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Sample records for admitted psychiatric patients

  1. Characterization of Older Emergency Department Patients Admitted to Psychiatric Units

    PubMed Central

    Stiffler, Kirk A.; Kohli, Erol; Chen, Oriana; Frey, Jennifer A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Many older patients presenting to emergency departments (EDs) with psychiatric complaints require admission to geropsychiatric units (GPUs). The medical evaluation needed prior to this is not understood. Our goal was to understand ED evaluation practices for patients admitted to the GPU through the ED and understand the medical problems identified after admission. Methods Via retrospective chart review, we abstracted demographics, medical history, ED complaint, evaluation, length of stay, and diagnosis. The number of patients later transferred from the GPU and the reasons for such transfers were also recorded. Results Of 100 patients reviewed, the average age was 78 years. Admission diagnoses were agitation/mania (30%), depression/suicidal ideation (28%), change in mental status/confusion (12%) and other (30%). Most had at least one prior psychiatric and medical diagnosis (77%, 60%). Common ED tests ordered were basic metabolic panel (BMP) (96%), complete blood count (CBC) (94%), urinalysis (UA) (89%), electrocardiogram (EKG) (69%), alcohol level (62%), urine toxicology (61%), chest X-ray (51%), and CT scan of the head (71%). Abnormal findings included urinalysis (24.7%), CBC (23.4%), toxicology (23%), BMP (21.9%), head CT (21.1%), chest X-ray (13.7%), ECG changes (10.1%), and alcohol (4.8%). Five of the 100 GPU admissions were later transferred to a medical floor. Conclusion Most GPU admissions have previous psychiatric and medical issues and are admitted for agitation/mania or depression/suicidal ideation. A certain percentage of patients are transferred out due to medical issues despite ED evaluation. However, it is unlikely that further ED testing would reduce this percentage. Further research of medical screening for geropsychiatric patients may elucidate ideal medical clearance procedures. PMID:26491495

  2. Suicide mortality of suicide attempt patients discharged from emergency room, nonsuicidal psychiatric patients discharged from emergency room, admitted suicide attempt patients, and admitted nonsuicidal psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae W; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K; Hong, Jin P

    2012-06-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients admitted for suicide attempt, and psychiatric inpatients admitted for other reasons were examined. The records of 3,897 patients who were treated at a general hospital in Seoul, Korea, from July 2003 to December 2006 were reviewed. Forty-three of the 3,897 subjects died by suicide during the 2.5-year observation period. Compared to the general Korean population, the suicide mortality rate was 82-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, admitted; 54-fold higher for suicide attempt patients, discharged; 21-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, admitted; and 11-fold higher for nonsuicidal patients, discharged. In all four groups, diagnosis of a depressive disorder and suicide attempt at presentation were each significant independent risk factors for suicide completion. These results highlight the need for suicide prevention strategies for depressed patients who present to the ER or are admitted to a psychiatric ward after a suicide attempt. PMID:22380459

  3. Potentially inappropriate prescriptions in patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Soerensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt; Lisby, Marianne; Mainz, Jan

    2016-07-01

    Background Very little is known about the general appropriateness of prescribing for psychiatric patients. Aims To identify prevalence and types of potentially inappropriate prescribing (PIP) of psychotropic and somatic medications, to assess the severity of potential clinical consequences and to identify possible predictive factors of PIP in a sample of adult psychiatric in-patients. Methods A descriptive, cross-sectional design using medication reviews by clinical pharmacologists to identify PIP during a 3-month period. The setting was in-patient units in a psychiatric department of a Danish university hospital during a 3-month period (September 2013-November 2013). Patients medication lists (n = 207) were reviewed at the time of admission and all identified PIPs were assessed for potential consequences by clinical pharmacologists. Results There were 349 PIP identified in 1291 prescriptions. The proportion of patients found to have at least one PIP was 123/207 (59%) and the proportions of patients with at least one PIP assessed to be potentially serious or fatal was 69/207 (33%) and 24/207 (12%), respectively. Interactions between drugs 125/207 (36%) and too high doses of drugs 56/207 (16%) were the most frequent PIP. Predictive factors for PIP were polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) and having one or more somatic diagnoses. Conclusion PIP is common in psychiatric patients and potentially fatal. Particularly polypharmacy (>5 prescriptions) and concomitant somatic illness were associated with the probability of PIP. Improving the quality of prescribing might benefit from an interprofessional approach and thus better training of physicians and nurses is needed in order to minimize PIP. PMID:26824679

  4. Suicide Mortality of Suicide Attempt Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Emergency Room, Admitted Suicide Attempt Patients, and Admitted Nonsuicidal Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Jae W.; Park, Subin; Yi, Ki K.; Hong, Jin P.

    2012-01-01

    The suicide mortality rate and risk factors for suicide completion of patients who presented to an emergency room (ER) for suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, patients who presented to an ER for psychiatric problems other than suicide attempt and were discharged without psychiatric admission, psychiatric inpatients…

  5. Patients with methamphetamine psychosis admitted to a psychiatric hospital in Japan. A preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Iwanami, A; Sugiyama, A; Kuroki, N; Toda, S; Kato, N; Nakatani, Y; Horita, N; Kaneko, T

    1994-06-01

    To examine the clinical characteristics of methamphetamine (MAP) psychosis in Japan, we evaluated 104 patients with MAP psychosis (80 men and 24 women) admitted to the closed psychiatric units of Tokyo Metropolitan Matsuzawa Hospital between 1988 and 1991. There has recently been a steep increase in the number of admissions for MAP psychosis, reflecting the growth of the epidemic of MAP abuse in Japan. Although more than half of the patients were discharged within one month, 16 patients were hospitalized for more than 3 months. Most of the patients showed paranoid psychotic state similar to schizophrenia, consistent with previous reports. Despite the abstinence from MAP and antipsychotic medication, psychotic symptoms tended to persist in some of the patients. The etiological role of MAP psychosis in the development of long-lasting psychotic state was discussed. PMID:8085475

  6. Treatment needs, diagnoses and use of services for acutely admitted psychiatric patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We compared demography, diagnoses and clinical needs in acutely admitted psychiatric hospital patients in northwest Russia and northern Norway. Method All acutely admitted psychiatric patients in 1 psychiatric hospital in north-west Russia and 2 in northern Norway were in a three months period assessed with HoNOS and a Norwegian form developed to study acute psychiatric services (MAP). Data from a total of 841 patients were analysed (377 Norwegian, 464 Russian) with univariate and multivariate statistics. Results Russian patients were more often males who had paid work. 2/3 were diagnosed with alcohol and organic disorders, and 70% reported problems related to sleep. Depression was widespread, as were problems associated with occupation. Many more Norwegian patients were on various forms of social security and lived in community supported homes. They had a clinical profile of affective disorders, use of drugs, suicidality and problems with activities involved of daily life. Slightly more Norwegian patients were involuntary admitted. Conclusion Acutely admitted psychiatric patients in North West Russia and Northern Norwegian showed different clinical profiles: alcohol, depression and organic disorders characterised Russian patients, affective disorders, suicidality and use of drugs characterised the Norwegians. Whereas Norwegian patients are mainly referred from GPs the Russians come via 1.line psychiatric services (“dispensaries”). Average length of stay for Russian patients was 2.5 times longer than that of the Norwegian. PMID:23317010

  7. A virtual psychiatric ward for orientating patients admitted for the first time.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wai-Chi; Choi, Kup-Sze; Chung, Wai-Yee

    2010-12-01

    Misconceptions about psychiatric wards frequently cause newly admitted mental patients to stay away from these wards despite their need for treatment. Although ward orientation is typically conducted by nurses in an attempt to help patients to adapt to the new environment, it is considered time-consuming, and the method of orientation and the explanations given may vary among different nurses. This situation calls for a more effective and standardized approach to orientating mental patients on their first admission. To this end, a computer-based interactive virtual environment was developed based on a real psychiatric ward by using virtual reality (VR) technologies. It enables the patient to navigate around to gain understanding about the ward through a virtual guided tour. The effectiveness of this VR orientation approach was investigated by a randomized controlled trial with consecutive sampling. Fifty-four Chinese participants were randomly assigned to undergo ward orientation by either using the VR-based approach or reading text-based electronic information sheets about the ward with a computer. Subjective and objective measures were obtained respectively using the Chinese version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire and the heart-rate variability measurement before and after the intervention. In addition, a test on the level of understanding about the ward was administered at the end of the session. The results showed that the VR orientation approach is helpful in reducing patients' anxiety while also improving their level of understanding about the ward. PMID:21142988

  8. The Psychosocial Characteristics Associated with NSSI and Suicide Attempt of Youth Admitted to an In-patient Psychiatric Unit

    PubMed Central

    Preyde, Michèle; Vanderkooy, John; Chevalier, Pat; Heintzman, John; Warne, Amanda; Barrick, Kendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence of self-harm and the psychosocial factors associated with self-harming behaviours in youth admitted to an in-patient psychiatric unit. Methods: Cross-sectional surveys of standardized measures were administered to youth and a separate survey to their caregivers while the youth were in hospital. Results: The mean age of the 123 youth who participated was 15.74 (SD 1.51) years, and 90 of 121 (74.38%) reported being female. Of the 115 who completed this question, 101 (87.83%) indicated that they thought of injuring themselves and 89 (77.39%) did engage in NSSI within the past month, and 78 of 116 (67%) reported that they had made an attempt to take their life. Youth who reported that they had attempted suicide (lifetime) reported significantly less difficulty with emotion regulation than youth who engaged in NSSI only, or both NSSI and suicide attempts. Conclusions: These youth reported a very high prevalence of self-harm, and in general substantial difficulty with regulating their emotions, and difficulty with their interpersonal relationships. The psychosocial distinctions evident between groups may have practical utility. PMID:24872825

  9. Severe, Persistent and Fatal Delirium in Psychogeriatric Patients Admitted to a Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jans, Ingrid S.; Oudewortel, Letty; Brandt, Paulien M.; van Gool, Willem A.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims Although delirium is generally regarded as a transient syndrome, persistence of delirium in patients with cognitive impairment – even with fatal outcome – has been reported as well. This study aims to describe the clinical features and neuropathological correlates of this type of delirium. Methods Inclusion criteria for this case series were: (1) severe persistent delirium until death, (2) history of cognitive decline and (3) consent for brain autopsy. Medical records were examined in combination with collected clinical data and neuropathological findings. Result In 15 patients, all living at home before admission, episodes with delirium lasted for 4.2 months on average. No distinct medical causes of persistent delirium could be identified. Pathological diagnoses included Alzheimer's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies as well as single cases of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and progressive supranuclear palsy. Conclusion Severe, persistent and fatal delirium in patients with cognitive impairment can occur relatively early in the disease trajectory and is associated with diverse neuropathologies. PMID:26195981

  10. Why are some patients admitted to psychiatric hospital while others are not? A study assessing risk during the admission interview and relationship to outcome.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Glenn E; O'Hara-Aarons, Maureen; O'Connor, Nick; Cleary, Michelle

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine what patient characteristics are used to decide whether a patient is or is not admitted to a psychiatric hospital, and what happens to those not admitted. A further aim was to determine if high levels of risk on admission predict seclusions, length of stay, or readmission within 28 days. Data were collected prospectively on consecutive presentations to an admission office via case notes and electronic databases. Eighty percent (100/127) of the adults presenting to the admission office over a typical month were admitted to hospital. Patients were more likely to be admitted if they were experiencing psychosis or exacerbation of schizophrenia, referred by other doctors or mental health teams, had a legal reason for referral, or if they were homeless. There was no association between risk for violence or suicide and seclusion rates, length of stay, or being readmitted within 28 days. It was reassuring to find that 85% of those not admitted were referred to other mental health providers, and none required admission over the following month. This study found high rates of seclusion and readmissions within 1 year, which requires further study to find strategies to reduce these rates. PMID:22039923

  11. Clinical features and therapeutic management of patients admitted to Italian acute hospital psychiatric units: the PERSEO (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) survey

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background The PERSEO study (psychiatric emergency study and epidemiology) is a naturalistic, observational clinical survey in Italian acute hospital psychiatric units, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura; in English, the psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). The aims of this paper are: (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients, including sociodemographic features, risk factors, life habits and psychiatric diagnoses; and (ii) to assess the clinical management, subjective wellbeing and attitudes toward medications. Methods A total of 62 SPDCs distributed throughout Italy participated in the study and 2521 patients were enrolled over the 5-month study period. Results Almost half of patients (46%) showed an aggressive behaviour at admission to ward, but they engaged more commonly in verbal aggression (38%), than in aggression toward other people (20%). A total of 78% of patients had a psychiatric diagnosis at admission, most frequently schizophrenia (36%), followed by depression (16%) and personality disorders (14%), and no relevant changes in the diagnoses pattern were observed during hospital stay. Benzodiazepines were the most commonly prescribed drugs, regardless of diagnosis, at all time points. Overall, up to 83% of patients were treated with neuroleptic drugs and up to 27% received more than one neuroleptic either during hospital stay or at discharge. Atypical and conventional antipsychotics were equally prescribed for schizophrenia (59 vs 65% during stay and 59 vs 60% at discharge), while atypical drugs were preferred in schizoaffective psychoses (72 vs 49% during stay and 70 vs 46% at discharge) and depression (41 vs 32% during stay and 44 vs 25% at discharge). Atypical neuroleptics were slightly preferred to conventional ones at hospital discharge (52 vs 44%). Polypharmacy was in general widely used. Patient attitudes toward medications were on average positive and self-reported compliance

  12. Enquiry about the Needs of Children Whose Mothers Are Admitted to Psychiatric Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manderson, J.; McCune, N.

    2004-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess whether children's needs are taken into consideration in female patients who are admitted to an adult psychiatric hospital. A retrospective case note audit of 100 female inpatients aged between 18 and 55 years over a 6-month period were randomly selected. The medical and nursing case notes of patients with…

  13. Clinical Features, Psychiatric Assessment, and Longitudinal Outcome of Suicide Attempters Admitted to a Tertiary Emergency Hospital.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Alcinéia Donizeti; Sponholz, Alcion; Mantovani, Célia; Pazin-Filho, Antônio; Passos, Afonso Dinis Costa; Botega, Neury José; Del-Ben, Cristina Marta

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to characterize admissions to an emergency hospital due to suicide attempts and verify outcomes in 2 years. Data were collected from medical records and were analyzed using descriptive statistics and logistic regression. The sample consisted of 412 patients (58.7% women; mean age = 32.6 years old, SD = 14.3). Self-poisoning was the most frequent method (84.0%), and they were diagnosed mainly as depressive (40.3%) and borderline personality disorders (19.1%). Previous suicide attempts and current psychiatric treatment were reported by, respectively, 32.0% and 28.4%. Fifteen patients (3.6%, 9 males) died during hospitalization. At discharge, 79.3% were referred to community-based psychiatric services. Being male (OR = 2.11; 95% CI = 1.25-3.55), using violent methods (i.e., hanging, firearms, and knives) (OR = 1.96; 95% CI = 1.02-3.75) and psychiatric treatment history (OR = 2.58; 95% CI = 1.53-4.36) were predictors for psychiatric hospitalization. Of 258 patients followed for 2 years, 10 (3.9%) died (3 suicide), and 24 (9.3%) undertook new suicide attempts. Patients with a history of psychiatric treatment had higher risks of new suicide attempts (OR = 2.46, 95% CI = 1.07-5.65). Suicide attempters admitted to emergency hospitals exhibit severe psychiatric disorders, and despite interventions, they continue to present high risks for suicide attempts and death. PMID:25961847

  14. Psychiatric patient and anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Attri, Joginder Pal; Bala, Neeru; Chatrath, Veena

    2012-01-01

    Many patients with psychiatric illnesses are prescribed long-term drug treatment, and the anaesthesiologist must be aware of potential interactions with anaesthetic agents. Psychotropic drugs often given in combination with each other or with other non-psychiatric drugs generally exert profound effects on the central and peripheral neurotransmitter and ionic mechanisms. Hence, prior intake of these drugs is an important consideration in the management of the patient about to undergo anaesthesia and surgery. This article highlights the effects of anaesthetics on patients taking antipsychotics, tricyclic antidepressants, monoamine oxidase inhibitors and lithium carbonate. The risk that should be considered in the perioperative period are the extent of surgery, the patient's physical state, anaesthesia, the direct and indirect effects of psychotropics, risk of withdrawal symptoms and risk of psychiatric recurrence and relapse. PMID:22529413

  15. Transporting Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Dike, Charles C; Nicholson, Elizabeth; Young, John L

    2015-12-01

    Patients in a forensic psychiatric facility often require escorted transport to medical facilities for investigations or treatments of physical health ailments. Transporting these patients presents significant safety and custody challenges because of the nature of patients housed in forensic psychiatric facilities. A significant proportion of these patients may be transfers from the Department of Corrections (DOC) under legal mandates for psychiatric evaluation and treatment better provided in a hospital setting, and most of them will return to the DOC. Although departments of correction have protocols for escorting these potentially dangerous individuals, it is unclear whether receiving psychiatric hospitals have established procedures for maintaining the safety of others and custody of these individuals during transportation outside the hospital facility. The literature is sparse on precautions to be observed when transporting dangerous forensic psychiatric patients, including those with high escape risk. In this article, we describe one forensic inpatient facility's procedure for determining the appropriate level needed to transport these individuals outside of the forensic facility. We also describe the risk assessment procedure for determining level of transport. These are quality improvement measures resulting from a critical review of an incident of escape from the forensic facility several years ago. PMID:26668224

  16. Clinical Characteristics and Precipitating Factors of Adolescent Suicide Attempters Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Care in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Park, Subin; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Bung-Nyun; Bae, Jeong-Hoon; Shin, Min-Sup; Yoo, Hee-Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Objective We aimed to examine the rates, correlates, methods, and precipitating factors of suicide attempts among adolescent patients admitted for psychiatric inpatient care from 1999 to 2010 in a university hospital in Korea. Methods The subjects consisted of 728 patients who were admitted for psychiatric inpatient care in a university hospital over a 12-year period and who were aged 10-19 years at the time of admission. We retrospectively investigated the information on suicidal behaviors and other clinical information by reviewing the subjects' electronic medical records. Whether these patients had completed their suicide on 31 December 2010 was determined by a link to the database of the National Statistical Office. Results Among 728 subjects, 21.7% had suicidal ideation at admission, and 10.7% admitted for suicidal attempts. Female gender, divorced/widowed parents, and the presence of mood disorders were associated with a significantly increased likelihood of suicide attempts. Most common method of suicide attempts was cutting, and most common reason for suicide attempts was relationship problems within the primary support group. A diagnosis of schizophrenia was associated with increased risk of death by suicide after discharge. Conclusion These results highlight the role of specific psychosocial factor (e.g., relational problems) and psychiatric disorders (e.g., mood disorders) in the suicide attempts of Korean adolescents, and the need for effective prevention strategies for adolescents at risk for suicide. PMID:25670943

  17. SUICIDAL COMMUNICATION IN PSYCHIATRIC PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Anand, R.; Trivedi, J.K.; Gupta, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    In this enquiry a cross-sectional study of hospitalized psychiatric patients was undertaken to assess prevalence and nature of suicidal behaviour. We have been able to delineate these subjects into three categories i.e. non-communicators, partial communicators and definite communicators on the basis of their scores upon 31ucid.il intent questionnaire. A follow up study of these patients which is in progress may further provide knowledge about relationship between predictive criterion and their final outcome. PMID:21847269

  18. Associations between sleep disturbance and suicidal ideation in adolescents admitted to an inpatient psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Sebastian G; Ali, Shahzad K; Simpson, Brittany; Britt, Victoria; McCall, W Vaughn

    2014-01-01

    The goals of our study were to: 1) describe the incidence of disturbances in sleep quality, sleep hygiene, sleep-related cognitions and nightmares; and 2) investigate the association between these sleep-related disturbances and suicidal ideation (SI), in adolescents admitted to a psychiatric inpatient unit. Our sample consisted of 50 adolescents between the ages of 12 and 17 years (32 females and 18 males; 41 Caucasian and nine African American). Our cross-sectional design involved the administration of the Adolescent Sleep Wake Scale (ASWS), the Adolescent Sleep Hygiene Scale (ASHS), the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes about Sleep-Short version for use with children (DBAS-C10), the Disturbing Dreams and Nightmare Scale (DDNSI), and the Suicidal Ideation Questionnaire Jr (SIQ-JR). Analyses were conducted using Pearson correlations, as well as univariate and multivariate regression. Results indicated that our sample experienced sleep disturbances and SI to a greater degree than non-clinical samples. Sleep quality was correlated with nightmares, while sleep quality and nightmares were each correlated with SI. Sleep quality, dysfunctional beliefs, and nightmares each independently predicted SI. Our study was the first to use the four sleep measures with an adolescent psychiatric inpatient sample. It is important to develop sleep-related assessment tools in high-risk populations given the link between sleep disturbances and suicidality. Furthermore, a better understanding of the relationships between SI and sleep quality, sleep-related cognitions, and nightmares is needed to develop potential prevention and treatment options for suicidality in adolescents. PMID:24356389

  19. Utilization of medical services by psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Norfleet, M A; Burnell, G M

    1981-03-01

    The relationship between medical and psychiatric utilization of services was examined in a two-year study of two groups of psychiatric patients: high users of psychiatric services (more than ten visits in one year) and low users of psychiatric services (ten or fewer visits in one year). The high-utilization group made more than 60 per cent of the total psychiatric visits in the two-year period, but only 21 per cent of the total medical visits. However, patients in this group increased their utilization of medical services when psychiatric utilization was reduced, raising the question of whether high-utilization patients tend to substitute medical visits for psychiatric visits. In contrast, patients in the low-utilization group were able to hold their medical utilization constant when they reduced psychiatric utilization. Analysis of factors influencing utilization patterns might allow illness behavior in patients to be predetermined and lead to better and more cost-effective health care. PMID:7203418

  20. Profile of psychiatric patients presenting to a tertiary care emergency department of Karachi.

    PubMed

    Shahid, Muhammad; Khan, Muhammad Zaman; Ejaz, Kiran; Nakeer, Rooham; Iftikhar, Sundus

    2015-05-01

    This study reviewed the presentations of psychiatric patients admitted through the Emergency Department (ED), The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi. Psychiatric patients admitted through the ED to the psychiatry ward were compared to those admitted through the same units other than the psychiatry ward, from 2006 to 2010 using medical records. Psychiatric patients were defined as those in whom psychiatry consult was generated and 1127 cases were included in study. There were 550 (48.8%) female patients. Most common presentations in the ED were sleep-related problems (n=205, 15.9%) followed by aggressive behavior (n=191, 14.8%). Depression was the most common diagnosis made in the ED (n=331, 29.3%) and at the time of discharge from the hospital (n=354, 29.5%). Psychiatric patients presenting to the ED had signs and symptoms which one generally disregards. However, these minor indicators can lead to major events in a patient's life. PMID:26008672

  1. Clinical profile and outcomes of women admitted to a psychiatric mother-baby unit.

    PubMed

    Christl, Bettina; Reilly, Nicole; Yin, Carolyn; Austin, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    This study examines the clinical profile of women admitted to a psychiatric mother-baby unit as well as change in their clinical, parenting, attachment and quality of life outcomes. Data was collected from 191 mothers through self-report measures at admission and discharge. Change was analysed in terms of Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) score, parenting confidence, maternal attachment to the infant and overall functioning. Psychosocial factors impacting on symptom severity and recovery were examined. Most women (64.8 %) were admitted in the first 3 months after birth with an ICD-10 unipolar depressive episode (52.3 %) or anxiety disorder (25.7 %), and 47.6 % had comorbid diagnoses. Improvement from admission to discharge was seen with large effect sizes (≥one standard deviation, i.e. μ) in terms of clinical symptoms (EPDS, μ = 1.7), parenting confidence (Karitane Parenting Confidence Scale (KPCS), μ = 1.1) and attachment to their infant (Maternal Postpartum Attachment Scale (MPAS), μ = 0.9) as well as overall level of functioning (SF-14, μ = 1.9). The majority (73.3 %) recovered symptomatically, and this was associated with increasing maternal age (odds ratio (OR) = 1.129, p = 0.002) and lower levels of psychosocial risk at admission (OR = 0.963, p = 0.008). Improvement in parenting confidence was associated with increasing maternal age (OR = 1.17, p = 0.003). No predictive factors were found for improvement in maternal attachment after controlling for admission scores. In the short term, joint admission of mothers with their infants is highly beneficial in terms of clinical, functional and parenting outcomes, but follow up studies are needed to assess the longer term benefits for mother-infant dyads. The use of an observational tool to enhance our assessment of maternal-infant interaction and some measure of maternal emotional dysregulation-both important mediators of development of secure infant

  2. Association between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety levels of violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic

    PubMed Central

    Hocagil, Hilal; Izci, Filiz; Hocagil, Abdullah Cüneyt; Findikli, Ebru; Korkmaz, Sevda; Koc, Merve Iris

    2016-01-01

    Background Here we aimed to investigate sociodemographic characteristics, psychiatric history, and association between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety levels of violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic. Methods This study consists of 73 violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency clinic who were literate and agreed to participate in the study. A sociodemographic data form created by us to investigate alcohol-substance abuse, suicide attempt, previous history of trauma, self and family history of psychiatric disorders and Beck Anxiety Inventory was given to the patients. Results Of the patients exposed to violence 63% (n=46) were female and 27% (n=27) were male. Of these patients, 68.5% (n=50) were married, 43.8% (n=25) were workers, 34.2% were housewives, 11% were unemployed, and 11% were civil servants. Of the violence-exposed patients, 56.2% (n=41) were primary school, 21.9% (n=16) were high school, and 21.9% (n=16) were university graduates. Smoking and alcohol use rates were 54.8% (n=40) and 17.8% (n=13), respectively. The most common trauma type was assault using physical force with a ratio of 78.1% (n=57). In addition, anxiety scores were high in 42.5% (n=31) and moderate in 9.6% (n=7) of the patients. Mentioned psychiatric disorder was present in 17.8% (n=13) of the patients and 19.2% (n=14) of the patients’ relatives. The correlation between sociodemographic characteristics and anxiety scores revealed that married patients had higher anxiety scores (P<0.01) and patients assaulted by their parents had lower anxiety scores (P<0.00). Conclusion A total of 63% of the violence-exposed patients admitted to emergency room were females, 56.2% were primary school graduates, and 43.8% were factory workers; this result shows that low socioeconomical status and education level affect exposure to trauma especially in females. In addition, ~20% of the patients and patients’ relatives had a psychiatric disorder and 53.4% of perpetrators

  3. [Treatments for otorhinolaryngological patients with psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Nishio, Ayako; Sumi, Takuro; Yamada, Masato; Kuwahata, Yuko

    2013-02-01

    There are few systems in place for patients with psychiatric disorders who need treatments for physical complications. In Tokyo, "The Tokyo metropolitan psychiatric emergency system" was established in 1981, and Ome Municipal General Hospital participated in it. Under this system, fifteen patients with psychiatric disorders were treated for otorhinolaryngological diseases in our department from April 2005 to March 2011. We reviewed the fifteen patients. The coexisting psychiatric disorders were schizophrenia in twelve patients, and mental retardation, Korsakoff's syndrome, and Alzheimer's dementia in one patient each, respectively. All the patients had been receiving psychiatric treatment. The otorhinolaryngological diseases were head and neck cancer in nine patients, chronic sinusitis in three patients, and benign salivary gland tumor, cholesteatoma, and epistaxis in one patient each, respectively. Among the fifteen patients, thirteen could complete their treatment, but two dropped out due to exacerbation of their psychiatric symptoms. The therapeutic course is uncertain in otorhinolaryngological diseases occurring concomitantly with psychiatric disorders, especially in head and neck cancer, because it may be difficult to prioritize the problem when determining the treatment options and delivering the treatment. Thus, we should treat patients with psychiatric disorders carefully on a case-by-case basis depending on their psychiatric symptoms. It is also important to cooperate with psychiatrists and patients' families. PMID:23539958

  4. Psychiatric disorders in multiple sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Fazzito, Mirella Martins; Jordy, Sérgio Semeraro; Tilbery, Charles Peter

    2009-09-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a demyelinating disease showing variable clinical presentation. Optic neuritis is the most common symptom, followed by motor and sensitive manifestations. It is known that this disease may be related to several psychiatric disorders, especially depression. In this study we will discribe 5 cases of MS patients harboring psychiatric disorder related or unchained by the disease itself. PMID:19722046

  5. Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy: A Brief Intervention for Psychiatric Inpatients Admitted After a Suicide Attempt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ghahramanlou-Holloway, Marjan; Cox, Daniel W.; Greene, Farrah N.

    2012-01-01

    To date, no empirically based inpatient intervention for individuals who have attempted suicide exists. We present an overview of a novel psychotherapeutic approach, Post-Admission Cognitive Therapy (PACT), currently under development and empirical testing for inpatients who have been admitted for a recent suicide attempt. PACT is adapted from an…

  6. Cortisol Predicts Behavioral Dysregulation and Length of Stay among Children Admitted for Psychiatric Inpatient Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luebbe, Aaron M.; Elledge, L. Christian; Kiel, Elizabeth J.; Stoppelbein, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in behavioral regulation system (BRS) and stress response system (SRS) functioning may reflect greater biological sensitivity to context. The current study tested whether children's cortisol, a measure of the SRS, was related to observed dysregulated behavior, an indicator of the BRS, in a sample of children admitted for…

  7. Management challenges in psychiatric patients with severe mandibular pain: a case report.

    PubMed

    Cheng, A; Kunchur, R; Goss, A N

    2011-03-01

    A 68-year-old man was admitted to the psychiatric unit of a major hospital as he was threatening self-harm due to uncontrolled left mandibular pain. Although he had significant psychiatric issues, psychiatric treatment did not help him. Further review at three weeks post-admission showed that he had had many months of unsuccessful dental treatment and this had triggered his psychiatric crisis. Multidisciplinary investigation and communication showed that he had trigeminal neuralgia secondary to vascular changes in his temporal lobe. He responded well to explanation and anti-neuralgic medication. Simple guidelines on how dental practitioners can cope with such patients are presented. PMID:21332745

  8. Main clinical features in patients at their first psychiatric admission to Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards. The PERSEO study

    PubMed Central

    Ballerini, Andrea; Boccalon, Roberto M; Boncompagni, Giancarlo; Casacchia, Massimo; Margari, Francesco; Minervini, Lina; Righi, Roberto; Russo, Federico; Salteri, Andrea; Frediani, Sonia; Rossi, Andrea; Scatigna, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Background Few data are available on subjects presenting to acute wards for the first time with psychotic symptoms. The aims of this paper are (i) to describe the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of patients at their first psychiatric admission (FPA), including socio-demographic features, risk factors, life habits, modalities of onset, psychiatric diagnoses and treatments before admission; (ii) to assess the aggressive behavior and the clinical management of FPA patients in Italian acute hospital psychiatric wards, called SPDCs (Servizio Psichiatrico Diagnosi e Cura = psychiatric service for diagnosis and management). Method Cross-sectional observational multi-center study involving 62 Italian SPDCs (PERSEO – Psychiatric EmeRgency Study and EpidemiOlogy). Results 253 FPA aged <= 40 were identified among 2521 patients admitted to Italian SPDCs over the 5-month study period. About half of FPA patients showed an aggressive behavior as defined by a Modified Overt Aggression Scale (MOAS) score greater than 0 Vs 46% of non-FPA patients (p = 0.3651). The most common was verbal aggression, while about 20% of FPA patients actually engaged in physical aggression against other people. 74% of FPA patients had no diagnosis at admission, while 40% had received a previous psychopharmacological treatment, mainly benzodiazepines and antidepressants. During SPDC stay, diagnosis was established in 96% of FPA patients and a pharmacological therapy was prescribed to 95% of them, mainly benzodiazepines, antipsychotics and mood stabilizers. Conclusion Subjects presenting at their first psychiatric ward admission have often not undergone previous adequate psychiatric assessment and diagnostic procedures. The first hospital admission allows diagnosis and psychopharmacological treatment to be established. In our population, aggressive behaviors were rather frequent, although most commonly verbal. Psychiatric symptoms, as evaluated by psychiatrists and patients, improved

  9. Correlates of sexual abuse in a sample of adolescent girls admitted to psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Kanamüller, Juha; Riala, Kaisa; Nivala, Maija; Hakko, Helinä; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2014-01-01

    We examined correlations of child sexual abuse among 300 adolescent girls in psychiatric inpatient treatment. Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.)-based psychiatric diagnoses were obtained from the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime and from data on family and behavioral characteristics from the European Addiction Severity Index (EuropASI). A total of 79 girls (26.3%) had experienced child sexual abuse during their lifetime. Child sexual abuse was associated with an adolescent's home environment, sibling status, smoking, posttraumatic stress disorder diagnosis, self-mutilating behavior, and suicidal behavior. At least 62% of the perpetrators were acquaintances of the victims. Correlates of child sexual abuse can be used to identify child sexual abuse victims and persons at heightened risk for child sexual abuse. PMID:25101753

  10. Fitness to Drive of Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    De las Cuevas, Carlos; Sanz, Emilio J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Driving a motor vehicle could be central to the functional autonomy of patients with psychiatric illnesses. For patients, a driver's license could mean independence, the ability to care for themselves, and the freedom to travel when they wish. However, both psychiatric disorders and psychiatric drug treatments can produce changes in perception, information processing and integration, and psychomotor activity that can disturb and/or interfere with the ability to drive safely. Objective: To assess the fitness to drive of psychiatric outpatients in a sample representative of current clinical practice. Method: Cognitive functioning and psychomotor performance of 208 consecutive psychiatric outpatients treated in a community mental health center in the Canary Islands (Spain) were assessed in different clinical situations. The LNDETER 100 battery, an electronic assessment unit–based measurement that consists of 5 screenbased tests, was used to assess concentrated attention and resistance to monotony, multiple discriminative reactions and their correctness, anticipation of speed, bimanual coordination, and the decision making process and tendency to assume risk. The study was conducted from July 2007 to September 2007. Results: Of 208 patients, only 33 had scores compatible with the requirements of a driver's license, and 84% failed at least 1 of the required tests. Of patients with a driver's license who drive almost every day, 79.5% registered scores that would not allow obtaining or renewal of the license. None of the driving patients studied notified the traffic authorities that they had a psychiatric condition that may affect safe driving. No patient stopped driving, although 10% of them recognized that their ability to drive was somehow damaged. Conclusion: Guidance on how best to formulate and deliver recommendations on driving fitness in stable psychiatric patients is lacking and much needed. PMID:19158977

  11. Differences in Psychopathology Between Immigrant and Native Adolescents Admitted to a Psychiatric Inpatient Unit.

    PubMed

    Blázquez, Ana; Castro-Fornieles, Josefina; Baeza, Inmaculada; Morer, Astrid; Martínez, Esteban; Lázaro, Luisa

    2015-12-01

    It has been postulated that immigrant children are at increased risk of mental health problems. This study examined differences in psychopathology between immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents admitted for the first time to a child and adolescent inpatient psychiatry unit. Participants were 234 adolescents (191 non-immigrants and 43 immigrants). There were significant differences between the two groups in relation to certain stressors: parental separation, family breakdown, being under state custody, physical and/or psychological maltreatment and sexual abuse. Differences between the main diagnoses of the two groups were found in relation to schizophrenia and anorexia nervosa. There are differences between immigrants and natives in terms of diagnosis, and these differences are influenced by ethnicity and stressors. Future studies should seek to identify protective factors in order to prevent mental health disorders in the immigrant population. PMID:25476167

  12. Psychiatric care for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Koh, K B

    1999-10-01

    Psychiatric management of patients with breast cancer, as well as women's emotional reactions to all phases of breast cancer, were reviewed. These patients face two major losses; one is the physical loss of part of the body and a threat to life, and the other is the loss of femininity. The patients are also likely to suffer from various psychiatric problems including anxiety and depression. Oncologists should be alert to each patient's emotional reactions and potential psychiatric problems, and if necessary, should refer them to a psychiatrist. A combination of psychotherapeutic, behavioural, and pharmacologic techniques is available for the care of patients with breast cancer. Psychotherapeutic modalities include individual therapy, family therapy, group therapy, and self-help treatment. The author divided individual therapy into general and specific treatment. General treatment deals with a crisis-intervention and cognitive-behavioral approach, whereas specific treatment deals with issues relevant to patients with breast cancer. Some of the therapeutic processes were illustrated in a case report. These guidelines will contribute to the relief and prevention of emotional suffering stemming from an encounter with the most common form of cancer in women. Also, proper and effective care for patients with breast cancer requires combined use of a variety of therapeutic modalities as well as a multi-disciplinary approach including psychiatric care. PMID:10565263

  13. Therapeutic touch with adolescent psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hughes, P P; Meize-Grochowski, R; Harris, C N

    1996-03-01

    Seven hospitalized, adolescent psychiatric patients who received a total of 31 Therapeutic Touch treatments over two 2-week periods were interviewed about their experience. Findings from the interviews were categorized within 2 overarching themes-the therapeutic relationship and the body/mind connection. The study participants enjoyed the Therapeutic Touch, and in fact, they wanted more of it. This research shows the possibility of Therapeutic Touch as a nursing intervention with adolescent psychiatric patients if all care is taken to obtain their consent and to provide them with a safe environment for touch therapy. PMID:8698982

  14. [Disease models and change in attitude of involuntarily admitted schizophrenic patients].

    PubMed

    Ullrich, J; Ulmar, G; Starzinski, T

    1995-12-01

    The attitude to illness and therapy of 28 involuntary and 31 voluntary patients admitted to a state psychiatric hospital was investigated by means of a questionnaire at the time of admission and prior to discharge. Involuntary patients have less illness consciousness, and only 17.9% of them but 67.7% of the voluntary patients show insight into their illness; they favour a medical-somatic model of illness and express less positive therapy expectations. Their whole attitude proves to be dysfunctional concerning compliance with medical treatment. Attitudes of involuntary patients changed during the hospital stay and became similar to those of voluntary patients, which hardly changed. This attitudinal change extended to illness consciousness, insight into illness and therapy expectations, whereas models of illness were found to be very stable. One third of the involuntary patients stayed in hospital voluntarily for further treatment. It is discussed that patients attitudes to illness and therapy should be taken more often into consideration and integrated into the planning of therapy. PMID:8586351

  15. Psychiatric conditions in cosmetic surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Ritvo, Eva C; Melnick, Ilan; Marcus, Gina R; Glick, Ira D

    2006-08-01

    Beauty is important. As psychiatrists, we see the interface of beauty with mental health, self-esteem, and mental illness. As physicians who enhance cosmetic appearance, you encounter a broad spectrum of patients ranging from those with a healthy pursuit of enhanced appearance to those whose behavior is extremely maladaptive. This article provides some examples of unhealthy pursuit and how to recognize patients who may be inappropriate for cosmetic procedures. Patients with body dysmorphic disorder and narcissistic and histrionic personality disorders are suffering from psychiatric illnesses that interfere with their judgment and can lead them to make poor choices when considering cosmetic procedures. Clinicians who acquire a basic understanding of these psychiatric conditions can properly screen their patients and enhance their understanding of their patients' goals, both realistic and unrealistic, thus saving them from performing inappropriate procedures that cause frustration to both the clinician and the patient. PMID:17048160

  16. Tobacco use treatment in primary care patients with psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Cerimele, Joseph M; Halperin, Abigail C; Saxon, Andrew J

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of smoking is higher in patients with psychiatric illness compared with the general population. Smoking causes chronic illnesses, which lead to premature mortality in those with psychiatric illness, is associated with greater burden of psychiatric symptoms, and contributes to the social isolation experienced by individuals with psychiatric disorders. Most patients with a psychiatric illness present initially to primary care rather than specialty care settings, and some patients receive care exclusively in the primary care setting. Therefore, family physicians and other primary care clinicians have an important role in the recognition and treatment of tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illnesses. In this article we review common myths associated with smoking and psychiatric illness, techniques for implementing evidence-based tobacco use treatments, the evidence base for tobacco use treatment for patients with specific psychiatric diagnoses, and factors to consider when treating tobacco use disorders in patients with psychiatric illness. PMID:24808119

  17. Sexual Attitude Reassessment for Psychiatric Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dincin, Jerry; Wise, Shirley

    1979-01-01

    Sexuality programs are one part of the program at Thresholds, a rehabilitation center for psychiatric patients (17 to 50 years old). A 16 week sexuality group includes seven phases: initial interview; beginning group development (health care, contraception, reproduction, sexuality); masturbation; intercourse; homosexuality; coed group discussion;…

  18. Severe Darier's disease in a psychiatric patient*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jeane Jeong Hoon; Lopes, Roberta Simão; Pereira, Medéia Carolina Fernandes; Tebcherani, Antonio Jose; Pires, Mário Cezar

    2015-01-01

    Darier’s disease is characterized by dense keratotic lesions in the seborrheic areas of the body such as scalp, forehead, nasolabial folds, trunk and inguinal region. It is a rare genodermatosis, an autosomal dominant inherited disease that may be associated with neuropsichiatric disorders. It is caused by ATPA2 gene mutation, presenting cutaneous and dermatologic expressions. Psychiatric symptoms are depression, suicidal attempts, and bipolar affective disorder. We report a case of Darier’s disease in a 48-year-old female patient presenting severe cutaneous and psychiatric manifestations. PMID:26312677

  19. The Impact of Psychiatric Patient Boarding in Emergency Departments

    PubMed Central

    Nicks, B. A.; Manthey, D. M.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Studies have demonstrated the adverse effects of emergency department (ED) boarding. This study examines the impact of resource utilization, throughput, and financial impact for psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement. Methods. The authors retrospectively studied all psychiatric and non-psychiatric adult admissions in an Academic Medical Center ED (>68,000 adult visits) from January 2007-2008. The main outcomes were ED length of stay (LOS) and associated reimbursement. Results. 1,438 patients were consulted to psychiatry with 505 (35.1%) requiring inpatient psychiatric care management. The mean psychiatric patient age was 42.5 years (SD 13.1 years), with 2.7 times more women than men. ED LOS was significantly longer for psychiatric admissions (1089 min, CI (1039–1140) versus 340 min, CI (304–375); P < 0.001) when compared to non-psychiatric admissions. The financial impact of psychiatric boarding accounted for a direct loss of ($1,198) compared to non-psychiatric admissions. Factoring the loss of bed turnover for waiting patients and opportunity cost due to loss of those patients, psychiatric patient boarding cost the department $2,264 per patient. Conclusions. Psychiatric patients awaiting inpatient placement remain in the ED 3.2 times longer than non-psychiatric patients, preventing 2.2 bed turnovers (additional patients) per psychiatric patient, and decreasing financial revenue. PMID:22888437

  20. [Sexual dysfunction among patients with psychiatric disorders].

    PubMed

    Soldati, Lorenzo

    2016-03-16

    Scientific literature shows that sexual dysfunction is more common in patients suffering from psychiatric illness as opposed to the general population. It also shows that the prevalence of sexual dysfunction is underestimated by professionals, partly because patients rarely talk spontaneously about their dysfunctions. However, sexual dysfunction has an impact on patients' mental health. Furthermore, some psychotropic medication, antidepressants and antipsychotics in particular, can hinder sexual functioning and induce sexual dysfunction. These harmful effects can, in turn, reduce patients' compliance with their medical treatments. It is therefore important that practitioners take into account their patients' sexual experience. PMID:27149715

  1. Factors associated with readmission of patients at a university hospital psychiatric ward in iran.

    PubMed

    Barekatain, Majid; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Hassannejad, Razeyeh; Hosseini, Reihane

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. Readmission has a major role in the reduction of the quality of life and the increase in the years of lost life. The main objectives of this study were to answer to the following research questions. (a) What was the readmission rate? (b) What were the social, demographic, and clinical characteristics of patients admitted to the Psychiatric Emergency Service at Nour University Hospital, affiliated to Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran? (c) What were the effective factors on readmission? Method. This cross-sectional study was conducted on a total number of 3935 patients who were admitted to Isfahan University Hospital Psychiatric Ward in Isfahan, Iran, from 2004 to 2010. Gender, age, marital status, education, self-report history of previous admission, type of psychiatric disorder, substance misuse, suicide, and the length of the current psychiatric disorder were collected from the registered medical files of patients. The data were analysed using the negative binomial regression model. Results. We found that factors such as psychiatric anxiety disorder, bipolar I, bipolar II, psychotic disorder, depression, and self report history of previous admission were statistically significant in the number of readmissions using the negative binomial model. Conclusion. Readmission to the psychiatric ward is mainly predictable by the type of diagnosis and psychosocial supports. PMID:24236285

  2. Comparison of psychiatric day hospital patient and inpatient scores on the MCMI-III.

    PubMed

    Piersma, H L; Boes, J L

    1997-10-01

    This study contrasts self-reported symptomatology on the MCMI-III of a sample of 97 psychiatric patients admitted directly to inpatient care with a sample of 75 patients admitted directly to day hospital treatment. The predominant Axis I diagnosis of patients in both samples was an affective disorder. Effect sizes of the degree of change from admission to retesting one week later were calculated and fell generally within the medium effect size range. There were no MCMI-III subscale differences between groups at either test time. A test item dealing with suicidal ideation did differentiate between the groups, with inpatients expressing more suicidal ideation at admission. PMID:9316817

  3. Cigarette smoking among psychiatric patients in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Barros, Fabiana Cristina Ribeiro de; Melo, Ana Paula Souto; Cournos, Francine; Cherchiglia, Mariângela Leal; Peixoto, Eliane Rezende de Morais; Guimarães, Mark Drew Crosland

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate tobacco smoking prevalence among psychiatric patients attended in care facilities in Brazil and assess associated factors. A cross-sectional multicenter study was conducted of psychiatric patients (N = 2,475) selected from 26 care facilities. Current and ex-smokers were compared to those who had never smoked. Odds ratios were estimated using logistic regression. The current and past smoking prevalence rates were 52.7% and 18.9%, respectively. Being male, aged 40 years or over, drug and alcohol use, unprotected sex and a history of physical violence were factors associated with both current and past smoking, while a low education level (≤ 8 years of schooling), history of homelessness, not practicing a religion, current or previous psychiatric hospitalization, and main psychiatric diagnosis substance use disorders, were factors only associated with current smoking. Tobacco smoking prevalence among this population was high and was higher than the rate in the general population. Appropriate interventions and smoking prevention policies should be incorporated into mental health services. PMID:25099043

  4. Coping in Chest Pain Patients with and without Psychiatric Disorders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitaliano, Peter P.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Examined relations between psychiatric disorder and coronary heart disease (CHD) in 77 patients with chest pain, and compared coping profiles of chest pain patients with and without psychiatric disorders and CHD. Psychiatric patients with no medical disease were also studied. Results are discussed in the context of illness behavior and…

  5. Computer Interview Problem Assessment of Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Angle, Hugh V.; Ellinwood, Everett H.; Carroll, Judith

    1978-01-01

    Behavioral Assessment information, a more general form of Problem- Oriented Record data, appears to have many useful clinical qualities and was selected to be the information content for a computer interview system. This interview system was designed to assess problematic behaviors of psychiatric patients. The computer interview covered 29 life problem areas and took patients from four to eight hours to complete. In two reliability studies, the computer interview was compared to human interviews. A greater number of general and specific patient problems were identified in the computer interview than in the human interviews. The attitudes of computer patients and clinicians receiving the computer reports were surveyed.

  6. Suicide among immigrant psychiatric patients in Canada.

    PubMed

    Chandrasena, R; Beddage, V; Fernando, M L

    1991-11-01

    Ninety-four Canadian-born psychiatric patients who committed suicide were compared with 23 foreign-born patients committing suicide in Canada. East Europeans were over-represented, and significant differences were found in the age distribution, stress, level of education, social isolation, and methods of suicide. Most foreign-born patients had come to Canada for family or economic reasons but were unemployed, with poor social integration. Employment, housing, education, social integration and a support network seem to be important in preventing these deaths. Cultural evaluation of the patient and early intervention is recommended. PMID:1756350

  7. Identifying Patients in the Acute Psychiatric Hospital Who May Benefit From a Palliative Care Approach.

    PubMed

    Burton, M Caroline; Warren, Mark; Cha, Stephen S; Stevens, Maria; Blommer, Megan; Kung, Simon; Lapid, Maria I

    2016-04-01

    Identifying patients who will benefit from a palliative care approach is the first critical step in integrating palliative with curative therapy. Criteria are established that identify hospitalized medical patients who are near end of life, yet there are no criteria with respect to hospitalized patients with psychiatric disorders. The records of 276 consecutive patients admitted to a dedicated inpatient psychiatric unit were reviewed to identify prognostic criteria predictive of mortality. Mortality predictors were 2 or more admissions in the past year (P = .0114) and older age (P = .0006). Twenty-two percent of patients met National Hospice and Palliative Care Organization noncancer criteria for dementia. Palliative care intervention should be considered when treating inpatients with psychiatric disorders, especially older patients who have a previous hospitalization or history of dementia. PMID:25318929

  8. Depersonalization in psychiatric patients: a transcultural study.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Mauricio; Gomez, Juliana; Molina, Juan J; Luque, Rogelio; Muñoz, Juan F; David, Anthony S

    2006-05-01

    There is evidence suggesting that the prevalence of depersonalization in psychiatric patients can vary across cultures. To explore the possible influence of culture on the prevalence of depersonalization, we compared psychiatric inpatient samples from the United Kingdom (N = 31), Spain (N = 68), and Colombia (N = 41) on standardized and validated self-rating measures of dissociation and depersonalization: the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale and the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES). Colombian patients were found to have lower global scores on the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale and the DES and all its subscales, with the exception of DES-Absorption. No differences were found for measures of depression or anxiety. These findings seem to support the view that depersonalization is susceptible to cultural influences. Attention is drawn to the potential relevance of the sociological dimension "individualism-collectivism" on the experience of the self, and it is proposed that cultures characterized by high individualism may confer vulnerability to depersonalization experiences. PMID:16699385

  9. Chromosomal abnormalities in child psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Hong, K E; Kim, J H; Moon, S Y; Oh, S K

    1999-08-01

    To determine the frequency of chromosomal abnormalities in a child psychiatric population, and to evaluate possible associations between types of abnormalities and patient's clinical characteristics, cytogenetic examination was performed on 604 patients. Demographic data, reasons for karyotyping, clinical signs, and other patient characteristics were assessed and correlated with the results from karyotyping. Chromosomal abnormalities were found in 69 patients (11.3%); these were structural in 49 cases and numerical in 20. Inversion of chromosome nine was found in 15 subjects, trisomy of chromosome 21 in 11, and fragile X in five patients. When karyotyping was performed because of intellectual impairment or multiple developmental delay, significantly more abnormalities were found than average; when performed because autistic disorder was suspected, the number of abnormalities was significantly fewer. There were no differences in clinical variables between structural and numerical abnormalities, nor among nine types of chromosomal abnormalities, except that numerical abnormalities and polymorphism were found at a later age, and that walking was more delayed and IQ was lower in patients with Down syndrome. Clinicians should be aware of the possible presence of chromosomal abnormalities in child psychiatric populations; the close collaboration with geneticists and the use of more defined guidelines for cytogenetic investigation are important. PMID:10485616

  10. Reactions of Psychiatric Patients to Telepsychiatry.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Robbie; O'Gorman, Jennifer; Cernovsky, Zack Z

    2015-09-30

    Telepsychiatry could offer a viable medical service to remote or isolated social communities if it does not generate adverse reactions such as delusional ideation, particularly in patients in settlements without adequate exposure to mainstream culture and internet. We examined subjective reactions to telepsychiatry of randomly selected 84 psychiatric patients from remote locations in Ontario, Canada. They rated the quality of their teleconferencing sessions via 10 item questionnaire and were asked about advantages and disadvantages of telepsychiatry. The majority of patients indicated that they were able to communicate as if physically present (92.9%) and were comfortable with telepsychiatric service (95.2%). They found the sessions as beneficial as direct meetings with their psychiatrist (84.5%) and would use this service again (98.8%). There were no instances of telepsychiatry being associated with adverse reactions in patients from remote communities with inadequate exposure to modern mainstream culture and internet. PMID:26605038

  11. [Psychiatric complications in patients under intensive care].

    PubMed

    Brand, M P; Suter, P; Gunn-Séchéhaye, A; Gardaz, J P; Gemperlé, M

    1978-01-01

    Ten adult patients with psychiatric disorders in the intensive care ward were examined. The length of stay varied from one week to four months and mechanical ventilation was necessary for all patients. Their experience of intensive care and their psychosensorial problems were as follows: temperospatial disorientation, perturbation of the sense of posture, hallucinations which could go as far as oneiric delirium, anguish and symptoms of depression. No psychotic syndrome, literraly speaking, was observed objectively. In the monthes that followed the stay under intensive care many patients presented important psychosomatic disorders. Organic factors are responsible for these complications, though the environment of the intensive care could induce a marked disafferentation. An effort by the attending staff, aimed at orientating or "reafferenting" these patients, could reduce these problems. PMID:30349

  12. Psychiatric aspects of pain in cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ozkan, Sedat

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this review is to discuss the psychiatric aspects of pain in cancer patients from a biopsychosocial approach. Pain in cancer patients is considered as a complex reaction causing severe suffering and involves many psychological aspects. It has many dimensions such as personality, affect, cognition and social relations. The pain experience may also be influenced by some psychological factors such as anxiety, depression and the meaning of pain. Therefore, a successful management of cancer pain requires a multidisciplinary approach. Since cancer pain is generally treated medically, the psychological impact of pain is often underestimated. However, cancer pain is usually related to high levels of psychological distress. Culture, as an important factor affecting cancer pain, will also be discussed during this review. It is crucial to understand cultural diversity in the treatment of cancer patients with pain. Research shows that a minority patients of various ethnicities have less control of their pain because of the miscommunication problem within the medical setting. By paying attention to patients' cultural diversities, problems such as miscommunication causing inadequate control of pain can be eliminated. In order to manage pain in cancer patients, cognitive-behavioral interventions may be integrated with pharmacotherapy. The main goal of these strategies is to provide a sense of control and better coping skills to deal with cancer. Patients' maladaptive thoughts or behaviors may cause physical and emotional stress. Main behavioral strategies include biofeedback, relaxation training, and hypnosis. Cognitive strategies include guided imagery, distraction, thought monitoring and problem solving. By discussing all of these aspects of cancer pain, the multidimensional characteristic of pain and the relation between cancer pain and psychiatric factors will be clarified. PMID:20590361

  13. Quantitative EEG findings in patients with acute, brief depression combined with other fluctuating psychiatric symptoms: a controlled study from an acute psychiatric department

    PubMed Central

    Bjørk, Marte Helene; Sand, Trond; Bråthen, Geir; Linaker, Olav M; Morken, Gunnar; Nilsen, Brigt M; Vaaler, Arne Einar

    2008-01-01

    Background Patients with brief depressive episodes and concurrent rapidly fluctuating psychiatric symptoms do not fit current diagnostic criteria and they can be difficult to diagnose and treat in an acute psychiatric setting. We wanted to study whether these patients had signs of more epileptic or organic brain dysfunction than patients with depression without additional symptomatology. Methods Sixteen acutely admitted patients diagnosed with a brief depressive episode as well as another concurrent psychiatric diagnosis were included. Sixteen patients with major depression served as controls. Three electroencephalographic studies (EEG) were visually interpreted and the background activity was also analysed with quantitative electroencephalography (QEEG). Results The group with brief depression and concurrent symptoms had multiple abnormal features in their standard EEG compared to patients with major depression, but they did not show significantly more epileptiform activity. They also had significantly higher temporal QEEG delta amplitude and interhemispheric temporal delta asymmetry. Conclusion Organic brain dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of patients with brief depressive episodes mixed with rapidly fluctuating psychiatric symptoms. This subgroup of depressed patients should be investigated further in order to clarify the pathophysiology and to establish the optimal evaluation scheme and treatment in an acute psychiatric setting. PMID:19014422

  14. Stressful life events, hopelessness, and suicidal intent in patients admitted with attempted suicide in a tertiary care general hospital

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, SV; Faye, AD; Gore, SP; Shah, HR; Kamath, RM

    2016-01-01

    Background: Suicide is a psychiatric emergency. Stressors in life and social variables (like marital status, family, and social support) are among the determinants of suicide. Hopelessness and suicidal intent are among the psychological variables that have shown promise in the prediction of suicide. Aims and Objectives: To assess stressful life events, hopelessness, suicidal intent, and sociodemographic variables in patients of attempted suicide. Materials and Methods: Fifty consecutive patients admitted with attempted suicide were interviewed. Presumptive Stressful Life Event Scale, Beck Hopelessness Scale, and Beck Suicidal Intent Scale were used along with a semistructured pro forma for interview. Data were analyzed with statistical tests. Results: Sixty-six percent of the participants were females, 72% were less than 30 years of age. Sixty-six percent of the patients had stressful life event score between 101 and 200 with the mean score of 127. The stressful life event score in those who considered they are in need of psychiatric help was significantly high. Most of the patients had mild (34%) and moderate (40%) degrees of hopelessness, and the mean score was 9.64. The mean suicidal intent in the participants was 25.14, when correlated with hopelessness score significant positive correlation was found. Conclusion: Lethality of the attempt increases with the increase in hopelessness. PMID:27089109

  15. Management of Patients Admitted with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Krim, Selim R.; Campbell, Patrick T.; Desai, Sapna; Mandras, Stacy; Patel, Hamang; Eiswirth, Clement; Ventura, Hector O.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hospital admission for the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure is an unfortunate certainty in the vast majority of patients with heart failure. Regardless of the etiology, inpatient treatment for acute decompensated heart failure portends a worsening prognosis. Methods This review identifies patients with heart failure who need inpatient therapy and provides an overview of recommended therapies and management of these patients in the hospital setting. Results Inpatient therapy for patients with acute decompensated heart failure should be directed at decongestion and symptom improvement. Clinicians should also treat possible precipitating events, identify comorbid conditions that may exacerbate heart failure, evaluate and update current guideline-directed medical therapy, and perform risk stratification for all patients. Finally, efforts should be made to educate patients about the importance of restricting salt and fluid, monitoring daily weights, and adhering to a graded exercise program. Conclusion Early discharge follow-up and continued optimization of guideline-directed medical therapy are key to preventing future heart failure readmissions. PMID:26413005

  16. A prevalence study of bestiality (zoophilia) in psychiatric in-patients, medical in-patients, and psychiatric staff.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, W A; Freinhar, J P

    1991-01-01

    The prevalence of bestiality (both actual sexual contacts and sexual fantasy) was investigated in an experimental group (psychiatric in-patients) and two control populations (medical in-patients and psychiatric staff). Psychiatric patients were found to have a statistically significant higher prevalence rate (55%) of bestiality than the control groups (10% and 15% respectively). Implications of these findings are discussed. It is recommended that due to the obvious prevalence of this condition, questions exploring this previously ignored topic should be routinely included in the psychiatric interview. PMID:1778686

  17. Psychiatric considerations in patients with decreased levels of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Young, James L; Rund, Douglas

    2010-08-01

    When patients present to the emergency department with changes in behavior and levels of consciousness, psychiatric causes often move to the top of the list of diagnostic considerations. It is important to thoroughly assess such patients for medical causes. Although it is not common for primary psychiatric conditions to present with altered levels of consciousness, severe cases may present in this fashion. Altered mental states may also be caused by adverse reactions to psychiatric medications. In this article, the authors review some of the psychiatric causes of decreased levels of consciousness, as well as certain adverse drug reactions to psychotropic medications. PMID:20709245

  18. Paranoid symptoms in patients on a general hospital psychiatric unit. Implications for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R; Schwab, P J

    1978-03-01

    Paranoid symptoms were found in 40% of patients admitted to a university general hospital psychiatric unit during a ten-month period. Fifty-eight percent of this group had frank paranoid delusions, while the rest had ideas of reference or generalized suspiciousness. Only one half of those who had paranoid delusions had paranoid schizophrenia. A significant number had affective disorders or organic brain disorder. Ideas of reference and suspiciousness were found in many patients who were not psychotic. The therapeutic implications of these findings are reported in three patients who were inadequately treated for affective disorders because the presence of paranoid symptomatology had led to an incorrect diagnosis of schizophrenia. PMID:727891

  19. Respect for patient autonomy in forensic psychiatric nursing.

    PubMed

    Rose, Donald N

    2005-01-01

    A fundamental issue that forensic psychiatric nurses struggle with is respect for patient autonomy, as the two liberal prerequisites for autonomy, liberty and rationality, are either absent or compromised in forensic psychiatric settings. In this paper, a contemporary feminist perspective of autonomy, relational autonomy, will be advanced as an alternative approach to the traditional liberalist, Kantian, perspective of autonomy. The concepts of autonomy, paternalism, and justice will be discussed in relation to forensic psychiatric nursing. PMID:17073051

  20. Prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Shyam Chand; Nanda, Satyan; Tripathi, Adarsh; Sawlani, Kamal Kumar; Gupta, Kamlesh Kumar; Himanshu, D; Verma, Ajay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Psychiatric disorders, especially anxiety and depression have been reported to have an increased prevalence in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients, but there is a paucity of data from India. Aims and Objectives: Aim of our study is to study the frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients and their correlation with severity of COPD, as per global initiative for obstructive lung disease guidelines. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted in outpatient department of a tertiary care hospital (King George's Medical University). A total of 74 COPD patients were included in this study and compared with 74 controls. The diagnosis and severity of COPD were assessed by spirometry. Psychiatric comorbidities were assessed using the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview questionnaire. Results: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities was significantly higher (P < 0.05) in COPD patients (28.4%) as compared to controls (2.7%). As regards to severity, the frequency was significantly increased in severe and very severe COPD. The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities in COPD patients increased significantly with the increase in duration of symptoms being present in 67% of patients with duration of symptoms more than 10 years and only 23% of patients with duration of symptoms ≤5 years. Conclusion: The frequency of psychiatric comorbidities is increased in COPD patients as compared to controls. We recommend that all patients with COPD should be screened for psychiatric comorbidity, if any. PMID:27051106

  1. Death and suicide among former child and adolescent psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Engqvist, Ulf; Rydelius, Per-Anders

    2006-01-01

    Background Increased mortality rates among previous child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) patients have been found in Scandinavian studies up to the 1980s. The suicide risk in this group has been estimated to be almost five times higher than expected. This article addresses two questions: Do Swedish CAP patients continue to risk premature death and what kind of information related to psychiatric symptoms and/or behavior problems can predict later suicide? Methods Hospital files, Sweden's census databases (including immigration and emigration) and administrative databases (including the Swedish Hospital Discharge register and the Persons Convicted of Offences register), and the Cause of Death register were examined to determine the mortality rate in a group of 1,400 former CAP inpatients and outpatients over a period of 12–33 years. Observed and expected numbers of deceased were calculated with the prospective method and the standardized mortality ratio (SMR) method. The relative risk or the risk ratio (RR) is presented with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Significance level tests were made using two-by-two tables and chi-square tests. The Cox proportional-hazards regression model was used for survival analysis. Results Twenty-four males and 14 females died. Compared with the general population, the standardized mortality ratio in this group of CAP patients was significantly higher in both sexes. Behavioral problems, school problems, and co-morbid alcohol or drug abuse and criminality (including alcohol-related crimes) were found to be important predictors. Thirty-two deaths were attributed to suicide, intoxication, drug overdose, or accident; one patient died of an alcohol abuse-related disorder, and five patients died of natural causes. Suicide was the most common cause of death, but only 2 of these 19 cases were initially admitted for attempted suicide. Conclusion We suggest that suicide and death prevention among CAP patients may not be a psychiatric issue per

  2. Predicting Healthcare Utilization by Patients Admitted for COPD Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Kaza, Anupama Murthy; Balasubramanian, Nithilavalli; Chandrasekaran, Siddhuraj

    2016-01-01

    Background Healthcare utilization, especially length of hospital stay and ICU admission, for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) determine overall outcomes in terms of morbidity, mortality and cost burden. Predicting prolonged hospital stay (PHS) and prolonged intensive care (PIC) for AECOPD is useful for rational allocation of resources in healthcare centres. Aim To characterize the pattern of healthcare utilization by COPD patients hospitalized for acute exacerbation, and to identify clinical and laboratory predictors of ‘prolonged hospital stay’ (PHS) and ‘prolonged intensive care’(PIC) Materials and Methods This study attempted through retrospective data analysis, to identify risk factors and evolve prediction models for increased healthcare utilization namely PHS and PIC for AECOPD. The data were extracted from 255 eligible admissions for AECOPD by 166 patients from Aug 2012 to July 2013. Logistic regression analysis was used for identifying predictors and models were tested with area under receiver operating characteristic curve. Results Independent predictors of prolonged hospital stay (≥ 6 days) were chronic respiratory failure at baseline, low saturation at admission, high HbA1c level and positive isolates in sputum culture. Independent predictors of prolonged intensive care (for ≥ 48 hours) were past history of pulmonary tuberculosis, chronic respiratory failure at baseline, low saturation at admission, high leukocyte count and positive culture isolates in sputum. Prediction models evolved from variables available at admission showed AUC 0.805 (95% CI 0.729 – 0.881) and 0.825 (95% CI 0.75 – 0.90) for PHS and ICU admissions respectively. Conclusion Our prediction models derived from simple and easily available variables show good discriminative properties in predicting PHS and PIC for AECOPD. When prospectively validated, these models are useful for rational allocation of services especially in resource

  3. Valuing psychiatric patients' stories: belief in and use of the supernatural in the Jamaican psychiatric setting.

    PubMed

    James, Caryl C A B; Carpenter, Karen A; Peltzer, Karl; Weaver, Steve

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to examine illness presentation and understand how psychiatric patients make meaning of the causes of their mental illnesses. Six Jamaican psychiatric patients were interviewed using the McGill Illness Narrative Interview Schedule. Of the 6, 3 representative case studies were chosen. The hermeneutic phenomenological approach and the common sense model were used in the formulation of patients' explanatory models. Results indicate that psychiatric patients actively conceptualized the causes and resultant treatment of their mental illnesses. Patients' satisfaction and compliance with treatment were dependent on the extent to which practitioners' conceptualization matched their own, as well as practitioners' acknowledgement of patients' concerns about causation, prognosis, and treatment. PMID:24067328

  4. Outcomes and Predictors of Mortality for Patients with Acute Leukemia Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Croucher, Danielle; Christian, Michael; Ibrahimova, Narmin; Kumar, Vikram; Jacob, Gabriella; Kiss, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. The objectives were to describe the management and outcomes of acute leukemia (AL) patients admitted to the ICU and to identify predictors of ICU mortality. Methods. Data was retrospectively collected from the medical records of all patients with AML or ALL admitted to the Mount Sinai Hospital ICU from August 2009 to December 2012. Results. 151 AL patients (117 AML, 34 ALL) were admitted to the ICU. Mean age was 54 (SD 15) years, median APACHE II score was 27 (IQR 22–33), and 50% were female. While in ICU, 128 (85%) patients had sepsis and 56 (37%) had ARDS. The majority of patients required invasive organ support: 94 (62%) required mechanical ventilation while 23 (15%) received renal replacement therapy. Multivariable analysis identified SOFA score (OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.01–1.38) and invasive ventilation (OR 9.64, 95% CI 3.39–27.4) as independent predictors of ICU mortality. Ninety-four (62%) patients survived to ICU discharge. Only 39% of these 94 patients discharged were alive 12 months after ICU admission. Conclusions. AL patients admitted to the ICU had a 62% ICU survival rate; yet only 25% of cohort patients were alive 12 months after ICU admission. Higher admission SOFA scores and invasive ventilation are independently associated with a greater risk of dying in the ICU. PMID:27445524

  5. Long-term persistence of MRSA in re-admitted patients

    PubMed Central

    Biertz, F.; Ziesing, S.; Gastmeier, P.; Chaberny, I. F.

