assess and identify communication gaps between the residents and their patients. Medical students observed the internal medicine and family medicine residents while they admitted patients to the medical service in the Emergency Room. Before this, medical students were trained for two weeks with a senior internist. The role of the medical student was not revealed; rather they were self-described as observers of the admission process. Results Over an 8 week period, 71 observations were made of 27 medicine residents. 71 patient intakes were observed, evaluating 27 residents. In 52.1% of these interactions, the residents used medical acronyms when communicating with the patients. During 66.2% of interactions, technical medical terms or expressions were used during the history taking and in only 27.6% of those cases were the terms explained at least partially. Teach back technique was not observed in any of the interactions evaluated. Data was also analyzed based on whether the doctors were ESL residents or native English speakers. ESL residents tended to use significantly more technical language than the native English speakers, but the native English speakers tended to use more acronyms. Conclusions How much patients understand of what their doctor says is called “health literacy.” Resident physicians often overestimate their patients’ health literacy, and this leads to communication gaps which have the potential to result in poorer health outcomes for the patients. The checklist developed for this pilot study assessed how well residents tailor their communication to their patients’ health

  16. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The flow instabilities in floating zones of silicon were investigated and methods for investigation of these instabilities in microgravity were defined. Three principal tasks were involved: (1) characterization of the float zone in small diameter rods; (2) investigation of melt flow instabilities in circular melts in silicon disks; and (3) the development of a prototype of an apparatus that could be used in near term space experiments to investigate flow instabilities in a molten zone. It is shown that in a resistance heated zoner with 4 to 7 mm diameter silicon rods that the critical Marangoni number is about 1480 compared to a predicted value of 14 indicative that viable space experiments might be performed. The prototype float zone apparatus is built and specifications are prepared for a flight zoner should a decision be reached to proceed with a space flight experimental investigation.

  17. Theory of zone radiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farmer, R. C.; Audeh, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A spectroscopic instrumentation system was developed which was used to measure temperature and concentration distributions in axisymmetric and two dimensional combusting flows. This measurement technique is known as zone radiometry.

  18. Drivers׳ merging behavior data in highway work zones.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Mahmoud; Ikuma, Laura H; Aghazadeh, Fereydoun; Ishak, Sherif

    2016-03-01

    There have been growing research interests in finding a suitable work zone layout to improve work zone safety and traffic efficiency. This paper contains data supporting the research article entitled: Effects of work zone configurations and traffic density on performance variables and subjective workload (Shakouri et al., 2014 [1]). A full factorial experiment was conducted to compare the efficiency of two work zone configurations by using a driving simulator with two levels of work zone configuration, two levels of traffic density and three levels of sign placement as fixed factors. Seven female and 23 male participants completed the experiment. In this paper we present the data relating to demographic information of participants, driving simulator data and subjective workload evaluation of participants for each work zone. PMID:26937456

  19. Drivers׳ merging behavior data in highway work zones

    PubMed Central

    Shakouri, Mahmoud; Ikuma, Laura H.; Aghazadeh, Fereydoun; Ishak, Sherif

    2016-01-01

    There have been growing research interests in finding a suitable work zone layout to improve work zone safety and traffic efficiency. This paper contains data supporting the research article entitled: Effects of work zone configurations and traffic density on performance variables and subjective workload (Shakouri et al., 2014 [1]). A full factorial experiment was conducted to compare the efficiency of two work zone configurations by using a driving simulator with two levels of work zone configuration, two levels of traffic density and three levels of sign placement as fixed factors. Seven female and 23 male participants completed the experiment. In this paper we present the data relating to demographic information of participants, driving simulator data and subjective workload evaluation of participants for each work zone. PMID:26937456

  20. Historical review: First facial pain patient admitted to Massachusetts General Hospital, February 1823 and first case series.

    PubMed

    Keith, David A; Dodson, Thomas B; Kaban, Leonard B

    2013-08-01

    Founded in 1811, the Massachusetts General Hospital recently celebrated its bicentennial. The War of 1812 delayed construction of the building so the first patient actually was admitted to the hospital 10 years later, on September 3, 1821. By 1823, the 60 hospital beds were full. Patient 66 was admitted on February 28, 1823, and his hospital course, as described in the admissions book, was transcribed for the Massachusetts General Hospital bicentennial celebration. That case history is reproduced and a case series of 6 similar patients published in 1828 by Dr John Warren, surgeon-in-chief and a founder of the hospital, is presented. In this report, the authors comment on the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of these patients in the context of the contemporaneous health care environment and in light of the current knowledge of facial pain disorders. This article was adapted from the authors' commentary for the bicentennial celebration. PMID:23866949

  1. Evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of criteria for isolation of patients admitted to a specialized cancer hospital.

    PubMed

    Cataneo, Caroline; Canini, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; e Castro, Paulo de Tarso Oliveira; Hayashida, Miyeko; Gir, Elucir

    2011-01-01

    Early isolation of patients possibly colonized by multi-resistant microorganisms can minimize their spread, reducing cases of hospital infection and the related costs. This study aimed to identify the sensitivity and specificity of the criteria for isolation of patients admitted to a specialized cancer hospital. Cross-sectional study with a population of 61 patients coming from other hospitals who were admitted to the hospital between March 1st and August 31th, 2009. At the moment of admission, a data collection instrument was filled out and nasal and anal swabs were collected for microbiological culture. Of the 56 patients who met the isolation criteria, 30 (49.2%) presented positive cultures for multi-resistant microorganisms and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently identified microorganism. Most patients colonized by multi-resistant microorganisms were isolated at the moment of admission. The sensitivity of the isolation criteria was 90% and the specificity was 6.5%. PMID:22030570

  2. Multidrug-resistant organisms detected in refugee patients admitted to a University Hospital, Germany June‒December 2015.

    PubMed

    Reinheimer, Claudia; Kempf, Volkhard A J; Göttig, Stephan; Hogardt, Michael; Wichelhaus, Thomas A; O'Rourke, Fiona; Brandt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR GNB) were found to colonise 60.8% (95% confidence interval: 52.3-68.9) of 143 refugee patients mainly from Syria (47), Afghanistan (29), and Somalia (14) admitted to the University Hospital Frankfurt, Germany, between June and December 2015. This percentage exceeds the prevalence of MDR GNB in resident patients four-fold. Healthcare personnel should be aware of this and the need to implement or adapt adequate infection control measures. PMID:26794850

  3. Outcomes of Patients Who Have Do Not Resuscitate Status prior to Being Admitted to an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Debjit; Moreno, Carlos; Csete, Marc; Perez, Elizabeth Kury; Cubeddu, Luigi; Farcy, David; Henry, Steven; Glazer, Zachary; Moreno-Walton, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Admission of patients who have do not resuscitate (DNR) status to an intensive care unit (ICU) is potentially a misallocation of limited resources to patients who may neither need nor want intensive care. Yet, patients who have DNR status are often admitted to the ICU. This is a retrospective review of patients who had a valid DNR status at the time that they were admitted to an ICU in a single hospital over an eighteen-month period. Thirty-five patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The primary reasons for admission to the ICU were respiratory distress (54.2%) and sepsis (45.7%). Sixteen (45.7%) of the patients died, compared to a 5.4% mortality rate for all patients admitted to our ICU during this period (p < 0.001). APACHE II score was a significant predictor of mortality (18.5 ± 1.3 alive and 23.4 ± 1.4 dead; p = 0.038). Of the 19 patients discharged alive, 9 were discharged home, 5 to hospice, and 4 to a post-acute care facility. Conclusions. Patients who have DNR status and are admitted to the ICU have a higher mortality than other ICU patients. Those who survive have a high likelihood of being discharged to hospice or a post-acute care facility. The value of intensive intervention for these patients is not supported by these results. Only a minority of patients were seen by palliative care and chaplain teams, services which the literature supports as valuable for DNR patients. Our study supports the need for less expensive and less intensive but more appropriate resources for patients and families who have chosen DNR status. PMID:27051551

  4. Risk factors, management and outcomes of patients admitted with near fatal asthma to a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dorzi, Hasan M.; Al-Shammary, Haifa A.; Al-Shareef, Salha Y.; Tamim, Hani M.; Shammout, Khaled; Al Dawood, Abdulaziz; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Near-fatal asthma (NFA) has not been well studied in Saudi Arabia. We evaluated NFA risk factors in asthmatics admitted to a tertiary-care hospital and described NFA management and outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective study of NFA patients admitted to an ICU in Riyadh (2006-2010). NFA was defined as a severe asthma attack requiring intubation. To evaluate NFA risk factors, randomly selected patients admitted to the ward for asthma exacerbation were used as controls. Collected data included demographics, information on prior asthma control and various NFA treatments and outcomes. RESULTS: Thirty NFA cases were admitted to the ICU in the five-year period. Compared to controls (N = 120), NFA patients were younger (37.5 ± 19.9 vs. 50.3 ± 23.1 years, P = 0.004) and predominantly males (70.0% vs. 41.7%, P = 0.005) and used less inhaled steroids/long-acting ß2-agonists combination (13.6% vs. 38.7% P = 0.024. Most (73.3%) NFA cases presented in the cool months (October-March). On multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92-0.99, P = 0.015) and the number of ED visits in the preceding year (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.00-1.55) were associated with NFA. Rescue NFA management included ketamine (50%) and theophylline (19%) infusions. NFA outcomes included: neuromyopathy (23%), mechanical ventilation duration = 6.4 ± 4.7 days, tracheostomy (13%) and mortality (0%). Neuromuscular blockade duration was associated with neuromyopathy (OR, 3.16 per one day increment; 95% CI, 1.27-7.83). CONCLUSIONS: In our study, NFA risk factors were younger age and higher number of ED visits. NFA had significant morbidity. Reducing neuromuscular blockade duration during ventilator management may decrease neuromyopathy risk. PMID:24551016

  5. The Pattern of Pediatric Respiratory Illnesses Admitted in Ebonyi State University Teaching Hospital South-East Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ezeonu, CT; Uneke, CJ; Ojukwu, JO; Anyanwu, OU; Okike, CO; Ezeanosike, OB; Agumadu, HU

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reports from the developed nations reveal respiratory tract infections as the leading cause of childhood hospital admissions. Children may be admitted for a variety of respiratory illnesses. Data on the spectrum of pediatric respiratory illnesses admitted in the hospital is scarce. Aim: To determine the pattern of pediatrics respiratory illness admissions, seasonal frequency, underlying risk factors and outcome. Subjects and Methods: A retrospective assessment of respiratory cases admitted in the pediatric ward from 2005 to 2010 was conducted using case notes. Parameters considered included month of presentation, age, sex, immunization and nutritional status, tools of diagnosis and patient outcome. Results were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences with the level of significance P ≤ 0.05. Results: Of the 239 cases admitted, there were more males than females (1.4:1). The commonest case was Bronchopneumonia, 71.6% (171/239 out of which 161 were uncomplicated, 5 had effusions and 6 were associated with measles). Other cases were Pulmonary Tuberculosis, 10.9% (26/239), Lobar pneumonia 8.8% (21/239), Bronchiolitis, 5% (12/239), Aspiration pneumonitis 2.1% (5/239) and Bronchial asthma, 0.8% (2/239). Mortality was 7.5% (18/239) mostly from Bronchopneumonia amongst the 1–5 years old. Mortality was significantly associated with malnutrition (P < 0.001) and poor immunization status (P < 0.01). Conclusion: Bronchopneumonia was found to be the commonest illness with significant mortality and peak occurrence in the rainy season. More emphasis must be laid on anticipatory guidance and prevention by encouraging the immunization, good nutrition and increased attention on children even after 1 year of age. PMID:25745580

  6. Molecular epidemiology of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus carriage in neonates admitted to an intensive care unit in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nasal colonization with coagulase-negative Staphylococcus (CoNS) has been described as a risk factor for subsequent systemic infection. In this study, we evaluated the genetic profile of CoNS isolates colonizing the nares of children admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). Methods We assessed CoNS carriage at admittance and discharge among newborns admitted to a NICU from July 2007 through May 2008 in one of the major municipalities of Brazil. Isolates were screened on mannitol salt agar and tryptic soy broth and tested for susceptibility to antimicrobials using the disc diffusion method. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to determine the species, the presence of the mecA gene, and to perform SCCmec typing. S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus isolated from the same child at both admission and discharge were characterized by PFGE. Results Among 429 neonates admitted to the NICU, 392 (91.4%) had nasal swabs collected at both admission and discharge. The incidence of CoNS during the hospitalization period was 55.9% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 50.9-60.7). The most frequently isolated species were S. haemolyticus (38.3%) and S.epidermidis (38.0%). Multidrug resistance (MDR) was detected in 2.2% and 29.9% of the CoNS isolates, respectively at admittance and discharge (p = 0.053). The mecA gene was more prevalent among strains isolated at discharge (83.6%) than those isolated at admission (60%); overall, SCCmec type I was isolated most frequently. The length of hospitalization was associated with colonization by MDR isolates (p < 0.005). Great genetic diversity was observed among S. epidermidis and S. haemolyticus. Conclusions NICU represents an environment of risk for colonization by MDR CoNS. Neonates admitted to the NICU can become a reservoir of CoNS strains with the potential to spread MDR strains into the community. PMID:24308773

  7. The characteristics of advanced cancer patients followed at home, but admitted to the hospital for the last days of life.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Masedu, Francesco; Valenti, Marco; Mercadante, Alessandro; Aielli, Federica

    2016-08-01

    Information regarding advanced cancer patients followed at home who are admitted to the hospital in the last days of life are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of patients who were hospitalized in the last days of life after being assisted by a home palliative care team. The secondary outcome was to identify possible risk factors for hospitalization. The charts were analyzed of a consecutive sample of advanced cancer patients admitted to hospital wards in the last days of life after being followed at home by a palliative care team. Of 550 consecutive patients followed at home, 138 (25.1 %) were admitted to the hospital. Younger patients were more likely to die in the hospital. In a logistic risk analysis adjusted for age, patients with lung and head-neck cancer were more likely to die in the hospital. Patients having a female relative or a female consort as a caregiver were more likely to die at home. CAGE-positive patients (7.25 %), and patients with a shorter period of home assistance were more likely transported to hospital before dying (p = 0.00 and p < 0.024, respectively). The most frequent reason for hospital admission was dyspnea. Admission was more frequent to the oncology ward. Patients who were admitted to the hospital died after a mean of 10.2 days (SD 8.2, range 0-40). This study provides preliminary data on the risk factors of hospitalization at the end of life for advanced cancer patients followed at home. PMID:26895033

  8. 17 CFR 240.12f-4 - Exemption of securities admitted to unlisted trading privileges from sections 13, 14 and 16.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... admitted to unlisted trading privileges from sections 13, 14 and 16. 240.12f-4 Section 240.12f-4 Commodity... Trading § 240.12f-4 Exemption of securities admitted to unlisted trading privileges from sections 13, 14 and 16. (a) Any security for which unlisted trading privileges on any national securities...

