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Sample records for adobe flash player

  1. Collecting response times using Amazon Mechanical Turk and Adobe Flash.

    PubMed

    Simcox, Travis; Fiez, Julie A

    2014-03-01

    Crowdsourcing systems like Amazon's Mechanical Turk (AMT) allow data to be collected from a large sample of people in a short amount of time. This use has garnered considerable interest from behavioral scientists. So far, most experiments conducted on AMT have focused on survey-type instruments because of difficulties inherent in running many experimental paradigms over the Internet. This study investigated the viability of presenting stimuli and collecting response times using Adobe Flash to run ActionScript 3 code in conjunction with AMT. First, the timing properties of Adobe Flash were investigated using a phototransistor and two desktop computers running under several conditions mimicking those that may be present in research using AMT. This experiment revealed some strengths and weaknesses of the timing capabilities of this method. Next, a flanker task and a lexical decision task implemented in Adobe Flash were administered to participants recruited with AMT. The expected effects in these tasks were replicated. Power analyses were conducted to describe the number of participants needed to replicate these effects. A questionnaire was used to investigate previously undescribed computer use habits of 100 participants on AMT. We conclude that a Flash program in conjunction with AMT can be successfully used for running many experimental paradigms that rely on response times, although experimenters must understand the limitations of the method.

  2. Adobe Flash as a medium for online experimentation: a test of reaction time measurement capabilities.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2007-08-01

    Adobe Flash can be used to run complex psychological experiments over the Web. We examined the reliability of using Flash to measure reaction times (RTs) using a simple binary-choice task implemented both in Flash and in a Linux-based system known to record RTs with millisecond accuracy. Twenty-four participants were tested in the laboratory using both implementations; they also completed the Flash version on computers of their own choice outside the lab. RTs from the trials run on Flash outside the lab were approximately 20 msec slower than those from trials run on Flash in the lab, which in turn were approximately 10 msec slower than RTs from the trials run on the Linux-based system (baseline condition). RT SDs were similar in all conditions, suggesting that although Flash may overestimate RTs slightly, it does not appear to add significant noise to the data recorded.

  3. Vector Graphics for Web Lectures: Experiences with Adobe Flash 9 and SVG

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ketterl, Markus; Mertens, Robert; Vornberger, Oliver

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe vector graphics for web lectures, focusing on the experiences with Adobe Flash 9 and SVG. Design/methodology/approach: The paper presents experiences made during the development and everyday use of two versions of the lecture-recording system virtPresenter. The first of these versions is based on…

  4. MedlinePlus: Viewers & Players

    MedlinePlus

    ... Download NLM podcasts and applications. mp3 mp4 mov Adobe Reader Read and print Portable Document Format (PDF) from your Web browser. pdf Adobe Flash Player View applications, content, and videos developed ...

  5. Visual reinforcement audiometry: an Adobe Flash based approach.

    PubMed

    Atherton, Steve

    2010-09-01

    Visual Reinforcement Audiometry (VRA) is a key behavioural test for young children. It is central to the diagnosis of hearing-impaired infants (1) . Habituation to the visual reinforcement can give misleading results. Medical Illustration ABM University Health Board has designed a collection of Flash animations to overcome this.

  6. Presentation and response timing accuracy in Adobe Flash and HTML5/JavaScript Web experiments.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Web-based research is becoming ubiquitous in the behavioral sciences, facilitated by convenient, readily available participant pools and relatively straightforward ways of running experiments: most recently, through the development of the HTML5 standard. Although in most studies participants give untimed responses, there is a growing interest in being able to record response times online. Existing data on the accuracy and cross-machine variability of online timing measures are limited, and generally they have compared behavioral data gathered on the Web with similar data gathered in the lab. For this article, we took a more direct approach, examining two ways of running experiments online-Adobe Flash and HTML5 with CSS3 and JavaScript-across 19 different computer systems. We used specialist hardware to measure stimulus display durations and to generate precise response times to visual stimuli in order to assess measurement accuracy, examining effects of duration, browser, and system-to-system variability (such as across different Windows versions), as well as effects of processing power and graphics capability. We found that (a) Flash and JavaScript's presentation and response time measurement accuracy are similar; (b) within-system variability is generally small, even in low-powered machines under high load; (c) the variability of measured response times across systems is somewhat larger; and (d) browser type and system hardware appear to have relatively small effects on measured response times. Modeling of the effects of this technical variability suggests that for most within- and between-subjects experiments, Flash and JavaScript can both be used to accurately detect differences in response times across conditions. Concerns are, however, noted about using some correlational or longitudinal designs online.

  7. Presentation and response timing accuracy in Adobe Flash and HTML5/JavaScript Web experiments.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2015-06-01

    Web-based research is becoming ubiquitous in the behavioral sciences, facilitated by convenient, readily available participant pools and relatively straightforward ways of running experiments: most recently, through the development of the HTML5 standard. Although in most studies participants give untimed responses, there is a growing interest in being able to record response times online. Existing data on the accuracy and cross-machine variability of online timing measures are limited, and generally they have compared behavioral data gathered on the Web with similar data gathered in the lab. For this article, we took a more direct approach, examining two ways of running experiments online-Adobe Flash and HTML5 with CSS3 and JavaScript-across 19 different computer systems. We used specialist hardware to measure stimulus display durations and to generate precise response times to visual stimuli in order to assess measurement accuracy, examining effects of duration, browser, and system-to-system variability (such as across different Windows versions), as well as effects of processing power and graphics capability. We found that (a) Flash and JavaScript's presentation and response time measurement accuracy are similar; (b) within-system variability is generally small, even in low-powered machines under high load; (c) the variability of measured response times across systems is somewhat larger; and (d) browser type and system hardware appear to have relatively small effects on measured response times. Modeling of the effects of this technical variability suggests that for most within- and between-subjects experiments, Flash and JavaScript can both be used to accurately detect differences in response times across conditions. Concerns are, however, noted about using some correlational or longitudinal designs online. PMID:24903687

  8. Auditory presentation and synchronization in Adobe Flash and HTML5/JavaScript Web experiments.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2016-09-01

    Substantial recent research has examined the accuracy of presentation durations and response time measurements for visually presented stimuli in Web-based experiments, with a general conclusion that accuracy is acceptable for most kinds of experiments. However, many areas of behavioral research use auditory stimuli instead of, or in addition to, visual stimuli. Much less is known about auditory accuracy using standard Web-based testing procedures. We used a millisecond-accurate Black Box Toolkit to measure the actual durations of auditory stimuli and the synchronization of auditory and visual presentation onsets. We examined the distribution of timings for 100 presentations of auditory and visual stimuli across two computers with difference specs, three commonly used browsers, and code written in either Adobe Flash or JavaScript. We also examined different coding options for attempting to synchronize the auditory and visual onsets. Overall, we found that auditory durations were very consistent, but that the lags between visual and auditory onsets varied substantially across browsers and computer systems.

  9. Using Adobe Flash animations of electron transport chain to teach and learn biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Teplá, Milada; Klímová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash CS3 Professional animation program and is designed for high school chemistry students. Our goal is to develop educational materials that facilitate the comprehension of this complex subject through dynamic animations which show the course of the electron transport chain and simultaneously explain its nature. We record the process of the electron transport chain, including connections with oxidative phosphorylation, in such a way as to minimize the occurrence of discrepancies in interpretation. The educational program was evaluated in high schools through the administration of a questionnaire, which contained 12 opened-ended items and which required participants to evaluate the graphics of the animations, chemical content, student preferences, and its suitability for high school biochemistry teaching.

  10. Using Adobe Flash animations of electron transport chain to teach and learn biochemistry.

    PubMed

    Teplá, Milada; Klímová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash CS3 Professional animation program and is designed for high school chemistry students. Our goal is to develop educational materials that facilitate the comprehension of this complex subject through dynamic animations which show the course of the electron transport chain and simultaneously explain its nature. We record the process of the electron transport chain, including connections with oxidative phosphorylation, in such a way as to minimize the occurrence of discrepancies in interpretation. The educational program was evaluated in high schools through the administration of a questionnaire, which contained 12 opened-ended items and which required participants to evaluate the graphics of the animations, chemical content, student preferences, and its suitability for high school biochemistry teaching. PMID:25846233

  11. Auditory presentation and synchronization in Adobe Flash and HTML5/JavaScript Web experiments.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2016-09-01

    Substantial recent research has examined the accuracy of presentation durations and response time measurements for visually presented stimuli in Web-based experiments, with a general conclusion that accuracy is acceptable for most kinds of experiments. However, many areas of behavioral research use auditory stimuli instead of, or in addition to, visual stimuli. Much less is known about auditory accuracy using standard Web-based testing procedures. We used a millisecond-accurate Black Box Toolkit to measure the actual durations of auditory stimuli and the synchronization of auditory and visual presentation onsets. We examined the distribution of timings for 100 presentations of auditory and visual stimuli across two computers with difference specs, three commonly used browsers, and code written in either Adobe Flash or JavaScript. We also examined different coding options for attempting to synchronize the auditory and visual onsets. Overall, we found that auditory durations were very consistent, but that the lags between visual and auditory onsets varied substantially across browsers and computer systems. PMID:27421976

  12. Using Adobe Flash Animations of Electron Transport Chain to Teach and Learn Biochemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teplá, Milada; Klímová, Helena

    2015-01-01

    Teaching the subject of the electron transport chain is one of the most challenging aspects of the chemistry curriculum at the high school level. This article presents an educational program called "Electron Transport Chain" which consists of 14 visual animations including a biochemistry quiz. The program was created in the Adobe Flash…

  13. Using Adobe Flash Lite on mobile phones for psychological research: Reaction time measurement reliability and interdevice variability.

    PubMed

    Reimers, Stian; Stewart, Neil

    2008-11-01

    Mobile telephones have significant potential for use in psychological research, possessing unique characteristics-not least their ubiquity--that may make them useful tools for psychologists. We examined whether it is possible to measure reaction times (RTs) accurately using Adobe Flash Lite on mobile phones. We ran simple and choice RT experiments on two widely available mobile phones, a Nokia 6110 Navigator and a Sony Ericsson W810i, using a wireless application protocol (WAP) connection to access the Internet from the devices. RTs were compared within subjects with those obtained using a Linux-based millisecond-accurate measurement system. Results show that measured RTs were significantly longer on mobile devices, and that overall RTs and distribution of RTs varied across devices.

  14. Evaluation of Adobe[R] Presenter as a Teaching Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grabowski, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    Adobe[R] Presenter software provides educators with a tool to create narrated distance learning presentations. This article describes Adobe[R] Presenter's many features and explains which most strongly affect learning. Six Adobe[R] Presenter trainings were presented to 62 volunteers preparing to provide information at a public outreach event. One…

  15. Adobe Boxes: Locating Object Proposals Using Object Adobes.

    PubMed

    Fang, Zhiwen; Cao, Zhiguo; Xiao, Yang; Zhu, Lei; Yuan, Junsong

    2016-09-01

    Despite the previous efforts of object proposals, the detection rates of the existing approaches are still not satisfactory enough. To address this, we propose Adobe Boxes to efficiently locate the potential objects with fewer proposals, in terms of searching the object adobes that are the salient object parts easy to be perceived. Because of the visual difference between the object and its surroundings, an object adobe obtained from the local region has a high probability to be a part of an object, which is capable of depicting the locative information of the proto-object. Our approach comprises of three main procedures. First, the coarse object proposals are acquired by employing randomly sampled windows. Then, based on local-contrast analysis, the object adobes are identified within the enlarged bounding boxes that correspond to the coarse proposals. The final object proposals are obtained by converging the bounding boxes to tightly surround the object adobes. Meanwhile, our object adobes can also refine the detection rate of most state-of-the-art methods as a refinement approach. The extensive experiments on four challenging datasets (PASCAL VOC2007, VOC2010, VOC2012, and ILSVRC2014) demonstrate that the detection rate of our approach generally outperforms the state-of-the-art methods, especially with relatively small number of proposals. The average time consumed on one image is about 48 ms, which nearly meets the real-time requirement.

  16. Shock Compression of Simulated Adobe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braithwaite, C. H.; Church, P. D.; Gould, P. J.; Stewart, B.; Jardine, A. P.

    2015-06-01

    A series of plate impact experiments were conducted to investigate the shock response of a simulant for adobe, a traditional form of building material widely used around the world. Air dried bricks were sourced from the London brick company, dry machined and impacted at a range of velocities in a single stage gas gun. The shock Hugoniot was determined (Us = 2.26up + 0.33) as well as release information. The material was found to behave in a manner which was similar to that of loose sand and considerably less stiff than a weak porous sandstone. The effect of any cementing of the grains was examined by shocking powdered samples contained within a cell arrangement. The research was funded by DSTL through a WSTC contract.

  17. Preservation of adobe buildings. Study of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velosa, A.; Rocha, F.; Costa, C.; Varum, H.

    2012-04-01

    Adobe buildings are common in the central region of Portugal due to the lack of natural stone in the surrounding area. This type of construction technique lasted until the 20th Century, at which time cementitious materials, with faster hardening and greater structural capacity substituted traditional materials and techniques. Currently, a significant percentage of these buildings is vacant and many are degraded and in need of conservation actions. Adobes from central Portugal are distinctive as they are lightly coloured and made from air lime and quarry sand. Although some adobes were manufactured locally, most were produced almost 'industrially' and sold to nearby regions. In order to preserve this heritage, conservation actions must be undertaken. So as to ensure the adequacy of these actions and compatibility between original materials and new ones, a thorough study of adobe compostion is mandatory. The current study is an initial step in the characterization of earth based construction materials from central Portugal. Adobe samples were collected from residential buildings in two different locations. The determination of the composition of adobe blocks encompassed the determination of the binder fraction and of their chemical composition and also the particle size analysis of the aggregate. For this purpose FRX analysis, acid dissolution and dry sieving were performed. Methylene blue test was also executed in order to determine the clay fraction. Additionally, the mineral composition of powder samples and oriented samples was performed using XRD analysis in order to determine the clay minerals present in the blocks. As adobe blocks are extremely prone to the action of water the Geelong test was undertaken in order to provide information in terms of durability. It was concluded that air lime was generally used in adobe compositions. However, the clay content varies in adobes from different regions, providing distinct durability characteristics to these materials.

  18. 76 FR 553 - FDIC Advisory Committee on Community Banking; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... anyone with the following systems requirements: http://www.vodium.com/home/sysreq.html . Adobe Flash Player is required to view these presentations. The latest version of Adobe Flash Player can be downloaded at...

  19. 75 FR 67091 - FDIC Advisory Committee on Economic Inclusion (ComE-IN); Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-01

    ... anyone with the following systems requirements: http://www.vodium.com/home/sysreq.html . Adobe Flash Player is required to view these presentations. The latest version of Adobe Flash Player can be downloaded at...

  20. 77 FR 21773 - FDIC Advisory Committee on Economic Inclusion (ComE-IN); Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... available to anyone with the following systems requirements: http://www.vodium.com/home/sysreq.html . Adobe Flash Player is required to view these presentations. The latest version of Adobe Flash Player can be downloaded at...

  1. 78 FR 58537 - FDIC Advisory Committee on Economic Inclusion (ComE-IN); Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-24

    ... anyone with the following systems requirements: http://www.vodium.com/home/sysreq.html . Adobe Flash Player is required to view these presentations. The latest version of Adobe Flash Player can be downloaded at...

  2. 76 FR 32203 - FDIC Systemic Resolution Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-03

    ... available to anyone with the following systems requirements: http://www.vodium.com/home/sysreq.html . Adobe Flash Player is required to view these presentations. The latest version of Adobe Flash Player can be downloaded at:...

  3. The Application of Flash in Web-Based Multimedia Courseware Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Jun; Wang, Zu-Yuan; Wu, Yuren

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to introduce some new functions achieved in a web-based multimedia courseware, which is developed by Flash software and used by part-time graduate students. Design/methodology/approach: The courseware uses Adobe Flash CS3 as its development software, which supports Actionscript language, FMS and FLV technology…

  4. Digital Imaging: An Adobe Photoshop Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cobb, Kristine

    2007-01-01

    This article introduces digital imaging, an Adobe Photoshop course at Shrewsbury High School in Shrewsbury, Massachusetts. Students are able to earn art credits to graduate by successfully completing the course. Digital imaging must cover art criteria as well as technical skills. The course begins with tutorials created by the instructor and other…

  5. 77 FR 52031 - FDIC Advisory Committee on Economic Inclusion (ComE-IN); Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-28

    ... following systems requirements: http://www.vodium.com/home/sysreq.html . Adobe Flash Player is required to view these presentations. The latest version of Adobe Flash Player can be downloaded at http://www.adobe.com/shockwave/download/download.cgi?P1_Prod_Version=ShockwaveFlash . Installation questions...

  6. National Institute on Drug Abuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Subscribe Archives PDF documents require the free Adobe Reader . Microsoft Word documents require the free Microsoft ... Microsoft PowerPoint viewer . Flash content requires the free Adobe Flash Player . NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health ®

  7. Drug Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Human Services . PDF documents require the free Adobe Reader . Microsoft Word documents require the free Microsoft ... Microsoft PowerPoint viewer . Flash content requires the free Adobe Flash Player . NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health ®

  8. Apparatus for forming adobe bricks and drilling wells

    SciTech Connect

    Kinnamon, H. D.

    1985-02-12

    An improved apparatus for the continuous and relatively labor-free fabrication of adobe bricks and the forcing of well casings into the earth. With regard to forming adobe bricks, a rotating table carries the bricks being processed from one station to the next and a novel means for applying unusually high forming pressures permits immediate forming and ejection of the bricks from the forms while at the same time producing adobe bricks of improved quality and hardness characteristics.

  9. Residential mercury contamination in adobe brick homes in Huancavelica, Peru.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Nicole; Robins, Nicholas; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Halabi, Susan; Espinoza Gonzales, Ruben Dario; Richter, Daniel deB; Vandenberg, John

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study of adobe brick contamination anywhere in the world. Huancavelica, Peru is the site of historic cinnabar refining and one of the most mercury (Hg) contaminated urban areas in the world. Over 80% of homes in Huancavelica are constructed with adobe bricks made from Hg contaminated soil. In this study we measured total Hg concentrations in adobe brick, dirt floor, surface dust, and air samples from the interior of 60 adobe brick houses located in four neighborhoods. Concentrations of total Hg in adobe bricks, dirt floors, and surface dust ranged from 8.00 to 1070 µg/g, 3.06 to 926 µg/g, and 0.02 to 9.69 µg/wipe, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the four neighborhoods. Concentrations of Hg in adobe brick and dirt floor samples in Huancavelica were orders of magnitude higher than in Ayacucho, a non-mining town in Peru. A strong correlation exists between total Hg concentrations in adobe bricks and dirt floors which confirms that adobe bricks were being made on-site and not purchased from an off-site source. A strong correlation between surface dust and adobe bricks and dirt floors indicates that walls and floors serve as indoor sources of Hg contamination. Elemental Hg vapor concentrations were below detection (<0.5 µg/m(3)) in most homes; however in homes with detectable levels, concentrations up to 5.1 µg/m(3) were observed. No statistically significant differences in Hg vapor measurements were observed between neighborhoods. This study demonstrates that building materials used widely in developing communities, such as adobe bricks, may be a substantial source of residential Hg exposure in silver or gold refining communities where Hg is produced or used for amalgamation in artisanal gold production.

  10. Residential Mercury Contamination in Adobe Brick Homes in Huancavelica, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Nicole; Robins, Nicholas; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Halabi, Susan; Espinoza Gonzales, Ruben Dario; Richter, Daniel deB.; Vandenberg, John

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study of adobe brick contamination anywhere in the world. Huancavelica, Peru is the site of historic cinnabar refining and one of the most mercury (Hg) contaminated urban areas in the world. Over 80% of homes in Huancavelica are constructed with adobe bricks made from Hg contaminated soil. In this study we measured total Hg concentrations in adobe brick, dirt floor, surface dust, and air samples from the interior of 60 adobe brick houses located in four neighborhoods. Concentrations of total Hg in adobe bricks, dirt floors, and surface dust ranged from 8.00 to 1070 µg/g, 3.06 to 926 µg/g, and 0.02 to 9.69 µg/wipe, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the four neighborhoods. Concentrations of Hg in adobe brick and dirt floor samples in Huancavelica were orders of magnitude higher than in Ayacucho, a non-mining town in Peru. A strong correlation exists between total Hg concentrations in adobe bricks and dirt floors which confirms that adobe bricks were being made on-site and not purchased from an off-site source. A strong correlation between surface dust and adobe bricks and dirt floors indicates that walls and floors serve as indoor sources of Hg contamination. Elemental Hg vapor concentrations were below detection (<0.5 µg/m3) in most homes; however in homes with detectable levels, concentrations up to 5.1 µg/m3 were observed. No statistically significant differences in Hg vapor measurements were observed between neighborhoods. This study demonstrates that building materials used widely in developing communities, such as adobe bricks, may be a substantial source of residential Hg exposure in silver or gold refining communities where Hg is produced or used for amalgamation in artisanal gold production. PMID:24040399

  11. Residential mercury contamination in adobe brick homes in Huancavelica, Peru.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Nicole; Robins, Nicholas; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Halabi, Susan; Espinoza Gonzales, Ruben Dario; Richter, Daniel deB; Vandenberg, John

    2013-01-01

    This is the first study of adobe brick contamination anywhere in the world. Huancavelica, Peru is the site of historic cinnabar refining and one of the most mercury (Hg) contaminated urban areas in the world. Over 80% of homes in Huancavelica are constructed with adobe bricks made from Hg contaminated soil. In this study we measured total Hg concentrations in adobe brick, dirt floor, surface dust, and air samples from the interior of 60 adobe brick houses located in four neighborhoods. Concentrations of total Hg in adobe bricks, dirt floors, and surface dust ranged from 8.00 to 1070 µg/g, 3.06 to 926 µg/g, and 0.02 to 9.69 µg/wipe, respectively, with statistically significant differences between the four neighborhoods. Concentrations of Hg in adobe brick and dirt floor samples in Huancavelica were orders of magnitude higher than in Ayacucho, a non-mining town in Peru. A strong correlation exists between total Hg concentrations in adobe bricks and dirt floors which confirms that adobe bricks were being made on-site and not purchased from an off-site source. A strong correlation between surface dust and adobe bricks and dirt floors indicates that walls and floors serve as indoor sources of Hg contamination. Elemental Hg vapor concentrations were below detection (<0.5 µg/m(3)) in most homes; however in homes with detectable levels, concentrations up to 5.1 µg/m(3) were observed. No statistically significant differences in Hg vapor measurements were observed between neighborhoods. This study demonstrates that building materials used widely in developing communities, such as adobe bricks, may be a substantial source of residential Hg exposure in silver or gold refining communities where Hg is produced or used for amalgamation in artisanal gold production. PMID:24040399

  12. 77 FR 30003 - FDIC Advisory Committee on Community Banking; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-21

    ... anyone with the following systems requirements: http://www.vodium.com/home/sysreq.html . Adobe Flash Player is required to view these presentations. The latest version of Adobe Flash Player can be downloaded at http://www.adobe.com/shockwave/download/download.cgi?P1_...

  13. Physico-mechanical characterization of adobe bricks from Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannou, I.; Illampas, R.; Charmpis, D. C.

    2012-04-01

    Adobe bricks have been used in the construction of buildings for thousands of years. In our days, adobe masonry is no longer a prevailing form of construction. However, a great number of earthen buildings still survives in most regions of the world and constitutes an essential part of the international architectural and cultural heritage. Furthermore, efforts are currently being made to reintroduce adobes as an environmentally-friendly building material to contemporary architecture within the context of sustainable development. Despite the long-term use of adobes and their importance for the society, our knowledge of many aspects of this material is still rather limited. As a result, there are many ongoing research initiatives worldwide aiming to investigate the physicochemical and mechanical properties of adobe bricks and related durability problems. In this paper, we present our work (which is funded by the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation Project EΠIXEIPHΣEIΣ/ΠPOION/0609/41, the Republic of Cyprus and the European Regional Development Fund) on the physico-mechanical characterization of adobes from Cyprus. In the absence of standardized procedures for most of the tests carried out, testing methodologies that either refer to other types of masonry materials and/or are encountered in the literature are adopted. The results show that adobes are mostly composed of random quantities of silt and clay. Calcite is also predominant in the X-ray diffraction analyses patterns. The average capillary water absorption coefficient of the test specimens rarely exceeds 1 mm/min1/2 (when measured against a saturated sponge surface), while their thermal conductivity is around 0.55 W/mK. Extensive experimental data on the material's mechanical behaviour show that adobes' response to compression is characterized by intense deformability. The average value of compressive strength depends greatly on the form of specimen examined (cube, cylinder, prism) and the failure criterion

  14. Characterization, reproduction and optimization of traditional adobe bricks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannou, Ioannis; Eftychiou, Marina; Costi de Castrillo, Maria; Illampas, Rogiros

    2013-04-01

    Adobe bricks were first introduced 10-12,000 years ago. Extensive use of the material throughout the centuries has led to strong local traditions of building with earth and has established adobe masonry as an important feature of the international architectural heritage. Today, despite no longer being a prevalent building material, adobes are still in use, since a number of earthen structures survive worldwide. Furthermore, the simplicity, low cost and almost negligible embodied energy associated with the production of adobes, as well as their good thermal and acoustic properties, render them an attractive option for use in contemporary sustainable construction. Therefore, several ongoing research projects internationally investigate the physicochemical and mechanical properties of traditional adobe bricks and the design/production of optimized adobes, with improved characteristics, for use in contemporary architecture. Here, we present ongoing research on adobe bricks carried out in the framework of the project E& IXEIPH EI / POION/0609/41, which is co-funded by the European Regional Development Fund and the Republic of Cyprus, through the Cyprus Research Promotion Foundation. Our work focuses on the characterization of traditional adobes, their reproduction and optimization in the laboratory to produce materials with improved physicomechanical properties. Results up-to-date show that traditional adobes are mostly composed of random quantities of silt and clay. Calcite is also predominant in relevant X-ray diffraction analyses. The average capillary water absorption coefficient (measured against a saturated sponge surface) of samples collected from market suppliers rarely exceeds 1 mm/min1 -2, while their thermal conductivity is around 0.55 W/mK. The response of traditional adobes to compression is characterized by intense deformability. The average compressive strength recorded depends on the form of test specimen (cube, cylinder, prism). Samples with aspect

  15. [Use of Adobe Photoshop software in medical criminology].