    2010-01-01

    Background A better knowledge of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) persistence in hospitalised patients may impact on specific prevention strategies. We have investigated the persistence of MRSA-carriage in patients admitted and re-admitted to a university hospital. Patients and methods Between January 2002 and October 2005 all MRSA-positive patients admitted to the university hospital of Hannover Medical School were assessed at first admission and all subsequent re-admissions. Patients re-admitted at least once were analysed for the persistence or loss of MRSA. The association of possible factors influencing the persistence of MRSA colonisation or infection (age group, gender, decolonisation therapy during first hospital stay due to MRSA positivity and colonisation of different anatomical sites) was analysed using univariate, multivariate and time-dependent analyses. Results A total of 1,032 patients who had tested positive at least once for MRSA were admitted to our hospital during the study period, accounting for 2,038 admissions. Of these patients, 403 (39.1%) were admitted more than once (from two times to 21 times), and 238 (59.1%) of the re-admitted patients remained MRSA positive during all subsequent admissions. Fifty-five (13.6%) patients tested MRSA negative at their last admission, and 61 (15.1%) tested MRSA negative at at least two consecutive admissions. In 27 (6.7%) patients, the MRSA status differed more than once between subsequent admissions. Overall, the half-life time (HLT) of MRSA persistence was 549 days, with the duration of persistence dependent on the colonisation of different anatomical sites (HLT only wounds 117 days; HLT mouth, throat, bronchial secretions 627 days; HLT nose, wounds and other body sites 801 days; p < 0.01) and was prolonged if more than one body site was MRSA-positive (HR 2.18, 95% confidence interval 1.52–3.15). Conclusion A detailed knowledge of the dynamics of the loss of MRSA infection could

  6. Comparison Between Emergency Department and Inpatient Nurses’ Perceptions of Boarding of Admitted Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pulliam, Bryce C.; Liao, Mark Y.; Geissler, Theodore M.; Richards, John R.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The boarding of admitted patients in the emergency department (ED) is a major cause of crowding and access block. One solution is boarding admitted patients in inpatient ward (W) hallways. This study queried and compared ED and W nurses’ opinions toward ED and W boarding. It also assessed their preferred boarding location if they were patients. Methods: A survey administered to a convenience sample of ED and W nurses was performed in a 631-bed academic medical center (30,000 admissions/year) with a 68-bed ED (70,000 visits/ year). We identified nurses as ED or W, and if W, whether they had previously worked in the ED. The nurses were asked if there were any circumstances where admitted patients should be boarded in ED or W hallways. They were also asked their preferred location if they were admitted as a patient. Six clinical scenarios were then presented, and the nurses’ opinions on boarding based on each scenario were queried. Results: Ninety nurses completed the survey, with a response rate of 60%; 35 (39%) were current ED nurses (cED), 40 (44%) had previously worked in the ED (pED). For all nurses surveyed 46 (52%) believed admitted patients should board in the ED. Overall, 52 (58%) were opposed to W boarding, with 20% of cED versus 83% of current W (cW) nurses (P < 0.0001), and 28% of pED versus 85% of nurses never having worked in the ED (nED) were opposed (P < 0.001). If admitted as patients themselves, 43 (54%) of all nurses preferred W boarding, with 82% of cED versus 33% of cW nurses (P < 0.0001) and 74% of pED versus 34% nED nurses (P = 0.0007). The most commonly cited reasons for opposition to hallway boarding were lack of monitoring and patient privacy. For the 6 clinical scenarios, significant differences in opinion regarding W boarding existed in all but 2 cases: a patient with stable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease but requiring oxygen, and an intubated, unstable sepsis patient. Conclusion: Inpatient nurses and those who have

  7. Promoting Good Psychiatric Management for Patients With Borderline Personality Disorder.

    PubMed

    Links, Paul S; Ross, James; Gunderson, John G

    2015-08-01

    General psychiatric management for patients with borderline personality disorder was devised to be an outpatient intervention that could be readily learned and easily delivered by independent community mental health professionals. To disseminate the approach, Drs. Gunderson and Links developed the Handbook of Good Psychiatric Management for Borderline Personality Disorder (Gunderson & Links, ) that presented the basics of the approach, videos to illustrate the appropriate clinical skills, and case examples to practice adherence to the approach. Unfortunately, the inclusion of "psychiatric" in the treatment's name may discourage psychologists and other mental health professionals from using this therapy. In this article, we review the basic principles and approaches related to general psychiatric management. With a case example, we illustrate how psychologists can use all the general psychiatric management principles for their patients with BPD, except medications and, as a result, provide and deliver this approach effectively. PMID:26197971

  8. The relation between poor sleep, impulsivity and aggression in forensic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Kamphuis, Jeanine; Dijk, Derk-Jan; Spreen, Marinus; Lancel, Marike

    2014-01-17

    Psychiatric disorders are often associated with disturbed sleep. Poor sleep can attenuate emotional control, including the regulation of aggression, and thus, may increase the risk of impulsive, aggressive acts. This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the potential contribution of sleep problems to subjective and objective aggressiveness and impulsivity in a forensic psychiatric population. Questionnaires on sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), chronic severe insomnia (Sleep Diagnosis List), aggressiveness (Aggression Questionnaire) and impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11) were completed by 96 forensic psychiatric inpatients, admitted to two forensic facilities in the Netherlands. To obtain more objective measurements of aggression and impulsivity, observational scores on a professional instrument to assess the risk of future aggression (Historical Clinical Future-30) and reported aggressive incidents were collected from files. Results showed that a worse sleep quality and higher insomnia scores were significantly associated with self-reported aggression and impulsivity, clinician-rated hostility and involvement in aggressive incidents within the facility. Whether a participant was professionally judged as impulsive could not be predicted by sleep quality or the insomnia score. To a large extent the results of this study support the hypothesis that poor sleep is related to impulsive, aggressive behavior in forensic psychiatric patients. It is worthwhile to examine the protective effect of treatment of sleep difficulties on aggressive reactivity in (forensic) psychiatric populations. PMID:24184508

  9. Outcome and periprocedural time management in referred versus directly admitted stroke patients treated with thrombectomy

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Ralph; Reimann, Gernot; Weimar, Christian; Winkler, Angela; Berger, Klaus; Nordmeyer, Hannes; Hadisurya, Jeffrie; Brassel, Friedhelm; Kitzrow, Martin; Krogias, Christos; Weber, Werner; Busch, Elmar W.; Eyding, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Background: After thrombectomy has shown to be effective in acute stroke patients with large vessel occlusion, the potential benefit of secondary referral for such an intervention needs to be validated. Aims: We aimed to compare consecutive stoke patients directly admitted and treated with thrombectomy at a neurointerventional centre with patients secondarily referred for such a procedure from hospitals with a stroke unit. Methods: Periprocedure times and mortality in 300 patients primarily treated in eight neurointerventional centres were compared with 343 patients referred from nine other hospitals in a prospective multicentre study of a German neurovascular network. Data on functional outcome at 3 months was available in 430 (76.4%) patients. Results: In-hospital mortality (14.8% versus 11.7%, p = 0.26) and 3 months mortality (21.9% versus 24.1%, p = 0.53) were not statistically different in both patient groups despite a significant shorter symptom to groin puncture time in directly admitted patients, which was mainly caused by a longer interfacility transfer time. We found a nonsignificant trend for better functional outcome at 3 months in directly admitted patients (modified Rankin Scale 0–2, 44.0% versus 35.7%, p = 0.08). Conclusions: Our results show that a drip-and-ship thrombectomy concept can be effectively organized in a metropolitan stroke network. Every effort should be made to speed up the emergency interfacility transfer to a neurointerventional centre in stroke patients eligible for thrombectomy after initial brain imaging. PMID:27006695

  10. Psychiatric Axis I Comorbidities among Patients with Gender Dysphoria

    PubMed Central

    Hajebi, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. Cooccurring psychiatric disorders influence the outcome and prognosis of gender dysphoria. The aim of this study is to assess psychiatric comorbidities in a group of patients. Methods. Eighty-three patients requesting sex reassignment surgery (SRS) were recruited and assessed through the Persian Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis I disorders (SCID-I). Results. Fifty-seven (62.7%) patients had at least one psychiatric comorbidity. Major depressive disorder (33.7%), specific phobia (20.5%), and adjustment disorder (15.7%) were the three most prevalent disorders. Conclusion. Consistent with most earlier researches, the majority of patients with gender dysphoria had psychiatric Axis I comorbidity. PMID:25180172

  11. Length of stay and hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital by family physicians

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Chuck K.; Chambers, Catharine; Fang, Dianne; Mazowita, Garey; Hwang, Stephen W.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare length of stay and total hospital costs among patients admitted to hospital under the care of family physicians who were their usual health care providers in the community (group A) and patients admitted to the same inpatient service under the care of family physicians who were not their usual health care providers (group B). Design Retrospective observational study. Setting A large urban hospital in Vancouver, BC. Participants All adult admissions to the family practice inpatient service between April 1, 2006, and June 30, 2008. Main outcome measures Ratio of length of stay to expected length of stay and total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit. Multivariate linear regression was performed to determine the effect of admitting group (group A vs group B) on the natural logarithm transformations of the outcomes. Results The median acute length of stay was 8.0 days (interquartile range [IQR] 4.0 to 13.0 days) for group A admissions and 8.0 days (IQR 4.0 to 15.0 days) for group B admissions. The median (IQR) total hospital costs were $6498 ($4035 to $11 313) for group A admissions and $6798 ($4040 to $12 713) for group B admissions. After adjustment for patient characteristics, patients admitted to hospital under the care of their own family physicians did not significantly differ in terms of acute length of stay to expected length of stay ratio (percent change 0.6%, P = .942) or total hospital costs per resource intensity weight unit (percent change −2.0%, P = .722) compared with patients admitted under the care of other family physicians. Conclusion These findings suggest that having networks of family physicians involved in hospital care for patients is not less efficient than having family physicians provide care for their own patients. PMID:22518905

  12. Outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Alice Mânica; Gazzana, Marcelo Basso; Silva, Denise Rossato

    2013-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes for patients with lung cancer admitted to intensive care units and assess their clinical and demographic profiles. Methods Retrospective, analytical, observational study, wherein the outcomes for patients diagnosed with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit of university hospital from January 2010 until February 2011 were evaluated. Results Thirty-four patients' medical records were included. Twenty-six (76.5%) patients received some type of ventilatory support, of whom 21 (61.8%) used invasive mechanical ventilation and 11 (32.4%) used noninvasive ventilation at some point during their stay at the intensive care unit. Regarding mortality, 12 (35.3%) patients died during hospitalization at the intensive care unit, totaling 15 (44.1%) deaths during the entire hospitalization period; 19 (55.9%) patients were discharged from the hospital. The analysis of the variables showed that the patients who died had remained on invasive mechanical ventilation for a longer period 5.0 (0.25 to 15.0) days than the survivors (1.0 (0 to 1.0) days) (p=0.033) and underwent dialysis during their stay at the intensive care unit (p=0.014). Conclusions The mortality of patients with lung cancer admitted to the intensive care unit is associated with the time spent on invasive mechanical ventilation and the need for dialysis. PMID:23887754

  13. Substance Use and Mental Health Outcomes for Comorbid Patients in Psychiatric Day Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Magura, Stephen; Rosenblum, Andrew; Betzler, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The study’s purpose was to determine treatment outcomes for patients who present with drug use vs. those presenting with no drug use at admission to a psychiatric day treatment program. Consecutively admitted patients completed confidential interviews which included psychological distress and quality of life measures and provided urine specimens for toxicology at admission and six month follow-up. Subjects positive by past 30 day self-report or urinalysis were categorized as drug users. Major psychiatric diagnoses were: major depression 25%; bipolar, 13%; other mood 13%; schizoaffective 13%; schizophrenia 13%. Drug use at admission was: cocaine 35%; marijuana 33%; opiates 18%, (meth)amphetamines, 6% For each of these drugs, the percentage of patients positive at admission who remitted from using the drug significantly exceeded the percentage negative at baseline who initiated using the drug. Overall, there were significant decreases in psychological distress and significant improvement on quality of life, but no change on positive affect. There were no significant differences between drug users and non-drug users on symptom reduction and improvement in quality of life. Psychiatric day treatment appears to benefit comorbid patients by reducing the net number of patients who actively use certain common drugs and by improving psychological status and quality of life to the same degree as for non-drug using patients. PMID:20333262

  14. Neuro-oncological patients admitted in intensive-care unit: predictive factors and functional outcome.

    PubMed

    Tabouret, E; Boucard, C; Devillier, R; Barrie, M; Boussen, S; Autran, D; Chinot, O; Bruder, N

    2016-03-01

    The prognosis of oncology patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) is considered poor. Our objective was to analyze the characteristics and predictive factors of death in the ICU and functional outcome following ICU treatment for neuro-oncology patients. A retrospective study was conducted on all patients with primary brain tumor admitted to our institutional ICU for medical indications. Predictive impact on the risk of death in the ICU was analyzed as well as the functional status was evaluated prior and following ICU discharge. Seventy-one patients were admitted to the ICU. ICU admission indications were refractory seizures (41 %) and septic shock (17 %). On admission, 16 % had multi-organ failure. Ventilation was necessary for 41 % and catecholamines for 13 %. Twenty-two percent of patients died in the ICU. By multivariate analysis, predictive factors associated with an increased risk of ICU death were: non-neurological cause of admission [p = 0.045; odds ratio (OR) 5.405], multiple organ failure (p = 0.021; OR 8.027), respiratory failure (p = 0.006; OR 9.615), and hemodynamic failure (p = 0.008; OR 10.111). In contrast, tumor type (p = 0.678) and disease control status (p = 0.380) were not associated with an increased risk of ICU death. Among the 35 evaluable patients, 77 % presented with a stable or improved Karnofsky performance status following ICU hospitalization compared with the ongoing status before discharge. In patients with primary brain tumor admitted to the ICU, predictive factors of death appear to be similar to those described in non-oncology patients. ICU hospitalization is generally not associated with a subsequent decrease in the functional status. PMID:26608523

  15. The pharmacological management of psychiatric comorbidities in patients with epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Mula, Marco

    2016-05-01

    Psychiatric disorders represent a frequent comorbidity in patients with epilepsy affecting quality of life, morbidity and mortality. Evidence-based data on the management of these conditions are limited but a number of recommendations are now available to guide clinical practice. The present paper reviews the pharmacological treatment of psychiatric problems in epilepsy with special attention to data coming from randomised controlled trials (RCTs), pharmacological interactions with AEDs and the issue of seizure worsening during treatment with psychotropic drugs. Epidemiologically or clinically relevant psychiatric conditions are discussed namely mood and anxiety disorders, psychoses and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. PMID:27001226

  16. Prospective study of the role of cardiac troponin T in patients admitted with unstable angina.

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, P.; Collinson, P.; Moseley, D.; Greenwood, T.; Noble, M.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the prognostic significance and role in risk stratification of the biochemical marker troponin T in patients admitted with unstable angina. DESIGN--Single centre, blinded, prospective study of patients admitted with chest pain. SETTING--Coronary care unit of a district general hospital. SUBJECTS--460 patients admitted with chest pain and followed up for a median of three years. 183 patients had a final diagnosis of unstable angina. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Cardiac death, need for coronary revascularisation, or readmission with non-fatal myocardial infarction as first events. RESULTS--62 (34%) unstable angina patients were troponin T positive. This group had significantly increased incidence rates of subsequent cardiac death (12 cases (19%) v 14 (12%)), coronary revascularisation (22 (35%) v 26 (21%)), death or revascularisation (33 (53%) v 40 (33%)), and death or non-fatal myocardial infarction (18 (29%) v 21 (17%)) compared with the troponin T negative group. In multiple logistic regression troponin T status was a highly significant predictor for the end points coronary revascularisation and cardiac death or revascularisation as first events. CONCLUSION--Troponin T in the serum of patients with unstable angina identifies a subgroup at higher risk of subsequent cardiac events and its measurement aids in risk factor stratification. The increased risk extends to two years after admission. Prospective randomised trials are required to identify optimum therapeutic strategies for this subgroup. PMID:8704534

  17. Evaluating the Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) System for Admitted Patients in the Pediatric Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Gold, Delia L.; Mihalov, Leslie K.; Cohen, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The Pediatric Early Warning Score (PEWS) systems were developed to provide a reproducible assessment of a child’s clinical status while hospitalized. Most studies investigating the PEWS evaluate its usefulness in the inpatient setting. Limited studies evaluate the effectiveness and integration of PEWS in the pediatric emergency department (ED). The goal of this study was to explore the test characteristics of an ED-assigned PEWS score for intensive care unit (ICU) admission or clinical deterioration in admitted patients. Methods This was a prospective 12-month observational study of patients, aged 0 to 21 years, admitted from the ED of an urban, tertiary care children’s hospital. ED nurses were instructed in PEWS assignment and electronic medical record (EMR) documentation. Interrater reliability between nurses was evaluated. PEWS scores were measured at initial assessment (P0) and time of admission (P1). Patients were stratified into outcome groups: those admitted to the ICU either from the ED or as transfers from the floor and those admitted to the floor only. Clinical deterioration was defined as transfer to the ICU within 6 hours or within 6 to 24 hours of admission. PEWS scores and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were compared for patients admitted to the floor, ICU, and with clinical deterioration. Results The authors evaluated 12,306 consecutively admitted patients, with 99% having a PEWS documented in the EMR. Interrater reliability was excellent (intraclass coefficient 0.91). A total of 1,300 (10.6%) patients were admitted to the ICU and 11,066 (89.4%) were admitted to the floor. PEWS scores were higher for patients in the ICU group (P0 = 2.8, SD ± 2.4; P1 = 3.2, SD ± 2.4; p < 0.0001) versus floor patients (P0 = 0.7, SD ± 1.2; P1 = 0.5, SD ± 0.9; p < 0.0001). To predict the need for ICU admission, the optimal cutoff points on the ROC are P0 = 1 and P1 = 2, with areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) of 0.79 and 0

  18. Psychiatric Patients Experiences with Mechanical Restraints: An Interview Study

    PubMed Central

    Lanthén, Klas; Rask, Mikael; Sunnqvist, Charlotta

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine psychiatric patients' experience of mechanical restraints and to describe the care the patients received. Background. All around the world, threats and violence perpetrated by patients in psychiatric emergency inpatient units are quite common and are a prevalent factor concerning the application of mechanical restraints, although psychiatric patients' experiences of mechanical restraints are still moderately unknown. Method. A qualitative design with an inductive approach were used, based on interviews with patients who once been in restraints. Results. This study resulted in an overbridging theme: Physical Presence, Instruction and Composed Behaviour Can Reduce Discontent and Trauma, including five categories. These findings implicated the following: information must be given in a calm and sensitive way, staff must be physically present during the whole procedure, and debriefing after the incident must be conducted. Conclusions. When mechanical restraints were unavoidable, the presence of committed staff during mechanical restraint was important, demonstrating the significance of training acute psychiatric nurses correctly so that their presence is meaningful. Nurses in acute psychiatric settings should be required to be genuinely committed, aware of their actions, and fully present in coercive situations where patients are vulnerable. PMID:26199931

  19. Psychiatric morbidity of overseas patients in inner London: A hospital based study

    PubMed Central

    Carranza, Fredy J; Parshall, Alice M

    2005-01-01

    Background Evaluation of the referral, admission, treatment, and outcome of overseas patients admitted to a psychiatric hospital in central London. Ethical, legal and economic implications, and the involvement of consulates in the admission process, are discussed. Method Assessment and review of overseas patients admitted between 1 January 1999 and 31 December 1999. Non-parametric statistical tests were used, and relevant outcomes described. Results 19% of admissions were overseas patients. Mean age was 38 years. 90% were unattached; 84% were white, 71% from European countries. 45% spoke fluent English. Differences in socio-economic status between home country and England were found. 74% were unwell on arrival; 65% travelled to England as tourists. 65% of admissions came via the police. 32% had been ill for more than one year before admission; 68% had psychiatric history. 77% were admitted and 48% discharged under section of the Mental Health Act. 74% had psychotic disorders, all of them with positive symptoms. 55% showed little to moderate improvement in mental state; 10% were on Enhanced Care Programme Approach. Relatives of 48% of patients were contacted. The Hospital repatriated 52% of patients; the Mental Health Team followed up 13% of those discharged. The average length of admission was 43.4 days (range 1–365). Total cost of admissions was GBP350, 600 ($577, 490); average individual cost was GBP11, 116 (range GBP200-81, 000). Conclusions Mentally ill overseas individuals are a vulnerable group that need recognition by health organisations to adapt current practice to better serve their needs. The involvement of consulates needs further evaluation. PMID:15845140

  20. The Peregrinating Psychiatric Patient in the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Simpson, Scott A.; Pasic, Jagoda

    2016-01-01

    Many emergency department (ED) psychiatric patients present after traveling. Although such travel, or peregrination, has long been associated with factitious disorder, other diagnoses are more common among travelers, including psychotic disorders, personality disorders, and substance abuse. Travelers’ intense psychopathology, disrupted social networks, lack of collateral informants, and unawareness of local resources complicate treatment. These patients can consume disproportionate time and resources from emergency providers. We review the literature on the emergency psychiatric treatment of peregrinating patients and use case examples to illustrate common presentations and treatment strategies. Difficulties in studying this population and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:27625725

  1. The Peregrinating Psychiatric Patient in the Emergency Department.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Scott A; Pasic, Jagoda

    2016-09-01

    Many emergency department (ED) psychiatric patients present after traveling. Although such travel, or peregrination, has long been associated with factitious disorder, other diagnoses are more common among travelers, including psychotic disorders, personality disorders, and substance abuse. Travelers' intense psychopathology, disrupted social networks, lack of collateral informants, and unawareness of local resources complicate treatment. These patients can consume disproportionate time and resources from emergency providers. We review the literature on the emergency psychiatric treatment of peregrinating patients and use case examples to illustrate common presentations and treatment strategies. Difficulties in studying this population and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:27625725

  2. Microtraining of Forensic Psychiatric Patients for Empathic Counseling Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomis, Marsha J.; Baker, Linda L.

    1985-01-01

    Assessed the usefulness of a microtraining package for developing empathic communication skills of peer counselors (N=16) in a therapeutic community of forensic psychiatric patients. Patients were assigned to the skills (empathy training) group, or the attention group, where they viewed counseling films. The skills group gained greater counseling…

  3. Cutaneous factitia in elderly patients: alarm signal for psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chiriac, Anca; Foia, Liliana; Birsan, Cristina; Goriuc, Ancuta; Solovan, Caius

    2014-01-01

    Background The factitious disorders, more commonly known in daily practice as pathomimia, are expressed in dermatology units by skin lesions induced voluntarily by the patient, in order to draw attention of the medical staff and/or the family members. The disorder is often challenging to diagnose and even more difficult to document in front of the patient or relatives. It represents a challenge for the physician, and any attempt at treatment may be followed by recurrence of the self-mutilation. This paper describes two cases of pathomimia diagnosed by dermatologists and treated in a psychiatry unit, highlighting the importance of collaboration in these situations. Patients and methods Two case reports, describing old female patients with pathomimia, hospitalized in a department of dermatology for bizarre skin lesions. Results The first case was a 77-year-old female with unknown psychiatric problems and atrophic skin lesions on the face, self-induced for many months, with multiple hospitalizations in dermatology units, with no response to different therapeutic patterns, and full recovery after psychiatric treatment for a major depressive syndrome. The second case was a 61-year-old female patient with disseminated atrophic scars on the face, trunk, and limbs. She raised our interest because of possible psychiatric issues, as she had attempted to commit suicide. The prescription of antidepressants led to a significant clinical improvement. Conclusion These cases indicate that a real psychiatric disease may be recorded in patients suffering from pathomimia. Therefore, complete psychiatric evaluation in order to choose the proper therapy is mandatory for all these cases. Dermatologists and all physicians who take care of old patients must recognize the disorder in order to provide optimum care for this chronic condition. We emphasize therefore the importance of psychiatric evaluation and treatment to avoid the major risk of suicide. Skin lesions must be regarded as an

  4. Training psychiatric staff to treat a multicultural patient population.

    PubMed

    Collins, J L; Mathura, C B; Risher, D L

    1984-04-01

    Cultural and linguistic barriers have long been problems in establishing an effective therapeutic alliance between patients and therapists from different cultural, ethnic, and racial backgrounds. The current emphasis on cultural psychiatry has stimulated the inclusion of culturally relevant material in the curricula of American psychiatric residency programs, such as the program at Howard University Hospital in Washington, D.C. After a preliminary study of foreign patients treated on the psychiatry service, the department of psychiatry established a program of seminars and didactic sessions intended to familiarize staff and trainees with cultural patterns of the largest groups of foreign students attending the university. The department also participated in a transcultural fellowship program for medical students sponsored by the American Psychiatric Association and the National Institute of Mental Health. After describing the programs, the authors briefly discuss such culturally related issues as foreign patients' return to their original language when they develop psychiatric illnesses. PMID:6714949

  5. Physician experience and outcomes among patients admitted to general internal medicine teaching wards

    PubMed Central

    McAlister, Finlay A.; Youngson, Erik; Bakal, Jeffrey A.; Holroyd-Leduc, Jayna; Kassam, Narmin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Physician scores on examinations decline with time after graduation. However, whether this translates into declining quality of care is unknown. Our objective was to determine how physician experience is associated with negative outcomes for patients admitted to hospital. Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort study involving all patients admitted to general internal medicine wards over a 2-year period at all 7 teaching hospitals in Alberta, Canada. We used files from the Alberta College of Physicians and Surgeons to determine the number of years since medical school graduation for each patient’s most responsible physician. Our primary outcome was the composite of in-hospital death, or readmission or death within 30 days postdischarge. Results: We identified 10 046 patients who were cared for by 149 physicians. Patient characteristics were similar across physician experience strata, as were primary outcome rates (17.4% for patients whose care was managed by physicians in the highest quartile of experience, compared with 18.8% in those receiving care from the least experienced physicians; adjusted odds ratio [OR] 0.88, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.72–1.06). Outcomes were similar between experience quartiles when further stratified by physician volume, most responsible diagnosis or complexity of the patient’s condition. Although we found substantial variability in length of stay between individual physicians, there were no significant differences between physician experience quartiles (mean adjusted for patient covariates and accounting for intraphysician clustering: 7.90 [95% CI 7.39–8.42] d for most experienced quartile; 7.63 [95% CI 7.13–8.14] d for least experienced quartile). Interpretation: For patients admitted to general internal medicine teaching wards, we saw no negative association between physician experience and outcomes commonly used as proxies for quality of inpatient care. PMID:26283716

  6. Safe laparoscopic clearance of the common bile duct in emergently admitted patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis

    PubMed Central

    Plaudis, Haralds; Fokins, Vladimirs; Mukans, Maksims; Pupelis, Guntars

    2016-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Laparoscopic treatment of patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis is challenging due to mandatory recovery of the biliary drainage and clearance of the common bile duct (CBD). The aim of our study was to assess postoperative course of cholangitis and biliary sepsis after laparoscopic clearance of the CBD in emergently admitted patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis. Methods Emergently admitted patients who underwent laparoscopic clearance of the CBD were included prospectively and stratified in 2 groups i.e., cholangitis positive (CH+) or negative (CH-) group. Patient demographics, comorbidities, preoperative imaging data, inflammatory response, surgical intervention, complication rate and outcomes were compared between groups. Results Ninety-nine of a total 320 patients underwent laparoscopic clearance of the CBD, of which, 60 belonged to the acute cholangitis group (CH+) and 39 to the cholangitis negative group (CH-). Interventions were done on average 4 days after admission, operation duration was 95-105 min, and the conversion rate was 3-7% without differences in the groups. Preoperative inflammatory response was markedly higher in the CH+ group. Inflammation signs on intraoperative choledochoscopy were more evident in patients with cholangitis. Postoperative inflammatory response did not differ between the groups. The overall complication rate was 8.3% and 5.1%, respectively. Laparoscopic clearance of the CBD resulted in 1 lethal case (CH+ group), resulting in 1% mortality rate and a similar 12-month readmission rate. Conclusions Single-stage laparoscopic intraoperative US and choledochoscopy-assisted clearance of the CBD is feasible in emergently admitted patients with choledocholithiasis and cholangitis. PMID:27212991

  7. Prevalence and characteristics of breakthrough pain in cancer patients admitted to a hospice.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, G; O'Doherty, C A; Collins, S

    2000-08-01

    A prospective survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence and characteristics of breakthrough pain in cancer patients admitted to a hospice. Of 414 consecutive admissions, 33 patients were confused or too unwell to take part and 136 were pain-free. The remaining 245 reported 404 pains (range 1-5 per patient); of these patients, 218 (89%) had breakthrough pain and identified 361 pains (range 1-5 per patient). Breakthrough pain was classified as somatic (46%) visceral (30%), neuropathic (10%) or mixed etiology (16%). Thirty-eight percent of pains were severe or excruciating. The average number of daily breakthrough pain episodes was 4 [corrected] (range 1-14); 49% occurred suddenly. Most (59%) were unpredictable, and 72% lasted less than 30 minutes. Seventy-five percent of patients were dissatisfied with their pain control. Breakthrough pain is common among patients admitted to our hospice. It is frequent, short lasting, often unpredictable and not necessarily related to chronic pain making treatment difficult. PMID:10989246

  8. Predictors of major lower limb amputation among type II diabetic patients admitted for diabetic foot problems

    PubMed Central

    Yusof, Nazri Mohd; Rahman, Jamalludin Ab; Zulkifly, Ahmad Hafiz; Che-Ahmad, Aminudin; Khalid, Kamarul Ariffin; Sulong, Ahmad Fadzli; Vijayasingham, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Diabetes mellitus (DM) is the most common cause of amputations in Malaysia. This study aimed to identify the predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with type 2 DM (T2DM) who were admitted to a hospital, in order to reduce its likelihood. METHODS This cross-sectional study involved 218 patients with T2DM who were admitted to Hospital Tengku Ampuan Afzan, Kuantan, Malaysia, for diabetic foot problems from June 2011 to July 2012. A form was developed to document the patients’ profiles, comorbidities, complications, investigations, treatment and clinical outcomes. The predictors for major lower limb amputations were determined using univariate and stepwise logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 31 patients underwent major lower limb amputations (25 transtibial, 6 transfemoral). The following factors were found to be associated with the incidence of major lower limb amputations: T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, diabetic neuropathy, diabetic nephropathy, presentation with gangrene, diabetic foot conditions of Wagner grade 4 or 5, and necrotising fasciitis. Patients who underwent major amputations had significantly lower haemoglobin and albumin levels, and higher total white blood cell counts, erythrocyte sedimentation rates, and C-reactive protein, urea and creatinine levels. However, only T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and albumin levels were significant on stepwise logistic regression analysis. CONCLUSION T2DM duration ≥ 10 years, positive bacterial culture and low albumin levels were found to be significant predictive factors for major lower limb amputation among patients with T2DM admitted for diabetic foot problems. PMID:26668408

  9. Quality of Life in Patients with Substance Use Disorders Admitted to Detoxification Compared with Those Admitted to Hospitals for Medical Disorders: Follow-Up Results

    PubMed Central

    Vederhus, John-Kåre; Pripp, Are Hugo; Clausen, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Quality of life (QoL) in patients admitted to a general hospital was compared with those admitted to a detoxification unit for the treatment of substance use disorder (SUD). This study combines data from two separate data collections: a cross-sectional study in a general hospital unit (somatic sample, N = 519) and a follow-up study in a detoxification unit (SUD sample, N = 140). A total of 659 patients recruited during 2008–2013 were included in this study. All patients completed a generic QoL questionnaire at inclusion, and the SUD sample also completed it at the six-month follow-up. SUD patients experienced comparably low physical QoL and had significantly lower psychological, social, and existential QoL domain scores when compared with the somatic sample. Mental distress and having a SUD were the major factors explaining variations in QoL, with both influencing QoL negatively. In the SUD sample, QoL improved moderately at the six-month follow-up with less improvement for the domain relationship to a partner. To facilitate the recovery of SUD patients, clinicians must view their patients’ situation holistically and invest efforts into the different life domains affected by poor QoL. PMID:27226719

  10. Characteristics and mortality of elderly patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of a district hospital

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, José Carlos Llamas; Alonso, Joaquín Valle; Fonseca, Javier; Santos, Margarita Luque; Jiménez, María de los Ángeles Ruiz-Cabello; Braniff, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To study all the elderly patients (≥75 years) who were admitted in an Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a Spanish hospital and identify factors associated with mortality. Patients and Methods: A retrospective, observational data collected prospectively in patients ≥75 years recruited from the ICU in the period of January 2004 to December 2010. Results: During the study period, 1661 patients were admitted to our unit, of whom 553 (33.3%) were older than 75 years. The mean age was 79.9 years, 317 (57.3%) were male, and the overall in-hospital mortality was 94 patients (17% confidence interval 14–20.3%). When comparing patients who survived to those who died, we found significant differences in mean age (P = 0.001), Acute Physiologic Assessment and Chronic Health Evaluation II and Simplified Acute Physiology Scoring II (SAPS II) on admission (P < 0.0001, postoperative patients (P = 0.001), and need for mechanical ventilation (P < 0.0001). Comparing age groups, we found statistically significant differences in SAPS II (P = 0.007), diagnosis of non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (P = 0.014), complicated postoperative period (P = 0.001), and pacemaker (P = 0.034). Mortality between the groups was statistically significant (P = 0.004). The survival between the group of 65 and 74 years and patients >75 years was not significant (P = 0.1390). Conclusions: The percentage of elderly patients in our unit is high, with low mortality rates. The age itself is not the sole determinant for admission to the ICU and other factors should be taken into account. PMID:27555692

  11. Acute kidney injury among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Randall, D W; Brima, N; Walker, D; Connolly, J; Laing, C; Copas, A J; Edwards, S G; Batson, S; Miller, R F

    2015-11-01

    We describe the incidence, associations and outcomes of acute kidney injury (AKI) among HIV-infected patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). We retrospectively analysed 223 admissions to an inner-London, University-affiliated ICU between 1999 and 2012, and identified those with AKI and performed multivariate analysis to determine associations with AKI. Of all admissions, 66% were affected by AKI of any severity and 35% developed stage 3 AKI. In multivariate analysis, AKI was associated with chronic kidney disease (odds ratio [OR] = 3.19; p = 0.014), a previous AIDS-defining illness (OR = 1.93; p = 0.039) and the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score, (OR = 3.49; p = 0.018, if > 30). No associations were demonstrated with use of anti-retroviral medication (including tenofovir), or an individual's HIV viral load or CD4 count. AKI was associated with higher inpatient mortality and longer duration of ICU admission. Among patients with stage 3 AKI, only 41% were alive 90 days after ICU admission. Among survivors, 74% regained good renal function, the remainder were dependent on renal replacement therapy or were left with significant ongoing renal dysfunction. Of note, many patients had baseline serum creatinine concentrations well below published reference ranges. AKI among HIV-infected patients admitted to ICU carries a poor prognosis. PMID:25411349

  12. What shall we do with untreatable forensic psychiatric patients?

    PubMed

    Martens, W

    2000-01-01

    The destiny of untreatable forensic psychiatric patients in many western countries is uncertain, because governments, staff members of forensic psychiatric hospitals, lawyers and other involved groups do not know what to do with this category of patients. The debate concerning this matter, and related cost saving measures, very frequently ignores two important questions. Who is responsible for the untreatability of these patients? What are the criteria for untreatability? These core questions, which are related to each other, must be answered before the debate can go further. An exact definition of untreatability is needed for a) a fair screening of the patients, and b) getting more insight in the precise nature of, and interactions of the factors which play a role in the phenomenon of untreatability. To say that some patients are not (totally) responsible for their untreatability is not justifiable, as they may eventually become the victims of cost saving measures. PMID:11143874

  13. Prevalence of unrecognized diabetes mellitus in patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abdullatef, W K; Al-Aqeedi, R F; Dabdoob, W; Hajar, H A; Bener, A; Gehani, A A

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the prevalence of unrecognized diabetes mellitus (DM) in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) as determined by elevated glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), fasting plasma glucose (FPG), and random plasma glucose (RPG) levels. This prospective study recruited 583 patients admitted with ACS without previous diagnosis of DM during 1-year period. Glycosylated hemoglobin was checked for most patients especially those with high values of FPG and or RPG. Patients were classified according to their glycemic state into 123 (21.1%) with DM, 82 (14.1%) with prediabetes, and 57(9.8%) with stress hyperglycemia, while 321 (55%) were classified as nondiabetics. Glycosylated hemoglobin estimation in the setting of ACS was helpful in the diagnosis of DM to eliminate the effect of stress-induced hyperglycemia that might accompany this condition. PMID:22550348

  14. Monoamine oxidase and agitation in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Nikolac Perkovic, Matea; Svob Strac, Dubravka; Nedic Erjavec, Gordana; Uzun, Suzana; Podobnik, Josip; Kozumplik, Oliver; Vlatkovic, Suzana; Pivac, Nela

    2016-08-01

    Subjects with schizophrenia or conduct disorder display a lifelong pattern of antisocial, aggressive and violent behavior and agitation. Monoamine oxidase (MAO) is an enzyme involved in the degradation of various monoamine neurotransmitters and neuromodulators and therefore has a role in various psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders and pathological behaviors. Platelet MAO-B activity has been associated with psychopathy- and aggression-related personality traits, while variants of the MAOA and MAOB genes have been associated with diverse clinical phenotypes, including aggressiveness, antisocial problems and violent delinquency. The aim of the study was to evaluate the association of platelet MAO-B activity, MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism and MAOA uVNTR polymorphism with severe agitation in 363 subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. The results demonstrated significant association of severe agitation and smoking, but not diagnosis or age, with platelet MAO-B activity. Higher platelet MAO-B activity was found in subjects with severe agitation compared to non-agitated subjects. Platelet MAO-B activity was not associated with MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism. These results suggested the association between increased platelet MAO-B activity and severe agitation. No significant association was found between severe agitation and MAOA uVNTR or MAOB rs1799836 polymorphism, revealing that these individual polymorphisms in MAO genes are not related to severe agitation in subjects with schizophrenia and conduct disorder. As our study included 363 homogenous Caucasian male subjects, our data showing this negative genetic association will be a useful addition to future meta-analyses. PMID:26851573

  15. Psychiatric benefits of integrative therapies in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Cassileth, Barrie R

    2014-02-01

    Integrative oncology uses non-pharmacological adjuncts to mainstream care to manage physical, emotional, and psychological symptoms experienced by cancer survivors. Depression, anxiety, fatigue and pain are among the common, often burdensome symptoms that can occur in clusters, deplete patient morale, interfere with treatment plans, and hamper recovery. Patients already seek various modalities on their own to address a broad range of problems. Legitimate complementary therapies offered at major cancer institutions improve quality of life, speed recovery, and optimize patient support. They also augment the benefits of psychiatric interventions, due to their ability to increase self-awareness and improve physical and psychological conditioning. Further, these integrated therapies provide lifelong tools and develop skills that patients use well after treatment to develop self-care regimens. The active referral of patients to integrative therapies achieves three important objectives: complementary care is received from therapists experienced in working with cancer patients, visits become part of the medical record, allowing treatment teams to guide individuals in maximizing benefit, and patients are diverted from useless or harmful 'alternatives.' We review the reciprocal physical and psychiatric benefits of exercise, mind-body practices, massage, acupuncture, and music therapy for cancer survivors, and suggest how their use can augment mainstream psychiatric interventions. PMID:24716505

  16. Psychiatric Morbidity and Quality of Life in Vitiligo Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Podaralla; Rajni, Tenali

    2014-01-01

    Background: Vitiligo has underlying mental illness but mostly not diagnosed and never used psychiatric medication. Hence, the problem persists affecting mostly the individual's quality of life. Aim: Assessing the quality of life, level of depression, and self-esteem of patients with vitiligo and give psychiatric medication for underlying mental illness. Materials and Methods: The study conducted at Owaisi Hospital Research Centre, Hyderabad. The patients registered for dermatologist consultation were also registered for consultation with psychiatrist to rule out any mental illness after detailed evaluation using standardized scales. Results: Patients suffering with vitiligo had depression and low self-esteem; their quality of life was disturbed. Conclusion: The findings provide the role of Mental Health Professionals involved in the field of dermatology for the patients suffering with vitiligo. PMID:25035556

  17. Treatment of patients with immune thrombocytopenia admitted to the emergency room.

    PubMed

    Bavunoğlu, Işıl; Eşkazan, Ahmet Emre; Ar, Muhlis Cem; Cengiz, Mahir; Yavuzer, Serap; Salihoğlu, Ayşe; Öngören, Şeniz; Tunçkale, Aydın; Soysal, Teoman

    2016-08-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is the most frequent cause of acquired thrombocytopenia. In adult ITP patients, corticosteroids and intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) are used as first-line treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate retrospectively the demographic and etiologic characteristics of patients with ITP admitted to the emergency room at our hospital. Seventy-five adult patients with ITP were included, and demographic data, bleeding characteristics, etiologic features and responses to treatments were evaluated retrospectively. Fifty-six patients (75 %) were female, and the median age was 43 years. Eighteen patients had a history of ITP, whereas in 57, thrombocytopenia was identified for the first time. During admission, the median platelet count was 5 × 10(9)/L. Cutaneous and/or mucosal bleeding was the most common clinical feature. High-dose dexamethasone was administered in 60 episodes, whereas IVIg and conventional-dose methylprednisolone were used in nine and six episodes, respectively. The overall response rate of the entire cohort following first-line treatments was 67 %, and complete remission was achieved in 31 patients, 19 patients achieved partial remission, and 25 patients were non-responders. In cases with life-threatening bleeding, concomitant infection, post-traumatic bleeding and need for emergency surgery, IVIg can be used as the first line of treatment option in addition to platelet transfusions. PMID:27129318

  18. Psychiatric complications in the critically ill cardiac patient.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, K M; Cassem, E H

    1993-01-01

    Psychiatric consultation to the critically ill cardiac patient focuses on several common problems: anxiety, delirium, depression, personality reactions, and behavioral disturbances. A review of the causes and treatment of anxiety in the coronary care unit is followed by a discussion of delirium in the critically ill cardiac patient. A description of delirium associated with the use of the intraaortic balloon pump and its treatment with high doses of intravenous haloperidol is also included. After the initial crisis has been stabilized in the critical care unit, the premorbid personality traits of the patient may emerge as behavioral disturbances--particularly as the duration of stay increases. The use of psychiatric consultation completes the discussion. PMID:8219821

  19. Evaluation of Different Methods for Removing Oral Biofilm in Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Maria Sonia; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Mattos, Fernanda Zanol; Semenoff, Tereza Aparecida Della Vedove; Segundo, Alex Semenoff; Tonetto, Mateus Rodrigues; Bandeca, Matheus Coêlho; Porto, Alessandra Nogueira

    2014-01-01

    Background: The present study aimed to evaluate the different methods for removing oral biofilm in combination with 0.12% chlorhexidine, in patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) of the General University Hospital. Materials and Methods: Initially, the patients were included in the study and underwent periodontal evaluation by means of the visible plaque index (VPI) and gingival bleeding index (GBI). The removal of visible biofilm, by a professional, was carried out using a toothbrush and dental floss, followed by the application of a 0.12% chlorhexidine solution. The patients were included in this randomized and controlled study into four groups (total n = 48), as follows: Chlorhexidine and gauze 12/12 h; chlorhexidine and gauze 24/24 h; chlorhexidine and brushing 12/12 h; chlorhexidine and brushing 24/24 h. The patients underwent the biofilm removal protocol for 7 days and then were subjected to a new clinical evaluation as to VPI and GBI. Data analysis was performed through stratification and arrangement of the records, in order to carry out the associations with health indicators used in the study, and the statistical tests used were Kappa and t-test for independent and paired samples. Results: A decrease in the VPI and GBI values when comparing baseline to the final evaluation for all groups was observed. Conclusion: Based on the methodology, it was possible to concluded that chlorhexidine associated with the mechanical action of the toothbrush or gauze in the times 12 h and 24 h in the ICU environment presented the same results as regards amount of visible biofilm. How to cite the article: Oliveira MS, Borges AH, Mattos FZ, Semenoff TA, Segundo AS, Tonetto MR, Bandeca MC, Porto AN. Evaluation of different methods for removing oral biofilm in patients admitted to the intensive care unit. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(3):61-4. PMID:25083034

  20. Etiologies and Management of Aseptic Meningitis in Patients Admitted to an Internal Medicine Department

    PubMed Central

    Jarrin, Irène; Sellier, Pierre; Lopes, Amanda; Morgand, Marjolaine; Makovec, Tamara; Delcey, Veronique; Champion, Karine; Simoneau, Guy; Green, Andrew; Mouly, Stéphane; Bergmann, Jean-François; Lloret-Linares, Célia

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Several studies have focused on the clinical and biological characteristics of meningitis in order to distinguish between bacterial and viral meningitis in the emergency setting. However, little is known about the etiologies and outcomes of aseptic meningitis in patients admitted to Internal Medicine. The aim of the study is to describe the etiologies, characteristics, and outcomes of aseptic meningitis with or without encephalitis in adults admitted to an Internal Medicine Department. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Internal Medicine Department of the Lariboisière Hospital in Paris, France, from January 2009 to December 2011. Clinical and biological characteristics of aseptic meningitis were recorded. These included cerebrospinal fluid analysis, results of polymerase chain reaction testing, final diagnoses, and therapeutic management. The cohort included 180 patients fulfilling the criteria for aseptic meningitis with (n = 56) or without (n = 124) encephalitis. A definitive etiological diagnosis was established in 83 of the 180 cases. Of the cases with a definitive diagnosis, 73 were due to infectious agents, mainly enteroviruses, Herpes Simplex Virus 2, and Varicella Zoster Virus (43.4%, 16.8%, and 14.5% respectively). Inflammatory diseases were diagnosed in 7 cases. Among the 97 cases without definitive diagnoses, 26 (26.8%) remained free of treatment throughout their management whereas antiviral or antibiotic therapy was initiated in the emergency department for the remaining 71 patients. The treatment was discontinued in only 10 patients deemed to have viral meningitis upon admission to Internal Medicine. The prevalence of inflammatory diseases among patients admitted to internal medicine for aseptic meningitis is not rare (4% of overall aseptic meningitis). The PCR upon admission to the emergency department is obviously of major importance for the prompt optimization of therapy and management. However, meningitis due to

  1. Prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in Patients Admitted with Acute Coronary Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Prosdócimo, Ana Cláudia Giaxa; Lucina, Luciane Boreki; Marcia, Olandoski; Jobs, Priscila Megda João; Schio, Nicolle Amboni; Baldanzi, Fernanda Fachin; Costantini, Costantino Ortiz; Benevides-Pereira, Ana Maria Teresa; Guarita-Souza, Luiz Cesar; Faria-Neto, José Rocha

    2015-01-01

    Background Burnout Syndrome is the extreme emotional response to chronic occupational stress, manifesting as physical and mental exhaustion. Although associated with higher prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors, no study so far has evaluated whether the Burnout Syndrome could be a prevalent factor in non-elderly individuals active in the labor market, admitted for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Objective To evaluate the prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome in non-elderly, economically active patients, hospitalized with ACS. Methods Cross-sectional study conducted in a tertiary and private cardiology center, with economically active patients aged <65 years, hospitalized with diagnosis of ACS. The Burnout Syndrome was evaluated with the Burnout Syndrome Inventory (BSI), which assesses workplace conditions and four dimensions that characterize the syndrome: emotional exhaustion (EE), emotional distancing (EmD), dehumanization (De) and professional fulfillment (PF). The Lipp’s Stress Symptoms Inventory for Adults (LSSI) was applied to evaluate global stress. Results Of 830 patients evaluated with suspected ACS, 170 met the study criteria, 90% of which were men, overall average age was 52 years, and 40.5% had an average income above 11 minimum wages. The prevalence of the Burnout Syndrome was 4.1%. When we evaluated each dimension individually, we found high EE in 34.7%, high De in 52.4%, high EDi in 30.6%, and low PF in 5.9%. The overall prevalence of stress was 87.5%. Conclusion We found a low prevalence of Burnout Syndrome in an economically active, non-elderly population among patients admitted for ACS in a tertiary and private hospital. PMID:25517388

  2. Paradoxical Association of Smoking With In‐Hospital Mortality Among Patients Admitted With Acute Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Syed F.; Smith, Eric E.; Bhatt, Deepak L.; Fonarow, Gregg C.; Schwamm, Lee H.

    2013-01-01

    Background Compared to those who never smoked, a paradoxical effect of smoking on reducing mortality in patients admitted with myocardial ischemia has been reported. We sought to determine if this effect was present in patients hospitalized with ischemic stroke. Methods and Results Using the local Get with the Guidelines‐Stroke registry, we analyzed 4305 consecutively admitted ischemic stroke patients (March 2002–December 2011). The sample was divided into smokers versus nonsmokers. The main outcome of interest was the overall inpatient mortality. Compared to nonsmokers, tobacco smokers were younger, more frequently male and presented with fewer stroke risk factors such as hypertension, hyperlipidemia, diabetes, coronary artery disease, and atrial fibrillation. Smokers also had a lower average NIH Stroke Scale (NIHSS) and fewer received tissue plasminogen activator (tPA). Patients in both groups had similar adherence to early antithrombotics, dysphagia screening prior to oral intake, and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis. Smoking was associated with lower all‐cause in‐hospital mortality (6.6% versus 12.4%; unadjusted OR 0.46; CI [0.34 to 0.63]; P<0.001). In multivariable analysis, adjusted for age, gender, ethnicity, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, CAD, atrial fibrillation, NIHSS, and tPA, smoking remained independently associated with lower mortality (adjusted OR 0.64; CI [0.42 to 0.96]; P=0.03). Conclusions Similar to myocardial ischemia, smoking was independently associated with lower inpatient mortality in acute ischemic stroke. This effect may be due to tobacco‐induced changes in cerebrovascular vasoreactivity, or may be due in part to residual confounding. Larger, multicenter studies are needed to confirm the finding and the effect on 30‐day and 1‐year mortality. PMID:23782919

  3. Psychiatric morbidity and depressive symptomatology in patients with permanent pacemakers.

    PubMed

    Aydemir, O; Ozmen, E; Küey, L; Kültür, S; Yeşil, M; Postaci, N; Bayata, S

    1997-06-01

    Implantation of a permanent pacemaker requires a psychological effort on the patient's part for adaptation in the acute term, and chronically, it restricts activities of the patient and may cause some psychiatric disturbances. To investigate psychiatric morbidity and depressive symptomatology of the patients with permanent pacemakers, 84 pacemaker patients were diagnosed using the DSM-III-R criteria and depressive symptoms were determined by modified Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (mHDRS). Sixteen (19.1%) patients had been given a psychiatric diagnosis. The most frequent diagnoses were adjustment disorder (5.9%) and major depressive episode (4.7%). Nine patients (10.7%) were diagnosed as having clinical depression (mHDRS > or = 17). The mean score of mHDRS was 7.57 +/- 7.46, and the severity of depression was significantly higher in females. The most frequent symptoms are difficulties in work and activities (53.6%), psychic anxiety (48.8%), loss of energy (42.9%), and hypochondriasis and insomnia (39.3%). Depressed mood, psychic anxiety, loss of energy, loss of interest, insomnia, and hypochondriasis were significantly more frequent in females. Uneducated patients had a more significant loss of energy than educated patients. Depressed mood, psychic anxiety, and somatic concerns and symptoms were more frequent in patients with permanent pacemakers than in the general population. These symptoms, resembling mixed anxiety-depression disorder, were related to fears of having a permanent pacemaker, since our series were composed of uneducated patients who did not have enough knowledge about the device. PMID:9227759

  4. Housing Trajectories of Forensic Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Salem, Leila; Crocker, Anne G; Charette, Yanick; Earls, Christopher M; Nicholls, Tonia L; Seto, Michael C

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to describe the disposition and housing trajectories of individuals found Not Criminally Responsible on account of Mental Disorder (NCRMD), and the factors that predict different trajectories. To do so, disposition and housing status were coded for 934 NCRMD patients over a 36-month follow-up period. Sequential data analysis resulted in four distinct trajectories: detention in hospital, conditional discharge in supportive housing, conditional discharge in independent housing, and absolute discharge to unknown housing. The likelihood of a placement in supportive housing compared with detention significantly decreased for individuals with a higher index offense severity. Less restrictive trajectories were significantly predicted by clinical factors. The results revealed little change in the disposition and housing trajectories of NCRMD patients. Furthermore, decisions about disposition and housing placement reflect a knowledge-practice gap between risk factors known to be predictive of community resources use in the forensic population. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27138216

  5. Psychiatric symptoms in glioma patients: from diagnosis to management

    PubMed Central

    Boele, Florien W; Rooney, Alasdair G; Grant, Robin; Klein, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Patients with primary intrinsic brain tumors can experience neurological, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms that greatly affect daily life. In this review, we focus on changes in personality and behavior, mood issues, hallucinations, and psychosis, because these are either difficult to recognize, to treat, or are understudied in scientific literature. Neurobehavioral symptoms are common, often multiple, and causation can be multifactorial. Although different symptoms sometimes require a different treatment approach, we advise a comprehensive treatment approach, including pharmacological treatment and/or psychotherapy where appropriate. Further research is needed to obtain a better estimate of the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms in glioma patients, and the extent to which these affect everyday functioning and family life. PMID:26089669

  6. Predicting the Length of Stay of Patients Admitted for Intensive Care Using a First Step Analysis

    PubMed Central

    PEREZ, ADRIANA; CHAN, WENYAW; DENNIS, RODOLFO J.

    2006-01-01

    Predicting the Length of Stay of Patients Admitted for Intensive Care Using a First Step Analysis For patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU), the length of stay in different destinations after the first day of ICU admission, has not been systematically studied. We aimed to estimate the average length of stay (LOS) of such patients in Colombia, using a discrete time Markov process. We used the maximum likelihood method and Markov chain modeling to estimate the average LOS in the ICU and at each destination after discharge from intensive care. Six Markov models were estimated, describing the LOS in each one of the Cardiovascular, Neurological, Respiratory, Gastrointestinal, Trauma and Other diagnostic groups from the ultimate primary reason for admission to ICU. Possible destinations were: the intensive care unit, ward in the same hospital, the high dependency unit/intermediate care area in the same hospital, ward in other hospital, intensive care unit in other hospital, other hospital, other location same hospital, discharge from same hospital and death. The stationary property was tested and using a split-sample analysis, we provide indirect evidence about the appropriateness of the Markov property. It is not possible to use a unique Markov chain model for each diagnostic group. The length of stay varies across the ultimate primary reason for admission to intensive care. Although our Markov models shown to be predictive, the fact that current available statistical methods do not allow us to verify the Markov property test is a limitation. Clinicians may be able to provide information about the hospital LOS by diagnostic groups for different hospital destinations. PMID:18059977

  7. Mortality in Relation to Frailty in Patients Admitted to a Specialized Geriatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, An; Song, Xiaowei; Dong, Jiahui; Mitnitski, Arnold; Liu, Jian; Guo, Zhenhui; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    Background. In older adults admitted to intensive care units (ICUs), frailty influences prognosis. We examined the relationship between the frailty index (FI) based on deficit accumulation and early and late survival. Methods. Older patients (≥65 years) admitted to a specialized geriatric ICU at the Liuhuaqiao Hospital, Guangzhou, China between July–December 2011 (n = 155; age 82.7±7.1 y; 87.1% men) were followed for 300 days. The FI was calculated as the proportion present of 52 health deficits. FI performance was compared with that of several prognostic scores. Results. The 90-day death rate was 38.7% (n = 60; 27 died within 30 days). The FI score was correlated with the Glasgow Coma Scale, Karnofsky Scale, Palliative Performance Scale, Acute Physiology Score—APACHE II and APACHE IV (r 2 = 0.52 to 0.72, p < 0.001). Patients who died within 30 days had higher mean FI scores (0.41±0.11) than those who survived to 300 days (0.22±0.11; F = 38.91, p < 0.001). Each 1% increase in the FI from the previous level was associated with an 11% increase in the 30-day mortality risk (95% CI: 7%–15%) adjusting for age, sex, and the prognostic scores. The FI discriminated patients who died in 30 days from those who survived with moderately high accuracy (AUC = 0.89±0.03). No one with an FI score >0.46 survived past 90 days. Conclusion. ICU survival was strongly associated with the level of frailty at admission. An FI based on health deficit accumulation may help improve critical care outcome prediction in older adults. PMID:26400736

  8. Communication elements supporting patient safety in psychiatric inpatient care.

    PubMed

    Kanerva, A; Kivinen, T; Lammintakanen, J

    2015-06-01

    Communication is important for safe and quality health care. The study provides needed insight on the communication elements that support patient safety from the psychiatric care view. Fluent information transfer between the health care professionals and care units is important for care planning and maintaining practices. Information should be documented and implemented accordingly. Communication should happen in an open communication culture that enables discussion, the opportunity to have debriefing discussions and the entire staff can feel they are heard. For effective communication, it is also important that staff are active themselves in information collecting about the essential information needed in patient care. In mental health nursing, it is important to pay attention to all elements of communication and to develop processes concerning communication in multidisciplinary teams and across unit boundaries. The study aims to describe which communication elements support patient safety in psychiatric inpatient care from the viewpoint of the nursing staff. Communication is an essential part of care and one of the core competencies of the psychiatric care. It enables safe and quality patient care. Errors in health care are often connected with poor communication. The study brings needed insight from the psychiatric care view to the topic. The data were gathered from semi-structured interviews in which 26 nurses were asked to describe the elements that constitute patient safety in psychiatric inpatient care. The data were analysed inductively from the viewpoint of communication. The descriptions connected with communication formed a main category of communication elements that support patient safety; this main category was made up of three subcategories: fluent information transfer, open communication culture and being active in information collecting. Fluent information transfer consists of the practical implementation of communication; open communication

  9. Managing the patient with psychiatric issues in dermatologic practice.

    PubMed

    Gordon-Elliott, Janna S; Muskin, Philip R

    2013-01-01

    Patients often communicate emotions through their bodies and physical symptoms; the skin commonly serves as a means of expression in the patient-doctor relationship. It is important for the dermatologist to be able to indentify psychological issues that manifest in the skin and the interplay between psychiatric and dermatologic conditions. Delusional parasitosis, dermatitis artefacta, trichotillomania, and somatoform disorders all represent dermatologic conditions with underlying emotional causes. Many chronic dermatoses, such as psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, and acne, modulate and are influenced by psychosocial factors. Special issues, including significant medication interactions and the treatment of the "difficult" patient, are reviewed. PMID:23245968

  10. Acceptance of NCPAP in a sample of patients admitted for geriatric rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Objective Sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) is common in older people. Nasal continuous airway pressure (NCPAP) therapy is the treatment of choice for sleep apnea, but is not always accepted by patients. The rate of successful initiation of NCPAP is unknown in geriatric patients. Methods All patients admitted for geriatric rehabilitation were considered for sleep studies. Sleep apnea was assessed using an Edentrace (Nellcor, Hayward, CA) multi-channel recording system. SAS was defined as an apnea-hypopnea-index (AHI) of more than five events per hour plus excessive daytime sleepiness, or an AHI of more than fifteen events per hour regardless of reported sleepiness. Disability was assessed using the Barthel Index of Activities of Daily Living. Results Two hundred sixty nine of 322 consecutive patients (84%) had adequate sleep studies and gave informed consent. SAS was found in 169 subjects (68%). There was no gender difference in the prevalence of SAS. Six subjects (4%) accepted NCPAP therapy. Individuals who accepted NCPAP were younger and less disabled (p < 0.03). Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed disability as the only significant factor predicting NCPAP acceptance. Conclusion NCPAP should not be withheld in the elderly. However, initiation of treatment for SAS remains to be a great challenge in those patients. Geriatric assessment procedures may help better manage older subjects with sleep apnea syndrome. PMID:20156732

  11. Causality of injury and outcome in patients admitted in a major trauma center in North India

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Devarshi; Meena, Sanjay; Sharma, Vineet; Singh, Girish Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Context: Trauma in South Asia is an increasingly significant problem, particularly in light of increasing motorization. Societal changes are resulting in alterations in the epidemiology of trauma. Aims: To assess various epidemiological parameters that influence causation of injury in the patients admitted in a major trauma center in Northern India. Settings and Design: Prospective, cross-sectional, Hospital based study from August 2008 to July 2009. Materials and Methods: A prospective study of 748 patients chosen by random assortment was carried out over a period of 1 year (August 2008 to July 2009) and following parameters were noted: Age group, sex, mode of trauma, type of injury, place where the trauma occurred and factors leading to injury. The length of stay of patients, Kampala trauma score (KTS) and mortality depending on the arrival time in emergency department was also noted. Statistical Analysis: Data analysis was performed using SPSS Version 16. Results: Overall trauma was most common in the age group 15-30 years (Mean age: 29.43 ± 16.87 years), with male constituting 85.29% of the total patients. It was observed that road side injuries were the most frequent (66.71%) site of injuries, whereas household injuries (23.66%), farm site (6.28%), work place (1.60) were the next most common modes of trauma. Mean time of presentation of injured patient was 2.53 ± 4.92 days. About 48.13% patients were admitted after more than 24 h after the injury. Two wheelers (32.09) were found to be the most common mode of injury. Maximum injuries (65.31%) occurred in the rural setting. The overall length of hospital stay ranged from 2 days to 178 days (median15.6 days). Mortality is more in patients who arrive in night (between 9 pm and 5 pm). Conclusions: We conclude that the majority of injuries are preventable and the epidemiological trends differ from that of developed countries. Therefore, preventive strategies should be made on the basis of these epidemiological

  12. The outcomes of patients with severe dengue admitted to intensive care units

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chin-Ming; Chan, Khee-Siang; Yu, Wen-Liang; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Chao, Hui-Chun; Yeh, Chiu-Yin; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Outcomes of adult patients with dengue infections requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admissions remain unclear. We assessed the clinical manifestations and prognostic factors of patients critically ill with severe dengue. This retrospective study was done in a tertiary referral hospital with 96 adult ICU beds. All of the patients with laboratory-confirmed severe dengue infections and admitted to the ICU were enrolled between July 31 and November 31, 2015, during the large outbreak period. The medical records of all the recruited patients were reviewed for the following information: age, gender, clinical manifestations, disease severity scores, underlying conditions, laboratory examinations, and outcomes. The primary endpoint was to find the predictors of ICU mortality. During the study period, 4787 patients with dengue infections required ICU admission. One hundred forty-three (2.99%) were critically ill (mean age: 69.7 years). Hypertension (n = 90, 62.9%) and diabetes mellitus (n = 70, 49.0%) were the 2 most common underlying diseases. Eighty critically ill patients (55.9%) had cobacterial infections, and 33 had cobacteremia. The hematologic system failed most often, followed by thoracic and cardiovascular systems. Fever was the most common presentation (n = 112; 78.3%), followed by anorexia (n = 47; 32.9%) and abdominal pain (n = 46; 32.2%). Overall, 33 patients died (mortality rate: 23.1%). Multivariate analysis showed that ICU mortality was significantly associated with lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, lower platelet counts before ICU discharge, and more organ failures. The number of severe dengue patients who require ICU admission remains high. The mortality rate was associated with lower GCS scores, lower platelet counts, and more organ failures. In addition, more than half of the critically ill dengue patients had comorbid bacterial infections. PMID:27495047

  13. The outcomes of patients with severe dengue admitted to intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chin-Ming; Chan, Khee-Siang; Yu, Wen-Liang; Cheng, Kuo-Chen; Chao, Hui-Chun; Yeh, Chiu-Yin; Lai, Chih-Cheng

    2016-08-01

    Outcomes of adult patients with dengue infections requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admissions remain unclear. We assessed the clinical manifestations and prognostic factors of patients critically ill with severe dengue.This retrospective study was done in a tertiary referral hospital with 96 adult ICU beds. All of the patients with laboratory-confirmed severe dengue infections and admitted to the ICU were enrolled between July 31 and November 31, 2015, during the large outbreak period. The medical records of all the recruited patients were reviewed for the following information: age, gender, clinical manifestations, disease severity scores, underlying conditions, laboratory examinations, and outcomes. The primary endpoint was to find the predictors of ICU mortality.During the study period, 4787 patients with dengue infections required ICU admission. One hundred forty-three (2.99%) were critically ill (mean age: 69.7 years). Hypertension (n = 90, 62.9%) and diabetes mellitus (n = 70, 49.0%) were the 2 most common underlying diseases. Eighty critically ill patients (55.9%) had cobacterial infections, and 33 had cobacteremia. The hematologic system failed most often, followed by thoracic and cardiovascular systems. Fever was the most common presentation (n = 112; 78.3%), followed by anorexia (n = 47; 32.9%) and abdominal pain (n = 46; 32.2%). Overall, 33 patients died (mortality rate: 23.1%). Multivariate analysis showed that ICU mortality was significantly associated with lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores, lower platelet counts before ICU discharge, and more organ failures.The number of severe dengue patients who require ICU admission remains high. The mortality rate was associated with lower GCS scores, lower platelet counts, and more organ failures. In addition, more than half of the critically ill dengue patients had comorbid bacterial infections. PMID:27495047

  14. Predictors of disease severity in patients admitted to a cholera treatment center in urban Haiti.

    PubMed

    Valcin, Claude-Lyne; Severe, Karine; Riche, Claudia T; Anglade, Benedict S; Moise, Colette Guiteau; Woodworth, Michael; Charles, Macarthur; Li, Zhongze; Joseph, Patrice; Pape, Jean W; Wright, Peter F

    2013-10-01

    Cholera, previously unrecognized in Haiti, spread through the country in the fall of 2010. An analysis was performed to understand the epidemiological characteristics, clinical management, and risk factors for disease severity in a population seen at the GHESKIO Cholera Treatment Center in Port-au-Prince. A comprehensive review of the medical records of patients admitted during the period of October 28, 2010-July 10, 2011 was conducted. Disease severity on admission was directly correlated with older age, more prolonged length of stay, and presentation during the two epidemic waves seen in the observation period. Although there was a high seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), severity of cholera was not greater with HIV infection. This study documents the correlation of cholera waves with rainfall and its reduction in settings with improved sanitary conditions and potable water when newly introduced cholera affects all ages equally so that interventions must be directed throughout the population. PMID:24106188

  15. Prevalence and risk factors of pneumothorax among patients admitted to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    El-Nawawy, Ahmed Ahmed; Al-Halawany, Amina Sedky; Antonios, Manal Abdelmalik; Newegy, Reem Gamal

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Pneumothorax should be considered a medical emergency and requires a high index of suspicion and prompt recognition and intervention. Aims: The objective of the study was to evaluate cases developing pneumothorax following admission to a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) over a 5-year period. Settings and Design: Case notes of all PICU patients (n = 1298) were reviewed, revealing that 135 cases (10.4%) developed pneumothorax, and these were compared with those patients who did not. The most common tool for diagnosis used was chest X-ray followed by a clinical examination. Subjects and Methods: Case notes of 1298 patients admitted in PICU over 1-year study. Results: Patients with pneumothorax had higher mortality rate (P < 0.001), longer length of stay (P < 0.001), higher need for mechanical ventilation (MV) (P < 0.001), and were of younger age (P < 0.001), lower body weight (P < 0.001), higher pediatric index of mortality 2 score on admission (P < 0.001), higher pediatric logistic organ dysfunction score (P < 0.001), compared to their counterpart. Iatrogenic pneumothorax (IP) represented 95% of episodes of pneumothorax. The most common causes of IP were barotrauma secondary to MV, central vein catheter insertion, and other (69.6%, 13.2%, and 17.2%, respectively). Compared to ventilated patients without pneumothorax, ventilated patients who developed pneumothorax had a longer duration of MV care (P < 0.001) and higher nonconventional and high-frequency oscillatory ventilation settings (P < 0.001). Conclusions: This study demonstrated that pneumothorax is common in Alexandria University PICU patients, especially in those on MV and emphasized the importance of the strict application of protective lung strategies among ventilated patients to minimize the risk of pneumothorax.

  16. Which values are important for patients during involuntary treatment? A qualitative study with psychiatric inpatients.

    PubMed

    Valenti, Emanuele; Giacco, Domenico; Katasakou, Christina; Priebe, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Involuntary hospital treatment is practised throughout the world. Providing appropriate treatment in this context is particularly challenging for mental health professionals, who frequently face ethical issues as they have to administer treatments in the absence of patient consent. We have explored the views of 59 psychiatric patients who had been involuntarily admitted to hospital treatment across England. Moral deliberation theory, developed in the field of clinical bioethics, was used to assess ethical issues. Interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, and analysed through thematic content analysis. We have detected a number of circumstances in the hospital that were perceived as potentially conflictual by patients. We have established which patient values should be considered by staff when deliberating on ethically controversial issues in these circumstances. Patients regarded as important having freedom of choice and the feeling of being safe during their stay in the hospital. Patients also valued non-paternalistic and respectful behaviour from staff. Consideration of patient values in moral deliberation is important to manage ethical conflicts. Even in the ethically challenging context of involuntary treatment, there are possibilities to increase patient freedoms, enhance their sense of safety and convey respect. PMID:24129367

  17. Clinical predictors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia in patients admitted to the ED.

    PubMed

    Kang, Cheol-In; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon

    2012-09-01

    The identification of clinical characteristics that could identify patients at high risk for Pseudomonas aeruginosa or Acinetobacter baumannii bacteremia would aid clinicians in the appropriate management of these life-threatening conditions, especially in patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) with community-onset infections. To determine clinical risk factors for P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia in patients with community-onset gram-negative bacteremia (GNB), a post hoc analysis of a nationwide bacteremia surveillance database including patients with microbiologically documented GNB was performed. Ninety-six patients with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia were compared with 1230 patients with Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae bacteremia. A solid tumor or hematologic malignancy was more likely to be associated with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia, whereas concurrent neurologic disease was less frequently seen. In regards to the site of infection, pneumonia was more common in P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia, whereas a urinary tract infection was less frequently seen. Factors associated with P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia in multivariate analysis included pneumonia (odds ratio [OR], 3.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.86-6.99), hematologic malignancy (OR, 2.71; 95% CI, 1.26-5.84), male sex (OR, 2.17; 95% CI, 1.31-3.58), solid tumor (OR, 1.89; 95% CI, 1.15-3.12), and health-care-associated infection (OR, 1.88; 95% CI, 1.48-2.41). Our data suggest that an initial empirical antimicrobial coverage of P. aeruginosa or A. baumannii bacteremia should be seriously considered in patients with pneumonia, a hematologic malignancy, solid tumor, or health-care-associated infection, when GNB is suspected, even in community-onset infections. PMID:22030178

  18. Does a clerkship affect students' views of psychiatric patients?

    PubMed

    Fabrega, H

    1995-12-01

    This study deals with the views of medical students toward real psychiatric patients. The students answered seven questions about ten patients who had been interviewed by a senior faculty member. The interviews were recorded on audiovisual tapes. The questions dealt with different aspects of mental illness and included views on how laypersons would evaluate and respond to patients, what it would be like to care for the patients, and whether the patients were potentially dangerous. Answers to questions were correlated. Gender and the student's accuracy in rating psychopathology were used as independent variables to examine students' views and the possible change in these views as a result of participating in a 6-week psychiatric clerkship. The pattern of intercorrelations is reported and discussed. Negative views correlated with anticipated difficulty in caring for patients, and positive views correlated with a higher accuracy in rating psychopathology. In general, student views about mental illness were relatively impervious to the effect of a clerkship. Results are discussed in terms of prior research and knowledge about gender differences in interpersonal sensitivity. Some of the social implications of the results are discussed. PMID:8522934

  19. Patients' experiences of absconding from a psychiatric setting in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Nurjannah, Intansari; FitzGerald, Mary; Foster, Kim

    2009-10-01

    Absconding from psychiatric institutions is a relatively common phenomenon. Yet patients' experience of absconding is a perspective that has received little attention in the West and none in Indonesia. A case study using mixed methods was undertaken in order to provide a profile of absconding events over a 1-year period in a psychiatric setting in Indonesia. In the qualitative phase of the study, in a semistructured interview, 16 patients who absconded described their experiences of absconding. Three themes of experience were identified: the call to home, hopes and realities, and us and them. The call to home theme described patients' eagerness to connect with family and others and to feel safe. Hopes and realities identified patients' hopes for happiness, which were dashed by the realities of life at home and in the hospital. The final theme, us and them, described the competing interests and different opinions of patients in relation to others including hospital staff and family. There is a need for changes to mental health policy and service provision in order to reduce the incidence of absconding in Indonesia and enable patients and their families to receive adequate support while living in the community. PMID:19740142

  20. Prevalence of MRSA Nasal Carriage in Patients Admitted to a Tertiary Care Hospital in Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkader, Jasmine Kulapurathu; Sugumar, Madhan; Rajagopal, Girija Kalarikkal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Infections with MRSA, both community and hospital acquired, are well established and the source of infection is often a carrier. There are very few studies showing the magnitude of MRSA nasal colonization among healthy persons from the community. This study was conducted to detect the prevalence of MRSA nasal carriage in patients who did not have any known risk factors associated with HA- MRSA colonization, admitted to a tertiary care centre in Kerala. Materials and Methods Nasal swabs were collected from patients within 24 hours of admission. Specimen were inoculated on chromogenic agar (HiCrome MeReSa agar-HiMedia) for MRSA screening. Isolates were then subjected to antibiotic sensitivity tests, SCCmec typing and PVL gene detection. Results Out of 683 patients, 16 carried MRSA in their nares (2.3%). Of the 16 strains 13 (81.25 %) strain were SCCmec type III and one belonged to SCCmec type IV (6.25 %). Two strains failed to amplify SCCmec genes. Three strains carried genes for PVL toxin (18.75%). Conclusion With a better understanding of the complex epidemiology of MRSA it is increasingly apparent that demarcations between the HA and CA phenotypes are not as clear cut as previously thought. In this study of nasal carriage of MRSA in the community we have demonstrated prevalence consistent with published data. Most isolates however were shown to belong to the type conventionally assigned to HA-MRSA. PMID:27042461

  1. Acute outcome of treating patients admitted with electrical storm in a tertiary care centre

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Mukund A.; Namboodiri, Narayanan; Prasad BV, Srinivas; Abhilash, S.P.; Thajudeen, Anees; Ajith, Kumar V.K.

    2016-01-01

    Background Electrical storm (ES) is a life threatening emergency. There is little data available regarding acute outcome of ES. Aims The study aimed to analyze the acute outcome of ES, various treatment modalities used, and the factors associated with mortality. Methods This is a retrospective observational study involving patients admitted with ES at our centre between 1/1/2007 and 31/12/2013. Results 41 patients (mean age 54.61 ± 12.41 years; 86.7% males; mean ejection fraction (EF) 44.51 ± 16.48%) underwent treatment for ES. Hypokalemia (14.63%) and acute coronary syndrome (ACS) (14.63%) were the commonest identifiable triggers. Only 9 (21.95%) patients already had an ICD implanted. Apart from antiarrhythmic drugs (100%), deep sedation (87.8%), mechanical ventilation (24.39%) and neuraxial modulation using left sympathetic cardiac denervation (21.95%) were the common treatment modalities used. Thirty-three (80.49%) patients could be discharged after a mean duration of 14.2 ± 2.31 days. Eight (19.5%) patients died in hospital. The mortality was significantly higher in those with EF < 35% compared to those with a higher EF (8 (42.11% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.03)). There was no significant difference in mortality between those with versus without a structural heart disease (8 (21.1% vs 0 (0%), p = 0.32)). Comparison of mortality an ACS with ES versus ES of other aetiologies (3 (50%) vs 5 (14.29) %, p = 0.076)) showed a trend towards significance. Conclusion With comprehensive treatment, there is reasonable acute survival rate of ES. Hypokalemia and ACS are the commonest triggers of ES. Patients with low EF and ACS have higher mortality.

