Science.gov

Sample records for admit variable zoning

  1. Zone edge effects with variable rate irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Variable rate irrigation (VRI) systems may offer solutions to enhance water use efficiency by addressing variability within a field. However, the design of VRI systems should be considered to maximize application uniformity within sprinkler zones, while minimizing edge effects between such zones alo...

  2. Application of Variable Life Adjusted Displays (VLAD) on Victorian Admitted Episodes Dataset (VAED)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The need to improve patient safety has been identified as a major priority for health reform in developed countries, including Australia. We investigated the implementation and appropriateness of Variable Life Adjusted Displays as a quality control procedure to monitor “in-control” versus “out-of-control” processes in Victorian public hospitals. Methods Victorian Admitted Episode Data from Department of Human Services, Victoria for 2004–7 were used. The VLAD is a plot of a cumulative sum of the difference in expected outcome (range 0–1) and observed outcome (0 or 1) for sequential separations. Three outcomes were assessed: in-hospital mortality for acute myocardial infarction, stroke and heart failure. Logistic regression was used to obtain a realistic measure of expected mortality over the period 2004–5, adjusting for covariates and comorbidities, to estimate expected mortality risk for the separations between 2005–7. VLAD were plotted for the years 2005–7, by the 11 hospitals with the highest frequency of separations. Signalling limits for 30%, 50% and 75% risk decrease and risk increase were determined and plotted for each VLAD utilizing risk-adjusted cumulative sum techniques. This is a likelihood-ratio test statistic for signalling. If the VLAD signalled by intersecting with a limit, the limit was reset. Results The three logit models displayed reasonable fit to the observed data. There were n = 2999 separations in the AMI model, n = 3598 in the HF model and n = 1922 in the stroke model. The number of separations plotted by VLAD ranged from n = 126 to n = 648. No signals were observed in 64%, 55% and 18% of VLAD for AMI, HF and stroke respectively. For AMI and HF 9% of hospitals signalled at least once for each of 30%, 50% and 75% risk increase, whereas this was 45% for stroke. Hospitals signalling at least once for risk decrease ranged from 18% to 36% across the levels of risk and outcomes. No VLAD signalled

  3. Variable Phase for Fresnel Zone Plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, George W.

    2004-03-01

    It is not widely known that there is a free parameter in the usual design of zone plates. An earlier work treated the radius of the central Fresnel zone as the free parameter and investigated the effects of its variation numerically [1]. It is possible instead to treat the choice of reference phase in the design of a zone plate as the free parameter [2]. The standard zone plate construction assumes a specific choice for this phase which, however, can be chosen to have any value between 0^o and 360^o. Here we present analysis and measurements on zone plates for 39 GHz radiation with reference phase varied from 0^o to 360^o. When the reference phase is varied, measurements show that the phase of the focused beam is varied in a nearly linear fashion through 360^o with only small changes in beam amplitude. It is concluded that reference phase is an inherent and useful property of zone plates. 1) I.V. Minin and O.V. Minin, Sov. J. Quantum Electron. derline 20, 198 (1990). I thank I.V. Minin for calling this work to my attention. 2) G.W. Webb, Proc. 2003 Antenna Applications Symposium, Allerton Park, Monticello, IL, September 15-17, 2003 and arXiv:physics/0303002 28 Feb 2003.

  4. New Variable for Fresnel Zone Plate Antennas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    Gomez- Reino , Selected Papers on ZONE PLATES, SPIE Milestone Series VOL. MS 128 (1996). 96 [2] J. Ojeda-Castanada and C. Gomez- Reino , ibid. This work...der Physic und Chemie, Vol. 156, pp. 99-113 (1875). Reprinted in J. Ojeda-Castanada and C. Gomez- Reino , ibid. Soret also demonstrated the existence of

  5. Survival status and predictors of mortality among severely acute malnourished children <5 years of age admitted to stabilization centers in Gedeo Zone: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Girum, Tadele; Kote, Mesfin; Tariku, Befikadu; Bekele, Henok

    2017-01-01

    Despite the existence of standard protocol, many stabilization centers (SCs) continue to experience high mortality of children receiving treatment for severe acute malnutrition. Assessing treatment outcomes and identifying predictors may help to overcome this problem. Therefore, a 30-month retrospective cohort study was conducted among 545 randomly selected medical records of children <5 years of age admitted to SCs in Gedeo Zone. Data was entered by Epi Info version 7 and analyzed by STATA version 11. Cox proportional hazards model was built by forward stepwise procedure and compared by the likelihood ratio test and Harrell's concordance, and fitness was checked by Cox-Snell residual plot. During follow-up, 51 (9.3%) children had died, and 414 (76%) and 26 (4.8%) children had recovered and defaulted (missed follow-up for 2 consecutive days), respectively. The survival rates at the end of the first, second and third weeks were 95.3%, 90% and 85%, respectively, and the overall mean survival time was 79.6 days. Age <24 months (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] =2.841, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.101-7.329), altered pulse rate (AHR =3.926, 95% CI =1.579-9.763), altered temperature (AHR =7.173, 95% CI =3.05-16.867), shock (AHR =3.805, 95% CI =1.829-7.919), anemia (AHR =2.618, 95% CI =1.148-5.97), nasogastric tube feeding (AHR =3.181, 95% CI =1.18-8.575), hypoglycemia (AHR =2.74, 95% CI =1.279-5.87) and treatment at hospital stabilization center (AHR =4.772, 95% CI =1.638-13.9) were independent predictors of mortality. The treatment outcomes and incidence of death were in the acceptable ranges of national and international standards. Intervention to further reduce deaths has to focus on young children with comorbidities and altered general conditions.

  6. Earth's rotation variability triggers explosive eruptions in subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sottili, Gianluca; Palladino, Danilo M.; Cuffaro, Marco; Doglioni, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    The uneven Earth's spinning has been reported to affect geological processes, i.e. tectonism, seismicity and volcanism, on a planetary scale. Here, we show that changes of the length of day (LOD) influence eruptive activity at subduction margins. Statistical analysis indicates that eruptions with volcanic explosivity index (VEI) ≥3 alternate along oppositely directed subduction zones as a function of whether the LOD increases or decreases. In particular, eruptions in volcanic arcs along contractional subduction zones, which are mostly E- or NE-directed, occur when LOD increases, whereas they are more frequent when LOD decreases along the opposite W- or SW-directed subduction zones that are rather characterized by upper plate extension and back-arc spreading. We find that the LOD variability determines a modulation of the horizontal shear stresses acting on the crust up to 0.4 MPa. An increase of the horizontal maximum stress in compressive regimes during LOD increment may favour the rupture of the magma feeder system wall rocks. Similarly, a decrease of the minimum horizontal stress in extensional settings during LOD lowering generates a larger differential stress, which may enhance failure of the magma-confining rocks. This asymmetric behaviour of magmatism sheds new light on the role of astronomical forces in the dynamics of the solid Earth.

  7. Survival status and predictors of mortality among severely acute malnourished children <5 years of age admitted to stabilization centers in Gedeo Zone: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Girum, Tadele; Kote, Mesfin; Tariku, Befikadu; Bekele, Henok

    2017-01-01

    Despite the existence of standard protocol, many stabilization centers (SCs) continue to experience high mortality of children receiving treatment for severe acute malnutrition. Assessing treatment outcomes and identifying predictors may help to overcome this problem. Therefore, a 30-month retrospective cohort study was conducted among 545 randomly selected medical records of children <5 years of age admitted to SCs in Gedeo Zone. Data was entered by Epi Info version 7 and analyzed by STATA version 11. Cox proportional hazards model was built by forward stepwise procedure and compared by the likelihood ratio test and Harrell’s concordance, and fitness was checked by Cox–Snell residual plot. During follow-up, 51 (9.3%) children had died, and 414 (76%) and 26 (4.8%) children had recovered and defaulted (missed follow-up for 2 consecutive days), respectively. The survival rates at the end of the first, second and third weeks were 95.3%, 90% and 85%, respectively, and the overall mean survival time was 79.6 days. Age <24 months (adjusted hazard ratio [AHR] =2.841, 95% confidence interval [CI] =1.101–7.329), altered pulse rate (AHR =3.926, 95% CI =1.579–9.763), altered temperature (AHR =7.173, 95% CI =3.05–16.867), shock (AHR =3.805, 95% CI =1.829–7.919), anemia (AHR =2.618, 95% CI =1.148–5.97), nasogastric tube feeding (AHR =3.181, 95% CI =1.18–8.575), hypoglycemia (AHR =2.74, 95% CI =1.279–5.87) and treatment at hospital stabilization center (AHR =4.772, 95% CI =1.638–13.9) were independent predictors of mortality. The treatment outcomes and incidence of death were in the acceptable ranges of national and international standards. Intervention to further reduce deaths has to focus on young children with comorbidities and altered general conditions. PMID:28176953

  8. Variability in Coastal Neotectonics Along the Kamchatka Subduction Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeois, J.; Pinegina, T.; Ponomareva, V.

    2004-12-01

    The eastern coast of Kamchatka can be divided into several morphotectonic zones, which appear to correspond primarily to variations in the subducting crust, rather than to characteristics of the subduction zone such as rate of subduction or subduction angle. Pleistocene marine terraces and Holocene coastal stratigraphy along Kamchatka show variability in uplift (and subsidence) rate both at the degree-latitude scale, and at a scale of kilometers to 10s of km. The southern coast (51-53oN, to Petropavlovsk) is primarily rocky headlands with narrow embayments, some filled with volcaniclastics. North of Petropavlovsk, the coast is subdivided into a series of broad embayments separated by four peninsulas--Zhupanovskiy, Kronotskiy, Kamchatskiy, Ozernoi, from south to north. These peninsulas are landward, respectively, of the Kruzenstern fracture zone, the Meiji seamounts, the Aleutian-Komandorskiy island chain, and the Beta Rise. Our field studies of Quaternary coastal evolution and seismotectonic regime over the last decade have included: 1) tephra chronology for dating and correlation 2) study of paleotsunami deposits to estimate recurrence rates of tsunamigenic earthquakes; and 3) analysis of the modern and paleo-topography of marine terraces and beach ridges in order to determine the direction and intensity of tectonic deformation over different spatial and temporal scales. The shorter the time interval we are able to specify (decades to hundreds of years), the higher the rate of vertical movements we tend to obtain. Estimates of net deformation for longer periods (10s to 100s of thousands of years) are commonly an order of magnitude slower, because seismic cycles are averaged out. The net Quaternary deformation of eastern Kamchatka is uplift, with peninsulas exhibiting the highest rates, up to 2 mm/yr for the last 0.5 my on Kamchatskiy Peninsula. The large embayments between peninsulas typically exhibit evidence for subsidence or stasis on a Holocene time scale. On

  9. A methodology to analyze treatment zone geometry and variability of percutaneous thermal ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshava, Krishna N.; Kimia, Benjamin B.; Cook, Madeleine; Dupuy, Damian E.; Collins, Scott A.; Merck, Derek

    2015-03-01

    A major challenge for image guided tumor ablation is the high treatment variability due to heterogeneous tissue characteristics and thermal sinks. In this work, we present a methodology to analyze the geometry of the treatment zones and treatment zone variability. Our first contribution is an applicator centric co-ordinate system which enables us to compare treatment zones and vendor specifications across patients. Our second contribution is the analysis of the shape of the ablation zone using applicator centric longitudinal 2D cross sections. We present initial results of applying this methodology to analyze the geometry and variability in synthetic examples like ellipsoid, sphere and real microwave ablation zones in lung and liver.

  10. Parasuicide and drug self-poisoning: analysis of the epidemiological and clinical variables of the patients admitted to the Poisoning Treatment Centre (CAV), Niguarda General Hospital, Milan

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological knowledge of parasuicides and drug self-poisoning is still limited by a lack of data. A number of preliminary studies, which require further analysis, evidenced that parasuicidal acts occur more often among females, that the peak rate is generally recorded between the ages of 15 and 34 years and psychotropic medications seems to be the most frequently used. The aim of this study was to describe the demographic and clinical variables of a sample of subjects admitted to the Posisoning Treatment Centre (CAV), Niguarda General Hospital, Milan, following drug self-poisoning. Furthermore, this study is aimed to identify the risk factors associated to parasuicidal gestures, with special care for the used drugs, the presence of psychiatric or organic disorders, alcoholism and drug addiction. The study included the 201 patients attending the CAV in 1999 and 2000 who satisfied the criteria of self-poisoning attempts: 106 cases in 1999 and 95 in 2000. The sample had a prevalence of females (64%). The peak rates of parasuicides from drug self-poisoning were reached between 21 and 30 years among the females, and 31 and 40 years among the males. 81.6% of the patients used one or more psychoactive drugs, the most frequent being the benzodiazepines (58.7%), classic neuroleptics (16.9%) and new-generation antidepressants (SSRIs, SNRIs, NARIs) (12.9%). The prevalence of mood disorders was higher among females (64% vs 42%), whereas schizophrenia was more frequently diagnosed in males (22% vs 10%). 61% (33%) had a history of previous attempted suicides. The presence of clinically relevant organic diseases was observed in 24.9% of the sample. PMID:15967050

  11. Vertical Variability in Saturated Zone Hydrochemistry Near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    G. Patterson; P. Striffler

    2007-02-17

    The differences in the saturated zone hydrochemistry with depth at borehole NC-EWDP-22PC reflect the addition of recharge along Fortymile Wash. The differences in water chemistry with depth at borehole NC-EWDP-19PB appear to indicate that other processes are involved. Water from the lower part of NC-EWDP-19PB possesses chemical characteristics that clearly indicate that it has undergone cation exchange that resulted in the removal of calcium and magnesium and the addition of sodium. This water is very similar to water from the Western Yucca Mountain facies that has previously been thought to flow west of NC-EWDP-19PB. Water from the lower zone in NC-EWDP-19PB also could represent water from the Eastern Yucca Mountain facies that has moved through clay-bearing or zeolitized aquifer material resulting in the altered chemistry. Water chemistry from the upper part of the saturated zone at NC-EWDP-19PB, both zones at NC-EWDP-22PC, and wells in the Fortymile Wash facies appears to be the result of recharge through the alluvium south of Yucca Mountain and within the Fortymile Wash channel.

  12. Vertical variability in saturated zone hydrochemistry near Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patterson, G.L.; Striffler, P.S.

    2006-01-01

    The differences in the saturated zone hydrochemistry with depth at borehole NC-EWDP-22PC reflect the addition of recharge along Fortymile Wash. The differences in water chemistry with depth at borehole NC-EWDP-19PB appear to indicate that other processes are involved. Water from the lower part of NC-EWDP-19PB possesses chemical characteristics that clearly indicate that it has undergone cation exchange that resulted in the removal of calcium and magnesium and the addition of sodium. This water is very similar to water from the Western Yucca Mountain facies that has previously been thought to flow west of NC-EWDP-19PB. Water from the lower zone in NC-EWDP-19PB also could represent water from the Eastern Yucca Mountain fades that has moved through day-bearing or zeolitized aquifer material resulting in the altered chemistry. Water chemistry from the upper part of the saturated zone at NC-EWDP-19PB, both zones at NC-EWDP-22PC, and wells in the Fortymile Wash facies appears to be the result of recharge through the alluvium south of Yucca Mountain and within the Fortymile Wash channel.

  13. A first approach to calculate BIOCLIM variables and climate zones for Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Monika; Trutschnig, Wolfgang; Bathke, Arne C.; Ruprecht, Ulrike

    2017-02-01

    For testing the hypothesis that macroclimatological factors determine the occurrence, biodiversity, and species specificity of both symbiotic partners of Antarctic lecideoid lichens, we present a first approach for the computation of the full set of 19 BIOCLIM variables, as available at http://www.worldclim.org/ for all regions of the world with exception of Antarctica. Annual mean temperature (Bio 1) and annual precipitation (Bio 12) were chosen to define climate zones of the Antarctic continent and adjacent islands as required for ecological niche modeling (ENM). The zones are based on data for the years 2009-2015 which was obtained from the Antarctic Mesoscale Prediction System (AMPS) database of the Ohio State University. For both temperature and precipitation, two separate zonings were specified; temperature values were divided into 12 zones (named 1 to 12) and precipitation values into five (named A to E). By combining these two partitions, we defined climate zonings where each geographical point can be uniquely assigned to exactly one zone, which allows an immediate explicit interpretation. The soundness of the newly calculated climate zones was tested by comparison with already published data, which used only three zones defined on climate information from the literature. The newly defined climate zones result in a more precise assignment of species distribution to the single habitats. This study provides the basis for a more detailed continental-wide ENM using a comprehensive dataset of lichen specimens which are located within 21 different climate regions.

  14. A variable-geometry combustor used to study primary and secondary zone stoichiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briehl, D.; Schultz, D. F.; Ehlers, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    A combustion program is underway to evaluate fuel quality effects on gas turbine combustors. A rich-lean variable geometry combustor design was chosen to evaluate fuel quality effects over a wide range of primary and secondary zone equivalence ratios at simulated engine operating conditions. The first task of this effort, was to evaluate the performance of the variable geometry combustor. The combustor incorporates three stations of variable geometry to control primary and secondary zone equivalence ratio and overall pressure loss. Geometry changes could be made while a test was in progress through the use of remote control actuators. The primary zone liner was water cooled to eliminate the concern of liner durability. Emissions and performance data were obtained at simulated engine conditions of 80 percent and full power. Inlet air temperature varied from 611 to 665K, inlet total pressure varied from 1.02 to 1.24 MPa, reference velocity was a constant 1400 K.

  15. Variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of a super-high arch dam.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhongwen; Gu, Chongshi; Qin, Dong

    2016-01-01

    This study determines dam deformation similarity indexes based on an analysis of deformation zoning features and panel data clustering theory, with comprehensive consideration to the actual deformation law of super-high arch dams and the spatial-temporal features of dam deformation. Measurement methods of these indexes are studied. Based on the established deformation similarity criteria, the principle used to determine the number of dam deformation zones is constructed through entropy weight method. This study proposes the deformation zoning method for super-high arch dams and the implementation steps, analyzes the effect of special influencing factors of different dam zones on the deformation, introduces dummy variables that represent the special effect of dam deformation, and establishes a variable-intercept panel model for deformation zoning of super-high arch dams. Based on different patterns of the special effect in the variable-intercept panel model, two panel analysis models were established to monitor fixed and random effects of dam deformation. Hausman test method of model selection and model effectiveness assessment method are discussed. Finally, the effectiveness of established models is verified through a case study.

  16. Environmental and economic benefits of variable rate nitrogen fertilization in a nitrate vulnerable zone.

    PubMed

    Basso, Bruno; Dumont, Benjamin; Cammarano, Davide; Pezzuolo, Andrea; Marinello, Francesco; Sartori, Luigi

    2016-03-01

    Agronomic input and management practices have traditionally been applied uniformly on agricultural fields despite the presence of spatial variability of soil properties and landscape position. When spatial variability is ignored, uniform agronomic management can be both economically and environmentally inefficient. The objectives of this study were to: i) identify optimal N fertilizer rates using an integrated spatio-temporal analysis of yield and site-specific N rate response; ii) test the sensitivity of site specific N management to nitrate leaching in response to different N rates; and iii) demonstrate the environmental benefits of variable rate N fertilizer in a Nitrate Vulnerable Zone. This study was carried out on a 13.6 ha field near the Venice Lagoon, northeast Italy over four years (2005-2008). We utilized a validated crop simulation model to evaluate crop response to different N rates at specific zones in the field based on localized soil and landscape properties under rainfed conditions. The simulated rates were: 50 kg N ha(-1) applied at sowing for the entire study area and increasing fractions, ranging from 150 to 350 kg N ha(-1) applied at V6 stage. Based on the analysis of yield maps from previous harvests and soil electrical resistivity data, three management zones were defined. Two N rates were applied in each of these zones, one suggested by our simulation analysis and the other with uniform N fertilization as normally applied by the producer. N leaching was lower and net revenue was higher in the zones where variable rates of N were applied when compared to uniform N fertilization. This demonstrates the efficacy of using crop models to determine variable rates of N fertilization within a field and the application of variable rate N fertilizer to achieve higher profit and reduce nitrate leaching.

  17. A preliminary study on the relationships between diurnal melatonin secretion profile and sleep variables in patients emergently admitted to the coronary care unit.

    PubMed

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Futenma, Kunihiro; Kobayashi, Mina; Komada, Yoko; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Yamashina, Akira; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-01-01

    To clarify the significance of melatonin secretion under intensive care conditions, we investigated melatonin secretion profiles and sleep parameters of 23 patients just after admission to the coronary care unit (CCU) and 19 age-matched controls. Sleep parameters were evaluated by actigraphy, and melatonin secretion was assessed by measuring the urinary 6-sulphatoxy melatonin (6-SMT). 6-SMT secretion was lower and nocturnal sleep parameters were less satisfactory in the subjects than those in the controls, and there were positive correlations between these variables, particularly in the subject patients. The lowered melatonin secretion might be involved in the mechanism of insomnia in CCU patients.

  18. Booming during a bust: Asynchronous population responses of arid zone lizards to climatic variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Read, John L.; Kovac, Kelli-Jo; Brook, Barry W.; Fordham, Damien A.

    2012-04-01

    The productivity of arid environments and the reproductive success of vertebrates in these systems, are typically thought to be primarily influenced by rainfall patterns. Data from our 15 year study at an Australian arid zone site reveals asynchronous demographic responses to rainfall and other climatic variables among different lizard species. We show that, in addition to precipitation, key demographic rates (fecundity, recruitment and survival) are correlated strongly with temporal variability in temperature, during and prior to the breeding season, and also to the density of sympatric lizard species. There were nine-fold fluctuations through time in the relative abundance of two similar-sized Ctenotus species, and asynchronous recruitment success and survival among other species, despite the absence of direct anthropogenic affects Understanding the drivers and magnitude of the substantial natural variability in arid-zone lizard assemblages is integral to predicting and interpreting their responses to future land use or climate-change scenarios.

  19. Climate Variability and Vadose Zone Controls on Damping of Transient Recharge Fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corona, C.; Gurdak, J. J.; Dickinson, J.; Ferré, T. P. A.

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the effects of interannual to multidecadal climate variability on groundwater resources by exploring the physical processes in the vadose zone that partially control transient infiltration and recharge fluxes. The vadose zone connects climate variability modes to groundwater systems by influencing infiltration events. Infiltration events become time-varying water flux through the vadose zone and are controlled by highly nonlinear, complex interactions between mean infiltration flux, infiltration period, soil textures, and depth to water table. We focus on the behavior and damping depth of water flux in the vadose zone. The damping depth is defined as the depth that the flux variation damps to 5% of the land surface variation. When the damping depth is above the water table, recharge may be considered steady; when the damping depth is below the water table, recharge may be considered transient. Previous work shows that the damping depth is sensitive to the frequency of the infiltration pattern and the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the media. We examine controls on the damping depth by modeling transient water fluxes at the land surface using the Gardner-Kozeny soil model for diffuse unsaturated flow in HYDRUS 1-D. Results for homogeneous profiles show that shorter-period oscillations, smaller mean fluxes, and finer-grained soil textures generally produce damping depths closer to land surface. Modeling layered soil textures indicates similar, but more complicated responses in the damping depth. Model results indicate that finer-textured layers in a coarser soil profile generally result in damping depths closer to land surface, while coarser-textured layers in a coarser soil profile result in damping depths deeper in the vadose zone. Findings from this study will enhance understanding of the vadose zone's influence on transient water flux and improve the simulation of recharge processes and climate variability effects in groundwater models.

  20. Seasonal and interannual variability of pigment concentrations across a California Current frontal zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, A. C.; Strub, P. T.

    1990-01-01

    The seasonal and interannual variability of the latitudinal position of the California Current frontal zone was investigated by examining satellite images of phytoplankton pigment from the coastal-zone color scanner for the periods 1979-1983 and 1986. The pigment concentrations associated with the zonal front were also determined. A general seasonal cycle of pigment concentrations is was established. It was found that variations in the frontal structure are controlled primarily by changes in pigment concentration north of the front. Seasonal variations were found to be minimal south of the front, where pigment concentrations remain low throughout the spring, summer, and fall.

  1. Climate, soil, and vegetation controls on the temporal variability of vadose zone transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harman, C. J.; Rao, P. S. C.; Basu, N. B.; McGrath, G. S.; Kumar, P.; Sivapalan, M.

    2011-10-01

    Temporal patterns of solute transport and transformation through the vadose zone are driven by the stochastic variability of water fluxes. This is determined by the hydrologic filtering of precipitation variability into infiltration, storage, drainage, and evapotranspiration. In this work we develop a framework for examining the role of the hydrologic filtering and, in particular, the effect of evapotranspiration in determining the travel time and delivery of sorbing, reacting solutes transported through the vadose zone by stochastic rainfall events. We describe a 1-D vertical model in which solute pulses are tracked as point loads transported to depth by a series of discrete infiltration events. Numerical solutions of this model compare well to the Richards equation-based HYDRUS model for some typical cases. We then utilize existing theory of the stochastic dynamics of soil water to derive analytical and semianalytical expressions for the probability density functions (pdf's) of solute travel time and delivery. The moments of these pdf's directly relate the mean and variance of expected travel times to the water balance and show how evapotranspiration tends to reduce (and make more uncertain) the mass of a degrading solute delivered to the base of the vadose zone. The framework suggests a classification of different modes hydrologic filtering depending on hydroclimatic and landscape controls. Results suggest that variability in travel times decreases with soil depth in wet climates but increases with soil depth in dry climates. In dry climates, rare large storms can be an important mechanism for leaching to groundwater.

  2. Admit: Alma Data Mining Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedel, Douglas; Looney, Leslie; Xu, Lisa; Pound, Marc W.; Teuben, Peter J.; Rauch, Kevin P.; Mundy, Lee; Kern, Jeffrey S.

    2015-06-01

    ADMIT (ALMA Data Mining Toolkit) is a toolkit for the creation and analysis of new science products from ALMA data. ADMIT is an ALMA Development Project written purely in Python. While specifically targeted for ALMA science and production use after the ALMA pipeline, it is designed to be generally applicable to radio-astronomical data. ADMIT quickly provides users with a detailed overview of their science products: line identifications, line 'cutout' cubes, moment maps, emission type analysis (e.g., feature detection), etc. Users can download the small ADMIT pipeline product (<20MB), analyze the results, then fine-tune and re-run the ADMIT pipeline (or any part thereof) on their own machines and interactively inspect the results. ADMIT will have both a GUI and command line interface available for this purpose. By analyzing multiple data cubes simultaneously, data mining between many astronomical sources and line transitions will be possible. Users will also be able to enhance the capabilities of ADMIT by creating customized ADMIT tasks satisfying any special processing needs. Future implementations of ADMIT may include EVLA and other instruments.

  3. Quantifying catchment scale soil variability in Marshall Gulch, Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleran, M.; Rasmussen, C.

    2012-12-01

    Quantifying regolith variation, both chemical and physical yields insights to the evolution of the subsurface. In this study we aim to quantify soil variability within a forested catchment, Marshall Gulch, AZ. Marshall Gulch (MG) lies within the Coronado National Forest, part of the Jemez River Basin-Santa Catalina Mountains Critical Zone Observatory (CZO). MG is 5-hectare, mixed-conifer forested catchment situated on granitic parent material, with a mean elevation of 2400m, mean annual temperature of 8°C and mean annual precipitation of 75 cm. To ensure samples sites capture landscape variability, principal component analysis (PCA) were run on NAIP imagery and additional ancillary data from the study area. The PCA determined input layers of soil depth, slope, soil wetness index, NDVI and NAIP bands 3/2 as the variables needed to capture the landscape variability of MG. A conditioned Latin Hyper Cube (cLHC) model was then utilized to randomly determine 20 sample locations within the catchment to equally represent the six input layers, as determined from the PCA. Regolith profiles were described and sampled at all 20 locations. At each sample site a soil pit was dug to refusal (paralithic contact) and sampled according to genetic horizon. Each sample was then analyzed using methods of X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), particle size, color, pH, EC, C/N isotopes, and loss on ignition (LOI) to characterize chemical and physical soil properties. By quantifying chemical denudation and mineralogical variability of the collected soils, we establish a proxy for regolith weathering both on the profile scale (1m2) as well as the catchment scale (50k m2). GIS spatial techniques enable us to produce maps depicting the variability of soil properties. We confidently extrapolate our findings (pH, depth to paralithic contact, color, mineralogy etc.) throughout the entirety of the MG field site, generating a high-resolution understanding of the processes shaping

  4. Soil moisture variability of root zone profiles within SMEX02 remote sensing footprints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Minha; Jacobs, Jennifer M.

    2007-04-01

    Remote sensing of soil moisture effectively provides soil moisture at a large scale, but does not explain highly heterogeneous soil moisture characteristics within remote sensing footprints. In this study, field scale spatio-temporal variability of root zone soil moisture was analyzed. During the Soil Moisture Experiment 2002 (SMEX02), daily soil moisture profiles (i.e., 0-6, 5-11, 15-21, and 25-31 cm) were measured in two fields in Walnut Creek watershed, Ames, Iowa, USA. Theta probe measurements of the volumetric soil moisture profile data were used to analyze statistical moments and time stability and to validate soil moisture predicted by a simple physical model simulation. For all depths, the coefficient of variation of soil moisture is well explained by the mean soil moisture using an exponential relationship. The simple model simulated very similar variability patterns as those observed. As soil depth increases, soil moisture distributions shift from skewed to normal patterns. At the surface depth, the soil moisture during dry down is log-normally distributed, while the soil moisture is normally distributed after rainfall. At all depths below the surface, the normal distribution captures the soil moisture variability for all conditions. Time stability analyses show that spatial patterns of sampling points are preserved for all depths and that time stability of surface measurements is a good indicator of subsurface time stability. The most time stable sampling sites estimate the field average root zone soil moisture value within ±2.1% volumetric soil moisture.

  5. Assessment of surf zone environmental variables in a southwestern Atlantic sandy beach (Monte Hermoso, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Menéndez, M Clara; Fernández Severini, Melisa D; Buzzi, Natalia S; Piccolo, M Cintia; Perillo, Gerardo M E

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the temporal dynamics (monthly/tidal) of water temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a (chlo-a), suspended particulate matter (SPM), particulate organic carbon (POC), and dissolved nutrients in the surf zone of Monte Hermoso sandy beach, Argentina. We also aimed to understand the underlying mechanisms responsible for the observed variability. Sampling was carried out approximately monthly (September 2009-November 2010), and all samples were collected in a fixed station during high and low tide. Water temperature showed a clear seasonal variability (July: 9 °C-December: 26.5 °C) and a thermal amplitude of 17.5 °C. Salinity ranged from 33 to 37, without a pronounced seasonality. SPM (10-223 mg L(-1)) and POC concentrations (399-6445 mg C m(-3)) were high in surf zone waters. Chlo-a (0.05-9.16 μg L(-1)) was low and did not evidence the occurrence of surf diatom accumulations. Dissolved nutrient concentration was quite fluctuating. None of the variables seemed to be affected by tidal stage. The results showed how fluctuating the physico-chemical and biological variables can be in this particular system. The observed variability can be related with local beach conditions but also with regional processes. The study area is highly influenced by a neighbor estuary and as a consequence, could be vulnerable to their seasonal and inter-annual dynamics. All of these characteristics must be considered for further studies and planning of the uses of natural resources and should be taken into account in any environmental monitoring program conducted in a similar beach system.

  6. Variability in apparent soil organic carbon turnover times across climate zones and vegetation classes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomik, M.; Reichstein, M.; Schrumpf, M.; Beer, C.; Curiel Yuste, J.; Janssens, I.; Luyssaert, S.; Subke, J.; Trumbore, S.; Wutzler, T.; Fluxnet Lathuile: Www. Fluxdata. Org

    2011-12-01

    Our understanding about the climatic controls on the rate of soil organic carbon (SOC) decomposition is still limited and greatly debated, especially the temperature sensitivity of SOC decomposition. Some argue that SOC turnover time (TO) decreases exponentially with increasing temperatures, while others disagree. Based on a number of assumptions, we calculated the ratio between soil CO2 efflux and soil bulk carbon stocks, from which we obtained an estimate of apparent TO for bulk soils across a selection of forested sites around the globe. We used data collected from site-PIs and from recently-available databases of: soil chamber flux measurements (Global soil respiration database: code.google.com/p/srdb/), ecosystem carbon flux measurements (FLUXNET LaThuile dataset: www.fluxdata.org), and global soil carbon stock estimates (Harmonized world soil database: www.iiasa.ac.at/Research/LUC/External-World-soil-database/HTML/). We investigated across-site variability of these apparent TO values in relation to climate (i.e. site's mean annual temperature, MAT, and total annual precipitation, TAP) and vegetation classes (i.e. broadleaf deciduous, needle-leaf deciduous, broadleaf evergreen, and needle-leaf evergreen). We found that, when all data points were considered, TO decreased exponentially with increasing MAT and TAP, in accordance with past studies, although the relationship with TAP was not as strong as with MAT. The overall negative exponential relationship was maintained even when the data was analyzed under the combined effects of MAT and TAP and vegetation class. TO at sites with low annual precipitation and low mean annual temperatures were high (i.e. the rate of decomposition was low). However, we also found that this overall global exponential relationship was largely driven by the difference in TO between sites located in the boreal climate zone and sites located in the other climate zones considered (i.e. tropical, Mediterranean and temperate climate

  7. Temperature and acidification variability reduce physiological performance in the intertidal zone porcelain crab Petrolisthes cinctipes.

    PubMed

    Paganini, Adam W; Miller, Nathan A; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2014-11-15

    We show here that increased variability of temperature and pH synergistically negatively affects the energetics of intertidal zone crabs. Under future climate scenarios, coastal ecosystems are projected to have increased extremes of low tide-associated thermal stress and ocean acidification-associated low pH, the individual or interactive effects of which have yet to be determined. To characterize energetic consequences of exposure to increased variability of pH and temperature, we exposed porcelain crabs, Petrolisthes cinctipes, to conditions that simulated current and future intertidal zone thermal and pH environments. During the daily low tide, specimens were exposed to no, moderate or extreme heating, and during the daily high tide experienced no, moderate or extreme acidification. Respiration rate and cardiac thermal limits were assessed following 2.5 weeks of acclimation. Thermal variation had a larger overall effect than pH variation, though there was an interactive effect between the two environmental drivers. Under the most extreme temperature and pH combination, respiration rate decreased while heat tolerance increased, indicating a smaller overall aerobic energy budget (i.e. a reduced O2 consumption rate) of which a larger portion is devoted to basal maintenance (i.e. greater thermal tolerance indicating induction of the cellular stress response). These results suggest the potential for negative long-term ecological consequences for intertidal ectotherms exposed to increased extremes in pH and temperature due to reduced energy for behavior and reproduction.

  8. Multi-Decadal Rainfall Variability under the South Pacific Convergence Zone from 1570-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, J. W.; Quinn, T. M.; Shen, C.; Taylor, F. W.; Banner, J. L.; Maupin, C. R.; lin, K.; Sinclair, D. J.; Huh, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Pacific Ocean Basin undergoes natural climate variability on decadal to multi-decadal timescales. Ocean-atmosphere feedbacks drive a complex cycle in tropical and extra-tropical winds and zonal sea-surface temperatures (SST) resulting in basin-scale climate reorganizations. The Pacific Ocean zonal SST gradient responds to upwelling of cold waters near the equator transported by shallow Pacific Meridional Overturning Circulation (PMOC), which in turn responds to changes in winds. However, the frequency, timing, and magnitude of past decadal changes in the Pacific are largely unknown. To address this question, we developed a U-Th dated, 430-year stable oxygen isotope (δ18O) cave record of past precipitation in Vanuatu, a location whose climate is heavily influenced by variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). The δ18O-based precipitation record shows repeating cycles that are ~25-50 years in duration and correspond to ~115 mm/month of rainfall change that can occur in as fast as 5 years - a change larger and quicker than the 1976 regime shift. The stalagmite δ18O to rainfall amount conversion is based on the "amount effect" observed at similar tropical sites. The "Little Ice Age" (LIA) section of the record exhibits no trend in precipitation, hence no change in the strength or position of the SPCZ over Vanuatu. This result suggests a disconnection between changes in the SPCZ and the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ), which does exhibit a southerly shift during the LIA period. Changes in PMOC via ocean-atmosphere feedbacks most likely explain the decadal shifts in SPCZ strength through alteration of the tropical Pacific zonal SST gradient and subsequent trade wind response. Periods of high paleo-rainfall in Vanuatu (strong PMOC, increased zonal SST gradient and increased trade winds) correlate with historical accounts of little to no El Niño activity implying that Pacific Basin mean state regulates interannual variability.

  9. Effects of Atlantic warm pool variability over climate of South America tropical transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricaurte Villota, Constanza; Romero-Rodríguez, Deisy; Andrés Ordoñez-Zuñiga, Silvio; Murcia-Riaño, Magnolia; Coca-Domínguez, Oswaldo

    2016-04-01

    Colombia is located in the northwestern corner of South America in a climatically complex region due to the influence processes modulators of climate both the Pacific and Atlantic region, becoming in a transition zone between phenomena of northern and southern hemisphere. Variations in the climatic conditions of this region, especially rainfall, have been attributed to the influence of the El Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO), but little is known about the interaction within Atlantic Ocean and specifically Caribbean Sea with the environmental conditions of this region. In this work We studied the influence of the Atlantic Warm Pool (AWP) on the Colombian Caribbean (CC) climate using data of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) between 1900 - 2014 from ERSST V4, compared with in situ data SIMAC (National System for Coral Reef Monitoring in Colombia - INVEMAR), rainfall between 1953-2013 of meteorological stations located at main airports in the Colombian Caribbean zone, administered by IDEAM, and winds data between 2003 - 2014 from WindSat sensor. The parameters analyzed showed spatial differences throughout the study area. SST anomalies, representing the variability of the AWP, showed to be associated with Multidecadal Atlantic Oscillation (AMO) and with the index of sea surface temperature of the North-tropical Atlantic (NTA), the variations was on 3 to 5 years on the ENSO scale and of approximately 11 years possibly related to solar cycles. Rainfall anomalies in the central and northern CC respond to changes in SST, while in the south zone these are not fully engage and show a high relationship with the ENSO. Finally, the winds also respond to changes in SST and showed a signal approximately 90 days possibly related to the Madden-Julian Oscillation, whose intensity depends on the CC region being analyzed. The results confirm that region is a transition zone in which operate several forcing, the variability of climate conditions is difficult to attribute only one, as ENSO

  10. Intraseasonal variability of the Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone during austral summer and winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomaziello, Ana Carolina Nóbile; Carvalho, Leila M. V.; Gandu, Adilson W.

    2016-09-01

    The Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone (A-ITCZ) exhibits variations on several time-scales and plays a crucial role in precipitation regimes of northern South America and western Africa. Here we investigate the variability of the A-ITCZ on intraseasonal time-scales during austral summer (November-March) and winter (May-September) based on a multivariate index that describes the main atmospheric features of the A-ITCZ and retains its variability on interannual, semiannual, and intraseasonal time-scales. This index is the time coefficient of the first combined empirical orthogonal function mode of anomalies (annual cycle removed) of precipitation, and zonal and meridional wind components at 850 hPa from the climate forecast system reanalysis (1979-2010). We examine associations between the intraseasonal variability of the A-ITCZ and the activity of the Madden-Julian oscillation (MJO). We show that during austral summer intraseasonal variability of the A-ITCZ is associated with a Rossby wave train in the Northern Hemisphere. In austral winter this variability is associated with the propagation of a Rossby wave in the Southern Hemisphere consistent with the Pacific-South American pattern. Moreover, we show that intense A-ITCZ events on intraseasonal time-scales are more frequent during the phase of MJO characterized by convection over western Pacific and suppression over the Indian Ocean. These teleconnection patterns induce anomalies in the trade winds and upper level divergence over the equatorial Atlantic that modulate the intensity of the A-ITCZ.

  11. Spatial variability of available soil microelements in an ecological functional zone of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Ye, Huichun; Shen, Chongyang; Huang, Yuanfang; Huang, Wenjiang; Zhang, Shiwen; Jia, Xiaohong

    2015-02-01

    Understanding the spatial variability of soil microelements and its influencing factors is of importance for a number of applications such as scientifically formulated fertilizer and environmental protection. This study used descriptive statistics and geostatistics to investigate the spatial variability of available soil Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn contents in agricultural topsoil (0-20 cm) in an ecological functional zone located at Yanqing County, Beijing, China. Kriging method was applied to map the spatial patterns of available soil Fe, Mn, Cu, and Zn contents. Results showed that the available soil Cu had a widest spatial correlation distance (e.g., 9.6 km), which for available soil Fe, Mn, and Zn were only 1.29, 2.58, and 0.99 km, respectively. The values of C 0/sill for available soil Fe and Zn were 0.12 and 0.11, respectively, demonstrating that the spatial heterogeneity was mainly due to structural factors. The available soil Mn and Cu had the larger values of C 0/sill (i.e., 0.50 and 0.44 for Mn and Cu, respectively), which showed a medium spatial correlation. Mapping of the spatial patterns of the four microelements showed that the decrease trend of available soil Fe and Mn were from northeast to southwest across the study area. The highest amount of available soil Cu was distributed in the middle of the study area surrounding urban region which presented as a "single island". The highest amount of available soil Zn was mainly distributed in the north and south of the study area. One-way analysis of variance for the influencing factors showed that the lithology of parental materials, soil organic matter, and pH were important factors affecting spatial variability of the available microelements. The topography only had a significant influence on the spatial variability of available soil Fe and Mn contents, parental materials, and the land use types had little influence on the spatial variability.

  12. The Barents Sea frontal zones and water masses variability (1980-2011)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oziel, L.; Sirven, J.; Gascard, J.-C.

    2016-01-01

    The polar front separates the warm and saline Atlantic Water entering the southern Barents Sea from the cold and fresh Arctic Water located in the north. These water masses can mix together (mainly in the center of the Barents Sea), be cooled by the atmosphere and receive salt because of brine release; these processes generate dense water in winter, which then cascades into the Arctic Ocean to form the Arctic Intermediate Water. To study the interannual variability and evolution of the frontal zones and the corresponding variations of the water masses, we have merged data from the International Council for the Exploration of the Sea and the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute and have built a new database, which covers the 1980-2011 period. The summer data were interpolated on a regular grid. A probability density function is used to show that the polar front splits into two branches east of 32° E where the topographic constraint weakens. Two fronts can then be identified: the Northern Front is associated with strong salinity gradients and the Southern Front with temperature gradients. Both fronts enclose the denser Barents Sea Water. The interannual variability of the water masses is apparent in the observed data and is linked to that of the ice cover. The frontal zones variability is found by using data from a general circulation model. The link with the atmospheric variability, represented here by the Arctic Oscillation, is not clear. However, model results suggest that such a link could be validated if winter data were taken into account. A strong trend appears: the Atlantic Water (Arctic Water) occupies a larger (smaller) volume of the Barents Sea. This trend amplifies during the last decade and the model study suggests that this could be accompanied by a northwards displacement of the Southern Front in the eastern part of the Barents Sea. The results are less clear for the Northern Front. The observations show that the volume of the Barents Sea Water

  13. Mapping and Assessing Variability in the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone, the Pack Ice and Coastal Polynyas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeve, Julienne; Jenouvrier, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Sea ice variability within the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and polynyas plays an important role for phytoplankton productivity and krill abundance. Therefore mapping their spatial extent, seasonal and interannual variability is essential for understanding how current and future changes in these biological active regions may impact the Antarctic marine ecosystem. Knowledge of the distribution of different ice types to the total Antarctic sea ice cover may also help to shed light on the factors contributing towards recent expansion of the Antarctic ice cover in some regions and contraction in others. The long-term passive microwave satellite data record provides the longest and most consistent data record for assessing different ice types. However, estimates of the amount of MIZ, consolidated pack ice and polynyas depends strongly on what sea ice algorithm is used. This study uses two popular passive microwave sea ice algorithms, the NASA Team and Bootstrap to evaluate the distribution and variability in the MIZ, the consolidated pack ice and coastal polynyas. Results reveal the NASA Team algorithm has on average twice the MIZ and half the consolidated pack ice area as the Bootstrap algorithm. Polynya area is also larger in the NASA Team algorithm, and the timing of maximum polynya area may differ by as much as 5 months between algorithms. These differences lead to different relationships between sea ice characteristics and biological processes, as illustrated here with the breeding success of an Antarctic seabird.

  14. Unsaturated zone hydrology and cave drip discharge water response: Implications for speleothem paleoclimate record variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markowska, Monika; Baker, Andy; Treble, Pauline C.; Andersen, Martin S.; Hankin, Stuart; Jex, Catherine N.; Tadros, Carol V.; Roach, Regina

    2015-10-01

    High-frequency, spatially-dense discharge monitoring was conducted over fifteen months to characterise unsaturated zone flow at Harrie Wood Cave (HWC), in the Snowy Mountains, Yarrangobilly (SE Australia). The cave was formed in the Late Silurian Yarrangobilly Limestone, a fractured rock associated with very low primary porosity due to past diagenesis. Over our monitoring period we simultaneously measured rainfall, soil moisture saturation and drip discharge rate at fourteen sites to characterise infiltration-discharge relationships. All drip discharge sites exhibited non-Gaussian distributions, indicating long periods where low discharge predominates, punctuated by short infrequent periods of high discharge. However, there was significant variability in discharge between sites and consequently no spatial correlation in the cave. We investigated the depth-discharge relationship at HWC and found a moderate relationship between depth and drip discharge lag (response) times to soil moisture content, but only weak relationships between depth and mean and maximum discharge. This highlights that the karst architecture plays an important role in controlling drip discharge dynamics. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Agglomerative Hierarchal Clustering (AHC) were used to classify similar drip types, revealing five unique drip regimes. Two-phase flow and non-linear response to recharge behaviour were observed, suggesting secondary porosity is controlling unsaturated zone flow in mature limestone environments with low primary porosity. Using the data presented here, the first coupled conceptual and box hydrological flow model was developed. This study highlights the heterogeneous nature of hydrological flow in karst and the need to understand unsaturated zone hydrology at the individual drip discharge level, to inform speleothem studies for high-resolution paleoclimate reconstruction.

  15. Variable Holocene deformation above a shallow subduction zone extremely close to the trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Taylor, Frederick W.; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Lavier, Luc L.; Frohlich, Cliff; Wallace, Laura M.; Wu, Chung-Che; Sun, Hailong; Papabatu, Alison K.

    2015-06-01

    Histories of vertical crustal motions at convergent margins offer fundamental insights into the relationship between interplate slip and permanent deformation. Moreover, past abrupt motions are proxies for potential tsunamigenic earthquakes and benefit hazard assessment. Well-dated records are required to understand the relationship between past earthquakes and Holocene vertical deformation. Here we measure elevations and 230Th ages of in situ corals raised above the sea level in the western Solomon Islands to build an uplift event history overlying the seismogenic zone, extremely close to the trench (4-40 km). We find marked spatiotemporal heterogeneity in uplift from mid-Holocene to present: some areas accrue more permanent uplift than others. Thus, uplift imposed during the 1 April 2007 Mw 8.1 event may be retained in some locations but removed in others before the next megathrust rupture. This variability suggests significant changes in strain accumulation and the interplate thrust process from one event to the next.

  16. Variable Holocene deformation above a shallow subduction zone extremely close to the trench.

    PubMed

    Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Taylor, Frederick W; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Lavier, Luc L; Frohlich, Cliff; Wallace, Laura M; Wu, Chung-Che; Sun, Hailong; Papabatu, Alison K

    2015-06-30

    Histories of vertical crustal motions at convergent margins offer fundamental insights into the relationship between interplate slip and permanent deformation. Moreover, past abrupt motions are proxies for potential tsunamigenic earthquakes and benefit hazard assessment. Well-dated records are required to understand the relationship between past earthquakes and Holocene vertical deformation. Here we measure elevations and (230)Th ages of in situ corals raised above the sea level in the western Solomon Islands to build an uplift event history overlying the seismogenic zone, extremely close to the trench (4-40 km). We find marked spatiotemporal heterogeneity in uplift from mid-Holocene to present: some areas accrue more permanent uplift than others. Thus, uplift imposed during the 1 April 2007 Mw 8.1 event may be retained in some locations but removed in others before the next megathrust rupture. This variability suggests significant changes in strain accumulation and the interplate thrust process from one event to the next.

  17. Variability of concentration and composition of hydrocarbons in frontal zones of the Kara Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.

    2015-07-01

    The distribution and composition of aliphatic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HC) in dissolved and particulate forms, as well as in bottom sediments, was studied along the route of a vessel and at stations. It was found that the widest variability of HC concentrations in surface waters was characteristic for the frontal zones of the Yenisei River mouth (4.8-69 µg/L) and for the western branch of the St. Anna Trough (5.5-80.4 µg/L). The increased concentrations of aliphatic HC coincide with those of chlorophyll and particulate matter, as well as with the growth of the intensity of fluorescence, and are caused by natural processes. This is confirmed by HC composition. Bottom sediments are characterized by low HC concentrations, both in terms of dry mass (14 µg/g on average, with the maximum of 36.8 µg/g at station 5018 in the layer of 3-17 cm) and within Corg compositions (0.88%). Natural terrigenous homologues are prevailing in alkane composition of the sediments. The marginal filters of the Ob and Yenisei rivers were compared. It is shown that oil HC transferred by the rivers are deposited in the zone of marginal filters without reaching the open waters of the Kara Sea.

  18. Climate variability and environmental stress in the Sudan-Sahel zone of West Africa.

    PubMed

    Mertz, Ole; D'haen, Sarah; Maiga, Abdou; Moussa, Ibrahim Bouzou; Barbier, Bruno; Diouf, Awa; Diallo, Drissa; Da, Evariste Dapola; Dabi, Daniel

    2012-06-01

    Environmental change in the Sudan-Sahel region of West Africa (SSWA) has been much debated since the droughts of the 1970s. In this article we assess climate variability and environmental stress in the region. Households in Senegal, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, and Nigeria were asked about climatic changes and their perceptions were compared across north-south and west-east rainfall gradients. More than 80% of all households found that rainfall had decreased, especially in the wettest areas. Increases in wind speeds and temperature were perceived by an overall 60-80% of households. Contrary to household perceptions, observed rainfall patterns showed an increasing trend over the past 20 years. However, August rainfall declined, and could therefore potentially explain the contrasting negative household perceptions of rainfall trends. Most households reported degradation of soils, water resources, vegetation, and fauna, but more so in the 500-900 mm zones. Adaptation measures to counter environmental degradation included use of manure, reforestation, soil and water conservation, and protection of fauna and vegetation. The results raise concerns for future environmental management in the region, especially in the 500-900 mm zones and the western part of SSWA.

  19. Quantifying soil and critical zone variability in a forested catchment through digital soil mapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holleran, M.; Levi, M.; Rasmussen, C.

    2015-01-01

    Quantifying catchment-scale soil property variation yields insights into critical zone evolution and function. The objective of this study was to quantify and predict the spatial distribution of soil properties within a high-elevation forested catchment in southern Arizona, USA, using a combined set of digital soil mapping (DSM) and sampling design techniques to quantify catchment-scale soil spatial variability that would inform interpretation of soil-forming processes. The study focused on a 6 ha catchment on granitic parent materials under mixed-conifer forest, with a mean elevation of 2400 m a.s.l, mean annual temperature of 10 °C, and mean annual precipitation of ~ 85 cm yr-1. The sample design was developed using a unique combination of iterative principal component analysis (iPCA) of environmental covariates derived from remotely sensed imagery and topography, and a conditioned Latin hypercube sampling (cLHS) scheme. Samples were collected by genetic horizon from 24 soil profiles excavated to the depth of refusal and characterized for soil mineral assemblage, geochemical composition, and general soil physical and chemical properties. Soil properties were extrapolated across the entire catchment using a combination of least-squares linear regression between soil properties and selected environmental covariates, and spatial interpolation or regression residual using inverse distance weighting (IDW). Model results indicated that convergent portions of the landscape contained deeper soils, higher clay and carbon content, and greater Na mass loss relative to adjacent slopes and divergent ridgelines. The results of this study indicated that (i) the coupled application of iPCA and cLHS produced a sampling scheme that captured the greater part of catchment-scale soil variability; (ii) application of relatively simple regression models and IDW interpolation of residuals described well the variance in measured soil properties and predicted spatial correlation of soil

  20. Dated eclogitic diamond growth zones reveal variable recycling of crustal carbon through time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timmerman, S.; Koornneef, J. M.; Chinn, I. L.; Davies, G. R.

    2017-04-01

    Monocrystalline diamonds commonly record complex internal structures reflecting episodic growth linked to changing carbon-bearing fluids in the mantle. Using diamonds to trace the evolution of the deep carbon cycle therefore requires dating of individual diamond growth zones. To this end Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd isotope data are presented from individual eclogitic silicate inclusions from the Orapa and Letlhakane diamond mines, Botswana. δ13 C values are reported from the host diamond growth zones. Heterogeneous 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7033-0.7097) suggest inclusion formation in multiple and distinct tectono-magmatic environments. Sm-Nd isochron ages were determined based on groups of inclusions with similar trace element chemistry, Sr isotope ratios, and nitrogen aggregation of the host diamond growth zone. Diamond growth events at 0.14 ± 0.09, 0.25 ± 0.04, 1.1 ± 0.09, 1.70 ± 0.34 and 2.33 ± 0.02 Ga can be directly related to regional tectono-magmatic events. Individual diamonds record episodic growth with age differences of up to 2 Ga. Dated diamond zones have variable δ13 C values (-5.0 to -33.6‰ vs PDB) and appear to imply changes in subducted material over time. The studied Botswanan diamonds are interpreted to have formed in different tectono-magmatic environments that involve mixing of carbon from three sources that represent: i) subducted biogenic sediments (lightest δ13 C, low 87Sr/86Sr); ii) subducted carbonate-rich sediments (heavy δ13 C, high 87Sr/86Sr) and iii) depleted upper mantle (heavy δ13 C, low 87Sr/86Sr). We infer that older diamonds from these two localities are more likely to have light δ13 C due to greater subduction of biogenic sediments that may be related to hotter and more reduced conditions in the Archaean before the Great Oxidation Event at 2.3 Ga. These findings imply a marked temporal change in the nature of subducted carbon beneath Botswana and warrant further study to establish if this is a global phenomenon.

  1. Travel times in the vadose zone: Variability in space and time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprenger, Matthias; Seeger, Stefan; Blume, Theresa; Weiler, Markus

    2016-08-01

    Water travel times reflect hydrological processes, yet we know little about how travel times in the unsaturated zone vary with time. Using the soil physical model HYDRUS-1D, we derived time variable travel time distributions for 35 study sites within the Attert catchment in Luxembourg. While all sites experience similar climatic forcing, they differ with regard to soil types (16 Cambisols, 12 Arenosols, and 7 Stagnosols) and the vegetation cover (29 forest and 6 grassland). We estimated site specific water flow and transport parameters by fitting the model simulations to observed soil moisture time series and depth profiles of pore water stable isotopes. With the calibrated model, we tracked the water parcels introduced with each rainfall event over a period of several years. Our results show that the median travel time of water from the soil surface to depths down to 200 cm is mainly driven by the subsequent rainfall amounts. The median time until precipitation is taken up by roots is governed by the seasonality of evapotranspiration rates. The ratio between the amount of water that leaves the soil profile by on the one hand and evaporation and transpiration on the other hand also shows an annual cycle. This time variable response due to climatic forcing is furthermore visible in the multimodal nature of the site specific master transit time distribution representing the flow-averaged probability density for rainwater to become recharge. The spatial variability of travel times is mainly driven by soil texture and structure, with significant longer travel times for the clayey Stagnosols than for the loamy to sandy Cambisols and Arenosols.

  2. [Variability of vegetation growth season in different latitudinal zones of North China: a monitoring by NOAA NDVI and MSAVI].

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Li, Xiaobing; Han, Ruibo; Ge, Yongqin

    2006-12-01

    In this study, North China was latitudinally divided into five zones, i.e., 32 degrees - 36 degrees N (Zone I), 36 degrees - 40 degrees N (Zone II), 40 degrees - 44 degrees N (Zone III), 44 degrees - 48 degrees N (Zone IV) and 48 degrees - 52 degrees N (Zone V), and the NOAA/ AVHRR NDVI and MSAVI time-series images from 1982 to 1999 were smoothed with Savitzky-Golay filter algorithm. Based on the EOF analysis, the principal components of NDVI and MSAVI for the vegetations in different latitudinal zones of North China were extracted, the annual beginning and ending dates and the length of growth season in 1982 - 1999 were estimated, and the related parameters were linearly fitted, aimed to analyze the variability of vegetation growth season. The results showed that the beginning date of the growth season in different zones tended to be advanced, while the ending date tended to be postponed with increasing latitude. The length of the growth season was also prolonged, with the prolonging time exceeded 10 days.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability of clouds and precipitation over Germany: multiscale simulations across the "gray zone"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthlott, C.; Hoose, C.

    2015-11-01

    This paper assesses the resolution dependance of clouds and precipitation over Germany by numerical simulations with the COnsortium for Small-scale MOdeling (COSMO) model. Six intensive observation periods of the HOPE (HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment) measurement campaign conducted in spring 2013 and 1 summer day of the same year are simulated. By means of a series of grid-refinement resolution tests (horizontal grid spacing 2.8, 1 km, 500, and 250 m), the applicability of the COSMO model to represent real weather events in the gray zone, i.e., the scale ranging between the mesoscale limit (no turbulence resolved) and the large-eddy simulation limit (energy-containing turbulence resolved), is tested. To the authors' knowledge, this paper presents the first non-idealized COSMO simulations in the peer-reviewed literature at the 250-500 m scale. It is found that the kinetic energy spectra derived from model output show the expected -5/3 slope, as well as a dependency on model resolution, and that the effective resolution lies between 6 and 7 times the nominal resolution. Although the representation of a number of processes is enhanced with resolution (e.g., boundary-layer thermals, low-level convergence zones, gravity waves), their influence on the temporal evolution of precipitation is rather weak. However, rain intensities vary with resolution, leading to differences in the total rain amount of up to +48 %. Furthermore, the location of rain is similar for the springtime cases with moderate and strong synoptic forcing, whereas significant differences are obtained for the summertime case with air mass convection. Domain-averaged liquid water paths and cloud condensate profiles are used to analyze the temporal and spatial variability of the simulated clouds. Finally, probability density functions of convection-related parameters are analyzed to investigate their dependance on model resolution and their impact on cloud formation and subsequent precipitation.

  4. Distribution and variability of redox zones controlling spatial variability of arsenic in the Mississippi River Valley alluvial aquifer, southeastern Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sharif, M.U.; Davis, R.K.; Steele, K.F.; Kim, B.; Hays, P.D.; Kresse, T.M.; Fazio, J.A.

    2008-01-01

    historic flushing of As and Fe from hydrous ferric oxides (HFO) by microbially-mediated reductive dissolution and aging of HFO to crystalline phases. Hydrogeochemical data suggests that the groundwater in the area falls in the mildly reducing (suboxic) to relatively highly reducing (anoxic) zone, and points to reductive dissolution of HFO as the dominant As release mechanism. Spatial variability of gypsum solubility and simultaneous SO42- reduction with co-precipitation of As and sulfide is an important limiting process controlling the concentration of As in groundwater in the area. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Characterization of the variability of the South Pacific Convergence Zone using satellite and reanalysis wind products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidwell, Autumn; Lee, Tong; Jo, Young-Heon; Yan, Xiao-hai

    2016-04-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the largest rain band worldwide during austral summer, is important to atmospheric circulation (including cyclone genesis) and ocean circulation. Previous studies of the SPCZ have focused on parameters such as outgoing longwave radiation or precipitation. However, wind convergence is fundamental causing the variations of these parameters. In this study, the SPCZ variability is examined using ocean surface wind products derived from NASA's QuickSCAT (1999-2009) and ESA's ASCAT (2007 onward) satellite scatterometers and ERA-Interim atmospheric reanalysis (1981 onward). From these products, indices were developed to characterize the SPCZ strength, area, and centroid location. Excellent agreement is found in terms of the temporal variations of the indices derived from the satellites and reanalysis wind products, despite some small differences in the time-mean SPCZ strength. The SPCZ strength, area, and centroid latitude have a dominant seasonal cycle. In contrast, the SPCZ centroid longitude is dominated by intraseasonal variability due to the influence by the Madden-Julian Oscillation. The SPCZ indices are all correlated with El Niño-Southern Oscillation indices. Interannual and intraseasonal variations of SPCZ strength during strong El Niño are approximately twice as large as the respective seasonal variations. SPCZ strength depends more on the intensity of El Niño rather than the central- vs. eastern-Pacific type. The longer ERA-Interim product is also used to examine decadal variations of the SPCZ indices. The change from positive to negative Pacific Decadal Oscillation phase around 1999 resulted in a westward shift of the SPCZ centroid longitude, much smaller interannual swing in centroid latitude, and a decrease in SPCZ area. This study improves the understanding of the variations of the SPCZ on multiple time scales and reveals the variations of SPCZ strength not reported previously. The diagnostics analyses can be

  6. Individual variability in the core interthreshold zone as related to body physique, somatotype, and physical constitution.

    PubMed

    Kakitsuba, Naoshi; Mekjavic, Igor B; Katsuura, Tetsuo

    2009-11-01

    For evaluating the effect of body physique, somatotype, and physical constitution on individual variability in the core interthreshold zone (CIZ), data from 22 healthy young Japanese male subjects were examined. The experiment was carried out in a climatic chamber in which air temperature was maintained at 20-24 degrees C. The subjects' body physique and the maximum work load were measured. Somatotype was predicted from the Heath-Carter Somatotype method. In addition, factors reflecting physical constitution, for example, susceptibility to heat and cold, and quality of sleep were obtained by questionnaire. The subjects wore a water-perfused suit which was perfused with water at a temperature of 25 degrees C and at a rate of 600 cc/min, and exercised on an ergometer at 50% of their maximum work rate for 10-15 min until their sweating rate increased. They then remained continuously seated without exercise until shivering increased. Rectal temperature (T(re)) and skin temperatures at four sites were monitored by thermistors, and sweating rate was measured at the forehead with a sweat rate monitor. Oxygen uptake was monitored with a gas analyzer. The results showed individual variability in the CIZ. According to the reciprocal cross-inhibition (RCI) theory, thermoafferent information from peripheral and core sensors is activated by T(re), mean skin temperature (T(sk)), and their changes. Since T(sk) was relatively unchanged, the data were selected to eliminate the influence of the core cooling rate on the sensor-to-effector pathway before RCI, and the relationship between the CIZ and the various factors was then analyzed. The results revealed that susceptibility to heat showed a good correlation with the CIZ, indicating that individual awareness of heat may change the CIZ due to thermoregulatory behavior.

  7. Temporal and spatial variability of fecal indicator bacteria in the surf zone off Huntington Beach, CA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfeld, L.K.; McGee, C.D.; Robertson, G.L.; Noble, M.A.; Jones, B.H.

    2006-01-01

    Fecal indicator bacteria concentrations measured in the surf zone off Huntington Beach, CA from July 1998-December 2001 were analyzed with respect to their spatial patterns along 23 km of beach, and temporal variability on time scales from hourly to fortnightly. The majority of samples had bacterial concentrations less than, or equal to, the minimum detection limit, but a small percentage exceeded the California recreational water standards. Areas where coliform bacteria exceeded standards were more prevalent north of the Santa Ana River, whereas enterococci exceedances covered a broad area both north and south of the river. Higher concentrations of bacteria were associated with spring tides. No temporal correspondence was found between these bacterial events and either the timing of cold water pulses near shore due to internal tides, or the presence of southerly swell in the surface wave field. All three fecal indicator bacteria exhibited a diel cycle, but enterococci rebounded to high nighttime values almost as soon as the sun went down, whereas coliform levels were highest near the nighttime low tide, which was also the lower low tide. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of work zone configurations and traffic density on performance variables and subjective workload.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Mahmoud; Ikuma, Laura H; Aghazadeh, Fereydoun; Punniaraj, Karthy; Ishak, Sherif

    2014-10-01

    This paper investigates the effect of changing work zone configurations and traffic density on performance variables and subjective workload. Data regarding travel time, average speed, maximum percent braking force and location of lane changes were collected by using a full size driving simulator. The NASA-TLX was used to measure self-reported workload ratings during the driving task. Conventional lane merge (CLM) and joint lane merge (JLM) were modeled in a driving simulator, and thirty participants (seven female and 23 male), navigated through the two configurations with two levels of traffic density. The mean maximum braking forces was 34% lower in the JLM configuration, and drivers going through the JLM configuration remained in the closed lane longer. However, no significant differences in speed were found between the two merge configurations. The analysis of self-reported workload ratings show that participants reported 15.3% lower total workload when driving through the JLM. In conclusion, the implemented changes in the JLM make it a more favorable merge configuration in both high and low traffic densities in terms of optimizing traffic flow by increasing the time and distance cars use both lanes, and in terms of improving safety due to lower braking forces and lower reported workload.

  9. Variable Holocene deformation above a shallow subduction zone extremely close to the trench

    PubMed Central

    Thirumalai, Kaustubh; Taylor, Frederick W.; Shen, Chuan-Chou; Lavier, Luc L.; Frohlich, Cliff; Wallace, Laura M.; Wu, Chung-Che; Sun, Hailong; Papabatu, Alison K.

    2015-01-01

    Histories of vertical crustal motions at convergent margins offer fundamental insights into the relationship between interplate slip and permanent deformation. Moreover, past abrupt motions are proxies for potential tsunamigenic earthquakes and benefit hazard assessment. Well-dated records are required to understand the relationship between past earthquakes and Holocene vertical deformation. Here we measure elevations and 230Th ages of in situ corals raised above the sea level in the western Solomon Islands to build an uplift event history overlying the seismogenic zone, extremely close to the trench (4–40 km). We find marked spatiotemporal heterogeneity in uplift from mid-Holocene to present: some areas accrue more permanent uplift than others. Thus, uplift imposed during the 1 April 2007 Mw 8.1 event may be retained in some locations but removed in others before the next megathrust rupture. This variability suggests significant changes in strain accumulation and the interplate thrust process from one event to the next. PMID:26123872

  10. Variability in the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone and Pack Ice in Observations and NCAR CESM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeve, J. C.; Campbell, G. G.; Holland, M. M.; Landrum, L.

    2015-12-01

    Sea ice around Antarctica reached another record high extent in September 2014, recording a maximum extent of more than 20 million km2 for the first time since the modern satellite data record began in October 1978. This follows previous record maxima in 2012 and 2013, resulting in an overall increase in Antarctic September sea ice extent of 1.3% per decade since 1979. Several explanations have been put forward to explain the increasing trends, such as anomalous short-term wind patterns that both grow and spread out the ice, and freshening of the surface ocean layer from increased melting of floating ice from the continent. These positive trends in Antarctic sea ice are at odds with climate model forecasts that suggest the sea ice should be declining in response to increasing greenhouse gases and stratospheric ozone depletion. While the reasons for the increases in total extent remain poorly understood, it is likely that these changes are not just impacting the total ice extent, but also the distribution of pack ice, the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and polynyas, with important ramifications for phytoplankton productivity that in turn impact zooplankton, fish, sea birds and marine mammals. This study evaluates changes in the distribution of the pack ice, polynyas and the marginal ice zone around Antarctica from two sea ice algorithms, the NASA Team and the Bootstrap. These results are further compared with climate model simulations from the CESM large ensemble output. Seasonal analysis of the different ice types using NASA Team and Bootstrap shows that during ice advance, the ice advances as pack ice, with a seasonal peak in September (broader peak for Bootstrap), and as the pack ice begins to retreat, it first converts to a wide area of MIZ, that reaches its peak around November (NASA Team) or December (Bootstrap). CESM also shows a similar seasonal cycle, with a peak in the pack ice in August, and a December/January peak in the MIZ. Seasonal variability and trends are

  11. Variable power distribution for zoned regeneration of an electrically heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Bhatia, Garima [Bangalore, IN; Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2012-04-03

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter with multiple zones, an electric heater and a control module. The electrical heater includes heater segments, which each correspond with a respective one of the zones. The electrical heater is arranged upstream from and is proximate with the PM filter. The control module selectively applies a first energy level to a first one of the zones via a first one of the heater segments to initiate regeneration in the first zone. The control module also selectively applies a second energy level that is less than the first energy level to a second one of the zones via a second one of the heater segments to initiate regeneration in the second zone.

  12. Study of the variability of Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone using multivariate indices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nóbile Tomaziello, A.; Gandu, A.; Carvalho, L. V.

    2013-05-01

    Ana Carolina Nóbile Tomaziello, Adilson Wagner Gandu Institute of Astronomy, Geophysics and Atmospheric Sciences, University of São Paulo, Brazil carolnobile@model.iag.usp.br; adwgandu@model.iag.usp.br Leila Maria Véspoli de Carvalho Department of Geography, University of California, Santa Barbara, United States leila@eri.ucsb.edu The variability of Atlantic Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is studied using multivariate indices based on the first and second combined EOF (EOFc) of anomalies of zonal and meridional wind's components, specific humidity, and air temperature at 850 mb, and precipitation. The EOFc's spatial domain encompassed tropical Atlantic Ocean and part of Brazilian Northeast and western Africa. Silva and Carvalho (2007) described a similar index in order to characterize the South American monsoon. First and second modes of EOFc describe successfully ITCZ's main features. Composites for the percentile of 25% (75%) for EOFc-1 show convection (suppression), and easterly and south (westerly and north) wind anomalies in ITCZ. There are negative anomalies of humidity over central Brazil when there are positive ones over ITCZ, and vice-versa. For the second mode, composites for the percentile of 25% (75%) show convection (suppression), westerly and south (easterly and north) wind anomalies in ITCZ, and negative (positive) anomalies of temperature in tropical Atlantic. Negative (positive) anomalies of humidity in northern and northwestern South America, and central Brazil are accompanied by positive (negative) ones in tropical north Atlantic. Convergence (divergence) of meridional wind in tropical Atlantic is associated with divergence (convergence) over southern and part of southeastern Brazil. EOFc-2 illustrates a possible relationship between SACZ and ITCZ and also shows a Pacific-South America (PSA) like pattern teleconnecting Indian and Pacific Oceans to South America. The PSA-like wave train has opposite phases for percentiles of 25% and 75

  13. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; Oostrom, Martinus; Brusseau, Mark

    2014-08-05

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. A well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. We found that the results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.

  14. Measuring Spatial Variability of Vapor Flux to Characterize Vadose-zone VOC Sources: Flow-cell Experiments

    DOE PAGES

    Mainhagu, Jon; Morrison, C.; Truex, Michael J.; ...