    PubMed

    Nikitin, S A; Demidov, I V

    2000-01-01

    Describes the method of comparative analysis of various objects in practical medical criminology and making of high-quality photographs with the use of Adobe Photoshop software. Options of the software needed for expert evaluations are enumerated.

  16. Non Volatile Flash Memory Radiation Tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, Farokh; Nguyen, Duc N.; Allen, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Commercial flash memory industry has experienced a fast growth in the recent years, because of their wide spread usage in cell phones, mp3 players and digital cameras. On the other hand, there has been increased interest in the use of high density commercial nonvolatile flash memories in space because of ever increasing data requirements and strict power requirements. Because of flash memories complex structure; they cannot be treated as just simple memories in regards to testing and analysis. It becomes quite challenging to determine how they will respond in radiation environments.

  17. 20. This adobe building, housing the Phoenix Herald in 1879, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. This adobe building, housing the Phoenix Herald in 1879, stood on the site later occupied by the Stroud Building. The Salt River Herald, Phoenix's first newspaper, was founded in 1878; in 1879, it became the Phoenix Herald. Prior to 1879, the adobe building served as the office for a stagecoach line operating between Maricopa and Prescott via Phoenix. Credit PPL. - Stroud Building, 31-33 North Central Avenue, Phoenix, Maricopa County, AZ

  18. Make Your Calories Count

    MedlinePlus

    ... module requires Adobe Flash Player ; PDFs require Adobe Reader . The character displayed above is a trademark of ... Product Area Product Areas back Food Drugs Medical Devices Radiation-Emitting Products Vaccines, Blood & Biologics Animal & Veterinary ...

  19. An Improved B+ Tree for Flash File Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havasi, Ferenc

    Nowadays mobile devices such as mobile phones, mp3 players and PDAs are becoming evermore common. Most of them use flash chips as storage. To store data efficiently on flash, it is necessary to adapt ordinary file systems because they are designed for use on hard disks. Most of the file systems use some kind of search tree to store index information, which is very important from a performance aspect. Here we improved the B+ search tree algorithm so as to make flash devices more efficient. Our implementation of this solution saves 98%-99% of the flash operations, and is now the part of the Linux kernel.

  20. Lunar Impact Flash Locations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Kupferschmidt, L.; Feldman, J.

    2015-01-01

    A bright impact flash detected by the NASA Lunar Impact Monitoring Program in March 2013 brought into focus the importance of determining the impact flash location. A process for locating the impact flash, and presumably its associated crater, was developed using commercially available software tools. The process was successfully applied to the March 2013 impact flash and put into production on an additional 300 impact flashes. The goal today: provide a description of the geolocation technique developed.

  1. Technical report on semiautomatic segmentation using the Adobe Photoshop.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Seo; Chung, Min Suk; Hwang, Sung Bae; Lee, Yong Sook; Har, Dong-Hwan

    2005-12-01

    The purpose of this research is to enable users to semiautomatically segment the anatomical structures in magnetic resonance images (MRIs), computerized tomographs (CTs), and other medical images on a personal computer. The segmented images are used for making 3D images, which are helpful to medical education and research. To achieve this purpose, the following trials were performed. The entire body of a volunteer was scanned to make 557 MRIs. On Adobe Photoshop, contours of 19 anatomical structures in the MRIs were semiautomatically drawn using MAGNETIC LASSO TOOL and manually corrected using either LASSO TOOL or DIRECT SELECTION TOOL to make 557 segmented images. In a similar manner, 13 anatomical structures in 8,590 anatomical images were segmented. Proper segmentation was verified by making 3D images from the segmented images. Semiautomatic segmentation using Adobe Photoshop is expected to be widely used for segmentation of anatomical structures in various medical images.

  2. Techniques on semiautomatic segmentation using the Adobe Photoshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jin Seo; Chung, Min Suk; Hwang, Sung Bae

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this research is to enable anybody to semiautomatically segment the anatomical structures in the MRIs, CTs, and other medical images on the personal computer. The segmented images are used for making three-dimensional images, which are helpful in medical education and research. To achieve this purpose, the following trials were performed. The entire body of a volunteer was MR scanned to make 557 MRIs, which were transferred to a personal computer. On Adobe Photoshop, contours of 19 anatomical structures in the MRIs were semiautomatically drawn using MAGNETIC LASSO TOOL; successively, manually corrected using either LASSO TOOL or DIRECT SELECTION TOOL to make 557 segmented images. In a likewise manner, 11 anatomical structures in the 8,500 anatomcial images were segmented. Also, 12 brain and 10 heart anatomical structures in anatomical images were segmented. Proper segmentation was verified by making and examining the coronal, sagittal, and three-dimensional images from the segmented images. During semiautomatic segmentation on Adobe Photoshop, suitable algorithm could be used, the extent of automatization could be regulated, convenient user interface could be used, and software bugs rarely occurred. The techniques of semiautomatic segmentation using Adobe Photoshop are expected to be widely used for segmentation of the anatomical structures in various medical images.

  3. Rehabilitation of adobe buildings. Understanding different materials from Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Cristiana; Rocha, Fernando; Velosa, Ana

    2016-04-01

    Earth construction is the oldest building material known, with documented cases of the use of earth bricks since Mesopotamia around 10 000 BC (Heathcote, 1995). The earth construction exists throughout the majority of the world in different cultures, and for some countries, nowadays it continues to be the main process of construction (Vega et al, 2011). Around 30% of the world's population lives in buildings made of earth materials. Earthen construction is an environmentally friendly technique with a social and cultural contribution; this advantage is increased when this type of construction is applied in developing countries where the material costs counterbalance with labour costs, and where other materials and techniques cannot be available (Ciancio et al, 2013). Studies of materials characterization are required in order to understand the composition and specific properties of the earth buildings, their heterogeneity and their degradation mechanisms. Some adobes from different buildings, ages and regions of Portugal were collected in order to characterize them (mineralogically, chemically and physically). It was possible to understand the composition of these materials and their differences. Main minerals are quartz, feldspars, calcite and phyllosilicates (mica and kaolinite). The mechanical behaviour of these materials isn't the best, but it is possible to improve it with some simple and cheap natural additives (kaolinitic soils). The characterization of these materials allows us to understand the differences between the materials from the different regions (controlled by locally available raw materials). Understanding these materials, and their properties, it is possible to formulate new ones for repair, conservation and rehabilitation works. The adobe bricks are an alternative of kiln baked bricks which has several advantages and one of the most important is that these materials are recyclable. Adobes are an excellent option for building rehabilitation, if

  4. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    PubMed

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions.

  5. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    PubMed

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions. PMID:23307357

  6. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, Lee K.

    1981-01-01

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  7. Flash protection controller

    DOEpatents

    Galbraith, L.K.

    1979-12-07

    A controller provides a high voltage to maintain an electro-optic shutter in a transparent condition until a flash of light which would be harmful to personnel is sensed by a phototransistor. The controller then shorts the shutter to ground to minimize light transmission to the user and maintains light transmission at the pre-flash level for a predetermined time to allow the flash to subside. A log converter and differential trigger circuit keep the controller from being triggered by other light flashes which are not dangerous.

  8. Asian Rhinoplasty: Preoperative Simulation and Planning Using Adobe Photoshop.

    PubMed

    Kiranantawat, Kidakorn; Nguyen, Anh H

    2015-11-01

    A rhinoplasty in Asians differs from a rhinoplasty performed in patients of other ethnicities. Surgeons should understand the concept of Asian beauty, the nasal anatomy of Asians, and common problems encountered while operating on the Asian nose. With this understanding, surgeons can set appropriate goals, choose proper operative procedures, and provide an outcome that satisfies patients. In this article the authors define the concept of an Asian rhinoplasty-a paradigm shift from the traditional on-top augmentation rhinoplasty to a structurally integrated augmentation rhinoplasty-and provide a step-by-step procedure for the use of Adobe Photoshop as a preoperative program to simulate the expected surgical outcome for patients and to develop a preoperative plan for surgeons.

  9. Building code challenging the ethics behind adobe architecture in North Cyprus.

    PubMed

    Hurol, Yonca; Yüceer, Hülya; Şahali, Öznem

    2015-04-01

    Adobe masonry is part of the vernacular architecture of Cyprus. Thus, it is possible to use this technology in a meaningful way on the island. On the other hand, although adobe architecture is more sustainable in comparison to other building technologies, the use of it is diminishing in North Cyprus. The application of Turkish building code in the north of the island has created complications in respect of the use of adobe masonry, because this building code demands that reinforced concrete vertical tie-beams are used together with adobe masonry. The use of reinforced concrete elements together with adobe masonry causes problems in relation to the climatic response of the building as well as causing other technical and aesthetic problems. This situation makes the design of adobe masonry complicated and various types of ethical problems also emerge. The objective of this article is to analyse the ethical problems which arise as a consequence of the restrictive character of the building code, by analysing two case studies and conducting an interview with an architect who was involved with the use of adobe masonry in North Cyprus. According to the results of this article there are ethical problems at various levels in the design of both case studies. These problems are connected to the responsibilities of architects in respect of the social benefit, material production, aesthetics and affordability of the architecture as well as presenting distrustful behaviour where the obligations of architects to their clients is concerned.

  10. Flash-Type Discrimination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, William J.

    2010-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the significant progress made in the flash-type discrimination algorithm development. The contents include: 1) Highlights of Progress for GLM-R3 Flash-Type discrimination Algorithm Development; 2) Maximum Group Area (MGA) Data; 3) Retrieval Errors from Simulations; and 4) Preliminary Global-scale Retrieval.

  11. Speciation and bioaccessibility of mercury in adobe bricks and dirt floors in Huancavelica, Peru

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: Huancavelica, Peru, a historic cinnabar refining site, is one of the most mercury (Hg) contaminated urban areas in the world. Residents’ exposures are amplified because residents build their adobe brick homes from contaminated soil. Objectives: The objectives of th...

  12. The Flash Grab Effect

    PubMed Central

    Cavanagh, Patrick; Anstis, Stuart

    2013-01-01

    When an object moves back and forth, its trajectory appears significantly shorter than it actually is. The object appears to stop and reverse well before its actual reversal point, as if there is some averaging of location within a window of about 100 ms (Sinico et al, 2009). Surprisingly, if a bar is flashed at the physical end point of the trajectory, right on top of the object, just as it reverses direction, the flash is also shifted – grabbed by the object – and is seen at the perceived endpoint of the trajectory rather than the physical endpoint. This can shift the perceived location of the flash by as much as 2 or 3 times its physical size and by up to several degrees of visual angle. We first show that the position shift of the flash is generated by the trajectory shortening, as the same shift is seen with or without the flash. The flash itself is only grabbed if it is presented within a small spatiotemporal attraction zone around the physical end point of the trajectory. Any flash falling in that zone is pulled toward the perceived endpoint. The effect scales linearly with speed, up to a maximum, and is independent of the contrast of the moving stimulus once it is above 5%. Finally, we demonstrate that this position shift requires attention. These results reveal a new “flash grab” effect in the family of motion-induced position shifts. Although it most resembles the flash drag effect, it differs from this in the following ways: 1) it has a different temporal profile, 2) it requires attention, 3) it is about 10 times larger. PMID:23872166

  13. GrinLine identification using digital imaging and Adobe Photoshop.

    PubMed

    Bollinger, Susan A; Brumit, Paula C; Schrader, Bruce A; Senn, David R

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to outline a method by which an antemortem photograph of a victim can be critically compared with a postmortem photograph in an effort to facilitate the identification process. Ten subjects, between 27 and 55 years old provided historical pictures of themselves exhibiting a broad smile showing anterior teeth to some extent (a grin). These photos were termed "antemortem" for the purpose of the study. A digital camera was used to take a current photo of each subject's grin. These photos represented the "postmortem" images. A single subject's "postmortem" photo set was randomly selected to be the "unknown victim." These combined data of the unknown and the 10 antemortem subjects were digitally stored and, using Adobe Photoshop software, the images were sized and oriented for comparative analysis. The goal was to devise a technique that could facilitate the accurate determination of which "antemortem" subject was the "unknown." The generation of antemortem digital overlays of the teeth visible in a grin and the comparison of those overlays to the images of the postmortem dentition is the foundation of the technique. The comparisons made using the GrinLine Identification Technique may assist medical examiners and coroners in making identifications or exclusions.

  14. Flashes and Floaters

    MedlinePlus

    ... either in the form of lightening bolts, shooting stars, sparks, or an arc of light to the ... against it that causes the sparks and shooting stars phenomenon. But flashes and floaters may have more ...

  15. Flash Bulletin: Fireflies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Debbie

    1984-01-01

    Explains the flashes of light emitted by fireflies as competition, species-specific code, species identification and mating behavior and ecology. Suggests activities to conduct to study the insects and their behavior. (ERB)

  16. Flash fire propensity of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Cumming, H. J.

    1977-01-01

    Flash fire test results on 86 materials, evaluated using the USF flash fire screening test, are presented. The materials which appear least prone to flash fires are PVC, polyphenylene oxide and sulfide, and polyether and polyaryl sulfone; these did not produce flash fires under these particular test conditions. The principal value of these screening tests at the present time is in identifying materials which appear prone to flash fires, and in identifying which formulations of a generic material are more or less prone to flash fires.

  17. 14. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF TRIMMED FLASH; FLASH IS EXCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. INTERIOR VIEW, DETAIL OF TRIMMED FLASH; FLASH IS EXCESS METAL EXTRUDED BETWEEN THE DIES USED TO FORGE THE BLADE END OF THE POST HOLE DIGGER - Warwood Tool Company, Foot of Nineteenth Street, Wheeling, Ohio County, WV

  18. Core helium flash

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, P.W.; Deupree, R.G.

    1980-01-01

    The role of convection in the core helium flash is simulated by two-dimensional eddies interacting with the thermonuclear runaway. These eddies are followed by the explicit solution of the 2D conservation laws with a 2D finite difference hydrodynamics code. Thus, no phenomenological theory of convection such as the local mixing length theory is required. The core helium flash is violent, producing a deflagration wave. This differs from the detonation wave (and subsequent disruption of the entire star) produced in previous spherically symmetric violent core helium flashes as the second dimension provides a degree of relief which allows the expansion wave to decouple itself from the burning front. Our results predict that a considerable amount of helium in the core will be burned before the horizontal branch is reached and that some envelope mass loss is likely.

  19. Evaluating Internet Health Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... content requires the Adobe Flash Player and a JavaScript-enabled browser. It seems JavaScript is disabled in your browser settings. Please enable JavaScript and reload this page, or use a different ...

  20. Staying on Top of Your Game and Scoring Big with Adobe Presenter Multimedia Tutorials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koury, Regina; Francis, Marcia J.; Gray, Catherine J.; Jardine, Spencer J.; Guo, Ruiling

    2010-01-01

    In order to reach distance students in times of financial uncertainty, librarians must be creative. While much has been written about Camtasia, Captivate and Jing tutorial software, Adobe Presenter, a Microsoft PowerPoint plug-in, has not been discussed. This article describes how our library team created multimedia tutorial projects at Idaho…

  1. Using Adobe Connect to Deliver Online Library Instruction to the RN to BSN Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    This paper takes a look at how one academic health sciences librarian brought mediated literature searching to the distance RN to BSN nursing students. It takes a look at why Adobe Connect was the webinar software that was selected to deliver online instruction to the students. The article explains how students participated in a pre-class survey…

  2. Phosphatic Permian rocks of the Adobe Range, Nevada, and their environment of deposition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ketner, Keith Brindley

    1979-01-01

    Permian sedimentary rocks in the Adobe range, northern Nevada, are phosphatic, and although the particles of phosphate are relatively more disseminated, they closely resemble the rocks of the Phosphoria Formation. In the northern Adobe Range, where the entire Permian sequence is approximately correlative with the Phosphoria Formation, it is 200 m thick and averages 1.7 percent P2O5 . In the southern Adobe Range, the Permian sequence is more than 1,700 m thick, and the upper half which is roughly correlative with the Phosphoria Formation averages more than 2 percent P2O5. Some thin beds in rocks of Permian age contain more than 20 percent P2O5. Phosphatic rocks of the Adobe Range were deposited in shallow water among islands in the western part of the epicontinental Phosphoria sea. The continental margin and the open ocean lay far to the west. At the same time, the Phosphoria Formation was being deposited in the eastern and central parts of the Phosphoria sea. Theories based on the work of Kasakov done in 1937 relating phosphate deposition directly to sites of upwelling oceanic waters are questioned. Nondeposition of diluent materials such as detritus and carbonate is probably of more importance in producing phosphate in economic concentrations than is geographic position with respect to upwelling waters.

  3. Enriching Learning for First Year Chemistry Students: Introduction of Adobe Connect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Erica; Lye, Peter; Greatrex, Ben; Taylor, Michelle; Stupans, Ieva

    2013-01-01

    The study of chemistry is central within science and other associated degrees. At the University of New England in Armidale academics need to provide chemistry teaching in both a distance and the traditional on-campus mode within science and other degrees. This study explores the contribution that the adoption of Adobe Connect technology can make…

  4. Building on Tradition: The Art of Adobe and the Revival of Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocker, Amanda; Swan, Susan

    2001-01-01

    A New Mexico foundation helps primarily Hispanic and American Indian communities restore adobe churches by supplying technical assistance and matching grants. Community leadership of the projects enhances volunteer commitment. The projects build community cohesiveness and pride, maintain local culture, foster intergenerational relations, teach…

  5. Flash Rust & Waterjetting Study

    SciTech Connect

    DORSH, P.M..

    2001-11-14

    Certain areas of the primary wall in the AY-101 tank annulus are being cleaned with a remotely operated waterjet. There is some concern on how it will effect the surface of the tank wall after cleaning and how to prevent rust and corrosion from developing on the wall in the future. This study addresses the cause and effects of flash rust, which typically develops on steel surfaces after the waterjetting process.

  6. Coherent imaging at FLASH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, H. N.; Bajt, S.; Barty, A.; Benner, W. H.; Bogan, M. J.; Boutet, S.; Cavalleri, A.; Duesterer, S.; Frank, M.; Hajdu, J.; Hau-Riege, S. P.; Iwan, B.; Marchesini, S.; Sakdinawat, A.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Seibert, M. M.; Timneanu, N.; Treusch, R.; Woods, B. W.

    2009-09-01

    We have carried out high-resolution single-pulse coherent diffractive imaging at the FLASH free-electron laser. The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high-resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of an object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. In particular we are developing imaging of biological specimens beyond conventional radiation damage resolution limits, developing imaging of ultrafast processes, and testing methods to characterize and perform single-particle imaging.

  7. Optimal flash rate and duty cycle for flashing visual indicators.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, J.

    1971-01-01

    This experiment examined the ability of observers to determine, as quickly as possible, whether a visual indicator was steadily on or flashing. Six flash rates (periods) were combined factorially with three duty cycles (on-off ratios) to define 18 ?types' of intermittent signals. Experimental sessions were divided into six runs of 100 trials, each run utilizing one of the six flash rates. On any given trial in a run, the probability of a steady signal occurring was 0.5 and the probability of a flashing signal occurring was 0.5. A different duty cycle was employed daily for each experimental session. In all, 400 trials were devoted to each of the flash rates at each duty cycle. Accuracy and latency of response were the dependent variables of interest. The results show that the observers view the light for an interval of time appropriate to the expected flash rate and duty cycle; whether they judge the light to be steady or intermittent depends upon whether the light is extinguished during the predetermined waiting period. Adoption of this temporal criterion delays responding in comparison to those tasks involving responses to light onset. The decision or response criteria held by the observers are also sensitive to the parameters of the flashing light: observers become increasingly willing to call a flashing light ?steady' as flash duration increases.

  8. Posture in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Perrin, P; Perrin, C; Courant, P; Béné, M C; Durupt, D

    1991-01-01

    Static and dynamic posturography was recorded in eleven professional national basketball players (complete team). This sport requires balance and skill and is practiced by tall subjects (average height: 197 cm) with a history of 10 to 15 tibio-tarsal sprains. In static tests, with eyes open or closed, the way was similar between controls and players, while the area was increased for the latter. Area increment could be related to the history of ankle trauma reported by these subjects. In toes up dynamic tests, the latency of the first response (short latency response-myotatic reflex) was shorter in players. Data provided by national charts were used to compare posturography performance and player's skill. The best player who also ranks high in the national chart, has distinctive results in static posturography, with almost no difference when the test is performed with closed eyes.

  9. Flash Proton Radiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merrill, Frank E.

    Protons were first investigated as radiographic probes as high energy proton accelerators became accessible to the scientific community in the 1960s. Like the initial use of X-rays in the 1800s, protons were shown to be a useful tool for studying the contents of opaque materials, but the electromagnetic charge of the protons opened up a new set of interaction processes which complicated their use. These complications in combination with the high expense of generating protons with energies high enough to penetrate typical objects resulted in proton radiography becoming a novelty, demonstrated at accelerator facilities, but not utilized to their full potential until the 1990s at Los Alamos. During this time Los Alamos National Laboratory was investigating a wide range of options, including X-rays and neutrons, as the next generation of probes to be used for thick object flash radiography. During this process it was realized that the charge nature of the protons, which was the source of the initial difficulty with this idea, could be used to recover this technique. By introducing a magnetic imaging lens downstream of the object to be radiographed, the blur resulting from scattering within the object could be focused out of the measurements, dramatically improving the resolution of proton radiography of thick systems. Imaging systems were quickly developed and combined with the temporal structure of a proton beam generated by a linear accelerator, providing a unique flash radiography capability for measurements at Los Alamos National Laboratory. This technique has now been employed at LANSCE for two decades and has been adopted around the world as the premier flash radiography technique for the study of dynamic material properties.

  10. Flash evaporator systems test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, J. B.

    1976-01-01

    A flash evaporator heat rejection system representative of that proposed for the space shuttle orbiter underwent extensive system testing at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) to determine its operational suitability and to establish system performance/operational characteristics for use in the shuttle system. During the tests the evaporator system demonstrated its suitability to meet the shuttle requirements by: (1) efficient operation with 90 to 95% water evaporation efficiency, (2) control of outlet temperature to 40 + or - 2 F for partial heat load operation, (3) stability of control system for rapid changes in Freon inlet temperature, and (4) repeated dormant-to-active device operation without any startup procedures.

  11. Methods of flash sintering

    DOEpatents

    Raj, Rishi; Cologna, Marco; Francis, John S.

    2016-05-10

    This disclosure provides methods of flash sintering and compositions created by these methods. Methods for sintering multilayered bodies are provided in which a sintered body is produced in less than one minute. In one aspect, each layer is of a different composition, and may be constituted wholly from a ceramic or from a combination of ceramic and metallic particles. When the body includes a layer of an anode composition, a layer of an electrolyte composition and a layer of a cathode composition, the sintered body can be used to produce a solid oxide fuel cell.

  12. NAND FLASH Radiation Tolerant Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS FLASH)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sellier, Charles; Wang, Pierre

    2014-08-01

    The NAND Flash Radiation Tolerant and Intelligent Memory Stack (RTIMS FLASH) is a User's Friendly, Plug-and- Play and Radiation Protected high density NAND Flash Memory. It provides a very high density, radiation hardened by design and non-volatile memory module suitable for all space applications such as commercial or scientific geo-stationary missions, earth observation, navigation, manned space vehicles and deep space scientific exploration. The Intelligent Memory Module embeds a very high density of non-volatile NAND Flash memory and one Intelligent Flash Memory Controller (FMC). The FMC provides the module with a full protection against the radiation effects such as SEL, SEFI and SEU. It's also granting the module with bad block immunity as well as high level service functions that will benefit to the user's applications.