  2. Dysphagia in psychiatric patients: clinical and videofluoroscopic study.

    PubMed

    Bazemore, P H; Tonkonogy, J; Ananth, R

    1991-01-01

    Deaths due to airway obstruction are more common in psychiatric inpatients than in the normal population. A dysphagia program was started in a 400 bed Massachusetts psychiatric hospital after 4 patients in 1 year died from asphyxia. In the year after the program was started, there were no deaths; however, 28 patients experienced 32 choking incidents. The 28 patients received clinical evaluations by speech pathologists, neurologists, psychiatrists, and internists. Of the incidents, 55% required use of the Heimlich maneuver to open the airway. Choking incidents could be classified into five types based on results of clinical examination: bradykinetic, dyskinetic, fast eating syndrome, paralytic, and medical. Twenty-one of the 28 patients were studied by videofluoroscopy and 86% of the videos were abnormal, showing aspiration in eight, webs in five, and delay in the oral phase in five. Patients with bradykinetic dysphagia (secondary to neuroleptic-induced extra-pyramidal syndrome [EPS]) and paralytic dysphagia appeared to experience a more severe form of choking. PMID:1884635

  3. Belief in demons and exorcism in psychiatric patients in Switzerland.

    PubMed

    Pfeifer, S

    1994-09-01

    Belief in demons as the cause of mental health problems is a well-known phenomenon in many cultures of the world. However, there is little literature on this phenomenon in Protestant subcultures of the West. The author conducted a systematic investigation of the prevalence of this attribution in 343 mainly Protestant out-patients of a psychiatric clinic in Switzerland, who described themselves as religious. Of these, 129 (37.6 per cent) believed in the possible causation of their problems through the influence of evil spirits, labelling this as 'occult bondage' or 'possession'. One hundred and four patients (30.3 per cent) sought help through ritual 'prayers for deliverance' and exorcism. Prevalence of such practices was significantly related to diagnosis (p < .01) and to church affiliation (p < .005). Patients in charismatic free churches suffering from anxiety disorders and schizophrenia reported the highest rate of exorcistic rituals (70 per cent), and patients with adjustment disorders from traditional state churches the lowest (14 per cent). The various forms and functions of these healing rituals are described. Although many patients subjectively experienced the rituals as positive, outcome in psychiatric symptomatology was not improved. Negative outcome, such as psychotic decompensation, is associated with the exclusion of medical treatment and coercive forms of exorcism. PMID:7803317

  4. On the Moral Acceptability of Physician-Assisted Dying for Non-Autonomous Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Varelius, Jukka

    2016-05-01

    Several authors have recently suggested that the suffering caused by mental illness could provide moral grounds for physician-assisted dying. Yet they typically require that psychiatric-assisted dying could come to question in the cases of autonomous, or rational, psychiatric patients only. Given that also non-autonomous psychiatric patients can sometimes suffer unbearably, this limitation appears questionable. In this article, I maintain that restricting psychiatric-assisted dying to autonomous, or rational, psychiatric patients would not be compatible with endorsing certain end-of-life practices commonly accepted in current medical ethics and law, practices often referred to as 'passive euthanasia'. PMID:26449985

  5. Sexual activity among patients in psychiatric hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Warner, James; Pitts, Nicola; Crawford, Mike J; Serfaty, Marc; Prabhakaran, Pramod; Amin, Rizkar

    2004-10-01

    In psychiatric hospitals, sexual activity between patients raises special difficulties regarding consent. We undertook a questionnaire survey of inpatients in the mental health units of three hospitals to identify the nature and frequency of sexual activity. A contemporaneous staff questionnaire was used in an attempt to validate the patient reports. Of the 100 patients who participated (response rate 60%), 30 reported engaging in some form of sexual activity including 10 who had sexual intercourse. All sexual intercourse was consensual, but only 2 respondents used condoms. Staff questionnaires suggested levels of sexual activity congruent with patient reports. This survey underlines the conflict between an individual's right to sexual expression and the need to protect vulnerable patients. PMID:15459258

  6. Psychiatric comorbidities among patients with epilepsy in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Vujisić, Slavica; Vodopić, Sanja; Radulović, Ljiljana; Injac-Stevović, Lidija

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidities, depression and anxiety, among patients with epilepsy in the outpatient Clinic for Epilepsy, Clinical Centre of Montenegro. Patients aged 18 and above with a diagnosis of epilepsy for at least one year were consecutively enrolled during a six-month period. Patients anonymously filled out a questionnaire which included data on the gender, age, education, marital status and degree of seizure control. The Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) were used to evaluate the presence or absence of anxiety and depression. Total number of study patients was 70, including 52 patients with partial seizures and 18 patients with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. The mean patient age was 37 ± 7.92 years. The prevalence of depression in our sample was 32.8%, whereas the prevalence of anxiety was 21.4%. Patients with partial seizures were more depressed, while those with idiopathic generalized seizures were more anxious (p < 0.01). Depression was associated with a lower educational level, unemployment and poor seizure control (p < 0.05). The number of antiepileptic drugs showed a trend towards negative association with depression (p = 0.005). Anxiety was associated with the level of education and uncontrolled seizures (p < 0.01). Neither depression nor anxiety was associated with age, gender, marital status, age at onset and duration of epilepsy. Psychiatric disorders among patients with epilepsy are quite common but yet under-recognized. Therefore, appropriate recognition and efficient treatment of these disorders in patients with epilepsy might improve their quality of life and could consequently lead to better treatment success. PMID:25868308

  7. Inpatient treatment of the psychiatric patient with alcoholism.

    PubMed

    Bean-Bayog, M

    1987-05-01

    Patients with both alcoholism and mental illness, or the one masquerading as the other, are very common and often puzzling and discouraging to clinicians. This article reviews several aspects of these problems: epidemiologic studies show that substantial proportions of mentally ill people suffer from alcoholism, and these disorders interlock in complex ways, each exacerbating the other. Many physicians feel uncomfortable working with alcoholic people, mostly because of poor training, and this impinges on difficulties of giving excellent care to these taxing patients. Complexities and resistances to interviewing obstruct evaluation. Interviewing and history taking techniques and the reason for them are discussed. The decision whether a patient needs medical or psychiatric hospitalization, alcoholism rehabilitation, or outpatient psychiatric or alcoholism treatment is reviewed along with the management and sequencing of treatment for primary and secondary alcoholism with concomitant psychosis, mania, depression, panic disorder, and adult attention deficit disorder. Clinical intervention and referral for the patient on a medical or surgical floor who may have alcoholism is discussed. Two special clinical problems, the differential diagnosis of postdetoxification depression and the risks of using alcohol cross-tolerant drugs, are also reviewed. PMID:2884166

  8. Patient or consumer? The colonization of the psychiatric clinic.

    PubMed

    Evans, Alicia M

    2005-12-01

    Information is given a privileged place in the psychiatric clinic, as illustrated by the prevalence and volume of data to be collected and forms to be completed by psychiatric nurses. Information though is different to knowledge. The present paper argues that information is part of a managerial discourse that implies commodification whereas knowledge is part of a clinical discourse that allows room for the suffering of the patient. Information belongs to the discourse of managerialism, one that positions the patient as customer/consumer and in doing so renders them unsuffering. The patient's suffering is silenced by their construction as a consumer. The discourse of managerialism seeks a complete data set of information. By way of contrast, another discourse, that of psychoanalysis offers the institution the idea that there are always holes, gaps, and uncertainty. The idea of uncertainty, gaps, things remaining unknown and a limit sits uncomfortably with the dominant discourse of managerialism; one that demands no limits, complete data sets, and many satisfied customers. This market model of managerialism denies the potential of the therapeutic relationship; that something curative might be produced via the transference. In addition, the managerialist discourse potentially positions the patient as both illegitimate and unsuffering. PMID:16296997

  9. Human immunodeficiency virus antibody test and seroprevalence in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Naber, D; Pajonk, F G; Perro, C; Löhmer, B

    1994-05-01

    Psychiatric inpatients are at risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Investigations in the United States revealed seroprevalence rates of 5.5-8.9%. Therefore, inclusion of HIV antibody testing in routine laboratory screening is sometimes suggested. To investigate this issue for inpatients in the Department of Psychiatry, University of Munich, the incidence, reason for HIV testing and results were analyzed. Of 12,603 patients, hospitalized from 1985 to 1993, 4.9% (623 patients, 265 in risk groups) underwent the HIV test after informed consent. Thirty patients (4.8% of those tested) were found to be positive, but only in 5 cases (all of risk groups) was infection newly detected. Data indicate that, in psychiatry, HIV testing is reasonable only in patients in risk groups or if clinical variables suggest HIV infection. PMID:8067276

  10. Assessment of medical resident's attention to the health literacy level of newly admitted patients

    PubMed Central

    Karsenty, Cecile; Landau, Michael; Ferguson, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to assess communication at the bedside in the emergency room between residents and their patients in order to identify common communication gaps. We also intended to evaluate whether residents for whom English is a second language (ESL residents) communicate less effectively. Methods A scorable checklist was developed in order to assess and identify communication gaps between the residents and their patients. Medical students observed the internal medicine and family medicine residents while they admitted patients to the medical service in the Emergency Room. Before this, medical students were trained for two weeks with a senior internist. The role of the medical student was not revealed; rather they were self-described as observers of the admission process. Results Over an 8 week period, 71 observations were made of 27 medicine residents. 71 patient intakes were observed, evaluating 27 residents. In 52.1% of these interactions, the residents used medical acronyms when communicating with the patients. During 66.2% of interactions, technical medical terms or expressions were used during the history taking and in only 27.6% of those cases were the terms explained at least partially. Teach back technique was not observed in any of the interactions evaluated. Data was also analyzed based on whether the doctors were ESL residents or native English speakers. ESL residents tended to use significantly more technical language than the native English speakers, but the native English speakers tended to use more acronyms. Conclusions How much patients understand of what their doctor says is called “health literacy.” Resident physicians often overestimate their patients’ health literacy, and this leads to communication gaps which have the potential to result in poorer health outcomes for the patients. The checklist developed for this pilot study assessed how well residents tailor their communication to their patients’ health

  11. Prevalence of Vitamin D Deficiency in Elderly Patients Admitted to an Inpatient Rehabilitation Unit in Tropical Singapore

    PubMed Central

    Neo, Jong J.; Kong, Keng H.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Data on hypovitaminosis D in elderly patients admitted to rehabilitation units in tropical countries are scarce. Objective. To assess the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency and its associated risk factors in elderly patients admitted to a rehabilitation unit in tropical Singapore. Methods. Prospective, cohort study of 134 subjects ≥ 65 years old admitted to a tertiary rehabilitation centre. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25OHD3) was measured on rehabilitation admission. Results. Mean age was 72.0 ± 5.7 years, and stroke was the commonest rehabilitation diagnosis (49.3%). Low 25OHD3 levels were present in 115 patients (85.6%) and 59 patients (44%) were deemed to be vitamin D deficient. The mean PTH level was significantly higher in patients with low 25OHD3 levels. (p = 0.002) Age, gender, vitamin D supplementation, premorbid ambulatory status, and admission/discharge Functional Independence Measure scores were not significantly associated with vitamin D deficiency. Malays/Indians (p = 0.013) and recurrent fallers (p = 0.029) were at significantly higher risk of vitamin D deficiency. Conclusions. Despite the tropical weather, vitamin D deficiency is common in elderly subjects admitted to a rehabilitation unit in Singapore. Routine assessment of vitamin D levels is recommended especially in those with a history of recurrent falls and patients of Indian/Malay ethnicity. PMID:26998361

  12. Outcomes of Patients Who Have Do Not Resuscitate Status prior to Being Admitted to an Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Debjit; Moreno, Carlos; Csete, Marc; Perez, Elizabeth Kury; Cubeddu, Luigi; Farcy, David; Henry, Steven; Glazer, Zachary; Moreno-Walton, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Admission of patients who have do not resuscitate (DNR) status to an intensive care unit (ICU) is potentially a misallocation of limited resources to patients who may neither need nor want intensive care. Yet, patients who have DNR status are often admitted to the ICU. This is a retrospective review of patients who had a valid DNR status at the time that they were admitted to an ICU in a single hospital over an eighteen-month period. Thirty-five patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. The primary reasons for admission to the ICU were respiratory distress (54.2%) and sepsis (45.7%). Sixteen (45.7%) of the patients died, compared to a 5.4% mortality rate for all patients admitted to our ICU during this period (p < 0.001). APACHE II score was a significant predictor of mortality (18.5 ± 1.3 alive and 23.4 ± 1.4 dead; p = 0.038). Of the 19 patients discharged alive, 9 were discharged home, 5 to hospice, and 4 to a post-acute care facility. Conclusions. Patients who have DNR status and are admitted to the ICU have a higher mortality than other ICU patients. Those who survive have a high likelihood of being discharged to hospice or a post-acute care facility. The value of intensive intervention for these patients is not supported by these results. Only a minority of patients were seen by palliative care and chaplain teams, services which the literature supports as valuable for DNR patients. Our study supports the need for less expensive and less intensive but more appropriate resources for patients and families who have chosen DNR status. PMID:27051551

  13. Assessment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo in medical patients admitted with falls in a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Joel; Tomassen, Sylvia; Lane, Laura; Bishop, Katie; Thomas, Nibu

    2016-08-01

    Having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) puts patients at a significantly higher risk of falling. It is poorly recognised and diagnosis is frequently delayed. BPPV has been studied in outpatient settings, but there have been no studies looking at the prevalence in patients admitted with falls. This study aims to establish how common BPPV is in these patients.For a 4-month period, patients admitted on an unselected medical take were screened for an admission precipitated by a fall. Patients who consented were assessed for BPPV using the Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre. Patients who tested positive were treated using the Epley manoeuvre. The assessments were carried out by specialist physiotherapists who were experienced at assessing and diagnosing patients with peripheral vestibular disorders. Out of the 111 patients initially identified, 37 (33%) were considered to be appropriate and consented to be part of the study. Of these, 20 patients (54%) had a positive Dix-Hallpike manoeuvre.Of the patients included in the study, over half tested positive for BPPV. This merits further study. Potentially, there is a proportion of patients admitted with falls who have an easily treatable contributing factor that is not being identified with standard practice. PMID:27481376

  14. Effect of White Noise on Sleep in Patients Admitted to a Coronary Care

    PubMed Central

    Farokhnezhad Afshar, Pouya; Bahramnezhad, Fatemeh; Asgari, Parvaneh; Shiri, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Sleep disorders are a common problem in patients in the critical care unit. The objective of the present study was to determine the effect of white noise on the quality of sleep in patients admitted to the CCU. Methods: The present study was single-blind, quasi-experimental study. A total of 60 patients were selected using the purposive sampling method. Quality of sleep was measured with PSQI on the first day in admission, then after three nights of admission without any intervention for control group and for the experimental group quality of sleep measured by white noise with intensity of 50-60 dB then Quality of sleep was measured with PSQI. Data were analyzed by SPSS 13 software. Results: The average total sleep time in the control group before the study reached from 7.08 (0.8) to 4.75 (0.66) hours after three nights of hospitalization, while in the experimental group, no significant changes were seen in the average sleep hours (6.69 ± 0.84 vs. 6.92 ± 0.89, P = 0.15).The average minutes of sleep in the control group before the study reached from 12.66 (7.51) to 25.83 (11.75) minutes after a three- night stay, while in the experimental group, no significant changes were observed in the average sleep duration (12.16 ± 7.50 vs. 11 ±6. 07, P = 0.16). Conclusion: The use of white noise is recommended as a method for masking environmental noises, improving sleep, and maintaining sleep in the coronary care unit. PMID:27354974

  15. Glycated hemoglobin screening identifies patients admitted for retreatment of tuberculosis at risk for diabetes in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Sariko, Margaretha L; Mpagama, Stellah G; Gratz, Jean; Kisonga, Riziki; Saidi, Queen; Kibiki, Gibson S; Heysell, Scott K

    2016-01-01

    Introduction World Health Organization recommendations of bidirectional screening for tuberculosis (TB) and diabetes have been met with varying levels of uptake by national TB programs in resource-limited settings. Methodology Kibong’oto Infectious Diseases Hospital (KIDH) is a referral hospital for TB from northern Tanzania, and the national referral hospital for multidrug-resistant (MDR)-TB. Glycated hemoglobin (HgbA1c) testing was done on patients admitted to KIDH for newly diagnosed TB, retreatment TB, and MDR-TB, to determine the point prevalence of diabetes (HgbA1c ≥ 6.5%) and prediabetes (HgbA1c 5.7%– 6.4%). Results Of 148 patients hospitalized at KIDH over a single week, 59 (38%) had no prior TB treatment, 22 (15%) were retreatment cases, and 69 (47%) had MDR-TB. Only 3 (2%) had a known history of diabetes. A total of 144 (97%) had successful screening, of which 110 (77%) had an HgbA1c ≤ 5.6%, 28 (19%) had ≥ 5.7 < 6.5, and 6 (4%) had ≥ 6.5. Comparing subjects with prediabetes or diabetes to those with normal A1c levels, retreatment patients were significantly more likely to have a A1c ≥ 5.7% (odds ratio: 3.2, 95% CI: 1.2–9.0; p = 0.02) compared to those without prior TB treatment. No retreatment case was a known diabetic, thus the number needed to screen to diagnose one new case of diabetes among retreatment cases was 11. Conclusions Diabetes prevalence by HgbA1c was less common than expected, but higher HgA1c values were significantly more frequent among retreatment cases, allowing for a rational, resource-conscious screening approach. PMID:27131008

  16. Comorbid psychiatric disorders in substance dependence patients: A control study

    PubMed Central

    Shantna, K.; Chaudhury, S.; Verma, A. N.; Singh, A. R.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to investigate the comorbidity of mental disorders among a random sample of substance dependence patients from a psychiatric inpatients department and the general population. Materials and Methods: Comprehensive data was collected from inpatients with substance abuse/dependence and comorbidity of mental disorders at the Ranchi Institute of Neuropsychiatry and Allied Sciences (RINPAS) and from normal controls from the general population during the period January 2007 to May 2007. Results: The results show that the most prevalent comorbid disorders in substance dependence patients and substance abusers were depressive disorders. Conclusions: The majority of substance dependence patients suffered from comorbid mental disorders. Comorbidity needs to be taken into account when analyzing the relationship between substance dependence and depression and in planning treatment strategies for comorbid conditions. PMID:21180482

  17. Psychiatric symptoms of patients with primary mitochondrial DNA disorders

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of our study was to assess psychiatric symptoms in patients with genetically proven primary mutation of the mitochondrial DNA. Methods 19 adults with known mitochondrial mutation (MT) have been assessed with the Stanford Health Assessment Questionnaire 20-item Disability Index (HAQ-DI), the Symptom Check List-90-Revised (SCL-90-R), the Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form (BDI-SF), the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and the clinical version of the Structured Clinical Interview for the the DSM-IV (SCID-I and SCID-II) As control, 10 patients with hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy (HN), harboring the peripheral myelin protein-22 (PMP22) mutation were examined with the same tools. Results The two groups did not differ significantly in gender, age or education. Mean HAQ-DI score was 0.82 in the MT (range: 0-1.625) and 0.71 in the HN group (range: 0-1.625). Level of disability between the two groups did not differ significantly (p = 0.6076). MT patients scored significantly higher on the BDI-SF and HDRS than HN patients (12.85 versus 4.40, p = 0.031, and 15.62 vs 7.30, p = 0.043, respectively). The Global Severity Index (GSI) of SCL-90-R also showed significant difference (1.44 vs 0.46, p = 0.013) as well as the subscales except for somatization. SCID-I interview yielded a variety of mood disorders in both groups. Eight MT patient (42%) had past, 6 (31%) had current, 5 (26%) had both past and current psychiatric diagnosis, yielding a lifetime prevalence of 9/19 (47%) in the MT group. In the HN group, 3 patients had both past and current diagnosis showing a lifetime prevalence of 3/10 (30%) in this group. SCID-II detected personality disorder in 8 MT cases (42%), yielding 3 avoidant, 2 obsessive-compulsive and 3 personality disorder not otherwise specified (NOS) diagnosis. No personality disorder was identified in the HN group. Conclusions Clinicians should be aware of the high prevalence of psychiatric symptoms in patients with mitochondrial

  18. Revolving-door patients in a public psychiatric hospital in Israel: cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Oyffe, Igor; Kurs, Rena; Gelkopf, Marc; Melamed, Yuval; Bleich, Avi

    2009-12-01

    AIM. To study social, demographic, clinical, and forensic profiles of frequently re-hospitalized (revolving-door) psychiatric patients. METHODS. The study included all patients (n=183) who were admitted to our hospital 3 or more times during a 2-year period from 1999 through 2000. We compared these patients to 2 control groups of patients who were admitted to our hospital in the same period. For comparison of forensic data, we compared them with all non revolving-door patients (n=1056) registered in the computerized hospital database and for comparison of medical and clinical data we compared them with a random sample of non revolving-door patients (n=98). The sample was sufficiently large to yield high statistical power (above 98%). We collected data on the legal status of the hospitalizations (voluntary or involuntary) and social, demographic, clinical, and forensic information from the forensic and medical records of revolving-door and non revolving-door patients. RESULTS. In the period 1999-2000, 183 revolving-door patients accounted for 771 (37.8%, 4.2 admissions per patient) and 1056 non revolving-door patients accounted for 1264 (62.5%, 1.2 admissions per patient) of the 2035 admissions to our hospital. Involuntary hospitalizations accounted for 23.9% of revolving-door and 76.0% of non revolving-door admissions. Revolving-door patients had significantly shorter mean interval between hospitalizations, showed less violence, and were usually discharged contrary to medical advice. We found no differences in sex, marital status, age, ethnicity, diagnoses, illegal drug and alcohol use, or previous suicide-attempts between the groups. CONCLUSIONS. Revolving-door patients are not necessarily hospitalized for longer time periods and do not have more involuntarily admissions. The main difference between revolving-door and non revolving-door patients is greater self-management of the hospitalization process by shortening the time between voluntary re-admission and

  19. Comparison of different methods for measurement of electrolytes in patients admitted to the intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    Yılmaz, Sinan; Uysal, Hilal B.; Avcil, Mücahit; Yılmaz, Mustafa; Dağlı, Bekir; Bakış, Murat; Ömürlü, Imran K.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate whether electrolyte levels measured by using blood gas analyzers (ABG) and auto-analyzers (AA) are equivalent and can be used interchangeably. Methods: This observational prospective study was conducted in 100 patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit, Adnan Menderes University School of Medicine, Aydin, Turkey, between March and August 2014. Samples for both AA and ABG analyzers were collected simultaneously from invasive arterial catheters of patients. The electrolyte levels were measured by using 2 methods. Results: The mean sodium level measured by ABG was 136.1±6.3 mmol/L and 137.8±5.4 mmol/L for AA (p=0.001). The Pearson’s correlation coefficient was 0.561 (p<0.001). The Bland-Altman 95% limits of agreement were -9.4 to 12.6 mmol/L. The mean potassium levels measured by ABG was 3.4±0.7 mmol/L and AA was 3.8±0.7 mmol/L (p=0.001). The Bland-Altman comparison limits were -0.58 to 1.24 and the associated Pearson’s correlation coefficient was 0.812 (p<0.001). Conclusion: The results of the 2 analyzing methods, in terms of sodium, were not equivalent and could not be used interchangeably. However, according to the statistical analyses results, by including, but not blindly trusting these findings, urgent and vital decisions could be made by the potassium levels obtained from the BGA, but a simultaneous follow-up sample had to be sent to the central laboratory for confirmation. PMID:26905347

  20. The Concept of Patient Participation in Forensic Psychiatric Care: The Patient Perspective.

    PubMed

    Selvin, Mikael; Almqvist, Kjerstin; Kjellin, Lars; Schröder, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    The importance of patient participation is advocated in medical treatment and nursing care and has been linked to increased quality of care, increased patient satisfaction, and treatment adherence. Still, patients in forensic psychiatric care often report being unhappy with their experienced level of participation. The concept of patient participation is complex and has several definitions, thus it is important to investigate it from different perspectives in different contexts. The aim of this study was to describe patients' perceptions of the concept of patient participation in forensic psychiatric care. A qualitative design with a phenomenographic approach was used, and interviews with 19 participants in a Swedish setting were completed. The participants described the concept of patient participation in forensic psychiatric care as follows: influence, to have good communication and to be involved; confidence, to have mutual trust and to trust the care; and own responsibility, to participate in activities and to take the initiative. On the basis of the results of this study, improved patient participation in forensic psychiatric care may be achieved with active communication, by building up and maintaining trust for professional competence and by encouraging patients' own responsibility. It is important that knowledge about patients' views of the concept of patient participation is included in the planning and improvement of forensic care. PMID:27088759

  1. Psychiatric disorders in patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and drug-resistant epilepsy: a study of an Argentine population.

    PubMed

    Scévola, Laura; Teitelbaum, Julia; Oddo, Silvia; Centurión, Estela; Loidl, César Fabián; Kochen, Silvia; D Alessio, Luciana

    2013-10-01

    Epidemiological data show that up to 20-30% of patients with psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNESs), resembling drug-resistant epilepsy (DRE), are referred to tertiary epilepsy centers. Furthermore, both disorders present high psychiatric comorbidity, and video-EEG is the gold standard to make differential diagnoses. In this study, we described and compared the clinical presentation and the frequency of psychiatric disorders codified in DSM IV in two groups of patients, one with PNESs and the other with DRE, admitted in a tertiary care epilepsy center of Buenos Aires, Argentina. We included 35 patients with PNESs and 49 with DRE; all were admitted in the video-EEG unit in order to confirm an epilepsy diagnosis and determine surgical treatment possibilities. All patients underwent a neurological and psychiatric assessment, according to standardized protocol (SCID I and II; DSM IV criteria). Student's t test was performed to compare continuous variables and Chi square test to compare qualitative variables. In this study, 33 (67%) patients with DRE and 35 (100%) patients with PNESs met criteria for at least one disorder codified in Axis I of DSM IV (p=0.003). Differences in the frequency of psychiatric disorder presentation were found between groups. Anxiety disorders (16.32% vs 40%; p=0.015), trauma history (24.5% vs 48.57%; p=0.02), posttraumatic stress disorder (4.08% vs 22.85%; p=0.009), and personality cluster B disorders (18.37% vs 42.86%; p=0.02) were more frequent in the group with PNESs. Psychotic disorders were more frequent in the group with DRE (20.4% vs 2.85%; p=0.019). Depression was equally prevalent in both groups. Standardized psychiatric assessment provides information that could be used by the mental health professional who receives the referral in order to improve quality of care and smooth transitions to proper PNES treatment, which should include a multidisciplinary approach including neurology and psychiatry. PMID:23969203

  2. The characteristics of advanced cancer patients followed at home, but admitted to the hospital for the last days of life.

    PubMed

    Mercadante, Sebastiano; Masedu, Francesco; Valenti, Marco; Mercadante, Alessandro; Aielli, Federica

    2016-08-01

    Information regarding advanced cancer patients followed at home who are admitted to the hospital in the last days of life are lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the characteristics of patients who were hospitalized in the last days of life after being assisted by a home palliative care team. The secondary outcome was to identify possible risk factors for hospitalization. The charts were analyzed of a consecutive sample of advanced cancer patients admitted to hospital wards in the last days of life after being followed at home by a palliative care team. Of 550 consecutive patients followed at home, 138 (25.1 %) were admitted to the hospital. Younger patients were more likely to die in the hospital. In a logistic risk analysis adjusted for age, patients with lung and head-neck cancer were more likely to die in the hospital. Patients having a female relative or a female consort as a caregiver were more likely to die at home. CAGE-positive patients (7.25 %), and patients with a shorter period of home assistance were more likely transported to hospital before dying (p = 0.00 and p < 0.024, respectively). The most frequent reason for hospital admission was dyspnea. Admission was more frequent to the oncology ward. Patients who were admitted to the hospital died after a mean of 10.2 days (SD 8.2, range 0-40). This study provides preliminary data on the risk factors of hospitalization at the end of life for advanced cancer patients followed at home. PMID:26895033

  3. Evaluation of the sensitivity and specificity of criteria for isolation of patients admitted to a specialized cancer hospital.

    PubMed

    Cataneo, Caroline; Canini, Silvia Rita Marin da Silva; e Castro, Paulo de Tarso Oliveira; Hayashida, Miyeko; Gir, Elucir

    2011-01-01

    Early isolation of patients possibly colonized by multi-resistant microorganisms can minimize their spread, reducing cases of hospital infection and the related costs. This study aimed to identify the sensitivity and specificity of the criteria for isolation of patients admitted to a specialized cancer hospital. Cross-sectional study with a population of 61 patients coming from other hospitals who were admitted to the hospital between March 1st and August 31th, 2009. At the moment of admission, a data collection instrument was filled out and nasal and anal swabs were collected for microbiological culture. Of the 56 patients who met the isolation criteria, 30 (49.2%) presented positive cultures for multi-resistant microorganisms and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequently identified microorganism. Most patients colonized by multi-resistant microorganisms were isolated at the moment of admission. The sensitivity of the isolation criteria was 90% and the specificity was 6.5%. PMID:22030570

  4. Traditional Healing Practices Sought by Muslim Psychiatric Patients in Lahore, Pakistan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farooqi, Yasmin Nilofer

    2006-01-01

    This research explored the type of traditional healing practices sought by Muslim psychiatric patients treated at public hospitals of Lahore city, Pakistan. The sample comprised 87 adult psychiatric patients (38% male and 62% female). The patients self-reported on the Case History Interview Schedule that they had sought diverse traditional healing…

  5. Management of severe sepsis in patients admitted to Asian intensive care units: prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Phua, Jason; Du, Bin; Tang, Yao-Qing; Divatia, Jigeeshu V; Tan, Cheng Cheng; Gomersall, Charles D; Faruq, Mohammad Omar; Shrestha, Babu Raja; Gia Binh, Nguyen; Arabi, Yaseen M; Salahuddin, Nawal; Wahyuprajitno, Bambang; Tu, Mei-Lien; Wahab, Ahmad Yazid Haji Abd; Hameed, Akmal A; Nishimura, Masaji; Procyshyn, Mark; Chan, Yiong Huak

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To assess the compliance of Asian intensive care units and hospitals to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s resuscitation and management bundles. Secondary objectives were to evaluate the impact of compliance on mortality and the organisational characteristics of hospitals that were associated with higher compliance. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting 150 intensive care units in 16 Asian countries. Participants 1285 adult patients with severe sepsis admitted to these intensive care units in July 2009. The organisational characteristics of participating centres, the patients’ baseline characteristics, the achievement of targets within the resuscitation and management bundles, and outcome data were recorded. Main outcome measure Compliance with the Surviving Sepsis Campaign’s resuscitation (six hours) and management (24 hours) bundles. Results Hospital mortality was 44.5% (572/1285). Compliance rates for the resuscitation and management bundles were 7.6% (98/1285) and 3.5% (45/1285), respectively. On logistic regression analysis, compliance with the following bundle targets independently predicted decreased mortality: blood cultures (achieved in 803/1285; 62.5%, 95% confidence interval 59.8% to 65.1%), broad spectrum antibiotics (achieved in 821/1285; 63.9%, 61.3% to 66.5%), and central venous pressure (achieved in 345/870; 39.7%, 36.4% to 42.9%). High income countries, university hospitals, intensive care units with an accredited fellowship programme, and surgical intensive care units were more likely to be compliant with the resuscitation bundle. Conclusions While mortality from severe sepsis is high, compliance with resuscitation and management bundles is generally poor in much of Asia. As the centres included in this study might not be fully representative, achievement rates reported might overestimate the true degree of compliance with recommended care and should be interpreted with caution. Achievement of targets for blood cultures

  6. Historical review: First facial pain patient admitted to Massachusetts General Hospital, February 1823 and first case series.

    PubMed

    Keith, David A; Dodson, Thomas B; Kaban, Leonard B

    2013-08-01

    Founded in 1811, the Massachusetts General Hospital recently celebrated its bicentennial. The War of 1812 delayed construction of the building so the first patient actually was admitted to the hospital 10 years later, on September 3, 1821. By 1823, the 60 hospital beds were full. Patient 66 was admitted on February 28, 1823, and his hospital course, as described in the admissions book, was transcribed for the Massachusetts General Hospital bicentennial celebration. That case history is reproduced and a case series of 6 similar patients published in 1828 by Dr John Warren, surgeon-in-chief and a founder of the hospital, is presented. In this report, the authors comment on the diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of these patients in the context of the contemporaneous health care environment and in light of the current knowledge of facial pain disorders. This article was adapted from the authors' commentary for the bicentennial celebration. PMID:23866949

  7. Multidrug-resistant organisms detected in refugee patients admitted to a University Hospital, Germany June‒December 2015.

    PubMed

    Reinheimer, Claudia; Kempf, Volkhard A J; Göttig, Stephan; Hogardt, Michael; Wichelhaus, Thomas A; O'Rourke, Fiona; Brandt, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria (MDR GNB) were found to colonise 60.8% (95% confidence interval: 52.3-68.9) of 143 refugee patients mainly from Syria (47), Afghanistan (29), and Somalia (14) admitted to the University Hospital Frankfurt, Germany, between June and December 2015. This percentage exceeds the prevalence of MDR GNB in resident patients four-fold. Healthcare personnel should be aware of this and the need to implement or adapt adequate infection control measures. PMID:26794850

  8. [Working with life histories of relatives of psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Osinaga, V L; Vieira, M J; Armelin, M V; Furegato, A R

    2000-12-01

    This text contains the account of a practical research experience which uses the theory and techniques of oral narratives. The authors present the theoretical and methodological framework of the technique, the choice of the topic, which focused on the psychiatric patient and his/her family relationship, the research site and the characterization of collaborators. They also present each step of this methodology, starting from the interviews and following on to the reading, transcription, text correction, floating reading, trans-creation, identification of the vital tone as well as that of analysis categories. Finally, they point out the categories that have been removed from the account by making comments on the topics referring to each one. The technique was shown to be effective for the apprehension of subjective categories and as way to understand personal and social relationships in the everyday practice of nursing in mental health. PMID:12033068

  9. Psychiatric and psychological comorbidities in patients with psoriasis- a review.

    PubMed

    Rabin, F; Bhuiyan, S I; Islam, T; Haque, M A; Islam, M A

    2012-10-01

    Psoriasis is a common inflammatory skin disease. The impact of psoriasis on quality of life is significant even when it involves relatively limited body surface area (BSA). Life stresses have been found as both a cause of psoriasis and as an aggravating factor in the disease. In different large epidemiological studies up to 79% patients of psoriasis had a negative impact on their lives, and Psoriasis was reported to be associated stressful life event in 10-90%, depression in 24-51%, felt shame and embarrassment over their appearance in 89%, lack of confidence in 42%, family friction in 26%, wish to be dead to active suicidal ideation in 9.7-5.5%, addiction and alcoholism in 18% and also significant impact upon sexual function. Children with psoriasis had 25-47% higher risk of developing any psychiatric disorder, 23-62% higher risk of develop depression and 32-250% higher risk of anxiety. PMID:23134936

  10. Medicare Cost Differences between Nursing Home Patients Admitted with and without Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stuart, Bruce; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L.; Fahlman, Cheryl; Quinn, Charlene C.; Burton, Lynda; Zuckerman, Illene H.; Hebel, J. Rich; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Singhal, Puneet K.; Magaziner, Jay

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Our objective in this study was to compare Medicare costs of treating older adults with and without dementia in nursing home settings. Design and Methods: An expert panel established the dementia status of a stratified random sample of newly admitted residents in 59 Maryland nursing homes between 1992 and 1995. Medicare expenditures…

  11. Postoperative hospital course of patients with history of severe psychiatric illness.

    PubMed

    Solomon, S; McCartney, J R; Saravay, S M; Katz, E

    1987-09-01

    The postoperative hospital course of 54 patients with a past history of psychiatric illness was studied through chart review. Both chronic schizophrenics and chronic depressives tolerated surgical procedures well, without any unusual difficulties or exacerbation of psychiatric illness. They represented no management problems. Patients with acute, severe upset in the preoperative period (regardless of diagnosis) presented most of the management problems postoperatively. PMID:3678811

  12. [Compulsory measures and pathological creatine kinase levels in psychiatric in-patients].

    PubMed

    Grube, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of compulsory measures (CM) with pathological Creatine Kinase (CK) levels in 317 patients admitted to a secure psychiatric ward. The assumptions is that CK-activity is increased prior to administration of CM because increases in CK-levels may represent aggressive behaviour as precursors of a higher chance of administrating CM. The CK-levels were assessed immediately following admission. During the course of the patients' stay the frequency of different CM was assessed by the use of the Staff Observation Aggression Scale. In a CHAID analysis pathological CK-levels were associated with subsequent administration of CM. Lifetime aggression and main diagnosis were associated with administration of CM as well. In a ROC analysis concerning pathological CK-activity the AUC for subsequent administration of CM was 70.5 % with a sensitivity of 73.5 % and a specifity of 67.5 %. Despite some methodological shortcomings the study indicates that it could be useful to measure CK-activity at the time of admission because pathological levels may indicate an increased probability of administration of CM subsequent to aggressive behaviour. PMID:23925933

  13. Characteristics of Older Adults Admitted to Hospital versus Those Discharged Home, in Emergency Department Patients Referred to Internal Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Hominick, Kathryn; McLeod, Victoria; Rockwood, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Background Frail older adults present to the Emergency Department (ED) with complex medical, functional, and social needs. When these needs can be addressed promptly, discharge is possible, and when they cannot, hospital admission is required. We evaluated the care needs of frail older adults in the ED who were consulted to internal medicine and seen by a geriatrician to determine, under current practices, which factors were associated with hospitalization and which allowed discharge. Methods We preformed a chart-based, exploratory study. Data were abstracted from consultation records and ED charts. All cases had a standard Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA which records a Clinical Frailty Scale (CFA) and allows calculation of a Frailty Index (FI). Results Of 100 consecutive patients, 2 died in the ED, 75 were admitted, and 23 were discharged, including one urgent placement. Compared with discharged patients (0.39 ± SD 0.16), those admitted had a higher mean FI-CGA (0.48 ± 0.13; p < .01). Greater mobility dependence (2% in discharged vs. 32% in admitted; p < .05) was notable. Conclusions Discharge decisions require assessment of medical, functional, and social problems. Ill, frail patients often can be discharged home when social and nursing support can be provided. The degree of frailty, impaired mobility, and likely delirium must be taken into account when planning for their care. PMID:27076860

  14. Association of family background with adolescent smoking and regular use of illicit substances among underage psychiatric in-patients.

    PubMed

    Laukkanen, Matti; Hakko, Helinä; Riala, Kaisa; Räsänen, Pirkko

    2008-01-01

    This study investigated whether adolescent's family type was associated with regular smoking or the use of illicit substances (cannabis or hard drugs) among underage adolescent psychiatric in-patients. The sample consisted of 471 adolescents aged 12-17 years admitted to psychiatric hospital between April 2001 and March 2006 at Oulu University Hospital, Finland. The information on family factors and substance use was based on the Schedule for Affective Disorder and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children, Present and Lifetime interview and the European modification of the Addiction Severity Index questionnaire. Compared to adolescent boys from two-parent families, those from child welfare placement were more likely to regularly use both cannabis (odds ratio [OR]=4.4; 95%confidence interval [CI]=1.4-13.7; P=.012) and hard drugs (OR=8.4; 95% CI=1.7-42.1; P=.01).Among girls, no association was found between family type and the use of illicit substances. Two-parent or foster family units may protect adolescents from involvement with illicit substances. In clinical adolescent psychiatric practice more attention should be paid to family interventions and parental support. PMID:19062350

  15. Risk factors, management and outcomes of patients admitted with near fatal asthma to a tertiary care hospital in Riyadh

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dorzi, Hasan M.; Al-Shammary, Haifa A.; Al-Shareef, Salha Y.; Tamim, Hani M.; Shammout, Khaled; Al Dawood, Abdulaziz; Arabi, Yaseen M.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE: Near-fatal asthma (NFA) has not been well studied in Saudi Arabia. We evaluated NFA risk factors in asthmatics admitted to a tertiary-care hospital and described NFA management and outcomes. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a retrospective study of NFA patients admitted to an ICU in Riyadh (2006-2010). NFA was defined as a severe asthma attack requiring intubation. To evaluate NFA risk factors, randomly selected patients admitted to the ward for asthma exacerbation were used as controls. Collected data included demographics, information on prior asthma control and various NFA treatments and outcomes. RESULTS: Thirty NFA cases were admitted to the ICU in the five-year period. Compared to controls (N = 120), NFA patients were younger (37.5 ± 19.9 vs. 50.3 ± 23.1 years, P = 0.004) and predominantly males (70.0% vs. 41.7%, P = 0.005) and used less inhaled steroids/long-acting ß2-agonists combination (13.6% vs. 38.7% P = 0.024. Most (73.3%) NFA cases presented in the cool months (October-March). On multivariate analysis, age (odds ratio [OR] 0.96; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.92-0.99, P = 0.015) and the number of ED visits in the preceding year (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.00-1.55) were associated with NFA. Rescue NFA management included ketamine (50%) and theophylline (19%) infusions. NFA outcomes included: neuromyopathy (23%), mechanical ventilation duration = 6.4 ± 4.7 days, tracheostomy (13%) and mortality (0%). Neuromuscular blockade duration was associated with neuromyopathy (OR, 3.16 per one day increment; 95% CI, 1.27-7.83). CONCLUSIONS: In our study, NFA risk factors were younger age and higher number of ED visits. NFA had significant morbidity. Reducing neuromuscular blockade duration during ventilator management may decrease neuromyopathy risk. PMID:24551016

  16. Does HIV status influence the outcome of patients admitted to a surgical intensive care unit? A prospective double blind study.

    PubMed Central

    Bhagwanjee, S.; Muckart, D. J.; Jeena, P. M.; Moodley, P.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: (a) To assess the impact of HIV status (HIV negative, HIV positive, AIDS) on the outcome of patients admitted to intensive care units for diseases unrelated to HIV; (b) to decide whether a positive test result for HIV should be a criterion for excluding patients from intensive care for diseases unrelated to HIV. DESIGN: A prospective double blind study of all admissions over six months. HIV status was determined in all patients by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunofluorescence assay, western blotting, and flow cytometry. The ethics committee considered the clinical implications of the study important enough to waive patients' right to informed consent. Staff and patients were blinded to HIV results. On discharge patients could be advised of their HIV status if they wished. SETTING: A 16 bed surgical intensive care unit. SUBJECTS: All 267 men and 135 women admitted to the unit during the study period. INTERVENTIONS: None. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: APACHE II score (acute physiological, age, and chronic health evaluation), organ failure, septic shock, durations of intensive care unit and hospital stay, and intensive care unit and hospital mortality. RESULTS: No patient had AIDS. 52 patients were tested positive for HIV and 350 patients were tested negative. The two groups were similar in sex distribution but differed significantly in age, incidence of organ failure (37 (71%) v 171 (49%) patients), and incidence of septic shock (20 (38%) v 54 (15%)). After adjustment for age there were no differences in intensive care unit or hospital mortality or in the durations of stay in the intensive care unit or hospital. CONCLUSIONS: Morbidity was higher in HIV positive patients but there was no difference in mortality. In this patient population a positive HIV test result should not be a criterion for excluding a patient from intensive care. PMID:9133887

  17. Impact of psychiatric illness upon asthma patients' health care utilization and illness control. Are all psychiatric comorbidities created equal?

    PubMed

    Pilipenko, Nataliya; Karekla, Maria; Georgiou, Andreas; Feldman, Jonathan

    2016-10-01

    The impact of psychiatric illnesses upon asthma patients' functioning is not well understood. This study examined the impact of psychiatric comorbidity upon illness management in asthma patients using empirically-derived psychiatric comorbidity groups. Participants were a clinic sample of Greek-speaking asthma patients (N = 212) assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ) Somatoform, Depression, Panic Disorder (PD), Other Anxiety Disorder, Eating Disorder (ED) and Alcohol sub-scales. The associations between sub-scales were examined using multiway frequency analysis. The following groups were derived: Somatoform disorder and/or Any Depressive disorder (n = 63), Somatoform disorder and/or Other Anxiety disorder (n = 51), Somatoform disorder and/or Any ED (n = 60), and Any Anxiety group including PD and/or Other Anxiety disorder (n = 24). Across all groups, psychiatric illness was associated with significantly worse asthma control (p < .01). Participants in Any Anxiety group, OR = 4.61, 95% CI [1.90, 11.15], Somatoform and/or Any Depressive disorder, OR = 2.06, 95% CI [1.04, 4.09] and Somatoform and/or Other Anxiety disorder, OR = 2.75, 95% CI [1.35, 5.60] were at higher risk for asthma-related Emergency Room (ER) visits compared to controls. However only Somatoform and/or Any Depressive disorder, OR = 3.67, 95% CI [1.60, 8.72], Somatoform and/or Other Anxiety disorder, OR = 5.50, 95% CI [2.34, 12.74], and Somatoform and/or Any ED, OR = 4.98, 95% CI [2.14, 11.60] group membership were risk factors for asthma-related hospitalizations. Results suggest that while comorbid psychiatric disorders generally negatively impact asthma illness management, different psychiatric comorbidities appear to have disparate effects upon illness management outcomes. PMID:26782700

  18. Acute Poisonings Admitted to a Tertiary Level Intensive Care Unit in Northern India: Patient Profile and Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mathai, Ashu Sara; Pannu, Aman; Arora, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Background Poisoning is becoming a real health care burden for developing countries like India. An improved knowledge of the patterns of poisonings, as well as the clinical course and outcomes of these cases can help to formulate better preventive and management strategies. Aim To study the demographic and clinical profiles of patients admitted to the ICU with acute poisoning and to study the factors that predict their mortality. Materials and Methods Retrospective two years (September 1, 2010 to August 31, 2012) study of all consecutive patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with acute poisoning at a tertiary care hospital in Northern India. Results Out of the 67 patients admitted to the ICU during the study period, the majority were young (median age 29 years) males (69%) who had consumed poison intentionally. Pesticides were the most commonly employed poison, notably organophosphorus compounds (22 patients, 32.8%) and aluminium phosphide (14 patients, 20.9%). While the overall mortality from all poisonings was low (18%), aluminium phosphide was highly toxic, with a mortality rate of 35%. The factors at ICU admission that were found to be associated with a significant risk of death were, high APACHE II and SOFA scores (p =0.0001 and p=0.006, respectively), as well as the need for mechanical ventilation and drugs for vasoactive support (p=0.012 and p= 0.0001, respectively). Conclusion Use of pesticides for intentional poisoning continues to be rampant in Northern India, with many patients presenting in a critical condition to tertiary level hospitals. Pesticide regulations laws, educational awareness, counseling and poison information centers will help to curtail this public health problem. PMID:26557594

  19. Social Support as Predictor of Psychopathology in the Adolescent Offspring of Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoefnagels, Cees; Meesters, Cor; Simenon, Joke

    2007-01-01

    The potential role of social support for the adolescent offspring of psychiatric patients has hitherto not been examined. We examined whether the adolescent's level of psychiatric symptoms is dependent on the content and the function of social support (whether direct or moderating), controlling for perceived stress. In a cross-sectional design, 40…

  20. Psychiatric Morbidity, Pain Perception, and Functional Status of Chronic Pain Patients in Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Rajmohan, V; Kumar, Suresh K

    2013-01-01

    Context: Psychological factors, such as that exist when we experience pain, can profoundly alter the strength of pain perception. Aim: The study aims to estimate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders, and its association with perception of pain and functional status in chronic patients in palliative care. Materials and Methods: The sample was selected via simple randomisation and post consent were assessed using (1) a semi- structured questionnaire to elicit socio-demographic information and medical data (2) Brief Pain Inventory (3) ICD-10 Symptom Checklist (4) ICD-10-Diagnostic Criteria for Research (DCR) (5) Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) (6) Covi Anxiety Rating Scale (7) Karnofsky Performance Status Scale. Data was analysed using independent sample t test and chi square test. Results: The psychiatric morbidity was 67% with depression and adjustment disorders being the major diagnosis. There was a significant association between psychiatric morbidity pain variables (P = 0.000). Psychiatric morbidity significantly impaired activity, mood, working, walk, sleep, relationship, and enjoyment. There was no association between aetiology of pain, type of cancer, treatment for primary condition and treatment for pain and psychiatric morbidity. The functional status of cancer patients was also poorer in patients with psychiatric morbidity (P = 0.008). Conclusion: There is a high prevalence of psychiatric illness in chronic pain patients of any aetiology. Psychiatric morbidity is associated with increased pain perception, impairment in activity and poor functional status. PMID:24347904

  1. A Psychiatric Residency Curriculum on the Care of African American Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Herbert W.; Felder, Diane; Clark, Michelle O.

    2004-01-01

    Training psychiatric residents to address cross-cultural issues in their practice of psychiatry is a necessary objective of contemporary psychiatric education. Cultural issues play a critical role in the formation and expression of a patient's personality. In addition, they are a major determinant of the context in which mental illness develops.…

  2. Prevalence and characteristics of breakthrough pain in patients with non-malignant terminal disease admitted to a hospice.

    PubMed

    Zeppetella, G; O'Doherty, C A; Collins, S

    2001-05-01

    A prospective survey was undertaken to determine the prevalence and characteristics of breakthrough pain in patients with non-malignant terminal disease admitted to a hospice. Of the 78 admissions surveyed, 10 patients were confused or too unwell to take part and 25 were pain-free. The remaining 43 reported 86 pains (range 1-6 per patient); of these patients, 27 (63%) had breakthrough pain and identified 52 pains (range 1-5 per patient). Breakthrough pain was classified as somatic (46%) visceral (14%), neuropathic (25%) or mixed aetiology (15%); 60% of pains were severe or excruciating. The mean number of daily breakthrough pain episodes was five (range 1-13), 54% of which occurred suddenly. Most pains (56%) were unpredictable; 75% lasted less than 30 min. These findings suggest that breakthrough pain is common in patients with non-malignant terminal disease; it is frequent, short lasting and often unpredictable, thus making treatment difficult. PMID:11407195

  3. The Comparison of Procalcitonin Guidance Administer Antibiotics with Empiric Antibiotic Therapy in Critically Ill Patients Admitted in Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Atabak; Khodadadian, Ali; Sanatkar, Mehdi; Shariat Moharari, Reza; Etezadi, Farhad; Ahmadi, Arezoo; Imani, Farsad; Khajavi, Mohammad Reza

    2015-01-01

    The empiric antibiotic therapy can result in antibiotic overuse, development of bacterial resistance and increasing costs in critically ill patients. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of procalcitonin (PCT) guide treatment on antibiotic use and clinical outcomes of patients admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS). A total of 60 patients were enrolled in this study and randomly divided into two groups, cases that underwent antibiotic treatment based on serum level of PCT as PCT group (n=30) and patients who undergoing antibiotic empiric therapy as control group (n=30). Our primary endpoint was the use of antibiotic treatment. Additional endpoints were changed in clinical status and early mortality. Antibiotics use was lower in PCT group compared to control group (P=0.03). Current data showed that difference in SOFA score from the first day to the second day after admitting patients in ICU did not significantly differ (P=0.88). Patients in PCT group had a significantly shorter median ICU stay, four days versus six days (P=0.01). However, hospital stay was not statistically significant different between two groups, 20 days versus 22 days (P=0.23). Early mortality was similar between two groups. PCT guidance administers antibiotics reduce antibiotics exposure and length of ICU stay, and we found no differences in clinical outcomes and early mortality rates between the two studied groups. PMID:26553084

  4. The psychiatric management of patients with alcohol dependence.

    PubMed

    Ritvo, Jonathan I; Park, Charles

    2007-09-01

    Alcohol dependence is a chronic, relapsing biobehavioral disease mediated by various parts of the brain, including reward systems, memory circuits, and the prefrontal cortex. It is characterized by loss of the ability to drink alcohol in moderation and continued drinking despite negative consequences. The alcohol withdrawal syndrome is a common but not universal diagnostic feature of alcohol dependence. Benzodiazepine detoxification of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome prevents the development of withdrawal seizures and delirium tremens, and makes patients more comfortable, which promotes engagement in treatment. Symptom-triggered dosing, based on a withdrawal rating scale such as the Clinical Institute Withdrawal Assessment of Alcohol Scale, Revised, is optimal for minimizing the total benzodiazepine dosage. Use of a long-acting benzodiazepine (eg, chlordiazepoxide) is preferred in uncomplicated patients. Thiamine should be administered routinely before the administration of intravenous fluids to prevent the development of Wernicke's encephalopathy and Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome. In combination with psychosocial treatment, disulfiram, naltrexone, and acamprosate can reduce the frequency of relapse. Naltrexone may be more effective for reduction of loss of control with the first drink and cue-related craving, and acamprosate may be more effective for stabilizing the physiology of post-acute withdrawal. Disulfiram, an aversive deterrent, can be useful if administration can be monitored and tied to meaningful contingencies or when used prophylactically for situations anticipated to carry high risk of relapse. Psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression, is common and is best addressed concurrently, although definitive diagnosis may have to await a period of prolonged sobriety. Prescription of addictive substances, including benzodiazepines beyond the period of acute detoxification, should be avoided, and if necessary should be closely monitored (eg, by frequent

  5. "Boarding" Psychiatric Patients in Emergency Rooms: One Court Says "No More".

    PubMed

    Appelbaum, Paul S

    2015-07-01

    "Boarding" involuntary psychiatric patients in medical emergency rooms is common in many parts of the United States. The practice, driven by a shortage of alternative resources, including limited inpatient capacity, can result in patients' being held for days without treatment or a hospital room, often in busy corridors or treatment rooms. A recent challenge to this practice led the Washington Supreme Court to declare it illegal and resulted in the appropriation of substantial funding to create new psychiatric beds. Centralized psychiatric crisis services, with appropriate payment models, may offer another approach to reducing the need for holding patients awaiting inpatient admission. PMID:26130151

  6. Study of prevalence of hypertension in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease patients admitted at Nepal Medical College and Teaching Hospital.

    PubMed

    Dhungel, Sanjib; Paudel, Badri; Shah, Shristi

    2005-12-01

    A retrospective study of 237 cases of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) patients admitted in medical ward of Nepal Medical College Teaching Hospital (NMCTH) was performed to find out the prevalence of hypertension in such COPD subjects. The prevalence of COPD amongst the total number of patients admitted at NMCTH medical ward was 17.3%. Prevalence of COPD was more after the onset of middle age, the peak was found to be at the age of 60-69 years. Out of these COPD subjects, 98 patients (37 patients were known case of hypertension) had hypertension. Thus prevalence of hypertension was 41.3% in COPD subjects studied. Prevalence increased with age after the age of 50 years and the highest prevalence was at the age of 60-69 years which directly correlates with the prevalence of COPD. The prevalence of hypertension in COPD patients was significantly higher than the normal population that may reflect COPD itself as a risk factor for developing hypertension. A larger and detailed study is needed to confirm such finding. PMID:16519071

  7. Physical restraint for psychiatric patients and its associations with clinical characteristics and the National Mental Health Law in China.

    PubMed

    An, Feng-Rong; Sha, Sha; Zhang, Qing-E; Ungvari, Gabor S; Ng, Chee H; Chiu, Helen F K; Wu, Ping-Ping; Jin, Xin; Zhou, Jian-Song; Tang, Yi-Lang; Xiang, Yu-Tao

    2016-07-30

    Physical restraint (PR) for patients is an ongoing controversial topic in psychiatry. This study examined the percentage of PR and its associations with clinical characteristics and the implementation of the National Mental Health Law (NMHL) in China. The study consecutively assessed a sample of 1364 psychiatric inpatients. Socio-demographic and clinical data including use of PR were collected from the medical records using a form designed for this study and confirmed via interview. Psychopathology and insight were measured using standardized instruments. The percentage of PR was 27.2% in the whole sample with 30.7% and 22.4% occurring respectively before and after the NMHL implementation (p=0.001). In multiple logistic regression analysis PR was positively associated with unemployment, lower income, aggression in the past month, being admitted before the NMHL implementation and poorer insight. The percentage of PR in Chinese psychiatric patients is associated with various clinical factors and appeared to decrease after the implementation of the NMHL. Focused and individualized care for patients who are unemployed, have low income, recent aggression and poor insight would be necessary at early stages of admission. PMID:27179180

  8. Psychiatric Stigma in Treatment-Seeking Adults with Personality Problems: Evidence from a Sample of 214 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Catthoor, Kirsten; Schrijvers, Didier; Hutsebaut, Joost; Feenstra, Dineke; Sabbe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Stigmatization is a major burden in adult psychiatric patients with Axis-I diagnoses, as shown consistently in most studies. Significantly fewer studies on the emergence of psychiatric stigma in adult patients with personality disorders (PDs) exist, although the resulting evidence is conclusive. Some authors consider patients with PDs at risk for severe stigmatization because of intense difficulties during interpersonal contact, even in a psychotherapeutic relationship. The aim of this study was primarily the assessment of pre-existing stigma in patients referred for intensive treatment for PDs. The study enrolled 214 patients admitted to the adult department of a highly specialized mental health care institute offering psychotherapy for patients with severe and complex personality pathology. All patients underwent a standard assessment with self-report questionnaires and a semi-structured interview to measure Axis II PDs. The stigma consciousness questionnaire and the perceived devaluation-discrimination questionnaire, both validated instruments, were used to measure perceived and actual experiences of stigma. Independent sample t-tests were used to investigate differences in the mean total stigma scores for patients both with and without a PD. One-way ANOVAs were performed to assess the differences between having a borderline PD, another PD, or no PD diagnosis. Multiple regression main effect analyses were conducted in order to explore the impact of the different PD diagnosis on the level of stigma. The mean scores across all patient groups were consistent with rather low stigma. No differences were found for patients with or without a PD diagnosis. Level of stigma in general was not associated with an accumulating number of PDs. Given the remarkable results, we would strongly recommend further investigations in the field to better understand the phenomenon of stigma in all its aspects. PMID:26217243

  9. Risk Factors for Mechanical Ventilation in Patients with Scrub Typhus Admitted to Intensive Care Unit at a University Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Kyoung Min; Rim, Ch'ang Bum; Lee, Jun Ho; Kang, Min Seok; Kim, Ji Hye; Kim, Sang Il; Jung, Sun Young; Cho, Yongseon

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for mechanical ventilation in the patients with scrub typhus admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) at a university hospital. Methods We retrospectively selected and analyzed clinical data from the medical records of 70 patients (32 men, 38 women) admitted to the ICU with scrub typhus between 2004 and 2014. The patients had a mean±standard deviation age of 71.2±11.1 years and were evaluated in two groups: those who had been treated with mechanical ventilation (the MV group, n=19) and those who had not (the non-MV group, n=51). Mean ages of the MV group and the non-MV group were 71.2±8.3 years and 71.2±11.1 years, respectively. Results Significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to acute respiratory failure (p=0.008), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE) II score (p=0.015), Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score (p=0.013), death (p=0.014), and ICU duration (p<0.01). Multivariate analysis indicated that the following factors were significantly associated with mechanical ventilation: acute respiratory failure (p=0.011), SOFA score (p=0.005), APACHE II score (p=0.011), platelet count (p=0.009), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) (p=0.011). Conclusion Thus, five factors-acute respiratory failure, SOFA score, APACHE II score, platelet count, and LDH-can be the meaningful indicators for mechanical ventilation for the patients with scrub typhus admitted to ICU. PMID:26770232

  10. [Indications for central veinous catheterism in psychiatric patients (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    König, P; Strickner, M

    1978-03-01

    Based on cases of a Psychiatric Intensive Care Unit specific indications and applications of catheterism of central-veins in these special instances are presented, the psychiatric indications and contraindications for such measures are submitted in addition to those known from other medical fields. The mode of insertion, duration, infusionregimen and rates of complications are reviewed in 102 cases. Two of the common veinous-catheter systems are compared as for practicability. PMID:417008

  11. Mortality, Rehospitalisation and Violent Crime in Forensic Psychiatric Patients Discharged from Hospital: Rates and Risk Factors

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Wolf, Achim; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Larsson, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine rates and risk factors for adverse outcomes in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services. Method We conducted a historical cohort study of all 6,520 psychiatric patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals between 1973 and 2009 in Sweden. We calculated hazard ratios for mortality, rehospitalisation, and violent crime using Cox regression to investigate the effect of different psychiatric diagnoses and two comorbidities (personality or substance use disorder) on outcomes. Results Over mean follow-up of 15.6 years, 30% of patients died (n = 1,949) after discharge with an average age at death of 52 years. Over two-thirds were rehospitalised (n = 4,472, 69%), and 40% violently offended after discharge (n = 2,613) with a mean time to violent crime of 4.2 years. The association between psychiatric diagnosis and outcome varied—substance use disorder as a primary diagnosis was associated with highest risk of mortality and rehospitalisation, and personality disorder was linked with the highest risk of violent offending. Furthermore comorbid substance use disorder typically increased risk of adverse outcomes. Conclusion Violent offending, premature mortality and rehospitalisation are prevalent in patients discharged from forensic psychiatric hospitals. Individualised treatment plans for such patients should take into account primary and comorbid psychiatric diagnoses. PMID:27196309

  12. The Effect of Trauma Intervention on the Satisfaction of Patients Admitted to the Emergency Department: A Clinical Trial Study

    PubMed Central

    Zakerimoghadam, Masoumeh; Sadeghi, Somayeh; Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Kazemnejad, Anoshirvan

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient satisfaction is a key determinant of the quality of medical care. Moreover, satisfaction can be used as a criterion for examining the adequacy of the care, health, and competency of personnel. Objectives This study was conducted to determine the satisfaction of patients receiving trauma care in the emergency department of a hospital affiliated with Isfahan University of Medical Sciences. Patients and Methods This simple clinical trial was performed on 104 patients admitted for traumatic injury to an emergency department in Iran. Given that patients frequently enter an emergency department for care, the sampling of patients in the department was done on days that were randomly assigned to the study group. The experimental group received trauma intervention in four areas from their admission to the emergency department to their discharge from the hospital, and the control group received routine nursing care. The data were collected through a questionnaire that asked for demographic characteristics and then went on to ask about patient satisfaction. The satisfaction questionnaire was completed after the trauma intervention at the end of patients’ stay in the hospital. The data were analyzed using SPSS 22 software and descriptive statistical tests and analytical tests (independent t and Chi-square). Results The mean score for total satisfaction after trauma intervention in the experimental group (45.6 ± 3.69) was significantly different from that of the control group (32.01 ± 7.78) (P < 0.001). Therefore, the levels of total satisfaction in the experimental and control group were favorable and relatively favorable, respectively. Conclusions In this study, trauma intervention increased satisfaction in patients admitted to the emergency department. Therefore, managers and personnel of hospitals and healthcare training centers are urged to implement trauma intervention in their hospitals or healthcare training centers. PMID:27433350

  13. Clinical and Therapeutic Profiles of Heart Failure Patients admitted to a Tertiary Hospital, Aseer Region, Saudi Arabia

    PubMed Central

    Assiri, Abdullah S

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the clinical and therapeutic profiles of heart failure (HF) cases admitted to Aseer Central Hospital (ACH), Saudi Arabia. Methods: A retrospective cohort of 300 consecutive patients admitted with the diagnosis of HF to ACH from 1 June 2007 to 31 May 2009 were included in the study. Data on demographic variables, aetiologic factors, risk factors, and therapeutic profiles of patients with HF were collected and analysed. Results: The patients’ mean age was 67.4 ± 13.7 years and 68.7% of them were male. The commonest aetiologies for HF were ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and hypertension in 38.3% and 33.3% of patients, respectively. A total of 61.3% of patients were diabetics. Other risk factors for HF included renal failure in 9.7%, atrial fibrillation in 13%, and anaemia in 48.3% of patients. Echocardiography was performed in 98.7% of cases: the average ejection fraction (EF) was 33% ± 17. Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEI) or angiotensin 2 receptor blockers were used in 68.3% of cases, β-blockers in 51.6% of cases and digoxin in 28.3% of cases. Conclusion: The major causes of HF in our study were IHD and hypertension. Diabetes and anaemia were common risk factors. The cohort constituted an intermediate HF risk group (ejection fraction (EF) 33%). Important therapeutic agents like angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor I, β-blockers and digoxin were underutilised. Fostering such therapy in practice will lead to a better outcome in the management of HF patients. Anaemia was a significant risk factor in our HF patients and should be managed properly. PMID:21969895

  14. Quality of care in African-American patients admitted for congestive heart failure at a university teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Ilksoy, Nurcan; Moore, Renee H; Easley, Kirk; Jacobson, Terry A

    2006-03-01

    Previous studies have shown that the quality of congestive heart failure (CHF) treatment for hospitalized patients varies. The goal of this study was to evaluate the compliance of physicians at a large, inner-city teaching hospital with current evidence-based guidelines. A retrospective review of the medical records of 104 patients admitted with CHF was conducted. Quality-of-care indicators were assessed, including the use of echocardiograms, the administration of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and beta blockers to appropriate patients, and lifestyle and medication counseling at discharge. The assessment of left ventricular (LV) function was documented in 96.1% of patients (n = 100). A total of 65 patients (92.8%) with systolic dysfunction were considered to be ideal candidates for ACE inhibitor therapy. Of these 65 patients, 58 (89.2%) were discharged on ACE inhibitors. Of 41 patients with LV systolic dysfunction who were considered to be ideal candidates for beta-blocker therapy, only 10 (24.4%) were discharged on beta-blocker therapy. Of all patients with CHF, 50% received discharge counseling on medication compliance, 48% received counseling on a low-salt diet, and only 9% were told to monitor daily weight. This study shows that in a major academic teaching hospital, there is a need for improvement in the use of beta-blocker therapy as well as greater emphasis on patient education strategies regarding diet, medication adherence, and monitoring daily weight. PMID:16490439

  15. Elderly Psychiatric Patient Status and Caregiver Perceptions as Predictors of Caregiver Burden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearson, Jane; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Examined aspects of patient status and caregiver perceptions in 46 pairs of elderly psychiatric patients and their caregivers. Found that significant predictors of caregiver burden included disruptive patient behavior, caregiver distress, and patients' functional limitations. Findings suggest that predictors of caregiver burden vary with patient…

  16. Medical Students and Psychiatric Patients: An Encounter of the First Kind.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ries, Richard K.; And Others

    1980-01-01

    The use of psychiatric patients in teaching interview technique to medical students is studied through a survey of participating patients and medical students. The experience was judged by both patients and students as useful, with more students than patients reporting the experience as being stressful. (Author/JMD)

  17. Profile of patients admitted to a triage dermatology clinic at a tertiary hospital in São Paulo, Brazil*

    PubMed Central

    Bertanha, Fernanda; Nelumba, Erica Judite Pimentel; Freiberg, Alyne Korukian; Samorano, Luciana Paula; Festa Neto, Cyro

    2016-01-01

    Background Knowledge of epidemiological data on skin diseases is important in planning preventive strategies in healthcare services. Objective To assess data from patients admitted to a triage dermatology clinic. Methods A retrospective study was performed of patients admitted over a one-year period to the Triage Dermatology Clinic at the Hospital das Clínicas of the University of São Paulo Medical School. Data were obtained from record books. The variables analyzed were: patient age, gender, dermatologic disease (initial diagnosis), origin (from where the patient was referred) and destination (where the patient was referred to). Results A total of 16,399 patients and 17,454 diseases were identified for analysis. The most frequent skin disorders were eczema (18%), cutaneous infections (13.1%), erythematous squamous diseases (6.8%) and malignant cutaneous neoplasms (6.1%). Atopic dermatitis was the most common disease in children. Acne was more common among children and adults, as were viral warts. Basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma were more common in the elderly. Contact dermatitis and acne predominated in women. The most frequent origins were: the primary/secondary health system (26.6%), other outpatient specialties (25.5%), emergency care (14.9%); while the destinations were: discharged (27.5%), follow-up in our Dermatology Division (24.1%), return (14.1%) and the primary/secondary health system (20.7%). Conclusion Understanding the incidence of skin diseases is fundamental in making decisions regarding resource allocation for clinical care and research. Thus, we believe our findings can contribute to improving public health policies. PMID:27438199

  18. Hyponatremia and in-hospital mortality in patients admitted for heart failure (from the ATTEND registry).

    PubMed

    Sato, Naoki; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Kajimoto, Katsuya; Munakata, Ryo; Minami, Yuichiro; Mizuno, Masayuki; Aokage, Toshiyuki; Asai, Kuniya; Sakata, Yasushi; Yumino, Dai; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Takano, Teruo

    2013-04-01

    Hyponatremia is known to be a poor prognostic factor in patients hospitalized with heart failure (HF), however not well studied in Japan. The aims of this study were to characterize hyponatremic hospitalized patients with HF and to clarify the relations between hyponatremia and detailed in-hospital outcomes in Japan. Among 4,837 hospitalized patients with HF enrolled in the Acute Decompensated Heart Failure Syndromes (ATTEND) registry, patient characteristics and in-hospital mortality in those with hyponatremia were examined. Hyponatremia (sodium <135 mEq/L) was observed in 11.6% of patients. Patients with hyponatremia were of similar age, included fewer men, and had a higher proportion of previous hospitalizations for HF compared to those with normonatremia. On admission, lower heart rates and blood pressures and higher brain natriuretic peptide levels were observed in patients with hyponatremia. During hospitalization, inotrope levels and mechanical device use were significantly higher in patients with hyponatremia. Rates of all-cause and cardiac death were significantly higher in patients with hyponatremia, 15.0% and 11.4%, respectively, compared to 5.3% and 3.6%, respectively, in those with normonatremia. In hyponatremic hospitalized patients with HF, cardiac death accounted for 76.2% of all-cause death. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in Japan hyponatremia in patients hospitalized with HF is relatively common and is associated with a very high in-hospital mortality. PMID:23312128

  19. Cognitive Investigation Study of Patients Admitted for Cosmetic Surgery: Information, Expectations, and Consent for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Cogliandro, Annalisa; La Monaca, Giuseppe; Tambone, Vittoradolfo; Persichetti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Background In all branches of medicine, it is the surgeon's responsibility to provide the patient with accurate information before surgery. This is especially important in cosmetic surgery because the surgeon must focus on the aesthetic results desired by the patient. Methods An experimental protocol was developed based on an original questionnaire given to 72 patients. The nature of the responses, the patients' motivation and expectations, the degree of patient awareness regarding the planned operation, and the patients' perceptions of the purpose of the required consent for cosmetic surgery were all analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Results Candidates for abdominal wall surgery had significantly more preoperative psychological problems than their counterparts did (P=0.035). A significantly different percentage of patients under 40 years of age compared to those over 40 years of age searched for additional sources of information prior to the operation (P=0.046). Only 30% of patients with a lower educational background stated that the preoperative information had been adequate, whereas 92% of subjects with secondary schooling or a postsecondary degree felt that the information was sufficient (P=0.001). A statistically significant difference was also present between patients according to their educational background regarding expected improvements in their quality of life postoperatively (P=0.008). Conclusions This study suggests that patients require more attention in presurgical consultations and that clear communication should be prioritized to ensure that the surgeon understands the patient's expectations. PMID:25606489

  20. Patients' satisfaction with psychiatric treatment: comparison between an open and a closed ward.

    PubMed

    Müller, Matthias J; Schlösser, Ralf; Kapp-Steen, Gisela; Schanz, Benno; Benkert, Otto

    2002-01-01

    The study compared patients' satisfaction with psychiatric inpatient treatment between an open and a closed ward. During a six-month period, all voluntarily participating patients on two wards of a psychiatric University hospital were investigated anonymously at admission and/or before discharge. A self-rating questionnaire (SATQ-98) was used to assess satisfaction with several domains of psychiatric inpatient treatment. In total, 135 questionnaires were received (retrieval rate 49%). The general level of satisfaction with treatment was high. General satisfaction, satisfaction with medication, ward equipment, visiting opportunities, and regulations for going out were significantly lower at discharge on the closed ward. Dissatisfaction with medication was related to low actual mood, and to low satisfaction with the frequency of psychotherapeutic interventions, visiting opportunities, and with the treating doctor. The results thus far strongly support the need for patients' satisfaction with treatment to be taken into account in order to improve psychiatric inpatient services, particularly on closed wards. PMID:12025725

  1. Psychiatric Care of the Patient With Hepatitis C: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Gleason, Ondria C.; Sabouni, Douha

    2010-01-01

    Context: Approximately 1.8% of the US population is chronically infected with the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The prevalence rates of psychiatric illness in patients with HCV infection are higher than those rates in the general US population, and the prevalence of HCV infection in patients with severe mental illness may be as high as 9 times that of the general US population. Primary care physicians and psychiatrists are on the forefront of identifying patients with psychiatric illness who are at risk for HCV infection and can screen for HCV infection. This review summarizes the psychiatric implications of HCV infection and strategies for the management of interferon alfa–induced neuropsychiatric adverse effects. Evidence Acquisition: English-language studies were identified by computerized searches using the term hepatitis C psychiatric between 1972 and 2009, and further references were obtained from bibliographies of the reviewed articles. Relevant references were reviewed by the authors and included the basis of significance and applicability to practicing psychiatrists and internists. Results: Since primary care physicians and psychiatrists are sometimes the only medical link for patients with psychiatric illness, they are expected to provide posttest counseling for their patients with HCV and psychiatric illness. The task of conducting a psychiatric and psychosocial pretreatment risk-benefit assessment to determine whether or not to treat HCV infection is increasingly delegated to primary care providers as well as psychiatrists. The use of interferon alfa–based therapies to eradicate HCV has been associated with frequent neuropsychiatric adverse effects (eg, affective, anxiety, cognitive, and psychotic symptoms) that compromise the management of HCV patients with and without a preexisting history of psychiatric illness. Primary care physicians and psychiatrists are frequently asked to assist in the management of these neuropsychiatric adverse effects and

  2. Factors Affecting the Downward Mobility of Psychiatric Patients: A Korean Study of National Health Insurance Beneficiaries

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The purpose of this study is to examine the magnitude of and the factors associated with the downward mobility of first-episode psychiatric patients. Methods: This study used the claims data from the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service. The study population included 19 293 first-episode psychiatric inpatients diagnosed with alcohol use disorder (International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision [ICD-10] code F10), schizophrenia and related disorders (ICD-10 codes F20-F29), and mood disorders (ICD-10 codes F30-F33) in the first half of 2005. This study included only National Health Insurance beneficiaries in 2005. The dependent variable was the occurrence of downward mobility, which was defined as a health insurance status change from National Health Insurance to Medical Aid. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess factors associated with downward drift of first-episode psychiatric patients. Results: About 10% of the study population who were National Health Insurance beneficiaries in 2005 became Medical Aid recipients in 2007. The logistic regression analysis showed that age, gender, primary diagnosis, type of hospital at first admission, regular use of outpatient clinic, and long-term hospitalization are significant predictors in determining downward drift in newly diagnosed psychiatric patients. Conclusions: This research showed that the downward mobility of psychiatric patients is affected by long-term hospitalization and medical care utilization. The findings suggest that early intensive intervention might reduce long-term hospitalization and the downward mobility of psychiatric patients. PMID:26841885

  3. Respect in forensic psychiatric nurse-patient relationships: a practical compromise.

    PubMed

    Rose, Donald N; Peter, Elizabeth; Gallop, Ruth; Angus, Jan E; Liaschenko, Joan

    2011-03-01

    The context of forensic psychiatric nursing is distinct from other psychiatric settings as, it involves placement of patients in secure environments with restrictions determined by the courts. Previous literature has identified that nurses morally struggle with respecting patients who have committed heinous offences, which can lead to the patient being depersonalized and dehumanized. Although respect is fundamental to ethical nursing practice, it has not been adequately explored conceptually or empirically. As a result, little knowledge exists that identifies how nurses develop, maintain, and express respect for patients. The purpose of this study is to analyze the concept of respect systematically, from a forensic psychiatric nurse's perspective using the qualitative methodology of focused ethnography. Forensic psychiatric nurses were recruited from two medium secure forensic rehabilitation units. In the first interview, 13 registered nurses (RNs) and two registered practical nurses (RPNs) participated, and although all informants were invited to the second interview, six RNs were lost to follow-up. Despite this loss, saturation was achieved and the data were interpreted through a feminist philosophical lens. Respect was influenced by factors categorized into four themes: (1) emotive-cognitive reactions, (2) nonjudgmental approach, (3) social identity and power, and (4) context. The data from the themes indicate that forensic psychiatric nurses strike a practical compromise, in their understanding and enactment of respect in therapeutic relationships with forensic psychiatric patients. PMID:21348929

  4. Stress, psychiatric co-morbidity and coping in patients with chronic idiopathic urticaria.

    PubMed

    Chung, Man Cheung; Symons, Christine; Gilliam, Jane; Kaminski, Edward R

    2010-04-01

    This study examined life event stress, perceived stress and psychiatric co-morbidity among patients with Chronic Idiopathic Urticaria (CIU). It also investigated the relationship between coping, stress, the severity of CIU and psychiatric co-morbidity. Total of 100 CIU patients and 60 allergy patients participated in the study. They completed the General Health Questionnaire, the Social Readjustment Rating Scale, the Perceived Stress Scale, and the Ways of Coping Checklist. Compared with allergy patients, CIU patients had worse co-morbidity and higher levels of life event stress and perceived stress. Emotion-focussed coping was associated with the severity of CIU; perceived stress was associated with co-morbidity. PMID:20204926

  5. Suicide Probability Scale and Its Utility with Adolescent Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eltz, Michael; Evans, Allison Schettini; Celio, Mark; Dyl, Jennifer; Hunt, Jeffrey; Armstrong, Laura; Spirito, Anthony

    2007-01-01

    This study examined the factor structure, reliability, and validity of the Suicide Probability Scale (SPS) in a sample of 226 (80 male, 146 female) adolescent psychiatric inpatients. Confirmatory factor analyses provided only some support for the original subscales. Exploratory factor analyses revealed some overlap with the original scales, but…

  6. Spectrum of Opportunistic Infections and Risk Factors for In-Hospital Mortality of Admitted AIDS Patients in Shanghai

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Bin; Sun, Jianjun; Cai, Rentian; Shen, Yinzhong; Liu, Li; Wang, Jiangrong; Zhang, Renfang; Shen, Jiayin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the frequency and the spectrum of major opportunistic infections (OIs), evaluate the major clinical factors associated with each specific OI, and identify the risk factors for in-hospital death among HIV patients in East China. A retrospective cohort study was made including all the HIV-infected patients who were admitted for the first time to the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center during June 1, 2013 to June 1, 2015. The demographic and clinical data were collected. Comparison of continuous variables was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and rank sum test. Person χ2 test and Fisher exact test were applied to analyze the categorical variables. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine the risk for the occurrence of in-hospital death. In total, 920 patients were enrolled with age of 41.59 ± 13.36 years and 91% male. Median CD4 was 34 (IQR, 13–94) cells/μL. Among these patients, 94.7% acquired OIs while the rest developed malignancies. Pneumocystis pneumonia and bacterial coinfection (42.1%) was found to be the most common OIs, followed by tuberculosis (31.4%), CMV (20.9%), Cryptococcosis (9.0%), and MAC infection (5.2%). Of the above 5 major OIs, CMV-infected patients had the lowest median CD4 cell count 22.50 (IQR, 7.50–82.00) while the patients with tuberculosis infection had the highest count 61.00 (IQR, 27.00–176.00). In-hospital death rate was 4.2 per 100 person-years among these patients. Of note, admitted patients with 2 types of OIs (2.20, 95% CI 1.39–3.48) and those patients who were 40-year old or older (1.75, 95% CI 1.10–2.78) had a higher risk of such death. Pneumocystis pneumonia and tuberculosis were still the leading causes for the admission of HIV-infected patients in East China, and these patients tended to have very low CD4 cell counts. It is believed that expanding the HIV screening test and pushing the infected ones get ART earlier is required for generating a more successful HIV management

  7. Spectrum of Opportunistic Infections and Risk Factors for In-Hospital Mortality of Admitted AIDS Patients in Shanghai.