  9. A Study of the Success Rate of Late Admits in Freshman English at the Two-Year College. Working Paper 2-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sova, Ann D.

    In fall 1985, a study was conducted at Broome Community College (BCC) in Binghamton, New York, to determine whether students who added a class on or after the first class meeting (i.e., late admits) were at greater risk of withdrawing or failing than students who registered on time (i.e., regular admits). Final grades awarded to students in ENG…

  10. 7 CFR 202.43 - Proceedings under section 302(a) to show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. 202.43 Section 202.43 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT... show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. When seed or...

  11. 7 CFR 202.43 - Proceedings under section 302(a) to show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. 202.43 Section 202.43 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT... show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. When seed or...

  12. 7 CFR 202.43 - Proceedings under section 302(a) to show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. 202.43 Section 202.43 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT... show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. When seed or...

  13. 7 CFR 202.43 - Proceedings under section 302(a) to show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. 202.43 Section 202.43 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT... show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. When seed or...

  14. 7 CFR 202.43 - Proceedings under section 302(a) to show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. 202.43 Section 202.43 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT... show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. When seed or...

  15. Decreasing prevalence and seasonal variation of gunshot trauma in raptors admitted to the wildlife center of Virginia: 1993-2002.

    PubMed

    Richards, Jean; Lickey, Adrienne; Sleeman, Jonathan M

    2005-09-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to identify the epidemiologic factors associated with gunshot injuries in raptors presented to the Wildlife Center of Virginia from 1993 to 2002. Of the 3,156 raptors admitted, 118 raptors (3.7%), representing 15 species, were admitted with gunshot trauma as the primary cause of morbidity and mortality. The majority of cases consisted of four species: red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis; 47%), red-shouldered hawk (Buteo lineatus; 14%), turkey vulture (Cathartes aura; 10%), and bald eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus; 8%). For species with greater than 40 admissions during the study period, the proportion of gunshot trauma of all causes of morbidity and mortality ranged from <1% to 11%. Greater numbers of raptors with gunshot trauma were admitted during the fall and winter months (75%) compared with the spring and summer (25%). A significant decrease in the absolute number of gunshot cases per year was observed over the time period studied. The population-level effect of gunshot trauma is unknown for these species; however, it appears to be minor compared with other causes of morbidity and mortality. PMID:17312769

  16. Characteristics of Older Adults Admitted to Hospital versus Those Discharged Home, in Emergency Department Patients Referred to Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hominick, Kathryn; McLeod, Victoria; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Background Frail older adults present to the Emergency Department (ED) with complex medical, functional, and social needs. When these needs can be addressed promptly, discharge is possible, and when they cannot, hospital admission is required. We evaluated the care needs of frail older adults in the ED who were consulted to internal medicine and seen by a geriatrician to determine, under current practices, which factors were associated with hospitalization and which allowed discharge. Methods We preformed a chart-based, exploratory study. Data were abstracted from consultation records and ED charts. All cases had a standard Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA which records a Clinical Frailty Scale (CFA) and allows calculation of a Frailty Index (FI). Results Of 100 consecutive patients, 2 died in the ED, 75 were admitted, and 23 were discharged, including one urgent placement. Compared with discharged patients (0.39 ± SD 0.16), those admitted had a higher mean FI-CGA (0.48 ± 0.13; p < .01). Greater mobility dependence (2% in discharged vs. 32% in admitted; p < .05) was notable. Conclusions Discharge decisions require assessment of medical, functional, and social problems. Ill, frail patients often can be discharged home when social and nursing support can be provided. The degree of frailty, impaired mobility, and likely delirium must be taken into account when planning for their care. PMID:27076860

  17. Assessment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in medical patients admitted with falls in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Joel; Tomassen, Sylvia; Lane, Laura; Bishop, Katie; Thomas, Nibu

    2016-08-01

    Having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) puts patients at a significantly higher risk of falling. It is poorly recognised and diagnosis is frequently delayed. BPPV has been studied in outpatient settings, but there have been no studies looking at the prevalence in patients admitted with falls. This study aims to establish how common BPPV is in these patients.For a 4-month period, patients admitted on an unselected medical take were screened for an admission precipitated by a fall. Patients who consented were assessed for BPPV using the Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre. Patients who tested positive were treated using the Epley manoeuvre. The assessments were carried out by specialist physiotherapists who were experienced at assessing and diagnosing patients with peripheral vestibular disorders. Out of the 111 patients initially identified, 37 (33%) were considered to be appropriate and consented to be part of the study. Of these, 20 patients (54%) had a positive Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre.Of the patients included in the study, over half tested positive for BPPV. This merits further study. Potentially, there is a proportion of patients admitted with falls who have an easily treatable contributing factor that is not being identified with standard practice. PMID:27481376

  18. Clinical Characteristics and Precipitating Factors of Adolescent Suicide Attempters Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Care in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Subin; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Bae, Jeong-Hoon; Shin, Min-Sup; Yoo, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to examine the rates, correlates, methods, and precipitating factors of suicide attempts among adolescent patients admitted for psychiatric inpatient care from 1999 to 2010 in a university hospital in Korea. Methods The subjects consisted of 728 patients who were admitted for psychiatric inpatient care in a university hospital over a 12-year period and who were aged 10-19 years at the time of admission. We retrospectively investigated the information on suicidal behaviors and other clinical information by reviewing the subjects' electronic medical records. Whether these patients had completed their suicide on 31 December 2010 was determined by a link to the database of the National Statistical Office. Results Among 728 subjects, 21.7% had suicidal ideation at admission, and 10.7% admitted for suicidal attempts. Female gender, divorced/widowed parents, and the presence of mood disorders were associated with a significantly increased likelihood of suicide attempts. Most common method of suicide attempts was cutting, and most common reason for suicide attempts was relationship problems within the primary support group. A diagnosis of schizophrenia was associated with increased risk of death by suicide after discharge. Conclusion These results highlight the role of specific psychosocial factor (e.g., relational problems) and psychiatric disorders (e.g., mood disorders) in the suicide attempts of Korean adolescents, and the need for effective prevention strategies for adolescents at risk for suicide. PMID:25670943

  19. Clinical profiles and outcomes of children admitted to the pediatric intensive care unit from the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Haque, Anwarul; Siddiqui, Naveedur Rehman; Jafri, Sidra Kaleem; Hoda, Mehar; Bano, Surraiya; Mian, Asad

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to describe clinical profiles and outcomes of children admitted directly from the Emergency Room (ER) to the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of academic hospital. The medical records of all children (1 month to 16 years) admitted in PICU from ER, from January 2011 to December 2012 were reviewed. Of the 26,774 patients seen in the ER during the study period, 468 (1.7%) were admitted to the PICU which constituted about 41.5% (468/1127) of all the total PICU admissions. Sixty three percent (n=294) were under-five; males were 60.9% (285), 82.3% (385) were in medical category. Neurological and respiratory illnesses were the most common groups (> 50% of all ER admissions). Multi-organ dysfunction syndrome and co-morbidity were present in 25.2% (n=118) and 23.5% (n=110) respectively. The mean length of stay was 5 ± 3.7 hours. The case-fatality rate was 20.3% (n=95) as compared to the overall PICU mortality rate of 11.9% (n=135). PMID:25899201

  20. Effective Factors in Door-to-Needle Time for Streptokinase Administration in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Admitted to the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Omraninava, Ali; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Masoumi, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular incidents are a common cause of death around the world. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) poses high risks for the patient due to plaque rupture or erosion along with a superimposed non-occlusive thrombus; therefore, timely treatment with antithrombotic agents plays a key role in reducing an AMI mortality rate. Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the time interval between the admission of AMI-suspected patients and treatment initiation. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 110 patients admitted to the emergency department of Imam Hussein hospital in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected using checklists, completed by the patients’ next of kin or the emergency staff. To analyze the data, student t- test and analysis of variance were used. Results: In this study, 31 female and 79 male subjects were included, respectively. The mean time to receive the first dose of streptokinase was 66.39 minutes (73.74 minutes for females and 63.5 minutes for male patients), varying from 49.92 minutes in the morning to 69.78 minutes in the afternoon and 72.68 minutes during night shifts. Conclusions: The door-to-needle (DTN) time, in a standard setting, is recommended to be less than 30 minutes. According to the results of this study, the DTN time is comparatively two times longer in females and afternoon and night shifts. Different variables including emergency staff, physicians, patients’ characteristics, and environmental/physical factors induced this difference. PMID:27218043

  1. Mesopelagic zone ecology and biogeochemistry - a synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Carol; Steinberg, Deborah K.; Anderson, Thomas R.; Arístegui, Javier; Carlson, Craig A.; Frost, Jessica R.; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Hernández-León, Santiago; Jackson, George A.; Koppelmann, Rolf; Quéguiner, Bernard; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rassoulzadegan, Fereidoun; Robison, Bruce H.; Tamburini, Christian; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Wishner, Karen F.; Zhang, Jing

    2010-08-01

    The mesopelagic zone is the oceanic region through which carbon and other elements must pass in order to reach deeper waters or the sea floor. However, the food web interactions that occur in the mesopelagic zone are difficult to measure and so, despite their crucial importance to global elemental cycles, are not very well known. Recent developments in technology and new approaches have advanced the study of the variability in and controls upon the distribution and diversity of organisms in the mesopelagic zone, including the roles of respiration, recycling, and repackaging of particulate and dissolved organic material. However, there are remarkably few syntheses of the ecology and biogeochemistry of the microbes and metazoa that permanently reside or habitually visit this 'twilight zone'. Without this synthesis, it is difficult to assess the impact of ongoing changes in ocean hydrography and chemistry, due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, on the biological carbon pump. This paper reviews what is known about the distribution of microbes and metazoa in the mesopelagic zone in relation to their activity and impact on global biogeochemical cycles. Thus, gaps in our knowledge are identified and suggestions made for priority research programmes that will improve our ability to predict the effects of climate change on carbon sequestration.

  2. Cataclysmic variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szkody, Paula; Cropper, Mark

    1988-01-01

    Recent observations of cataclysmic variables (CVs) at different wavelengths are reviewed, with a focus on their implications for theoretical models. Consideration is given to disk CVs (the flux distribution of the disk and changes during dwarf-nova outbursts), magnetic CVs (flux distributions and components), and the underlying stars. Typical data are presented in graphs, tables, and sample spectra, and it is concluded that more detailed multiwavelength observations are needed to improve models of radiative transfer and viscosity effects in accretion disks.

  3. Hierarchical analysis of rainfall variability across Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnaji, Chidozie Charles; Mama, Cordelia Nnennaya; Ukpabi, Okechukwu

    2016-01-01

    Rainfall in Nigeria is subjected to wide variability both in time and space. This variability has assumed a more pronounced dimension as a result of climate change. In this paper, cluster analyses were used to study rainfall variability in Nigeria. Rainfall data in 20 locations spread across the geopolitical and ecological zones of Nigeria were subjected to hierarchical cluster analysis and analysis of time series and coefficient of variation for over periods spanning 30 years. Maps of spatial variations of mean annual rainfall and mean rainfall coefficient of variation were produced using ARCGIS 10.1. Furthermore, a better understanding of temporal variation of rainfall was sought by an investigation into the time series of rainfall coefficients of variation. It was found that the southern parts of the country were given to more severe rainfall variability/fluctuations than the northern parts. The north central parts exhibited more similarity to the southern parts than the other northern locations. The relationship between average annual rainfall and the coefficient of rainfall variation was found to follow a power law with R 2 value approximately 0.7. With respect to variability of annual rainfall, three zones emerged as follows: a linear relationship ( R 2 = 0.90) exists between coefficient of variation and average annual rainfall for the rainforest zone of the southsouth; a power law ( R 2 = 0.86) exists between coefficient of variation and average annual rainfall for all rainforest and derived guinea savannah zones of the southeastern and southwestern states; and a logarithmic relationship ( R 2 = 0.54) exists between coefficient of variation and average annual rainfall for all northern states regardless of ecological zone. Generally, in-year rainfall variability increases from the northwest to the southwest; while between-year (yearly) rainfall variability increases from the north central to the southeast. This study further confirms that rainfall variability

  4. Respiratory viral infections and effects of meteorological parameters and air pollution in adults with respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency room

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Denise R; Viana, Vinícius P; Müller, Alice M; Livi, Fernando P; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso R

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory viral infections (RVIs) are the most common causes of respiratory infections. The prevalence of respiratory viruses in adults is underestimated. Meteorological variations and air pollution are likely to play a role in these infections. Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine the number of emergency visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) and to evaluate the association between ILI/SARI, RVI prevalence, and meteorological factors/air pollution, in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil, from November 2008 to October 2010. Methods Eleven thousand nine hundred and fifty-three hospitalizations (adults and children) for respiratory symptoms were correlated with meteorological parameters and air pollutants. In a subset of adults, nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected and analyzed through IFI test. The data were analyzed using time-series analysis. Results Influenza-like illness and SARI were diagnosed in 3698 (30·9%) and 2063 (17·7%) patients, respectively. Thirty-seven (9·0%) samples were positive by IFI and 93 of 410 (22·7%) were IFI and/or PCR positive. In a multivariate logistic regression model, IFI positivity was statistically associated with absolute humidity, use of air conditioning, and presence of mold in home. Sunshine duration was significantly associated with the frequency of ILI cases. For SARI cases, the variables mean temperature, sunshine duration, relative humidity, and mean concentration of pollutants were singnificant. Conclusions At least 22% of infections in adult patients admitted to ER with respiratory complaints were caused by RVI. The correlations among meteorological variables, air pollution, ILI/SARI cases, and respiratory viruses demonstrated the relevance of climate factors as significant underlying contributors to the prevalence of RVI. PMID:24034701

  5. Predicting 1-Year Mortality Rate for Patients Admitted With an Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease to an Intensive Care Unit: An Opportunity for Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Batzlaff, Cassandra M.; Karpman, Craig; Afessa, Bekele; Benzo, Roberto P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a model to aid clinicians in better predicting 1-year mortality rate for patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) with the goal of earlier initiation of palliative care and end-of-life communications in this patient population. This retrospective cohort study included patients from a medical ICU from April 1, 1995, to November 30, 2009. Data collected from the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III database included demographic characteristics; severity of illness scores; noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation time; ICU and hospital length of stay; and ICU, hospital, and 1-year mortality. Statistically significant univariate variables for 1-year mortality were entered into a multivariate model, and the independent variables were used to generate a scoring system to predict 1-year mortality rate. At 1-year follow-up, 295 of 591 patients died (50%). Age and hospital length of stay were identified as independent determinants of mortality at 1 year by using multivariate analysis, and the predictive model developed had an area under the operating curve of 0.68. Bootstrap analysis with 1000 iterations validated the model, age, and hospital length of stay, entered the model 100% of the time (area under the operating curve=0.687; 95% CI, 0.686–0.688). A simple model using age and hospital length of stay may be informative for providers willing to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with high 1-year mortality rate who may benefit from end-of-life communications and from palliative care. PMID:24656805

  6. Dike zones on Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markov, M. S.; Sukhanov, A. L.

    1987-01-01

    Venusian dike zone structures were identified from Venera 15 and 16 radar images. These include: a zone of subparallel rows centered at 30 deg N, 7 deg E; a system of intersecting bands centered at 67 deg N, 284 deg E; polygonal systems in lavas covering the structural base uplift centered at 47 deg N, 200 deg E; a system of light bands in the region of the ring structure centered at 43 deg N, 13 deg E; and a dike band centered at 27 deg N, 36 deg E.