  13. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Gross, Mark E.

    1997-01-01

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  14. Vacuum flash evaporated polymer composites

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Gross, M.E.

    1997-10-28

    A method for fabrication of polymer composite layers in a vacuum is disclosed. More specifically, the method of dissolving salts in a monomer solution, vacuum flash evaporating the solution, condensing the flash evaporated solution as a liquid film, and forming the condensed liquid film into a polymer composite layer on a substrate is disclosed.

  15. Geomorphological factors of flash floods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetsova, Yulia

    2016-04-01

    Growing anthropogenic load, rise of extreme meteorological events frequency and total precipitation depth often lead to increasing danger of catastrophic fluvial processes worldwide. Flash floods are one of the most dangerous and less understood types of them. Difficulties of their study are mainly related to short duration of single events, remoteness and hard access to origin areas. Most detailed researches of flash floods focus on hydrological parameters of the flow itself and its meteorological factors. At the same time, importance of the basin geological and geomorphological structure for flash floods generation and the role they play in global sediment redistribution is yet poorly understood. However, understanding and quantitative assessment of these features is a real basis for a complete concept of factors, characteristics and dynamics of flash floods. This work is a review of published data on flash floods, and focuses on the geomorphological factors of the phenomenon. We consider both individual roles and interactions between different geomorphological features (the whole basin parameters, characteristics of the single slopes and valley bottom). Special attention is paid to critical values of certain factors. This approach also highlights the gaps or less studied factors of flash floods. Finally, all data is organized into a complex diagram that may be used for flash floods modeling. This also may help to reach a new level of flash flood predictions and risk assessment.

  16. Van earthquakes (23 October 2011 and 9 November 2011) and performance of masonry and adobe structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güney, D.

    2012-11-01

    Earthquakes, which are unavoidable natural phenomena in Turkey, have often produced economic and social disaster. The latest destructive earthquakes happened in Van city. Van, Turkey, earthquakes with M = 7.2 occurred on 23 October 2011 at 13:41 (local time), whose epicenter was about 16 km north of Van (Tabanlı village) and M = 5.6 on 9 November 2011 epicentered near the town of Edremit south of Van in eastern Turkey and caused the loss of life and heavy damages. Both earthquakes killed 644 people and 2608 people were injured. Approximately 4000 buildings collapsed or were seriously damaged. The majority of the damaged structures were seismically insufficient, unreinforced masonry and adobe buildings in rural areas. In this paper, site surveys of the damaged masonry and adobe buildings are presented and the reasons for the caused damages are discussed in detail.

  17. Speciation and bioaccessibility of mercury in adobe bricks and dirt floors in Huancavelica, Peru.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Nicole; Robins, Nicholas; Gonzales, Ruben Dario Espinoza; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2015-04-01

    Huancavelica, Peru, a historic cinnabar refining site, is one of the most mercury (Hg)-contaminated urban areas in the world. Exposure is amplified because residents build their adobe brick homes from contaminated soil. The objectives of this study were to compare two Hg-leaching procedures, and their application as risk-assessment screening tools in Hg-contaminated adobe brick homes in Huancavelica. The purpose was to evaluate potential health implications, particularly for children, after ingestion of Hg-contaminated particles. Hg was measured in adobe brick and dirt floor samples from 60 households by total Hg extraction, simulated gastric fluid (GF) extraction, and sequential selective extraction (SSE), which provides more detailed data but is resource-intensive. Most of the Hg present in samples was relatively insoluble, although in some households soluble Hg species were present at concentrations that may be of concern after ingestion. A strong correlation was identified between results from simulated GF extraction of adobe bricks and dirt floors and the more soluble fractions of Hg from SSE. Simulated GF extraction data were combined with ingestion and body mass characteristics for small children to compare potential risk of ingestion of Hg-contaminated soil with current health standards. Simulated GF extraction can be used as a risk assessment screening tool for effective allocation of time and resources to households that have measurable concentrations of bioaccessible Hg. Combining simulated GF extraction data with health standards enables intervention strategies targeted at households with the greatest potential health threat from ingestion of Hg-contaminated particles.

  18. FLASH LIDAR Based Relative Navigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brazzel, Jack; Clark, Fred; Milenkovic, Zoran

    2014-01-01

    Relative navigation remains the most challenging part of spacecraft rendezvous and docking. In recent years, flash LIDARs, have been increasingly selected as the go-to sensors for proximity operations and docking. Flash LIDARS are generally lighter and require less power that scanning Lidars. Flash LIDARs do not have moving parts, and they are capable of tracking multiple targets as well as generating a 3D map of a given target. However, there are some significant drawbacks of Flash Lidars that must be resolved if their use is to be of long-term significance. Overcoming the challenges of Flash LIDARs for navigation-namely, low technology readiness level, lack of historical performance data, target identification, existence of false positives, and performance of vision processing algorithms as intermediaries between the raw sensor data and the Kalman filter-requires a world-class testing facility, such as the Lockheed Martin Space Operations Simulation Center (SOSC). Ground-based testing is a critical step for maturing the next-generation flash LIDAR-based spacecraft relative navigation. This paper will focus on the tests of an integrated relative navigation system conducted at the SOSC in January 2014. The intent of the tests was to characterize and then improve the performance of relative navigation, while addressing many of the flash LIDAR challenges mentioned above. A section on navigation performance and future recommendation completes the discussion.

  19. Flash Smelting of Lead Concentrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nermes, Esko O.; Talonen, Timo T.

    1982-11-01

    Oxygen-autogenous flash smelting of lead concentrates followed by slag reduction by injection coal in an electric furnace has been developed and is ready for commercial application. Pilot-plant studies demonstrate that the process works. Pilot studies have established process characteristics. The process is easily controlled. Process equipment and operation are based on the extensive experience with Outokumpu flash smelting technology in smelting copper and nickel. The process equipment is small, even for high capacities. Flash smelter and electric furnace equipment are designed for close fit in order to meet the environmental control requirements.

  20. Concussion Study Shows Player-To-Player Hits Most Damaging

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159936.html Concussion Study Shows Player-to-Player Hits Most Damaging ... American football continue to debate how to prevent concussions, a new study using data from devices inside ...

  1. The adolescent basketball player.

    PubMed

    Sickles, R T; Lombardo, J A

    1993-04-01

    Adolescent basketball players can be viewed in two ways, as a unique population requiring special attention for their unique problems or as a similar group sharing the same problems as their adult counterparts. Attention should be paid to issues related to adolescence in general including changes in body size, growth of the musculoskeletal system, and hormonal changes that contribute to changes in behavior, emotions, and maturity. Attention to the particular needs of the adolescent basketball player may help prevent problems or lead to early recognition and intervention.

  2. Professional Basketball Players: Athletic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Parr, R B; Hoover, R; Wilmore, J H; Bachman, D; Kerlan, R K

    1978-04-01

    The physical characteristics of basketball players are closely related to their position on the team, according to this study. The authors believe this type of information would be useful in the selection and training of players.

  3. Menopausal hot flashes: Randomness or rhythmicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kronenberg, Fredi

    1991-10-01

    Menopausal hot flashes are episodes of flushing, increased heart rate, skin blood flow and skin temperature, and a sensation of heat. The thermoregulatory and cardiovascular concomitants of hot flashes are associated with peaks in the levels of various hormones and neurotransmitters in the peripheral circulation. Although hot flashes affect about 75% of women, and are the primary reason that women at menopause seek medical attention, the mechanism of hot flashes is still not understood. Hot flashes vary in frequency and intensity both within and between individuals, and have been thought of as occurring randomly. Yet, some women report that their hot flashes are worse at a particular time of day or year. Initial examination of subjects' recordings of their hot flashes showed diurnal patterns of hot flash occurrence. There also seems to be a diurnal rhythm of hot flash intensity. Continuous physiological monitoring of hot flashes is facilitating the analysis of these patterns, which is revealing circadian and ultradian periodicities. The occurrence of hot flashes can be modulated by external and internal factors, including ambient temperature and fever. Rhythms of thermoregulatory and endocrine functions also may influence hot flash patterns. Examination of the interrelationships between the various systems of the body involved in hot flashes, and a multidisciplinary approach to the analysis of hot flash patterns, will aid our understanding of this complex phenomenon.

  4. Electronic Flash In Data Acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, C. E.

    1982-02-01

    Photographic acquisition of data often may be simplified, or the data quality improved upon by employing electronic flash sources with traditional equipment or techniques. The relatively short flash duration compared to movie camera shutters, or to the long integration time of video camera provides improved spatial resolution through blur reduction, particularly important as image movement becomes a significant fraction of film format dimension. Greater accuracy typically is achieved in velocity and acceleration determinations by using a stroboscopic light source rather than a movie camera frame-rate control as a time standard. Electrical efficiency often is an important advantage of electronic flash sources since almost any necessary light level for exposure may be produced, yet the source typically is "off" most of the time. Various synchronization techniques greatly expand the precise control of exposure. Biomechanical and sports equipment studies may involve velocities up to 200 feet-per-second, and often will have associated very rapid actions of interest. The need for brief exposures increases H.s one "ZOOMS in on the action." In golf, for example, the swing may be examined using 100 microsecond (Us) flashes at rates of 60 or 120 flashes-per-second (FPS). Accurate determination of linear and rotational velocity of the ball requires 10 Us flashes at 500-1,000 FPS, while sub-Us flashes at 20,000-50,000 FPS are required to resolve the interaction of the ball and the club, head. Some seldom. used techniques involving streak photography are described, with enhanced results obtained by combining strobe with the usual continuous light source. The combination of strobe and a fast electro-mechanical shutter is considered for Us photography under daylight conditions.

  5. Cooling and welding history of the Bishop Tuff in Adobe Valley and Chidago Canyon, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheridan, Michael F.; Wang, Yunpeng

    2005-04-01

    A numerical model for cooling and welding of ash-flow tuffs was developed to obtain a quantitative understanding of the welding compaction that occurs during the cooling of ash-flow sheets and to evaluate the relative effects of emplacement temperature, thickness, and emplacement histories on compaction zonation (density profiles) of large ash-flow sheets. This model includes a set of two-phase, compressible Navier-Stokes equations for the transport of mass, momentum, and energy for a variable density volatile outfluxing through a porous media (ash-flow tuff). With this model we calculated theoretical compaction profiles (density vs. elevation) to match actual data measured in sections of Bishop Tuff. Compaction profiles from the Adobe basin indicate that there were 3 periods of non-deposition (5, 10, and 40 days) separating 4 distinct rapidly emplaced packets (REP) of pyroclastic flow deposition. In contrast, the 3 periods of quiescence (400, 20, and 800 days) between the 4 REPs in Chidago Canyon were considerably longer. These data constrain models of eruption for the Bishop Tuff by implying an eruption cycle that lasted longer than 3 years. The average calculated deposition temperatures for all 4 REPs in the Adobe basin are fairly uniform at 667±33 °C. In Chidago Canyon two of the REPs had a higher deposition temperature (˜660 °C) than the other two (534 °C).

  6. DICOM to print, 35-mm slides, web, and video projector: tutorial using Adobe Photoshop.

    PubMed

    Gurney, Jud W

    2002-10-01

    Preparing images for publication has dealt with film and the photographic process. With picture archiving and communications systems, many departments will no longer produce film. This will change how images are produced for publication. DICOM, the file format for radiographic images, has to be converted and then prepared for traditional publication, 35-mm slides, the newest techniques of video projection, and the World Wide Web. Tagged image file format is the common format for traditional print publication, whereas joint photographic expert group is the current file format for the World Wide Web. Each medium has specific requirements that can be met with a common image-editing program such as Adobe Photoshop (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA). High-resolution images are required for print, a process that requires interpolation. However, the Internet requires images with a small file size for rapid transmission. The resolution of each output differs and the image resolution must be optimized to match the output of the publishing medium.

  7. Adobe acrobat: an alternative electronic teaching file construction methodology independent of HTML restrictions.

    PubMed

    Katzman, G L

    2001-03-01

    The goal of the project was to create a method by which an in-house digital teaching file could be constructed that was simple, inexpensive, independent of hypertext markup language (HTML) restrictions, and appears identical on multiple platforms. To accomplish this, Microsoft PowerPoint and Adobe Acrobat were used in succession to assemble digital teaching files in the Acrobat portable document file format. They were then verified to appear identically on computers running Windows, Macintosh Operating Systems (OS), and the Silicon Graphics Unix-based OS as either a free-standing file using Acrobat Reader software or from within a browser window using the Acrobat browser plug-in. This latter display method yields a file viewed through a browser window, yet remains independent of underlying HTML restrictions, which may confer an advantage over simple HTML teaching file construction. Thus, a hybrid of HTML-distributed Adobe Acrobat generated WWW documents may be a viable alternative for digital teaching file construction and distribution.

  8. Sport specific fitness testing of elite badminton players.

    PubMed Central

    Chin, M K; Wong, A S; So, R C; Siu, O T; Steininger, K; Lo, D T

    1995-01-01

    There is a scarcity of descriptive data on the performance capacity of elite badminton players, whose fitness requirements are quite specific. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the physiological response of elite badminton players in a sport-specific fitness test. Twelve Hong Kong national badminton team players performed a field test on a badminton court. Six light bulbs were connected to a programming device causing individual bulbs to light up in a given sequence. The players were instructed to react to the flashes by running towards them, and striking shuttles mounted in the vicinity of the bulbs. Exercise intensity was controlled by altering the interval between successive lightings. A low correlation (r = 0.65) was found between the results of the field test and the rank-order list of subjects, based on an objective on-field physiological assessment and subjective ranking. This may be explained by the requirements of other factors besides physical fitness which contribute to success in elite level badminton competition. These factors may include, for example, technical skill, mental power, and aesthetic judgements on the court. Maximum mean (s.d.) heart rate data (187(8) beats.min-1) and blood lactate values (10.4(2.9) mmol.l-1) in this study showed that players were under maximal load during the field test. From the testing data, it seems reasonable to speculate that the intensity of level 3 (20 light pulses.min-1; 3.0 s.pulse-1) and level 4 (22 light pulses.min-1; 2.7 s.pulse-1) simulates the requirement of actual games energy expenditure of the Hong Kong badminton players exercising at close to their anaerobic threshold. The results also show that an estimate of fitness can be derived from measurements involving exercise closely resembling that which is specific for the sports activity in question. Improved training advice and guidance may result from such studies. PMID:8800846

  9. How to optimize radiological images captured from digital cameras, using the Adobe Photoshop 6.0 program.

    PubMed

    Chalazonitis, A N; Koumarianos, D; Tzovara, J; Chronopoulos, P

    2003-06-01

    Over the past decade, the technology that permits images to be digitized and the reduction in the cost of digital equipment allows quick digital transfer of any conventional radiological film. Images then can be transferred to a personal computer, and several software programs are available that can manipulate their digital appearance. In this article, the fundamentals of digital imaging are discussed, as well as the wide variety of optional adjustments that the Adobe Photoshop 6.0 (Adobe Systems, San Jose, CA) program can offer to present radiological images with satisfactory digital imaging quality.

  10. Flashing light in microalgae biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghosh, Said; Fixler, Dror; Dubinsky, Zvy; Iluz, David

    2016-03-01

    Flashing light can enhance photosynthesis and improve the quality and quantity of microalgal biomass, as it can increase the products of interest by magnitudes. Therefore, the integration of flashing light effect into microalgal cultivation systems should be considered. However, microalgae require a balanced mix of the light/dark cycle for higher growth rates, and respond to light intensity differently according to the pigments acquired or lost during the growth. This review highlights recently published results on flashing light effect on microalgae and its applications in biotechnology, as well as the recently developed bioreactors designed to fulfill this effect. It also discusses how this knowledge can be applied in selecting the optimal light frequencies and intensities with specific technical properties for increasing biomass production and/or the yield of the chemicals of interest by microalgae belonging to different genera. PMID:26747205

  11. Flashing light in microalgae biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Abu-Ghosh, Said; Fixler, Dror; Dubinsky, Zvy; Iluz, David

    2016-03-01

    Flashing light can enhance photosynthesis and improve the quality and quantity of microalgal biomass, as it can increase the products of interest by magnitudes. Therefore, the integration of flashing light effect into microalgal cultivation systems should be considered. However, microalgae require a balanced mix of the light/dark cycle for higher growth rates, and respond to light intensity differently according to the pigments acquired or lost during the growth. This review highlights recently published results on flashing light effect on microalgae and its applications in biotechnology, as well as the recently developed bioreactors designed to fulfill this effect. It also discusses how this knowledge can be applied in selecting the optimal light frequencies and intensities with specific technical properties for increasing biomass production and/or the yield of the chemicals of interest by microalgae belonging to different genera.

  12. Flash sintering of ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dancer, C. E. J.

    2016-10-01

    During flash sintering, ceramic materials can sinter to high density in a matter of seconds while subjected to electric field and elevated temperature. This process, which occurs at lower furnace temperatures and in shorter times than both conventional ceramic sintering and field-assisted methods such as spark plasma sintering, has the potential to radically reduce the power consumption required for the densification of ceramic materials. This paper reviews the experimental work on flash sintering methods carried out to date, and compares the properties of the materials obtained to those produced by conventional sintering. The flash sintering process is described for oxides of zirconium, yttrium, aluminium, tin, zinc, and titanium; silicon and boron carbide, zirconium diboride, materials for solid oxide fuel applications, ferroelectric materials, and composite materials. While experimental observations have been made on a wide range of materials, understanding of the underlying mechanisms responsible for the onset and latter stages of flash sintering is still elusive. Elements of the proposed theories to explain the observed behaviour include extensive Joule heating throughout the material causing thermal runaway, arrested by the current limitation in the power supply, and the formation of defect avalanches which rapidly and dramatically increase the sample conductivity. Undoubtedly, the flash sintering process is affected by the electric field strength, furnace temperature and current density limit, but also by microstructural features such as the presence of second phase particles or dopants and the particle size in the starting material. While further experimental work and modelling is still required to attain a full understanding capable of predicting the success of the flash sintering process in different materials, the technique non-etheless holds great potential for exceptional control of the ceramic sintering process.

  13. Evaluation of Radiation Effects in Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyahira, T.; Swift, G.

    1998-01-01

    Features of flash memories: Flash memories are non-volatile; that is they do not require power to retain the information in its memory. They can be erased and written to while the device is still in the circuit.

  14. Researchers Identify Genes Linked to Hot Flashes

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_161579.html Researchers Identify Genes Linked to Hot Flashes Mutations found in women of all races, ... Some women may be genetically predisposed to suffer hot flashes before or during menopause, a new study ...

  15. Undergraduate Separations Utilizing Flash Chromatography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horowitz, G.

    2000-02-01

    This article describes the procedures used to carry out four flash chromatography experiments: the isolation of the carotenes, chlorophylls and xanthophylls from a spinach extract; the separation of ß-carotene from tetraphenyl cyclopentadienone; the isolation of (+) and (-) carvone from caraway and spearmint oil; and the purification of benzil from benzoin. Apparatus used is nonbreakable, easy to use, and inexpensive.

  16. Energy optimization in flash smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Partelpoeg, E.H.

    1985-01-01

    The copper smelting industry has been replacing old reverberatory furnaces with energy-efficient flash furnaces. While this in itself has been a significant move towards reduced energy costs, there is yet no industry consensus as to which mode of flash smelting is optimum. It is possible to model copper smelting, the ensuring converting step, and acid production with linear equations and inequalities. These equations include mass and heat balances, and energy and cost equations. The matrix of equations and inequalities can be entered into a linear programming routine to determine minimum costs. Such a model was developed and the results indicate that optimum smelting parameters include the following. (1) The grade of matte is 65% Cu. (2) The flash furnace operates autogenously with no air preheat. The flash furnace air is oxygen enriched to approximately 40 volume % O/sub 2/. (3) Total energy cost (1985 dollars and prices) for smelting, converting, and acid production is approximately $10 per tonne concentrate. The general model employed to obtain these optimum conditions can be modified to represent unique smelting conditions.

  17. Multi-stage flash degaser

    DOEpatents

    Rapier, P.M.

    1980-06-26

    A multi-stage flash degaser is incorporated in an energy conversion system having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger in order that the heat exchanger and a turbine and condenser of the system can operate at optimal efficiency.

  18. Adobe InDesign vs. QuarkXPress and PageMaker: The Best of Both Worlds?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Bradley

    2000-01-01

    Evaluates the newly released Adobe InDesign software, finding that while it brings new life into desktop publishing, it is not yet a "must buy" for publications advisers. Compares specific features that are relevant for student publications, including: character, paragraph, drop caps, define styles, page setup, text wrap, defining and using…

  19. SteroMoviePlayer

    2005-03-14

    StereoMoviePlayer StereoMoviePlayer (SMP) is a software package for creating and displaying stereo movies on a variety of computer architectures and display configuations. SMP is capable of running in serial, or in parallel to facilitate multiple computers driving a collection of display surfaces. SMP utilizes the standatd openGL gaphics library for display of both monoscopic and stereoscopic images and MPI for parallel communication and sychronization between multiple computers. SMP uses standard IO methods for loading moviemore » files into memory and, when compressed movies are being displayed uses zLIB (which is standard in most Linux/Unix;/IRIX distributions) for decompression. A movie file is simply a concatenation of each frame. Each frame is a raw red/green/blue encoding. For stereoscopic movies, concatenation is left followed by right, as follows; Frame0-Left, Frame0-Right, Frame1-Left, Frame1-Right .... FrameN-Left, FrameN-Right To enhance performance, this concatenation of frames can be compressed using the aforementioned zLib compression/decompression library. ConvertMovie is a utility that converts between compressed and uncompressed movie formats. ConvertMovie uses zLib, which is included in most standard Linux/Unix/IRIX distributions for compression and decompression. StereoMoviePlayer consists of 3 main parts: 1-Initialization. Information is parsed from a configuration script that specifies machines on which to run, the movie file and the parameters for each graphics display. MPI is then used to instantiate a movie player on each specified computer. 2-Per-node initialization. Each parallel node creates 2 threads of execution, an IO thread and a display and communication thread. 3-Execution: The IO thread reads movie frames from disk, decompresses if necessary and places the frames in main memory. The display thread copies fromes from main memory to the graphics card for display. The display thread also handles synchronization among the other

  20. SteroMoviePlayer

    SciTech Connect

    Hodson, Steve; Pugmire, Dave

    2005-03-14

    StereoMoviePlayer StereoMoviePlayer (SMP) is a software package for creating and displaying stereo movies on a variety of computer architectures and display configuations. SMP is capable of running in serial, or in parallel to facilitate multiple computers driving a collection of display surfaces. SMP utilizes the standatd openGL gaphics library for display of both monoscopic and stereoscopic images and MPI for parallel communication and sychronization between multiple computers. SMP uses standard IO methods for loading movie files into memory and, when compressed movies are being displayed uses zLIB (which is standard in most Linux/Unix;/IRIX distributions) for decompression. A movie file is simply a concatenation of each frame. Each frame is a raw red/green/blue encoding. For stereoscopic movies, concatenation is left followed by right, as follows; Frame0-Left, Frame0-Right, Frame1-Left, Frame1-Right .... FrameN-Left, FrameN-Right To enhance performance, this concatenation of frames can be compressed using the aforementioned zLib compression/decompression library. ConvertMovie is a utility that converts between compressed and uncompressed movie formats. ConvertMovie uses zLib, which is included in most standard Linux/Unix/IRIX distributions for compression and decompression. StereoMoviePlayer consists of 3 main parts: 1-Initialization. Information is parsed from a configuration script that specifies machines on which to run, the movie file and the parameters for each graphics display. MPI is then used to instantiate a movie player on each specified computer. 2-Per-node initialization. Each parallel node creates 2 threads of execution, an IO thread and a display and communication thread. 3-Execution: The IO thread reads movie frames from disk, decompresses if necessary and places the frames in main memory. The display thread copies fromes from main memory to the graphics card for display. The display thread also handles synchronization among the other nodes

  1. Multi-stage flash degaser

    DOEpatents

    Rapier, Pascal M.

    1982-01-01

    A multi-stage flash degaser (18) is incorporated in an energy conversion system (10) having a direct-contact, binary-fluid heat exchanger to remove essentially all of the noncondensable gases from geothermal brine ahead of the direct-contact binary-fluid heat exchanger (22) in order that the heat exchanger (22) and a turbine (48) and condenser (32) of the system (10) can operate at optimal efficiency.