    PubMed

    Luo, Bin; Sun, Jianjun; Cai, Rentian; Shen, Yinzhong; Liu, Li; Wang, Jiangrong; Zhang, Renfang; Shen, Jiayin; Lu, Hongzhou

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the frequency and the spectrum of major opportunistic infections (OIs), evaluate the major clinical factors associated with each specific OI, and identify the risk factors for in-hospital death among HIV patients in East China.A retrospective cohort study was made including all the HIV-infected patients who were admitted for the first time to the Shanghai Public Health Clinical Center during June 1, 2013 to June 1, 2015. The demographic and clinical data were collected. Comparison of continuous variables was analyzed by one-way ANOVA and rank sum test. Person χ test and Fisher exact test were applied to analyze the categorical variables. A Cox proportional hazards regression model was used to determine the risk for the occurrence of in-hospital death.In total, 920 patients were enrolled with age of 41.59 ± 13.36 years and 91% male. Median CD4 was 34 (IQR, 13-94) cells/μL. Among these patients, 94.7% acquired OIs while the rest developed malignancies. Pneumocystis pneumonia and bacterial coinfection (42.1%) was found to be the most common OIs, followed by tuberculosis (31.4%), CMV (20.9%), Cryptococcosis (9.0%), and MAC infection (5.2%). Of the above 5 major OIs, CMV-infected patients had the lowest median CD4 cell count 22.50 (IQR, 7.50-82.00) while the patients with tuberculosis infection had the highest count 61.00 (IQR, 27.00-176.00). In-hospital death rate was 4.2 per 100 person-years among these patients. Of note, admitted patients with 2 types of OIs (2.20, 95% CI 1.39-3.48) and those patients who were 40-year old or older (1.75, 95% CI 1.10-2.78) had a higher risk of such death.Pneumocystis pneumonia and tuberculosis were still the leading causes for the admission of HIV-infected patients in East China, and these patients tended to have very low CD4 cell counts. It is believed that expanding the HIV screening test and pushing the infected ones get ART earlier is required for generating a more successful HIV management strategy. PMID

  8. Application of Predictive Nursing Reduces Psychiatric Complications in ICU Patients after Neurosurgery

    PubMed Central

    LIU, Qiong; ZHU, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to investigate the effects of clinical application of perioperative predictive nursing on reducing psychiatric complications in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) patients after neurosurgery. Methods: A total of 129 patients who underwent neurosurgery and received intensive care were enrolled in our study from February 2013 to February 2014. These patients were divided into two groups: the experimental group (n=68) receiving predictive nursing before and after operation, and the control group (n=61) with general nursing. Clinical data including length of ICU stay, duration of the patients’ psychiatric symptoms, form and incidence of adverse events, and patient satisfaction ratings were recorded, and their differences between the two groups were analyzed. Results: The duration of psychiatric symptoms and the length of ICU stay for patients in the experimental group were significantly shorter than those in the control group (P<0.05). The incidence of adverse events and psychiatric symptoms, such as sensory and intuition disturbance, thought disturbance, emotional disorder, and consciousness disorder, in the experimental group was significantly lower than that in the control group (P<0.05). Patient satisfaction ratings were significantly higher in the experimental group than those in the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: Application of predictive nursing on ICU patients who undergo neurosurgery could effectively reduce the incidence of psychiatric symptoms as well as other adverse events. Our study provided clinical evidences to encourage predictive nursing in routine settings for patients in critical conditions. PMID:27252916

  9. Effects of neurofeedback on adult patients with psychiatric disorders in a naturalistic setting.

    PubMed

    Cheon, Eun-Jin; Koo, Bon-Hoon; Seo, Wan-Seok; Lee, Jun-Yeob; Choi, Joong-Hyeon; Song, Shin-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Few well-controlled studies have considered neurofeedback treatment in adult psychiatric patients. In this regard, the present study investigates the characteristics and effects of neurofeedback on adult psychiatric patients in a naturalistic setting. A total of 77 adult patients with psychiatric disorders participated in this study. Demographic data and neurofeedback states were retrospectively analyzed, and the effects of neurofeedback were evaluated using clinical global impression (CGI) and subjective self-rating scales. Depressive disorders were the most common psychiatric disorders (19; 24.7 %), followed by anxiety disorders (18; 23.4 %). A total of 69 patients (89.6 %) took medicine, and the average frequency of neurofeedback was 17.39 ± 16.64. Neurofeedback was applied to a total of 39 patients (50.6 %) more than 10 times, and 48 patients (62.3 %) received both β/SMR and α/θ training. The discontinuation rate was 33.8 % (26 patients). There was significant difference between pretreatment and posttreatment CGI scores (<.001), and the self-rating scale also showed significant differences in depressive symptoms, anxiety, and inattention (<.001). This is a naturalistic study in a clinical setting, and has several limitations, including the absence of a control group and a heterogenous sample. Despite these limitations, the study demonstrates the potential of neurofeedback as an effective complimentary treatment for adult patients with psychiatric disorders. PMID:25740085

  10. Attitudes towards patient gender among psychiatric hospital staff: results of a case study with focus groups.

    PubMed

    Krumm, Silvia; Kilian, Reinhold; Becker, Thomas

    2006-03-01

    There is an increasing awareness of gender-related issues in psychiatry. However, empirical findings on attitudes of psychiatric staff towards patient gender are limited. Gender-related issues are particularly relevant in the debate about mixed versus segregated sex wards, yet while the appropriateness of mixed-sex wards is questioned in Great Britain this is not the case in Germany. To investigate attitudes of psychiatric staff towards both patient gender and mixed versus segregated sex wards, we conducted a case study using focus groups with members of professional teams. We evaluated the transition process from two single-sex wards to two mixed-sex wards in a 330-bed psychiatric hospital in a rural area in south Germany. Staff described female patients as more externally oriented, motivating of others, demanding, and even sexually aggressive. Male patients, on the other hand, were described as more quiet, modest, or lazy. Furthermore, participants described the mixing process as a positive development whereas they did not see a need for gender-separated wards in order to protect vulnerable female patients. Some gender descriptions by professionals are "reversed" in comparison with gender stereotypes supposed to be present in wider society. The perception of crossed gender norms may affect staff attitudes towards the vulnerability of female patients in psychiatric settings and the provision of single-sex wards in in-patient psychiatric care. Practical implications are discussed against the background of a high rate of female patients with sexual abuse histories. PMID:16157434

  11. Psychiatric patients' internet use corresponds to the internet use of the general public.

    PubMed

    Trefflich, Friederike; Kalckreuth, Sophie; Mergl, Roland; Rummel-Kluge, Christine

    2015-03-30

    The use of Internet has grown in the past number of years, including the increased application of various therapy programs for psychiatric patients which can be accessed online. Few studies investigating psychiatric patients' Internet use exist. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine the number of psychiatric patients that use the Internet in comparison to the general population. Since patients with mental health disorders frequently suffer from a variety of disadvantages in society, it was evaluated whether psychiatric patients were disadvantaged particularly concerning the use and access of the Internet. Three hundred and thirty-seven patients participated in the study and completed a 29-item questionnaire. A response rate of 66% was achieved. Descriptive statistics, analysis of variance and binary logistic regression analysis were used. Out of the participants, 79.5% were Internet users. This number corresponds to the Internet use of the general population. Young patients in particular were found to use online information, using mostly search engines to seek medical information. The results show that psychiatric patients do not rank below the general population concerning the frequency of Internet use, which is especially important for accessing health related information online or participating in online programs. PMID:25623020

  12. Detection and characterization of carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae in wounded Syrian patients admitted to hospitals in northern Israel.

    PubMed

    Lerner, A; Solter, E; Rachi, E; Adler, A; Rechnitzer, H; Miron, D; Krupnick, L; Sela, S; Aga, E; Ziv, Y; Peretz, A; Labay, K; Rahav, G; Geffen, Y; Hussein, K; Eluk, O; Carmeli, Y; Schwaber, M J

    2016-01-01

    Since 2013, four hospitals in northern Israel have been providing care for Syrian nationals, primarily those wounded in the ongoing civil war. We analyzed carbapenemase-producing Enterobacteriaceae (CPE) isolates obtained from these patients. Isolate identification was performed using the VITEK 2 system. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed for the presence of bla KPC, bla NDM, and bla OXA-48. Susceptibility testing and genotyping were performed on selected isolates. During the study period, 595 Syrian patients were hospitalized, most of them young men. Thirty-two confirmed CPE isolates were grown from cultures taken from 30 patients. All but five isolates were identified as Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli. Nineteen isolates produced NDM and 13 produced OXA-48. Among a further 29 isolates tested, multilocus sequence typing (MLST) showed that ST278 and ST38 were the major sequence types among the NDM-producing K. pneumoniae and OXA-48-producing E. coli isolates, respectively. Most were resistant to all three carbapenems in use in Israel and to gentamicin, but susceptible to colistin and fosfomycin. The source for bacterial acquisition could not be determined; however, some patients admitted to different medical centers were found to carry the same sequence type. CPE containing bla NDM and bla OXA-48 were prevalent among Syrian wounded hospitalized patients in northern Israel. The finding of the same sequence type among patients at different medical centers implies a common, prehospital source for these patients. These findings have implications for public health throughout the region. PMID:26581423

  13. Status of human dignity of adult patients admitted to hospitals of Tehran.

    PubMed

    Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Moosavi, Soolmaz

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining dignity and respect is among patients' most fundamental rights. The importance of patient dignity, the status quo, patients' needs, and a shortage of survey studies in this area were the underlying incentives for conducting this study. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which data were collected through Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI). The questionnaire was completed by 280 inpatients in 2012 to determine their perspectives on their personal state of human dignity. In this study, the mean score of patients' dignity was 1.89 out of 5 (SD = 0.81). Results indicated a significant relationship between type of hospital and the distress caused by disease symptoms, peace of mind, and social support (P < 0.05). There were also relationship between type of ward and dependency (P < 0.05), type of disease and dependency (P < 0.05), gender and social support (P < 0.05), household size and peace of mind (P < 0.05). The person's satisfaction with household income showed significant relationship with symptom distress, dependency and existential distress (P < 0.05). Results showed a significant inverse correlation between age and patient dignity (P = 0.005, r = - 0.166). However, the relationship between employment status, health insurance, education level and the above factors were insignificant. Studies indicate that there is a relationship between patients' dignity and mental distress, and therefore policy makers and health services officials should establish and implement plans to maintain and enhance patients' dignity in hospitals. Educating the health team, particularly the nurses can be very effective in maintaining patients' dignity and respect. PMID:26587200

  14. Psychiatric manifestations of neurocysticercosis: a study of 38 patients from a neurology clinic in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Forlenza, O V; Filho, A H; Nobrega, J P; dos Ramos Machado, L; de Barros, N G; de Camargo, C H; da Silva, M F

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency and features of psychiatric morbidity in a cross section of 38 outpatients with neurocysticercosis. METHODS: Diagnosis of neurocysticercosis was established by CT, MRI, and CSF analysis. Psychiatric diagnoses were made by using the present state examination and the schedule for affective disorders and schizophrenia-lifetime version; cognitive state was assessed by mini mental state examination and Strub and Black's mental status examination. RESULTS: Signs of psychiatric disease and cognitive decline were found in 65.8 and 87.5% of the cases respectively. Depression was the most frequent psychiatric diagnosis (52.6%) and 14.2% of the patients were psychotic. Active disease and intracranial hypertension were associated with higher psychiatric morbidity, and previous history of mood disorders was strongly related to current depression. Other variables, such as number and type of brain lesions, severity of neuropsychological deficits, epilepsy, and use of steroids did not correlate with mental disturbances in this sample. CONCLUSIONS: Psychiatric abnormalities, particularly depression syndromes, are frequent in patients with neurocysticercosis. Although regarded as a rare cause of dementia, mild cognitive impairment may be a much more prevalent neuropsychological feature of patients with neurocysticercosis. The extent to which organic mechanisms related to brain lesions may underlie the mental changes is yet unclear, although the similar sex distribution of patients with and without depression, as well as the above mentioned correlations, provide further evidence of the part played by organic factors in the cause of these syndromes. PMID:9219748

  15. How CAGE, RAPS4-QF, and AUDIT Can Help Practitioners for Patients Admitted with Acute Alcohol Intoxication in Emergency Departments?

    PubMed Central

    Brousse, Georges; Arnaud, Benjamin; Geneste, Julie; Pereira, Bruno; De Chazeron, Ingrid; Teissedre, Frederique; Perrier, Christophe; Schwan, Raymund; Malet, Laurent; Schmidt, Jeannot; Llorca, Pierre Michel; Cherpitel, Cheryl J.

    2014-01-01

    Aims: To help clinicians to identify the severity of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) from optimal thresholds found for recommended scales. Especially, taking account of the high prevalence of alcohol dependence among patients admitted to the emergency department (ED) for acute alcohol intoxication (AAI), we propose to define thresholds of severity of dependence based on the AUDIT score. Methods: All patients admitted to the ED with AAI (blood alcohol level >0.8 g/L), in a 2-month period, were assessed using the CAGE, RAPS-QF, and AUDIT, with the alcohol dependence/abuse section of the mini international neuropsychiatric interview (MINI) used as the gold standard. To explore the relation between the AUDIT and the MINI the sum of the positive items on the MINI (dependence) as a quantitative variable and as an ordinal parameter were analyzed. From the threshold score found for each scale we proposed intervals of severity of AUDs. Results: The mean age of the sample (122 males, 42 females) was 46 years. Approximately 12% of the patients were identified with alcohol abuse and 78% with dependence (DSM-IV). Cut points were determined for the AUDIT in order to distinguish mild and moderate dependence from severe dependence. A strategy of intervention based on levels of severity of AUD was proposed. Conclusion: Different thresholds proposed for the CAGE, RAPS4-QF, and AUDIT could be used to guide the choice of intervention for a patient: brief intervention, brief negotiation interviewing, or longer more intensive motivational intervention. PMID:25009509

  16. Reliability of Oscillometric Blood Pressure Monitoring in Atrial Fibrillation Patients Admitted for Electric Cardioversion.

    PubMed

    Maselli, Monica; Giantin, Valter; Corrado, Domenico; Franchin, Alessandro; Attanasio, Francesca; Pengo, Valentina; Tramontano, Alessandra; De Toni, Pietro; Perissinotto, Egle; Manzato, Enzo

    2015-07-01

    The reliability of automated oscillometric blood pressure (BP) monitors in atrial fibrillation (AF) has been poorly investigated, only comparing different patients with AF and sinus rhythm (SR), and is a method influenced by individual characteristics. This study compared the reliability of the oscillometric device A&D TM-2430 (A&D Company, Tokyo, Japan) with that of a mercury sphygmomanometer in AF patients whose SR was restored after electric cardioversion (ECV). Three consecutive BP measurements were obtained on the day before and about 30 days after ECV in stable treatment conditions. Of the 100 patients studied, 63 reported an SR at follow-up, with a significant increase in systolic BP and a significant decrease in diastolic BP according to both devices. There were no significant differences between the systolic and diastolic biases before and after ECV using Bland Altman analysis (P > .05 each). The oscillometric device analyzed, using three repeated measurements, is reliable in measuring BP in AF patients. PMID:25855463

  17. Assaultive Behavior in State Psychiatric Hospitals: Differences Between Forensic and Nonforensic Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linhorst, Donald M.; Scott, Lisa Parker

    2004-01-01

    Forensic patients are occupying an increasingly large number of beds in state psychiatric hospitals. The presence of these mentally ill offenders has raised concerns about the risk they present to nonforensic patients. This study compared the rate of assaults and factors associated with assaultive behavior among 308 nonforensic patients and two…

  18. Revision of the Predictive Method Improves Precision in the Prediction of Stroke Outcomes for Patients Admitted to Rehabilitation Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Matsugi, Akiyoshi; Tani, Keisuke; Mitani, Yasuhiro; Oku, Kosuke; Tamaru, Yoshiki; Nagano, Kiyoshi

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to confirm the accuracy of a revised method for predicting the Functional Independence Measure (FIM) at discharge when stroke patients are first admitted to a rehabilitation hospital. [Subjects and Methods] The predictive equation with logarithmic trend line was calculated based on the total score of the FIM at admission and discharge in 93 patients with cerebral infarction (CI) and 60 patients with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). In other patients with CI or ICH (validation group), the differences between the actual FIM and the predicted FIM at discharge calculated by the CI or ICH equation and the combined (CI + ICH) equation, as well as by the CI or ICH equation and combined equation used in a previous study, were calculated. [Results] The multiple correlation coefficients of the CI equation, ICH equation, and combined equation were 0.87, 0.71, and 0.8. The residual of the actual FIM and predicted FIM at discharge calculated by the CI equation was the smallest in the CI validation group. In the ICH validation group, the residual calculated for ICH patients alone was smaller than that calculated by the previous ICH equation. [Conclusion] This easy-to-use method using a new equation for prediction was more precise than the previous equation. Therefore, we should revise the equation for predicting stroke patient outcome strata according to data from within the governing medical administration system. PMID:25276029

  19. Intermediate risk of multidrug-resistant organisms in patients who admitted intensive care unit with healthcare-associated pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hongyeul; Park, Ji Young; Lee, Taehoon; Lee, Yeon Joo; Lim, Hyo-Jeong; Park, Jong Sun; Yoon, Ho Il; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lee, Choon-Taek; Cho, Young-Jae

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Healthcare-associated pneumonia (HCAP) was proposed asa new pneumonia category in 2005, and treatment recommendations includebroad-spectrum antibiotics directed at multidrug-resistant (MDR) pathogens.However, this concept continues to be controversial, and microbiological data arelacking for HCAP patients in the intensive care unit (ICU). This study was conductedto determine the rate and type of antibiotic-resistant organisms and theclinical outcomes in patients with HCAP in the ICU, compared to patients withcommunity-acquired pneumonia (CAP) or hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP). Methods: We conducted a retrospective cohort analysis of patients with pneumonia(n = 195) who admitted to medical ICU in tertiary teaching hospital fromMarch 2011 to February 2013. Clinical characteristics, microbiological distributions,treatment outcomes, and prognosis of HCAP (n = 74) were compared tothose of CAP (n = 75) and HAP (n = 46). Results: MDR pathogens were significantly higher in HCAP patients (39.1%) thanin CAP (13.5%) and lower than in HAP (79.3%, p < 0.001). The initial use of inappropriateantibiotic treatment occurred more frequently in the HCAP (32.6%) andHAP (51.7%) groups than in the CAP group (11.8%, p = 0.006). There were no differencesin clinical outcomes. The significant prognostic factors were pneumoniaseverity and treatment response. Conclusions: MDR pathogens were isolated in HCAP patients requiring ICU admissionat intermediate rates between those of CAP and HAP. PMID:26968189

  20. The Low Proportion and Associated Factors of Involuntary Admission in the Psychiatric Emergency Service in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jen-Pang; Chiu, Chih-Chiang; Yang, Tsu-Hui; Liu, Tzong-Hsien; Wu, Chia-Yi; Chou, Pesus

    2015-01-01

    Background The involuntary admission regulated under the Mental Health Act has become an increasingly important issue in the developed countries in recent years. Most studies about the distribution and associated factors of involuntary admission were carried out in the western countries; however, the results may vary in different areas with different legal and socio-cultural backgrounds. Aims The aim of this study was to investigate the proportion and associated factors of involuntary admission in a psychiatric emergency service in Taiwan. Methods The study cohort included patients admitted from a psychiatric emergency service over a two-year period. Demographic, psychiatric emergency service utilization, and clinical variables were compared between those who were voluntarily and involuntarily admitted to explore the associated factors of involuntary admission. Results Among 2,777 admitted patients, 110 (4.0%) were involuntarily admitted. Police referrals and presenting problems as violence assessed by psychiatric nurses were found to be associated with involuntary admission. These patients were more likely to be involuntarily admitted during the night shift and stayed longer in the psychiatric emergency service. Conclusions The proportion of involuntary admissions in Taiwan was in the lower range when compared to Western countries. Dangerous conditions evaluated by the psychiatric nurses and police rather than diagnosis made by the psychiatrists were related factors of involuntary admission. As it spent more time to admit involuntary patients, it was suggested that multidisciplinary professionals should be included in and educated for during the process of involuntary admission. PMID:26046529

  1. The experience of caring for former long-stay psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    McGilloway, S; Donnelly, M; Mays, N

    1997-02-01

    This study investigated the experiences and the mental health status of the informal carers (usually relatives) of 38 former long-stay psychiatric patients. According to the GHQ-12, 45 per cent of carers were classified as minor psychiatric 'cases'. Women were significantly more likely than men to experience poor mental health. Most carers reported personal and social restrictions, but cases were significantly more likely than non-cases to report personal, physical and financial burden. PMID:9051286

  2. Nutritional Status of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease Patients Admitted in Hospital With Acute Exacerbation

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Barkha; Kant, Surya; Mishra, Rachna; Verma, Sanjay

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are frequently hospitalized with an acute exacerbation. Patients with COPD often lose weight. Consequently, deterioration in nutritional status (loss of lean body mass) is a likely repercussion of acute exacerbation in hospitalized COPD patients. The study was carried out to assess the nutritional status of COPD patients with acute exacerbation, during the period of hospital admission, and to evaluate the relationships between the nutritional indices and the pulmonary function parameters. Methods A cross sectional observation study constituting 83 COPD patients consecutively hospitalized with acute exacerbation on accrual during a period of one year. Lung function was measured by routine spirometry. Nutritional status was assessed by the measurement of anthropometric parameters. Hospital outcome was also assessed. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS version 16.0 Independent t-tests and Pearsons correlation coefficient was used. Results Mean body weight was 50.03 ± 9.23 kg. Subjects had approximately 5 kg weight loss in previous six months. All the subjects had low BMI (19.38 ± 3.10) and MUAC (21.18 ± 2.31) that was significantly below the predicted levels. The correlation between body weight and FEV1/FVC% was good (r = 0.648, p = 0.003). BMI was negatively correlated (r = - 0.0103, p= 0.03) with duration of hospital stay. Conclusions The high prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized COPD patients with acute exacerbation is related to their lung function and hospital outcome such as duration of hospital stay. Keywords Nutritional status; COPD; Acute exacerbation; Hospitalization PMID:21811522

  3. Magnesium Sulfate in Exacerbations of COPD in Patients Admitted to Internal Medicine Ward

    PubMed Central

    Solooki, Mehrdad; Miri, Mirmohamad; Mokhtari, Majid; Valai, Morteza; Sistanizad, Mohammad; Kouchek, Mehran

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of intravenous magnesium sulfate on patients with COPD exacerbation requiring hospitalization. In this randomized clinical trial 30 patients with COPD exacerbation were studied. Patients were randomly assigned to group A (case) who concurrent with standard therapy received 2 g magnesium sulfate in normal saline infused in 20 minutes on days one to three and group B (control) who received standard medications and placebo. PEFR and FEV1 were measured by before, 45 minutes and third day of entering the study. Vital signs HR, BP, RR, temperature and SpO2 were monitored during hospitalization. 21 males and 9 females patients with mean age of 68 ± 9 years, case 67 ± 10 and control 70 ± 8 were studied (15 patients in each arm of study). The mean pretreatment FEV1 was 26% ± 12, and 35% ± 18 in case and control groups respectively (P=0.137). FEV1 after 45 minutes in case group was 27% ± 9 and control group 36% ± 20 (p=0.122). FEV1 after 3 days of study was 32% ± 17 in case and 41% ± 22 in control groups (P=0.205). The mean pretreatment PEFR was 126 ± 76 l/min in case and 142 ± 62 l/min in control groups (P=0.46). Changes in PEFR were not significant 45 min (p=0.540) and 3 days (p=0.733) of the administration of intravenous magnesium sulfate. Duration of hospital stay between the two groups did not show any significant difference. This study showed that administration of intravenous magnesium sulfate in hospitalized patients with COPD exacerbation neither revealed any significant bronchodilating effect nor reduced duration of hospital stay. PMID:25587312

  4. The experience of daily life of acutely admitted frail elderly patients one week after discharge from the hospital

    PubMed Central

    Andreasen, Jane; Lund, Hans; Aadahl, Mette; Sørensen, Erik E.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Frail elderly are at higher risk of negative outcomes such as disability, low quality of life, and hospital admissions. Furthermore, a peak in readmission of acutely admitted elderly patients is seen shortly after discharge. An investigation into the daily life experiences of the frail elderly shortly after discharge seems important to address these issues. The aim of this study was to explore how frail elderly patients experience daily life 1 week after discharge from an acute admission. Methods The qualitative methodological approach was interpretive description. Data were gathered using individual interviews. The participants were frail elderly patients over 65 years of age, who were interviewed at their home 1 week after discharge from an acute admission to a medical ward. Results Four main categories were identified: “The system,” “Keeping a social life,” “Being in everyday life,” and “Handling everyday life.” These categories affected the way the frail elderly experienced daily life and these elements resulted in a general feeling of well-being or non-well-being. The transition to home was experienced as unsafe and troublesome especially for the more frail participants, whereas the less frail experienced this less. Conclusion and discussion Several elements and stressors were affecting the well-being of the participants in daily life 1 week after discharge. In particular, contact with the health care system created frustrations and worries, but also physical disability, loneliness, and inactivity were issues of concern. These elements should be addressed by health professionals in relation to the transition phase. Future interventions should incorporate a multidimensional and bio-psycho-social perspective when acutely admitted frail elderly are discharged. Stakeholders should evaluate present practice to seek to improve care across health care sectors. PMID:26037333

  5. Prospective observational cohort study of patients with weaning failure admitted to a specialist weaning, rehabilitation and home mechanical ventilation centre

    PubMed Central

    Mifsud Bonnici, Denise; Sanctuary, Thomas; Murphy, Patrick B; Steier, Joerg; Marino, Philip; Pattani, Hina; Creagh-Brown, Ben C; Hart, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Objectives According to National Health Service England (NHSE) specialist respiratory commissioning specification for complex home ventilation, patients with weaning failure should be referred to a specialist centre. However, there are limited data reporting the clinical outcomes from such centres. Setting Prospective observational cohort study of patients admitted to a UK specialist weaning, rehabilitation and home mechanical ventilation centre between February 2005 and July 2013. Participants 262 patients admitted with a median age of 64.2 years (IQR 52.6–73.2 years). 59.9% were male. Results 39.7% of patients had neuromuscular and/or chest wall disease, 21% were postsurgical, 19.5% had chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), 5.3% had obesity-related respiratory failure and 14.5% had other diagnoses. 64.1% of patients were successfully weaned, with 38.2% weaned fully from ventilation, 24% weaned to nocturnal non-invasive ventilation (NIV), 1.9% weaned to nocturnal NIV with intermittent NIV during the daytime. 21.4% of patients were discharged on long-term tracheostomy ventilation. The obesity-related respiratory failure group were most likely to wean (relative risk (RR) for weaning success=1.48, 95% CI 1.35 to 1.77; p<0.001), but otherwise weaning success rates did not significantly vary by diagnostic group. The median time-to-wean was 19 days (IQR 9–33) and the median duration of stay was 31 days (IQR 16–50), with no difference observed between the groups. Weaning centre mortality was 14.5%, highest in the COPD group (RR=2.15, 95% CI 1.19 to 3.91, p=0.012) and lowest in the neuromuscular and/or chest wall disease group (RR=0.34, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.75, p=0.007). Of all patients discharged alive, survival was 71.7% at 6 months and 61.8% at 12 months postdischarge. Conclusions Following NHSE guidance, patients with weaning delay and failure should be considered for transfer to a specialist centre where available, which can demonstrate

  6. Main characteristics observed in patients with hematologic diseases admitted to an intensive care unit of a Brazilian university hospital

    PubMed Central

    Barreto, Lídia Miranda; Torga, Júlia Pereira; Coelho, Samuel Viana; Nobre, Vandack

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical characteristics of patients with hematological disease admitted to the intensive care unit and the use of noninvasive mechanical ventilation in a subgroup with respiratory dysfunction. Methods A retrospective observational study from September 2011 to January 2014. Results Overall, 157 patients were included. The mean age was 45.13 (± 17.2) years and 46.5% of the patients were female. Sixty-seven (48.4%) patients had sepsis, and 90 (57.3%) patients required vasoactive vasopressors. The main cause for admission to the intensive care unit was acute respiratory failure (94.3%). Among the 157 studied patients, 47 (29.9%) were intubated within the first 24 hours, and 38 (24.2%) underwent noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Among the 38 patients who initially received noninvasive mechanical ventilation, 26 (68.4%) were subsequently intubated, and 12 (31.6%) responded to this mode of ventilation. Patients who failed to respond to noninvasive mechanical ventilation had higher intensive care unit mortality (66.7% versus 16.7%; p = 0.004) and a longer stay in the intensive care unit (9.6 days versus 4.6 days, p = 0.02) compared with the successful cases. Baseline severity scores (SOFA and SAPS 3) and the total leukocyte count were not significantly different between these two subgroups. In a multivariate logistic regression model including the 157 patients, intubation at any time during the stay in the intensive care unit and SAPS 3 were independently associated with intensive care unit mortality, while using noninvasive mechanical ventilation was not. Conclusion In this retrospective study with severely ill hematologic patients, those who underwent noninvasive mechanical ventilation at admission and failed to respond to it presented elevated intensive care unit mortality. However, only intubation during the intensive care unit stay was independently associated with a poor outcome. Further studies are needed to define predictors of

  7. EMPADE Study: Evaluation of Medical Prescriptions and Adverse Drug Events in COPD Patients Admitted to Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Amer; Khan, M. Nematullah; Sultan, Ihtisham; Khan, M. Aamer; Ali, S. Amir; Farooqui, Afroze

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Inappropriate drug usage may preclude ideal benefit due to increased medical cost, antimicrobial resistance, adverse effects and mortality. Therefore drug utilization studies have become a plausible means in evaluating the healthcare systems. COPD management usually involves more than one drug which may escalate the risk of ADEs (adverse drug events). Aim The present study was aimed at assessing the current drug practice and ADEs in COPD management in ICU. Materials and Methods A total of 1,044 patients admitted for the treatment of COPD were included in the study. Their prescriptions were recorded for evaluation of drug utilization and patients were counseled for assessing ADEs. Results were evaluated by Chi-square test and percentages. Result All-embracing 15,360 drugs were prescribed at an average of 14.71 drugs per patient, wherein β2-agonists were extensively prescribed agents followed by inhaled-corticosteroids and anti-cholinergics. 372 ADEs were reported in 252 patients, wherein restlessness was the most frequent ADE and theophylline was found to be associated with highest cases of ADEs. Conclusion Practitioners should prescribe least number of drugs to mitigate the likelihood of adverse outcomes in patients due to numerous drugs usage, which may be achieved by following GOLD guidelines. The present work may help in improving the current management of COPD by rectifying the flaws delineated in this article. PMID:26675667

  8. The quality of nursing care regarding personal hygiene of patients admitted to a selected hospital in the Kavango region.

    PubMed

    van Dyk, A; Small, L F; vd Merwe, T; Mueyu, U

    2004-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the quality of nursing care regarding personal hygiene of patients admitted to a hospital in the Kavango region of Namibia. The study was prompted by repeated media reports over the radio. Commentators and listeners expressed concern over the seeming lack of adequate hygienic measures, specifically with regard to patient care. To objectively quantify and describe the extent of this problem, a single objective was stated, namely to measure the quality of nursing care with regard to patient hygiene. A descriptive survey design was chosen to explore and describe the problem. A check-list was developed to observe thirty patients (the total population) over a period of one week. The results indicated that certain aspects of hygienic care needed improvement. These aspects (parts) were the care of male patient's beards; perineal care; and mouth care. Other aspects of care were indirectly negatively influenced due to incomplete record keeping. On completion of the study recommendations were made with regard to in-service education, management and research. PMID:15777033

  9. Clinical and immunological analysis of measles patients admitted to a Beijing hospital in 2014 during an outbreak in China.

    PubMed

    Tu, B; Zhao, J-J; Hu, Y; Fu, J-L; Huang, H-H; Xie, Y-X; Zhang, X; Shi, L; Zhao, P; Zhang, X-W; Wu, D; Xu, Z; Zhou, Z-P; Qin, E-Q; Wang, F-S

    2016-09-01

    At the end of 2013, China reported a countrywide outbreak of measles. From January to May 2014, we investigated the clinical and immunological features of the cases of the outbreak admitted to our hospital. In this study, all 112 inpatients with clinically diagnosed measles were recruited from the 302 Military Hospital of China. The virus was isolated from throat swabs from these patients, and cytokine profiles were examined. By detecting the measles virus of 30 of the 112 patients, we found that this measles outbreak was of the H1 genotype, which is the major strain in China. The rates of complications, specifically pneumonia and liver injury, differed significantly in patients aged 18 years: pneumonia was more common in children, while liver injury was more common in adults. Pneumonia was a significant independent risk factor affecting measles duration. Compared to healthy subjects, measles patients had fewer CD4+IL-17+, CD4+IFN-γ +, and CD8+IFN-γ + cells in both the acute and recovery phases. In contrast, measles patients in the acute phase had more CD8+IL-22+ cells than those in recovery or healthy subjects. We recommend that future studies focus on the age-related distribution of pneumonia and liver injury as measles-related complications as well as the association between immunological markers and measles prognosis. PMID:27251754

  10. Etiology and Viral Genotype in Patients with End-Stage Liver Diseases admitted to a Hepatology Unit in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Cortes-Mancera, Fabian; Loureiro, Carmen Luisa; Hoyos, Sergio; Restrepo, Juan-Carlos; Correa, Gonzalo; Jaramillo, Sergio; Norder, Helene; Pujol, Flor Helene; Navas, Maria-Cristina

    2011-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections are the principal risk factor associated to end-stage liver diseases in the world. A study was carried out on end-stage liver disease cases admitted to an important hepatology unit in Medellin, the second largest city in Colombia. From 131 patients recruited in this prospective study, 71% of cases were diagnosed as cirrhosis, 12.2% as HCC, and 16.8% as cirrhosis and HCC. Regarding the risk factors of these patients, alcohol consumption was the most frequent (37.4%), followed by viral etiology (17.6%). Blood and/or hepatic tissue samples from patients with serological markers for HCV or HBV infection were characterized; on the basis of the phylogenetic analysis of HCV 5′ UTR and HBV S gene, isolates belonged to HCV/1 and HBV/F3, respectively. These results confirm the presence of strains associated with poor clinical outcome, in patients with liver disease in Colombia; additionally, HBV basal core promoter double mutant was identified in HCC cases. Here we show the first study of cirrhosis and/or HCC in Colombian and HBV and HCV molecular characterization of these patients. Viral aetiology was not the main risk factor in this cohort but alcohol consumption. PMID:21941645

  11. Evaluation of preoperative investigations in patients admitted for ovarian primary cytoreductive surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Guidozzi, F.; Sonnendecker, E.W. )

    1991-03-01

    Consistent with universally established practice, it has been customary in our unit to subject patients with clinically suspected or biopsy proven ovarian cancer to a large number of preoperative investigations. This is in order to determine metastases, surgical strategy, and exclusion of pelvic kidney. This study presents a comparison of the preoperative ultrasonography, computerized tomography, intravenous pyelography, chest X-ray, liver and bone scintigraphy, and barium enema results performed in 100 cases with the operative findings. These investigations were found to have marginal value in determining extent of disease, upper gastrointestinal metastatic deposits, and the need for or extent of bowel resection. It is concluded that such a standard workup, which is time-consuming and distressing for an already anxious patient, is not cost effective for a surgical procedure which is ultimately determined at laparotomy.

  12. Kodamaea (Pichia) ohmeri fungemia in a pediatric patient admitted in a public hospital.

    PubMed

    De Barros, Jadson Duque; Do Nascimento, Suerda Maria Nogueira; De Araújo, Fernanda Janaína Silva; Braz, Regina De Fátima Dos Santos; Andrade, Vania Sousa; Theelen, Bart; Boekhout, Teun; Illnait-Zaragozi, Maria Teresa; Gouveia, Maria Narriman Guimarães; Fernandes, Maria Conceição; Monteiro, Maria Goretti Lins; De Oliveira, Maria Tereza Barreto

    2009-11-01

    Kodamaea (Pichia) ohmeri is a yeast species that has not been reported to be a frequent cause of human infections. The current report describes a case of fungemia caused by K. ohmeri in a 3-year-old female patient hospitalized in the public hospital Maria Alice Fernandes, Natal, RN, Brazil. The patient had previously received antimicrobial therapy due to a peritoneal infection and nosocomial pneumonia, and had a central venous catheter implanted. Kodamaea ohmeri was isolated from blood and the tip of the catheter, 48 h after its implantation. The yeast was identified by standard microbiological methods and sequence analysis of the D1/D2 domains and the ITS 1 + 2 spacer regions of the ribosomal DNA. On CHROMagar Candida medium, the isolate showed a color change from pink to blue. The yeast was susceptible to amphotericin B, and liposomal AmB was used successfully to clear the infection. PMID:19888811

  13. Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Admitted to Intensive Care Units: Outcome Analysis and Risk Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Braess, Jan; Thudium, Johannes; Schmid, Christoph; Kochanek, Matthias; Kreuzer, Karl-Anton; Lebiedz, Pia; Görlich, Dennis; Gerth, Hans U.; Rohde, Christian; Kessler, Torsten; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Stelljes, Matthias; Büchner, Thomas; Schlimok, Günter; Hallek, Michael; Waltenberger, Johannes; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Berdel, Wolfgang E.; Heilmeier, Bernhard; Krug, Utz

    2016-01-01

    Background This retrospective, multicenter study aimed to reveal risk predictors for mortality in the intensive care unit (ICU) as well as survival after ICU discharge in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) requiring treatment in the ICU. Methods and Results Multivariate analysis of data for 187 adults with AML treated in the ICU in one institution revealed the following as independent prognostic factors for death in the ICU: arterial oxygen partial pressure below 72 mmHg, active AML and systemic inflammatory response syndrome upon ICU admission, and need for hemodialysis and mechanical ventilation in the ICU. Based on these variables, we developed an ICU mortality score and validated the score in an independent cohort of 264 patients treated in the ICU in three additional tertiary hospitals. Compared with the Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II, the Logistic Organ Dysfunction (LOD) score, and the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score, our score yielded a better prediction of ICU mortality in the receiver operator characteristics (ROC) analysis (AUC = 0.913 vs. AUC = 0.710 [SAPS II], AUC = 0.708 [LOD], and 0.770 [SOFA] in the training cohort; AUC = 0.841 for the developed score vs. AUC = 0.730 [SAPSII], AUC = 0.773 [LOD], and 0.783 [SOFA] in the validation cohort). Factors predicting decreased survival after ICU discharge were as follows: relapse or refractory disease, previous allogeneic stem cell transplantation, time between hospital admission and ICU admission, time spent in ICU, impaired diuresis, Glasgow Coma Scale <8 and hematocrit of ≥25% at ICU admission. Based on these factors, an ICU survival score was created and used for risk stratification into three risk groups. This stratification discriminated distinct survival rates after ICU discharge. Conclusions Our data emphasize that although individual risks differ widely depending on the patient and disease status, a substantial portion of critically ill patients with AML benefit

  14. Improving venous thromboembolism risk assessment compliance using the electronic tool in admitted medical patients

    PubMed Central

    Taha, Haytham; Raji, Salama J.; Ellahham, Samer; Bashir, Nihal; Al hanaee, Manar; Boharoon, Hessa; AlFalahi, May

    2015-01-01

    Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) in Abu Dhabi is the main tertiary care referral hospital in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) with 560 bed capacity that is fully occupied most of the time. SKMC senior management has made a commitment to make quality and patient safety a top priority. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk assessment has been identified as a critical patient safety measure and key performance indicator. The electronic VTE risk assessment form a computerized decision support tool was introduced to improve adherence with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis recommendations. A multidisciplinary task force team was formed and led this quality improvement project. The purpose of this publication is to indicate the quality improvement interventions implemented to enhance compliance with VTE risk assessment and the outcomes of those interventions. We chose to conduct the pilot study in General Medicine as it is the busiest department in the hospital. The study period was from April 2014 till August 2015.The lessons learned were disseminated throughout the hospital. Our aim was to improve VTE risk assessment compliance by using the electronic form in order to ensure patient safety and reduce preventable harm. VTE risk assessment compliance improved in general medicine from 4% to 98%, and overall SKMC compliance from 21% to above 90%. PMID:26734399

  15. Improving venous thromboembolism risk assessment compliance using the electronic tool in admitted medical patients.

    PubMed

    Taha, Haytham; Raji, Salama J; Ellahham, Samer; Bashir, Nihal; Al Hanaee, Manar; Boharoon, Hessa; AlFalahi, May

    2015-01-01

    Sheikh Khalifa Medical City (SKMC) in Abu Dhabi is the main tertiary care referral hospital in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) with 560 bed capacity that is fully occupied most of the time. SKMC senior management has made a commitment to make quality and patient safety a top priority. Venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk assessment has been identified as a critical patient safety measure and key performance indicator. The electronic VTE risk assessment form a computerized decision support tool was introduced to improve adherence with deep venous thrombosis (DVT) prophylaxis recommendations. A multidisciplinary task force team was formed and led this quality improvement project. The purpose of this publication is to indicate the quality improvement interventions implemented to enhance compliance with VTE risk assessment and the outcomes of those interventions. We chose to conduct the pilot study in General Medicine as it is the busiest department in the hospital. The study period was from April 2014 till August 2015.The lessons learned were disseminated throughout the hospital. Our aim was to improve VTE risk assessment compliance by using the electronic form in order to ensure patient safety and reduce preventable harm. VTE risk assessment compliance improved in general medicine from 4% to 98%, and overall SKMC compliance from 21% to above 90%. PMID:26734399

  16. How common are ventricular arrhythmias in patients admitted to CCU with chest pain and a non-ischaemic ECG? A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Anne-Maree; Klim, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of serious ventricular arrhythmias in a cohort of patients admitted to coronary care units for investigation and treatment of possible acute coronary syndrome. Design Secondary analysis of prospective cohort study. Setting Community teaching hospital. Patients Adults (>18 years) admitted to coronary care unit with chest pain and non-ischaemic ECG. Interventions None. Main outcome measures Rate of serious ventricular arrhythmia during hospital stay. Results 397 patients were studied; median age 64 years, 65% male; median Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction score 3; troponin elevation 43%, final diagnosis myocardial infarction 32%. No patient in the study suffered a serious ventricular arrhythmia (0%, 95% CI 0 to 1.0%). Conclusion Patients admitted to coronary care units for investigation and treatment of possible acute coronary syndrome with a non-ischaemic ECG have a very low rate of serious ventricular arrhythmia.

  17. Homicide committed by psychiatric patients: Psychiatrists' liability in Italian law cases.

    PubMed

    Terranova, Claudio; Rocca, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Interest in psychiatrists' professional liability in Italy has increased in recent years because of the number of medical malpractice claims. Professional liability for failure to prevent violent behaviour by psychiatric patients is particularly debated. This study describes three Italian cases in which health professionals - physicians and nurses - were found guilty of manslaughter for murders committed by psychiatric patients. Examination of the cases focuses on claims of malpractice, patients' characteristics, the circumstances of the homicide and the reasons for the court's judgment. In particular, the predictability of violent behaviour and the concept of causal links are examined in detail. The cases provide an opportunity for a study of comparative jurisprudence. The topics discussed are relevant not only to practicing psychiatrists but also to experts assessing medical liability in cases of criminal acts committed by psychiatric patients. PMID:26130750

  18. Non-Psychiatric Health Problems among Psychiatric Inpatients with Intellectual Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charlot, L.; Abend, S.; Ravin, P.; Mastis, K.; Hunt, A.; Deutsch, C.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Physical distress resulting from medical problems has been found to cause increased behaviour problems in patients with intellectual disabilities (ID). Despite this fact, little has been documented on the medical problems of individuals with ID admitted for inpatient psychiatric care. We conducted an exploratory investigation based on…

  19. Predictors of in-hospital mortality in elderly patients with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine ward

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infectious diseases are a common cause of increased morbidity and mortality in elderly patients. Bacteraemia in the elderly is a difficult diagnosis and a therapeutic challenge due to age-related vicissitudes and to their comorbidities. The main purpose of the study was to assess independent risk factors for in-hospital mortality among the elderly with bacteraemia admitted to an Internal Medicine Ward. Methods Overall, a cohort of 135 patients, 65 years of age and older, with bacteraemia were retrospectively studied. Data related to demographic information, comorbidities, clinical parameters on admission, source and type of infection, microorganism isolated in the blood culture, laboratory data and empirical antibiotic treatment was recorded from each patient. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify independent predictors of all-cause in-hospital mortality. Results Of these 135 patients, 45.9% were women. The most common infections in this group of patients were urinary tract infections (46.7%). The main microorganisms isolated in the blood cultures were Escherichia coli (14.9%), Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) (12.0%), non-MRSA (11.4%), Klebsiella pneumoniae (9.1%) and Enterococcus faecalis (8.0%). The in-hospital mortality was 22.2%. Independent prognostic factors associated with in-hospital mortality were age ≥ 85 years, chronic renal disease, bacteraemia of unknown focus and cognitive impairment at admission (OR, 2.812 [95% CI, 1.039-7.611; p = 0.042]; OR, 6.179 [95% CI, 1.840-20.748; p = 0.003]; OR, 8.673 [95% CI, 1.557-48.311; p = 0.014] and OR, 3.621 [95% CI, 1.226-10.695; p = 0.020], respectively). By multivariate analysis appropriate antibiotic therapy was not associated with lower odds of mortality. Conclusion Bacteraemia in the elderly has a high mortality rate. There are no set of signs or clinical features that can predict bacteraemia in the elderly. However, older age (≥ 85 years), chronic renal

  20. Status of human dignity of adult patients admitted to hospitals of Tehran

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Moosavi, Soolmaz

    2014-01-01

    Maintaining dignity and respect is among patients’ most fundamental rights. The importance of patient dignity, the status quo, patients’ needs, and a shortage of survey studies in this area were the underlying incentives for conducting this study. This was a cross-sectional descriptive study in which data were collected through Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI). The questionnaire was completed by 280 inpatients in 2012 to determine their perspectives on their personal state of human dignity. In this study, the mean score of patients’ dignity was 1.89 out of 5 (SD = 0.81). Results indicated a significant relationship between type of hospital and the distress caused by disease symptoms, peace of mind, and social support (P < 0.05). There were also relationship between type of ward and dependency (P < 0.05), type of disease and dependency (P < 0.05), gender and social support (P < 0.05), household size and peace of mind (P < 0.05). The person’s satisfaction with household income showed significant relationship with symptom distress, dependency and existential distress (P < 0.05). Results showed a significant inverse correlation between age and patient dignity (P = 0.005, r = - 0.166). However, the relationship between employment status, health insurance, education level and the above factors were insignificant. Studies indicate that there is a relationship between patients’ dignity and mental distress, and therefore policy makers and health services officials should establish and implement plans to maintain and enhance patients’ dignity in hospitals. Educating the health team, particularly the nurses can be very effective in maintaining patients’ dignity and respect. PMID:26587200

  1. American Psychiatric Nurses Association-Transitions in Practice Certificate Program: Bridging the Knowledge Gap in Caring for Psychiatric Patients Within the General Nursing Workforce.

    PubMed

    Adams, Susie M; Black, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to publicize an important new Web-based educational program. Recognizing the growing gap in psychiatric-mental health knowledge and the need to better prepare new graduates and nurses transitioning from other service lines into psychiatric inpatient nursing settings, the American Psychiatric Nurses Association developed a 15-hour, modularized curriculum to provide foundational psychiatric-mental health knowledge. This modularized curriculum, called American Psychiatric Nurses Association Transitions in Practice (ATP) focuses on the knowledge and skills to insure the success of nurses new to psychiatric-mental health nursing settings and to improve the overall care for persons with mental health and substance use disorders. The ATP program is also proving to be useful content for nurses in emergency departments, hospitals, and other health settings to improve their care of patients with psychiatric and mental health needs. A summary of the program modules and a toolkit with suggested measures for nurses, patients, and agency outcomes is described. Feedback from participants completing the ATP program within the first 6 months is overwhelmingly positive and holds promise for widespread application across a variety of health care settings. PMID:27259126

  2. iPad-Assisted Measurements of Duration Estimation in Psychiatric Patients and Healthy Control Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Preuschoff, Irene; Müller, Helge H.; Sperling, Wolfgang; Biermann, Teresa; Bergner, Matthias; Kornhuber, Johannes; Groemer, Teja W.

    2013-01-01

    Handheld devices with touchscreen controls have become widespread in the general population. In this study, we examined the duration estimates (explicit timing) made by patients in a major general hospital and healthy control subjects using a custom iPad application. We methodically assessed duration estimates using this novel device. We found that both psychiatric and non-psychiatric patients significantly overestimated time periods compared with healthy control subjects, who estimated elapsed time very precisely. The use of touchscreen-based methodologies can provide valuable information about patients. PMID:23658689

  3. A Review of Impact of Tobacco Use on Patients with Co-occurring Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Arghya; Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Consumption of tobacco has been a worldwide problem over the past few decades due to the highly prevalent tobacco-attributable complications. Tobacco use has also been found to be more prevalent in patients with psychiatric disorders. Therefore, we conducted this review about the impact of tobacco use on co-occurring psychiatric disorders. Various facets of this interaction between tobacco use among those with co-occurring psychiatric disorders have been explored. It has been found that people with psychiatric disorders have a higher chance of currently smoking tobacco and lesser chance of cessation. Tobacco use and mental disorders continue to share a complex relationship that has been further evolving after the change in the pattern of tobacco use and also the advent of newer modalities of treatment. However, at the same time, it is believed that cessation of smoking may lead to improvement in the symptoms of mental illness. PMID:26997871

  4. Difficulties diagnosing psychiatric paraneoplastic syndromes in patients with a psychiatric history: a patient with secondary mania and renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gaston, Romina Lopez; Constantine, Lenia

    2009-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is characterised by lack of early warning signs. The classic triad (palpable mass, haematuria and flank pain) occurs in less than 15% of cases and paraneoplastic syndromes develop in 10–40%, often preceding the detection of the neoplasm. This report describes a 51-year-old woman who displayed manic symptomatology and was investigated due to anaemia. RCC was diagnosed and her psychiatric symptomatology remitted after the nephrectomy. PMID:21686959

  5. Relationship between Cognitive Function, Depression/Anxiety and Functional Parameters in Patients Admitted for Congestive Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Feola, Mauro; Garnero, Sonia; Vallauri, Paola; Salvatico, Luigi; Vado, Antonello; Leto, Laura; Testa, Marzia

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairment, anxiety and depression have been described in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). We analyzed in-hospital CHF patients before discharge with neuropsychological tests attempting to correlate with prognostic parameters. Methods: All subjects underwent a mini mental state examination (MMSE), geriatric depression scale (GDS), anxiety and depression scale test (HADS). We evaluated NYHA class, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) and non-invasive cardiac output (CO). Results: Three-hundred and three CHF patients (age 71.6 ys) were analysed. The mean NYHA class was 2.9±0.8, LVEF was 43.4±15.8%; BNP plasma level and CO were calculated as 579.8±688.4 pg/ml and 3.9±1.1 l/min, respectively. In 9.6% a pathological MMSE score emerged; a depression of mood in 18.2% and anxiety in 23.4% of patients were observed. A significant correlation between MMSE and age (r=0.11 p=0.001), BNP (r=0.64 p=0.03) but not between MMSE and NYHA class and LVEF was observed. GDS and HADS were inversely correlated with NYHA class (r=0.38 p=0.04) and six-minute walking test (r=0.18 p=0.01) without an association with objective parameters in CHF (BNP, LVEF and cardiac output). At multivariate analysis only MMSE and BNP are inversely correlated significantly (p=0.019 OR=-0.64, CI=-042-0.86). Conclusions: in-hospital CHF patients may manifest a reduction of MMSE and important anxiety/depression disorders. The results of the study suggest that the presence of cognitive impairment in older CHF patients with higher BNP plasma level should be considered. In admitted CHF patients anxiety and depression of mood are commonly reported and influenced the perception of the severity of illness. PMID:24044027

  6. Punding in non-demented Parkinson's disease patients: Relationship with psychiatric and addiction spectrum comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Pettorruso, Mauro; Fasano, Alfonso; De Risio, Luisa; Ricciardi, Lucia; Di Nicola, Marco; Martinotti, Giovanni; Janiri, Luigi; Bentivoglio, Anna Rita

    2016-03-15

    Punding is a stereotyped behavior characterized by an intense fascination with a complex, excessive, non-goal oriented, repetitive activity, associated with dopaminergic replacement therapy (DRT) in patients affected by Parkinson's disease (PD) and with dopamine agonists in several conditions. We studied 25 PD patients with punding behaviors, and compared them to 130 PD controls. The psychiatric evaluation included: the Snaith-Hamilton Pleasure Scale (SHAPS); the SCales for Outcomes in PArkinson's disease-Psychiatric Complications (SCOPA-PC); the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, Version 11 (BIS-11); the Mood Disorder Questionnaire; the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HDRS) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HARS). The occurrence of impulse control disorders (ICDs) was diagnosed through a psychiatric interview. Significantly more punding patients (96% vs. 68%; p<0.01) were in treatment with DA agonists, receiving significantly higher DA agonists levodopa equivalent daily dose (LEDD). Punding behaviors were found to be associated with psychiatric comorbidity, particularly with psychosis and bipolar disorder. In addition, higher anhedonic symptoms were reported by punders. High rate of co-occurring addictive behaviors (pathological gambling, hedonistic homeostatic dysregulation) and ICDs were found. In conclusion, presented data confirm that DRT, in a subset of PD patients, is strongly associated with addiction-like behavioral issues. Punding shares similarities with addictive behaviors and is associated to other psychiatric symptoms involving dopamine system alterations. PMID:26944176

  7. Rash in Psychiatric and Nonpsychiatric Adolescent Patients Receiving Lamotrigine in Korea: A Retrospective Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Tak, Hee-Jong; Ahn, Joon-Ho; Kim, Kun-Woo; Kim, Yeni; Choi, Sam-Wook; Lee, Kyung-Yeon; Park, Eun Jin

    2012-01-01

    Objective Lamotrigine is a widely used medication for psychiatric disorders and epilepsy, but the adverse effects of this drug in adolescent Korean patients have not yet been investigated. In the present study, we sought to compare the incidence and impact of lamotrigine-induced skin rashes and different pattern of adverse events in psychiatric and nonpsychiatric adolescent patients. Methods Using a retrospective cohort design, all of the charts were reviewed for adolescents (13 to 20 years old), treated with lamotrigine during the previous 2 years in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Clinic and Pediatric Neurologic Clinic of the Ulsan University Hospital in South Korea. Results Of the 102 subjects, 23 patients developed a skin rash. All of these rashes were observed within 7 weeks of the initiation of the lamotrigine therapy. Only one subject developed a serious rash, which was diagnosed as Stevens-Johnson syndrome. Although the psychiatric subjects were administered statistically lower doses of lamotrigine during weeks 1 through 5 and at week 12, the likelihood of developing a rash was not significantly different between the psychiatric and nonpsychiatric patients. Conclusion Careful dose escalation and close observation of side effects for the first 7 weeks of treatment is important. The present study reveals the tolerability of lamotrigine in an adolescent population, although a double-blind, controlled trial is needed to confirm these findings. PMID:22707969

  8. The Chauvet 2014 Meeting Report: Psychiatric and Psychosocial Evaluation and Outcomes of Upper Extremity Grafted Patients.

    PubMed

    Jowsey-Gregoire, Sheila G; Kumnig, Martin; Morelon, Emmanuel; Moreno, Elisa; Petruzzo, Palmina; Seulin, Christian

    2016-07-01

    Under the auspices for the International Society on Hand and Composite Tissue Allotransplantation, a section of The Transplantation Society (IHCTAS), a meeting was convened on March 21-22, 2014 in Paris to review the following areas that were deemed significant in the understanding of the psychosocial evaluation and outcomes of upper extremity transplant recipients: required domains of the evaluation, screening instruments, clinical monitoring pretransplant, clinical monitoring posttransplant, patient and team expectations, body image, psychiatric complications, functional goals and quality of life, ethics and media relations. Experts in the fields of psychiatry and psychology, transplantation, social work, ethics, and transplant administration met and reviewed center experiences and literature. The attendees highlighted the importance and the complexity of the psychiatric assessment in this field of transplantation. Moreover, the necessity to develop common instruments and evaluation protocols to predict psychosocial outcomes as well as to understand whether we are transplanting the right patients and how the transplantation is affecting the patients were pointed out. Psychiatric complications in upper extremity transplanted patients have been reported by the majority of teams. Preexisting psychiatric difficulties, the initial trauma of amputation, or adjusting to the transplantation process itself (especially the medical follow-up and rehabilitation process) appeared to be important factors. Monitoring during the whole follow-up was recommended to detect psychiatric issues and to facilitate and ensure long-term adherence. The participants proposed an annual meeting format to build upon the findings of this inaugural meeting to be called the Chauvet Workgroup meeting. PMID:26636738

  9. Spouses of Discharged Psychiatric Patients: Factors Associated with Their Experience of Burden.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noh, Samuel; Avison, William R.

    1988-01-01

    Examined variations in experience of burden among men and women married to formerly hospitalized psychiatric patients. Substantial proportion of individuals found living with previously hospitalized spouse burdensome. Experience of burden was not simply function of patient's behavioral problems as indexed by measure of symptomatology; psychosocial…

  10. Aggression and Risk of Future Violence in Forensic Psychiatric Patients with and without Dyslexia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selenius, Heidi; Hellstrom, Ake; Belfrage, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    Dyslexia does not cause criminal behaviour, but it may worsen aggressive behaviour tendencies. In this study, aggressive behaviour and risk of future violence were compared between forensic psychiatric patients with and without dyslexia. Dyslexia was assessed using the Swedish phonological processing battery "The Pigeon". The patients filled in…

  11. Memory-for-designs drawing styles of psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Holmes, C B

    1983-07-01

    Studied the relationship between several Memory-For-Designs drawing styles and personality traits using a sample of psychiatric outpatients. Four MFD drawing styles were studied by comparing the MMPI scores of Ss who did or did not draw constricted figures, draw expanded figures, draw along the edges of the paper, or place the figures on the page in a disorganized manner. Contrary to previous work in this area, the present results showed a relationship between certain drawing styles and scores on the MMPI, i.e., certain drawing styles correlate with personality traits. PMID:6874996

  12. Paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity: ethical perspectives in encounters with patients in psychiatric in-patient care

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Psychiatric staff members have the power to decide the options that frame encounters with patients. Intentional as well as unintentional framing can have a crucial impact on patients’ opportunities to be heard and participate in the process. We identified three dominant ethical perspectives in the normative medical ethics literature concerning how doctors and other staff members should frame interactions in relation to patients; paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity. The aim of this study was to describe and analyse statements describing real work situations and ethical reflections made by staff members in relation to three central perspectives in medical ethics; paternalism, autonomy and reciprocity. Methods All staff members involved with patients in seven adult psychiatric and six child and adolescent psychiatric clinics were given the opportunity to freely describe ethical considerations in their work by keeping an ethical diary over the course of one week and 173 persons handed in their diaries. Qualitative theory-guided content analysis was used to provide a description of staff encounters with patients and in what way these encounters were consistent with, or contrary to, the three perspectives. Results The majority of the statements could be attributed to the perspective of paternalism and several to autonomy. Only a few statements could be attributed to reciprocity, most of which concerned staff members acting contrary to the perspective. The result is presented as three perspectives containing eight values. •Paternalism; 1) promoting and restoring the health of the patient, 2) providing good care and 3) assuming responsibility. •Autonomy; 1) respecting the patient’s right to self-determination and information, 2) respecting the patient’s integrity and 3) protecting human rights. •Reciprocity; 1) involving patients in the planning and implementation of their care and 2) building trust between staff and patients. Conclusions

  13. Procalcitonin levels and bacterial aetiology among COPD patients admitted to the ICU with severe pneumonia: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Serum procalcitonin (PCT) is considered useful in predicting the likeliness of developing bacterial infections in emergency setting. In this study, we describe PCT levels overtime and their relationship with bacterial infection in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) critically ill patients with pneumonia. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in an ICU of a University Hospital. All consecutive COPD patients admitted for pneumonia between September 2005 and September 2006 were included. Respiratory samples were tested for the presence of bacteria and viruses. Procalcitonin was sequentially assessed and patients classified according to the probability of the presence of a bacterial infection. Results Thirty four patients were included. The PCT levels were assessed in 32/34 patients, median values were: 0.493 μg/L [IQR, 0.131 to 1.471] at the time of admission, 0.724 μg/L [IQR, 0.167 to 2.646] at six hours, and 0.557 μg/L [IQR, 0.123 to 3.4] at 24 hours. The highest PCT (PCTmax) levels were less than 0.1 μg/L in 3/32 (9%) patients and greater than 0.25 μg/L in 22/32 (69%) patients, suggesting low and high probability of bacterial infection, respectively. Fifteen bacteria and five viruses were detected in 15/34 (44%) patients. Bacteria were not detected in patients with PCTmax levels < 0.1 μg/L. In contrast, bacteria were detected in 4/7 (57%) patients estimated unlikely to have a bacterial infection by PCT levels (PCTmax > 0.1 and < 0.25 μg/L). Conclusion Based on these results we suggest that a PCT level cut off > 0.1 μg/L may be more appropriate than 0.25 μg/L (previously proposed for non severe lower respiratory tract infection) to predict the probability of a bacterial infection in severe COPD patients with pneumonia. Further studies testing procalcitonin-based antibiotic strategies are needed in COPD patients with severe pneumonia. PMID:19772586

  14. The measurement of aggression and violence in hospitalized psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Morrison, E F

    1993-02-01

    Aggression and violence are significant clinical problems in psychiatric inpatient units. However, research exploring violent behavior is limited by the lack of an adequate research scale. This paper reports on the development and testing of the Violence Scale (VS), a behavioral rating scale which measures aggressive and violent behavior towards self, others and property. The VS has been tested in two studies of psychiatric inpatients (N = 162) and (N = 42). Tests of reliability included internal consistency, item analysis and stability. Tests of validity included content and construct validity. The psychometric results were evaluated through the application of standard statistical criteria [Carmines, E. G. and Zeller, R. A. (1979). Reliability and Validity Assessment. Sage University Press, Beverly Hills, CA; Cronbach, L. J. (1951). Coefficient alpha and the internal structure of tests. Psychometrika 16, 197-333; Nunnally J. (1978). Psychometric Theory, McGraw-Hill, New York]. Coefficient alpha was 0.91 (study 1) and 0.68 (study 2) and stability was r = 0.79 (study 1). The items met most of the established criteria for item analysis and internal consistency. In factor analysis, the items met the criteria for loading onto the three predicted factors (others, self and property). Results of predictive model testing indicated that three of the four predicted relationships were supported. Initial testing indicates the scale is moderately stable, is internally consistent, and has evidence of initial limited construct validity. PMID:8449658

  15. Psychiatric Morbidity and Other Factors Affecting Treatment Adherence in Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Pachi, Argiro; Bratis, Dionisios; Moussas, Georgios; Tselebis, Athanasios

    2013-01-01

    As the overall prevalence of TB remains high among certain population groups, there is growing awareness of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression and its role in the outcome of the disease. The paper attempts a holistic approach to the effects of psychiatric comorbidity to the natural history of tuberculosis. In order to investigate factors associated with medication nonadherence among patients suffering from tuberculosis, with emphasis on psychopathology as a major barrier to treatment adherence, we performed a systematic review of the literature on epidemiological data and past medical reviews from an historical perspective, followed by theoretical considerations upon the relationship between psychiatric disorders and tuberculosis. Studies reporting high prevalence rates of psychiatric comorbidity, especially depression, as well as specific psychological reactions and disease perceptions and reviews indicating psychiatric complications as adverse effects of anti-TB medication were included. In sum, data concerning factors affecting medication nonadherence among TB patients suggested that better management of comorbid conditions, especially depression, could improve the adherence rates, serving as a framework for the effective control of tuberculosis, but further studies are necessary to identify the optimal way to address such issues among these patients. PMID:23691305

  16. Patients of immigrant origin in inpatient psychiatric facilities. A representative national survey by the Psychiatry and Migration Working Group of the German Federal Conference of Psychiatric Hospital Directors.