    2014-08-05

    A method termed vapor-phase tomography has recently been proposed to characterize the distribution of volatile organic contaminant mass in vadose-zone source areas, and to measure associated three-dimensional distributions of local contaminant mass discharge. The method is based on measuring the spatial variability of vapor flux, and thus inherent to its effectiveness is the premise that the magnitudes and temporal variability of vapor concentrations measured at different monitoring points within the interrogated area will be a function of the geospatial positions of the points relative to the source location. A series of flow-cell experiments was conducted to evaluate this premise. Amore » well-defined source zone was created by injection and extraction of a non-reactive gas (SF6). Spatial and temporal concentration distributions obtained from the tests were compared to simulations produced with a mathematical model describing advective and diffusive transport. Tests were conducted to characterize both areal and vertical components of the application. Decreases in concentration over time were observed for monitoring points located on the opposite side of the source zone from the local–extraction point, whereas increases were observed for monitoring points located between the local–extraction point and the source zone. We found that the results illustrate that comparison of temporal concentration profiles obtained at various monitoring points gives a general indication of the source location with respect to the extraction and monitoring points.« less

  15. Enhancing customer service in the admitting process.

    PubMed

    Somers, M

    1994-09-01

    As a result of participating with 28 other healthcare organizations in a study on benchmarking the hospital admitting process, St. Marys Hospital Medical Center, Madison, Wisconsin, was able to speed-up its admitting process and improve its telephone system to serve patients better. St. Marys switched from an admitting system to a preadmitting system, coordinated its admitting system information, and improved its ability to identify triage patients.

  16. Modeling and classifying variable width riparian zones utilizing digital elevation models, flood height data, digital soil data and National Wetlands Inventory: A new approach for riparian zone delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abood, Sinan A.

    Riparian zones are dynamic, transitional ecosystems between aquatic and terrestrial ecosystems with well defined vegetation and soil characteristics. Development of an all-encompassing definition for riparian ecotones, because of their high variability, is challenging. However, there are two primary factors that all riparian ecotones are dependent on: the watercourse and its associated floodplain. Previous approaches to riparian boundary delineation have utilized fixed width buffers, but this methodology has proven to be inadequate as it only takes the watercourse into consideration and ignores critical geomorphology, associated vegetation and soil characteristics. Our approach offers advantages over other previously used methods by utilizing: the geospatial modeling capabilities of ArcMap GIS; a better sampling technique along the water course that can distinguish the 50-year flood plain, which is the optimal hydrologic descriptor of riparian ecotones; the Soil Survey Database (SSURGO) and National Wetland Inventory (NWI) databases to distinguish contiguous areas beyond the 50-year plain; and land use/cover characteristics associated with the delineated riparian zones. The model utilizes spatial data readily available from Federal and State agencies and geospatial clearinghouses. An accuracy assessment was performed to assess the impact of varying the 50-year flood height, changing the DEM spatial resolution (1, 3, 5 and 10m), and positional inaccuracies with the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) streams layer on the boundary placement of the delineated variable width riparian ecotones area. The result of this study is a robust and automated GIS based model attached to ESRI ArcMap software to delineate and classify variable-width riparian ecotones.

  17. Redox-variability and controls in subduction zones from an iron-isotope perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebel, O.; Sossi, P. A.; Bénard, A.; Wille, M.; Vroon, P. Z.; Arculus, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    An ongoing controversy in mantle geochemistry concerns the oxidation state of the sources of island arc lavas (IAL). Three key factors control oxidation-reduction (redox) of IAL sources: (i) metasomatism of the mantle wedge by fluids and/or melts, liberated from the underlying subducted slab; (ii) the oxidation state of the wedge prior to melting and metasomatism; and (iii) the loss of melt from IAL sources. Subsequently, magmatic differentiation by fractional crystallisation, possible crustal contamination and degassing of melts en route to and at the surface can further modify the redox states of IAL. The remote nature of sub-arc processes and the complex interplay between them render direct investigations difficult. However, a possible gauge for redox-controlled, high-temperature pre-eruptive differentiation conditions is variations in stable Fe isotope compositions (expressed here as δ57Fe) in erupting IAL because Fe isotopes can preserve a record of sub-surface mass transfer reactions involving the major element Fe. Here we report Fe isotope compositions of bulk IAL along the active Banda arc, Indonesia, which is well known for a prominent subducted sediment input. In conjunction with other arc rocks, δ57Fe in erupted Banda IAL indicates that fractional crystallisation and possibly crustal contamination primarily control their Fe isotope signatures. When corrected for fractional crystallisation and filtered for contamination, arc magmas that had variable sediment melt contributions in their sources show no resolvable co-variation of δ57Fe with radiogenic isotope tracers. This indicates that crustal recycling in the form of subducted sediment does not alter the Fe isotope character of arc lavas, in agreement with mass balance estimates. Primitive sources of IAL, however, are clearly isotopically lighter than those sourced beneath mid-ocean ridges, indicating either preferential Fe3+-depletion in the mantle wedge by prior, δ57Fe-heavy melt extraction, and

  18. Quantifying soil and critical zone variability in a forested catchment through digital soil mapping

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying catchment scale soil property variation yields insights into critical zone evolution and function. The objective of this study was to quantify and predict the spatial distribution of soil properties within a high elevation forested catchment in southern AZ, USA using a combined set of di...

  19. Influence of riparian seepage zones on nitrate variability in two agricultural headwater streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Riparian seepage zones are one of the primary pathways of groundwater transport to headwater streams. While seeps have been recognized for their contributions to streamflow, there is little information on how seeps affect stream water quality. The objective of this study was to examine the influence...

  20. Discriminatory power of MicroResp analyses across variable spatial scales in semiarid ecological zones

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Indirect assessment of enzymatic activity potential via substrate induced respiration is a common tool used to evaluate variability in soil microbial activity induced by environmental or management variables. The MicroResp™ method for total soil sample catabolic profiling has been employed to estima...

  1. Circadian Variability in Methane Oxidation Activity in the Root Zone of Rice Plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroth, M. H.; Cho, R.; Zeyer, J.

    2009-12-01

    Methane is an important greenhouse gas with a warming potential about 20 times stronger than that of carbon dioxide. A main source of biogenic methane are rice-paddy soils. Methane is produced in flooded rice fields under anaerobic conditions. Conversely, methanotrophic microorganisms oxidize methane to carbon dioxide in the root zone of rice plants in the presence of molecular oxygen supplied to the roots through the plants’ aerenchyma, thus reducing overall methane emissions to the atmosphere. To quantify methane oxidation we adapted push-pull tests (PPTs), a technique originally developed for aquifer testing, in combination with a suitable microbial inhibitor for application in the root zone of rice plants. During a PPT, 70 ml of a test solution containing dissolved substrates (methane, oxygen), nonreactive tracers (argon, chloride) and the methanogenesis inhibitor 2-Bromoethane sulfonate was injected into the plant’s root zone, and after a rest period of two hours extracted from the same location. Reaction rate constants were calculated from extraction-phase breakthrough curves of substrates and tracers. We conducted a set of three different laboratory PPTs to quantify methane oxidation at day time, directly after dawn, and at night in the root zone of four different potted rice plants each. High diurnal methane oxidation rate constants (up to 23 h-1) were obtained for all rice plants. Methane oxidation potential decreased soon after nightfall. At night, rate constants were usually below 1 h-1. Methane oxidation rates were apparently independent of additional oxygen supplied via the injected test solutions, but strongly dependent on photosynthetically produced oxygen transported to the roots through the plants’ aerenchyma. Additional PPTs utilizing 13C-labeled methane are currently being conducted to corroborate these findings. Ultimately, this novel tool shall support efforts to quantitatively understand the controlling mechanisms of methane turnover in

  2. Persistent decadal-scale rainfall variability in the tropical South Pacific Convergence Zone through the past six centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maupin, C. R.; Partin, J. W.; Shen, C.-C.; Quinn, T. M.; Lin, K.; Taylor, F. W.; Banner, J. L.; Thirumalai, K.; Sinclair, D. J.

    2014-07-01

    Modern Pacific decadal variability (PDV) has global impacts; hence records of PDV from the pre-instrumental period are needed to better inform models that are used to project future climate variability. We focus here on reconstructing rainfall in the western tropical Pacific (Solomon Islands; ~ 9.5° S, ~160° E), a region directly influenced by PDV, using cave deposits (stalagmite). A relationship is developed between δ18O variations in the stalagmite and local rainfall amount to produce a 600 yr record of rainfall variability from the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ). We present evidence for large (~1.5 m), abrupt, and periodic changes in total annual rainfall amount on decadal to multidecadal timescales since 1423 ± 5 CE (Common Era) in the Solomon Islands. The timing of the decadal changes in rainfall inferred from the 20th century portion of the stalagmite δ18O record coincides with previously identified decadal shifts in PDV-related Pacific ocean-atmosphere behavior (Clement et al., 2011; Deser et al., 2004). The Solomons record of PDV is not associated with variations in external forcings, but rather results from internal climate variability. The 600 yr Solomon Islands stalagmite δ18O record indicates that decadal oscillations in rainfall are a persistent characteristic of SPCZ-related climate variability.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability in surf zone fish assemblages on the coast of northern New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilber, D. H.; Clarke, D. G.; Burlas, M. H.; Ruben, H.; Will, R. J.

    2003-02-01

    The surf zone fish community along 15 km of northern New Jersey shoreline was sampled every 2 weeks by beach seine in the late summers and early falls of 1995-1999 in conjunction with monitoring of a beach nourishment project. Fifty-seven species representing 30 families were collected during the course of the study. Over 90% of each sampling period's catch was composed of five taxa or less. These taxa included Atlantic and rough silversides, Menidia menidia and Membras martinica, bluefish, Pomatomus saltatrix, and bay and striped anchovies, Anchoa mitchilli and Anchoa hepsetus, with the relative contributions of these taxa varying among years. Both bluefish and anchovy abundances varied by an order of magnitude among years. Size-frequency distributions indicate summer-spawned bluefish recruit to the surf zone habitat as two cohorts in August and October, respectively. Fish abundance and richness were greater at substations closest to rock groins. Taxonomic richness declined along with decreasing water temperature in the fall, but was not correlated with turbidity or tide stage (measured as minutes before or after low tide). The extensive sampling effort undertaken in this study, 2190 seine hauls that captured 295 868 fish, was examined in relation to the number and relative proportions of taxa collected. Species accumulation curves and percent similarity calculations were used to investigate the adequacy of a reduced sampling protocol in characterizing the taxonomic composition of the surf zone fish community. Calculations from eight complete sampling periods (84 seine hauls each) indicate that a reduction in sampling effort by one-half would have yielded on average 75% of the total number of species captured with approximately 85% similarity in relative species composition.

  4. Seasonal Variability in Vadose zone biodegradation at a crude oil pipeline rupture site

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sihota, Natasha J.; Trost, Jared J.; Bekins, Barbara; Berg, Andrew M.; Delin, Geoffrey N.; Mason, Brent E.; Warren, Ean; Mayer, K. Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Understanding seasonal changes in natural attenuation processes is critical for evaluating source-zone longevity and informing management decisions. The seasonal variations of natural attenuation were investigated through measurements of surficial CO2 effluxes, shallow soil CO2 radiocarbon contents, subsurface gas concentrations, soil temperature, and volumetric water contents during a 2-yr period. Surficial CO2 effluxes varied seasonally, with peak values of total soil respiration (TSR) occurring in the late spring and summer. Efflux and radiocarbon data indicated that the fractional contributions of natural soil respiration (NSR) and contaminant soil respiration (CSR) to TSR varied seasonally. The NSR dominated in the spring and summer, and CSR dominated in the fall and winter. Subsurface gas concentrations also varied seasonally, with peak values of CO2 and CH4 occurring in the fall and winter. Vadose zone temperatures and subsurface CO2 concentrations revealed a correlation between contaminant respiration and temperature. A time lag of 5 to 7 mo between peak subsurface CO2 concentrations and peak surface efflux is consistent with travel-time estimates for subsurface gas migration. Periods of frozen soils coincided with depressed surface CO2 effluxes and elevated CO2 concentrations, pointing to the temporary presence of an ice layer that inhibited gas transport. Quantitative reactive transport simulations demonstrated aspects of the conceptual model developed from field measurements. Overall, results indicated that source-zone natural attenuation (SZNA) rates and gas transport processes varied seasonally and that the average annual SZNA rate estimated from periodic surface efflux measurements is 60% lower than rates determined from measurements during the summer.

  5. Seasonal variability of the oxygen minimum zone off Peru in a high-resolution regional coupled model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergara, Oscar; Dewitte, Boris; Montes, Ivonne; Garçon, Veronique; Ramos, Marcel; Paulmier, Aurélien; Pizarro, Oscar

    2016-08-01

    In addition to being one of the most productive upwelling systems, the oceanic region off Peru is embedded in one of the most extensive oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the world ocean. The dynamics of the OMZ off Peru remain uncertain, partly due to the scarcity of data and to the ubiquitous role of mesoscale activity on the circulation and biogeochemistry. Here we use a high-resolution coupled physical/biogeochemical model simulation to investigate the seasonal variability of the OMZ off Peru. The focus is on characterizing the seasonal cycle in dissolved O2 (DO) eddy flux at the OMZ boundaries, including the coastal domain, viewed here as the eastern boundary of the OMZ, considering that the mean DO eddy flux in these zones has a significant contribution to the total DO flux. The results indicate that the seasonal variations of the OMZ can be interpreted as resulting from the seasonal modulation of the mesoscale activity. Along the coast, despite the increased seasonal low DO water upwelling, the DO peaks homogeneously over the water column and within the Peru Undercurrent (PUC) in austral winter, which results from mixing associated with the increase in both the intraseasonal wind variability and baroclinic instability of the PUC. The coastal ocean acts therefore as a source of DO in austral winter for the OMZ core, through eddy-induced offshore transport that is also shown to peak in austral winter. In the open ocean, the OMZ can be divided vertically into two zones: an upper zone above 400 m, where the mean DO eddy flux is larger on average than the mean seasonal DO flux and varies seasonally, and a lower part, where the mean seasonal DO flux exhibits vertical-zonal propagating features that share similar characteristics than those of the energy flux associated with the annual extratropical Rossby waves. At the OMZ meridional boundaries where the mean DO eddy flux is large, the DO eddy flux has also a marked seasonal cycle that peaks in austral winter (spring

  6. Seasonal variability and long term trends of chlorofluorocarbon mixing ratios in the unsaturated zone.

    PubMed

    Santella, Nicholas; Schlosser, Peter; Smethie, William M; Ho, David T; Stute, Martin

    2006-07-15

    To investigate processes that might affect chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) mixing ratios at the water table, a time series was obtained of unsaturated zone soil gas CFCs to depths of ca. 4 m at a site near New York City (NYC). Observed CFC 11, 12, and 113 mixing ratios were lower in winter than expected from either a local, high-resolution time series or remote atmospheric mixing ratios. A diffusion model, which includes seasonal changes in soil temperature, moisture, and CFC solubility, reproduces to first order the observed soil gas mixing ratios for CFC 11 and 12. Underestimation by the model of the seasonal cycle of CFC 11 points to changing levels of sorption to soils due to seasonal changes in temperature as an additional cause of the cycle seen in CFC 11 mixing ratios in soil air. In the case of spring recharge, low CFC mixing ratios in soil air caused by increased solubility may result in low CFC 11 concentrations in groundwater and, when dating groundwater recharged before the 1990s with CFCs, older apparent ages by up to 4 years. Attempts to observe average atmospheric CFC levels from soil gas are also significantly hindered by these seasonal fluctuations. Our results indicate the importance of considering seasonal changes in soil temperature when making precise observations of even very moderately soluble gases in the unsaturated zone and shallow groundwater.

  7. Systematically variable planktonic carbon metabolism along a land-to-lake gradient in a Great Lakes coastal zone

    PubMed Central

    Weinke, Anthony D.; Kendall, Scott T.; Kroll, Daniel J.; Strickler, Eric A.; Weinert, Maggie E.; Holcomb, Thomas M.; Defore, Angela A.; Dila, Deborah K.; Snider, Michael J.; Gereaux, Leon C.; Biddanda, Bopaiah A.

    2014-01-01

    During the summers of 2002–2013, we measured rates of carbon metabolism in surface waters of six sites across a land-to-lake gradient from the upstream end of drowned river-mouth Muskegon Lake (ML) (freshwater estuary) to 19 km offshore in Lake Michigan (LM) (a Great Lake). Despite considerable inter-year variability, the average rates of gross production (GP), respiration (R) and net production (NP) across ML (604 ± 58, 222 ± 22 and 381 ± 52 µg C L−1 day−1, respectively) decreased steeply in the furthest offshore LM site (22 ± 3, 55 ± 17 and −33 ± 15 µg C L−1day−1, respectively). Along this land-to-lake gradient, GP decreased by 96 ± 1%, whereas R only decreased by 75 ± 9%, variably influencing the carbon balance along this coastal zone. All ML sites were consistently net autotrophic (mean GP:R = 2.7), while the furthest offshore LM site was net heterotrophic (mean GP:R = 0.4). Our study suggests that pelagic waters of this Great Lakes coastal estuary are net carbon sinks that transition into net carbon sources offshore. Reactive and dynamic estuarine coastal zones everywhere may contribute similarly to regional and global carbon cycles. PMID:25954055

  8. Systematically variable planktonic carbon metabolism along a land-to-lake gradient in a Great Lakes coastal zone.

    PubMed

    Weinke, Anthony D; Kendall, Scott T; Kroll, Daniel J; Strickler, Eric A; Weinert, Maggie E; Holcomb, Thomas M; Defore, Angela A; Dila, Deborah K; Snider, Michael J; Gereaux, Leon C; Biddanda, Bopaiah A

    2014-11-01

    During the summers of 2002-2013, we measured rates of carbon metabolism in surface waters of six sites across a land-to-lake gradient from the upstream end of drowned river-mouth Muskegon Lake (ML) (freshwater estuary) to 19 km offshore in Lake Michigan (LM) (a Great Lake). Despite considerable inter-year variability, the average rates of gross production (GP), respiration (R) and net production (NP) across ML (604 ± 58, 222 ± 22 and 381 ± 52 µg C L(-1) day(-1), respectively) decreased steeply in the furthest offshore LM site (22 ± 3, 55 ± 17 and -33 ± 15 µg C L(-1)day(-1), respectively). Along this land-to-lake gradient, GP decreased by 96 ± 1%, whereas R only decreased by 75 ± 9%, variably influencing the carbon balance along this coastal zone. All ML sites were consistently net autotrophic (mean GP:R = 2.7), while the furthest offshore LM site was net heterotrophic (mean GP:R = 0.4). Our study suggests that pelagic waters of this Great Lakes coastal estuary are net carbon sinks that transition into net carbon sources offshore. Reactive and dynamic estuarine coastal zones everywhere may contribute similarly to regional and global carbon cycles.

  9. [Variability of enzyme systems in the coenopopulation of Taraxacum officinale s.l. from the zone of East-Ural- radioactive trace].

    PubMed

    Ul'ianova, E V; Pozolotina, V N

    2004-01-01

    Levels of soil contamination with 90Sr and 137Cs radionuclides on the plots within the zone of Eastern-Ural radioactive trace exceed values of the global level 4-240 times. We have carried out allozyme analysis of apomict species Taraxacum officinale s.l. from this zone. Zimogrammes were interpreted as allozyme phenotypes. In condition of chronic irradiation the plants had increased phenogenetic variability of majority enzymes systems and high frequency of rare morphs. Thus, in plant coenopopoulations situated in radioactive-polluted zone, genomic recombination processes show higher intensity. High enzymatic variability provides the material for natural selection and increase the adaptive potential of coenopopulations.

  10. Long-term spatio-temporal precipitation variability in arid-zone Australia and implications for groundwater recharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acworth, R. Ian; Rau, Gabriel C.; Cuthbert, Mark O.; Jensen, Evan; Leggett, Keith

    2016-06-01

    Quantifying dryland groundwater recharge as a function of climate variability is becoming increasingly important in the face of a globally depleted resource, yet this remains a major challenge due to lack of adequate monitoring and the complexity of processes involved. A previously unpublished and unique dataset of high density and frequency rainfall measurements is presented, from the Fowlers Gap Arid Zone Research Station in western New South Wales (Australia). The dataset confirms extreme spatial and temporal variability in rainfall distribution which has been observed in other dryland areas and is generally explained by the dominance of individual storm cells. Contrary to previous observations, however, this dataset contains only a few localised storm cells despite the variability. The implications of spatiotemporal rainfall variability on the estimation of groundwater recharge is assessed and show that the most likely recharge mechanism is through indirect and localised, rather than direct, recharge. Examples of rainfall and stream gauge height illustrate runoff generation when a spatially averaged threshold of 15-25 mm (depending on the antecedent moisture conditions) is exceeded. Preliminary assessment of groundwater levels illustrates that the regional water table is much deeper than anticipated, especially considering the expected magnitude of indirect and localised recharge. A possible explanation is that pathways for indirect and localised recharge are inhibited by the large quantities of Aeolian dust observed at the site. Runoff readily occurs with water collecting in surface lakes which slowly dry and disappear. Assuming direct groundwater recharge under these conditions will significantly overestimate actual recharge.

  11. Persistent decadal-scale rainfall variability in the tropical South Pacific Convergence Zone through the past six centuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maupin, C. R.; Partin, J. W.; Shen, C.-C.; Quinn, T. M.; Lin, K.; Taylor, F. W.; Banner, J. L.; Thirumalai, K.; Sinclair, D. J.

    2013-10-01

    Observations and reconstructions of decadal-scale climate variability are necessary to place predictions of future global climate change into temporal context (Goddard et al., 2012). This is especially true for decadal-scale climate variability that originates in the Pacific Ocean (Deser et al., 2004; Dong and Lu, 2013). We focus here on the western tropical Pacific (Solomon Islands; ~ 9.5° S, ~ 160° E), a region directly influenced by: the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), the West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP), the Pacific Walker Circulation (PWC), and the Hadley Circulation. We calibrate δ18O variations in a fast growing stalagmite to local rainfall amount and produce a 600 yr record of rainfall variability from the zonally oriented, tropical portion of the SPCZ. We present evidence for large (~ 1.5 m), persistent and decade(s)-long shifts in total annual rainfall amount in the Solomon Islands since 1416 ± 5 CE. The timing of the decadal changes in rainfall inferred from the 20th century portion of the stalagmite δ18O record coincide with previously identified decadal shifts in Pacific ocean-atmosphere behavior (Clement et al., 2011; Deser et al., 2004). The 600 yr Solomons stalagmite δ18O record indicates that decadal oscillations in rainfall are a robust characteristic of SPCZ-related climate variability, which has important implications to water resource management in this region.

  12. Defining an Abrasion Index for Lunar Surface Systems as a Function of Dust Interaction Modes and Variable Concentration Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kobrick, Ryan L.; Klaus, David M.; Street, Kenneth W., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Unexpected issues were encountered during the Apollo era of lunar exploration due to detrimental abrasion of materials upon exposure to the fine-grained, irregular shaped dust on the surface of the Moon. For critical design features involving contact with the lunar surface and for astronaut safety concerns, operational concepts and dust tolerance must be considered in the early phases of mission planning. To systematically define material selection criteria, dust interaction can be characterized by two-body or three-body abrasion testing, and subcategorically by physical interactions of compression, rolling, sliding and bending representing specific applications within the system. Two-body abrasion occurs when a single particle or asperity slides across a given surface removing or displacing material. Three-body abrasion occurs when multiple particles interact with a solid surface, or in between two surfaces, allowing the abrasives to freely rotate and interact with the material(s), leading to removal or displacement of mass. Different modes of interaction are described in this paper along with corresponding types of tests that can be utilized to evaluate each configuration. In addition to differential modes of abrasion, variable concentrations of dust in different zones can also be considered for a given system design and operational protocol. These zones include: (1) outside the habitat where extensive dust exposure occurs, (2) in a transitional zone such as an airlock or suitport, and (3) inside the habitat or spacesuit with a low particle count. These zones can be used to help define dust interaction frequencies, and corresponding risks to the systems and/or crew can be addressed by appropriate mitigation strategies. An abrasion index is introduced that includes the level of risk, R, the hardness of the mineralogy, H, the severity of the abrasion mode, S, and the frequency of particle interactions, F.

  13. Simulation of submesoscale variability of currents in the Black Sea coastal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divinsky, B. V.; Kuklev, S. B.; Zatsepin, A. G.; Chubarenko, B. V.

    2015-11-01

    The setting and adjustment of three-dimensional hydrodynamic models (regional and local) for the simulation of Black Sea dynamics and submesoscale variability (1-10 km, 10-102 h) of currents at the northeastern shelf are the main goal of the presented work. Preliminary simulation results are in good agreement with observations.

  14. Intra and Inter-Observer Variability of Transformation Zone Assessment in Colposcopy: A Qualitative and Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Vallikad, Elizabeth; Kulkarni, Kiran Abhijit; Firtion, Celine; Keswarpu, Payal; Vajinepalli, Pallavi; Naik, Sarif; Gupta, Lovi

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Colposcopy is an important tool in the diagnosis of cervical precancer and early cancer. The assessment of women with abnormal cytology and selection of those who require further therapy or follow up depends on the colposcopic assessment of the Transformation Zone (TZ). Identification of the TZ is thus an important part of this examination. Intra and inter-observer variability is known to be relatively high in the colposcopic interpretation of abnormal features. However, there are hardly any studies on the observer variability in the assessment of the type of TZ. Aim The present study was conducted with the aim to compare the intra and inter-observer variability of the TZ type classification and the Squamo-Columnar Junction (SCJ) visibility and to quantitatively measure the intra and inter-observer correlations of tracing of the TZ contours. Materials and Methods Colposcopy images were obtained for a total of 170 cases. They were reviewed by three colposcopists independently. The colposcopists classified the TZ type and also marked the SCJ contours on the images. Each observer independently reviewed the cases on two different instances (few weeks apart) and the result was compiled for intra-observer variation. The intra and inter observer variability on the TZ type was compared using Cohen’s Kappa. This was followed by a quantitative measurement of TZ observation variability using Hausdorff distance. Results The inter-observer agreement for the TZ type classification was moderate (Kappa= 0.53 to 0.66). The Intra-observer agreement was moderate to strong (0.60 to 0.86). Conclusion Colposcopic in vivo examination increases the variability in the identification of the TZ when compared to the analysis of recorded images. The disagreement in the TZ type was mostly in categories Type 2 vs Type 3 followed by Type 1 vs Type 2. A computerized quantification method can be used for quality control and training purpose in colposcopy. PMID:28274030

  15. Spatial variability and long-term analysis of groundwater quality of Faisalabad industrial zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasir, Muhammad Salman; Nasir, Abdul; Rashid, Haroon; Shah, Syed Hamid Hussain

    2016-09-01

    Water is the basic necessity of life and is essential for healthy society. In this study, groundwater quality analysis was carried out for the industrial zone of Faisalabad city. Sixty samples of groundwater were collected from the study area. The quality maps of deliberately analyzed results were prepared in GIS. The collected samples were analyzed for chemical parameters and heavy metals, such as total hardness, alkalinity, cadmium, arsenic, nickel, lead, and fluoride, and then, the results were compared with the WHO guidelines. The values of these results were represented by a mapping of quality parameters using the ArcView GIS v9.3, and IDW was used for raster interpolation. The long-term analysis of these parameters has been carried out using the `R Statistical' software. It was concluded that water is partially not fit for drinking, and direct use of this groundwater may cause health issues.

  16. Time Variability of the Dust Sublimation Zones in Pre-Main Sequence Disk Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sitko, Michael L.; Carpenter, W. J.; Grady, C. A.; Russel, R. W.; Lynch, D. K.; Rudy, R. J.; Mazuk, S. M.; Venturini, C. C.; Kimes, R. L.; Beerman, L. C.; Ablordeppey, K. E.; Puetter, R. C.; Wisnewski, P.; Brafford, S. M.; Polomski, E. R.; Hammel, H. B.; Perry, R. B.; Wilde, J. L.

    2007-01-01

    The dust sublimation zone (DSZ) is the region of pre-main sequence (PMS) disks where dust grains most easily anneal, sublime, and condense out of the gas. Because of this, it is a location where crystalline material may be enhanced and redistributed throughout the rest of the disk. A decade-long program to monitor the thermal emission of the grains located in this region demonstrates that large changes in emitted flux occur in many systems. Changes in the thermal emission between 3 and 13.5 microns were observed in HD 31648 (MWC 480), HD 163296 (MWC 275), and DG Tau. This emission is consistent with it being produced at the DSZ, where the transition from a disk of gas to one of gas+dust occurs. In the case of DG Tau, the outbursts were accompanied by increased emission on the 10 micron silicate band on one occasion, while on another occasion it went into absorption. This requires lofting of the material above the disk into the line of sight. Such changes will affect the determination of the inner disk structure obtained through interferometry measurements, and this has been confirmed in the case of HD 163296. Cyclic variations in the heating of the DSZ will lead to the annealing of large grains, the sublimation of smaller grains, possibly followed by re-condensation as the zone enters a cooling phase. Lofting of dust above the disk plane, and outward acceleration by stellar winds and radiation pressure, can re-distribute the processed material to cooler regions of the disk, where cometesimals form. This processing is consistent with the detection of the preferential concentration of large crystalline grains in the inner few AU of PMS disks using interferometric spectroscopy with the VLTI.

  17. Assessment of the spatial variability in tall wheatgrass forage using LANDSAT 8 satellite imagery to delineate potential management zones.

    PubMed

    Cicore, Pablo; Serrano, João; Shahidian, Shakib; Sousa, Adelia; Costa, José Luis; da Silva, José Rafael Marques

    2016-09-01

    Little information is available on the degree of within-field variability of potential production of Tall wheatgrass (Thinopyrum ponticum) forage under unirrigated conditions. The aim of this study was to characterize the spatial variability of the accumulated biomass (AB) without nutritional limitations through vegetation indexes, and then use this information to determine potential management zones. A 27-×-27-m grid cell size was chosen and 84 biomass sampling areas (BSA), each 2 m(2) in size, were georeferenced. Nitrogen and phosphorus fertilizers were applied after an initial cut at 3 cm height. At 500 °C day, the AB from each sampling area, was collected and evaluated. The spatial variability of AB was estimated more accurately using the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), calculated from LANDSAT 8 images obtained on 24 November 2014 (NDVInov) and 10 December 2014 (NDVIdec) because the potential AB was highly associated with NDVInov and NDVIdec (r (2)  = 0.85 and 0.83, respectively). These models between the potential AB data and NDVI were evaluated by root mean squared error (RMSE) and relative root mean squared error (RRMSE). This last coefficient was 12 and 15 % for NDVInov and NDVIdec, respectively. Potential AB and NDVI spatial correlation were quantified with semivariograms. The spatial dependence of AB was low. Six classes of NDVI were analyzed for comparison, and two management zones (MZ) were established with them. In order to evaluate if the NDVI method allows us to delimit MZ with different attainable yields, the AB estimated for these MZ were compared through an ANOVA test. The potential AB had significant differences among MZ. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that NDVI obtained from LANDSAT 8 images can be reliably used for creating MZ in soils under permanent pastures dominated by Tall wheatgrass.

  18. An Assessment of Actual and Potential Building Climate Zone Change and Variability From the Last 30 Years Through 2100 Using NASA's MERRA and CMIP5 Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackhouse, Paul W., Jr.; Chandler, William S.; Hoell, James M.; Westberg, David; Zhang, Taiping

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the US, residential and commercial building infrastructure combined consumes about 40% of total energy usage and emits about 39% of total CO2 emission (DOE/EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2013"). Building codes, as used by local and state enforcement entities are typically tied to the dominant climate within an enforcement jurisdiction classified according to various climate zones. These climate zones are based upon a 30-year average of local surface observations and are developed by DOE and ASHRAE. Establishing the current variability and potential changes to future building climate zones is very important for increasing the energy efficiency of buildings and reducing energy costs and emissions in the future. Objectives: This paper demonstrates the usefulness of using NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric data assimilation to derive the DOE/ASHRAE building climate zone maps and then using MERRA to define the last 30 years of variability in climate zones for the Continental US. An atmospheric assimilation is a global atmospheric model optimized to satellite, atmospheric and surface in situ measurements. Using MERRA as a baseline, we then evaluate the latest Climate Model Inter-comparison Project (CMIP) climate model Version 5 runs to assess potential variability in future climate zones under various assumptions. Methods: We derive DOE/ASHRAE building climate zones using surface and temperature data products from MERRA. We assess these zones using the uncertainties derived by comparison to surface measurements. Using statistical tests, we evaluate variability of the climate zones in time and assess areas in the continental US for statistically significant trends by region. CMIP 5 produced a data base of over two dozen detailed climate model runs under various greenhouse gas forcing assumptions. We evaluate the variation in building climate zones for 3 different decades using an ensemble and quartile

  19. Significant Events or Persons Influencing College Decisions of Conditionally-admitted and Early-Admitted Freshmen.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nieves, Edwin; Hartman, Kathleen

    2001-01-01

    Examines reasons cited by conditionally-admitted and early-admitted freshmen for choosing to attend college. Finds that parents and family had the greatest influence on both groups; however, the conditionally-admitted students cited these influences more often as the primary influence. Discusses other influences cited by both groups, such as…

  20. Investigating Rainfall Variability in the South Pacific Convergence Zone using the Geochemistry of Stalagmites from the Solomon Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekhon, N.; Quinn, T. M.; Partin, J. W.; Edwards, R. L.; Cheng, H.

    2015-12-01

    The South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ), which extends southeastward from New Guinea to Tahiti, is the largest perennial rainfall feature in the Southern Hemisphere. The position of the SPCZ and its associated rainfall varies significantly on multidecadal timescales, as documented by instrumental and climate proxy data. For example, stalagmite δ18O records (rainfall proxy) from Espiritu Santo, Vanuatu (Partin et al., 2013) and Guadalcanal, Solomon Islands (Maupin et al., 2014), document large (~1‰), abrupt changes in stalagmite δ18O on multidecadal timescales over the past 600 years that arise from internal variability in the climate system. The proxy data agree with the type of rainfall changes observed in the instrumental record, such as the change across 1976/77, but the older changes are larger in relative magnitude. We expand on these earlier studies of rainfall variability in the SPCZ system using stable isotope variations in stalagmites from two other locations in the Solomon Islands (Munda, New Georgia, 8.3°S, 157.3°E; Suku, Nggela Pile (9.8° S, 160.2° E). These stalagmites range in age from about 400 CE to 1850 CE, based on U-Th dating, and have relatively fast growth rates (60 to 300 µm/yr). Stalagmite δ18O time series were generated from sub-samples milled every 500 µm, or approximately 1 to 8 years per data point. Initial results from these two new Solomon Island stalagmites not only confirm the presence of multidecadal variability in stalagmite δ18O identified in previous studies, but suggest that the same amplitude of variability has occurred over several windows of time during the past 1600 years. When complete, these new proxy rainfall records from Munda and Suku will further constrain the pattern and mechanism of SPCZ rainfall variability in western tropical Pacific region.

  1. Spatial and temporal variability of clouds and precipitation over Germany: multiscale simulations across the "gray zone"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthlott, C.; Hoose, C.

    2015-06-01

    This paper assesses the resolution dependance of clouds and precipitation over Germany by numerical simulations with the COnsortium for Small-scale MOdeling (COSMO) model. Six intensive observation periods of the HOPE (HD(CP)2 Observational Prototype Experiment) measurement campaign conducted in spring 2013 and one summer day of the same year are simulated. By means of a series of grid-refinement resolution tests (horizontal grid spacing 2.8, 1 km, 500 and 250 m), the applicability of the COSMO model to real weather events in the terra incognita, i. e. the scale ranging between the mesoscale limit (no turbulence resolved) and the large-eddy simulation limit (energy-containing turbulence resolved), is tested. It is found that although the representation of a number of processes is enhanced with resolution (e. g. boundary-layer thermals, low-level convergence zones, gravity waves), their influence on the temporal evolution of precipitation is rather weak. However, rain intensities may vary with resolution, leading to differences in the total rain amount of up to +48 %. Furthermore, the location of rain is similar for the springtime cases with moderate and strong synoptic forcing, whereas significant differences are obtained for the summertime case with air mass convection. Probability density functions of convection-related parameters are analyzed to investigate their dependance on model resolution and their impact on cloud formation and subsequent precipitation.

  2. Carbon-water Cycling in the Critical Zone: Understanding Ecosystem Process Variability Across Complex Terrain

    SciTech Connect

    Barnard, Holly; Brooks, Paul

    2016-06-16

    One of the largest knowledge gaps in environmental science is the ability to understand and predict how ecosystems will respond to future climate variability. The links between vegetation, hydrology, and climate that control carbon sequestration in plant biomass and soils remain poorly understood. Soil respiration is the second largest carbon flux of terrestrial ecosystems, yet there is no consensus on how respiration will change as water availability and temperature co-vary. To address this knowledge gap, we use the variation in soil development and topography across an elevation and climate gradient on the Front Range of Colorado to conduct a natural experiment that enables us to examine the co-evolution of soil carbon, vegetation, hydrology, and climate in an accessible field laboratory. The goal of this project is to further our ability to combine plant water availability, carbon flux and storage, and topographically driven hydrometrics into a watershed scale predictive model of carbon balance. We hypothesize: (i) landscape structure and hydrology are important controls on soil respiration as a result of spatial variability in both physical and biological drivers: (ii) variation in rates of soil respiration during the growing season is due to corresponding shifts in belowground carbon inputs from vegetation; and (iii) aboveground carbon storage (biomass) and species composition are directly correlated with soil moisture and therefore, can be directly related to subsurface drainage patterns.

  3. Spatial and temporal variability in nitrous oxide and methane emissions in urban riparian zones of the Pearl River Delta.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Taiping; Huang, Xinyu; Yang, Yue; Li, Yuelin; Dahlgren, Randy A

    2016-01-01

    Spatial and temporal variability in nitrous oxide and methane emissions were quantified in three seasons using closed chambers in three riparian zone locations of three branches of the Pearl River, Guangzhou, China. The sampling sites were selected in a rapidly developing urban area of Guangzhou and represented a pollution gradient. The results show that urban riparian landscapes can be large source areas for CH4 and N2O, with fluxes of -0.035∼32.30 mg m(-2) h(-1) and -5.49∼37.31 μg m(-2) h(-1), respectively. River water quality, sediment texture, and NH4-N and NO3-N concentrations correlated with N2O and CH4 emission rates. The riparian zones of the more seriously polluted tributaries showed higher greenhouse gas fluxes than that of the less polluted main stem of the Pearl River. Rain events increased emissions of CH4 by 6.5∼21.3 times and N2O by 2.2∼5.7 times. The lower concentrations of heavy metals increased the activity of denitrifying enzymes while inhibited the methane producing pathways. This work demonstrates that rapidly developing urban areas are an important source of greenhouse gas emissions, which is conditioned by various environmental factors.

  4. Estimating the Relative Sociolinguistic Salience of Segmental Variables in a Dialect Boundary Zone

    PubMed Central

    Llamas, Carmen; Watt, Dominic; MacFarlane, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    One way of evaluating the salience of a linguistic feature is by assessing the extent to which listeners associate the feature with a social category such as a particular socioeconomic class, gender, or nationality. Such ‘top–down’ associations will inevitably differ somewhat from listener to listener, as a linguistic feature – the pronunciation of a vowel or consonant, for instance – can evoke multiple social category associations, depending upon the dialect in which the feature is embedded and the context in which it is heard. In a given speech community it is reasonable to expect, as a consequence of the salience of the linguistic form in question, a certain level of intersubjective agreement on social category associations. Two metrics we can use to quantify the salience of a linguistic feature are (a) the speed with which the association is made, and (b) the degree to which members of a speech community appear to share the association. Through the use of a new technique, designed as an adaptation of the Implicit Association Test, this paper examines levels of agreement among 40 informants from the Scottish/English border region with respect to the associations they make between four key phonetic variables and the social categories of ‘Scotland’ and ‘England.’ Our findings reveal that the participants exhibit differential agreement patterns across the set of phonetic variables, and that listeners’ responses vary in line with whether participants are members of the Scottish or the English listener groups. These results demonstrate the importance of community-level agreement with respect to the associations that listeners make between social categories and linguistic forms, and as a means of ranking the forms’ relative salience. PMID:27574511

  5. A Coupled Formulation for Vadose Zone Transport of Multiple Gas Species With Plant Exchange Under Variable Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stothoff, S. A.

    2008-12-01

    Most plants require a balance between water availability and oxygen availability in the rooting zone. Procedures for raising plants under microgravity conditions, such as might be encountered in long-term space missions, face a special challenge: water redistribution is not affected by gravity, leading to difficulty in maintaining both water and oxygen levels in the rooting zone because flow is dominated by capillary properties. The plant substrate used for microgravity conditions is typically a coarse material that drains extremely rapidly under the fluctuating gravity conditions (0 to 1.8 G) experienced on KC-135 aircraft during flight parabolas. To evaluate control strategies for meeting plant water uptake and respiration needs under microgravity and to characterize flow redistribution under fluctuating gravity, a single formulation considering partial to full saturation was developed to cover this range of conditions. The fully coupled system of equations considers N>1 gaseous species, including water, that are all constituents in the liquid phase and in equilibrium between the gas and liquid phases where both phases are present. Plants are considered as separate quasi steady continua. Plant uptake and respiration, when considered, are defined using (possibly age dependent) transfer functions characterized by root length density. The formulation avoids complexities arising from switching variables when going from very dry to saturated conditions by using variables that are continuous throughout the domain: liquid pressure and N-1 mass fraction variables, expressed as partial capillary pressure. The mass fractions of all species in both phases are recovered from the standard equilibrium conditions used to define the partial capillary pressures. The use of partial capillary pressure state variables is inspired by mass balance considerations near saturation (where capillary pressure is almost zero), because mass balance convergence rates are dominated by the phase

  6. Luminous blue variables at quiescence: The zone of avoidance in the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stothers, Richard B.; Chin, Chao-Wen

    1994-01-01

    Two phases of dynamical instability are theoretically predicted to exist during the evolution of supergiants of normal metallicity that are initially more massive than approximately 60 solar mass. One phase occurs briefly in the yellow or red region of the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram for stars in the early stages of core helium burning, and the other phase occurs for a longer time in the blue or blue-white region for stars exhausting their core helium. Probably only the second phase exists in the case of supergiants with initial masses between approximately 60 solar mass and approximately 30 solar mass or with low metallicities The cause of instability is the partial ionization of hydrogen and helium in a quasi-isolated outer region of the stellar envelope, above the layer where the iron opacity attains a large local maximum. Predicted luminosities, effective temperatures, ejected nebular masses, remnant masses, eruption recurrence times, and lifetimes, though very approximate, are generally consistent with available observational data for the important class of unstable supergiants known as luminous blue variables.

  7. Spatial-temporal variability of soil CO2 emissions within urban areas in forest-steppe zone of Central Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarzhanov, Dmitrii; Vasenev, Viacheslav; Sotnikova, Julia; Tembo, Allan; Valentini, Riccardo

    2014-05-01

    Global climate change is of the most important environmental problems. It is widely assumed that increasing concentration of greenhouse gases (GHG) is one of the main reasons of global warming. Carbon dioxide (CO2) plays a key role in climate change because of considerable natural and anthropogenic fluxes. In comparison to all the other GHG CO2 makes the most considerable contribution to global warming (more than 60%). Land-use change and following alteration of carbon cycle is one the main reasons of global warming. Land use and management is the key factor distinguishing carbon stocks and fluxes of terrestrial ecosystems. Urbanization is one the most rapid current land-use change trends. Urbanization results in fundamental transformations in matter and energy fluxes, vegetation and soil cover. Urban soil is the key element in urban ecosystems. They are principally different from natural ones in respect of physical, chemical and biological features and fluxes. Urban soils can play a considerable role in carbon budget. Carbon stocks of urban soil can be considerable, although soil respiration is also high because of intensive mineralization of turf-sand substrates, used for urban soils' construction. Urbanization effect on soil carbon stocks and fluxes varies between bioclimatic zones. Central Chernozemic region in general and Kursk city in particular provide a promising study, because natural regional soil cover represented by grey forest soils and chernozems. Relative carbon stocks in chernozems and grey forest soils are among the highest in the world, although soil respiration in these soils is also very intensive. The current study aims to study the main factors behind spatial and temporal variability of CO2 emission from urban soil in forest-steppe conditions of Central Chernozemic region. We monitored CO2 fluxes on the three different functional zones in Kursk city: recreational, residential and industrial (15 replicas per each zone). Monitoring plots were

  8. Temporal variation on environmental variables and pollution indicators in marine sediments under sea Salmon farming cages in protected and exposed zones in the Chilean inland Southern Sea.

    PubMed

    Urbina, Mauricio A

    2016-12-15

    The impacts of any activity on marine ecosystems will depend on the characteristics of the receptor medium and its resilience to external pressures. Salmon farming industry develops along a constant gradient of hydrodynamic conditions in the south of Chile. However, the influence of the hydrodynamic characteristics (weak or strong) on the impacts of intensive salmon farming is still poorly understood. This one year study evaluates the impacts of salmon farming on the marine sediments of both protected and exposed marine zones differing in their hydrodynamic characteristics. Six physico-chemical, five biological variables and seven indexes of marine sediments status were evaluated under the salmon farming cages and control sites. Our results identified a few key variables and indexes necessary to accurately evaluate the salmon farming impacts on both protected and exposed zones. Interestingly, the ranking of importance of the variables and the temporality of the observed changes, varied depending on the hydrodynamic characteristics. Biological variables (nematodes abundance) and environmental indexes (Simpson's dominance, Shannon's diversity and Pielou evenness) are the first to reflect detrimental impacts under the salmon farming cages. Then the physico-chemical variables such as redox, sulphurs and phosphorus in both zones also show detrimental impacts. Based on the present results we propose that the hydrodynamic regime is an important driver of the magnitude and temporality of the effects of salmon farming on marine sediments. The variables and indexes that best reflect the effects of salmon farming, in both protected and exposed zones, are also described.

  9. Influence of depth and time on diversity of free-living microbial community in the variably saturated zone of a granitic aquifer.

    PubMed

    Bougon, Nolwenn; Aquilina, Luc; Molénat, Jérome; Marie, Dominique; Delettre, Yannick; Chancerel, Emilie; Vandenkoornhuyse, Philippe

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the temporal and vertical changes in the microbial communities related to hydrological variations an aquifer (Brittany, France). Five water samplings were carried out, spanning three hydrological cycles in the variably and the permanently saturated zones. Seasonal variations in the major anion concentrations (NO3 -, SO4 2- and Cl(-) ) indicated that different physical processes occurred during the recharge process in the two zones. The variably saturated zone is mainly dominated by diffusion and advection processes from the soil, whereas the permanently saturated zone is controlled by moderate advective transfer from the variably saturated zone. Bacterial diversity was investigated by flow cytometry, 16S rRNA and narG genes analyses. Part of this diversity was new in that 6 of the 27 16S rRNA gene sequence phylotypes were unknown even at the class or phylum level. The narG gene analysis did not reveal any clear variation in time or depth within the nitrate reducers' community. In contrast, 16S rRNA gene analyses showed modifications of community composition that could be related to the hydrologic and chemical contrast between the two zones. It was concluded that the physical processes of water transfer could influence bacterial diversity at the soil-aquifer interface.

  10. Variability of the Oxygen Minimum Zone in the EASTERN TROPICAL SOUTH PACIFIC: Role of Mesoscale Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jose, Y. J. S.; Oschlies, A.

    2015-12-01

    Here, we investigate the contribution of mesoscale eddies on the oxygen variability of the eastern tropical south Pacific, using a coupled physical-biogeochemical model. The contribution of mesoscale eddies is uncovered under a sensitivity experiments, in which an idealized simulation without mesoscale dynamics is compared to a realistic simulation. We found that eddy dynamics intensified the ventilation of both equatorial and oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) core regions of the eastern tropical south Pacific ocean. This increased ventilation was related to the intensified eastward and poleward transport of well oxygenated waters. At the equatorial region, the increased oxygen supply reduced the volume of hypoxic waters in the upper 500 m depth. This reduction of hypoxic waters volume was accompanied by an increase of oxygen content. In contrast, the eddy-driven oxygen supply to the core of the OMZ did not result in a reduction of hypoxic waters volume. The oxygen content in the water column showed reduced concentration. This reduction of oxygen content was related to the eddy-induced shallowing of the thermocline, which have contributed to the upward expansion of low oxygen waters, and increased oxygen consumption by increasing the export production. Our results suggest an influence of eddy variability on the observed interannual oxygen variability along the Peruvian coast. The intense eddy activity during El Niño events might have contributed to the increased oxygen content along the coast. During La Niña events, the weak eddy activity might not have favoured the oxygen increase, therefore the reduction of water column oxygen content.

  11. Ocean bottom pressure variability in the Antarctic Divergence Zone off Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayakawa, Hideaki; Shibuya, Kazuo; Aoyama, Yuichi; Nogi, Yoshifumi; Doi, Koichiro

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed bottom pressure recorder (BPR) data obtained by the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) from 4500 m depth off Lützow-Holm Bay (66°50'S, 37°50'E) in the Antarctic Divergence Zone (ADZ). Data collected between December 16, 2004 and February 22, 2008 were processed after removing the tidal constituents with periods shorter than 1 month. The time series of monthly mean equivalent water height (OBP height) has a clear annual period. We correlated monthly GRACE Tellus OBP data with the JARE BPR heights. The GRACE data can account for about 38% of the variance of ocean signal observed by the JARE BPR. The variability in OBP height within the ADZ shows a maximum (2-4 cm) in the austral summer and a minimum (-2 to -4 cm) in the austral winter. In contrast, data from the coastal Syowa Station Tide Gauge (Syowa TG; 69.0°S, 39.6°E) have a maximum (7-8 cm) at the austral winter and a minimum (-5 to -6 cm) at the austral summer (opposite phase). We explained these OBP height variations in terms of the Ekman divergence mechanism using the wind velocity grids (2.5°×2.5°) of the NCEP/NCAR Reanalysis data. The monthly average of the vertical velocity (Ekman pumping) in the area of 65-67.5°S, 35-40°E is positive (upwelling) in all months, but varies seasonally, with its maximum in the austral winter and its minimum in the austral summer. This annual property is consistent with the variable differences observed between the JARE BPR and Syowa TG OBP heights. We subtracted this annual variation from the OBP monthly time series to obtain the non-seasonal OBP variability, and examined its correlation with the AAO index. The non-seasonal OBP variability of Syowa TG shows similar correlation strength (the coefficients of -0.50 to -0.52) for the short period (<7 months) and for the long period (7-19 months). The variability in the ADZ had stronger correlation for the long period (-0.79), compared with that for the short period (-0.32); this characteristic is

  12. Children's Motives for Admitting to Prosocial Behavior.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yayoi; Lee, Kayo

    2016-01-01

    There has been extensive research on children's moral evaluation of lying in prosocial situations. Current knowledge regarding the concept of lying has been derived from studies showing that cultural differences exist, whereby non-Western children tend to rate lie telling more positively than Western children do. These findings suggest that there are different views about whether children should publicize their prosocial behaviors and that children have universal motives when they admit to engaging in prosocial behavior. A gender difference has also been found in relation to prosocial behavior. However, previous studies did not investigate in detail children's motives for admission or non-admission to prosocial behavior, and if there is a gender difference. Therefore, this study examined the diversity in and development of motives for admitting or not admitting to engaging in prosocial behavior, with the aim of clarifying these behaviors as a function of children's grade level in school, and how such motives differ with age and gender. Questionnaires from 1345 elementary and junior high school students in Japan were analyzed. Results showed that children's communication tendency with regard to prosocial behavior reports peaked in the fourth grade of elementary school and gradually decreased thereafter. From the third grade of elementary school onwards, children reported that they refrained from admitting prosocial behaviors. Younger children more likely cited honesty as a crucial motive for admitting to prosocial behaviors. Girls were more likely to endorse honesty as a motive than boys were. Moreover, among younger children, girls feared others' negative evaluation and wanted to comply with modesty norms when not admitting. Further research is needed to examine the developmental process for motives behind prosocial behaviors.

  13. Children's Motives for Admitting to Prosocial Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yayoi; Lee, Kayo

    2016-01-01

    There has been extensive research on children's moral evaluation of lying in prosocial situations. Current knowledge regarding the concept of lying has been derived from studies showing that cultural differences exist, whereby non-Western children tend to rate lie telling more positively than Western children do. These findings suggest that there are different views about whether children should publicize their prosocial behaviors and that children have universal motives when they admit to engaging in prosocial behavior. A gender difference has also been found in relation to prosocial behavior. However, previous studies did not investigate in detail children's motives for admission or non-admission to prosocial behavior, and if there is a gender difference. Therefore, this study examined the diversity in and development of motives for admitting or not admitting to engaging in prosocial behavior, with the aim of clarifying these behaviors as a function of children's grade level in school, and how such motives differ with age and gender. Questionnaires from 1345 elementary and junior high school students in Japan were analyzed. Results showed that children's communication tendency with regard to prosocial behavior reports peaked in the fourth grade of elementary school and gradually decreased thereafter. From the third grade of elementary school onwards, children reported that they refrained from admitting prosocial behaviors. Younger children more likely cited honesty as a crucial motive for admitting to prosocial behaviors. Girls were more likely to endorse honesty as a motive than boys were. Moreover, among younger children, girls feared others' negative evaluation and wanted to comply with modesty norms when not admitting. Further research is needed to examine the developmental process for motives behind prosocial behaviors. PMID:26925025

  14. Rainfall Variability under the South Pacific Convergence Zone as Reconstructed from a Speleothem Record (1670-2005) from Vanuatu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, J. W.; Quinn, T. M.; Shen, C.; Maupin, C. R.; Lin, K.; Taylor, F. W.; Sinclair, D. J.; Banner, J. L.

    2010-12-01

    The tropical Pacific exhibits known climate changes on interannual timescales during El Niño-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events causing global socio-economic impacts. On decadal timescales, climate changes associated with oscillations in the tropical Pacific have been postulated, such as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO). However, the instrumental record is too short and too sparse to allow reliable and convincing evaluation of such decadal-scale oscillations. A fast-growing speleothem (~1-3 mm/year) collected from the island of Espirito Santo, Vanuatu (15.5°S, 167°E), which is located under the South Pacific Convergence Zone (SPCZ) yields a record of rainfall variability spanning ~1670 - 2005 Common Era (CE), as dated by U-Th disequilibrium techniques. Close agreement between speleothem stable oxygen isotopic composition (δ18O) and the amount of rainfall from nearby Pekoa Airport demonstrates the ability of the speleothem to record hydrologic changes above-ground. While the speleothem grows fast enough to capture the annual cycle, mixing of rain and groundwaters in the overlying bedrock dampens this δ18O signal. However, interannual changes in speleothem δ18O, or reconstructed rainfall, of ~0.6 ‰ appear to capture events associated with ENSO and subsequent reorganizations of the SPCZ. The speleothem sample offers the opportunity to record local expressions of ENSO-related changes in rainfall for the last several hundred years. The speleothem record complements previously published coral records from Vanuatu of oceanic changes to provide a broader picture of pre-instrumental ENSO variability in the region. The speleothem δ18O record also exhibits concentrations of variance on the decadal scale, which correlate with variations associated with the PDO. The amplitude of this decadal signal is large (~1.5 ‰), which serves to highlight the sensitivity of SPCZ rainfall to decadal-scale changes in the tropical Pacific ocean-atmosphere system.

  15. Photophysiological variability and its influence on primary production in the NW Africa-Canary Islands coastal transition zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueiras, F. G.; Arbones, B.; Montero, M. F.; Barton, E. D.; Arístegui, J.

    2016-05-01

    Photophysiological variability and its influence on primary production were studied in the NW Africa-Canary Islands coastal transition zone. The region showed strong mesoscale activity, in which upwelling filaments and island eddies interacted to cause significant vertical displacements of the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM). Oligotrophic stations both in the open ocean and within anticyclonic eddies were characterised by low values of integrated chlorophyll (33 ± 4 mg chl a m- 2) and dominance of pico- and nanophytoplankton, while stations associated with filaments and cyclonic eddies showed moderate chl a values (50 ± 17 mg m- 2). Shelf stations affected by upwelling exhibited the highest chl a (112 ± 36 mg m- 2) with microphytoplankton dominance. Photosynthetic variables in the three groups of stations showed similar depth gradients, with maximum photosynthetic rates (PmB) decreasing with depth and maximum quantum yields (ϕm) increasing with depth. However, the increase with depth of ϕm was not so evident in shelf waters where nutrients were not depleted at the surface. Primary production (PP) displayed a coast-ocean gradient similar to that of chl a, with highest values (2.5 ± 1.2 g C m- 2 d- 1) at the eutrophic shelf stations and lowest (0.36 ± 0.11 g C m- 2 d- 1) at the oligotrophic stations. Nevertheless, integrated PP at the oligotrophic stations was not related to integrated chl a concentration but was positively (r = 0.95) correlated to carbon fixation at the DCM and negatively (r = - 0.85) correlated to the depth of the DCM, suggesting that light, and not phytoplankton biomass, was the main factor controlling PP in oligotrophic environments. It is concluded that downward displacements of the DCM, either by convergence fronts or downwelling at the core of anticyclones can significantly reduce PP in the oligotrophic ocean.

  16. Influence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer in a semi-arid critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Rios, Xavier; Brooks, Paul D.; Troch, Peter A.; McIntosh, Jennifer; Rasmussen, Craig

    2016-03-01

    The critical zone (CZ) is the heterogeneous, near-surface layer of the planet that regulates life-sustaining resources. Previous research has demonstrated that a quantification of the influxes of effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) to the CZ can predict its structure and function. In this study, we quantify how climate variability in the last 3 decades (1984-2012) has affected water availability and the temporal trends in EEMT. This study takes place in the 1200 km2 upper Jemez River basin in northern New Mexico. The analysis of climate, water availability, and EEMT was based on records from two high-elevation SNOTEL stations, PRISM data, catchment-scale discharge, and satellite-derived net primary productivity (MODIS). Results from this study indicated a decreasing trend in water availability, a reduction in forest productivity (4 g C m-2 per 10 mm of reduction in precipitation), and decreasing EEMT (1.2-1.3 MJ m2 decade-1). Although we do not know the timescales of CZ change, these results suggest an upward migration of CZ/ecosystem structure on the order of 100 m decade-1, and that decadal-scale differences in EEMT are similar to the differences between convergent/hydrologically subsidized and planar/divergent landscapes, which have been shown to be very different in vegetation and CZ structure.

  17. Phenotypic variability confirmed by nuclear ribosomal DNA suggests a possible natural hybrid zone of Triatoma brasiliensis species complex.

    PubMed

    Costa, Jane; Bargues, Maria Dolores; Neiva, Vanessa Lima; Lawrence, Gena G; Gumiel, Marcia; Oliveira, Genova; Cabello, Pedro; Lima, Marli Maria; Dotson, Ellen; Provance, David William; Almeida, Carlos Eduardo; Mateo, Lucia; Mas-Coma, Santiago; Dujardin, Jean Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis macromelasoma occurs in Pernambuco state, Brazil, which is situated between the distribution areas of Triatoma brasiliensis brasiliensis (north) and Triatoma juazeirensis (south). T. b. macromelasoma displays greater variations in its chromatic phenotype than either T. b. brasiliensis or T. juazeirensis, and patterns reminiscent of one or the other. Experimental crosses from each of these members of the T. brasiliensis species complex generated fertile offspring suggesting that viable hybrids could be present in nature, despite their significant genetic distances. Considering the geographical position of occurrence of the T. b. macromelasoma (in Pernambuco) it was proposed to be an area capable of supporting natural hybridization between T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis. Since phenotypic variability is expected, this study investigated the existence of intermediate chromatic phenotypes for T. b. macromelasoma in various locations in areas between the T. b. brasiliensis and T. juazeirensis occurrences. Thirteen different color patterns were for the first time characterized and nine of those displayed intermediate phenotypes. Molecular analysis performed using ribosomal DNA intergenic region, grouped all within the T. brasiliensis complex. The intermediate chromatic phenotypes, molecular analysis and experimental crosses all support the distinction of a zone of hybridization that gave rise to the T. b. macromelasoma through homoploidal evolution.

  18. ADMIT: The ALMA Data Mining Toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teuben, P.; Pound, M.; Mundy, L.; Rauch, K.; Friedel, D.; Looney, L.; Xu, L.; Kern, J.

    2015-09-01

    ADMIT (ALMA Data Mining ToolkiT), a toolkit for the creation of new science products from ALMA data, is being developed as an ALMA Development Project. It is written in Python and, while specifically targeted for a uniform analysis of the ALMA science products that come out of the ALMA pipeline, it is designed to be generally applicable to (radio) astronomical data. It first provides users with a detailed view of their science products created by ADMIT inside the ALMA pipeline: line identifications, line ‘cutout' cubes, moment maps, emission type analysis (e.g., feature detection). Using descriptor vectors the ALMA data archive is enriched with useful information to make archive data mining possible. Users can also opt to download the (small) ADMIT pipeline product, then fine-tune and re-run the pipeline and inspect their hopefully improved data. By running many projects in a parallel fashion, data mining between many astronomical sources and line transitions will also be possible. Future implementations of ADMIT may include EVLA and other instruments.

  19. A property of subspaces admitting spectral synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Abuzyarova, N F

    1999-04-30

    Let H be the space of holomorphic functions in a convex domain G subset of C. The following result is established: each closed subspace W subset of H that is invariant with respect to the operator of differentiation and admits spectral synthesis can be represented as the solution set of two (possibly coinciding) homogeneous convolution equations.

  20. Butaclamol hydrochloride in newly admitted schizophrenics.

    PubMed

    Hollister, L E; Davis, K L; Berger, P A

    1975-01-01

    Butaclamol hydrochloride, a new type of antipsychotic drug, was evaluated by an uncontrolled study of 13 newly admitted schizophrenic patients. The drug had antipsychotic effects as well as a strong propensity for evoking extrapyramidal side effects. With the maximal daily doses of 30 mg used in this study, therapeutic results obtained were probably somewhat less than optimal.

  1. Variability of the Oxygen Minimum Zone during the Holocene in the Gulf of California, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Pina, K. G.; Gonzalez-Yajimovich, O.; Huerta-Diaz, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in the oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) in the southern portion of the Gulf of California (GoC) can be caused by changes in primary productivity or by advection of water masses with low oxygen concentrations. To discern the acting mechanism, multiple and gravity cores (NH01-22 and NH01-25) comprising the Holocene (~4800 and ~6600 years, respectively) were collected in the OMZ of the GoC during the CALMEX NH-01 cruise. Sediments were collected on the eastern slopes of Pescadero (PB) and Carmen (CB) Basins, intersecting in both cases the GoC's distinct OMZ. The cores were sectioned at 1-cm intervals and analyzed for total Mo (MoTotal), total Al and Fe-pyrite. With these values, Mo enrichment factors (EFMo) and degrees of pyritization (DOP) were calculated for each sediment interval. Average DOP values for CB and PB were 38%±11% (n=306) and 28.6%±6.5% (n=259), respectively, indicating that the sediments are not limited by the availability of reactive Fe. Higher average MoTOTAL values were measured in CB (0.22±0.04 μmol g-1) relative to PB (0.09±0.02 μmol g-1). As a result, EFMo values were high (14.5±3.4, range of 6.6-35.6) in CB and significantly lower in PB (4.5±1.1, range of 2.7-12.0). For CB, EFMO values are comparable to regions such as the west coast of Baja California, Mexico (EFMO=20±9) and the euxinic Black Sea (EFMO=27±8) and Saanich Inlet, British Columbia (EFMO=39±35) zones. In PB EFMO values were similar to those reported for well oxygenated marginal basins (e.g., Japan Sea; EFMO=2.5±1.5). DOP values for CB and PB are generally <40%, characteristic of oxic sedimentary environments. The DOP and EFMO conflicting results could indicate that the sediments are not completely pyritized because Fe is also associated with acid volatile sulfides (unlikely), or that values <40% are not necessarily associated with oxic sedimentary environments. However, for both basins, the persistence of laminations, the EFMo levels and the DOP values suggest variable

  2. Oxygen minimum zone of the open Arabian Sea: variability of oxygen and nitrite from daily to decadal time scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banse, K.; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Narvekar, P. V.; Postel, J. R.; Jayakumar, D. A.

    2013-09-01

    The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea is the thickest of the three oceanic OMZs, which is of global biogeochemical significance because of denitrification in the upper part leading to N2 and N2O production. The residence time of the OMZ water is believed to be less than a decade. The upper few hundred meters of this zone are nearly anoxic but non-sulfidic and still support animal (metazoan) pelagic life, possibly as a result of episodic injections of O2 by physical processes. The very low O2 values obtained with the new STOX sensor in the eastern tropical South Pacific probably also characterize the Arabian Sea OMZ, but there is no apparent reason as to why the temporal trends of the historic data should not hold. We report on discrete measurements of dissolved O2 and NO2-, besides temperature and salinity, made between 1959 and 2004 well below the tops of the sharp pycno- and oxyclines near 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 m depth. We assemble nearly all O2 determinations (originally, 849 values, 695 in the OMZ) by the visual endpoint detection of the iodometric Winkler procedure, which in our data base yields about 0.04 mL L-1 (∼2 μM) O2 above the endpoint from modern automated titration methods. We find 632 values acceptable (480 from 150 stations in the OMZ). The data are grouped in zonally-paired boxes of 1° lat. and 2° long. centered at 8°, 10°, 12°, 15°, 18°, 20°, and 21° N along 65° E and 67° E. The latitudes of 8-12° N, outside the OMZ, are only treated in passing. The principal results are as follows: (1) an O2 climatology for the upper OMZ reveals a marked seasonality at 200 to 500 m depth with O2 levels during the northeast monsoon and spring intermonsoon season elevated over those during the southwest monsoon season (median difference, 0.08 mL L-1 [3.5 μM]). The medians of the slopes of the seasonal regressions of O2 on year for the NE and SW monsoon seasons are -0.0043 and -0.0019 mL L-1 a-1, respectively (-0.19 and -0.08 μM a

  3. Using MERRA, AMIP II, CMIP5 Outputs to Assess Actual and Potential Building Climate Zone Change and Variability From the Last 30 Years Through 2100

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stackhouse, P. W.; Westberg, D. J.; Hoell, J. M., Jr.; Chandler, W.; Zhang, T.

    2014-12-01

    In the US, residential and commercial building infrastructure combined consumes about 40% of total energy usage and emits about 39% of total CO2emission (DOE/EIA "Annual Energy Outlook 2013"). Thus, increasing the energy efficiency of buildings is paramount to reducing energy costs and emissions. Building codes, as used by local and state enforcement entities are typically tied to the dominant climate within an enforcement jurisdiction classified according to various climate zones. These climates zones are based upon a 30-year average of local surface observations and are developed by DOE and ASHRAE (formerly known as the American Society of Hearting, Refrigeration and Air-Conditioning Engineers). A significant shortcoming of the methodology used in constructing such maps is the use of surface observations (located mainly near airports) that are unequally distributed and frequently have periods of missing data that need to be filled by various approximation schemes. This paper demonstrates the usefulness of using NASA's Modern Era Retrospective-analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) atmospheric data assimilation to derive the ASHRAE climate zone maps and then using MERRA to define the last 30 years of variability in climate zones. These results show that there is a statistically significant increase in the area covered by warmer climate zones and some tendency for a reduction of area in colder climate zones that require longer time series to confirm. Using the uncertainties of the basic surface temperature and precipitation parameters from MERRA as determined by comparison to surface measurements, we first compare patterns and variability of ASHRAE climate zones from MERRA relative to present day climate model runs from AMIP simulations to establish baseline sensitivity. Based upon these results, we assess the variability of the ASHRAE climate zones according to CMIP runs through 2100 using an ensemble analysis that classifies model output changes by

  4. Interannual Variability in Carbon and Nitrogen Stable Isotopic Signatures of Size-Fractionated POM from the South Florida Coastal Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, S. L.; Anderson, W. T.; Jochem, F. J.; Fourqurean, J. W.

    2004-12-01

    Environmental conditions in South Florida coastal waters have been of local and national concern over the past 15 years. Attention has focused on the ecosystem impacts of salinity increases, seagrass die-off, increased algal bloom frequency, waste water influence, groundwater discharge, and exchange between Florida Bay, the Gulf of Mexico, and the Atlantic Ocean. Changes in water quality and productivity levels may be reflected in the isotopic signatures of coastal zone primary producers. Recent work with seagrasses in South Florida has demonstrated high seasonal and spatial variability in C and N isotopic signatures and decoupling between the two isotopic systems as they vary. To better understand the sources of seasonal and spatial fluctuation, size fractionated POM (particulate organic matter) samples have been collected on a quarterly basis since Sept. 2002. Fractions collected include >150μ m, 50-150μ m, and 0.1-50μ m using Nitex mesh sieves and a portable pump system deployed from a small boat at 10 sites around the Florida Keys and Florida Bay. It was hypothesized that planktonic groups respond more quickly to changes in water quality then seagrasses, and thus variations may be more clearly attributed to environmental parameters. Significant spatial and temporal variability is evident both within site between size fractions and between sites. Seasonal oscillations of up to 4‰ were observed in N isotopic values and 6‰ in C isotopic values of the 50-150μ m size fraction, which is dominated by diatoms and dinoflagellates. δ 13C values are depleted in the late winter/early spring sampling period possibly reflecting decreased productivity stress on available C pools. 13C depletion is generally coincident with δ 15N enrichment in the late winter/early spring, possibly demonstrating changes in DIN pools (NO3- and NH4+ concentrations) or changes in decomposition or denitrification rates. Broad groupings appear to separate Atlantic coral reef sites

  5. Spatial and Temporal Variability in Nitrate Concentration below the Root Zone in an Almond Orchard and its Implications for Potential Groundwater Contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baram, S.; Couvreur, V.