  2. Ankle injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Leanderson, J; Nemeth, G; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    We carried out a retrospective study of the frequency of ankle sprains in basketball players. A questionnaire about previous ankle injuries, time off after such injuries, current ankle problems, personal data, number of practice hours and the use of prophylactic measures was sent out to 102 basketball players in a second division league in Sweden. Ninety-six players answered. 92% of them had suffered an ankle sprain while playing basketball, and of these 83% reported repeated sprains of one ankle. In the last two seasons, 78% of the players had injured at least one ankle. The injury frequency in the investigation was 5.5 ankle injuries per 1000 activity hours. 22% of the players used some kind of prophylactic support of their ankle joints. Because of the great number of ankle sprains and the disability in terms of time away from sports that they cause, prevention of these injuries is essential.

  3. Flash photography-induced maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Veugelen, Tim; Coutteel, Carine; Leys, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report a flash photography-induced maculopathy. Methods: A professional photographer blinded himself accidentally and he consulted 3 days after the event with a scotoma in his dominant left eye. A unilateral acute light-induced maculopathy with hemorrhage was observed. The lesion was studied with colour photography, fluorescein and indocyanin angiography, autofluorescence imaging and repeated optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Results: At age 43, this professional photographer was blinded by the flash light of his camera and subsequently realized he had a scotoma in his dominant eye. Three days after the event visual acuity (VA) was 20/70 and an acute light-induced maculopathy was noted. Another three days later, VA was 20/50 and the lesions were less prominent. After one month, the photographer still had problems making sharp pictures, VA was 20/25 and a macular scar was observed. During further follow-up, he regained full vision and experienced no professional problems. Conclusions: This case illustrates that the light of flash photography can accidentally hit an eye and induce a light-induced maculopathy.

  4. Flash photography-induced maculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Veugelen, Tim; Coutteel, Carine; Leys, Anita

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report a flash photography-induced maculopathy. Methods: A professional photographer blinded himself accidentally and he consulted 3 days after the event with a scotoma in his dominant left eye. A unilateral acute light-induced maculopathy with hemorrhage was observed. The lesion was studied with colour photography, fluorescein and indocyanin angiography, autofluorescence imaging and repeated optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. Results: At age 43, this professional photographer was blinded by the flash light of his camera and subsequently realized he had a scotoma in his dominant eye. Three days after the event visual acuity (VA) was 20/70 and an acute light-induced maculopathy was noted. Another three days later, VA was 20/50 and the lesions were less prominent. After one month, the photographer still had problems making sharp pictures, VA was 20/25 and a macular scar was observed. During further follow-up, he regained full vision and experienced no professional problems. Conclusions: This case illustrates that the light of flash photography can accidentally hit an eye and induce a light-induced maculopathy. PMID:27625926

  5. Suprascapular neuropathy in volleyball players

    PubMed Central

    Witvrouw, E; Cools, A; Lysens, R; Cambier, D; Vanderstraeten, G; Victor, J; Sneyers, C; Walravens, M

    2000-01-01

    Background—Suprascapular nerve entrapment with isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle is uncommon. However, this pathology has been reported in volleyball players. Despite a lack of scientific evidence, excessive strain on the nerve is often cited as a possible cause of this syndrome. Previous research has shown a close association between shoulder range of motion and strain on the suprascapular nerve. No clinical studies have so far been designed to examine the association between excessive shoulder mobility and the presence of this pathology. Aim—To study the possible association between the range of motion of the shoulder joint and the presence of suprascapular neuropathy by clinically examining the Belgian male volleyball team with respect to several parameters. Methods—An electromyographic investigation, a clinical shoulder examination, shoulder range of motion measurements, and an isokinetic concentric peak torque shoulder internal/external rotation strength test were performed in 16 professional players. Results—The electrodiagnostic study showed a severe suprascapular neuropathy in four players which affected only the infraspinatus muscle. In each of these four players, suprascapular nerve entrapment was present on the dominant side. Except for the hypotrophy of the infraspinatus muscle, no significant differences between the affected and non-affected players were observed on clinical examination. Significant differences between the affected and non-affected players were found for range of motion measurements of external rotation, horizontal flexion and forward flexion, and for flexion of the shoulder girdle (protraction); all were found to be higher in the affected players than the non-affected players. Conclusions—This study suggests an association between increased range of motion of the shoulder joint and the presence of isolated paralysis of the infraspinatus muscle in volleyball players. However, the small number of patients in this

  6. Photomultiplier reception of satellite beacon flashes.

    PubMed

    Abby, D G; Wirtanen, T E

    1969-03-01

    Experiments have been performed on the electrooptical detection of flashes from satellite-borne beacons for the purposes of establishing the time of flash at the observing site, measurement of received pulse shape, and relative measurement of received energy. Initial observations have been made of the beacons carried by the geodetic satellite GEOS-B. Time of flash has been obtained to a precision of 0.1 msec. Pulse shape and energy measurements have been made for various slant ranges and at various voltages on the photomultiplier circuits. Continued testing is directed toward microsecond timing of flash reception.

  7. Residential metal contamination and potential health risks of exposure in adobe brick houses in Potosí, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Abigail R; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Robins, Nicholas A; Hagan, Nicole A; Halabi, Susan; Barras, Olivo; Richter, Daniel deB; Vandenberg, John J

    2016-08-15

    Potosí, Bolivia, is the site of centuries of historic and present-day mining of the Cerro Rico, a mountain known for its rich polymetallic deposits, and was the site of large-scale Colonial era silver refining operations. In this study, the concentrations of several metal and metalloid elements were quantified in adobe brick, dirt floor, and surface dust samples from 49 houses in Potosí. Median concentrations of total mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and arsenic (As) were significantly greater than concentrations measured in Sucre, Bolivia, a non-mining town, and exceeded US-based soil screening levels. Adobe brick samples were further analyzed for bioaccessible concentrations of trace elements using a simulated gastric fluid (GF) extraction. Median GF extractable concentrations of Hg, As, and Pb were 0.085, 13.9, and 32.2% of the total element concentration, respectively. Total and GF extractable concentrations of Hg, As, and Pb were used to estimate exposure and potential health risks to children following incidental ingestion of adobe brick particles. Risks were assessed using a range of potential ingestion rates (50-1000mg/day). Overall, the results of the risk assessment show that the majority of households sampled contained concentrations of bioaccessible Pb and As, but not Hg, that represent a potential health risk. Even at the lowest ingestion rate considered, the majority of households exceeded the risk threshold for Pb, indicating that the concentrations of this metal are of particular concern. To our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify key trace elements in building materials in adobe brick houses and the results indicate that these houses are a potential source of exposure to metals and metalloids in South American mining communities. Additional studies are needed to fully characterize personal exposure and to understand potential adverse health outcomes within the community.

  8. Residential metal contamination and potential health risks of exposure in adobe brick houses in Potosí, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Abigail R; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Robins, Nicholas A; Hagan, Nicole A; Halabi, Susan; Barras, Olivo; Richter, Daniel deB; Vandenberg, John J

    2016-08-15

    Potosí, Bolivia, is the site of centuries of historic and present-day mining of the Cerro Rico, a mountain known for its rich polymetallic deposits, and was the site of large-scale Colonial era silver refining operations. In this study, the concentrations of several metal and metalloid elements were quantified in adobe brick, dirt floor, and surface dust samples from 49 houses in Potosí. Median concentrations of total mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and arsenic (As) were significantly greater than concentrations measured in Sucre, Bolivia, a non-mining town, and exceeded US-based soil screening levels. Adobe brick samples were further analyzed for bioaccessible concentrations of trace elements using a simulated gastric fluid (GF) extraction. Median GF extractable concentrations of Hg, As, and Pb were 0.085, 13.9, and 32.2% of the total element concentration, respectively. Total and GF extractable concentrations of Hg, As, and Pb were used to estimate exposure and potential health risks to children following incidental ingestion of adobe brick particles. Risks were assessed using a range of potential ingestion rates (50-1000mg/day). Overall, the results of the risk assessment show that the majority of households sampled contained concentrations of bioaccessible Pb and As, but not Hg, that represent a potential health risk. Even at the lowest ingestion rate considered, the majority of households exceeded the risk threshold for Pb, indicating that the concentrations of this metal are of particular concern. To our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify key trace elements in building materials in adobe brick houses and the results indicate that these houses are a potential source of exposure to metals and metalloids in South American mining communities. Additional studies are needed to fully characterize personal exposure and to understand potential adverse health outcomes within the community. PMID:27100004

  9. Evaluation of chronic periapical lesions by digital subtraction radiography by using Adobe Photoshop CS: a technical report.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fabiola B; Gonçalves, Marcelo; Tanomaru-Filho, Mário

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a new technique by using Adobe Photoshop CS (San Jose, CA) image-analysis software to evaluate the radiographic changes of chronic periapical lesions after root canal treatment by digital subtraction radiography. Thirteen upper anterior human teeth with pulp necrosis and radiographic image of chronic periapical lesion were endodontically treated and radiographed 0, 2, 4, and 6 months after root canal treatment by using a film holder. The radiographic films were automatically developed and digitized. The radiographic images taken 0, 2, 4, and 6 months after root canal therapy were submitted to digital subtraction in pairs (0 and 2 months, 2 and 4 months, and 4 and 6 months) choosing "image," "calculation," "subtract," and "new document" tools from Adobe Photoshop CS image-analysis software toolbar. The resulting images showed areas of periapical healing in all cases. According to this methodology, the healing or expansion of periapical lesions can be evaluated by means of digital subtraction radiography by using Adobe Photoshop CS software.

  10. Radon and thoron levels, their spatial and seasonal variations in adobe dwellings - a case study at the great Hungarian plain.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Zsuzsanna; Jordan, Gyozo; Szabó, Csaba; Horváth, Ákos; Holm, Óskar; Kocsy, Gábor; Csige, István; Szabó, Péter; Homoki, Zsolt

    2014-06-01

    Radon and thoron isotopes are responsible for approximately half of the average annual effective dose to humans. Although the half-life of thoron is short, it can potentially enter indoor air from adobe walls. Adobe was a traditional construction material in the Great Hungarian Plain. Its major raw materials are the alluvial sediments of the area. Here, seasonal radon and thoron activity concentrations were measured in 53 adobe dwellings in 7 settlements by pairs of etched track detectors. The results show that the annual average radon and thoron activity concentrations are elevated in these dwellings and that the proportions with values higher than 300 Bq m(-3) are 14-17 and 29-32% for radon and thoron, respectively. The calculated radon inhalation dose is significantly higher than the world average value, exceeding 10 mSv y(-1) in 7% of the dwellings of this study. Thoron also can be a significant contributor to the inhalation dose with about 30% in the total inhalation dose. The changes of weather conditions seem to be more relevant in the variation of measurement results than the differences in the local sedimentary geology. Still, the highest values were detected on clay. Through the year, radon follows the average temperature changes and is affected by the ventilation, whereas thoron rather seems to follow the amount of precipitation.

  11. Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000826.htm Cancer treatment: dealing with hot flashes and night sweats To use the sharing ... JavaScript. Certain types of cancer treatments can cause hot flashes and night sweats. Hot flashes are when ...

  12. Digital ischemia in baseball players.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, M; Ogino, T; Minami, A; Ishii, S

    1986-01-01

    Eight baseball players developed digital ischemia as a result of repetitive ball impact. Symptoms and signs were coolness, numbness, cyanosis, paleness, and a positive reaction to the digital Allen's test. Seven of the eight players developed digital ischemia between the ages of 16 and 17. Angiograms of four patients with an occluded index digital artery are presented. Thermograms of four patients with a cool area of the left index finger are also presented. We investigated the incidence of digital ischemia by administration of a questionnaire. The respondents were 578 players belonging to clubs in junior high schools, high schools, and colleges. No digital ischemia was found in 207 junior high school baseball players. The incidence increased in high school (66 of 299) and college (29 of 72). The probability of developing digital ischemia corresponded to the accumulated playing time. Digital ischemia occurred characteristically in the left index finger.

  13. Au Contraire: Gifted in a Flash (Mob)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delisle, James R.

    2012-01-01

    A "flash mob" is defined by Wikipedia as "a large group of people who assemble suddenly in a public place, perform an unusual and pointless act for a brief time, then disperse." Fueled by social media and Smartphones, flash mobs have been used, primarily, as entertaining diversions by addicted techies with (apparently) tons of time on their hands.…

  14. Flash Expansion Threshold in Whirligig Swarms

    PubMed Central

    Romey, William L.; Lamb, Alicia R.

    2015-01-01

    In the selfish herd hypothesis, prey animals move toward each other to avoid the likelihood of being selected by a predator. However, many grouped animals move away from each other the moment before a predator attacks. Very little is known about this phenomenon, called flash expansion, such as whether it is triggered by one individual or a threshold and how information is transferred between group members. We performed a controlled experiment with whirligig beetles in which the ratio of sighted to unsighted individuals was systematically varied and emergent flash expansion was measured. Specifically, we examined: the percentage of individuals in a group that startled, the resulting group area, and the longevity of the flash expansion. We found that one or two sighted beetles in a group of 24 was not enough to cause a flash expansion after a predator stimulus, but four sighted beetles usually initiated a flash expansion. Also, the more beetles that were sighted the larger the resulting group area and the longer duration of the flash expansion. We conclude that flash expansion is best described as a threshold event whose adaptive value is to prevent energetically costly false alarms while quickly mobilizing an emergent predator avoidance response. This is one of the first controlled experiments of flash expansion, an important emergent property that has applications to understanding collective motion in swarms, schools, flocks, and human crowds. Also, our study is a convincing demonstration of social contagion, how the actions of one individual can pass through a group. PMID:26301958

  15. The flash-lag effect and equiluminance.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Mark; Hine, Trevor J; Hardwick, David

    2002-06-01

    An object briefly flashed adjacent to the path of another moving object appears to spatially lag the moving object in the direction of its motion: the 'flash-lag effect'. A simple differential lag model account of this effect suggests that it occurs because the moving object activates motion detectors in the faster magnocellular pathway, whereas the flashed object does not. This model was tested by reducing M-pathway involvement using isoluminant stimuli. All four participants, who were university undergraduate students, were exposed to eight conditions, involving all possible combinations of moving and flashing objects coloured either white or green, shown against either a grey or a black background. Green objects were equiluminant with the grey background. The magnitude of the flash-lag effect was found using the method of constant stimuli. No reliable support was found for the hypothesis that equiluminance of the moving object reduces the flash-lag effect. Instead an interaction was found where there was an effect of equiluminance on the flash, but only when the moving object was not equiluminant. Such data is problematic for this and other simple differential lag models of the flash-lag effect.

  16. Flash Expansion Threshold in Whirligig Swarms.

    PubMed

    Romey, William L; Lamb, Alicia R

    2015-01-01

    In the selfish herd hypothesis, prey animals move toward each other to avoid the likelihood of being selected by a predator. However, many grouped animals move away from each other the moment before a predator attacks. Very little is known about this phenomenon, called flash expansion, such as whether it is triggered by one individual or a threshold and how information is transferred between group members. We performed a controlled experiment with whirligig beetles in which the ratio of sighted to unsighted individuals was systematically varied and emergent flash expansion was measured. Specifically, we examined: the percentage of individuals in a group that startled, the resulting group area, and the longevity of the flash expansion. We found that one or two sighted beetles in a group of 24 was not enough to cause a flash expansion after a predator stimulus, but four sighted beetles usually initiated a flash expansion. Also, the more beetles that were sighted the larger the resulting group area and the longer duration of the flash expansion. We conclude that flash expansion is best described as a threshold event whose adaptive value is to prevent energetically costly false alarms while quickly mobilizing an emergent predator avoidance response. This is one of the first controlled experiments of flash expansion, an important emergent property that has applications to understanding collective motion in swarms, schools, flocks, and human crowds. Also, our study is a convincing demonstration of social contagion, how the actions of one individual can pass through a group.

  17. Organic flash cycles for efficient power production

    DOEpatents

    Ho, Tony; Mao, Samuel S.; Greif, Ralph

    2016-03-15

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to an Organic Flash Cycle (OFC). In one aspect, a modified OFC system includes a pump, a heat exchanger, a flash evaporator, a high pressure turbine, a throttling valve, a mixer, a low pressure turbine, and a condenser. The heat exchanger is coupled to an outlet of the pump. The flash evaporator is coupled to an outlet of the heat exchanger. The high pressure turbine is coupled to a vapor outlet of the flash evaporator. The throttling valve is coupled to a liquid outlet of the flash evaporator. The mixer is coupled to an outlet of the throttling valve and to an outlet of the high pressure turbine. The low pressure turbine is coupled to an outlet of the mixer. The condenser is coupled to an outlet of the low pressure turbine and to an inlet of the pump.

  18. Luminosities for Final Flash Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinkle, Kenneth; Joyce, Richard; Lebzelter, Thomas

    2010-08-01

    A brief yet common evolutionary process is a post-AGB final episode of helium shell burning. This occurs after a low mass star has ejected a planetary nebula and has started on the white dwarf track. Seven stars are now classified with varying degrees of certainty as one of these ``final flash'' objects. Two of these have actually been observed to eject a shell of gas first as a pseudo-photosphere and then as a thick dust envelope. The dust envelopes are expanding at ~100 km s^-1. We propose AO imaging of the circumstellar shells to measure changes from images recorded a decade or more ago. From these changes we will determine geometric parallaxes and hence luminosities. The luminosity will be compared to stellar evolution models. In an additional challenge to models we will calibrate the He I emission line flux and through this the mass loss rate from the fast stellar wind.

  19. NUCLEAR FLASH TYPE STEAM GENERATOR

    DOEpatents

    Johns, F.L.; Gronemeyer, E.C.; Dusbabek, M.R.

    1962-09-01

    A nuclear steam generating apparatus is designed so that steam may be generated from water heated directly by the nuclear heat source. The apparatus comprises a pair of pressure vessels mounted one within the other, the inner vessel containing a nuclear reactor heat source in the lower portion thereof to which water is pumped. A series of small ports are disposed in the upper portion of the inner vessel for jetting heated water under pressure outwardly into the atmosphere within the interior of the outer vessel, at which time part of the jetted water flashes into steam. The invention eliminates the necessity of any intermediate heat transfer medium and components ordinarily required for handling that medium. (AEC)

  20. Radiometry of flashing LED sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregory, Don A.; Medley, Stephanie; Roberts, Adam

    2008-08-01

    A laboratory based technique has been devised for measuring the illumination characteristics of flashing light emitting diode (LED) sources. The difference between the photopic measurement of a continuous source and a flashing source is that some analytic method must be incorporated into the measurement to account for the response of the eye. Ohno et al have devised an analytic expression for the impulse response of the eye, which closely matches existing forms used for finding effective intensity1. These other forms are the Blondel-Rey equation, the Form Factor method, and the Allard method.4,5,6 Ohno's research suggests a modified Allard method, but offers no procedure for actually making the measurement. In this research, the modified Allard1 method approach has been updated using standard laboratory equipment such as a silicon detector in conjunction with a digital multi-meter and Labview® software to make this measurement. Labview® allows exact computation of the modified Allard method. However, an approximation scheme for the conversion from radiometric units to photopic units must be adopted. The LED spectral form is approximately a Gaussian line shape with full width at half maximum of about 15 to 30nm. The Gaussian curve makes converting from radiometric to photopic units difficult. To simplify, the technique presented here estimates the spectral form of the LEDs to be a Dirac delta function situated at the peak wavelength. This allows the conversion from watts to lumens to be a simple application of the luminous efficiency curve.2 For LEDs with a full width half maximum of 20nm, this scheme is found to be accurate to +/- 5%.

  1. Illuminating Flash Point: Comprehensive Prediction Models.

    PubMed

    Le, Tu C; Ballard, Mathew; Casey, Phillip; Liu, Ming S; Winkler, David A

    2015-01-01

    Flash point is an important property of chemical compounds that is widely used to evaluate flammability hazard. However, there is often a significant gap between the demand for experimental flash point data and their availability. Furthermore, the determination of flash point is difficult and costly, particularly for some toxic, explosive, or radioactive compounds. The development of a reliable and widely applicable method to predict flash point is therefore essential. In this paper, the construction of a quantitative structure - property relationship model with excellent performance and domain of applicability is reported. It uses the largest data set to date of 9399 chemically diverse compounds, with flash point spanning from less than -130 °C to over 900 °C. The model employs only computed parameters, eliminating the need for experimental data that some earlier computational models required. The model allows accurate prediction of flash point for a broad range of compounds that are unavailable or not yet synthesized. This single model with a very broad range of chemical and flash point applicability will allow accurate predictions of this important property to be made for a broad range of new materials. PMID:27490859

  2. Flash Droughts over the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettenmaier, D. P.; Mo, K. C.

    2015-12-01

    Flash drought refers to relatively short periods of warm surface temperature and anomalously low and rapid decreasing soil moisture (SM). Based on the physical mechanisms associated with flash droughts, we classify them into two categories: heat wave and precipitation (P) deficit flash droughts. We analyze the flash droughts based on the observations and the land surface model reconstructed soil moisture (SM) and evaporation (ET) from 1916 to 2013. Heat wave flash droughts are most likely to occur over the Midwest and the Pacific Northwest during the growing season. They do not occur often. The maximum frequency of occurrence is only 4%. Heat wave flash drought is temperature driven. High temperatures increase the transpiration and drive down soil moisture and cause drought to occur. The P deficit flash droughts are more common than the heat wave droughts and the maximum frequency of occurrence is about 8- 10 %. They are most likely to occur over the southern United States with a maximum over the Southern Plains. They are P driven. Heat waves are caused by P deficits. P deficits drive down SM and cause ET to decreases and temperature to increase.

  3. Influence of geological features (geochemistry and mineralogy) of soil wich constitutes adobes in their durability - Huambo, Angola.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Isabel; Pedro, Elsa; Varum, Humberto; Mirão, José; Pinho, António

    2014-05-01

    After long years of war, great efforts have been made for the socio-economic development of Angola, mainly in the construction industry. Among the construction techniques, the Adobe is the most used in the province of Huambo, especially by low-income families, which constitute the majority. This technique was established as a historical heritage in the culture of that population. The Huambo province is located in the central region of Angola (Central Plateau) and is bounded on the northeast and east by the province of Bié, on the south and southern by province of Huila, and on the west by the province of Benguela and on the northwest by the province of Kwanza Sul. Has an area of 35,771 km2 and approximately 2,301,524 inhabitants, which corresponds to 58 inhabitants per km2 (Government of the Province of Huambo, 2006). The buildings in this province, particularly in rural areas, were deeply marked by war. Given the current scenario of development of the country and considering the possibility of integrate systems and traditional building materials, that respect the environment and fit harmoniously into its natural habitat, one of the alternative options in the actual construction, undergoes resume old solutions and traditional materials such as adobe construction.It is in this context that this project is part of a scientific research in order to permit the improvement and optimization of these traditional solutions, responding to current demands for social, economic and environmental sustainability. The adobe is a building element with potential degradation by water. Due to the climate, subtropical, hot and humid, and geomorphology of the province, about 1000 to 2000 meters of altitude and an extensive river system, these buildings can be vulnerable and present early degradation, exacerbated by lack of knowledge of the properties of geomaterials used and techniques that allow their stabilization and conservation. This paper aims to study the influence of

  4. Brief history of ETOX NOR flash memory.

    PubMed

    Lai, Stefan K

    2012-10-01

    NOR Flash memory grew from a simple concept in the 80's to worldwide revenue of US$4.8B in 2011. Stacked gate NOR (ETOX NOR at Intel) has highest revenue share of different NOR flash types. Cost reduction was made possible by continuous innovation along many fronts. Key enabler is Moore's Law scaling augmented by multiple self aligned techniques. Another key one is multilevel-cell technology giving 2 bits of information in a single cell. With emergence of NAND at much lower cost, NOR flash market is projected not to grow but NOR is still dominant memory for BIOS and program store in many electronic devices.

  5. 49 CFR 234.217 - Flashing light units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flashing light units. 234.217 Section 234.217..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.217 Flashing light units. (a) Each flashing light unit.... (b) Each flashing light unit shall be maintained to prevent dust and moisture from entering...

  6. 49 CFR 234.217 - Flashing light units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flashing light units. 234.217 Section 234.217..., Inspection, and Testing Maintenance Standards § 234.217 Flashing light units. (a) Each flashing light unit.... (b) Each flashing light unit shall be maintained to prevent dust and moisture from entering...