  7. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene DNAPL source zones: source zone architecture versus electron donor availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M.; Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    The persistence of dense-non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface has led practitioners and regulatory agencies to turn towards low-maintenance, low-cost remediation methods. Biological degradation has been suggested as a possible solution, based on the well-proven ability of certain microbial species to break down dissolved chlorinated ethenes under favorable conditions. However, the biodegradation of pure phase chlorinated ethenes is subject to additional constraints: the continuous release of electron acceptor at a rate governed by mass transfer kinetics, and the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of DNAPL source zones which leads to spatially and temporally variable availability of the reactants for reductive dechlorination. In this work, we investigate the relationship between various DNAPL source zone characteristics and reaction kinetics using COMPSIM, a multiphase groundwater model that considers non-equilibrium mass transfer and Monod-type kinetics for reductive dechlorination. Numerical simulations are performed for simple, homogeneous trichloroethene DNAPL source zones to demonstrate the effect of single source zone characteristics, as well as for larger, more realistic heterogeneous source zones. It is shown that source zone size, and mass transfer kinetics may have a decisive effect on the predicted bio-enhancement. Finally, we evaluate the performance of DNAPL bioremediation for realistic, thermodynamically constrained, concentrations of electron donor. Our results indicate that the latter may be the most important limitation for the success of DNAPL bioremediation, leading to reduced bio-enhancement and, in many cases, comparable performance with water flooding.

  8. Modeling work zone crash frequency by quantifying measurement errors in work zone length.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Ozbay, Kaan; Ozturk, Ozgur; Yildirimoglu, Mehmet

    2013-06-01

    Work zones are temporary traffic control zones that can potentially cause safety problems. Maintaining safety, while implementing necessary changes on roadways, is an important challenge traffic engineers and researchers have to confront. In this study, the risk factors in work zone safety evaluation were identified through the estimation of a crash frequency (CF) model. Measurement errors in explanatory variables of a CF model can lead to unreliable estimates of certain parameters. Among these, work zone length raises a major concern in this analysis because it may change as the construction schedule progresses generally without being properly documented. This paper proposes an improved modeling and estimation approach that involves the use of a measurement error (ME) model integrated with the traditional negative binomial (NB) model. The proposed approach was compared with the traditional NB approach. Both models were estimated using a large dataset that consists of 60 work zones in New Jersey. Results showed that the proposed improved approach outperformed the traditional approach in terms of goodness-of-fit statistics. Moreover it is shown that the use of the traditional NB approach in this context can lead to the overestimation of the effect of work zone length on the crash occurrence. PMID:23563145

  9. Outcomes for women admitted to a mother and baby unit: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Gillham, Rebecca; Wittkowski, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Mother and baby units (MBUs) provide inpatient psychiatric care for mothers and their infants up to a year after childbirth. They are commissioned to support the mother–infant relationship as well as stabilize maternal mental health. As their efficacy at meeting these aims had not previously been systematically assessed, this paper reviewed the international literature relating to psychological outcomes following MBU admission. A systematic search of five databases identified 23 papers eligible for inclusion, reporting on a range of outcomes indicating positive effects on maternal mental health and the mother–infant relationship and an absence of adverse effects on child development. The review also highlighted specific groups responding less favorably to MBU admission, eg, mothers with a diagnosis of schizophrenia. Although the included studies were of variable methodological quality, the research findings consistently indicated positive effects. Implications for research and clinical practice are outlined in the discussion. PMID:25995650

  10. Weak electromagnetic field admitting integrability in Kerr-NUT-(A)dS spacetimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolář, Ivan; Krtouš, Pavel

    2015-06-01

    We investigate properties of higher-dimensional generally rotating black-hole spacetimes, so-called Kerr-NUT-(anti)-de Sitter spacetimes, as well as a family of related spaces which share the same explicit and hidden symmetries. In these spaces, we study a particle motion in the presence of a weak electromagnetic field and compare it with its operator analogies. First, we find general commutativity conditions for classical observables and for their operator counterparts, then we investigate a fulfillment of these conditions in the Kerr-NUT-(anti)-de Sitter and related spaces. We find the most general form of the weak electromagnetic field compatible with the complete integrability of the particle motion and the comutativity of the field operators. For such a field we solve the charged Hamilton-Jacobi and Klein-Gordon equations by separation of variables.

  11. Current Climate Variability & Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, J.; Criswell, B.; Elliott, W. C.

    2013-12-01

    climate change. The next section guides students through the exploration of temporal changes in global temperature from the surface to the lower stratosphere. Students discover that there has been global warming over the past several decades, and the subsequent section allows them to consider solar radiation and greenhouse gases as possible causes of this warming. Students then zoom in on different latitudinal zones to examine changes in temperature for each zone and hypothesize about why one zone may have warmed more than others. The final section, prior to the answering of the essential questions, is an examination of the following effects of the current change in temperatures: loss of sea ice; rise of sea level; loss of permafrost loss; and moistening of the atmosphere. The lab addresses 14 climate-literacy concepts and all seven climate-literacy principles through data and images that are mainly NASA products. It focuses on the satellite era of climate data; therefore, 1979 is the typical starting year for most datasets used by students. Additionally, all time-series analysis end with the latest year with full-year data availability; thus, the climate variability and trends truly are 'current.'

  12. Fast aurora zone analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Mattie

    1992-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), of the Goddard Space Flight Center provides acquisition data to tracking stations and orbit and attitude services to scientists and mission support personnel. The following paper explains how a method was determined that found spacecraft entry and exit times of the aurora zone.

  13. Stretching the comfort zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibb, Bruce C.

    2015-08-01

    Bruce C. Gibb is organizing a workshop for two groups of scientists that study a similar topic, but rarely get together. The different perspectives they bring and the unusual set up of the meeting will hopefully lead to new ideas, but, as he suggests, they will also lead to the attendees leaving their comfort zones.

  14. Zones of Peace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Judith L.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Children affected by armed violence face a specific set of stressors and challenges which calls for appropriate programming. This Coordinator's Notebook focuses on how to work with children affected by organized violence in order to provide them the best possible early childhood experiences. It is divided into five sections. "Children as Zones of…

  15. Dementia in older people admitted to hospital: a regional multi-hospital observational study of prevalence, associations and case recognition

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Suzanne; Manning, Edmund; Barrett, Aoife; Brady, Noeleen M.; Browne, Vanessa; O’Shea, Emma; Molloy, David William; O'Regan, Niamh A.; Trawley, Steven; Cahill, Suzanne; O'Sullivan, Kathleen; Woods, Noel; Meagher, David; Ni Chorcorain, Aoife M.; Linehan, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: previous studies have indicated a prevalence of dementia in older admissions of ∼42% in a single London teaching hospital, and 21% in four Queensland hospitals. However, there is a lack of published data from any European country on the prevalence of dementia across hospitals and between patient groups. Objective: to determine the prevalence and associations of dementia in older patients admitted to acute hospitals in Ireland. Methods: six hundred and six patients aged ≥70 years were recruited on admission to six hospitals in Cork County. Screening consisted of Standardised Mini-Mental State Examination (SMMSE); patients with scores <27/30 had further assessment with the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). Final expert diagnosis was based on SMMSE, IQCODE and relevant medical and demographic history. Patients were screened for delirium and depression, and assessed for co-morbidity, functional ability and nutritional status. Results: of 598 older patients admitted to acute hospitals, 25% overall had dementia; with 29% in public hospitals. Prevalence varied between hospitals (P < 0.001); most common in rural hospitals and acute medical admissions. Only 35.6% of patients with dementia had a previous diagnosis. Patients with dementia were older and frailer, with higher co-morbidity, malnutrition and lower functional status (P < 0.001). Delirium was commonly superimposed on dementia (57%) on admission. Conclusion: dementia is common in older people admitted to acute hospitals, particularly in acute medical admissions, and rural hospitals, where services may be less available. Most dementia is not previously diagnosed, emphasising the necessity for cognitive assessment in older people on presentation to hospital. PMID:26420638

  16. Risk Factors for Mechanical Ventilation in Patients with Scrub Typhus Admitted to Intensive Care Unit at a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Rim, Ch'ang Bum; Lee, Jun Ho; Kang, Min Seok; Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Sang Il; Jung, Sun Young; Cho, Yongseon

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for mechanical ventilation in the patients with scrub typhus admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) at a university hospital. Methods We retrospectively selected and analyzed clinical data from the medical records of 70 patients (32 men, 38 women) admitted to the ICU with scrub typhus between 2004 and 2014. The patients had a mean±standard deviation age of 71.2±11.1 years and were evaluated in two groups: those who had been treated with mechanical ventilation (the MV group, n=19) and those who had not (the non-MV group, n=51). Mean ages of the MV group and the non-MV group were 71.2±8.3 years and 71.2±11.1 years, respectively. Results Significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to acute respiratory failure (p=0.008), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score (p=0.015), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (p=0.013), death (p=0.014), and ICU duration (p<0.01). Multivariate analysis indicated that the following factors were significantly associated with mechanical ventilation: acute respiratory failure (p=0.011), SOFA score (p=0.005), APACHE II score (p=0.011), platelet count (p=0.009), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (p=0.011). Conclusion Thus, five factors-acute respiratory failure, SOFA score, APACHE II score, platelet count, and LDH-can be the meaningful indicators for mechanical ventilation for the patients with scrub typhus admitted to ICU. PMID:26770232

  17. Acute Poisonings Admitted to a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit in Northern India: Patient Profile and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Ashu Sara; Pannu, Aman; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Background Poisoning is becoming a real health care burden for developing countries like India. An improved knowledge of the patterns of poisonings, as well as the clinical course and outcomes of these cases can help to formulate better preventive and management strategies. Aim To study the demographic and clinical profiles of patients admitted to the ICU with acute poisoning and to study the factors that predict their mortality. Materials and Methods Retrospective two years (September 1, 2010 to August 31, 2012) study of all consecutive patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with acute poisoning at a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Results Out of the 67 patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, the majority were young (median age 29 years) males (69%) who had consumed poison intentionally. Pesticides were the most commonly employed poison, notably organophosphorus compounds (22 patients, 32.8%) and aluminium phosphide (14 patients, 20.9%). While the overall mortality from all poisonings was low (18%), aluminium phosphide was highly toxic, with a mortality rate of 35%. The factors at ICU admission that were found to be associated with a significant risk of death were, high APACHE II and SOFA scores (p =0.0001 and p=0.006, respectively), as well as the need for mechanical ventilation and drugs for vasoactive support (p=0.012 and p= 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion Use of pesticides for intentional poisoning continues to be rampant in Northern India, with many patients presenting in a critical condition to tertiary level hospitals. Pesticide regulations laws, educational awareness, counseling and poison information centers will help to curtail this public health problem. PMID:26557594

  18. Stable wormholes on a noncommutative-geometry background admitting a one-parameter group of conformal motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhfittig, P. K. F.

    2016-07-01

    When Morris and Thorne first proposed the possible existence of traversable wormholes, they adopted the following strategy: maintain complete control over the geometry, thereby leaving open the determination of the stress-energy tensor. In this paper we determine this tensor by starting with a noncommutative-geometry background and assuming that the static and spherically symmetric spacetime admits conformal motions. This had been established in a previous collaboration with Rahaman et al. using a slightly different approach. Accordingly, the main purpose of this paper is to show that the wormhole obtained can be made stable to linearized radial perturbations.

  19. Users manual for program ADMIT: Admittance and pressure transfer function developed for use on a PC computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Wilbur C.

    1992-01-01

    The piping in a liquid rocket can assume complex configurations due to multiple tanks, multiple engines, and structures that must be piped around. The capability to handle some of these complex configurations have been incorporated into the ADMIT code. The capability to modify the input on line has been implemented. The configurations allowed include multiple tanks, multiple engines, the splitting of a pipe into unequal segments going to different (or the same) engines. This program will handle the following type elements: straight pipes, bends, inline accumulators, tuned stub accumulators, Helmholtz resonators, parallel resonators, pumps, split pipes, multiple tanks, and multiple engines.

  20. Functional Disability Among Late Middle-Aged and Older Adults Admitted to a Safety-Net Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Rebecca T.; Pierluissi, Edgar; Guzman, David; Kessell, Eric R.; Goldman, L. Elizabeth; Sarkar, Urmimala; Schneidermann, Michelle; Critchfield, Jeffrey M.; Kushel, Margot B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Although individuals with lower socioeconomic status may develop functional disability at younger ages, little is known about the prevalence and correlates of functional disability among late middle-aged and older patients admitted to safety-net hospitals. Objectives To determine the prevalence of pre-admission functional disability among late middle-aged and older safety-net inpatients, and to identify characteristics associated with functional disability by age. Design Cross-sectional analysis. Setting Safety-net hospital in San Francisco, California. Participants English, Spanish, and Chinese-speaking community-dwelling patients aged 55 and older admitted to a safety-net hospital with anticipated return to the community (N = 699). Measurements At hospital admission, patients reported their need for help performing 5 activities of daily living (ADLs) and 7 instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs) 2 weeks before admission. ADL disability was defined as needing help performing 1 or more ADLs and IADL disability as needing help performing 2 or more IADLs. Participant characteristics were assessed, including sociodemographics, health status, health-related behaviors, and health-seeking behaviors. Results Overall, 28.3% of participants reported that they had an ADL disability 2 weeks prior to admission and 40.4% reported an IADL disability. The prevalence of pre-admission ADL disability was 28.9% among those 55-59 years, 20.7% among those 60-69 years, and 41.2% among those aged 70 and older (P<.001). The prevalence of IADL disability had a similar distribution. The characteristics associated with functional disability differed by age: among adults aged 55-59, African Americans had a higher odds of ADL and/or IADL disability, while among participants aged 60-69 and aged 70 and older, inadequate health literacy was associated with functional disability. Conclusion Pre-admission functional disability is common among patients aged 55 and older admitted

  1. Variation in fracture zone rigidity by dynamic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spivak, A. A.; Khazins, V. M.