    PubMed

    Schouler-Ocak, M; Bretz, H J; Penka, S; Koch, E; Hartkamp, N; Siefen, R G; Schepker, R; Ozek, M; Hauth, I; Heinz, A

    2008-01-01

    In a representative nationwide survey, the Psychiatry and Migration Working Group of the German Federal Conference of Psychiatric Hospital Directors (Bundesdirektorenkonferenz) examined the use of inpatient psychiatric and psychotherapeutic services in Germany by patients of immigrant origin. Questionnaires were sent to a total of 350 general hospital psychiatric clinics throughout Germany, and 131 clinics responded. As shown by the 2005 Microcensus [22], almost one-fifth (18.6%) of the German population is of immigrant origin. In our study, persons of immigrant origin comprised 17% of patients in the responding facilities. This indicates that the percentage of inpatient psychiatric services used by patients of immigrant origin is almost proportionate to these patients' percentage of the general population. The largest group of immigrant patients in our study were those of Russian heritage, followed by patients of Turkish, Arabic, or other origin. Almost two-thirds of the immigrant patients were born in Germany, and a considerably larger percentage were German citizens (74%). Sixty-two per cent of all patients of immigrant origin spoke a language other than German (e.g. Russian, Turkish, Polish) at home. Patients of immigrant origin were significantly more likely to receive an ICD-10 F2 diagnosis, and it was precisely patients with this diagnosis who were observed to experience difficulties in communication with caregivers. PMID:18371576

  17. Factors associated with suicide method among psychiatric patients in a general hospital in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Subin; Ahn, Myung Hee; Na, Riji; Kim, Seon-Ok; Yoon, Jin Sang; Park, Jun-Hyuk; Hong, Jin Pyo

    2013-12-30

    This study aims to highlight the factors associated with suicide method among psychiatric patients in a general hospital in Korea. In a sample of 467 suicides by patients who had received mental health care in a general hospital in Korea, the relationship between suicide method and time of death as well as clinical characteristics, including psychiatric adiagnosis, was examined using multinomial logistic regression analysis. Compared with the general population, psychiatric patients, regardless of disorder, committed suicide by jumping from heights more often than by hanging (OR=2.35-8.64). In particular, patients with psychotic disorders and female patients were more likely to use jumping from a height than hanging to kill themselves (OR=2.98 and 1.83, respectively). Patients were more likely to use suicide methods other than hanging (e.g., OR=6.7 for jumping, 5.3 for drowning, and 2.7 for self-poisoning) between midnight and dawn. Possible suicide-prevention strategies suggested by this study include limiting access to or fencing off tall structures in close proximity to psychiatric institutions and residential care homes. At night, limiting access to or instituting heightened supervision of tall structures is specifically indicated. PMID:24055162

  18. Variables influencing presenting symptoms of patients with eating disorders at psychiatric outpatient clinics.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Mei-Chih Meg; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chang, Chin-Hao; Liao, Shih-Cheng; Chen, Hsi-Chung

    2016-04-30

    Eating disorders (EDs) have been underdiagnosed in many clinical settings. This study investigates the influence of clinical characteristics on presenting symptoms of patients with EDs. Psychiatric outpatients, aged 18-45, were enrolled sequentially and received a two-phase survey for EDs in August 2010-January 2013. Their primary reasons for seeking psychiatric help were obtained at their first encounter with outpatient psychiatrists. Patients' clinical and demographic characteristics were compared according to presenting symptoms with or without eating/weight problems. Of 2140 patients, 348 (16.3%) were diagnosed with an ED (22.6% of women and 6.3% of men). The three most common reasons for seeking psychiatric help were eating/weight problems (46.0%), emotional problems (41.3%), and sleep disturbances (19.3%). The multivariate analyses suggest that when patients with EDs presented symptoms that were less related to eating/weight problems, they were significantly more likely to be those having diagnoses other than anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa and less severe degree of binge-eating. Further, patients with EDs who demonstrated more impulsive behaviors and poorer functioning were less likely to report their eating problems when visiting psychiatric clinics. Thus, ED should be assessed routinely in patients with complex psychopathology to facilitate comprehensive treatment. PMID:27086254

  19. Misdiagnosis of Wilson's Disease in a Patient with Psychiatric Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Nimisha, Doval; Dhruv, Batra; Vikas, Moun; Sneh, Jha K; Rakesh, Shukla

    2016-01-01

    Therapeutic outcome of Wilson's disease significantly depends upon its early recognition. As Wilson's disease is a rare disorder with protean manifestations, its diagnosis and subsequent treatment are often delayed. We elaborate here the case of a young boy who had initially presented with psychiatrc symptoms suggestive of dissociative fugue followed by withdrawn behaviour and was treated by a psychiatrist with minimal response. This was associated with symptoms of tremors, hypersalivation, and slowness of movements. This case highlights the delay in diagnosing Wilson's disease when faced with the case of a young adult with psychiatric manifestations. It is extremely important for physicians, psychiatrists and health professionals at primary care level to recognize and diagnose this treatable disease at an early stage. PMID:27570350

  20. Validation of candidate genes associated with cardiovascular risk factors in psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Windemuth, Andreas; de Leon, Jose; Goethe, John W.; Schwartz, Harold I.; Woolley, Stephen; Susce, Margaret; Kocherla, Mohan; Bogaard, Kali; Holford, Theodore R.; Seip, Richard L.; Ruaño, Gualberto

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify genetic variants predictive of cardiovascular risk factors in a psychiatric population treated with second generation antipsychotics (SGA). 924 patients undergoing treatment for severe mental illness at four US hospitals were genotyped at 1.2 million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Patients were assessed for fasting serum lipid (low density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDLc], high density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDLc], and triglycerides) and obesity phenotypes (body mass index, BMI). Thirteen candidate genes from previous studies of the same phenotypes in non-psychiatric populations were tested for association. We confirmed 8 of the 13 candidate genes at the 95% confidence level. An increased genetic effect size was observed for triglycerides in the psychiatric population compared to that in the cardiovascular population. PMID:21851846

  1. [Characteristics of calls by psychiatric patients to an emergency telephone helpline].

    PubMed

    Gilat, I; Gil, Z E

    1996-05-15

    The role of the Israeli emergency telephone helpline, ERAN, was investigated by comparative analysis of calls received from 464 patients being treated psychiatrically, with calls received from 3,292 nonpatients during 1994. Findings reveal different patterns for helping relations in the 2 groups: Those being treated psychiatrically on a regular basis called ERAN more frequently, expected emotional support rather than direct help, mainly presented mental problems, and suicidal thoughts were much more prevalent among them. Those under no psychiatric treatment often called only once and presented a wider spectrum of expectations and problems. These differences indicate that the interrelations between the para-professional ERAN service and professional agents are complementary for mental patients and substitutional for other callers. PMID:8794654

  2. Oesophageal varices, schistosomiasis, and mortality among patients admitted with haematemesis in Mwanza, Tanzania: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Upper gastrointestinal bleeding (UGIB) is a common cause of hospital admissions worldwide. Aetiologies vary by sociodemographics and geography. Retrospective studies of endoscopies in much of Africa have documented oesophageal varices as a leading cause of UGIB. Prospective studies describing outcomes and associations with clinical factors are lacking. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study at a referral hospital in Mwanza, Tanzania where schistosomiasis is endemic. Adults admitted with haematemesis underwent laboratory workup, schistosomiasis antigen testing and elective endoscopy, and were followed for two months for death or re-bleeding. We assessed predictors of endoscopic findings using logistic regression models, and determined prediction rules that maximised sensitivity and positive predictive value (PPV). Results Of 124 enrolled patients, 13 died within two months (10%); active schistosomiasis prevalence was 48%. 64/91(70%) patients had oesophageal varices. We found strong associations between varices and numerous demographic or clinical findings, permitting construction of simple, high-fidelity prediction rules for oesophageal varices applicable even in rural settings. Portal vein diameter ≥ 13 mm or water sourced from the lake yielded sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV > 90% for oesophageal varices; presence of splenomegaly or water sourced from the lake maintained sensitivity and PPV > 90%. Conclusions Our results guide identification of patients, via ultrasound and clinical examination, likely to have varices for whom referral for endoscopy may be life-saving. Furthermore, they support empiric anti-schistosome treatment for patients with UGIB in schistosome-endemic regions. These interventions have potential to reduce UGIB-related morbidity and mortality in Africa. PMID:24894393

  3. Quality of interactions influences everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care--patients' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Molin, Jenny; Graneheim, Ulla H; Lindgren, Britt-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Everyday life consists of daily activities that are taken for granted. It forms the foundation for human efforts and contains elements of both comfort and boredom. Because everyday life escapes no one, life in a psychiatric ward will become ordinary while staying there. This study aims to explore everyday life in psychiatric inpatient care based on patients' experiences. We individually interviewed 16 participants with experiences of psychiatric inpatient care and analysed the data in accordance with the methods of grounded theory. Data collection and analysis continued in parallel in accordance with the method. Our results showed that everyday life is linked to the core category quality of interactions influences everyday life, and three constructed categories-staff makes the difference, looking for shelter in a stigmatizing environment, and facing a confusing care content-were related to the core category. Our results highlight the importance of ordinary relationships between staff and patients in psychiatric inpatient care. These results can be used to develop nursing interventions to improve psychiatric inpatient care and might also be used as a basis for reflective dialogues among staff. PMID:26806313

  4. [Wish to change smoking behaviour among staff and patients of a psychiatric hospital].

    PubMed

    Grempler, Julia; Droste-Arndt, Hildegard; Flammer, Erich; Steinert, Tilman

    2012-05-01

    Objective To examine smoking behaviour and motivation to reach abstinence among staff and patients of a psychiatric hospital.Methods In two due day surveys all in-patients and staff of the Centre for Psychiatry Weissenau were interviewed by a questionnaire.Results The response rate was 78.5 %. 442 (48 %) out of 933 subjects (523 patients, 410 staff) were smokers. Patients were smoking more frequently than staff (58 % vs. 34 %) and were more severely nicotine-dependent. Significant gender differences were observed with regard to prevalence and nicotin dependence. 57 % said they wanted to stop smoking and 34 % would appreciate therapeutic offers. There were no significant differences between patients and staff.Conclusions Psychiatric patients are as motivated as staff for offers about smoking cessation. There is a need for therapeutic offers. PMID:22422161

  5. Pandemic Influenza A H1N1 in Oman: Epidemiology, Clinical Features, and Outcome of Patients Admitted to Sultan Qaboos University Hospital in 2009

    PubMed Central

    Al-Busaidi, Mujahid; Al Maamari, Khuloud; Al’Adawi, Badriya; Alawi, Fatma Ba; Al-Wahaibi, Adil; Belkhair, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Oman experienced the H1N1 pandemic in 2009 that initially started in Mexico and the United States. We present the epidemiology, clinical features, and outcome of cases admitted to Sultan Qaboos University Hospital. Methods We retrospectively reviewed all patients admitted with confirmed influenza A H1N1 infection from August to December 2009. The study included adults and pediatric patients. We looked at the clinical and laboratory factors associated with increased length of hospital stay. Results There were 68 patients admitted with influenza A H1N1 infection, and their median age was 23 years. The most common symptoms were fever (100%) and cough (79.4%). The most common reason for admission was the severity of illness (69.1%). Lymphopenia was the most common hematological abnormality (41.8%). All patients received treatment with oseltamivir. One patient died secondary to multi-organ failure. On multivariate analysis, severity of illness, use of steroids, anemia, lymphopenia, and abnormal alanine amino transferase levels were associated with increased length of stay. Conclusions The H1N1 pandemic in Oman followed the international trends in terms of clinical presentation and laboratory values for patients admitted to the hospital. PMID:27403242

  6. Can Selection of Mechanical Ventilation Mode Prevent Increased Intra-Abdominal Pressure in Patients Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit?

    PubMed Central

    Rafiei, Mohammad Reza; Aghadavoudi, Omid; Shekarchi, Babak; Sajjadi, Seyed Sajed; Masoudifar, Mehrdad

    2013-01-01

    Background: Increased intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) results in dysfunction of vital organs. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of mechanical ventilation mode on IAP. Methods: In a cohort study, a total of 60 patients aged 20-70 years who were admitted to the ICU and underwent mechanical ventilation were recruited. Mechanical ventilation included one of the three modes: Biphasic positive airway pressure (BIPAP) group, synchronize intermittent mandatory ventilation (SIMV) group, or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) group. For each patient, mechanical ventilation mode and its parameters, blood pressure, SpO2, and status of tube feeding and IAP were recorded. Results: Our findings indicate that the study groups were not significantly different in terms of anthropometric characteristics including age (64.5 ± 4, P = 0.1), gender (male/female 31/29, P = 0.63), and body mass index (24 ± 1.2, P = 0.11). Increase IAP was related to the type of respiratory mode with the more increased IAP observed in SIMV mode, followed by BIPAP and CPAP modes (P = 0.01). There were significant correlations between increased IAP and respiratory variables including respiratory rate, pressure support ventilation, and inspiratory pressure (P < 0.05). Tube feeding tolerance through NG-tube was lower in SIMV group, followed by BIPAP and CPAP groups (P < 0.05). Conclusions: There is a significant relationship between respiratory modes and IAP; therefore, it is better to utilize those types of mechanical ventilation like CPAP and BIPAP mode in patients who are prone to Intra-abdominal hypertension. PMID:23930166

  7. Medical problems in Ethiopian refugees airlifted to Israel: experience in 131 patients admitted to a general hospital.

    PubMed

    Hershko, C; Nesher, G; Yinnon, A M; Zandman-Goddard, G; Klutstein, M; Abrahamov, A; Alon, I; Rudensky, B; Isacsohn, M

    1986-06-01

    Within a 2 month period 131 Ethiopian immigrants were admitted for treatment at a general hospital in Jerusalem. There were 52 patients with malaria, 13 with typhoid fever, 24 with pneumonia, seven with tuberculosis, nine with shigella and 11 with campylobacter. Over three-quarters of these patients were anaemic. In the majority of cases anaemia was normocytic and was most probably secondary to malaria and other intercurrent infections. The prevalence of diffuse non-toxic goitre was 7% in children and 19% in adults with a male to female ratio of 4:13. A positive rapid plasma reagin (RPR) test was found in 4% of sera tested and a positive HBsAg in 13%. IgG antibodies to HBc antigen were found in 75% of subjects. All patients with infectious diseases responded to therapy and, despite their poor condition at arrival, there were no fatalities and no late sequelae. The high HBsAg carrier state calls attention to the risk of vertical transmission by infected mothers and underlines the need for active immunization of infants at risk. The high prevalence of untreated tuberculosis and malaria poses a potential public health hazard, but with the current systematic screening of this population leading to identification and effective treatment of affected subjects, chances for the practical eradication of malaria and tuberculosis are excellent. Finally, the large scale transfer of a population from rural Africa to a modern and largely urban society presents a unique opportunity for a prospective study of the impact of environment on the emergence of diseases which plague modern society such as diabetes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, hypertension and cancer. PMID:3464761

  8. A study of the presentation of somatic symptoms in general practice by patients with psychiatric disturbance.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, A F

    1990-01-01

    A computerized questionnaire was used to collect information on the presentation of symptoms in all 125 new patients presenting to one general practitioner in the course of one year who were considered to be suffering clinically significant psychiatric disturbance. Comparison was made between the 73 (58%) patients presenting with psychological symptoms and the 52 (42%) patients presenting with somatic symptoms for which no physical explanation was evident at the time of the consultation. Important differences emerged between the groups. Those patients presenting somatic symptoms had lower scores on the tests of psychiatric distress (indicating severity), fewer individual symptoms and fewer severe symptoms than patients presenting with psychological problems. This group also had statistically significant differences in personality profile and reported significantly fewer social problems. Prognosis for both groups was similar in that patients in both groups were equally likely to have a normal psychiatric distress score after six months. Adequate management of somatizing patients calls for vigilance and for improved detection and negotiating skills. Reviewing the computer results with patients helped them discuss their symptoms and the system allowed the general practitioner not only a clinical assessment of these patients' problems but a measure of psychological, social and personality components. PMID:2271279

  9. The Right of Psychiatric Patients to Refuse Medication: Where Should Social Workers Stand?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Kia J.

    1993-01-01

    Addresses differences among competence, commitment, and mental illness; the right to privacy; and the prohibition against cruel and unusual punishment. Reviews professional motivations in relation to both sides of controversy over rights of psychiatric patients to refuse medication. Presents position for social work profession that stands for…

  10. Opinions about Treatment Modalities among Patients Involuntarily Committed to a Forensic Psychiatric Hospital in Finland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Vuorio, Osmo; Koivisto, Hanna; Paavola, Paula; Hakola, Panu

    2004-01-01

    Patient satisfaction studies concerning various treatment modalities are few among involuntary forensic psychiatric treatment. They indicate general satisfaction with medication, interactive treatment and occupational therapy but dissatisfaction with lack of privacy, insufficiently explained rules and inadequately explained reasons of seclusion.…

  11. Ethnomethodology. II: A study of the Community Psychiatric Nurse in the patient's home.

    PubMed

    Bowers, L

    1992-02-01

    The former paper delineated the main points of ethnomethodology and its implications for nursing research. This paper describes a research study into the home visits of Community Psychiatric Nurses using the framework of ethnomethodology. Relevant sociological, psychological, medical and nursing literature is briefly reviewed. Home visits are found to be socially constructed events in which the sense of the talk is dependent upon the setting and context. The context of being in the home is shown to exert pressure upon how the developing events of the visit are construed by the participants. In particular, it is discovered that being a visitor in the patient's home tends to define the occasion of a Community Psychiatric Nurse visit as that of a meeting of friends. This is oriented to by the participants who draw upon their stock of typified knowledge of conduct of guests and hosts to make visible their desired definitions of the situation. The dynamics of power and control by the nurse are also altered by the location of the visit in the patient's home. Being in the home puts the patient firmly in charge, allowing him to take the lead at every turn. The nurse uses the strategies of persuasion and negotiation which can be enacted in the patient's home without fracturing the intersubjective understandings of the visit. Only in matters seen by both participants as clearly medico-psychiatric will the nurse become more assertive. Attention is drawn to some implications of these findings for the practice of Community Psychiatric Nursing. PMID:1551756

  12. Characteristics of Patients Visiting the Child & Adolescent Psychiatric Clinic: A 26-Year Study from North India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malhotra, Savita; Biswas, Parthasarathy; Sharan, Pratap; Grover, Sandeep

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study the sociodemographic and clinical profile of patients, who presented to the child and adolescent psychiatric services of a tertiary care centre over a 26-year period (1980-2005). Methodology: Data were abstracted retrospectively from detailed work up files of all subjects assessed in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) Clinic…

  13. The Novaco Anger Scale--Provocation Inventory (1994 Version) in Dutch Forensic Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornsveld, Ruud H. J.; Muris, Peter; Kraaimaat, Floris W.

    2011-01-01

    We examined the psychometric properties of the Novaco Anger Scale--Provocation Inventory (NAS-PI, 1994 version) in Dutch violent forensic psychiatric patients and secondary vocational students. A confirmatory factor analysis of the subscale structure of the NAS was carried out, reliability was investigated, and relations were calculated between…

  14. The Tell-Tale Tasks: A Review of Saccadic Research in Psychiatric Patient Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gooding, Diane C.; Basso, Michele A.

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on saccade research with adult psychiatric patients. It begins with an introduction of the various types of saccades and the tasks used to evoke them. The functional significance of the different types of eye movements is briefly discussed. Research findings regarding the saccadic performance of different adult psychiatric…

  15. Comparative Study of Suicide Potential among Pakistani and American Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farooqi, Yasmin Nilofer

    2004-01-01

    This study compared suicide potential and suicide attempts in 50 Pakistani and 50 American psychiatric patients all of whom reported a positive history of suicide attempts during the past 1-5 years. It further explored the role of nationality, gender, diagnosis, and marital status in respondents' potential for suicide and suicide attempts. The…

  16. The killing of psychiatric patients in Nazi Germany between 1939-1945.

    PubMed

    von Cranach, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Between 1939 and 1945, 180,000 psychiatric patients were killed in Nazi Germany. This paper opens with a brief discussion of the reasons for addressing this issue today; it is followed by the details of the so-called euthanasia program that entailed killing of patients by gas in special hospitals in the years 1939-1941, and in psychiatric hospitals in the years 1942-1945. In this latter period, patients were killed with lethal injections and through the introduction of a starvation diet. The fate of the Jewish patients and forced laborers, as well as the experiments conducted on the patients, are mentioned. Finally, some thoughts are presented to answer the question of why this could have happened. To me, the giving up of individual responsibility in an authoritarian system leads to the loss of the individual conscience and soul, including those of a psychiatrist. PMID:12817666

  17. Psychiatric adverse effects of zonisamide in patients with epilepsy and mental disorder comorbidities.

    PubMed

    Cavanna, Andrea E; Seri, Stefano

    2013-11-01

    Over the last few years, zonisamide has been proposed as a potentially useful medication for patients with focal seizures, with or without secondary generalization. Since psychiatric adverse effects, including mania, psychosis, and suicidal ideation, have been associated with its use, it was suggested that the presence of antecedent psychiatric disorders is an important factor associated with the discontinuation of zonisamide therapy in patients with epilepsy. We, therefore, set out to assess the tolerability profile of zonisamide in a retrospective chart review of 23 patients with epilepsy and comorbid mental disorders, recruited from two specialist pediatric (n=11) and adult (n=12) neuropsychiatry clinics. All patients had a clinical diagnosis of treatment-refractory epilepsy after extensive neurophysiological and neuroimaging investigations. The vast majority of patients (n=22/23, 95.7%) had tried previous antiepileptic medications, and most adult patients (n=9/11, 81.8%) were on concomitant medication for epilepsy. In the majority of cases, the psychiatric adverse effects of zonisamide were not severe. Four patients (17.4%) discontinued zonisamide because of lack of efficacy, whereas only one patient (4.3%) discontinued it because of the severity of psychiatric adverse effects (major depressive disorder). The low discontinuation rate of zonisamide in a selected population of patients with epilepsy and neuropsychiatric comorbidity suggests that this medication is safe and reasonably well-tolerated for use in patients with treatment-refractory epilepsy. Given the limitations of the present study, including the relatively small sample size, further research is warranted to confirm this finding. PMID:24070880

  18. Molecular analysis of velo-cardio-facial syndrome patients with psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Carlson, C; Papolos, D; Pandita, R K; Faedda, G L; Veit, S; Goldberg, R; Shprintzen, R; Kucherlapati, R; Morrow, B

    1997-01-01

    Velo-cardio-facial syndrome (VCFS) is characterized by conotruncal cardiac defects, cleft palate, learning disabilities, and characteristic facial appearance and is associated with hemizygous deletions within 22q11. A newly recognized clinical feature is the presence of psychiatric illness in children and adults with VCFS. To ascertain the relationship between psychiatric illness, VCFS, and chromosome 22 deletions, we evaluated 26 VCFS patients by clinical and molecular biological methods. The VCFS children and adolescents were found to share a set of psychiatric disorders, including bipolar spectrum disorders and attention-deficit disorder with hyperactivity. The adult patients, >18 years of age, were affected with bipolar spectrum disorders. Four of six adult patients had psychotic symptoms manifested as paranoid and grandiose delusions. Loss-of-heterozygosity analysis of all 26 patients revealed that all but 3 had a large 3-Mb common deletion. One patient had a nested distal deletion and two did not have a detectable deletion. Somatic cell hybrids were developed from the two patients who did not have a detectable deletion within 22q11 and were analyzed with a large number of sequence tagged sites. A deletion was not detected among the two patients at a resolution of 21 kb. There was no correlation between the phenotype and the presence of the deletion within 22q11. The remarkably high prevalence of bipolar spectrum disorders, in association with the congenital anomalies of VCFS and its occurrence among nondeleted VCFS patients, suggest a common genetic etiology. Images Figure 4 PMID:9106531

  19. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    PubMed

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury. PMID:23533394

  20. Patients' experiences of psychiatric care in emergency departments: A secondary analysis.

    PubMed

    Harris, Barbara; Beurmann, Ross; Fagien, Samantha; Shattell, Mona M

    2016-05-01

    The number of psychiatric emergencies presenting to EDs in the United States continues to rise. Evidence suggests that psychiatric ED care encounters can have less than optimal outcomes, and result in stress for providers. The primary aim of this study is to describe the perceptions of ED visits by persons experiencing emotional distress, identifying themes among these that may guide nursing interventions that minimize stress and optimize outcomes in the treatment of psychiatric emergency. This secondary analysis used a qualitative, phenomenological method to analyze a de-identified data set originally collected in a study of experiences of psychiatric emergency in a community based crisis management setting. Findings consist of three major themes: "Emergency rooms are cold and clinical", "They talk to you like you're a crazy person", and "You get put away against your will". An overarching theme through all three is the influence of RN communication, both positive and negative, on patient perceptions of their ED encounters. While nurse-patient communication is basic to all areas of practice, it may be a low priority in the urgent and chaotic context of the ED. However, our findings suggest that increased attention to timely, empathic and validating communication and openness to the patient's reality may decrease severity of symptoms, optimize outcomes, and decrease provider stress. PMID:26459607

  1. Psychiatric clinical course strengthens the student-patient relationships of baccalaureate nursing students.

    PubMed

    Ketola, J; Stein, J V

    2013-02-01

    Psychiatric nursing teaches students how to engage and communicate with patients who have severe emotional distress. Nurses need this knowledge as the majority of patients encountered in hospitals are distressed. This study explores the impact of a psychiatric clinical course in helping students learn to relate to distressed patients. The study used a mixed research methodology to survey 67 baccalaureate students about their experiences in the placement portion of the psychiatric nursing course. The pre-clinical questions focused on students' anticipation regarding individuals with mental illness and how the clinical experience would affect them as nurses and as individuals. The post-clinical questions asked how the clinical experience affected them. The students stated that their time with patients had changed them. Ninety-nine per cent were no longer frightened of the patients. Students realized the patients were distressed and were glad to help them. This work sensitized them to the individual rather than the generic patient. It initiated a process in self-awareness, in sensitivity to the feelings of another person and in communication skills. These are steps in the development of an empathetic presence. The students recognized the need for these skills in all nursing. The authors recommend strategies to assist students in developing an empathetic presence. PMID:22413758

  2. Interaction between psychiatric and autoimmune disorders in celiac disease patients in the Northeastern United States

    PubMed Central

    GARUD, S.; LEFFLER, D.; DENNIS, M.; EDWARDS-GEORGE, J.; SARYAN, D.; SHETH, S.; SCHUPPAN, D.; JAMMA, S.; KELLY, C. P.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Background Previous studies yielded conflicting results regarding the presence of an association between celiac disease (CD) and psychiatric disorders including depression. This association has not been studied in the United States. Aim To determine the prevalence of psychiatric and autoimmune disorders in patients with CD in the US compared to control groups. Methods In a case control study, the prevalence of psychiatric and autoimmune disorders was compared in 600 CD patients, 200 irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients and 200 healthy controls. Results The prevalence of depression in CD was 17.2% and was similar to that in IBS (18.5%, P = 0.74) and controls (16.0%, P = 0.79). Among CD patients, type I DM was identified as a significant risk factor for depression (P < 0.01) with 37% of patients with both CD and type I DM having clinical depression. Conclusion The prevalence of depression in CD is similar to that in other chronic gastrointestinal diseases and healthy controls. However, there is a markedly elevated risk of depression in patients with both type I DM and CD. Differing rates of type 1 DM among celiac populations may account for disparity in published rates of depression in patients with CD. PMID:19183153

  3. A psychiatric study of patients attending mehandipur balaji temple.

    PubMed

    Satija, D C; Singh, D; Nathawat, S S; Sharma, V

    1981-07-01

    In the present study 100 cases, randomly selected were studied at famous shrine of Rajasthan, the Mehandipur Balaji. As regards the sociodemographic variables, patients were mainly between 15-39 years of age, 80% were educated, 82% had Urban domicile, 98% were Hindus and Females were 54%. Majority of the visitors being from Northern part of India. Failure of modern treatment and influence of family members and friends were the main motivating factors. Majority of patients were Neurotic (48%), followed by Psychotics (28%). Patients who developed trance (possession) were Neurotics. One quarter of the patients who were mainly psychoneurotics, showed improvement. PMID:22058548

  4. A Preliminary Study of Psychiatric, Familial, and Medical Characteristics of High Utilizing Sickle Cell Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, C. Patrick; Haywood, Carlton; Hoot, Michelle R.; Lanzkron, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To identify demographic, medical, and psychosocial characteristics that distinguished sickle cell disease patients who were frequent utilizers of urgent or emergent care resources from low-utilizing patients. Methods Patients at a large urban comprehensive sickle cell disease treatment center were recruited from clinic or during urgent care visits. Participants who were high utilizers, defined as having more than 4 acute or emergency care visits in the prior 12 months, were compared to patients with more typical utilization patterns on lifetime complications of SCD, family background, psychiatric history, occupational function, coping, depressive symptoms, and personality. Results High utilizers were nearly a decade younger on average; despite this they had a similar lifetime history of SCD complications. High utilizing patients' parents appeared to have greater educational achievement overall. High utilizers reported a nearly three-fold greater prevalence of psychiatric illness in family members than low utilizers. On other measures; including coping strategies, social support, and personality; the two groups were comparable. Discussion The study strengthens emerging evidence that disease severity, familial factors related to greater parental education, and psychiatric illness are important factors in high care utilization in patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:23246997

  5. [An exploratory study of psychiatric patients' needs and nurses' current practices related to sexual counseling].

    PubMed

    Sung, Su-Ching; Lin, Yen-Chin; Hong, Chi-Mei; Cho, Pei-Pei

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore psychiatric patient needs and current nursing practice with regard to sexual counseling and to understand differences in individual patient characteristics. A total of 182 psychiatric patients and 44 psychiatric nurses were purposively selected from a mental hospital in northern Taiwan. Results revealed that 63.2% of subjects had not been given sexuality information and 81.9% had not been approached by nurses to discuss such issues. While 35.2% of study patients treated sexual issues as psychological or private issues that should only be discussed with psychologists, 33.5% expressed a desire to discuss issues related to sexuality with nurses. Even so, most subjects preferred to discuss sexual issues in a private way, and asked for assistance from same-gender professionals. Also, patients with higher education levels placed greater attention on the counseling topics of how to express sexual needs and the impacts of mental illness on sexuality. With regard to nurses participating in the study, female nurses had a generally more conservative attitude toward sexual values than males. Those who were married, older, or had received continuing sexuality education were more comfortable with conducting sexual counseling. Those with clinical experience and continuing sexuality education were able to take more responsibility and a more professional role in sexual counseling. Data collected on the specific subject groups in order to provide effective comparisons can be employed to refine current sexual counseling training programs for nurses in order to improve patient care. PMID:17340547

  6. Response to the NCEPOD report: development of a care bundle for patients admitted with decompensated cirrhosis—the first 24 h

    PubMed Central

    McPherson, Stuart; Dyson, Jessica; Austin, Andrew; Hudson, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been a significant increase in the prevalence of chronic liver disease in the UK, and as a result, hospital admissions and deaths due to liver disease have also increased. The 2013 National Confidential Enquiry into Patient Outcome and Death (NCEPOD) of patients with alcohol-related liver disease (ARLD) found that less than half the number of patients who died from ARLD received ‘good care’, and avoidable deaths were identified. In order to improve the care of patients admitted with ARLD, the NCEPOD report recommended that a ‘toolkit’ for the acute management of patients admitted with decompensated ARLD be developed and made widely available. As a result, we have developed a ‘care bundle’ for patients admitted with decompensated cirrhosis (of all aetiologies) to ensure that effective evidence-based treatments are delivered within the first 24 h. This care bundle provides a checklist to ensure that all appropriate investigations are undertaken when a patient with decompensated cirrhosis presents and provides clinicians with clear guidance on the initial management of alcohol withdrawal, infection, acute kidney injury, gastrointestinal bleeding and encephalopathy. The first 24 h are particularly important, as early intervention can reduce mortality and shorten hospital stay, and specialist gastroenterology/liver advice is not always available during this period. This review will discuss the care bundle and the evidence base behind the treatment recommendations made. PMID:26834955

  7. [Analgesic abuse and psychiatric comorbidity in headache patients].

    PubMed

    Radat, F; Irachabal, S; Swendsen, J; Henry, P

    2002-01-01

    Headache patients frequently overuse analgesic medications: 20% of the patients from headache centers is concerned by this problem, which has been estimated to occur in four percent of the community migrainers. Frequent use of various types of headache medication may paradoxically cause an increase in headache attack frequency as well as their chronicisation due to potentially complex mechanisms of sensitization. Patients will enter into a self- perpetuating cycle of daily headaches and use of symptomatic medications which can lead to addiction and to social and occupational impairement. Indeed, many patients will experience pharmacological tolerance and dependence but also by some kind of craving. International Headache Society qualify these patients as abusers referring mostly to the amount of substance ingested. Hence patients are labelled analgesic abusers . However, as many of these analgesic medications contained psychotropic substances (i.e. caffeine, codeine.), these patients may fulfill DSM IV criteria of dependance. Nevertheless, the dependance criteria should be adapted to chronic pain patients. Indeed, if pharmacological dependence and tolerance criteria are easy to apply in such patients, it is not the case for the criteria a great deal of time spent to obtain substances, to use substances or to recover from substances effects . As analgesic medications are legally obtained from medical practitioners, drug seeking behaviours are mostly: obtaining medications from multiple providers, repeating episodes of prescription loss and multiplying requests for early refills. Moreover the detrimental effects of analgesic abuse on psychosocial functioning is likely to be related to pain rather than to medication overuse. Finally the best indicator of addictive behaviors in such patients, is the loss of control over the use of analgesic medication despite the adverse consequences over pain. Comorbidity with addiction to other substances has never been specifically

  8. Sequence type 72 community-associated meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus emerged as a predominant clone of nasal colonization in newly admitted patients.

    PubMed

    Park, S Y; Chung, D R; Yoo, J R; Baek, J Y; Kim, S H; Ha, Y E; Kang, C-I; Peck, K R; Lee, N Y; Song, J-H

    2016-08-01

    Current knowledge of community-associated (CA) meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage in hospitalized patients is incomplete. Genotypic characteristics of 637 nasal MRSA isolates from newly admitted patients in South Korea were investigated. Sequence type (ST) 72 accounted for 52.1%, 46.3%, and 52.8% of the isolates during the periods of 2007-2008, 2009-2010, and 2013-2014, respectively. Instead of classic MRSA clones responsible for healthcare-associated infections, including ST5 and ST239, MRSA with community genotype ST72 was the predominant strain in newly admitted patients regardless of age and home province of the patients. Active strategies are needed to prevent healthcare-associated infection by CA-MRSA. PMID:26874934

  9. Long-lasting seizure-related anxiety in patients with temporal lobe epilepsy and comorbid psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Boulogne, Sebastien; Catenoix, Hélène; Ryvlin, Philippe; Rheims, Sylvain

    2015-09-01

    Ictal anxiety is a frequent epileptic symptom; it is usually brief, associated with objective clinical signs, and is not positively influenced by external factors, in contrast to psychiatric disorders. These criteria can, however, be misleading, especially in patients with psychiatric comorbidities. We report two patients with a history of drug-resistant right temporal lobe epilepsy, who developed long-lasting psychiatric symptoms, suggestive of exacerbation of their comorbid anxiety disorder. However, intracranial EEG data and [(18)F] FDG-PET suggested that these symptoms were related to seizure activity, highlighting the difficulties in differentiating ictal symptoms from psychiatric episodes in some patients with epilepsy and comorbid psychiatric disorders. [Published with video sequence]. PMID:26235301

  10. The Tell-Tale Tasks: A Review of Saccadic Research in Psychiatric Patient Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gooding, Diane C.; Basso, Michele A.

    2008-01-01

    This review focuses on saccade research with adult psychiatric patients. It begins with an introduction of the various types of saccades and the tasks used to evoke them. The functional significance of the different types of eye movements is briefly discussed. Research findings regarding the saccadic performance of different adult psychiatric patient populations are discussed in detail, with particular emphasis on findings regarding error rates, response latencies, and any specific task parameters that might affect those variables. Findings regarding the symptom, neurocognitive, and neural correlates of saccadic performance and the functional significance of patients’ saccadic deficits are also discussed. We also discuss the saccadic deficits displayed by various patient groups in terms of circuitry (e.g. cortical/basal ganglia circuits) that may be implicated in the underlying pathophysiology of several of these disorders. Future directions for research in this growing area are offered. PMID:18950927

  11. Detection of Serum Antibodies to Borna Disease Virus in Patients with Psychiatric Disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rott, R.; Herzog, S.; Fleischer, B.; Winokur, A.; Amsterdam, J.; Dyson, W.; Koprowski, H.

    1985-05-01

    Borna disease virus causes a rare meningoencephalitis in horses and sheep and has been shown to produce behavioral effects in some species. The possibility that the Borna virus is associated with mental disorders in humans was evaluated by examining serum samples from 979 psychiatric patients and 200 normal volunteers for the presence of Borna virus-specific antibodies. Antibodies were detected by the indirect immunofluorescence focus assay. Antibodies to the virus were demonstrated in 16 of the patients but none of the normal volunteers. The patients with the positive serum samples were characterized by having histories of affective disorders, particularly of a cyclic nature. Further studies are needed to define the possible involvement of Borna virus in human psychiatric disturbances.

  12. Clay and Anxiety Reduction: A One-Group, Pretest/Posttest Design with Patients on a Psychiatric Unit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kimport, Elizabeth R.; Hartzell, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Little research exists on using clay as an anxiety-reducing intervention with patients in psychiatric hospitals. This article reports on a study that used a one-group, pretest/posttest design with 49 adults in a psychiatric facility who created a clay pinch pot. The State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used as a pre- and posttest measure.…

  13. The impact of facility relocation on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, Eirini; Degl' Innocenti, Alessio; Kullgren, Anette; Wijk, Helle

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, large groups of forensic psychiatric patients have been relocated into new medium- and maximum-security forensic psychiatric facilities in Sweden, where a psychosocial care approach is embedded. From this perspective and on the assumption that physical structures affect the therapeutic environment, a prospective longitudinal study was designed to investigate the impact of the facility relocation of three forensic psychiatric hospitals on patients' perceptions of ward atmosphere and quality of received forensic psychiatric care. Participants were patients over 18 years of age sentenced to compulsory forensic psychiatric treatment. Data were obtained by validated questionnaires. Overall, 58 patients (78%) answered the questionnaires at baseline with a total of 25 patients (34%) completing follow-up 1 at six months and 11 patients (15%) completing follow-up 2, one year after relocation. Approximately two-thirds of the participants at all time-points were men and their age range varied from 18 to 69. The results of this study showed that poor physical environment features can have a severe impact on care quality and can reduce the possibilities for person-centered care. Furthermore, the study provides evidence that the patients' perceptions of person-centered care in forensic psychiatric clinics are highly susceptible to factors in the physical and psychosocial environment. Future work will explore the staff's perception of ward atmosphere and the possibilities to adapt a person-centered approach in forensic psychiatric care after facility relocation. PMID:27213839

  14. The admissions process in two state psychiatric hospitals.

    PubMed

    Solomon, P

    1981-06-01

    In this study, a conceptual model of the factors influencing the admissions process was tested in two state psychiatric hospitals. The factors included in the model fell into four categories: characteristics of patients, characteristics of admitting personnel, system factors, and patient assessment. The attitudes of individuals accompanying an applicant were found to be most important. Patients referred by police, courts, family, friends, or agency personnel were more likely to be admitted than self-referrals. Pathological behaviors that had a significant impact on the admissions process were those that indicated the presence of mental disorder or danger to self or others. The availability of alternatives to hospitalization was not found to be significant, a finding that suggests that admitting personnel, particularly psychiatrists, should be educated about community alternatives if spiraling rates of psychiatric admission are to be reduced. PMID:7262846

  15. An Examination of Perceived Helplessness in Psychiatric Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valine, Warren J.; Phillips, Carolyn

    1984-01-01

    Examined the relationship of helplessness, locus of control, depression, and voluntary participation in therapy. Results confirmed the relationship between helplessness, locus of control, and depression and suggested patients with greater degrees of helplessness were less likely to take an active role in treatment. (JAC)

  16. Cognitive Deficits in Psychiatric Patients: Constraints on HIV Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tunnell, Gil

    Some mental health experts have suggested that particular subgroups of the chronic mentally ill may be especially vulnerable to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Patients with mood disorders (manic type), schizophrenia, and dual diagnosis of either disorder with substance abuse are considered at high risk for HIV infection, as are…

  17. Impact of Patient Suicide on Psychiatrists and Psychiatric Trainees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruskin, R.; Sakinofsky, I.; Bagby, R. M.; Dickens, S.; Sousa, G.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: The authors investigated the impact of patient suicides on trainees and psychiatrists and their utilization of supports. Methods: Graduates in practice and trainees of the residency program of the University of Toronto from 1980-1995 (N = 495) were surveyed, retrospectively, with 239/495 responding (48%). Demographic and educational…

  18. Relationships among Stress, Experiential Avoidance and Depression in Psychiatric Patients.

    PubMed

    Rueda, Beatriz; Valls, Esperanza

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the specific association of stressful life events (SLE) and experiential avoidance (EA) with depression in patients with mental disorders. It also analyzed the possible mediating role of depression in the relation of EA to well-being and life satisfaction. A total of 147 patients (mean age = 40.16 years) diagnosed with anxiety, mood or adjustment disorder were recruited from a mental health centre. They completed measures of SLE, EA, depression, well-being and life satisfaction. Regression analyses showed that SLE and EA were positively related to depression (R 2 = .45), although the contribution made by EA was higher (β = .61, p < .001) than the one made by SLE (β = .19, p < .01). Bootstrap mediation analyses revealed that there was an indirect effect from EA to physical well-being (B = -4.52, SE = .70, p < .001, 95% CI [-6.03, -3.20]) and satisfaction (B = -.14, SE = .02, p < .001, 95%, CI [-.19 -.09]) through depression. This indirect effect was less consistently supported with respect to emotional well-being (B = -3.33, SE = .48, p < .001, 95%, CI [-4.30, -2.41]). These findings give support to the hypothesis that EA could be an important factor contributing to depression in patients with mental disorders. The results also provide evidence that depression seems to play an important mediational role when considering the negative impact that EA exerts on patients´ well-being and satisfaction. PMID:27210826

  19. The probability of patients being admitted from the emergency department is negatively correlated to in-hospital bed occupancy – a registry study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The association between emergency department (ED) overcrowding and poor patient outcomes is well described, with recent work suggesting that the phenomenon causes delays in time-sensitive interventions, such as resuscitation. Even though most researchers agree on the fact that admitted patients boarding in the ED is a major contributing factor to ED overcrowding, little work explicitly addresses whether in-hospital occupancy is associated to the probability of patients being admitted from the ED. The objective of the present study is to investigate whether such an association exists. Methods Retrospective analysis of data on all ED visits to Helsingborg General Hospital in southern Sweden between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2012, was undertaken. The fraction of admitted patients was calculated separately for strata of in-hospital occupancy <95%, 95–100%, 100–105%, and >105%. Multivariate models were constructed in an attempt to take confounding factors, e.g., presenting complaints, age, referral status, triage priority, and sex into account. Subgroup analysis was performed for each specialty unit within the ED. Results Overall, 118,668 visits were included. The total admitted fraction was 30.9%. For levels of in-hospital occupancy <95%, 95–100%, 100–105%, and >105% the admitted fractions were 31.5%, 30.9%, 29.9%, and 28.7%, respectively. After taking confounding factors into account, the odds ratio for admission were 0.88 (CI 0.84–0.93, P >0.001) for occupancy level 95–100%, 0.82 (CI 0.78–0.87, P >0.001) for occupancy level 100–105%, and 0.74 (CI 0.67–0.81, P >0.001) for occupancy level >105%, relative to the odds ratio for admission at occupancy level <95%. A similar pattern was observed upon subgroup analysis. Conclusions In-hospital occupancy was significantly associated with a decreased odds ratio for admission in the study population. One interpretation is that patients who would benefit from inpatient care instead received

  20. Sexual dysfunctions in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards compared to other specialized wards in Isfahan, Iran, in 2012

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadzadeh, Gholamhossain; Shahin, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Background: Having pleasurable sexual intercourses plays a major role in marital life satisfaction. Many of the medical and psychiatric disorders may affect the sexual function of the patients. The present study aims to investigate the relative frequency of sexual dysfunctions in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards and that of the patients in other specialized wards. Materials and Methods: This study is a descriptive-analytical, cross-sectional one, carried out on 900 patients hospitalized in psychiatric, cardiac, orthopedic, ophthalmology, and dermatology and plastic surgery wards of 5 hospitals in Isfahan. Data collection tools included demographic questionnaire and Arizona Sexual Experiences Scale (ASEX). Results: Sexual dysfunction in the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards (38%) was significantly higher than in the patients in other wards (27%), (P = 0.00). Among the patients hospitalized in psychiatric wards, those with bipolar disorder (37.3%) had the highest prevalence rate of sexual dysfunction. The patients with schizophrenia, major depression, substance abuse, and anxiety disorders had the following rates respectively. Among the patients in non-psychiatric wards, those in cardiac wards (37.1%) had the highest prevalence rate of sexual dysfunction. There was a significant relationship between the drug uses, mostly psychiatric drugs especially anti-psychotics, and the occurrence of sexual dysfunction. Conclusion: Considering the significant relative frequency of sexual dysfunction in psychiatric patients and undesired effects of simultaneous occurrence of both of these disorders in the patients, more emphasis is recommended to be placed on the prevention and proper treatment of these disorders in the patients. PMID:26623400

  1. Early trajectory of psychiatric symptoms after traumatic brain injury: relationship to patient and injury characteristics.

    PubMed

    Hart, Tessa; Benn, Emma K T; Bagiella, Emilia; Arenth, Patricia; Dikmen, Sureyya; Hesdorffer, Dale C; Novack, Thomas A; Ricker, Joseph H; Zafonte, Ross

    2014-04-01

    Psychiatric disturbance is common and disabling after traumatic brain injury (TBI). Few studies have investigated the trajectory of psychiatric symptoms in the first 6 months postinjury, when monitoring and early treatment might prevent persistent difficulties. The aim of this study was to examine the trajectory of psychiatric symptoms 1-6 months post-TBI, the patient/injury characteristics associated with changes, and characteristics predictive of persisting symptoms. A secondary analysis was performed on data from a clinical trial with three data collection points. Across eight centers, 872 participants with complicated mild to severe TBI were administered the Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI) at 30, 90, and 180 days postinjury. Mixed-effects models were used to assess longitudinal changes in the BSI Global Severity Index (GSI). Multi-variate logistic regression was used to assess predictors of clinically significant GSI elevations persisting to 6 months post-TBI. In general, GSI scores improved over time. Women improved faster than men; race/ethnicity was also significantly associated with rate of change, with Hispanics showing the most and African Americans the least improvement. Clinically significant psychiatric symptoms (caseness) occurred in 42% of the sample at 6 months, and more than one type of symptom was common. Significant predictors of caseness included African American race, age from 30 to 60 years, longer post-traumatic amnesia (PTA) duration, pre-TBI unemployment, and pre-TBI risky alcohol use. Findings indicate that psychiatric symptoms are common in the first 6 months post-TBI and frequently extend beyond the depression and anxiety symptoms that may be most commonly screened. Patients with longer PTA and preinjury alcohol misuse may need more intensive monitoring for symptom persistence. PMID:24237113

  2. Values as determinant of meaning among patients with psychiatric disorders in the perspective of recovery

    PubMed Central

    Huguelet, Philippe; Guillaume, Sébastien; Vidal, Sonia; Mohr, Sylvia; Courtet, Philippe; Villain, Lucile; Girod, Chloé; Hasler, Roland; Prada, Paco; Olié, Emilie; Perroud, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Recovery is a personal process of growth that involves hope, self-identity, meaning in life and responsibility. Determinants of meaning have not been explored among populations of patients with persistent psychiatric conditions. However, an evidence-based approach aiming at assessing such determinants should provide some insight into the psychotherapeutic aspects of recovery. We tested a model hypothesizing that some symptoms and social parameters of patients are related to values, and secondarily to meaning in life, and in turn that meaning is associated with various parameters, such as depressiveness and self-esteem. We assessed 176 patients with schizophrenia, anorexia, borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder. Overall, our hypotheses proved correct: firstly, characteristics such as depression, hopelessness, self-esteem and the number of relationships influenced values; secondly, the presence and an enactment of values were associated with meaning, and thirdly, meaning was associated with some symptoms and social characteristics. This model was confirmed in the four psychiatric populations under study. These results support the relevance of addressing values and meaning in the recovery-oriented care of patients with persistent psychiatric disorders, in addition to other psychosocial interventions which are more systematically considered in this area. PMID:27272094

  3. Virtual patient simulation in psychiatric care - A pilot study of digital support for collaborate learning.

    PubMed

    Sunnqvist, Charlotta; Karlsson, Karin; Lindell, Lisbeth; Fors, Uno

    2016-03-01

    Psychiatric and mental health nursing is built on a trusted nurse and patient relationship. Therefore communication and clinical reasoning are two important issues. Our experiences as teachers in psychiatric educational programmes are that the students feel anxiety and fear before they start their clinical practices in psychiatry. Therefore there is a need for bridging over the fear. Technology enhanced learning might support such activities so we used Virtual patients (VPs), an interactive computer simulations of real-life clinical scenarios. The aim of this study was to investigate 4th term nursing students' opinions on the use of Virtual Patients for assessment in a Mental Health and Ill-health course module. We asked 24 volunteering students to practise with five different VP cases during almost 10 weeks before the exam. The participants were gathered together for participating in a written and an oral evaluation. The students were positive to the use of VPs in psychiatry and were very positive to use VPs in their continued nursing education. It seems that Virtual Patients can be an activity producing pedagogic model promoting students' independent knowledge development, critical thinking, reflection and problem solving ability for nurse students in psychiatric care. PMID:27038085

  4. Values as determinant of meaning among patients with psychiatric disorders in the perspective of recovery.

    PubMed

    Huguelet, Philippe; Guillaume, Sébastien; Vidal, Sonia; Mohr, Sylvia; Courtet, Philippe; Villain, Lucile; Girod, Chloé; Hasler, Roland; Prada, Paco; Olié, Emilie; Perroud, Nader

    2016-01-01

    Recovery is a personal process of growth that involves hope, self-identity, meaning in life and responsibility. Determinants of meaning have not been explored among populations of patients with persistent psychiatric conditions. However, an evidence-based approach aiming at assessing such determinants should provide some insight into the psychotherapeutic aspects of recovery. We tested a model hypothesizing that some symptoms and social parameters of patients are related to values, and secondarily to meaning in life, and in turn that meaning is associated with various parameters, such as depressiveness and self-esteem. We assessed 176 patients with schizophrenia, anorexia, borderline personality disorder and bipolar disorder. Overall, our hypotheses proved correct: firstly, characteristics such as depression, hopelessness, self-esteem and the number of relationships influenced values; secondly, the presence and an enactment of values were associated with meaning, and thirdly, meaning was associated with some symptoms and social characteristics. This model was confirmed in the four psychiatric populations under study. These results support the relevance of addressing values and meaning in the recovery-oriented care of patients with persistent psychiatric disorders, in addition to other psychosocial interventions which are more systematically considered in this area. PMID:27272094

  5. The Effect of Psychotherapy in Improving Physical and Psychiatric Symptoms in Patients with Functional Dyspepsia

    PubMed Central

    Faramarzi, Mahbobeh; Book, Howard E.; Rasolzadeh Tabatabai, Kazem; Taherim, Hassan; Kashifard, Mehrdad

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Functional Dyspepsia (FD) is a common symptom of upper gastrointestinal discomfort. Few data are available on the role of psychotherapy in the treatment of dyspeptic syndromes. This study assesses whether brief core conflictual relationship theme (CCRT) psychoanalytic psychotherapy improves gastrointestinal and psychiatric symptoms in patients with functional dyspepsia. Methods: A randomized, controlled trial was planned in two educational hospitals in city of Babol. Forty-nine patients with FD were randomly assigned to receive standard medication treatment with CCRT psychotherapy (24 participants) or standard medication treatment alone (25 participants). The participants completed the Patient Assessment of Upper Gastrointestinal Symptom Severity Index (PAGI-SYM) and Symptom Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R) questionnaires before the trial, after the treatment and at 1 and 12-month follow-ups. The mixed-effects (regression) model was used to analyze the data. Results: The results showed that CCRT psychotherapy improved all of the FD symptoms (heartburn/regurgitation, nausea/vomiting, fullness, bloating, upper abdominal pain, and lower abdominal pain) and many of the psychiatric symptoms (depression, anxiety, somatization, interpersonal sensitivity and paranoid ideation) after the treatment and at 1-month and 12-month follow-ups. Conclusion: Brief CCRT psychoanalytic psychotherapy can serve as an effective intervention for promoting gastrointestinal and psychiatric symptoms in patients with functional dyspepsia. PMID:26005480

  6. Antipsychotic Medication Prescribing Practices Among Adult Patients Discharged From State Psychiatric Inpatient Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    HOLLEN, VERA; SCHACHT, LUCILLE

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The goal of this study was to explore antipsychotic medication prescribing practices in a sample of 86,034 patients discharged from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals and to find the prevalence of patients discharged with no antipsychotic medications, on antipsychotic monotherapy, and on antipsychotic polypharmacy. For patients discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the study explored the adjusted rates of antipsychotic polypharmacy, the reasons patients were discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy, the proportion of antipsychotic polypharmacy by mental health disorder, and the characteristics associated with being discharged on antipsychotic polypharmacy. Methods: This cross-sectional study analyzed all discharges for adult patients (18 to 64 y of age) from state psychiatric inpatient hospitals between January 1 and December 31, 2011. The relationship among variables was explored using χ2, t test, and analysis of variance. Logistic regression was used to determine predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy. Results: The prevalence of antipsychotic polypharmacy was 12%. Of the discharged patients receiving at least 1 antipsychotic medication (adjusted rate), 18% were on antipsychotic polypharmacy. The strongest predictors of antipsychotic polypharmacy being prescribed were having a diagnosis of schizophrenia and a length of stay of 90 days or more. Patients were prescribed antipsychotic polypharmacy primarily to reduce their symptoms. Conclusions: Antipsychotic polypharmacy continues at a high enough rate to affect nearly 10,000 patients with a diagnosis of schizophrenia each year in state psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Further analysis of the clinical presentation of these patients may highlight particular aspects of the illness and its previous treatment that are contributing to practices outside the best-practice guideline. An increased understanding of trend data, patient characteristics, and national benchmarks provides an opportunity for

  7. White House Cases: psychiatric patients and the Secret Service.

    PubMed

    Shore, D; Filson, C R; Davis, T S; Olivos, G; DeLisi, L; Wyatt, R J

    1985-03-01

    Delusional visitors to the White House or other government offices (often seeking a personal audience with the President) are interviewed by the Secret Service and then sent to Saint Elizabeths Hospital if they are considered mentally ill and potentially dangerous to themselves or others. A review of the demographic characteristics and diagnoses of 328 of these "White House Cases" treated at the hospital between 1970 and mid-1974 showed that these patients were most commonly unmarried, white, and male, and most had a diagnosis of paranoid schizophrenia. Although 22% of this group have threatened some prominent political figure, to date none of this study's patients has attempted to assassinate any such government official. PMID:3970266

  8. Behavioral adjustment of psychiatric hospital patients and helping behavior.

    PubMed

    Tipton, R M; Bland, R E

    1975-03-01

    This study investigated the relationship between behavioral adjustment of mental hospital patients and helping behavior in two distinctly different controlled situations. Forty hospitalized male patients between the ages of 20 and 45 were assigned to two groups of equal size according to ratings they received on the MACC Behavioral Adjustment Scale. Each subject was exposed to two separate and independent experimental situations calling for helping behavior. Helping in the first situation was defined as offering a confederate the use of an extra pencil, while in the second it was defined as offering to help a confederate in the hallway to pick up a box of pencils that had just been dropped. The results of both experiments confirmed the hypothesis that persons suffering more severe levels of disturbance and maladjustment perform significantly fewer helpful acts. Results were discussed in terms of empathy, self-concern, and response cost. Also some implications for treatment were discussed. PMID:1159641

  9. Psychiatric Morbidity in Infertility Patients in a Tertiary Care Setup

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Pankaj; Rastogi, Rajesh; Gandhi, Raghu; Kapoor, Rohit; Sachdeva, Sarthak

    2015-01-01

    Context Infertility is regarded as a trigger for psychological morbidity. Infertile couples often suffer from anxiety, depression and lack of self confidence. Aims To study the demographic factors associated with infertility in a tertiary care setup and to determine the level of anxiety and depression associated with it by using standardized scales. The study protocol also included studying the various coping strategies employed by these patient groups. Settings and Design Case control study. Materials and Methods A prestructured questionnaire based study conducted for a span of 6 months. The study population included the patients attending the infertility and the family planning outpatient department. We applied the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale (HADS) and the Becks Depression Inventory (BDI). Brief COPE Inventory was applied to look for the various coping measures that are employed by the anxious and depressed patients. Statistical Analysis Data analysis was done using SPSS ver20. Results A total of 280 study subjects were included in the study; which included 140 women from the infertility clinic and 140 from the family planning OPD. A total of 56.4% (79/140) of the females were found to be suffering from depression and 68.9% (96/140) of the females were found to be suffering from anxiety and depression both. Seven risk factors were found to be significant for depression based on the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scale and 6 risk factors were found to be significant based on the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). The most common coping method employed by depressed women was venting 72.2% (57/79) followed by behavioural disengagement 70.9% (56/79); whereas the most important coping method employed by the anxious and depressed women was behavioural disengagement 71.9% (69/96). Conclusion Anxiety and depression is common among patients suffering from infertility and measures should be taken to alleviate it. PMID:26500988

  10. Mental health clustering and diagnosis in psychiatric in-patients.

    PubMed

    Trevithick, Liam; Painter, Jon; Keown, Patrick

    2015-06-01

    Aims and method This paper investigates the relationship between cluster (Mental Health Clustering Tool, MHCT) and diagnosis in an in-patient population. We analysed the diagnostic make-up of each cluster and the clinical utility of the diagnostic advice in the Department of Health's Mental Health Clustering Booklet. In-patients discharged from working-age adult and older people's services of a National Health Service trust over 1 year were included. Cluster on admission was compared with primary diagnosis on discharge. Results Organic, schizophreniform, anxiety disorder and personality disorders aligned to one superclass cluster. Alcohol and substance misuse, and mood disorders distributed evenly across psychosis and non-psychosis superclass clusters. Two-thirds of diagnoses fell within the MHCT 'likely' group and a tenth into the 'unlikely' group. Clinical implications Cluster and diagnosis are best viewed as complimentary systems to describe an individual's needs. Improvements are suggested to the MHCT diagnostic advice in in-patient settings. Substance misuse and affective disorders have a more complex distribution between superclass clusters than all other broad diagnostic groups. PMID:26191449

  11. Studying Prevalence and Pattern of Taking Narcotic and Ecstasy Drugs by Patients Admitted to Special Care Centers of Shahid Bahonar Hospital, Kerman, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi-Nejad, Mehdi; Jadidi, Fatemeh; Dehghani, Mahmoud Reza; Divsalar, Kouros

    2012-01-01

    Background Addiction is the repeated use of a chemical substance which affects the biological function of the brain and endangers physical health of the addicted person. Prevalence and pattern of taking drugs were assessed in the current study in a Special Cares Trauma Center. So the specialized physician could manage the medical procedure more easily through identification of addicted patients and type of their narcotics. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on 545 patients admitted to the Special Cares Center of Shahid Bahonar Hospital, Kerman, Iran, during 2010-2012. The data were collected by special information collection forms and then analyzed using SPSS software. Findings Among the total studied samples, around 55% of admitted patients were addicts. Opium was the most frequently used narcotic among the addicted patients with a percentage of 62%. Smoking was the most common method of taking the narcotics. 90% of addicted persons were male and 95% of them held diploma and under-diploma educational degrees. Among the reasons for admission of addicted patients to the Special Cares Clinic of Trauma Center, head trauma was the dominant cause (51%). Conclusion Addiction is considerably more prevalent among the population admitted to the Special Cares Center compared to the society, indicating greater vulnerability of addicted individuals in the society. Addiction to traditional and indigenous drugs are still the most prevalent, and fortunately, these drugs are easier to substitute and medicate compared to the new industrial narcotics. PMID:24494137

  12. Predicting Early Mortality in Adult Trauma Patients Admitted to Three Public University Hospitals in Urban India: A Prospective Multicentre Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Gerdin, Martin; Roy, Nobhojit; Khajanchi, Monty; Kumar, Vineet; Dharap, Satish; Felländer-Tsai, Li; Petzold, Max; Bhoi, Sanjeev; Saha, Makhan Lal; von Schreeb, Johan

    2014-01-01

    Background In India alone, more than one million people die yearly due to trauma. Identification of patients at risk of early mortality is crucial to guide clinical management and explain prognosis. Prediction models can support clinical judgement, but existing models have methodological limitations. The aim of this study was to derive a vital sign based prediction model for early mortality among adult trauma patients admitted to three public university hospitals in urban India. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of adult trauma patients admitted to three urban university hospitals in India between October 2013 and January 2014. The outcome measure was mortality within 24 hours. We used logistic regression with restricted cubic splines to derive our model. We assessed model performance in terms of discrimination, calibration, and optimism. Results A total of 1629 patients were included. Median age was 35, 80% were males. Mortality between admission and 24 hours was 6%. Our final model included systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and Glasgow coma scale. Our model displayed good discrimination, with an area under the receiver operating characteristics curve (AUROCC) of 0.85. Predicted mortality corresponded well with observed mortality, indicating good calibration. Conclusion This study showed that routinely recorded systolic blood pressure, heart rate, and Glasgow coma scale predicted early hospital mortality in trauma patients admitted to three public university hospitals in urban India. Our model needs to be externally validated before it can be applied in the clinical setting. PMID:25180494

  13. A multivariate approach to aggression and the orbital frontal cortex in psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Gansler, David A; McLaughlin, Nicole C R; Iguchi, Lisa; Jerram, Matthew; Moore, Dana W; Bhadelia, Rafeeque; Fulwiler, Carl

    2009-03-31

    The association between orbital frontal cortex (OFC) volume and aggression was investigated in an at-risk psychiatric population. Forty-one psychiatric patients were referred for magnetic resonance imaging and a standardized psychometric assessment of aggression (Lifetime History of Aggression-Revised). Nineteen matched controls had lower levels of aggression and greater OFC volume, establishing the appropriateness of the psychiatric group for studying aggression pathophysiology. Consistent with study hypotheses, left OFC gray matter volume predicted 34% of the variance in self-reported aggression ratings. When impulsivity was not controlled for, left OFC gray matter only accounted for 26% of aggression variance, suggesting a complex relationship between impulsivity and OFC-aggression pathophysiology. Contrary to study hypotheses, right OFC gray matter volume did not predict degree of aggressive behavior. Current models do not account for lateralization, yet this may be quite important. Greater consideration should be given to laterality in OFC regulation of social/emotional behavior. Regulatory focus theory, positing two motivational systems, promotion and prevention, lateralized to the left and right hemispheres, respectively, may provide an explanatory framework for these results. Dysregulation of the left hemisphere 'promotion' motivational system may help to explain the aggressive behavior present in psychiatric populations. PMID:19216060

  14. Dopamine transporter gene polymorphism and psychiatric symptoms seen in schizophrenic patients at their first episode

    SciTech Connect

    Inada, Toshiya; Sugita, Tetsuyoshi; Dobashi, Izumi

    1996-07-26

    To investigate the possible role of the dopamine transporter (DAT) gene in determining the phenotype in human subjects, allele frequencies for the 40-bp variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) polymorphism at this site were compared between 117 Japanese normal controls and 118 schizophrenic patients, including six subgroups: early-onset, those with a family history, and those suffering from one of the following psychiatric symptoms at their first episode: delusion and hallucination; disorganization; bizarre behavior; and negative symptoms. No significant differences were observed between the group as a whole or any subgroup of schizophrenic patients and controls. The results indicate that VNTR polymorphism in the DAT gene is unlikely to be a major contributor to any of the psychiatric parameters examined in the present population of schizophrenic subjects. 12 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. There Is No Difference in IQ between Suicide and Non-Suicide Psychiatric Patients: A Retrospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Jin; Yi, Kikyoung; Lee, Joon Deuk

    2015-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to examine the association between IQ and suicide in psychiatric patients. Methods We conducted a nested case-control study using data obtained from psychiatric patients affiliated with a general hospital in Seoul, Korea. In a one-to-two ratio the psychiatric patients who died of suicide (Suicide Group; n=35) were matched to those who didn't (Non-suicide Group; n=70) by age, gender, psychiatric diagnosis and approximate time of first treatment. IQ was measured using the Korean version of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-Revised. Results There were no significant differences in any type of IQ between suicide patients and non-suicide patients. Logistic regression showed no evidence of an association between IQ and suicide. Conclusion These results do not support the existence of an association between IQ and suicide. PMID:26207125

  16. Diagnostic importance of Clostridium perfringens enterotoxin analysis in recurring enteritis among elderly, chronic care psychiatric patients.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, S G; Yip-Chuck, D A; Clark, J B; Brodsky, M H

    1986-01-01

    A series of Clostridium perfringens-related gastrointestinal outbreaks occurred over a period of several months among elderly, chronic care patients in a psychiatric hospital. Several serotypes of C. perfringens and many nontypeable isolates were found. The distribution of certain serotypes and the incidence of detection of enterotoxin in fecal extracts were related to wards on which patients were resident (six wards were involved). Several patients were reported to have chronic or recurring fecal incontinence or diarrhea or both. With a background of elevated spore counts of several serotypes and chronic diarrhea, only detection of enterotoxin could provide definitive evidence of C. perfringens etiology in gastoenteritis cases. PMID:2871043

  17. [Structural and dynamic characteristics of patients with oligophrenia at a forensic-psychiatric clinic].

    PubMed

    Gorinov, V V

    1989-01-01

    In a comparative structure-dynamic investigation of 250 oligophrenic patients at the debility stage the results of forensic-psychiatric evaluation of responsibility depended on the dynamic shifts. The complexes of symptoms of psychogenic decompensation and reactive states were singled out that were observable in debile patients. The criteria are given for the forensic evaluation of these states. A group of mentally retarded patients with considerable volitional-emotional disorders was studied which did not achieve the age-related compensation. In these, social dysadaptation was of a steady nature with persisting incapability of organizing and critically assessing their own behavior. PMID:2728747

  18. Getting in and getting out whole: nurse-patient connections in the psychiatric setting.

    PubMed

    Van Sant, Judith E; Patterson, Barbara J

    2013-01-01

    As a strong component in patient healing, interpersonal connection in the psychiatric/mental health setting can threaten nurses' health. Participant observation on four behavioral health and addiction units revealed a process of connecting with patients' emotional pain, delineating strategies applicable to nurses' multiple world views and practice styles. Findings from 12 nurses highlighted connectedness as a process and personal decision that, with self-awareness and individualized self-protective/self-separating strategies, can enhance patient healing as well as nurse satisfaction and growth. The evolved model may help nurses ease emotional labor, combat compassion fatigue, enhance performance, and preserve their self in today's complex acute care setting. PMID:23301568

  19. Short- and long-term outcomes in onco-hematological patients admitted to the intensive care unit with classic factors of poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Faucher, Etienne; Cour, Martin; Jahandiez, Vincent; Grateau, Adeline; Baudry, Thomas; Hernu, Romain; Simon, Marie; Robert, Jean-michel; Michallet, Mauricette; Argaud, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Although the overall mortality of patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU) with hematological malignancy has decreased over the years, some groups of patients still have low survival rates. We performed a monocentric retrospective study including all patients with hematological malignancy in a ten-year period, to identify factors related to the outcome for the whole cohort and for patients with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), neutropenia, or those requiring invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). A total of 418 patients with acute leukemia (n=239; 57%), myeloma (n=69; 17%), and lymphoma (n=53; 13%) were studied. Day-28 and 1-year mortality were 49% and 72%, respectively. The type of disease was not associated with outcome. The disease status was independentlty associated with 1-year mortality only. Independent predictors of day-28 mortality were IMV, renal replacement therapy (RRT), and performance status. For allogeneic HSCT recipients (n=116), neutropenic patients (n=124) and patients requiring IMV (n=196), day-28 and 1-year mortality were 52%, 54%, 74% and 81%, 78%, 87%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that IMV and RRT for allogeneic HSCT recipients, performance status and IMV for neutropenic patients, and RRT for patients requiring IMV were independently associated with short-term mortality (p<0.05). These results suggest that IMV is the strongest predictor of mortality in hematological patients admitted to ICUs, whereas allogeneic HSCT and neutropenia do not worsen their short-term outcome. PMID:26968953

  20. Diagnosis and Treatment of Psychiatric Comorbidity in a Patient with Charles Bonnet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background. A significant proportion of patients with neurological disorders may have comorbid psychiatric symptomology, which may be managed by primary outpatient neurologists. Referral to their psychiatric colleagues is mediated by available consultation-liaison units and according to clinical opinion. Aims of Case Report. We present the case of a patient whose initial referral to epilepsy clinic led to a workup which ultimately diagnosed her with nonepileptic seizures (NES). In the course of her follow-up, she developed intractable headaches, and worsening mood symptoms and eventually exhibited Psychotic Features for which psychiatry became coinvolved in her care. Major Depression with Psychotic Features and Charles Bonnet syndrome were considered as a likely comorbid diagnoses. Her pharmacologic management on venlafaxine and quetiapine eventually caused substantial amelioration of her psychiatric symptomology as longitudinally followed by PHQ-9 and GAD-7 scores. Conclusion. Optimal evaluation and management of mental illness in patients with complex neurologic symptomology may require independent evaluation and treatment by psychiatrists when clinically appropriate. PMID:25431721

  1. Patients Discharged Against Medical Advice from a Psychiatric Hospital in Iran: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Sheikhmoonesi, Fatemeh; Khademloo, Mohammad; Pazhuheshgar, Samaneh

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Self- discharged patients are at high risk for readmission and ultimately higher cost for care. We intended to find the proportion of patients who leave hospital against medical advice and explore some of their characteristics. Methods: This prospective study of discharge against medical advice was conducted in psychiatric wards of Zare hospital in Iran, 2011. A psychologist recorded some information on a checklist based on the documented information about the patient who wanted to leave against medical advice. The psychologist interviewed these patients and recorded the reasons for discharge against medical advice. Descriptive statistics were calculated for the variables. Results: The rate of premature discharge was 34.4%. Compared to patients with regular discharges, patients with premature discharge were significantly more likely to be male, self-employed, to have co morbid substance abuse and first admission and positive family history of psychiatric disorder. Disappearance of symptoms was the most frequent reason for premature discharge. Conclusion: The 34.4% rate of premature discharge observed in our study is higher than rate reported in other studies. One possible explanation is our teaching hospital serves a low-income urban area and most patients had low socioeconomic status. Further studies are needed to compare teaching and non-teaching hospital about the rate of premature discharge and the reasons of patients who want to leave against medical advice. PMID:24762365

  2. [Psychological and psychiatric problems in cancer patients: relationship to the localization of the disease].