    2015-12-01

    Spatial and Temporal Variability in Nitrate Concentration below the Root Zone in an Almond Orchard and its Implications for Potential Groundwater Contamination S. Baram1, M. Read1, D. Smart2, T. Harter1, J Hopmans11Department of Land, Air & Water Resources University of California Davis 2Department of Viticulture and Enology University of California Davis Estimates of water and fertilizer losses below the root zone of nitrogen (N) intensive agricultural orchard crops are major concern in groundwater protection. However, microscopic and macroscopic heterogeneity in unsaturated soils make accurate loss estimates very challenging. In this study we aimed to examine field scale variability in nitrate (NO3-) losses below the root zone (>250cm) of a 15 years old almond orchard in Madera county California. Based on a soil variability survey, tensiometers and solution samplers were installed at 17 locations around the 40 acre orchard. The hydraulic potential and the NO3- concentrations were monitored over two growing seasons. Nitrate concentrations varied spatially and temporarily, and ranged from below to more than 30 times higher than the drinking water contamination standard of >10 mg NO3--N L-1. Principal component analysis of the relations between the NO3- concentration, presence of a hard pan in the subsurface, its depth and thickness, and the fertigation and irrigation events indicated that none of these factors explained the observed variability in pore-water NO3- concentrations, with hard pan being the most dominant factor. Throughout the irrigation season minimal leaching was observed, yet post-harvest and preseason flooding events led to deep drainage. Due to the high spatial and temporal variability in the NO3- concentration and the potential for deep drainage following a wet winter or flooding event we conclude that the most efficient way to protect ground water is by transitioning to high frequency low nitrogen fertigation which would retain NO3-in the active

  6. Pre-operative variables affecting final vision outcome with a critical review of ocular trauma classification for posterior open globe (zone III) injury

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Rupesh; Ho, Sue Wei; Teoh, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To identify pre-operative variables affecting the outcome of posterior open globe (zone III) injuries. Secondary objective was to re-look at the definition or landmarks for zone III injury and its clinical significance for predicting visual prognosis following open globe injury. Materials and Methods: Retrospective review of medical records of all hospitalized patients with surgical repair of open globe injury over last 10 years at a tertiary referral eye care center in Singapore. Out of 172 eyes with open globe injury, 28 eyes (16.3%) with zone III injury was identified and reviewed further. Pre-operative visual acuity (VA) and other variables, extent of scleral wound in reference to rectus insertion, relative afferent pupillary defect (RAPD) and final vision outcome were recorded. Results: Median age was 37 years with male predilection (92.9%). Mean follow-up was 12.9 months. Pre-operative VA was no light perception (NLP) in 16 (57.1%) eyes. Final VA remained NLP in 14 eyes (50.0%). The factors contributing to poor post-operative vision based on univariate regression analysis were the presence of RAPD, poor pre-operative VA, blunt trauma, extent of trauma, associated traumatic cataract, hyphema, vitreous loss and associated vitreo-retinal trauma. Further on, zone III injuries with scleral wound limited anterior to rectus insertion (6 eyes) had better vision outcome than those with injuries extending beyond rectus insertion (22 eyes). Conclusion: Initial VA, blunt ocular trauma, visual axis involvement, loss of light perception, presence of RAPD, traumatic cataract, hyphema, vitreous loss were the important determinants for final visual outcome in patients with zone III injury. Wound extending posterior to rectus insertion has poorer outcome as those limited anterior to rectus insertion. We suggest that there may be a need to relook at zone III injuries with reference to rectus insertion for prognostic significance, and further studies are warranted. PMID

  7. Higher dimensional charged gravastar admitting conformal motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhar, Piyali

    2014-12-01

    In the present paper we have discussed about the higher dimensional charged gravastar admitting conformal motion. The gravastar, gravitationally vacuum condense star is generally considered as the alternative to black hole which has three regions with three different equation of state. (i) In interior region p=- ρ, (ii) in shell p= ρ, (iii) in exterior region p= ρ=0. p=- ρ is generally called the `false vacuum' or `degenerate vacuum' or ρ vacuum. We match our interior spacetime to the R-N higher dimensional spacetime in presence of thin shell.

  8. Oxygen minimum zone of the open Arabian Sea: variability of oxygen and nitrite from daily to decadal timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banse, K.; Naqvi, S. W. A.; Narvekar, P. V.; Postel, J. R.; Jayakumar, D. A.

    2014-04-01

    The oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) of the Arabian Sea is the thickest of the three oceanic OMZ. It is of global biogeochemical significance because of denitrification in the upper part leading to N2 and N2O production. The residence time of OMZ water is believed to be less than a decade. The upper few hundred meters of this zone are nearly anoxic but non-sulfidic and still support animal (metazoan) pelagic life, possibly as a result of episodic injections of O2 by physical processes. We report on discrete measurements of dissolved O2 and NO2-, temperature and salinity made between 1959 and 2004 well below the tops of the sharp pycnocline and oxycline near 150, 200, 300, 400, and 500 m depth. We assemble nearly all O2 determinations (originally there were 849 values, 695 of which came from the OMZ) by the visual endpoint detection of the iodometric Winkler procedure, which in our data base yields about 0.04 mL L-1 (~ 2 μM) O2 above the endpoint from modern automated titration methods. We acknowledge that much lower (nanomolar) O2 values have been measured recently with the STOX (Switchable Trace amount OXygen) sensor in the eastern tropical South Pacific, and that similar conditions may also prevail in the Arabian Sea OMZ. In spite of the error in O2 measurements at vanishingly low levels, we argue that the temporal trends of the historic data should still hold. We find 632 values acceptable (480 from 150 stations in the OMZ). The data are grouped in zonally paired boxes of 1° lat. and 2° long. centered at 8, 10, 12, 15, 18, 20, and 21° N along 65 and 67° E. The latitudes of 8-12° N, outside the OMZ, are treated in passing. The principal results are as follows: (1) an O2 climatology for the upper OMZ reveals a marked seasonality at 200 to 500 m depth with O2 levels during the northeast monsoon and spring intermonsoon seasons elevated over those during the southwest monsoon season (median difference, 0.08 mL L-1 [~ 3.5 μM]). The medians of the slopes of the

  9. Spatial and temporal variability of nitrate and nitrous oxide concentrations in the unsaturated zone at a corn field in the US Midwest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopalakrishnan, G.; Negri, C.

    2011-12-01

    There has been a significant increase in reactive nitrogen in the environment as a result of human activity. Reactive nitrogen of anthropogenic origin now equals that derived from natural terrestrial nitrogen fixation and is expected to exceed it by the end of the decade. Nitrogen is applied to crops as fertilizer and impacts the environment through water quality impairments (mostly as nitrate) and as greenhouse gas emissions (as nitrous oxide). Research on environmental impacts resulting from nitrogen application in the form of fertilizers has focused disproportionately on the degradation of water quality from agricultural non-point sources. The impacts of this degradation are registered both locally, with runoff and percolation of agrochemicals into local surface water and groundwater, and on a larger scale, such as the increase in the anoxic zone in the Gulf of Mexico attributed to nitrate from the Mississippi River. Impacts to the global climate from increased production of nitrous oxide as a result of increased fertilization are equally significant. Nitrous oxide is a greenhouse gas with a warming potential that is approximately 300 times greater than carbon dioxide. Direct emissions of nitrous oxide from the soil have been expressed as 1% of the applied nitrogen. Indirect emissions due to runoff, leaching and volatilization of the nitrogen from the field have been expressed as 0.75% of the applied nitrogen. Many studies have focused on processes governing nitrogen fluxes in the soil, surface water and groundwater systems. However, research on the biogeochemical processes regulating nitrogen fluxes in the unsaturated zone and consequent impacts on nitrate and nitrous oxide concentrations in groundwater are lacking. Our study explores the spatial and temporal variability of nitrate and nitrous oxide concentrations in the vadose zone at a 15 acre corn field in the US Midwest and links it to the concentrations found in the groundwater at the field site. Results

  10. The Prediction of Teacher Morale Using the Supervisory Conference Rating, the Zones of Indifference Instrument and Selected Personal Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackbourn, Joe M.; Wilkes, Sam T.

    A prediction equation for teacher morale was developed from the responses of 236 teachers in a large school system in Mississippi. The Supervisory Conference Rating (SCR) was used to measure teachers' perceptions of the supervisory conference following observation by the principal. The Zones of Indifference of these teachers were measured with the…

  11. Variability of seismic source spectra, estimated stress drop, and radiated energy, derived from cohesive-zone models of symmetrical and asymmetrical circular and elliptical ruptures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Y.; Shearer, P. M.

    2015-02-01

    Large variability of earthquake stress drops and scaled energy has been commonly reported in the literature, but it is difficult to assess how much of this variability is caused by underlying physical source processes rather than simply observational uncertainties. Here we examine a variety of dynamically realistic rupture scenarios for circular and elliptical faults and investigate to what extent the variability in seismically estimated stress drops and scaled energy comes from differences in source geometry, rupture directivity, and rupture speeds. We numerically simulate earthquake source scenarios using a cohesive-zone model with the small-scale yielding limit, where the solution approaches a singular crack model with spontaneous healing of slip. Compared to symmetrical circular source models, asymmetrical models result in larger variability of estimated corner frequencies and scaled energy over the focal sphere. The general behavior of the spherical averages of corner frequencies and scaled energy in the subshear regime extends to the supershear regime, although shear Mach waves generated by the propagation of supershear rupture lead to much higher corner frequency and scaled energy estimates locally. Our results suggest that at least a factor of 2 difference in the spherical average of corner frequencies is expected in observational studies simply from variability in source characteristics almost independent of the actual stress drops, translating into a factor of 8 difference in estimated stress drops. Furthermore, radiation efficiency estimates derived from observed seismic spectra should not be directly interpreted as describing rupture properties unless there are independent constraints on rupture speed and geometry.

  12. Chlorophyll-a Variability in the Southern Ocean Mixed Layer and Euphotic Zone From Elephant Seals and Profiling Floats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carranza, M. M.; Gille, S. T.; Franks, P. J. S.; Johnson, K. S.; Girton, J. B.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Ocean contains some of the ocean's deepest mixed layers. Because deep mixed layers can transport phytoplankton below the euphotic zone, light levels depend on mixed-layer depth (MLD), and phytoplankton growth is hypothesized to be co-limited by iron and light. Estimates of Chl-a fluorescence, particle backscattering and hydrographic profiles collected by southern elephant seals, EM-APEX, and biogeochemical Argo floats are used to evaluate the extent to which MLD influences phytoplankton bloom development and the vertical structure of chlorophyll-a (Chl-a) in the Southern Ocean. We find that surface Chl-a (i.e., mean Chl-a for the upper light penetration depth) is a relatively good proxy of phytoplankton biomass (i.e., depth-integrated Chl-a) within the euphotic zone but gives an inadequate representation of biomass within the mixed layer, particularly in the summer. Although nearly vertically homogeneous Chl-a within the mixed layer prevails in seasonal mean profiles, subsurface Chl-a maxima are not uncommon from spring through fall. Deep Chl-a maxima that correlate with particle backscattering in summer and fall are found near the base of the mixed layer, closer to the nutrient maximum than the light maximum, suggesting that nutrient limitation (i.e., essentially iron) can play a greater role than light limitation in governing productivity.

  13. Hospital-Admitted Injury Attributable to Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Ted R.; Spicer, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Primary data collection has established that alcohol causes injuries treated in the emergency department. No comparable data exist for injuries admitted to hospital. Data on the injury risks of heavy drinkers relative to other drinkers also are sparse. Methods We estimated (1) whether regular heavy drinkers have higher hospitalized injury risks than other people when alcohol negative and (2) how much hospitalized injury risk of regular heavy drinkers and other drinkers rises when alcohol positive. We combined national alcohol consumption data with alcohol metabolism rates to estimate hours spent alcohol positive versus alcohol negative during a year for heavy drinkers versus other people. A literature review provided hospitalized non-fatal injury rates for these groups by alcohol involvement. Results Relative to other alcohol-negative people aged 18 and older, heavy drinkers have an estimated relative risk of hospitalized injury of 1.4 when alcohol negative and 4.3 when alcohol positive. Others have an estimated relative risk of 1.0 when alcohol negative and 6.8 when alcohol positive. Thus alcohol greatly raises injury risk. The excess risk patterns persist for a wide range of sensitivity analysis values. Of hospitalized injuries, an estimated 21% are alcohol attributable including 36% of assaults. Conclusions Drinking alcohol is a major cause of hospitalized injury. Heavy drinkers lead risky lifestyles. They tolerate alcohol better than most drinkers but their injury risks still triple when they drink. Our approach to attribution is a valuable complement to more costly, more precise approaches that rely heavily on primary data collection. It works for any severity of injury. Applying it only requires an existing alcohol consumption survey plus data on alcohol involvement in targeted injuries. PMID:22004026

  14. Serpent: Magnetic signatures of serpentinized mantle and mesoscale oceanic variability along the Alaska/Aleutian subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purucker, Michael; Serpent Team

    2010-05-01

    NASA recently solicited suborbital missions as a part of its new Earth Venture program element. These missions are designed as complete PI-led investigations to conduct innovative, integrated, hypothesis or scientific question driven approaches to pressing questions in Earth System science. The missions should require sustained observations (<5 years) and significant resources (<30 million USD). The submitted mission proposals have been under evaluation since last November, and NASA is scheduled to make a decision in April. We, a team led by Raytheon's Photon Research Associates, propose to carry out a suborbital magnetic survey of the Aleutian subduction zone using NASA's Global Hawk to test the magnetic serpentinite hypothesis. This hypothesis states that dewatering of the descending slab within subduction zones produces an observable static magnetic signature through the formation of serpentinite in the overriding mantle. This signature may serve as a predictor of the location of large megathrust earthquakes and their associated tsunamis. Magnetic field measurements from 20 km (sub-orbital) altitude are essential to the testing of this hypothesis; analysis shows orbital and/or near-surface measurements are not likely to provide sufficient sensitivity and uniform calibration to confirm or reject the hypothesis, nor to consistently map its presence around the world. Static and dynamic magnetic signatures from the motion of seawater in the earth's magnetic field have the potential to confound an evaluation of the magnetic serpentinite hypothesis. Through a combination of modeling and exact repeat surveys over the subduction zone, spaced weeks to as much as six months apart, we can study the magnetic signature of the motion that characterizes the mesoscale oceanic circulation in order to develop the best possible corrections for lithospheric imaging, and elucidating the intrinsic and unique oceanic information content in the magnetic fields for the first time ever

  15. Influence of management of variables, sampling zones and land units on LR analysis for landslide spatial prevision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greco, R.; Sorriso-Valvo, M.

    2013-09-01

    Several authors, according to different methodological approaches, have employed logistic Regression (LR), a multivariate statistical analysis adopted to assess the spatial probability of landslide, even though its fundamental principles have remained unaltered. This study aims at assessing the influence of some of these methodological approaches on the performance of LR, through a series of sensitivity analyses developed over a test area of about 300 km2 in Calabria (southern Italy). In particular, four types of sampling (1 - the whole study area; 2 - transects running parallel to the general slope direction of the study area with a total surface of about 1/3 of the whole study area; 3 - buffers surrounding the phenomena with a 1/1 ratio between the stable and the unstable area; 4 - buffers surrounding the phenomena with a 1/2 ratio between the stable and the unstable area), two variable coding modes (1 - grouped variables; 2 - binary variables), and two types of elementary land (1 - cells units; 2 - slope units) units have been tested. The obtained results must be considered as statistically relevant in all cases (Aroc values > 70%), thus confirming the soundness of the LR analysis which maintains high predictive capacities notwithstanding the features of input data. As for the area under investigation, the best performing methodological choices are the following: (i) transects produced the best results (0 < P(y) ≤ 93.4%; Aroc = 79.5%); (ii) as for sampling modalities, binary variables (0 < P(y) ≤ 98.3%; Aroc = 80.7%) provide better performance than ordinated variables; (iii) as for the choice of elementary land units, slope units (0 < P(y) ≤ 100%; Aroc = 84.2%) have obtained better results than cells matrix.

  16. Investigations of Spatial and Temporal Variability of Ocean and Ice Conditions in and Near the Marginal Ice Zone. The “Marginal Ice Zone Observations and Processes Experiment” (MIZOPEX) Final Campaign Summary

    SciTech Connect

    DeMott, P. J.; Hill, T. C.J.

    2016-02-01

    Despite the significance of the marginal ice zones of the Arctic Ocean, basic parameters such as sea surface temperature (SST) and a range of sea-ice characteristics are still insufficiently understood in these areas, and especially so during the summer melt period. The field campaigns summarized here, identified collectively as the “Marginal Ice Zone Ocean and Ice Observations and Processes Experiment” (MIZOPEX), were funded by U.S. National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) with the intent of helping to address these information gaps through a targeted, intensive observation field campaign that tested and exploited unique capabilities of multiple classes of unmanned aerial systems (UASs). MIZOPEX was conceived and carried out in response to NASA’s request for research efforts that would address a key area of science while also helping to advance the application of UASs in a manner useful to NASA for assessing the relative merits of different UASs. To further exercise the potential of unmanned systems and to expand the science value of the effort, the field campaign added further challenges such as air deployment of miniaturized buoys and coordinating missions involving multiple aircraft. Specific research areas that MIZOPEX data were designed to address include relationships between ocean skin temperatures and subsurface temperatures and how these evolve over time in an Arctic environment during summer; variability in sea-ice conditions such as thickness, age, and albedo within the marginal ice zone (MIZ); interactions of SST, salinity, and ice conditions during the melt cycle; and validation of satellite-derived SST and ice concentration fields provided by satellite imagery and models.

  17. Variability of suspended particulate matter concentrations and organic compounds in frontal zones of the Atlantic and Southern oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemirovskaya, I. A.; Kravchishina, M. D.

    2016-01-01

    The concentrations of suspended particulate matter (SPM) and particulate forms of the organic compounds (hydrocarbons, lipids, and chlorophyll a) were determined in the surface water layers of the Atlantic and Southern oceans during February to May of 2012 and 2014. It was found that the distribution of concentrations of the studied components is mainly affected by the location of frontal zones. When ice cover forms in the Southern Ocean, the changes in water temperature and phytoplankton development at the ice-water interface result in an increase of the concentrations of SPM, chlorophyll a, and, to a lesser extent, of lipids and hydrocarbons in the surface water layer. The occasional sharp increase of hydrocarbon concentrations caused by anthropogenic pollution was registered at local parts of water areas in the east of the Atlantic Ocean, as well as in the North and Baltic seas.

  18. Variable post-Paleozoic deformation detected by seismic reflection profiling across the northwestern "prong" of New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.; Pugin, Andre J.M.; Nelson, W.J.; Larson, T.H.; Sargent, S.L.; Devera, J.A.; Denny, F.B.; Woolery, E.W.

    2003-01-01

    High-resolution shallow seismic reflection profiles across the northwesternmost part of the New Madrid seismic zone (NMSZ) and northwestern margin of the Reelfoot rift, near the confluence of the Ohio and Mississippi Rivers in the northern Mississippi embayment, reveal intense structural deformation that apparently took place during the late Paleozoic and/or Mesozoic up to near the end of the Cretaceous Period. The seismic profiles were sited on both sides of the northeast-trending Olmsted fault, defined by varying elevations of the top of Mississippian (locally base of Cretaceous) bedrock. The trend of this fault is close to and parallel with an unusually straight segment of the Ohio River and is approximately on trend with the westernmost of two groups of northeast-aligned epicenters ("prongs") in the NMSZ. Initially suspected on the basis of pre-existing borehole data, the deformation along the fault has been confirmed by four seismic reflection profiles, combined with some new information from drilling. The new data reveal (1) many high-angle normal and reverse faults expressed as narrow grabens and anticlines (suggesting both extensional and compressional regimes) that involved the largest displacements during the late Cretaceous (McNairy); (2) a different style of deformation involving probably more horizontal displacements (i.e., thrusting) that occurred at the end of this phase near the end of McNairy deposition, with some fault offsets of Paleocene and younger units; (3) zones of steeply dipping faults that bound chaotic blocks similar to that observed previously from the nearby Commerce geophysical lineament (CGL); and (4) complex internal deformation stratigraphically restricted to the McNairy, suggestive of major sediment liquefaction or landsliding. Our results thus confirm the prevalence of complex Cretaceous deformations continuing up into Tertiary strata near the northern terminus of the NMSZ. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Multiwaveband Variability of Blazars from Turbulent Plasma Passing through a Standing Shock: The Mother of Multi-zone Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marscher, Alan P.

    2011-09-01

    Multi-wavelength light curves of bright gamma-ray blazars (e.g., 3C 454.3) are compared with the model proposed by Marscher and Jorstad. In this scenario, much of the optical and high-energy radiation in a blazar is emitted near the 43 GHz core of the jet as seen in VLBA images, parsecs from the central engine. The main physical features are a turbulent ambient jet plasma that passes through a standing recollimation shock in the jet. The model allows for short time-scales of optical and gamma-ray variability by restricting the highest-energy electrons radiating at these frequencies to a small fraction of the turbulent cells, perhaps those with a particular orientation of the magnetic field relative to the shock front. Because of this, the volume filling factor at high frequencies is relatively low, while that of the electrons radiating below about 10 THz is near unity. Such a model is consistent with the (1) red-noise power spectra of flux variations, (2) shorter time-scales of variability at higher frequencies, (3) frequency dependence of polarization and its variability, and (4) breaks in the synchrotron spectrum by more than the radiative loss value of 0.5. Simulated light curves are generated by a numerical code that (as of May 2011) includes synchrotron radiation as well as inverse Compton scattering of seed photons from both a dust torus and a Mach disk at the jet axis. The latter source of seed photons produces more pronounced variability in gamma-ray than in optical light curves, as is often observed. More features are expected to be added to the code by the time of the presentation. This research is supported in part by NASA through Fermi grants NNX08AV65G and NNX10AO59G, and by NSF grant AST-0907893.

  20. Variable deep structure of a midcontinent fault and fold zone from seismic reflection: La Salle deformation belt, Illinois basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, J.H.

    1997-01-01

    Deformation within the United States mid-continent is frequently expressed as quasilinear zones of faulting and folding, such as the La Salle deformation belt, a northwest-trending series of folds cutting through the center of the Illinois basin. Seismic reflection profiles over the southern La Salle deformation belt reveal the three-dimensional structural style of deformation in the lower Paleozoic section and uppermost Precambrian(?) basement. Individual profiles and structural contour maps show for the first time that the folds of the La Salle deformation belt are underlain at depth by reverse faults that disrupt and offset intrabasement structure, offset the top of interpreted Precambrian basement, and accommodate folding of overlying Paleozoic strata. The folds do not represent development of initial dips by strata deposited over a preexisting basement high. Rather, the structures resemble subdued "Laramide-style" forced folds, in that Paleozoic stratal reflectors appear to be flexed over a fault-bounded basement uplift with the basement-cover contact folded concordantly with overlying strata. For about 40 km along strike, the dominant faults reverse their dip direction, alternating between east and west. Less well expressed antithetic or back thrusts appear to be associated with the dominant faults and could together describe a positive flower structure. The overall trend of this part of the La Salle deformation belt is disrupted by along-strike discontinuities that separate distinct fold culminations. Observations of dual vergence and along-strike discontinuities suggest an original deformation regime possibly involving limited transpression associated with distant late Paleozoic Appalachian-Ouachita mountain building. Moderate-magnitude earthquakes located west of the western flank of the La Salle deformation belt have reverse and strike-slip mechanisms at upper trustai depths, which might be reactivating deep basement faults such as observed in this study

  1. Surgeons and suture zones: Hybridization among four surgeonfish species in the Indo-Pacific with variable evolutionary outcomes.

    PubMed

    DiBattista, Joseph D; Whitney, Jonathan; Craig, Matthew T; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Rocha, Luiz A; Feldheim, Kevin A; Berumen, Michael L; Bowen, Brian W

    2016-08-01

    Closely related species can provide valuable insights into evolutionary processes through comparison of their ecology, geographic distribution and the history recorded in their genomes. In the Indo-Pacific, many reef fishes are divided into sister species that come into secondary contact at biogeographic borders, most prominently where Indian Ocean and Pacific Ocean faunas meet. It is unclear whether hybridization in this contact zone represents incomplete speciation, secondary contact, an evolutionary dead-end (for hybrids) or some combination of the above. To address these issues, we conducted comprehensive surveys of two widely-distributed surgeonfish species, Acanthurus leucosternon (N=141) and A. nigricans (N=412), with mtDNA cytochrome b sequences and ten microsatellite loci. These surgeonfishes are found primarily in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, respectively, but overlap at the Christmas and Cocos-Keeling Islands hybrid zone in the eastern Indian Ocean. We also sampled the two other Pacific members of this species complex, A. achilles (N=54) and A. japonicus (N=49), which are known to hybridize with A. nigricans where their ranges overlap. Our results indicate separation between the four species that range from the recent Pleistocene to late Pliocene (235,000-2.25million years ago). The Pacific A. achilles is the most divergent (and possibly ancestral) species with mtDNA dcorr≈0.04, whereas the other two Pacific species (A. japonicus and A. nigricans) are distinguishable only at a population or subspecies level (ΦST=0.6533, P<0.001). Little population structure was observed within species, with evidence of recent population expansion across all four geographic ranges. We detected sharing of mtDNA haplotypes between species and extensive hybridization based on microsatellites, consistent with later generation hybrids but also the effects of allele homoplasy. Despite extensive introgression, 98% of specimens had concordance between mtDNA lineage and

  2. Variability in pigment concentration in warm-core rings as determined by coastal zone color scanner satellite imagery from the Mid-Atlantic Bight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia-Moliner, Graciela; Yoder, James A.

    1994-01-01

    A time series of coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) derived chlorophyll (CZCS-chl) and sea surface temperature (SST) satellite imagery was developed for the Mid-Atlantic Bight (MAB). Warm-core rings (WCR) were identified by both the warmer SST signal as well as the low pigment concentrations of their cores. The variation in pigment concentrations and SST observed in satellite imagery over the geographic range and life span of four WCRs is investigated. The hypotheses are that pigment concentration increase during the lifetime of the WCR is a response to processes such as convective overturn, upwelling, edge enhancement due to increased vertical mixing, active convergence, or lateral exchange. Empirical orthogonal function analysis (EOF) is used to investigate the relationship between SST and pigment patterns observed in the presence of a WCR. The first two EOF modes explain more than 80% of the variability observed in all four WCRs and in both (SST and pigment) data sets. The results of this study show that, at the synoptic scales of staellite data, the variability observed in the WCRs is greater at the periphery of the rings. These results show that advective entrainment, rather than processes at ring center (e.g., shoaling of the pycnocline/nutricline in response to frictional decay) or at the periphery due to other processes such as vertical mixing, is the mechanism responsible for the observed variability.

  3. Deriving variable travel times and aerobic respiration in the hyporheic zone using electrical conductivity as natural tracer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweg, Michael; Fleckenstein, Jan H.; Schmidt, Christian

    2014-05-01

    Determining oxygen consumption (respiration) rates is important for characterizing the ecological functioning of a stream. It is known, that respiration is strongly temperature dependent, but the variability over time and the effects of changing hydrologic conditions are still scarce. Existing respiration measuring methods mostly utilize ex situ respiration chambers, which do not necessarily represent the actual conditions in a riverbed. We present an approach of transient in situ measurements, which utilize changes in the natural stream-EC signal as tracer for the advective transport in the streambed and combine these with precise oxygen measurements. LTC Logger and optode based oxygen logger were installed in the stream and at 45cm depth beside an in-stream gravel bar. Streambed adapted probe rods with a screened section of 2 cm ensuring a minimized flow-through volume hold the loggers which were programmed to 5min interval measuring interval. Diurnal changes in the EC signal are considered to be quasi-conservative and were tracked in the subsurface. A windowed cross correlation approach was utilized to derive a time-resolved advective travel-time. Assuming a one dimensional flow-path from the stream into the sediment, the time-shift in the EC signal is interpreted as the peak travel time of a tracer breakthrough curve. Additionally a moving average filter of variable length was applied to the stream EC signal, to account for dispersion and further maximize the correlation. For obtaining an experimental respiration rate, the physical transport conditions are then applied to the oxygen data, assuming a first order decay. The results show that the natural EC signal is applicable as tracer, as long as the measurements show distinctive fluctuations. The cross correlation revealed transient travel times with a range between 1-7h (mean 4h) at the upstream and 8-18h (mean 11h) at the downstream location of the gravel bar. There are strong indications, that the stream

  4. Variability of Residence Time tracer Concentrations at the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory during the California Drought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Visser, A.; Thaw, M.; Stacy, E.; Hunsaker, C. T.; Bibby, R. K.; Deinhart, A.; Schorzman, K.; Egnatuk, C. M.; Conklin, M. H.; Esser, B.

    2015-12-01

    California water supply from high elevation snow melt is vulnerable to climate change and prolonged drought conditions. Reduced snow pack and earlier snow melt will result in a greater reliance on man-made reservoirs and subsurface catchment storage. To gain insight into the subsurface storage volume of high elevation catchments, we studied the residence time distribution of surface water leaving the Southern Sierra Critical Zone Observatory. Since October 2014, we have collected monthly samples of two residence time tracers with contrasting half-lives: sulfur-35 (87.5 days) and tritium (12.32 years). Upstream catchment area at the three nested sampling locations is 1 km2 (P301 sub-catchment), 4 km2 (Providence Creek) and ~50 km2 (Big Creek). Samples were analyzed at LLNL by low level liquid scintillation counting and noble gas mass spectrometry after helium accumulation. Variations in tracer concentrations in precipitation, both for tritium (11-24 pCi/L) and sulfur-35 (24-100 mBq/L), complicate straightforward interpretation of residence times. Sulfur-35 concentrations show that last year precipitation contributes 1% - 10% of total stream flow, even during peak snowmelt. Tritium concentrations in stream flow vary between 40% and 60% of the initial concentration in precipitation (15.5 pCi/L), indicating that water leaving the catchment has a residence time on the order of years to decades. Additional analyses of sodium-22 (2.6 year half-life) will aid in deconvoluting the residence time distribution. These low tracer concentrations can be attributed to current severe drought conditions, resulting in low discharge rates and longer residence times. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LLNL-ABS-675107

  5. Evaluating the role of soil variability on groundwater pollution and recharge at regional scale by integrating a process-based vadose zone model in a stochastic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coppola, Antonio; Comegna, Alessandro; Dragonetti, Giovanna; Lamaddalena, Nicola; Zdruli, Pandi

    2013-04-01

    Interpreting and predicting the evolution of water resources and soils at regional scale are continuing challenges for natural scientists. Examples include non-point source (NPS) pollution of soil and surface and subsurface water from agricultural chemicals and pathogens, as well as overexploitation of groundwater resources. The presence and build up of NPS pollutants may be harmful for both soil and groundwater resources. The accumulation of salts and trace elements in soils can significantly impact crop productivity, while loading of salts, nitrates, trace elements and pesticides into groundwater supplies can deteriorate a source of drinking and irrigation water. Consequently, predicting the spatial distribution and fate of NPS pollutants in soils at applicative scales is now considered crucial for maintaining the fragile balance between crop productivity and the negative environmental impacts of NPS pollutants, which is a basis of sustainable agriculture. Soil scientists and hydrologists are regularly asked to assist state agencies to understand these critical environmental issues. The most frequent inquiries are related to the development of mathematical models needed for analyzing the impacts of alternative land-use and best management use and management of soil and water resources. Different modelling solutions exist, mainly differing on the role of the vadose zone and its horizontal and vertical variability in the predictive models. The vadose zone (the region from the soil surface to the groundwater surface) is a complex physical, chemical and biological ecosystem that controls the passage of NPS pollutants from the soil surface where they have been deposited or accumulated due to agricultural activities, to groundwater. Physically based distributed hydrological models require the internal variability of the vadose zone be explored at a variety of scales. The equations describing fluxes and storage of water and solutes in the unsaturated zone used in these

  6. 25 CFR 11.702 - Proving and admitting will.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ORDER CODE Probate Proceedings § 11.702 Proving and admitting will. (a) Upon initiating the probate of... admitted to probate by filing an affidavit of an attesting witness which identifies such will as being the... probate, any person having an interest in the decedent's estate may contest the validity of such will....

  7. 25 CFR 11.702 - Proving and admitting will.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ORDER CODE Probate Proceedings § 11.702 Proving and admitting will. (a) Upon initiating the probate of... admitted to probate by filing an affidavit of an attesting witness which identifies such will as being the... probate, any person having an interest in the decedent's estate may contest the validity of such will....

  8. 25 CFR 11.702 - Proving and admitting will.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ORDER CODE Probate Proceedings § 11.702 Proving and admitting will. (a) Upon initiating the probate of... admitted to probate by filing an affidavit of an attesting witness which identifies such will as being the... probate, any person having an interest in the decedent's estate may contest the validity of such will....

  9. 25 CFR 11.702 - Proving and admitting will.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ORDER CODE Probate Proceedings § 11.702 Proving and admitting will. (a) Upon initiating the probate of... admitted to probate by filing an affidavit of an attesting witness which identifies such will as being the... probate, any person having an interest in the decedent's estate may contest the validity of such will....

  10. 25 CFR 11.702 - Proving and admitting will.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ORDER CODE Probate Proceedings § 11.702 Proving and admitting will. (a) Upon initiating the probate of... admitted to probate by filing an affidavit of an attesting witness which identifies such will as being the... probate, any person having an interest in the decedent's estate may contest the validity of such will....

  11. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  12. 27 CFR 71.65 - Answer admitting facts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Answer admitting facts. 71... Hearing Procedure Answers § 71.65 Answer admitting facts. If the respondent desires to waive the hearing on the allegations of fact set forth in the order to show cause, and does not contest the facts,...

  13. Variability of the carbonate system parameters in the coast-shelf zone of the East Siberian Sea during the autumn season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipko, I. I.; Semiletov, I. P.; Tishchenko, P. Ya.; Pugach, S. P.; Savel'Eva, N. I.

    2008-02-01

    The publication presents the results of the studies on the carbonate system of the waters of the East Siberian Sea performed aboard R/V Ivan Kireev in September 2003-2004. It is shown that the aquatic area considered may be subdivided into two biohydrochemical provinces. The western part of the sea is a CO2 supplier to the atmosphere, while its eastern part is a sink for CO2. This is caused by the fact that the western part of the East Siberian Sea was affected by the waters of the southeastern part of the Laptev Sea, which were desalinated by riverine runoff, turbid, and enriched in the bioactive organic matter supplied into the water due to the coastal (and bottom) erosion. In the eastern part, cold waters of Pacific origin prevailed (saline, transparent, and productive), which caused a pronounced decrease in the partial pressure of CO2( pCO2) in the surface layer. In the frontal zone delimiting the desalinated shelf waters and those of the Pacific origin, the direction of the CO2 flux between the atmosphere and the sea changed (from evasion to invasion). The interannual variability of the carbonate system parameters in the coastal-shelf zone of the East Siberian Sea was determined by the intensity of the propagation of the waters of different origins over the sea aquatic area caused by the atmospheric circulation, as well as by the riverine runoff intensity and the dynamics of erosion processes.

  14. Topological limit of gravity admitting an SU(2) connection formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihui; Montesinos, Merced; Perez, Alejandro

    2010-03-01

    We study the Hamiltonian formulation of the generally covariant theory defined by the Lagrangian 4-form L=eI∧eJ∧FIJ(ω), where eI is a tetrad field and FIJ is the curvature of a Lorentz connection ωIJ. This theory can be thought of as the limit of the Holst action for gravity for the Newton constant G→∞ and Immirzi parameter γ→0, while keeping the product Gγ fixed. This theory has for a long time been conjectured to be topological. We prove this statement both in the covariant phase space formulation as well as in the standard Dirac formulation. In the time gauge, the unconstrained phase space of theory admits an SU(2) connection formulation which makes it isomorphic to the unconstrained phase space of gravity in terms of Ashtekar-Barbero variables. Among possible physical applications, we argue that the quantization of this topological theory might shed new light on the nature of the degrees of freedom that are responsible for black entropy in loop quantum gravity.

  15. Refining a relativistic, hydrodynamic solver: Admitting ultra-relativistic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernstein, J. P.; Hughes, P. A.

    2009-09-01

    We have undertaken the simulation of hydrodynamic flows with bulk Lorentz factors in the range 102-106. We discuss the application of an existing relativistic, hydrodynamic primitive variable recovery algorithm to a study of pulsar winds, and, in particular, the refinement made to admit such ultra-relativistic flows. We show that an iterative quartic root finder breaks down for Lorentz factors above 102 and employ an analytic root finder as a solution. We find that the former, which is known to be robust for Lorentz factors up to at least 50, offers a 24% speed advantage. We demonstrate the existence of a simple diagnostic allowing for a hybrid primitives recovery algorithm that includes an automatic, real-time toggle between the iterative and analytical methods. We further determine the accuracy of the iterative and hybrid algorithms for a comprehensive selection of input parameters and demonstrate the latter’s capability to elucidate the internal structure of ultra-relativistic plasmas. In particular, we discuss simulations showing that the interaction of a light, ultra-relativistic pulsar wind with a slow, dense ambient medium can give rise to asymmetry reminiscent of the Guitar nebula leading to the formation of a relativistic backflow harboring a series of internal shockwaves. The shockwaves provide thermalized energy that is available for the continued inflation of the PWN bubble. In turn, the bubble enhances the asymmetry, thereby providing positive feedback to the backflow.

  16. The Lac Des Iles Palladium Deposit, Ontario, Canada part I. The effect of variable alteration on the Offset Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, Alan; Djon, Lionnel; Tchalikian, Arnaud; Corkery, John

    2014-06-01

    The recently discovered Offset Zone of the Mine Block Intrusion of the Lac des Iles Complex hosts palladium mineralization with unusually high Pd/Pt and Pd/Ir ratios in rocks that range from relatively unaltered norite to amphibolites and chlorite-actinolite-talc schist. Quantitative assessment of the effect of progressive alteration using mineral modes was done using total silicate H2O as a monitor of reaction progress ( ξ = moles H2O added to form alteration minerals per 100 g of rock). Major mineral modal variations define three reaction regions: (1) ξ = 0.00-0.03, characterized by epidote/clinozoisite formation and some amphibole; (2) ξ = 0.03-0.23, characterized by formation of chlorite, amphibole, quartz muscovite/sericite, and calcite after plagioclase + pyroxene; and (3) ξ = 0.23-0.28, characterized by the formation of talc after earlier formed amphibole. Epidote occurs as an incongruent product from the destruction of plagioclase that is itself lost as the reaction proceeds. Pyroxene is altered at about twice the rate of plagioclase, resulting in pyroxene-rich protoliths to be more altered than those relatively enriched in plagioclase. Major elements variations largely reflect variations in the plagioclase/pyroxene ratio of the protolith, but compositional trends suggest a loss of Na with reaction progress. The base metal sulfides chalcopyrite, pyrrhotite, and pentlandite show decreasing abundance with reaction progress, forming pyrite (± magnetite) as an intermediate reaction product that also is lost as the reaction proceeds. Millerite is overall low but increases slightly. A more limited data set on the platinum-group minerals suggests that platinum-group element (PGE)-arsenides increase whereas PGE-sulfides and PGE-Bi-tellurides decrease with reaction progress. Assuming ore element concentrations in the protolith were constant and similar to relatively fresh norites, Pd increases modestly, by 5 %, whereas Pt decreases by about 65 % in the most

  17. A Framework for Thinking about the Spatial Variability of Snow across Multiple Scales and Climate Zones (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturm, M.

    2010-12-01

    It is well known that snow on the ground (or on lake and sea ice) varies at a myriad of scales ranging from millimeters to hundreds of kilometers. Many studies have focused directly, or in part, on snow heterogeneity at one or more of these scales, but a consistent broad framework within which these studies can be placed has yet to be developed. Consequently, the overall approach to scaling issues and snow variability is disjoint and inefficient. Nevertheless, strong common threads unite these issues. At the finest scale within-layer variations always arise from vapor transport and snow metamorphism. Layer properties vary based on weather during deposition and following snowfall (winter history). At plot to landscape scales, micro and macro topography and vegetation interact with wind, solar irradience, melt water percolation, and gravity to produce lateral variations in depth and snow water equivalent. At the coarsest scales, synoptic and climate gradients produce facies changes in both layers and bulk snow cover characteristics that vary in predictable ways. Here a preliminary multi-scale framework for snow variations is suggested and its utility discussed. At the largest scale, the framework uses the snow climate classification as a first discriminator. These classes are divided into wind-affected vs. non-wind-affected snow. Landscape and local variations in topography are then superimposed on these coarser-scale variations. Because vegetation varies with both climate and topography, it correlates with, as well as drives variations snow property variations; it becomes the third discriminator. Using these discriminators, similarities in snow variations and critical inherent length scales of several types of snow covers are explored.

  18. Short-term variability and long-term change in the composition of the littoral zone fish community in Spirit Lake, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pierce, C.L.; Sexton, M.D.; Pelham, M.E.; Larscheid, J.G.

    2001-01-01

    We assessed short-term variability and long-term change in the composition of the littoral fish community in Spirit Lake, Iowa. Fish were sampled in several locations at night with large beach seines during spring, summer and fall of 1995-1998. Long-term changes were inferred from comparison with a similar study conducted over 70 y earlier in Spirit Lake. We found 26 species in the littoral zone. The number of species per sample ranged from 4 to 18, averaging 11.8. The average number of species per sample was higher at stations with greater vegetation density. A distinct seasonal pattern was evident in the number of species collected per sample in most years, increasing steadily from spring to fall. Patterns of variability within our 1995-1998 study period suggest that: (1) numerous samples are necessary to adequately characterize a littoral fish community, (2) sampling should be done when vegetation and young-of-year densities are highest and (3) sampling during a single year is inadequate to reveal the full community. The number of native species has declined by approximately 25% over the last 70 y. A coincident decline in littoral vegetation and associated habitat changes during the same period are likely causes of the long-term community change.

  19. Why are patients with acute stroke admitted to hospital?

    PubMed Central

    Bamford, J; Sandercock, P; Warlow, C; Gray, M

    1986-01-01

    Data on 515 consecutive patients registered with the Oxfordshire Community Stroke Project were used to compare the characteristics of those patients who were admitted to hospital within one month after their first stroke with those who remained in the community during that time. Twenty eight patients had their stroke while in hospital for other conditions, and of the remaining 487, 266 were admitted. Though patients with a severe neurological deficit were significantly more likely to be admitted, 47 out of 202 such patients were managed in the community. In a substudy of 162 consecutive patients the general practitioners' reasons for either arranging admission to hospital or continuing with community care in the first week after the stroke were ascertained. Sixty patients were admitted. The only reason for admission was diagnostic uncertainty in five cases (though this was a contributing factor in 25) and to provide nursing or general, non-medical care in 25. Patients who lived alone were more likely to be admitted. All 12 patients who presented directly to the casualty department were admitted, though only five had had a severe stroke. A stroke service that provides a facility for rapid outpatient and domiciliary diagnosis as well as a rapidly acting domiciliary nursing team might reduce the number of patients with stroke admitted to hospital without adversely affecting the quality of patient care: this should be properly evaluated. PMID:3085852

  20. Influence of climate variability on water partitioning and effective energy and mass transfer (EEMT) in a semi-arid critical zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapata-Rios, X.; Brooks, P. D.; Troch, P. A.; McIntosh, J.; Rasmussen, C.

    2015-08-01

    The Critical Zone (CZ) is the heterogeneous, near-surface layer of the planet that regulates life-sustaining resources. Previous research has demonstrated that a quantification of the influxes of effective energy and mass (EEMT) to the CZ can predict its structure and function. In this study, we quantify how climate variability in the last three decades (1984-2012) has affected water availability and the temporal trends in EEMT. This study takes place in the 1200 km2 upper Jemez River Basin in northern New Mexico. The analysis of climate, water availability, and EEMT was based on records from two high elevation SNOTEL stations, PRISM data, catchment scale discharge, and satellite derived net primary productivity (MODIS). Records from the two SNOTEL stations showed clear increasing trends in winter and annual temperatures (+1.0-1.3 °C decade-1; +1.2-1.4 °C decade-1, respectively), decreasing trends in winter and annual precipitation (-41.6-51.4 mm decade-1; -69.8-73.2 mm decade-1, respectively) and maximum Snow Water Equivalent (SWE; -33.1-34.7 mm decade-1). The water partitioning fluxes at the basin scale showed statistically significant decreasing trends in precipitation (-61.7 mm decade-1), discharge (-17.6 mm decade-1) and vaporization (-45.7 mm decade-1). Similarly Q50, an indicator of snowmelt timing, is occurring 4.3 days decade-1 earlier. Results from this study indicated a decreasing trend in water availability, a reduction in forest productivity (4 g C m-2 per 10 mm of reduction in Precipitation) and EEMT (1.2-1.3 MJ m2 decade-1). These changes in EEMT point towards a hotter, drier and less productive ecosystem which may alter critical zone processes in high elevation semi-arid systems.

  1. Fluids preserved in variably altered graphitic pelitic schists in the Dufferin Lake Zone, south-central Athabasca Basin, Canada: implications for graphite loss and uranium deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascal, Marjolaine; Boiron, Marie-Christine; Ansdell, Kevin; Annesley, Irvine R.; Kotzer, Tom; Jiricka, Dan; Cuney, Michel

    2016-06-01

    The Athabasca Basin (Canada) contains the highest grade unconformity-type uranium deposits in the world. Underlying the Athabasca Group sedimentary rocks of the Dufferin Lake Zone are variably graphitic, pelitic schists (VGPS), altered to chlorite and hematite (Red/Green Zone: RGZ). They were locally bleached near the unconformity during paleoweathering and/or later fluid interaction. Overall, graphite was lost from the RGZ and the bleached zone relative to the original VGPS. Fluid inclusions were examined in different generations of quartz veins, using microthermometry and Raman spectroscopy, to characterize and compare the different fluids that interacted with the RGZ and the VGPS. In the VGPS, CH4-, and N2-rich fluid inclusions, which homogenize into the vapor phase between -100 and -74 °C, and -152 and -125 °C, respectively, and CO2-rich fluid inclusions, homogenizing either into vapor or liquid between 20 and 28 °C, are present. Carbonic fluids could be the result of the breakdown of graphite to CH4 + CO2, whereas N2-rich fluid is interpreted to be the result of breakdown of feldspars/micas to NH4 ++N2. In the RGZ, the presence of fluid inclusions with low ice melting temperature (-38 to -16 °C) reflect the presence of CaCl2, and fluid inclusions with halite daughter minerals that dissolve between 190 and 240 °C indicate the presence of highly saline fluids. These fluids are interpreted to be derived from the Athabasca Basin. The circulation of carbonic fluids and brines occurred during two different events related to different P-T conditions of trapping. The carbonic fluids interacted with basement rocks during retrograde metamorphism of the basement rocks before deposition of the Athabasca Basin, whereas the brines circulated after the deposition of the Athabasca Basin. These latter fluids are similar to brines related to uranium mineralization at McArthur River and thus, in addition to possibly being related to graphite depletion in the RGZ, they could

  2. Growing season variability of net ecosystem CO2 exchange and evapotranspiration of a sphagnum mire in the broad-leaved forest zone of European Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olchev, A.; Volkova, E.; Karataeva, T.; Novenko, E.

    2013-09-01

    The spatial and temporal variability of net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of CO2 and evapotranspiration (ET) of a karst-hole sphagnum peat mire situated at the boundary between broad-leaved and forest-steppe zones in the central part of European Russia in the Tula region was described using results from field measurements. NEE and ET were measured using a portable measuring system consisting of a transparent ventilated chamber combined with an infrared CO2/H2O analyzer, LI-840A (Li-Cor, USA) along a transect from the southern peripheral part of the mire to its center under sunny clear-sky weather conditions in the period from May to September of 2012 and in May 2013. The results of the field measurements showed significant spatial and temporal variability of NEE and ET that was mainly influenced by incoming solar radiation and ground water level. The seasonal patterns of NEE and ET within the mire were quite different. During the entire growing season the central part of the mire was a sink of CO2 for the atmosphere. NEE reached maximal values in June-July (-6.8 ± 4.2 μmol m-2 s-1). The southern peripheral part of the mire, due to strong shading by the surrounding forest, was a sink of CO2 for the atmosphere in June-July only. ET reached maximal values in the well-lighted central parts of the mire in May (0.34 ± 0.20 mm h-1) mainly because of high air and surface temperatures and the very wet upper peat horizon and sphagnum moss. Herbaceous species made the maximum contribution to the total gross primary production (GPP) in both the central and the peripheral parts of the mire. The contribution of sphagnum to the total GPP of these plant communities was relatively small and ranged on sunny days of July-August from -1.1 ± 1.1 mgC g-1 of dry weight (DW) per hour in the peripheral zone of the mire to -0.6 ± 0.2 mgC g-1 DW h-1 at the mire center. The sphagnum layer made the maximum contribution to total ET at the mire center (0.25 ± 0.10 mm h-1) and the herbaceous

  3. Time Dependent Multi Zone Modeling of X-ray and Gamma-ray Variability of the TeV Blazar Mrk 421.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fossati, Giovanni; Chen, X.

    2010-03-01

    We present a new time-dependent multi-zone code and its first application to study the SSC emission of Blazar Mrk 421. The code couples Fokker-Planck and Monte Carlo methods. All the light travel time effects are fully considered, internal and external. It has long been realized that simple one-zone homogeneous models are not adequate to describe several aspects of the phenomenology, in particular those pertaining to the complex multiwavelength variability. Progress has been made by several groups but important trade-offs have always been necessary, such as neglecting internal light travel time or the inclusion of IC losses in the electron evolution. Our code fully accounts for all the relevant effects, and it also affords us significant freedom w.r.t. geometry and "variability". This latter is implemented as a shock traveling along the jet, with electrons being injected as it sweeps the blob. Results are compared with the 2001 observations of Mrk 421. We also analyzed cases including a pre-existing cospatial electron population contributing to the SED, and external radiation field. It seems to be possible to achieve adequate fits to the observations, but a there remain several open issues, such as a systematic soft X-ray intraband lag, and a delay of the gamma-ray flare with respect to the X-ray flare. The two principal challenges are: 1. The simulated VHE spectrum is always softer than the observed one. 2. The correlation between the TeV gamma-ray and X-ray does not reproduce the (super)quadratic relationship observed in multiple occasions. In fact we have not been able to reproduce anything close to it in this first suite of models. We will report also on the extension of the code, and case studies, to jet-in-jet and spine-layer configurations, as well as to the study of red blazars. We acknowledge support from Chandra Award AR9-0016X

  4. Unraveling the Drivers of Spatial and Temporal Variability in Biogeochemical Cycling at Aquifer-River Interfaces - The LEVERHULME Hyporheic Zone Research Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, Stefan

    2015-04-01

    While there has been substantial improvement of understanding hyporheic exchange flow and residence time controls on biogeochemical turnover rates, there is little knowledge of the actual drivers of the spatial and temporal variability of interlinked biogeochemical cycles. Previous research has mainly focused on bedform controlled hyporheic exchange and the transformation of surface solutes along a hyporheic flow path but failed to explain observations of spatially and temporally variable nutrient turnover in streambeds with higher structural heterogeneity and autochthonous carbon and nitrogen sources. The "Leverhulme Hyporheic Zone Research Network" has developed an interdisciplinary strategy for investigating the physical controls on hyporheic exchange fluxes and residence time distributions, heat and reactive solute transport along biogeographical and catchment gradients. This strategy combines smart tracer applications with distributed sensor networks in multi-scale nested monitoring schemes and numerical model studies to investigate the interactions between physico-chemical process dynamics and hyporheic microbial, invertebrate and macrophyte ecology. Investigations integrating the process knowledge from mesocosms to artificial channels and stream reaches highlight the impact of small-scale streambed structure on spatial patterns of hyporheic exchange flow, residence time distribution and the development of biogeochemical hotspots. Manipulation studies inhibiting flow through dominant hyporheic exchange flow paths allowed to quantify the functional significance, sensitivity and resilience of biogeochemical, microbial and ecological functioning of identified hyporheic hotspots to environmental change. Further discharge and stage manipulations proved to not only control in-channel macrophyte growth but also temperature patterns and residence time distributions as well as microbial metabolic activity and biogeochemical processing rates, highlighting the potential

  5. Mapping and assessing variability in the Antarctic marginal ice zone, pack ice and coastal polynyas in two sea ice algorithms with implications on breeding success of snow petrels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroeve, Julienne C.; Jenouvrier, Stephanie; Campbell, G. Garrett; Barbraud, Christophe; Delord, Karine

    2016-08-01

    Sea ice variability within the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and polynyas plays an important role for phytoplankton productivity and krill abundance. Therefore, mapping their spatial extent as well as seasonal and interannual variability is essential for understanding how current and future changes in these biologically active regions may impact the Antarctic marine ecosystem. Knowledge of the distribution of MIZ, consolidated pack ice and coastal polynyas in the total Antarctic sea ice cover may also help to shed light on the factors contributing towards recent expansion of the Antarctic ice cover in some regions and contraction in others. The long-term passive microwave satellite data record provides the longest and most consistent record for assessing the proportion of the sea ice cover that is covered by each of these ice categories. However, estimates of the amount of MIZ, consolidated pack ice and polynyas depend strongly on which sea ice algorithm is used. This study uses two popular passive microwave sea ice algorithms, the NASA Team and Bootstrap, and applies the same thresholds to the sea ice concentrations to evaluate the distribution and variability in the MIZ, the consolidated pack ice and coastal polynyas. Results reveal that the seasonal cycle in the MIZ and pack ice is generally similar between both algorithms, yet the NASA Team algorithm has on average twice the MIZ and half the consolidated pack ice area as the Bootstrap algorithm. Trends also differ, with the Bootstrap algorithm suggesting statistically significant trends towards increased pack ice area and no statistically significant trends in the MIZ. The NASA Team algorithm on the other hand indicates statistically significant positive trends in the MIZ during spring. Potential coastal polynya area and amount of broken ice within the consolidated ice pack are also larger in the NASA Team algorithm. The timing of maximum polynya area may differ by as much as 5 months between algorithms. These

  6. A prospective registry of emergency department patients admitted with infection

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Patients with infections account for a significant proportion of Emergency Department (ED) workload, with many hospital patients admitted with severe sepsis initially investigated and resuscitated in the ED. The aim of this registry is to systematically collect quality observational clinical and microbiological data regarding emergency patients admitted with infection, in order to explore in detail the microbiological profile of these patients, and to provide the foundation for a significant programme of prospective observational studies and further clinical research. Methods/design ED patients admitted with infection will be identified through daily review of the computerised database of ED admissions, and clinical information such as site of infection, physiological status in the ED, and components of management abstracted from patients' charts. This information will be supplemented by further data regarding results of investigations, microbiological isolates, and length of stay (LOS) from hospital electronic databases. Outcome measures will be hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) LOS, and mortality endpoints derived from a national death registry. Discussion This database will provide substantial insights into the characteristics, microbiological profile, and outcomes of emergency patients admitted with infections. It will become the nidus for a programme of research into compliance with evidence-based guidelines, optimisation of empiric antimicrobial regimens, validation of clinical decision rules and identification of outcome determinants. The detailed observational data obtained will provide a solid baseline to inform the design of further controlled trials planned to optimise treatment and outcomes for emergency patients admitted with infections. PMID:21269438

  7. Nitrate and Nitrite Variability at the Seafloor of an Oxygen Minimum Zone Revealed by a Novel Microfluidic In-Situ Chemical Sensor

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Mustafa; Beaton, Alexander D.; Dengler, Marcus; Mowlem, Matthew C.; Sohl, Frank; Sommer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) is a promising technology that allows the development of miniaturized chemical sensors. In contrast to the surging interest in biomedical sciences, the utilization of LOC sensors in aquatic sciences is still in infancy but a wider use of such sensors could mitigate the undersampling problem of ocean biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the first underwater test of a novel LOC sensor to obtain in situ calibrated time-series (up to 40 h) of nitrate+nitrite (ΣNOx) and nitrite on the seafloor of the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone, offshore Western Africa. Initial tests showed that the sensor successfully reproduced water column (160 m) nutrient profiles. Lander deployments at 50, 100 and 170 m depth indicated that the biogeochemical variability was high over the Mauritanian shelf: The 50 m site had the lowest ΣNOx concentration, with 15.2 to 23.4 μM (median=18.3 μM); while at the 100 site ΣNOx varied between 21.0 and 30.1 μM over 40 hours (median = 25.1μM). The 170 m site had the highest median ΣNOx level (25.8 μM) with less variability (22.8 to 27.7 μM). At the 50 m site, nitrite concentration decreased fivefold from 1 to 0.2 μM in just 30 hours accompanied by decreasing oxygen and increasing nitrate concentrations. Taken together with the time series of oxygen, temperature, pressure and current velocities, we propose that the episodic intrusion of deeper waters via cross-shelf transport leads to intrusion of nitrate-rich, but oxygen-poor waters to shallower locations, with consequences for benthic nitrogen cycling. This first validation of an LOC sensor at elevated water depths revealed that when deployed for longer periods and as a part of a sensor network, LOC technology has the potential to contribute to the understanding of the benthic biogeochemical dynamics. PMID:26161958

  8. Nitrate and Nitrite Variability at the Seafloor of an Oxygen Minimum Zone Revealed by a Novel Microfluidic In-Situ Chemical Sensor.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Mustafa; Beaton, Alexander D; Dengler, Marcus; Mowlem, Matthew C; Sohl, Frank; Sommer, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Microfluidics, or lab-on-a-chip (LOC) is a promising technology that allows the development of miniaturized chemical sensors. In contrast to the surging interest in biomedical sciences, the utilization of LOC sensors in aquatic sciences is still in infancy but a wider use of such sensors could mitigate the undersampling problem of ocean biogeochemical processes. Here we describe the first underwater test of a novel LOC sensor to obtain in situ calibrated time-series (up to 40 h) of nitrate+nitrite (ΣNOx) and nitrite on the seafloor of the Mauritanian oxygen minimum zone, offshore Western Africa. Initial tests showed that the sensor successfully reproduced water column (160 m) nutrient profiles. Lander deployments at 50, 100 and 170 m depth indicated that the biogeochemical variability was high over the Mauritanian shelf: The 50 m site had the lowest ΣNOx concentration, with 15.2 to 23.4 μM (median=18.3 μM); while at the 100 site ΣNOx varied between 21.0 and 30.1 μM over 40 hours (median = 25.1 μM). The 170 m site had the highest median ΣNOx level (25.8 μM) with less variability (22.8 to 27.7 μM). At the 50 m site, nitrite concentration decreased fivefold from 1 to 0.2 μM in just 30 hours accompanied by decreasing oxygen and increasing nitrate concentrations. Taken together with the time series of oxygen, temperature, pressure and current velocities, we propose that the episodic intrusion of deeper waters via cross-shelf transport leads to intrusion of nitrate-rich, but oxygen-poor waters to shallower locations, with consequences for benthic nitrogen cycling. This first validation of an LOC sensor at elevated water depths revealed that when deployed for longer periods and as a part of a sensor network, LOC technology has the potential to contribute to the understanding of the benthic biogeochemical dynamics.

  9. Risk Factors for Worsening of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients Admitted with Mild Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Zhouxiang; Xu, Lubai; Wang, Xiangyu; Yang, Dinghua

    2017-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for developing more severe pancreatitis, including moderately severe (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), in patients admitted with mild acute pancreatitis (MAP). Material/Methods Patients admitted with MAP to our hospital from March 2013 to May 2016 were included and prospectively evaluated. Possible risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP were age, blood glucose level on admission, etiology, sex, Ranson score, amylase level, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) scores, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, serum calcium level, visceral fat area (VFA), body mass index (BMI), whether this was the first episode of AP, and method of administration of octreotide. The effects of variables for developing MSAP or SAP were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Mortality, hospital duration, and rate of ICU transfer of patients were compared between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and patients who did not. Results A total of 602 patients admitted with MAP were recruited into this study (256 men and 346 women). Seventy-four patients (12.3%) developed MSAP or SAP. According to univariate logistic regression analyses, the results indicated that there were 5 significant differences between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and those who did not: VFA (>100 cm2) (p=0.003), BMI (≥25 kg/m2) (p=0.001), Ranson score(p=0.004), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.040). Further multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BMI (≥25 kg/m2) (p=0.005), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.004) were independent risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP. Moreover, patients who developed MSAP or SAP had a mortality rate of 5.4%. Conclusions Significant risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP

  10. Risk Factors for Worsening of Acute Pancreatitis in Patients Admitted with Mild Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Jin, Zhouxiang; Xu, Lubai; Wang, Xiangyu; Yang, Dinghua

    2017-02-26

    BACKGROUND The aim of the present study was to investigate risk factors for developing more severe pancreatitis, including moderately severe (MSAP) and severe acute pancreatitis (SAP), in patients admitted with mild acute pancreatitis (MAP). MATERIAL AND METHODS Patients admitted with MAP to our hospital from March 2013 to May 2016 were included and prospectively evaluated. Possible risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP were age, blood glucose level on admission, etiology, sex, Ranson score, amylase level, Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) scores, C-reactive protein (CRP) level, serum calcium level, visceral fat area (VFA), body mass index (BMI), whether this was the first episode of AP, and method of administration of octreotide. The effects of variables for developing MSAP or SAP were evaluated using univariate and multivariate logistic regression models. Mortality, hospital duration, and rate of ICU transfer of patients were compared between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and patients who did not. RESULTS A total of 602 patients admitted with MAP were recruited into this study (256 men and 346 women). Seventy-four patients (12.3%) developed MSAP or SAP. According to univariate logistic regression analyses, the results indicated that there were 5 significant differences between patients who developed MSAP or SAP and those who did not: VFA (>100 cm²) (p=0.003), BMI (≥25 kg/m²) (p=0.001), Ranson score(p=0.004), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.040). Further multivariate logistic regression analyses revealed that BMI (≥25 kg/m²) (p=0.005), APACHE-II (≥5) (p=0.001), and blood glucose level on admission (>11.1 mmol/L) (p=0.004) were independent risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted with MAP. Moreover, patients who developed MSAP or SAP had a mortality rate of 5.4%. CONCLUSIONS Significant risk factors for developing MSAP or SAP in patients admitted

  11. Predictors of suicide in the patient population admitted to a locked-door psychiatric acute ward

    PubMed Central

    Fosse, Roar; Ryberg, Wenche; Carlsson, Merete Kvalsvik; Hammer, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Objective No prior study appears to have focused on predictors of suicide in the general patient population admitted to psychiatric acute wards. We used a case-control design to investigate the association between suicide risk factors assessed systematically at admission to a locked-door psychiatric acute ward in Norway and subsequent death by suicide. Method From 2008 to 2013, patients were routinely assessed for suicide risk upon admission to the acute ward with a 17-item check list based on recommendations from the Norwegian Directorate of Health and Social Affairs. Among 1976 patients admitted to the ward, 40 patients, 22 men and 18 women, completed suicide within December 2014. Results Compared to a matched control group (n = 120), after correction for multiple tests, suicide completers scored significantly higher on two items on the check list: presence of suicidal thoughts and wishing to be dead. An additional four items were significant in non-corrected tests: previous suicide attempts, continuity of suicidal thoughts, having a suicide plan, and feelings of hopelessness, indifference, and/or aggression. A brief scale based on these six items was the only variable associated with suicide in multivariate regression analysis, but its predictive value was poor. Conclusion Suicide specific ideations may be the most central risk markers for suicide in the general patient population admitted to psychiatric acute wards. However, a low predictive value may question the utility of assessing suicide risk. PMID:28301590

  12. Outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Alice Mânica; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Silva, Denise Rossato

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units and assess their clinical and demographic profiles. Methods Retrospective, analytical, observational study, wherein the outcomes for patients diagnosed with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit of university hospital from January 2010 until February 2011 were evaluated. Results Thirty-four patients' medical records were included. Twenty-six (76.5%) patients received some type of ventilatory support, of whom 21 (61.8%) used invasive mechanical ventilation and 11 (32.4%) used noninvasive ventilation at some point during their stay at the intensive care unit. Regarding mortality, 12 (35.3%) patients died during hospitalization at the intensive care unit, totaling 15 (44.1%) deaths during the entire hospitalization period; 19 (55.9%) patients were discharged from the hospital. The analysis of the variables showed that the patients who died had remained on invasive mechanical ventilation for a longer period 5.0 (0.25 to 15.0) days than the survivors (1.0 (0 to 1.0) days) (p=0.033) and underwent dialysis during their stay at the intensive care unit (p=0.014). Conclusions The mortality of patients with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit is associated with the time spent on invasive mechanical ventilation and the need for dialysis. PMID:23887754

  13. Admitting Failure (With a Little Help from My Friends)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Teachers who are no longer considered novices can have a difficult time admitting failures. There is an expectation that teachers should be "on" all the time, but disorientation can happen even to veteran teachers--or maybe especially to veteran teachers--if expectations are too high. Sarah Cooper, an experienced teacher and dean of…

  14. Wormhole supported by dark energy admitting conformal motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhar, Piyali; Rahaman, Farook; Manna, Tuhina; Banerjee, Ayan

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we study the possibility of sustaining static and spherically symmetric traversable wormhole geometries admitting conformal motion in Einstein gravity, which presents a more systematic approach to search a relation between matter and geometry. In wormhole physics, the presence of exotic matter is a fundamental ingredient and we show that this exotic source can be dark energy type which support the existence of wormhole spacetimes. In this work we model a wormhole supported by dark energy which admits conformal motion. We also discuss the possibility of the detection of wormholes in the outer regions of galactic halos by means of gravitational lensing. Studies of the total gravitational energy for the exotic matter inside a static wormhole configuration are also performed.

  15. Safety Zones

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These are established primarily to reduce the accidental spread of hazardous substances by workers or equipment from contaminated areas to clean areas. They include the exclusion (hot) zone, contamination reduction (warm) zone, and support (cold) zone.

  16. The structure of Leibniz superalgebras admitting a multiplicative basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, Helena; Barreiro, Elisabete; Calderón Martín, Antonio J.; Sánchez Delgado, José M.

    2016-12-01

    In the literature, most of the descriptions of different classes of Leibniz superalgebras (L =L0bar ⊕L1bar , [ ṡ , ṡ ]) have been made by giving the multiplication table on the elements of a graded basis B ={vk } k ∈ K of L, in such a way that for any i , j ∈ K we have [vi ,vj ] =λi,j [vj ,vi ] ∈ Fvk for some k ∈ K, where F denotes the base field and λi,j ∈ F. In order to give a unifying viewpoint of all these classes of algebras we introduce the category of Leibniz superalgebras admitting a multiplicative basis and study its structure. We show that if a Leibniz superalgebra L =L0bar ⊕L1bar admits a multiplicative basis then it is the direct sum L =⨁αIα with any Iα =I α , 0 bar ⊕I α , 1 bar being a well described ideal of L admitting a multiplicative basis inherited from B. Also the B-simplicity of L is characterized in terms of J-connections.

  17. Ultraviolet-Visible and Fluorescence Analyses Reveal the Spatial and Seasonal Variability of Dissolved Organic Matter through the Vadose Zone to Groundwater at the Rifle, Colorado River Floodplain Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, W.; Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Gilbert, B.; Kim, Y.; Williams, K. H.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) is a complex and poorly understood mixture of natural organic compounds that play important roles in terrestrial C transport and biogeochemical cycles, and its reactivity makes it sensitive to seasonal variations and longer term climate change. As a component within the LBNL Science Focus Area 2.0, this study is designed to determine the spatial and temporal variability of DOM concentrations and characteristics throughout the vadose zone and groundwater within a semi-arid floodplain at Rifle, Colorado. Three sets of vertically stratified pore water samplers and wells were installed along a groundwater flow transect. These installations allowed acquisition of vertically- and temporally-resolved pore water samples from the vadose zone, capillary fringe, and saturated zone from April 2013 to May 2014. Ultraviolet-visible absorbance (UVA) and fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy are being applied to trace the changes in DOM characteristics. Initial results indicate that the aromatic C contents (%) of DOM vary with depth and season and exhibit patterns distinct from groundwater. EEM analysis identified fulvic- and humic-like substances as the major fluorescent components of DOM in pore water samples. The concentrations of fulvic- and humic-like matter decreases with depth within the vadose zone, and increases from Spring and Summer to Fall, then decreases in Winter. The trend is consistent with UVA results. Microbial by-product-like components in DOM show higher concentrations in the vadose zone, and decrease from Spring to Winter. Fulvic- and humic-like substances are the only detectable fluorophore components in the groundwater samples. The results from both UVA and EEM suggest that (1) aromatic C or fulvic- and humic-like matter are preferentially adsorbed within shallower sediments during transport; and (2) microbial transformations of DOM composition may occur in the vadose zone, particularly during late Spring

  18. The Content of Plasma Selenium in Early Admitted Septic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Moghaddam, Omid Moradi; Lahiji, Mohammad Niakan; Moghaddas, Azadeh; Farasatinasab, Maryam; Nasiripour, Somayyeh

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Selenium depletion has been reported in critical illness correlates with an increase in mortality and morbidity. In this study, we aimed to access the selenium plasma levels of septic patients early at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission in order to compare with reference range. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study in a university affiliated hospital aiming to assess the early plasma level of selenium in ICU admitted patients. eighty patients diagnoses with sepsis were included and considered for characteristic evaluation, monitoring criteria assessment and also blood sampling. All blood sampling was performed during 48 hours of the ICU admission in order to determined the plasma Selenium level by atomic absorption method. Findings: The mean plasma levels of selenium in male and female was 98.14 ± 23.52 and 78.1 ± 24.46 μ/L, respectively. Although selenium plasma levels was higher in the ICU male patients significantly, both had near normal range (80 μ/L). Conclusion: In this study we found that in early admitted Iranian ICU patients in Tehran, selenium deficiency has not routinely seen but probably will happen during ICU hospitalization. PMID:28331867

  19. Briefing notes on propulsion stability codes ADMIT, NYQUIST, and SSFREQ

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. C.

    1992-01-01

    The piping in a liquid rocket can assume complex configurations due to multiple tanks, multiple engines, and structures that piping must go around. The capability to handle some of these complex configurations have been incorporated into the Low Frequency Code (ADMIT), the Nyquist Code (NYQUIST), and the Intermediate Frequency code (SSFREQ). The capability to modify the input on line has been implemented. The configurations allowed include multiple tanks, multiple engines, and the splitting of a pipe into unequal segments going to different (or the same) engines. Straight pipes, bends, inline accumulators, tuned stubs, Helmholtz resonators, parallel resonators, and pumps are the types of piping that may be used. The three codes require the computation of admittance looking toward the tank. Therefore, they all have a number of similar routines for reading in the tank, piping, and engine descriptions. They also have similar routines for computing the admittance looking toward the tank. ADMIT uses only one type of feedline, either a LOX or FUEL line. NYQUIST can use no feedlines, one feedline (either LOX or FUEL), or two feedlines (both LOX and FUEL). SSFREQ requires both feedlines to be present (LOX and FUEL). The common features of the three codes are discussed first, with two sample runs described. Then each of the three codes are discussed along with the sample runs. Several on-line variations are suggested for the second sample run. Input descriptions and the input for the sample runs are given in the appendices.