    2013-03-01

    The coefficient of normal rigidity of different-order fault zones was evaluated from seismic data. The crust tectonic faults were shown to be dynamic systems and nonstatic. Specifically, this is manifested in the variability of their rigidity with time. The value of the rigidity of fault zones varies in time with periods of 13-15 days, 27-32 days, and around 1 year. Here, the coefficient of normal rigidity of different-order fault zones can vary by 1.3 (semimonthly variations) 1.5 (monthly variations), and 2.5 times (annual variations), respectively. These variations are most likely governed by the rate and intensity of the transformation of matter of fault zones and, as a consequence, the variations in their mechanical properties under tidal conditions. Dynamic effects like seismoexplosive waves lead to a reduction in the rigidity of fault zones by 5-50% depending on the amplitude of the compression wave.

  2. Risk of death and readmission of hospital-admitted COPD exacerbations: European COPD Audit.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Sylvia; Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis; Pozo-Rodriguez, Francisco; Castro-Acosta, Ady; Studnicka, Michael; Kaiser, Bernhard; Roberts, C Michael

    2016-01-01

    Studies report high in-hospital and post-discharge mortality of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations varying depending upon patient characteristics, hospital resources and treatment standards. This study aimed to investigate the patient, resource and organisational factors associated with in-hospital and 90-day post-discharge mortality and readmission of COPD exacerbations within the European COPD Audit. The audit collected data of COPD exacerbation admissions from 13 European countries.On admission, only 49.7% of COPD patients had spirometry results available and only 81.6% had blood gases taken. Using logistic regression analysis, the risk associated with in-hospital and post-discharge mortality was higher age, presence of acidotic respiratory failure, subsequent need for ventilatory support and presence of comorbidity. In addition, the 90-day risk of COPD readmission was associated with previous admissions. Only the number of respiratory specialists per 1000 beds, a variable related to hospital resources, decreased the risk of post-discharge mortality.The European COPD Audit identifies risk factors associated with in-hospital and post-discharge mortality and COPD readmission. Addressing the deficiencies in acute COPD care such as making spirometry available and measuring blood gases and providing noninvasive ventilation more regularly would provide opportunities to improve COPD outcomes. PMID:26493806

  3. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  4. Transport of through a Thick Vadose Zone.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Best, Anna; Parker, Beth L; Aravena, Ramon; Dunfield, Kari

    2015-09-01

    Livestock manure applications on fields can be a source of contamination in water resources, including groundwater. Although fecal indicators like have often been detected in tile drainage systems, few studies have monitored groundwater at depth after manure treatments, especially at sites with a deep, heterogeneous vadose zone. Our hypothesis was that microbial transport through a thick vadose zone would be limited or nonexistent due to attenuation processes, subsurface thickness, and heterogeneity. This study tested this hypothesis by monitoring concentrations beneath a 12-m-thick vadose zone of coarse, heterogeneous glacial sediments after surface application of liquid swine manure. was detected on all 23 sample dates over the 5-mo period (4 Apr. 2012-13 Aug. 2012), with particularly elevated concentrations 1 wk after application and lasting for 5 wk. Variable low-level concentrations before and after the elevated period suggest remobilization and delayed transport of microorganisms to the water table without additional loadings within the flow field. These findings suggest preferential flow pathways allowing deep infiltration of manure bacteria as well as a continued source of bacteria, with variable retention and travel times, over several months. Preferential flow pathways at this site include soil macropores, depression focused infiltration, and pathways related to subsurface heterogeneity and/or fracture flow through finer-grained diamict beds. Further research is needed to confirm the relative contribution of sources, constrain travel times, and define specific transport pathways. PMID:26436260

  5. Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Admitted to Intensive Care Units: Outcome Analysis and Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Braess, Jan; Thudium, Johannes; Schmid, Christoph; Kochanek, Matthias; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Lebiedz, Pia; Görlich, Dennis; Gerth, Hans U.; Rohde, Christian; Kessler, Torsten; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Stelljes, Matthias; Büchner, Thomas; Schlimok, Günter; Hallek, Michael; Waltenberger, Johannes; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Heilmeier, Bernhard; Krug, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Background This retrospective, multicenter study aimed to reveal risk predictors for mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) as well as survival after ICU discharge in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requiring treatment in the ICU. Methods and Results Multivariate analysis of data for 187 adults with AML treated in the ICU in one institution revealed the following as independent prognostic factors for death in the ICU: arterial oxygen partial pressure below 72 mmHg, active AML and systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon ICU admission, and need for hemodialysis and mechanical ventilation in the ICU. Based on these variables, we developed an ICU mortality score and validated the score in an independent cohort of 264 patients treated in the ICU in three additional tertiary hospitals. Compared with the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, the Logistic Organ Dysfunction (LOD) score, and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, our score yielded a better prediction of ICU mortality in the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis (AUC = 0.913 vs. AUC = 0.710 [SAPS II], AUC = 0.708 [LOD], and 0.770 [SOFA] in the training cohort; AUC = 0.841 for the developed score vs. AUC = 0.730 [SAPSII], AUC = 0.773 [LOD], and 0.783 [SOFA] in the validation cohort). Factors predicting decreased survival after ICU discharge were as follows: relapse or refractory disease, previous allogeneic stem cell transplantation, time between hospital admission and ICU admission, time spent in ICU, impaired diuresis, Glasgow Coma Scale <8 and hematocrit of ≥25% at ICU admission. Based on these factors, an ICU survival score was created and used for risk stratification into three risk groups. This stratification discriminated distinct survival rates after ICU discharge. Conclusions Our data emphasize that although individual risks differ widely depending on the patient and disease status, a substantial portion of critically ill patients with AML benefit

  6. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOEpatents

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  7. The prevalence and risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity among preterm babies admitted to Soba Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Omer, Ilham M; Hassan, Hafsa A

    2014-01-01

    This is a prospective hospital based study conducted in Soba University Hospital (SUH), Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) between January 2012 and January 2013, to determine the prevalence and risk factors of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) among preterm babies admitted to Soba NICU and to assess the outcome of those babies. Ninety-two neonates with gestational age less than 34 weeks at birth were included in the study. Thirty-three of them were males and 59 were females. All of them were admitted to the NICU due to prematurity. Data was collected in a structured questionnaire. Thirty-four infants (37%) developed ROP in one or both eyes; 12 (35.3%) of them developed stage 3 and underwent laser therapy, 2 of them had aggressive posterior form, which was treated with Evastin injection. Seven (20.3%) neonates diagnosed as stage 2, and 13 (37.7%) had stage 1. Statistically, there were significant relationships between ROP and gestational age, birth weight (BW), oxygen therapy, sepsis, and blood transfusion (p=0.000). No significant relationship was found between the occurrence of ROP and sex of the baby, respiratory distress syndrome (RDS), hyperbilirubineamia, intraventricular haemorrage (IVH) and necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), p >0.000 in all of them. The prevalence of ROP in this study was 37%. Low BW, low gestational age, oxygen therapy, and blood transfusion were all significant risk factors for ROP. ROP should be highlighted in Sudan, and screening program should be recommended for all premature babies.

  8. The Comparison of Procalcitonin Guidance Administer Antibiotics with Empiric Antibiotic Therapy in Critically Ill Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Atabak; Khodadadian, Ali; Sanatkar, Mehdi; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Ahmadi, Arezoo; Imani, Farsad; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    The empiric antibiotic therapy can result in antibiotic overuse, development of bacterial resistance and increasing costs in critically ill patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of procalcitonin (PCT) guide treatment on antibiotic use and clinical outcomes of patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). A total of 60 patients were enrolled in this study and randomly divided into two groups, cases that underwent antibiotic treatment based on serum level of PCT as PCT group (n=30) and patients who undergoing antibiotic empiric therapy as control group (n=30). Our primary endpoint was the use of antibiotic treatment. Additional endpoints were changed in clinical status and early mortality. Antibiotics use was lower in PCT group compared to control group (P=0.03). Current data showed that difference in SOFA score from the first day to the second day after admitting patients in ICU did not significantly differ (P=0.88). Patients in PCT group had a significantly shorter median ICU stay, four days versus six days (P=0.01). However, hospital stay was not statistically significant different between two groups, 20 days versus 22 days (P=0.23). Early mortality was similar between two groups. PCT guidance administers antibiotics reduce antibiotics exposure and length of ICU stay, and we found no differences in clinical outcomes and early mortality rates between the two studied groups. PMID:26553084

  9. Influenza epidemiology in adults admitted to sentinel Australian hospitals in 2014: the Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Holmes, Mark; Senenayake, Sanjaya; Dwyer, Dominic E; Hewagama, Saliya; Korman, Tony; Irving, Louis; Brown, Simon; Waterer, Grant; Hunter, Cameron; Friedman, N Deborah; Wark, Peter; Simpson, Graham; Upman, John; Bowler, Simon; Macartney, Kristine; Blyth, Christopher; Kotsimbos, Tom; Kelly, Paul

    2015-09-01

    The Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN) is a sentinel hospital-based surveillance program that operates at sites in all states and territories in Australia. This report summarises the epidemiology of hospitalisations with laboratory-confirmed influenza during the 2014 influenza season. In this observational study, cases were defined as patients admitted to one of the sentinel hospitals with an acute respiratory illness with influenza confirmed by nucleic acid detection. During the period 3 April to 31 October 2014 (the 2014 influenza season), 1,692 adult patients (>16 years) were admitted with confirmed influenza to one of 15 of 17 FluCAN sentinel hospitals (excluding 2 paediatric hospitals). Of these, 47% were over 65 years of age, 10% were Indigenous Australians, 3.3% were pregnant and 85% had chronic co-morbidities. The majority of cases were due to influenza A. Influenza B was detected in 7% of patients. There were a large number of hospital admissions detected with confirmed influenza in this national observational surveillance system in 2014. These are estimated to represent a national annual burden of around 15,000 admissions and almost 100,000 bed-days nationally. PMID:26620349

  10. Study of prevalence of hypertension in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease patients admitted at Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Sanjib; Paudel, Badri; Shah, Shristi

    2005-12-01

    A retrospective study of 237 cases of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients admitted in medical ward of Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital (NMCTH) was performed to find out the prevalence of hypertension in such COPD subjects. The prevalence of COPD amongst the total number of patients admitted at NMCTH medical ward was 17.3%. Prevalence of COPD was more after the onset of middle age, the peak was found to be at the age of 60-69 years. Out of these COPD subjects, 98 patients (37 patients were known case of hypertension) had hypertension. Thus prevalence of hypertension was 41.3% in COPD subjects studied. Prevalence increased with age after the age of 50 years and the highest prevalence was at the age of 60-69 years which directly correlates with the prevalence of COPD. The prevalence of hypertension in COPD patients was significantly higher than the normal population that may reflect COPD itself as a risk factor for developing hypertension. A larger and detailed study is needed to confirm such finding. PMID:16519071

  11. Physical activity levels improve following discharge in people admitted to hospital with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ling Ling Y; Alison, Jennifer A; McKenzie, David K; McKeough, Zoe J

    2016-02-01

    This study aimed to determine the physical activity level of people admitted to hospital with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) and whether physical activity changed immediately after discharge and 6 weeks post hospital admission. In this prospective observational study, people admitted to hospital with an AECOPD had physical activity levels monitored using the SenseWear(®) Armband (model MF-SW) for 3 days in hospital (T1), during the first week at home following discharge (T2), and at home during the sixth week after admission (T3). Fifty participants (mean age (SD) 71 (10) years) completed the study. There was a linear increase in average steps per day over the three time periods (T1, mean (SD) 1385 (1972) steps/day; T2, 2040 (2680); T3, 2328 (2745); analysis of variance (ANOVA) p = 0.001) and time spent in moderate activity (3.0-6.0 metabolic equivalents; minutes/day) (T1, mean (SD) 16 (27) minutes/day; T2, 32 (46) minutes/day; T3, 35 (58) minutes/day; ANOVA p = 0.008). For both outcomes, post hoc t-tests showed significant improvements from T1 to T2 and from T1 to T3, but not between T2 and T3. Physical activity was low in hospital and significantly improved in the week after discharge but showed no further significant improvement at 6 weeks following a hospitalized AECOPD. PMID:26374299

  12. Trojans in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Richard; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Dvorak, Rudolf; Erdi, Balint; Sándor, Zsolt

    2005-10-01

    With the aid of numerical experiments we examined the dynamical stability of fictitious terrestrial planets in 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jovian-like planets of extrasolar planetary systems. In our stability study of the so-called "Trojan" planets in the habitable zone, we used the restricted three-body problem with different mass ratios of the primary bodies. The application of the three-body problem showed that even massive Trojan planets can be stable in the 1:1 mean motion resonance. From the 117 extrasolar planetary systems only 11 systems were found with one giant planet in the habitable zone. Out of this sample set we chose four planetary systems--HD17051, HD27442, HD28185, and HD108874--for further investigation. To study the orbital behavior of the stable zone in the different systems, we used direct numerical computations (Lie Integration Method) that allowed us to determine the escape times and the maximum eccentricity of the fictitious "Trojan planets." PMID:16225431

  13. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  14. Renewable liquid reflecting zone plate

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Arthur; Ryutov, Dmitri D.

    2003-12-09

    A renewable liquid reflecting zone plate. Electrodes are operatively connected to a dielectric liquid in a circular or other arrangement to produce a reflecting zone plate. A system for renewing the liquid uses a penetrable substrate.

  15. Educational Motivations of Part-Time Adults as Related to Socio-Demographic Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogers, Brenda H.; And Others

    The motivations of adult learners who were not admitted to college degree programs but who chose to take credit courses on a part-time basis were studied, with attention to the relationship of motivational orientations and sociodemographic variables (sex, race, age, and family income level). The study population of 464 part-time students 25 years…

  16. Habitable zones and UV habitable zones around host stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jianpo; Zhang, Fenghui; Zhang, Xianfei; Han, Zhanwen

    2010-01-01

    Ultraviolet radiation is a double-edged sword to life. If it is too strong, the terrestrial biological systems will be damaged. And if it is too weak, the synthesis of many biochemical compounds cannot go along. We try to obtain the continuous ultraviolet habitable zones, and compare the ultraviolet habitable zones with the habitable zones of host stars. Using the boundary ultraviolet radiation of ultraviolet habitable zone, we calculate the ultraviolet habitable zones of host stars with masses from 0.08 to 4.00 M ⊙. For the host stars with effective temperatures lower than 4,600 K, the ultraviolet habitable zones are closer than the habitable zones. For the host stars with effective temperatures higher than 7,137 K, the ultraviolet habitable zones are farther than the habitable zones. For a hot subdwarf as a host star, the distance of the ultraviolet habitable zone is about ten times more than that of the habitable zone, which is not suitable for the existence of life.