  7. Shoulder injuries in soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Loppini, Mattia; Berton, Alessandra; Martinelli, Nicolò; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Summary Even though soccer is the most popular sport of the world, no review is available at present to resume the available data on shoulder injuries in soccer. The aim of this review is to report the available epidemiological data on shoulder specific injuries in soccer players and to describe the common mechanisms of shoulder injuries in soccer. Studies published through September 15, 2011, were identified by using MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Pre-CINAHL, Pub-Med, Web of Science, and the full Cochrane Library. Reference lists of included studies were searched by hand. Studies were included if they reported on shoulder injuries in soccer players. Limits were not placed on year of publication, status of publication, or language. The journal, authors, and author affiliations of included studies were masked from 2 reviewers. We planned to perform a study on the epidemiology, mechanisms and management of shoulder injuries in elite soccer players. We also planned to use Review Manager (RevMan. Version 5 for Windows) to calculate the magnitude of treatment effect. No studies on clinical outcome of shoulder injuries in elite soccer athletes were found. No studies on the mechanism of shoulder injury in elite soccer players were found. The results of the available studies on epidemiology are reported. Despite soccer is the world’s game, few studies focused on shoulder injuries in soccer players, and therefore no definitive conclusions can be drawn. Further research is warranted to clarify the epidemiology, mechanisms and management of shoulder injuries in elite soccer players. PMID:23289025

  8. An Inexpensive, Foolproof Apparatus for Flash Chromatography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Wayne J.; Hanson, Bryan A.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a new, modified "flash chromatography" apparatus which overcomes difficulties found in conventional apparatus. For example, an expensive teflon pressure valve is not necessary in the modified version. The apparatus is suitable as an instructional tool in undergraduate courses. (JN)

  9. Photoinactivation of photosystem II by flashing light.

    PubMed

    Szilárd, András; Sass, László; Hideg, Eva; Vass, Imre

    2005-06-01

    Inhibition of Photosystem II (PS II) activity by single turnover visible light flashes was studied in thylakoid membranes isolated form spinach. Flash illumination results in decreased oxygen evolving activity of PS II, which effect is most pronounced when the water-oxidizing complex is in the S2 and S3 states, and increases with increasing time delay between the subsequent flashes. By applying the fluorescent spin-trap DanePy, we detected the production of singlet oxygen, whose amount was increasing with increasing flash spacing. These findings were explained in the framework of a model, which assumes that recombination of the S2QB - and S3QB - states generate the triplet state of the reaction center chlorophyll and lead to the production of singlet oxygen.

  10. Quality control in the "flash" process.

    PubMed

    1985-03-01

    This article has briefly discussed the three basic types of sterilization monitoring systems--mechanical, chemical, and biological. Mechanical indicators help tell you that the sterilizer is working. Chemical indicators provide you with immediate information in each "flash" load that the conditions necessary for steam sterilization were present. Biological indicators tell you that microorganisms were killed. For maximum assurance that the conditions necessary for steam sterilization are present and that non-sterile instruments are not inadvertently used, each "flash" sterilizer should be monitored daily with biological indicators and each "flash" load with chemical indicators. This quality control monitoring program should give the O.R. staff confidence that their "flash" sterilization process is working. PMID:10271096

  11. A Simple Lightning Flash Polarity Discriminating Counter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devan, K. R. S.; Jayaratne, E. R.

    1990-01-01

    Described are the apparatus and procedures needed for a demonstration of a determination of the polarity of charges carried by individual ground flashes of lightning. Discussed are materials, apparatus construction, and experimental results. (CW)

  12. A global flash flood forecasting system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baugh, Calum; Pappenberger, Florian; Wetterhall, Fredrik; Hewson, Tim; Zsoter, Ervin

    2016-04-01

    The sudden and devastating nature of flash flood events means it is imperative to provide early warnings such as those derived from Numerical Weather Prediction (NWP) forecasts. Currently such systems exist on basin, national and continental scales in Europe, North America and Australia but rely on high resolution NWP forecasts or rainfall-radar nowcasting, neither of which have global coverage. To produce global flash flood forecasts this work investigates the possibility of using forecasts from a global NWP system. In particular we: (i) discuss how global NWP can be used for flash flood forecasting and discuss strengths and weaknesses; (ii) demonstrate how a robust evaluation can be performed given the rarity of the event; (iii) highlight the challenges and opportunities in communicating flash flood uncertainty to decision makers; and (iv) explore future developments which would significantly improve global flash flood forecasting. The proposed forecast system uses ensemble surface runoff forecasts from the ECMWF H-TESSEL land surface scheme. A flash flood index is generated using the ERIC (Enhanced Runoff Index based on Climatology) methodology [Raynaud et al., 2014]. This global methodology is applied to a series of flash floods across southern Europe. Results from the system are compared against warnings produced using the higher resolution COSMO-LEPS limited area model. The global system is evaluated by comparing forecasted warning locations against a flash flood database of media reports created in partnership with floodlist.com. To deal with the lack of objectivity in media reports we carefully assess the suitability of different skill scores and apply spatial uncertainty thresholds to the observations. To communicate the uncertainties of the flash flood system output we experiment with a dynamic region-growing algorithm. This automatically clusters regions of similar return period exceedence probabilities, thus presenting the at-risk areas at a spatial

  13. Method for programming a flash memory

    DOEpatents

    Brosky, Alexander R.; Locke, William N.; Maher, Conrado M.

    2016-08-23

    A method of programming a flash memory is described. The method includes partitioning a flash memory into a first group having a first level of write-protection, a second group having a second level of write-protection, and a third group having a third level of write-protection. The write-protection of the second and third groups is disabled using an installation adapter. The third group is programmed using a Software Installation Device.

  14. Flash Flood Trail near Parras, Coahuila, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Evidence of a recent flash flood can be seen in the form of light brown sediment that flowed down gullies and mountain sides forming ponds of debris over agricultural areas in the broad valley near the town of Parras (26.5N, 102.5W). This part of Mexico has extensive vineyards, orchards and both dry land and irrigated agriculture. Based on the photo, it appears that flash flood waters damaged some 300 square miles of property in this area alone.

  15. QSPR modeling of flash points: an update.

    PubMed

    Katritzky, Alan R; Stoyanova-Slavova, Iva B; Dobchev, Dimitar A; Karelson, Mati

    2007-09-01

    Quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) models for the flash points of 758 organic compounds are developed using geometrical, topological, quantum mechanical and electronic descriptors calculated by CODESSA PRO software. Multilinear regression models link the structures to their reported flash point values. We also report a nonlinear model based on an artificial neural network. The results are discussed in the light of the main factors that influence the property under investigation and its modeling.

  16. The Effectiveness Evaluation among Different Player-Matching Mechanisms in a Multi-Player Quiz Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Fu-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to investigate whether different player-matching mechanisms in educational multi-player online games (MOGs) can affect students' learning performance, enjoyment perception and gaming behaviors. Based on the multi-player quiz game, TRIS-Q, developed by Tsai, Tsai and Lin (2015) using a free player-matching (FPM) mechanism, the same…

  17. Facial injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Guyette, R F

    1993-04-01

    As the popularity of basketball increases and the style of the game becomes more physical, there is an increasing number of basketball-related injuries. Although most facial injuries sustained while playing basketball are relatively minor, severe and permanent injuries do occur. This article reviews the most common facial injuries incurred by basketball players with emphasis on diagnosis, early treatment, and prevention.

  18. FPGA Flash Memory High Speed Data Acquisition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, April

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to design and implement a VHDL ONFI Controller module for a Modular Instrumentation System. The goal of the Modular Instrumentation System will be to have a low power device that will store data and send the data at a low speed to a processor. The benefit of such a system will give an advantage over other purchased binary IP due to the capability of allowing NASA to re-use and modify the memory controller module. To accomplish the performance criteria of a low power system, an in house auxiliary board (Flash/ADC board), FPGA development kit, debug board, and modular instrumentation board will be jointly used for the data acquisition. The Flash/ADC board contains four, 1 MSPS, input channel signals and an Open NAND Flash memory module with an analog to digital converter. The ADC, data bits, and control line signals from the board are sent to an Microsemi/Actel FPGA development kit for VHDL programming of the flash memory WRITE, READ, READ STATUS, ERASE, and RESET operation waveforms using Libero software. The debug board will be used for verification of the analog input signal and be able to communicate via serial interface with the module instrumentation. The scope of the new controller module was to find and develop an ONFI controller with the debug board layout designed and completed for manufacture. Successful flash memory operation waveform test routines were completed, simulated, and tested to work on the FPGA board. Through connection of the Flash/ADC board with the FPGA, it was found that the device specifications were not being meet with Vdd reaching half of its voltage. Further testing showed that it was the manufactured Flash/ADC board that contained a misalignment with the ONFI memory module traces. The errors proved to be too great to fix in the time limit set for the project.

  19. Flash LIDAR Systems for Planetary Exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissly, Richard; Weinberg, J.; Weimer, C.; Craig, R.; Earhart, P.; Miller, K.

    2009-01-01

    Ball Aerospace offers a mature, highly capable 3D flash-imaging LIDAR system for planetary exploration. Multi mission applications include orbital, standoff and surface terrain mapping, long distance and rapid close-in ranging, descent and surface navigation and rendezvous and docking. Our flash LIDAR is an optical, time-of-flight, topographic imaging system, leveraging innovations in focal plane arrays, readout integrated circuit real time processing, and compact and efficient pulsed laser sources. Due to its modular design, it can be easily tailored to satisfy a wide range of mission requirements. Flash LIDAR offers several distinct advantages over traditional scanning systems. The entire scene within the sensor's field of view is imaged with a single laser flash. This directly produces an image with each pixel already correlated in time, making the sensor resistant to the relative motion of a target subject. Additionally, images may be produced at rates much faster than are possible with a scanning system. And because the system captures a new complete image with each flash, optical glint and clutter are easily filtered and discarded. This allows for imaging under any lighting condition and makes the system virtually insensitive to stray light. Finally, because there are no moving parts, our flash LIDAR system is highly reliable and has a long life expectancy. As an industry leader in laser active sensor system development, Ball Aerospace has been working for more than four years to mature flash LIDAR systems for space applications, and is now under contract to provide the Vision Navigation System for NASA's Orion spacecraft. Our system uses heritage optics and electronics from our star tracker products, and space qualified lasers similar to those used in our CALIPSO LIDAR, which has been in continuous operation since 2006, providing more than 1.3 billion laser pulses to date.

  20. Single Particle Difraction at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Bogan, M.; Boutet, S.; Starodub, Dmitri; Decorwin-Martin, Philippe; Chapman, H.; Bajt, S.; Schulz, J.; Hajdu, Janos; Seibert, M.M.; Iwan, Bianca; Timneanu, Nicusor; Marchesini, Stefano; Barty, Anton; Benner, W.Henry; Frank, Matthias; Hau-Riege, Stefan P.; Woods, Bruce; Rohner, Urs; /Tofwerk AG, Thun

    2010-06-11

    Single-pulse coherent diffraction patterns have been collected from randomly injected single particles with a soft X-ray free-electron laser (FEL). The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high-resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of the object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. A diffraction pattern of a single particle will only be recorded when the particle arrival into the FEL interaction region coincides with FEL pulse arrival and detector integration. The properties of the experimental apparatus coinciding with these three events set the data acquisition rate. For our single particle FLASH diffraction imaging experiments: (1) an aerodynamic lens stack prepared a particle beam that consisted of particles moving at 150-200 m/s positioned randomly in space and time, (2) the 10 fs long FEL pulses were delivered at a fixed rate, and (3) the detector was set to integrate and readout once every two seconds. The effect of these experimental parameters on the rate of data acquisition using randomly injected particles will be discussed. Overall, the ultrashort FEL pulses do not set the limit of the data acquisition, more important is the effective interaction time of the particle crossing the FEL focus, the pulse sequence structure and the detector readout rate. Example diffraction patterns of randomly injected ellipsoidal iron oxide nanoparticles in different orientations are presented. This is the first single particle diffraction data set of identical particles in different orientations collected on a shot-to-shot basis. This data set will be used to test algorithms for recovering 3D structure from single particle diffraction.

  1. Spondylolysis in young tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz‐Cotorro, A; Balius‐Matas, R; Estruch‐Massana, A; Angulo, J Vilaró

    2006-01-01

    The general aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of spondylolysis, a bone defect in the pars interarticularis of the vertebra, are reviewed. A retrospective study of young tennis players diagnosed between 2000 and 2004 with spondylolysis with or without spondylolisthesis, assessed by radiography and planar bone scintigraphy, is described. If the radiographic results were negative, computed tomography was performed. Sixty six cases were evaluated: 53 L5 lesions, eight L4 lesions, two L3 lesions, and one bilateral lesion at the L2 level. Two more lesions at two levels were found (bilateral L5 and unilateral L4 and L3 on the right side). Classification, treatment, and outcome of the cases are reported. A combination of radiography, planar bone scintigraphy, and SPECT is useful for evaluating spondylolysis in tennis players and recommending treatment. Use of a brace did not appear to achieve significant results. PMID:16632576

  2. Back injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Herskowitz, A; Selesnick, H

    1993-04-01

    The basketball player with lower back or lower extremity radicular pain needs to be carefully evaluated. A complete history of any previous symptomatology and a specific history of the new injury are absolutely essential. A careful physical examination with an understanding of the anatomy as well as possible causes of the lower back pain is crucial. An accurate diagnosis is essential in treating every athlete. Most basketball-related lower back injuries will respond to conservative nonsurgical treatment. Rehabilitation is a cornerstone in not only treating the initial symptoms, but decreasing the risks of reinjury. The goal of returning the basketball player to previous performance level as quickly as possible, with a minimal risk of re-injury, is the goal of the team physicians.

  3. The first confirmed Perseid lunar impact flash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Masahisa; Ohnishi, Kouji; Takamura, Yuzaburo; Masuda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Yoshihito; Ida, Miyoshi; Adachi, Makoto; Ishida, Masayuki

    2006-06-01

    The first confirmed lunar impact flash due to a non-Leonid meteoroid is reported. The observed Perseid meteoroid impact occurred at 18 h28 m27 s on August 11, 2004 (UT). The selenographic coordinates of the lunar impact flash are 48±1° N and 72±2° E, and the flash had a visual magnitude of ca. 9.5 with duration of about 1/30 s. The mass of the impactor is estimated to have been 12 g based on a nominal model with conversion efficiency from kinetic to optical energy of 2×10. Extrapolation of a power law size-frequency distribution fitting the sub-centimeter Perseid meteoric particles to large meteoroids suggests that several flashes should have been observed at this optical efficiency. The detection of only one flash may indicate that the optical efficiency for Perseid lunar impact is much lower, or that the slope of the size distribution differs between large meteoroids and typical sub-centimeter meteoric particles.

  4. Lightning flash multiplicity in eastern Mediterranean thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yair, Y.; Shalev, S.; Erlich, Z.; Agrachov, A.; Katz, E.; Saaroni, H.; Price, C.; Ziv, B.

    2014-02-01

    Cloud-to-ground lightning flashes usually consist of one or several strokes coming in very short temporal succession and close spatial proximity. A commonly used method for converting stroke data into flashes is using the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) thresholds of maximum temporal separation of 0.5 s and maximum lateral distance of 10 km radius between successive strokes. In the present study, we tested a location-based algorithm with several spatial and temporal ranges, and analyzed stroke data obtained by the Israel Lightning Location System (ILLS) during one year (1.8.2009-31.7.2010). We computed the multiplicity, the percentage of single stroke flashes and the geographical distribution of average multiplicity values for thunderstorms in the Eastern Mediterranean region. Results show that for the NLDN thresholds, the percentage of single stroke flashes in Israel was 37% and the average multiplicity was 1.7. We reanalyzed the data with a spatial range that equals twice the ILLS location error and shorter times. For the new thresholds of maximum distance of 2.5 km and maximum allowed temporal separation of 0.2 s we find that the mean multiplicity of negative CGs is lowered to 1.4 and find a percentage of 58% of single stroke flashes. A unique severe storm from 30 October 2009 is analyzed and compared with the annual average of 2009/2010, showing that large deviations from the mean values can occur in specific events.

  5. Using built-in functions of Adobe Acrobat Pro DC to help the selection process in systematic reviews of randomised trials.

    PubMed

    Nur, Selin; Adams, Clive E; Brailsford, David F

    2016-02-18

    This letter describes a simple way of using Adobe Acrobat Pro DC to help select and auto-extract data from Portable Document Format (PDFs) of randomised trials in order to assist swift early selection of trials for a systematic review.

  6. Economic assessment and pathogenic bacteria inhibition of bovine hide presoaking solutions formulated with enzymes that can remove adobe-type manure

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presoaking formulations that have recently been developed are effective in removing the damaging adobe type bovine manure and eco-friendly because the ingredients used are recycled and required only a quarter of the amount of biocide and surfactant that the industry is commonly using. The goal ...

  7. Firefly light flashing: oxygen supply mechanism.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yueh-Lin; Li, Chia-Wei; Hong, Tzay-Ming; Ho, Jen-Zon; Yang, En-Cheng; Wu, Wen-Yen; Margaritondo, G; Hsu, Su-Ting; Ong, Edwin B L; Hwu, Y

    2014-12-19

    Firefly luminescence is an intriguing phenomenon with potential technological applications, whose biochemistry background was only recently established. The physics side of this phenomenon, however, was still unclear, specifically as far as the oxygen supply mechanism for light flashing is concerned. This uncertainty is due to the complex microscopic structure of the tracheal system: without fully knowing its geometry, one cannot reliably test the proposed mechanisms. We solved this problem using synchrotron phase contrast microtomography and transmission x-ray microscopy, finding that the oxygen consumption corresponding to mitochondria functions exceeds the maximum rate of oxygen diffusion from the tracheal system to the photocytes. Furthermore, the flashing mechanism uses a large portion of this maximum rate. Thus, the flashing control requires passivation of the mitochondria functions, e.g., by nitric oxide, and switching of the oxygen supply from them to photoluminescence.

  8. Firefly Light Flashing: Oxygen Supply Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yueh-Lin; Li, Chia-Wei; Hong, Tzay-Ming; Ho, Jen-Zon; Yang, En-Cheng; Wu, Wen-Yen; Margaritondo, G.; Hsu, Su-Ting; Ong, Edwin B. L.; Hwu, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Firefly luminescence is an intriguing phenomenon with potential technological applications, whose biochemistry background was only recently established. The physics side of this phenomenon, however, was still unclear, specifically as far as the oxygen supply mechanism for light flashing is concerned. This uncertainty is due to the complex microscopic structure of the tracheal system: without fully knowing its geometry, one cannot reliably test the proposed mechanisms. We solved this problem using synchrotron phase contrast microtomography and transmission x-ray microscopy, finding that the oxygen consumption corresponding to mitochondria functions exceeds the maximum rate of oxygen diffusion from the tracheal system to the photocytes. Furthermore, the flashing mechanism uses a large portion of this maximum rate. Thus, the flashing control requires passivation of the mitochondria functions, e.g., by nitric oxide, and switching of the oxygen supply from them to photoluminescence.

  9. A void distribution model-flashing flow

    SciTech Connect

    Riznic, J.; Ishii, M.; Afgan, N.

    1987-01-01

    A new model for flashing flow based on wall nucleations is proposed here and the model predictions are compared with some experimental data. In order to calculate the bubble number density, the bubble number transport equation with a distributed source from the wall nucleation sites was used. Thus it was possible to avoid the usual assumption of a constant bubble number density. Comparisons of the model with the data shows that the model based on the nucleation site density correlation appears to be acceptable to describe the vapor generation in the flashing flow. For the limited data examined, the comparisons show rather satisfactory agreement without using a floating parameter to adjust the model. This result indicated that, at least for the experimental conditions considered here, the mechanistic predictions of the flashing phenomenon is possible on the present wall nucleation based model.

  10. Menopause: Not All Hot Flashes Are Created Equal

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_160027.html Menopause: Not All Hot Flashes Are Created Equal Weight, race, education and ... 2016 FRIDAY, July 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The hot flashes and night sweats of menopause don't ...

  11. Longitudinal Diagnostics of Short Bunches at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shaukat

    2009-01-22

    Novel acceleration concepts such as laser- or beam-driven plasma acceleration require advanced diagnostic techniques to characterize and monitor the beam. A particular challenge is to measure bunch lengths of the order of 10 femtoseconds. Several methods are currently explored at the free-electron laser FLASH at DESY/Hamburg and will be discussed it this paper, such as electro-optical sampling, streaking bunches with a transversely deflecting cavity, and -most recently implemented at FLASH--the optical-replica synthesizer, a laser-based technique promising a time resolution of a few femtoseconds.

  12. Probabilistic Flash Flood Forecasting using Stormscale Ensembles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, J.; Gourley, J. J.; Kain, J. S.; Clark, A.; Novak, D.; Hong, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Flash flooding is one of the most costly and deadly natural hazards in the US and across the globe. The loss of life and property from flash floods could be mitigated with better guidance from hydrological models, but these models have limitations. For example, they are commonly initialized using rainfall estimates derived from weather radars, but the time interval between observations of heavy rainfall and a flash flood can be on the order of minutes, particularly for small basins in urban settings. Increasing the lead time for these events is critical for protecting life and property. Therefore, this study advances the use of quantitative precipitation forecasts (QPFs) from a stormscale NWP ensemble system into a distributed hydrological model setting to yield basin-specific, probabilistic flash flood forecasts (PFFFs). Rainfall error characteristics of the individual members are first diagnosed and quantified in terms of structure, amplitude, and location (SAL; Wernli et al., 2008). Amplitude and structure errors are readily correctable due to their diurnal nature, and the fine scales represented by the CAPS QPF members are consistent with radar-observed rainfall, mainly showing larger errors with afternoon convection. To account for the spatial uncertainty of the QPFs, we use an elliptic smoother, as in Marsh et al. (2012), to produce probabilistic QPFs (PQPFs). The elliptic smoother takes into consideration underdispersion, which is notoriously associated with stormscale ensembles, and thus, is good for targeting the approximate regions that may receive heavy rainfall. However, stormscale details contained in individual members are still needed to yield reasonable flash flood simulations. Therefore, on a case study basis, QPFs from individual members are then run through the hydrological model with their predicted structure and corrected amplitudes, but the locations of individual rainfall elements are perturbed within the PQPF elliptical regions using Monte

  13. Vitamin D Deficiency Among Professional Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Fishman, Matthew P.; Lombardo, Stephen J.; Kharrazi, F. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Background: Vitamin D plays an important role in several systems of the human body. Various studies have linked vitamin D deficiency to stress and insufficiency fractures, muscle recovery and function, and athletic performance. The prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in the elite athletic population has not been extensively studied, and very few reports exist among professional athletes. Hypothesis: There is a high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency or insufficiency among players attending the National Basketball Association (NBA) Combine. Study Design: Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods: This is a retrospective review of data previously collected as part of the routine medical evaluation of players in the NBA Combines from 2009 through 2013. Player parameters evaluated were height, weight, body mass index (BMI), and vitamin D level. Statistical analysis using t tests and analysis of variance was used to detect any correlation between the player parameters and vitamin D level. Vitamin D levels were categorized as deficient (<20 ng/mL), insufficient (20-32 ng/mL), and sufficient (>32 ng/mL). Results: After institutional review board approval was submitted to the NBA, the NBA released deidentified data on 279 players who participated in the combines from 2009 through 2013. There were 90 players (32.3%) who were deficient, 131 players (47.0%) who were insufficient, and 58 players (20.8%) who were sufficient. A total of 221 players (79.3%) were either vitamin D deficient or insufficient. Among all players included, the average vitamin D level was 25.6 ± 10.2 ng/mL. Among the players who were deficient, insufficient, and sufficient, the average vitamin D levels were 16.1 ± 2.1 ng/mL, 25.0 ± 3.4 ng/mL, and 41.6 ± 8.6 ng/mL, respectively. Player height and weight were significantly increased in vitamin D–sufficient players compared with players who were not sufficient (P = .0008 and .009, respectively). Player age and BMI did not significantly

  14. Adobe photoshop quantification (PSQ) rather than point-counting: A rapid and precise method for quantifying rock textural data and porosities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuefeng; Liu, Bo; Wang, Jieqiong; Zhang, Zhe; Shi, Kaibo; Wu, Shuanglin

    2014-08-01

    Commonly used petrological quantification methods are visual estimation, counting, and image analyses. However, in this article, an Adobe Photoshop-based analyzing method (PSQ) is recommended for quantifying the rock textural data and porosities. Adobe Photoshop system provides versatile abilities in selecting an area of interest and the pixel number of a selection could be read and used to calculate its area percentage. Therefore, Adobe Photoshop could be used to rapidly quantify textural components, such as content of grains, cements, and porosities including total porosities and different genetic type porosities. This method was named as Adobe Photoshop Quantification (PSQ). The workflow of the PSQ method was introduced with the oolitic dolomite samples from the Triassic Feixianguan Formation, Northeastern Sichuan Basin, China, for example. And the method was tested by comparing with the Folk's and Shvetsov's "standard" diagrams. In both cases, there is a close agreement between the "standard" percentages and those determined by the PSQ method with really small counting errors and operator errors, small standard deviations and high confidence levels. The porosities quantified by PSQ were evaluated against those determined by the whole rock helium gas expansion method to test the specimen errors. Results have shown that the porosities quantified by the PSQ are well correlated to the porosities determined by the conventional helium gas expansion method. Generally small discrepancies (mostly ranging from -3% to 3%) are caused by microporosities which would cause systematic underestimation of 2% and/or by macroporosities causing underestimation or overestimation in different cases. Adobe Photoshop could be used to quantify rock textural components and porosities. This method has been tested to be precise and accurate. It is time saving compared with usual methods.