  20. Vulnerabilities of children admitted to a pediatric inpatient care unit☆

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Larissa Natacha; Breigeiron, Márcia Koja; Hallmann, Sofia; Witkowski, Maria Carolina

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the vulnerabilities of children admitted to a pediatric inpatient unit of a university hospital. METHODS: Cross-sectional, descriptive study from April to September 2013 with36 children aged 30 days to 12 years old, admitted to medical-surgical pediatric inpatient units of a university hospital and their caregivers. Data concerning sociocultural, socioeconomic and clinical context of children and their families were collected by interview with the child caregiver and from patients, records, and analyzed by descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Of the total sample, 97.1% (n=132) of children had at least one type of vulnerability, the majority related to the caregiver's level of education, followed by caregiver's financial situation, health history of the child, caregiver's family situation, use of alcohol, tobacco, and illicit drugs by the caregiver, family's living conditions, caregiver's schooling, and bonding between the caregiver and the child. Only 2.9% (n=4) of the children did not show any criteria to be classified in a category of vulnerability. CONCLUSIONS: Most children were classified has having a social vulnerability. It is imperative to create networks of support between the hospital and the primary healthcare service to promote healthcare practices directed to the needs of the child and family. PMID:25511001

  1. Overriding plate deformation and variability of fore-arc deformation during subduction: Insight from geodynamic models and application to the Calabria subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Schellart, Wouter P.; Duarte, João. C.

    2015-10-01

    In nature, subducting slabs and overriding plate segments bordering subduction zones are generally embedded within larger plates. Such large plates can impose far-field boundary conditions that influence the style of subduction and overriding plate deformation. Here we present dynamic laboratory models of progressive subduction in three-dimensional space, in which the far-field boundary conditions at the trailing edges of the subducting plate (SP) and overriding plate (OP) are varied. Four configurations are presented: Free (both plates free), SP-Fixed, OP-Fixed, and SP-OP-Fixed. We investigate their impact on the kinematics and dynamics of subduction, particularly focusing on overriding plate deformation. The results indicate that the variation in far-field boundary conditions has an influence on the slab geometry, subduction partitioning, and trench migration partitioning. Our models also indicate that in natural (narrow) subduction zones, assuming a homogeneous overriding plate, the formation of back-arc basins (e.g., Tyrrhenian Sea, Aegean Sea, and Scotia Sea) is generally expected to occur at a comparable location (250-700 km from the trench), irrespective of the boundary condition. In addition, our models indicate that the style of fore-arc deformation (shortening or extension) is influenced by the mobility of the overriding plate through controlling the force normal to the subduction zone interface (trench suction). Our geodynamic model that uses the SP-OP-Fixed setup is comparable to the Calabria subduction zone with respect to subduction kinematics, slab geometry, trench curvature, and accretionary configuration. Furthermore, the model can explain back-arc and fore-arc extension at the Calabria subduction zone since the latest middle Miocene as a consequence of subduction of the narrow Calabrian slab and the immobility of the subducting African plate and overriding Eurasian plate. This setting induced strong trench suction, driving fore-arc extension, and

  2. Thyroid function status and its impact on clinical outcome in patients admitted to critical care

    PubMed Central

    Qari, Faiza A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze alterations in thyroid function and the correlation between results of thyroid function test and mortality in medical and surgical intensive care unit (ICU) patients. It also aimed to evaluate the effect of thyroid dysfunction in ICU patients and their need for mechanical ventilation (MV). Methods: A single-center, prospective, observational study was conducted on patients admitted to medical and surgical ICU between 2013-2014.. Clinical and paraclinical findings (free triiodothyronine, free thyroxine and thyroid stimulating hormone) were documented for all patients. Regression analysis and chi-square were used for death and MV outcome variables. Results: We included 502 patients. Of these, 340 (67.7%) were admitted to the medical ICU. Results of thyroid function tests were normal in 320 (64%) and 162 (32.3%) medical and surgical ICU patients, respectively. Euthyroid sick syndrome (ESS) was documented in 86 patients (17%). Mortality was twice higher among surgical ICU patients with ESS compared to those with normal thyroid function (p=0.085), which is not statistically significant. Based on thyroid function status, no differences in the risk to be mechanically ventilated was found between medical or surgical ICU patients. Conclusion: There is a significant association between ESS and mortality in ICU patients. Future studies should determine whether abnormal thyroid function increases the risk for MV in ICU patients. PMID:26430429

  3. New algorithm of mortality risk prediction for cardiovascular patients admitted in intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Moridani, Mohammad Karimi; Setarehdan, Seyed Kamaledin; Nasrabadi, Ali Motie; Hajinasrollah, Esmaeil

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Recognizing and managing of admitted patients in intensive care unit (ICU) with high risk of mortality is important for maximizing the patient’s outcomes and minimizing the costs. This study is based on linear and nonlinear analysis of heart rate variability (HRV) to design a classifier for mortality prediction of cardio vascular patients admitted to ICU. Methods: In this study we evaluated 90 cardiovascular ICU patients (45 males and 45 females). Linear and nonlinear features of HRV include SDNN, NN50, low frequency (LF), high frequency (HF), correlation dimension, approximate entropy; detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) and Poincaré plot were analyzed. Paired sample t-test was used for statistical comparison. Finally, we fed these features to the Multi-Layer Perceptron (MLP) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs) to find a robust classification method to classify the patients with low risk and high risk of death. Results: Almost all HRV features measuring heart rate complexity were significantly decreased in the episode of half-hour before death. The results generated based on SVM and MLP classifiers show that SVM classifier is enable to distinguish high and low risk episodes with the total classification sensitivity, specificity, positive productivity and accuracy rate of 97.3%, 98.1%, 92.5% and 99.3%, respectively. Conclusions: The results of the current study suggest that nonlinear features of the HRV signals could be show nonlinear dynamics. PMID:26309114

  4. Stable phantom-energy wormholes admitting conformal motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhfittig, Peter K. F.

    It has been argued that wormholes are as good a prediction of Einstein’s theory as black holes but the theoretical construction requires a reverse strategy, specifying the desired geometric properties of the wormhole and leaving open the determination of the stress-energy tensor. We begin by confirming an earlier result by the author showing that a complete wormhole solution can be obtained by adopting the equation of state p = ωρ and assuming that the wormhole admits a one-parameter group of conformal motions. The main purpose of this paper is to use the assumption of conformal symmetry to show that the wormhole is stable to linearized radial perturbations whenever ‑ 1.5 < ω < ‑1.

  5. Butaclamol in newly admitted chronic schizophrenic patients: a modified fixed-dose dose-range design.

    PubMed

    Clark, M L; Costiloe, J P; Wood, F; Paredes, A; Fulkerson, F G

    1977-11-01

    In a double-blind placebo controlled study of newly admitted chronic schizophrenics, an attempt was made to further evaluate the safety, acceptability, and effectiveness of BT in doses of 10, 20, and 40 mg. Significant dose related responses occurred on several behavioral variables by the first week of treatment. Maximum clinical response appeared to be at the 20-40 mg. dose level. Extrapyramidal signs occurred at all doses, but with greater severity at higher doses. Excessive daytime drowsiness occurred in all groups but with longer duration and greater intensity in the 20 mg. group. Rebound insomnia occurred after the abrupt withdrawal of BT at all dose levels suggesting the desirability of further study of its hypnotic properties.

  6. Subduction of fracture zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantin Manea, Vlad; Gerya, Taras; Manea, Marina; Zhu, Guizhi; Leeman, William

    2013-04-01

    Since Wilson proposed in 1965 the existence of a new class of faults on the ocean floor, namely transform faults, the geodynamic effects and importance of fracture zone subduction is still little studied. It is known that oceanic plates are characterized by numerous fracture zones, and some of them have the potential to transport into subduction zones large volumes of water-rich serpentinite, providing a fertile water source for magma generated in subduction-related arc volcanoes. In most previous geodynamic studies, subducting plates are considered to be homogeneous, and there is no clear indication how the subduction of a fracture zone influences the melting pattern in the mantle wedge and the slab-derived fluids distribution in the subarc mantle. Here we show that subduction of serpentinized fracture zones plays a significant role in distribution of melt and fluids in the mantle wedge above the slab. Using high-resolution tree-dimensional coupled petrological-termomechanical simulations of subduction, we show that fluids, including melts and water, vary dramatically in the region where a serpentinized fracture zone enters into subduction. Our models show that substantial hydration and partial melting tend to concentrate where fracture zones are being subducted, creating favorable conditions for partially molten hydrous plumes to develop. These results are consistent with the along-arc variability in magma source compositions and processes in several regions, as the Aleutian Arc, the Cascades, the Southern Mexican Volcanic Arc, and the Andean Southern Volcanic Zone.

  7. Origins of streamflow in a crystalline basement catchment in a sub-humid Sudanian zone: The Donga basin (Benin, West Africa): Inter-annual variability of water budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Séguis, L.; Kamagaté, B.; Favreau, G.; Descloitres, M.; Seidel, J.-L.; Galle, S.; Peugeot, C.; Gosset, M.; Le Barbé, L.; Malinur, F.; Van Exter, S.; Arjounin, M.; Boubkraoui, S.; Wubda, M.

    2011-05-01

    SummaryDuring the last quarter of the 20th century, West Africa underwent a particularly intense and generalized drought. During this period, the biggest drops in streamflow were observed in the Sudanian zone rather than in the Sahelian zone, but the reasons are still poorly understood. In 2000, a meso-scale hydrological observatory was set up in the sub-humid Sudanian zone of the Upper Ouémé Valley (Benin). Three embedded catchments of 12-586 km 2 located on a crystalline bedrock were intensively instrumented to document the different terms of the water budget and to identify the main streamflow generating processes and base-flow mechanisms at different scales. Geophysical, hydrological and geochemical data were collected throughout the catchments from 2002 to 2006. Crossing these data helped define their hydrological functioning. The region has seasonal streamflow, and the permanent groundwater in the weathered mantle does not drain to rivers, instead, seasonal perched groundwaters are the major contributor to annual streamflow. The perched groundwaters are mainly located in seasonally waterlogged sandy layers in the headwater bottom-lands called bas-fonds in French-speaking West Africa of 1st order streams. During the period 2003-2006, regolith groundwater recharge ranged between 10% and 15% of the annual rainfall depth. Depletion of permanent groundwater during the dry season is probably explained by local evapotranspiration which was seen not to be limited to gallery forests. During the 4-year study period, a reduction of 20% in annual rainfall led to a 50% reduction in streamflow. This reduction was observed in the two components of the flow: direct runoff and drainage of perched groundwater. Thanks to the comprehensive dataset obtained, the results obtained for the Donga experimental catchment are now being extrapolated to the whole upper Ouémé valley, which can be considered as representative of sub-humid Sudanian rivers flowing on a crystalline

  8. Pattern of Pulmonary Involvement and Outcome of Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients with Altered Consciousness Admitted in Dhaka Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, R A; Azad, A K; Sardar, H; Siddiqui, M R; Saad, S; Rahman, S; Sikder, A S

    2016-01-01

    Aspiration is well recognized as a cause of pulmonary disease and is not uncommon in patients with altered consciousness.The mortality rate of aspiration pneumonia is approximately 1% in outpatient setting and upto 25% in those requiring hospitalization. This study was done to see the pattern of pulmonary involvement and outcome of aspiration pneumonia in patients with altered consciousness admitted in medicine department of a tertiary care hospital in our country. This was a prospective observational study conducted among the 52 adult patients of aspiration pneumonia with altered consciousness admitted in the medicine department of Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH), during June 2010 to December 2010. Aspiration pneumonia was confirmed by clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Hematologic measurements (TC of WBC, Hb%, ESR, platelet count), chest X-ray, blood gas analysis, blood urea, creatinine and random blood sugar, sputum for Gram staining, sputum for culture sensitivity and blood culture were done in all patients.Assessment of altered conscious patient was done by application of the Glasgow Coma Scale. Case record forms with appropriate questionnaire were filled for all patients. The mean±SD age was 57.42±13.63 years with ranged from 25 to 90 years. Out of 52 patients, 37(71.15%) patients were male and 15(28.85%) patients were female. Following aspiration 76.92% patients developed pneumonitis, 13.46% patients developed lung abscess and only 9.62% patients developed ARDS. Most (33) of the patients had opacity in right lower zone and 13 patients had opacity in the left lower zone, 6 patients had opacity in right mid zone. Only 10 patients had opacity in both lower zones. In this study overall mortality rate was 23%. If only one lobe was involved radiologically, mortality was 8.33%. If two or more lobes on one or both sides were involved, mortality was in the range of 25-91%.

  9. Interactions between seasonality and oceanic forcing drive the phytoplankton variability in the tropical-temperate transition zone (~ 30°S) of Eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armbrecht, Linda H.; Schaeffer, Amandine; Roughan, Moninya; Armand, Leanne K.

    2015-04-01

    The East Australian Current (EAC) has been shown to be warming rapidly, which is expected to cause latitudinal shifts in phytoplankton abundance, distribution and composition along the east Australian coast. Yet a lack of phytoplankton information exists northward of 34°S. Here, we provide the first detailed taxonomic time-series survey (monthly sampling for about one annual cycle, 2011-2012) in the east Australian tropical-temperate transition zone (~ 30°S, upstream of the EAC separation point at ~ 31-32°S). All phytoplankton (categorised depending on their association with specific water-types) show a seasonal signal with abundance maxima (minima) during summer (winter). This seasonal signal is most pronounced in the seasonal/bloom category and least expressed by deep-water taxa, which prefer cold, saline and dense bottom water independent of the season. Different extents of EAC encroachment onto the continental shelf drive the cross-shelf phytoplankton composition and distribution, such that a weak EAC is associated with phytoplankton community being organised along 'depth' and 'distance from the coast' gradients with high phytoplankton abundances inshore. A strong EAC favours the occurrence of warm-water taxa offshore and an increase in diatom abundance on the mid-shelf (53% shelf width). We conclude that the phytoplankton community in the tropical-temperate transition zone of Eastern Australia is driven by an interaction of intrinsic seasonal cycles and primarily EAC-driven oceanic forcing. Our findings benefit studies located in Western Boundary Current systems worldwide, in which warming and strengthening of these currents are predicted to severely impact phytoplankton dynamics.

  10. Modelling vegetation water-use and groundwater recharge as affected by climate variability in an arid-zone Acacia savanna woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Eamus, Derek; Cleverly, James; Boulain, Nicolas; Cook, Peter; Zhang, Lu; Cheng, Lei; Yu, Qiang

    2014-11-01

    For efficient and sustainable utilisation of limited groundwater resources, improved understanding of how vegetation water-use responds to climate variation and the corresponding controls on recharge is essential. This study investigated these responses using a modelling approach. The biophysically based model WAVES was calibrated and validated with more than two years of field experimental data conducted in Mulga (Acacia aneura) in arid central Australia. The validated model was then applied to simulate vegetation growth (as changes in overstory and understory leaf area index; LAI), vegetation water-use and groundwater recharge using observed climate data for the period 1981-2012. Due to large inter-annual climatic variability, especially precipitation, simulated annual mean LAI ranged from 0.12 to 0.35 for the overstory and 0.07 to 0.21 for the understory. These variations in simulated LAI resulted in vegetation water-use varying greatly from year-to-year, from 64 to 601 mm pa. Simulated vegetation water-use also showed distinct seasonal patterns. Vegetation dynamics affected by climate variability exerted significant controls on simulated annual recharge, which was greatly reduced to 0-48 mm compared to that (58-672 mm) only affected by climate. Understanding how climate variability and land use/land cover change interactively impact on groundwater recharge significantly improves groundwater resources management in arid and semi-arid regions.

  11. Mode of delivery among women admitted with polyhydramnios.

    PubMed

    Suleiman, Abeer; Salim, Raed

    2016-12-26

    A retrospective matched case control study was conducted to examine the incidence of caesarean delivery (CD) among women admitted with polyhydramnios with and without a trial of labour compared to women with normal amniotic fluid index (AFI). Singleton pregnancies diagnosed with polyhydramnios upon admission to labour between 2003 and 2013 were included. A control group (normal AFI) matched at a ratio of 1:1 was randomly selected. Primary outcome was the incidence of CD. A total of 588 women were included. The overall incidence of CD was significantly higher among women with polyhydramnios (31.3%) compared to the controls (18.7%), (p < .001). The incidences of both non-labouring caesarean and intrapartum operative deliveries were significantly higher among women with polyhydramnios compared to the controls (p = .007 and p = .01, respectively). On a multiple logistic regression model, polyhydramnios was found to be an independent risk factor for delivery by a caesarean (p = .0015; OR 2.0; 95%CI 1.30-2.90).

  12. Effects of bottom water dissolved oxygen variability on copper and lead fractionation in the sediments across the oxygen minimum zone, western continental margin of India.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Parthasarathi; Chakraborty, Sucharita; Jayachandran, Saranya; Madan, Ritu; Sarkar, Arindam; Linsy, P; Nath, B Nagender

    2016-10-01

    This study describes the effect of varying bottom-water oxygen concentration on geochemical fractionation (operational speciation) of Cu and Pb in the underneath sediments across the oxygen minimum zone (Arabian Sea) in the west coast of India. Both, Cu and Pb were redistributed among the different binding phases of the sediments with changing dissolved oxygen level (from oxic to hypoxic and close to suboxic) in the bottom water. The average lability of Cu-sediment complexes gradually decreased (i.e., stability increased) with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentrations of the bottom water. Decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration increased Cu association with sedimentary organic matter. However, Pb association with Fe/Mn-oxyhydroxide phases in the sediments gradually decreased with the decreasing dissolved oxygen concentration of the overlying bottom water (due to dissolution of Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide phase). The lability of Pb-sediment complexes increased with the decreasing bottom-water oxygen concentration. This study suggests that bottom-water oxygen concentration is one of the key factors governing stability and lability of Cu and Pb complexes in the underneath sediment. Sedimentary organic matter and Fe/Mn oxyhydroxide binding phases were the major hosting phases for Cu and Pb respectively in the study area. Increasing lability of Pb-complexes in bottom sediments may lead to positive benthic fluxes of Pb at low oxygen environment.

  13. Assessment of Spatial Variability of Heavy Metals in Metropolitan Zone of Toluca Valley, Mexico, Using the Biomonitoring Technique in Mosses and TXRF Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zarazúa-Ortega, Graciela; Poblano-Bata, Josefina; Tejeda-Vega, Samuel; Ávila-Pérez, Pedro; Zepeda-Gómez, Carmen; Ortiz-Oliveros, Huemantzin; Macedo-Miranda, Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing atmospheric deposition of heavy metals using the epiphytic moss genera Fabronia ciliaris collected from six urban sites in the Metropolitan Zone of the Toluca Valley in Mexico. The concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, and Pb were determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique. Results show that the average metal concentration decrease in the following order: Fe (8207 mg/Kg) > Ca (7315 mg/Kg) > K (3842 mg/Kg) > Ti (387 mg/Kg) > Mn, Zn (191 mg/Kg) > Sr (71 mg/Kg) > Pb (59 mg/Kg) > Cu, V (32 mg/Kg) > Cr (24 mg/Kg) > Rb (13 mg/Kg) > Ni (10 mg/Kg). Enrichment factors show a high enrichment for Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb which provides an evidence of anthropogenic impact in the industrial and urban areas, mainly due to the intense vehicular traffic and the fossil fuel combustion. Monitoring techniques in mosses have proved to be a powerful tool for determining the deposition of heavy metals coming from diverse point sources of pollution. PMID:23853536

  14. Assessment of spatial variability of heavy metals in Metropolitan Zone of Toluca Valley, Mexico, using the biomonitoring technique in mosses and TXRF analysis.

    PubMed

    Zarazúa-Ortega, Graciela; Poblano-Bata, Josefina; Tejeda-Vega, Samuel; Ávila-Pérez, Pedro; Zepeda-Gómez, Carmen; Ortiz-Oliveros, Huemantzin; Macedo-Miranda, Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    This study is aimed at assessing atmospheric deposition of heavy metals using the epiphytic moss genera Fabronia ciliaris collected from six urban sites in the Metropolitan Zone of the Toluca Valley in Mexico. The concentrations of K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Rb, Sr, and Pb were determined by total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique. Results show that the average metal concentration decrease in the following order: Fe (8207 mg/Kg) > Ca (7315 mg/Kg) > K (3842 mg/Kg) > Ti (387 mg/Kg) > Mn, Zn (191 mg/Kg) > Sr (71 mg/Kg) > Pb (59 mg/Kg) > Cu, V (32 mg/Kg) > Cr (24 mg/Kg) > Rb (13 mg/Kg) > Ni (10 mg/Kg). Enrichment factors show a high enrichment for Cr, Cu, Zn, and Pb which provides an evidence of anthropogenic impact in the industrial and urban areas, mainly due to the intense vehicular traffic and the fossil fuel combustion. Monitoring techniques in mosses have proved to be a powerful tool for determining the deposition of heavy metals coming from diverse point sources of pollution.

  15. A Method for Determining the Nominal Occular Hazard Zone for Gaussian Beam Laser Rangers with a Firmware Controlled Variable Focal Length

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picco, C. E.; Shavers, M. R.; Victor, J. M.; Duron, J. L.; Bowers, W. h.; Gillis, D. B.; VanBaalen, M.

    2009-01-01

    LIDAR systems that maintain a constant beam spot size on a retroreflector in order to increase the accuracy of bearing and ranging data must use a software controlled variable position lens. These systems periodically update the estimated range and set the position of the focusing lens accordingly. In order to precisely calculate the r NOHD for such a system, the software method for setting the variable position lens and gaussian laser propagation can be used to calculate the irradiance at any point given the range estimation. NASA s Space Shuttle LIDAR, called the Trajectory Control Sensor (TCS), uses this configuration. Analytical tools were developed using Excel and VBA to determine the radiant energy to the International Space Station (ISS) crewmembers eyes while viewing the shuttle on approach and departure. Various viewing scenarios are considered including the use of through-the-lens imaging optics and the window transmissivity at the TCS wavelength. The methodology incorporates the TCS system control logic, gaussian laser propagation, potential failure mode end states, and guidance from American National Standard for the Safe Use of Lasers (ANSI Z136.1-2007). This approach can be adapted for laser safety analyses of similar LIDAR systems.

  16. Variable-beamwidth monopulse antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    The merits of nine methods for zooming microwave amplitude-sensing monopulse antenna patterns are discussed. Of these, six are directly related to the TDRSS (Tracking Data Relay Satellite System) and are compatible with a deployable-mesh pseudo-paraboloidal main reflector. The remaining three methods utilize radically different geometrical configurations that depart considerably from the TDRSS parameters existing at this time. Preservation of the monopulse postulates is considered to be of prime importance for any variable-beamwidth candidate, however, it is allowed that approximate satisfaction of the postulates should be accepted for practical reasons. All of the methods discussed admit free choice of the polarization state, and the zooming function is never predicated on polarization. Exploration of the zooming techniques was carried out almost entirely by means of the Kirchhoff-Kottler vector diffraction program. The program generates electric and magnetic field intensity, associated phase, and time-average Poynting vector power flow in the intermediate near-field and far-field zones in both receive and transmit modes of operation. A few of the concepts have been verified experimentally with excellent agreement between theory and practice.

  17. Limitation to Advanced Life Support in patients admitted to intensive care unit with integrated palliative care

    PubMed Central

    Mazutti, Sandra Regina Gonzaga; Nascimento, Andréia de Fátima; Fumis, Renata Rego Lins

    2016-01-01

    Objective To estimate the incidence of limitations to Advanced Life Support in critically ill patients admitted to an intensive care unit with integrated palliative care. Methods This retrospective cohort study included patients in the palliative care program of the intensive care unit of Hospital Paulistano over 18 years of age from May 1, 2011, to January 31, 2014. The limitations to Advanced Life Support that were analyzed included do-not-resuscitate orders, mechanical ventilation, dialysis and vasoactive drugs. Central tendency measures were calculated for quantitative variables. The chi-squared test was used to compare the characteristics of patients with or without limits to Advanced Life Support, and the Wilcoxon test was used to compare length of stay after Advanced Life Support. Confidence intervals reflecting p ≤ 0.05 were considered for statistical significance. Results A total of 3,487 patients were admitted to the intensive care unit, of whom 342 were included in the palliative care program. It was observed that after entering the palliative care program, it took a median of 2 (1 - 4) days for death to occur in the intensive care unit and 4 (2 - 11) days for hospital death to occur. Many of the limitations to Advanced Life Support (42.7%) took place on the first day of hospitalization. Cardiopulmonary resuscitation (96.8%) and ventilatory support (73.6%) were the most adopted limitations. Conclusion The contribution of palliative care integrated into the intensive care unit was important for the practice of orthothanasia, i.e., the non-extension of the life of a critically ill patient by artificial means. PMID:27626949

  18. X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) calibration and its application as a tool to study the Oxygen Minimum Zone variability during the Holocene.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Pina, K. G.; Gonzalez-Yajimovich, O.; Huerta-Diaz, M. A.

    2014-12-01

    X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) is a non destructive analytical technique widely used to estimate the elemental composition of sedimentary records. This analytical technique measure a number of elements in a sample with a resolution similar or better than conventional destructive methods, is quick and requires minimal analytical effort.We tested the precision and reliability of a handheld XRF instrument (DELTA Premium-XRF analyzer) and developed a methodological calibration of the equipment considered to be a potential tool for paleo-environmental investigations, i.e., in the reconstruction of past oxygen concentrations by analyzing redox sensitive trace metals like Mo, which is sequestered from the water column and transferred to the underlying sediments under anoxic and sulfidic conditions (euxinic).Calibration of the instrument was performed using eight certified standards and twelve in-house standards to create a calibration curve and its linear regression model (Pearson, r2=0.98 and p<0.001). Once the XRF was calibrated, the total concentrations of Mo were determined in gravity and multiple cores (NH01-20, 21, 22 and NH01-25, 26, 27) recovered during the CALMEX NH-01 cruise in the eastern slopes of Carmen and Pescadero basins (Gulf of California, Mexico). These sites are intersected by an Oxygen Minimum Zone promoting excellent sediment preservation. All cores were sampled every 1 cm to obtain high-resolution records of the last ~10,000 years. We conclude that handheld XRF enables precise and exact determinations of Mo concentrations in sediments, applied to the characterization of past euxinic environments.

  19. Rapid Ascent of Aphyric Mantle Melts through the Overriding Crust in Subduction Zones: Evidence from Variable Uranium-Series Disequilibria, Amorphous Hydrous Alteration Microtextures in Crystal Rims, and Two-Pyroxene Pseudo-Decompression Paths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zellmer, G. F.; Freymuth, H.; Hsieh, H. H.; Hwang, S. L.; Iizuka, Y.; Miller, C. A.; Rubin, K. H.; Sakamoto, N.; Yurimoto, H.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic hazard mitigation at subduction zones critically depends on knowledge of magma generation and ascent processes and timescales. Two diametrically opposite scenarios are presently debated: One paradigm is the generation of low-silica (basaltic) melts in the mantle wedge, followed by protracted sub-liquidus magma ascent and evolution through crystal growth and fractionation in crustal reservoirs, which are tapped during volcanic eruptions. In contrast, a diametrically opposite model favours the generation of higher silica melts in the mantle or in a lower crustal hot zone, followed by rapid decompression to the surface under super-liquidus conditions. In the latter case, crystals are picked up during magma ascent, and are in the process of dissolving. We present multiple lines of evidence that point to crystal uptake as the principal processes by which arc melts acquire their crystal cargo: (i) variable 234U-238U disequilibria in mineral separates; (ii) hydrous mineral rims with amorphous alteration textures; and (iii) two-pyroxene pseudo-decompression paths; cf. Zellmer et al. (2014a,b,c), doi: 10.1144/SP385.3 and 10.1144/SP385.9 and 10.1144/SP410.1. These observations point to a scarcity of true phenocrysts in many arc magmas, and thus to decompression of aphyric melts that take up their crystal cargo during ascent. The data imply that many hydrous wedge melts are more silica-rich than basalts and achieve super-liquidus conditions during rapid ascent from great depth.

  20. Anomalous zones (domal)

    SciTech Connect

    Kupfer, D.H. )

    1990-09-01

    Each zone contains several anomalous salt properties (anomalous features). Zones cannot be characterized by any single property Zones are highly variable, lenticular, and discontinuous in detail; however, once established, they commonly have a predictable trend. The individual anomalous features can occur alone (locally in pairs) over areas of various sizes and shapes. These alone occurrences are not anomalous zones. Anomalous zones may be of any origin, and origin is not part of the definition. Typical origins include: primary (sedimentary), external sheath zone, separating two spines of salt, or caused by toroidal flow. The major importance of an anomalous zone is that it consists of various anomalous features distributed discontinuously along the zone. Thus, if three or more anomalous properties are observed together, one should look for others. The anomalous zones observed in the Gulf Coast thus far are vertical, linear, and semicontinuous. Most are reasonably straight, but some bend sharply, end abruptly, or coalesce. Textures in salt involve grain size, color (white to dark gray), grain shape, or grain distribution of the salt. Typical anomalous textures are coarse-grain, poikiloblastic, and friability. A change in color is commonplace and seldom anomalous. Structural anomalous features, broadly defined, account for most of the rest of the anomalous features. Not uncommonly they cause mining problems. Among the structural anomalous features: INCLUSIONS: Sediments, hydrocarbons, brine, gases. Common gases are air (as N{sub 2}), CH-compounds, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S. STRUCTURES: Sheared salt, undue stabbing or jointing, voids (crystal-lined pockets), permeability, increased porosity COMPOSITION: High anhydrite content, visible anhydrite as grains or boudins, very black salt = disseminated impurities such as clay.

  1. Scientists Admitting to Plagiarism: A Meta-analysis of Surveys.

    PubMed

    Pupovac, Vanja; Fanelli, Daniele

    2015-10-01

    We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of anonymous surveys asking scientists whether they ever committed various forms of plagiarism. From May to December 2011 we searched 35 bibliographic databases, five grey literature databases and hand searched nine journals for potentially relevant studies. We included surveys that asked scientists if, in a given recall period, they had committed or knew of a colleague who committed plagiarism, and from each survey extracted the proportion of those who reported at least one case. Studies that focused on academic (i.e. student) plagiarism were excluded. Literature searches returned 12,460 titles from which 17 relevant survey studies were identified. Meta-analysis of studies reporting committed (N = 7) and witnessed (N = 11) plagiarism yielded a pooled estimate of, respectively, 1.7% (95% CI 1.2-2.4) and 30% (95% CI 17-46). Basic methodological factors, including sample size, year of survey, delivery method and whether survey questions were explicit rather than indirect made a significant difference on survey results. Even after controlling for these methodological factors, between-study differences in admission rates were significantly above those expected by sampling error alone and remained largely unexplained. Despite several limitations of the data and of this meta-analysis, we draw three robust conclusions: (1) The rate at which scientists report knowing a colleague who committed plagiarism is higher than for data fabrication and falsification; (2) The rate at which scientists report knowing a colleague who committed plagiarism is correlated to that of fabrication and falsification; (3) The rate at which scientists admit having committed either form of misconduct (i.e. fabrication, falsification and plagiarism) in surveys has declined over time.

  2. Spatially inhomogeneous and irrotational geometries admitting intrinsic conformal symmetries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostolopoulos, Pantelis S.

    2016-12-01

    "Diagonal" spatially inhomogeneous (SI) models are introduced under the assumption of the existence of (proper) intrinsic symmetries and can be seen, in some sense, as complementary to the Szekeres models. The structure of this class of spacetimes can be regarded as a generalization of the (twist-free) locally rotationally symmetric geometries without any global isometry containing, however, these models as special cases. We consider geometries where a six-dimensional algebra I C of intrinsic conformal vector fields (ICVFs) exists that acts on a two-dimensional (pseudo)-Riemannian manifold. Its members Xα —constituted of three intrinsic Killing vector fields and three proper and gradient ICVFs—and the specific form of the gravitational field are given explicitly. An interesting consequence, in contrast with the Szekeres models, is the immediate existence of conserved quantities along null geodesics. We check computationally that the magnetic part Ha b of the Weyl tensor vanishes, whereas the shear σa b and the electric part Ea b share a common eigenframe irrespective of the fluid interpretation of the models. A side result is the fact that the spacetimes are foliated by a set of conformally flat three-dimensional timelike slices when the anisotropy of the flux-free fluid is described only in terms of the three principal inhomogeneous "pressures" pα, or equivalently when the Ricci tensor shares the same basis of eigenvectors with σa b and Ea b. The conformal flatness also indicates that it is highly possible that a ten-dimensional algebra of ICVFs Ξ that acts on the three-dimensional timelike slices exists, enriching in that way the set of conserved quantities admitted by the SI models found in the present paper.

  3. Interannual variability in sea-ice thickness in the pack-ice zone off Lützow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Fuko; Tamura, Takeshi; Shimoda, Haruhito; Uto, Shotaro; Simizu, Daisuke; Tateyama, Kazutaka; Hoshino, Seita; Ozeki, Toshihiro; Fukamachi, Yasushi; Ushio, Shuki; Ohshima, Kay I.

    2016-03-01

    Under the Japanese Antarctic Research Expedition (JARE) program, sea-ice thickness has been routinely monitored off Lützow-Holm Bay (East Antarctica) during the summer (mid-December to early January) since 2000/01, using an electromagnetic induction (EM) instrument onboard the icebreaker Shirase. Analysis of these data over a 10-year period, combined with visual observations using a simplified form of the ASPeCt (Antarctic Sea ice Processes and Climate) protocol, suggests a strong interannual variability in sea-ice thickness in this region. For the repeat pack-ice observation area, where the sea-ice thickness averaged over the nine seasons is ∼1.9 m, mean thicknesses of observed sea-ice in 2010/11 and 2011/12 are exceptionally large, at ∼3.3 and ∼5.8 m, respectively. This result is strongly related to regional patterns of sea ice dynamics. Ice convergence caused by anomalous northerly winds was particularly high in 2011/12, suggesting that the extremely thick ice observed in that season resulted largely from sea-ice deformation processes (including pressure ridging). Longer-term analysis of data from the past 34 years confirms that sea-ice conditions and thickness off Lützow-Holm Bay in summer are determined mainly by the large-scale pattern of atmospheric pressure in December.

  4. Estimates of the width of the wetting zone along a fracture subjected to an episodic infiltration event in variably saturated, densely welded tuff

    SciTech Connect

    Buscheck, T.A.; Nitao, J.J.

    1988-05-31

    A central issue to be addressed within the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) is the role which fractures will play as the variably saturated, fractured rock mass surrounding the waste package responds to heating, cooling, and episodic infiltration events. Understanding the role of fractures during such events will, in part, depend on our ability to make geophysical measurements of perturbations in the moisture distribution in the vicinity of fractures. In this study we first examine the details of the perturbation in the moisture distribution in and around a fracture subjected to an episodic infiltration event, and then integrate that behavior over the scale at which moisture measurements are likely to be made during the Engineered Barrier Design Test of the NNWSI project. To model this system we use the TOUGH hydrothermal code and fracture and matrix properties considered relevant to the welded ash flow tuff found in the Topopah Spring member at Yucca Mountain as well as in the Grouse Canyon member within G-Tunnel at the Nevada Test Site. Our calculations provide insight into the anticipated spatial and temporal resolution obtainable through the use of the geophysical techniques being considered. These calculations should prove useful both in planning the implementation of these methods as well as in the interpretation of their results. 41 refs., 28 figs.

  5. Environmental variability in the monsoon-westerlies transition zone during the last 1200 years: lake sediment analyses from central Mongolia and supra-regional synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Fang; Herzschuh, Ulrike; Dallmeyer, Anne; Xu, Qinghai; Mischke, Steffen; Biskaborn, Boris K.

    2013-08-01

    A high resolution multi-proxy (pollen, grain size, total organic carbon) record from a small mountain lake (Lake Khuisiin; 46.6°N, 101.8°E; 2270 m a.s.l.) in the south-eastern Khangai Mountains of central Mongolia has been used to explore changes in vegetation and climate over the last 1200 years. The pollen data indicates that the vegetation changed from dry steppe dominated by Poaceae and Artemisia (ca AD 760-950), to Larix forest steppe (ca AD 950-1170), Larix-Betula forest steppe (ca AD 1170-1380), meadow dominated by Cyperaceae and Poaceae (ca AD 1380-1830), and Larix-Betula forest steppe (after ˜ AD 1830). The cold-wet period between AD 1380 and 1830 may relate to the Little Ice Age. Environmental changes were generally subtle and climate change seems to have been the major driver of variations in vegetation until at least the early part of the 20th century, suggesting that either the level of human activity was generally low, or the relationship between human activity and vegetation did not alter substantially between AD 760 and 1830. A review of centennial-scale moisture records from China and Mongolia revealed that most areas experienced major changes at ca AD 1500 and AD 1900. However, the moisture availability since AD 1500 varied between sites, with no clear regional pattern or relationship to present-day conditions. Both the reconstructions and the moisture levels simulation on a millennium scale performed in the MPI Earth System Model indicate that the monsoon-westerlies transition area shows a greater climate variability than those areas influenced by the westerlies, or by the summer monsoon only.

  6. Surveillance for West Nile virus in clinic-admitted raptors, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Nemeth, Nicole; Kratz, Gail; Edwards, Eric; Scherpelz, Judy; Bowen, Richard; Komar, Nicholas

    2007-02-01

    In 2005, 13.5% of clinic-admitted raptors in northern Colorado tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV). Clinic-admitted-raptor surveillance detected WNV activity nearly 14 weeks earlier than other surveillance systems. WNV surveillance using live raptor admissions to rehabilitation clinics may offer a novel surveillance method and should be considered along with other techniques already in use.

  7. A Semester Late: A Phenomenological Study Examining the Experiences of Spring Admits in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roth-Francis, Chrissy

    2013-01-01

    More than 25% of new college students begin their higher education careers outside of the traditional fall start date (National Student Clearinghouse, 2012). This study examines the social, personal, and academic experiences of spring admits at a large, private research institution in the western United States. In this study, a spring admit is…

  8. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  9. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  10. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  11. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  12. 25 CFR 1000.23 - How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool... Admission into the Applicant Pool § 1000.23 How is a Tribe/Consortium admitted to the applicant pool? To be considered for admission in the applicant pool, a Tribe/Consortium must submit an application to the...

  13. The College Selection Process of Freshmen Admitted to UC Davis: The Range of Choice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacKenzie, Bonnie L.

    Considerations in selecting a college were studied with a random sample of 768 freshmen admitted to the University of California (UC), Davis, in fall 1984. Major findings are: freshmen admitted to UC Davis had considerable breadth of knowledge about many other colleges and academic programs; over 80 percent applied to colleges besides UC Davis;…

  14. Splenic marginal zone lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Piris, Miguel A; Onaindía, Arantza; Mollejo, Manuela

    Splenic marginal zone lymphoma (SMZL) is an indolent small B-cell lymphoma involving the spleen and bone marrow characterized by a micronodular tumoral infiltration that replaces the preexisting lymphoid follicles and shows marginal zone differentiation as a distinctive finding. SMZL cases are characterized by prominent splenomegaly and bone marrow and peripheral blood infiltration. Cells in peripheral blood show a villous cytology. Bone marrow and peripheral blood characteristic features usually allow a diagnosis of SMZL to be performed. Mutational spectrum of SMZL identifies specific findings, such as 7q loss and NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations, both genes related with marginal zone differentiation. There is a striking clinical variability in SMZL cases, dependent of the tumoral load and performance status. Specific molecular markers such as 7q loss, p53 loss/mutation, NOTCH2 and KLF2 mutations have been found to be associated with the clinical variability. Distinction from Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis with marginal zone phenotype is still an open issue that requires identification of precise and specific thresholds with clinical meaning.

  15. Reduced amygdala volume in newly admitted psychiatric in-patients with unipolar major depression.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, Golo; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Regen, Francesca; Deuschle, Michael; Heuser, Isabella; Colla, Michael

    2009-09-01

    Structural neuroimaging studies investigating amygdala volumes in patients suffering from major depression have yielded variable results. Discrepant findings across studies may be attributable in part to heterogeneity with respect to antidepressant medication and to lack of adequate control for the effects of total brain volume and age. Here, 24 unipolar depressed in-patients newly admitted to a psychiatric unit and 14 healthy control participants matched for age, gender, and years of education underwent quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) toward the end of a one-week washout period. Saliva cortisol was measured at 08.00 and at 16.00h in patients during washout. Absolute amygdala volumes were significantly reduced in the patient group (by 13% in left amygdala and 12% in right amygdala). The effect of reduced amygdala volumes in patients remained significant after correction for brain volume (BV) and age. Furthermore, amygdala volume measurements in the patient sample showed a significant inverse relationship to the number of preceding depressive episodes. In patients, severity of disease (baseline HAMD scores) and baseline cortisol levels were not related to amygdala volume. This study of a sample of unmedicated depressed in-patients adds to the small, yet growing, body of evidence linking untreated major depression to reduced amygdala volume.

  16. Suicide mortality of suicide attempt patients discharged from emergency room, nonsuicidal psychiatric patients discharged from emergency room, admitted suicide attempt patients, and admitted nonsuicidal psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae W; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K; Hong, Jin P

    2012-06-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients admitted for suicide attempt, and psychiatric inpatients admitted for other reasons were examined. The records of 3,897 patients who were treated at a general hospital in Seoul, Korea, from July 2003 to December 2006 were reviewed. Forty-three of the 3,897 subjects died by suicide during the 2.5-year observation period. Compared to the general Korean population, the suicide mortality rate was 82-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, admitted; 54-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, discharged; 21-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, admitted; and 11-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, discharged. In all four groups, diagnosis of a depressive disorder and suicide attempt at presentation were each significant independent risk factors for suicide completion. These results highlight the need for suicide prevention strategies for depressed patients who present to the ER or are admitted to a psychiatric ward after a suicide attempt.

  17. Does drinking water influence hospital-admitted sialolithiasis on an epidemiological level in Denmark?

    PubMed Central

    Schrøder, Stine; Homøe, Preben; Wagner, Niels; Vataire, Anne-Lise; Lundager Madsen, Hans Erik; Bardow, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Sialolithiasis, or salivary stones, is not a rare disease of the major salivary glands. However, the aetiology and incidence remain largely unknown. Since sialoliths are comprised mainly of calcium phosphate salts, we hypothesise that drinking water calcium levels and other elements in drinking water could play a role in sialolithiasis. Owing to substantial intermunicipality differences in drinking water composition, Denmark constitutes a unique environment for testing such relations. Design An epidemiological study based on patient data extracted from the National Patient Registry and drinking water data from the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland retrieved as weighted data on all major drinking water constituents for each of the 3364 waterworks in Denmark. All patient cases with International Statistical Classification of Diseases 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes for sialolithiasis registered between the years 2000 and 2010 were included in the study (n=3014) and related to the drinking water composition on a municipality level (n=98). Primary and secondary outcome measures Multiple regression analysis using iterative search and testing among all demographic and drinking water variables with sialolithiasis incidence as the outcome in search of possible relations among the variables tested. Results The nationwide incidence of hospital-admitted sialolithiasis was 5.5 cases per 100 000 citizens per year in Denmark. Strong relations were found between the incidence of sialolithiasis and the drinking water concentration of calcium, magnesium and hydrogen carbonate, however, in separate models (p<0.001). Analyses also confirmed correlations between drinking water calcium and magnesium and their concentration in saliva whereas this was not the case for hydrogen carbonate. Conclusions Differences in drinking water calcium and magnesium may play a role in the incidence of sialolithiasis. These findings are of interest because many countries have started

  18. Bioelectrical impedance phase angle in septic patients admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Berbigier, Marina Carvalho; Pasinato, Valeska Fernandes; Rubin, Bibiana de Almeida; Moraes, Rafael Barberena; Perry, Ingrid Dalira Schweigert

    2013-01-01

    Objective To calculate the values of the phase angle of septic patients using bioelectrical impedance analysis, correlate the values with clinical and biochemical variables, and compare them to reference values. Methods Cohort study conducted with 50 septic patients aged ≥18 years old, admitted to intensive care units, and assessed according to prognostic indexes (APACHE II and SOFA), clinical progression (mortality, severity of sepsis, length of stay in intensive care unit), biochemical parameters (albumin and C-reactive protein), and the phase angle. Results The average age of the sample was 65.6±16.5 years. Most patients were male (58%) and suffering from septic shock (60%). The average APACHE II and SOFA scores were 22.98±7.1 and 7.5±3.4, respectively. The patients who survived stayed nine days on average (five to 13) in the intensive care unit, and the mortality rate was 30%. The average value of the phase angle was 5.4±2.6º in the total sample and was smaller among the females compared with the males (p=0.01). The phase angle measures did not exhibit an association with the severity of the sepsis, mortality, gender, and age or correlate with the length of hospitalization or the biochemical parameters. The participants' phase angle values adjusted per gender and age were 1.1 to 1.9 times lower compared with the values for a normal population. Conclusion The average value of the phase angle of septic patients was lower compared with the reference values for a healthy population. The phase angle measures did not exhibit association with the clinical and biochemical variables, which might be explained by the sample homogeneity. PMID:23887756

  19. Variability in warm-season atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns over subtropical South America: relationships between the South Atlantic convergence zone and large-scale organized convection over the La Plata basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattingly, Kyle S.; Mote, Thomas L.

    2017-01-01

    Warm-season precipitation variability over subtropical South America is characterized by an inverse relationship between the South Atlantic convergence zone (SACZ) and precipitation over the central and western La Plata basin of southeastern South America. This study extends the analysis of this "South American Seesaw" precipitation dipole to relationships between the SACZ and large, long-lived mesoscale convective systems (LLCSs) over the La Plata basin. By classifying SACZ events into distinct continental and oceanic categories and building a logistic regression model that relates LLCS activity across the region to continental and oceanic SACZ precipitation, a detailed account of spatial variability in the out-of-phase coupling between the SACZ and large-scale organized convection over the La Plata basin is provided. Enhanced precipitation in the continental SACZ is found to result in increased LLCS activity over northern, northeastern, and western sections of the La Plata basin, in association with poleward atmospheric moisture flux from the Amazon basin toward these regions, and a decrease in the probability of LLCS occurrence over the southeastern La Plata basin. Increased oceanic SACZ precipitation, however, was strongly related to reduced atmospheric moisture and decreased probability of LLCS occurrence over nearly the entire La Plata basin. These results suggest that continental SACZ activity and large-scale organized convection over the northern and eastern sections of the La Plata basin are closely tied to atmospheric moisture transport from the Amazon basin, while the warm coastal Brazil Current may also play an important role as an evaporative moisture source for LLCSs over the central and western La Plata basin.

  20. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-01-01

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  1. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-08-02

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  2. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, W.D.; Rudduck, R.C.; Yu, J.S.

    1987-02-27

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector. 2 figs.

  3. Geomorphic Variability in the Coastal Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-05-01

    types of worms, mollusks, bryozoa , and coralline algae are also capable of reef construction. Figure 9. Outcrops of Pleistocene coquina rock of the...spots occur and are subjected to wind erosion. BRYOZOA Invertebrate belonging to the Phylum Bryozoa and characterized by colonial growth and a

  4. Tomographic Resolution of Upper Mantle Structure at the Transeuropean Suture Zone and the Dip of the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist-Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busche, H.; Rabbel, W.; Tor Working Group

    2003-04-01

    The TOR-profile is an approximately 1000 km long teleseismic traverse linking Northern Germany, Denmark and Sweden. Its aim is to explore the structure of the upper mantle of the northern segment of the Trans-European Suture Zone (TESZ) including, among others, the North-German-Danish Basin, the Caledonian suture zone and the Sorgenfrei-Tornquist Zone (STZ) as major structural elements. Tomographic images provided by various previous investigators show a strong lateral variation of the lithosphere along the TOR-profile with low P-wave velocities below the N German Basin in the South, high velocities in the Fennoscandian Shield in the North and differently graded structure in between. Although agreeing in the general features, these tomographic images differ in their details, partly in important ones such as the dip of the STZ. Therefore, we investigated the tomographic resolution of the TOR data set with regard to both gross structure and the dip of the STZ. Based on a three-dimensional Fourier approach, velocity bounds of the upper mantle down to 300 km depth were estimated by the following two steps: (1) by inverting the teleseismic travel-time residuals for a large number of different model parametrizations realized by variable spatial bandwidths ("wavelenghts") of the admitted velocity fluctuation; and (2) by statistically analysing the scatter of the corresponding inversion results weighted by the variance of the respective residuals and deviations from a-priori limits of velocity. As a result we present depth sections of upper and lower velocity bounds corresponding to 80% bounds. It turns out that the majority of variation of previously published sections is in between these limits. To investigate ambiguities in the dip of the STZ we applied an inversion approach based on sigmoid functions. This approach allowed to restrict the number of variables to a minimum describing mainly outcrop position, dip and width of the fault zone. The advantage of this approach

  5. Differences in the Clinical Characteristics of Rapid Response System Activation in Patients Admitted to Medical or Surgical Services

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Variability in rapid response system (RRS) characteristics based on the admitted wards is unknown. We aimed to compare differences in the clinical characteristics of RRS activation between patients admitted to medical versus surgical services. We reviewed patients admitted to the hospital who were detected by the RRS from October 2012 to February 2014 at a tertiary care academic hospital. We compared the triggers for RRS activation, interventions performed, and outcomes of the 2 patient groups. The RRS was activated for 460 patients, and the activation rate was almost 2.3 times higher for surgical services than that for medical services (70% vs. 30%). The triggers for RRS activation significantly differed between patient groups (P = 0.001). They included abnormal values for the respiratory rate (23.2%) and blood gas analysis (20.3%), and low blood pressure (18.8%) in the medical group; and low blood pressure (32.0%), low oxygen saturation (20.8%), and an abnormal heart rate (17.7%) in the surgical group. Patients were more likely classified as do not resuscitate or required intensive care unit admission in the medical group compared to those in the surgical group (65.3% vs. 54.7%, P = 0.045). In multivariate analysis, whether the patient belongs to medical services was found to be an independent predictor of mortality after adjusting for the modified early warning score, Charlson comorbidity index, and intervention performed by the RRS team. Our data suggest that RRS triggers, interventions, and outcomes greatly differ between patient groups. Further research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of an RRS approach tailored to specific patient groups. PMID:28244298

  6. Population characteristics of feral cats admitted to seven trap-neuter-return programs in the United States.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Jennifer L; Levy, Julie K

    2006-08-01

    Internationally, large populations of feral cats constitute an important and controversial issue due to their impact on cat overpopulation, animal welfare, public health, and the environment, and to disagreement about what are the best methods for their control. Trap-neuter-return (TNR) programs are an increasingly popular alternative to mass euthanasia. The objective of this study was to determine the population characteristics of feral cats admitted to large-scale TNR programs from geographically diverse locations in the United States. Data from 103,643 feral cats admitted to TNR programs from 1993 to 2004 were evaluated. All groups reported more intact females (53.4%) than intact males (44.3%); only 2.3% of the cats were found to be previously sterilized. Overall, 15.9% of female cats were pregnant at the time of surgery. Pregnancy was highly seasonal and peaked between March and April for all of the groups. The average prenatal litter size was 4.1+/-0.1 fetuses per litter. Cryptorchidism was observed in 1.3% of male cats admitted for sterilization. A total of 0.4% of cats was euthanased because of the presence of debilitating conditions, and 0.4% died during the TNR clinics. Remarkably similar populations of cats with comparable seasonal variability were seen at each program, despite their wide geographical distribution. These results suggest that it is feasible to safely sterilize large numbers of feral cats and that the experiences of existing programs are a consistent source of information upon which to model new TNR programs.

  7. Climate change and dead zones.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Andrew H; Gedan, Keryn B

    2015-04-01

    Estuaries and coastal seas provide valuable ecosystem services but are particularly vulnerable to the co-occurring threats of climate change and oxygen-depleted dead zones. We analyzed the severity of climate change predicted for existing dead zones, and found that 94% of dead zones are in regions that will experience at least a 2 °C temperature increase by the end of the century. We then reviewed how climate change will exacerbate hypoxic conditions through oceanographic, ecological, and physiological processes. We found evidence that suggests numerous climate variables including temperature, ocean acidification, sea-level rise, precipitation, wind, and storm patterns will affect dead zones, and that each of those factors has the potential to act through multiple pathways on both oxygen availability and ecological responses to hypoxia. Given the variety and strength of the mechanisms by which climate change exacerbates hypoxia, and the rates at which climate is changing, we posit that climate change variables are contributing to the dead zone epidemic by acting synergistically with one another and with recognized anthropogenic triggers of hypoxia including eutrophication. This suggests that a multidisciplinary, integrated approach that considers the full range of climate variables is needed to track and potentially reverse the spread of dead zones.

  8. Analysis of Sociodemographic Parameters of Patients Admitted in a Newly Established Palliative Care Center in a Regional Cancer Institute of North-West India

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Mukesh Kumar; Kapoor, Akhil; Bagri, Puneet Kumar; Singh, Daleep; Nirban, Raj Kumar; Kumar, Narender; Kumar, Harvindra Singh

    2014-01-01

    Background: After 4 months of the establishment of palliative care center (PCC) in our institute, we present an audit of the sociodemographic parameters of admitted patients. Such an audit can help to recognize the lacuna in the management and thus help to identify the specific requirements of cancer patients that might be overlooked in a busy cancer center. Materials and Methods: A total of 234 patients were admitted in our PCC since its inception in October 2013. The study design was retrospective, collecting the data from the medical records of the patients. The descriptive statistics of all these data were calculated in terms of frequencies and percentage of categorical variables. Results: Out of 234 patients admitted in PCC, 156 (66%) were male. The median age of the patients was 54 years. A total of 44% patients had primary malignancy of head and neck, 14% of cervical, 17% of lung cancer, 6% of breast, and 5% of colon, respectively. Metastatic disease was present in 76% of the patients admitted in the PCC. Liver was the most common (46%) metastatic site. Total 13 symptoms were identified with mean number of symptoms per patient at admission in PCC being 5.17. Conclusions: Palliative care services are an indispensable part of a tertiary regional cancer care center. The oncologists should be made aware of the requirement of better relief of pain and other distressing symptoms to provide better quality of life to the patients suffering from advanced cancer. PMID:25191011

  9. Geophysics applications in critical zone science: emerging topics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pachepsky, Y. A.; Martinez, G.; Guber, A.; Walthall, C. L.; Vereecken, H.

    2012-12-01

    Geophysical studies have resulted in remarkable advances in characterization of critical zone. The geophysics applications uncover the relationships between structure and function in subsurface as they seek to define subsurface structural units with individual properties of retention and transmission of water, energy, solutes, electrical charge, etc. Several focal points of the research have emerged as the knowledge base of the critical zone geophysics grows. Time-lapse or multiple geophysical surveys admittedly improve the subsurface characterization. One of intriguing possibilities here is to use the temporal variation in geophysical parameters among time-lapse surveys directly to model spatial variation in soil properties affecting soil-water contents. Because critical phenomena causing erratic routing have been recently discovered in hillslope subsurface flow networks, it remains to be seen whether the time-lapse imagery depicts the same flow network if weather conditions are seemingly similar. High-frequency network observations usually reveal the temporal stability patterns in soil variables, including water contents, CO2 fluxes, etc. It becomes clear that these patterns can be described with spatiotemporal geostatistics models, and the opportunity arises to infer the spatial correlation structure of soil parameters from temporal variations of soil dynamic variables. There are indications that the spatial correlation structures of the geophysical parameters and soil/plant variables can be similar even though the correlations between these parameters are low. This may open additional avenues for mapping sparsely measured soil and plant variables. Fallacies of scale in geophysical depicting subsurface structural units and patterns are far from being understood. Soil state variables affect geophysical retrieval in nonlinear ways, and therefore scale effects in retrievals are warranted. For this reason, the strength and type of dependencies between geophysical

  10. The Effect of Depression on Social Engagement in Newly Admitted Dutch Nursing Home Residents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achterberg, Wilco; Pot, Anne Margriet; Kerkstra, Ada; Ooms, Marcel; Muller, Martien; Ribbe, Miel

    2003-01-01

    Studies the effect of depression on social engagement among newly admitted nursing home residents. Results reveal that residents with depression were significantly more often found to have low social engagement. (Contains 26 references and 3 tables.) (GCP)

  11. Evaluation of a Specialized Yoga Program for Persons Admitted to a Complex Continuing Care Hospital: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Kuluski, Kerry; Bechsgaard, Gitte; Ridgway, Jennifer; Katz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a specialized yoga intervention for inpatients in a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital. Design. Single-cohort repeated measures design. Methods. Participants (N = 10) admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital were recruited to participate in a 50–60 min Hatha Yoga class (modified for wheelchair users/seated position) once a week for eight weeks, with assigned homework practice. Questionnaires on pain (pain, pain interference, and pain catastrophizing), psychological variables (depression, anxiety, and experiences with injustice), mindfulness, self-compassion, and spiritual well-being were collected at three intervals: pre-, mid-, and post-intervention. Results. Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed a significant main effect of time indicating improvements over the course of the yoga program on the (1) anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, F(2,18) = 4.74, p < .05, and ηp2 = .35, (2) Self-Compassion Scale-Short Form, F(2,18) = 3.71, p < .05, and ηp2 = .29, and (3) Magnification subscale of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, F(2,18) = 3. 66, p < .05, and ηp2 = .29. Discussion. The results suggest that an 8-week Hatha Yoga program improves pain-related factors and psychological experiences in individuals admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital. PMID:28115969

  12. Evaluation of a Specialized Yoga Program for Persons Admitted to a Complex Continuing Care Hospital: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Curtis, Kathryn; Kuluski, Kerry; Bechsgaard, Gitte; Ridgway, Jennifer; Katz, Joel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a specialized yoga intervention for inpatients in a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital. Design. Single-cohort repeated measures design. Methods. Participants (N = 10) admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital were recruited to participate in a 50-60 min Hatha Yoga class (modified for wheelchair users/seated position) once a week for eight weeks, with assigned homework practice. Questionnaires on pain (pain, pain interference, and pain catastrophizing), psychological variables (depression, anxiety, and experiences with injustice), mindfulness, self-compassion, and spiritual well-being were collected at three intervals: pre-, mid-, and post-intervention. Results. Repeated measures ANOVAs revealed a significant main effect of time indicating improvements over the course of the yoga program on the (1) anxiety subscale of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, F(2,18) = 4.74, p < .05, and ηp(2) = .35, (2) Self-Compassion Scale-Short Form, F(2,18) = 3.71, p < .05, and ηp(2) = .29, and (3) Magnification subscale of the Pain Catastrophizing Scale, F(2,18) = 3. 66, p < .05, and ηp(2) = .29. Discussion. The results suggest that an 8-week Hatha Yoga program improves pain-related factors and psychological experiences in individuals admitted to a rehabilitation and complex continuing care hospital.

  13. Effect of climate, intra and inter-annual variability, on nutrients emission (C,N, P) in stream water: lessons from an agricultural long term observatory of the temperate zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gascuel-Odoux, Chantal; Remi, Dupas; Patrick, Durand; Ophélie, Fovet; Gerard, Gruau; Anne, Jaffrezic; Guillaume, Humbert; Philippe, Merot; Gu, Sen

    2016-04-01

    Agriculture greatly contributes to modify C, N and P cycles, particularly in animal breeding regions due to high inputs. Climatic conditions, intra and inter-annual variabilities, modify nutrient stream water emissions, acting in time on transfer and transformation, accumulation and mobilization processes, connecting and disconnecting in time different compartments (soil, riparian areas, groundwater). In agricultural catchments, nutrient perturbations are dominated by agricultural land use, and decoupling human activities and climate effects is far from easy. Climate change generally appears as a secondary driver compared to land use. If studied, generally only one nutrient is considered. Only long term, high frequency and multiple element data series can decouple these two drivers. The Kervidy-Naizin watershed belongs to the AgrHyS environmental research observatory (http://www6.inra.fr/ore_agrhys_eng), itself included in RBV (French catchment network of the CZO). On this catchment, 6 years of daily data on DOC, NO3, SRP, TP concentrations allow us to analyze the effect of seasonal and inter-annual climatic variabilities on water quality (C, N, P). Different papers have been published on the effect of climate on nitrate (Molenat et al, 2008), SRP and TP (Dupas et al, 2015) and DOC (Humbert et al, 2015). We will present first results comparing the effect of climate on these three major solute forms of C, N and P. While C and P dynamics are very close and controlled by fluctuation of water table downslope, i.e. in riparian areas, mobilizing C and P in time, nitrate dynamics is controlled by GW dynamics upslope acting as the major N reservoir. As example, the dryness conditions in summer appears a key factor of the C and P emissions in autumn. All the three solute forms interact when anoxic conditions are observed in riparian zones. These basic processes explain how climatic variability can influence and explain interactions between C, N and P emissions in stream

  14. Case analysis of brain-injured admittedly shaken infants: 54 cases, 1969-2001.

    PubMed

    Leestma, Jan E

    2005-09-01

    The English-language medical case literature was searched for cases of apparent or alleged child abuse between the years 1969 and 2001. Three-hundred and twenty-four cases that contained detailed individual case information were analyzed yielding 54 cases in which someone was recorded as having admitted, in some fashion, to have shaken the injured baby. Individual case findings were tabulated and analyzed with respect to shaking as being the cause for the injuries reported. For all 54 admittedly-shaken-infant cases, the provided details regarding the shaking incidents and other events are reported. Data in the case reports varied widely with respect to important details. Only 11 cases of admittedly shaken babies showed no sign of cranial impact (apparently free-shaken). This small number of cases does not permit valid statistical analysis or support for many of the commonly stated aspects of the so-called shaken baby syndrome.

  15. The prognostic factors for patients with hematological malignancies admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qian; Tang, Yishu; Yang, Qing; Wang, Erhua; Liu, Jing; Li, Xin

    2016-01-01

    Owing to the nature of acute illness and adverse effects derived from intensive chemotherapy, patients with hematological malignancies (HM) who are admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) often present with poor prognosis. However, with advances in life-sustaining therapies and close collaborations between hematologists and intensive care specialists, the prognosis for these patients has improved substantially. Many studies from different countries have examined the prognostic factors of these critically ill HM patients. However, there has not been an up-to-date review on this subject, and very few studies have focused on the prognosis of patients with HM admitted to the ICU in Asian countries. Herein, we aim to explore the current situation and prognostic factors in patients with HM admitted to ICU, mainly focusing on studies published in the last 10 years.

  16. A Study of the Patients Admitted to the Clinical Decision Unit over One Year.

    PubMed

    O'Shea, E; Cusack, S; O'Sullivan, I

    2016-06-10

    Clinical decision units (CDUs) are areas within an emergency department (ED) providing care for the patient who may benefit from an extended observation period, usually for a maximum of twenty-four hours. A retrospective patient record audit was performed to determine the characteristics of patients admitted to the Cork University Hospital (CUH) CDU over 12 months. The average length of stay of a patient in the CDU was 29 hours. The most common diagnoses admitted to the CDU were chest pain (9.5%) and headache (7.2%). The research implies that the CDU provided a means for CUH to save approximately €2 million annually.

  17. Profile of Patients Admitted in a Large Teaching Hospital as a Result of Earthquake in Kashmir During October 2005

    PubMed Central

    Yatoto, GH; Syed, AT; Rangrez, RA; Singh, Dara

    2009-01-01

    Background: Among natural calamities Earthquakes are more devastating, as much of the life and property is affected. Methods: The study was carried- out in Accident & Emergency Department of SKIMS, to determine personnel and medical profile of earthquake victims of October 2005, when the state was rattled by a major tremor. Data was obtained from Accident & Emergency Department. Total no of patients Admitted were 166, which were followed from admission to discharge/Death. Each patient was subjected to a pretested questionnaire indicating age, sex, rural/urban distribution, Glasgow coma score, out come of treatment and referral to other care facility. Results: The study revealed that children were mostly affected, being the valnerable group. Most of the patients had head and bone injuries. 143 patients out of 166 patients had a Glasgow coma score of 15. Only 9 patients died. The reason for better end result was because of initial first Aid, Rapid transportatation to Hospital and prompt treatment in the Hospital. Conclusion: As Jammu and Kashmir falls in seismic zone 5, it needs a central trauma centre, having all the specialties and sub specialties under one roof. This will save precious time, as cross referral to other hospitals will not be needed PMID:21475539

  18. A comparison of outcomes among hospital survivors with and without severe comorbidity admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Williams, T A; McConigley, R; Leslie, G D; Dobbs, G J; Phillips, M; Davies, H; Aoun, S

    2015-03-01

    Little is known about the experiences of patients with severe comorbidity discharged from Intensive Care Units (ICUs). This project aimed to determine the effects of an ICU stay for patients with severe comorbidity by comparing 1) quality of life (QOL), 2) the symptom profile of hospital survivors and 3) health service use after hospital discharge for patients admitted to ICU with and without severe comorbidity. A case-control study was used. Patients with severe comorbidity were matched to a contemporaneous cohort of ICU patients by age and severity of illness. Assessment tools were the Medical Outcome Study 36-item short-form and European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C15-PAL questionnaires for QOL and the Symptom Assessment Scale for symptom distress. A proportional odds assumption was performed using an ordinal regression model. The difference in QOL outcome was the dependent variable for each pair. Health service use after discharge from ICU was monitored with patient diaries. Patients aged 18+ years admitted to an ICU in a metropolitan teaching hospital between 2011 and 2012 were included. We recruited 30 cases and 30 controls. QOL improved over the six months after hospital discharge for patients with and without severe comorbidity (P <0.01) within the groups but there was no difference found between the groups (P >0.3). There was no difference in symptoms or health service use between patients with and without severe comorbidity. ICU admission for people with severe comorbidity can be appropriate to stabilise the patient's condition and is likely to be followed by some overall improvement over the six months after hospital discharge.

  19. Clinical and Therapeutic Profiles of Heart Failure Patients admitted to a Tertiary Hospital, Aseer Region, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Assiri, Abdullah S

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the clinical and therapeutic profiles of heart failure (HF) cases admitted to Aseer Central Hospital (ACH), Saudi Arabia. Methods: A retrospective cohort of 300 consecutive patients admitted with the diagnosis of HF to ACH from 1 June 2007 to 31 May 2009 were included in the study. Data on demographic variables, aetiologic factors, risk factors, and therapeutic profiles of patients with HF were collected and analysed. Results: The patients’ mean age was 67.4 ± 13.7 years and 68.7% of them were male. The commonest aetiologies for HF were ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and hypertension in 38.3% and 33.3% of patients, respectively. A total of 61.3% of patients were diabetics. Other risk factors for HF included renal failure in 9.7%, atrial fibrillation in 13%, and anaemia in 48.3% of patients. Echocardiography was performed in 98.7% of cases: the average ejection fraction (EF) was 33% ± 17. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin 2 receptor blockers were used in 68.3% of cases, β-blockers in 51.6% of cases and digoxin in 28.3% of cases. Conclusion: The major causes of HF in our study were IHD and hypertension. Diabetes and anaemia were common risk factors. The cohort constituted an intermediate HF risk group (ejection fraction (EF) 33%). Important therapeutic agents like angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor I, β-blockers and digoxin were underutilised. Fostering such therapy in practice will lead to a better outcome in the management of HF patients. Anaemia was a significant risk factor in our HF patients and should be managed properly. PMID:21969895

  20. Profile of patients admitted to a triage dermatology clinic at a tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Bertanha, Fernanda; Nelumba, Erica Judite Pimentel; Freiberg, Alyne Korukian; Samorano, Luciana Paula; Festa Neto, Cyro

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge of epidemiological data on skin diseases is important in planning preventive strategies in healthcare services. Objective To assess data from patients admitted to a triage dermatology clinic. Methods A retrospective study was performed of patients admitted over a one-year period to the Triage Dermatology Clinic at the Hospital das Clínicas of the University of São Paulo Medical School. Data were obtained from record books. The variables analyzed were: patient age, gender, dermatologic disease (initial diagnosis), origin (from where the patient was referred) and destination (where the patient was referred to). Results A total of 16,399 patients and 17,454 diseases were identified for analysis. The most frequent skin disorders were eczema (18%), cutaneous infections (13.1%), erythematous squamous diseases (6.8%) and malignant cutaneous neoplasms (6.1%). Atopic dermatitis was the most common disease in children. Acne was more common among children and adults, as were viral warts. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma were more common in the elderly. Contact dermatitis and acne predominated in women. The most frequent origins were: the primary/secondary health system (26.6%), other outpatient specialties (25.5%), emergency care (14.9%); while the destinations were: discharged (27.5%), follow-up in our Dermatology Division (24.1%), return (14.1%) and the primary/secondary health system (20.7%). Conclusion Understanding the incidence of skin diseases is fundamental in making decisions regarding resource allocation for clinical care and research. Thus, we believe our findings can contribute to improving public health policies. PMID:27438199

  1. Self-Admitted Pretensions of Mac Users on a Predominantly PC University Campus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firmin, Michael W.; Wood, Whitney L. Muhlenkamp; Firmin, Ruth L.; Wood, Jordan C.

    2010-01-01

    The present qualitative research study addressed the overall research question of college students' pretention dynamics in the context of a university setting. Thirty-five Mac users were interviewed on a university campus that exclusively supports PC machines. Mac users shared four self-admitted pretensions related to using Macintosh computers.…

  2. Safety and effectiveness of transdermal nicotine patch in smokers admitted with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Meine, Trip J; Patel, Manesh R; Washam, Jeffrey B; Pappas, Paul A; Jollis, James G

    2005-04-15

    An analysis of smokers admitted with acute coronary syndrome who received transdermal nicotine therapy and those who did not was performed. Propensity analysis was used to match patients. Transdermal nicotine therapy appears safe and does not have an effect on the mortality of patients with acute coronary syndromes.

  3. Differences of Personality, Defensiveness, and Compliance between Admitting and Denying Male Sex Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Birgisson, Gunnar Hrafn

    1996-01-01

    Assessed predicted psychological differences between denying (n=30) and admitting (n=72) male sex offenders within the framework of Eysenck's theory on the personality of criminals. The Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (EPQ) and Gudjonsson's Compliance Questionnaire (CQ) were administered to consenting participants who were probationers in…

  4. Personality preference distribution of dental students admitted to one dental school using different selection methods.