  17. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  18. Quantifying differences in the "fat burning" zone and the aerobic zone: implications for training.

    PubMed

    Carey, Daniel G

    2009-10-01

    The primary objective of this study was to examine the relationship of the "fat burning" and aerobic zones. Subjects consisted of 36 relatively fit runners (20 male, 16 female) who completed a maximal exercise test to exhaustion on a motor-driven treadmill. The lower and upper limit of the "fat burning" zone was visually assessed by examining each individual graph. Maximal fat oxidation (MFO) was determined to be that point during the test at which fat metabolism in fat calories per minute peaked. The lower limit of the aerobic zone was assessed as 50% of heart rate reserve, whereas the upper limit was set at anaerobic threshold. Although the lower and upper limits of the "fat burning" zone (67.6-87.1% maximal heart rate) were significantly lower (p < 0.05) than their counterparts in the aerobic zone (58.9-76.2%), the considerable overlap of the 2 zones would indicate that training for fat oxidation and training for aerobic fitness are not mutually exclusive and may be accomplished with the same training program. Furthermore, it was determined that this training program could simultaneously meet the requirements of the American College of Sports Medicine for both aerobic fitness and weight control. Maximal fat oxidation occurred at 54.2% maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). However, the great variability in response between individuals would preclude the prediction of both the "fat burning" zone and MFO, indicating a need for measurement in the laboratory. If laboratory testing is not possible, the practitioner or subject can be reasonably confident MFO lies between 60.2% and 80.0% of the maximal heart rate. PMID:19855335

  19. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  20. Liquid zone seal

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

  1. A characterization of the quadrilateral meshes of a surface which admit a compatible hexahedral mesh of the enclosed volume

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, S.A.

    1995-09-01

    A popular three-dimensional mesh generation scheme is to start with a quadrilateral of the surface of a volume, and then attempt to fill the interior of volume with hexahedra, so that the hexahedra touch the surface in exactly the given quadrilaterals. Folklore has maintained that there are many quadrilateral meshes for which no such compatible hexahedral mesh exists. In this paper we give an existence proof which contradicts this folklore: A quadrilateral mesh need only satisfy some very weak conditions for there to exist a compatible hexahedral mesh. For a volume that is topologically a ball, any quadrilateral mesh composed of an even number of quadrilaterals admits a compatible hexahedral mesh. We extend this to volumes of higher genus: There is a construction to reduce to the ball case if and only if certain cycles of edges are even.

  2. Prevalence and characteristics of breakthrough pain in patients with non-malignant terminal disease admitted to a hospice.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, G; O'Doherty, C A; Collins, S

    2001-05-01

    A prospective survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence and characteristics of breakthrough pain in patients with non-malignant terminal disease admitted to a hospice. Of the 78 admissions surveyed, 10 patients were confused or too unwell to take part and 25 were pain-free. The remaining 43 reported 86 pains (range 1-6 per patient); of these patients, 27 (63%) had breakthrough pain and identified 52 pains (range 1-5 per patient). Breakthrough pain was classified as somatic (46%) visceral (14%), neuropathic (25%) or mixed aetiology (15%); 60% of pains were severe or excruciating. The mean number of daily breakthrough pain episodes was five (range 1-13), 54% of which occurred suddenly. Most pains (56%) were unpredictable; 75% lasted less than 30 min. These findings suggest that breakthrough pain is common in patients with non-malignant terminal disease; it is frequent, short lasting and often unpredictable, thus making treatment difficult. PMID:11407195

  3. Screening for G6PD Deficiency Among Neonates with Neonatal Jaundice Admitted to Tertiary Care Center: A Need in Disguise.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kishwer; Sohaila, Arjumand; Tikmani, Shiyam Sunder; Khan, Iqtidar Ahmed; Zafar, Anila

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the association of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency among neonates admitted with jaundice at the neonatal intensive care unit, well baby nursery and neonatal step down nursery of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from January to June 2010. A total of 205 neonates following the selection criteria were included. All selected neonates have their venous blood drawn, saved in EDTA bottle and sent to laboratory of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH). The laboratory results of whether G-6-PD deficiency was present or not was recorded in the proforma. G-6-PD was deficient in 19 neonates (9.3%). All neonates were male. PMID:26305316

  4. Does HIV status influence the outcome of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit? A prospective double blind study.

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwanjee, S.; Muckart, D. J.; Jeena, P. M.; Moodley, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (a) To assess the impact of HIV status (HIV negative, HIV positive, AIDS) on the outcome of patients admitted to intensive care units for diseases unrelated to HIV; (b) to decide whether a positive test result for HIV should be a criterion for excluding patients from intensive care for diseases unrelated to HIV. DESIGN: A prospective double blind study of all admissions over six months. HIV status was determined in all patients by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunofluorescence assay, western blotting, and flow cytometry. The ethics committee considered the clinical implications of the study important enough to waive patients' right to informed consent. Staff and patients were blinded to HIV results. On discharge patients could be advised of their HIV status if they wished. SETTING: A 16 bed surgical intensive care unit. SUBJECTS: All 267 men and 135 women admitted to the unit during the study period. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: APACHE II score (acute physiological, age, and chronic health evaluation), organ failure, septic shock, durations of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and intensive care unit and hospital mortality. RESULTS: No patient had AIDS. 52 patients were tested positive for HIV and 350 patients were tested negative. The two groups were similar in sex distribution but differed significantly in age, incidence of organ failure (37 (71%) v 171 (49%) patients), and incidence of septic shock (20 (38%) v 54 (15%)). After adjustment for age there were no differences in intensive care unit or hospital mortality or in the durations of stay in the intensive care unit or hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Morbidity was higher in HIV positive patients but there was no difference in mortality. In this patient population a positive HIV test result should not be a criterion for excluding a patient from intensive care. PMID:9133887

  5. The experience of daily life of acutely admitted frail elderly patients one week after discharge from the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Jane; Lund, Hans; Aadahl, Mette; Sørensen, Erik E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Frail elderly are at higher risk of negative outcomes such as disability, low quality of life, and hospital admissions. Furthermore, a peak in readmission of acutely admitted elderly patients is seen shortly after discharge. An investigation into the daily life experiences of the frail elderly shortly after discharge seems important to address these issues. The aim of this study was to explore how frail elderly patients experience daily life 1 week after discharge from an acute admission. Methods The qualitative methodological approach was interpretive description. Data were gathered using individual interviews. The participants were frail elderly patients over 65 years of age, who were interviewed at their home 1 week after discharge from an acute admission to a medical ward. Results Four main categories were identified: “The system,” “Keeping a social life,” “Being in everyday life,” and “Handling everyday life.” These categories affected the way the frail elderly experienced daily life and these elements resulted in a general feeling of well-being or non-well-being. The transition to home was experienced as unsafe and troublesome especially for the more frail participants, whereas the less frail experienced this less. Conclusion and discussion Several elements and stressors were affecting the well-being of the participants in daily life 1 week after discharge. In particular, contact with the health care system created frustrations and worries, but also physical disability, loneliness, and inactivity were issues of concern. These elements should be addressed by health professionals in relation to the transition phase. Future interventions should incorporate a multidimensional and bio-psycho-social perspective when acutely admitted frail elderly are discharged. Stakeholders should evaluate present practice to seek to improve care across health care sectors. PMID:26037333

  6. Palliative care needs of HIV exposed and infected children admitted to the inpatient paediatric unit in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nakawesi, Jane; Kasirye, Ivy; Kavuma, David; Muziru, Benjamin; Businge, Alice; Naluwooza, Jackie; Kabunga, Grace; Karamagi, Yvonne; Akankwasa, Edith; Odiit, Mary; Mukasa, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Paediatric palliative care is an emerging subspecialty that focuses on achieving the best possible quality of life for children with life-limiting conditions and also for their families. It is a response to the suffering and unique needs of such children. Globally there is limited documented data available on the palliative care needs of children with HIV. A retrospective review of data of all the HIV exposed and positive children who were admitted to the ward from January to December 2012 was done to document their palliative care needs. A total of 243 children were admitted to the ward during the stated period. Of these, 139 (57.2%) were female and 104 (42.8%) were male. Among them 131 (54%) were aged five years and below whereas 112 (46%) were above five years. Some of the identified palliative care needs documented included physical needs: pneumonia 46 (19%), severe acute malnutrition 38 (16%), mild and moderate acute malnutrition 23 (9.6%), and respiratory tract infections 22 (9.3%). Social needs: poor social support 21 (41%), financial instability 16 (31%), and child neglect 4 (8%). Psychological needs: antiretroviral treatment (ART) counselling 127 (36%), HIV counselling and testing for the child and family 63 (18%), adherence support 53 (15%), and others 11 (3%). Spiritual needs: discontinuing ART because of belief in spiritual healing 18 (81%), loss of hope because of severe ill health 1 (5%), and others 3 (14%). These results emphasise the need for palliative care in children with HIV even in the era of ART. The needs identified are in keeping with studies done elsewhere and are similar to the palliative care needs of children with other life-limiting illnesses such as cancer. Conclusion HIV positive and exposed children plus their families have vast palliative care needs and a holistic approach is the key in their management. PMID:25624870

  7. Mortality over 12 years of follow-up in people admitted to provincial custody in Ontario: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdjian, Fiona G.; Kiefer, Lori; Wobeser, Wendy; Gonzalez, Alejandro; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We aimed to define rates and causes of death in custody and after release in people admitted to provincial custody in Ontario, and to compare these data with data for the general population. Methods: We linked data on adults admitted to provincial custody in Ontario in 2000 with data on deaths between 2000 and 2012. We examined rates and causes of death by age, sex, custodial status and period after release, and compared them with data for the general population, using indirect adjustment for age. Results: Between 2000 and 2012, 8.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.3%-8.8%) of those incarcerated died in provincial custody or after release. The crude death rate was 7.1 (95% CI 6.9-7.3) per 1000 person-years. The standardized mortality ratio for those incarcerated in 2000 was 4.0 (95% CI 3.9-4.1) overall and 1.9 (95% CI 1.5-2.4) while in provincial custody. The most common causes of death were injury and poisoning (38.2% of all deaths), including overdose (13.6%) and suicide (8.2%), diseases of the circulatory system (15.8%) and neoplasms (14.5%). In the 2 weeks after release, the standardized mortality ratio was 5.7 overall and 56.0 for overdose. Life expectancy was 72.3 years for women and 73.4 for men who experienced incarceration in 2000. Interpretation: Mortality was high for people who experienced incarceration, and life expectancy was 4.2 years less for men and 10.6 years less for women compared with the general population. Efforts should be made to reduce the gap in mortality between people who experience incarceration and those who do not. Time in custody could serve as an opportunity to intervene to decrease risk. PMID:27398358

  8. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Elizabeth L.; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen–Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

  9. Causes of mortality and associated modifiable health care factors for children (< 5-years) admitted at Onandjokwe Hospital, Namibia

    PubMed Central

    Mdala, Johnface F.; Mash, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Many countries, especially those from sub-Saharan Africa, are unlikely to reach the Millennium Development Goal for under-5 mortality reduction by 2015. This study aimed to identify the causes of mortality and associated modifiable health care factors for under-5 year-old children admitted to Onandjokwe Hospital, Namibia. Method: A descriptive retrospective review of the medical records of all children under five years who died in the hospital for the period of 12 months during 2013, using two different structured questionnaires targeting perinatal deaths and post-perinatal deaths respectively. Results: The top five causes of 125 perinatal deaths were prematurity 22 (17.6%), birth asphyxia 19 (15.2%), congenital anomalies 16 (12.8%), unknown 13 (10.4%) and abruptio placenta 11 (8.8%). The top five causes of 60 post-perinatal deaths were bacterial pneumonia 21 (35%), gastroenteritis 12 (20%), severe malnutrition 6 (10%), septicaemia 6 (10%), and tuberculosis 4 (6.7%). Sixty-nine (55%) perinatal deaths and 42 (70%) post-perinatal deaths were potentially avoidable. The modifiable factors were: late presentation to a health care facility, antenatal clinics not screening for danger signs, long distance referral, district hospitals not providing emergency obstetric care, poor monitoring of labour and admitted children in the wards, lack of screening for malnutrition, failure to repeat an HIV test in pregnant women in the third trimester or during breastfeeding, and a lack of review of the urgent results of critically ill children. Conclusion: A significant number of deaths in children under 5-years of age could be avoided by paying attention to the modifiable factors identified in this study. PMID:26245607

  10. Serum zinc levels in children of 0–24 months diagnosed with pneumonia admitted to our clinic

    PubMed Central

    Arıca, Seçil; Arıca, Vefik; Dag, Hüseyin; Kaya, Ayşen; Hatipoglu, Sami; Fenercioglu, Aysen; Karatekin, Güner

    2011-01-01

    Aim: We have planned to study the relationship between zinc (Zn) plasma levels, as well as pneumonia criteria, and zinc in healthy children younger than 2 years of age compared to pediatric patients diagnosed with pneumonia and admitted to a hospital. Materials and methods: The study enrolled 25 patients of 0-24 months referring to our hospital's pediatric clinic, who were then diagnosed with bronchopneumonia based on the World Health Organization diagnostic criteria and admitted to suckling children clinic due to inability to receive out-patient treatment, and 10 healthy children of the same age group, whose physical examinations revealed no pathological findings. Results: There was no difference between the groups in terms of age and gender distribution (p> 0.05). The control group included in the study showed a significantly higher mean duration of breast milk intake compared to the patient groups (p<0.001). WBC values obtained from the patient group was significantly higher than that of the control group (p<0.001). Zn and iron (Fe) values as determined in the control group enrolled in the study were significantly higher compared to the patient group (p<0.01). Mean total protein in the control group was found to be significantly higher versus that of the patient groups (p<0.05). With regard to the r values of correlation coefficients of the subjects enrolled in the study, a slightly positive correlation was observed between Zn levels and iron levels (r=0.457). Conclusion: It was concluded that infections, particularly pneumonia, which present a serious issue both in our country and developing countries, may be developed more commonly among children with zinc deficiency. PMID:21977237