  15. Longevity of major league baseball players.

    PubMed

    Abel, Ernest L; Kruger, Michael L

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether major league baseball players live lontger than the general public. Ages of death of major league baseball players who debuted between 1900 and 1950 were obtained, and differences between ages of death and age-adjusted life expectancies were determined by analysis of variance and t-tests, taking into account player position. Correlational analysis also was conducted to determine if career length affected longevity. Baseball players lived an average of four years longer than age-matched controls from the general public. Career length did not affect longevity among players. We concluded that professional athletes, as represented by major league baseball players, have increased life expectancies. This increase cannot be explained by increased fitness associated with working as a professionral athlete, but is likely the result of an initial selection process for becoming a professional athlete.

  16. Serious eye injury in badminton players.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, S. P.

    1987-01-01

    Serious eye injury can occur in badminton players and may become more frequent. The causes and nature of such injuries in this sport in six patients are discussed. All were playing competitive doubles matches. Penetrating eye injury due to a shattered glass spectacle lens occurred. Players should be advised not to wear spectacles with glass lenses. Ocular protection in this sport is desirable, and the forward player should hold the racket in front of the face. PMID:3676143

  17. Serious eye injury in badminton players.

    PubMed

    Kelly, S P

    1987-10-01

    Serious eye injury can occur in badminton players and may become more frequent. The causes and nature of such injuries in this sport in six patients are discussed. All were playing competitive doubles matches. Penetrating eye injury due to a shattered glass spectacle lens occurred. Players should be advised not to wear spectacles with glass lenses. Ocular protection in this sport is desirable, and the forward player should hold the racket in front of the face.

  18. 49 CFR 234.217 - Flashing light units.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flashing light units. 234.217 Section 234.217... light units. (a) Each flashing light unit shall be properly positioned and aligned and shall be visible to a highway user approaching the crossing. (b) Each flashing light unit shall be maintained...

  19. Auditory memory function in expert chess players

    PubMed Central

    Fattahi, Fariba; Geshani, Ahmad; Jafari, Zahra; Jalaie, Shohreh; Salman Mahini, Mona

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chess is a game that involves many aspects of high level cognition such as memory, attention, focus and problem solving. Long term practice of chess can improve cognition performances and behavioral skills. Auditory memory, as a kind of memory, can be influenced by strengthening processes following long term chess playing like other behavioral skills because of common processing pathways in the brain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the auditory memory function of expert chess players using the Persian version of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test. Methods: The Persian version of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test was performed for 30 expert chess players aged 20-35 years and 30 non chess players who were matched by different conditions; the participants in both groups were randomly selected. The performance of the two groups was compared by independent samples t-test using SPSS version 21. Results: The mean score of dichotic auditory-verbal memory test between the two groups, expert chess players and non-chess players, revealed a significant difference (p≤ 0.001). The difference between the ears scores for expert chess players (p= 0.023) and non-chess players (p= 0.013) was significant. Gender had no effect on the test results. Conclusion: Auditory memory function in expert chess players was significantly better compared to non-chess players. It seems that increased auditory memory function is related to strengthening cognitive performances due to playing chess for a long time. PMID:26793666

  20. The Prevalence of Injuries in Professional Turkish Soccer Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamaner, Faruk; Gumusdag, Hayrettin; Kartal, Alparslan; Gumus, M.; Gullu, A.; Imamoglu, O.

    2011-01-01

    Study aim: To assess the prevalence and anatomical sites of injuries in professional soccer players in one game season. Material and methods: A cohort of 510 professional male soccer players consisting of 48 goalkeepers, 194 defence players, 189 mid-field players and 79 forward players of the 1st and 2nd Turkish Professional Soccer Leagues in…

  1. Meniscal injuries in basketball players

    PubMed Central

    ZEDDE, PIETRO; MELA, FEDERICO; DEL PRETE, FABIO; MASIA, FRANCESCO; MANUNTA, ANDREA F.

    2014-01-01

    Basketball is a highly competitive sport in which the knee joint is constantly subject to physical stresses. Basketball-related traumatic injuries are the result of specific technical movements. Even though basketball is not considered a contact sport, injuries in basketball players are due both to athletes’ handling of the ball and to their intense physical interaction during games. Nowadays, traumatic meniscal injuries are constantly on the increase, especially in young athletes, and they are generally the result of compressive forces together with knee flexion rotation. Recognition of the great importance of meniscal biomechanics and of the functional role of the meniscus has resulted in the adoption of an increasingly preserving approach, also in the light of the effects, in terms of articular degeneration, of removing meniscal tissue. Even though recent decades have seen considerable developments in arthroscopic meniscectomy techniques, geared at preserving as much meniscal tissue as possible, basketball players undergoing this treatment often present, in the long run, clinical symptomatology severe enough to compromise their participation in competitive sport. Hence the treatment of meniscal injuries in athletes has become more and more preserving in recent years, through recourse to surgical techniques such as meniscal repair, biological replacement implantation and donor meniscus implantation, which allow pain relief, return to competitive activities and stable long-term results, slowing down arthritic progression. Therefore, considering the increasing number of meniscal injuries in basketball players, which can jeopardize their sporting careers, great importance is now attached to early diagnosis and to the correct choice of meniscal injury treatment in these athletes. PMID:25750909

  2. Meniscal injuries in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Zedde, Pietro; Mela, Federico; Del Prete, Fabio; Masia, Francesco; Manunta, Andrea F

    2014-01-01

    Basketball is a highly competitive sport in which the knee joint is constantly subject to physical stresses. Basketball-related traumatic injuries are the result of specific technical movements. Even though basketball is not considered a contact sport, injuries in basketball players are due both to athletes' handling of the ball and to their intense physical interaction during games. Nowadays, traumatic meniscal injuries are constantly on the increase, especially in young athletes, and they are generally the result of compressive forces together with knee flexion rotation. Recognition of the great importance of meniscal biomechanics and of the functional role of the meniscus has resulted in the adoption of an increasingly preserving approach, also in the light of the effects, in terms of articular degeneration, of removing meniscal tissue. Even though recent decades have seen considerable developments in arthroscopic meniscectomy techniques, geared at preserving as much meniscal tissue as possible, basketball players undergoing this treatment often present, in the long run, clinical symptomatology severe enough to compromise their participation in competitive sport. Hence the treatment of meniscal injuries in athletes has become more and more preserving in recent years, through recourse to surgical techniques such as meniscal repair, biological replacement implantation and donor meniscus implantation, which allow pain relief, return to competitive activities and stable long-term results, slowing down arthritic progression. Therefore, considering the increasing number of meniscal injuries in basketball players, which can jeopardize their sporting careers, great importance is now attached to early diagnosis and to the correct choice of meniscal injury treatment in these athletes.

  3. Sight-Word Practice in a Flash!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Erwin, Robin W., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    For learners who need sight-word practice, including young students and struggling readers, digital flash cards may promote automatic word recognition when used as a supplemental activity to regular reading instruction. A novel use of common presentation software efficiently supports this practice strategy.

  4. Assessment of flash flood warning procedures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Lynn E.

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of four alternate flash flood warning procedures was conducted to ascertain their suitability for forecast operations using radar-rainfall imagery. The procedures include (1) areal mean basin effective rainfall, (2) unit hydrograph, (3) time-area, and (4) 2-D numerical modeling. The Buffalo Creek flash flood of July 12, 1996, was used as a case study for application of each of the procedures. A significant feature of the Buffalo Creek event was a forest fire that occurred a few months before the flood and significantly affected watershed runoff characteristics. Objectives were to assess the applicability of the procedures for watersheds having spatial and temporal scale similarities to Buffalo Creek, to compare their technical characteristics, and to consider forecaster usability. Geographic information system techniques for hydrologic database development and flash flood potential computations are illustrated. Generalizations of the case study results are offered relative to their suitability for flash flood forecasting operations. Although all four methods have relative advantages, their application to the Buffalo Creek event resulted in mixed performance. Failure of any method was due primarily to uncertainties of the land surface response (i.e., burn area imperviousness). Results underscore the need for model calibration; a difficult requirement for real-time forecasting.

  5. High-Fidelity Flash Lidar Model Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hines, Glenn D.; Pierrottet, Diego F.; Amzajerdian, Farzin

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technologies (ALHAT) project is currently developing the critical technologies to safely and precisely navigate and land crew, cargo and robotic spacecraft vehicles on and around planetary bodies. One key element of this project is a high-fidelity Flash Lidar sensor that can generate three-dimensional (3-D) images of the planetary surface. These images are processed with hazard detection and avoidance and hazard relative navigation algorithms, and then are subsequently used by the Guidance, Navigation and Control subsystem to generate an optimal navigation solution. A complex, high-fidelity model of the Flash Lidar was developed in order to evaluate the performance of the sensor and its interaction with the interfacing ALHAT components on vehicles with different configurations and under different flight trajectories. The model contains a parameterized, general approach to Flash Lidar detection and reflects physical attributes such as range and electronic noise sources, and laser pulse temporal and spatial profiles. It also provides the realistic interaction of the laser pulse with terrain features that include varying albedo, boulders, craters slopes and shadows. This paper gives a description of the Flash Lidar model and presents results from the Lidar operating under different scenarios.

  6. FLASH2 photon diagnostics and beamline concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, M.; Plönjes, E.

    2013-05-01

    FLASH2 is a major extention to the soft X-ray free-electron laser FLASH at DESY. An additional variable-gap undulator line in a new separate tunnel and a new experimental hall will turn FLASH into a multi-beamline FEL user facility. Years of experience as single user facility have high impact on the planned photon diagnostics. Online measurements of intensity, position, wavelength, wavefront, and pulse length are optimized as well as photon beam manipulation tools such as a gas absorber and filters. The beamline system will be set up to cover a wide wavelength range with beamlines capable to deliver down to 0.8 nm in the 5th harmonic and 1st harmonics in the water window to cover the user community's high intrest in this wavelength range. In addition, other beamlines will cover the longer wavelengths from 6 nm - 40 nm and beyond. Proven concepts like the optical laser pump-and-probe instrument are taken over from the current operation scheme in an established way. Permanent endstations with specialized beamline layouts are foreseen. Civil construction and installations in the new FLASH2 tunnel are on-going, first beam is expected for end of 2013, and a first user experiment is anticipated for summer 2014.

  7. Anthropometric Characteristics of Columbia, South Carolina, Youth Baseball Players and Dixie Youth World Series Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    French, Karen E.; Spurgeon, John H.; Nevett, Michael E.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare measures of body size in two samples of youth baseball players with normative data from the United States National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) growth charts. One sample of youth baseball players participated in a local little league. The second sample of youth baseball players were members of eight…

  8. Flash flood modelling for ungauged catchments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garambois, P.-A.; Roux, H.; Larnier, K.; Dartus, D.

    2012-04-01

    Flash flood is a very intense and quick hydrologic response of a catchment to rainfall. This phenomenon has a high spatial-temporal variability as its generating storm, often hitting small catchments (few km2). Data collected by (Gaume et al. 2009) about 500 flash floods over the last 50 years showed that they could occur everywhere in Europe and more often in the Mediterranean regions, Alpine regions and continental Europe. Given the small spatial-temporal scales and high variability of flash floods, their prediction remains a hard exercise as the necessary data are often scarce. Flash flood prediction on ungauged catchments is one of the challenges of hydrological modelling as defined by (Sivapalan et al. 2003). Several studies have been headed up with the MARINE model (Modélisation de l'Anticipation du Ruissellement et des Inondations pour des évèNements Extrêmes) for the Gard region (France), (Roux et al. 2011), (Castaings et al. 2009). This physically based spatially distributed rainfall runoff model is dedicated to flash flood prediction. The study aims at finding a methodology for flash flood prediction at ungauged locations in the Cévennes-Vivarais region in particular. The regionalization method is based on multiple calibrations on gauged catchments in order to extract model structures (model + parameter values) for each catchment. Several mathematical methods (multiple regressions, transfer functions, krigging…) will then be tested to calculate a regional parameter set. The study also investigates the usability of additional hydrologic indices at different time scales to constrain model predictions from parameters obtained using these indices, and this independently of the model considered. These hydrologic indices gather information on hydrograph shape or catchment dynamic for instance. Results explaining global catchments behaviour are expected that way. The spatial-temporal variability of storms is also described through indices and linked with

  9. Initiation Locations of Lightning Flashes in Two Florida Thunderstorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, T. C.; Karunarathna, N.; Stolzenburg, M.; Karunarathne, S.

    2015-12-01

    In this presentation we investigate the initiation locations of all intracloud (IC) and cloud-to-ground (CG) lightning flashes in two small thunderstorms which occurred over NASA/Kennedy Space Center on July 22, 2011. Initiation points of 47 of the 58 lightning flashes (19 IC and 28 CG) were identified using the first initial breakdown (IB) pulse of each flash measured with E-change data. In this study 32 of the flashes had an LDAR2 (VHF) location coincident with the first IB pulse. For 15 flashes we used Position By Fast Antenna or PBFA [Karunarathne et al., 2013, JGR Atmospheres] to determine the location of the first IB pulse. (The remaining flashes had neither LDAR2 nor PBFA locations of the first IB pulse.) All these initiation points were then mapped onto radar reflectivity of the parent thundercloud. The initiation points of the flashes tend to cluster in specific regions in thundercloud. Lightning activity in both thunderstorms lasted 35 minutes, and all the flash initiation points in each storm occurred within a horizontal region of 4 km by 8 km. Flash initiation altitudes for IC flashes of the two thunderstorms ranged from 5.1 km to 12.1 km altitude while for CG flashes the altitude ranged from 4.6 km to 8.1 km. Based on available radar data for 14 IC flashes and 27 CG flashes, all but one of the IC flashes originated in 10 dBZ - 30 dBZ reflectivity regions while 22 of the CG flashes originated in 30 dBZ - 40 dBZ reflectivities. During the lifetimes of these two storms, no Narrow Bipolar Events occurred.

  10. Flash Diffusivity Technique Applied to Individual Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayeaux, Brian; Yowell, Leonard; Wang, Hsin

    2007-01-01

    A variant of the flash diffusivity technique has been devised for determining the thermal diffusivities, and thus the thermal conductivities, of individual aligned fibers. The technique is intended especially for application to nanocomposite fibers, made from narrower fibers of polyphenylene benzobisthiazole (PBZT) and carbon nanotubes. These highly aligned nanocomposite fibers could exploit the high thermal conductivities of carbon nanotubes for thermal-management applications. In the flash diffusivity technique as practiced heretofore, one or more heat pulse(s) is (are) applied to the front face of a plate or disk material specimen and the resulting time-varying temperature on the rear face is measured. Usually, the heat pulse is generated by use of a xenon flash lamp, and the variation of temperature on the rear face is measured by use of an infrared detector. The flash energy is made large enough to produce a usefully high temperature rise on the rear face, but not so large as to significantly alter the specimen material. Once the measurement has been completed, the thermal diffusivity of the specimen is computed from the thickness of the specimen and the time dependence of the temperature variation on the rear face. Heretofore, the infrared detector used in the flash diffusivity technique has been a single-point detector, which responds to a spatial average of the thermal radiation from the rear specimen surface. Such a detector cannot distinguish among regions of differing diffusivity within the specimen. Moreover, two basic assumptions of the thermaldiffusivity technique as practiced heretofore are that the specimen is homogeneous and that heat flows one-dimensionally from the front to the rear face. These assumptions are not valid for an inhomogeneous (composite) material.

  11. Current status and advances in flash fire modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Rew, P.J.; Deaves, D.M.; Madison, T.

    1995-12-31

    When a dispersing cloud of flammable vapor is ignited, it can burn in a number of different ways. A flash fire or cloud fire occurs if ignition takes place within the flammable region of a gas cloud, generally at a point remote from the source. A review of the modeling of flash fires (cloud fires) is presented. The present understanding of flash fires is discussed through reference to past incidents and current models. Full scale flash fire trials are reviewed, providing a database of relevant experimental data. Outline proposals are given for improving the current prediction methodologies for the direct (burn fatalities) and indirect (escalation) effects of flash fires.

  12. An unusual characteristic "flower-like" pattern: flash suppressor burns.

    PubMed

    Gurcan, Altun

    2012-04-01

    The case on contact shots from firearms with a flash suppressor is rare. When a rifle fitted with a flash suppressor is fired, the emerging soot-laden gas in the barrel escapes from the slits of the flash suppressor. If the shot is contact or near contact, the flash suppressor will produce a characteristic "flower-like" pattern of seared, blackened zones around the entrance. This paper presents the injury pattern of the flash suppressor in a 29-year-old man who committed suicide with a G3 automatic infantry rifle.

  13. Global optical lightning flash rates determined with the Forte satellite

    SciTech Connect

    Light, T.; Davis, S. M.; Boeck, W. L.; Jacobson, A. R.; Suszcynsky, D. M.

    2003-01-01

    Using FORTE photodiode detector (PDD) observations of lightning, we have determined the geographic distribution of nighttime flash rate density. We estimate the PDD flash detection efficiency to be 62% for total lightning through comparison to lightning observations by the TRMM satellite's Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS), using cases in which FORTE and TRMM viewed the same storm. We present here both seasonal and l,ot,al flash rate maps. We examine some characteristics of the optical emissions of lightning in both high and low flash rate environments, and find that while lightning occurs less frequently over ocean, oceanic lightning flashes are somewhat more powerful, on average, than those over land.

  14. Suprascapular neuropathy in volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Dramis, Asterios; Pimpalnerkar, Ashvin

    2005-06-01

    Entrapment neuropathy of the suprascapular nerve (SNE), although a recognised clinical entity, is a relatively rare cause of shoulder pain and subjective weakness in the athlete involved in overhead sports like volleyball and badminton. This study deals with the presentation and management of four unusual cases of suprascapular nerve entrapment in volleyball players. Four male volleyball players presented to our department with intractable shoulder pain and subjective sensation of shoulder weakness. They all had visible wasting of both supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscles, together with weakness of abduction and external rotation of the arm. They all responded temporarily to a diagnostic injection of local anaesthetic. MR imaging was useful in diagnosing space occupying lesions in three cases and the presence of a hypertrophic suprascapular ligament in one case. Due to failure of non- operative treatment, which included activity modification, rest, analgesics and rehabilitation programme over 6 months, surgery was then required to decompress the suprascapular nerve. All patients were symptom free at 6 months postoperatively and after an intensive rehabilitation programme, they were able to return to their normal level of activity including sport.

  15. FlashMap: A Versatile and Intuitive Web-based User Interface for Rich Heterogeneous Geospatial Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Staudigel, D. T.; Minnett, R. C.; Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.

    2007-12-01

    The Seamount Catalog (SC) under http://earthref.org is a hub for a variety of data. It has been growing steadily since its launch, and now has records for thousands of seamounts, each with carefully prepared maps, metadata, and large volumes of raw and processed multibeam data. Historically these records have been accessible only through traditional name and location queries. In these queries result sets are normally presented as a list and geospatial information is simply reported as latitude and longitude data pairs in these lists. This presents considerable limitations for integrating additional rich media content, such as videos, images, data files, cruise tracks, and interoperable database results, without overwhelming the user. The SC database clearly lends itself to a more intuitive user interface and thus has been an invaluable test bed for the design and implementation of FlashMap. This is a versatile KML-driven geospatial browser written for reliability and speed in Adobe Flash that either can be used in the users browsers or as a stand alone program on their computer desktops. FlashMap allows layers of content to be loaded and displayed over a streaming high-resolution map which can be zoomed on 14 levels and panned similarly to Google Maps and Earth. Many organizations, from National Geographic to the USGS, have begun using Google Earth software to display geospatial content. However, Google Earth, as a desktop application, does not integrate cleanly with existing websites requiring the user to navigate away from the browser and focus on a separate application. FlashMap remedies this problem with a web-based application that allows for seamless integration of the real-time display power of Google Earth and the flexibility of the web. Google Earth is based on KML (Keyhole Markup Language), which is an XML-based file format designed for geospatial display data. Our Flash-based application is fully compatible with KML 2.1, the most recent iteration of KML

  16. N-player stochastic differential games

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Varaiya, P.

    1976-01-01

    The paper presents conditions which guarantee that the control strategies adopted by N players constitute an efficient solution, an equilibrium, or a core solution. The system dynamics are described by an Ito equation, and all players have perfect information. When the set of instantaneous joint costs and velocity vectors is convex, the conditions are necessary.

  17. Who Are the Players in Canadian Curriculum?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Milburn, Geoffrey

    1987-01-01

    Labels range of persons advocating different theoretical positions of Canadian curriculum as "players." Describes players as "managers,""predictors,""transformers,""sleuths,""analysts." Values varied viewpoints for attention to language regarding curriculum, critical review of ideas/concepts, examination of current policies, awareness of history…

  18. Emotional Energy among College Football Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniels, Roberta R.; And Others

    Emotional energy levels of football players from a Division I college (large enrollment) and a Division II college (small enrollment) were assessed. The 20-item State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI) was used to measure varsity football players' emotional energy (anxiety) level. The 25 Division I and 36 Division II athletes were initially tested 96…

  19. Phenomenology of the sound-induced flash illusion.

    PubMed

    Abadi, Richard V; Murphy, Jonathan S

    2014-07-01

    Past studies, using pairings of auditory tones and visual flashes, which were static and coincident in space but variable in time, demonstrated errors in judging the temporal patterning of the visual flashes-the sound-induced flash illusion. These errors took one of the two forms: under-reporting (sound-induced fusion) or over-reporting (sound-induced fission) of the flash numbers. Our study had three objectives: to examine the robustness of both illusions and to consider the effects of stimulus set and response bias. To this end, we used an extended range of fixed spatial location flash-tone pairings, examined stimuli that were variable in space and time and measured confidence in judging flash numbers. Our results indicated that the sound-induced flash illusion is a robust percept, a finding underpinned by the confidence measures. Sound-induced fusion was found to be more robust than sound-induced fission and a most likely outcome when high numbers of flashes were incorporated within an incongruent flash-tone pairing. Conversely, sound-induced fission was the most likely outcome for the flash-tone pairing which contained two flashes. Fission was also shown to be strongly driven by stimuli confounds such as categorical boundary conditions (e.g. flash-tone pairings with ≤2 flashes) and compressed response options. These findings suggest whilst both fission and fusion are associated with 'auditory driving', the differences in the occurrence and strength of the two illusions not only reflect the separate neuronal mechanisms underlying audio and visual signal processing, but also the test conditions that have been used to investigate the sound-induced flash illusion.

  20. Matter Flashed at Ultra Speed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2007-06-01

    "REM observations of GRB060418 and GRB060607A: the onset of the afterglow and the initial fireball Lorentz factor determination", by E. Molinari, S. D. Vergani, D. Malesani, S. Covino, et al. The paper is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/0004-6361:20077388 (A&A, 469, L13-L16, 2007). The REM team is formed by G. Chincarini, E. Molinari, F.M. Zerbi, L.A. Antonelli, S. Covino, P. Conconi, L. Nicastro, E. Palazzi, M. Stefanon, V. Testa, G. Tosti, F. Vitali, A. Monfardini, F. D'Alessio, P. D'Avanzo, D. Fugazza, G. Malaspina, S. Piranomonte, S.D. Vergani, P.A. Ward, S. Campana, P. Goldoni, D. Guetta, D. Malesani, N. Masetti, E.J.A. Meurs, L. Norci, E. Pian, A. Fernandez-Soto, L. Stella, G. Tagliaferri, G. Ihle, L. Gonzalez, A. Pizarro, P. Sinclair, and J. Valenzuela. Notes Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are short flashes of energetic gamma-rays lasting from less than a second to several minutes. They release a tremendous quantity of energy in this short time making them the most powerful events since the Big Bang. They come in two different flavours, long and short ones. Over the past few years, international efforts have convincingly shown that long gamma-ray bursts are linked with the ultimate explosion of massive stars (hypernovae; see e.g. ESO PR 16/03) while the short ones most likely originate from the violent collision of neutron stars and/or black holes (see e.g. ESO PR 26/05 and 32/05). Irrespective of the original source of the GRB energy, the injection of so much energy into a confined volume will cause a fireball to form. Gamma-ray photons have nearly a million times more energy than the 'visual' photons the eye can see. Strictly speaking, the Lorentz factor is the ratio between the total and rest-mass energy of the fireball. REM (Rapid Eye Mount) is a small (60 cm mirror diameter) rapid reaction automatic telescope dedicated to monitor the prompt afterglow of Gamma Ray Burst events. It is located at the ESO La Silla Observatory in Chile. For more information, see

  1. Injuries in racket sports among Slovenian players.

    PubMed

    Kondric, Miran; Matković, Branka R; Furjan-Mandić, Gordana; Hadzić, Vedran; Dervisević, Edvin

    2011-06-01

    On the sample of 83 top Slovenian athletes we have studied the frequency of injuries among table tennis, tennis and badminton players, types of injuries and severity of injuries--the latter based on data of players absences from training and/or competition processes. The most liable parts to injuries are shoulder girdle (17.27%), spine (16.55%) and ankle (15.83%), while foot (10.07%) and wrist (12.23%) are slightly less liable to injuries. The most frequent injuries in racket sports pertain to muscle tissues. According to this data, the majority of injuries occur halfway through a training session or a competition event, mostly during a competition season. The injuries primarily pertain to muscle tissues; these are followed by joint and tendon injuries. There are no differences between male and female players. Compared to other racket sports players, table tennis players suffer from fewer injuries.