    PubMed

    Moussas, G I; Papadopoulou, A G; Christodoulaki, A G; Karkanias, A P

    2012-01-01

    Cancer may be localized in a variety of areas in the human body. This localization is associated with significant issues concerning not only therapy and prognosis but also psychological and psychiatric problems that the patient may be confronted with. The psychic impact on the patient is determined to a significant degree by the symbolism the affected organ carries. The symbolic significance of a sick body area triggers emotions and sets in motion self-defence mechanisms. In this way, patients deal with the new psychic reality that cancer creates. Therapeutic choices may include interventions, involving mutilation, which cause disfigurement and major consequences in the body image which result in narcissistic injuries. The phenomenology of anxiety and depressive disorders is connected to the affected body area. The appearance of cancer not only in sexual organs but also in other body areas, may disturb sexual function and therefore lead to sexual disorders. Especially, head and neck are connected with vital functions. This area of the body has had a major impact on psychic reality since early life. Complicated psychic functions have developed in relation to organs of the head and neck. Therefore, localization of cancer in this area leads to individual psychological and psychiatric problems, since eating and breathing are harmed, verbal communication becomes difficult and body image alters. Also, increased incidence of alcohol and nicotine abuse in these patients reflects special aspects of psychic structure and personality. Because of severe somatic symptoms and poor prognosis, lung cancer patients feel hopelessness and helplessness. Patients with gynaecological cancer are confronted with a disease that affects organs like breast and internal female sexual organs associated with femininity, attractiveness and fertility. Dietary habits are often a source of guilt for patients who suffer from cancer of the gastrointestinal tract. Additionally, stomas, as colostomy

  3. The burden of co-existing dermatological disorders and their tendency of being overlooked among patients admitted to muhimbili national hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Skin diseases are underestimated and overlooked by most clinicians despite being common in clinical practice. Many patients are hospitalized with co-existing dermatological conditions which may not be detected and managed by the attending physicians. The objective of this study was to determine the burden of co-existing and overlooked dermatological disorders among patients admitted to medical wards of Muhimbili National hospital in Dar es Salaam. Study design and settings A hospital-based descriptive cross-sectional study conducted at Muhimbili National hospital in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. Methods Patients were consecutively recruited from the medical wards. Detailed interview to obtain clinico-demographic characteristics was followed by a complete physical examination. Dermatological diagnoses were made mainly clinically. Appropriate confirmatory laboratory investigations were performed where necessary. Data was analyzed using the 'Statistical Package for Social Sciences' (SPSS) program version 10.0. A p-value of < 0.5 was statistically significant. Results Three hundred and ninety patients admitted to medical wards were enrolled into the study of whom, 221(56.7%) were females. The mean age was 36.7 ± 17.9 (range 7-84 years). Overall, 232/390 patients (59.5%) had co-existing dermatological disorders with 49% (191/390) having one, 9% (36/390) two and 5 patients (1%) three. A wide range of co-existing skin diseases was encountered, the most diverse being non-infectious conditions which together accounted for 36.4% (142/390) while infectious dermatoses accounted for 31.5% (123/390). The leading infectious skin diseases were superficial fungal infections accounting for 18%. Pruritic papular eruption of HIV/AIDS (PPE) and seborrheic eczema were the most common non-infectious conditions, each accounting for 4.3%. Of the 232/390 patients with dermatological disorders, 191/232 (82.3%) and 154/232 (66.3%) had been overlooked by their referring and admitting

  4. Cross sectional study of contribution of clinical assessment and simple cardiac investigations to diagnosis of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients admitted with acute dyspnoea.

    PubMed Central

    Gillespie, N. D.; McNeill, G.; Pringle, T.; Ogston, S.; Struthers, A. D.; Pringle, S. D.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the comparative contribution of clinical assessment, electrocardiography, and chest radiography to the diagnosis of left ventricular systolic dysfunction in patients admitted to a general medical ward with acute dyspnoea. DESIGN: Prospective cross sectional study. SETTING: Acute medical admissions ward of a teaching hospital. SUBJECTS: 71 randomly selected patients admitted with acute dyspnoea. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Sensitivity and specificity of each investigation and logistic regression analysis of each variable in identifying left ventricular systolic dysfunction. RESULTS: Clinical assessment in this cohort of patients with severe dyspnoea was generally sensitive (sensitivity 81%). Patients were divided into three groups on the basis of clinical assessment. In the first group (37 patients) the diagnosis of systolic dysfunction was clear, in the second (22) it was in doubt, and in the third (12) it was unlikely. The sensitivity of clinical assessment in identifying left ventricular systolic dysfunction was 81% and the specificity was 47%. The specificity of diagnosis was improved by electrocardiography (69%) and chest radiography (92%). Logistic regression analysis showed that isolated pulmonary crepitations were a comparatively poor predictor of left ventricular systolic dysfunction chi 2 = 10.215, P = 0.0014) but that a full clinical examination had reasonable predictive value (chi 2 = 24.82, P < 0.00001). The combination of clinical assessment and chest radiography improved the accuracy of diagnosis (chi 2 = 28.08, P < 0.00001), as did the combination of clinical assessment and electrocardiography (chi 2 = 32.41, P < 0.00001). CONCLUSION: Clinical assessment in patients admitted with acute dyspnoea is comparatively accurate. Patients with abnormal results on chest radiography, electrocardiography, and clinical examination have a high likelihood of having left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Echocardiography contributes little more to

  5. Adolescents with personality disorders suffer from severe psychiatric stigma: evidence from a sample of 131 patients

    PubMed Central

    Catthoor, Kirsten; Feenstra, Dine J; Hutsebaut, Joost; Schrijvers, Didier; Sabbe, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of the study is to assess the severity of psychiatric stigma in a sample of personality disordered adolescents in order to evaluate whether differences in stigma can be found in adolescents with different types and severity of personality disorders (PDs). Not only adults but children and adolescents with mental health problems suffer from psychiatric stigma. In contrast to the abundance of research in adult psychiatric samples, stigma in children and adolescents has hardly been investigated. Personality disordered adolescents with fragile identities and self-esteem might be especially prone to feeling stigmatized, an experience which might further shape their identity throughout this critical developmental phase. Materials and methods One hundred thirty-one adolescent patients underwent a standard assessment with Axis I and Axis II diagnostic interviews and two stigma instruments, Stigma Consciousness Questionnaire (SCQ) and Perceived Devaluation–Discrimination Questionnaire (PDDQ). Independent sample t-tests were used to investigate differences in the mean SCQ and PDDQ total scores for patients with and without a PD. Multiple regression main effect analyses were conducted to explore the impact of the different PDs on level of stigma, as well as comorbid Axis I disorders. Age and sex were also entered in the regression models. Results and conclusions Adolescents with severe mental health problems experience a burden of stigma. Personality disordered patients experience more stigma than adolescents with other severe psychiatric Axis I disorders. Borderline PD is the strongest predictor of experiences of stigma. More severely personality disordered adolescents tend to experience the highest level of stigma. PMID:25999774

  6. Substance use disorders and comorbid Axis I and II psychiatric disorders among young psychiatric patients: findings from a large electronic health records database

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Li-Tzy; Gersing, Ken; Burchett, Bruce; Woody, George E.; Blazer, Dan G.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the prevalence of substance use disorders (SUDs) among psychiatric patients aged 2–17 years in an electronic health records database (N=11,457) and determined patterns of comorbid diagnoses among patients with a SUD to inform emerging comparative effectiveness research (CER) efforts. DSM-IV diagnoses of all inpatients and outpatients at a large university-based hospital and its associated psychiatric clinics were systematically captured between 2000 and 2010: SUD, anxiety (AD), mood (MD), conduct (CD), attention deficit/hyperactivity (ADHD), personality (PD), adjustment, eating, impulse-control, psychotic, learning, mental retardation, and relational disorders. The prevalence of SUD in the 2–12-year age group (n=6,210) was 1.6% and increased to 25% in the 13–17-year age group (n=5,247). Cannabis diagnosis was the most prevalent SUD, accounting for more than 80% of all SUD cases. Among patients with a SUD (n=1,423), children aged 2–12 years (95%) and females (75–100%) showed high rates of comorbidities; blacks were more likely than whites to be diagnosed with CD, impulse-control, and psychotic diagnoses, while whites had elevated odds of having AD, ADHD, MD, PD, relational, and eating diagnoses. Patients with a SUD used more inpatient treatment than patients without a SUD (43% vs. 21%); children, females, and blacks had elevated odds of inpatient psychiatric treatment. Collectively, results add clinical evidence on treatment needs and diagnostic patterns for understudied diagnoses. PMID:21742345

  7. Patient Preference for Psychological vs. Pharmacological Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders: A Meta-Analytic Review

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, R. Kathryn; Whitton, Sarah W.; Peckham, Andrew D.; Welge, Jeffrey A.; Otto, Michael W.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Models of evidence-based practice emphasize the consideration of treatment efficacy/effectiveness, clinical expertise, and patient preference in treatment selection and implementation. However, patient preference for psychiatric treatment has been understudied. The aim of this meta-analytic review was to provide an estimate of the proportion of patients preferring psychological treatment relative to medication for psychiatric disorders. Data Sources A literature search was conducted using PubMed, PsycINFO, and the Cochrane Collaboration Library through August, 2011 for studies written in English that assessed patient preferences for the treatment of psychiatric disorders. Study Selection Studies assessing the preferred type of treatment including at least one psychological treatment and one pharmacological treatment were included. Of the 641 articles initially identified, 34 met criteria for inclusion. Data Extraction Authors extracted relevant data including the proportion of participants reporting preference for psychological and pharmacological treatment. Results Across studies, the proportion preferring psychological treatment was 0.75 (95% CI: 0.69 to 0.80), which was significantly higher than equivalent preference (i.e., higher than 0.50, p < .001). Sensitivity analyses suggested that younger patients (p < .05) and women (p < .01) were significantly more like to choose psychological treatment. A preference for psychological treatment was consistently evident in both treatment-seeking and unselected samples (ps < .05), but was somewhat stronger for the unselected samples. Conclusions Aggregation of patient preferences across diverse settings yielded a significant three-fold preference for psychological treatment relative to medication. Given the similar efficacy of these treatments for depression and anxiety, improving access to evidence-based psychological treatment is needed to connect more patients to their preferred treatment. PMID:23842011

  8. A Systematic Review of Music Therapy Practice and Outcomes with Acute Adult Psychiatric In-Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carr, Catherine; Odell-Miller, Helen; Priebe, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives There is an emerging evidence base for the use of music therapy in the treatment of severe mental illness. Whilst different models of music therapy have been developed in mental health care, none have specifically accounted for the features and context of acute in-patient settings. This review aimed to identify how music therapy is provided for acute adult psychiatric in-patients and what outcomes have been reported. Review Methods A systematic review using medical, psychological and music therapy databases. Papers describing music therapy with acute adult psychiatric in-patients were included. Analysis utilised narrative synthesis. Results 98 papers were identified, of which 35 reported research findings. Open group work and active music making for nonverbal expression alongside verbal reflection was emphasised. Aims were engagement, communication and interpersonal relationships focusing upon immediate areas of need rather than longer term insight. The short stay, patient diversity and institutional structure influenced delivery and resulted in a focus on single sessions, high session frequency, more therapist direction, flexible use of musical activities, predictable musical structures, and clear realistic goals. Outcome studies suggested effectiveness in addressing a range of symptoms, but were limited by methodological shortcomings and small sample sizes. Studies with significant positive effects all used active musical participation with a degree of structure and were delivered in four or more sessions. Conclusions No single clearly defined model exists for music therapy with adults in acute psychiatric in-patient settings, and described models are not conclusive. Greater frequency of therapy, active structured music making with verbal discussion, consistency of contact and boundaries, an emphasis on building a therapeutic relationship and building patient resources may be of particular importance. Further research is required to

  9. Oral health related quality of life among imprisoned Dutch forensic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Buunk-Werkhoven, Yvonne A B; Dijkstra, Arie; Schaub, Rob M H; van der Schans, Cees P; Spreen, Marinus

    2010-01-01

    Because dental health and oral pathology may affect forensic psychiatric patients' well being, it is important to be able to assess oral health related quality of life (OH-QoL) in these patients. Two studies were conducted among Dutch forensic psychiatric male patients to assess the psychometric properties and some potential predictors of the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14) as a measure of OH-QoL. Study 1 involved 40 patients who completed the OHIP-14 before receiving professional dental care and were retested 3 months later. The internal consistency was good, the test-retest correlations were fair, and over the 3 months follow-up no significant changes in OH-QoL were observed. Study 2 consisted of 39 patients who completed an improved version of the original OHIP-14, as well as measures to validate of the OHIP. Dental anxiety and unhealthy dentition jointly explained 26.7% of the variance in OH-QoL, and the better patients performed their oral hygiene behavior, the better their OH-QoL. It is concluded that the Dutch OHIP-14 is a useful instrument, and that nurses, especially in forensic nursing, should pay particularly attention to dental anxiety when encouraging patients to visit OH professionals and to perform adequate oral hygiene self-care. PMID:21175534

  10. The assessment of dynamic risk among forensic psychiatric patients transitioning to the community.

    PubMed

    Penney, Stephanie R; Marshall, Lisa A; Simpson, Alexander I F

    2016-08-01

    Individuals with serious mental illness (SMI; i.e., psychotic or major mood disorders) are vulnerable to experiencing multiple forms of adverse safety events in community settings, including violence perpetration and victimization. This study investigates the predictive validity and clinical utility of modifiable risk factors for violence in a sample of 87 forensic psychiatric patients found Not Criminally Responsible on Account of Mental Disorder (NCRMD) transitioning to the community. Using a repeated-measures prospective design, we assessed theoretically based dynamic risk factors (e.g., insight, psychiatric symptoms, negative affect, treatment compliance) before hospital discharge, and at 1 and 6 months postdischarge. Adverse outcomes relevant to this population (e.g., violence, victimization, hospital readmission) were measured at each community follow-up, and at 12 months postdischarge. The base rate of violence (23%) was similar to prior studies of discharged psychiatric patients, but results also highlighted elevated rates of victimization (29%) and hospital readmission (28%) characterizing this sample. Many of the dynamic risk indicators exhibited significant change across time and this change was related to clinically relevant outcomes. Specifically, while controlling for baseline level of risk, fluctuations in dynamic risk factors predicted the likelihood of violence and hospital readmission most consistently (hazard ratios [HR] = 1.35-1.84). Results provide direct support for the utility of dynamic factors in the assessment of violence risk and other adverse community outcomes, and emphasize the importance of incorporating time-sensitive methodologies into predictive models examining dynamic risk. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26914860

  11. [Social legislative and structural deficits of ambulatory management of chronic psychiatric and handicapped patients].

    PubMed

    Rössler, W; Salize, H J; Biechele, U

    1995-11-01

    In the past 25 years, psychiatric care for the chronically mentally ill in Germany has improved steadily. However, has improved steadily. However, this patient group continues to be discriminated against, especially in the sphere of outpatient care. The mentally ill often do not meet the requirements that the respective social security agencies, i.e. in particular pension and health insurance, set out for the granting of benefits. Moreover, contrary to scientific knowledge, measures aimed at the treatment of social disabilities are defined not as psychiatric rehabilitation measures, but as measures of social integration. For these reasons welfare is highly overrepresented in the financing of rehabilitation for the mentally ill. In recent years, legislators have attempted to compensate certain cases of discrimination. Significant legislative changes and administrative developments are described and discussed in terms of their implications. PMID:8532096

  12. [Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa Patients in General Hospitals with Psychiatric Wards Current Situation and Establishment of a Treatment System].

    PubMed

    Wada, Yoshihisa

    2015-01-01

    Patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) exhibit physical and psychiatric symptoms, in addition to their behavioral problems, and often require admission to a general hospital with a psychiatric ward. There are only a few general hospitals with psychiatric wards available, and patients with AN tend to be concentrated in a small number of such institutions. Thus, it is difficult to provide adequate support for the treatment of patients with AN. In Kyoto, the number of general hospitals with a psychiatric ward is small. Patients with AN tend to be treated at the two university hospitals. However, our University Hospital cannot accept all patients with AN, especially the emergency admissions. Therefore, with respect to the inpatient treatment of AN, we established a cooperation agreement with other psychiatric hospitals. We are planning to divide the inpatient treatment of AN between our university hospital and other psychiatric hospitals, depending on the stage of AN and the severity of the patients' physical condition. With respect to the treatment of AN, it is necessary to establish a treatment system with each hospital playing a role. PMID:26502711

  13. Level of Agitation of Psychiatric Patients Presenting to an Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Zun, Leslie S.; Downey, La Vonne A.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The primary purpose of this study was to determine the level of agitation that psychiatric patients exhibit upon arrival to the emergency department. The secondary purpose was to determine whether the level of agitation changed over time depending upon whether the patient was restrained or unrestrained. Method: An observational study enrolling a convenience sample of 100 patients presenting with a psychiatric complaint was planned, in order to obtain 50 chemically and/or physically restrained and 50 unrestrained patients. The study was performed in summer 2004 in a community, inner-city, level 1 emergency department with 45,000 visits per year. The level of patient agitation was measured using the Agitated Behavior Scale (ABS) and the Richmond Agitation-Sedation Scale (RASS) upon arrival and every 30 minutes over a 3-hour period. The inclusion criteria allowed entry of any patient who presented to the emergency department with a psychiatric complaint thought to be unrelated to physical illness. Patients who were restrained for nonbehavioral reasons or were medically unstable were excluded. Results: 101 patients were enrolled in the study. Of that total, 53 patients were not restrained, 47 patients were restrained, and 1 had incomplete data. There were no differences in gender, race, or age between the 2 groups. Upon arrival, 2 of the 47 restrained patients were rated severely agitated on the ABS, and 13 of 47 restrained patients were rated combative on the RASS. There was a statistical difference (p = .01) between the groups on both scales from time 0 to time 90 minutes. Scores on the agitation scales decreased over time in both groups. One patient in the unrestrained group became unarousable during treatment. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that patients who were restrained were more agitated than those who were not, and that agitation levels in both groups decreased over time. Some restrained patients did not meet combativeness or severe agitation

  14. Euthanasia requests, procedures and outcomes for 100 Belgian patients suffering from psychiatric disorders: a retrospective, descriptive study

    PubMed Central

    Thienpont, Lieve; Verhofstadt, Monica; Van Loon, Tony; Distelmans, Wim; Audenaert, Kurt; De Deyn, Peter P

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify patterns in euthanasia requests and practices relating to psychiatric patients; to generate recommendations for future research. Design Retrospective analysis of data obtained through medical file review. Setting Outpatient psychiatric clinical setting in the Dutch-speaking region of Belgium, between October 2007 and December 2011; follow-up at the end of December 2012. Participants 100 consecutive psychiatric patients requesting euthanasia based on psychological suffering associated with psychiatric disorders (77 women, 23 men; mean age 47 years; age range 21–80 years). Main outcome measures Patient sociodemographic characteristics; diagnoses; decisions on euthanasia requests; circumstances of euthanasia procedures; patient outcomes at follow-up. Results Most patients had been referred for psychiatric counselling by their physician (n=55) or by LEIF (Life End Information Forum) (n=36). 90 patients had >1 disorder; the most frequent diagnoses were depression (n=58) and personality disorder (n=50). 38 patients required further testing and/or treatment, including 13 specifically tested for autism spectrum disorder (ASD); 12 received an ASD diagnosis (all Asperger syndrome). In total, 48 of the euthanasia requests were accepted and 35 were carried out. Of the 13 remaining patients whose requests were accepted, 8 postponed or cancelled the procedure, because simply having this option gave them enough peace of mind to continue living. In December 2012, 43 patients had died, including 35 by euthanasia; others died by suicide (6), palliative sedation (1) and anorexia nervosa (1). Conclusions Depression and personality disorders are the most common diagnoses in psychiatric patients requesting euthanasia, with Asperger syndrome representing a neglected disease burden. Further research is needed, especially prospective quantitative and qualitative studies, to obtain a better understanding of patients with psychiatric disorders who request

  15. Factors influencing treatment team recommendations to review tribunals for forensic psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Martin, Krystle; Martin, Erica

    2016-07-01

    It is the responsibility of forensic psychiatric hospitals to detain and treat patients, gradually reintegrating them into society; decisions to release patients must balance risk to the public with maintaining the least restrictive environment for patients. Little is known about the factors considered when making such decisions and whether these factors have been empirically linked to future risk of violence. The current study explores the factors predictive of forensic treatment teams' recommendations for patients under the care of the Ontario Review Board (ORB). Factors differ depending on level of security; decisions on medium secure units were influenced by the presence of active symptoms and patients' overall violence risk level and decisions made on minimum secure units were influenced by the number of critical incidents that occurred within the recommendation year. Understanding the factors used to make recommendations to the ORB tribunal helps treatment teams to reflect on their own decision-making practices. Furthermore, the results serve to inform us about factors that influence length of stay for forensic psychiatric patients. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27147124

  16. Psychosocial Characteristics of Oromucosal Diseases in Psychiatric Patients: Observational Study from Indian Dental College

    PubMed Central

    Suresh, K V; Ganiger, Channamallappa C; Ahammed, Yusuf A R; Kumar, Mounesh C D; Pramod, R C; Nayak, Ajay G; Vibhute, Nupura

    2014-01-01

    Background: Psychiatric diseases like anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorders can affect the mental and physical statuses of an individual. Aim: The study was to investigate the different oromucosal diseases (OMD) in psychiatric patients and to evaluate the correlation between these OMD to severity of anxiety and depression. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out during a six-month period. Patients reporting to psychiatry department with anxiety, depression, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder as diagnosed by an experienced psychiatrist, were subjected to complete oral examination by a skilled oral diagnostician to check for OMD like oral lichen planus (OLP), aphthous stomatitis (AS) and burning mouth syndrome (BMS). During the above mentioned time interval, 1320 patients with any of the above mentioned psychiatric diseases were included in this study. Of these, 278 had anxiety, 398 had depression, 295 had schizophrenia and 349 had bipolar disorder. Equal number of individuals reported to the Oral Medicine and Radiology department for routine oral screening with no mucosal diseases were included as control group. Results: In this study, statistically significant increase in the OMD of the psychiatric patients was recorded when compared with the control group. The OMD were significantly higher in patients with anxiety (20.86%) followed by patients with depression (9.04%), schizophrenia (7.7%), bipolar disorder (7.4%) and control group (5.17%), respectively. Most prevalent OMD in patients with anxiety was AS (12%) followed by OLP (5.7%), and BMS (2.87%) respectively. Patients with moderate to severe anxiety and depression showed significantly higher prevalence of these OMD compared to the ones with mild anxiety and depression. The AS and OLP were significantly more in the younger age group (18-49 year) and BMS was higher in 50-77 year age group in both the study and control groups. Conclusion: A positive association was

  17. Relationship between Bender Designs and Basic Living Skills of geriatric psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Wolber, G; Lira, F T

    1981-02-01

    35 geriatric psychiatric patients were given the Bender-Gestalt and examined on level of Basic Living Skills Assessment. Significant inverse relationships were found between scores on the Bender-Gestalt and five of the seven Basic Living Skills Assessment scales indicating a decrease in patients' functioning with increased visual-motor impairment scores. Skills involving gross motor behaviors were moderately related to poor Bender performance (-.47). These findings suggest the utility of the Basic Living Skills Assessment in identifying the nature and extent of those living skills deficits associated with assessed visual-motor impairment. PMID:7232078

  18. Epidemiology and Outcome of Chemical Burn Patients Admitted in Burn Unit of JNMC Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, Uttar Pradesh, India: A 5-year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Md Sohaib; Ahmad, Imran; Khurram, M. Fahud; Kanungo, Srikanta

    2015-01-01

    Aims and Objective: The objectives of this study were to evaluate the epidemiology, clinical variable of chemical burns, and their outcomes to prevent or reduce the frequency and morbidity of such injuries. Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on all the patients with chemical burns admitted at author's center between November 2008 and December 2013. All the patients were evaluated in terms of age, sex, total body surface area, etiology, treatment given, morbidity, mortality, final outcome, and then educated regarding specific preventive measures. Results: A total of 96 patients (2.4% of total burn admissions) (42 males and 54 females) were admitted to our hospital with chemical burn injuries. Most of the patients were in the age group of 16–30 years. Incidence in females was slightly higher than in males. Acid was found to be the most common cause of injury. We found 55% patients admitted had <10% total body surface area (TBSA) involvement, 35% had burns involving between 11 and 20% TBSA, and 4% had burns involving 21–30% TBSA, and 6% had burns in >30% TBSA. Morbidity was noticed in the form of skin defect in 80% of cases, soft tissue defect with exposed tendon, bone, or vessels in 16% of cases, and 4% of patients developed contracture and hypertrophic scar. Eighty-six percent of patients required operative intervention. A total of three deaths (3%) were recorded. Conclusion: It was found that chemical burns, though not very common, are deeper burns and can be accidental or non-accidental, and the high-risk age group is 16–25 years. Chemical burns are largely preventable and if properly managed have a good outcome. PMID:25810999

  19. A Study of the Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Patients with Methamphetamine-Induced Psychosis

    PubMed Central

    Eslami-Shahrbabaki, Mahin; Fekrat, Alireza; Mazhari, Shahrzad

    2015-01-01

    Background The abuse of narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances such as amphetamines and ecstasy has had a growing trend. Tachycardia, increased blood pressure, hallucinations, panic attacks, and psychosis are the negative effects of methamphetamine abuse. The present study aimed to assess psychiatric disorders associated with methamphetamine-induced psychotic disorder. Methods This cross-sectional study was performed from October 2013 to March 2014 on 165 patients hospitalized at Shahid Beheshti Hospital in Kerman, Iran, and diagnosed with psychosis induced by methamphetamine abuse within the previous 6 months. Study subjects were selected via census method. Based on the exclusion criteria and due to the lack of cooperation of some patients, 121 patients were enrolled in the study. Research data were gathered using clinical interviews, the Yale-Brown obsessive compulsive scale (Y-BOCS), Hamilton anxiety scale (HAM-A) and Hamilton rating scale for depression (HRSD), Young mania rating scale (YMRS), substance dependence severity scale (SDSS), positive and negative syndrome scale (PANSS), and clinical global impression (CGI) scale. The data analysis was performed using SPSS software, descriptive statistics, and ANOVA. Findings Among the 121 patients of the sample group, 4 patients (3.3%) had anxiety, 58 patients (47.9%) depression, 30 patients (24.8%) obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), 20 patients (16.5%) bipolar mood disorder (BMD), 8 patients (6.6%) persistent psychotic symptoms, 85 patients (70.2%) personality disorder, and 36 patients (29.8%) had no personality disorders. The highest prevalence was related to borderline personality disorder (35.5%). However, 45 patients (37.2%) had no impairment associated with methamphetamine-induced psychosis. Conclusion It seems that there is comorbidity between psychiatric disorders, including mood disorders, especially depressive disorder, childhood history of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), bipolar

  20. Information on antidepressants for psychiatric inpatients: the divide between patient needs and professional practice

    PubMed Central

    Desplenter, Franciska A.; Laekeman, Gert J.; De Coster, Sandra; Reyntens, Johan; De Baere, Sheila; De Boever, Willy; De Vos, Marc; Vrijders, Danny; De Fré, Claudine; De Keyster, Cécile; De Meulemeester, Katharina; Heremans, Marise; Rutgeerts, Cathérine; Simoens, Steven R.

    Background Medicine information is an integral part of patient care and a patient right. In particular, patients with a mental health diagnosis have a need for information on medicines. Objective This study aims to describe the current practice on information provision on antidepressants to inpatients in psychiatric hospitals. Methods A qualitative study was conducted consisting of semi-structured interviews with health care professionals (n=46) and patients (n=17) in 11 Flemish psychiatric hospitals. Two topic guides were designed for conducting the interviews with these respective stakeholders. The issues addressed in the topic guides related to: organization of information provision in the hospital, information on demand of the patient, information provision by health care professionals, information for relatives, evaluation of provided information, interdisciplinary contacts on information provision and satisfaction on current practice of information provision. The interviews were analysed according to the five stages of the framework analysis. Results Psychiatrists and nurses are the key players to provide information on antidepressants. Their approach depends on patient characteristics and mental state. Information is provided mainly orally. Health care professionals consider non-verbal cues of patients to verify if information has been understood. Health care professionals reported lack of time and lack of interdisciplinary contacts as negative aspects. Patients indicated that health care professionals take too little initiative to provide medicine information. Conclusions Patients are informed about their antidepressants through various pathways. Although the awareness is present of the importance of the individual approach and efforts are done to tailor information to the individual patient, improvement is still possible. Tailoring communication; assessing patient needs and preferences; matching of health care professional style and patient needs; and

  1. Clinical profile of patients admitted to the coronary care unit with possible myocardial infarction without diagnostic ECG and/or enzyme changes.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Mohsen, M F; al-Quorain, A; al-Hamdan, A A; Husain, A; Qutub, H; Ladipo, G O

    1993-12-01

    Concern has been expressed about the cost-effectiveness of the Coronary Care Unit (CCU) and solution options offered on account of the large number of patients admitted to the CCU who turn out not to have acute myocardial infarction. In a prospective study over four years, we studied a group of patients admitted to the CCU with suspected myocardial infarction but who did not have diagnostic ECG and/or enzyme changes for the causes of their chest pain. We compared the clinical profile of these patients (Group A) with that of a random sample of patients with confirmed myocardial infarction (Group B). Gastrointestinal disorders, musculoskeletal chest pain, panic and anxiety disorders were the major causes of chest pain in Group A patients. A normal ECG and a normal creatine phosphokinase (CPK) within the first 24 hours, a normal initial random blood sugar, a younger age and absence of coronary risk factors effectively separated Group A patients as low risk from Group B patients as high risk for acute myocardial infarction. These simple parameters will assist physicians providing CCU care in most hospitals in early decision making and in the judicious use of the CCU. PMID:8026351

  2. Characteristics of Patients Who Admitted to the Emergency Department Because of Burns Due to Dens Liquids Such as Hot Milk/Oil

    PubMed Central

    Bayramoglu, Atif; Sener, M. Talip; Cakir, Zeynep; Aslan, Sahin; Emet, Mucahit; Akoz, Ayhan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Burn is the tissue damage on body caused due to various reasons. Although all burns caused by hot liquids are investigated as scalding burns, dense liquid burns (DLB) caused by such as milk and oil are different from other burns. The aim of this study was to report the properties of DLB. Materials and Methods: Patients admitted to the Emergency Service of Atatürk University Hospital, with DLB from June 2003 to December 2008, were examined retrospectively. Results: During the study, 28 DLB patients were admitted to the emergency service. The most common admission were found in autumn 28.6% (n=8), and in May and June, 17.9% (n=5). The frequency of burns on the right upper extremity was seen in 50% (n=14) of the patients. The burn degree of all patients was determined as 2nd degree. Seventy-five percent (n=21) of the patients were discharged, 14.3% (n=4) were hospitalized. None of the patients died. Conclusion: Dense liquid burns is a burn type that is commonly seen in women, absolutely causing 2nd degree burns, frequently reported in upper extremity and head/neck regions, and in contrast to other studies, in our region it is completely seen in patients living in city centre. PMID:27026759

  3. Decision-making capacity for treatment in psychiatric and medical in-patients: cross-sectional, comparative study†

    PubMed Central

    Owen, Gareth S.; Szmukler, George; Richardson, Genevra; David, Anthony S.; Raymont, Vanessa; Freyenhagen, Fabian; Martin, Wayne; Hotopf, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Background Is the nature of decision-making capacity (DMC) for treatment significantly different in medical and psychiatric patients? Aims To compare the abilities relevant to DMC for treatment in medical and psychiatric patients who are able to communicate a treatment choice. Method A secondary analysis of two cross-sectional studies of consecutive admissions: 125 to a psychiatric hospital and 164 to a medical hospital. The MacArthur Competence Assessment Tool - Treatment and a clinical interview were used to assess decision-making abilities (understanding, appreciating and reasoning) and judgements of DMC. We limited analysis to patients able to express a choice about treatment and stratified the analysis by low and high understanding ability. Results Most people scoring low on understanding were judged to lack DMC and there was no difference by hospital (P = 0.14). In both hospitals there were patients who were able to understand yet lacked DMC (39% psychiatric v. 13% medical in-patients, P<0.001). Appreciation was a better ‘test’ of DMC in the psychiatric hospital (where psychotic and severe affective disorders predominated) (P<0.001), whereas reasoning was a better test of DMC in the medical hospital (where cognitive impairment was common) (P = 0.02). Conclusions Among those with good understanding, the appreciation ability had more salience to DMC for treatment in a psychiatric setting and the reasoning ability had more salience in a medical setting. PMID:23969482

  4. [Dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients: prevalence and general characteristics].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Jiménez, Roberto; Aragüés, María; Jiménez-Arriero, Miguel Angel; Ponce, Guillermo; Muñoz, Antonio; Bagney, Alexandra; Hoenicka, Janet; Palomo, Tomás

    2008-06-01

    Comorbidity between a substance use disorder (SUD) and another psychiatric disorder is known as dual diagnosis. It is of great relevance due to its important clinical consequences and costs of care. There are practically no published studies on dual diagnosis prevalence in patients admitted to psychiatric hospitalization units in general hospitals (PHUGH) in our country. The objectives were to estimate the prevalence of dual diagnosis in psychiatric inpatients admitted consecutively to a Psychiatric Hospitalization Unit (Hospital Universitario 12 de Octubre, Madrid, Spain) in one year, to compare clinical and sociodemographic variables between the dual diagnosis group (DD group) and the group with a psychiatric disorder but no SUD (PD group), and to study the types of substances used. This is a retrospective study, based on the review of the clinical charts of the 257 patients admitted to this PHUGH in one year. The results showed that, excluding nicotine dependence, 24.9% of our inpatients had a SUD as well as another psychiatric disorder. A statistically significant predominance of men was found in the DD group, as well as a younger age at the time of the study, at the beginning of their psychiatric attention and on their first psychiatric admission, and they had received diagnoses of schizophrenia or related psychoses more often than the PD group, who had mostly affective disorders. The substances most frequently used in the DD group were alcohol (78.1%), cannabis (62.5%), and cocaine (51.6%). Due to the high prevalence and repercussions of dual diagnosis, it would be advisable to have specialized therapeutic programs for its treatment. PMID:18717266

  5. Psychiatric Comorbidity in Patients from the Addictive Disorders Assistance Units of Galicia: The COPSIAD Study

    PubMed Central

    Pereiro, César; Pino, Carlos; Flórez, Gerardo; Arrojo, Manuel; Becoña, Elisardo

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in patients under treatment within the addictive disorders assistance units of Galicia (Spain). Material and Methods A total of 64 healthcare professionals performed clinical diagnosis of mental disorders (on DSM IV-TR criteria) in 2300 patients treated throughout March 2010 in 21 addictive disorders assistance units. Results 56.3% of patients with substance abuse/dependency also showed some other mental disorder, 42.2% of patients suffering from at least an Axis I condition and 20.2% from some Axis II condition. Mood and anxiety disorders and borderline and antisocial personality disorders were the most frequent disorders in both axes. Conclusions A high comorbidity was found between mental and substance use disorders (SUD) in patients seen at the addictive disorders assistance units of Galicia. PMID:23823135

  6. Aggression and risk of future violence in forensic psychiatric patients with and without dyslexia.

    PubMed

    Selenius, Heidi; Hellström, Ake; Belfrage, Henrik

    2011-05-01

    Dyslexia does not cause criminal behaviour, but it may worsen aggressive behaviour tendencies. In this study, aggressive behaviour and risk of future violence were compared between forensic psychiatric patients with and without dyslexia. Dyslexia was assessed using the Swedish phonological processing battery 'The Pigeon'. The patients filled in the Aggression Questionnaire, and trained assessors performed the risk assessments using HCR-20 version 2. Patients with dyslexia self-reported more aggressive behaviour compared with those without dyslexia. There was only a nearly significant tendency (p = 0.06) for the patients with dyslexia to receive higher scores in the HCR-20 compared with the patients without dyslexia, and phonological processing skills did not significantly predict aggression or risk of future violence. However, regression analyses demonstrated that poor phonological processing skills are a significant predictor of anger, which in turn significantly predicts risk of future violence. PMID:21268184

  7. Assessing the utility of Xpert® MTB/RIF as a screening tool for patients admitted to medical wards in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Heidebrecht, Christine L.; Podewils, Laura J.; Pym, Alexander S.; Cohen, Ted; Mthiyane, Thuli; Wilson, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Many hospital inpatients in South Africa have undiagnosed active and drug-resistant tuberculosis (TB). Early detection of TB is essential to inform immediate infection control actions to minimize transmission risk. We assessed the utility of Xpert® MTB/RIF (GeneXpert) as a screening tool for medical admissions at a large public hospital in South Africa. Consecutive adult patients admitted to medical wards between March-June 2013 were enrolled; sputum specimens were collected and tested by GeneXpert, smear microscopy, and culture. Chest X-rays (CXRs) were conducted as standard care for all patients admitted. We evaluated the proportion of patients identified with TB disease through each diagnostic method. Among enrolled patients whose medical charts were available for review post-discharge, 61 (27%) were diagnosed with TB; 34 (56% of diagnosed TB cases) were GeneXpert positive. When patients in whom TB was identified by other means were excluded, GeneXpert yielded only four additional TB cases. However, GeneXpert identified rifampicin-resistant TB in one patient, who was initially diagnosed based on CXR. The utility of GeneXpert for TB screening was limited in an institution where CXR is conducted routinely and which serves a population in which TB and TB/HIV co-infection are highly prevalent, but it allowed for rapid detection of rifampicin resistance. PMID:26786396

  8. Quantitative MR Markers and Psychiatric Symptoms in a Patient with Fahr Disease

    PubMed Central

    Buono, Viviana Lo; Corallo, Francesco; Costa, Antonio; Bramanti, Placido; Marino, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Fahr disease Symptoms: Movement disorder • chorea and tremors • cognitive deficit • behavioral aggressiveness and restlessness • visual hallucination Medication: Haloperidolo • levomepromazine • sodium valproate Clinical Procedure: Neurology examination • neuropsychological examination • MRI Specialty: Neurology Objective: Rare disease Background: Fahr’s disease (FD), or primitive idiopathic calcification of the basal ganglia, is a rare neurodegenerative syndrome characterized by the presence of idiopathic bilateral and symmetrical cerebral calcifications. Case Report: We describe the case of 43-year-old woman presenting with psychiatric symptoms, disorganized behavior, and migraine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination showed basal ganglia calcifications. In addition, we analyzed the cortical brain volume and noted cortical atrophy. Extensive etiological clinico-biological assessment allowed us to exclude known causes of brain calcifications and to diagnose Fahr disease (FD). Neurological symptoms associated with psychiatric manifestations are not uncommon in FD. Conclusions: Purely psychiatric presentations are possible, as demonstrated by the present case, although there have been very few cases reported. To date, no studies related to the brain atrophy in FD have been reported. PMID:26094250

  9. Handover of patient information from the crisis assessment and treatment team to the inpatient psychiatric unit.

    PubMed

    Waters, Amanda; Sands, Natisha; Keppich-Arnold, Sandra; Henderson, Kathryn

    2015-06-01

    Handover, or the communication of patient information between clinicians, is a fundamental component of health care. Psychiatric settings are dynamic environments relying on timely and accurate communication to plan care and manage risk. Crisis assessment and treatment teams are the primary interface between community and mental health services in many Australian and international health services, facilitating access to assessment, treatment, and admission to hospital. No previous research has investigated the handover between crisis assessment and treatment teams and inpatient psychiatric units, despite the importance of handover to care planning. The aim of the present study was to identify the nature and types of information transferred during these handovers, and to explore how these guides initial care planning. An observational, exploratory study design was used. A 20-item handover observation tool was used to observe 19 occasions of handover. A prospective audit was undertaken on clinical documentation arising from the admission. Clinical information, including psychiatric history and mental state, were handed over consistently; however, information about consumer preferences was reported less consistently. The present study identified a lack of attention to consumer preferences at handover, despite the current focus on recovery-oriented models for mental health care, and the centrality of respecting consumer preferences within the recovery paradigm. PMID:25438620

  10. Perceived Discrimination in Patients With Psychiatric Disorder and Turkish Migration Background in Germany.

    PubMed

    Müller, Matthias J; Koch, Eckhardt

    2016-07-01

    Perceived discrimination (PD) has a negative impact on the course of psychiatric disorders. We have investigated PD in inpatients with affective or anxiety disorder and Turkish migration background (TP) or native Germans (GP). Migration-related, clinical, and sociodemographic data of n = 62 TP and n = 62 GP, matched for age, sex, and psychiatric diagnoses, were retrospectively analyzed. PD was assessed as one of 10 questions related to migration and acculturation (yes/no, severity 0-10). PD prevalence rates were compared between TP and GP; relationships of PD with other variables were analyzed using bivariate correlations and multiple regression analyses. A PD prevalence of 26% in TP and 1% in GP was found (odds ratio, 21.2 [2.7-165.8]). Migration background was the strongest predictor of PD in the total group. Within the TP sample, asylum-seeking status and migration-related distress were significantly predictive of PD. In patients with psychiatric disorder in Germany, PD seems to be strongly related to migration-related distress. PMID:27218220

  11. Neuropsychological Impairment and Its Association with Violence Risk in Japanese Forensic Psychiatric Patients: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Nishinaka, Hirofumi; Nakane, Jun; Nagata, Takako; Imai, Atsushi; Kuroki, Noriomi; Sakikawa, Noriko; Omori, Mayu; Kuroda, Osamu; Hirabayashi, Naotsugu; Igarashi, Yoshito; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Background In Japan, the legislation directing treatment of offenders with psychiatric disorders was enacted in 2005. Neuropsychological impairment is highly related to functional outcomes in patients with psychiatric disorders, and several studies have suggested an association between neuropsychological impairment and violent behaviors. However, there have been no studies of neuropsychological impairment in forensic patients covered by the Japanese legislation. This study is designed to examine the neuropsychological characteristics of forensic patients in comparison to healthy controls and to assess the relationship between neuropsychological impairment and violence risk. Methods Seventy-one forensic patients with psychiatric disorders and 54 healthy controls (matched by age, gender, and education) were enrolled. The CogState Battery (CSB) consisting of eight cognitive domains, the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT) to test emotion-based decision making, and psychological measures of violence risk including psychopathy were used. Results Forensic patients exhibited poorer performances on all CSB subtests and the IGT than controls. For each group, partial correlational analyses indicated that poor IGT performance was related to psychopathy, especially antisocial behavior. In forensic patients, the CSB composite score was associated with risk factors for future violent behavior, including stress and noncompliance with remediation attempts. Conclusion Forensic patients with psychiatric disorders exhibit a wide range of neuropsychological impairments, and these findings suggest that neuropsychological impairment may increase the risk of violent behavior. Therefore, the treatment of neuropsychological impairment in forensic patients with psychiatric disorders is necessary to improve functional outcomes as well as to prevent violence. PMID:26824701

  12. Predictors of the short- and long-term survival of HIV-infected patients admitted to a Brazilian intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Amâncio, F F; Lambertucci, J R; Cota, G F; Antunes, C M

    2012-10-01

    The outcomes of HIV-infected patients requiring critical care have improved. However, in developing countries, information about HIV-infected patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) is scarce. We describe the prognosis of HIV-infected patients admitted to a Brazilian ICU and the factors predictive of short- and long-term survival. A historical cohort study, including HIV-infected patients admitted to a Brazilian ICU at an HIV/AIDS reference hospital, was conducted. Survivors were followed up for 24 months after ICU discharge. Demographic, clinical and laboratory data, disease severity scores and mortality were evaluated. Data were analysed using survival and regression models. One hundred and twenty-five patients were studied. In-ICU and in-hospital mortality rates were 46.4% and 68.0%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that the in-ICU mortality was significantly associated with APACHE (Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation) II scores (odds ratio [OR], 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.03-1.11), mechanical ventilation (OR, 6.39; 95% CI, 1.29-31.76), tuberculosis treatment (OR, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.03-6.71), use of antiretroviral therapy (OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.77) and septic shock (OR, 4.38; 95% CI, 1.78-10.76). Septic shock was also associated with long-term survival (hazard ratio, 3.0; 95% CI, 1.31-6.90). In-hospital and in-ICU mortality were higher than those reported for developed countries. ICU admission mostly due to AIDS-related diseases may explain these differences. PMID:23104742

  13. [Psychiatric rehabilitation].

    PubMed

    Dusek, K

    1990-04-01

    The author presents a brief account of the development of psychiatric rehabilitation during the past two centuries. He draws attention to new trends in rehabilitation of the mentally sick during the post-war period and at present. He describes the system of rehabilitation in the Soviet Union which began to develop as a results of efforts in the Bekhterev Institute in Leningrad. In our country the law on social security in 1964 created conditions for protected workshop and protected work places. In 1973 methodical instructions of the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs issued instructions which specified the principles of planning, establishment and operation of these facilities. At the end of 1986 the Ministry of Health CSR issued an amendment to the concept of psychiatry which contains the organization of psychiatric rehabilitation not only in in-patient but in particular in out-patient psychiatric facilities. PMID:2194684

  14. "Chronicity," "nervios" and community care: a case study of Puerto Rican psychiatric patients in New York City.

    PubMed

    Swerdlow, M

    1992-06-01

    The role of ethnicity, community structure, and folk concepts of mental illness in facilitating the adaptation of long term psychiatric patients to community living has received little attention. This article examines the cultural concepts of mental illness and the community involvement of 30 Puerto Rican psychiatric patients participating in a New York City treatment program. It is shown that many of the attributes usually associated with chronic mental illness do not apply to this population. It is argued that the folk concept of nervios helps to foster the integration of these patients in a wide range of community networks. The impact of gentrification on these patients' community integration is also discussed. PMID:1395696

  15. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation–Specific Comorbidity Index Predicts Inpatient Mortality and Survival in Patients Who Received Allogeneic Transplantation Admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas D.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Liu, Ping; Ciurea, Stefan O.; Rondon, Gabriela; de Lima, Marcos; Cardenas-Turanzas, Marylou; Price, Kristen J.; Champlin, Richard E.; Nates, Joseph L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the prognostic value of the Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation–Specific Comorbidity Index (HCT-CI) in patients who received transplantation admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). Patients and Methods We investigated the association of HCT-CI with inpatient mortality and overall survival (OS) among 377 patients who were admitted to the ICU within 100 days of allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) at our institution. HCT-CI scores were collapsed into four groups and were evaluated in univariate and multivariate analyses using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards models. Results The most common pretransplantation comorbidities were pulmonary and cardiac diseases, and respiratory failure was the primary reason for ICU admission. We observed a strong trend for higher inpatient mortality and shorter OS among patients with HCT-CI values ≥ 2 compared with patients with values of 0 to 1 in all patient subsets studied. Multivariate analysis showed that patients with HCT-CI values ≥ 2 had significantly higher inpatient mortality than patients with values of 0 to 1 and that HCT-CI values ≥ 4 were significantly associated with shorter OS compared with values of 0 to 1 (hazard ratio, 1.74; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.47). The factors associated with lower inpatient mortality were ICU admission during the ASCT conditioning phase or the use of reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. The overall inpatient mortality rate was 64%, and the 1-year OS rate was 15%. Among patients with HCT-CI scores of 0 to 1, 2, 3, and ≥ 4, the 1-year OS rates were 22%, 17%, 18%, and 9%, respectively. Conclusion HCT-CI is a valuable predictor of mortality and survival in critically ill patients after ASCT. PMID:24127454

  16. Integrated medical-psychiatric care of a dying borderline patient: a case of dynamically informed "practical psychotherapy".

    PubMed

    Lacy, Timothy J; Higgins, Michael J

    2005-01-01

    Combined training in family practice and psychiatry is relatively new and consists of equal proportions of each specialty intermixed throughout a 5-year period. This blending of two distinct skill sets and patient populations creates opportunities to provide unique patient care. An understanding of psychodynamic principles is vital to treating patients with comorbid medical and psychiatric illnesses in a primary care setting. The patient presented in this article had several medical and psychiatric problems and was treated by a combined family practice-psychiatry resident who cared for her medically and psychiatrically until the time of her death from cancer. Complex patients such as this defy the use of purely applied school-specific psychotherapies. Rather, they require the creative application of integrated psychotherapeutic strategies. Integrated approaches to psychotherapy have been increasingly advocated in recent years. In keeping with terminology used by Carl Jung, this approach may be thought of simply as practical psychotherapy. PMID:16448341

  17. Computerized patient information system in a psychiatric unit: five-year experience.

    PubMed

    Modai, I; Valevski, A

    1993-10-01

    A computerized psychiatric clinical application based on CLICKS program was developed, consisting of a network of 34 personal computers, run by Novell Netware version 3.11. It includes all clinical records and covers most of the administrative needs of the department; it may be used also in the outpatient clinics. Implementation of the system followed the stages of planning, record structuring, record programming, practice and operation. The system is favorably accepted by the patients, has several important advantages over pencil and paper record keeping, and although it is slightly more time-consuming, it improves record quality and departmental efficiency. PMID:8113635

  18. Variables associated with the use of coercive measures on psychiatric patients in Spanish penitentiary centers.

    PubMed

    Girela, E; López, A; Ortega, L; De-Juan, J; Ruiz, F; Bosch, J I; Barrios, L F; Luna, J D; Torres-González, F

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the use of coercive medical measures (forced medication, isolation, and mechanical restraint) in mentally ill inmates within two secure psychiatric hospitals (SPH) and three regular prisons (RP) in Spain. Variables related to adopted coercive measures were analyzed, such as type of measure, causes of indication, opinion of patient inmate, opinion of medical staff, and more frequent morbidity. A total of 209 patients (108 from SPH and 101 from RP) were studied. Isolation (41.35%) was the most frequent coercive measure, followed by mechanical restraint (33.17%) and forced medication (25.48%). The type of center has some influence; specifically in RP there is less risk of isolation and restraint than in SPH. Not having had any previous imprisonment reduces isolation and restraint risk while increases the risk of forced medication, as well as previous admissions to psychiatric inpatient units does. Finally, the fact of having lived with a partner before imprisonment reduces the risk of forced medication and communication with the family decreases the risk of isolation. Patients subjected to a coercive measure exhibited a pronounced psychopathology and most of them had been subjected to such measures on previous occasions. The mere fact of external assessment of compliance with human rights slows down the incidence of coercive measures. PMID:24563866

  19. Variables Associated with the Use of Coercive Measures on Psychiatric Patients in Spanish Penitentiary Centers

    PubMed Central

    Girela, E.; López, A.; Ortega, L.; De-Juan, J.; Ruiz, F.; Bosch, J. I.; Barrios, L. F.; Luna, J. D.; Torres-González, F.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the use of coercive medical measures (forced medication, isolation, and mechanical restraint) in mentally ill inmates within two secure psychiatric hospitals (SPH) and three regular prisons (RP) in Spain. Variables related to adopted coercive measures were analyzed, such as type of measure, causes of indication, opinion of patient inmate, opinion of medical staff, and more frequent morbidity. A total of 209 patients (108 from SPH and 101 from RP) were studied. Isolation (41.35%) was the most frequent coercive measure, followed by mechanical restraint (33.17%) and forced medication (25.48%). The type of center has some influence; specifically in RP there is less risk of isolation and restraint than in SPH. Not having had any previous imprisonment reduces isolation and restraint risk while increases the risk of forced medication, as well as previous admissions to psychiatric inpatient units does. Finally, the fact of having lived with a partner before imprisonment reduces the risk of forced medication and communication with the family decreases the risk of isolation. Patients subjected to a coercive measure exhibited a pronounced psychopathology and most of them had been subjected to such measures on previous occasions. The mere fact of external assessment of compliance with human rights slows down the incidence of coercive measures. PMID:24563866

  20. [Oral health related quality of life among Dutch forensic psychiatric patients].

    PubMed

    Buunk-Werkhoven, Y A B; Verheggen-Udding, E L; van den Heuvel, J L M

    2011-05-01

    In order to determine the effects ofa new approach to preventive oral health treatment for forensic psychiatric patients, 3 studies were carried out using a Dutch version of the Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14-NL), among Dutch forensic psychiatric patients. In the first study, it was determined that the psychometric characteristics of the OHIP-14-NL were good and that attention to oral healthcare contributed positively to quality of life. The second study, which made use of an improved version of the OHIP-14-NL indicated that patients with a high level of anxiety for dental treatment and poor oral health reported a lesser quality of life. The third study showed that an effectively carried out programme of personal oral care can play an important role in the reduction of halitosis and in the improvement of quality of life. Moreover, it appeared that the retrospective version of the OHIP-14-NL was a useful method for determining the correlation between quality of life and oral health and for evaluating change therein within a relatively short period of time. PMID:21661248

  1. Prevalence of Psychiatric Disorders in Patients with a Diagnosis of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Kashmir

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Arshad; Chandel, Rajesh Kumar; Ganie, Mohd Ashraf; Dar, Mansoor Ahmad; Rather, Yasir Hassan; Wani, Zaid Ahmad; Shiekh, Javid Ahmad; Shah, Majid Shafi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the common endocrine disorders and is associated with reproductive, metabolic, and psychological disturbances affecting one in five women of reproductive age group. Objective: To investigate the prevalence of psychiatric disorders among women in ambulatory treatment with a diagnosis of PCOS. Materials and Methods: One hundred and ten patients of PCOS were evaluated using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria by means of Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview, English version 5.0.0. Diagnosis of PCOS was confirmed according to the National Institute of Health/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, 1990 consensus conference criteria. Forty subjects without PCOS who were matched for age and body mass index were taken as a comparison group. Results: About 23% of cases had major depressive disorder as compared to 7.5% of controls, 1.8% had dysthymia, 15.45% had panic disorder compared to 5% of controls, 6.36% had obsessive compulsive disorder compared to 2.5% of controls, 8% cases had suicidality, 2.72% of cases were bipolar affective disorder, and 15.45% had generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Conclusion: A high prevalence of mental disorders was observed, especially major depression, panic disorder, and GAD in patients with PCOS in our study. The results suggest that screening and appropriate management for psychiatric disorders should be part of the routine evaluation of these patients. PMID:25722515

  2. The living conditions of psychiatric patients discharged from half-way houses in Hong Kong.

    PubMed

    Mak, K Y; Gow, L

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on a study of the living environment of 64 psychiatric patients discharged from half-way houses in Hong Kong. The majority were living in a deprived situation compared to that of their neighbours. They were leading a very monotonous life throughout the year; the walls of their homes were dirty and very plain; and some even ate scraps from a neighbouring bakery. Many did not have any social life at all, and their hobbies were smoking, watching television and gambling. Their neighbours, by comparison, had hobbies such as floriculture, birds and goldfish; decorated their walls with pictures and had newspapers and periodicals in their houses; more often had telephone facilities, wardrobes and sofas; used town gas rather than kerosene stoves; and were more likely to have electrical appliances, especially an iron, refrigerator and shaver. Judged by their income from employment or from public assistance, the 'quality of life' (QOL) of these patients should not have been in such a desperate state. They lacked guidance and instruction in their management of money, and the care of their homes. It is proposed that an aftercare worker might improve the QOL of these discharged psychiatric patients. PMID:1655669

  3. [Interest of ambulatory simplified acute physiology score (ASAPS) applied to patients admitted in an intensive care unit of an infectious diseases unit in Dakar].

    PubMed

    Dia, N M; Diallo, I; Manga, N M; Diop, S A; Fortes-Deguenonvo, L; Lakhe, N A; Ka, D; Seydi, M; Diop, B M; Sow, P S

    2015-08-01

    The evaluation of patients by a scale of gravity allows a better categorization of patients admitted in intensive care unit (ICU). Our study had for objective to estimate interest of Ambulatory Simplified Acute Physiologic Score (ASAPS) applied to patients admitted in ICU of infectious diseases department of FANN hospital. It was about a descriptive and analytical retrospective study, made from the data found in patients' files admitted into the USI infectious diseases department of FANN hospital in Dakar, from January 1(st), 2009 till December 31st, 2009.The data of 354 patients' files were analyzed. The sex-ratio was 1.77 with an average age of 37.6 years ± 19.4 years old [5-94 years]. The majority of the patients were unemployed paid (39.6%). The most frequent failures were the following ones: neurological (80.5%), cardio-respiratory (16.7%). The average duration of stay was 6.2 days ± 8.2 days going of less than 24 hours to more than 10 weeks. The deaths arose much more at night (53.1%) than in the daytime (46.9%) and the strongest rate of death was recorded in January (61.5%), most low in October (26.7%). The global mortality was 48.3%. The rate of lethality according to the highest main diagnosis was allocated to the AIDS (80.5%). The average ambulatory simplified acute physiology score was 5.3 ± 3.6 with extremes of 0 and 18. The deaths in our series increased with this index (p = 0.000005). The female patients had a rate of lethality higher than that of the men people, 55.5% against 44.2% (p = 0.03). In spite of a predictive score of a high survival (ASAPS < 8), certain number of patients died (n = 105) that is 61.4% of the deaths. The metabolic disturbances, hyperleukocytosis or leukopenia when realised, the presence of a chronic disease, seemed also to influence this lethality. ASAPS only, although interesting, would not good estimate the gravity of patients, where from the necessity thus of a minimum biological balance sheet. It seems better adapted

  4. Adverse Drug Reactions: A Retrospective Review of Hospitalized Patients at a State Psychiatric Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Iuppa, Courtney A.; Nelson, Leigh Anne; Elliott, Ellie; Sommi, Roger W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: There is a paucity of information regarding adverse drug reactions (ADRs) in psychiatric patients. Information on common and preventable ADRs (pADRs) in psychiatric patients will allow for targeted improvement projects. Objective: To characterize reported ADRs and pharmacist interventions to prevent ADRs in an extended-care state psychiatric hospital. Methods: Four years of ADR reports were assessed for probability, reaction severity, pharmacological class of medication involved, preventability, change in therapy, and transfers to a medical facility. The pharmacist intervention database was queried for interventions classified as “prevention of ADR.” The interventions were assessed for type of medication and recommendation acceptance. Results: Medication classes responsible for ADRs included mood stabilizers (30%), typical antipsychotics (25%), atypical antipsychotics (25%), and antidepressants (8%). Nine percent resulted in transfer to a medical facility. Of all ADRs, 34.4% were pADRs; mood stabilizers (41%) and atypical antipsychotics (27%) were the most common pADRs. The most common causes of pADRs were supratherapeutic serum concentrations, drug-drug interactions, and history of reaction. There were 87 pharmacist interventions that were classified as “prevention of ADR,” and the acceptance rate of pharmacists’ recommendations was 96.5%. Mood stabilizers (20%), atypical antipsychotics (17%), and typical antipsychotics (11%) were commonly associated with prevented ADRs. Lithium accounted for 13.8% of prevented ADRs; these ADRs were most often due to a drug–drug interaction with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Conclusions: ADRs were most commonly associated with mood stabilizers and antipsychotics, and pADRs were common. There is an opportunity to provide education to medical staff on therapeutic drug monitoring and drug–drug interactions for these classes, particularly lithium. PMID:24474834

  5. Pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic profiling of imipenem in patients admitted to an intensive care unit in India: A nonrandomized, cross-sectional, analytical, open-labeled study

    PubMed Central

    Abhilash, B.; Tripathi, Chakra Dhar; Gogia, Anoop Raj; Meshram, Girish Gulab; Kumar, Manu; Suraj, B.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aim: Widespread use of imipenem in intensive care units (ICUs) in India has led to the development of numerous carbapenemase-producing strains of pathogens. The altered pathophysiological state in critically ill patients could lead to subtherapeutic antibiotic levels. Hence, the aim of this study was to investigate the variability in the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profile of imipenem in critically ill patients admitted to an ICU in India. Materials and Methods: Plasma concentration of imipenem was determined in critically ill patients using high performance liquid chromatography, at different time points, by grouping them according to their locus of infection. The elimination half-life (t΍) and volume of distribution (Vd) values were also computed. The patients with imipenem trough concentration values below the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and 5 times the MIC for the isolated pathogen were determined. Results: The difference in the plasma imipenem concentration between the gastrointestinal and the nongastrointestinal groups was significant at 2 h (P = 0.015) following drug dosing; while the difference was significant between the skin/cellulitis and nonskin/cellulitus groups at 2 h (P = 0.008), after drug dosing. The imipenem levels were above the MIC and 5 times the MIC for the isolated organism in 96.67% and 50% of the patients, respectively. Conclusions: The pharmacokinetic profile of imipenem does not vary according to the locus of an infection in critically ill patients. Imipenem, 3 g/day intermittent dosing, maintains a plasma concentration which is adequate to treat most infections encountered in patients admitted to an ICU. However, a change in the dosing regimen is suggested for patients infected with organisms having MIC values above 4 mg/L. PMID:26628823

  6. Victimization of patients with severe psychiatric disorders: prevalence, risk factors, protective factors and consequences for mental health. A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Victimization among people with a Severe Mental Illness is a common phenomenon. The objectives of this study proposal are: to delineate the extent and kind of victimization in a representative sample of chronic psychiatric patients; to contribute to the development and validation of a set of instruments registering victimization of psychiatric patients; to determine risk factors and protective factors; and to gain insight into the possible consequences of victimization. Methods/Design An extensive data set of 323 patients with Sever Mental Illness (assessed 4 years ago) is used. In 2010 a second measurement will be performed, enabling longitudinal research on the predictors and consequences of victimization. Discussion The consequences of (re)victimization have barely been subjected to analysis, partially due to the lack of a comprehensive, conceptual model for victimization. This research project will contribute significantly to the scientific development of the conceptual model of victimization in chronic psychiatric patients. PMID:21067566

  7. Temperament and character dimensions in male patients with substance use disorders: Differences relating to psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Marquez-Arrico, Julia E; López-Vera, Silvia; Prat, Gemma; Adan, Ana

    2016-03-30

    Previous research has not considered the influence of the Comorbid Mental Disorder (CMD) among Substance Use Disorders (SUD) patients. We explored the possible differences in personality dimensions among SUD patients taking into account their CMD (Schizophrenia, SZ; Bipolar Disorder, BD; Major Depressive Disorder, MDD); and elucidated clinical factors related to personality dimensions according to the CMD. The Temperament and Character Inventory Revised was used to assess a sample of 102 SUD male patients, considered in three groups according to their CMD: SUD+SZ (N=37), SUD+BD (N=30) and SUD+MDD (N=35). SUD+BD patients had the highest levels of Novelty Seeking and Persistence, SUD+SZ patients showed the highest levels of Harm Avoidance, and SUD+MDD patients reported a lower level of Self-transcendence. Novelty Seeking was positively associated with severity of addiction for SUD+BD; Harm Avoidance was positively associated with psychiatric symptoms for SUD+SZ; and the age of SUD onset was positively linked to Cooperativeness for SUD+BD and to Self-transcendence for SUD+MDD. The different personality characteristics associated to the type of CMD among SUD patients are related to several clinical variables. Interventions in these patients should be tailored according the personality traits that could influence treatment outcomes and patients' prognoses. PMID:26921044

  8. Psychiatric Comorbidity and Other Psychological Factors in Patients with “Chronic Lyme Disease”

    PubMed Central

    Hassett, Afton L.; Radvanski, Diane C.; Buyske, Steven; Savage, Shantal V.; Sigal, Leonard H.

    2009-01-01

    Background There is no evidence of current or previous B. burgdorferi infection in most patients evaluated at University-based Lyme disease referral centers. Instead, psychological factors likely exacerbate the persistent diffuse symptoms or “Chronic Multisymptom Illness” incorrectly ascribed to an ongoing chronic infection with B. burgdorferi. The objective of this study was to assess the medical and psychiatric status of such patients and compare these findings to those from patients without CMI. Methods 240 consecutive patients undergoing medical evaluation at an academic Lyme disease referral center in New Jersey were screened for clinical disorders (e.g. depression and anxiety) with diagnoses confirmed by structured clinical interviews. Personality disorders, catastrophizing, and negative and positive affect were also evaluated and all factors were compared between groups and to functional outcomes. Results 60.4% of our sample had symptoms that could not be explained by current Lyme disease or another medical condition other than CMI. After adjusting for age and gender, clinical disorders were more common in CMI than in the comparison group (p<.001, OR 3.54, 95% CI, 1.97 to 6.55), but personality disorders were not significantly more common. CMI patients had higher negative affect, lower positive affect and a greater tendency to catastrophize pain (p<.001) than did the comparison group. Except for personality disorders, all psychological factors were related to worse functioning. Our explanatory model based on these factors was confirmed. Conclusions Psychiatric comorbidity and other psychological factors are prominent in the presentation and outcome of some patients who inaccurately ascribe long-standing symptoms to “chronic Lyme disease.” PMID:19699380

  9. Psychiatric Patients Tracking Through a Private Social Network for Relatives: Development and Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    García-Peñalvo, Francisco J; Martín, Manuel Franco; García-Holgado, Alicia; Guzmán, José Miguel Toribio; Antón, Jesús Largo; Sánchez-Gómez, Ma Cruz

    2016-07-01

    The treatment of psychiatric patients requires different health care from that of patients from other medical specialties. In particular, in the case of Department of Psychiatry from the Zamora Hospital (Spain), the period of time which patients require institutionalized care is a tiny part of their treatment. A large part of health care provided to the patient is aimed at his/her rehabilitation and social integration through day-care centres, supervised flats or activities. Conversely, several reports reveal that approximately 50 % of Internet users use the network as a source of health information, which has led to the emergence of virtual communities where patients, relatives or health professionals share their knowledge concerning an illness, health problem or specific health condition. In this context, we have identified that the relatives have a lack of information regarding the daily activities of patients under psychiatric treatment. The social networks or the virtual communities regarding health problems do not provide a private space where relatives can follow the patient's progress, despite being in different places. The goal of the study was to use technologies to develop a private social network for being used by severe mental patients (mainly schizophrenic patients). SocialNet is a pioneer social network in the health sector because it provides a social interaction context restricted to persons authorized by the patient or his/her legal guardian in such a way that they can track his/her daily activity. Each patient has a private area only accessible to authorized persons and their caregivers, where they can share pictures, videos or texts regarding his/her progress. A preliminary study of usability of the system has been made for increasing the usefulness and usability of SocialNet. SocialNet is the first system for promoting personal interactions among formal caregivers, family, close friends and patient, promoting the recovery of schizophrenic

  10. Toxoplasma encephalitis in HIV/AIDS patients admitted to the Douala general hospital between 2004 and 2009: a cross sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background It is estimated that about a third of the world’s population is chronically infected with Toxoplasma gondii. Toxoplasma encephalitis (TE), which occurs as a reactivation of quiescent chronic infection, is one of the leading causes of central nervous system (CNS) infection in AIDS. Its diagnosis in most centres still remains difficult. We opted to describe the clinical and radiological features of TE as well as in-hospital outcome and its associated factors. Methods We carried out a cross sectional study on the clinical case notes of adult patients admitted and treated for TE at the Douala General Hospital, Cameroon between January 1st 2004 to December 31st 2009. Results Of 672 patients admitted during the study period, 14.4% (97/672) had TE. The mean age was 36.9 ± 14.1 years and the median CD4 cell count was 68/mm3 (IQR): 43 – 103). Headache and fever were the most common presenting symptoms in 92.8% (90/97) and 87.6% (85/97) of patients. Annular contrast enhanced lesions were the most common brain scan finding in 81.4% (79/97) of patients. In-hospital mortality was 29.9% (29/97). Altered sensorium, presence of focal signs, neck stiffness and low CD4 cell count were factors associated with mortality. Adjusting for low CD4 count, altered sensorium remained strongly associated with fatality, adjusted odd ratio (AOR) 3.5 (95% CI 1.2 – 10.5). Conclusion Toxoplasma encephalitis is common among AIDS patients in Douala. Its high case fatality warrants adequate and compliant prophylactic therapy in severely immune depressed patients as well as early initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected patients. PMID:23587093

  11. Violence risk assessment in psychiatric patients in China: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiansong; Witt, Katrina; Xiang, Yutao; Zhu, Xiaomin; Wang, Xiaoping; Fazel, Seena

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to undertake a systematic review on violence risk assessment instruments used for psychiatric patients in China. Methods: A systematic search was conducted from 1980 until 2014 to identify studies that used psychometric tools or structured instruments to assess aggression and violence risk. Information from primary studies was extracted, including demographic characteristics of the samples used, study design characteristics, and reliability and validity estimates. Results: A total of 30 primary studies were identified that investigated aggression or violence; 6 reported on tools assessing aggression while an additional 24 studies reported on structured instruments designed to predict violence. Although measures of reliability were typically good, estimates of predictive validity were mostly in the range of poor to moderate, with only 1 study finding good validity. These estimates were typically lower than that found in previous work for Western samples. Conclusion: There is currently little evidence to support the use of current violence risk assessment instruments in psychiatric patients in China. Developing more accurate and scalable approaches are research priorities. PMID:25991764

  12. Impact of a stress management program on stress perception of nurses working with psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Sailaxmi, Gandhi; Lalitha, Krishnasamy

    2015-04-01

    Nurses caring for psychiatric patients may have to face violent emotions and unpredictable behaviour which can be quite stressful. A stress management program may equip nurses with skills to cope effectively with the stress. A one group pre-test and post-test design was adopted to test this hypothesis. Both gender nurses caring for psychiatric patients were invited to undergo 10 consecutive, one hour sessions of a stress management program. The DCL Stress scale (The De Villiers, Carson & Leary Stress Scale; Carson et al., 1997a,b,c) was used to collect data immediately after intervention and four weeks later. RM ANOVA with spss 16 showed that pre-intervention mean stress reduced significantly (p=0.000) from 57.45±16.42 to 41.06±16.51 immediately following the intervention and 26.43±12.82 (p=0.000) four weeks after the intervention. The stress management strategies positively impacted on nurses' stress levels. PMID:25703040

  13. MIR137 variants identified in psychiatric patients affect synaptogenesis and neuronal transmission gene sets.

    PubMed

    Strazisar, M; Cammaerts, S; van der Ven, K; Forero, D A; Lenaerts, A-S; Nordin, A; Almeida-Souza, L; Genovese, G; Timmerman, V; Liekens, A; De Rijk, P; Adolfsson, R; Callaerts, P; Del-Favero, J

    2015-04-01

    Sequence analysis of 13 microRNA (miRNA) genes expressed in the human brain and located in genomic regions associated with schizophrenia and/or bipolar disorder, in a northern Swedish patient/control population, resulted in the discovery of two functional variants in the MIR137 gene. On the basis of their location and the allele frequency differences between patients and controls, we explored the hypothesis that the discovered variants impact the expression of the mature miRNA and consequently influence global mRNA expression affecting normal brain functioning. Using neuronal-like SH-SY5Y cells, we demonstrated significantly reduced mature miR-137 levels in the cells expressing the variant miRNA gene. Subsequent transcriptome analysis showed that the reduction in miR-137 expression led to the deregulation of gene sets involved in synaptogenesis and neuronal transmission, all implicated in psychiatric disorders. Our functional findings add to the growing data, which implicate that miR-137 has an important role in the etiology of psychiatric disorders and emphasizes its involvement in nervous system development and proper synaptic function. PMID:24888363

  14. Variability Among US Intensive Care Units in Managing the Care of Patients Admitted With Preexisting Limits on Life-Sustaining Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Hart, Joanna L.; Harhay, Michael O.; Gabler, Nicole B.; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Quill, Caroline M.; Halpern, Scott D.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Although the end-of-life care patients receive is known to vary across nations, regions, and centers, these differences are best explored within a group of patients with presumably similar care preferences. OBJECTIVE To examine the proportions of patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with limitations on life-sustaining treatments and the proportions of such patients who receive aggressive care across individual ICUs. DESIGN, SETTINGS, AND PARTICIPANTS Retrospective cohort study using the Project IMPACT database (from April 1, 2001, to December 31, 2008) including 141 ICUs in 105 hospitals in the United States and 277 693 ICU patient visits. We used logistic regression analysis models adjusted for available patient characteristics and clustered visits by individual ICU. The full analysis was last performed in October 2014. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES Outcomes included the provision of (1) cardiopulmonary resuscitation, (2) new forms of life support, and the (3) addition or (4) reversal of treatment limitations. RESULTS Of the ICU admissions evaluated, 4.8% (95% CI, 4.7%–4.9%) had previously established treatment limitations. Patients admitted with treatment limitations were more likely to be older with more functional limitations and comorbidities. Among patients who survived to hospital discharge, more experienced reversals of existing treatment limitations during the ICU stay (17.8% [95% CI, 17.0%–18.7%]) than additions of new limits (11.7% [95% CI, 11.1%–12.4%]) (P < .01). Among patients who died, 15.7% (95% CI, 14.7–16.8%) had received cardiopulmonary resuscitation. After risk adjustment, ICUs varied widely in the proportions of patients admitted with treatment limitations (median, 4.0%; range, <1.0%–20.9%), the proportions of those who received cardiopulmonary resuscitation (37.7% [95% CI, 3.8%–92.4%]), the proportions of new forms of life support (30.0% [95% CI, 6.0%–84.2%]), and, among survivors, the proportion who had new

  15. Reducing the use of seclusion and restraint in psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient services- improving patient-centered care.