  11. The Effect of Trauma Intervention on the Satisfaction of Patients Admitted to the Emergency Department: A Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakerimoghadam, Masoumeh; Sadeghi, Somayeh; Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is a key determinant of the quality of medical care. Moreover, satisfaction can be used as a criterion for examining the adequacy of the care, health, and competency of personnel. Objectives This study was conducted to determine the satisfaction of patients receiving trauma care in the emergency department of a hospital affiliated with Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Patients and Methods This simple clinical trial was performed on 104 patients admitted for traumatic injury to an emergency department in Iran. Given that patients frequently enter an emergency department for care, the sampling of patients in the department was done on days that were randomly assigned to the study group. The experimental group received trauma intervention in four areas from their admission to the emergency department to their discharge from the hospital, and the control group received routine nursing care. The data were collected through a questionnaire that asked for demographic characteristics and then went on to ask about patient satisfaction. The satisfaction questionnaire was completed after the trauma intervention at the end of patients’ stay in the hospital. The data were analyzed using SPSS 22 software and descriptive statistical tests and analytical tests (independent t and Chi-square). Results The mean score for total satisfaction after trauma intervention in the experimental group (45.6 ± 3.69) was significantly different from that of the control group (32.01 ± 7.78) (P < 0.001). Therefore, the levels of total satisfaction in the experimental and control group were favorable and relatively favorable, respectively. Conclusions In this study, trauma intervention increased satisfaction in patients admitted to the emergency department. Therefore, managers and personnel of hospitals and healthcare training centers are urged to implement trauma intervention in their hospitals or healthcare training centers. PMID:27433350

  12. Clinico-Epidemiological Profile of Snakebite Cases Admitted in a Tertiary Care Centre in South India: A 5 Years Study

    PubMed Central

    Thapar, Rekha; Darshan, B. B.; Unnikrishnan, Bhaskaran; Mithra, Prasanna; Kumar, Nithin; Kulkarni, Vaman; Holla, Ramesh; Kumar, Avinash; Kanchan, Tanuj

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study was conducted to assess the clinic-epidemiological profile of snakebite cases admitted at a Tertiary Care Centre in South India. Materials and Methods: A record based retrospective study was carried out at Kasturbha Medical College affiliated hospitals in Mangalore. All the snakebite cases admitted to the hospitals from January 2007 to December 2011 were included in the study. Data were collected using a pretested semi-structured questionnaire and analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS version 11.5). The results are expressed as percentages. Results: The study included 198 cases of snakebite victims. The majority of the cases were males (68.2%). The mean age of the study population was 34.8 years. Maximum numbers of snakebite cases were reported during the month of September to December (47.9%). The peak time of snakebite was between 18.01 and 24.00 h which was reported in 40.5% of the cases. Lower extremities were the most common site of bite in more than three-fourth of the cases (80.9%). The most common symptoms were a pain (45.9%) and swelling (44.9%). The case fatality rate was observed to be 3.0%. Conclusion: Snakebite still remains a major public health problem in this part of the world. Knowledge must be imparted regarding the prevention of snakebites through community health programs. Messages regarding prompt reporting of such cases and importance of effective treatment must be disseminated among people through mass media and role plays. PMID:26862263

  13. Does early intervention reduce the number of elderly people with dementia admitted to institutions for long term care?

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, D W; Pollitt, P A; Brook, C P; Reiss, B B; Roth, M

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To test whether early diagnosis and practical help reduce the number of elderly people with dementia admitted to institutions. DESIGN--Controlled trial of effect of help from a multidisciplinary team on admission rates of people with dementia. SETTING--Seven general practices in Cambridge. SUBJECTS--2889 subjects aged 75 and over, of whom 159 were identified as having dementia with a two stage community survey. Eighty six subjects were referred for extra help if they or their supporters wished. The other 73 subjects had access to the usual services and served as controls. INTERVENTION--Subjects and families in the action group were offered a wide range of help, including financial benefits, physical aids, home helps, respite admissions, practical advice, and psychiatric assessments. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Permanent admission to long term care within two years after diagnosis. RESULTS--Early intervention did not affect admission rates in subjects who lived with supporters. By contrast, nine of the 14 (64%) subjects with moderate or severe dementia living alone were admitted in the action group in the study's second year compared with only one of 13 (8%) controls (p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS--Some people with moderate or severe dementia who lived alone and were at serious risk may have been identified earlier by the resource team. Without the team these people would not have become known to the responsible authorities until families, neighbours, and wardens became unable to cope. The study was conducted during the team's formative period, however, and greater experience might have allowed some subjects to remain at home for longer. PMID:1902752

  14. Magnetically-conformed, Variable Area Discharge Chamber for Hall Thruster, and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention is a Hall thruster that incorporates a discharge chamber having a variable area channel including an ionization zone, a transition region, and an acceleration zone. The variable area channel is wider through the acceleration zone than through the ionization zone. An anode is located in a vicinity of the ionization zone and a cathode is located in a vicinity of the acceleration zone. The Hall thruster includes a magnetic circuit which is capable of forming a local magnetic field having a curvature within the transition region of the variable area channel whereby the transition region conforms to the curvature of the local magnetic field. The Hall thruster optimizes the ionization and acceleration efficiencies by the combined effects of the variable area channel and magnetic conformity.

  15. Why are some patients admitted to psychiatric hospital while others are not? A study assessing risk during the admission interview and relationship to outcome.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Glenn E; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; O'Connor, Nick; Cleary, Michelle

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine what patient characteristics are used to decide whether a patient is or is not admitted to a psychiatric hospital, and what happens to those not admitted. A further aim was to determine if high levels of risk on admission predict seclusions, length of stay, or readmission within 28 days. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive presentations to an admission office via case notes and electronic databases. Eighty percent (100/127) of the adults presenting to the admission office over a typical month were admitted to hospital. Patients were more likely to be admitted if they were experiencing psychosis or exacerbation of schizophrenia, referred by other doctors or mental health teams, had a legal reason for referral, or if they were homeless. There was no association between risk for violence or suicide and seclusion rates, length of stay, or being readmitted within 28 days. It was reassuring to find that 85% of those not admitted were referred to other mental health providers, and none required admission over the following month. This study found high rates of seclusion and readmissions within 1 year, which requires further study to find strategies to reduce these rates. PMID:22039923

  16. Breathing zone air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, John

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  17. Habitable zones in the universe.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2005-12-01

    Habitability varies dramatically with location and time in the universe. This was recognized centuries ago, but it was only in the last few decades that astronomers began to systematize the study of habitability. The introduction of the concept of the habitable zone was key to progress in this area. The habitable zone concept was first applied to the space around a star, now called the Circumstellar Habitable Zone. Recently, other, vastly broader, habitable zones have been proposed. We review the historical development of the concept of habitable zones and the present state of the research. We also suggest ways to make progress on each of the habitable zones and to unify them into a single concept encompassing the entire universe. PMID:16254692

  18. Zoning should promote public health.

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, Joel S

    2004-01-01

    Legally, governments use their police powers to protect public health, safety, and welfare through zoning. This paper presents a case for revisiting zoning on the basis of increasing evidence that certain types of community design promote public health, as opposed to the dominant pattern of sprawl development, which does not. Zoning, and the land use planning linked to it, that prohibits or disfavors health-promoting community designs contradicts the inherent public policy goal on which it is based. If there is a paradigm shift underway, from traditional sprawl to health-promoting community designs, then health professionals and others should understand why zoning must be reassessed. PMID:14748317

  19. Yield response to variable rate irrigation in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the impact of variable rate irrigation on corn yield, twenty plots of corn were laid out under a center pivot variable rate irrigation (VRI) system in an experimental field near Stoneville, MS. The VRI system is equipped with five VRI zone control units, a global positioning system (G...

  20. How common are ventricular arrhythmias in patients admitted to CCU with chest pain and a non-ischaemic ECG? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Anne-Maree; Klim, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of serious ventricular arrhythmias in a cohort of patients admitted to coronary care units for investigation and treatment of possible acute coronary syndrome. Design Secondary analysis of prospective cohort study. Setting Community teaching hospital. Patients Adults (>18 years) admitted to coronary care unit with chest pain and non-ischaemic ECG. Interventions None. Main outcome measures Rate of serious ventricular arrhythmia during hospital stay. Results 397 patients were studied; median age 64 years, 65% male; median Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction score 3; troponin elevation 43%, final diagnosis myocardial infarction 32%. No patient in the study suffered a serious ventricular arrhythmia (0%, 95% CI 0 to 1.0%). Conclusion Patients admitted to coronary care units for investigation and treatment of possible acute coronary syndrome with a non-ischaemic ECG have a very low rate of serious ventricular arrhythmia.

  1. Comparison of Routine Health Management Information System Versus Enhanced Inpatient Malaria Surveillance for Estimating the Burden of Malaria Among Children Admitted to Four Hospitals in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Miles, Melody; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Wanzira, Humphrey; Rubahika, Denis; Nasr, Sussann; Kapella, Bryan K.; Yoon, Steven S.; Chang, Michelle; Yeka, Adoke; Staedke, Sarah G.; Kamya, Moses R.; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    The primary source of malaria surveillance data in Uganda is the Health Management Information System (HMIS), which does not require laboratory confirmation of reported malaria cases. To improve data quality, an enhanced inpatient malaria surveillance system (EIMSS) was implemented with emphasis on malaria testing of all children admitted in select hospitals. Data were compared between the HMIS and the EIMSS at four hospitals over a period of 12 months. After the implementation of the EIMSS, over 96% of admitted children under 5 years of age underwent laboratory testing for malaria. The HMIS significantly overreported the proportion of children under 5 years of age admitted with malaria (average absolute difference = 19%, range = 8–27% across the four hospitals) compared with the EIMSS. To improve the quality of the HMIS data for malaria surveillance, the National Malaria Control Program should, in addition to increasing malaria testing rates, focus on linking laboratory test results to reported malaria cases. PMID:25422396

  2. Multi-Scale Imaging of the Fault Zone Velocity Structure: Double-difference Tomography, Inversion of Fault Zone Headwaves, and Fault Zone Sensitivity Kernels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allam, Amir A.

    In spite of the close relationship between fault zone structure and earthquake mechanics, fault zone structure at seismogenic depths remains poorly understood. How does localization of the primary slip zone vary with depth? Is there a signature of broad persistent damage zones at seismogenic depths? How does fault zone structure merge with regional structure? To answer these questions, we utilize multiple imaging techniques. We apply high-resolution double-difference tomography to the San Jacinto fault zone, invert for velocity structure along the Hayward fault using fault zone head waves, and use analytical results for idealized geometries to validate sensitivity kernels of fault zone phases for use in adjoint tomographic inversions. Double-difference tomography uses the arrival times of P and S waves to invert simultaneously for compressional velocity, shear wave velocity, and source location in three dimensions. We present results in the southern California plate-boundary area, with a focus on the San Jacinto fault zone, which incorporate arrival times of 247,472 P- and 105,448 S-wave picks for 5493 earthquakes recorded at 139 stations. Starting with a layered 1D model, and continuing in later iterations with various updated initial models, we invert the data for Vp and Vs in a 270 km long, 105 km wide and 35 km deep volume using a spatially variable grid with higher density around the San Jacinto. Our final velocity results show zones of low-velocity and high Vp/Vs ratios associated with various fault strands and sedimentary basins, along with clear velocity contrasts across the San Jacinto. While both features are limited to the upper 10km, the low velocity zones generally have higher amplitude and broader distribution in geometrically complex areas, while the velocity contrasts are more pronounced for Vp than Vs. Along the Hayward fault in the San Francisco Bay region, we identify fault zone head waves at eight stations on the northeastern side of the fault

  3. Wave statistics in a coastal focal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janssen, T. T.; Herbers, T. H. C.; Pearman, D. W.; Van Ettinger, E.; Smit, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    Wave-current dynamics in wave focal zones in exposed coastal inlets and river mouths are still poorly understood. This is in part due to lack of observations, which are complicated due to the presence of energetic waves, strong (tidal) currents, dynamic seabed morphology, and often busy ship traffic. Conventional (fixed) instruments, such as buoys and bottom-mounted current or pressure sensors, are difficult to maintain in such areas, and the spatial variability of the wave field is difficult to capture with single point measurements, or even arrays of fixed measurements. In addition to the observational difficulties, the effects of e.g. current shear, wave blocking, statistical inhomogeneity [see Smit & Janssen, 2013, J. Phys. Ocean., 43, pp 1741-1758], and nonlinearity [see Janssen & Herbers, 2009, J. Phys Ocean., 39, pp 1948-1964] on wave statistics are not fully understood, not accounted for in operational stochastic wave models, and - as a consequence - often ignored. In this paper, we consider new observational data of waves approaching the Mouth of the Columbia River undergoing bottom refraction and strong wave-current interaction. The data were collected during the 2013 ONR RIVET experiment using an array of free drifting wave-current buoys. The Lagrangian instruments capture the spatial variability of the wave field in the inlet and, by deploying them in large ensembles, resolve the (inhomogeneous and nonlinear) wave statistics in the focal zone. We discuss the use of free-drifting instruments to measure wave statistics in a coastal wave focal zone, consider the observed effects of wave inhomogeneity, and show that non-Gaussian effects are important and affect extreme wave occurrences in the Mouth of the Columbia River.