  2. Active Flash: Out-of-core Data Analytics on Flash Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Boboila, Simona; Kim, Youngjae; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S; Desnoyers, Peter; Shipman, Galen M

    2012-01-01

    Next generation science will increasingly come to rely on the ability to perform efficient, on-the-fly analytics of data generated by high-performance computing (HPC) simulations, modeling complex physical phenomena. Scientific computing workflows are stymied by the traditional chaining of simulation and data analysis, creating multiple rounds of redundant reads and writes to the storage system, which grows in cost with the ever-increasing gap between compute and storage speeds in HPC clusters. Recent HPC acquisitions have introduced compute node-local flash storage as a means to alleviate this I/O bottleneck. We propose a novel approach, Active Flash, to expedite data analysis pipelines by migrating to the location of the data, the flash device itself. We argue that Active Flash has the potential to enable true out-of-core data analytics by freeing up both the compute core and the associated main memory. By performing analysis locally, dependence on limited bandwidth to a central storage system is reduced, while allowing this analysis to proceed in parallel with the main application. In addition, offloading work from the host to the more power-efficient controller reduces peak system power usage, which is already in the megawatt range and poses a major barrier to HPC system scalability. We propose an architecture for Active Flash, explore energy and performance trade-offs in moving computation from host to storage, demonstrate the ability of appropriate embedded controllers to perform data analysis and reduction tasks at speeds sufficient for this application, and present a simulation study of Active Flash scheduling policies. These results show the viability of the Active Flash model, and its capability to potentially have a transformative impact on scientific data analysis.

  3. Executive functioning in highly talented soccer players.

    PubMed

    Verburgh, Lot; Scherder, Erik J A; van Lange, Paul A M; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions might be important for successful performance in sports, particularly in team sports requiring quick anticipation and adaptation to continuously changing situations in the field. The executive functions motor inhibition, attention and visuospatial working memory were examined in highly talented soccer players. Eighty-four highly talented youth soccer players (mean age 11.9), and forty-two age-matched amateur soccer players (mean age 11.8) in the age range 8 to 16 years performed a Stop Signal task (motor inhibition), the Attention Network Test (alerting, orienting, and executive attention) and a visuospatial working memory task. The highly talented soccer players followed the talent development program of the youth academy of a professional soccer club and played at the highest national soccer competition for their age. The amateur soccer players played at a regular soccer club in the same geographical region as the highly talented soccer players and play in a regular regional soccer competition. Group differences were tested using analyses of variance. The highly talented group showed superior motor inhibition as measured by stop signal reaction time (SSRT) on the Stop Signal task and a larger alerting effect on the Attention Network Test, indicating an enhanced ability to attain and maintain an alert state. No group differences were found for orienting and executive attention and visuospatial working memory. A logistic regression model with group (highly talented or amateur) as dependent variable and executive function measures that significantly distinguished between groups as predictors showed that these measures differentiated highly talented soccer players from amateur soccer players with 89% accuracy. Highly talented youth soccer players outperform youth amateur players on suppressing ongoing motor responses and on the ability to attain and maintain an alert state; both may be essential for success in soccer.

  4. Executive Functioning in Highly Talented Soccer Players

    PubMed Central

    Verburgh, Lot; Scherder, Erik J. A.; van Lange, Paul A.M.; Oosterlaan, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    Executive functions might be important for successful performance in sports, particularly in team sports requiring quick anticipation and adaptation to continuously changing situations in the field. The executive functions motor inhibition, attention and visuospatial working memory were examined in highly talented soccer players. Eighty-four highly talented youth soccer players (mean age 11.9), and forty-two age-matched amateur soccer players (mean age 11.8) in the age range 8 to 16 years performed a Stop Signal task (motor inhibition), the Attention Network Test (alerting, orienting, and executive attention) and a visuospatial working memory task. The highly talented soccer players followed the talent development program of the youth academy of a professional soccer club and played at the highest national soccer competition for their age. The amateur soccer players played at a regular soccer club in the same geographical region as the highly talented soccer players and play in a regular regional soccer competition. Group differences were tested using analyses of variance. The highly talented group showed superior motor inhibition as measured by stop signal reaction time (SSRT) on the Stop Signal task and a larger alerting effect on the Attention Network Test, indicating an enhanced ability to attain and maintain an alert state. No group differences were found for orienting and executive attention and visuospatial working memory. A logistic regression model with group (highly talented or amateur) as dependent variable and executive function measures that significantly distinguished between groups as predictors showed that these measures differentiated highly talented soccer players from amateur soccer players with 89% accuracy. Highly talented youth soccer players outperform youth amateur players on suppressing ongoing motor responses and on the ability to attain and maintain an alert state; both may be essential for success in soccer. PMID:24632735

  5. On the detection of adobe buried archaeological structures using multiscale remote sensing techniques : Piramide Naranja in Cahuachi (Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.; Lasaponara, R.; Orefici, G.

    2009-04-01

    The detection of buried adobe structures is a crucial issue for the remote sensing (ground, aerial and satellite) applied to archaeology for the widespread of sun-dried earth as building material in several ancient civilizations in Central and Southern America, Middle East and North Africa. Moreover it is complex, due to the subtle contrast existing between the archaeological features and the surrounding, especially in arid setting, as in the case of the well know Nazca Ceremonial Centre of Cahuachi, located in the desert of Nazca (Southern Peru) . During the last two decades of excavations adobe monuments dating back from the 6th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D have been highlighted by the Centro de Estudios Arqueológicos Precolombinos (CEAP), an italian-peruvian mission directed by Giuseppe Orefici. Actually, the archaeologists are excavating and restoring the core of the Ceremonial centre where is located a great pyramid (kown as Gran Piramide). Beginning from 2007 the two institutes of CNR, IMAA and IBAM, have been involved by CEAP, in order to provide a scientific and technological support for the archaeological research. Therefore, a multi-scale approach based on the integration of aerial and satellite remote sensing with geophysical techniques was employed in order to provide data useful for archaeological excavations. The abstract refers to the last investigations performed on a mound, known as "Piramide Naranja", during the 2008. The processing of an aerial imagery time series and two QuickBird satellite images acquired in 2002 and 2005, allowed for identifying some features related to shallow and buried structures. Such features were verified by means of geophysical prospections, performed by using the magnetometric method which observed changes in the magnetic field within the first few metres beneath the subsurface detecting buried walls and anomalies linked to ceramic deposits referable to possible tombs. Finally, the integration of all data

  6. Electrical Safety and Arc Flash Protections

    SciTech Connect

    R. Camp

    2008-03-04

    Over the past four years, the Electrical Safety Program at PPPL has evolved in addressing changing regulatory requirements and lessons learned from accident events, particularly in regards to arc flash hazards and implementing NFPA 70E requirements. This presentation will discuss PPPL's approaches to the areas of electrical hazards evaluation, both shock and arc flash; engineered solutions for hazards mitigation such as remote racking of medium voltage breakers, operational changes for hazards avoidance, targeted personnel training and hazard appropriate personal protective equipment. Practical solutions for nominal voltage identification and zero voltage checks for lockout/tagout will also be covered. Finally, we will review the value of a comprehensive electrical drawing program, employee attitudes expressed as a personal safety work ethic, integrated safety management, and sustained management support for continuous safety improvement.

  7. Synchronized Flashing Lights For Approach And Docking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Book, Michael L.; Howard, Richard T.; Bryan, Thomas C.; Bell, Joseph L.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed optoelectronic system for guiding vehicle in approaching and docking with another vehicle includes active optical targets (flashing lights) on approached vehicle synchronized with sensor and image-processing circuitry on approaching vehicle. Conceived for use in automated approach and docking of two spacecraft. Also applicable on Earth to manually controlled and automated approach and docking of land vehicles, aircraft, boats, and submersible vehicles, using GPS or terrestrial broadcast time signals for synchronization. Principal advantage: optical power reduced, with consequent enhancement of safety.

  8. Advances in flash flood monitoring using UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perks, Matthew; Russell, Andrew; Large, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    UAVs have the potential to capture information about the earth's surface in dangerous and previously inaccessible locations. Through image acquisition of flash flood events and subsequent object-based analysis, highly dynamic and oft-immeasurable hydraulic phenomenon may be quantified at previously unattainable spatial and temporal resolutions. The potential for this approach to provide valuable information about the hydraulic conditions present during dynamic, high-energy flash floods has until now not been explored. In this paper we adopt a novel approach, utilising the Kande-Lucas-Tomasi (KLT) algorithm to track features present on the water surface which are related to the free-surface velocity. Following the successful tracking of features, a method analogous to the vector correction method has enabled accurate geometric rectification of velocity vectors. Uncertainties associated with the rectification process induced by unsteady camera movements are subsequently explored. Geo-registration errors are relatively stable and occur as a result of persistent residual distortion effects following image correction. The apparent ground movement of immobile control points between measurement intervals ranges from 0.05 - 0.13m. The application of this approach to assess the hydraulic conditions present in Alyth Burn, Scotland during a 1:200 year flash flood resulted in the generation of an average 4.2 measurements/m2 at a rate of 508 measurements/s. Analysis of these vectors provide a rare insight into the complexity of channel-overbank interactions during flash floods. The uncertainty attached to the calculated velocities is relatively low with a spatial average across the area of ± 0.15m/s. Little difference is observed in the uncertainty attached to out-of-bank velocities (± 0.15m/s), and within-channel velocities (± 0.16m/s), illustrating the consistency of the approach.

  9. Radiation Effects on Advanced Flash Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, D. N.; Guertin, S.; Swift, G. M.; Johnston, A. H.

    1998-01-01

    Flash memories have evolved very rapidly in recent ears. New design techniques such as multilevel storage have been proposed to increase storage density, and are now available commercially. Threshold voltage distributions for single- and three-level technologies are compared. In order to implement this technology special circuitry must be added to allow the amount of charge stored in the floating gate to be controlled within narrow limits during the writing and also to detect the different amounts of charge during reading.

  10. Flash evaporation of liquid monomer particle mixture

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, John D.; Darab, John G.; Gross, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method of making a first solid composite polymer layer. The method has the steps of (a) mixing a liquid monomer with particles substantially insoluble in the liquid monomer forming a monomer particle mixture; (b) flash evaporating the particle mixture and forming a composite vapor; and (c) continuously cryocondensing said composite vapor on a cool substrate and cross-linking the cryocondensed film thereby forming the polymer layer.

  11. Flash evaporation of liquid monomer particle mixture

    DOEpatents

    Affinito, J.D.; Darab, J.G.; Gross, M.E.

    1999-05-11

    The present invention is a method of making a first solid composite polymer layer. The method has the steps of (a) mixing a liquid monomer with particles substantially insoluble in the liquid monomer forming a monomer particle mixture; (b) flash evaporating the particle mixture and forming a composite vapor; and (c) continuously cryocondensing said composite vapor on a cool substrate and cross-linking the cryocondensed film thereby forming the polymer layer. 3 figs.

  12. Do All Lightning Flashes Have Initial Breakdown Pulses?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, Thomas; Stolzenburg, Maribeth; Karunarathne, Sumedhe; Karunarathna, Nadeeka

    2013-04-01

    The initial breakdown (IB) stage of lightning flashes typically occurs in the first 5-15 ms of a flash. The IB stage is characterized in electric field change (E-change) records by a sequence of pulses (called "classic" IB pulses), each with relatively large amplitude and duration of tens of microseconds. Nag and Rakov [JGR, 2008] investigated the IB stage of cloud to ground (CG) lightning flashes in Florida thunderstorms and found that only 18% of CG flashes had classic IB pulses. Nag and Rakov [GRL, 2009] hypothesized that CG flashes without classic IB pulses initiated in thunderstorms with a weak or non-existent lower positive cloud charge. In this presentation we show the results of studying E-change data of 127 negative CG flashes and 90 intracloud (IC) flashes recorded at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida in the summers of 2010 and 2011. In 2011 we deployed 10 E-change sensors spread across an area of 70 km x 100 km; in 2010 5 E-change sensors were deployed over a smaller area. The bandwidth of the E-change sensors was 0.16 Hz - 2.6 MHz; the data were digitized at 12 bits with a sampling rate of 1, 5, or 10 MHz and a typical record length of 500 ms, including 150 ms of pre-trigger data. The analysis focuses on flashes that occurred within 30 km of at least one sensor. We find that all 127 CG flashes and all 90 IC flashes began with classic IB pulses, though the amplitude of these pulses varies significantly from flash to flash. For flashes with weak IB pulses, the more distant sensors did not always detect the IB pulses seen by closer sensors.

  13. Flash floods in Catalonia: a recurrent situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llasat, M. C.; Llasat-Botija, M.; Rodriguez, A.; Lindbergh, S.

    2010-09-01

    This work focuses on the analysis and characterization of the flash flood events occurring during summer in Catalonia. To this aim, a database with information about the social impact produced by all flood events recorded in Catalonia between 1982 and 2007 has been built. The social impact was obtained systematically on the basis of news press data and, occasionally, on the basis of insurance data. Flood events have been classified into ordinary, extraordinary and catastrophic floods, following the proposal of Llasat et al.~(2005). However, bearing in mind flash flood effects, some new categories concerning casualties and car damage have also been introduced. The spatial and temporal distribution of these flood events has been analyzed and, in an effort to better estimate the social impact and vulnerability, some indicators have been defined and analyzed for a specific region. These indicators allow an analysis of spacial and temporal trends as well as characterization of the events. Results show a flash-flood increase in summer and early autumn, mainly due to inter-annual and intra-annual changes in population density.

  14. FILTR: Flash Isotope Library and Training Resource

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, D; Trombino, D

    2007-07-26

    The subject of radiation detection is replete with complex concepts and challenging nomenclature. Furthermore, a daunting variety of radioactive isotopes may be encountered during the routine operation of a radiation detector. Individuals tasked with searching for illicit sources of radiation must remain vigilant while navigating through more frequently encountered mundane and legitimate radioactive sources. The Flash Isotope Library and Training Resource (FILTR) is being developed as an easily accessible and intuitive reference tool to manage the high volume of complex information required for this task. FILTR is an extended version of the Primary Utility for Nuclear Terminology (PUNT) software developed by the Counter Measures Test Beds group at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the United States Secret Service. Authored in the Flash multimedia development environment, FILTR contains detailed information on potentially encountered isotopes as well as training on radiation and operational procedures. Reference material is organized to present critical information quickly while facilitating more in-depth investigation through an intuitive interface and engaging content. FILTR is being developed for a diverse audience of law enforcement organizations and government agencies and a wide range of skill sets from expert analysts to officers whose primary role is not radiation detection. Additionally, the wide compatibility of Flash content will allow FILTR to be readily accessible through the growing number of multi-media enabled electronic devices, including PDAs and cellular phones.

  15. Natural lightning flashes: from observation to modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Defer, E.; Farges, T.; Barthe, C.; Bovalo, C.; Pinty, J.-P.; Chong, M.; Soula, S.; Ortéga, P.

    2011-12-01

    Different ground-based and space-based sensors are currently used to characterize and locate Earth lightning flashes like VHF mappers, VLF systems with short or long baseline, optical CCD camera and more recently microphone arrays. Concurrent observations with such equipments offer a unique description of the different processes occurring during the life of a lightning flash (triggering phase, leader development and junction phase). While the detection of lightning flashes becomes mature, more challenging investigations are still needed on i{)} Lightning Nitrogen Oxide (LINOx) production and on ii{)} the modeling of natural lightning discharges, even if ''engineer'' lightning schemes combined with electrification schemes are already implemented in numerical cloud resolving models. The PEACH project, the Atmospheric Electricity component of the upcoming field experiment HyMeX, will offer a unique opportunity for the European community to document and characterize the Mediterranean lightning activity with observations and modeling from the lightning scale to the regional scale and to gather the French community in preparation for the validation of future space-based missions like TARANIS and MTG-LI and for the interpretation of their lightning observations.

  16. The 20 February 2010 Madeira flash flood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranda, P. M. A.; Tomé, R.; Azevedo, E. B.; Cardoso, R. M.

    2010-09-01

    On February 20, 2010, Madeira Island was struck by a violent rain storm, which led to a major flash flood leading to more than 50 casualties and an estimated property loss above 1G€. The storm was not well forecasted by the Institute of Meteorology, based on the global ECMWF forecast. However, the operational forecasts made by our group at the University of Lisbon, with MM5 and WRF at 2 km resolution, consistently indicated heavy precipitation for that day, starting on the 72h from 18 February at 00 UTC, and including all intermediate forecasts, issued every 12h, until the day of the event. At the same time, many important details of the forecasts, concerning in particular the timing of precipitation in low level stations, have discrepancies with observations. In the present study we analyze not only the quality of the high resolution forecasts of the rain storm, with the two models at different resolutions, but also review the MM5 model performance in all forecasts from 2006 to 2010, where other important orographic precipitation events have occurred, but no flash flood was triggered. The analysis emphasizes the relative importance of the state of the terrain, due to accumulated precipitation in days and weeks before a major rain storm, in the occurrence of flash floods.

  17. Flash LIDAR Emulator for HIL Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewster, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    NASA's Autonomous Landing and Hazard Avoidance Technology (ALHAT) project is building a system for detecting hazards and automatically landing controlled vehicles safely anywhere on the Moon. The Flash Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) sensor is used to create on-the-fly a 3D map of the unknown terrain for hazard detection. As part of the ALHAT project, a hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) simulation testbed was developed to test the data processing, guidance, and navigation algorithms in real-time to prove their feasibility for flight. Replacing the Flash LIDAR camera with an emulator in the testbed provided a cheaper, safer, more feasible way to test the algorithms in a controlled environment. This emulator must have the same hardware interfaces as the LIDAR camera, have the same performance characteristics, and produce images similar in quality to the camera. This presentation describes the issues involved and the techniques used to create a real-time flash LIDAR emulator to support HIL simulation.

  18. Examining Player Anger in World of Warcraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, Jane; Coulson, Mark; Foreman, Nigel

    This questionnaire study of the sources of anger in World of Warcraft applies classical quantitative measurement scale construction to a new problem, generating a host of questionnaire items that could find use in future studies, and identifying four major categories of events that cause negative effect among players. First, 33 players provided examples of in-game scenarios that had made them angry, and their responses were culled to create a 93-item battery rated by hundreds of player respondents in terms of anger intensity and anger frequency. An iterative process of factor analysis and scale reliability assessment led to a 28-item instrument measuring four anger-provoking factors: Raids/Instances, Griefers, Perceived Time Wasting, and Anti-social Players. These anger-causing scenarios were then illustrated by concrete examples from player and researcher experiences in World of Warcraft. One striking finding is that players become angry at other players' negative behavior, regardless of whether that behavior was intended to harm.

  19. Outcomes of microfracture in professional basketball players.

    PubMed

    Cerynik, Douglas L; Lewullis, Gabriel E; Joves, Brian C; Palmer, Michael P; Tom, James A

    2009-09-01

    Surgical treatment for chondral defects of the knee in competitive running and jumping athletes remains controversial. This study evaluated the performance outcomes of professional basketball players in the National Basketball Association (NBA) who underwent microfracture. Data from 24 professional basketball players from 1997 to 2006 was obtained and analyzed. NBA player efficiency ratings (PER) were calculated for two seasons before and after injury. A control group of 24 players was used for comparison. Study group and control group demographics including age, NBA experience, and minutes per game demonstrated no statistical difference. Mean time to return to an NBA game was 30.0 weeks from the time of surgery. The first season after returning to competition PER and minutes per game decreased by 3.5 (P < 0.01) and 4.9 min (P < 0.05), respectively. The 17 players who continued to play two or more seasons after surgery, the average reduction in their PER and minutes per game was 2.7 (P > 0.05) and 3.0 min (P < 0.26), respectively. A multivariant comparison versus controls demonstrated that power rating during the 2 years after surgery decreased by 3.1 (P < 0.01); while minutes per game decreased by 5.2 (P < 0.001). Twenty-one percent (n = 5 of 24) of the players treated with microfracture did not return to competition in an NBA game. On return to competition player performance and minutes per game are diminished.

  20. Electrical Resistivity Tomographies on the detection of adobe buried archaeological structures in Piramide Sur in Cahuachi (Peru)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capozzoli, L.; Masini, N.; Rizzo, E.; Lasaponara, R.; Orefici, G.

    2012-04-01

    During the last two decades of excavations, adobe pyramids dating back from the 6th century B.C. to the 4th century A.D have been unearthed in the ancient Ceremonial Centre of Cahuachi near Nasca (Peru) by an Italian-Peruvian mission directed by Giuseppe Orefici. One of the archaeological sectors, called sector A, has been almost excavated and restored. To complete sector A only a terraced mound named "Piramide Sur" needs to be excavated. In order to provide useful information on the presence of buried structures and platforms as well on the geological stratigraphy a multi-scale approach based on the integration of satellite remote sensing with geophysical techniques was employed. Such investigations were carried out by the Italian mission ITACA, funded by the Italian Ministry Affairs and composed of researchers of two institutes of CNR (IMAA and IBAM), which provides a scientific support for archaeological research, since 2007. In particular, the subsurface features were investigated by Geoelectrical prospecting, performed by using a georesistivimeter for tomography which observe the resistivity value along sections. Several tomographies were carried out to investigate the shallow and deep structure of the pyramid both along the main flank at Nord and on the top. Finally, the integration of all data acquired by the different remote sensing techniques allowed for spatially characterizing the archaeological features, thus providing important information for the planning of the next archaeological campaign.

  1. Physiological characteristics of international female soccer players.

    PubMed

    Manson, Sarah A; Brughelli, Matt; Harris, Nigel K

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological characteristics of Fédération Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) eligible international female soccer players aged 14-36 years and to determine if measures were significantly different for players selected (i.e., starters) to the starting line up for an FIFA tournament as compared with those not selected (i.e., nonstarters). Fifty-one (N = 18 Under 17; N = 18 Under 20; N = 15 Senior) international female soccer players participated in this study. The subjects underwent measurements of anthropometry (height and body mass), lower body strength (isokinetic testing), sprint kinetics and kinematics (nonmotorized treadmill), leg power (unilateral jumping), and maximal aerobic velocity (30:15 intermittent fitness test) during the final preparatory stage for an FIFA event. Outcomes of the age group data indicate that differences in physiological capacities are evident for the Under 17 players as compared with those for the Under 20 and Senior capped international players, suggesting a plateau in the acquisition of physical qualities as players mature. Starters tended to be faster (effect size [ES] = 0.55-1.0, p < 0.05) and have a higher maximal aerobic velocity (ES = 0.78-2.45, p < 0.05), along with greater eccentric leg strength (ES = 0.33-1.67, p < 0.05). Significant differences were detected between starters and nonstarters for isokinetic leg strength (ES = 0.54-1.24, p < 0.05) and maximal aerobic velocity (ES = 0.87, p < 0.05) for Under 17 players, where maximal aerobic velocity was the primary difference between starters and nonstarters (ES = 0.83-2.45, p < 0.05) for the Under 20 and Senior players. Coaches should emphasize the development of speed, maximal aerobic velocity, and leg strength in developing female soccer players. PMID:24476742

  2. ACTN3 genotype in professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Santiago, C; González-Freire, M; Serratosa, L; Morate, F J; Meyer, T; Gómez-Gallego, F; Lucia, A

    2008-01-01

    The authors studied the frequency distribution of alpha-actinin-3 (ACTN3) R577X genotypes in 60 top-level professional soccer players. The results were compared with those of 52 elite endurance athletes and 123 sedentary controls. The per cent distribution of RR and RX genotypes in soccer players (48.3% and 36.7%) was significantly higher and lower, respectively, than controls (28.5% and 53.7%) and endurance athletes (26.5% and 52%) (p = 0.041). Although there are notable exceptions, elite soccer players tend to have the sprint/power ACTN3 genotype.

  3. Ulnar nerve entrapment syndrome in baseball players.

    PubMed

    Del Pizzo, W; Jobe, F W; Norwood, L

    1977-01-01

    Ulnar nerve entrapment at the elbow has been described in the literature. This paper deals with 19 skeletally mature baseball players with ulnar nerve entrapment who underwent surgery for correction of the problem. The surgery consisted of anterior transfer of the nerve and placement deep to the flexor muscles. Six players quit baseball because of continuing elbow problems, nine returned to playing, and four were lost to follow-up. Ulnar nerve entrapment is thought to represent one syndrome in a spectrum of diseases involving the medial side of the elbow in baseball players. The lesion is amenable to surgery.