    PubMed

    von Bergmann, Hsingchi; Dalrymple, Kirsten R; Shuler, Charles F

    2014-04-01

    This study sought to determine whether using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI) would detect differences in personality preferences in first-year dental students admitted to the same dental school through different admission methods. First-year dental students admitted in 2000 and 2001 were given the MBTI instrument during orientation prior to the start of classes. In fall 2000, the Class of 2004 had 140 students, with 116 in the traditional track and twenty-four in the parallel problem-based learning (PBL) track. In fall 2001, the Class of 2005 had 144 students, all enrolled in the PBL curriculum. All students admitted to the PBL track had experienced a process that included evaluation of their participation in a small group. Students in the traditional track had individual interviews with faculty members. Both student groups were required to meet the same baseline grade point average and Dental Admission Test standards. In 2000, the PBL students showed personality preferences that were distinctly different from the personality preferences of traditional track students in the categories of Extroversion (89 percent PBL, 44 percent traditional) and Thinking (72 percent PBL, 39 percent traditional). In 2001, the all-PBL class retained the trend towards Extroversion (69 percent). This study suggests that admission method may effectively change the personality preference distribution exhibited by the students who are admitted to dental school.

  5. Enquiry about the Needs of Children Whose Mothers Are Admitted to Psychiatric Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderson, J.; McCune, N.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess whether children's needs are taken into consideration in female patients who are admitted to an adult psychiatric hospital. A retrospective case note audit of 100 female inpatients aged between 18 and 55 years over a 6-month period were randomly selected. The medical and nursing case notes of patients with…

  6. Admission Rhetoric and Academic Self-Efficacy: The Importance of First Communications for Conditionally Admitted Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Joyce; Heaney, April

    2013-01-01

    This article advocates for increased attention on the college admission letter to strengthen conditionally admitted students' academic self-efficacy as they begin the college experience. Although first communications are often considered perfunctory, the language of admission materials has strong potential to help at-risk students begin college…

  7. Symmetries and conservation laws of space-times admitting two commuting killing vectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menon, Balraj

    In this dissertation, we determined all first-order generalized symmetries of the vacuum Einstein equations for spacetimes admitting two commuting Killing vector fields. The field equations for the two Killing vector models, referred to as the reduced Einstein equations, were first derived using a projection formalism first developed by Geroch. In the derivation of the reduced Einstein equations, we assumed the two-dimensional distribution orthogonal to the vector spaces spanned by the Killing vector fields admits integral submanifolds. Prior to embarking on the symmetry analysis, the reduced Einstein equations were expressed in harmonic-null coordinates. A brief survey of the theory of symmetry groups of differential equations, variational symmetries, and local conservation laws preceded the generalized symmetry analysis of the reduced Einstein equation. These concepts were motivated and presented through their application to a variety of physical systems drawn from classical mechanics, quantum mechanics, classical electromagnetism, and general relativity. We obtained partial results from a preliminary analysis of kth-order generalized symmetries (for k ≥ 1) of the reduced Einstein equations. This was followed by the determination of all first-order generalized symmetries admitted by the reduced Einstein equations. We showed that all first-order generalized symmetries of the reduced Einstein equations are, in fact, prolonged point symmetries. Since the reduced Einstein equations admit a Lagrangian formulation, the variational symmetries and local conservation laws associated with the first-order symmetries were also determined and discussed.

  8. Surveillance for West Nile Virus in Clinic-admitted Raptors, Colorado

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Gail; Edwards, Eric; Scherpelz, Judy; Bowen, Richard; Komar, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    In 2005, 13.5% of clinic-admitted raptors in northern Colorado tested positive for West Nile virus (WNV). Clinic-admitted–raptor surveillance detected WNV activity nearly 14 weeks earlier than other surveillance systems. WNV surveillance using live raptor admissions to rehabilitation clinics may offer a novel surveillance method and should be considered along with other techniques already in use. PMID:17479898

  9. Characteristics of Youths with Hearing Loss Admitted to Substance Abuse Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Janet C.; Schiller, James A.; Guthmann, Debra

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a profile of youths with hearing loss admitted to substance abuse treatment facilities. Intake data on 4,167 youths (28% female; 3% reporting a hearing loss) collected via the Global Appraisal of Individual Need-I assessment was used for the analyses. Information on demographics, environmental…

  10. 76 FR 60602 - Proposed Collection of Information: Annual Letters-Certificates of Authority (A) and Admitted...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... Admitted Reinsurer (B) AGENCY: Financial Management Service, Fiscal Service, Treasury. ACTION: Notice and request for comments. SUMMARY: The Financial Management Service, as part of its continuing effort to.... ADDRESSES: Direct all written comments to Financial Management Service, 3700 East West Highway, Records...

  11. Cortisol Predicts Behavioral Dysregulation and Length of Stay among Children Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luebbe, Aaron M.; Elledge, L. Christian; Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Stoppelbein, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in behavioral regulation system (BRS) and stress response system (SRS) functioning may reflect greater biological sensitivity to context. The current study tested whether children's cortisol, a measure of the SRS, was related to observed dysregulated behavior, an indicator of the BRS, in a sample of children admitted for…

  12. Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy: A Brief Intervention for Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted After a Suicide Attempt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Cox, Daniel W.; Greene, Farrah N.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no empirically based inpatient intervention for individuals who have attempted suicide exists. We present an overview of a novel psychotherapeutic approach, Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), currently under development and empirical testing for inpatients who have been admitted for a recent suicide attempt. PACT is adapted from an…

  13. Medicare Cost Differences between Nursing Home Patients Admitted with and without Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Bruce; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Fahlman, Cheryl; Quinn, Charlene C.; Burton, Lynda; Zuckerman, Illene H.; Hebel, J. Rich; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Singhal, Puneet K.; Magaziner, Jay

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective in this study was to compare Medicare costs of treating older adults with and without dementia in nursing home settings. Design and Methods: An expert panel established the dementia status of a stratified random sample of newly admitted residents in 59 Maryland nursing homes between 1992 and 1995. Medicare expenditures…

  14. Predictors of Service Disengagement in First-Admitted Adolescents with Psychosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schimmelmann, Benno Graf; Conus, Philippe; Schacht, Melanie; McGorry, Patrick; Lambert, Martin

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess the risk and predictors of service disengagement in adolescents with first-episode psychosis (FEP) receiving their first treatment in a long-standing early intervention and prevention centre. Method: The Early Psychosis Prevention and Intervention Centre (EPPIC) in Australia admitted 157 adolescents, ages 15 to 18, with FEP…

  15. College Choice of Minority Students Admitted to Institutions in the Council for Christian Colleges and Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Confer, Christopher; Mamiseishvili, Ketevan

    2012-01-01

    The study examined the factors that affected minority students' choice to enroll at private four-year faith-based institutions in the Council of Christian Colleges and Universities (CCCU) in the United States. The study utilized the data from the College Board's Admitted Student Questionnaire PLUS (ASQ PLUS) survey. The final sample included 283…

  16. Comparison Between Emergency Department and Inpatient Nurses’ Perceptions of Boarding of Admitted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pulliam, Bryce C.; Liao, Mark Y.; Geissler, Theodore M.; Richards, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The boarding of admitted patients in the emergency department (ED) is a major cause of crowding and access block. One solution is boarding admitted patients in inpatient ward (W) hallways. This study queried and compared ED and W nurses’ opinions toward ED and W boarding. It also assessed their preferred boarding location if they were patients. Methods: A survey administered to a convenience sample of ED and W nurses was performed in a 631-bed academic medical center (30,000 admissions/year) with a 68-bed ED (70,000 visits/ year). We identified nurses as ED or W, and if W, whether they had previously worked in the ED. The nurses were asked if there were any circumstances where admitted patients should be boarded in ED or W hallways. They were also asked their preferred location if they were admitted as a patient. Six clinical scenarios were then presented, and the nurses’ opinions on boarding based on each scenario were queried. Results: Ninety nurses completed the survey, with a response rate of 60%; 35 (39%) were current ED nurses (cED), 40 (44%) had previously worked in the ED (pED). For all nurses surveyed 46 (52%) believed admitted patients should board in the ED. Overall, 52 (58%) were opposed to W boarding, with 20% of cED versus 83% of current W (cW) nurses (P < 0.0001), and 28% of pED versus 85% of nurses never having worked in the ED (nED) were opposed (P < 0.001). If admitted as patients themselves, 43 (54%) of all nurses preferred W boarding, with 82% of cED versus 33% of cW nurses (P < 0.0001) and 74% of pED versus 34% nED nurses (P = 0.0007). The most commonly cited reasons for opposition to hallway boarding were lack of monitoring and patient privacy. For the 6 clinical scenarios, significant differences in opinion regarding W boarding existed in all but 2 cases: a patient with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but requiring oxygen, and an intubated, unstable sepsis patient. Conclusion: Inpatient nurses and those who have

  17. Fetal, Infant and Maternal Outcomes among Women with Prolapsed Membranes Admitted before 29 Weeks Gestation

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Julie E.; Lisonkova, Sarka; Lee, Tang; De Silva, Dane A.; von Dadelszen, Peter; Synnes, Anne R.; Joseph, K. S.; Liston, Robert M.; Magee, Laura A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined fetal, infant and maternal mortality and morbidity among pregnant women at very early gestation with an open cervix and prolapsed membranes. We carried out a study describing the outcomes of women hospitalized with prolapsed membranes at 22–28 weeks’ gestation. Methods We prospectively recruited women with singleton pregnancies admitted at 22–28 weeks’ gestation to tertiary hospitals of the Canadian Perinatal Network between 2005 and 2009. Time-to-delivery, perinatal death, neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) admission, severe neonatal morbidity and severe maternal morbidity were compared between women admitted at 22–25 vs. 26–28 weeks gestation. Logistic regression was used to estimate adjusted odds ratios (AOR) and 95% confidence intervals. Results 129 women at 22–25 weeks gestation and 65 women at 26–28 weeks gestation were admitted to hospital and the median time-to-delivery was 4 days in both groups. Stillbirth rates were 12.4% vs 4.6% among women admitted at earlier vs later gestation (AOR 2.8, 95% CI 0.5–14.8), while perinatal death rates were 38.0% vs 6.1% (AOR 14.1, 95% CI 3.5–59.0), respectively. There were no significant differences in NICU admission and severe morbidity among live-born infants; 89.4% and 82.3% died or were admitted to NICU, (P value 0.18), and 53.9% vs 44.0% of NICU infants had severe neonatal morbidity (P value 0.28). Antibiotics, tocolysis and cerclage did not have a significant effect on perinatal death. Maternal death or severe maternal morbidity occurred in 8.5% and 6.2% of women admitted at 22–25 vs 26–28 weeks (AOR 1.2, 95% CI 0.4–4.2). Conclusion Perinatal mortality among women with prolapsed membranes at very early gestation is high, although significantly lower among those admitted at a relatively later gestational age. Rates of adverse maternal outcomes are also high. This information can be used to counsel women with prolapsed membranes at 22 to 28 weeks

  18. Quality of Life in Patients with Substance Use Disorders Admitted to Detoxification Compared with Those Admitted to Hospitals for Medical Disorders: Follow-Up Results

    PubMed Central

    Vederhus, John-Kåre; Pripp, Are Hugo; Clausen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) in patients admitted to a general hospital was compared with those admitted to a detoxification unit for the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD). This study combines data from two separate data collections: a cross-sectional study in a general hospital unit (somatic sample, N = 519) and a follow-up study in a detoxification unit (SUD sample, N = 140). A total of 659 patients recruited during 2008–2013 were included in this study. All patients completed a generic QoL questionnaire at inclusion, and the SUD sample also completed it at the six-month follow-up. SUD patients experienced comparably low physical QoL and had significantly lower psychological, social, and existential QoL domain scores when compared with the somatic sample. Mental distress and having a SUD were the major factors explaining variations in QoL, with both influencing QoL negatively. In the SUD sample, QoL improved moderately at the six-month follow-up with less improvement for the domain relationship to a partner. To facilitate the recovery of SUD patients, clinicians must view their patients’ situation holistically and invest efforts into the different life domains affected by poor QoL. PMID:27226719

  19. Psychological Evaluation of Patients in Critical Care/Intensive Care Unit and Patients Admitted in Wards

    PubMed Central

    Sharma B, Gaurav; EVS, Maben; MS, Kotian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Psychological assessment for depression, anxiety and stress among ICU patients and the patients admitted to ward in a hospital in India. This aspect did not get much attention in India so far. Such studies were common in developed countries. Therefore we decided in this study, to analyse the psychological status responses from the hospitalised patients in Mangalore using a validated questionnaire. Aim: To assess and compare the depression, anxiety and stress Scores from the patients admitted in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) and those admitted to ward. Materials and Methods: Eighty patients admitted to hospital, 40 from ICU and 40 admitted to ward were recruited. They were explained the procedure and after taking an informed consent, they were administered Depression, Anxiety, Stress Scale (DASS) Questionnaire, which contains 42-item questionnaire which includes three self-report scales designed to measure the negative emotional states of depression, anxiety and stress. The responses were computed and tabulated. We analysed the responses with Student’s t-test and Chi-square test, p<0.05 accepted as statistically significant. Results: The results revealed significantly elevated stress, depression and anxiety among the ICU patients when compared to those in the ward (p<0.001). Above normal anxiety and stress levels were also seen in the ward patients, compared to the scores in normal range. 50% and 25% respectively showed mild and normal depression scores in ward patients, compared to 12% and 5% in those admitted to ICU. This trend was also true for Anxiety and stress scores. Conclusion: From the results we found that there were elevated depression, anxiety and stress levels among the patients and this was significantly higher in ICU patients. Various factors could influence the psychological wellbeing of the patients, including the hospital environment, care givers, presence of family members nearby apart from the seriousness of illness, apprehensions about

  20. Factors Associated with Mortality in Patients with Autoimmune Diseases Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit in Bogota, Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Carrizosa, Jorge Armando; Aponte, Jorge; Cartagena, Diego; Cervera, Ricard; Ospina, Maria Teresa; Sanchez, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    Patients with autoimmune diseases (ADs) are a challenge for the intensivist; it is hard to differentiate among infection, disease activity, and combinations of both, leading to high mortality. This study is a retrospective analysis of 124 critically ill patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) in a university hospital between 2008 and 2016. Bivariate case–control analysis was performed, using patients who died as cases; later, analysis using a logistic regression model with variables that were associated with mortality was conducted. Four variables were consistently associated with mortality in the logistic regression model and had adequate prediction value (Hosmer and Lemeshow statistic = 0.760; Nagelkerke R-squared = 0.494). The risk of death was found to be statistically associated with the following: shock at admission to ICU [odds ratio (OR): 7.56; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.78–31.97, p = 0.006], hemoglobin level <8 g/dL (OR: 16.12; 95% CI: 3.35–77.52, p = 0.001), use of cytostatic agents prior to admission to the ICU (OR: 8.71; 95% CI: 1.23–61.5, p = 0.03), and low levels ofcomplement C3 (OR: 5.23; 95% CI: 1.28–21.35, p = 0.02). These variables can guide clinicians in the early identification of patients with AD with increased risk of death during hospitalization, leading to initial therapies seeking to improve survival. These results should be evaluated prospectively in future studies to establish their predictive power. PMID:28386264

  1. Neurocysticercosis: declining incidence among patients admitted to a large public hospital in Guayaquil, Ecuador

    PubMed Central

    Alarcón, Tomas A; Del Brutto, Oscar H

    2012-01-01

    It has been stated that new cases of neurocysticercosis (NCC) are declining in some endemic regions over the past years. To confirm this assertion, we evaluated all NCC patients (n = 362) admitted to the Neurological Service of our Hospital from 1982 to 2011, and we noted a significant reduction in the incidence of NCC, when compared with the total number of patients admitted to the Service over the study years (6.4% of 2,723 patients from 1982 to 1991, 2.7% of 3,056 patients from 1992 to 2001, and 3.5% of 2,996 patients from 2002 to 2012; p < 0.0001). It is likely that improved sanitation, together with increased availability of neuroimaging machines which allow prompt recognition and management of NCC cases avoiding disease progression, were the main responsibles for our findings. PMID:23265556

  2. Prevalence and Predictors of Chronic Health Conditions of Inmates Newly Admitted to Maximum Security Prisons.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jennifer R; Befus, Montina; Mukherjee, Dhritiman V; Lowy, Franklin D; Larson, Elaine L

    2015-07-01

    This study estimated the prevalence of chronic medical conditions and risk predictors of 759 newly admitted inmates in two New York State maximum-security prisons. The most prevalent conditions were respiratory (34.1%), cardiovascular (17.4%), and sexually transmitted diseases (STD; 16.1%); least prevalent were HIV (3.6%), cancer (1.7%), and kidney disease (1.7%). Results of the multivariable logistic regression showed that females had higher risk for all conditions except cardiovascular and liver disease; individuals aged 40 years and older had significantly higher risk for all conditions except asthma and STD; non-Hispanic Black inmates had higher risk for respiratory disease and STD; cigarette smoking was associated with asthma; and obesity was significantly associated with diabetes, asthma, and cardiovascular conditions. These findings highlight the heavy burden of chronic illnesses among newly admitted inmates and the need to address adequate screening, prevention, and treatment services.

  3. Psychological problems in the family members of gravely traumatised patients admitted into an intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Pérez-San Gregorio, M A; Blanco-Picabia, A; Murillo-Cabezas, F; Domínguez-Roldán, J M; Sánchez, B; Núñez-Roldán, A

    1992-01-01

    The aim of these studies was the analysis of the psychological repercussions on the closest members of families of 76 gravely traumatised patients admitted into the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Hospital Universitario de Rehabilitación y Traumatología "Virgen del Rocio", Sevilla (Spain). An investigation based on social information and the Clinical Analysis Questionnaire was used. The sample of family members was composed of 42 women and 34 men, with an average age of 41.3 years (SD +/- 12.8). Results showed that (a) more than 50% of the family members of gravely traumatised patients admitted into an ICU showed symptoms of depression, (b) the women scored more points in hypochondria, suicidal depression, anxious depression, low-energy depression, guilt-resentment, apathy-withdrawal, paranoia, schizophrenia, psychasthenia and psychological disadjustment, and (c) in general terms, the psychological characteristics of the families were far from the norm of the control group.

  4. Evaluating the Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) System for Admitted Patients in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Delia L.; Mihalov, Leslie K.; Cohen, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) systems were developed to provide a reproducible assessment of a child’s clinical status while hospitalized. Most studies investigating the PEWS evaluate its usefulness in the inpatient setting. Limited studies evaluate the effectiveness and integration of PEWS in the pediatric emergency department (ED). The goal of this study was to explore the test characteristics of an ED-assigned PEWS score for intensive care unit (ICU) admission or clinical deterioration in admitted patients. Methods This was a prospective 12-month observational study of patients, aged 0 to 21 years, admitted from the ED of an urban, tertiary care children’s hospital. ED nurses were instructed in PEWS assignment and electronic medical record (EMR) documentation. Interrater reliability between nurses was evaluated. PEWS scores were measured at initial assessment (P0) and time of admission (P1). Patients were stratified into outcome groups: those admitted to the ICU either from the ED or as transfers from the floor and those admitted to the floor only. Clinical deterioration was defined as transfer to the ICU within 6 hours or within 6 to 24 hours of admission. PEWS scores and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were compared for patients admitted to the floor, ICU, and with clinical deterioration. Results The authors evaluated 12,306 consecutively admitted patients, with 99% having a PEWS documented in the EMR. Interrater reliability was excellent (intraclass coefficient 0.91). A total of 1,300 (10.6%) patients were admitted to the ICU and 11,066 (89.4%) were admitted to the floor. PEWS scores were higher for patients in the ICU group (P0 = 2.8, SD ± 2.4; P1 = 3.2, SD ± 2.4; p < 0.0001) versus floor patients (P0 = 0.7, SD ± 1.2; P1 = 0.5, SD ± 0.9; p < 0.0001). To predict the need for ICU admission, the optimal cutoff points on the ROC are P0 = 1 and P1 = 2, with areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of 0.79 and 0

  5. Prevalence and Predictors of Chronic Health Conditions of Inmates Newly Admitted to Maximum Security Prisons

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jennifer R.; Befus, Montina; Mukherjee, Dhritiman V.; Lowy, Franklin D.; Larson, Elaine L.

    2015-01-01

    This study estimated the prevalence of chronic medical conditions and risk predictors of 759 newly admitted inmates in two New York State maximum-security prisons. The most prevalent conditions were respiratory (34.1%), cardiovascular (17.4%), and sexually transmitted diseases (STD; 16.1%); least prevalent were HIV (3.6%), cancer (1.7%), and kidney disease (1.7%). Results of the multivariable logistic regression showed that females had higher risk for all conditions except cardiovascular and liver disease; individuals aged 40 years and older had significantly higher risk for all conditions except asthma and STD; non-Hispanic Black inmates had higher risk for respiratory disease and STD; cigarette smoking was associated with asthma; and obesity was significantly associated with diabetes, asthma, and cardiovascular conditions. These findings highlight the heavy burden of chronic illnesses among newly admitted inmates and the need to address adequate screening, prevention, and treatment services. PMID:26084947

  6. Wormholes admitting conformal Killing vectors and supported by generalized Chaplygin gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhfittig, Peter K. F.

    2015-08-01

    When Morris and Thorne first proposed that traversable wormholes may be actual physical objects, they concentrated on the geometry by specifying the shape and redshift functions. This mathematical approach necessarily raises questions regarding the determination of the required stress-energy tensor. This paper discusses a natural way to obtain a complete wormhole solution by assuming that the wormhole (1) is supported by generalized Chaplygin gas and (2) admits conformal Killing vectors.

  7. Missed Opportunities for Nutritional Rehabilitation in Children Admitted to Surgical Wards

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Pooja; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Phatak, Ajay; Desai, Rajendra; Srivastava, Shirish

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malnutrition in children has serious health and economic consequences. We studied documentation of malnutrition, actual prevalence, and treatment given in children admitted to surgical wards. Methods. Retrospective study of 154 patients aged <5 yrs admitted to general surgical, orthopedic, and otorhinolaryngology wards. Records were evaluated for completeness of data, way of documentation, and data quality. Descriptive analysis was done. If malnutrition was not identified and/or proper action was not taken, it was defined as a “missed opportunity.” Results. Of 154 records audited, 100 (64.94%) were males, 108 (70.13%) were from general surgery ward, and 78 (50.65%) were residing in suburban area. The mean (SD) age of the study population was 2.32 (1.16) years whereas mean (SD) duration of stay was 5.84 (6.29) days. Weight and height were mentioned in 116 (75.32%) and 8 (5.19%) records, respectively, mostly by nonsurgical personnel. Documentation and treatment of malnutrition were poor. Out of 106 apparently correct weight records, 19 (17.93%) children were severely undernourished and 30 (28.30%) were moderately undernourished whereas 20 (18.87%) children were not undernourished but required nutritional attention. Conclusion. There is poor documentation of nutritional indicators of children admitted to surgical wards. From data that was available, it is apparent that malnutrition is at high levels. “Identification” and hence management of malnutrition need more attention. PMID:27429836

  8. The hometowns of malaria patients admitted to King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok.

    PubMed

    Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2003-01-01

    We report the data on the hometowns of malaria patients admitted to King Chulalongkorn Memorial Hospital, Bangkok, between 1997 and 2001. A total of 162 patients was identified. Of these, 62 lived in Bangkok; all presented with a history of travelling to endemic areas in rural Thailand. Among the other 100 patients who did not live in Bangkok, 15, 6, 10, 12, 21 and 19 were from the northern, southern, western, eastern, northeastern and central regions, respectively. All of these cases were referred or moved from the endemic area and admitted to the hospital. The remaining 17 cases were foreigners, 10 migrant workers (all from Asia) and 7 travelers (2 from Asia and 5 from Europe). According to this study, there were four main groups of patients admitted to the tertiary hospital in Bangkok: a) people in Bangkok exposed to malaria when travelling to an endemic area, b) people who were infected in their hometown in an endemic area and referred or moved to the hospital, c) migrant workers from nearby countries, who bring malaria from endemic areas in their countries, and d) naïve cases, such as the travelers from Western countries, who exposed to malaria while travelling in Thailand.

  9. Missed Opportunities for Nutritional Rehabilitation in Children Admitted to Surgical Wards.

    PubMed

    Dave, Pooja; Nimbalkar, Somashekhar; Phatak, Ajay; Desai, Rajendra; Srivastava, Shirish

    2016-01-01

    Background. Malnutrition in children has serious health and economic consequences. We studied documentation of malnutrition, actual prevalence, and treatment given in children admitted to surgical wards. Methods. Retrospective study of 154 patients aged <5 yrs admitted to general surgical, orthopedic, and otorhinolaryngology wards. Records were evaluated for completeness of data, way of documentation, and data quality. Descriptive analysis was done. If malnutrition was not identified and/or proper action was not taken, it was defined as a "missed opportunity." Results. Of 154 records audited, 100 (64.94%) were males, 108 (70.13%) were from general surgery ward, and 78 (50.65%) were residing in suburban area. The mean (SD) age of the study population was 2.32 (1.16) years whereas mean (SD) duration of stay was 5.84 (6.29) days. Weight and height were mentioned in 116 (75.32%) and 8 (5.19%) records, respectively, mostly by nonsurgical personnel. Documentation and treatment of malnutrition were poor. Out of 106 apparently correct weight records, 19 (17.93%) children were severely undernourished and 30 (28.30%) were moderately undernourished whereas 20 (18.87%) children were not undernourished but required nutritional attention. Conclusion. There is poor documentation of nutritional indicators of children admitted to surgical wards. From data that was available, it is apparent that malnutrition is at high levels. "Identification" and hence management of malnutrition need more attention.

  10. Nurses' understanding influences comprehension of patients admitted in the observation unit.

    PubMed

    Desme, Aline; Mendes, Nathalie; Perruche, Franck; Veillard, Elsa; Elie, Caroline; Moulinet, Françoise; Sanson, Fabienne; Georget, Jean-Michel; Tissier, Anne; Pourriat, Jean-Louis; Claessens, Yann-Erick

    2013-01-01

    Comprehension is poor in patients admitted in the emergency observation unit. Teamwork communication gaps could contribute to patients' misunderstanding of their health condition. To determine in patients admitted in the emergency observation unit whether comprehension of diagnosis, prognosis, and management depended on nurses' comprehension, the authors conducted a prospective observational study in a busy adult emergency department of a tertiary teaching hospital in Paris over 2 months. Consecutive patients admitted in the emergency observation unit were included. Patients' and nurses' comprehension of diagnosis, prognosis, and management was compared with the statements of the emergency department attending physicians for these items. The authors observed whether patients' misunderstanding was associated with nurses' misunderstanding. A total of 544 patients were evaluated. For each patient, nurses' and patients' comprehension was available. Patients understood severity in 40%, organ involved in 69%, medical wording in 57%, reason for admission in 48%, and discharge instruction in 67%. In comparison with patients, nurses better understood each item except for discharge instruction. The authors observed that patients' comprehension was better when nurses understood diagnosis (p <.0001), reasons for admission (p =.032) and discharge instructions (p =.002). Nurses' understanding of severity did not modify patients' comprehension. These results support the conclusions that communication gaps in teamwork alter patients' comprehension and that nurses' and patients' misunderstandings are associated. Therefore, improving communication by nurses and physicians to patients may improve patients' understanding.

  11. ADMIT: a toolbox for guaranteed model invalidation, estimation and qualitative–quantitative modeling

    PubMed Central

    Streif, Stefan; Savchenko, Anton; Rumschinski, Philipp; Borchers, Steffen; Findeisen, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Often competing hypotheses for biochemical networks exist in the form of different mathematical models with unknown parameters. Considering available experimental data, it is then desired to reject model hypotheses that are inconsistent with the data, or to estimate the unknown parameters. However, these tasks are complicated because experimental data are typically sparse, uncertain, and are frequently only available in form of qualitative if–then observations. ADMIT (Analysis, Design and Model Invalidation Toolbox) is a MatLabTM-based tool for guaranteed model invalidation, state and parameter estimation. The toolbox allows the integration of quantitative measurement data, a priori knowledge of parameters and states, and qualitative information on the dynamic or steady-state behavior. A constraint satisfaction problem is automatically generated and algorithms are implemented for solving the desired estimation, invalidation or analysis tasks. The implemented methods built on convex relaxation and optimization and therefore provide guaranteed estimation results and certificates for invalidity. Availability: ADMIT, tutorials and illustrative examples are available free of charge for non-commercial use at http://ifatwww.et.uni-magdeburg.de/syst/ADMIT/ Contact: stefan.streif@ovgu.de PMID:22451270

  12. Using the Admitted Class Evaluation Service (ACES) to Conduct Institution-Specific Admission or Placement Validity Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaw, Emily J.

    2011-01-01

    Presented at the 23rd Annual Historically Black Colleges & Universities (HBCU) Conference in Atlanta, GA, in September 2011. Admitted Class Evaluation Service (ACES) is the College Board's free online service that predicts how admitted students will perform at a college or university generally, and how successful students will be in specific…

  13. Improving the accuracy of admitted subacute clinical costing: an action research approach.

    PubMed

    Hakkennes, Sharon; Arblaster, Ross; Lim, Kim

    2016-08-29

    Objective The aim of the present study was to determine whether action research could be used to improve the breadth and accuracy of clinical costing data in an admitted subacute settingMethods The setting was a 100-bed in-patient rehabilitation centre. Using a pre-post study design all admitted subacute separations during the 2011-12 financial year were eligible for inclusion. An action research framework aimed at improving clinical costing methodology was developed and implemented.Results In all, 1499 separations were included in the study. A medical record audit of a random selection of 80 separations demonstrated that the use of an action research framework was effective in improving the breadth and accuracy of the costing data. This was evidenced by a significant increase in the average number of activities costed, a reduction in the average number of activities incorrectly costed and a reduction in the average number of activities missing from the costing, per episode of care.Conclusions Engaging clinicians and cost centre managers was effective in facilitating the development of robust clinical costing data in an admitted subacute setting. Further investigation into the value of this approach across other care types and healthcare services is warranted.What is known about this topic? Accurate clinical costing data is essential for informing price models used in activity-based funding. In Australia, there is currently a lack of robust admitted subacute cost data to inform the price model for this care type.What does this paper add? The action research framework presented in this study was effective in improving the breadth and accuracy of clinical costing data in an admitted subacute setting.What are the implications for practitioners? To improve clinical costing practices, health services should consider engaging key stakeholders, including clinicians and cost centre managers, in reviewing clinical costing methodology. Robust clinical costing data has the

  14. Providing plastic zone extrusion

    DOEpatents

    Manchiraju, Venkata Kiran; Feng, Zhili; David, Stan A.; Yu, Zhenzhen

    2017-04-11

    Plastic zone extrusion may be provided. First, a compressor may generate frictional heat in stock to place the stock in a plastic zone of the stock. Then, a conveyer may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor and transport the stock in its plastic zone from the compressor. Next, a die may receive the stock in its plastic zone from the conveyer and extrude the stock to form a wire.

  15. National audit of acute severe asthma in adults admitted to hospital. Standards of Care Committee, British Thoracic Society.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, M G; Ryland, I; Harrison, B D

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To ascertain the standard of care for hospital management of acute severe asthma in adults. DESIGN--Questionnaire based retrospective multicentre survey of case records. SETTING--36 hospitals (12 teaching and 24 district general hospitals) across England, Wales, and Scotland. PATIENTS--All patients admitted with acute severe asthma between 1 August and 30 September 1990 immediately before publication of national guidelines for asthma management. MAIN MEASURES--Main recommendations of guidelines for hospital management of acute severe asthma as performed by respiratory and non-respiratory physicians. RESULTS--766 patients (median age 41 (range 16-94) years) were studied; 465 (63%) were female and 448 (61%) had had previous admissions for asthma. Deficiencies were evident for each aspect of care studied, and respiratory physicians performed better than non-respiratory physicians. 429 (56%) patients had had their treatment increased in the two weeks preceding the admission but only 237 (31%) were prescribed oral steroids. Initially 661/766 (86%) patients had peak expiratory flow measured and recorded but only 534 (70%) ever had arterial blood gas tensions assessed. 65 (8%) patients received no steroid treatment in the first 24 hours after admission. Variability of peak expiratory flow was measured before discharge in 597/759 (78%) patients, of whom 334 (56%) achieved good control (variability < 25%). 47 (6%) patients were discharged without oral or inhaled steroids; 182/743 (24%) had no planned outpatient follow up and 114 failed to attend, leaving 447 (60%) seen in clinic within two months. Only 57/629 (8%) patients were recorded as having a written management plan. CONCLUSIONS--The hospital management of a significant minority of patients deviates from recommended national standards and some deviations are potentially serious. Overall, respiratory physicians provide significantly better care than non-respiratory physicians. PMID:10142032

  16. Limit Cycles Bifurcating from a Period Annulus in Continuous Piecewise Linear Differential Systems with Three Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Maurício Firmino Silva; Pessoa, Claudio; Pereira, Weber F.

    We study a class of planar continuous piecewise linear vector fields with three zones. Using the Poincaré map and some techniques for proving the existence of limit cycles for smooth differential systems, we prove that this class admits at least two limit cycles that appear by perturbations of a period annulus. Moreover, we describe the bifurcation of the limit cycles for this class through two examples of two-parameter families of piecewise linear vector fields with three zones.

  17. Comparison of Two Diagnostic Scores of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Pregnant Women Admitted to the ICU

    PubMed Central

    Ducloy-Bouthors, Anne Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the validity of two previously published diagnostic scores of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) in pregnant women admitted to ICU for an acute thrombotic or hemorrhagic complication of delivery and postpartum. Methods This was a population based retrospective study of 154 patients admitted to ICU for severe delivery and postpartum complications in a University Hospital. A recently published score (adapted to physiological changes of pregnancy and based on three components: platelet count, prothrombin time difference and fibrinogen) was compared to the International Society for Thrombosis and Hemostasis (ISTH) score (based on four components: platelet count, fibrinogen, prothrombin time, and fibrin related marker). Both scores were calculated at delivery, ICU admission (day 0), day 1 and day 2 during the postpartum ICU stay. The validity of both scores was assessed by comparison with the consensual and blinded analysis of two experts. The sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve (AUC) of each score were calculated at each time and overall by generalized linear mixed model. The agreement between the two scores was evaluated by the Kappa coefficient. Results The new score had a sensitivity of 0.78, a specificity of 0.97 (p <0.01) and a global AUC of 96% while the ISTH score had a sensitivity of 0.31, a specificity of 0.99 and an AUC of 94% (p <0.01). The Kappa coefficient of correlation between both scores was 0.35. The lower sensitivity of the ISTH score was mainly explained by the lack of fibrinogen and fibrin-related peptides thresholds adapted to the physiological changes of coagulation induced by pregnancy. Conclusion The new DIC score seem highly discriminant in the subset of patients admitted to the ICU after delivery for an acute specific complication. The ISTH score is not recommended in pregnant women because of its poor sensitivity. PMID:27861597

  18. Stressors in the relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Angélica Adam; Weigel, Bruna Dorfey; Dummer, Claus Dieter; Machado, Kelly Campara; Tisott, Taís Montagner

    2016-01-01

    Objective To identify and stratify the main stressors for the relatives of patients admitted to the adult intensive care unit of a teaching hospital. Methods Cross-sectional descriptive study conducted with relatives of patients admitted to an intensive care unit from April to October 2014. The following materials were used: a questionnaire containing identification information and demographic data of the relatives, clinical data of the patients, and 25 stressors adapted from the Intensive Care Unit Environmental Stressor Scale. The degree of stress caused by each factor was determined on a scale of values from 1 to 4. The stressors were ranked based on the average score obtained. Results The main cause of admission to the intensive care unit was clinical in 36 (52.2%) cases. The main stressors were the patient being in a state of coma (3.15 ± 1.23), the patient being unable to speak (3.15 ± 1.20), and the reason for admission (3.00 ± 1.27). After removing the 27 (39.1%) coma patients from the analysis, the main stressors for the relatives were the reason for admission (2.75 ± 1.354), seeing the patient in the intensive care unit (2.51 ± 1.227), and the patient being unable to speak (2.50 ± 1.269). Conclusion Difficulties in communication and in the relationship with the patient admitted to the intensive care unit were identified as the main stressors by their relatives, with the state of coma being predominant. By contrast, the environment, work routines, and relationship between the relatives and intensive care unit team had the least impact as stressors. PMID:27737424

  19. [Determinants of induced abortion among poor women admitted to hospitals in a locality of northeastern Brazil].

    PubMed

    Fonseca, W; Misago, C; Correia, L L; Parente, J A; Oliveira, F C

    1996-02-01

    In Brazil, abortion is legally allowed only when it is necessary to save a woman's life or when pregnancy has occurred following rape. Despite this law, induced abortion is widely carried out. This study presents the findings as to the determinants of 2,084 abortions admitted to two major obstetric hospitals in Fortaleza, Brazil, between October 1992 and September 1993. Most of these women (2,074) have admitted an attempt to terminate pregnancy and 10 women were classified as induced abortion cases based on the findings of signs of intervention such as cervical laceration, perforation or foreign bodies in the vagina or uterus. The study findings indicate that self-administration of medicines plays an important role in terminating pregnancy. Among the 2,074 women who admitted to terminating the pregnancy 66% reported using misoprostol to induce abortion. Misoprostol, a prostaglandin E1 analogue indicated for ulcer treatment, has been widely used as an abortifacient by women in Brazil. Misoprostol has some uterine effects but it is not effective in inducing abortion. Among women who were hospitalized for complications resulting from abortion about 59.7% were 20 to 29 years old and 22.6% were aged less than 20. The majority of the women (91.6%) were Catholic and only 4.3% were illiterate. About 62% of the abortion cases lived alone or did not have a stable partner. Most of the women (59.2%) reported less than 2 live births and 11.8% had experienced a previous abortion; 61.1% of the women were not using a contraceptive method at the time of conception. The main reasons for this were "fear of side effects", "did not expect to have sexual intercourse" and "did not expect to get pregnant". The authors suggest that the situation of a high rate of self-inflicted abortion may be changed by the application of an appropriate contraceptive and reproductive health programme.

  20. Plant poisonings from herbal medication admitted to a Tunisian toxicologic intensive care unit, 1983-1998.

    PubMed

    Hamouda, C; Amamou, M; Thabet, H; Yacoub, M; Hedhili, A; Bescharnia, F; Ben Salah, N; Zhioua, M; Abdelmoumen, S; El Mekki Ben Brahim, N

    2000-06-01

    To collect data on Tunisian herbal toxicity we analysed 56 medical records of patients admitted to the toxicological intensive care unit from 1983 to 1998 following the ingestion of plants. The sex ratio of patients was 1:2, the mean age of patients was 26y (2 to 75y) and II species of plants were involved with Atractylis gummifera (32%), Datura stramonium (25%), Ricinus communis (9%), Nerium oleander (7%) and Peganum harmala (7%) most commonly infested. Poisonings involved neurological (91%), gastrointestinal (73%) and cardiovascular systems (18%). Treatment was mainly symptomatic. The only lethal cases of liver failure involved 16 Atractylis gummifera poisonings.

  1. [Neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia is a frequent condition in patients admitted to the ICU].

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Anette Barbre; Kjærsgaard, Annette; Larsen, Jens Kjærgaard Rolighed; Nielsen, Lars Hedemann

    2015-03-02

    Neurogenic oropharyngeal dysphagia (NOD) is a frequent condition in neurological patients admitted to the ICU, particularly in patients with brainstem lesions. The CNS damage itself can predispose to dysphagia, but also the treatment and preventive measures may predispose to and exacerbate the condition. Frequent pneumonia in a neurological patient is a warning signal that should cause screening for dysphagia. Complications are serious and can be fatal. Neurological patients should be examined for NOD before decannulation. Treatment is difficult, so prevention and multidisciplinary neurological rehabilitation is important.

  2. [Social and medical characteristics of psychiatric patients admitted by the district physician].

    PubMed

    Rogoll, H; Späte, H F

    1984-03-01

    The medical and social backgrounds of the 323 patients admitted to the County Psychiatric and Neurological Hospital Bernburg by committal order (Art. 6 of the Committment Act of the GDR) are analyzed. During these nine years such committals accounted for between 3.1 and 6.5% of all psychiatric admissions. The most frequent causes were schizophrenia (55.1%), alcohol addiction (10.5%) and geropsychiatric disorders (9.3%). Only 2% of the 323 patients concerned were committed indefinitely by court order after the initial six week term had expired. The study establishes the humanitarian nature of the Committal Act and the success of its practical application.

  3. Feasibility and Inter-Rater Reliability of Physical Performance Measures in Acutely Admitted Older Medical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bodilsen, Ann Christine; Juul-Larsen, Helle Gybel; Petersen, Janne; Beyer, Nina; Andersen, Ove; Bandholm, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Objective Physical performance measures can be used to predict functional decline and increased dependency in older persons. However, few studies have assessed the feasibility or reliability of such measures in hospitalized older patients. Here we assessed the feasibility and inter-rater reliability of four simple measures of physical performance in acutely admitted older medical patients. Design During the first 24 hours of hospitalization, the following were assessed twice by different raters in 52 (≥ 65 years) patients admitted for acute medical illness: isometric hand grip strength, 4-meter gait speed, 30-s chair stand and Cumulated Ambulation Score. Relative reliability was expressed as weighted kappa for the Cumulated Ambulation Score or as intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC1,1) and lower limit of the 95%-confidence interval (LL95%) for grip strength, gait speed, and 30-s chair stand. Absolute reliability was expressed as the standard error of measurement and the smallest real difference as a percentage of their respective means (SEM% and SRD%). Results The primary reasons for admission of the 52 included patients were infectious disease and cardiovascular illness. The mean± SD age was 78±8.3 years, and 73.1% were women. All patients performed grip strength and Cumulated Ambulation Score testing, 81% performed the gait speed test, and 54% completed the 30-s chair stand test (46% were unable to rise without using the armrests). No systematic bias was found between first and second tests or between raters. The weighted kappa for the Cumulated Ambulation Score was 0.76 (0.60–0.92). The ICC1,1 values were as follows: grip strength, 0.95 (LL95% 0.92); gait speed, 0.92 (LL95% 0.73), and 30-s chair stand, 0.82 (LL95% 0.67). The SEM% values for grip strength, gait speed, and 30-s chair stand were 8%, 7%, and 18%, and the SRD95% values were 22%, 17%, and 49%. Conclusion In acutely admitted older medical patients, grip strength, gait speed, and the

  4. Trends in Racial Disparities for Injured Patients Admitted to Trauma Centers

    PubMed Central

    Glance, Laurent G; Osler, Turner M; Mukamel, Dana B; Meredith, J Wayne; Li, Yue; Qian, Feng; Dick, Andrew W

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether outcome disparities between black and white trauma patients have decreased over the last 10 years. Data Source Pennsylvania Trauma Outcome Study. Study Design We performed an observational cohort study on 191,887 patients admitted to 28 Level 1 and Level II trauma centers. The main outcomes of interest were (1) death, (2) death or major complication, and (3) failure-to-rescue. Hospitals were categorized according to the proportion of black patients. Multivariate regression models were used to estimate trends in racial disparities and to assess whether the source of racial disparities was within or between hospitals. Principal Findings Trauma patients admitted to hospitals with high concentrations of blacks (>20 percent) had a 45 percent higher odds of death (adj OR: 1.45, 95 percent CI: 1.09–1.92) and a 73 percent higher odds of death or major complication (adj OR: 1.73, 95 percent CI: 1.42–2.11) compared with patients admitted to hospitals treating low proportions of blacks. Blacks and whites admitted to the same hospitals had no difference in mortality (adj OR: 1.05, 95 percent CI: 0.87, 1.27) or death or major complications (adj OR: 1.01; 95 percent CI: 0.90, 1.13). The odds of overall mortality, and death or major complications have been reduced by 32 percent (adj OR: 0.68; 95 percent CI: 0.54–0.86) and 28 percent (adj OR: 0.72; 95 percent CI: 0.60–0.85) between 2000 and 2009, respectively. Racial disparities did not change over 10 years. Conclusion Despite the overall improvement in outcomes, the gap in quality of care between black and white trauma patients in Pennsylvania has not narrowed over the last 10 years. Racial disparities in trauma are due to the fact that black patients are more likely to be treated in lower quality hospitals compared with whites. PMID:23662602

  5. Epidemiology and Outcome of Chemical Burn Patients Admitted in Burn Unit of JNMC Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India: A 5-year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Md Sohaib; Ahmad, Imran; Khurram, M. Fahud; Kanungo, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the epidemiology, clinical variable of chemical burns, and their outcomes to prevent or reduce the frequency and morbidity of such injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on all the patients with chemical burns admitted at author's center between November 2008 and December 2013. All the patients were evaluated in terms of age, sex, total body surface area, etiology, treatment given, morbidity, mortality, final outcome, and then educated regarding specific preventive measures. Results: A total of 96 patients (2.4% of total burn admissions) (42 males and 54 females) were admitted to our hospital with chemical burn injuries. Most of the patients were in the age group of 16–30 years. Incidence in females was slightly higher than in males. Acid was found to be the most common cause of injury. We found 55% patients admitted had <10% total body surface area (TBSA) involvement, 35% had burns involving between 11 and 20% TBSA, and 4% had burns involving 21–30% TBSA, and 6% had burns in >30% TBSA. Morbidity was noticed in the form of skin defect in 80% of cases, soft tissue defect with exposed tendon, bone, or vessels in 16% of cases, and 4% of patients developed contracture and hypertrophic scar. Eighty-six percent of patients required operative intervention. A total of three deaths (3%) were recorded. Conclusion: It was found that chemical burns, though not very common, are deeper burns and can be accidental or non-accidental, and the high-risk age group is 16–25 years. Chemical burns are largely preventable and if properly managed have a good outcome. PMID:25810999

  6. Undiagnosed chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in patients admitted to an acute assessment unit

    PubMed Central

    Eikhof, Karin D.; Olsen, Kristine R.; Wrengler, N. C. H.; Nielsen, Carl; Boedtger, Uffe; Titlestad, Ingrid L.; Weinreich, Ulla M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is very prevalent worldwide, yet underdiagnosed. Aim: This study investigates feasibility of performing spirometry in patients in need of acute hospital admission as well as the prevalence of undiagnosed COPD in the same cohort. Methods: During a two-week period, all patients admitted to three large acute assessment units were evaluated. Patients ≥ 18 years, able to perform spirometry, with no surgery to the thorax or abdomen within the last weeks and no known COPD was included. Patients with FEV1/FEV6 ≤ 0.7 or FEV1 < 80% or FEV6 < 80% were offered follow-up visit after 6 weeks. Results: Of the 1145 admitted patients, 46% were eligible: 28% of those had an abnormal spirometry. The offered follow-up visit was attended by 51% and in this group 17% were diagnosed with lung disease. COPD was the most prevalent diagnosis (73%), and 2/3 was in GOLD group A. In total, 75% of the patients with airflow obstruction at the initial examination remained obstructive. Conclusion: Performing spirometry in patients in need of acute hospital admission is feasible, abnormal findings are common, and COPD is the most prevalent diagnosis. PMID:28326181

  7. A Study of Acute Poisoning Cases Admitted to the University Hospital Emergency Department in Tabriz, Iran.

    PubMed

    Oraie, Mehdi; Hosseini, Mir-Jamal; Islambulchilar, Mina; Hosseini, Seyed-Hasan; Ahadi-Barzoki, Mehdi; Sadr, Habib; Yaghoubi, Hashem

    2017-03-01

    Chemical substances have an important threat due to extensive use in medicine, agriculture, industry and environment. In this retrospective study, etiological and demographic characteristics of acute poisoning cases admitted to a hospital in Iran were investigated. We compared these data with those reported from other parts of the country and the international experiences to evaluate any difference if exists. 7 052 poisoned cases admitted to the hospital from April 2006 to March 2013, by data collected from the medical record in poison center section. According to our results there is a predominance of male patients and the majority of the poisoned patients were between 20-30 years old. Drug poisoning was the most common cause of poisonings. The most frequently involved drugs were benzodiazepines and antidepressants. The seasonal distribution of our study showed a peak in summer. To prevent acute poisonings, the social education about the risk assessment of central nervous system-acting drugs and reduction of the exposure period of people to pesticides are recommended. This study suggested a proper educational program for the public and primary care units. Our results provide useful information for preventive strategies.

  8. Unintentional injuries among children admitted in a tertiary care hospital in North Kerala.

    PubMed

    Sheriff, Akbar; Rahim, Asma; Lailabi, M P; Gopi, Jibin

    2011-01-01

    World Health Organization global disease update (2004) points out injuries as the sixth leading cause of morbidity and mortality in childhood. A descriptive hospital based study was conducted to find out the common types of unintentional injuries among children admitted for management of unintentional injuries in Pediatric Surgery department and Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital of North Kerala and to find out the contributing risk factors. A total of 400 children admitted during the study period of 6 months of 2009 constituted the study population. Mechanical injuries comprising of Road traffic accidents and accidental fall were the major cause of unintentional injuries (36%), followed by Poisoning (22.3%). A higher proportion of unintentional injuries were noted to occur among children of younger mothers, overactive child, children belonging to extended or joint families, child left alone or with friends, pre-school children, male child and from urban dwellings. The study highlights the need to identify the different types of unintentional injuries and the risk factors of childhood injuries which require hospitalisation. Identification of risk factors will help to formulate strategies aimed at risk reduction and prevention of childhood injuries.

  9. Influenza epidemiology in patients admitted to sentinel Australian hospitals in 2015: the Influenza Complications Alert Network.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Holmes, Mark; Dwyer, Dominic E; Irving, Louis B; Korman, Tony M; Senenayake, Sanjaya; Macartney, Kristine K; Blyth, Christopher C; Brown, Simon; Waterer, Grant; Hewer, Robert; Friedman, N Deborah; Wark, Peter A; Simpson, Graham; Upham, John; Bowler, Simon D; Lessing, Albert; Kotsimbos, Tom; Kelly, Paul M

    2016-12-24

    The Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN) is a sentinel hospital-based surveillance program that operates at sites in all states and territories in Australia. This report summarises the epidemiology of hospitalisations with laboratory-confirmed influenza during the 2015 influenza season. In this observational study, cases were defined as patients admitted to one of the sentinel hospitals with an acute respiratory illness with influenza confirmed by nucleic acid detection. During the period 1 April to 30 October 2015 (the 2015 influenza season), 2,070 patients were admitted with confirmed influenza to one of 17 FluCAN sentinel hospitals. Of these, 46% were elderly (≥ 65 years), 15% were children (< 16 years), 5% were Indigenous Australians, 2.1% were pregnant and 75% had chronic co-morbidities. A high proportion were due to influenza B (51%). There were a large number of hospital admissions detected with confirmed influenza in this national observational surveillance system in 2015 with case numbers similar to that reported in 2014. The national immunisation program is estimated to avert 46% of admissions from confirmed influenza across all at-risk groups, but more complete vaccination coverage in target groups could further reduce influenza admissions by as much as 14%.

  10. Short- and long-term outcomes of AL amyloidosis patients admitted into intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Guinault, Damien; Canet, Emmanuel; Huart, Antoine; Jaccard, Arnaud; Ribes, David; Lavayssiere, Laurence; Venot, Marion; Cointault, Olivier; Roussel, Murielle; Nogier, Marie-Béatrice; Pichereau, Claire; Lemiale, Virginie; Arnulf, Bertrand; Attal, Michel; Chauveau, Dominique; Azoulay, Elie; Faguer, Stanislas

    2016-09-01

    Amyloidosis is a rare and threatening condition that may require intensive care because of amyloid deposit-related organ dysfunction or therapy-related adverse events. Although new multiple myeloma drugs have dramatically improved outcomes in AL amyloidosis, the outcomes of AL patients admitted into intensive care units (ICUs) remain largely unknown. Admission has been often restricted to patients with low Mayo Clinic staging and/or with a complete or very good immunological response at admission. In a retrospective multicentre cohort of 66 adult AL (n = 52) or AA (n = 14) amyloidosis patients, with similar causes of admission to an ICU, the 28-d and 6-month survival rates of AA patients were significantly higher compared to AL patients (93% vs. 60%, P = 0·03; 71% vs. 45%, P = 0·02, respectively). In AL patients, the simplified Index of Gravity Score (IGS2) was the only independent predictive factor for death by day 28, whereas the Mayo-Clinic classification stage had no influence. In Cox's multivariate regression model, only cardiac arrest and on-going chemotherapy at ICU admission significantly predicted death at 6 months. Short-term outcomes of AL patients admitted into an ICU were mainly related to the severity of the acute medical condition, whereas on-going chemotherapy for active amyloidosis impacted on long-term outcomes.

  11. Nutritional status in elderly people admitted to community residential homes: comparisons between two cohorts.

    PubMed

    Wikby, K; Ek, A-C; Christensson, L

    2006-01-01

    The aim was to describe nutritional status and socio-demographic and medical data in people who were newly admitted to community residential homes (cohort 2), and to compare the results with a previous study performed in the same municipality four years earlier (cohort 1). One hundred and twenty-seven people, 65 years of age, or older, newly admitted to residential homes in a municipality in the southern part of Sweden, were consecutively included. Nutritional status was assessed, using a combination of anthropometry and serum protein measurements and by Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA). The results showed that 32% of the residents in cohort 2 were assessed as protein-energy malnourished (PEM), compared with 38% in cohort 1. Body mass index, psychological stress or acute disease, and reduced fluid intake were items in MNA which had power to predict PEM. Residents in cohort 2, diagnosed as having severe medical diseases, increased as well as residents with neuropsychological problems. Simultaneously, the number living in residential homes decreased, as compared to cohort 1. These differences indicate that the admission criteria have changed between cohorts 1 and 2.

  12. Neurodevelopmental outcome of very low birth weight babies admitted to a Malaysian nursery.

    PubMed

    Ho, J J; Amar, H S; Mohan, A J; Hon, T H

    1999-04-01

    This paper examines the prevalence and pattern of neurodevelopmental handicap at 2 years of age in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) infants admitted during 1993 to a level 3 nursery in Malaysia. The study included all VLBW babies born in the hospital or referred for neonatal care. Control infants were randomly selected during attendance at a primary health care clinic. A total of 82 (54.6%) out of the 150 VLBW infants admitted survived for 2 years, 77 (93.9%) of which were evaluated. The mean General Quotient (GQ) on the Griffiths Scales was 94 (15.7) for the study group and 104 (8.3) for the 60 controls. For GQ, 21 infants (27.3%) of the study population were 1 or more standard deviations (SD) below the mean, as compared with 1 infant (1.6%) of the control group who was 1-2 SD below the mean. Visual impairment occurred in 2 study infants and none of the controls. There was no hearing impairment in either group. In conclusion, mortality was higher than reported in developing countries but the rate of handicap was not different. Neonatal intensive care should continue to be upgraded in developing countries but at a rate compatible with the availability of resources.

  13. [Varicella complications: study of 117 patients admitted to the Emílio Ribas Hospital].

    PubMed

    Stocco, J M; Silveira, A L; Carvalho, E da S

    1990-01-01

    Chickenpox, an exanthemic disease common in childhood, has a benign course in most of the cases. However, several complications may occur; among them we have: bacterial infection of the skin, pneumonia, meningoencephalitis, thrombocytopenia, renal failure and others. The present study aims to analyse the occurrence of these complications, and for this purpose, a retrospective survey of the cases admitted to the Hospital Emílio Ribas during the period of December 1986 through December 1987 was performed. During this period, 117 patients were admitted, 91 of them aged 15 years or less. Associated complications were detected in 103 patients. The most frequent ones were pneumonia (31.87%) and bacterial infection of the skin (28.75%). Among children, the most frequent complication was skin bacterial infection (44 cases); whereas among adults, pulmonary complications were the most frequent. Among neurologic complications, there was a case of Guillain-Barré Syndrome, a very rarely occurrence in the literature. The lethality was high, and the pulmonary complications with septicemia were responsible the most part of them.

  14. Experience with Clinically Diagnosed Down Syndrome Children Admitted with Diarrhea in an Urban Hospital in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Das, Rina; Sarker, Anupam; Saha, Haimanti; Bin Shahid, Abu Sadat Mohammad Sayeem; Shahunja, K M; Chisti, Mohammod Jobayer

    2015-01-01

    There is lack of information in the medical literature on clinically diagnosed Down syndrome children presenting with diarrhea. Our aim was to describe our experience with Down syndrome patients admitted with diarrhea by evaluating the factors associated with Down syndrome presenting with diarrheal illness. In this retrospective chart analysis, we enrolled all the diarrheal children aged 0-59 months admitted to the Dhaka Hospital of the International Centre for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh (icddr, b), from March 2011 to February 2013. Down syndrome children with diarrhea constituted cases and randomly selected threefold diarrheal children without Down syndrome constituted controls. Among 8422 enrolled children 32 and 96 were the cases and the controls, respectively. Median age (months) of the cases and the controls was comparable (7.6 (4.0, 15.0) versus 9.0 (5.0, 16.8); p = 0.496). The cases more often presented with severe acute malnutrition, developmental delay, congenital heart disease, hypothyroidism, sepsis, hypocalcemia, developed hospital acquired infection (HAI) during hospitalization, and required prolonged stay at hospital compared to the controls (for all p < 0.05). Thus, diarrheal children with clinically diagnosed Down syndrome should be investigated for these simple clinical parameters for their prompt management that may prevent HAI and prolonged hospital stay.

  15. Chronic health conditions reported by male inmates newly admitted to Canadian federal penitentiaries

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Lynn A.; Nolan, Amanda; Sapers, Jeremy; Power, Jenelle; Panaro, Linda; Smith, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Background International health studies have shown that inmates have higher rates of infectious diseases, chronic diseases and psychiatric disorders relative to the general population. We conducted a systematic collection of data on chronic physical health conditions reported by newly admitted inmates in Canadian federal penitentiaries. Methods Over a 6-month period from April to September 2012, we collected and analyzed data from a standardized health interview routinely conducted with consenting incoming male inmates (n = 2273). Prevalence rates of health conditions were determined and disaggregated by age (< 50 yr and ≥ 50 yr) and by Aboriginal status. Results The most common health conditions reported by respondents were head injury (34.1%), back pain (19.3%), asthma (14.7%) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection (9.4%). Rates of many health conditions were higher among inmates 50 years of age or older than among younger inmates. Compared with their non-Aboriginal counterparts, Aboriginal inmates had higher rates of head injury and HCV infection. Interpretation Our study provides a benchmark that can be used to examine health trends within Canada’s federal penitentiaries over time and points to subgroups of newly admitted inmates for whom health services may need to be concentrated. PMID:25844377

  16. Coastal Zone Color Scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, B.

    1988-01-01

    The Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS) spacecraft ocean color instrument is capable of measuring and mapping global ocean surface chlorophyll concentration. It is a scanning radiometer with multiband capability. With new electronics and some mechanical, and optical re-work, it probably can be made flight worthy. Some additional components of a second flight model are also available. An engineering study and further tests are necessary to determine exactly what effort is required to properly prepare the instrument for spaceflight and the nature of interfaces to prospective spacecraft. The CZCS provides operational instrument capability for monitoring of ocean productivity and currents. It could be a simple, low cost alternative to developing new instruments for ocean color imaging. Researchers have determined that with global ocean color data they can: specify quantitatively the role of oceans in the global carbon cycle and other major biogeochemical cycles; determine the magnitude and variability of annual primary production by marine phytoplankton on a global scale; understand the fate of fluvial nutrients and their possible affect on carbon budgets; elucidate the coupling mechanism between upwelling and large scale patterns in ocean basins; answer questions concerning the large scale distribution and timing of spring blooms in the global ocean; acquire a better understanding of the processes associated with mixing along the edge of eddies, coastal currents, western boundary currents, etc., and acquire global data on marine optical properties.

  17. Hospital Organization and Importance of an Interventional Radiology Inpatient Admitting Service: Italian Single-Center 3-Year Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Simonetti, Giovanni; Bollero, Enrico; Ciarrapico, Anna Micaela; Gandini, Roberto; Konda, Daniel Bartolucci, Alberto; Di Primio, Massimiliano; Mammucari, Matteo; Chiocchi, Marcello; D'Alba, Fabrizio; Masala, Salvatore

    2009-03-15

    In June 2005 a Complex Operating Unit of Interventional Radiology (COUIR), consisting of an outpatient visit service, an inpatient admitting service with four beds, and a day-hospital service with four beds was installed at our department. Between June 2005 and May 2008, 1772 and 861 well-screened elective patients were admitted to the inpatient ward of the COUIR and to the Internal Medicine Unit (IMU) or Surgery Unit (SU) of our hospital, respectively, and treated with IR procedures. For elective patients admitted to the COUIR's inpatient ward, hospital stays were significantly shorter and differences between reimbursements and costs were significantly higher for almost all IR procedures compared to those for patients admitted to the IMU and SU (Student's t-test for unpaired data, p < 0.05). The results of the 3-year activity show that the activation of a COUIR with an inpatient admitting service, and the better organization of the patient pathway that came with it, evidenced more efficient use of resources, with the possibility for the hospital to save money and obtain positive margins (differences between reimbursements and costs). During 3 years of activity, the inpatient admitting service of our COUIR yielded a positive difference between reimbursements and effective costs of Euro 1,009,095.35. The creation of an inpatient IR service and the admission of well-screened elective patients allowed short hospitalization times, reduction of waiting lists, and a positive economic outcome.

  18. Point-of-Care, Ultraportable Echocardiography Predicts Diuretic Response in Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Dena K.; Pawlaczyk, Barbara; McCullough, Peter A.; Enright, Susan; Kunadi, Arvind; Vanhecke, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Routine management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) requires careful attentiveness to fluid status and diuretic treatment efficacy. New advances in ultrasound have made ultraportable echocardiography (UE) available to physicians for point-of-care use. The purpose of this study is to explore physiologic measures of intravascular fluid volume derived from UE and explore predictors of diuretic response in ADHF. METHODS Various echocardiography imaging measurements, particularly diameter and collapse of inferior vena cava (IVC), were collected from 77 patients admitted with a primary diagnosis of ADHF. Patients were divided into two groups based on whether or not they achieved a net negative fluid output of 3 L within 48 hours. The demographic information, serum laboratory markers, and physical characteristics of the subjects were obtained to correlate with daily ultrasound measurements. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to compare diuretic “responders” to “nonresponders.” RESULTS A negative change in the IVC diameter at 48 hours was robust in prediction of diuretic response. For every 1 mm decrease in the IVC diameter at 48 hours, there was an odds ratio of 1.62 (95% CI: 1.20–2.19) for responding to diuretic therapy independent of other variables including baseline renal filtration function and blood B-type natriuretic peptide. CONCLUSION Assessment of central venous pressure as a proxy for passive renal congestion independently predicts initial diuretic response in ADHF. Future research is needed to further understand the individual variation in response to loop diuresis and to identify optimal treatment approaches that utilize anatomic and physiologic measures such as venous ultrasound. PMID:28008296

  19. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department.

    PubMed

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine.The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department.A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management.The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine.The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to viral agents or

  20. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine. The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management. The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine. The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to

  1. Association between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety levels of violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hocagil, Hilal; Izci, Filiz; Hocagil, Abdullah Cüneyt; Findikli, Ebru; Korkmaz, Sevda; Koc, Merve Iris

    2016-01-01

    Background Here we aimed to investigate sociodemographic characteristics, psychiatric history, and association between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety levels of violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic. Methods This study consists of 73 violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic who were literate and agreed to participate in the study. A sociodemographic data form created by us to investigate alcohol-substance abuse, suicide attempt, previous history of trauma, self and family history of psychiatric disorders and Beck Anxiety Inventory was given to the patients. Results Of the patients exposed to violence 63% (n=46) were female and 27% (n=27) were male. Of these patients, 68.5% (n=50) were married, 43.8% (n=25) were workers, 34.2% were housewives, 11% were unemployed, and 11% were civil servants. Of the violence-exposed patients, 56.2% (n=41) were primary school, 21.9% (n=16) were high school, and 21.9% (n=16) were university graduates. Smoking and alcohol use rates were 54.8% (n=40) and 17.8% (n=13), respectively. The most common trauma type was assault using physical force with a ratio of 78.1% (n=57). In addition, anxiety scores were high in 42.5% (n=31) and moderate in 9.6% (n=7) of the patients. Mentioned psychiatric disorder was present in 17.8% (n=13) of the patients and 19.2% (n=14) of the patients’ relatives. The correlation between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety scores revealed that married patients had higher anxiety scores (P<0.01) and patients assaulted by their parents had lower anxiety scores (P<0.00). Conclusion A total of 63% of the violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency room were females, 56.2% were primary school graduates, and 43.8% were factory workers; this result shows that low socioeconomical status and education level affect exposure to trauma especially in females. In addition, ~20% of the patients and patients’ relatives had a psychiatric disorder and 53.4% of perpetrators

  2. Holdridge life zone physical inconsistency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez, A., Sr.; Ochoa, A.

    2015-12-01

    Life zones is a very used classification system, developed by L.R. Holdridge in 1967, used to discern why plants have different adaptation mechanism to their surrounding environment. In this paper, the relation between potential evapotranspiration rate (ETr ), anual precipitation (P ) and biotemperature (Tb ) in the Holdridge triangle, is parametrized (P = (500/9)*ETr) to evaluate if the rain process is conserved in Colombia. Further, an adiabatic ascent of air with diurnal and interannual variability, and cluster analysis is view as a classification example of the advantage of using physical process to evaluate the plants adaptation mechanisms . The most inconsistency life zones are situated in the rainiest places of Colombian pacific costs in tropical latitudinal region, are non-exist places in holdridge triangle with annual biotemperature higher than 26◦ C, annual precipitation about 10.000mm and annual potential evapotranspiration rate about 0.1. The difference between Holdridge predicted precipitation and the precipitation measured with TRMM are about 5.000mm in these places. Classification systems based on an annual average, do not stablish adaptation as a function of diurnal variability, for example, the difference between valley sides vegetation could not being determined. This kind of limitations, added to a validation procces and the auscence of a physic procces in the variable interaction, make the Holdridge Life Zones a very useful tool, but physically inconsistent for caracterice vegetation as a function of precipitation. The rain process is very complex, depend of mass and energy exchanges and is still a controversial topic in atmospheric modeling, as a biotic pump.

  3. [Feelings of relatives regarding the patient who is admitted in intensive care unit].

    PubMed

    Almeida, Andreza Santos; Aragão, Neylor Rodrigo Oliveira; Moura, Elaine; Lima, Gabriela de Carvalho; Hora, Edilene Curvelo; Silva, Lausimary Araújo São Mateus

    2009-01-01

    This is a study with qualitative approach focusing on the relatives' feelings related to the patient who is admitted in intensive care unity. Twenty-four relatives were interviewed in a public hospital in Aracaju, SE, Brazil between July and August, 2007. The information was collected through an interview and evaluated according to content analysis. The results showed the following feelings: anxiety; worry; anguish and sadness; powerless; pain and sorrow; lost; fear and panic; stress; trust and security; insecurity; faith and hope and unexplainable feelings. Anxiety was the most common one and was related to the strange environment, the diversified procedures, fear of what will happen tomorrow and expectations of their relatives to get better.

  4. Viruses associated with acute respiratory infections in children admitted to hospital in Naples, 1979-82*

    PubMed Central

    Montanaro, D.; Ribera, G.; Attena, F.; Schioppa, F.; Romano, F.

    1983-01-01

    A survey of the virological and epidemiological features of acute respiratory diseases in children admitted to hospital in Naples has been carried out; the results of three years of research are reported. Between April 1979 and March 1982, 787 nasopharyngeal swabs were examined. There were 287 (36.5%) positive samples, with the highest isolation rate being found in children with bronchiolitis (39.5%). Among the different viruses isolated, adenovirus was the most common (161 positive samples, 56%); this agent appeared regularly in the different age and disease groups, with a marked increase in prevalence during the winter of 1980. Isolations of herpesvirus, respiratory syncytial virus and enterovirus were less frequent; however, echovirus 3 caused an epidemic in the summer of 1980. Influenza and parainfluenza viruses were seen fairly infrequently; two cases of Reye's syndrome yielded strains of influenza B. PMID:6325032

  5. Predictors of nursing workload in elderly patients admitted to intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Cleber Ricardo de; Gonçalves, Leilane Andrade; Toffoleto, Maria Cecília; Leão, Karine; Padilha, Kátia Grillo

    2008-01-01

    The age of patients is a controversial issue in admission to intensive care unit (ICU). The aim of this study was to compare severity and nursing workload of elderly patients with 60-69, 70-79, and e"80 years of age and to identify predictors of nursing workload in elderly patients. A cross sectional study was performed with a sample of 71 elderly patients admitted to three ICU in the city of Sao Paulo, Brazil from October to November 2004. Data were prospectively collected using Nursing Activities Score (NAS) and Simplified Acute Physiology Score II (SAPS II). There was no significant difference in nursing workload among the elderly patients age subgroups (p=0.84). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the independent risk factors of high nursing workload were severity, age e"70 years, and to be a surgical ICU patient. Age as an isolated factor should not be discriminative for elderly patients admission to ICU.

  6. What makes a good program? A case study of a school admitting high academic achievers.

    PubMed

    Lam, Ching Man

    2008-10-10

    This paper reports the results of a qualitative study that explored the administration and implementation of the Tier 1 Program (Secondary 1 Curriculum) of the Project P.A.T.H.S. The case study method was used to explore perceptions of the teachers and the project coordinator of program effectiveness, and to identify various factors for program success. A school admitting high academic achievers was selected, and site visits, as well as individual and focus group interviews, were conducted with the program coordinator, social worker, and course teachers. The results suggested that clear vision and program goals, high quality of curriculum, helpful leadership, positive teacher attitude, and strong administrative support are factors for program success. Analyzing the data enables the researchers to understand the characteristics of a successful program as well as the interplay among factors for producing success.

  7. Prevalence of Advance Directives Among Older Adults Admitted to Intensive Care Units and Requiring Mechanical Ventilation.

    PubMed

    Gamertsfelder, Elise M; Seaman, Jennifer Burgher; Tate, Judith; Buddadhumaruk, Praewpannarai; Happ, Mary Beth

    2016-04-01

    Because older adults are at high risk for hospitalization and potential decisional incapacity, advance directives are important components of pre-hospital advanced care planning, as they document individual preferences for future medical care. The prevalence of pre-hospital advance directive completion in 450 critically ill older adults requiring mechanical ventilation from two Mid-Atlantic hospitals is described, and demographic and clinical predictors of pre-hospital advance directive completion are explored. The overall advance directive completion rate was 42.4%, with those in older age groups (75 to 84 years and 85 and older) having approximately two times the odds of completion. No significant differences in the likelihood of advance directive completion were noted by sex, race, or admitting diagnosis. The relatively low prevalence of advance directive completion among older adults with critical illness and high mortality rate (24%) suggest a need for greater awareness and education.