  4. Prospective observational cohort study of patients with weaning failure admitted to a specialist weaning, rehabilitation and home mechanical ventilation centre

    PubMed Central

    Mifsud Bonnici, Denise; Sanctuary, Thomas; Murphy, Patrick B; Steier, Joerg; Marino, Philip; Pattani, Hina; Creagh-Brown, Ben C; Hart, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives According to National Health Service England (NHSE) specialist respiratory commissioning specification for complex home ventilation, patients with weaning failure should be referred to a specialist centre. However, there are limited data reporting the clinical outcomes from such centres. Setting Prospective observational cohort study of patients admitted to a UK specialist weaning, rehabilitation and home mechanical ventilation centre between February 2005 and July 2013. Participants 262 patients admitted with a median age of 64.2 years (IQR 52.6–73.2 years). 59.9% were male. Results 39.7% of patients had neuromuscular and/or chest wall disease, 21% were postsurgical, 19.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 5.3% had obesity-related respiratory failure and 14.5% had other diagnoses. 64.1% of patients were successfully weaned, with 38.2% weaned fully from ventilation, 24% weaned to nocturnal non-invasive ventilation (NIV), 1.9% weaned to nocturnal NIV with intermittent NIV during the daytime. 21.4% of patients were discharged on long-term tracheostomy ventilation. The obesity-related respiratory failure group were most likely to wean (relative risk (RR) for weaning success=1.48, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.77; p<0.001), but otherwise weaning success rates did not significantly vary by diagnostic group. The median time-to-wean was 19 days (IQR 9–33) and the median duration of stay was 31 days (IQR 16–50), with no difference observed between the groups. Weaning centre mortality was 14.5%, highest in the COPD group (RR=2.15, 95% CI 1.19 to 3.91, p=0.012) and lowest in the neuromuscular and/or chest wall disease group (RR=0.34, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.75, p=0.007). Of all patients discharged alive, survival was 71.7% at 6 months and 61.8% at 12 months postdischarge. Conclusions Following NHSE guidance, patients with weaning delay and failure should be considered for transfer to a specialist centre where available, which can demonstrate

  5. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine ward

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are a common cause of increased morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. Bacteraemia in the elderly is a difficult diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge due to age-related vicissitudes and to their comorbidities. The main purpose of the study was to assess independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality among the elderly with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine Ward. Methods Overall, a cohort of 135 patients, 65 years of age and older, with bacteraemia were retrospectively studied. Data related to demographic information, comorbidities, clinical parameters on admission, source and type of infection, microorganism isolated in the blood culture, laboratory data and empirical antibiotic treatment was recorded from each patient. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of these 135 patients, 45.9% were women. The most common infections in this group of patients were urinary tract infections (46.7%). The main microorganisms isolated in the blood cultures were Escherichia coli (14.9%), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (12.0%), non-MRSA (11.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%) and Enterococcus faecalis (8.0%). The in-hospital mortality was 22.2%. Independent prognostic factors associated with in-hospital mortality were age ≥ 85 years, chronic renal disease, bacteraemia of unknown focus and cognitive impairment at admission (OR, 2.812 [95% CI, 1.039-7.611; p = 0.042]; OR, 6.179 [95% CI, 1.840-20.748; p = 0.003]; OR, 8.673 [95% CI, 1.557-48.311; p = 0.014] and OR, 3.621 [95% CI, 1.226-10.695; p = 0.020], respectively). By multivariate analysis appropriate antibiotic therapy was not associated with lower odds of mortality. Conclusion Bacteraemia in the elderly has a high mortality rate. There are no set of signs or clinical features that can predict bacteraemia in the elderly. However, older age (≥ 85 years), chronic renal

  6. Perceptions of newly admitted undergraduate medical students on experiential training on community placements and working in rural areas of Uganda

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Uganda has an acute problem of inadequate human resources partly due to health professionals' unwillingness to work in a rural environment. One strategy to address this problem is to arrange health professional training in rural environments through community placements. Makerere University College of Health Sciences changed training of medical students from the traditional curriculum to a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum in 2003. This curriculum is based on the SPICES model (student-centered, problem-based, integrated, community-based and services oriented). During their first academic year, students undergo orientation on key areas of community-based education, after which they are sent in interdisciplinary teams for community placements. The objective was to assess first year students' perceptions on experiential training through community placements and factors that might influence their willingness to work in rural health facilities after completion of their training. Methods The survey was conducted among 107 newly admitted first year students on the medical, nursing, pharmacy and medical radiography program students, using in-depth interview and open-ended self-administered questionnaires on their first day at the college, from October 28-30, 2008. Data was collected on socio-demographic characteristics, motivation for choosing a medical career, prior exposure to rural health facilities, willingness to have part of their training in rural areas and factors that would influence the decision to work in rural areas. Results Over 75% completed their high school from urban areas. The majority had minimal exposure to rural health facilities, yet this is where most of them will eventually have to work. Over 75% of the newly admitted students were willing to have their training from a rural area. Perceived factors that might influence retention in rural areas include the local context of work environment, support from family and friends

  7. The global systematics of subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syracuse, Ellen M.

    To better understand the global systematics of subduction zones, a series of studies investigates their variability taking advantage of comprehensive and accurate seismicity catalogs and advances in computing for wave propagation and geodynamic modeling. Every subduction zone with sufficient intermediate-depth earthquakes (IDE) from a global teleseismic catalog is analyzed and the top of the IDE, presumably the top of the slab, is digitized. Subduction zones are separated into a total of 52 segments 500-km-long. Parameters such as dip, age, convergence velocity, and slab depth beneath arc volcanoes (H) are compiled, resulting in a comprehensive, complete suite of subduction zone descriptions. Surprisingly, H ranges from 70-190 km globally and varies smoothly between arc segments, even though most models and textbooks assume constant H for all arcs, placing new constraints on magma generation models at arcs. To assess regional biases in earthquake location due to large-scale structure, IDEs in each arc segment are relocated in a three-dimensional global velocity model. Although the absolute position of slab surfaces shifts 0-25 km regionally, global variations in H persist. These variations in geometry, as well as slab age, convergence velocity, sediments, the overlying plate, and the location of the transition from localized slip and distributed flow create a large range in the thermal states of subduction zones. Two dimensional thermal kinematic-flow models using these slab geometries for each 500-km segment indicate that slab crust and sediments dehydrate before reaching beneath the arc, whereas slab mantle may still be hydrated, for all slabs and a variety of assumptions. To test these inferences, a temporary array of seismographs was deployed in Central America, sampling the slab and sub-arc mantle. P and S arrival times were inverted for earthquake locations and high-resolution regional velocity structure. Hypocenters confirm high H here. The velocity models

  8. Atmospheric variability and air-sea interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Middleton, J. W.; Reiter, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    The topics studied include: (1) processing of Northern Hemispheric precipitation data, in order to fill in the transition seasons to provide a continuous 40 year data base on the variability of continental precipitation; (2) comparison of seasonally averaged fields of sea surface temperature obtained from ship observations in the North Atlantic and North Pacific in 1970 with the corresponding fields inferred from satellite observations; (3) estimation of seasonal average of total precipitable water at those admittedly few oceanic stations where repeated vertical soundings were made in 1970 and comparison with corresponding values inferred from satellite measurements; (4) comparison of seasonally averaged evaporation fields determined from ground based observations in 1970 with the field of divergence of the seasonal total horizontal water vapor flux inferred from satellite total water measurements and NMC wind data for the lower troposphere; (5) examination of meaning of convection-inversion index.

  9. EMPADE Study: Evaluation of Medical Prescriptions and Adverse Drug Events in COPD Patients Admitted to Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Amer; Khan, M. Nematullah; Sultan, Ihtisham; Khan, M. Aamer; Ali, S. Amir; Farooqui, Afroze

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inappropriate drug usage may preclude ideal benefit due to increased medical cost, antimicrobial resistance, adverse effects and mortality. Therefore drug utilization studies have become a plausible means in evaluating the healthcare systems. COPD management usually involves more than one drug which may escalate the risk of ADEs (adverse drug events). Aim The present study was aimed at assessing the current drug practice and ADEs in COPD management in ICU. Materials and Methods A total of 1,044 patients admitted for the treatment of COPD were included in the study. Their prescriptions were recorded for evaluation of drug utilization and patients were counseled for assessing ADEs. Results were evaluated by Chi-square test and percentages. Result All-embracing 15,360 drugs were prescribed at an average of 14.71 drugs per patient, wherein β2-agonists were extensively prescribed agents followed by inhaled-corticosteroids and anti-cholinergics. 372 ADEs were reported in 252 patients, wherein restlessness was the most frequent ADE and theophylline was found to be associated with highest cases of ADEs. Conclusion Practitioners should prescribe least number of drugs to mitigate the likelihood of adverse outcomes in patients due to numerous drugs usage, which may be achieved by following GOLD guidelines. The present work may help in improving the current management of COPD by rectifying the flaws delineated in this article. PMID:26675667

  10. Detection and characterization of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in wounded Syrian patients admitted to hospitals in northern Israel.

    PubMed

    Lerner, A; Solter, E; Rachi, E; Adler, A; Rechnitzer, H; Miron, D; Krupnick, L; Sela, S; Aga, E; Ziv, Y; Peretz, A; Labay, K; Rahav, G; Geffen, Y; Hussein, K; Eluk, O; Carmeli, Y; Schwaber, M J

    2016-01-01

    Since 2013, four hospitals in northern Israel have been providing care for Syrian nationals, primarily those wounded in the ongoing civil war. We analyzed carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) isolates obtained from these patients. Isolate identification was performed using the VITEK 2 system. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for the presence of bla KPC, bla NDM, and bla OXA-48. Susceptibility testing and genotyping were performed on selected isolates. During the study period, 595 Syrian patients were hospitalized, most of them young men. Thirty-two confirmed CPE isolates were grown from cultures taken from 30 patients. All but five isolates were identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Nineteen isolates produced NDM and 13 produced OXA-48. Among a further 29 isolates tested, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that ST278 and ST38 were the major sequence types among the NDM-producing K. pneumoniae and OXA-48-producing E. coli isolates, respectively. Most were resistant to all three carbapenems in use in Israel and to gentamicin, but susceptible to colistin and fosfomycin. The source for bacterial acquisition could not be determined; however, some patients admitted to different medical centers were found to carry the same sequence type. CPE containing bla NDM and bla OXA-48 were prevalent among Syrian wounded hospitalized patients in northern Israel. The finding of the same sequence type among patients at different medical centers implies a common, prehospital source for these patients. These findings have implications for public health throughout the region. PMID:26581423

  11. Quality of care in African-American patients admitted for congestive heart failure at a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Ilksoy, Nurcan; Moore, Renee H; Easley, Kirk; Jacobson, Terry A

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that the quality of congestive heart failure (CHF) treatment for hospitalized patients varies. The goal of this study was to evaluate the compliance of physicians at a large, inner-city teaching hospital with current evidence-based guidelines. A retrospective review of the medical records of 104 patients admitted with CHF was conducted. Quality-of-care indicators were assessed, including the use of echocardiograms, the administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta blockers to appropriate patients, and lifestyle and medication counseling at discharge. The assessment of left ventricular (LV) function was documented in 96.1% of patients (n = 100). A total of 65 patients (92.8%) with systolic dysfunction were considered to be ideal candidates for ACE inhibitor therapy. Of these 65 patients, 58 (89.2%) were discharged on ACE inhibitors. Of 41 patients with LV systolic dysfunction who were considered to be ideal candidates for beta-blocker therapy, only 10 (24.4%) were discharged on beta-blocker therapy. Of all patients with CHF, 50% received discharge counseling on medication compliance, 48% received counseling on a low-salt diet, and only 9% were told to monitor daily weight. This study shows that in a major academic teaching hospital, there is a need for improvement in the use of beta-blocker therapy as well as greater emphasis on patient education strategies regarding diet, medication adherence, and monitoring daily weight. PMID:16490439

  12. The quality of nursing care regarding personal hygiene of patients admitted to a selected hospital in the Kavango region.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, A; Small, L F; vd Merwe, T; Mueyu, U

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the quality of nursing care regarding personal hygiene of patients admitted to a hospital in the Kavango region of Namibia. The study was prompted by repeated media reports over the radio. Commentators and listeners expressed concern over the seeming lack of adequate hygienic measures, specifically with regard to patient care. To objectively quantify and describe the extent of this problem, a single objective was stated, namely to measure the quality of nursing care with regard to patient hygiene. A descriptive survey design was chosen to explore and describe the problem. A check-list was developed to observe thirty patients (the total population) over a period of one week. The results indicated that certain aspects of hygienic care needed improvement. These aspects (parts) were the care of male patient's beards; perineal care; and mouth care. Other aspects of care were indirectly negatively influenced due to incomplete record keeping. On completion of the study recommendations were made with regard to in-service education, management and research. PMID:15777033

  13. A qualitative study exploring the experiences of parents of children admitted to seven Dutch pediatric intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    van Goudoever, Johannes B.; Schuurman, Beatrix Elink; Albers, Marcel J. I. J.; van Dam, Nicolette A. M.; Dullaart, Eugenie; van Heerde, Marc; Verlaat, Carin W. M.; van Vught, Elise M.; Hazelzet, Jan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To explore parents' experiences during the admission of their children to a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Method Qualitative method using in-depth interviews. Thematic analysis was applied to capture parents’ experiences. Thirty-nine mothers and 25 fathers of 41 children admitted to seven of the eight PICUs in university medical centers in The Netherlands were interviewed. Results Parents were interviewed within 1 month after their child’s discharge from a PICU. Thematic analysis identified 1,514 quotations that were coded into 63 subthemes. The subthemes were categorized into six major themes: attitude of the professionals; coordination of care; emotional intensity; information management; environmental factors; parent participation. Most themes had an overarching relationship representing the array of experiences encountered by parents when their child was staying in a PICU. The theme of emotional intensity was in particular associated with all the other themes. Conclusions The findings provided a range of themes and subthemes describing the complexity of the parental experiences of a PICU admission. The subthemes present a systematic and thematic basis for the development of a quantitative instrument to measure parental experiences and satisfaction with care. The findings of this study have important clinical implications related to the deeper understanding of parental experiences and improving family-centered care. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00134-010-2074-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:21063674

  14. Postnatal demoralisation among women admitted to a hospital mother-baby unit: validation of a psychometric measure.

    PubMed

    Bobevski, I; Rowe, H; Clarke, D M; McKenzie, D P; Fisher, J

    2015-12-01

    Demoralisation is a psychological state characterised by experiences of distress and sadness, helplessness, subjective incompetence and hopelessness, in the context of a stressful situation. Experiences of demoralisation may be particularly relevant to women who have recently given birth, who can feel incompetent, isolated and helpless. The psychometric properties of the Demoralisation Scale among women in the postnatal period participating in a clinical program were examined. Women admitted with their infants to a hospital mother-baby unit in Australia for five nights were recruited consecutively (N = 209) and assessed at admission and discharge. The Demoralisation Scale was perceived as relevant and exhibited high reliability, acceptable construct validity and good sensitivity to change. The mean demoralisation score was high (M = 30.9, SD = 15.5) and associated with negative experiences of motherhood and functional impairment, independent of depression and anxiety symptoms. Mean demoralisation decreased significantly after program completion (M = 18.4, SD = 12.4). More participants showed a significant improvement in demoralisation (57.5 %) than in depression (34.8 %) and anxiety (9.8 %) symptoms. Demoralisation can provide a useful framework for understanding and measuring the experiences of women participating in postnatal clinical programs and in directing treatment towards helping women to acquire the necessary caregiving skills and increasing parental efficacy. The Demoralisation Scale is a useful clinical tool for assessing intervention effects. PMID:25520260

  15. The incidence of human herpesvirus 6 infection in children with febrile convulsion admitted to the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.

    PubMed

    Chua, K B; Lam, S K; AbuBakar, S; Koh, M T; Lee, W S

    1997-12-01

    From October 1996 to March 1997, 31 children with febrile convulsions were admitted to the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. Human Herpesvirus 6 (HHV 6) was virologically and/or serologically confirmed to be the cause of the febrile episode in 5 of these children (16.1%). Age, sex and other associated clinical features (diarrhoea, cough, running nose and type of seizure) were not useful in differentiating cases of febrile convulsion due to HHV 6 from those of other aetiology. However, uvulo-palatoglossal junctional ulcers were noted in children in whom the cause of the seizure could be attributed to HHV 6 but not in the remaining cases in the study group. HHV 6 DNA was detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all patients with febrile convulsions attributed to HHV6, and in patients shown serologically to have already been exposed to the virus by nested polymerase chain reaction amplification. Only genotype HHV 6B was detected from patients with seizure due to HHV 6 but both genotype 6A and 6B were detected in the remaining cases studied. PMID:10968110

  16. The Connected and Disjoint Union of Semi Jahangir Graphs Admit a Cycle-Super (a, d)-Atimagic Total Labeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dafik; Agustin, I. H.; Hardiyantik, D.