    PubMed

    Wale, Joyce B; Belkin, Gary S; Moon, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of seclusion and restraint (S/R) use has been given national priority by the US government, The Joint Commission, and patient advocacy groups. It is associated with high rates of patient and staff injuries and is a coercive and potentially traumatizing intervention. The New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) is the largest municipal health care system in the country, with 11 HHC facilities operating psychiatric emergency services and inpatient psychiatric services. HHC operates 1117 adult inpatient psychiatric beds with an average length of stay of 22.2 days that generated over 19,000 discharges in 2009. In 2009, there were over 36,000 psychiatric emergency services visits. HHC's Office of Behavioral Health provides strategic leadership, planning, and support for the operations and quality objectives of these services. In January 2007, the corporate office initiated the Seclusion and Restraint Reduction Initiative, with a sequenced, intensive series of interventions and strategies to help focus the behavioral health leadership and staff on the need for continued culture change toward a more patient-centered and safe system of psychiatric emergency and adult inpatient care. From 2007 to 2009, there was a substantial decline in HHC's overall rate of S/R incidents in inpatient units. The more substantial impact was in the reduced overall time spent in S/R; the reduced frequency of use of S/R; and the reduced likelihood of patient injury from S/R use. PMID:21841927

  16. Psychiatric Symptoms and Community Violence among High-Risk Patients: A Test of the Relationship at the Weekly Level

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeem, Jennifer L.; Schubert, Carol; Odgers, Candice; Mulvey, Edward P.; Gardner, William; Lidz, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Given the availability of violence risk assessment tools, clinicians are now better able to identify high-risk patients. Once these patients have been identified, clinicians must monitor risk state and intervene when necessary to prevent harm. Clinical practice is dominated by the assumption that increases in psychiatric symptoms elevate risk of…

  17. Personality disorders in heart failure patients requiring psychiatric management: comorbidity detections from a routine depression and anxiety screening protocol.

    PubMed

    Tully, Phillip J; Selkow, Terina

    2014-12-30

    Several international guidelines recommend routine depression screening in cardiac disease populations. No previous study has determined the prevalence and comorbidities of personality disorders in patients presenting for psychiatric treatment after these screening initiatives. In the first stage 404 heart failure (HF) patients were routinely screened and 73 underwent structured interview when either of the following criteria were met: (a) Patient Health Questionnaire ≥10; (b) Generalized Anxiety Disorder Questionnaire ≥7); (c) Response to one item panic-screener. Or (d) Suicidality. Patients with personality disorders were compared to the positive-screen patients on psychiatric comorbidities. The most common personality disorders were avoidant (8.2%), borderline (6.8%) and obsessive compulsive (4.1%), other personality disorders were prevalent in less than <3% of patients. Personality disorder patients had significantly greater risk of major depression (risk ratio (RR) 1.2; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.2-13.3), generalized anxiety disorder (RR 3.2; 95% CI 1.0-10.0), social phobia (RR 3.8; 95% CI 1.3-11.5) and alcohol abuse/dependence (RR 3.2; 95% 1.0-9.5). The findings that HF patients with personality disorders presented with complex psychiatric comorbidity suggest that pathways facilitating the integration of psychiatric services into cardiology settings are warranted when routine depression screening is in place. PMID:25238983

  18. Patient Suicides in Psychiatric Residencies and Post-Vention Responses: A National Survey of Psychiatry Chief Residents and Program Directors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Al; Moran, Scott; Shoemaker, Richard; Bradley, John

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: This report focuses on post-vention measures taken by U.S. psychiatry residencies when a resident-in-training experiences a patient suicide. Methods: A survey distributed to program directors and chief residents obtained an estimate of the frequency of psychiatric residents' experiencing a patient suicide and the frequency of numerous…

  19. The curious case of an invisible dog: a patient with non-psychiatric visual hallucinations

    PubMed Central

    Gulsin, Gaurav Singh; Gali, Swetha; Patel, Prashanth; Gupta, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old man reported experiencing hallucinations of a dog standing on his right side, following a recent episode of infective endocarditis. There was no history of reduced conscious level, psychosis or substance misuse. Neurological examination revealed an isolated right inferior quadrantopia, and the hallucinations were visible only in the area of the visual defect. A computed tomography scan confirmed a left occipital lobe infarct, congruent with the clinical signs. The infarct was deemed to be have originated from a septic embolus of his infected aortic valve and he was diagnosed with Charles Bonnet's syndrome (CBS). CBS is characterized by the presence of stereotyped visual hallucinations on a background of partial sight and in the absence of any psychotic illness. Early recognition can prevent wrongful diagnosis of a psychiatric condition, which may provide comfort to patients. Management is centred on reassurance and counselling, with medical therapies reserved only for patients experiencing distressing hallucinations. PMID:26835149

  20. The Prevalence of Depression among Untreated Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients Using a Standardized Psychiatric Interview

    PubMed Central

    Björnsdóttir, Erla; Benediktsdóttir, Bryndís; Pack, Allan I.; Arnardottir, Erna Sif; Kuna, Samuel T.; Gíslason, Thorarinn; Keenan, Brendan T.; Maislin, Greg; Sigurdsson, Jón Fridrik

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aims of this study were: (1) to use a standardized psychiatric interview, conducted by a trained psychologist to assess the prevalence of depression among patients with untreated OSA, and (2) to identify if OSA severity or other comorbid disorders (insomnia, hypertension, and diabetes) are related to depression among patients with untreated OSA. Methods: Participants were newly diagnosed patients with OSA (n = 284) waiting to start positive airway pressure (PAP) treatment. The Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) was used to assess depression. Results: Overall, 15.5% of the sample met the diagnosis for dysthymia. Women had a significantly higher prevalence (29.5% versus 11.7% among men, p < 0.001). The prevalence of major depression was 6% in the overall sample and there was no difference in the prevalence among sexes (5.8% among men versus 6.6 % among women). Obesity, daytime sleepiness, low physical activity, initial and late insomnia, low quality of life, and sleep medication and antidepressant use were all related to depression, whereas OSA severity, as measured by apnea-hypopnea index or oxygen desaturation index, was not. Daytime sleepiness, initial insomnia, and sleep medication use were the strongest predictors of depression in multivariable analyses. Conclusions: Sleep medication use, daytime sleepiness, and symptoms of initial insomnia were independently related to depression but OSA severity was not. Increased awareness of the relationship between depression and OSA and the appropriate use of assessment tools might substantially improve diagnostic accuracy as well as treatment outcome for both disorders. Citation: Björnsdóttir E, Benediktsdóttir B, Pack AI, Arnardottir ES, Kuna ST, Gíslason T, Keenan BT, Maislin G, Sigurdsson JF. The prevalence of depression among untreated obstructive sleep apnea patients using a standardized psychiatric interview. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(1):105–112. PMID:26350608

  1. Prostitution use has non sexual functions - case report of a depressed psychiatric out-patient

    PubMed Central

    Gysin, Fátima; Gysin, François

    2013-01-01

    Case: A shy, depressed 30 year old male discussed his frequent ego-syntonic indoor prostitution consumption in small peer groups. Several distinctive non-sexual functions of this paid sex habit were identified. Design and method: The patient had 40 hourly psychiatric sessions in the private practice setting over 14 months. The Arizona Sexual Experience Scale was applied to compare the subjective appraisal of both paid sex and sex in a relationship. The informal Social Atom elucidates social preferences and the Operationalized Psychodynamic Diagnostic-procedure was applied to describe a dominant relationship pattern. Results: The paid sex consumption functioned as a proud male life style choice to reinforce the patients fragile identity. The effect on self esteem was a release similar to his favorite past-time of kick-boxing. With paid sex asserted as a group ritual, it was practiced even with frequent erectile dysfunction and when sex with a stable romantic partner was more enjoyable and satisfying. The therapeutic attitude of the female psychiatrist, with her own ethical values, is put in to context with two opposing theories about prostitution: the ‘Sex-Work-model’ and the ‘Oppression-model’. The therapist’s reaction to the patients’ information was seen as a starting point to understanding the intrapsychic function of paid sex as a coping mechanism against depressive feelings. Conclusions: Exploring and understanding prostitution consumption patterns in young men can benefit the treatment of psychiatric disorders in the private practice setting. It is the psychiatrists task to investigate the patients hidden motives behind paid sex use to help patients achieve a greater inner and relational freedom. PMID:24627772

  2. The Rational Patient and Beyond: Implications for Treatment Adherence in People with Psychiatric Disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Patrick W.; Rüsch, Nicolas; Ben-Zeev, Dror; Sher, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective Many people with psychiatric disabilities do not benefit from evidence-based practices because they often do not seek out or fully adhere to them. One way psychologists have made sense of this rehabilitation and health decision process and subsequent behaviors (of which adherence might be viewed as one) is by proposing a “rational patient;” namely, that decisions are made deliberatively by weighing perceived costs and benefits of intervention options. Social psychological research, however, suggests limitations to a rational patient theory that impact models of health decision making. Design The research literature was reviewed for studies of rational patient models and alternative theories with empirical support. Special focus was on models specifically related to decisions about rehabilitation strategies for psychiatric disability. Results Notions of the rational patient evolved out of several psychological models including the health belief model, protection motivation theory, and theory of planned behavior. A variety of practice strategies evolved to promote rational decision making. However, research also suggests limitations to rational deliberations of health. (1) Rather than carefully and consciously considered, many health decisions are implicit, potentially occurring outside awareness. (2) Decisions are not always planful; often it is the immediate exigencies of a context rather than an earlier balance of costs and benefits that has the greatest effects. (3) Cool cognitions often do not dictate the process; emotional factors have an important role in health decisions. Each of these limitations suggests additional practice strategies that facilitate a person’s health decisions. Conclusions/Implications Old models of rational decision making need to be supplanted by multi-process models that explain supra-deliberative factors in health decisions and behaviors. PMID:24446671

  3. Psychiatric Emergencies.

    PubMed

    Wheat, Santina; Dschida, Dorothy; Talen, Mary R

    2016-06-01

    Psychiatric emergencies are acute disturbances in thought, behavior, mood, or social relationship that require immediate intervention as defined by the patient, family, or social unit to save the patient and/or others from imminent danger. Ensuring the safety of the patient, surrounding persons, and the medical team is the first step of evaluation. Treatment focuses on stabilization of the patient, then on specific symptoms and ultimately the cause of symptoms. There are important legal considerations, particularly regarding involuntary admissions. It is important to debrief with the patient, surrounding family, and the health care team to ensure a continued therapeutic alliance and the emotional health of all involved. PMID:27262012

  4. Mortality rates among 5321 patients with burns admitted to a burn unit in China: 1980-1998.

    PubMed

    Jie, Xiao; Baoren, Cai

    2003-05-01

    A retrospective study was conducted on 5321 burn patients hospitalized in a burn center in Jinzhou, China during the period 1980-1998. Of the 5321 patients, 57.8% were between 15 and 44 years old and 3.4% were > or =60 years old. Ninety-six percent had burns covering less than half of body surface area and 31.7% had only full thickness skin burn. The number of patients in the 1990s was three times that of the 1980s. Overall mortality rate was 0.86%. LA(50) for total body burn area (TBSA) and only full thickness skin burn (FTSB) was 94 and 87%, respectively. The high survival rate, may relate primarily to the low percentages of older patients and of patients with severe burns. Inhalation injuries, infection and MOD are the main causes of deaths in our patients and would be key targets to improve clinical care and in future study. PMID:12706617

  5. Psychiatric emergencies.

    PubMed

    Cavanaugh, S V

    1986-09-01

    Psychiatric disorders are common in medical inpatient and outpatient populations. As a result, internists commonly are the first to see psychiatric emergencies. As with all medical problems, a good history, including a collateral history from relatives and friends, physical and mental status examination, and appropriate laboratory tests help establish a preliminary diagnosis and treatment plan. Patients with suicidal ideation usually have multiple stressors in the environment and/or a psychiatric disorder (i.e., a major affective disorder, dysthymic disorder, anxiety or panic disorder, psychotic disorder, alcohol or drug abuse, a personality disorder, and/or an adjustment disorder). Of all patients who commit suicide, 70% have a major depressive disorder, schizophrenia, psychotic organic mental disorder, alcoholism, drug abuse, and borderline personality disorder. Patients who are at great risk have minimal supports, a history of previous suicide attempts, a plan with high lethality, hopelessness, psychosis, paranoia, and/or command self-destructive hallucinations. Treatment is directed toward placing the patient in a protected environment and providing psychotropic medication and/or psychotherapy for the underlying psychiatric problem. Other psychiatric emergencies include psychotic and violent patients. Psychotic disorders fall into two categories etiologically: those that have an identifiable organic factor causing the psychosis and those that have an underlying psychiatric disorder. Initially, it is essential to rule out organic pathology that is life-threatening or could cause irreversible brain damage. After such organic causes are ruled out, neuroleptic medication is indicated. If the patient is not agitated or combative, he or she may be placed on oral divided doses of neuroleptics in the antipsychotic range. Patients who are agitated or psychotic need rapid tranquilization with an intramuscular neuroleptic every half hour to 1 hour until the agitation and

  6. Prevalence of dermatoses in dermatologic evaluation requests from patients admitted to a tertiary hospital for 10 years*

    PubMed Central

    Dantas, Lia Dias Pinheiro; Bakos, Lucio; Balbinot, Gabriela; Drechsler, Carine Elisabete Rost; Eidt, Letícia Maria

    2015-01-01

    Skin diseases are common in hospitalized patients. However, there is a lack of data concerning their frequency. The objective of this study is to evaluate the prevalence of dermatological diagnoses in hospitalized patients after consultation requested by nondermatologist physicians to the Department of Dermatology, Hospital de Clinicas de Porto Alegre period of 10 years. A total of 5685 patients were evaluated, representing an average of 48.2 patients per month. The five most frequent groups were infectious dermatoses(33.25%), eczematous dermatoses (11.49%), drug reactions (11.43%), vascular dermatoses (6.81%) and group of pruritus, prurigo nodularis and urticaria (hives) (4.71%). PMID:26560228

  7. What do psychiatric patients believe regarding where control over their illness lies? Validation of the multidimensional health locus of control scale in psychiatric outpatient care.

    PubMed

    De Las Cuevas, Carlos; Peñate, Wenceslao; Betancort, Moisés; Cabrera, Casimiro

    2015-02-01

    Patients' perceived control constructs are important factors moderating health-related behaviors. We established the psychometric properties of the Spanish version of the Form C Multidimensional Health Locus of Control Scale (C-MHLC) and assessed the usefulness of these measures in the clinical setting. A cross-sectional survey querying about patients' health locus of control (HLOC) beliefs was offered to 607 psychiatric outpatients, of whom 507 accepted. The C-MHLC scale and the General Perceived Self-Efficacy Scale were completed. The psychiatric patients believe that their psychiatrist plays a crucial role in improving their state of health. The men scored higher than the women in internal dimension; the women scored higher in other people external dimension. Age, treatment time, and number of psychoactive drugs used showed significant differences in HLOC dimensions. Self-efficacy correlated positively with internal dimension and negatively with external dimensions. The results showed the validity of the four-factor structure of the Spanish version of the C-MHLC. PMID:25594790

  8. Psychopathy in women: Prediction of criminality and violence in UK and USA psychiatric patients resident in the community.

    PubMed

    Gray, Nicola S; Snowden, Robert J

    2016-03-30

    Psychopathy is an important clinical construct often used in the assessment and management of psychiatric patients and offenders. This, in part, is due to the strong association between psychopathy, crime, and particularly violent crime. However, there are few studies of these associations in women. These relationships were examined using information from two large databases. The Partnerships in Care database contains data from a sample of forensic psychiatric patients (154 women and 777 men) in the UK that were discharged from secure psychiatric units. Follow-up was via official conviction data within the next 2 years. The MacArthur study examined violence and aggression in a sample of civil psychiatric patients (367 women and 496 men) in the USA following discharge from an acute psychiatric hospital. Follow-up was via a mixture of self-report, informant report and official records. Psychopathy in both samples was measured via the PCL:SV prior to discharge. Psychopathy was a good predictor of target events for the women in both samples and for all time intervals used. No significant gender differences in the PCL:SV's predictive efficacy were found. The results provide a strong evidence-base for the use of psychopathy in women when considering future community behaviour and reoffending. PMID:26833281

  9. Admission Rate of Patients with Most Common Psychiatric Disorders in Relation to Seasons and Climatic Factors During 2010/2011

    PubMed Central

    Licanin, Ifeta; Fisekovic, Saida; Babić, Sanina

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Climate and its impact on human health and mental illness have been in the focus of the research since years in the field. Aim: The aim of the research is to study the admissions rate to the psychiatric clinic in correlation to seasons and climate. Material and method: The research was conducted in a Psychiatric clinic of the Clinical Center in Sarajevo. Randomly selected subjects (aged 5-89 years, 1316 males and 1039 females) N=2355, were interviewed by the Structural Clinical Interview (SCID) which generated DSM-IV. In this retrospective-prospective, clinicalepidemiological study subjects were divided into groups according to type of disorders. Correlation between the impact of seasons and the rate of admissions to a Psychiatric clinic was analyzed. Certain data were taken from Federal Hydrometeorological Institute in Sarajevo of the climatic situation for period of the study. Results and conclusions: Of the total number of subjects who were admitted to the clinic in the period of 2010/2011 the most common diagnoses were F10-F19, F20-F29, F30-F39, F40-F48, and the suicide attempts as the separate entity. It was found correlation between certain seasons and the effects of the certain weather parameters at an increased admission rate of subjects with the certain diseases. PMID:23922518

  10. [Authority in the psychiatric clinic].

    PubMed

    Laemmel, K

    1983-01-01

    patient. Attempts of intrusion into the independence and authority of the psychiatric hospital can also occur from the families of the patients, the admitting physicians or the mass media who developed a last a somewhat unsavory interest into the psychiatric institution. To deal with these challenges authoritative authority is mandatory as much as the understanding of the dynamics of human behavior. Special problems exist for the psychiatric service within a general hospital. As the most recent arrival from the banishment in the outskirts into the fold of medicine, it has to prove itself first.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS) PMID:6635585

  11. The influence of dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia on aggressive behavior of psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    de Schutter, Marja A M; Kramer, Hein J M Th; Franken, Ernest J F; Lodewijkx, Hein F M; Kleinepier, Tom

    2016-09-30

    Current approaches in Dutch mental health care institutions towards inpatients' aggression have focused predominantly on environmental factors, such as training the staff in aggression management. However, personality traits might be an important factor in patients' aggression - as shown by incidents in the wards. This study explores the influence of dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia on psychiatric patients' aggressive behavior, through self-reports and through involvement in aggressive incidents. Personality traits influencing patients' aggression emphasize the importance of a more direct approach to their aggression. Clinical patients at Dutch mental health care institution Emergis (n=84) filled out questionnaires about their aggressiveness (using Buss and Perry's Aggression Questionnaire Short Form), dysfunctional impulsivity and alexithymia. Multiple regression analyses indicated that dysfunctional impulsivity positively related to self-reported aggressive behavior. The relationship, however, could not be confirmed for inpatients' aggression as reported by the staff on the wards. Unexpectedly affective alexithymia negatively related to hostility. Gender differences in self-reported aggression were found. Female patients showed higher levels of hostility. Regression analyses indicated that the male gender positively related to physical aggression. Findings emphasize the importance of a new approach in Dutch mental health care, in which patients may engage in aggression-regulation training programs. PMID:27387554

  12. The frequency of rehospitalization and associated factors in Colombian psychiatric patients: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The rehospitalization of patients with mental disorders is common, with rehospitalization rates of up to 80% observed in these patients. This phenomenon negatively impacts families, patients, and the health care system. Several factors have been associated with an increased likelihood of rehospitalization. This study was aimed at determining the frequency and the factors associated with rehospitalization in a psychiatric clinic. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study with 361 patients who were hospitalized at the Clinic of Our Lady of Peace in Bogota, Colombia from August-December 2009. We calculated the incidence rates of rehospitalization and the risk factors using Cox regression. Results Overall, 60% of the patients in this cohort were rehospitalized during the year that followed the index event. The variables associated with rehospitalization were separated, divorced, or single status; higher socio-economic strata; a longer duration of index hospitalization; and a diagnosis of substance abuse, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or depression. Conclusions The rehospitalization rate in our study was as high as reported in other studies. The associated factors with it in this group, may contribute to the design of programs that will reduce the frequency of rehospitalization among patients with mental disorders, in countries like Colombia. Additionally, these results may be useful in interventions, such as coping skills training, psycho-education, and community care strategies, which have been demonstrated to reduce the frequency of rehospitalization. PMID:24888262

  13. Psychiatric morbidity in dementia patients in a neurology-based memory clinic.

    PubMed

    Shih, Ching-Sen; Yan, Sui-Hing; Ho, Ying-Hoo; Lin, Yuh-Te; Li, Jie-Yuan; Lo, Yuk-Keung

    2005-12-01

    The behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) often present major problems for patients and their caregivers. In the past, neurologists paid less attention to such symptoms than to the cognitive symptoms of dementia. This prospective study investigated the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity in a neurology-based memory clinic and the stress of caregivers. Our patients with dementia were found to have a high prevalence of BPSD. The most frequent were anxiety, apathy, and delusion; the most distressing to caregivers were agitation, anxiety, delusion, and sleep disturbance. Using Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), we compared BPSD between patients with mild dementia and those with moderate dementia. Only hallucinations and agitation were different significantly. Moderate dementia patients experienced these symptoms more frequently. The high prevalence of these symptoms might be explained by the fact that the cognitive symptoms were neglected or no enough information were received by many family members of patients with dementia until their own life quality was interfered and then they began to seek medical help. These symptoms and their effect of caregiver distress can be effectively reduced by pharmacologic and nonpharmacoloic managements, caregiver-focused training and education. They can be better approached by assessing neuropsychiatric symptoms regularly, educating the general population better, and treating these patients earlier. PMID:16425544

  14. The Psychiatric Patient as a Health Resource Consumer: Costs Associated with Electroconvulsive Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Selva-Sevilla, Carmen; Gonzalez-Moral, Maria Luisa; Tolosa-Perez, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Clinical practice protocols should consider both the psychological criteria related to a patient’s satisfaction as a consumer of health services and the economic criteria to allocate resources efficiently. An electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) program was implemented in our hospital to treat psychiatric patients. The main objective of this study was to determine the cost associated with the ECT sessions implemented in our hospital between 2008 and 2014. A secondary objective was to calculate the cost of sessions that were considered ineffective, defined as those sessions in which electrical convulsion did not reach the preset threshold duration, in order to identify possible ways of saving money and improving satisfaction among psychiatric patients receiving ECT. Methods: A descriptive analysis of the direct health costs related to ECT from the perspective of the public health system between 2008 and 2014 was performed using a retrospective chart review. All of the costs are in euros (2011) and were discounted at a rate of 3%. Based on the base case, a sensitivity analysis of the changes of those variables showing the greatest uncertainty was performed. Results: Seventy-six patients received 853 sessions of ECT. The cumulative cost of these sessions was €1409528.63, and 92.9% of this cost corresponded to the hospital stay. A total of €420732.57 (29.8%) was inefficiently spent on 269 ineffective sessions. A sensitivity analysis of the economic data showed stable results to changes in the variables of uncertainty. Conclusion: The efficiency of ECT in the context outlined here could be increased by discerning a way to shorten the associated hospital stay and by reducing the number of ineffective sessions performed. PMID:27303347

  15. Risk-factor differences for nonsuicidal self-injury and suicide attempts in Mexican psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Fresán, Ana; Camarena, Beatriz; González-Castro, Thelma Beatriz; Tovilla-Zárate, Carlos Alfonso; Juárez-Rojop, Isela E; López-Narváez, Lilia; González-Ramón, Alicia E; Hernández-Díaz, Yazmín

    2016-01-01

    Background The present study compared sociodemographic characteristics, comorbidities with substance use, and impulsivity features in three groups of psychiatric patients – suicide attempters, nonsuicidal self-injury, and nonsuicidal without self-injury – to determine the predictive factors for nonsuicidal self-injury or suicide behavior. Patients and methods Demographic features and self-reported substance use were assessed in 384 Mexican psychiatric patients. Impulsivity features were evaluated using the Plutchik Impulsivity Scale. Comparison analyses between groups were performed and a logistic regression model used to determine the factors associated with nonsuicidal with self-injury behavior and suicidal behavior. Results Different predictive factors were observed for nonsuicidal self-injury and suicidal behavior. Females were more likely to present nonsuicidal self-injury behaviors (odds ratio [OR] 0.42, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.18–0.93; P=0.03). For suicide attempters, the factors associated were younger age (OR 0.89, 95% CI 0.85–0.93; P<0.001), less than 6 years of schooling (OR 0.2, 95% CI 0.06–0.6; P=0.004), and higher impulsivity traits, such as self-control (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.03–1.36; P=0.01), planning of future actions (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.66–0.95; P=0.01), and physiological behavior (OR 1.34, 95% CI 1.01–1.78; P=0.03). Conclusion Our results show that in a Mexican population, impulsivity features are predictors for suicide attempts, but not for self-injury. Other factors related to sociocultural background and individual features (such as personality) may be involved in this behavioral distinction, and should be studied in future research aimed at better understanding of both self-harmful behaviors. PMID:27462155

  16. Brain Regions Associated With Internalizing and Externalizing Psychiatric Symptoms in Patients With Penetrating Traumatic Brain Injury.

    PubMed

    Huey, Edward D; Lee, Seonjoo; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Devanand, D P; Brickman, Adam M; Raymont, Vanessa; Krueger, Frank; Grafman, Jordan

    2016-01-01

    A factor structure underlying DSM-IV diagnoses has been previously reported in neurologically intact patients. The authors determined the brain regions associated with factors underlying DSM-IV diagnoses and compared the ability of DSM-IV diagnoses, factor scores, and self-report measures to account for the neuroanatomical findings in patients with penetrating brain injuries. This prospective cohort study included 254 Vietnam War veterans: 199 with penetrating brain injuries and 55 matched control participants. Measures include DSM-IV diagnoses (from a Structured Clinical Interview for DSM), self-report measures of depression and anxiety, and CT scans. Factors underlying DSM-IV diagnoses were determined using an exploratory factor analysis and correlated with percent of brain regions affected. The ability of the factor scores, DSM-IV diagnoses, and the self-report psychiatric measures to account for the anatomical variance was compared with multiple regressions. Internalizing and externalizing factors were identified in these brain-injured patients. Damage to the left amygdala and bilateral basal ganglia was associated with lower internalizing factor scores, and damage to the left medial orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) with higher, and bilateral hippocampi with lower, externalizing factor scores. Factor scores best predicted left amygdala and bilateral hippocampal involvement, whereas DSM-IV diagnoses best predicted bilateral basal ganglia and left OFC involvement. Damage to the limbic areas involved in the processing of emotional and reward information, including structures involved in the National Institute of Mental Health's Research Domain Criteria Negative Valence Domain, influences the development of internalizing and externalizing psychiatric symptoms. Self-report measures underperformed DSM-IV and factor scores in predicting neuroanatomical findings. PMID:26715034

  17. The nature of psychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Kenneth S

    2016-02-01

    A foundational question for the discipline of psychiatry is the nature of psychiatric disorders. What kinds of things are they? In this paper, I review and critique three major relevant theories: realism, pragmatism and constructivism. Realism assumes that the content of science is real and independent of human activities. I distinguish two "flavors" of realism: chemistry-based, for which the paradigmatic example is elements of the periodic table, and biology-based, for which the paradigm is species. The latter is a much better fit for psychiatry. Pragmatism articulates a sensible approach to psychiatric disorders just seeking categories that perform well in the world. But it makes no claim about the reality of those disorders. This is problematic, because we have a duty to advocate for our profession and our patients against other physicians who never doubt the reality of the disorders they treat. Constructivism has been associated with anti-psychiatry activists, but we should admit that social forces play a role in the creation of our diagnoses, as they do in many sciences. However, truly socially constructed psychiatric disorders are rare. I then describe powerful arguments against a realist theory of psychiatric disorders. Because so many prior psychiatric diagnoses have been proposed and then abandoned, can we really claim that our current nosologies have it right? Much of our current nosology arose from a series of historical figures and events which could have gone differently. If we re-run the tape of history over and over again, the DSM and ICD would not likely have the same categories on every iteration. Therefore, we should argue more confidently for the reality of broader constructs of psychiatric illness rather than our current diagnostic categories, which remain tentative. Finally, instead of thinking that our disorders are true because they correspond to clear entities in the world, we should consider a coherence theory of truth by which disorders

  18. Changes in pre-hospital management of vascular risk factors among patients admitted due to recurrent stroke in Poland from 1995 to 2013

    PubMed Central

    Bembenek, Jan P.; Karlinski, Michał; Kurkowska-Jastrzebska, Iwona

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to investigate long-term trends in secondary stroke prevention through management of vascular risk factors directly before hospital admission for recurrent stroke. Material and methods This is a retrospective registry-based analysis of consecutive recurrent acute stroke patients from a highly urbanized area (Warsaw, Poland) admitted to a single stroke center between 1995 and 2013 with previous ischemic stroke. We compared between four consecutive time periods: 1995–1999, 2000–2004, 2005–2009 and 2010–2013. Results During the study period, 894 patients with recurrent strokes were admitted (18% of all strokes), including 867 with previous ischemic stroke (our study group). Among those patients, the proportion of recurrent ischemic strokes (88.1% to 93.9%) (p = 0.319) and males (44% to 49.7%) (p = 0.5) remained stable. However, there was a rising trend in patients’ age (median age of 73, 74, 76 and 77 years, respectively). There was also an increase in the use of antihypertensives (from 70.2% to 83.8%) (p = 0.013), vitamin K antagonists (from 4.8% to 15.6%) (p = 0.012) and statins (from 32.5% to 59.4%) (p < 0.001). Nonetheless, 21% of patients did not receive any antithrombotic prophylaxis. Tobacco smoking pattern remained unchanged. Conclusions Our data indicate a clear overall improvement of secondary stroke prevention. However, persistent use of antithrombotic drugs and tobacco smoking after the first ischemic stroke is constantly suboptimal. PMID:27482236

  19. Hospitalized but not Admitted: Characteristics of Patients with “Observation Status” at an Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Sheehy, Ann M.; Graf, Ben; Gangireddy, Sreedevi; Hoffman, Robert; Ehlenbach, Mary; Heidke, Cynthia; Fields, Sheilah; Liegel, Barbara; Jacobs, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Importance The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS)defines observation status for hospitalized patients as a “well-defined set of specific, clinically appropriate services,” usually lasting <24 hours, and that in “only rare and exceptional cases” should last > 48 hours. Although an increasing proportion of observation care occurs on hospital wards, studies of patients with observation status have focused on the efficiency of dedicated units. Objective To describe inpatient and observation care. Design and Setting Descriptive study of all inpatient and observation stays between July 1, 2010 and December 31, 2011 at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, a 566 bed tertiary academic medical center. Participants All patients with observation or inpatient stays during the study period. Main Outcome and Measures Patient demographics, length of stay, difference between cost and reimbursement per stay, and percent of patients discharged to skilled nursing facilities. Results Of 43,853 stays, 4,578 (10.4%) were observation, with 1,141 distinct diagnosis codes. Average observation length of stay was 33.3 hours, with 44.4% of stays <24 hours, and 16.5% >48 hours. Observation care had a negative margin per stay (-$331); the inpatient margin per stay was positive (+$2,163). Adult General Medicine patients accounted for 2,404 (52.5%) of all observation stays; 25.4% of the 9,453 Adult General Medicine stays were observation. The mean length of stay for general medicine observation patients was 41.1 hours, with 32.6% of stays < 24 hours, and 26.4% >48 hours. As compared to observation patients on other clinical services, Adult General Medicine had the highest percent >65 years (40.9%), highest percent female (57.9%), highest percent discharged to skilled nursing facilities (11.6%) and the most negative margin per stay (-$1,378). Conclusions and Relevance In an academic medical center, observation status for hospitalized patients differed markedly

  20. 'The time it takes…' How doctors spend their time admitting a patient during the acute medical take.

    PubMed

    Sabin, Jodie; Khan, Waleed; Subbe, Christian P; Franklin, Marc; Abulela, Iman; Khan, Anwar; Mohammed, Hassan

    2016-08-01

    Patient safety depends on adequate staffing but the number of doctors required for safe staffing for medical emergencies is not known. We measured the duration of the admission process for patients seen by medical teams in emergency departments (EDs) and acute medical units. History taking and examination by a core medical trainee took 22 minutes for a patient referred from the ED and 21 minutes for a patient referred from primary care. A complete admission clerking with prescription and ordering of investigations ranged from a mean of 15 minutes for a consultant in acute medicine to a mean of 55 minutes for a foundation year 1 trainee. The duration of post-take ward rounds also showed significant variability.Our data can be used to model staffing patterns if combined with information about admission numbers and local set up. PMID:27481373

  1. A simplified way for the urgent treatment of somatic pain in patients admitted to the emergency room: the SUPER algorithm.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Francesco; Marsiliani, Davide; Alesi, Andrea; Mancini, Maria Grazia; Ojetti, Veronica; Candelli, Marcello; Gabrielli, Maurizio; D'Aurizio, Gabriella; Gilardi, Emanuele; Adducci, Enrica; Proietti, Rodolfo; Buccelletti, Francesco

    2015-12-01

    Somatic pain is one of the most frequent symptoms reported by patients presenting to the emergency department (ED), but, in spite of this, it is very often underestimated and under-treated. Moreover, pain-killers prescriptions are usually related to the medical examination, leading to a delay in its administration, thus worsening the patient's quality of life. With our study, we want to define and validate a systematic and homogeneous approach to analgesic drugs administration, testing a new therapeutic algorithm in terms of earliness, safety, and efficacy. 442 consecutive patients who accessed our ED for any kind of somatic pain were enrolled, and then randomly divided into two groups: group A follow the normal process of access to pain-control drugs, and group B follow our SUPER algorithm for early administration of drugs to relieve pain directly from triage. We excluded from the study, patients with abdominal pain referred to the surgeon, patients with headache, recent history of trauma, history of drug allergies, and life-threatening conditions or lack of cooperation. Drugs used in the study were those available in our ED, such as paracetamol, paracetamol/codeine, ketorolac-tromethamine, and tramadol-hydrochloride. Pain level, risk factors, indication, and contraindication of each drug were taken into account in our SUPER algorithm for a rapid and safe administration of it. The Verbal Numeric Scale (VNS) and the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) were used to verify the patient's health and perception of it. Only 59 patient from group A (27.1 %) received analgesic therapy (at the time of the medical examination) compared to 181 patients (100 %) of group B (p < 0.001). Group B patients, received analgesic therapy 76 min before group A subjects (p < 0.01), resulting in a significant lower VNS (7.31 ± 1.68 vs 4.75 ± 2.3; p < 0.001), and a superior VAS after discharge (54.43 ± 22.16 vs 61.30 ± 19.13; p < 0.001) compared to group A subjects. No significant differences

  2. Negative and positive childhood experiences across developmental periods in psychiatric patients with different diagnoses – an explorative study

    PubMed Central

    Saleptsi, Evangelia; Bichescu, Dana; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Neuner, Frank; Schauer, Margarete; Studer, Karl; Hoffmann, Klaus; Elbert, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    Background A high frequency of childhood abuse has often been reported in adult psychiatric patients. The present survey explores the relationship between psychiatric diagnoses and positive and negative life events during childhood and adulthood in psychiatric samples. Methods A total of 192 patients with diagnoses of alcohol-related disorders (n = 45), schizophrenic disorders (n = 52), affective disorders (n = 54), and personality disorders (n = 41) completed a 42-item self-rating scale (Traumatic Antecedents Questionnaire, TAQ). The TAQ assesses personal positive experiences (competence and safety) and negative experiences (neglect, separation, secrets, emotional, physical and sexual abuse, trauma witnessing, other traumas, and alcohol and drugs abuse) during four developmental periods, beginning from early childhood to adulthood. Patients were recruited from four Psychiatric hospitals in Germany, Switzerland, and Romania; 63 subjects without any history of mental illness served as controls. Results The amount of positive experiences did not differ significantly among groups, except for safety scores that were lower in patients with personality disorders as compared to the other groups. On the other side, negative experiences appeared more frequently in patients than in controls. Emotional neglect and abuse were reported in patients more frequently than physical and sexual abuse, with negative experiences encountered more often in late childhood and adolescence than in early childhood. The patients with alcohol-related and personality disorders reported more negative events than the ones with schizophrenic and affective disorders. Conclusions The present findings add evidence to the relationship between retrospectively reported childhood experiences and psychiatric diagnoses, and emphasize the fact that a) emotional neglect and abuse are the most prominent negative experiences, b) adolescence is a more 'sensitive' period for negative experiences as compared to

  3. Beyond Alcoholism: Wernicke-Korsakoff Syndrome in Patients With Psychiatric Disorders

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Laurie M.; Buchanan, Judith R.; Onwuameze, Obiora E.; Pierson, Ronald K.; Paradiso, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Objective Wernicke encephalopathy and Korsakoff syndrome (the combined disorder is named Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome [WKS]) are preventable, life-threatening neuropsychiatric syndromes resulting from thiamine deficiency. WKS has historically been associated with alcoholism; more recently, it has been recognized in patients who have anorexia nervosa or have undergone bariatric surgery for obesity. However, patients with nutritional deficiencies of any origin are at risk for WKS. We present clinical histories and neuroimaging data on 2 young adults with underlying psychiatric disorders who became malnourished and developed WKS. Methods A young woman with bipolar disorder and somatization disorder was hospitalized for intractable vomiting. A young man with chronic paranoid schizophrenia developed delusions that food and water were harmful, and was hospitalized after subsisting for 4 months on soda pop. Results Acute, life-threatening Wernicke encephalopathy was confirmed in both patients by brain magnetic resonance imaging showing classic thalamic injury. The patients were left with persistent cognitive and physical disabilities that were consistent with Korsakoff syndrome. Conclusions Failure to suspect a vitamin deficiency led to permanent cognitive and physical disabilities that may necessitate lifelong care for these patients. The neuropsychiatric consequences could have been prevented by prompt recognition of their thiamine deficiency. PMID:22134191

  4. Psychiatric Comorbidities in Restless Legs Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kallweit, Ulf; Werth, Esther; Seiz, Angela; Sefidan, Sandra; Dahmen, Norbert; Manconi, Mauro; Ehlert, Ulrike; Bassetti, Claudio L A

    2016-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a neurological sleep disorder with frequent (39%) coexisting psychiatric comorbidities. Patients with any psychiatric comorbidity had fewer periodic leg movements in sleep. Psychiatric disorders should be taken into account in patients with RLS. PMID:27019065

  5. Ventilator-Associated Pneumonia in Patients Admitted to Intensive Care Units, Using Open or Closed Endotracheal Suctioning

    PubMed Central

    Hamishekar, Hadi; Shadvar, Kamran; Taghizadeh, Majid; Golzari, Samad EJ; Mojtahedzadeh, Mojtaba; Soleimanpour, Hassan; Mahmoodpoor, Ata

    2014-01-01

    Background: Critically ill patients under mechanical ventilation require frequent suctioning of airway secretion. Closed suction permits suctioning without disconnection from ventilator; so it might decrease hypoxemia and infection rate. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of closed tracheal suction system (CTSS) versus open tracheal suction system (OTSS). Patients and Methods: This is a prospective randomized study, which was carried on 100 patients in surgical Intensive Care Unit requiring mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours from June 2012 to November 2013. In two groups, suction was performed based on the patients' need as well as physician's or nurses' decision on tracheal secretions. Patients randomly allocated into two groups (50 patients each): CTSS group and OTSS group. Patients were monitored for developing ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) during the study. Throat samples were taken on admission and two times per week from each patient. Tracheal samples were performed during endotracheal intubation, two times per week during mechanical ventilation and during extubation. Results: Drainage of subglottic secretions decreased the incidence of VAP (P < 0.05). Also type of the pharmacologic medicine for stress ulcer prophylaxis has significant effect on VAP incidence. Among the patients in OTSS and CTSS groups, 20% and 12% developed VAP, respectively. Use of CTSS compared with OTSS did not show statistically significant effect on VAP incidence in multivariate analysis; however, OR (odds ratio) tended to identify OTSS as an exposure factor for the development of VAP (OR = 1.92; CI = 0.45-8.30; = 0.38) compared with the CTSS. Higher levels of APACHE II score, sinusitis and tracheostomy put the patients at the risk of VAP. However, using heat and moisture exchanger (HME) instead of humidifier decreased this risk. Conclusions: Based on the results obtained from our study, impact of suctioning is similar between CTSS and OTSS regarding

  6. [Patient admission to a child and adolescent psychiatric polyclinic. Referral, patient information, preparation, concepts, expectations and fears of children, adolescents and their parents].

    PubMed

    Stösser, D; Klosinski, G

    1995-03-01

    This study investigates 77 families i.e. their children, aged 7-17, and their parents, who attended the out-patient clinic of the child psychiatric department for the first time. It was intended to examine and outline the subjective situation on entering the clinic. A structured verbal interview was conducted with the children before the start of the actual examination procedure, while a written questionnaire was submitted to the parents. Among the questioned items were modes of referral, references, sources of information, knowledge and preparedness, ideas, expectations and apprehensions about the institution and its treatments. The answer that were obtained reflected a lack of self-determination on the part of the children and the strength of influence exerted by the parents along with other relevant authorities. The children were often taken to the clinic without any active consent on their part. When asked about hopes of improvement they did not often confirm. Similarly fears about the impending examination were at first denied by most children but subsequently conceded, when concrete suggestions were made. Strikingly the better informed and prepared, children were able to admit to their fears more often. The results of the parental questionnaire illustrate an extensive lack of information about the institution that the families were actually attending. It may be concluded that the parents had also been little assertive when preparing their children for the examination. When asked about their expectations the parents primarily quoted "help" and "advice". Scepticism about the examination came only at the bottom of the list.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7784354

  7. Prolactin and breast cancer: The need to avoid undertreatment of serious psychiatric illnesses in breast cancer patients: A review.

    PubMed

    Froes Brandao, Denise; Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Goss, Paul E

    2016-01-15

    Hyperprolactinemia, defined as a sustained elevation of prolactin (PRL) levels greater than 530 mIU/L in women and greater than 424 mIU/L in men, has been implicated for a long time in breast cancer etiology and prognosis. Elevated PRL values (approximately 2-3 times higher than the reference values) are a common adverse effect of antipsychotic medications, especially with first-generation drugs, and most antipsychotics carry a standard warning regarding PRL elevations on their US product labels. These associations foster undertreatment of serious psychiatric illnesses in both otherwise healthy patients and cancer patients. This review assesses both the preclinical and clinical evidence that has led to the hypothesis of PRL's role in breast cancer risk or breast cancer progression. It is concluded that taken together, the published data are unconvincing and insufficient to deprive cancer patients in general and breast cancer patients specifically of potentially effective antipsychotic or antidepressant medications for serious psychiatric indications. We thus call on revised medication guidelines to avoid the existing undertreatment of serious psychiatric illnesses among cancer patients based on an unproven contraindication to psychiatric medications. Cancer 2016;122:184-188. © 2015 American Cancer Society. PMID:26457577

  8. Brain MRI in patients with diffuse psychiatric/neuropsychological syndromes in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Arinuma, Yoshiyuki; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Wada, Tatsuhiko; Nagai, Tatsuo; Tanaka, Sumiaki; Oba, Hiroshi; Hirohata, Shunsei

    2014-01-01

    Background Manifestations in neuropsychiatric systemic lupus erythematosus (NPSLE), especially active diffuse NPSLE syndromes, are some of the most difficult complications of the disease. For the evaluation and the diagnosis of central nervous system manifestations, including NPSLE, MRI is a very useful tool to detect the various abnormalities. However, the relationship between brain MRI findings and clinical variables has not yet been clarified in patients with diffuse NPSLE. Objectives The aim of this study is to investigate the pathogenesis of diffuse NPSLE, by comparing various parameters such as serum autoantibodies and cytokines in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) with abnormal findings revealed on brain MRIs in patients with diffuse NPSLE. Methods Fifty-three patients with diffuse NPSLE admitted to our University Hospital from 1992 to 2012 were exhaustively enrolled in this study. Their medical charts and brain MRI scans were reviewed. The relationship of MRI abnormalities with various parameters was analysed. Results As many as 25 of 53 patients (47.2%) had abnormal MRI findings. MRI findings improved after treatment in 10 of 17 patients for whom follow-up studies were available. MRI abnormalities were not correlated with age at the onset of diffuse NPSLE. However, the disease duration of SLE was significantly longer in patients with abnormal MRI findings (p=0.0009). MRI abnormalities were not significantly associated with serum autoantibodies. However, there were significant elevations of the CSF protein level (p=0.0106) and the CSF interleukin 6 level (p=0.0225) in patients with abnormal MRI findings. Patients with MRI abnormalities showed significantly higher overall mortality (p=0.0348). Conclusions The results revealed that MRI abnormalities in diffuse NPSLE might be heterogeneous with regard to their reversibility. These data also indicate that patients with diffuse NPSLE and MRI abnormalities have more severe inflammation in the central nervous system

  9. Assessing the violent offending and violent victimization overlap among discharged psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Silver, Eric; Piquero, Alex R; Jennings, Wesley G; Piquero, Nicole L; Leiber, Michael

    2011-02-01

    Prior studies have documented linkages between mental disorder and both offending and victimization. However, few studies have examined the violent offending-violent victimization overlap among mentally disordered individuals and none have examined the factors that are jointly related to their covariation. Here, we assess this overlap during the first ten weeks following hospital discharge among a large sample of psychiatric patients from three large cities. Findings indicate that: (1) violent offending and violent victimization show substantial covariation; (2) although each of the two outcomes were predicted by a few unique risk factors, several risk factors were similarly predictive of both outcomes; and (3) even after adjusting for demographic, clinical, and social risk factors, the correlation between violent offending and violent victimization remained robust. Implications for theory, research, and policy are highlighted. PMID:20145985

  10. The impact of pain control on physical and psychiatric functions of cancer patients: a nation-wide survey in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Rau, Kun-Ming; Chen, Jen-Shi; Wu, Hung-Bo; Lin, Sheng-Fung; Lai, Ming-Kuen; Chow, Jyh-Ming; Huang, Ming-Lih; Wang, Cyuan-Jheng; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Hwang, Wen-Li; Lu, Yin-Che; Chan, Chung-Huang; Hsieh, Ruey Kuen

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence of pain in cancer patients at different disease statuses, the impact of pain on physical and psychiatric functions of patients and the satisfaction of pain control of patients at outpatient clinic department in Taiwan. Methods Short form of the Brief Pain Inventory was used as the outcome questionnaire. Unselected patients of different cancers and different disease statuses at outpatient clinic department were included. The impacts of their current pain control on physical function, psychiatric function and the satisfaction of doctors were evaluated. Logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate whether the interference scale performed identically in the different analgesic ladders. The dependent variables were satisfaction toward physician and treatment. Results A total of 14 sites enrolled 2075 patients in the study. One thousand and fifty-one patients reported pain within the last 1 week. In patients whose diseases deteriorated, >60% of them need analgesics for pain control. Pain influenced physical and psychiatric functions of patients, especially in the deteriorated status. More than 80% of patients were satisfied about current pain control, satisfaction rate related to disease status, pain intensities and treatments for pain. Conclusion Our study found that different cancers at different statuses had pain at variable severity. Pain can influence physical and psychological functions significantly. More than 75% of subjects reported satisfaction over physician and pain management in outpatient clinic department patients with cancer pain in Taiwan. PMID:26292698

  11. Psychiatric comorbidities in opioid-dependent patients undergoing a replacement therapy programme in Spain: The PROTEUS study.

    PubMed

    Roncero, Carlos; Barral, Carmen; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Pérez-Pazos, Jesús; Martinez-Luna, Nieves; Casas, Miguel; Torrens, Marta; Grau-López, Lara

    2016-09-30

    Opioid-dependent patients show a high rate of psychiatric comorbidities. The prevalence and characteristics of patients with dual diagnosis have not been well established in Spanish opioid agonist treatment (OAT) programmes. Thus, 621 opioid-dependent patients enrolled in OAT programmes were assessed, using the EuropASI questionnaire, for psychiatric comorbidities, which were detected in 67% of patients (anxiety 53%, mood disorders 48%, sleep disorders 41%, substance-related disorders 36%). In addition, compared with patients without a dual diagnosis, patients with dual pathology were significantly older, used benzodiazepines and cannabis in significantly greater percentages, and showed significantly more frequent infectious and non-infectious comorbidities, worse overall working status, a lower proportion of drivers and higher levels of severity regarding medical, employment, alcohol, legal, family and psychological issues. Therefore, the data showed a very high prevalence of psychiatric comorbidity in opioid-dependent patients receiving OAT in Spain and several problems frequently associated with patients with dual diagnosis. Physicians treating opioid-dependent patients should be aware of these facts to correctly identify and manage patients with a dual diagnosis. PMID:27416536

  12. Outcome and prognostic indicators of patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplants admitted to the intensive care unit.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Thanh N; Weigt, S Sam; Belperio, John A; Territo, Mary; Keane, Michael P

    2009-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with hematopoietic stem cell transplants (HSCTs) who require admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) has been regarded as extremely poor. We sought to re-evaluate recent outcomes and predictive factors in a retrospective cohort study. Among the 605 adult patients that received an HSCT between 2001 and 2006, 154 required admission to the ICU. Of these, 47% were discharged from the ICU, 36% were discharged from the hospital, and 19% survived 6 months. Allogeneic transplant, mechanical ventilation, vasopressor-use, and neutropenia were each associated with increased mortality, and the mortality of patients with all four characteristics was 100%. Hemodialysis was also associated with increased mortality in a Kaplan-Meier analysis but did not appear important in a multivariate tree analysis. A final Cox model confirmed that allogeneic transplant, mechanical ventilation, and vasopressor-use were each independent risk factors for mortality in the 6 months following ICU admission. PMID:20130763

  13. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cimino, Nina; Di Pietro, Elena; Pollutri, Gabriella; Neviani, Vittoria; Ferri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT), and in the residential facility for adolescents, “The Medlar”, located in Modena. The sample was constituted by all adolescent patients (n=101, age range 14–18) who had acute hospitalizations (n=140) in SPDT and had been successively transferred to “The Medlar” (n=83), from February 2, 2010 to January 31, 2015. From clinical charts, we extracted demographic and anamnestic characteristics of patients and clinical variables related to hospitalizations. Data were statistically analyzed. Results Sixty-one percent of our patients lived with one divorced parent, with adoptive or immigrant family, or in institutions; 51% had experienced stressful events during childhood; 81% had a normal intellective level, but only 6% presented regular school performance. Parental psychiatric illness was negatively related, in a statistically significantly way, with onset age of adolescent mental disorders (coefficient −2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −3.53 to 1.01, P<0.001, single linear regression; odds ratio: 4.39, 95% CI: 1.43–13.47, P<0.010, single logistic regression). The most frequent reasons for admission were aggressive behavior in males and suicide risk in females (P=0.002). The most frequent psychiatric diagnosis at SPDT discharge was “conduct disorder”, more frequent in males, followed by “adjustment disorder”, more frequent in females (P=0.001). In SPDT, the adolescent hospitalizations progressively increased fivefold at the end of the observation period

  14. Adherence to stress-related mucosal damage prophylaxis guideline in patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Rafinazari, Niloofar; Abbasi, Saeed; Farsaei, Shadi; Mansourian, Marjan; Adibi, Peyman

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Concern about adverse effects of the inconsistent use of stress-related mucosal damage prophylaxis in intensive care unit (ICU) is increasing. Hence, this study was designed to prospectively evaluate the rate of inappropriate stress ulcer prophylaxis (SUP) administration upon ICU admission, at ICU discharge and determine the adherence to American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) guideline during ICU stay. Methods: In this study, 200 patients were randomly selected from all ICU admissions during 9 months. Risk factors of stress ulcer were recorded daily during ICU stay and appropriateness of SUP administration was assessed according to the ASHP criteria. Findings: Of all 160 (80%) patients who received SUP, 44.4% did not have indication; and among 95 patients with an indication for SUP administration, 6.3% did not receive it upon ICU admission. Consequently, 77 (38.5%) of 200 patients received inappropriate prophylaxis on ICU admission. In addition, 53.5% of patients had appropriate adherence to ASHP guideline during all days of ICU stay (44% and 2.5% of patients received SUP more than 120% and <80% of appropriate SUP duration, respectively). Moreover, 81.2% were continued on inappropriate prophylaxis upon transfer from the ICU. Conclusion: We concluded that although SUP administration included both overutilization and underutilization in this ICU, but high prevalence of SUP overutilization caused unnecessary hospital costs, personal monetary burden, and may increase adverse drug reactions. Therefore, educating physicians and cooperation of clinical pharmacists regarding implementing standard protocols could improve patterns of SUP administration. PMID:27512710

  15. [A clinical study on tuberculosis among young adults in Japan: analysis on patients admitted to national hospitals in Kanto- and Kinki-areas in the year 2000].

    PubMed

    Yotsumoto, Hideki; Yonemaru, Makoto; Suzuki, Katsuhiro; Kawabe, Yoshiko; Sasaki, Yuka; Toyoda, Emiko; Yamagishi, Fumio; Kudoh, Koichiro; Kurasawa, Takuya; Ito, Masami; Kawashiro, Takeo; Sakatani, Mitsunori; Mori, Masashi

    2003-08-01

    Considering the high social activity, the trend of tuberculosis among young adults appears to be one of the key factors that influence the future morbidity rate of tuberculosis in Japan. To investigate its current characteristics, we analyzed new cases of tuberculosis aged 20 to 29 who were admitted to 7 national hospitals in Kanto- and Kinki-areas during the period of January 1st to December 31st, 2000. Data on the following items were compiled: sex, age, body height and weight, nationality; background factors such as life style, complications; course of the disease before the diagnosis; result of PPD skin test; severity of the disease estimated by the amount of M. tuberculosis in sputum and the grade of chest X-ray findings; therapeutic regimens and the response rate. Data were collected from 234 patients (129 males and 105 females) and the results were as follows: 1) about 80% of the patients were symptomatic and in 50% of patients who presented with cough, more than one month was needed before establishing the diagnosis as TB, 2) the disease was found in advanced stage in more than half of the patients, 3) foreigner patients, most of them were from Kanto-area, accounted for 11%, and were in advanced stage, some with drug-resistant tuberculosis, 4) INH resistance was noted in 7.7%, 5) pyrazinamide was included in the therapeutic regimens in 84.0% of the smear positive patients, 6) the admission period was within 90 days in 63.7% of the patients, however, the duration of treatment was 6 months in only 48.0% of patients who were treated with regimens containing pyrazinamide. More efforts for early detection of patients is needed to prevent the transmission of the disease, and more extensive use of directly observed therapy is essential for the prevention of dropout. We also argued about the shortening of the admission and duration of treatment in these patients. PMID:14509224

  16. To reduce the average length of stay of patients who are admitted for DA-EPOCH-R chemotherapy regimen

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yee Mei

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare institutions are often faced with bed crunch situation. As a result, patients requiring inpatient hospital stay for cancer treatment are delayed and this could lead to compromised overall disease response. Apart from the early discharge of patients to step-down care and explore alternatives of treatment setting, one of the ways to reduce length of stay is to improve on the efficiency of work processes. A baseline study demonstrated that delays in prescribing chemotherapy orders has led to an increased inpatient stay of seven days for a five day treatment regimen. This has profound consequences in terms of costs, patient safety, and utilisation of healthcare resources. A quality improvement project was initiated to review and revise the workflow and processes involved for the entire episode of treatment. A post-implementation review of the interventions showed cost savings, a reduction of average length of stay from seven days to six days (with a total of 28 days saved over six months), and improved patient and staff experience. PMID:26734323

  17. Incident hyperglycemia, parenteral nutrition administration and adverse outcomes in patients with myeloma admitted for initial auto-SCT.

    PubMed

    Sheean, P M; Kilkus, J M; Liu, D; Maciejewski, J; Braunschweig, C A

    2013-08-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) exacerbates hyperglycemia, which is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in various cancer populations. By using a retrospective design, we examined incident hyperglycemia in PN and non-PN recipients and the associations with clinical events and 5-year survival in a cohort treated for myeloma with melphalan and auto-SCT (n=112). Clinical comparisons were made at admission, and 'before' and 'after' initiating PN to discern differences and temporality. Actual infusion times were used for PN patients; time frames based on mean PN infusion days were created for the non-PN recipients. Oral intake was lower 'before' in PN vs non-PN patients (P<0.001); however, no differences in mucositis, emesis, infections or transfusions were detected 'before.' Incident hyperglycemia (≥7.0 mmol/L) was significant 'after' PN initiation, and PN recipients experienced delays in WBC (P<0.05) and platelet engraftment (P=0.009), and required significantly greater RBC (P=0.0014) and platelet (P=0.001) support 'after' than non-PN patients. Neutropenic fever and longer hospital stay were more frequent among PN vs non-PN recipients (P<0.001). Differences in 5-year mortality were not apparent. The findings fail to support clinical benefits of PN administration during auto-SCT for myeloma. Further study is needed to discern if hyperglycemia or feeding per se was deleterious in this patient population. PMID:23419432

  18. Coronary Computed Tomography Versus Radionuclide Myocardial Perfusion Imaging in Chest Pain Patients Admitted to Telemetry: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Levsky, Jeffrey M.; Spevack, Daniel M.; Travin, Mark I.; Menegus, Mark A.; Huang, Paul W.; Clark, Elana T.; Kim, Choo-won; Hirschhorn, Esther; Freeman, Katherine D.; Tobin, Jonathan N.; Haramati, Linda B.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Coronary computed tomography angiography plays an expanding role managing symptomatic patients with suspected coronary artery disease. Prospective intermediate-term outcomes are lacking. OBJECTIVE To compare coronary CT angiography with conventional non-invasive testing. DESIGN Randomized, controlled comparative effectiveness trial. SETTING Telemetry-monitored wards of one inner-city medical center. PATIENTS 400 acute chest pain patients (mean age 57); 63% women; 54% Hispanic, 37% African-American; low socioeconomic status. INTERVENTION Coronary CT angiography (CT) or radionuclide stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI). MEASUREMENTS The primary outcome was cardiac catheterization not leading to revascularization within one year. Secondary outcomes included length of stay, resource utilization and patient experience. Safety outcomes included death, major cardiovascular events and radiation exposure. RESULTS 30(15%) CT patients and 32(16%) MPI patients underwent cardiac catheterization within one year, of which 15(7.5%) and 20(10%), respectively, were not revascularized (-2.5% difference, 95%CI −8.6%–+3.5%; hazard ratio 0.77, 95%CI 0.40–1.49, p=0.44). Median length of stay was 28.9 hours for CT and 30.4 hours for MPI (p=0.057). Median follow-up was 40.4 months. For CT and MPI, the incidences of death (0.5% vs 3%, p=0.12), non-fatal cardiovascular events (4.5% vs 4.5%), re-hospitalization (43% vs 49%), emergency visit (63% vs 58%) and outpatient cardiology visit (23% vs 21%) were not different. Long-term, all-cause radiation was lower for CT (24 vs 29 milliSieverts, p<0.001). More CT patients graded their experience favorably (p=0.001) and would undergo the exam again (p=0.003). LIMITATIONS Single site study; primary outcome dependent on clinical management decisions. CONCLUSIONS There were no significant differences between CT and MPI in outcomes or resource utilization over 40 months. CT had lower associated radiation and was more positively

  19. Assessment of noninvasive acoustic respiration rate monitoring in patients admitted to an Emergency Department for drug or alcoholic poisoning.

    PubMed

    Guechi, Youcef; Pichot, Amélie; Frasca, Denis; Rayeh-Pelardy, Fatima; Lardeur, Jean-Yves; Mimoz, Olivier

    2015-12-01

    To compare respiration rate measurement by an acoustic method and thoracic impedance to capnometry as the reference method, in patients at the Emergency Department after drug or alcoholic poisoning. In this observational study, 30 patients aged 18 or older, hospitalized at the Emergency Department for drug or alcoholic poisoning, without any contraindication to a face mask and/or a cervical acoustic sensor, were included in the study. They benefited from a simultaneous recording of their respiration rate by the acoustic method (RRa(®), Masimo Corp., Irvine, CA, USA), by thoracic impedance (Philips Intellivue(®) MP2, Suresnes, France) and by capnometry (Capnostream(®) 20, Oridion, Jerusalem, Israël) through a face mask (Capnomask(®), Mediplus Ltd, Raleigh, NC, USA) for 40-60 min. Of the 86,578 triplets collected, 77,155 (89.1%) were exploitable. Median (range) respiration rate measured by capnometry was 18 (7-29) bpm. Compared to capnometry, bias and limits of agreement were 0.1 ± 3.8 bpm for the acoustic method and 0.3 ± 5.5 bpm for thoracic impedance. The proportions of RR values collected by acoustic method or by thoracic impedance which differed over 10 or 20% during more than 15 s, compared to capnometry, were 8.3 versus 14.3, and 1.5 versus 3.8%, respectively (p < 0.0001). The acoustic sensor had to be repositioned on three patients. For 11 patients, the Capnomask(®) was removed several times. In patients with drug or alcoholic poisoning, the acoustic method seems more accurate than thoracic impedance and better tolerated than face mask capnometry. PMID:25614223

  20. Analysis of epidemiology, lifestyle, and psychosocial factors in patients with back pain admitted to an orthopedic emergency unit

    PubMed Central

    Gotfryd, Alberto Ofenhejm; Valesin, Edgar Santiago; Viola, Dan Carai Maia; Lenza, Mario; da Silva, Joselito Adriano; Emi, Angélica Santos; Tomiosso, Raylton; Piccinato, Carla de Azevedo; Antonioli, Eliane; Ferretti, Mario

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To correlate epidemiological data, lifestyle, and psychosocial factors as predictors for clinical manifestation of back pain in patients treated at the orthopedic emergency unit of a Brazilian tertiary care hospital, and to evaluate their interest in participating in a hypothetical program for physical rehabilitation. Methods: This is an observational cross-sectional study. We evaluated 210 patients from the emergency department of a tertiary hospital with a major complaint of back pain. We used: epidemiological multiple-choice questionnaires developed for this study; Oswestry questionnaire for physical disability; Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HAD) scale. Data analyses were performed using SAS - Statistical Analysis System (SAS Institute, 2001). Measurements were performed with the SAS functions Proc MEANS and Proc Freq. Results: The mean age was 39.1 years and there was no predominance between genders. The usual work activity was administrative (65.2% of cases). The mean body mass index was 26.0, indicating overweight. The majority (83.3%) of patients had low physical disability (Oswestry 0 – 40%). The number of medical visits in the previous 6 months (p=0.04) and the scores of anxiety and depression (p=0.05), independently, were correlated with physical disability. Most patients (77%) would agree to participate in a hypothetical program of physical rehabilitation for prevention of back pain. Conclusion: Patients with back pain complaints were predominantly young adults, sedentary or hypoactive, overweight, and with recurrent complaints of symptoms. Most participants had low levels of physical disability and would accept participation in a hypothetical physical rehabilitation program for the prevention of back pain. PMID:26154546

  1. Patient outcomes following discharge from secure psychiatric hospitals: systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fazel, Seena; Fimińska, Zuzanna; Cocks, Christopher; Coid, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Background Secure hospitals are a high-cost, low-volume service consuming around a fifth of the overall mental health budget in England and Wales. Aims A systematic review and meta-analysis of adverse outcomes after discharge along with a comparison with rates in other clinical and forensic groups in order to inform public health and policy. Method We searched for primary studies that followed patients discharged from a secure hospital, and reported mortality, readmissions or reconvictions. We determined crude rates for all adverse outcomes. Results In total, 35 studies from 10 countries were included, involving 12 056 patients out of which 53% were violent offenders. The crude death rate for all-cause mortality was 1538 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 1175–1901). For suicide, the crude death rate was 325 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 235–415). The readmission rate was 7208 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 5916–8500). Crude reoffending rates were 4484 per 100 000 person-years (95% CI 3679–5287), with lower rates in more recent studies. Conclusions There is some evidence that patients discharged from forensic psychiatric services have lower offending outcomes than many comparative groups. Services could consider improving interventions aimed at reducing premature mortality, particularly suicide, in discharged patients. PMID:26729842

  2. History of sexual, emotional or physical abuse and psychiatric comorbidity in substance-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Daigre, Constanza; Rodríguez-Cintas, Laia; Tarifa, Núria; Rodríguez-Martos, Lola; Grau-López, Lara; Berenguer, Marta; Casas, Miguel; Roncero, Carlos

    2015-10-30

    Sexual, emotional or physical abuse history is a risk factor for mental disorders in addicted patients. However, the relationship between addiction and abuse lifespan is not well known. This study aims to compare clinical and psychopathological features of addicted patients according to the experience of abuse and to the number of different types of abuse suffered. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. 512 addicted patients seeking treatment were included, 45.9% reported abuse throughout life (38.9% emotional, 22.3% physical and 13.5% sexual abuse). It was found that female gender; depressive symptoms and borderline personality disorder were independently associated with history of any abuse throughout life. As well, it was found that 14% have been suffered from all three types of abuse (sexual, emotional and physical), 34.5% from two and 55.5% from one type. Female gender and borderline personality disorder were independently associated independently with a greater number of different types of abuse. Results suggest that history of abuse is frequent among substance-dependent patients and these experiences are more prevalent in women and are associated with more psychiatric comorbidity. PMID:26279128

  3. Factors Related to Postoperative Pain Trajectories following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Longitudinal Study of Patients Admitted to a Russian Orthopaedic Clinic.