  8. Predictors of disease severity in patients admitted to a cholera treatment center in urban Haiti.

    PubMed

    Valcin, Claude-Lyne; Severe, Karine; Riche, Claudia T; Anglade, Benedict S; Moise, Colette Guiteau; Woodworth, Michael; Charles, Macarthur; Li, Zhongze; Joseph, Patrice; Pape, Jean W; Wright, Peter F

    2013-10-01

    Cholera, previously unrecognized in Haiti, spread through the country in the fall of 2010. An analysis was performed to understand the epidemiological characteristics, clinical management, and risk factors for disease severity in a population seen at the GHESKIO Cholera Treatment Center in Port-au-Prince. A comprehensive review of the medical records of patients admitted during the period of October 28, 2010-July 10, 2011 was conducted. Disease severity on admission was directly correlated with older age, more prolonged length of stay, and presentation during the two epidemic waves seen in the observation period. Although there was a high seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), severity of cholera was not greater with HIV infection. This study documents the correlation of cholera waves with rainfall and its reduction in settings with improved sanitary conditions and potable water when newly introduced cholera affects all ages equally so that interventions must be directed throughout the population.

  9. Survey of factors effective on re-intubation among children admitted to pediatric intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Bilan, N; Ghaffari, S H

    2009-03-01

    This study was aimed to recognize the risk factors of re intubation among children who were admitted to pediatric intensive care unit. in an analytical cross-sectional study, the risk factors of reintubation in two groups of patients compared, both groups consist of 55 children, one with successful extubation and another with extubation failure. The study showed that neuromuscular disorders are the main underlying disease in extubation-failure group (p = 0.004). Besides, in comparison between two group of patients who had successful versus failed extubation, hypercapnia (PaCO2 > 50 mmHg) was shown to be the most common cause of both the first intubation (p = 0.003) and reintubation (p = 0.002) in patients who failed extubation. This study shows that neuromuscular disorders as a background, are the most common causes which defeat weaning from ventilator or result in reintubation by induction of hypercapnia.

  10. Connectedness at the End of Life Among People Admitted to Inpatient Palliative Care.

    PubMed

    Håkanson, Cecilia; Öhlén, Joakim

    2016-02-01

    The significance of connectedness for well-being is well known. At the end of life however, illness and body decline may challenge a person's ability of staying and feeling connected. The aim of this phenomenological study was to interpret meanings of connectedness, through narrative interviews with persons admitted to inpatient palliative care in Sweden. Results involving connectedness through the body, connectedness to, and uncanniness toward other patients, and connectedness to significant others and society are discussed. The study underscores the importance of connectedness until death. However, in inpatient palliative care this is complex. Patients can co-create or challenge each other's sense of connectedness through the symbolism of illness and diseased bodies. Moreover, the capability of connectedness is influenced by illness, spatiality, atmosphere, activities, and resources in the care place.

  11. Mortality in Relation to Frailty in Patients Admitted to a Specialized Geriatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, An; Song, Xiaowei; Dong, Jiahui; Mitnitski, Arnold; Liu, Jian; Guo, Zhenhui; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background. In older adults admitted to intensive care units (ICUs), frailty influences prognosis. We examined the relationship between the frailty index (FI) based on deficit accumulation and early and late survival. Methods. Older patients (≥65 years) admitted to a specialized geriatric ICU at the Liuhuaqiao Hospital, Guangzhou, China between July–December 2011 (n = 155; age 82.7±7.1 y; 87.1% men) were followed for 300 days. The FI was calculated as the proportion present of 52 health deficits. FI performance was compared with that of several prognostic scores. Results. The 90-day death rate was 38.7% (n = 60; 27 died within 30 days). The FI score was correlated with the Glasgow Coma Scale, Karnofsky Scale, Palliative Performance Scale, Acute Physiology Score—APACHE II and APACHE IV (r 2 = 0.52 to 0.72, p < 0.001). Patients who died within 30 days had higher mean FI scores (0.41±0.11) than those who survived to 300 days (0.22±0.11; F = 38.91, p < 0.001). Each 1% increase in the FI from the previous level was associated with an 11% increase in the 30-day mortality risk (95% CI: 7%–15%) adjusting for age, sex, and the prognostic scores. The FI discriminated patients who died in 30 days from those who survived with moderately high accuracy (AUC = 0.89±0.03). No one with an FI score >0.46 survived past 90 days. Conclusion. ICU survival was strongly associated with the level of frailty at admission. An FI based on health deficit accumulation may help improve critical care outcome prediction in older adults. PMID:26400736

  12. Prospective evaluation of clinical scoring systems in infants with bronchiolitis admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Rödl, S; Resch, B; Hofer, N; Marschitz, I; Madler, G; Eber, E; Zobel, G

    2012-10-01

    The objective of this investigation was to compare different scoring systems to assess the severity of illness in infants with bronchiolitis admitted to a tertiary paediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Over an 18-year period (1990-2007), infants with bronchiolitis aged up to 12 months and admitted to the PICU were prospectively scored using the Pediatric Risk of Mortality III (PRISM III) score, the Organ System Failure (OSF) score and the Acute Physiologic Score for Children (APSC) within 24 h. Infants were compared as to whether or not bronchiolitis was associated with respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). There was no difference between 113 RSV-positive and 80 RSV-negative infants regarding gestational age, birth weight, rate of premature delivery or bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). The PRISM III score differed significantly between RSV-positive and RSV-negative cases (3.27 ± 0.39 vs. 1.96 ± 0.44, p = 0.006), as did the OSF score (0.56 ± 0.05 vs. 0.35 ± 0.06, p = 0.049) and the APSC (5.16 ± 0.46 vs. 4.1 ± 0.53, p = 0.048). All scores were significantly higher in the subgroup with mechanical ventilation (p < 0.0001). The mean time of ventilation was significantly higher in the RSV-positive group compared to the RSV-negative group (6.39 ± 1.74 days vs. 2.4 ± 0.47 days, p < 0.001). Infants suffering from RSV-positive bronchiolitis had higher clinical scores corresponding with the severity of bronchiolitis.

  13. Characteristics and mortality of elderly patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a district hospital

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José Carlos Llamas; Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Fonseca, Javier; Santos, Margarita Luque; Jiménez, María de los Ángeles Ruiz-Cabello; Braniff, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study all the elderly patients (≥75 years) who were admitted in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Spanish hospital and identify factors associated with mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective, observational data collected prospectively in patients ≥75 years recruited from the ICU in the period of January 2004 to December 2010. Results: During the study period, 1661 patients were admitted to our unit, of whom 553 (33.3%) were older than 75 years. The mean age was 79.9 years, 317 (57.3%) were male, and the overall in-hospital mortality was 94 patients (17% confidence interval 14–20.3%). When comparing patients who survived to those who died, we found significant differences in mean age (P = 0.001), Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Simplified Acute Physiology Scoring II (SAPS II) on admission (P < 0.0001, postoperative patients (P = 0.001), and need for mechanical ventilation (P < 0.0001). Comparing age groups, we found statistically significant differences in SAPS II (P = 0.007), diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (P = 0.014), complicated postoperative period (P = 0.001), and pacemaker (P = 0.034). Mortality between the groups was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The survival between the group of 65 and 74 years and patients >75 years was not significant (P = 0.1390). Conclusions: The percentage of elderly patients in our unit is high, with low mortality rates. The age itself is not the sole determinant for admission to the ICU and other factors should be taken into account. PMID:27555692

  14. Prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in Patients Admitted with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prosdócimo, Ana Cláudia Giaxa; Lucina, Luciane Boreki; Marcia, Olandoski; Jobs, Priscila Megda João; Schio, Nicolle Amboni; Baldanzi, Fernanda Fachin; Costantini, Costantino Ortiz; Benevides-Pereira, Ana Maria Teresa; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Faria-Neto, José Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Background Burnout Syndrome is the extreme emotional response to chronic occupational stress, manifesting as physical and mental exhaustion. Although associated with higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, no study so far has evaluated whether the Burnout Syndrome could be a prevalent factor in non-elderly individuals active in the labor market, admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Objective To evaluate the prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome in non-elderly, economically active patients, hospitalized with ACS. Methods Cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary and private cardiology center, with economically active patients aged <65 years, hospitalized with diagnosis of ACS. The Burnout Syndrome was evaluated with the Burnout Syndrome Inventory (BSI), which assesses workplace conditions and four dimensions that characterize the syndrome: emotional exhaustion (EE), emotional distancing (EmD), dehumanization (De) and professional fulfillment (PF). The Lipp’s Stress Symptoms Inventory for Adults (LSSI) was applied to evaluate global stress. Results Of 830 patients evaluated with suspected ACS, 170 met the study criteria, 90% of which were men, overall average age was 52 years, and 40.5% had an average income above 11 minimum wages. The prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome was 4.1%. When we evaluated each dimension individually, we found high EE in 34.7%, high De in 52.4%, high EDi in 30.6%, and low PF in 5.9%. The overall prevalence of stress was 87.5%. Conclusion We found a low prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in an economically active, non-elderly population among patients admitted for ACS in a tertiary and private hospital. PMID:25517388

  15. Errors Related to Medication Reconciliation: A Prospective Study in Patients Admitted to the Post CCU.

    PubMed

    Haji Aghajani, Mohammad; Ghazaeian, Monireh; Mehrazin, Hamid Reza; Sistanizad, Mohammad; Miri, Mirmohammad

    2016-01-01

    Medication errors are one of the important factors that increase fatal injuries to the patients and burden significant economic costs to the health care. An appropriate medical history could reduce errors related to omission of the previous drugs at the time of hospitalization. The aim of this study, as first one in Iran, was evaluating the discrepancies between medication histories obtained by pharmacists and physicians/nurses and first order of physician. From September 2012 until March 2013, patients admitted to the post CCU of a 550 bed university hospital, were recruited in the study. As a part of medication reconciliation on admission, the physicians/nurses obtained medication history from all admitted patients. For patients included in the study, medication history was obtained by both physician/nurse and a pharmacy student (after training by a faculty clinical pharmacist) during the first 24 h of admission. 250 patients met inclusion criteria. The mean age of patients was 61.19 ± 14.41 years. Comparing pharmacy student drug history with medication lists obtained by nurses/physicians revealed 3036 discrepancies. On average, 12.14 discrepancies, ranged from 0 to 68, were identified per patient. Only in 20 patients (8%) there was 100 % agreement among medication lists obtained by pharmacist and physician/nurse. Comparing the medications by list of drugs ordered by physician at first visit showed 12.1 discrepancies on average ranging 0 to 72. According to the results, omission errors in our setting are higher than other countries. Pharmacy-based medication reconciliation could be recommended to decrease this type of error.

  16. Validation of a prognostic score for mortality in elderly patients admitted to Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Hurtado, Luis Alejandro; Ángeles-Veléz, Adrian; Tejeda-Huezo, Brigette Carmen; García-Cruz, Juan Carlos; Juárez-Cedillo, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Context: The performance of a prognostic score must be evaluated prior to being used. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the predictive ability of hospital mortality of Simplified Acute Physiology Score 3 (SAPS 3) score in elderly patients admitted to Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Aims: The aim of the present study was to evaluate the SAPS 3 score predictive ability of hospital mortality in elderly patients admitted to ICU. Settings and Design: This study was conducted as a prospective cohort, in two mixed ICUs. Patients and Methods: Two hundred and eleven elderly patients were included. Interventions: None. We compared the predictive accuracy of SAPS 3 measured at the first hour at ICU and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II) measured with the worst values in the first 24 h at ICU. The patients were followed until hospital discharge. Statistical Analysis Used: Evaluation of discrimination through area under curve receiver operating characteristic (aROC) and calibration by Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL) test. Results: The median age was 68 years. The hospital mortality rate was 35.54%. The mean value of SAPS 3 was 62.54 ± 12.51 and APACHE II was 17.46 ± 6.77. The mortality predicted by APACHE II was 24.98 ± 19.96 and for standard SAPS 3 equation 41.18 ± 22.34. The discrimination for SAPS 3 model was aROC = 0.68 (0.62–0.75) and to APACHE II aROC = 0.70 (0.63–0.78). Calibration: APACHE II with HL 10.127 P = 0.26, and standard SAPS 3 equation HL 7.204 P = 0.51. Conclusions: In this study, the prognostic model of SAPS 3 was not found to be accurate in predicting mortality in geriatric patients requiring ICU admission. PMID:28149026

  17. Severe metapneumovirus infections among immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients admitted to hospital with respiratory infection.

    PubMed

    Souza, Juliana Sinohara; Watanabe, Aripuana; Carraro, Emerson; Granato, Celso; Bellei, Nancy

    2013-03-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is considered an important cause of acute respiratory infections. hMPV can cause morbidity in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients and recent research has demonstrated that it is an important virus in patients admitted to hospital with respiratory infections and suspected of having pandemic 2009 influenza A (H1N1pdm09) virus. The purpose of this study was to investigate infections caused by hMPV in two groups of patients admitted to hospital: Immunocompromized patients with a potential risk of severe outcomes and immunocompetent patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome. A total of 288 samples were tested: 165 samples were collected from patients with suspected influenza A (H1N1) pdm09 infection during the first pandemic wave in 2009; and 123 samples were collected from patients of a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation program in 2008-2009. Amplification of the hMPV genes was performed by polymerase chain reaction. This was followed by sequencing and phylogenetic analysis. hMPV was detected in 14.2% (41/288) of all samples: 17% (28/165) of immunocompetent patients with suspected H1N1 infection and 10.6% (13/123) among hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. hMPV accounted for 12.1% (8/66) of immunocompetent adults patients with severe respiratory infections (median age, 55.9 years). Two hMPV subtypes were identified, A2 (26.9%; 7/26) and B2 (73.1%; 19/26) but no difference was observed between the patient groups in terms of age or immunosuppression level. This study highlights the significance of hMPV in immunocompetent adult patients with severe infections and further investigations are recommended for understanding the impact of this virus.

  18. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... engines certified using the duty cycle specified in § 1042.505(b)(1), except for variable-speed propulsion... Appendix illustrates the default NTE zone for variable-speed marine engines used with controllable-pitch... this Appendix illustrates the default NTE zone for variable-speed auxiliary marine engines...

  19. 40 CFR Appendix III to Part 1042 - Not-to-Exceed Zones

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... engines certified using the duty cycle specified in § 1042.505(b)(1), except for variable-speed propulsion... Appendix illustrates the default NTE zone for variable-speed marine engines used with controllable-pitch... this Appendix illustrates the default NTE zone for variable-speed auxiliary marine engines...

  20. Suicide attempts and related factors in patients admitted to a general hospital: a ten-year cross-sectional study (1997-2007)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Suicide and suicide attempts represent a severe problem for public health services. The aim of this study is to determine the socio-demographic and psychopathological variables associated with suicide attempts in the population admitted to a General Hospital. Methods An observational-descriptive study of patients admitted to the A Coruña University Hospital (Spain) during the period 1997-2007, assessed by the Consultation and Liaison Psychiatric Unit. We include n = 5,234 admissions from 4,509 patients. Among these admissions, n = 361 (6.9%) were subsequent to a suicide attempt. Admissions arising from a suicide attempt were compared with admissions occurring due to other reasons. Multivariate generalised estimating equation logistic regression models were used to examine factors associated with suicide attempts. Results Adjusting by age, gender, educational level, cohabitation status, being employed or unemployed, the psychiatric diagnosis at the time of the interview and the information on previous suicide attempts, we found that the variables associated with the risk of a suicide attempt were: age, psychiatric diagnosis and previous suicide attempts. The risk of suicide attempts decreases with age (OR = 0.969). Psychiatric diagnosis was associated with a higher risk of suicide attempts, with the highest risk being found for Mood or Affective Disorders (OR = 7.49), followed by Personality Disorders (OR = 7.31), and Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders (OR = 5.03). The strongest single predictive factor for suicide attempts was a prior history of attempts (OR = 23.63). Conclusions Age, psychopathological diagnosis and previous suicide attempts are determinants of suicide attempts. PMID:21453478

  1. New Madrid Seismic Zone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    NEW MADRID SEISMIC ZONE BY COLONEL J.DAVID NORWOOD United States Army DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A...mCTBB l USAWC STRATEGY RESEARCH PROJECT New Madrid Seismic Zone by J. David Norwood, COL, USA Michael A. Pearson, COL, USA Project Advisor The...ABSTRACT AUTHOR: J. David Norwood, Colonel, U.S. Army TITLE: New Madrid Seismic Zone FORMAT: Strategy Research Project DATE: 22 April 1998 . PAGES:

  2. Transient flow conditions in probabilistic wellhead protection: importance and ways to manage spatial and temporal uncertainty in capture zone delineation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enzenhoefer, R.; Rodriguez-Pretelin, A.; Nowak, W.

    2012-12-01

    "From an engineering standpoint, the quantification of uncertainty is extremely important not only because it allows estimating risk but mostly because it allows taking optimal decisions in an uncertain framework" (Renard, 2007). The most common way to account for uncertainty in the field of subsurface hydrology and wellhead protection is to randomize spatial parameters, e.g. the log-hydraulic conductivity or porosity. This enables water managers to take robust decisions in delineating wellhead protection zones with rationally chosen safety margins in the spirit of probabilistic risk management. Probabilistic wellhead protection zones are commonly based on steady-state flow fields. However, several past studies showed that transient flow conditions may substantially influence the shape and extent of catchments. Therefore, we believe they should be accounted for in the probabilistic assessment and in the delineation process. The aim of our work is to show the significance of flow transients and to investigate the interplay between spatial uncertainty and flow transients in wellhead protection zone delineation. To this end, we advance our concept of probabilistic capture zone delineation (Enzenhoefer et al., 2012) that works with capture probabilities and other probabilistic criteria for delineation. The extended framework is able to evaluate the time fraction that any point on a map falls within a capture zone. In short, we separate capture probabilities into spatial/statistical and time-related frequencies. This will provide water managers additional information on how to manage a well catchment in the light of possible hazard conditions close to the capture boundary under uncertain and time-variable flow conditions. In order to save computational costs, we take advantage of super-positioned flow components with time-variable coefficients. We assume an instantaneous development of steady-state flow conditions after each temporal change in driving forces, following

  3. Spatial and temporal variability of rock fall in a (peri)glacial environment: a LiDAR-based, multi-year investigation of rock fall release zones and volumes, Kitzsteinhorn, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delleske, Robert; Hartmeyer, Ingo; Keuschnig, Markus; Götz, Joachim

    2014-05-01

    October). All scans (n = 41) were conducted using a RIEGL LMS-Z620. The resulting spatial resolution varies between 0.1 and 0.5 m and object distance (i.e. distance between scanner and rock face) ranges from 250 to 500 m. Post-processing of TLS data enabled to precisely identify rock fall release zones, rock fall volumes and surface changes of the Schmiedingerkees glacier (lowering rate of approximately 1.5 m per year). Since 2011 a total number of nine rock fall events with a volume exceeding 100 m³ have been recorded - with the largest reaching a volume of approx. 500 m³. All were triggered from areas that have been exposed by the retreating Schmiedingerkees glacier over the last 1-2 decades. Thus, glacial debuttressing and subsequent exposure to atmospheric influences might be considered as the dominant destabilizing factors. Temporal clustering of rock fall events over the first three seasons (2011 to 2013) tentatively indicates a bimodal occurrence pattern with a first maximum during snowmelt (May/June) and a second distinct peak during the warmest period of the year (August).

  4. Clinical profile and outcomes of women admitted to a psychiatric mother-baby unit.

    PubMed

    Christl, Bettina; Reilly, Nicole; Yin, Carolyn; Austin, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the clinical profile of women admitted to a psychiatric mother-baby unit as well as change in their clinical, parenting, attachment and quality of life outcomes. Data was collected from 191 mothers through self-report measures at admission and discharge. Change was analysed in terms of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score, parenting confidence, maternal attachment to the infant and overall functioning. Psychosocial factors impacting on symptom severity and recovery were examined. Most women (64.8 %) were admitted in the first 3 months after birth with an ICD-10 unipolar depressive episode (52.3 %) or anxiety disorder (25.7 %), and 47.6 % had comorbid diagnoses. Improvement from admission to discharge was seen with large effect sizes (≥one standard deviation, i.e. μ) in terms of clinical symptoms (EPDS, μ = 1.7), parenting confidence (Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale (KPCS), μ = 1.1) and attachment to their infant (Maternal Postpartum Attachment Scale (MPAS), μ = 0.9) as well as overall level of functioning (SF-14, μ = 1.9). The majority (73.3 %) recovered symptomatically, and this was associated with increasing maternal age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.129, p = 0.002) and lower levels of psychosocial risk at admission (OR = 0.963, p = 0.008). Improvement in parenting confidence was associated with increasing maternal age (OR = 1.17, p = 0.003). No predictive factors were found for improvement in maternal attachment after controlling for admission scores. In the short term, joint admission of mothers with their infants is highly beneficial in terms of clinical, functional and parenting outcomes, but follow up studies are needed to assess the longer term benefits for mother-infant dyads. The use of an observational tool to enhance our assessment of maternal-infant interaction and some measure of maternal emotional dysregulation-both important mediators of development of secure infant

  5. Epidemiology and implications of ocular trauma admitted to hospital in Scotland.

    PubMed Central

    Desai, P; MacEwen, C J; Baines, P; Minassian, D C

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the current epidemiology of serious ocular trauma which necessitates admission to hospital so that health and safety strategies for the prevention of ocular injuries and their role within the national health strategy, The Health of the Nation, can be better informed. DESIGN: A prospective observational study of all patients with ocular trauma admitted to hospital under the care of a consultant ophthalmologist between 1 November 1991 and 31 October 1992. SETTING: All ophthalmic department in Scotland. SUBJECTS: All patients with ocular trauma admitted to hospital in Scotland. The population of Scotland represented the population at risk of injury. MEASURES AND MAIN RESULTS: Measures included the type and cause of injury, the place where it occurred, and awareness of risk and safety. All ophthalmic departments in Scotland participated and 428 admissions were reported. The home was the most common place for a serious injury to occur (30.2%), followed by the workplace (19.6%) and a sports or leisure facility (15.8%). The home was the single most frequent place of injury for the 0-15 year and 65 year and over age groups. Tools or machinery, either at home (13.9%) or at work (10.3%), were collectively (24.2%) the most frequent cause of injury, followed by assault (21.8%) and sports-related activities (12.5%). The most frequent type of injury was a blunt injury (54.4%). Six per cent (n = 25) of all injuries were bilateral. Only 13.2% of patients were aware of any risk of injury, with 5.6% aware of any risk at home. When applicable, protective eye wear was only available to 48.6% of patients and only 19.4% of these used it. CONCLUSION: Serious ocular trauma frequently occurs at home and the young and the elderly are particularly at risk. This represents a significant change in the epidemiology of serious ocular trauma and has important implications for prevention. Health and safety strategies specifically aimed at preventing eye injury should now

  6. Short-term outcomes of sport- and recreation-related concussion in patients admitted to a pediatric trauma service.

    PubMed

    Bramley, Harry; Mcfarland, Carol; Lewis, Mechelle M; Shaffer, Michele L; Cilley, Robert; Engbrecht, Brett; Santos, Mary; Rzucidlo, Susan; Shirk, Beverly; Simmons, Lynn; Dias, Mark S

    2014-07-01

    The outcomes of patients admitted to the hospital following a sport-related concussion are largely unknown. Medical records of patients admitted to the pediatric trauma service between 2008 and 2011 after sustaining a sport-related concussion were reviewed. In all, 59 participants were in the high-velocity activities group, and 21 in the field or court sport group. Abnormal CT scans were found in 14 patients in the high-velocity group and 2 in the field or court sport group. The majority of participants in the field or court sport group were football players, all of whom had normal CT scans. Headache was predictive of an abnormal CT scan. Among the patients, 56% clinically improved and were discharged the following day. Patients with field or court sport-related concussion admitted to a pediatric trauma service appear to be at low risk for clinically significant intracranial pathology and do well in the acute setting.

  7. Are publicly insured children less likely to be admitted to hospital than the privately insured (and does it matter)?

    PubMed

    Alexander, Diane; Currie, Janet

    2016-12-09

    There is continuing controversy about the extent to which publicly insured children are treated differently than privately insured children, and whether differences in treatment matter. We show that on average, hospitals are less likely to admit publicly insured children than privately insured children who present at the ER and the gap grows during high flu weeks, when hospital beds are in high demand. This pattern is present even after controlling for detailed diagnostic categories and hospital fixed effects, but does not appear to have any effect on measurable health outcomes such as repeat ER visits and future hospitalizations. Hence, our results raise the possibility that instead of too few publicly insured children being admitted during high flu weeks, there are too many publicly and privately insured children being admitted most of the time.

  8. Ashtekar variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    2015-05-01

    In the spirit of Scholarpedia, this invited article is addressed to students and younger researchers. It provides the motivation and background material, a summary of the main physical ideas, mathematical structures and results, and an outline of applications of the connection variables for general relativity. These variables underlie both the canonical/Hamiltonian and the spinfoam/path integral approaches in loop quantum gravity.

  9. Marginal Zone Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... zone lymphomas are a group of indolent (slow-growing) NHL B-cell lymphomas, which account for approximately 12 percent of all B-cell lymphomas. The median age for diagnosis is 65 years old. There are three types of marginal zone lymphoma: ...

  10. Urban Terrain Zone Characteristics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-09-01

    function . An example of the interaction of some of these can result in an exposed surface of decorative brick veneer on a framed stracture . Or, a...Classification System for HOUT Studies . . . . . . . . .- ..- . . . . . . 14 2. Urban Terrain Zones Function /Morphology Relationship...By Function --All Cities Aggregated . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 6. Building Types: Major Terrain Zones . . . . ...... 103 7. Urban Terrain

  11. Coastal zone management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tilton, E. L., III

    1975-01-01

    A panel of federal and state representatives concerned with coastal zone affairs discussed their problems in this area. In addition, several demonstrations of the application of remote sensing technology to coastal zone management were described. These demonstrations were performed by several agencies in a variety of geographical areas.

  12. Float Zone Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naumann, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    A summary of the Analytical Float Zone Experiment System (AFZES) concept is presented. The types of experiments considered for such a facility are discussed. Reports from various industrial producers and users of float zone material are presented. Special emphasis is placed on state-of-the-art developments in low gravity manufacturing and their applications to space processing.

  13. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  14. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    A resistance heated zoner, suitable for early zoning experiments with silicon, was designed and put into operation. The initial power usage and size was designed for an shown to be compatible with payload carriers contemplated for the Shuttle. This equipment will be used in the definition and development of flight experiments and apparatus for float zoning silicon and other materials in microgravity.

  15. 75 FR 3859 - Safety Zone; Baltimore Captain of Port Zone

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Baltimore Captain of Port Zone AGENCY... establishing a temporary safety zone in all navigable waters of the Captain of the Port Baltimore zone. The... authorized by the Captain of the Port Baltimore, or his designated representative. This safety zone...

  16. Effects of time and day of admission on the outcome of critically ill patients admitted to ICU

    PubMed Central

    Orsini, Jose; Rajayer, Salil; Ahmad, Noeen; Din, Nanda; Morante, Joaquin; Malik, Ryan; Shim, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies have shown that patients admitted to hospitals on weekends and after-hours experience worse outcome than those admitted on weekdays and daytime hours. Although admissions of patients to intensive care units (ICUs) occur 24 hours a day, not all critical care units maintain the same level of staffing during nighttime, weekends, and holidays. This raises concerns in view of evidence showing that the organizational structure of an ICU influences the outcome of critically ill patients. The objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of day and time of admission to ICU on patients’ outcome. Methods A single-center, prospective, observational study was conducted among all consecutive admissions to ICU in a community teaching hospital during a 4-month period. Results A total of 282 patients were admitted during the study period. Their mean age was 59.5 years (median 59, range 17–96), and the majority were male (157, 55.7%). Mean Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE)-II score was 18.9 (median 33, range 1–45), and mean ICU length of stay was 3.1 days (median 2, range 1–19). Of the patients, 104 patients (36.9%) were admitted during weekends and 178 (63.1%) during weekdays. A total of 122 patients (43.3%) were admitted after-hours, constituting 68.5% of all admissions during weekdays. Fifty-six patients (19.9%) were admitted during daytime hours, representing 31.5% of all weekday admissions. Forty-five patients (15.9%) died in ICU. Compared to patients admitted on weekends, those admitted on weekdays had increased ICU mortality (operating room (OR)=0.437; 95% confidence interval=0.2054–0.9196; p=0.0293). Conclusion Admissions to ICU during weekends were not independently associated with increased mortality. A linear relationship between weekdays and after-hours admissions to ICU with mortality was observed at our institution. PMID:27987290

  17. Nutritional Status of Patients Admitted in a General Surgical Ward at a Tertiary Hospital of Punjab.

    PubMed

    Kamal, Faiza; Fazal, Muhammad Irfan; Cheema, Muhammad Arshad

    2016-04-01

    Nutritional assessment, as a method to identify malnourishment, has long been documented as an essential component of patient management which predicts adverse outcomes. The objective of the study was to find out the frequency of malnutrition and its association with the frequency of complications and deaths postoperatively. This study included all patients who were operated upon in a general surgical unit of Mayo Hospital, Lahore from June to August, 2013. Evaluation of 280 patients showed that 112 (40%) of the patients were malnourished, 90 (32%) were at risk of being malnourished and remaining 78 (28%) of the patients had normal nutritional status, according to the Subjective Global Assessment. Thirteen percent (13%) malnourished and 2 (3%) of the normally nourished patients died within 30 days of operation (p=0.001). Incidence of complications in malnourished patients was 23 (20.53%) as compared to normally nourished patients (5.12%, p=0.006). Malnutrition is very common in patients admitted to surgery wards of our hospitals. It adversely effects the outcome of surgical operations by increasing complications and mortality.

  18. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius among dogs admitted to a small animal hospital.

    PubMed

    Nienhoff, Ulrike; Kadlec, Kristina; Chaberny, Iris F; Verspohl, Jutta; Gerlach, Gerald-F; Kreienbrock, Lothar; Schwarz, Stefan; Simon, Daniela; Nolte, Ingo

    2011-05-12

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of carriage of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MRSP) among dogs admitted to a small animal hospital during a 17-month period, to characterize these isolates and to initially screen for possible factors associated with MRSP carriage. Swabs were taken from the nose/pharynx and the perineum as well as from wounds and skin infections (if present) of 814 dogs before entering the small animal hospital. A questionnaire for background information was completed. The staphylococcal species and methicillin resistance were confirmed pheno- and genotypically. The identified MRSP isolates were characterized by SCCmec typing, testing for susceptibility to 25 antimicrobial agents and SmaI-directed pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. A first screening for possible risk factors for MRSP carriage was performed by means of unifactorial contingency tables and CART analysis. Sixty (7.4%) dogs were positive for MRSP. All MRSP isolates harboured a type II-III SCCmec cassette and showed extended resistance to antimicrobial agents. Fifteen different SmaI patterns were observed. The major factors that clustered with MRSP carriage were former hospitalization and antibiotic treatment within the last six months before sampling. This study showed that only a minor part of the sampled dogs carried multi-resistant MRSP isolates. The facts that prior hospitalization and/or antibiotic therapy are potential associated factors for MRSP carriage underline the necessity of a judicious use of antibiotics in small animal medicine.

  19. Associations between sleep disturbance and suicidal ideation in adolescents admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sebastian G; Ali, Shahzad K; Simpson, Brittany; Britt, Victoria; McCall, W Vaughn

    2014-01-01

    The goals of our study were to: 1) describe the incidence of disturbances in sleep quality, sleep hygiene, sleep-related cognitions and nightmares; and 2) investigate the association between these sleep-related disturbances and suicidal ideation (SI), in adolescents admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Our sample consisted of 50 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 years (32 females and 18 males; 41 Caucasian and nine African American). Our cross-sectional design involved the administration of the Adolescent Sleep Wake Scale (ASWS), the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS), the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep-Short version for use with children (DBAS-C10), the Disturbing Dreams and Nightmare Scale (DDNSI), and the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire Jr (SIQ-JR). Analyses were conducted using Pearson correlations, as well as univariate and multivariate regression. Results indicated that our sample experienced sleep disturbances and SI to a greater degree than non-clinical samples. Sleep quality was correlated with nightmares, while sleep quality and nightmares were each correlated with SI. Sleep quality, dysfunctional beliefs, and nightmares each independently predicted SI. Our study was the first to use the four sleep measures with an adolescent psychiatric inpatient sample. It is important to develop sleep-related assessment tools in high-risk populations given the link between sleep disturbances and suicidality. Furthermore, a better understanding of the relationships between SI and sleep quality, sleep-related cognitions, and nightmares is needed to develop potential prevention and treatment options for suicidality in adolescents.

  20. Chlamydiaceae in North Atlantic Seabirds Admitted to a Wildlife Rescue Center in Western France

    PubMed Central

    Aaziz, R.; Gourlay, P.; Vorimore, F.; Sachse, K.; Siarkou, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    Birds are the primary hosts of Chlamydia psittaci, a bacterium that can cause avian chlamydiosis in birds and psittacosis in humans. Wild seabirds are frequently admitted to wildlife rescue centers (WRC) at European Atlantic coasts, for example, in connection with oil spills. To investigate the extent of chlamydial shedding by these birds and the resulting risk for animals in care and the medical staff, seabirds from a French WRC were sampled from May 2011 to January 2014. By use of a quantitative PCR (qPCR), 195 seabirds belonging to 4 orders, 5 families and 13 species were examined, of which 18.5% proved to be Chlamydiaceae positive. The highest prevalence of shedders was found in northern gannets (Morus bassanus) (41%), followed by European herring gulls (Larus argentatus) (14%) and common murres (Uria aalge) (7%). Molecular characterization and phylogenetic analysis of qPCR-positive northern gannet samples revealed two variants of a strain closely related to C. psittaci. In European herring gulls and in one common murre, strains showing high sequence similarity to the atypical Chlamydiaceae-like C122 previously found in gulls were detected. Our study shows that seabirds from the northeastern Atlantic Ocean carry several chlamydial organisms, including C. psittaci-related strains. The staff in WRCs should take protective measures, particularly in the case of mass admissions of seabirds. PMID:25934619

  1. [An elderly man with known heart failure admitted with cardiogenic shock].

    PubMed

    Hovland, Anders; Fagerheim, Anne Kristine; Hardersen, Randolf; Nielsen, Erik Waage

    2010-07-01

    A 75-year-old man with post-MI heart failure and an ejection fraction of 15 % was treated with an ACE-inhibitor, spironolactone and a beta-blocker. He had reduced his intake of food and water due to an intercurrent illness the days before admission. He was admitted to our coronary care unit due to bradycardia and hypotension. On arrival his blood pressure was 60/40 mm Hg, and he was in a cardiogenic shock. The electrocardiogram showed broad QRS-complexes and large T waves. Serum-potassium was 9.1 mmol/L and he had acute renal failure with oliguria, probably caused by reduced cardiac output due to hypovolemia combined with taking an ACE inhibitor and spironolactone. Haemodialysis was started and during dialysis QRS complexes became more narrow and heart rate and blood pressure normalized. The patient was discharged 10 days later with normal potassium and creatinine levels. Patients treated with ACE-inhibitors and spironolactone should be monitored closely. During intercurrent illness dehydration may occur and this can lead to renal failure and hyperkalemia which can be life-threatening. The condition should be recognized and addressed promptly, and if indicated haemodialysis should be performed.

  2. Assessment of the sexually abused female children admitted to a tertiary care hospital: Eight year experience

    PubMed Central

    Mollamahmutoglu, Leyla; Uzunlar, Ozlem; Kahyaoglu, Inci; Ozyer, Sebnem; Besli, Mustafa; Karaca, Mujdegul

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the medical, social and legal characteristics of the child sexual abuse and to provide a perspective for gynecologists on this topic. Methods: A retrospective analysis was carried out of the medicolegal records of female children below the age of 18 referred to a tertiary teaching hospital and diagnosed as being exposed to sexual abuse within the family between the years of 2004 to 2012. Results: One hundred and thirty-nine cases were diagnosed as being exposed to sexual abuse during the 8 year period, 23 of them (16.5%) had been involved in sexual abuse within the family. Eleven out of 23 had been admitted as part of a legal process while the rest were reported by a third person. Conclusion: Since sexual abuse within the family is a taboo in Islamic societies, the diagnosis can take a long time. Recognition of sexually abused children, providing early performance of medicolegal examinations, and applying standardized medical guidelines are essential to protect these children. PMID:25225535

  3. Risk factors of stroke patients admitted to a general hospital in Kuwait.

    PubMed

    Ashkanani, Abdulaziz; Hassan, Khalid Ali; Lamdhade, Shekhar

    2013-02-01

    There are limited data on stroke incidence in the Middle East, and only one study from Kuwait. The aim of this study was to establish a baseline status of stroke in Kuwait. We performed a retrospective chart review of all patients admitted from January 1st to December 31st, 2008 to the Amiri Hospital, Kuwait, who either were discharged or passed away with a diagnosis of stroke. Documented risk factors for stroke were analyzed for the total cohort and for male and female subgroups. Stroke subtypes were defined in accordance with the Trial of Org 10172 in acute stroke treatment (TOAST) criteria. There were 151 cases of stroke, of which 90.1% were ischemic. Eighty-five (56.3%) of the patients had diabetes mellitus, 86 (57.0%) had hyperlipidemia, and 104 (68.9%) had hypertension. Statins were used by 42.4% of the 86 hyperlipidemic patients prior to their presentation, and only 66 hypertensive patients (63.5%) were receiving treatment for hypertension prior to their presentation. Atrial fibrillation was diagnosed in 4% of the patients prior to their presentation, and 4% more were diagnosed afterward. History of ischemic heart disease was present in 28.5% of the subjects. This study shows similar rates of risk factors to regionally published reports and provides an updated picture of stroke in Kuwait.

  4. QTc Prolongation in Patients Acutely Admitted to Hospital for Psychosis and Treated with Second Generation Antipsychotics

    PubMed Central

    Kroken, Rune A.; Løberg, Else-Marie; Jørgensen, Hugo A.

    2013-01-01

    QTc interval prolongation is a side effect of several antipsychotic drugs, with associated risks of torsade de pointes arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. There is an ongoing debate of whether or not electrocardiogram (ECG) assessments should be mandatory in patients starting antipsychotic drugs. To investigate QTc prolongation in a clinically relevant patient group 171 adult patients acutely admitted to an emergency ward for psychosis were consecutively recruited. ECGs were recorded at baseline and then at discharge or after 6 weeks at the latest (discharge/6 weeks), thus reflecting the acute phase treatment period. The mean QTc interval was 421.1 (30.4) ms at baseline and there was a positive association between the QTc interval and the agitation score whereas the QTc interval was inversely associated with the serum calcium level. A total of 11.6% had abnormally prolonged QTc intervals and another 14.3% had borderline prolongation. At discharge/6 weeks, the corresponding proportions were reduced to 4.2% and 5.3%, respectively. The reduction of the proportion with prolonged QTc intervals reached statistical significance (chi-square exact test: P = 0.046). The finding of about one-quarter of the patients with borderline or prolonged QTc intervals could indicate mandatory ECG recordings in this population. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT00932529. PMID:24490070

  5. Opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS admitted to an university hospital of the Southeast of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Nobre, Vandack; Braga, Emanuella; Rayes, Abdunnabi; Serufo, José Carlos; Godoy, Pérsio; Nunes, Nívea; Antunes, Carlos Maurício; Lambertucci, José Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Opportunistic diseases in HIV-infected patients have changed since the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy (HAART). This study aims at evaluating the frequency of associated diseases in patients with AIDS admitted to an university hospital of Brazil, before and after HAART. The medical records of 342 HIV-infected patients were reviewed and divided into two groups: group 1 comprised 247 patients before HAART and, group 2, 95 patients after HAART. The male-to-female rate dropped from 5:1 to 2:1for HIV infection. There was an increase in the prevalence of tuberculosis and toxoplasmosis, with a decrease in Kaposi's sarcoma, histoplasmosis and cryptococcosis. A reduction of in-hospital mortality (42.0% vs. 16.9%; p = 0.00002) has also occurred. An agreement between the main clinical diagnoses and autopsy findings was observed in 10 out of 20 cases (50%). Two patients with disseminated schistosomiasis and 2 with paracoccidioidomycosis are reported. Overall, except for cerebral toxoplasmosis, it has been noticed a smaller proportion of opportunistic conditions related to severe immunosuppression in the post HAART group. There was also a significant reduction in the in-hospital mortality, possibly reflecting improvement in the treatment of the HIV infection.

  6. Inhaler technique: facts and fantasies. A view from the Aerosol Drug Management Improvement Team (ADMIT)

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Mark L; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Barnes, P J; Broeders, M; Corrigan, C J; Chawes, B L; Corbetta, L; Dubus, J C; Hausen, Th; Lavorini, F; Roche, N; Sanchis, J; Usmani, Omar S; Viejo, J; Vincken, W; Voshaar, Th; Crompton, G K; Pedersen, Soren

    2016-01-01

    Health professionals tasked with advising patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) how to use inhaler devices properly and what to do about unwanted effects will be aware of a variety of commonly held precepts. The evidence for many of these is, however, lacking or old and therefore in need of re-examination. Few would disagree that facilitating and encouraging regular and proper use of inhaler devices for the treatment of asthma and COPD is critical for successful outcomes. It seems logical that the abandonment of unnecessary or ill-founded practices forms an integral part of this process: the use of inhalers is bewildering enough, particularly with regular introduction of new drugs, devices and ancillary equipment, without unnecessary and pointless adages. We review the evidence, or lack thereof, underlying ten items of inhaler ‘lore’ commonly passed on by health professionals to each other and thence to patients. The exercise is intended as a pragmatic, evidence-informed review by a group of clinicians with appropriate experience. It is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the literature; rather, we aim to stimulate debate, and to encourage researchers to challenge some of these ideas and to provide new, updated evidence on which to base relevant, meaningful advice in the future. The discussion on each item is followed by a formal, expert opinion by members of the ADMIT Working Group. PMID:27098045

  7. Inhaler technique: facts and fantasies. A view from the Aerosol Drug Management Improvement Team (ADMIT).

    PubMed

    Levy, Mark L; Dekhuijzen, P N R; Barnes, P J; Broeders, M; Corrigan, C J; Chawes, B L; Corbetta, L; Dubus, J C; Hausen, Th; Lavorini, F; Roche, N; Sanchis, J; Usmani, Omar S; Viejo, J; Vincken, W; Voshaar, Th; Crompton, G K; Pedersen, Soren

    2016-04-21

    Health professionals tasked with advising patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) how to use inhaler devices properly and what to do about unwanted effects will be aware of a variety of commonly held precepts. The evidence for many of these is, however, lacking or old and therefore in need of re-examination. Few would disagree that facilitating and encouraging regular and proper use of inhaler devices for the treatment of asthma and COPD is critical for successful outcomes. It seems logical that the abandonment of unnecessary or ill-founded practices forms an integral part of this process: the use of inhalers is bewildering enough, particularly with regular introduction of new drugs, devices and ancillary equipment, without unnecessary and pointless adages. We review the evidence, or lack thereof, underlying ten items of inhaler 'lore' commonly passed on by health professionals to each other and thence to patients. The exercise is intended as a pragmatic, evidence-informed review by a group of clinicians with appropriate experience. It is not intended to be an exhaustive review of the literature; rather, we aim to stimulate debate, and to encourage researchers to challenge some of these ideas and to provide new, updated evidence on which to base relevant, meaningful advice in the future. The discussion on each item is followed by a formal, expert opinion by members of the ADMIT Working Group.

  8. Pharmacotherapy and Postdischarge Outcomes of Child Inpatients Admitted for Aggressive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Blader, Joseph C.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives (1) To ascertain the utilization rates of specific pharmacotherapy strategies for child psychiatric inpatients with aggressive behavior from preadmission care through 12 months after discharge, and (2) To examine the associations between these strategies and postdischarge outcomes. Method Prospective follow-up of eighty-three 5- to 13-year-old children admitted to acute inpatient care for aggressive behavior in the context of a disruptive behavior disorder. Treatment and symptom severity data were obtained at admission, discharge, and 3, 6, and 12 months after discharge between 1998 and 2001. Results Utilization The number of concurrent medications increased over assessment times. Changes in children’s pharmacotherapy occurred most frequently during hospitalization and from discharge to 3 months after discharge. Treatment with antipsychotics and mood stabilizers increased over assessment times, whereas selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) treatment decreased. Outcomes Children treated with stimulants and risperidone 3 months after discharge had significantly improved behavioral ratings, adjusted for admission scores utilization and concurrent medications. Children treated with SSRIs at 6 months after discharge had higher problem severity ratings. Those who maintained lithium and SSRI treatment between 6 and 12 months showed improvements. Conclusions The complexity of pharmacotherapy for child inpatients ratchets upwards from admission through 1 year after discharge. Hospital-initiated treatment is commonly altered soon after discharge. Within the limitations of observational methodology, their postdischarge outcomes seem related to specific pharmacotherapy regimens. PMID:16855463

  9. Outcome of high security patients admitted to a medium secure unit: the Edenfield Centre study.

    PubMed

    Blattner, Regine; Dolan, Mairead

    2009-10-01

    This study examined the outcome of a cohort of 72 patients from a high secure psychiatric hospital (HSPH) who were admitted to and discharged from the Edenfield Centre over a 16-year period. The sample was predominately male and mentally ill and the majority was subject to restriction orders. Compared with two similar studies focusing specifically on the outcomes of HSPH patients in medium security, our sample had fewer women and the group had more extensive criminal and psychiatric histories. None of our cohort was discharged to the community via district services or transferred to other hospitals. We found that the Edenfield Centre had relatively higher rates of readmissions to the HSPH and a slightly higher reconviction rate than similar studies focusing solely on the outcomes of HSPH patients. In line with previous research, those detained under the legal category of psychopathic disorder were more likely to be reconvicted following discharge to the community than those detained under mental illness. Further large scale studies are needed to compare the outcomes of HSPH patients discharged through medium secure services that operate parallel or integrated aftercare service models.

  10. Anaemia and other haematological abnormalities in patients admitted to long-term care.

    PubMed

    Granérus, A K; Nilsson-Ehle, H; Westin, J

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the occurence and causes of anaemia and other haematological abnormalities in 142 elderly patients (43 men, 99 women; median age 79 and 80 years), admitted to long-term care. Healthy 81-year-old subjects (n = 220) were used as reference group. Anaemia according to the WHO definition was much more common in the studied population (41%) than in a representative sample of 81-year-old subjects (10%). Somatically fit patients were less often anaemic (30%) than those with somatic illness (68%). The main causes for anaemia were: chronic disease (14.9%), recent haemorrhage (7.8%), iron deficiency (5.7%); and often multifactorial. Secondary leuko- or thrombocytosis occurred in 14 and 23%, drug-induced thrombocytopenia in 2.8% of the patients. Anaemia and other haematological abnormalities seen in elderly patients hospitalized for long-term care are often secondary to chronic or acute disorders. However, they also occur in patients without severe somatic impairment and many of them are reversible. Such findings should therefore not be neglected, but properly investigated, and if possible treated.

  11. Prevalence of MRSA Nasal Carriage in Patients Admitted to a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkader, Jasmine Kulapurathu; Sugumar, Madhan; Rajagopal, Girija Kalarikkal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infections with MRSA, both community and hospital acquired, are well established and the source of infection is often a carrier. There are very few studies showing the magnitude of MRSA nasal colonization among healthy persons from the community. This study was conducted to detect the prevalence of MRSA nasal carriage in patients who did not have any known risk factors associated with HA- MRSA colonization, admitted to a tertiary care centre in Kerala. Materials and Methods Nasal swabs were collected from patients within 24 hours of admission. Specimen were inoculated on chromogenic agar (HiCrome MeReSa agar-HiMedia) for MRSA screening. Isolates were then subjected to antibiotic sensitivity tests, SCCmec typing and PVL gene detection. Results Out of 683 patients, 16 carried MRSA in their nares (2.3%). Of the 16 strains 13 (81.25 %) strain were SCCmec type III and one belonged to SCCmec type IV (6.25 %). Two strains failed to amplify SCCmec genes. Three strains carried genes for PVL toxin (18.75%). Conclusion With a better understanding of the complex epidemiology of MRSA it is increasingly apparent that demarcations between the HA and CA phenotypes are not as clear cut as previously thought. In this study of nasal carriage of MRSA in the community we have demonstrated prevalence consistent with published data. Most isolates however were shown to belong to the type conventionally assigned to HA-MRSA. PMID:27042461

  12. Intrinsically variable stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohm-Vitense, Erika; Querci, Monique

    1987-01-01

    The characteristics of intrinsically variable stars are examined, reviewing the results of observations obtained with the IUE satellite since its launch in 1978. Selected data on both medium-spectral-class pulsating stars (Delta Cep stars, W Vir stars, and related groups) and late-type variables (M, S, and C giants and supergiants) are presented in spectra, graphs, and tables and described in detail. Topics addressed include the calibration of the the period-luminosity relation, Cepheid distance determination, checking stellar evolution theory by the giant companions of Cepheids, Cepheid masses, the importance of the hydrogen convection zone in Cepheids, temperature and abundance estimates for Population II pulsating stars, mass loss in Population II Cepheids, SWP and LWP images of cold giants and supergiants, temporal variations in the UV lines of cold stars, C-rich cold stars, and cold stars with highly ionized emission lines.

  13. Some Aspects of the Physical Variability of the Caribbean Sea Relevant to Regional Climate Variability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mooers, C. N.

    2001-12-01

    The Caribbean Sea is the least studied portion of the Intra-Americas Sea (IAS), which is the combined Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico, Straits of Florida, and the adjacent western North Atlantic. The upstream elements of the Gulf Stream System are the dominant features of the upper ocean circulation in the Caribbean Sea. The Trade Winds superimpose a coastal upwelling regime along the northern coast of South America and a coastal downwelling regime along the southern coasts of Cuba and Hispaniola. The inflow from the Atlantic through several Antillean passages is derived from tropical and subtropical sources and is relatively weak, shallow, and variable; the outflow to the Gulf of Mexico through the Yucatan Channel is relatively strong, deep, and variable. The variability includes mesoscale eddies and meanders as well as the seasonal cycle and year-to-year variability; it also includes lengthy plumes from the Orinoco and other rivers and lengthy filaments from coastal upwelling centers. Some of the mesoscale variability originates in the Eastern Caribbean; other components originate in the Western Caribbean, especially in the cyclonic Panama-Colombia Gyre. The upper ocean of the Caribbean Sea is not only under the influence of the Trade Winds and their seasonal and longer term variability but also two other, not mutually exclusive, sources of variability: the seasonal heating and precipitation cycles on one hand, and synoptic scale and mesoscale phenomena on the other hand. For example, there are wet and dry seasons, and the Eastern Caribbean is typically dry and the Western Caribbean typically wet, with a heavy rainfall zone off the coast of Central America. And the patterns of atmospheric deep convection and subsidence apparently account for the summertime intensification of an extensive "warm pool" concentrated in the Northwestern Caribbean, which is exported to the Gulf of Mexico. As another example, the weekly Tropical Easterly Waves (TEWs) are the predominant

  14. [Investigation of Bartonella henselae seroprevalence and related risk factors in blood donors admitted to Pamukkale University Blood Center].

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Cansev; Ergin, Cağri; Kaleli, Ilknur

    2009-07-01

    Bartonella henselae is an emerging infectious agent that mainly causes cat scratch disease, basillary angiomatosis and peliosis hepatitis. Although many basillary angiomatosis cases have been reported especially from the Mediterranean region of Turkey, adequate data about the seroprevalence of B. henselae in Turkey does not exist. The aim of this study was to investigate the seroprevalence of B. henselae in volunteer blood donors and the related risk factors. In this study, sera samples were randomly collected from 800 (771 man, 29 women; age range: 18-60 years) voluntary healthy blood donors admitted to Pamukkale University Research and Training Hospital. B. henselae (Houston-1 strain) total antibodies were investigated by an in-house indirect immunofluorescent antibody assay. Seropositivity was detected in 6% (48/800) of the donors. B. henselae (Houston-1) antibody titer was 1/64 in 40 of the donors, 1/128 in 4, 1/256 in 2, 1/512 in 1 and 1/1024 in 1 of the donors. Statistical analysis of epidemiological and demographical data revealed that high seroprevalence rates have been found in rabbit stockfarmers (p = 0.004), students staying at hostels (p = 0.04) and people with history of tick-bite (p = 0.03). No significant statistical differences were found in each related groups in terms of age, sex, chronic disorders, sport activities, outside behaviors, being injured by any wild or domestic animals, working outdoors, geographical properties of the area of inhabitance, hunting and travelling (p > 0.05). One of the high titer (1/512) antibody positive subjects was a cat owner and had a history of phlebotomus bite, pediculosis and sporting in open area while 1/1024 titer positive case was a farmer and a dog owner. Our healthy blood donors' seroprevalence results are similar to those of other Mediterranean countries. The analysis of epidemiological data revealed that tick bite history and rabbit stockfarming were the risk factors for B. henselae infection. Variability

  15. Gaseous contaminant distribution in the breathing zone.

    PubMed

    Ojima, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Conventionally, the "breathing zone" is defined as the zone within a 0.3 m (or 10 inches) radius of a worker's nose and mouth, and it has been generally assumed that a contaminant in the breathing zone is homogeneous and its concentration is equivalent to the concentration inhaled by the worker. However, several studies have mentioned that the concentration is not uniform in the breathing zone when a worker is close to the contaminant source. In order to examine the spatial variability of contaminant concentrations in a worker's breathing zone, comparative measurements of personal exposure were carried out in a laboratory. In experiment, ethanol vapor was released in front of a model worker (human subject and mockup mannequin) and the vapor concentrations were measured at two different sampling points, at the nose and at the chest, in the breathing zone. Then, the effects of the sampling location and the body temperature on the exposure were observed. The ratios of nose concentration to chest concentration for the human subject and the mannequin were 0-0.2 and 0.12, respectively. The exposure level of the mannequin was about 5.5-9.3 times higher than that of the human subject.

  16. Fault zone hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bense, V. F.; Gleeson, T.; Loveless, S. E.; Bour, O.; Scibek, J.

    2013-12-01

    Deformation along faults in the shallow crust (< 1 km) introduces permeability heterogeneity and anisotropy, which has an important impact on processes such as regional groundwater flow, hydrocarbon migration, and hydrothermal fluid circulation. Fault zones have the capacity to be hydraulic conduits connecting shallow and deep geological environments, but simultaneously the fault cores of many faults often form effective barriers to flow. The direct evaluation of the impact of faults to fluid flow patterns remains a challenge and requires a multidisciplinary research effort of structural geologists and hydrogeologists. However, we find that these disciplines often use different methods with little interaction between them. In this review, we document the current multi-disciplinary understanding of fault zone hydrogeology. We discuss surface- and subsurface observations from diverse rock types from unlithified and lithified clastic sediments through to carbonate, crystalline, and volcanic rocks. For each rock type, we evaluate geological deformation mechanisms, hydrogeologic observations and conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Outcrop observations indicate that fault zones commonly have a permeability structure suggesting they should act as complex conduit-barrier systems in which along-fault flow is encouraged and across-fault flow is impeded. Hydrogeological observations of fault zones reported in the literature show a broad qualitative agreement with outcrop-based conceptual models of fault zone hydrogeology. Nevertheless, the specific impact of a particular fault permeability structure on fault zone hydrogeology can only be assessed when the hydrogeological context of the fault zone is considered and not from outcrop observations alone. To gain a more integrated, comprehensive understanding of fault zone hydrogeology, we foresee numerous synergistic opportunities and challenges for the discipline of structural geology and hydrogeology to co-evolve and

  17. Tactical Determinants of Setting Zone in Elite Men'S Volleyball

    PubMed Central

    Afonso, Jose; Esteves, Francisca; Araújo, Rui; Thomas, Luke; Mesquita, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The interactions between two opposing teams lead to the emergence of unique game patterns. In volleyball, attack efficacy emerges as the strongest predictor of the final result and thus it becomes of foremost importance to understand which game patterns afford the attaining of higher attack efficacies. These rely on the quality of the setting action. In turn, the serve and the serve reception constrain the setter's actions and the attacker's efficacy. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine predictors of the setting zone in elite-level men's volleyball. Thirty-one matches of the 2007 World Cup were analyzed, in total 5117 rallies. The dependent variable was the setting zone, and the independent variables were the server player, serve type, serve direction, serve depth, reception zone, receiver player and reception type. Multinomial logistic regression was applied, in order to obtain the estimated likelihood of occurrence of the dependent variable, based on the values of the independent variables (p < 0.05). Only the serve direction showed not to be predictive of the setting zone. Concerning the remaining variables, the tennis jump serve, serves from the middle-player, deep serves, reception near the endline or sidelines, reception by the zone 4 attackers when in defensive zone, and low reception all proved to impair the quality of reception, demanding the setter to play more often in the not acceptable setting zone. Results suggest that, at this level, practice of serve-reception should preferably cover the deep tennis jump serve, and attempt to afford the libero more opportunities to receive. By focusing on the variables with the most predictive power, performers may better allocate their attention towards the most pertinent cues at each moment. Knowledge of these interactive models provides valuable insights into the dynamics of the action sequences, affording coaches important information and guidance. Key pointsA set of key variables interact and

  18. Tactical determinants of setting zone in elite men's volleyball.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Jose; Esteves, Francisca; Araújo, Rui; Thomas, Luke; Mesquita, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    The interactions between two opposing teams lead to the emergence of unique game patterns. In volleyball, attack efficacy emerges as the strongest predictor of the final result and thus it becomes of foremost importance to understand which game patterns afford the attaining of higher attack efficacies. These rely on the quality of the setting action. In turn, the serve and the serve reception constrain the setter's actions and the attacker's efficacy. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine predictors of the setting zone in elite-level men's volleyball. Thirty-one matches of the 2007 World Cup were analyzed, in total 5117 rallies. The dependent variable was the setting zone, and the independent variables were the server player, serve type, serve direction, serve depth, reception zone, receiver player and reception type. Multinomial logistic regression was applied, in order to obtain the estimated likelihood of occurrence of the dependent variable, based on the values of the independent variables (p < 0.05). Only the serve direction showed not to be predictive of the setting zone. Concerning the remaining variables, the tennis jump serve, serves from the middle-player, deep serves, reception near the endline or sidelines, reception by the zone 4 attackers when in defensive zone, and low reception all proved to impair the quality of reception, demanding the setter to play more often in the not acceptable setting zone. Results suggest that, at this level, practice of serve-reception should preferably cover the deep tennis jump serve, and attempt to afford the libero more opportunities to receive. By focusing on the variables with the most predictive power, performers may better allocate their attention towards the most pertinent cues at each moment. Knowledge of these interactive models provides valuable insights into the dynamics of the action sequences, affording coaches important information and guidance. Key pointsA set of key variables interact and

  19. Satellite-Derived Management Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepoutre, Damien; Layrol, Laurent

    2005-01-01

    The term "satellite-derived management zones" (SAMZ) denotes agricultural management zones that are subdivisions of large fields and that are derived from images of the fields acquired by instruments aboard Earth-orbiting satellites during approximately the past 15 years. "SAMZ" also denotes the methodology and the software that implements the methodology for creating such zones. The SAMZ approach is one of several products of continuing efforts to realize a concept of precision agriculture, which involves optimal variations in seeding, in application of chemicals, and in irrigation, plus decisions to farm or not to farm certain portions of fields, all in an effort to maximize profitability in view of spatial and temporal variations in the growth and health of crops, and in the chemical and physical conditions of soils. As used here, "management zone" signifies, more precisely, a subdivision of a field within which the crop-production behavior is regarded as homogeneous. From the perspective of precision agriculture, management zones are the smallest subdivisions between which the seeding, application of chemicals, and other management parameters are to be varied. In the SAMZ approach, the main sources of data are the archives of satellite imagery that have been collected over the years for diverse purposes. One of the main advantages afforded by the SAMZ approach is that the data in these archives can be reused for purposes of precision agriculture at low cost. De facto, these archives contain information on all sources of variability within a field, including weather, crop types, crop management, soil types, and water drainage patterns. The SAMZ methodology involves the establishment of a Web-based interface based on an algorithm that generates management zones automatically and quickly from archival satellite image data in response to requests from farmers. A farmer can make a request by either uploading data describing a field boundary to the Web site or else

  20. 16. UPPER PASSENGER LOADING ZONE, NOTE LOADING ZONE BELOW WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. UPPER PASSENGER LOADING ZONE, NOTE LOADING ZONE BELOW WITH TURN STILES - Jefferson National Expansion Memorial Arch, Mississippi River between Washington & Poplar Streets, Saint Louis, Independent City, MO

  1. [Investigation of the hepatitis E virus seroprevalence in cases admitted to Hacettepe University Medical Faculty Hospital].

    PubMed

    Aydın, Nesibe Nur; Ergünay, Koray; Karagül, Aydan; Pınar, Ahmet; Us, Dürdal

    2015-10-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV), classified in Hepeviridae family, Hepevirus genus, is a non-enveloped virus with icosahedral capsid containing single-stranded positive sense RNA genome. HEV infections may be asymptomatic especially in children, however it may present as fulminant hepatitis in pregnant women, as well as chronic hepatitis in immunocompromised patients. There are four well-known genotypes of HEV that infect humans and many mammalian species. Genotype 1 and 2 are frequently responsible for water-borne infections transmitted by fecal-oral way in developing countries, while genotype 3 and 4 cause zoonotic infections in developed countries. Turkey is considered as an endemic country with a total seroprevalence rate of 6.3% for normal population, showing significant variation (0-73%) according to the regions and study groups. The aims of this study were to investigate the HEV seropositivity in cases admitted to Hacettepe University Medical Faculty Hospital (HUMFH), to evaluate the results according to the demographic features of patients, and to determine the current HEV seroprevalence in our region, contributing seroepidemiological data in Turkey. A total of 1043 serum samples (514 female, 529 male; age range: 1-90 years, mean age: 38.03) obtained from 327 blood donors (32 female, 295 male; age range: 19-59 years, mean age: 31.1) who were admitted to HUMFH Blood Center, and 716 sera (482 female, 234 male; age range: 1-90 years, mean age: 41.7) that were sent to HUMFH Central Laboratory from various outpatient/inpatient clinics, between November 2012 to November 2013, were included in the study. The presence of HEV-IgG antibodies in serum samples was detected by a commercial ELISA method (Euroimmun, Germany), and the presence of HEV-IgM antibodies was also investigated in the sera with IgG-positive results. The overall HEV-IgG seropositivity rate was determined as 4.4% (46/1043), and the seropositivity rates for blood donors and in/outpatients were as 0.92% (3

  2. INEEL Vadose Zone Research Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, G.; Hull, L.; Ansley, S.; Versteeg, R.; Scott, C.; Street, L.

    2003-12-01

    The Vadose Zone Research Park was developed to address mission critical issues related to operations, waste management, and environmental restoration at U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites that are located over thick vadose zones. The research park provides instrumentation and facilities for scientists to address vadose zone processes that are important in assessing operational activities, remedial measures, and long-term stewardship of DOE lands. The park, at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), is strategically located along the Big Lost River, an intermittent river, and around two new percolation ponds. This location provides the opportunity to study variable recharge from the river, continuous recharge from the ponds, and the interactions between the two sources. Drilling began in September 2000 and was completed in June 2001. Thirty one wells and instrumented boreholes have been installed at the park to monitor perched water, measure moisture movement, collect water and gas samples, and study intra-well geophysical properties. Nine of the boreholes, ranging in depth from 150 ft to 504 ft below land surface (bls), are instrumented to monitor moisture in the vadose zone. Instruments include: tensiometers, moisture content sensors, suction lysimeters, temperature sensors, gas ports and electrodes for electrical resistance tomography. Electrodes are evenly spaced throughout the borehole with hydrologic instruments concentrated in and near the sedimentary interbeds-discontinuous layers of silts and clays that occur between some basalt flows. Eighteen monitoring wells, ranging in depth from 60 ft to 250 ft bls, are completed with 4 or 6 inch PVC casing, and generally include an electrical resistivity electrode array attached to the casing. Three bore holes are constructed for testing cross-hole ground penetrating radar as well as for testing new nuclear logging tools being designed at the INEEL. The remaining borehole contains only

  3. 37 CFR 1.91 - Models or exhibits not generally admitted as part of application or patent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 37 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Models or exhibits not generally admitted as part of application or patent. 1.91 Section 1.91 Patents, Trademarks, and Copyrights UNITED STATES PATENT AND TRADEMARK OFFICE, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE GENERAL RULES OF PRACTICE IN PATENT CASES National Processing Provisions...

  4. Comparison of Adults with Intellectual Disabilities and Mental Health Problems Admitted to Specialist and Generic Inpatient Units

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hemmings, C. P.; O'Hara, J.; McCarthy, J.; Holt, G.; Eoster, F.; Costello, H.; Hammond, R.; Xenitidis, K.; Bouras, N.

    2009-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the characteristics of service users with intellectual disabilities and mental health problems admitted to either a specialist or a generic inpatient unit in an area of South London. Socio-demographic and clinical characteristics of consecutive admissions over a 5.5-year period were recorded using a questionnaire. Key…

  5. Profile of BC College Transfer Students Admitted to the University of British Columbia: 2003/04 to 2007/08

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert-Maberly, Ashley

    2009-01-01

    This report examines the demographics, performance, and success of students who were admitted to the University of British Columbia's Vancouver campus on the basis of a minimum 24 transfer credits earned at a BC college during the five year period comprising the 2003/04 through 2007/08 academic years. The report mines familiar ground--similar…

  6. Economics of Higher Education: Are We Overeducating by Admitting Too Many Students? [Comments by the President of Indiana University].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John W.

    While some critics may point out the overabundance of college graduates in proportion to available jobs, Indiana is not admitting too many students at the higher education level. New technology has increased the demand for new occupations and a better educated work force. Emphasis must shift from quantitative growth--in student numbers, programs,…

  7. Prevalence of Stroke in Neonates Who Admitted With Seizures in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    FARHADI, Roya; ALAEE, Abdolrasool; ALIPOUR, Zahra; ABBASKHANIAN, Ali; NAKHSHAB, Maryam; DERAKHSHANFAR, Hojjat

    2015-01-01

    Objective Prevalence of neonatal stroke has been reported 1/2300-1/4000 live births and accounts for 12-20% of the cases of neonatal seizures. Although stroke has been introduced as the second cause of the neonatal seizures in literatures, it may remain unclear in diagnostic evaluations of seizure in neonates. This study was performed to assess the prevalence of stroke in neonates with seizure. Materials & Methods In this cross-sectional study, all neonates ≥ 28 weeks of gestation with a diagnosis of seizures admitted to the NICU of Boo-Ali Sina Hospital in Sari, north of Iran, were enrolled. Brain CT scan and a Transcranial Doppler ultrasonography were performed for the all cases. In cases that stroke were reported in one or two above modalities, an MRI was also performed and prevalence of stroke was reported. Putative risk factors of stroke were analyzed with univariate and multivariate statistical methods. Results From 174 newborn infants, 75.3% of neonates were male. Prevalence of stroke was 8%, 2.3% and 3.4% in Doppler ultrasonography, CT scan and MRI reports respectively. Umbilical venous catheterization was the risk factor of stroke in the univariate and multivariate analysis (P= 0.001; OR, 10.39; 95% CI, 2.72- 39.77). The most common form of seizure was focal clonic seizures (78.6%) in neonates with stroke. Conclusion Investigation of stroke as an etiology of neonatal seizures is essential because seizure may be the only symptom of neonatal cerebral infarction. Doppler ultrasonography can be a valuable diagnostic tool at first in critically ill neonates or in situations that MRI is not available primarily. Further studies with notice to outcome assessment of these infants recommended. PMID:26664440

  8. Prevalence and risk factors of pneumothorax among patients admitted to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    El-Nawawy, Ahmed Ahmed; Al-Halawany, Amina Sedky; Antonios, Manal Abdelmalik; Newegy, Reem Gamal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pneumothorax should be considered a medical emergency and requires a high index of suspicion and prompt recognition and intervention. Aims: The objective of the study was to evaluate cases developing pneumothorax following admission to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) over a 5-year period. Settings and Design: Case notes of all PICU patients (n = 1298) were reviewed, revealing that 135 cases (10.4%) developed pneumothorax, and these were compared with those patients who did not. The most common tool for diagnosis used was chest X-ray followed by a clinical examination. Subjects and Methods: Case notes of 1298 patients admitted in PICU over 1-year study. Results: Patients with pneumothorax had higher mortality rate (P < 0.001), longer length of stay (P < 0.001), higher need for mechanical ventilation (MV) (P < 0.001), and were of younger age (P < 0.001), lower body weight (P < 0.001), higher pediatric index of mortality 2 score on admission (P < 0.001), higher pediatric logistic organ dysfunction score (P < 0.001), compared to their counterpart. Iatrogenic pneumothorax (IP) represented 95% of episodes of pneumothorax. The most common causes of IP were barotrauma secondary to MV, central vein catheter insertion, and other (69.6%, 13.2%, and 17.2%, respectively). Compared to ventilated patients without pneumothorax, ventilated patients who developed pneumothorax had a longer duration of MV care (P < 0.001) and higher nonconventional and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation settings (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that pneumothorax is common in Alexandria University PICU patients, especially in those on MV and emphasized the importance of the strict application of protective lung strategies among ventilated patients to minimize the risk of pneumothorax. PMID:27630456

  9. Intestinal parasitic infection among children and neonatus admitted to Ibn-Sina Hospital, Sirt, Libya.

    PubMed

    Kasssem, Hamed H; Zaed, Hana Abdalsalam; Sadaga, Gazala A

    2007-08-01

    A total of 350 stool samples from 196 males and 154 female children and neonatus admitted in Ibn-Sina hospital, Sirt, were examined from June 2001 to May 2002, to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasites. Intestinal parasitic infections were identified in 196 (56%) of children and neonates. No intestinal helminthic parasites were detected but 13 intestinal protozoan parasites were detected. The most prevalent protozoan was Entamoeba histolytica /E. dispar (36.57%); Blastocystis hominis (12.57%), Giardia lamblia (10.29%), Isospora belli (3.14%) and Balantidium coli (0.86%), the latter was detected in non-Libyan children. The non-pathogenic ones were Entamoeba coli (15.14%), Endolimax nana (13.71%), Entamoeba hartmanni (4.29%), Chilomastix mesnilli (4.29%), Retortamonas intestinalis (3.43%), Dientamoeba fragilis (2%), Iodamoeba butschlii (0.86%) and Trichomonas hominis (0.86%). The result showed a significant difference exists between the prevalence of pathogenic and non-pathogenic protozoan parasites (P < 0.05). High prevalence of E. histolytica/ E. dispar followed by E. coli, E. nana, B. hominis and G. lamblia in both sexes of children, while the prevalence of other intestinal parasites were low in both sexes, significantly different existed in the prevalence of intestinal parasites between males and females children (t = 24.68; P < 0.05). Age groups had no effect on the prevalence of intestinal parasites (F = 0.66; P < 0.05). Significant differences existed in the prevalence between single and multiple infections with pathogenic protozoa. The socio-economic status of children parents revealed that high prevalence in children from medium socio-economic status. The family size had no significant effect on the prevalence of the intestinal parasites.