    2016-02-01

    We assume that all graphs in this paper are finite, undirected and no loop and multiple edges. Given a graph G of order p and size q. Let H',H be subgraphs of G. By H'-covering, we mean every edge in E(G) belongs to at least one subgraph of G isomorphic to a given graph H. A graph G is said to be an (a,d)-H-antimagic total labeling if there exist a bijective function f : V(G) ∪︀E(G) → {1, 2,...,p + q} such that for all subgraphs H' isomorphicto H,the total H-weights ω(H) = form an arithmetic sequence {a, a+d, a+2d,..., a+(s-1)d}, where a and d are positive integers and s is the number of all subgraphs H' isomorphic to H. Such a labeling is called super if f : V(G) → {1, 2,. .., | V(G)|}. In this paper, we will discuss a cycle-super (a,d)-atimagicness of a connected and disjoint union of semi jahangir graphs. The results show that those graphs admit a cycle-super (a,d)-atimagic total labeling for some feasible d ∈ {0,1, 2, 4, 6, 7,10,13,14}.

  17. Correlates of malnutrition among children under 2 years of age admitted to hospital in Yaoundé, Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Defo, B K; Young, T B

    1993-04-01

    A survey of health status, biodemographics, and use of health care services of all children under 2 years of age, consecutively admitted to the Baudeloque ward of the Central Hospital of Yaoundé, Cameroon, was conducted over a 12-month period (1984). During the admission procedure, each child's mother or surrogate mother was interviewed and the child was weighted according to study protocol; additional data were collected by review of hospital records. A total of 669 children were recruited into the study sample; there were no refusals. Nutritional status was estimated by categories based on weight for age. Overall, 43 per cent of the sample were of normal weight-for-age, and 6 per cent, 19 per cent, and 32 per cent were categorized as having severe, moderate, and mild malnutrition, respectively. Multinomial logit modelling was used to identify independent correlates of mild, moderate, and severe PEM simultaneously. The study findings underscore the broad health benefits of immunizations. Furthermore, any prior contact of mother or child with the health care system appears to be associated with better nutritional status on hospital admission. Children with mothers employed outside the home may benefit particularly from health services outreach programmes. PMID:8492366

  18. Clinical and immunological analysis of measles patients admitted to a Beijing hospital in 2014 during an outbreak in China.

    PubMed

    Tu, B; Zhao, J-J; Hu, Y; Fu, J-L; Huang, H-H; Xie, Y-X; Zhang, X; Shi, L; Zhao, P; Zhang, X-W; Wu, D; Xu, Z; Zhou, Z-P; Qin, E-Q; Wang, F-S

    2016-09-01

    At the end of 2013, China reported a countrywide outbreak of measles. From January to May 2014, we investigated the clinical and immunological features of the cases of the outbreak admitted to our hospital. In this study, all 112 inpatients with clinically diagnosed measles were recruited from the 302 Military Hospital of China. The virus was isolated from throat swabs from these patients, and cytokine profiles were examined. By detecting the measles virus of 30 of the 112 patients, we found that this measles outbreak was of the H1 genotype, which is the major strain in China. The rates of complications, specifically pneumonia and liver injury, differed significantly in patients aged 18 years: pneumonia was more common in children, while liver injury was more common in adults. Pneumonia was a significant independent risk factor affecting measles duration. Compared to healthy subjects, measles patients had fewer CD4+IL-17+, CD4+IFN-γ +, and CD8+IFN-γ + cells in both the acute and recovery phases. In contrast, measles patients in the acute phase had more CD8+IL-22+ cells than those in recovery or healthy subjects. We recommend that future studies focus on the age-related distribution of pneumonia and liver injury as measles-related complications as well as the association between immunological markers and measles prognosis. PMID:27251754

  19. The Psychosocial Characteristics Associated with NSSI and Suicide Attempt of Youth Admitted to an In-patient Psychiatric Unit

    PubMed Central

    Preyde, Michèle; Vanderkooy, John; Chevalier, Pat; Heintzman, John; Warne, Amanda; Barrick, Kendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of self-harm and the psychosocial factors associated with self-harming behaviours in youth admitted to an in-patient psychiatric unit. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys of standardized measures were administered to youth and a separate survey to their caregivers while the youth were in hospital. Results: The mean age of the 123 youth who participated was 15.74 (SD 1.51) years, and 90 of 121 (74.38%) reported being female. Of the 115 who completed this question, 101 (87.83%) indicated that they thought of injuring themselves and 89 (77.39%) did engage in NSSI within the past month, and 78 of 116 (67%) reported that they had made an attempt to take their life. Youth who reported that they had attempted suicide (lifetime) reported significantly less difficulty with emotion regulation than youth who engaged in NSSI only, or both NSSI and suicide attempts. Conclusions: These youth reported a very high prevalence of self-harm, and in general substantial difficulty with regulating their emotions, and difficulty with their interpersonal relationships. The psychosocial distinctions evident between groups may have practical utility. PMID:24872825

  20. High prevalence of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia among Mozambican children <5 years of age admitted to hospital with clinical severe pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Lanaspa, M; O'Callaghan-Gordo, C; Machevo, S; Madrid, L; Nhampossa, T; Acácio, S; de la Horra, C; Friaza, V; Campano, E; Alonso, P L; Calderón, E J; Roca, A; Bassat, Q

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to describe Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) prevalence and features in children from sub-Saharan Africa and to investigate PCP-associated risk factors. During 2006-2007 we used molecular methods to test children younger than 5 years old admitted with severe pneumonia to a hospital in southern Mozambique for Pneumocystis infection. We recruited 834 children. PCP prevalence was 6.8% and HIV prevalence was 25.7%. The in-hospital and delayed mortality were significantly higher among children with PCP (20.8% vs. 10.2%, p 0.021, and 11.5% vs. 3.6%, p 0.044, respectively). Clinical features were mostly overlapping between the two groups. Independent risk factors for PCP were age less than a year (odds ratio (OR) 6.34, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.86-21.65), HIV infection (OR 2.99, 95% CI 1.16-7.70), grunting (OR 2.64, 95% CI 1.04-6.73) and digital clubbing (OR 10.75, 95% CI 1.21-95.56). PCP is a common and life-threatening cause of severe pneumonia in Mozambican children. Mother-to-child HIV transmission prevention should be strengthened. Better diagnostic tools are needed. PMID:26231980

  1. Etiology and Viral Genotype in Patients with End-Stage Liver Diseases admitted to a Hepatology Unit in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Mancera, Fabian; Loureiro, Carmen Luisa; Hoyos, Sergio; Restrepo, Juan-Carlos; Correa, Gonzalo; Jaramillo, Sergio; Norder, Helene; Pujol, Flor Helene; Navas, Maria-Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are the principal risk factor associated to end-stage liver diseases in the world. A study was carried out on end-stage liver disease cases admitted to an important hepatology unit in Medellin, the second largest city in Colombia. From 131 patients recruited in this prospective study, 71% of cases were diagnosed as cirrhosis, 12.2% as HCC, and 16.8% as cirrhosis and HCC. Regarding the risk factors of these patients, alcohol consumption was the most frequent (37.4%), followed by viral etiology (17.6%). Blood and/or hepatic tissue samples from patients with serological markers for HCV or HBV infection were characterized; on the basis of the phylogenetic analysis of HCV 5′ UTR and HBV S gene, isolates belonged to HCV/1 and HBV/F3, respectively. These results confirm the presence of strains associated with poor clinical outcome, in patients with liver disease in Colombia; additionally, HBV basal core promoter double mutant was identified in HCC cases. Here we show the first study of cirrhosis and/or HCC in Colombian and HBV and HCV molecular characterization of these patients. Viral aetiology was not the main risk factor in this cohort but alcohol consumption. PMID:21941645

  2. [Fungal colonization in preterm neonates weighing less than 1500g admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Benjamin, M D; Jolivet, E; Desbois, N; Pignol, J; Ketterer-Martinon, S; Pierre-Louis, L; Flechelles, O

    2016-09-01

    Fungal colonization is a common occurrence in preterm neonates. Our objective was to describe the profile and characteristics of fungal colonization in preterm infants admitted to the Martinique NICU. From March 2012 to January 2013, an epidemiological prospective cohort study was conducted with 57 very low-birth-weight infants. Cutaneous, rectal, gastric, respiratory, and urinary swabs were collected on admission, then every week for 4 weeks. The prevalence of fungal colonization was 68% (39/57): 46% by Malassezia species, 28% by Candida parapsilosis, 19% by C. albicans, 5% by C. glabrata, and 2% by C. guilliermondii. The colonized patients had a duration of parenteral nutrition and antibiotic therapy longer than the others (P<0.05). Nosocomial colonization (after 2 days of life) occurred in 52% of cases: Malassezia species and C. parapsilosis were the commensal skin yeasts most frequently implicated. Forty-nine percent (28/57) had suspected invasive fungal infections that received probabilistic treatment. Only one case of invasive fungal infection with C. glabrata was diagnosed. This study highlights the important role played by nosocomial transmission in the colonization of preterm newborns. Mycological surveillance cultures in the NICU are very useful for monitoring fungal ecology and can improve the prevention of fungal colonization in preterm infants at risk of invasive fungal infection. PMID:27364939

  3. Revision of the Predictive Method Improves Precision in the Prediction of Stroke Outcomes for Patients Admitted to Rehabilitation Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Tani, Keisuke; Mitani, Yasuhiro; Oku, Kosuke; Tamaru, Yoshiki; Nagano, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the accuracy of a revised method for predicting the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) at discharge when stroke patients are first admitted to a rehabilitation hospital. [Subjects and Methods] The predictive equation with logarithmic trend line was calculated based on the total score of the FIM at admission and discharge in 93 patients with cerebral infarction (CI) and 60 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In other patients with CI or ICH (validation group), the differences between the actual FIM and the predicted FIM at discharge calculated by the CI or ICH equation and the combined (CI + ICH) equation, as well as by the CI or ICH equation and combined equation used in a previous study, were calculated. [Results] The multiple correlation coefficients of the CI equation, ICH equation, and combined equation were 0.87, 0.71, and 0.8. The residual of the actual FIM and predicted FIM at discharge calculated by the CI equation was the smallest in the CI validation group. In the ICH validation group, the residual calculated for ICH patients alone was smaller than that calculated by the previous ICH equation. [Conclusion] This easy-to-use method using a new equation for prediction was more precise than the previous equation. Therefore, we should revise the equation for predicting stroke patient outcome strata according to data from within the governing medical administration system. PMID:25276029

  4. Intermediate risk of multidrug-resistant organisms in patients who admitted intensive care unit with healthcare-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongyeul; Park, Ji Young; Lee, Taehoon; Lee, Yeon Joo; Lim, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Jong Sun; Yoon, Ho Il; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek; Cho, Young-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) was proposed asa new pneumonia category in 2005, and treatment recommendations includebroad-spectrum antibiotics directed at multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens.However, this concept continues to be controversial, and microbiological data arelacking for HCAP patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study was conductedto determine the rate and type of antibiotic-resistant organisms and theclinical outcomes in patients with HCAP in the ICU, compared to patients withcommunity-acquired pneumonia (CAP) or hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of patients with pneumonia(n = 195) who admitted to medical ICU in tertiary teaching hospital fromMarch 2011 to February 2013. Clinical characteristics, microbiological distributions,treatment outcomes, and prognosis of HCAP (n = 74) were compared tothose of CAP (n = 75) and HAP (n = 46). Results: MDR pathogens were significantly higher in HCAP patients (39.1%) thanin CAP (13.5%) and lower than in HAP (79.3%, p < 0.001). The initial use of inappropriateantibiotic treatment occurred more frequently in the HCAP (32.6%) andHAP (51.7%) groups than in the CAP group (11.8%, p = 0.006). There were no differencesin clinical outcomes. The significant prognostic factors were pneumoniaseverity and treatment response. Conclusions: MDR pathogens were isolated in HCAP patients requiring ICU admissionat intermediate rates between those of CAP and HAP. PMID:26968189

  5. Commercial Zone Melting Ingots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yun; Xie, Hongyao; Shu, Shengcheng; Yan, Yonggao; Li, Han; Tang, Xinfeng

    2014-06-01

    Bismuth telluride-based compounds have been extensively utilized for commercial application. However, thermoelectric materials must suffer numerous mechanical vibrations and thermal stresses while in service, making it equally important to discuss the mechanical properties, especially at high temperature. In this study, the compressive and bending strengths of Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 commercial zone melting (ZM) ingots were investigated at 25, 100, and 200 °C, respectively. Due to the obvious anisotropy of materials prepared by ZM method, the effect of anisotropy on the strengths was also explored. Two-parameter Weibull distribution was employed to fit a series of values acquired by a universal testing machine. And digital speckle photography was applied to record the strain field evolution, providing visual observation of surface strain. The compressive and bending strengths along ZM direction were approximately three times as large as those perpendicular to the ZM direction independent of the temperature, indicating a weak van der Waals bond along the c axis.

  6. Neonatal Subventricular Zone Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, David M.; Lafourcade, Carlos A.; Bordey, Angélique

    2013-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) line the postnatal lateral ventricles and give rise to multiple cell types which include neurons, astrocytes, and ependymal cells1. Understanding the molecular pathways responsible for NSC self-renewal, commitment, and differentiation is critical for harnessing their unique potential to repair the brain and better understand central nervous system disorders. Previous methods for the manipulation of mammalian systems required the time consuming and expensive endeavor of genetic engineering at the whole animal level2. Thus, the vast majority of studies have explored the functions of NSC molecules in vitro or in invertebrates. Here, we demonstrate the simple and rapid technique to manipulate neonatal NPCs that is referred to as neonatal subventricular zone (SVZ) electroporation. Similar techniques were developed a decade ago to study embryonic NSCs and have aided studies on cortical development3,4 . More recently this was applied to study the postnatal rodent forebrain5-7. This technique results in robust labeling of SVZ NSCs and their progeny. Thus, postnatal SVZ electroporation provides a cost and time effective alternative for mammalian NSC genetic engineering. PMID:23426329

  7. Predicting km-scale shear zone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbi, Christopher; Culshaw, Nicholas; Shulman, Deborah; Foley, Maura; Marsh, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Because km-scale shear