    PubMed

    Kornilov, Nikolai; Lindberg, Maren Falch; Gay, Caryl; Saraev, Alexander; Kuliaba, Taras; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Muniz, Konstantin; Lerdal, Anners

    2016-01-01

    This study explores sociodemographic, clinical, and surgical factors in relation to pain trajectories during the first 3 days following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). 100 patients (mean age 63.5 ± 7.8 years and 93% female) consecutively admitted for uncomplicated primary TKA were prospectively included. Postoperative pain was assessed using pain diaries. Measures of preoperative pain, symptoms, daily functioning, quality of life, comorbidities, knee function, perioperative characteristics, and physical/biochemical parameters were also evaluated. All pain ratings decreased in the three days following surgery (p < .001) as well as the reported number of daily hours in moderate/severe pain (p < .001). Women reported more pain than men (p = .009). Pain trajectories did not differ by education, employment, cohabitation, or any patient clinical and biochemical characteristics but were significantly related to preoperative anxiety (p = .029). Patients reporting moderate/severe pain prior to surgery also reported more hours in moderate/severe pain on days 0-3 postoperatively (p = .029). Patients with surgeries longer than 90 min reported more hours of moderate/severe pain compared with patients who had shorter surgeries (p = .008), and similar results were observed for ratings of pain with activity (p = .012). In this sample, only female gender, higher levels of preoperative pain and anxiety, and longer surgical duration were associated with increased pain after TKA. PMID:26885390

  4. Factors Related to Postoperative Pain Trajectories following Total Knee Arthroplasty: A Longitudinal Study of Patients Admitted to a Russian Orthopaedic Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Kornilov, Nikolai; Lindberg, Maren Falch; Gay, Caryl; Saraev, Alexander; Kuliaba, Taras; Rosseland, Leiv Arne; Muniz, Konstantin; Lerdal, Anners

    2016-01-01

    This study explores sociodemographic, clinical, and surgical factors in relation to pain trajectories during the first 3 days following total knee arthroplasty (TKA). 100 patients (mean age 63.5 ± 7.8 years and 93% female) consecutively admitted for uncomplicated primary TKA were prospectively included. Postoperative pain was assessed using pain diaries. Measures of preoperative pain, symptoms, daily functioning, quality of life, comorbidities, knee function, perioperative characteristics, and physical/biochemical parameters were also evaluated. All pain ratings decreased in the three days following surgery (p < .001) as well as the reported number of daily hours in moderate/severe pain (p < .001). Women reported more pain than men (p = .009). Pain trajectories did not differ by education, employment, cohabitation, or any patient clinical and biochemical characteristics but were significantly related to preoperative anxiety (p = .029). Patients reporting moderate/severe pain prior to surgery also reported more hours in moderate/severe pain on days 0–3 postoperatively (p = .029). Patients with surgeries longer than 90 min reported more hours of moderate/severe pain compared with patients who had shorter surgeries (p = .008), and similar results were observed for ratings of pain with activity (p = .012). In this sample, only female gender, higher levels of preoperative pain and anxiety, and longer surgical duration were associated with increased pain after TKA. PMID:26885390

  5. Effective Factors in Door-to-Needle Time for Streptokinase Administration in Patients With Acute Myocardial Infarction Admitted to the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Omraninava, Ali; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Masoumi, Babak

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cardiovascular incidents are a common cause of death around the world. Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) poses high risks for the patient due to plaque rupture or erosion along with a superimposed non-occlusive thrombus; therefore, timely treatment with antithrombotic agents plays a key role in reducing an AMI mortality rate. Objectives: The present study aimed to assess the time interval between the admission of AMI-suspected patients and treatment initiation. Patients and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 110 patients admitted to the emergency department of Imam Hussein hospital in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected using checklists, completed by the patients’ next of kin or the emergency staff. To analyze the data, student t- test and analysis of variance were used. Results: In this study, 31 female and 79 male subjects were included, respectively. The mean time to receive the first dose of streptokinase was 66.39 minutes (73.74 minutes for females and 63.5 minutes for male patients), varying from 49.92 minutes in the morning to 69.78 minutes in the afternoon and 72.68 minutes during night shifts. Conclusions: The door-to-needle (DTN) time, in a standard setting, is recommended to be less than 30 minutes. According to the results of this study, the DTN time is comparatively two times longer in females and afternoon and night shifts. Different variables including emergency staff, physicians, patients’ characteristics, and environmental/physical factors induced this difference. PMID:27218043

  6. Caregivers' perceptions of coercion in psychiatric hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Veronica; Madigan, Kevin; Roche, Eric; Bainbridge, Emma; McGuinness, David; Tierney, Kevin; Feeney, Larkin; Hallahan, Brian; McDonald, Colm; O'Donoghue, Brian

    2015-08-30

    While knowledge on service users' perspective on their admissions to psychiatric wards has improved substantially in the last decade, there is a paucity of knowledge of the perspectives of caregivers. This study aimed to determine caregiver's perception of the levels of perceived coercion, perceived pressures and procedural justice experienced by service users during their admission to acute psychiatric in-patient units. The perspective of caregivers were then compared to the perspectives of their related service users, who had been admitted to five psychiatric units in Ireland. Caregivers were interviewed using an adapted version of the MacArthur admission experience interview. Sixty-six caregivers participated in this study and the majority were parents. Seventy one percent of service users were admitted involuntarily and nearly half had a diagnosis of schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder. Caregivers of involuntarily admitted individuals perceived the service users' admission as less coercive than reported by the service users. Caregivers also perceived a higher level of procedural justice in comparison to the level reported by service users. Reducing the disparity of perceptions between caregivers and service users could result in caregivers having a greater understanding of the admission process and why some service users may be reluctant to be admitted. PMID:26163727

  7. Psychiatric In-Patients Away from Home: Accounts by People with Intellectual Disabilities in Specialist Hospitals outside Their Home Localities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chinn, Deborah; Hall, Ian; Ali, Afia; Hassell, Holly; Patkas, Iannis

    2011-01-01

    Background: This study reflects a growing concern with the placement of people with intellectual disabilities and complex mental health problems in out of area placements at a distance from their families and communities. Materials and methods: We interviewed service users (n = 17) living in out of area in-patient psychiatric units using a…

  8. Acculturation and Acculturative Stress as Predictors of Psychological Distress and Quality-of-Life Functioning in Hispanic Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thoman, Lisa Vinuesa; Suris, Alina

    2004-01-01

    This study examined acculturation level and type, acculturative stress, and several demographic variables as predictors of psychological distress and health-related quality of life in a sample of 101 Hispanic patients at a community psychiatric clinic. Acculturative stress was predictive of psychological distress beyond the effects of the…

  9. Using a Five-Factor Lens to Explore the Relation Between Personality Traits and Violence in Psychiatric Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skeem, Jennifer L.; Miller, Joshua D.; Mulvey, Edward; Tiemann, Jenny; Monahan, John

    2005-01-01

    Recent work suggests that predictors of violence are similar for individuals with and without mental illness. Although psychopathy is among the most potent of such predictors, the nature of its relation to violence is unclear. On the basis of a sample of 769 civil psychiatric patients, the authors explore the possibility that measures of…

  10. Magnitude of Enterococcal Bacteremia in Trauma Patients Admitted for Intensive Trauma Care: A Tertiary Care Experience from South Asian Country

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumari, Nonika; Mathur, Purva; Thanbuana, Bariamtak; Sajan, Swaminathan; Misra, Mahesh C

    2015-01-01

    Background: Bloodstream infection (BSI) and bacteremias due to Enterococcus spp. are increasing worldwide with the current need to understand its causes among hospitalized trauma patients. Hence, the study was conducted. Methodology: A 3-year retrospective laboratory cum clinical based study was performed at a level I trauma center in India. Patients with health care associated enterococcal bacteremia were identified using the hospital database, their episodes of BSI/bacteremia calculated and their clinical records and treatment were noted. Results: A total of 104 nonrepetitive Enterococcus spp. was isolated of which Enterococcus faecium was the most common (52%). High-level resistance to gentamicin high-level aminoglycoside resistance was seen in all the Enterococcus spp. causing bacteremia, whereas a low resistance to vancomycin and teichoplanin was observed. Overall mortality was more in patients infected with vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (5/11, 46%) compared to those with vancomycin sensitive Enterococcus (9/93, 10%); though no significant association of mortality with Enterococcus spp. bacteremia (P > 0.05) was seen. The rate of bacteremia due to Enterococcus spp. was 25.4 episodes/1,000 admissions (104/4,094) during the study period. Conclusion: Enterococcal bacteremia is much prevalent in trauma care facilities. Here, a microbiologist can act as a sentinel and help in preventing such infections. PMID:25949058

  11. Lower mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration is associated with poorer outcomes in intensive care unit admitted patients with acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yuan-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Background Accumulated studies have shown that hematological parameters [e.g., red blood cell distribution width (RDW), hemoglobin, platelet count] and serum potassium level can impact the prognosis of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, no previous study has evaluated the prognostic values of these laboratory tests simultaneously. Methods This study is based on an intensive care unit (ICU) database named Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care II (MIMIC II). Adult patients with AMI were included, and their hematological parameters and serum ion levels on admission were extracted. The relationships between these laboratory tests and hospital mortality were evaluated using a logistic regression model and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis. The effects of these laboratory tests on 1-year mortality were evaluated using a Cox hazard regression model and Kaplan-Meier curve analysis. Results In univariable analysis, increased white blood cell (WBC), neutrophil percentage, mean corpuscular volume (MCV), RDW, potassium and decreased red blood cell (RBC), hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (MCHC), hematocrit and percentage of lymphocyte, monocyte, basophil and eosinophil were significantly associated with hospital mortality. In multivariable analyses, basophil percentage, potassium, WBC and MCHC were independently associated with hospital morality, while WBC, RDW, MCHC, potassium and percentages of neutrophil and lymphocyte were associated with 1-year mortality. Conclusions Hematological parameters and serum potassium can provide prognostic information in AMI patients. MCHC is an independent prognostic factor for both short and long term outcomes of AMI. PMID:27294086

  12. Outcome and predictors of cardiopulmonary resuscitation among patients admitted in Medical Intensive Care Unit in North India

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Amit; Singh, Tirath; Ahluwalia, Gautam; Singh, Parminder

    2016-01-01

    Background: Outcome and predictors of survival after cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in Intensive Care Units (ICUs) have been extensively studied in western world, but data from developing countries is sparse. Objectives: To study the outcome and predictors of survival after CPR in a Medical ICU (MICU) of a tertiary level teaching hospital in North India. Materials and Methods: A 1-year prospective cohort study. Results: Of 105 in-MICU CPRs, forty patients (38.1%) achieved return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Only one patient (0.9%) survived up to hospital discharge. The predictors of ROSC were ventricular tachycardia/ventricular fibrillation as first monitored rhythm, intubation during CPR and CPR duration ≤ 10 min. CPR duration > 10 min was a significant factor for resuscitation failure. Conclusions: The rate of survival to hospital discharge after in-MICU CPRs is extremely poor. Our data may aid treating physicians, resuscitation teams, and families in understanding the likely outcome of patients after in-MICU CPRs. PMID:27076727

  13. Cause of death in patients with atrial fibrillation admitted to French hospitals in 2012: a nationwide database study

    PubMed Central

    Fauchier, Laurent; Samson, Adeline; Chaize, Gwendoline; Gaudin, Anne-Françoise; Vainchtock, Alexandre; Bailly, Cécile; Cotté, Francois-Emery

    2015-01-01

    Objective Most patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) have risk factors and coexisting conditions that increase their mortality risk. We performed a cause-of-death analysis to identify predictors of mortality in hospitalised patients with AF in France. Methods and results In this retrospective, population-based cross-sectional study, the Programme de médicalisation des systèmes d'information was used to identify 533 044 adults with a diagnosis of AF or atrial flutter hospitalised for any reason in France from January through December 2012. Stepwise multivariable analyses were performed to identify determinants of mortality. The mean age was 78.0±11.4 years, 47.1% were women, and the mean CHA2DS2-VASc score was 4.0±1.8. During hospitalisation, 9.4% (n=50 165) of the patients died, 34% due to a cardiovascular event, most often heart failure (16.6%), stroke/transient ischaemic attack/systemic embolism (9.8%) or vascular or ischaemic disease (4.0%). The strongest predictors of overall death were age ≥75 years (OR 2.57, 95% CI 2.47 to 2.68), renal failure (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.81 to 1.89), cancer (OR 1.81, 95% CI 1.78 to 1.85) and lung disease (OR 1.58, 95% CI 1.55 to 1.62). Conclusions Cardiovascular events were the most common cause of death, occurring in one-third of patients, in this comprehensive study of hospitalised patients with AF. Despite the high risk of stroke in this population, only 10% died from stroke/transient ischaemic attack/systemic embolism. The strongest predictors of overall death were non-cardiovascular. Physicians should be encouraged to focus on preventable serious and disabling cardiovascular events (such as stroke) as well as on potentially fatal non-cardiovascular comorbidities. PMID:26688739

  14. Psychiatric comorbidity of patients on methadone maintenance treatment with a history of sexual abuse.

    PubMed

    Peles, Einat; Potik, David; Schreiber, Shaul; Bloch, Miki; Adelson, Miriam

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of a history of sexual abuse and its relation to psychiatric comorbidity among former opiate addicts currently on methadone maintenance treatment (MMT). We evaluated the history of sexual abuse and current clinical obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD), dissociative identity disorder (DID), and complex posttraumatic distress disorder (cPTSD), and administered the Life Events Inventory Questionnaire among 125 MMT patients (76 females and 49 males). Eighty (64%) patients had experienced sexual abuse, 69 (55.2%) met the criteria for clinical OCD, 20 (16.0%) for cPTSD and 13 (10.4%) for DID. More females had clinical OCD than males (63.2% vs. 42.9%, respectively, p=0.03). Sexually abused patients had higher rates of clinical OCD than their non-abused counterparts (67.5% vs. 33.3%, respectively, p<0.0005) and a higher mean number of negative life events (8.0±2.0 vs. 7.1±1.8, p=0.01). Sexually abused patients showed a trend towards a higher Dissociative Experiences Scale score (17.6±10.1 vs. 14.6±8.1, p=0.08) and rate of DID (13.8% vs. 4.4%, p=0.1), but no significant difference in the rate of cPTSD (17.5% vs. 13.3%, p=0.6) compared to non-abused subjects. The 80 sexually abused patients were mostly female (85%), and 57.5% of them were abused by a family member. In summary, more sexually abused MMT patients were diagnosed with clinical OCD and fewer with cPTSD and DID. Those with cPTSD were characterized by more negative life events, higher dissociation scores, and assaults by a family member. We conclude that sexually abused MMT patients should be screened for clinical OCD. PMID:22564825

  15. 12-step participation and outcomes over 7 years among adolescent substance use patients with and without psychiatric comorbidity.

    PubMed

    Chi, Felicia W; Sterling, Stacy; Campbell, Cynthia I; Weisner, Constance

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the associations between 12-step participation and outcomes over 7 years among 419 adolescent substance use patients with and without psychiatric comorbidities. Although level of participation decreased over time for both groups, comorbid adolescents participated in 12-step groups at comparable or higher levels across time points. Results from mixed-effects logistic regression models indicated that for both groups, 12-step participation was associated with both alcohol and drug abstinence at follow-ups, increasing the likelihood of either by at least 3 times. Findings highlight the potential benefits of 12-step participation in maintaining long-term recovery for adolescents with and without psychiatric disorders. PMID:23327502

  16. The Spectrum of Psychiatric Pathology in a Patient with Genetically Verified Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alkabie, Samir; Singh, Daljinder; Hernandez, Amy; Dumenigo, Rhaisa

    2015-01-01

    Psychiatric and behavioral disturbances are common in Huntington's disease (HD) and contribute significantly to its morbidity and mortality. We herein present the case of a 43-year-old woman with genetically verified HD, whose deteriorating psychiatric condition necessitated multiple inpatient psychiatric hospitalizations and featured a clinical spectrum of neuropsychiatric disturbances classically associated with HD. This paper reviews the literature concerning Huntington's psychopathology and provides an illustrative case example of its clinical nature. PMID:26451266

  17. Blood tests: One too many? Evaluating blood requesting guidance developed for acute patients admitted to trauma and orthopaedic units.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, Alastair; Reidy, Mike; Scicluna, Gabrielle; Love, Gavin J; Joss, Judith

    2016-03-01

    In a recently published report from the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges, around 20% of clinical practice which encompasses blood science investigations is considered wasteful. Blood tests including liver function tests (LFTs), C-reactive protein (CRP), coagulation screens, and international normalising ratios (INR) are frequently requested for patients who undergo emergency hospital admission. The paucity of guidance available for blood requesting in acute trauma and orthopaedic admissions can lead to inappropriate requesting practices and over investigation. Acute admissions over a period of one month were audited retrospectively for the frequency and clinical indications of requests for LFTs, coagulation screens/INR, and CRP. The total number of blood tests requested for the duration of the patient's admission was recorded. Initial auditing of 216 admissions in January 2014 demonstrated a striking amount of over-investigation. Clinical guidelines were developed with multidisciplinary expert input and implemented within the department. Re-audit of 233 admissions was carried out in September 2014. Total no. of LFTs requested: January 895, September 336 (-62.5%); coagulation screens/INR requested: January 307, September 210 (-31.6%); CRPs requested: January 894, September 317 (-64.5%). No. of blood requests per patient: January (M=4.81, SD 4.75), September (M=3.60, SD=4.70). Approximate combined total cost of LFT, coagulation/INR, CRP in January £2674.14 and September £1236.19 (-£1437.95, -53.77%). A large decrease was observed in admission requesting and subsequent monitoring (p<0.01) following the implementation. This both significantly reduced cost and venepuncture rates. PMID:26696248

  18. Pneumococcal Colonization Rates in Patients Admitted to a United Kingdom Hospital with Lower Respiratory Tract Infection: a Prospective Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Johnstone, Catherine M. K.; Gritzfeld, Jenna F.; Banyard, Antonia; Hancock, Carole A.; Wright, Angela D.; Macfarlane, Laura; Ferreira, Daniela M.

    2016-01-01

    Current diagnostic tests are ineffective for identifying the etiological pathogen in hospitalized adults with lower respiratory tract infections (LRTIs). The association of pneumococcal colonization with disease has been suggested as a means to increase the diagnostic precision. We compared the pneumococcal colonization rates and the densities of nasal pneumococcal colonization by (i) classical culture and (ii) quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) targeting lytA in patients with LRTIs admitted to a hospital in the United Kingdom and control patients. A total of 826 patients were screened for inclusion in this prospective case-control study. Of these, 38 patients were recruited, 19 with confirmed LRTIs and 19 controls with other diagnoses. Nasal wash (NW) samples were collected at the time of recruitment. Pneumococcal colonization was detected in 1 patient with LRTI and 3 controls (P = 0.6) by classical culture. By qPCR, pneumococcal colonization was detected in 10 LRTI patients and 8 controls (P = 0.5). Antibiotic usage prior to sampling was significantly higher in the LRTI group than in the control group (19 versus 3; P < 0.001). With a clinically relevant cutoff of >8,000 copies/ml on qPCR, pneumococcal colonization was found in 3 LRTI patients and 4 controls (P > 0.05). We conclude that neither the prevalence nor the density of nasal pneumococcal colonization (by culture and qPCR) can be used as a method of microbiological diagnosis in hospitalized adults with LRTI in the United Kingdom. A community-based study recruiting patients prior to antibiotic therapy may be a useful future step. PMID:26791364

  19. [Anxiety disorders in private practice psychiatric out-patients: prevalence, comorbidity and burden (DELTA study)].

    PubMed

    Pélissolo, A; André, C; Chignon, J-M; Dutoit, D; Martin, P; Richard-Berthe, C; Tignol, J

    2002-01-01

    Few data are currently available on the prevalence and associated characteristics of anxiety disorders in psychiatric out-patients in France, in particular in the private health-care. However, this represents one of the principal systems of care for patients suffering from anxiety disorders, with a possible direct access and several types of treatments available (pharmacotherapy but also different kinds of psychotherapy). The aim of our study was to describe the prevalence of anxiety disorders in a large sample of patients consulting in the private sector, and in addition to study the comorbidity, the severity of the disorders, their consequences on quality of life and health care consumption. The studied patients were included and assessed by 501 psychiatrists from all the country, at the time of a first visit. Inclusions were to be made in a consecutive way, but with the exclusion of psychotic disorders and dementia. A sample of 1 955 patients was obtained, and all subjects had a standardized diagnostic assessment with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) and with various dimensional scales of symptomatology severity, quality of life, and health care consumption. On the whole, at least one current anxiety disorder was found in 64.3% of the patients, while 55% had a depressive disorder. Individually, the prevalence rates are 29.4% for generalized anxiety disorder, 25.9% for agoraphobia, 19.2% for panic disorder, 15.3% for social phobia, 11.4% for obsessive-compulsive disorder, and 5.4% for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). A history of suicide attempts was found in 12-20% of patients, and an elevated suicide risk was found for example in 25% of PTSD patients. The scores of the symptomatic scales, adaptation and quality of life measure show a very significant anxious symptomatology, with serious functional consequences. Approximately 75% of patients had another medical consultation during the three previous months, and 9% have been

  20. Effects of early physiotherapy with respect to severity of pneumonia of elderly patients admitted to an intensive care unit: a single center study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Chigira, Yusuke; Takai, Tomoko; Igusa, Hironobu; Dobashi, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] We performed early physiotherapy for elderly patients with pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), and examined the effects of this early physiotherapy on the severity of pneumonia. [Subjects and Methods] Patients for whom physiotherapy was started the day after admission to the ICU (acute phase) were assigned to the early intervention group and compared with patients in the standard intervention group. All patients were divided into three groups (Groups I, II, and III) based on the severity of pneumonia. We evaluated the ICU admission period, hospitalization period, and activities of daily living (ADL) before and after admission. [Results] With respect to the severity of pneumonia, Group II showed significant differences in the ICU admission period and rates of change in the operating range, cognitive domain, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Group III showed significant differences in the ICU admission period and rate of change in the cognitive domain (FIM item). The results were more favorable in the early intervention group than in the standard intervention group. [Conclusion] The ICU admission period was shorter and a reduction in the ADL level was prevented in Groups II, and III compared to Group I. This may have occurred because of the early rehabilitation. PMID:26311924

  1. A Study on Polypharmacy and Potential Drug-Drug Interactions among Elderly Patients Admitted in Department of Medicine of a Tertiary Care Hospital in Puducherry

    PubMed Central

    Kalyansundaram, Dharani; Bahurupi, Yogesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The proportion of elderly population has been constantly increasing over last few years. Polypharmacy is unavoidable in the elderly as they often suffer from multiple co-morbidities. Potential drug-drug interaction due to polypharmacy and potential inappropriate medication among the elderly must be carefully assessed. Aim To find out polypharmacy and potential drug-drug interactions among elderly patients admitted and discharged in Department of Medicine. Materials and Methods This study was carried out on 100 patients above 65 years of age both males and females. Data was collected through review of case sheets. Polypharmacy was observed based on admission and discharge prescriptions. Frequently occurring drug-drug interactions were assessed using online checks. Results Mean number of drugs prescribed to patients on admission (7.61 ± 3.37) was more than that on discharge (5.48±2.46). More than half of these patients received 5 to 9 number of drugs. On admission 52.69% potential drug-drug interactions were observed and on discharge 52.91%. Most common drug interactions observed in both the groups were of moderate grade. Conclusion From the present study we can conclude that polypharmacy leads to more potential drug-drug interactions. To improve drug safety in this high-risk population, appropriate prescribing is very important. PMID:27042480

  2. Effects of early physiotherapy with respect to severity of pneumonia of elderly patients admitted to an intensive care unit: a single center study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Chigira, Yusuke; Takai, Tomoko; Igusa, Hironobu; Dobashi, Kunio

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] We performed early physiotherapy for elderly patients with pneumonia admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU), and examined the effects of this early physiotherapy on the severity of pneumonia. [Subjects and Methods] Patients for whom physiotherapy was started the day after admission to the ICU (acute phase) were assigned to the early intervention group and compared with patients in the standard intervention group. All patients were divided into three groups (Groups I, II, and III) based on the severity of pneumonia. We evaluated the ICU admission period, hospitalization period, and activities of daily living (ADL) before and after admission. [Results] With respect to the severity of pneumonia, Group II showed significant differences in the ICU admission period and rates of change in the operating range, cognitive domain, and Functional Independence Measure (FIM). Group III showed significant differences in the ICU admission period and rate of change in the cognitive domain (FIM item). The results were more favorable in the early intervention group than in the standard intervention group. [Conclusion] The ICU admission period was shorter and a reduction in the ADL level was prevented in Groups II, and III compared to Group I. This may have occurred because of the early rehabilitation. PMID:26311924

  3. Oral health and treatment needs in institutionalized psychiatric patients in India.

    PubMed

    Kenkre, A M; Spadigam, A E

    2000-01-01

    The caries prevalence, oral hygiene status, periodontal health and treatment needs were evaluated in a group of institutionalized psychiatric patients in Goa, India. Of the total 153 inmates, males constituted 59 percent, the mean age was 25 years, 96 percent were self sufficient and the response rate was 84 percent. 63 percent were diagnosed with schizophrenia. They did not receive any assistance in daily self-care activities including oral hygiene maintenance. None of the 5 edentulous patients had dentures, 5% had been referred for emergency dental care during the period of institutionalization. 15 subjects (12%) were caries-free, the stepwise linear regression analysis showed that the mean DMFT index significantly increased with age (t = 2-819, PL 0.05). Two third of the study population (88%) were in need of conservative dental treatment. The stepwise linear regression analysis showed that the mean OHI-S index significantly increased with age (t = 2.412, P < 0.01). Only 5.4% reported a healthy periodontium whereas 16.27% required complex periodontal therapy. Soft tissue lesions included dorsal lingual depapillation/heavily coated areas and angular cheilitis in addition to incidental observations such as mucosal hyperpigmentation, gingival hyperplasia, and leucoedema. Bruxism and factitious injuries were also noted. The onus of meeting the oral health needs of this marginalized patient population therefore depends on the effectiveness of community dentistry programs vis a vis the efforts of the staff of the institution to provide such services on a regular basis. PMID:11307250

  4. Spouses of male psychiatric patients are more prone to intimate partner violence.

    PubMed

    Masoudzadeh, Abbas; Bonab, Nafiseh Moghaddasi; Abbasi, Zeynab

    2015-06-01

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a great public health concern. Most studies have evaluated different risk factors of IPV in general population, but few have evaluated the perpetration of IPV by subjects with psychological disease. We evaluated the prevalence of IPV among spouses of men with psychiatric disease. In this descriptive study, we questioned 119 women whose husbands were in-patient or out-patients of psychology clinic. A validated questionnaire was used for evaluation IPV and its different subtypes. All women reported to encounter some kind of IPV in some periods. Women reported emotional abuse in 100%, physical abuse in 99.2% and sexual abuse in 81.5%. None of the patients were eager to tell anyone about being victim of IPV due to religious beliefs, society culture and believing in their marital status and trying to keep their marriage. IPV is higher among families with men having psychological disease. Policy makers and clinicians should predominantly target these families. Also, empowering women may reduce the risk of intimate partner violence. PMID:25998094

  5. The effects of psychiatric treatment on depression, anxiety, quality of life, and sexual dysfunction in patients with inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Yanartas, O; Kani, HT; Bicakci, E; Kilic, I; Banzragch, M; Acikel, C; Atug, O; Kuscu, K; Imeryuz, N; Akin, H

    2016-01-01

    Objective Depression and anxiety are common disorders in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Our aim is to prospectively determine the effect of psychiatric treatment on scores for depression, anxiety, quality of life (QoL), and sexual dysfunction in an outpatient population diagnosed with IBD and also anxiety and/or depression disorder. Patients and methods Patients who scored higher than the cutoff point on the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale were referred for further structured psychiatric evaluation and determination of the need for psychiatric drug treatment. Patients who underwent drug therapy completed Short Form-36 (SF-36) and the Arizona Sexual Experience Scale at baseline and after 6 months of follow-up. Results Major depressive disorder and generalized anxiety disorder were the most common diagnoses. After 6 months, 47 patients had completely adhered to drug treatment (group A), whereas 20 were nonadherent (group B). In group A, all domains of SF-36, Arizona Sexual Experience Scale, depression/anxiety scores, and Crohn’s disease activity index were statistically improved after treatment when compared with the baseline. In group B, the three domains of SF-36, platelet count, and mean corpuscular volume were worse between baseline and at 6 months. Conclusion In IBD patients having any psychiatric disorder, 6 months of antidepressant drug treatment is associated with an improvement in depression, anxiety, QoL, and sexual functioning scores, as well as an improvement in Crohn’s disease activity index. On the other hand, insufficient psychiatric treatment seems to be related to a poor QoL. PMID:27069364

  6. Childhood clumsiness and peer victimization: a case–control study of psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Poor motor and social skills as well as peer victimization are commonly reported in both ADHD and autism spectrum disorder. Positive relationships between poor motor and poor social skills, and between poor social skills and peer victimization, are well documented, but the relationship between poor motor skills and peer victimization has not been studied in psychiatric populations. Method 277 patients (133 males, 144 females), mean age 31 years, investigated for ADHD or autism spectrum disorder in adulthood and with normal intelligence, were interviewed about childhood peer victimization and examined for gross motor skills. The parents completed a comprehensive questionnaire on childhood problems, the Five to Fifteen. The Five to Fifteen is a validated questionnaire with 181 statements that covers various symptoms in childhood across eight different domains, one of them targeting motor skills. Regression models were used to evaluate the relationship between motor skills and the risk and duration of peer victimization, adjusted for sex and diagnosis. Results Victims were described as more clumsy in childhood than their non-victimized counterparts. A significant independent association was found between reportedly poor childhood gross motor skills and peer victimization (adjusted odds ratio: 2.97 [95% confidence interval: 1.46-6.07], n = 235, p = 0.003). In adulthood, the victimized group performed worse on vertical jumps, a gross motor task, and were lonelier. Other factors that were expected to be associated with peer victimization were not found in this highly selected group. Conclusion Poor gross motor skills constitute a strong and independent risk factor for peer victimization in childhood, regardless of sex, childhood psychiatric care and diagnosis. PMID:23442984

  7. [Investigation of human herpesvirus-8 seroprevalence in blood donors and HIV-positive patients admitted to Ege University Medical School Hospital, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Altuğlu, İmre; Yolcu, Ayfer; Öcek, Zeliha Aslı; Yazan Sertöz, Rüçhan; Gökengin, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), classified in Herpesviridae family, is the etiological agent of Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), primary effusion lymphoma and multicentric Castleman's disease. In contrast to the other herpesviruses, HHV-8 seroprevalence is low in general populations; however, the higher prevalence observed in individuals with immunodeficiencies such as AIDS poses an increased risk for KS. The global distribution of HHV-8 shows great variations, with the highest seroprevalence seen in Africa. The number of studies on the seroprevalence of HHV-8 in Turkey are limited. The aim of this study was to determine the HHV-8 seroprevalences in healthy blood donors and HIV-positive patients, that will contribute HHV-8 seroepidemiological data in our country. This study was designed as a cross-sectional study. A total of 551 healthy donors (76 female, 475 male; age range: 18-65 years) admitted to Ege University Medical School Hospital, Blood Center for blood donation between December 2013-January 2014, and 173 HIV-positive patients (30 female, 143 male; age range: 18-65 years) admitted to infectious diseases outpatient clinic between October 2013-January 2014, were included in the study. A commercial ELISA method (KSHV/HHV-8 IgG ELISA Kit, Advanced Biotechnologies Inc, USA) was used for the detection of IgG antibodies that were structured against HHV-8 lytic antigens. In the study, 29 (29/551, 5.3%) of blood donors and 44 (44/173, 25.4%) of HIV-positive patients, with a total of 73 (73/724, 10.1%) cases were found as HHV-8 seropositive. The difference between blood donors and HIV-positive patients in terms of HHV-8 seropositivity rates was statistically significant (5.3% versus 25.4%; p< 0.05). In both of the study groups, no statistically significant difference was detected between HHV-8 seropositivity with gender and age. When considering HIV-positive patients, no statistically significant difference was observed between HHV-8 seropositivity with the duration of anti

  8. Clinical Features, Short-Term Mortality, and Prognostic Risk Factors of Septic Patients Admitted to Internal Medicine Units: Results of an Italian Multicenter Prospective Study.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Antonino; Dentali, Francesco; La Regina, Micaela; Foglia, Emanuela; Gambacorta, Maurizia; Garagiola, Elisabetta; Bonardi, Giorgio; Clerici, Pierangelo; Concia, Ercole; Colombo, Fabrizio; Campanini, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Only a few studies provided data on the clinical history of sepsis within internal Medicine units. The aim of the study was to assess the short-term mortality and to evaluate the prognostic risk factors in a large cohort of septic patients treated in internal medicine units. Thirty-one internal medicine units participated to the study. Within each participating unit, all admitted patients were screened for the presence of sepsis. A total of 533 patients were included; 78 patients (14.6%, 95%CI 11.9, 18.0%) died during hospitalization; mortality rate was 5.5% (95% CI 3.1, 9.6%) in patients with nonsevere sepsis and 20.1% (95%CI 16.2, 28.8%) in patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. Severe sepsis or septic shock (OR 4.41, 95%CI 1.93, 10.05), immune system weakening (OR 2.10, 95%CI 1.12, 3.94), active solid cancer (OR 2.14, 95% CI 1.16, 3.94), and age (OR 1.03 per year, 95% CI 1.01, 1.06) were significantly associated with an increased mortality risk, whereas blood culture positive for Escherichia coli was significantly associated with a reduced mortality risk (OR 0.46, 95%CI 0.24, 0.88). In-hospital mortality of septic patients treated in internal medicine units appeared similar to the mortality rate obtained in recent studies conducted in the ICU setting. PMID:26825876

  9. [Atherosclerosis of the lower extremities as a linked comorbidity in Patients Admitted for cardiac rehabilitation (THINKPAD): rationale, design, and study group].

    PubMed

    Ambrosetti, Marco; Diaco, Tommaso; Febo, Oreste; Calisi, Pasqualina; Favretto, Giuseppe; Carlon, Roberto; Temporelli, Pier Luigi

    2012-03-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is a frequent comorbidity among patients entering cardiac rehabilitation (CR) programmes and an important source of disability and impaired prognosis. The prevalence of PAD across the wide range of conditions for CR is poorly understood, as far as its impact on drug optimization and intervention delivered. The "ATHerosclerosis of the lower extremities as a liNKed comorbidity in Patients Admitted for carDiac rehabilitation" (THINKPAD) study was carried out by the Italian Association for Cardiovascular Prevention, Rehabilitation and Epidemiology (GICR-IACPR) in order to explore PAD both as a comorbidity and a primary indication at the entry of CR. The study was a retrospective case series. In the study period (from May 1, 2012 to June 30, 2012), data on consecutive patients discharged from 17 CR units in Northern Italy were collected. Web-based electronic case report forms (e-CRF), accessible in a dedicated section of the IACPR website (www.iacpr.it), were used for data entry, and data were transferred via web to a central database. The data collection instrument was designed with a multiple choice format, with jump menus or select boxes and obligatory items. A sample size of 1,300 subjects is expected, with first data available by the end of 2012. PMID:22928398

  10. Factors affecting the discharge destination of hip fracture patients who live alone and have been admitted to an inpatient rehabilitation unit

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hiroyuki; Iwai, Midori; Matsuoka, Hiroka; Nakashima, Daiki; Nakamura, Shugo; Kubo, Ayumi; Tomiyama, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] (1) The aim of this study was to examine relations between clinical and functional assessment and discharge destination and (2) to identify the optimal cutoff point for estimating discharge to home after inpatient rehabilitation. [Subjects] The subjects were 54 hip fracture patients (15 males, 39 females; mean age 81.3 ± 7.4 years) living alone. [Methods] The patients were classified into two groups: those discharged to home and those admitted to an institution. Age, gender, side of fracture, fracture type, number of comorbidities, Functional Independence Measure motor score, and Functional Independence Measure cognitive score were compared between groups. Multiple logistic regression analysis was conducted with discharge to home as the dependent variable and age, gender, side of fracture, fracture type, number of comorbidities, Functional Independence Measure motor score, and Functional Independence Measure cognitive score as independent variables. A receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was used to identify a cutoff point for classification of the patients into the two groups. [Results] Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that the Functional Independence Measure cognitive score was a significant variable affecting the discharge destination. The receiver operating characteristic curve analysis revealed that discharge to home was predicted accurately by a Functional Independence Measure cognitive score of 23.5. [Conclusion] Information from this study is expected to be useful for determining discharge plans and for the setting of treatment goals. PMID:27190457

  11. What are the potential outcomes of integrating emotionally competent behaviours into the care of psychiatric patients?

    PubMed

    Doas, M D

    2013-04-01

    This descriptive study explored the concept of emotional competence in inpatient psychiatric nurse's daily interactions. Psychiatric registered nurses were asked to identify interactions of emotional competence they experienced on the nursing unit. Content analysis revealed deficits in self-awareness, mood management and managing relationships. PMID:22676309

  12. Outcome of patients admitted with acute coronary syndrome on palliative treatment: insights from the nationwide AMIS Plus Registry 1997–2014

    PubMed Central

    Erne, Paul; Radovanovic, Dragana; Seifert, Burkhardt; Bertel, Osmund; Urban, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Objective Compliance with guidelines is increasingly used to benchmark the quality of hospital care, however, very little is known on patients admitted with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and treated palliatively. This study aimed to evaluate the baseline characteristics and outcomes of these patients. Design Prospective cohort study. Setting Eighty-two Swiss hospitals enrolled patients from 1997 to 2014. Participants All patients with ACS enrolled in the AMIS Plus registry (n=45 091) were analysed according to three treatment groups: palliative treatment, defined as use of aspirin and analgesics only and no reperfusion; conservative treatment, defined as any treatment including antithrombotics or anticoagulants, heparins, P2Y12 inhibitors, GPIIb/IIIa but no pharmacological or mechanical reperfusion; and reperfusion treatment (thrombolysis and/or percutaneous coronary intervention during initial hospitalisation). The primary outcome measure was in-hospital mortality and the secondary measure was 1-year mortality. Results Of the patients, 1485 (3.3%) were palliatively treated, 11 119 (24.7%) were conservatively treated and 32 487 (72.0%) underwent reperfusion therapy. In 1997, 6% of all patients were treated palliatively and this continuously decreased to 2% in 2013. Baseline characteristics of palliative patients differed in comparison with conservatively treated and reperfusion patients in age, gender and comorbidities (all p<0.001). These patients had more in-hospital complications such as postadmission onset of cardiogenic shock (15.6% vs 5.2%; p<0.001), stroke (1.8% vs 0.8%; p=0.001) and a higher in-hospital mortality (25.8% vs 5.6%; p<0.001).The subgroup of patients followed 1 year after discharge (n=8316) had a higher rate of reinfarction (9.2% vs 3.4%; p=0.003) and mortality (14.0% vs 3.5%; p<0.001). Conclusions Patients with ACS treated palliatively were older, sicker, with more heart failure at admission and very high in-hospital mortality. While

  13. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Associated With Higher 1-year All-Cause Rehospitalization Rates in Patients Admitted for Acute Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Valbusa, Filippo; Bonapace, Stefano; Grillo, Cristina; Scala, Luca; Chiampan, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea; Zoppini, Giacomo; Lonardo, Amedeo; Arcaro, Guido; Byrne, Christopher D; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-02-01

    Repeat hospitalization due to acute heart failure (HF) is a global public health problem that markedly impacts on health resource use. Identifying novel predictors of rehospitalization would help physicians to determine the optimal postdischarge plan for preventing HF rehospitalization. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging risk factor for many heart diseases, including HF. We assessed whether NAFLD at hospital admission predicts 1-year all-cause rehospitalization in patients with acute HF. We enrolled all patients consecutively admitted for acute HF to our General Medicine Division, from January 2013 to April 2014, after excluding patients with acute myocardial infarction, severe heart valve diseases, malignancy, known liver diseases, and those with volume overload related to extracardiac causes. NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasonography and exclusion of competing etiologies. The primary outcome of the study was the 1-year all-cause rehospitalization rate. Among the 107 patients enrolled in the study, the cumulative rehospitalization rate was 12.1% at 1 month, 25.2% at 3 months, 29.9% at 6 months, and 38.3% at 1 year. Patients with NAFLD had markedly higher 1-year rehospitalization rates than those without NAFLD (58% vs 21% at 1 y; P < 0.001 by the log-rank test). Cox regression analysis revealed that NAFLD was associated with a 5.5-fold increased risk of rehospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio 5.56, 95% confidence interval 2.46-12.1, P < 0.001) after adjustment for multiple HF risk factors and potential confounders. In conclusion, NAFLD was independently associated with higher 1-year rehospitalization in patients hospitalized for acute HF. PMID:26886619

  14. Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Is Associated With Higher 1-year All-Cause Rehospitalization Rates in Patients Admitted for Acute Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Valbusa, Filippo; Bonapace, Stefano; Grillo, Cristina; Scala, Luca; Chiampan, Andrea; Rossi, Andrea; Zoppini, Giacomo; Lonardo, Amedeo; Arcaro, Guido; Byrne, Christopher D.; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Repeat hospitalization due to acute heart failure (HF) is a global public health problem that markedly impacts on health resource use. Identifying novel predictors of rehospitalization would help physicians to determine the optimal postdischarge plan for preventing HF rehospitalization. Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an emerging risk factor for many heart diseases, including HF. We assessed whether NAFLD at hospital admission predicts 1-year all-cause rehospitalization in patients with acute HF. We enrolled all patients consecutively admitted for acute HF to our General Medicine Division, from January 2013 to April 2014, after excluding patients with acute myocardial infarction, severe heart valve diseases, malignancy, known liver diseases, and those with volume overload related to extracardiac causes. NAFLD was diagnosed by ultrasonography and exclusion of competing etiologies. The primary outcome of the study was the 1-year all-cause rehospitalization rate. Among the 107 patients enrolled in the study, the cumulative rehospitalization rate was 12.1% at 1 month, 25.2% at 3 months, 29.9% at 6 months, and 38.3% at 1 year. Patients with NAFLD had markedly higher 1-year rehospitalization rates than those without NAFLD (58% vs 21% at 1 y; P < 0.001 by the log-rank test). Cox regression analysis revealed that NAFLD was associated with a 5.5-fold increased risk of rehospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio 5.56, 95% confidence interval 2.46–12.1, P < 0.001) after adjustment for multiple HF risk factors and potential confounders. In conclusion, NAFLD was independently associated with higher 1-year rehospitalization in patients hospitalized for acute HF. PMID:26886619

  15. Acute lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients from the ingestion of lead-based ceramic glazes.

    PubMed

    Vance, M V; Curry, S C; Bradley, J M; Kunkel, D B; Gerkin, R D; Bond, G R

    1990-10-01

    To our knowledge, acute inorganic lead poisoning from single ingestions of lead compounds has been only rarely reported. During a 14-month period, we were contacted regarding eight instances of acute ingestions of liquid lead-based ceramic glazes by mentally impaired residents of nursing homes or psychiatric facilities participating in ceramic arts programs. While some ingestions did not cause toxic effects, some patients developed acute lead poisoning characterized by abdominal pain, anemia, and basophilic stippling of red blood cells. In the blood of several patients, lead concentrations were far above normal (4 to 9.5 mumol/L). Urinary lead excretions were tremendously elevated during chelation therapy, with one patient excreting 535.9 mumol/L of lead during a 6-day period, the largest lead excretion ever reported in a patient suffering from acute lead poisoning, to our knowledge. All patients recovered following supportive care and appropriate use of chelating agents. Lead-based glazes are commonly found in nursing homes and psychiatric facilities. We suspect that acute or chronic lead poisoning from the ingestion(s) of lead-based ceramic glazes may be an unrecognized but not uncommon problem among such residents. We urge physicians to take ingestions of lead-based glazes seriously and to consider the diagnosis of lead poisoning in nursing home and psychiatric patients who have participated in ceramic crafts programs. PMID:2222094

  16. Accounting for Accountability: A Discourse Analysis of Psychiatric Nurses’ Experience of a Patient Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Robertson, Maggie; Paterson, Brodie; Lauder, Billy; Fenton, Rosemary; Gavin, John

    2010-01-01

    Whilst the experience of a patient suicide is likely to have a significant impact upon the nurses who had been providing care, little work has actually explored this experience in any depth. In this article we explore how two psychiatric nurses construct and orient to accountability when talking of their experiences of a patient suicide. Discourse analysis was used to explore particular phases that the nurses oriented to in their accounts: scene setting; risk assessment; attributing for the suicide. Findings highlight the different, sometimes contradictory, ways the nurses attended to interactional concerns relating to implicit accountability and potential inferences of blame. Analysis of the nurses’ talk can make a valuable contribution to understanding the nature and the impact of ‘accountability’ in a mental health setting and so help nurses and other professionals gain an insight into their practice. The results from this study suggest that as a consequence of internalising fundamentally unrealisable expectations regarding suicide prevention, nurses can hold themselves to blame raising significant concerns around their needs in terms of support, which may not be recognised. This paper also makes a valuable contribution to our methodological understanding and the value of using discourse analysis in this setting. PMID:20305746

  17. Prolactin and macroprolactin levels in psychiatric patients receiving atypical antipsychotics: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Min; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Bun-Hee; Lee, Kyu Young; Lee, Kye-Seong; Kang, Seung-Gul; Lee, Hwa-Young; Kim, Won

    2016-05-30

    The aims of this study were to clarify whether atypical antipsychotics can elevate serum levels of both macroprolactin and prolactin, and whether the macroprolactin levels differ according to the type of atypical antipsychotic being taken. In total, 245 subjects were enrolled consecutively in 6 hospitals. Serum prolactin and macroprolactin levels were measured at a single time point during maintenance antipsychotic monotherapy. The mean total serum prolactin levels including macroprolactin were 11.91, 20.73, 16.41, 50.83, 12.84, and 59.1ng/mL for patients taking aripiprazole, blonanserin, olanzapine, paliperidone, quetiapine, and risperidone, respectively, while those for macroprolactin were 1.71, 3.86, 3.73, 7.28, 2.77, and 8.0ng/mL. The total prolactin and macroprolactin levels were significantly higher among those taking paliperidone and risperidone than among those taking any of the other antipsychotics (p<0.01). Moreover, there was a strong positive correlation between serum levels of prolactin and macroprolactin. Sexual dysfunction was reported in 35.5% (87/245) of the total subjects. However, the total prolactin level did not differ significantly between subjects with and without sexual dysfunction except gynecomastia. These findings suggest that treatment with risperidone and paliperidone can induce hyperprolactinemia and macroprolactinemia in psychiatric patients. PMID:27010188

  18. Excessive self-focused attention and defensiveness among psychiatric patients: a vicious cycle?

    PubMed

    Höping, Winfried; de Jong-Meyer, Renate; Abrams, Dominic

    2006-04-01

    The contribution of defensive coping to the phenomenon of excessive self-focused attention was studied in 20 depressed or anxious psychiatric outpatients comprising the negative affect group, 20 patients with psychotic disorders, and a control group of 21 patients of an orthopaedic clinic. Self-focused attention was assessed using the Self-reflectiveness and Internal State Awareness subfactors of the Private Self-consciousness Scale. In accordance with other research on self-focused attention, the negative affect group obtained higher scores on the Self-reflectiveness scale than the control group (t39=2.40, p<.03). To examine the relationship between self-focus and defensiveness, Weinberger, Schwartz, and Davidson's approach was employed, using median splits of short forms of the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale and the Marlowe-Crowne scale to differentiate among four groups of subjects. The highest self-reflectiveness was found for those participants who were high in both defensiveness and anxiety. This group scored higher than the nondefensive high anxious group (t30= -2.31, p<.03). The heightened self-focused attention might result from automatically instigated states of self-focused attention and paradoxical effects of defensive efforts to avoid self-focus. PMID:16796082

  19. Centrifuge "therapy" for psychiatric patients in Germany in the early 1800s.

    PubMed

    Harsch, Viktor

    2006-02-01

    In 1818, Dr. Ernst Horn (1774-1848) reported miraculous cures for patients suffering from hysteria through the use of centrifuges at the psychiatric wards of the Charit6-Hospital in Berlin during the previous decade. In his book, "Public Account Concerning My 12 years' Service as Second Physician of the Royal Hospital in Berlin, Including Experiences from Hospitals and Mental Institutions," a full description of the indications and methods for treatment of mental illness, including technical data and construction costs for a rotating bed and rotating chair, is given. The rotating bed was turned by a crankshaft connected by ropes to a capstan. Slowing or stopping was achieved by tensing a rope around a wheel near the ceiling. With a diameter of 13 ft, this therapeutic instrument was capable of producing up to 4 to 5 -Gz in the head region. Several hundred patients and many volunteer subjects, including medical doctors, were reported to have been exposed to the rotating devices, along with some miraculous cures. Apart from the ethical problems associated with this type of torturous treatment, the rotating bed could be described as an ancient centrifuge. With the well-documented observations made on this device, the very first description of G-induced biomedical effects, such as shortness of breath and a feeling of oppression and anxiety, was given: These observations were comparable to those made one century later on human centrifuges and in flight. PMID:16491585

  20. Does antiepileptic drug withdrawal predispose patients undergoing temporal lobe epilepsy surgery to late onset of psychiatric morbidity? A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Shukla, Garima; Agarwal, Priya; Sagar, Rajesh; Sood, Mamta; Gupta, Aditya; Suri, Ashish; Garg, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is an established and increasingly utilized treatment option in medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Many psychiatric problems are known to complicate in the postoperative period. Most studies have a follow-up period of less than 24 months. We report the cases of three patients who developed severe psychiatric problems in the late postoperative period after successful temporal lobectomy for refractory epilepsy — Psychosis, major depression with psychosis, and severe anxiety disorder, respectively. None of the patients had past or family history of psychiatric disease. All three patients had undergone anterior temporal lobectomy on the right side for intractable epilepsy. They remained absolutely seizure-free after surgery. We conclude that psychiatric morbidity may arise de novo long after temporal lobectomy. This association between temporal lobectomy for epilepsy and late onset psychiatric morbidity should be carefully studied. Mechanisms underlying this late complication require deeper understanding of the effects of epilepsy surgery. PMID:27570392

  1. Does antiepileptic drug withdrawal predispose patients undergoing temporal lobe epilepsy surgery to late onset of psychiatric morbidity? A report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Garima; Agarwal, Priya; Sagar, Rajesh; Sood, Mamta; Gupta, Aditya; Suri, Ashish; Garg, Ajay

    2016-01-01

    Surgery is an established and increasingly utilized treatment option in medically refractory temporal lobe epilepsy. Many psychiatric problems are known to complicate in the postoperative period. Most studies have a follow-up period of less than 24 months. We report the cases of three patients who developed severe psychiatric problems in the late postoperative period after successful temporal lobectomy for refractory epilepsy - Psychosis, major depression with psychosis, and severe anxiety disorder, respectively. None of the patients had past or family history of psychiatric disease. All three patients had undergone anterior temporal lobectomy on the right side for intractable epilepsy. They remained absolutely seizure-free after surgery. We conclude that psychiatric morbidity may arise de novo long after temporal lobectomy. This association between temporal lobectomy for epilepsy and late onset psychiatric morbidity should be carefully studied. Mechanisms underlying this late complication require deeper understanding of the effects of epilepsy surgery. PMID:27570392

  2. Experience of gratitude, awe and beauty in life among patients with multiple sclerosis and psychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Feelings of gratitude and awe facilitate perceptions and cognitions that go beyond the focus of illness and include positive aspects of one’s personal and interpersonal reality, even in the face of disease. We intended to measure feelings of gratitude, awe, and experiences of beauty in life among patients with multiple sclerosis and psychiatric disorders, particularly with respect to their engagement in specific spiritual/religious practices and their life satisfaction. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey with standardized questionnaires to measure engagement in various spiritual practices (SpREUK-P) and their relation to experiences of Gratitude, Awe and Beauty in Life and life satisfaction (BMLSS-10). In total, 461 individuals (41 ± 13 years; 68% women) with multiple sclerosis (46%) and depressive (22%) or other psychiatric disorders (32%) participated. Results Among participants, 23% never, 43% rarely, 24% often, and 10% frequently experienced Gratitude. In contrast, 41% never, 37% rarely, 17% often, and 6% frequently experienced Awe. Beauty in Life was never experienced by 8% of the sample, and 28% rarely, 46% often, and 18% frequently experienced it. Gratitude (F = 9.2; p = .003) and Beauty in Life (F = 6.0; p = .015) were experienced significantly more often by women than men. However, the experience of Awe did not differ between women and men (F = 2.2; n.s.). In contrast to our hypothesis, Gratitude/Awe cannot explain any relevant variance in patients’ life satisfaction (R2 = .04). Regression analyses (R2 = .42) revealed that Gratitude/Awe can be predicted best by a person’s engagement in religious practices, followed by other forms of spiritual practices and life satisfaction. Female gender was a weak predictor and underlying disease showed no effect. Conclusions Gratitude/Awe could be regarded as a life orientation towards noticing and appreciating the positive in life - despite the symptoms of

  3. Predicting 1-Year Mortality Rate for Patients Admitted With an Acute Exacerbation of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease to an Intensive Care Unit: An Opportunity for Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Batzlaff, Cassandra M.; Karpman, Craig; Afessa, Bekele; Benzo, Roberto P.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a model to aid clinicians in better predicting 1-year mortality rate for patients with an acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease admitted to the medical intensive care unit (ICU) with the goal of earlier initiation of palliative care and end-of-life communications in this patient population. This retrospective cohort study included patients from a medical ICU from April 1, 1995, to November 30, 2009. Data collected from the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation III database included demographic characteristics; severity of illness scores; noninvasive and invasive mechanical ventilation time; ICU and hospital length of stay; and ICU, hospital, and 1-year mortality. Statistically significant univariate variables for 1-year mortality were entered into a multivariate model, and the independent variables were used to generate a scoring system to predict 1-year mortality rate. At 1-year follow-up, 295 of 591 patients died (50%). Age and hospital length of stay were identified as independent determinants of mortality at 1 year by using multivariate analysis, and the predictive model developed had an area under the operating curve of 0.68. Bootstrap analysis with 1000 iterations validated the model, age, and hospital length of stay, entered the model 100% of the time (area under the operating curve=0.687; 95% CI, 0.686–0.688). A simple model using age and hospital length of stay may be informative for providers willing to identify patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with high 1-year mortality rate who may benefit from end-of-life communications and from palliative care. PMID:24656805

  4. Diagnostic Value of Leukocyte Esterase Test Strip Reagents for Rapid Clinical Diagnosis of Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis in Patients Admitted to Hospital Emergency Departments in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Ahmadi, Koorosh; Zamani Moghaddam, Hamid; Zakeri, Hosein; Davoodi Navakh, Seyed Akbar; Sharifi, Mohammad Davood; Bahrami, Abdollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) is a common and important clinical problem and is life-threatening in decompensated liver disease. Ascites fluid test by leukocyte esterase test strip has been recently proposed as an effective and rapid method to diagnose SBP in patients with cirrhosis. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate sensitivity and specificity of leukocyte esterase test strip in the diagnosis of SBP. Patients and Methods: The population of this research was all patients with cirrhosis and ascites admitted to the emergency room at Imam Reza (AS) hospital, Mashhad. A written consent was taken for inclusion in the study. 50 mL ascites sample was taken from all patients for use in a urine test strip (LER) (Urine Test Strips Convergys®Urine Matrix 11). The patient’s ascites samples were evaluated for cell counting. Positive dipstick test for LER in this study considered as grade 3 +. The values of WBC > 500 cell/mm3 or PMN > 250 cell/mm3 considered as positive result of the gold standard method for the diagnosis of SBP. Results: In this study, 100 patients with ascites due to cirrhosis, with an average age of 38.9 ± 6.54 years were evaluated. Twenty cases had positive results, of whom 17 cases were also detected based on the standard diagnostic criteria and other three cases were healthy individuals. Thus, sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values, and accuracy of the method were 95%, 96.3%, 85%, 97.5% and 95%, respectively. Conclusions: The use of leukocyte esterase urine dipstick test can be a quick and easy method in early diagnosis of SBP to start the treatment until preparation of SBP-cell count results. PMID:26568859

  5. The Royal Free Hospital Score: A Calibrated Prognostic Model for Patients With Cirrhosis Admitted to Intensive Care Unit. Comparison With Current Models and CLIF-SOFA Score

    PubMed Central

    Theocharidou, Eleni; Pieri, Giulia; Mohammad, Ali Omar; Cheung, Michelle; Cholongitas, Evangelos; Banwari, Agarwal; Burroughs, Andrew K

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Prognosis for patients with cirrhosis admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) is poor. ICU prognostic models are more accurate than liver-specific models. We identified predictors of mortality, developed a novel prognostic score (Royal Free Hospital (RFH) score), and tested it against established prognostic models and the yet unvalidated Chronic Liver Failure-Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (CLIF-SOFA) model. METHODS: Predictors of mortality were defined by logistic regression in a cohort of 635 consecutive patients with cirrhosis admitted to ICU (1989–2012). The RFH score was derived using a 75% training and 25% validation set. Predictive accuracy and calibration were evaluated using area under the receiver operating characteristic (AUROC) and goodness-of-fit χ2 for the RFH score, as well as for SOFA, Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD), Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II), and Child-Pugh. CLIF-SOFA was applied to a recent subset (2005–2012) of patients. RESULTS: In-hospital mortality was 52.3%. Mortality improved over time but with a corresponding reduction in acuity of illness on admission. Predictors of mortality in training set, which constituted the RFH score, were the following: bilirubin, international normalized ratio, lactate, alveolar arterial partial pressure oxygen gradient, urea, while variceal bleeding as indication for admission conferred lesser risk. Classification accuracy was 73.4% in training and 76.7% in validation sample and did not change significantly across different eras of admission. The AUROC for the derived model was 0.83 and the goodness-of-fit χ2 was 3.74 (P=0.88). AUROC for SOFA was 0.81, MELD was 0.79, APACHE II was 0.78, and Child-Pugh was 0.67. In 2005–2012 cohort, AUROC was: SOFA: 0.74, CLIF-SOFA: 0.75, and RFH: 0.78. Goodness-of-fit χ2 was: SOFA: 6.21 (P=0.63), CLIF-SOFA: 9.18 (P=0.33), and RFH: 2.91 (P=0.94). CONCLUSIONS: RFH score demonstrated good discriminative ability and

  6. Cross-Racial Foster Home Placement among Native American Psychiatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Westermeyer, Joseph

    1977-01-01

    In Minnesota, about 0.5 percent of the general population are raised outside of their biologic homes. However, it has been estimated that 25 to 30 percent of all Indian children under the age of 18 years are currently living outside of their biologic homes. Clinical experience with adolescent and adult Indian psychiatric patients bears this out: about half of them have been raised in foster or adoptive homes. Seventeen American Indian patients who had been raised in non-Indian foster and adoptive homes were interviewed for five to ten hours each. Data were collected from the patients and social agencies regarding demographic characteristics, social coping, and current clinical problems. In addition, information obtained regarding their out-of-family placement included: age at placement, reason for placement, number of subsequent placements, and interracial and intraracial relationships during placement and subsequently during adulthood. This clinical sample shows a low rate of psychosis and neurosis, but a high rate of alcohol-related disorders, suicide attempts, and behavioral problems. While their education is average, their employment and marital status shows marked social disability. Most have had numerous childhood placements over a long period, all in white homes, and none have subsequently returned to their family-of-origin. These unfortunate human beings have been described by both whites and Indians in Minnesota as “apples”: racially “red” or Indian on the outside, but culturally white on the inside. White groups do not accept them as whites because they are distinctively racial Indians, but they do not feel at ease in Indian communities since they were raised with white values and attitudes. While some of these people do indeed make successful adjustments in Indian or white society (or both) the results of this study show that many apparently do not. PMID:853536

  7. Psychophysiology and psychoacoustics of music: Perception of complex sound in normal subjects and psychiatric patients

    PubMed Central

    Iakovides, Stefanos A; Iliadou, Vassiliki TH; Bizeli, Vassiliki TH; Kaprinis, Stergios G; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Kaprinis, George S

    2004-01-01

    Perception of complex sound is a process carried out in everyday life situations and contributes in the way one perceives reality. Attempting to explain sound perception and how it affects human beings is complicated. Physics of simple sound can be described as a function of frequency, amplitude and phase. Psychology of sound, also termed psychoacoustics, has its own distinct elements of pitch, intensity and tibre. An interconnection exists between physics and psychology of hearing. Music being a complex sound contributes to communication and conveys information with semantic and emotional elements. These elements indicate the involvement of the central nervous system through processes of integration and interpretation together with peripheral auditory processing. Effects of sound and music in human psychology and physiology are complicated. Psychological influences of listening to different types of music are based on the different characteristics of basic musical sounds. Attempting to explain music perception can be simpler if music is broken down to its basic auditory signals. Perception of auditory signals is analyzed by the science of psychoacoustics. Differences in complex sound perception have been found between normal subjects and psychiatric patients and between different types of psychopathologies. PMID:15050030

  8. Psychophysiology and psychoacoustics of music: Perception of complex sound in normal subjects and psychiatric patients.

    PubMed

    Iakovides, Stefanos A; Iliadou, Vassiliki TH; Bizeli, Vassiliki TH; Kaprinis, Stergios G; Fountoulakis, Konstantinos N; Kaprinis, George S

    2004-03-29

    Perception of complex sound is a process carried out in everyday life situations and contributes in the way one perceives reality. Attempting to explain sound perception and how it affects human beings is complicated. Physics of simple sound can be described as a function of frequency, amplitude and phase. Psychology of sound, also termed psychoacoustics, has its own distinct elements of pitch, intensity and tibre. An interconnection exists between physics and psychology of hearing.Music being a complex sound contributes to communication and conveys information with semantic and emotional elements. These elements indicate the involvement of the central nervous system through processes of integration and interpretation together with peripheral auditory processing.Effects of sound and music in human psychology and physiology are complicated. Psychological influences of listening to different types of music are based on the different characteristics of basic musical sounds. Attempting to explain music perception can be simpler if music is broken down to its basic auditory signals. Perception of auditory signals is analyzed by the science of psychoacoustics. Differences in complex sound perception have been found between normal subjects and psychiatric patients and between different types of psychopathologies. PMID:15050030

  9. Gender differences in the clinical characteristics and psychiatric comorbidity in patients with antisocial personality disorder.

    PubMed

    Sher, Leo; Siever, Larry J; Goodman, Marianne; McNamara, Margaret; Hazlett, Erin A; Koenigsberg, Harold W; New, Antonia S

    2015-10-30

    Gender is an important variable in the study of mental health because of the actual and perceived differences between men and women. Relatively little is known how males and females differ in their manifestations of antisocial personality disorder (ASPD). Demographic and clinical features of 323 participants with ASPD were assessed and recorded. Women had fewer episodes of antisocial behavior involving or not involving police, higher scores on the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and on Emotional Abuse and Sexual Abuse subscales of the CTQ compared to men. CTQ scores positively correlated with the number of episodes of antisocial behavior involving police in men but not in women. The percentage of patients with comorbid borderline and histrionic personality disorders was higher and the percentage of participants with cocaine use disorder was lower among women compared to men. Comorbid alcohol use disorder was frequent in both groups, while a higher percentage of women had comorbid mood disorders compared to men. Logistic regression analysis demonstrates that CTQ scores, histrionic personality disorder, and antisocial behavior involving the police drive the difference between the groups. Our findings indicate that treatment of individuals with ASPD should focus on the management of comorbid psychiatric disorders. PMID:26296756

  10. Voluntary psychiatric hospitalization and patient-driven requests for discharge: a statutory review and analysis of implications for the capacity to consent to voluntary hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Garakani, Amir; Shalenberg, Eli; Burstin, Samantha C; Weintraub Brendel, Rebecca; Appel, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    Along with the advances in civil rights protections for psychiatric patients since the 1970s, so-called voluntary inpatient psychiatric admissions have become common. In most U.S. states, however, these voluntary admissions abridge the rights of patients through legal provisions that limit the conditions under which patients can be discharged upon their request. This phenomenon, including variations in the state laws governing requests for discharge from voluntary psychiatric hospitalization, has received little attention in the psychiatry literature. Using Lexis-Nexis, PubMed, and Web of Science, we conducted a review of state laws regarding patients' legal rights to request discharge from voluntary hospitalization. Our hypothesis was that most states would have provisions limiting access to immediate discharge for patients whose psychiatric admission had been voluntary. Our findings from the review indicate that 49 of the 51 jurisdictions (50 states plus the District of Columbia) have provisions about patients requesting discharge from voluntary psychiatric admission. The majority of states employ a 72-hour period in which patients can be held following a request for discharge from hospitalization. As a general rule, after this evaluation period, either the patient must be discharged, or the facility must initiate involuntary commitment proceedings. Given these provisions, we explore the range of clinical admission procedures and whether voluntary admissions are truly voluntary. We also discuss the implications of our analysis for assessing the decisional capacity of patients seeking voluntary psychiatric admission. PMID:24983871

  11. Emergency Department Length-Of-Stay For Psychiatric Visits Was Significantly Longer Than For Nonpsychiatric Visits, 2002-11.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jane M; Singhal, Astha; Hsia, Renee Y

    2016-09-01

    Despite increases in the use of emergency department (EDs) for mental health care, there are limited data on whether psychiatric patients disproportionately contribute to ED crowding. We conducted a retrospective analysis using a national database of ED visits in the period 2002-11 to describe trends in median and ninetieth-percentile length-of-stay for patients with psychiatric versus nonpsychiatric primary diagnoses. Psychiatric patients who visited the ED were transferred to another facility at six times the rate of nonpsychiatric patients. Median lengths-of-stay were similar for psychiatric and nonpsychiatric patients among those who were admitted to the hospital (264 versus 269 minutes) but significantly different for those who were admitted for observation (355 versus 279 minutes), transferred (312 versus 195 minutes), or discharged (189 versus 144 minutes). Overall, differences in ED length-of-stay between psychiatric and nonpsychiatric patients did not narrow over time. These findings suggest deficiencies in ED capacity for psychiatric care, which may necessitate improvements in both throughput and alternative models of care. PMID:27605653

  12. ["Euthanasia" operation by Nazis on patients with psychiatric or hereditary diseases, and Bishop von Galen of Münster].

    PubMed

    Izumi, Hyonosuke

    2003-07-01

    In so-called "euthanasia" operations, Nazis murdered patients with psychiatric or hereditary diseases in large numbers. Psychiatric patients in Germany were sent to six institutions, where they were deprived of their lives in gas chambers. In his sermon delivered on 3rd August, 1941, at St Lambert's Church in Münster, Bishop von Galen of Münster intensely condemned this cruel operation in public. Quoting the fifth commandment, "Thou shall not kill", he said it was sinful to kill innocent people on account of their unproductiveness. By the influence of this brave sermon, Hitler had to order the closure of the institutions, though the "euthanasia" operation itself was secretly continued. PMID:14518473

  13. Profile Difference Between Male and Female Psychiatric Patients Seeking Certificate of Disability

    PubMed Central

    Balhara, Yatan Pal Singh; Gauba, Deepak; Deshpande, Smita N.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Neuropsychiatric disorders are one of the major contributors to the global burden of disease and disability. Issue of disability in psychiatric disorders has been studied across multiple studies in India. However, there are no reports on the profile and nature of disability among those seeking disability certificates. The current study aims at understanding the socio-clinical profile of patients seeking disability certificate in a tertiary care hospital in India. Methods The study was carried out in the Department of Psychiatry of a tertiary care multispecialty teaching hospital. A chart review of the records of the patients referred for disability evaluation over a one year period was conducted. The disability was assessed using IDEAS. In between group comparisons were carried out for male and female subjects for different socio-demographic variables, IDEAS total score and individuals item score using independent sample t test (parametric test) and Mann Whitney-U test (non parametric test). Additionally, Spearman’s rank order correlation was calculated to establish the level of correlation between total IDEAS score and score on individual items of the scale. Results The subjects were diagnosed to have been suffering from mental retardation 107 (61.8%), schizophrenia 54 (31.2%), dementia 5 (2.9%), bipolar affective disorder 4 (2.3%) and obsessive compulsive disorder 3 (1.7%) as per ICD-10. Male and female subjects differed significantly on the global IDEAS score. The total score was significantly higher for male subjects compared to female subjects. The difference was statistically significant for "self care" and interpersonal activities items of the scale with male subjects having higher disability scores. Conclusions The current study provides some important insights into profile of disability certificate seeking individuals in India. PMID:22253949

  14. Interventions to improve therapeutic communications between Black and minority ethnic patients and professionals in psychiatric services: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Bhui, Kamaldeep S.; Aslam, Rabeea'h W.; Palinski, Andrea; McCabe, Rose; Johnson, Mark R. D.; Weich, Scott; Singh, Swaran P.; Knapp, Martin; Ardino, Vittoria; Szczepura, Ala

    2015-01-01

    Background Communication may be an influential determinant of inequality of access to, engagement with and benefit from psychiatric services. Aims To review the evidence on interventions designed to improve therapeutic communications between Black and minority ethnic patients and clinicians who provide care in psychiatric services. Method Systematic review and evidence synthesis (PROSPERO registration: CRD42011001661). Data sources included the published and the ‘grey’ literature. A survey of experts and a consultation with patients and carers all contributed to the evidence synthesis, interpretation and recommendations. Results Twenty-one studies were included in our analysis. The trials showed benefits mainly for depressive symptoms, experiences of care, knowledge, stigma, adherence to prescribed medication, insight and alliance. The effect sizes were smaller for better-quality trials (range of d 0.18–0.75) than for moderate- or lower-quality studies (range of d 0.18–4.3). The review found only two studies offering weak economic evidence. Conclusions Culturally adapted psychotherapies, and ethnographic and motivational assessment leading to psychotherapies were effective and favoured by patients and carers. Further trials are needed from outside of the UK and USA, as are economic evaluations and studies of routine psychiatric care practices. PMID:26243761

  15. A dance movement therapy group for depressed adult patients in a psychiatric outpatient clinic: effects of the treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pylvänäinen, Päivi M.; Muotka, Joona S.; Lappalainen, Raimo

    2015-01-01

    We were interested in investigating the effects of dance movement therapy (DMT) in a psychiatric outpatient clinic with patients diagnosed with depression. DMT aims to engage the patients in physical and verbal exploration of their experiences generated in movement based interaction. The assumption was that DMT, which includes both physical engagement as well as emotional and social exploration, would alleviate the mood and psychiatric symptoms. All adult patients (n = 33) included in the study received treatment as usual (TAU). Twenty-one patients participated in a 12-session DMT group intervention, and the remaining 12 patients chose to take TAU only. The majority of the patients suffered from moderate or severe depression, recurrent and/or chronic type. The effects of the interventions were investigated after the intervention, and at 3-month follow-up. Compared to the TAU, adding DMT seemed to improve the effect of the treatment. The effect of the DMT was observable whether the patient was taking antidepressant medication or not. At follow-up, between group effect sizes (ES) were medium in favor for the DMT group (d = 0.60–0.79). In the DMT group, the within ES at the 3 months follow-up varied from 0.62 to 0.82 as compared to TAU 0.15–0.37. The results indicated that DMT is beneficial in the treatment of depressed patients. PMID:26217292

  16. Clinical outcomes and mortality associated with weekend admission to psychiatric hospital

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rashmi; Chesney, Edward; Cullen, Alexis E.; Tulloch, Alex D.; Broadbent, Matthew; Stewart, Robert; McGuire, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Background Studies indicate that risk of mortality is higher for patients admitted to acute hospitals at the weekend. However, less is known about clinical outcomes among patients admitted to psychiatric hospitals. Aims To investigate whether weekend admission to a psychiatric hospital is associated with worse clinical outcomes. Method Data were obtained from 45 264 consecutive psychiatric hospital admissions. The association of weekend admission with in-patient mortality, duration of hospital admission and risk of readmission was investigated using multivariable regression analyses. Secondary analyses were performed to investigate the distribution of admissions, discharges, in-patient mortality, episodes of seclusion and violent incidents on different days of the week. Results There were 7303 weekend admissions (16.1%). Patients who were aged between 26 and 35 years, female or from a minority ethnic group were more likely to be admitted at the weekend. Patients admitted at the weekend were more likely to present via acute hospital services, other psychiatric hospitals and the criminal justice system than to be admitted directly from their own home. Weekend admission was associated with a shorter duration of admission (B coefficient −21.1 days, 95% CI −24.6 to −17.6, P<0.001) and an increased risk of readmission in the 12 months following index admission (incidence rate ratio 1.13, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.18, P<0.001), but in-patient mortality (odds ratio (OR) = 0.79, 95% CI 0.51 to 1.23, P = 0.30) was not greater than for weekday admission. Fewer episodes of seclusion occurred at the weekend but there was no significant variation in deaths during hospital admission or violent incidents on different days of the week. Conclusions Being admitted at the weekend was not associated with an increased risk of in-patient mortality. However, patients admitted at the weekend had shorter admissions and were more likely to be readmitted, suggesting that they may represent a

  17. Psychiatric Disorders in Children and Adolescents Attending Pediatric Out Patient Departments of Tertiary Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Jesmin, Akhter; Rahman, Khan Muhammad Zillur; Muntasir, Maruf Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Psychiatric disorders are increasingly recognized among children and adolescents in Bangladesh. Psychiatric disorders are more common in children with chronic and acute pediatric disorders. Our study was designed to determine the psychiatric disorders among children and adolescents attending pediatric outpatient departments of tertiary care hospitals. Methods This cross-sectional study was carried out from July 2012 to February 2013 in pediatric outpatient departments of three prime tertiary level hospitals of Dhaka, Bangladesh. A purposive sampling technique was used. A total of 240 male and female children aged 5 to 16 years old were included in the study. We used a semi-structured questionnaire to obtain sociodemographic and other relevant clinical information about the children and their families from their parents or caregivers and a validated parent version of the Bangla Development and Well-Being Assessment (DAWBA) for measuring psychopathology. Results The mean age of the children was 9.0± 2.6 years. The majority (71%) of children were in the 5–10 year age group. The male/female ratio was 1.2:1. Among the respondents, 18% were found to have a psychiatric disorder. Behavioral disorders, emotional disorders, and developmental disorders were found in 9.0%, 15.0% and 0.4% respectively. Hyperkinetic disorder was the single most frequent (5.0%) psychiatric disorder. Conclusions A significant number of children were found to have psychiatric disorders. Our study indicates the importance of identification and subsequent management of psychiatric conditions among the pediatric population. PMID:27403237

  18. Faecal Escherichia coli isolates show potential to cause endogenous infection in patients admitted to the ICU in a tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Nagarjuna, D; Mittal, G; Dhanda, R S; Verma, P K; Gaind, R; Yadav, M

    2015-09-01

    Nosocomial infections are acquired during hospital treatment or in a hospital environment. One such infecting agent, Esche