  10. Mandibular Fractures Admitted to the Emergency Department: Data Analysis from a Swiss Level One Trauma Centre

    PubMed Central

    Yildirgan, Kemal; Zahir, Edris; Sharafi, Siamak; Schaller, Benoit; Exadaktylos, Aristomenis K.

    2016-01-01

    Mandibular fracture is a common occurrence in emergency medicine and belongs to the most frequent facial fractures. Historically road traffic injuries (RTIs) have played a prominent role as a cause for mandibular fractures. We extracted data from all patients between August 2012 and February 2015 with “lower jaw fracture” or “mandibular fracture” from the routine database from the emergency department. We conducted a descriptive analysis at a Swiss level one trauma centre. 144 patients were admitted with suspected mandibular fractures. The majority underwent CT diagnostic (83%). In 7% suspected mandibular fracture was not confirmed. More than half of all patients suffered two or more fractures. The fractures were median or paramedian in 77/144 patients (53%) and in other parts (corpus, mandibular angle, ramus mandibularis, collum, and temporomandibular joint) in 100/144 (69%). Male to female ratio was 3 : 1 up to 59 years of age; 69% were younger than 40 years. 72% of all patients presented during daytime, 69% had to be hospitalized, and 31% could be discharged from the ED after treatment. Most fractures were due to fall (44%), followed by interpersonal violence (25%) and sport activities (12%). Falls were a dominant cause of fracture in all age groups while violence and sport activities were common only in younger patients. Comparisons to other studies were difficult due to lack of standardization of causes contributing to the injuries. In the observed time period and setting RTIs have played a minor role compared to falls, interpersonal violence, and sports. In the future, standardized documentation as well as categorization of causes for analytic purposes is urgently needed to facilitate international comparison of studies. PMID:27656297

  11. Prognostic value of ejection fraction in patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Perelshtein Brezinov, Olga; Klempfner, Robert; Zekry, Sagit Ben; Goldenberg, Ilan; Kuperstein, Rafael

    2017-01-01

    Abstract There are limited data regarding factors affecting outcomes among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients presenting with varying degrees of left ventricle (LV) dysfunction. We aimed to identify factors associated with mortality according to LV ejection fraction (LVEF) at 1st admission in ACS patients. A total of 8983 ACS patients prospectively enrolled in the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey (2000–2010) were categorized according to their LVEF at admission: severe LV dysfunction (LVEF < 30% [n = 845]), mild-moderate LV dysfunction (LVEF 30%–49% [n = 4470]); preserved LV function (LVEF ≥ 50% [n = 3659]). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to assess the risk factors for 1-year mortality according to LVEF on admission. Over the past decade there was a gradual decline in the proportion of patients admitted with low LVEF. Mortality rates were highest among patients with severe LV dysfunction (36%), intermediate among those with mild-moderate LV dysfunction (10%), and lowest among those with preserved LV function (4%, P < 0.001). We recognized different risk factors for mortality according to LVEF at admission. Admission clinical features (syncope, anterior myocardial infarction, and ST elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI]) predicted mortality risk in patients with severe LV dysfunction (all P < 0.05), whereas the presence of comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, and peripheral arterial disease) predicted mortality risk in patients with more preserved LV function. Age and admission Killip class ≥II were consistent predictors in all LVEF subsets. LVEF at admission is a strong predictor of mortality in ACS, and prognostic factors differ according to LVEF during admission. In patients with severe LV dysfunction signs of clinical instability are related to 1-year mortality; in patients with a more preserved LV function the prognosis is related to the

  12. Palliative care for patients with HIV/AIDS admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Paola Nóbrega; de Miranda, Erique José Peixoto; Cruz, Ronaldo; Forte, Daniel Neves

    2016-01-01

    Objective To describe the characteristics of patients with HIV/AIDS and to compare the therapeutic interventions and end-of-life care before and after evaluation by the palliative care team. Methods This retrospective cohort study included all patients with HIV/AIDS admitted to the intensive care unit of the Instituto de Infectologia Emílio Ribas who were evaluated by a palliative care team between January 2006 and December 2012. Results Of the 109 patients evaluated, 89% acquired opportunistic infections, 70% had CD4 counts lower than 100 cells/mm3, and only 19% adhered to treatment. The overall mortality rate was 88%. Among patients predicted with a terminally ill (68%), the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy decreased from 50.0% to 23.1% (p = 0.02), the use of antibiotics decreased from 100% to 63.6% (p < 0.001), the use of vasoactive drugs decreased from 62.1% to 37.8% (p = 0.009), the use of renal replacement therapy decreased from 34.8% to 23.0% (p < 0.0001), and the number of blood product transfusions decreased from 74.2% to 19.7% (p < 0.0001). Meetings with the family were held in 48 cases, and 23% of the terminally ill patients were discharged from the intensive care unit. Conclusion Palliative care was required in patients with severe illnesses and high mortality. The number of potentially inappropriate interventions in terminally ill patients monitored by the palliative care team significantly decreased, and 26% of the patients were discharged from the intensive care unit. PMID:27737420

  13. Evaluation of Radiation Dose Received by Premature Neonates Admitted to Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Aramesh, Mohmmadreza; Zanganeh, Kobra Aria; Dehdashtian, Masoud; Malekian, Arash; Fatahiasl, Jafar

    2017-01-01

    Background This study aimed to evaluate the radiation dose received by premature neonates using diagnostic radiographies. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 116 premature neonates with gestational age from 25 to 37 weeks; with the diagnosis of neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (NRDS) and tachypnea, they were admitted to a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) at Ahvaz Imam Khomeini Hospital in 2015. For assessing the dose received, the model GR-200 thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) was used. For each premature neonate under radiation, three TLDs separately (one for each) were placed on surfaces of Ch1, T1, and G1 (chest, thyroid, and gonad of first newborn, respectively). Moreover, for the adjacent neonate at a distance of 60 - 100 cm, two TLDs were laid in the surfaces of T2 and G2 (thyroid and gonad of second newborn, respectively). The dose received by TLDs for any baby and the adjacent neonate under the entrance surface dose (ESD) was estimated. Results The mean of neonates’ weight under study was 1,950.78 ± 484.9 g. During the hospitalization period, minimum one and maximum three radiographies were done for any premature neonate. The doses received in the premature neonates to Ch1, T1 and G1 were 0.08 ± 0.01, 0.06 ± 0.01, and 0.05 ± 0.01 mSv, respectively and for adjacent infants for T2 and G2 were 0.003 ± 0.001 and 0.002 ± 0.0009 mSv, respectively. Conclusions In the study, radiation dose received by organs at risk of premature neonates was lower than the international criteria and standards, therefore, also due to the lack of radiation damage threshold, to limit collimator, and the use of the proper filtration, kilovoltage and time during radiography of premature neonates are recommended. PMID:28090228

  14. Characteristics of road traffic accident casualties admitted to a tertiary care hospital in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Dinesh M; Tennakoon, Sampath U; Samaranayake, Achini N; Wickramasinghe, Medhani

    2017-03-01

    The mortality and morbidity of road traffic accidents (RTA) is increasing in the South Asian region, including Sri Lanka. Therefore, the demographic factors, types of vehicles involved, and the severity of injuries sustained in RTA was studied. Age, gender, and details of the incident of all patients admitted to hospital following a RTA, between January 2007 and August 2012, were obtained by interview. Following a medico-legal examination, the type and severity of injuries was categorized as, non-grievous, grievous, endangering life or fatal in the ordinary course of nature. Of the 579 RTA casualties examined, 72% were males, 28% females, and 26% were in the 20-29 year age group. There were 44% passengers, 32% drivers, and 20% pedestrians. Of the 440 vehicle occupants, 37% were on motor cycles, 28% in three wheelers, 13% in dual purpose vehicles and 11% in buses. Of the 114 pedestrians, 33% had been struck by motor cycles, 19% by three-wheelers and 17% by dual purpose vehicles. There was at least one soft tissue injury in 84%, whilst 45% had one or more fractures. In 85% of bicycle riders, the injuries were grievous, endangering life or fatal in the ordinary course of nature. A high proportion of young adults sustained grievous injuries due to RTA. Almost two thirds of the casualties resulted from motorcycle or three wheeler accidents. Laws limiting the number of passengers carried, installation of side doors, mandatory use of seat belts in three wheelers, and protective garments for motorcyclists are recommended.

  15. [Characteristics of acute renal failure in elderly patients admitted to a small town hospital].

    PubMed

    Lou, L M; Boned, B; Gimeno, J A; Beguer, P; Cruz, A; Telmo, S; Lou, M T; Gómez Sánchez, R

    2002-01-01

    We studied the features of acute renal failure (ARF) in elderly patients treated in a hospital, without an intensive care unit, to identify etiological factors and establish adequate preventive measures and treatment. During twelve consecutive months we studied prospectively 99 patients with ARF diagnosed by conventional criteria, an incidence of 1,238 cases per million per year. ARF affected 1.78% of patients admitted to hospital. We analyzed age, sex, serum creatinine, diuresis, etiology, type of ARF, preexisting chronic diseases, treatment, complications and outcome. Preexisting chronic diseases were common, the most frequent being hypertension (54%) and diabetes (39%). Previous treatments for cardiovascular diseases were frequent (angiotensin-renin system blockade 35.4%, diuretics 50.5%). 79% of ARF arose in hospital, 21% outside hospital. ARF was pre-renal in 60%, renal in 31% and post-renal in 9%. 34.7% were caused by volume depletion, 23.4% by low cardiac output and 23.4% by infection. 44.4% of ARF patients had oliguria or anuria latrogenic factors contributed to the ethiology of ARF in 35.3% of patients. Hospital stay was doubled by ARF the presence of ARF and the mortality was 36.4%. The rate was higher in ARF arising in hospital than in ARF acquired before admission. Factors that had a significant influence on the mortality rate were comorbid conditions, oliguroanuria, ARF of renal origin and serum albumin. We conclude that ARF has a high incidence, morbidity and mortality in this elderly population. Volume depletion, associated cardiovascular pathology and pharmacological treatment are important etiological factors in those with ARF outside hospital. Adequate treatment of ARF and avoidance of nephrotoxic medications are necessary in hospital.

  16. Sedentary lifestyle in active children admitted to a summer sport school.

    PubMed

    Fainardi, Valentina; Scarabello, Chiara; Brunella, Iovane; Errico, Maria Katrin; Mele, Alessandra; Gelmetti, Chiara; Sponzilli, Ivonne; Chiari, Giovanni; Volta, Elio; Vitale, Marco; Vanelli, Maurizio

    2009-08-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate the sedentary patterns of school-aged active children admitted to a summer sport school. One hundred-twelve children aged 9-11 years were interviewed through a questionnaire about sedentary behaviours and nutrition habits. Seventy-one per cent of children reported they watch TV seven days a week, girls less than boys (84 +/- 45 minutes vs. 110 +/- 75 minutes) (t = 2.056; p = 0.042). The habit of TV viewing during meals was widespread (38% breakfast, 31% lunch, 62% dinner, 18% every meal). The prevalence of overweight or obesity (58.5%) was significantly higher among boys watching TV at dinner compared to the boys viewing TV only in the afternoon (35%) (chi2 = 4.976; p = 0.026). Fifty-seven per cent of children (65% boys) were accustomed to nibble snacks during TV viewing, and this habit was widespread in overweight or obese boys (chi2 = 4.546; p = 0.033). The dietary patterns of children watching TV include more snack foods and fewer fruits than the dietary patterns of the same children exercising (chi2 = 4.199 p = 0.040). Also in active children the habit to watch television is widespread and, in spite of the tendency to physical activity, 46% of them were overweight or obese; in fact the time spent looking at a TV may be associated to overweight/obesity and this relationship could be explained by the amount of high-density foods consumption during inactivity. Playing video games, read a book and listening to music are sedentary lifestyle patterns but these seem not to represent a risk factor for an increased BMI.

  17. Association between hemoglobin and prognosis in patients admitted to hospital for COPD

    PubMed Central

    Toft-Petersen, Anne Pernille; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Weinreich, Ulla Møller; Rasmussen, Bodil Steen

    2016-01-01

    Low concentrations of hemoglobin have previously been demonstrated in many patients with COPD. There is evidence of anemia as a prognostic factor in acute exacerbations, but the detailed relationship between concentrations of hemoglobin and mortality is not known. A register-based cohort of patients admitted for the first time to Danish hospitals for acute exacerbations of COPD from 2007 through 2012 was established. Age, sex, comorbidities, medication, renal function, and concentrations of hemoglobin were retrieved. Sex-specific survival analyses were fitted for different rounded concentrations of hemoglobin. The cohort encompassed 6,969 patients. Hemoglobin below 130 g/L was present in 39% of males and below 120 g/L in 24% of females. The in-hospital mortality rates for patients with hemoglobin below or above these limits were 11.6% and 5.4%, respectively. After discharge, compared to hemoglobin 130 g/L, the hazard ratio (HR) for males with hemoglobin 120 g/L was 1.45 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.22–1.73), adjusted HR 1.37 (95% CI 1.15–1.64). Compared to hemoglobin 120 g/L, the HR for females with hemoglobin 110 g/L was 1.4 (95% CI 1.17–1.68), adjusted HR 1.28 (95% CI 1.06–1.53). In conclusion, low concentrations of hemoglobin are frequent in COPD patients with acute exacerbations, and predict long-term mortality. PMID:27877035

  18. Prognostic value of ejection fraction in patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome: A real world study.

    PubMed

    Perelshtein Brezinov, Olga; Klempfner, Robert; Zekry, Sagit Ben; Goldenberg, Ilan; Kuperstein, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    There are limited data regarding factors affecting outcomes among acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients presenting with varying degrees of left ventricle (LV) dysfunction. We aimed to identify factors associated with mortality according to LV ejection fraction (LVEF) at 1st admission in ACS patients.A total of 8983 ACS patients prospectively enrolled in the Acute Coronary Syndrome Israeli Survey (2000-2010) were categorized according to their LVEF at admission: severe LV dysfunction (LVEF < 30% [n = 845]), mild-moderate LV dysfunction (LVEF 30%-49% [n = 4470]); preserved LV function (LVEF ≥ 50% [n = 3659]). Multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression modeling was used to assess the risk factors for 1-year mortality according to LVEF on admission.Over the past decade there was a gradual decline in the proportion of patients admitted with low LVEF. Mortality rates were highest among patients with severe LV dysfunction (36%), intermediate among those with mild-moderate LV dysfunction (10%), and lowest among those with preserved LV function (4%, P < 0.001). We recognized different risk factors for mortality according to LVEF at admission. Admission clinical features (syncope, anterior myocardial infarction, and ST elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI]) predicted mortality risk in patients with severe LV dysfunction (all P < 0.05), whereas the presence of comorbidities (hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic renal failure, and peripheral arterial disease) predicted mortality risk in patients with more preserved LV function. Age and admission Killip class ≥II were consistent predictors in all LVEF subsets.LVEF at admission is a strong predictor of mortality in ACS, and prognostic factors differ according to LVEF during admission. In patients with severe LV dysfunction signs of clinical instability are related to 1-year mortality; in patients with a more preserved LV function the prognosis is related to the presence of co-morbidities.

  19. Buffer Zone Fact Sheets

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    New requirements for buffer zones and sign posting contribute to soil fumigant mitigation and protection for workers and bystanders. The buffer provides distance between the pesticide application site and bystanders, reducing exposure risk.

  20. Microgravity silicon zoning investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.; Gill, G. L., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The flow instabilities in floating zones of silicon were investigated and methods for investigation of these instabilities in microgravity were defined. Three principal tasks were involved: (1) characterization of the float zone in small diameter rods; (2) investigation of melt flow instabilities in circular melts in silicon disks; and (3) the development of a prototype of an apparatus that could be used in near term space experiments to investigate flow instabilities in a molten zone. It is shown that in a resistance heated zoner with 4 to 7 mm diameter silicon rods that the critical Marangoni number is about 1480 compared to a predicted value of 14 indicative that viable space experiments might be performed. The prototype float zone apparatus is built and specifications are prepared for a flight zoner should a decision be reached to proceed with a space flight experimental investigation.

  1. Cascadia Subduction Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur D.; Petersen, Mark D.

    2008-01-01

    The geometry and recurrence times of large earthquakes associated with the Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ) were discussed and debated at a March 28-29, 2006 Pacific Northwest workshop for the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps. The CSZ is modeled from Cape Mendocino in California to Vancouver Island in British Columbia. We include the same geometry and weighting scheme as was used in the 2002 model (Frankel and others, 2002) based on thermal constraints (Fig. 1; Fluck and others, 1997 and a reexamination by Wang et al., 2003, Fig. 11, eastern edge of intermediate shading). This scheme includes four possibilities for the lower (eastern) limit of seismic rupture: the base of elastic zone (weight 0.1), the base of transition zone (weight 0.2), the midpoint of the transition zone (weight 0.2), and a model with a long north-south segment at 123.8? W in the southern and central portions of the CSZ, with a dogleg to the northwest in the northern portion of the zone (weight 0.5). The latter model was derived from the approximate average longitude of the contour of the 30 km depth of the CSZ as modeled by Fluck et al. (1997). A global study of the maximum depth of thrust earthquakes on subduction zones by Tichelaar and Ruff (1993) indicated maximum depths of about 40 km for most of the subduction zones studied, although the Mexican subduction zone had a maximum depth of about 25 km (R. LaForge, pers. comm., 2006). The recent inversion of GPS data by McCaffrey et al. (2007) shows a significant amount of coupling (a coupling factor of 0.2-0.3) as far east as 123.8? West in some portions of the CSZ. Both of these lines of evidence lend support to the model with a north-south segment at 123.8? W.

  2. Dentin Caries Zones

    PubMed Central

    Pugach, M.K.; Strother, J.; Darling, C.L.; Fried, D.; Gansky, S.A.; Marshall, S.J.; Marshall, G.W.

    2009-01-01

    Caries Detector staining reveals 4 zones in dentin containing caries lesions, but characteristics of each zone are not well-defined. We therefore investigated the physical and microstructural properties of carious dentin in the 4 different zones to determine important differences revealed by Caries Detector staining. Six arrested dentin caries lesions and 2 normal controls were Caries-Detector-stained, each zone (pink, light pink, transparent, apparently normal) being analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging for microstructure, by AFM nano-indentation for mechanical properties, and by transverse digital microradiography (TMR) for mineral content. Microstructure changes, and nanomechanical properties and mineral content significantly decreased across zones. Hydrated elastic modulus and mineral content from normal dentin to pink Caries-Detector-stained dentin ranged from 19.5 [10.6-25.3] GPa to 1.6 [0.0-5.0] GPa and from 42.9 [39.8-44.6] vol% to 12.4 [9.1-14.2] vol%, respectively. Even the most demineralized pink zone contained considerable residual mineral. PMID:19131321

  3. Effect of Variable Stress Intensity Factor on Hydrogen Environment Assisted Cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, M. M.

    2011-02-01

    Fitness-for-service evaluations of engineered components that are subject to environment assisted cracking (EAC) often require analyses of potentially large crack extensions through regions of variable stress intensity. However, there are few EAC data and models that directly address the effects of variable stress intensity factor on EAC crack growth. The model developed here is used to evaluate stress corrosion cracking (SCC) data that were obtained on a high-strength beta-titanium alloy under conditions of variable crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD) rate. SCC of this Ti alloy in ambient temperature, near-neutral NaCl aqueous solution is thought to be due to hydrogen environment assisted cracking (HEAC). As the model equations developed here do not admit to a closed form solution for crack velocity as a function of applied stress intensity factor, K, a semiquantitative graphical solution is used to rationalize the crack growth data. The analyses support a previous suggestion that the observed crack growth rate behavior can be attributed to the effect of crack tip strain rate on rates of mechanical disruption and repair of an otherwise protective crack tip oxide film. Model elements introduced here to HEAC modeling include (1) an expression relating corrosion-active surface area to crack tip strain rate and repassivation rate, (2) an expression relating the critical grain boundary hydrogen to the applied stress intensity factor, and (3) an expression relating CTSR to both applied and crack advance strain rate components. Intergranular crack advance is modeled assuming diffusive segregation of corrosion-generated hydrogen to grain boundary trap sites causing embrittlement of the fracture process zone (FPZ). The model equations developed here provide a quantitative basis for understanding the physical significance of K-variation effects and, with additional development, will provide an engineering tool for analysis of crack growth in a variable K field.

  4. Towards mapping attenuation and water content in the Transition Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, B. K.

    2013-12-01

    The mantle transition zone is suggested to play a significant role in water storage due to the high solubility of H2O in transition zone minerals. However, quantifying the water content of the transition zone has proven difficult. Previous investigations of the transition zone using a variety of techniques have identified variations in water content globally, associated melt at 400 km, and variable thickness. The resulting water distribution models indicate substantially different Earth models and subsequent seismic responses. Water enhances attenuation with minimal change to seismic wave speed in the transition zone. Taken in combination with correlated temperature induced wave speed / attenuation reductions, the water content and temperature in the transition zone can be inferred. Using upper mantle seismic phases that propagate within the transition zone, we can isolate the effects of attenuation, or anelasticity, and seismic wave speeds. Synthetic seismograms at high frequency, around 1 Hz, from models with a "wet" transition zone show a distinct amplitude reduction and phase delay. Conversely, models with melt on top of the transition zone produce a delayed, secondary arrival with an upper mantle moveout velocity. These diagnostic arrivals, based on synthetic seismic responses, are best identified at the end of the triplicated 660 km branch. Full modeling of the seismic phases from the transition zone will enable a mapping of water content and temperature, while deciphering how water is distributed and transported throughout the mantle.

  5. Time-variable deformation in the New Madrid seismic zone.

    PubMed

    Calais, Eric; Stein, Seth

    2009-03-13

    New geodetic measurements show that the New Madrid is currently deforming too slowly, if at all, to account for large earthquakes in the region over the past 5000 years. This result, together with increasing evidence for temporal clustering and spatial migration of earthquake sequences in continental interiors, indicates that either tectonic loading rates or fault properties vary over a few thousand years.

  6. Introducing Rhode Island's Health Equity Zones.

    PubMed

    Patriarca, Mia; Ausura, Christopher J

    2016-11-01

    Many social and environmental factors contribute to the health - and unhealthiness - of a community, and the mix of these factors varies widely from one community to another. A persistent challenge to public health is just how to address so many variables, in so many combinations, in so many diverse communities. The Rhode Island Department of Health is exploring an innovative approach, its Health Equity Zone Initiative, to meet this challenge. [Full article available at http://rimed.org/rimedicaljournal-2016-11.asp].

  7. Modeling hyporheic zone processes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runkel, Robert L.; McKnight, Diane M.; Rajaram, Harihar

    2003-01-01

    Stream biogeochemistry is influenced by the physical and chemical processes that occur in the surrounding watershed. These processes include the mass loading of solutes from terrestrial and atmospheric sources, the physical transport of solutes within the watershed, and the transformation of solutes due to biogeochemical reactions. Research over the last two decades has identified the hyporheic zone as an important part of the stream system in which these processes occur. The hyporheic zone may be loosely defined as the porous areas of the stream bed and stream bank in which stream water mixes with shallow groundwater. Exchange of water and solutes between the stream proper and the hyporheic zone has many biogeochemical implications, due to differences in the chemical composition of surface and groundwater. For example, surface waters are typically oxidized environments with relatively high dissolved oxygen concentrations. In contrast, reducing conditions are often present in groundwater systems leading to low dissolved oxygen concentrations. Further, microbial oxidation of organic materials in groundwater leads to supersaturated concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide relative to the atmosphere. Differences in surface and groundwater pH and temperature are also common. The hyporheic zone is therefore a mixing zone in which there are gradients in the concentrations of dissolved gasses, the concentrations of oxidized and reduced species, pH, and temperature. These gradients lead to biogeochemical reactions that ultimately affect stream water quality. Due to the complexity of these natural systems, modeling techniques are frequently employed to quantify process dynamics.

  8. Mesopelagic zone ecology and biogeochemistry - a synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Carol; Steinberg, Deborah K.; Anderson, Thomas R.; Arístegui, Javier; Carlson, Craig A.; Frost, Jessica R.; Ghiglione, Jean-François; Hernández-León, Santiago; Jackson, George A.; Koppelmann, Rolf; Quéguiner, Bernard; Ragueneau, Olivier; Rassoulzadegan, Fereidoun; Robison, Bruce H.; Tamburini, Christian; Tanaka, Tsuneo; Wishner, Karen F.; Zhang, Jing

    2010-08-01

    The mesopelagic zone is the oceanic region through which carbon and other elements must pass in order to reach deeper waters or the sea floor. However, the food web interactions that occur in the mesopelagic zone are difficult to measure and so, despite their crucial importance to global elemental cycles, are not very well known. Recent developments in technology and new approaches have advanced the study of the variability in and controls upon the distribution and diversity of organisms in the mesopelagic zone, including the roles of respiration, recycling, and repackaging of particulate and dissolved organic material. However, there are remarkably few syntheses of the ecology and biogeochemistry of the microbes and metazoa that permanently reside or habitually visit this 'twilight zone'. Without this synthesis, it is difficult to assess the impact of ongoing changes in ocean hydrography and chemistry, due to increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide levels, on the biological carbon pump. This paper reviews what is known about the distribution of microbes and metazoa in the mesopelagic zone in relation to their activity and impact on global biogeochemical cycles. Thus, gaps in our knowledge are identified and suggestions made for priority research programmes that will improve our ability to predict the effects of climate change on carbon sequestration.

  9. Stable wormholes on a noncommutative-geometry background admitting a one-parameter group of conformal motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhfittig, P. K. F.

    2016-07-01

    When Morris and Thorne first proposed the possible existence of traversable wormholes, they adopted the following strategy: maintain complete control over the geometry, thereby leaving open the determination of the stress-energy tensor. In this paper we determine this tensor by starting with a noncommutative-geometry background and assuming that the static and spherically symmetric spacetime admits conformal motions. We have shown that the wormhole obtained can be made stable to linearized radial perturbations.

  10. Glucose Variability

    PubMed Central

    Le Floch, Jean-Pierre; Kessler, Laurence

    2016-01-01

    Background: Glucose variability has been suspected to be a major factor of diabetic complications. Several indices have been proposed for measuring glucose variability, but their interest remains discussed. Our aim was to compare different indices. Methods: Glucose variability was studied in 150 insulin-treated diabetic patients (46% men, 42% type 1 diabetes, age 52 ± 11 years) using a continuous glucose monitoring system (668 ± 564 glucose values; mean glucose value 173 ± 38 mg/dL). Results from the mean, the median, different indices (SD, MAGE, MAG, glucose fluctuation index (GFI), and percentages of low [<60 mg/dL] and high [>180 mg/dL] glucose values), and ratios (CV = SD/m, MAGE/m, MAG/m, and GCF = GFI/m) were compared using Pearson linear correlations and a multivariate principal component analysis (PCA). Results: CV, MAGE/m (ns), GCF and GFI (P < .05), MAG and MAG/m (P < .01) were not strongly correlated with the mean. The percentage of high glucose values was mainly correlated with indices. The percentage of low glucose values was mainly correlated with ratios. PCA showed 3 main axes; the first was associated with descriptive data (mean, SD, CV, MAGE, MAGE/m, and percentage of high glucose values); the second with ratios MAG/m and GCF and with the percentage of low glucose values; and the third with MAG, GFI, and the percentage of high glucose values. Conclusions: Indices and ratios provide complementary pieces of information associated with high and low glucose values, respectively. The pairs MAG+MAG/m and GFI+GCF appear to be the most reliable markers of glucose variability in diabetic patients. PMID:26880391

  11. QT variability.

    PubMed

    Berger, Ronald D

    2003-01-01

    We hypothesized that temporal lability in ventricular repolarization is a marker for, and is mechanistically related to, increased risk of malignant ventricular arrhythmias. To assess repolarization lability in the surface electrocardiogram, we developed an automated algorithm, based on template matching, to measure beat-to-beat changes in QT interval. We calculate a QT variability index (QTVI) to quantify the relative magnitude of QT interval changes compared to heart rate variability. We found that QTVI is a reproducible measure. It is elevated in patients with ischemic and nonischemic dilated cardiomyopathy compared with age-matched controls (P<.00001). We have also shown that QTVI is elevated in patients with malignant beta-myosin heavy-chain mutations associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In a study of patients undergoing electrophysiologic testing, QTVI identified patients with cardiac arrest better than electrophysiologic test result and better than other risk stratifiers included in the analysis. QT variability is a marker of electrical disease in the ventricle and may be associated with enhanced risk of life-threatening arrhythmias.

  12. Characteristics of Older Adults Admitted to Hospital versus Those Discharged Home, in Emergency Department Patients Referred to Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hominick, Kathryn; McLeod, Victoria; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Background Frail older adults present to the Emergency Department (ED) with complex medical, functional, and social needs. When these needs can be addressed promptly, discharge is possible, and when they cannot, hospital admission is required. We evaluated the care needs of frail older adults in the ED who were consulted to internal medicine and seen by a geriatrician to determine, under current practices, which factors were associated with hospitalization and which allowed discharge. Methods We preformed a chart-based, exploratory study. Data were abstracted from consultation records and ED charts. All cases had a standard Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA which records a Clinical Frailty Scale (CFA) and allows calculation of a Frailty Index (FI). Results Of 100 consecutive patients, 2 died in the ED, 75 were admitted, and 23 were discharged, including one urgent placement. Compared with discharged patients (0.39 ± SD 0.16), those admitted had a higher mean FI-CGA (0.48 ± 0.13; p < .01). Greater mobility dependence (2% in discharged vs. 32% in admitted; p < .05) was notable. Conclusions Discharge decisions require assessment of medical, functional, and social problems. Ill, frail patients often can be discharged home when social and nursing support can be provided. The degree of frailty, impaired mobility, and likely delirium must be taken into account when planning for their care. PMID:27076860

  13. 7 CFR 202.43 - Proceedings under section 302(a) to show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. 202.43 Section 202.43 Agriculture..., Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) FEDERAL SEED ACT FEDERAL SEED ACT... show cause why seed or screenings should be admitted into the United States. When seed or...

  14. Hierarchical analysis of rainfall variability across Nigeria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nnaji, Chidozie Charles; Mama, Cordelia Nnennaya; Ukpabi, Okechukwu

    2016-01-01

    Rainfall in Nigeria is subjected to wide variability both in time and space. This variability has assumed a more pronounced dimension as a result of climate change. In this paper, cluster analyses were used to study rainfall variability in Nigeria. Rainfall data in 20 locations spread across the geopolitical and ecological zones of Nigeria were subjected to hierarchical cluster analysis and analysis of time series and coefficient of variation for over periods spanning 30 years. Maps of spatial variations of mean annual rainfall and mean rainfall coefficient of variation were produced using ARCGIS 10.1. Furthermore, a better understanding of temporal variation of rainfall was sought by an investigation into the time series of rainfall coefficients of variation. It was found that the southern parts of the country were given to more severe rainfall variability/fluctuations than the northern parts. The north central parts exhibited more similarity to the southern parts than the other northern locations. The relationship between average annual rainfall and the coefficient of rainfall variation was found to follow a power law with R 2 value approximately 0.7. With respect to variability of annual rainfall, three zones emerged as follows: a linear relationship ( R 2 = 0.90) exists between coefficient of variation and average annual rainfall for the rainforest zone of the southsouth; a power law ( R 2 = 0.86) exists between coefficient of variation and average annual rainfall for all rainforest and derived guinea savannah zones of the southeastern and southwestern states; and a logarithmic relationship ( R 2 = 0.54) exists between coefficient of variation and average annual rainfall for all northern states regardless of ecological zone. Generally, in-year rainfall variability increases from the northwest to the southwest; while between-year (yearly) rainfall variability increases from the north central to the southeast. This study further confirms that rainfall variability

  15. Reductive dechlorination of trichloroethene DNAPL source zones: source zone architecture versus electron donor availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krol, M.; Kokkinaki, A.; Sleep, B.

    2014-12-01

    The persistence of dense-non-aqueous-phase liquids (DNAPLs) in the subsurface has led practitioners and regulatory agencies to turn towards low-maintenance, low-cost remediation methods. Biological degradation has been suggested as a possible solution, based on the well-proven ability of certain microbial species to break down dissolved chlorinated ethenes under favorable conditions. However, the biodegradation of pure phase chlorinated ethenes is subject to additional constraints: the continuous release of electron acceptor at a rate governed by mass transfer kinetics, and the temporal and spatial heterogeneity of DNAPL source zones which leads to spatially and temporally variable availability of the reactants for reductive dechlorination. In this work, we investigate the relationship between various DNAPL source zone characteristics and reaction kinetics using COMPSIM, a multiphase groundwater model that considers non-equilibrium mass transfer and Monod-type kinetics for reductive dechlorination. Numerical simulations are performed for simple, homogeneous trichloroethene DNAPL source zones to demonstrate the effect of single source zone characteristics, as well as for larger, more realistic heterogeneous source zones. It is shown that source zone size, and mass transfer kinetics may have a decisive effect on the predicted bio-enhancement. Finally, we evaluate the performance of DNAPL bioremediation for realistic, thermodynamically constrained, concentrations of electron donor. Our results indicate that the latter may be the most important limitation for the success of DNAPL bioremediation, leading to reduced bio-enhancement and, in many cases, comparable performance with water flooding.

  16. Modeling work zone crash frequency by quantifying measurement errors in work zone length.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hong; Ozbay, Kaan; Ozturk, Ozgur; Yildirimoglu, Mehmet

    2013-06-01

    Work zones are temporary traffic control zones that can potentially cause safety problems. Maintaining safety, while implementing necessary changes on roadways, is an important challenge traffic engineers and researchers have to confront. In this study, the risk factors in work zone safety evaluation were identified through the estimation of a crash frequency (CF) model. Measurement errors in explanatory variables of a CF model can lead to unreliable estimates of certain parameters. Among these, work zone length raises a major concern in this analysis because it may change as the construction schedule progresses generally without being properly documented. This paper proposes an improved modeling and estimation approach that involves the use of a measurement error (ME) model integrated with the traditional negative binomial (NB) model. The proposed approach was compared with the traditional NB approach. Both models were estimated using a large dataset that consists of 60 work zones in New Jersey. Results showed that the proposed improved approach outperformed the traditional approach in terms of goodness-of-fit statistics. Moreover it is shown that the use of the traditional NB approach in this context can lead to the overestimation of the effect of work zone length on the crash occurrence.

  17. Fast aurora zone analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Booker, Mattie

    1992-01-01

    The Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) of the Flight Dynamics Division (FDD), of the Goddard Space Flight Center provides acquisition data to tracking stations and orbit and attitude services to scientists and mission support personnel. The following paper explains how a method was determined that found spacecraft entry and exit times of the aurora zone.

  18. Dilution Zone Mixing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdeman, J. D.

    1983-01-01

    Studies to characterize dilution zone mixing; experiments on the effects of free-stream turbulence on a jet in crossflow; and the development of an interactive computer code for the analysis of the mixing of jets with a confined crossflow are reviewed.

  19. Microgravity Silicon Zoning Investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    This research program is directed toward the understanding of the float zone crystal growth process, the melt interactions which lead to crystal inhomogeneities, and the influence of microgravity on reducing these inhomogeneities. Silicon was selected as the model crystal because its inhomogeneities lead to known variations in device performance, and because the mechanisms involved in its growth are understood better than for other high temperature crystals. The objective of the program is to understand the growth mechanisms in float zone growth and thereby determine the feasibility and advantages of float zone growth of silicon under microgravity conditions. This will be done by characterizing the growth at g = 1, projecting the changes in melt flows due to microgravity, observing these in space growth and determining the effects on defective inhomogeneities. A Thin Rod Zoner was constructed as a laboratory prototype for flight growth of 5 mm diameter silicon crystals, which can be done within the power and cooling capabilities of shuttle flights. A new method of zoning silicon, using resistance heating, has resulted in melting 5 mm diameter ingots.

  20. Flexible 'zoning' aids adaptability.

    PubMed

    Corben, Simon

    2013-09-01

    Simon Corben, business development director at Capita Symonds' Health team, examines how 'clever use of zoning' when planning new healthcare facilities could improve hospital design, increase inherent flexibility, and reduce lifetime costs, and argues that a 'loose-fit, non-bespoke approach' to space planning will lead to 'more flexible buildings that are suitable for conversion to alternative uses'.

  1. Current Climate Variability & Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diem, J.; Criswell, B.; Elliott, W. C.

    2013-12-01

    climate change. The next section guides students through the exploration of temporal changes in global temperature from the surface to the lower stratosphere. Students discover that there has been global warming over the past several decades, and the subsequent section allows them to consider solar radiation and greenhouse gases as possible causes of this warming. Students then zoom in on different latitudinal zones to examine changes in temperature for each zone and hypothesize about why one zone may have warmed more than others. The final section, prior to the answering of the essential questions, is an examination of the following effects of the current change in temperatures: loss of sea ice; rise of sea level; loss of permafrost loss; and moistening of the atmosphere. The lab addresses 14 climate-literacy concepts and all seven climate-literacy principles through data and images that are mainly NASA products. It focuses on the satellite era of climate data; therefore, 1979 is the typical starting year for most datasets used by students. Additionally, all time-series analysis end with the latest year with full-year data availability; thus, the climate variability and trends truly are 'current.'

  2. Psychological and social resources relate to biomarkers of allostasis in newly admitted nursing home residents

    PubMed Central

    Meeks, Suzanne; Van Haitsma, Kimberly; Mast, Benjamin T.; Arnold, Steven; Streim, Joel E.; Sephton, Sandra; Smith, Patrick J.; Kleban, Morton; Rovine, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This paper presents preliminary baseline data from a prospective study of nursing home adaptation that attempts to capture the complexity of residents’ adaptive resources by examining psychological, social, and biological variables from a longitudinal conceptual framework. Our emphasis was on validating an index of allostasis. Method In a sample of 26 long-term care patients, we measured 6 hormone and protein biomarkers to capture the concept of allostasis as an index of physiological resilience, related to other baseline resources, including frailty, hope and optimism, social support, and mental health history, collected via interview with the resident and collaterals. We also examined the performance of self-report measures reflecting psychosocial and well-being constructs, given the prevalence of cognitive impairment in nursing homes. Results Our results supported both the psychometric stability of our self-report measures, and the preliminary validity of our index of allostasis. Each biomarker was associated with at least one other resilience resource, suggesting that our choice of biomarkers was appropriate. As a group, the biomarkers showed good correspondence with the majority of other resource variables, and our standardized summation score was also associated with physical, social, and psychological resilience resources, including those reflecting physical and mental health vulnerability as well as positive resources of social support, optimism, and hope. Conclusion Although these results are based on a small sample, the effect sizes were large enough to confer some confidence in the value of pursuing further research relating biomarkers of allostasis to psychological and physical resources and well-being. PMID:26237175

  3. Respiratory viral infections and effects of meteorological parameters and air pollution in adults with respiratory symptoms admitted to the emergency room

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Denise R; Viana, Vinícius P; Müller, Alice M; Livi, Fernando P; Dalcin, Paulo de Tarso R

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory viral infections (RVIs) are the most common causes of respiratory infections. The prevalence of respiratory viruses in adults is underestimated. Meteorological variations and air pollution are likely to play a role in these infections. Objectives The objectives of this study were to determine the number of emergency visits for influenza-like illness (ILI) and severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) and to evaluate the association between ILI/SARI, RVI prevalence, and meteorological factors/air pollution, in the city of Porto Alegre, Brazil, from November 2008 to October 2010. Methods Eleven thousand nine hundred and fifty-three hospitalizations (adults and children) for respiratory symptoms were correlated with meteorological parameters and air pollutants. In a subset of adults, nasopharyngeal aspirates were collected and analyzed through IFI test. The data were analyzed using time-series analysis. Results Influenza-like illness and SARI were diagnosed in 3698 (30·9%) and 2063 (17·7%) patients, respectively. Thirty-seven (9·0%) samples were positive by IFI and 93 of 410 (22·7%) were IFI and/or PCR positive. In a multivariate logistic regression model, IFI positivity was statistically associated with absolute humidity, use of air conditioning, and presence of mold in home. Sunshine duration was significantly associated with the frequency of ILI cases. For SARI cases, the variables mean temperature, sunshine duration, relative humidity, and mean concentration of pollutants were singnificant. Conclusions At least 22% of infections in adult patients admitted to ER with respiratory complaints were caused by RVI. The correlations among meteorological variables, air pollution, ILI/SARI cases, and respiratory viruses demonstrated the relevance of climate factors as significant underlying contributors to the prevalence of RVI. PMID:24034701

  4. Twin Convergence Zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    NASA's QuikSCAT satellite has confirmed a 30-year old largely unproven theory that there are two areas near the equator where the winds converge year after year and drive ocean circulation south of the equator. By analyzing winds, QuikSCAT has found a year-round southern and northern Intertropical Convergence Zone. This find is important to climate modelers and weather forecasters because it provides more detail on how the oceans and atmosphere interact near the equator. The Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) is the region that circles the Earth near the equator, where the trade winds of both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. North of the equator, strong sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, drawing air in from north and south and causing the air to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Satellite data, however, has confirmed that there is an ITCZ north of the equator and a parallel ITCZ south of the equator. Variation in the location of the ITCZ is important to people around the world because it affects the north-south atmospheric circulation, which redistributes energy. It drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. 'The double ITCZ is usually only identified in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans on a limited and seasonal basis,' said Timothy Liu, of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory and California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, Calif., and lead researcher on the project. In the eastern Pacific Ocean, the southern ITCZ is usually seen springtime. In the western Atlantic Ocean, the southern ITCZ was recently clearly identified only in the summertime. However, QuikSCAT's wind data has seen the southern ITCZ in all seasons across the

  5. Transport of through a Thick Vadose Zone.

    PubMed

    Arnaud, Emmanuelle; Best, Anna; Parker, Beth L; Aravena, Ramon; Dunfield, Kari

    2015-09-01

    Livestock manure applications on fields can be a source of contamination in water resources, including groundwater. Although fecal indicators like have often been detected in tile drainage systems, few studies have monitored groundwater at depth after manure treatments, especially at sites with a deep, heterogeneous vadose zone. Our hypothesis was that microbial transport through a thick vadose zone would be limited or nonexistent due to attenuation processes, subsurface thickness, and heterogeneity. This study tested this hypothesis by monitoring concentrations beneath a 12-m-thick vadose zone of coarse, heterogeneous glacial sediments after surface application of liquid swine manure. was detected on all 23 sample dates over the 5-mo period (4 Apr. 2012-13 Aug. 2012), with particularly elevated concentrations 1 wk after application and lasting for 5 wk. Variable low-level concentrations before and after the elevated period suggest remobilization and delayed transport of microorganisms to the water table without additional loadings within the flow field. These findings suggest preferential flow pathways allowing deep infiltration of manure bacteria as well as a continued source of bacteria, with variable retention and travel times, over several months. Preferential flow pathways at this site include soil macropores, depression focused infiltration, and pathways related to subsurface heterogeneity and/or fracture flow through finer-grained diamict beds. Further research is needed to confirm the relative contribution of sources, constrain travel times, and define specific transport pathways.

  6. Vadose zone water fluxmeter

    DOEpatents

    Faybishenko, Boris A.

    2005-10-25

    A Vadose Zone Water Fluxmeter (WFM) or Direct Measurement WFM provides direct measurement of unsaturated water flow in the vadose zone. The fluxmeter is a cylindrical device that fits in a borehole or can be installed near the surface, or in pits, or in pile structures. The fluxmeter is primarily a combination of tensiometers and a porous element or plate in a water cell that is used for water injection or extraction under field conditions. The same water pressure measured outside and inside of the soil sheltered by the lower cylinder of the fluxmeter indicates that the water flux through the lower cylinder is similar to the water flux in the surrounding soil. The fluxmeter provides direct measurement of the water flow rate in the unsaturated soils and then determines the water flux, i.e. the water flow rate per unit area.

  7. Radiant zone heated particulate filter

    DOEpatents

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI

    2011-12-27

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter including an upstream end for receiving exhaust gas and a downstream end. A radiant zoned heater includes N zones, where N is an integer greater than one, wherein each of the N zones includes M sub-zones, where M is an integer greater than or equal to one. A control module selectively activates at least a selected one of the N zones to initiate regeneration in downstream portions of the PM filter from the one of the N zones, restricts exhaust gas flow in a portion of the PM filter that corresponds to the selected one of the N zones, and deactivates non-selected ones of the N zones.

  8. Renewable liquid reflecting zone plate

    DOEpatents

    Toor, Arthur; Ryutov, Dmitri D.

    2003-12-09

    A renewable liquid reflecting zone plate. Electrodes are operatively connected to a dielectric liquid in a circular or other arrangement to produce a reflecting zone plate. A system for renewing the liquid uses a penetrable substrate.

  9. Dementia in older people admitted to hospital: a regional multi-hospital observational study of prevalence, associations and case recognition

    PubMed Central

    Timmons, Suzanne; Manning, Edmund; Barrett, Aoife; Brady, Noeleen M.; Browne, Vanessa; O’Shea, Emma; Molloy, David William; O'Regan, Niamh A.; Trawley, Steven; Cahill, Suzanne; O'Sullivan, Kathleen; Woods, Noel; Meagher, David; Ni Chorcorain, Aoife M.; Linehan, John G.

    2015-01-01

    Background: previous studies have indicated a prevalence of dementia in older admissions of ∼42% in a single London teaching hospital, and 21% in four Queensland hospitals. However, there is a lack of published data from any European country on the prevalence of dementia across hospitals and between patient groups. Objective: to determine the prevalence and associations of dementia in older patients admitted to acute hospitals in Ireland. Methods: six hundred and six patients aged ≥70 years were recruited on admission to six hospitals in Cork County. Screening consisted of Standardised Mini-Mental State Examination (SMMSE); patients with scores <27/30 had further assessment with the Informant Questionnaire on Cognitive Decline in the Elderly (IQCODE). Final expert diagnosis was based on SMMSE, IQCODE and relevant medical and demographic history. Patients were screened for delirium and depression, and assessed for co-morbidity, functional ability and nutritional status. Results: of 598 older patients admitted to acute hospitals, 25% overall had dementia; with 29% in public hospitals. Prevalence varied between hospitals (P < 0.001); most common in rural hospitals and acute medical admissions. Only 35.6% of patients with dementia had a previous diagnosis. Patients with dementia were older and frailer, with higher co-morbidity, malnutrition and lower functional status (P < 0.001). Delirium was commonly superimposed on dementia (57%) on admission. Conclusion: dementia is common in older people admitted to acute hospitals, particularly in acute medical admissions, and rural hospitals, where services may be less available. Most dementia is not previously diagnosed, emphasising the necessity for cognitive assessment in older people on presentation to hospital. PMID:26420638

  10. Acute Poisonings Admitted to a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit in Northern India: Patient Profile and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Ashu Sara; Pannu, Aman; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Background Poisoning is becoming a real health care burden for developing countries like India. An improved knowledge of the patterns of poisonings, as well as the clinical course and outcomes of these cases can help to formulate better preventive and management strategies. Aim To study the demographic and clinical profiles of patients admitted to the ICU with acute poisoning and to study the factors that predict their mortality. Materials and Methods Retrospective two years (September 1, 2010 to August 31, 2012) study of all consecutive patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with acute poisoning at a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Results Out of the 67 patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, the majority were young (median age 29 years) males (69%) who had consumed poison intentionally. Pesticides were the most commonly employed poison, notably organophosphorus compounds (22 patients, 32.8%) and aluminium phosphide (14 patients, 20.9%). While the overall mortality from all poisonings was low (18%), aluminium phosphide was highly toxic, with a mortality rate of 35%. The factors at ICU admission that were found to be associated with a significant risk of death were, high APACHE II and SOFA scores (p =0.0001 and p=0.006, respectively), as well as the need for mechanical ventilation and drugs for vasoactive support (p=0.012 and p= 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion Use of pesticides for intentional poisoning continues to be rampant in Northern India, with many patients presenting in a critical condition to tertiary level hospitals. Pesticide regulations laws, educational awareness, counseling and poison information centers will help to curtail this public health problem. PMID:26557594

  11. Risk Factors for Delirium During Acute and Subacute Stages of Various Disorders in Patients Admitted to Rehabilitation Units

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the risk factors for delirium in patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit for acute or subacute neurological or musculoskeletal disorders. Methods We reviewed the medical records of 537 patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit and selected 398 patients in the acute or subacute stage of various neurological or musculoskeletal disorders. Among them, patients who had suffered from delirium were categorized into the delirium group (n=65), and the other patients were categorized into the non-delirium group (n=333). As potential risk factors for delirium, the patients' diagnosis, underlying disease, demographic data, hospital stay duration, surgery, and laboratory findings were reviewed, and the differences between the two groups with respect to independent risk factors were analyzed. Results The average age in the delirium group was higher; the hospital stay and pre-transfer periods were longer. A large proportion of the patients were admitted for musculoskeletal disorders, and many patients had diabetes mellitus, dementia, and depression as underlying diseases. Laboratory tests revealed increases in the white blood cells (WBC), glucose, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total bilirubin, aspartate transaminase (AST), erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in the delirium group, while the hemoglobin, calcium, phosphorus, protein, albumin, and potassium levels were decreased. Depression, musculoskeletal disorders, traumatic brain injury, elevated WBC, BUN, AST, and CRP levels, and decreased potassium and phosphorus levels were identified as independent risk factors for delirium. Conclusion Risk factors treatable before delirium onset were identified in rehabilitation patients in acute and subacute stages of various disorders. Early diagnosis and prevention of these risk factors could decrease delirium occurrence and increase rehabilitation effectiveness. PMID:28119839

  12. An antibiotic decision-making tool for patients with pneumonia admitted to a medical intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Feng; Chang, Jung-San; Sheu, Chau-Chyun; Liu, Yu-Ting; Lin, Ying-Chi

    2016-09-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of death in medical intensive care units (MICUs). Delayed or inappropriate antibiotic therapy largely increases morbidity and mortality. Multidrug-resistant (MDR) micro-organisms are major reasons for inappropriate antibiotic use. Currently there is no good antibiotic decision-making tool designed for critically ill patients. The objective of this study was to develop a convenient MDR prediction scoring system for patients admitted to MICUs with pneumonia. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using databases and chart reviews of pneumonia patients admitted to a 30-bed MICU from 2012 to 2013. Forward logistic regression was applied to identify independent MDR risk factors for prediction tool development. A total of 283 pneumonia episodes from 263 patients with positive cultures from blood or respiratory secretions were recruited, of which 154 (54.4%) were MDR episodes. Long-term ventilation (OR = 11.09; P = 0.026), residence in a long-term care facility (OR = 2.50; P = 0.005), MDR infection/colonisation during the preceding 90 days (OR = 2.08; P = 0.041), current hospitalisation ≥2 days (OR = 1.98; P = 0.019) and stroke (OR = 1.81; P = 0.035) were identified as independent predictors for MDR pneumonia. The area under the ROC curve of this prediction tool was much higher than that of ATS/IDSA classification (0.69 vs. 0.54; P <0.001). The prediction accuracy of this tool with risk score ≥1 for MDR infections was 63.7%. This simple five-item, one-step scoring tool for critically ill patients admitted to the MICU could help physicians provide timely appropriate empirical antibiotics.

  13. Trojans in habitable zones.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Richard; Pilat-Lohinger, Elke; Dvorak, Rudolf; Erdi, Balint; Sándor, Zsolt

    2005-10-01

    With the aid of numerical experiments we examined the dynamical stability of fictitious terrestrial planets in 1:1 mean motion resonance with Jovian-like planets of extrasolar planetary systems. In our stability study of the so-called "Trojan" planets in the habitable zone, we used the restricted three-body problem with different mass ratios of the primary bodies. The application of the three-body problem showed that even massive Trojan planets can be stable in the 1:1 mean motion resonance. From the 117 extrasolar planetary systems only 11 systems were found with one giant planet in the habitable zone. Out of this sample set we chose four planetary systems--HD17051, HD27442, HD28185, and HD108874--for further investigation. To study the orbital behavior of the stable zone in the different systems, we used direct numerical computations (Lie Integration Method) that allowed us to determine the escape times and the maximum eccentricity of the fictitious "Trojan planets."

  14. Characterisation of metabolic acidosis in Kenyan children admitted to hospital for acute non-surgical conditions.

    PubMed

    Sasi, P; English, M; Berkley, J; Lowe, B; Shebe, M; Mwakesi, R; Kokwaro, G

    2006-05-01

    Metabolic acidosis is associated with most severe malaria deaths in African children, and most deaths occur before maximum antimalarial action is achieved. Thus, specific acidosis treatment may reduce mortality. However, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood and no specific interventions have been developed. A detailed characterisation of this acidosis is critical in treatment development. We used the traditional and Stewart's approach to characterise acidosis in consecutive paediatric admissions for malaria and other acute non-surgical conditions to Kilifi District Hospital in Kenya. The overall acidosis prevalence was 21%. Gastroenteritis had the highest prevalence (61%). Both the mean albumin-corrected anion gap and the strong ion gap were high (>13 mmol/l and >0 mmol/l, respectively) in malaria, gastroenteritis, lower respiratory tract infection and malnutrition. Presence of salicylate in plasma was not associated with acidosis but was associated with signs of severe illness (odds ratio 2.11, 95% CI 1.1-4.2). In malaria, mean (95% CI) strong ion gap was 15 (14-7) mmol/l, and lactate, creatinine and inorganic phosphorous explained only approximately 40% of the variability in base excess (adjusted R2 = 0.397). Acidosis may be more common than previously recognised amongst paediatric admissions in Africa and is characterised by the presence of currently unidentified strong anions. In malaria, lactate and ketones, but not salicylate, are associated with acidosis. However, unidentified anions may be more important.

  15. Risk of death and readmission of hospital-admitted COPD exacerbations: European COPD Audit.

    PubMed

    Hartl, Sylvia; Lopez-Campos, Jose Luis; Pozo-Rodriguez, Francisco; Castro-Acosta, Ady; Studnicka, Michael; Kaiser, Bernhard; Roberts, C Michael

    2016-01-01

    Studies report high in-hospital and post-discharge mortality of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations varying depending upon patient characteristics, hospital resources and treatment standards. This study aimed to investigate the patient, resource and organisational factors associated with in-hospital and 90-day post-discharge mortality and readmission of COPD exacerbations within the European COPD Audit. The audit collected data of COPD exacerbation admissions from 13 European countries.On admission, only 49.7% of COPD patients had spirometry results available and only 81.6% had blood gases taken. Using logistic regression analysis, the risk associated with in-hospital and post-discharge mortality was higher age, presence of acidotic respiratory failure, subsequent need for ventilatory support and presence of comorbidity. In addition, the 90-day risk of COPD readmission was associated with previous admissions. Only the number of respiratory specialists per 1000 beds, a variable related to hospital resources, decreased the risk of post-discharge mortality.The European COPD Audit identifies risk factors associated with in-hospital and post-discharge mortality and COPD readmission. Addressing the deficiencies in acute COPD care such as making spirometry available and measuring blood gases and providing noninvasive ventilation more regularly would provide opportunities to improve COPD outcomes.

  16. Users manual for program ADMIT: Admittance and pressure transfer function developed for use on a PC computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, Wilbur C.

    1992-01-01

    The piping in a liquid rocket can assume complex configurations due to multiple tanks, multiple engines, and structures that must be piped around. The capability to handle some of these complex configurations have been incorporated into the ADMIT code. The capability to modify the input on line has been implemented. The configurations allowed include multiple tanks, multiple engines, the splitting of a pipe into unequal segments going to different (or the same) engines. This program will handle the following type elements: straight pipes, bends, inline accumulators, tuned stub accumulators, Helmholtz resonators, parallel resonators, pumps, split pipes, multiple tanks, and multiple engines.

  17. All ASD complex and real 4-dimensional Einstein spaces with Λ≠0 admitting a nonnull Killing vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chudecki, Adam

    2016-12-01

    Anti-self-dual (ASD) 4-dimensional complex Einstein spaces with nonzero cosmological constant Λ equipped with a nonnull Killing vector are considered. It is shown that any conformally nonflat metric of such spaces can be always brought to a special form and the Einstein field equations can be reduced to the Boyer-Finley-Plebański equation (Toda field equation). Some alternative forms of the metric are discussed. All possible real slices (neutral, Euclidean and Lorentzian) of ASD complex Einstein spaces with Λ≠0 admitting a nonnull Killing vector are found.

  18. Aggregate nonparametric safety analysis of traffic zones.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Chowdhury; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Huang, Helai

    2012-03-01

    Exploring the significant variables related to specific types of crashes is vitally important in the planning stage of a transportation network. This paper aims to identify and examine important variables associated with total crashes and severe crashes per traffic analysis zone (TAZ) in four counties of the state of Florida by applying nonparametric statistical techniques such as data mining and random forest. The intention of investigating these factors in such aggregate level analysis is to incorporate proactive safety measures in transportation planning. Total and severe crashes per TAZ were modeled to provide predictive decision trees. The variables which carried higher weight of importance for total crashes per TAZ were - total number of intersections per TAZ, airport trip productions, light truck productions, and total roadway segment length with 35 mph posted speed limit. The other significant variables identified for total crashes were total roadway length with 15 mph posted speed limit, total roadway length with 65 mph posted speed limit, and non-home based work productions. For severe crashes, total number of intersections per TAZ, light truck productions, total roadway length with 35 mph posted speed limit, and total roadway length with 65 mph posted speed limit were among the significant variables. These variables were further verified and supported by the random forest results.

  19. Lab-score is a valuable predictor of serious bacterial infection in infants admitted to hospital.

    PubMed

    Markic, Josko; Kovacevic, Tanja; Krzelj, Vjekoslav; Bosnjak, Nada; Sapunar, Ada

    2015-12-01

    Parents frequently bring their children to the Emergency Department (ED) because of the fever without apparent source (FWAS). To avoid possible complications, it is important to recognize serious bacterial infection (SBI) as early as possible. Various tests, including different clinical scores and scales, are used in the laboratory evaluation of patients. However, it is still impossible to predict the presence of SBI with complete certainty. Galetto-Lacour et al. developed and validated a risk index score, named Lab-score. Lab-score is based on the three predictive variables independently associated with SBI: procalcitonin (PCT), C-reactive protein (CRP), and urinary dipstick. The objective of this study was to assess the performance of the Lab-score in predicting SBI in well-appearing infants ≤ 180 days of age with FWAS, who presented to ED and were hospitalized with suspicion of having SBI. Based on this study findings, white blood cells count (WBC), CRP, PCT, and lab-score ≥ 3 were confirmed as useful biomarkers for differentiation between SBI and non-SBI. Also, receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC) analysis confirmed that all of them were useful for differentiation between SBI and non-SBI patients with the highest area under curve (AUC) calculated for the Lab-score. The results of this research confirmed its value, with calculated sensitivity of 67.7% and specificity of 98.6% in prediction of SBI in infants aged ≤ 180 days. Its value was even better in infants aged ≤ 90 days with sensitivity of 75% and specificity of 97.7%. In conclusion, we demonstrated the high value of lab-score in detecting SBI in infants under 6 months of age with FWAS.

  20. A new type of migrating zone boundary in electrophoresis: 2. Transient sample zone shapes.

    PubMed

    Gebauer, Petr; Malá, Zdena; Bocek, Petr

    2006-02-01

    A new type of migrating zone boundary in electrophoresis is presented theoretically and evidenced experimentally. This type of the boundary (called hybrid boundary) shows simultaneously a steady-state part with self-sharpening properties and an unsteady-state part with time-dependent electromigration dispersion. It is shown that a sample zone may possess a hybrid boundary both as its front and rear one simultaneously. In such a case, the evolution of a sample zone injected originally as a rectangular pulse exhibits very complex transient shapes before it reaches the well-known fronting or tailing triangular shape. Depending on the stage at which detection of such a sample zone occurs, variable and peculiar-shape peaks may appear in the electropherogram. Based on theoretical predictions, experimental examples of the above-mentioned phenomena are presented in this contribution for direct and indirect UV absorbance detection of sample zones. Excellent agreement of theoretical predictions with the experiments has been found. The knowledge of hybrid boundaries is of key significance for correct interpretation of records of CE analyses in practice.

  1. Variable residence time vortex combustor

    DOEpatents

    Melconian, Jerry O.

    1987-01-01

    A variable residence time vortex combustor including a primary combustion chamber for containing a combustion vortex, and a plurality of louvres peripherally disposed about the primary combustion chamber and longitudinally distributed along its primary axis. The louvres are inclined to impel air about the primary combustion chamber to cool its interior surfaces and to impel air inwardly to assist in driving the combustion vortex in a first rotational direction and to feed combustion in the primary combustion chamber. The vortex combustor also includes a second combustion chamber having a secondary zone and a narrowed waist region in the primary combustion chamber interconnecting the output of the primary combustion chamber with the secondary zone for passing only lower density particles and trapping higher density particles in the combustion vortex in the primary combustion chamber for substantial combustion.

  2. Horner's syndrome in patients admitted to the intensive care unit that have undergone central venous catheterization: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Butty, Z; Gopwani, J; Mehta, S; Margolin, E

    2016-01-01

    PurposeCentral venous catheterization (CVC) is estimated to be performed in millions of patients per year. Swan-Ganz catheters used for CVC are most often inserted into the internal jugular vein and during this procedure they may come into contact with the sympathetic chain. This study aims to determine the incidence of Horner's syndrome in patients admitted to intensive care unit that have undergone internal jugular CVC insertion during their admission and to determine whether ultrasonography-assisted insertion has decreased the frequency of this complication.Patients and methodsA total of 100 prospective patients admitted to the ICU were examined for the presence of anisocoria and ptosis after undergoing recent CVC. Presence of Horner's syndrome was confirmed by testing with 0.5% apraclonidine and looking for the reversal of anisocoria.ResultsFrequency of Horner's syndrome after CVC was 2% in a sample of 100 prospectively examined patients.ConclusionHorner's syndrome remains a relatively rare but definitive complication of CVC. ICU physicians should be educated about its existence and prevalence and ophthalmologists should inquire about any history of ICU admission necessitating CVC insertion in any patient presenting with Horner's syndrome.

  3. Clinical Profiles and Factors Associated with Death in Adults with Dengue Admitted to Intensive Care Units, Minas Gerais, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Heringer, Tiago Pires; de Oliveira, Cristina da Cunha Hueb Barata; Fassy, Liliane Boaventura; de Carvalho, Frederico Bruzzi; Oliveira, Daniela Pagliari; de Oliveira, Claudio Dornas; Botoni, Fernando Otoni; Magalhães, Fernanda do Carmo; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the clinical profile of dengue-infected patients admitted to Brazilian intensive care units (ICU) and evaluate factors associated with death. A longitudinal, multicenter case series study was conducted with laboratory-confirmed dengue patients admitted to nine Brazilian ICUs situated in Minas Gerais state, southeastern Brazil from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2013. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data; disease severity scores; and mortality were evaluated. A total of 97 patients were studied. The in-ICU and in-hospital mortality rates were 18.6% and 19.6%, respectively. Patients classified as having severe dengue according to current World Health Organization classifications showed an increased risk of death in a univariate analysis. Nonsurvivors were older, exhibited lower serum albumin concentrations and higher total leukocyte counts and serum creatinine levels. Other risk factors (vomiting, lethargy/restlessness, dyspnea/respiratory distress) were also associated with death in a univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis indicated that in-hospital mortality was significantly associated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score. The ICU and in-hospital mortality observed in this study were higher than values reported in similar studies. An increased frequency of ICU admission due to severe organ dysfunction, higher severity indices and scarcity of ICU beds may partially explain the higher mortality.

  4. Clinical Profiles and Factors Associated with Death in Adults with Dengue Admitted to Intensive Care Units, Minas Gerais, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Amâncio, Frederico Figueiredo; Heringer, Tiago Pires; de Oliveira, Cristina da Cunha Hueb Barata; Fassy, Liliane Boaventura; de Carvalho, Frederico Bruzzi; Oliveira, Daniela Pagliari; de Oliveira, Claudio Dornas; Botoni, Fernando Otoni; Magalhães, Fernanda do Carmo; Lambertucci, José Roberto; Carneiro, Mariângela

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to describe the clinical profile of dengue-infected patients admitted to Brazilian intensive care units (ICU) and evaluate factors associated with death. A longitudinal, multicenter case series study was conducted with laboratory-confirmed dengue patients admitted to nine Brazilian ICUs situated in Minas Gerais state, southeastern Brazil from January 1, 2008, to December 31, 2013. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data; disease severity scores; and mortality were evaluated. A total of 97 patients were studied. The in-ICU and in-hospital mortality rates were 18.6% and 19.6%, respectively. Patients classified as having severe dengue according to current World Health Organization classifications showed an increased risk of death in a univariate analysis. Nonsurvivors were older, exhibited lower serum albumin concentrations and higher total leukocyte counts and serum creatinine levels. Other risk factors (vomiting, lethargy/restlessness, dyspnea/respiratory distress) were also associated with death in a univariate analysis. Multivariate analysis indicated that in-hospital mortality was significantly associated with Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score. The ICU and in-hospital mortality observed in this study were higher than values reported in similar studies. An increased frequency of ICU admission due to severe organ dysfunction, higher severity indices and scarcity of ICU beds may partially explain the higher mortality. PMID:26090676

  5. Influenza epidemiology in adults admitted to sentinel Australian hospitals in 2014: the Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN).

    PubMed

    Cheng, Allen C; Holmes, Mark; Senenayake, Sanjaya; Dwyer, Dominic E; Hewagama, Saliya; Korman, Tony; Irving, Louis; Brown, Simon; Waterer, Grant; Hunter, Cameron; Friedman, N Deborah; Wark, Peter; Simpson, Graham; Upman, John; Bowler, Simon; Macartney, Kristine; Blyth, Christopher; Kotsimbos, Tom; Kelly, Paul

    2015-09-30

    The Influenza Complications Alert Network (FluCAN) is a sentinel hospital-based surveillance program that operates at sites in all states and territories in Australia. This report summarises the epidemiology of hospitalisations with laboratory-confirmed influenza during the 2014 influenza season. In this observational study, cases were defined as patients admitted to one of the sentinel hospitals with an acute respiratory illness with influenza confirmed by nucleic acid detection. During the period 3 April to 31 October 2014 (the 2014 influenza season), 1,692 adult patients (>16 years) were admitted with confirmed influenza to one of 15 of 17 FluCAN sentinel hospitals (excluding 2 paediatric hospitals). Of these, 47% were over 65 years of age, 10% were Indigenous Australians, 3.3% were pregnant and 85% had chronic co-morbidities. The majority of cases were due to influenza A. Influenza B was detected in 7% of patients. There were a large number of hospital admissions detected with confirmed influenza in this national observational surveillance system in 2014. These are estimated to represent a national annual burden of around 15,000 admissions and almost 100,000 bed-days nationally.

  6. Aeolian sedimentation in the middle buntsandstein in the eifel north-south depression zone: Summary of the variability of sedimentary processes in a buntsandstein erg as a base for evaluation of the mutual relationships between aeolian sand seas and fluvial river systems in the mid-european buntsandstein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mader, Detlef

    The spectrum of aeolian depositional subenvironments in the upper Middle Buntsandstein Karlstal-Schichten sequence in the Eifel North-South-zone at the western margin of the Mid-European Triassic Basin comprises trains of larger and higher narrowly-spaced dunes in sand seas, isolated smaller and lower widely-spaced dunes in floodplains and interdune playas, dry interdune sheet sands, damp interdune adhesive sandflats, wet interdune playa lakes, rainfall runoff watercourses and ephemeral channels cutting through the dune belt, and deflation gravel lag veneers. Distinction of aeolian and fluvial sediments within the succession of closely intertonguing wind- and water-laid deposits is possible by independent analysis of the conventional criteria and the more modern stratification styles. Thick cross-bedded aeolian sand sequences originate as barchanoid-type dunes which accumulate and migrate in the regime of narrow to wide unimodal southeasterly to southwesterly trade winds in low northern palaeolatitude in summer when the intertropical convergence zone is shifted to the north. The predominantly transverse-ridge dunes accrete mainly by grainfall and subcritical climbing of wind ripples, subordinately also by grainflow interfingering with grainfall. Horizontal-laminated aeolian sands form as sand sheets in dry interdune playas by subcritical migration of wind ripple trains, rarely also by plane bed accretion. Thin cross-bedded dune sands or horizontal-laminated aeolian sands capping fluvial cyclothems originate by deflation of emerged alluvial bar sands during low-water stages and subsequent accumulation of the winnowed sand as widely-spaced dunelets or chains of wind ripples in desiccated parts of the adjoining floodplain. The aeolian sand layers at the base of lacustrine cyclothems record migration of isolated little dunes across the dry playa floor at the beginning of a wetting-upwards cyclothem, with the sand deriving from deflation of fluvial incursions or

  7. Floristic zones and aeroallergen diversity.

    PubMed

    Weber, Richard W

    2003-08-01

    The interplay of geographic, geochemical, and meteorologic factors combines to define distinct floristic zones in North America. Latitude, elevation, Pacific or Atlantic Ocean influence, continental air mass influence, mountains, and hills are contributory geographic factors. Hardiness zones are defined by the nadir of temperature, which strongly affects the survival of individual plant species. There are 12 hardiness zones from the northernmost tundra to the tropics of Mexico. Although it is useful to consider the 10 major floristic zones, the hardiness zones cut across these zones and characterize subregions. A multiplicity of local terrain effects, such as soil porosity and acidity, and sun exposure also impact on plant growth. The ability of plant species, whether woody shrubs and trees, or herbaceous weeds and grasses, to adapt to conditions within the floristic zones determines their range. This article identifies the major aeroallergenic species and the regions in which they are most prevalent.

  8. Smartphones and Time Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, William; Secrest, Jeffery; Padgett, Clifford; Johnson, Wayne; Hagrelius, Claire

    2016-09-01

    Using the Sun to tell time is an ancient idea, but we can take advantage of modern technology to bring it into the 21st century for students in astronomy, physics, or physical science classes. We have employed smartphones, Google Earth, and 3D printing to find the moment of local noon at two widely separated locations. By reviewing GPS time-stamped photos from each place, we are able to illustrate that local noon is longitude-dependent and therefore explain the need for time zones.

  9. Liquid zone seal

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2001-01-01

    A seal assembly that provides a means for establishing multiple pressure zones within a system. The seal assembly combines a plate extending from the inner wall of a housing or inner enclosure that intersects with and is immersed in the fluid contained in a well formed in a tray contained within the enclosure. The fluid is a low vapor pressure oil, chemically inert and oxidation resistant. The use of a fluid as the sealing component provides a seal that is self-healing and mechanically robust not subject to normal mechanical wear, breakage, and formation of cracks or pinholes and decouples external mechanical vibrations from internal structural members.

  10. Saturated Zone Colloid Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H. S. Viswanathan

    2004-10-07

    This scientific analysis provides retardation factors for colloids transporting in the saturated zone (SZ) and the unsaturated zone (UZ). These retardation factors represent the reversible chemical and physical filtration of colloids in the SZ. The value of the colloid retardation factor, R{sub col} is dependent on several factors, such as colloid size, colloid type, and geochemical conditions (e.g., pH, Eh, and ionic strength). These factors are folded into the distributions of R{sub col} that have been developed from field and experimental data collected under varying geochemical conditions with different colloid types and sizes. Attachment rate constants, k{sub att}, and detachment rate constants, k{sub det}, of colloids to the fracture surface have been measured for the fractured volcanics, and separate R{sub col} uncertainty distributions have been developed for attachment and detachment to clastic material and mineral grains in the alluvium. Radionuclides such as plutonium and americium sorb mostly (90 to 99 percent) irreversibly to colloids (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170025], Section 6.3.3.2). The colloid retardation factors developed in this analysis are needed to simulate the transport of radionuclides that are irreversibly sorbed onto colloids; this transport is discussed in the model report ''Site-Scale Saturated Zone Transport'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170036]). Although it is not exclusive to any particular radionuclide release scenario, this scientific analysis especially addresses those scenarios pertaining to evidence from waste-degradation experiments, which indicate that plutonium and americium may be irreversibly attached to colloids for the time scales of interest. A section of this report will also discuss the validity of using microspheres as analogs to colloids in some of the lab and field experiments used to obtain the colloid retardation factors. In addition, a small fraction of colloids travels with the groundwater without any significant retardation

  11. Does Zoning Winter Recreationists Reduce Recreation Conflict?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Aubrey D.; Vaske, Jerry J.; Squires, John R.; Olson, Lucretia E.; Roberts, Elizabeth K.

    2017-01-01

    Parks and protected area managers use zoning to decrease interpersonal conflict between recreationists. Zoning, or segregation, of recreation—often by non-motorized and motorized activity—is designed to limit physical interaction while providing recreation opportunities to both groups. This article investigated the effectiveness of zoning to reduce recreation conflict in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area in Colorado, USA. Despite a zoning management system, established groomed travel routes were used by both non-motorized recreationists (backcountry skiers, snowboarders, snowshoers) and motorized recreationists (snowmobilers). We hypothesized that persistent recreation conflict reported by non-motorized recreationists was the result of recreation occurring in areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use, mostly along groomed routes. We performed a geospatial analysis of recreation [from Global Positioning System (GPS) points, n = 1,233,449] in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area to identify areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use. We then surveyed non-motorized recreationists ( n = 199) to test whether reported conflict is higher for respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with respondents traveling outside areas of mixed-use. Results from the geospatial analysis showed that only 0.7 % of the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area contained recreation from both groups, however that area contained 14.8 % of all non-motorized recreation and 49.1 % of all motorized recreation. Survey analysis results showed higher interpersonal conflict for all five standard conflict variables among non-motorized respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with those traveling outside mixed-use areas. Management implications and recommendations for increasing the effectiveness of zoning are provided.

  12. Does Zoning Winter Recreationists Reduce Recreation Conflict?

    PubMed

    Miller, Aubrey D; Vaske, Jerry J; Squires, John R; Olson, Lucretia E; Roberts, Elizabeth K

    2017-01-01

    Parks and protected area managers use zoning to decrease interpersonal conflict between recreationists. Zoning, or segregation, of recreation-often by non-motorized and motorized activity-is designed to limit physical interaction while providing recreation opportunities to both groups. This article investigated the effectiveness of zoning to reduce recreation conflict in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area in Colorado, USA. Despite a zoning management system, established groomed travel routes were used by both non-motorized recreationists (backcountry skiers, snowboarders, snowshoers) and motorized recreationists (snowmobilers). We hypothesized that persistent recreation conflict reported by non-motorized recreationists was the result of recreation occurring in areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use, mostly along groomed routes. We performed a geospatial analysis of recreation [from Global Positioning System (GPS) points, n = 1,233,449] in the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area to identify areas of mixed non-motorized and motorized use. We then surveyed non-motorized recreationists (n = 199) to test whether reported conflict is higher for respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with respondents traveling outside areas of mixed-use. Results from the geospatial analysis showed that only 0.7 % of the Vail Pass Winter Recreation Area contained recreation from both groups, however that area contained 14.8 % of all non-motorized recreation and 49.1 % of all motorized recreation. Survey analysis results showed higher interpersonal conflict for all five standard conflict variables among non-motorized respondents who traveled in areas of mixed-use, compared with those traveling outside mixed-use areas. Management implications and recommendations for increasing the effectiveness of zoning are provided.

  13. Determination of potential management zones from soil electrical conductivity, yield and crop data.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Shi, Zhou; Wu, Ci-fang; Li, Hong-yi; Li, Feng

    2008-01-01

    One approach to apply precision agriculture to optimize crop production and environmental quality is identifying management zones. In this paper, the variables of soil electrical conductivity (EC) data, cotton yield data and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data in an about 15 ha field in a coastal saline land were selected as data resources, and their spatial variabilities were firstly analyzed and spatial distribution maps constructed with geostatistics technique. Then fuzzy c-means clustering algorithm was used to define management zones, fuzzy performance index (FPI) and normalized classification entropy (NCE) were used to determine the optimal cluster numbers. Finally one-way variance analysis was performed on 224 georeferenced soil and yield sampling points to assess how well the defined management zones reflected the soil properties and productivity level. The results reveal that the optimal number of management zones for the present study area was 3 and the defined management zones provided a better description of soil properties and yield variation. Statistical analyses indicate significant differences between the chemical properties of soil samples and crop yield in each management zone, and management zone 3 presented the highest nutrient level and potential crop productivity, whereas management zone 1 the lowest. Based on these findings, we conclude that fuzzy c-means clustering approach can be used to delineate management zones by using the given three variables in the coastal saline soils, and the defined management zones form an objective basis for targeting soil samples for nutrient analysis and development of site-specific application strategies.

  14. Usefulness of Combining Galectin-3 and BIVA Assessments in Predicting Short- and Long-Term Events in Patients Admitted for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    De Berardinis, Benedetta; Magrini, Laura; Zampini, Giorgio; Zancla, Benedetta; Salerno, Gerardo; Cardelli, Patrizia; Di Stasio, Enrico; Gaggin, Hanna K.; Belcher, Arianna; Parry, Blair A.; Nagurney, John T.; Januzzi, James L.; Di Somma, Salvatore

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. Acute heart failure (AHF) is associated with a higher risk for the occurrence of rehospitalization and death. Galectin-3 (GAL3) is elevated in AHF patients and is an indicator in predicting short-term mortality. The total body water using bioimpedance vector analysis (BIVA) is able to identify mortality within AHF patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short- and long-term predictive value of GAL3, BIVA, and the combination of both in AHF patients in Emergency Department (ED). Methods. 205 ED patients with AHF were evaluated by testing for B type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and GAL3. The primary endpoint was death and rehospitalization at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days and 12 and 18 months. AHF patients were evaluated at the moment of ED arrival with clinical judgment and GAL3 and BIVA measurement. Results. GAL3 level was significantly higher in patients >71 years old, and with eGFR < 30 cc/min. The area under the curve (AUC) of GAL3 + BIVA, GAL3 and BIVA for death and rehospitalization both when considered in total and when considered serially for the follow-up period showed that the combination has a better prognostic value. Kaplan-Meier survival curve for GAL3 values >17.8 ng/mL shows significant survival difference. At multivariate Cox regression analysis GAL3 is an independent variable to predict death + rehospitalization with a value of 32.24 ng/mL at 30 days (P < 0.005). Conclusion. In patients admitted for AHF an early assessment of GAL3 and BIVA seems to be useful in identifying patients at high risk for death and rehospitalization at short and long term. Combining the biomarker and the device could be of great utility since they monitor the severity of two pathophysiological different mechanisms: heart fibrosis and fluid overload. PMID:25101304

  15. The Near Zone to Far Zone Transformation (N2F)

    SciTech Connect

    Blackfield, Donald T.; Poole, Brian R.

    2016-03-11

    N2F is a C/C++ code used to calculate the far zone electromagnetic (EM) field, given E and H near zone field data. The method used by N2F can be found in Ref. 1 and 2. N2F determines the far field EΦ and Eθ in spherical coordinates for near zone data calculated in either Cartesian or Cylindrical geometry.

  16. Incidence and Clinical Characteristics of Group A Rotavirus Infections among Children Admitted to Hospital in Kilifi, Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Nokes, D. James; Abwao, John; Pamba, Allan; Peenze, Ina; Dewar, John; Maghenda, J. Kamino; Gatakaa, Hellen; Bauni, Evasius; Scott, J. Anthony G; Maitland, Kathryn; Williams, Thomas N

    2008-01-01

    Background Rotavirus, predominantly of group A, is a major cause of severe diarrhoea worldwide, with the greatest burden falling on young children living in less-developed countries. Vaccines directed against this virus have shown promise in recent trials, and are undergoing effectiveness evaluation in sub-Saharan Africa. In this region limited childhood data are available on the incidence and clinical characteristics of severe group A rotavirus disease. Advocacy for vaccine intervention and interpretation of effectiveness following implementation will benefit from accurate base-line estimates of the incidence and severity of rotavirus paediatric admissions in relevant populations. The study objective was to accurately define the incidence and severity of group A rotavirus disease in a resource-poor setting necessary to make informed decisions on the need for vaccine prevention. Methods and Findings Between 2002 and 2004 we conducted prospective surveillance for group A rotavirus infection at Kilifi District Hospital in coastal Kenya. Children < 13 y of age were eligible as “cases” if admitted with diarrhoea, and “controls” if admitted without diarrhoea. We calculated the incidence of hospital admission with group A rotavirus using data from a demographic surveillance study of 220,000 people in Kilifi District. Of 15,347 childhood admissions 3,296 (22%) had diarrhoea, 2,039 were tested for group A rotavirus antigen and, of these, 588 (29%) were positive. 372 (63%) rotavirus-positive cases were infants. Of 620 controls 19 (3.1%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.9–4.7) were rotavirus positive. The annual incidence (per 100,000 children) of rotavirus-positive admissions was 1,431 (95% CI 1,275–1,600) in infants and 478 (437–521) in under-5-y-olds, and highest proximal to the hospital. Compared to children with rotavirus-negative diarrhoea, rotavirus-positive cases were less likely to have coexisting illnesses and more likely to have acidosis (46% versus 17

  17. Incidence Rate of Post-Intubation Tracheal Stenosis in Patients Admitted to Five Intensive Care Units in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Farzanegan, Roya; Farzanegan, Behrooz; Zangi, Mahdi; Golestani Eraghi, Majid; Noorbakhsh, Shahram; Doozandeh Tabarestani, Neda; Shadmehr, Mohammad Behgam

    2016-01-01

    Background Tracheal stenosis is one of the worst complications associated with endotracheal intubation and it is the most common reason for reconstructive airway surgeries. Due to various local risk factors, the incidence rate of tracheal stenosis may vary in different countries. In order to estimate the incidence rate of post-intubation tracheal stenosis (PITS) in patients admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), a follow-up study was planned. As there was no similar methodological model in the literature, a feasibility step was also designed to examine the whole project and to enhance the follow-up rate. Objectives To estimate the PITS incidence rate in patients admitted to ICUs, as well as to evaluate the feasibility of the study. Methods This prospective cohort study was conducted in five hospitals in two provinces (Tehran and Arak) of Iran from November 2011 to March 2013. All patients admitted to ICUs who underwent more than 24 hours of endotracheal intubation were included. Upon their discharge from the ICUs, the patients received oral and written educational materials intended to ensure a more successful follow-up. The patients were asked to come back for follow-up three months after their extubation, or sooner in case of any symptoms developing. Those with dyspnea or stridor underwent a bronchoscopy. The asymptomatic patients were given a spirometry and then they underwent a bronchoscopy if the flow-volume loop suggested airway stenosis. Results Some seventy-three patients (70% men) were included in the study. Multiple trauma secondary to motor vehicle accidents (52%) was the most common cause of intubation. Follow-ups were completed in only 14 (19.2%, CI = 0.109 - 0.300) patients. One patient (7%, CI = 0.007 - 0.288) developed symptomatic tracheal stenosis that was confirmed by bronchoscopy. The barriers to a successful follow-up were assessed on three levels: ineffective oral education upon discharge, improper usage of educational materials, and

  18. Very old patients admitted to intensive care in Australia and New Zealand: a multi-centre cohort analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bagshaw, Sean M; Webb, Steve AR; Delaney, Anthony; George, Carol; Pilcher, David; Hart, Graeme K; Bellomo, Rinaldo

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Older age is associated with higher prevalence of chronic illness and functional impairment, contributing to an increased rate of hospitalization and admission to intensive care. The primary objective was to evaluate the rate, characteristics and outcomes of very old (age ≥ 80 years) patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs). Methods Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data from the Australian New Zealand Intensive Care Society Adult Patient Database. Data were obtained for 120,123 adult admissions for ≥ 24 hours across 57 ICUs from 1 January 2000 to 31 December 2005. Results A total of 15,640 very old patients (13.0%) were admitted during the study. These patients were more likely to be from a chronic care facility, had greater co-morbid illness, greater illness severity, and were less likely to receive mechanical ventilation. Crude ICU and hospital mortalities were higher (ICU: 12% vs. 8.2%, P < 0.001; hospital: 24.0% vs. 13%, P < 0.001). By multivariable analysis, age ≥ 80 years was associated with higher ICU and hospital death compared with younger age strata (ICU: odds ratio (OR) = 2.7, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 2.4 to 3.0; hospital: OR = 5.4, 95% CI = 4.9 to 5.9). Factors associated with lower survival included admission from a chronic care facility, co-morbid illness, nonsurgical admission, greater illness severity, mechanical ventilation, and longer stay in the ICU. Those aged ≥ 80 years were more likely to be discharged to rehabilitation/long-term care (12.3% vs. 4.9%, OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 2.6 to 2.9). The admission rates of very old patients increased by 5.6% per year. This potentially translates to a 72.4% increase in demand for ICU bed-days by 2015. Conclusions The proportion of patients aged ≥ 80 years admitted to intensive care in Australia and New Zealand is rapidly increasing. Although these patients have more co-morbid illness, are less likely to be discharged home, and have a greater mortality than

  19. Interannual variability versus seasonal variability in the tropical Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picaut, J.; Servain, J.; Seva, M.; Busalacchi, A. J.

    1984-01-01

    Monthly fields of sea surface temperature and wind stress for the tropical Atlantic are constructed for January 1964 to December 1979. Inside the Gulf of Guinea the amplitude of the seasonal variability of SST ranges between 2.5 and 4 times greater than the interannual variability. In the remainder of the equatorial Atlantic this measure is less than 2. Standard deviations of wind stress anomalies indicate that, except near the Intertropical Convergence Zone, the magnitude of interannual fluctuations is greater than that of seasonal ones. The joint analyses of these SST and wind stress fields indicate the largest positive SST anomaly in the Gulf of Guinea (July, 1968) was immediately preceded by the only reversal of the trade winds west along the equator.

  20. Prevalence of Extended-Spectrum Beta-Lactamases-Producing Microorganisms in Patients Admitted at KRRH, Southwestern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Andrew, Baguma; Kagirita, Atek

    2017-01-01

    The emergence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase- (ESBL-) producing pathogenic bacteria at Kabale Regional Referral Hospital (KRRH), located in southwestern Uganda, is of great concern: a phenomenon that worries clinicians and other healthcare workers due to the serious threat they pose to patients. This current study aimed at determining the phenotypic detection of ESBL-producing strains of E. coli, Klebsiella sp., and Proteus sp. isolated from clinical specimens and their prevalence in patients admitted at KRRH. We used combined disc diffusion technique to detect and establish the presence of ESBLs-producing bacteria. Of the 100 tested bacterial isolates, 89 (89%) were identified as ESBL-producing bacteria. Klebsiella sp. predominated in the samples (46 (52%)), presenting the highest frequency of ESBLs producing followed by E. coli (39 (44%)) and Proteus mirabilis (4 (4.5%)) from the combined disk diffusion. PMID:28270849

  1. Dengue serotype surveillance among patients admitted for dengue in two major hospitals in Selangor, Malaysia, 2010-2011.

    PubMed

    Ab-Fatah, M; Subenthiran, S; Abdul-Rahman, P S A; Saat, Z; Thayan, R

    2015-03-01

    Dengue serotype surveillance is important as any changes in serotype distribution may result in an outbreak or increase in severe dengue cases. This study aimed to determine circulating dengue serotypes in two hospitals in Selangor. Serum samples were collected from patients admitted for dengue at these two major public hospitals i.e. Hospital Sungai Buloh (HSB) and Hospital Tunku Ampuan Rahimah (HTAR) between November 2010 and August 2011 and subjected to real-time RT-PCR using SYBR® Green. All four dengue serotypes were detected in samples from both hospitals. The predominating serotype was dengue 1 in samples from both hospitals (HSB, DENV-1; 25.53 % and HTAR, DENV-1; 32.1 %).

  2. Occurrence of blood parasites in seabirds admitted for rehabilitation in the Western Cape, South Africa, 2001-2013.

    PubMed

    Parsons, N J; Voogt, N M; Schaefer, A M; Peirce, M A; Vanstreels, R E T

    2017-01-15

    Blood parasites are generally uncommon in seabirds, and knowledge on their epidemiology is further limited by the fact that they often inhabit remote locations that are logistically difficult or expensive to study. We present a long term data set of blood smear examinations of 1909 seabirds belonging to 27 species that were admitted to a rehabilitation centre in Cape Town (Western Cape, South Africa) between 2001 and 2013. Blood parasites were detected in 59% of species (16/27) and 29% of individuals examined (551/1909). The following blood parasites were recorded: Babesia ugwidiensis, Babesia peircei, Babesia sp., Plasmodium sp., Leucocytozoon ugwidi, Hepatozoon albatrossi, Haemoproteus skuae and Spirochaetales. Several of the records are novel host-parasite associations, demonstrating the potential of rehabilitation centres for parasite and disease surveillance, particularly for species infrequently sampled from which no host-specific parasites have been described.

  3. Screening for G6PD Deficiency Among Neonates with Neonatal Jaundice Admitted to Tertiary Care Center: A Need in Disguise.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Kishwer; Sohaila, Arjumand; Tikmani, Shiyam Sunder; Khan, Iqtidar Ahmed; Zafar, Anila

    2015-08-01

    This study was conducted to determine the association of Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase (G-6-PD) deficiency among neonates admitted with jaundice at the neonatal intensive care unit, well baby nursery and neonatal step down nursery of the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan, from January to June 2010. A total of 205 neonates following the selection criteria were included. All selected neonates have their venous blood drawn, saved in EDTA bottle and sent to laboratory of The Aga Khan University Hospital (AKUH). The laboratory results of whether G-6-PD deficiency was present or not was recorded in the proforma. G-6-PD was deficient in 19 neonates (9.3%). All neonates were male.

  4. Habitable zones in the universe.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Guillermo

    2005-12-01

    Habitability varies dramatically with location and time in the universe. This was recognized centuries ago, but it was only in the last few decades that astronomers began to systematize the study of habitability. The introduction of the concept of the habitable zone was key to progress in this area. The habitable zone concept was first applied to the space around a star, now called the Circumstellar Habitable Zone. Recently, other, vastly broader, habitable zones have been proposed. We review the historical development of the concept of habitable zones and the present state of the research. We also suggest ways to make progress on each of the habitable zones and to unify them into a single concept encompassing the entire universe.

  5. Number and size of acquired melanocytic nevi and affecting risk factors in cases admitted to the dermatology clinic

    PubMed Central

    Gül, Ülker; Kılıç, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The size and number of acquired melanocytic nevi (AMN) and presence of dysplastic nevi are the leading risk factors that should be recognized in the development of malignant melanoma. Aim To evaluate AMN and risk factors in the development of AMN in all age groups admitted to a dermatology outpatient clinic. Material and methods Four hundred and twelve patients who were admitted to the dermatology outpatient clinic for any dermatological symptom and who accepted to participate in the study were randomly included in the study. For each case, background-family history and dermatological findings were recorded. All AMN observed in the patients were dermatoscopically examined. Results The presence of more than 50 nevi was significantly higher in males, in individuals who had a history of sunburn and smokers. The number of nevi that were 5 mm and below was found to be higher in individuals who regularly sunbathed their face/body, in individuals using sunscreen, in individuals who had a history of sunburn, smokers and alcohol users. The number of nevi that were above 5 mm was higher in smokers. The total dermatoscopy score between 4.75 and 5.45 was found to be higher in individuals who had more than 50 nevi, in individuals exposed to more than one chemical substance and in alcohol users. Conclusions When determining the patient’s risk factors, factors such as the patient’s sunbathing habits and chemical substance exposure features should be taken into consideration besides the number and size of nevi. PMID:27881943

  6. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, Elizabeth L.; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen–Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia. PMID:25790457

  7. Hallucinations in acutely admitted patients with psychosis, and effectiveness of risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, and ziprasidone: a pragmatic, randomized study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Hallucinations are prevalent in schizophrenia and related psychotic disorders and may have severe consequences for the affected patients. Antipsychotic drug trials that specifically address the anti-hallucinatory effectiveness of the respective drugs in representative samples are rare. The aims of the present study were to investigate the rate and severity of hallucinations in acutely admitted psychotic patients at hospital admission and discharge or after 6 weeks at the latest, if not discharged earlier (discharge/6 weeks); and to compare the anti-hallucinatory effectiveness of risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, and ziprasidone with up to 2 years’ follow-up. Methods Adult patients acutely admitted to an emergency ward for psychosis were consecutively randomized to risperidone, olanzapine, quetiapine, or ziprasidone and followed for up to 2 years in a pragmatic design. Participants were assessed repeatedly using the hallucinatory behavior item of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS). Results A total of 226 patients, 30.5% of those assessed for eligibility, were randomized and 68% were hallucinating at baseline. This proportion was reduced to 33% at discharge/6 weeks. In the primary analyses based on intention to treat groups of patients experiencing frequent hallucinations, the quetiapine and ziprasidone groups both had faster decreases of the mean hallucination scores than the risperidone group. Conclusions Hallucinations are fairly responsive to antipsychotic drug treatment and differential anti-hallucinatory effectiveness may be found among existing antipsychotic drugs. If replicated, this could pave the way for a more targeted pharmacotherapy based on individual symptom profiles, rather than on the diagnostic category. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov ID; NCT00932529 PMID:24079855

  8. Mortality over 12 years of follow-up in people admitted to provincial custody in Ontario: a retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdjian, Fiona G.; Kiefer, Lori; Wobeser, Wendy; Gonzalez, Alejandro; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2016-01-01

    Background: We aimed to define rates and causes of death in custody and after release in people admitted to provincial custody in Ontario, and to compare these data with data for the general population. Methods: We linked data on adults admitted to provincial custody in Ontario in 2000 with data on deaths between 2000 and 2012. We examined rates and causes of death by age, sex, custodial status and period after release, and compared them with data for the general population, using indirect adjustment for age. Results: Between 2000 and 2012, 8.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 8.3%-8.8%) of those incarcerated died in provincial custody or after release. The crude death rate was 7.1 (95% CI 6.9-7.3) per 1000 person-years. The standardized mortality ratio for those incarcerated in 2000 was 4.0 (95% CI 3.9-4.1) overall and 1.9 (95% CI 1.5-2.4) while in provincial custody. The most common causes of death were injury and poisoning (38.2% of all deaths), including overdose (13.6%) and suicide (8.2%), diseases of the circulatory system (15.8%) and neoplasms (14.5%). In the 2 weeks after release, the standardized mortality ratio was 5.7 overall and 56.0 for overdose. Life expectancy was 72.3 years for women and 73.4 for men who experienced incarceration in 2000. Interpretation: Mortality was high for people who experienced incarceration, and life expectancy was 4.2 years less for men and 10.6 years less for women compared with the general population. Efforts should be made to reduce the gap in mortality between people who experience incarceration and those who do not. Time in custody could serve as an opportunity to intervene to decrease risk. PMID:27398358

  9. Pain, agitation, and behavioural problems in people with dementia admitted to general hospital wards: a longitudinal cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sampson, Elizabeth L; White, Nicola; Lord, Kathryn; Leurent, Baptiste; Vickerstaff, Victoria; Scott, Sharon; Jones, Louise

    2015-04-01

    Pain is underdetected and undertreated in people with dementia. We aimed to investigate the prevalence of pain in people with dementia admitted to general hospitals and explore the association between pain and behavioural and psychiatric symptoms of dementia (BPSD). We conducted a longitudinal cohort study of 230 people, aged above 70, with dementia and unplanned medical admissions to 2 UK hospitals. Participants were assessed at baseline and every 4 days for self-reported pain (yes/no question and FACES scale) and observed pain (Pain Assessment in Advanced Dementia scale [PAINAD]) at movement and at rest, for agitation (Cohen-Mansfield Agitating Inventory [CMAI]) and BPSD (Behavioural Pathology in Alzheimer Disease Scale [BEHAVE-AD]). On admission, 27% of participants self-reported pain rising to 39% on at least 1 occasion during admission. Half of them were able to complete the FACES scale, this proportion decreasing with more severe dementia. Using the PAINAD, 19% had pain at rest and 57% had pain on movement on at least 1 occasion (in 16%, this was persistent throughout the admission). In controlled analyses, pain was not associated with CMAI scores but was strongly associated with total BEHAVE-AD scores, both when pain was assessed on movement (β = 0.20, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.07-0.32, P = 0.002) and at rest (β = 0.41, 95% CI = 0.14-0.69, P = 0.003). The association was the strongest for aggression and anxiety. Pain was common in people with dementia admitted to the acute hospital and associated with BPSD. Improved pain management may reduce distressing behaviours and improve the quality of hospital care for people with dementia.

  10. Multiple pathogens in adult patients admitted with community-acquired pneumonia: a one year prospective study of 346 consecutive patients.

    PubMed Central

    Lieberman, D.; Schlaeffer, F.; Boldur, I.; Lieberman, D.; Horowitz, S.; Friedman, M. G.; Leiononen, M.; Horovitz, O.; Manor, E.; Porath, A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to assess the causes of community-acquired pneumonia in adult patients admitted to hospital. METHODS: A prospective study was performed on 346 consecutive adult patients (54% men) of mean (SD) 49.3 (19.5) years (range 17-94) admitted to a university affiliated regional hospital in southern Israel with community-acquired pneumonia over a period of one year. Convalescent serum samples were obtained from 308 patients (89%). The aetiological diagnosis for community-acquired pneumonia was based on positive blood cultures and/or significant changes in antibody titres to Streptococcus pneumoniae, Haemophilus influenzae, Moraxella catarrhalis, respiratory viruses, Coxiella burnetii, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Chlamydia pneumoniae, and Legionella sp. RESULTS: The aetiology of community-acquired pneumonia was identified in 279 patients (80.6%). The distribution of causal agents was as follows: S pneumoniae, 148 patients (42.8%); M pneumoniae, 101 (29.2%); C pneumoniae, 62 (17.9%); Legionella sp, 56 (16.2%); respiratory viruses, 35 (10.1%); C burnetii, 20 (5.8%); H influenzae 19 (5.5%); and other causes, 21 patients (6.0%). In patients above the age of 55 years C pneumoniae was the second most frequent aetiological agent (25.5%). In 133 patients (38.4%) more than one causal agent was found. CONCLUSIONS: The causal agents for community-acquired pneumonia in Israel are different from those described in other parts of the world. In many of the patients more than one causal agent was found. In all these patients treatment should include a macrolide antibiotic, at least in the first stage of their illness. PMID:8711652

  11. The experience of daily life of acutely admitted frail elderly patients one week after discharge from the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Jane; Lund, Hans; Aadahl, Mette; Sørensen, Erik E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Frail elderly are at higher risk of negative outcomes such as disability, low quality of life, and hospital admissions. Furthermore, a peak in readmission of acutely admitted elderly patients is seen shortly after discharge. An investigation into the daily life experiences of the frail elderly shortly after discharge seems important to address these issues. The aim of this study was to explore how frail elderly patients experience daily life 1 week after discharge from an acute admission. Methods The qualitative methodological approach was interpretive description. Data were gathered using individual interviews. The participants were frail elderly patients over 65 years of age, who were interviewed at their home 1 week after discharge from an acute admission to a medical ward. Results Four main categories were identified: “The system,” “Keeping a social life,” “Being in everyday life,” and “Handling everyday life.” These categories affected the way the frail elderly experienced daily life and these elements resulted in a general feeling of well-being or non-well-being. The transition to home was experienced as unsafe and troublesome especially for the more frail participants, whereas the less frail experienced this less. Conclusion and discussion Several elements and stressors were affecting the well-being of the participants in daily life 1 week after discharge. In particular, contact with the health care system created frustrations and worries, but also physical disability, loneliness, and inactivity were issues of concern. These elements should be addressed by health professionals in relation to the transition phase. Future interventions should incorporate a multidimensional and bio-psycho-social perspective when acutely admitted frail elderly are discharged. Stakeholders should evaluate present practice to seek to improve care across health care sectors. PMID:26037333

  12. Breathing zone air sampler

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, John

    1989-01-01

    A sampling apparatus is provided which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  13. [Foot reflex zone massage].

    PubMed

    Kesselring, A

    1994-01-01

    Foot reflexology is defined as massage of zones on the feet which correspond to different parts of the body. A medline-search yielded no literature in the field of foot reflexology. Indications for and results of foot reflexology have been extrapolated from case-descriptions and two pilot studies with small samples. One study (Lafuente et al.) found foot reflexology to be as helpful to patients with headaches as medication (flunarizine), yet foot reflexology was fraught with less side-effects than medication. In a second study (Eichelberger et al.) foot reflexology was used postoperatively on gynecological patients. The intervention group showed a lesser need for medication to enhance bladder tonus than did the control group. The literature describes foot reflexology as enhancing urination, bowel movements and relaxation.

  14. Breathing zone air sampler

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J.

    1989-08-22

    A sampling apparatus is presented which comprises a sampler for sampling air in the breathing zone of a wearer of the apparatus and a support for the sampler preferably in the form of a pair of eyeglasses. The sampler comprises a sampling assembly supported on the frame of the eyeglasses and including a pair of sample transport tubes which are suspended, in use, centrally of the frame so as to be disposed on opposite sides of the nose of the wearer and which each include an inlet therein that, in use, is disposed adjacent to a respective nostril of the nose of the wearer. A filter holder connected to sample transport tubes supports a removable filter for filtering out particulate material in the air sampled by the apparatus. The sample apparatus is connected to a pump for drawing air into the apparatus through the tube inlets so that the air passes through the filter.

  15. Magnetically-conformed, Variable Area Discharge Chamber for Hall Thruster, and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    The invention is a Hall thruster that incorporates a discharge chamber having a variable area channel including an ionization zone, a transition region, and an acceleration zone. The variable area channel is wider through the acceleration zone than through the ionization zone. An anode is located in a vicinity of the ionization zone and a cathode is located in a vicinity of the acceleration zone. The Hall thruster includes a magnetic circuit which is capable of forming a local magnetic field having a curvature within the transition region of the variable area channel whereby the transition region conforms to the curvature of the local magnetic field. The Hall thruster optimizes the ionization and acceleration efficiencies by the combined effects of the variable area channel and magnetic conformity.

  16. Stellar convection theory. III - Dynamical coupling of the two convection zones in A-type stars by penetrative motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latour, J.; Toomre, J.; Zahn, J.-P.

    1981-01-01

    The thermal convection occurring over many density scale heights in an A-type star outer envelope, encompassing both the hydrogen and helium convectively unstable zones, is examined by means of anelastic modal equations. The single-mode anelastic equations for such compressible convection display strong overshooting of the motions into adjacent radiative zones, which would preclude diffusive separation of elements in the supposedly quiescent region between the two unstable zones. In addition, the anelastic solutions reveal that the two zones of convective instability are dynamically coupled by the overshooting motions. The two solutions that the nonlinear single-mode equations admit for the same horizontal wavelength are distinguished by the sense of the vertical velocity at the center of the three-dimensional cell. It is suggested that strong horizontal shear flows should be present just below the surface of the star, and that the large-scale motions extending into the stable atmosphere would appear mainly as horizontal flows.

  17. Zoning should promote public health.

    PubMed

    Hirschhorn, Joel S

    2004-01-01

    Legally, governments use their police powers to protect public health, safety, and welfare through zoning. This paper presents a case for revisiting zoning on the basis of increasing evidence that certain types of community design promote public health, as opposed to the dominant pattern of sprawl development, which does not. Zoning, and the land use planning linked to it, that prohibits or disfavors health-promoting community designs contradicts the inherent public policy goal on which it is based. If there is a paradigm shift underway, from traditional sprawl to health-promoting community designs, then health professionals and others should understand why zoning must be reassessed.

  18. Swash zone boundary conditions derived from optical remote sensing of swash zone flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, H. E.; Holman, R. A.; Baldock, T. E.

    2011-06-01

    Optical remote sensing is used to measure flow patterns in the swash zone. Timestack images are analyzed to measure the asymmetry and the relative duration of the inflow into the swash zone. This varies significantly between individual swashes, contrary to the classical analytical swash model for runup induced by bores, which predicts a similar flow pattern for all events. For swash forced by breaking bores, the gradient of the x-t locus of flow reversal varies over a wide range and flow reversal can occur simultaneously across the whole swash zone. This variation of the gradient of the locus of flow reversal in x-t space can be parameterized in terms of a single free variable in recent solutions to the nonlinear shallow water equations, which fully defines the swash boundary inflow condition. Consistent with the theory, the horizontal runup, the swash period, and the swash similarity parameter were observed to be independent of the swash inflow conditions but the flow asymmetry is not. Only a weak correlation was observed between the swash boundary condition and the Iribarren number and beach slope. Conversely, the analysis suggests that the degree of swash-swash interaction does influence the swash boundary condition and the resulting internal flow kinematics. The variation in inflow conditions is expected to influence the magnitudes of the velocity moments within the swash zone and therefore sediment transport rates.

  19. Yield response to variable rate irrigation in corn

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To investigate the impact of variable rate irrigation on corn yield, twenty plots of corn were laid out under a center pivot variable rate irrigation (VRI) system in an experimental field near Stoneville, MS. The VRI system is equipped with five VRI zone control units, a global positioning system (G...

  20. Adaptive membership functions for handwritten character recognition by Voronoi-based image zoning.

    PubMed

    Pirlo, Giuseppe; Impedovo, Donato

    2012-09-01

    In the field of handwritten character recognition, image zoning is a widespread technique for feature extraction since it is rightly considered to be able to cope with handwritten pattern variability. As a matter of fact, the problem of zoning design has attracted many researchers who have proposed several image-zoning topologies, according to static and dynamic strategies. Unfortunately, little attention has been paid so far to the role of feature-zone membership functions that define the way in which a feature influences different zones of the zoning method. The result is that the membership functions defined to date follow nonadaptive, global approaches that are unable to model local information on feature distributions. In this paper, a new class of zone-based membership functions with adaptive capabilities is introduced and its effectiveness is shown. The basic idea is to select, for each zone of the zoning method, the membership function best suited to exploit the characteristics of the feature distribution of that zone. In addition, a genetic algorithm is proposed to determine-in a unique process-the most favorable membership functions along with the optimal zoning topology, described by Voronoi tessellation. The experimental tests show the superiority of the new technique with respect to traditional zoning methods.

  1. Seismogenic zone structure along the Middle America subduction zone, Costa Rica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deshon, Heather Rene

    Most large (MW > 7.0) underthrusting earthquakes nucleate along a shallow region of unstable frictional stability on or near the subducting plate interface termed the seismogenic zone. The studies presented here investigate along-strike spatial and temporal variability in microseismicity and seismic velocity and provide spatial constraints on the updip and downdip limits of microseismicity within the Middle America subduction offshore western Costa Rica. All chapters utilize data recorded by the Costa Rica Seismogenic Zone Experiment (CRSEIZE), a collaborative seismic and geodetic study undertaken from September 1999--June 2001 to better understand subduction zone behavior near the Osa and Nicoya Peninsulas, Costa Rica. Chapter 1 serves as a broad introduction to the thesis while Chapter 2 provides an overview of Costa Rica seismicity, the CRSEIZE experiment setup, data processing, and data quality. Chapter 3 discusses simultaneous inversion for 1D P- and S-wave velocity models, station corrections, and hypocenter parameters for both the Nicoya and Osa experiments and presents a refined location for the continental Moho in northern Costa Rica. Chapter 4 presents absolute and relative relocations of ˜300 aftershocks of the 1999 Quepos, Costa Rica, underthrusting earthquake and analyzes seismogenic zone structure offshore central Costa Rica during a period of increased seismicity rate. Subduction of highly disrupted seafloor north of the Osa Peninsula has established a set of conditions that presently limit the seismogenic zone to be between 10--35 km below sea level, 30--95 km from the trench axis. Chapter 5 presents high resolution earthquake locations and P-wave and P-wave/S-wave 3D velocity models for the locked Nicoya Peninsula segment of the Middle America subduction zone calculated using an iterative, damped least squares local tomography method. In the southern Nicoya Peninsula, microseismicity along the plate interface extends from 12--26 km depth, 73

  2. Achieving That Elusive "Leadership Zone"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Reaching the "leadership zone" happens when librarians tap into the extraordinary skills lying within to overcome obstacles and transform sometimes-difficult situations into meaningful outcomes. Maturing into an experienced leader who stays in the leadership zone requires knowledge, training, and practice. This article provides tactical…

  3. Theoretical model of the helium zone plate microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvador Palau, Adrià; Bracco, Gianangelo; Holst, Bodil

    2017-01-01

    Neutral helium microscopy is a new technique currently under development. Its advantages are the low energy, charge neutrality, and inertness of the helium atoms, a potential large depth of field, and the fact that at thermal energies the helium atoms do not penetrate into any solid material. This opens the possibility, among others, for the creation of an instrument that can measure surface topology on the nanoscale, even on surfaces with high aspect ratios. One of the most promising designs for helium microscopy is the zone plate microscope. It consists of a supersonic expansion helium beam collimated by an aperture (skimmer) focused by a Fresnel zone plate onto a sample. The resolution is determined by the focal spot size, which depends on the size of the skimmer, the optics of the system, and the velocity spread of the beam through the chromatic aberrations of the zone plate. An important factor for the optics of the zone plate is the width of the outermost zone, corresponding to the smallest opening in the zone plate. The width of the outermost zone is fabrication limited to around 10 nm with present-day state-of-the-art technology. Due to the high ionization potential of neutral helium atoms, it is difficult to build efficient helium detectors. Therefore, it is crucial to optimize the microscope design to maximize the intensity for a given resolution and width of the outermost zone. Here we present an optimization model for the helium zone plate microscope. Assuming constant resolution and width of the outermost zone, we are able to reduce the problem to a two-variable problem (zone plate radius and object distance) and we show that for a given beam temperature and pressure, there is always a single intensity maximum. We compare our model with the highest-resolution zone plate focusing images published and show that the intensity can be increased seven times. Reducing the width of the outermost zone to 10 nm leads to an increase in intensity of more than 8000

  4. The Intertropical Convergence Zone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Intertropical Convergence Zone, or ITCZ, is the region that circles the Earth, near the equator, where the trade winds of the Northern and Southern Hemispheres come together. The intense sun and warm water of the equator heats the air in the ITCZ, raising its humidity and causing it to rise. As the air rises it cools, releasing the accumulated moisture in an almost perpetual series of thunderstorms. Variation in the location of the ITCZ drastically affects rainfall in many equatorial nations, resulting in the wet and dry seasons of the tropics rather than the cold and warm seasons of higher latitudes. Longer term changes in the ITCZ can result in severe droughts or flooding in nearby areas. This image is a combination of cloud data from NOAA's newest Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES-11) and color land cover classification data. The ITCZ is the band of bright white clouds that cuts across the center of the image. For more GOES images, visit the GOES Project Science site. Image Courtesy GOES Project Science Office

  5. Detecting livestock production zones.

    PubMed

    Grisi-Filho, J H H; Amaku, M; Ferreira, F; Dias, R A; Neto, J S Ferreira; Negreiros, R L; Ossada, R

    2013-07-01

    Communities are sets of nodes that are related in an important way, most likely sharing common properties and/or playing similar roles within a network. Unraveling a network structure, and hence the trade preferences and pathways, could be useful to a researcher or a decision maker. We implemented a community detection algorithm to find livestock communities, which is consistent with the definition of a livestock production zone, assuming that a community is a group of farm premises in which an animal is more likely to stay during its lifetime than expected by chance. We applied this algorithm to the network of animal movements within the state of Mato Grosso for 2007. This database holds information concerning 87,899 premises and 521,431 movements throughout the year, totaling 15,844,779 animals moved. The community detection algorithm achieved a network partition that shows a clear geographical and commercial pattern, two crucial features for preventive veterinary medicine applications; this algorithm provides also a meaningful interpretation to trade networks where links emerge based on trader node choices.

  6. Lithospheric flexure at fracture zones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sandwell, D.; Schubert, G.

    1982-01-01

    Studies attempting to demonstrate that lithospheric flexure occurs across the Pioneer and Mendocino fracture zones, and that the flexural topography is a topographic expression at these fracture zones, are presented. The flexure is modelled and compared with predicted depths with five bathymetric profiles which cross the two fracture zones at different ages. The model uses a thin elastic plate overlying an incompressible fluid half-space, and incorporates a temperature-dependent effective elastic thickness. Several conclusions were derived from this study. First, it is found that no significant slip on the fossil fault planes of the Mendocino and Pioneer fracture zones exists. In addition, the flexural amplitude is determined to increase with age. Finally, it is concluded that there is elastic coupling between the Mendocino and Pioneer fracture zones since the separation is less than a flexural wavelength.

  7. Predicting km-scale shear zone formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerbi, Christopher; Culshaw, Nicholas; Shulman, Deborah; Foley, Maura; Marsh, Jeffrey

    2015-04-01

    Because km-scale shear zones play a first-order role in lithospheric kinematics, accurate conceptual and numerical models of orogenic development require predicting when and where they form. Although a strain-based algorithm in the upper crust for weakening due to faulting appears to succeed (e.g., Koons et al., 2010, doi:10.1029/2009TC002463), a comparable general rule for the viscous crust remains unestablished. Here we consider two aspects of the geological argument for a similar algorithm in the viscous regime, namely (1) whether predicting km-scale shear zone development based on a single parameter (such as strain or shear heating) is reasonable; and (2) whether lithologic variability inherent in most orogenic systems precludes a simple predictive rule. A review of tectonically significant shear zones worldwide and more detailed investigations in the Central Gneiss belt of the Ontario segment of the Grenville Province reveals that most km-scale shear zones occur at lithological boundaries and involve mass transfer, but have fairly little else in common. As examples, the relatively flat-lying Twelve Mile Bay shear zone in the western Central Gneiss belt bounds the Parry Sound domain and is likely the product of both localized anatexis and later retrograde hydration with attendant metamorphism. Moderately dipping shear zones in granitoids of the Grenville Front Tectonic Zone apparently resulted from cooperation among several complementary microstructural processes, such as grain size reduction, enhanced diffusion, and a small degree of metamorphic reaction. Localization into shear zones requires the operation of some spatially restricted processes such as stress concentration, metamorphism/fluid access, textural evolution, and thermal perturbation. All of these could be due in part to strain, but not necessarily linearly related to strain. Stress concentrations, such as those that form at rheological boundaries, may be sufficient to nucleate high strain

  8. Surgical intensive care unit admission variables predict subsequent readmission.

    PubMed

    Lissauer, Matthew E; Diaz, Jose J; Narayan, Mayur; Shah, Paulesh K; Hanna, Nader N

    2013-06-01

    Intensive care unit (ICU) readmissions are associated with increased resource use. Defining predictors may improve resource use. Surgical ICU patients requiring readmission will have different characteristics than those who do not. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of a prospectively maintained database. The Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) IV quality database identified patients admitted January 1 through December 31, 2011. Patients were divided into groups: NREA = patients admitted to the ICU, discharged, and not readmitted versus REA = patients admitted to the ICU, discharged, and readmitted. Comparisons were made at index admission, not readmission. Categorical variables were compared by Fisher's exact testing and continuous variables by t test. Multivariate logistic regression identified independent predictors of readmission. There were 765 admissions. Seventy-seven patients required readmission 94 times (12.8% rate). Sixty-two patients died on initial ICU admission. Admission severity of illness was significantly higher (APACHE III score: 69.54 ± 21.11 vs 54.88 ± 23.48) in the REA group. Discharge acute physiology scores were equal between groups (47.0 ± 39.2 vs 44.2 ± 34.0, P = nonsignificant). In multivariate analysis, REA patients were more likely admitted to emergency surgery (odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.01 ± 3.5) more likely to have a history of immunosuppression (2.7, 1.4 ± 5.3) or higher Acute Physiology Score (1.02; 1.0 ± 1.03) than NREA. Patients who require ICU readmission have a different admission profile than those who do not "bounce back." Understanding these differences may allow for quality improvement projects such as instituting different discharge criteria for different patient populations.

  9. Racecadotril for the treatment of severe acute watery diarrhoea in children admitted to a tertiary hospital in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Gharial, Jaspreet; Laving, Ahmed; Were, Fred

    2017-01-01

    Background Diarrhoea is the second most common cause of death in children under 5 years of age in Kenya. It is usually treated with oral rehydration, zinc and continued feeding. Racecadotril has been in use for over 2 decades; however, there is a paucity of data regarding its efficacy from Africa. Objectives The objectives of this study were: to compare the number of stools in the first 48 hours in children with severe gastroenteritis requiring admission and treated with either racecadotril or placebo, to study the impact of racecadotril on duration of inpatient stay as well as duration of diarrhoea and to describe the side effect profile of racecadotril. Methods This was a randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial. It enrolled children between the age of 3 and 60 months who were admitted with severe acute gastroenteritis. They received either racecadotril or placebo in addition to oral rehydration solution (ORS) and zinc and were followed up daily. Results 120 children were enrolled into the study. There were no differences in the demographics or outcomes between the 2 groups. Stools at 48 hours: median (IQR) of 5 (3–7) and 5 (2.5–7.5), respectively; p=0.63. The duration of inpatient stay: median (IQR): 4 days (1.5–6.5) and 4.5 (1.8–6.3); p=0.71. The duration of illness: 3 days (2–4) and 2 days (1–3); p=0.77. The relative risk of a severe adverse event was 3-fold higher in the drug group but was not statistically significant (95% CI 0.63 to 14.7); p=0.16. Conclusions Racecadotril has no impact on the number of stools at 48 hours, the duration of hospital stay or the duration of diarrhoea in children admitted with severe gastroenteritis and managed with ORS and zinc. Trial registration number PACTR201403000694398; Pre-results. PMID:28123772

  10. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine ward

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are a common cause of increased morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. Bacteraemia in the elderly is a difficult diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge due to age-related vicissitudes and to their comorbidities. The main purpose of the study was to assess independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality among the elderly with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine Ward. Methods Overall, a cohort of 135 patients, 65 years of age and older, with bacteraemia were retrospectively studied. Data related to demographic information, comorbidities, clinical parameters on admission, source and type of infection, microorganism isolated in the blood culture, laboratory data and empirical antibiotic treatment was recorded from each patient. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of these 135 patients, 45.9% were women. The most common infections in this group of patients were urinary tract infections (46.7%). The main microorganisms isolated in the blood cultures were Escherichia coli (14.9%), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (12.0%), non-MRSA (11.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%) and Enterococcus faecalis (8.0%). The in-hospital mortality was 22.2%. Independent prognostic factors associated with in-hospital mortality were age ≥ 85 years, chronic renal disease, bacteraemia of unknown focus and cognitive impairment at admission (OR, 2.812 [95% CI, 1.039-7.611; p = 0.042]; OR, 6.179 [95% CI, 1.840-20.748; p = 0.003]; OR, 8.673 [95% CI, 1.557-48.311; p = 0.014] and OR, 3.621 [95% CI, 1.226-10.695; p = 0.020], respectively). By multivariate analysis appropriate antibiotic therapy was not associated with lower odds of mortality. Conclusion Bacteraemia in the elderly has a high mortality rate. There are no set of signs or clinical features that can predict bacteraemia in the elderly. However, older age (≥ 85 years), chronic renal

  11. Prospective observational cohort study of patients with weaning failure admitted to a specialist weaning, rehabilitation and home mechanical ventilation centre

    PubMed Central

    Mifsud Bonnici, Denise; Sanctuary, Thomas; Murphy, Patrick B; Steier, Joerg; Marino, Philip; Pattani, Hina; Creagh-Brown, Ben C; Hart, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives According to National Health Service England (NHSE) specialist respiratory commissioning specification for complex home ventilation, patients with weaning failure should be referred to a specialist centre. However, there are limited data reporting the clinical outcomes from such centres. Setting Prospective observational cohort study of patients admitted to a UK specialist weaning, rehabilitation and home mechanical ventilation centre between February 2005 and July 2013. Participants 262 patients admitted with a median age of 64.2 years (IQR 52.6–73.2 years). 59.9% were male. Results 39.7% of patients had neuromuscular and/or chest wall disease, 21% were postsurgical, 19.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 5.3% had obesity-related respiratory failure and 14.5% had other diagnoses. 64.1% of patients were successfully weaned, with 38.2% weaned fully from ventilation, 24% weaned to nocturnal non-invasive ventilation (NIV), 1.9% weaned to nocturnal NIV with intermittent NIV during the daytime. 21.4% of patients were discharged on long-term tracheostomy ventilation. The obesity-related respiratory failure group were most likely to wean (relative risk (RR) for weaning success=1.48, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.77; p<0.001), but otherwise weaning success rates did not significantly vary by diagnostic group. The median time-to-wean was 19 days (IQR 9–33) and the median duration of stay was 31 days (IQR 16–50), with no difference observed between the groups. Weaning centre mortality was 14.5%, highest in the COPD group (RR=2.15, 95% CI 1.19 to 3.91, p=0.012) and lowest in the neuromuscular and/or chest wall disease group (RR=0.34, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.75, p=0.007). Of all patients discharged alive, survival was 71.7% at 6 months and 61.8% at 12 months postdischarge. Conclusions Following NHSE guidance, patients with weaning delay and failure should be considered for transfer to a specialist centre where available, which can demonstrate

  12. Rehabilitation Profiles of Older Adult Stroke Survivors Admitted to Intermediate Care Units: A Multi-Centre Study

    PubMed Central

    Inzitari, Marco; Quinn, Terence J.; Montaner, Joan; Gavaldà, Ricard; Duarte, Esther; Coll-Planas, Laura; Cerdà, Mercè; Santaeugenia, Sebastià; Closa, Conxita; Gallofré, Miquel

    2016-01-01

    Background Stroke is a major cause of disability in older adults, but the evidence around post-acute treatment is limited and heterogeneous. We aimed to identify profiles of older adult stroke survivors admitted to intermediate care geriatric rehabilitation units. Methods We performed a cohort study, enrolling stroke survivors aged 65 years or older, admitted to 9 intermediate care units in Catalonia-Spain. To identify potential profiles, we included age, caregiver presence, comorbidity, pre-stroke and post-stroke disability, cognitive impairment and stroke severity in a cluster analysis. We also proposed a practical decision tree for patient’s classification in clinical practice. We analyzed differences between profiles in functional improvement (Barthel index), relative functional gain (Montebello index), length of hospital stay (LOS), rehabilitation efficiency (functional improvement by LOS), and new institutionalization using multivariable regression models (for continuous and dichotomous outcomes). Results Among 384 patients (79.1±7.9 years, 50.8% women), we identified 3 complexity profiles: a) Lower Complexity with Caregiver (LCC), b) Moderate Complexity without Caregiver (MCN), and c) Higher Complexity with Caregiver (HCC). The decision tree showed high agreement with cluster analysis (96.6%). Using either linear (continuous outcomes) or logistic regression, both LCC and MCN, compared to HCC, showed statistically significant higher chances of functional improvement (OR = 4.68, 95%CI = 2.54–8.63 and OR = 3.0, 95%CI = 1.52–5.87, respectively, for Barthel index improvement ≥20), relative functional gain (OR = 4.41, 95%CI = 1.81–10.75 and OR = 3.45, 95%CI = 1.31–9.04, respectively, for top Vs lower tertiles), and rehabilitation efficiency (OR = 7.88, 95%CI = 3.65–17.03 and OR = 3.87, 95%CI = 1.69–8.89, respectively, for top Vs lower tertiles). In relation to LOS, MCN cluster had lower chance of shorter LOS than LCC (OR = 0.41, 95%CI = 0.23–0

  13. Differences in quantitative assessment of myocardial scar and gray zone by LGE-CMR imaging using established gray zone protocols.

    PubMed

    Mesubi, Olurotimi; Ego-Osuala, Kelechi; Jeudy, Jean; Purtilo, James; Synowski, Stephen; Abutaleb, Ameer; Niekoop, Michelle; Abdulghani, Mohammed; Asoglu, Ramazan; See, Vincent; Saliaris, Anastasios; Shorofsky, Stephen; Dickfeld, Timm

    2015-02-01

    Late gadolinium enhancement cardiac magnetic resonance (LGE-CMR) imaging is the gold standard for myocardial scar evaluation. Heterogeneous areas of scar ('gray zone'), may serve as arrhythmogenic substrate. Various gray zone protocols have been correlated to clinical outcomes and ventricular tachycardia channels. This study assessed the quantitative differences in gray zone and scar core sizes as defined by previously validated signal intensity (SI) threshold algorithms. High quality LGE-CMR images performed in 41 cardiomyopathy patients [ischemic (33) or non-ischemic (8)] were analyzed using previously validated SI threshold methods [Full Width at Half Maximum (FWHM), n-standard deviation (NSD) and modified-FWHM]. Myocardial scar was defined as scar core and gray zone using SI thresholds based on these methods. Scar core, gray zone and total scar sizes were then computed and compared among these models. The median gray zone mass was 2-3 times larger with FWHM (15 g, IQR: 8-26 g) compared to NSD or modified-FWHM (5 g, IQR: 3-9 g; and 8 g. IQR: 6-12 g respectively, p < 0.001). Conversely, infarct core mass was 2.3 times larger with NSD (30 g, IQR: 17-53 g) versus FWHM and modified-FWHM (13 g, IQR: 7-23 g, p < 0.001). The gray zone extent (percentage of total scar that was gray zone) also varied significantly among the three methods, 51 % (IQR: 42-61 %), 17 % (IQR: 11-21 %) versus 38 % (IQR: 33-43 %) for FWHM, NSD and modified-FWHM respectively (p < 0.001). Considerable variability exists among the current methods for MRI defined gray zone and scar core. Infarct core and total myocardial scar mass also differ using these methods. Further evaluation of the most accurate quantification method is needed.

  14. Comparison of Routine Health Management Information System Versus Enhanced Inpatient Malaria Surveillance for Estimating the Burden of Malaria Among Children Admitted to Four Hospitals in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Mpimbaza, Arthur; Miles, Melody; Sserwanga, Asadu; Kigozi, Ruth; Wanzira, Humphrey; Rubahika, Denis; Nasr, Sussann; Kapella, Bryan K.; Yoon, Steven S.; Chang, Michelle; Yeka, Adoke; Staedke, Sarah G.; Kamya, Moses R.; Dorsey, Grant

    2015-01-01

    The primary source of malaria surveillance data in Uganda is the Health Management Information System (HMIS), which does not require laboratory confirmation of reported malaria cases. To improve data quality, an enhanced inpatient malaria surveillance system (EIMSS) was implemented with emphasis on malaria testing of all children admitted in select hospitals. Data were compared between the HMIS and the EIMSS at four hospitals over a period of 12 months. After the implementation of the EIMSS, over 96% of admitted children under 5 years of age underwent laboratory testing for malaria. The HMIS significantly overreported the proportion of children under 5 years of age admitted with malaria (average absolute difference = 19%, range = 8–27% across the four hospitals) compared with the EIMSS. To improve the quality of the HMIS data for malaria surveillance, the National Malaria Control Program should, in addition to increasing malaria testing rates, focus on linking laboratory test results to reported malaria cases. PMID:25422396

  15. Influence of soil and climate on root zone storage capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Euser, Tanja; McMillan, Hilary; Hrachowitz, Markus; Winsemius, Hessel; Savenije, Hubert

    2015-04-01

    The root zone water storage capacity (Sr) of a catchment is an important variable for the hydrological behaviour of a catchment; it strongly influences the storage, transpiration and runoff generation in an area. However, the root zone storage capacity is largely heterogeneous and not measurable. There are different theories about the variables affecting the root zone storage capacity; among the most debated are soil, vegetation and climate. The effect of vegetation and soil is often accounted for by detailed soil and land use maps. To investigate the effect of climate on the root zone storage capacity, an analogue can be made between the root zone storage capacity of a catchment and the human habit to design and construct reservoirs: both storage capacities help to overcome a dry period of a certain length. Humans often use the mass curve technique to determine the required storage needed to design the reservoir capacity. This mass curve technique can also be used to derive the root zone storage capacity created by vegetation in a certain ecosystem and climate (Gao et al., 2014). Only precipitation and discharge or evaporation data are required for this method. This study tests whether Sr values derived by both the mass curve technique and from soil maps are comparable for a range of catchments in New Zealand. Catchments are selected over a gradient of climates and land use. Special focus lies on how Sr values derived for a larger catchment are representative for smaller nested catchments. The spatial differences are examined between values derived from soil data and from climate and flow data. Gao, H., Hrachowitz, M., Schymanski, S.J., Fenicia, F., Sriwongsitanon, N., Savenije, H.H.G, (2014): Climate controls how ecosystems size the root zone storage capacity at catchment scale. DOI: 10.1002/2014GL061668

  16. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  17. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″...

  18. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″...

  19. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″...

  20. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″...

  1. 49 CFR 71.3 - Atlantic zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Atlantic zone. 71.3 Section 71.3 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.3 Atlantic zone. The first zone, the Atlantic standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is between 52°30″...

  2. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  3. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  4. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  5. 49 CFR 71.8 - Mountain zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Mountain zone. 71.8 Section 71.8 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation STANDARD TIME ZONE BOUNDARIES § 71.8 Mountain zone. The fourth zone, the mountain standard time zone, includes that part of the United States that is west of...

  6. 47 CFR 73.505 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.505 Zones. For the purpose of assignment of noncommercial educational FM stations, the United States is divided into three zones, Zone I, Zone I-A, and Zone II,...

  7. 47 CFR 73.505 - Zones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES RADIO BROADCAST SERVICES Noncommercial Educational FM Broadcast Stations § 73.505 Zones. For the purpose of assignment of noncommercial educational FM stations, the United States is divided into three zones, Zone I, Zone I-A, and Zone II,...

  8. Analytics For Distracted Driver Behavior Modeling in Dilemma Zone

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jan-Mou; Malikopoulos, Andreas; Thakur, Gautam; Vatsavai, Raju

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results obtained and insights gained through the analysis of TRB contest data. We used exploratory analysis, regression, and clustering models for gaining insights into the driver behavior in a dilemma zone while driving under distraction. While simple exploratory analysis showed the distinguishing driver behavior patterns among different popu- lation groups in the dilemma zone, regression analysis showed statically signification relationships between groups of variables. In addition to analyzing the contest data, we have also looked into the possible impact of distracted driving on the fuel economy.

  9. Multi-level hot zone identification for pedestrian safety.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jaeyoung; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Choi, Keechoo; Huang, Helai

    2015-03-01

    According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), while fatalities from traffic crashes have decreased, the proportion of pedestrian fatalities has steadily increased from 11% to 14% over the past decade. This study aims at identifying two zonal levels factors. The first is to identify hot zones at which pedestrian crashes occurs, while the second are zones where crash-involved pedestrians came from. Bayesian Poisson lognormal simultaneous equation spatial error model (BPLSESEM) was estimated and revealed significant factors for the two target variables. Then, PSIs (potential for safety improvements) were computed using the model. Subsequently, a novel hot zone identification method was suggested to combine both hot zones from where vulnerable pedestrians originated with hot zones where many pedestrian crashes occur. For the former zones, targeted safety education and awareness campaigns can be provided as countermeasures whereas area-wide engineering treatments and enforcement may be effective safety treatments for the latter ones. Thus, it is expected that practitioners are able to suggest appropriate safety treatments for pedestrian crashes using the method and results from this study.

  10. Heat transport dynamics at a sandy intertidal zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kevin M.; Cardenas, M. Bayani; Erler, Dirk V.; Santos, Isaac R.; Eyre, Bradley D.

    2013-06-01

    Intertidal zones are spatially complex and temporally dynamic environments. Coastal groundwater discharge, including submarine groundwater discharge, may provide stabilizing conditions for intertidal zone permeable sediments. In this study, we integrated detailed time series temperature observations, porewater pressure measurements, and two-dimensional electrical resistivity tomography profiles to understand the coupled hydraulic-thermal regime of a tropical sandy intertidal zone in a fringing coral reef lagoon (Rarotonga, Cook Islands). We found three heating patterns across the 15 m study transect over tidal and diel periods: (1) a highly variable thermal regime dominated by swash infiltration and changes in saturation state in the upper foreshore with net heat import into the sediment, (2) a groundwater-supported underground stable, cool region just seaward of the intertidal slope break also importing heat into the subsurface, and (3) a zone of seawater recirculation that sustained consistently warm subsurface temperatures that exported heat across the sediment-water interface. Simple calculations suggested thermal conduction as the main heat transport mechanism for the shallow intertidal sediment, but deeper and/or multidimensional groundwater flow was required to explain temperature patterns beyond 20 cm depth. Temperature differences between the distinct hydrodynamic zones of the foreshore site resulted in significant thermal gradients that persisted beyond tidal and diel periods. The thermal buffering of intertidal zones by coastal groundwater systems, both at surface seeps and in the shallow subsurface, can be responsible for thermal refugia for some coastal organisms and hotspots for biogeochemical reactions.

  11. Capture zones for simple aquifers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McElwee, Carl D.

    1991-01-01

    Capture zones showing the area influenced by a well within a certain time are useful for both aquifer protection and cleanup. If hydrodynamic dispersion is neglected, a deterministic curve defines the capture zone. Analytical expressions for the capture zones can be derived for simple aquifers. However, the capture zone equations are transcendental and cannot be explicitly solved for the coordinates of the capture zone boundary. Fortunately, an iterative scheme allows the solution to proceed quickly and efficiently even on a modest personal computer. Three forms of the analytical solution must be used in an iterative scheme to cover the entire region of interest, after the extreme values of the x coordinate are determined by an iterative solution. The resulting solution is a discrete one, and usually 100-1000 intervals along the x-axis are necessary for a smooth definition of the capture zone. The presented program is written in FORTRAN and has been used in a variety of computing environments. No graphics capability is included with the program; it is assumed the user has access to a commercial package. The superposition of capture zones for multiple wells is expected to be satisfactory if the spacing is not too close. Because this program deals with simple aquifers, the results rarely will be the final word in a real application.

  12. Prediction of initiation and duration of breast-feeding for neonates admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Lessen, Rachelle; Crivelli-Kovach, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    Women who desire to breast-feed their sick newborns often encounter obstacles, including insufficient support and education as well as unsupportive hospital practices. The purpose of this study was to describe maternal, neonatal, and outside influences associated with the intention, initiation, and duration of breast-feeding for women whose newborns were admitted to the neonatal intensive care unit. One hundred mothers were interviewed. Most mothers (67%) intended to breast-feed exclusively and this was significantly related to maternal characteristics such as age, education, parity, smoking and marital status, pre-breast-feeding experience, and the influences of the neonate's father and prenatal education. Seventy-eight mothers initiated pumping. Initiation was significantly related to maternal education, smoking, parity, previous breast-feeding experience, the neonate's physician, the neonate's father, and postpartum breast-feeding education. Fifty-four mothers were followed up by telephone after discharge until weaning. Thirty percent were exclusively breast-feeding at 2 weeks after discharge, and 15% were breast-feeding at 1 year. Duration of breast-feeding was significantly associated with education, marital status, ethnicity, income, assistance from nurses and lactation consultants, and feeding method along with milk type and milk volume at discharge. Increased family support, timely breast-feeding information, and a supportive neonatal intensive care unit environment are needed for women to succeed in breast-feeding their hospitalized newborns.

  13. Cardiac risk factors and metabolic syndrome in patients with schizophrenia admitted to a general hospital psychiatric unit

    PubMed Central

    Grover, Sandeep; Nebhinani, Naresh; Chakrabarti, Subho; Avasthi, Ajit; Basu, Debasish; Kulhara, Parmanand; Mattoo, Surendra Kumar; Malhotra, Savita

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The study aimed to evaluate the prevalence of cardiovascular risk (CVR) factors and metabolic syndrome (MS) in patients with schizophrenia. Materials and Methods: By consecutive sampling, 143 patients (of age ≥ 20 years), out of total 159 patients with schizophrenia admitted to the inpatient unit were evaluated for the coronary heart disease (CHD) risk as per Framingham (10-year all CHD events) function/risk equation and systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE) - 10-year cardiovascular mortality risk (CMR). Prevalence of MS was estimated by using the consensus definition. Results: Fifty-two (36.4%) patients fulfilled the criteria for MS. 10-year CHD risk was 1.65%, and 10-year CMR was 1.39%. Compared to females, males had higher Framingham score (1.96 ± 2.74 vs. 1.09 ± 0.41, U value 1987.5*, P < 0.05). Conclusion: Patients of schizophrenia have a high prevalence of MS and CVR factors. Hence, there is a need to screen the patient of schizophrenia for the same and manage the same as early as possible during the course of illness. PMID:25568478

  14. 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in patients admitted to a cardiac pediatric intensive care unit in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Rafael F M; Pilla, Carlo B; Pereira, Vera L B; Flores, José A M; Golendziner, Eliete; Koshiyama, Dayane B; Hertz, Michele T; Ricachinevsky, Cláudia P; Roman, Tatiana; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Paskulin, Giorgio A

    2008-07-01

    The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is one of the most recognizable causes of congenital heart defects (CHDs), but the frequency varies in non-selected populations. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence and clinical features of patients with CHD and 22q11DS admitted to a pediatric cardiology intensive care unit in Brazil. In a prospective study, we evaluated a consecutive series of 207 patients with a CHD following a clinical protocol and cytogenetic analysis by high resolution karyotype and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). 22q11DS was identified in four patients (2%), a frequency similar to studies that evaluated subjects with major CHDs in other countries. Despite this similarity, we believe that the low rate of prenatal identification of CHDs and the limited access of these patients to appropriate diagnosis and care, which occur in our region, could have had an influence on this frequency. It is possible that 22q11DS patients with a severe CHD could have died before having a chance to access a tertiary hospital, leading to an underestimate of its frequency.

  15. Development and evaluation of a DVD for the education of burn patients who were not admitted to hospital.

    PubMed

    Finlay, Vidya; Davidoss, Nishant; Lei, Cory; Huangfu, Juhui; Burrows, Sally; Edgar, Dale Wesley; Rea, Suzanne; Wood, Fiona M

    2012-01-01

    Patient involvement is an important component of burn care and is necessary to produce good outcomes. Patient education using multimedia resources is useful in facilitating self-management and recovery from burn injury. The study aims to provide and evaluate an instructional DVD to assist burn patients with their self-management. The project was divided into three phases: 1) research about the needs of patients, 2) production of the DVD based on those needs, and 3) evaluation of the effectiveness of the DVD. In phase III, 49 burn patients (73% male; median age 32 years, median TBSA 3%) completed a survey on confidence in their burn care before development of an educational DVD, the results of which were compared with those of 55 burn patients (58% male; median age 35 years, median TBSA 3%) who completed the same survey questions after viewing a burn care DVD. Patient confidence in all self-management activities showed a statistically significant improvement (P < .01). An instructional burns DVD improves confidence in self-management of patients who have not been admitted to hospital and is a useful adjunct to current burn practice.

  16. Etiology of diarrhea in children younger than 5 years of age admitted in a rural hospital of southern Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Mandomando, Inácio M; Macete, Eusébio V; Ruiz, Joaquim; Sanz, Sergi; Abacassamo, Fatima; Vallès, Xavier; Sacarlal, Jahit; Navia, Margarita M; Vila, Jordi; Alonso, Pedro L; Gascon, Joaquim

    2007-03-01

    Diarrhea is one of the main causes of morbidity and mortality among children in sub-Saharan Africa and one of the main causes of hospital admissions in rural areas. Stool samples were collected from 529 children admitted with diarrhea to the Manhiça District Hospital (September 2000 to September 2001) and processed to detect bacterial enteropathogens, parasites, and virus. Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli, isolated from 120 samples (22.6%; enteroaggregative [corrected] [9.6%], enterotoxigenic [6.8%], enteropathogenic [corrected] [4.3%], and verotoxigenic [1.9%]) was the most frequently isolated pathogen, followed by Ascaris lumbricoides (9.3%). Others detected included Salmonella spp. and Giardia lamblia (2.5% each) and Campylobacter spp. (1.7%). A. lumbricoides (92% versus 8%; P<0.001) and Strongyloides stercolaris (100% versus 0%; P=0.008) were most frequently isolated in children older than 12 months of age. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulphametoxazole and ampicillin was high. Etiologic data on diarrheal diseases and susceptibility patterns of diarrheal pathogens are important tools for clinical management and control strategic planning.

  17. The effects of earmuff on physiologic and motor responses in premature infants admitted in neonatal intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Ghassemi, Sara; Marofi, Maryam

    2014-01-01

    Background: Continuous high-intensity noise in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) is stressful for premature infants and its reduction is considered as a nursing care. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of earmuffs’ use on the physiologic and motor responses of premature infants. Materials and Methods: This is a clinical trial conducted on 64 premature infants admitted to the NICU, who met the inclusion criteria, and were randomly assigned to study and control groups. Earmuffs were used for premature infants for 2 h in the morning and 2 h in the afternoon for two consecutive days to reduce the noise intensity in the busiest time of the NICU. The group with earmuff (study group) was compared with the control group receiving only routine care. Infants’ physiolo