  4. A Comparison of Sprite Locations to Flash Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanley, M. A.; Ashcraft, T.; Krehbiel, P. R.; Rison, W.; Edens, H. E.; Cummer, S. A.; Lyons, W. A.

    2014-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that sprites can be horizontally offset byover 40 km from the parent stroke while VHF lightning maps show thatthe center of a sprite cluster generally occurs above recent portionsof the flash. However, a detailed comparison of individual spriteelement locations in relation to flash structure is currently lacking.In this presentation, I will show the results of such comparisons forvarious sprite-producing flashes in a 3 year study period between 2012and 2014. It will be shown that while there is a general correlationbetween the sprites and the active portion of a flash, it is notuncommon for the individual sprite element plan positions to belocated outside of the flash boundary. The horizontal distancebetween such sprite elements and the flash boundary rarely exceedsmuch more than 10 km. The implications of these results in regards tovarious potential seeding mechanisms for sprites will be discussed.

  5. Positive cloud-to-ground lightning flashes in severe storms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rust, W. D.; Macgorman, D. R.; Arnold, R. T.

    1981-01-01

    The occurrence of cloud-to-ground flashes that effectively lower positive charge to earth (+CG flash) over flat terrain has been documented in the mature stage of severe thunderstorms. Of the 31 documented +CG flashes, most had only one return stroke. Zero-to-peak rise times for the strokes averaged 7 microsec. The +CG flashes averaged 520 ms in duration, with 25 percent lasting more than 800 ms. Many of these had field changes suggestive of continuing current. Positive flashes have been observed to emanate from several regions of severe storms: high on the back of the main storm tower, through the wall cloud, and from the downshear anvil. Visually most of these positive flashes have emanated from high in the storm, and acoustic mapping of two shows thunder sources to a height of about 15 km.

  6. Arc Flash Boundary Calculations Using Computer Software Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, M.D.

    2005-01-07

    Arc Flash Protection boundary calculations have become easier to perform with the availability of personal computer software. These programs incorporate arc flash protection boundary formulas for different voltage and current levels, calculate the bolted fault current at each bus, and use built in time-current coordination curves to determine the clearing time of protective devices in the system. Results of the arc flash protection boundary calculations can be presented in several different forms--as an annotation to the one-line diagram, as a table of arc flash protection boundary distances, and as printed placards to be attached to the appropriate equipment. Basic arc flash protection boundary principles are presented in this paper along with several helpful suggestions for performing arc flash protection boundary calculations.

  7. Susceptibility to the Flash-Beep Illusion Is Increased in Children Compared to Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Innes-Brown, Hamish; Barutchu, Ayla; Shivdasani, Mohit N.; Crewther, David P.; Grayden, David B.; Paolini, Antonio

    2011-01-01

    Audio-visual integration was studied in children aged 8-17 (N = 30) and adults (N = 22) using the "flash-beep illusion" paradigm, where the presentation of two beeps causes a single flash to be perceived as two flashes ("fission" illusion), and a single beep causes two flashes to be perceived as one flash ("fusion" illusion). Children reported…

  8. Sensitivity and kinetics of mouse rod flash responses determined in vivo from paired-flash electroretinograms

    PubMed Central

    Hetling, John R; Pepperberg, David R

    1999-01-01

    Electroretinograms (ERGs) were recorded corneally from C57BL/6J mice using a paired-flash procedure in which a brief test flash at time zero was followed at time tprobe by a bright probe flash of fixed strength, and in which the probe response amplitude was determined at time t=tprobe+ 6 ms. Probe responses obtained in a series of paired-flash trials were analysed to derive A(t), a family of amplitudes that putatively represents the massed response of the rod photoreceptors to the test flash. A central aim was to obtain a mathematical description of the normalized derived response A(t)/Amo as a function of Itest, the test flash strength. With fixed tprobe (80 ≤tprobe≤ 1200 ms), A(t)/Amo was described by the saturating exponential function [1 - exp(-ktItest)], where kt is a time-dependent sensitivity parameter. For t= 86 ms, a time near the peak of A(t), k86 was 7·0 ± 1·2 (scotopic cd s m−2)−1 (mean ± s.d.; n= 4). A(t)/Amo data were analysed in relation to the equation below, a time-generalized form of the above exponential function in which (k86Itest) is replaced by the product [k86Itestu(t)], and where u(t) is independent of the test flash strength. The function u(t) was modelled as the product of a scaling factor γ, an activation term 1 - exp[-α(t - td)2]}, and a decay term exp(-t/τω):where td is a brief delay, τω is an exponential time constant, and α characterizes the acceleration of the activation term. For Itest up to ∼2·57 scotopic cd s m−2, the overall time course of A(t) was well described by the above equation with γ= 2·21, td= 3·1 ms, τω= 132 ms and α= 2·32 × 10−4 ms−2. An approximate halving of α improved the fit of the above equation to ERG a-wave and A(t)/Amo data obtained at t about 0-20 ms. Kinetic and sensitivity properties of A(t) suggest that it approximates the in vivo massed photocurrent response of the rods to a test flash, and imply that u(t) in the above equation is the approximate kinetic description of

  9. Simple flash evaporator for making thin films of compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Hemanadhan, M.; Bapanayya, Ch.; Agarwal, S. C.

    2010-07-15

    A simple and compact arrangement for flash evaporation is described. It uses a cell phone vibrator for powder dispensing that can be incorporated into a vacuum deposition chamber without any major alterations. The performance of the flash evaporation system is checked by making thin films of the optical memory chalcogenide glass Ge{sub 2}Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 5} (GST). Energy dispersive x-ray analysis shows that the flash evaporation preserves the stoichiometry in thin films.

  10. Does Education Matter? Major League Baseball Players and Longevity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalist, David E.; Peng, Yingwei

    2007-01-01

    The authors used duration analysis to examine the longevity of Major League Baseball players. Using data on players who were born between 1945 and 1964, the authors found that the hazard rate of death for players who only attended high school was almost 2.0 times higher than those players who attended a 4-year university, evidence that the…

  11. Hold-up power supply for flash memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ott, William E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A hold-up power supply for flash memory systems is provided. The hold-up power supply provides the flash memory with the power needed to temporarily operate when a power loss exists. This allows the flash memory system to complete any erasures and writes, and thus allows it to shut down gracefully. The hold-up power supply detects when a power loss on a power supply bus is occurring and supplies the power needed for the flash memory system to temporally operate. The hold-up power supply stores power in at least one capacitor. During normal operation, power from a high voltage supply bus is used to charge the storage capacitors. When a power supply loss is detected, the power supply bus is disconnected from the flash memory system. A hold-up controller controls the power flow from the storage capacitors to the flash memory system. The hold-up controller uses feedback to assure that the proper voltage is provided from the storage capacitors to the flash memory system. This power supplied by the storage capacitors allows the flash memory system to complete any erasures and writes, and thus allows the flash memory system to shut down gracefully.

  12. The Cheerleader and the Football Player.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patil, Malati

    2001-01-01

    Describes an activity in physics using a narrative about a bet between a cheerleader who claims she can lift a 300-pound football player off the ground. Includes questions, teaching notes, and solutions. (MM)

  13. Multi-player games on the cycle

    PubMed Central

    van Veelen, Matthijs; Nowak, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In multi-player games n individuals interact in any one encounter and derive a payoff from that interaction. We assume that individuals adopt one of two strategies, and we consider symmetric games, which means the payoff depends only on the number of players using either strategy, but not on any particular configuration of the encounter. On the cycle we assume that any string of n neighbouring players interacts. We study fixation probabilities of stochastic evolutionary dynamics. We derive analytical results on the cycle both for linear and exponential fitness for any intensity of selection, and compare those to results for the well-mixed population. As particular examples we study multi-player public goods games, stag hunt games and snowdrift games. PMID:21907215

  14. Video Player Keyboard Shortcuts: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/hotkeys.html Video Player Keyboard Shortcuts To use the sharing features ... of accessible keyboard shortcuts for our latest Health videos on the MedlinePlus site. These shortcuts allow you ...

  15. Replicator dynamics with turnover of players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juul, Jeppe; Kianercy, Ardeshir; Bernhardsson, Sebastian; Pigolotti, Simone

    2013-08-01

    We study adaptive dynamics in games where players abandon the population at a given rate and are replaced by naive players characterized by a prior distribution over the admitted strategies. We demonstrate how such a process leads macroscopically to a variant of the replicator equation, with an additional term accounting for player turnover. We study how Nash equilibria and the dynamics of the system are modified by this additional term for prototypical examples such as the rock-paper-scissors game and different classes of two-action games played between two distinct populations. We conclude by showing how player turnover can account for nontrivial departures from Nash equilibria observed in data from lowest unique bid auctions.

  16. Major League Baseball Players' Life Expectancies.

    PubMed

    Saint Onge, Jarron M; Rogers, Richard G; Krueger, Patrick M

    2008-07-17

    OBJECTIVE: We examine the importance of anthropometric and performance measures, and age, period, and cohort effects in explaining life expectancies among major league baseball (MLB) players over the past century. METHODS: We use discrete time hazard models to calculate life tables with covariates with data from Total Baseball, a rich source of information on all players who played in the major league. RESULTS: Compared to 20-year-old U.S. males, MLB players can expect almost five additional years of life. Height, weight, handedness, and player ratings are unassociated with the risk of death in this population of highly active and successful adults. Career length is inversely associated with the risk of death, likely because those who play longer gain additional incomes, physical fitness, and training. CONCLUSIONS: Our results indicate improvements in life expectancies with time for all age groups and indicate possible improvements in longevity in the general U.S. population.

  17. Maximal anaerobic power in national level Indian players.

    PubMed

    Bhanot, J L; Sidhu, L S

    1981-12-01

    The comparative study of aerobic power in different sports was conducted on 99 National Senior as well as National Junior players specialised in hockey and football, field games; volleyball and basketball, court games. The National Seniors were 27 hockey and 16 volleyball players, whereas, 32 football and 24 basketball players were the National Juniors. The maximal anaerobic power of the players was determined from maximal vertical velocity and body weight by the methods of margaria. The football players have been found to be highest followed by hockey, volleyball and basketball players in vertical velocity. It is observed that field game players are higher than the court game players in vertical velocity and that volleyball players possess higher maximum anaerobic power than football, hockey and basketball players. PMID:7317726

  18. Maximal anaerobic power in national level Indian players.

    PubMed

    Bhanot, J L; Sidhu, L S

    1981-12-01

    The comparative study of aerobic power in different sports was conducted on 99 National Senior as well as National Junior players specialised in hockey and football, field games; volleyball and basketball, court games. The National Seniors were 27 hockey and 16 volleyball players, whereas, 32 football and 24 basketball players were the National Juniors. The maximal anaerobic power of the players was determined from maximal vertical velocity and body weight by the methods of margaria. The football players have been found to be highest followed by hockey, volleyball and basketball players in vertical velocity. It is observed that field game players are higher than the court game players in vertical velocity and that volleyball players possess higher maximum anaerobic power than football, hockey and basketball players.

  19. Rectus abdominis muscle strains in tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Maquirriain, Javier; Ghisi, Juan P; Kokalj, Antonio M

    2007-01-01

    Rectus abdominis muscle strains are common and debilitating injuries among competitive tennis players. Eccentric overload, followed by forced contraction of the non‐dominant rectus abdominis during the cocking phase of the service motion is the accepted injury mechanism. A tennis‐specific rehabilitation program emphasising eccentrics and plyometric strengthening of the abdominal wall muscles, contributes to the complete functional recovery in tennis players, and could help reduce recurrences. PMID:17957025

  20. Shoulder injuries in adolescent rugby players

    PubMed Central

    Hodhody, Ghazal; Mackenzie, Tanya A

    2016-01-01

    Background Rugby is a high-intensity contact sport, frequently causing shoulder injuries. Between the ages of 12 years to 18 years, academy and county level players are being selected for professional contracts, making this is a critical stage of their career. The present study aimed to describe the patterns of injury in adolescent rugby players with shoulder injuries. Methods Academy and county level rugby players in the target age group, over a 7-year period, were included in the present study. Data collected included the mechanism of injury, position and level of play, radiology and surgical findings, and recurrence rate at a minimum of 2 years post-surgery. Results One hundred and sixty-nine cases adhered to the inclusion criteria, with most cases involving two or more pathologies in the shoulder (54%). Forwards sustained more shoulder injuries than backs, incurring more labral injuries. By contrast, backs had a higher incidence of bony pathology. The mechanism of injury frequently correlated with player positions. There was a 21% injury recurrence rate, with forwards (7%) and higher level academy players (11%) most likely to suffer a recurrence. Conclusions Shoulder injury patterns in this important group of adolescent contact athletes are complex, with recurrence rates being higher than those in older rugby players. PMID:27583014

  1. Bridging Media with the Help of Players

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitsche, Michael; Drake, Matthew; Murray, Janet

    We suggest harvesting the power of multiplayer design to bridge content across different media platforms and develop player-driven cross-media experiences. This paper first argues to partially replace complex AI systems with multiplayer design strategies to provide the necessary level of flexibility in the content generation for cross-media applications. The second part describes one example project - the Next Generation Play (NGP) project - that illustrates one practical approach of such a player-driven cross-media content generation. NGP allows players to collect virtual items while watching a TV show. These items are re-used in a multiplayer casual game that automatically generates new game worlds based on the various collections of active players joining a game session. While the TV experience is designed for the single big screen, the game executes on multiple mobile phones. Design and technical implementation of the prototype are explained in more detail to clarify how players carry elements of television narratives into a non-linear handheld gaming experience. The system describes a practical way to create casual game adaptations based on players' personal preferences in a multi-user environment.

  2. Muzzle flash localization for the dismounted soldier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy Scott, Will

    2015-05-01

    The ability to accurately and rapidly know the precise location of enemy fire would be a substantial capability enhancement to the dismounted soldier. Acoustic gun-shot detections systems can provide an approximate bearing but it is desired to precisely know the location (direction and range) of enemy fire; for example to know from `which window' the fire is coming from. Funded by the UK MOD (via Roke Manor Research) QinetiQ is developing an imaging solution built around an InGaAs camera. This paper presents work that QinetiQ has undertaken on the Muzzle Flash Locator system. Key technical challenges that have been overcome are explained and discussed in this paper. They include; the design of the optical sensor and processing hardware to meet low size, weight and power requirements; the algorithm approach required to maintain sensitivity whilst rejecting false alarms from sources such as close passing insects and sun glint from scene objects; and operation on the move. This work shows that such a sensor can provide sufficient sensitivity to detect muzzle flash events to militarily significant ranges and that such a system can be combined with an acoustic gunshot detection system to minimize the false alarm rate. The muzzle flash sensor developed in this work operates in real-time and has a field of view of approximately 29° (horizontal) by 12° (vertical) with a pixel resolution of 0.13°. The work has demonstrated that extension to a sensor with realistic angular rotation rate is feasible.

  3. Flash pyrolysis of coal with reactive and non-reactive gases. [Methanolysis and flash pyrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.; Sundaram, M.S.

    1985-06-01

    The purpose of this research is to perform a systematic study of the yield and distribution of products on the flash or rapid pyrolysis of various ranks of coal with non-reactive (N/sub 2/, Ar, He) and with reactive gases (H/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, CO, CO/sub 2/, and H/sub 2/O) in an entrained flow reactor. A body of information has been obtained on the flash hydropyrolysis of coals with the use of H/sub 2/ gas. Data is in the process of being obtained with the other gases. The use of methane as a pyrolyzing gas has indicated a reaction with coal and has led to developing the process of flash methanolysis of coal. The addition of steam leads to the flash hydrolysis of coal. In addition to obtaining a better understanding of the gasification of coal, the developed process chemistry data can be used to design and evaluate advanced gasification processes. 7 figs.

  4. Terrestrial Gamma-Ray Flashes (TGFs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fishman, Gerald J.

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the observation of Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes (TGFs) by Gamma-Ray Telescopes. These were: (1) BATSE /Compton Observatory, (2) Solar Spectroscopic Imager, (3) AGILE Gamma-ray Telescope, and (4) Gamma-ray Burst Monitor (GBM) on the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It contains charts which display the counts over time, a map or the TGFs observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). and a map showing the latitude and longitude of 85 of the TGFs observed by the Fermi GBM.

  5. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Connaughton, V.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R. D.; Kippen, R. M.; vonKienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed 79 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds.

  6. Apollo-Soyuz light-flash observations.

    PubMed

    Budinger, T F; Tobias, C A; Huesman, R H; Upham, F T; Wieskamp, T F; Hoffman, R A

    1977-01-01

    While dark adapted, two Apollo-Soyuz astronauts saw eighty-two light flash events during a complete 51 degrees orbit which passed near the north magnetic pole and through the South Atlantic Anomaly. The frequency of events at the polar parts of the orbit is 25 times that noted in equatorial latitudes and no increased frequency was noted in the South Atlantic Anomaly at the 225-km altitude. The expected flux of heavy particles at the northern and southern points is 1-2 min-1 per eye, and the efficiency for seeing HZE particles which were below the Cerenkov threshold is 50%.

  7. Flash floods in Catalonia: a recurrent situation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llasat, M. C.; Lindbergh, S.; Llasat-Botija, M.; Rodríguez, A.; Zaragoza, A.

    2009-09-01

    A database with information about the social impact produced by all the flood events recorded in Catalonia between 1982 and 2007 has been built. Original information comes from the INUNGAMA database (1900-2000) presented by Barnolas and Llasat (2007), the PRESSGAMA database (1982-2007) (Llasat et al., in rev.) and information from different published works (Barriendos et al, 2003; Barriendos and Pomés, 1993). Social impact has been obtained systematically in basis to news press data and, occasionally, in basis to insurance data. Flood events have been classified in ordinary floods, extraordinary floods and catastrophic ones, following the proposal of Llasat et al (2005). However, having in mind the flash floods effects, some new categories concerning casualties and car damages have also been introduced. The spatial and temporal distribution of these flood events has been analysed. Results have been compared with those obtained for the period 1900-2000 (Barnolas and Llasat, 2007) and 1350-2000 (Barrera et al, 2006). In order to better estimate the social impact and vulnerability some indicators have been defined and analyzed for some specific cases and a specific region. Besides the indicators applied in the INUNCAT Plan to obtain a cartography of flood risk in Catalonia, other ones like the number of cars affected or the number of request received by the meteorological service, has been also taken into account. These indicators allow analyzing global and temporal trends as well as characterizing the events. The selected region has been the Maresme, which is a flood prone region with a great density of population and that experiences every year one or more flash floods. The annual number of floods shows a positive trend that cannot be justified by the rainfall trend. Both vulnerability and hazard components have been considered and a discussion about the flood prevention measures is presented. The third part of this work has been centred in the analysis and

  8. Characteristics of flash initiations in a supercell cluster with tornadoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Dong; MacGorman, Donald R.

    2016-01-01

    Flash initiations within a supercell cluster during 10-11 May 2010 in Oklahoma were investigated based on observations from the Oklahoma Lightning Mapping Array and the Norman, Oklahoma, polarimetric radar (KOUN). The flash initiations at positions dominated by graupel, dry snow, small hail and crystals accounted for 44.3%, 44.1%, 8.0% and 3.0% of the total flashes, respectively. During the tornadic stage of the southern supercell in the cluster, flash initiations associated with graupel occupied the main body, the right flank and the forward flank of the supercell, while those associated with dry snow dominated the outskirts of the adjacent forward anvil, right anvil and rear anvil. The flash initiations associated with small hail were concentrated around the main updraft, particularly toward its front side. Highly dense flash initiations were located in the regions overlying the differential reflectivity (ZDR) arc and right anvil. The average initial height of the flashes decreased gradually from the rear to the front and from the right to the left flanks, while the height range over which initiations occurred reached a maximum at the front of the updraft. The flashes that were initiated in the adjacent forward anvils were largest on average, followed by those in the regions ahead of the updraft and near the ZDR arc. This study supports the concept of charge pockets and further deduces that the pockets in the right anvil are the most abundant and compact due to the frequent flash initiations, small-sized flashes and thin layers including flash initiations.

  9. Aging, Spatial Disparity, and the Sound-Induced Flash Illusion

    PubMed Central

    DeLoss, Denton J.; Andersen, George J.

    2015-01-01

    The present study examined age-related differences in multisensory integration and the effect of spatial disparity on the sound-induced flash illusion—-an illusion used in previous research to assess age-related differences in multisensory integration. Prior to participation in the study, both younger and older participants demonstrated their ability to detect 1–2 visual flashes and 1–2 auditory beep presented unimodally. After passing the pre-test, participants were then presented 1–2 flashes paired with 0–2 beeps that originated from one of five speakers positioned equidistantly 100cm from the participant. One speaker was positioned directly below the screen, two speakers were positioned 50cm to the left and right from the center of the screen, and two more speakers positioned to the left and right 100cm from the center of the screen. Participants were told to report the number of flashes presented and to ignore the beeps. Both age groups showed a significant effect of the beeps on the perceived number of flashes. However, neither younger nor older individuals showed any significant effect of spatial disparity on the sound-induced flash illusion. The presence of a congruent number of beeps increased accuracy for both older and younger individuals. Reaction time data was also analyzed. As expected, older individuals showed significantly longer reaction times when compared to younger individuals. In addition, both older and younger individuals showed a significant increase in reaction time for fusion trials, where two flashes and one beep are perceived as a single flash, as compared to congruent single flash trials. This increase in reaction time was not found for fission trials, where one flash and two beeps were perceived as two flashes. This suggests that processing may differ for the two forms for fission as compared to fusion illusions. PMID:26619352

  10. Comparison of cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors in professional baseball players versus professional football players.

    PubMed

    Helzberg, John H; Waeckerle, Joseph F; Camilo, Joel; Selden, Michael A; Tang, Fengming; Joyce, Steven A; Browne, Jon E; O'Keefe, James H

    2010-09-01

    In 2006, a newspaper report indicated an increased prevalence of cardiovascular disease and early mortality in retired professional football players compared to professional baseball players. This study included 69 professional football players from a 2008 National Football League training camp and 155 professional baseball players from an American League 2009 spring training site who volunteered to participate in a study of cardiovascular and metabolic risk factors. The prevalence of body mass index > or =30 kg/m(2), waist circumference > or =100 cm, waist/height ratio >0.5, blood pressure > or =130/85 mm Hg, triglycerides > or =150 mg/dl, triglycerides/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio >3.5, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol < or =40 mg/dl, and alanine aminotransferase > or =40 IU/L was determined in baseball players and compared to measurements obtained in a matched cohort from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), professional football players, and linemen and nonlinemen subsets. In conclusion, professional baseball players had favorable cardiovascular parameters, with the exception of an increased prevalence of hypertension, compared to the reference population, and professional baseball players had decreased measures of obesity, hyperglycemia, and the cardiometabolic syndrome compared to professional football lineman.

  11. Macromedia Flash as a Tool for Mathematics Teaching and Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garofalo, Joe; Summers, Tim

    2004-01-01

    Macromedia Flash is a powerful and robust development tool. Because of its graphical, sound, and animation capabilities (and ubiquitous browser plug-in), major companies employ it in their website development (see www.nike.com or www.espn.com). These same features also make Flash a valuable environment for building multi-representational "movies"…

  12. Acceleration of electrons during the flash phase of solar flares

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kane, S. R.

    1974-01-01

    The characteristics of the electron acceleration process operating during the flash phase of solar flares are deduced from the high time resolution observations of impulsive solar X rays greater than or equal to 10 keV and other flash phase emissions from small solar flares, and the implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. Assessment of Vulnerability to Extreme Flash Floods in Design Storms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Eung Seok; Choi, Hyun Il

    2011-01-01

    There has been an increase in the occurrence of sudden local flooding of great volume and short duration caused by heavy or excessive rainfall intensity over a small area, which presents the greatest potential danger threat to the natural environment, human life, public health and property, etc. Such flash floods have rapid runoff and debris flow that rises quickly with little or no advance warning to prevent flood damage. This study develops a flash flood index through the average of the same scale relative severity factors quantifying characteristics of hydrographs generated from a rainfall-runoff model for the long-term observed rainfall data in a small ungauged study basin, and presents regression equations between rainfall characteristics and the flash flood index. The aim of this study is to develop flash flood index-duration-frequency relation curves by combining the rainfall intensity-duration-frequency relation and the flash flood index from probability rainfall data in order to evaluate vulnerability to extreme flash floods in design storms. This study is an initial effort to quantify the flash flood severity of design storms for both existing and planned flood control facilities to cope with residual flood risks due to extreme flash floods that have ocurred frequently in recent years. PMID:21845165

  14. Kinetics of Reactions of Monomeric Nitrosomethane Induced by Flash Photolysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kozubek, H.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the kinetics of dimerization of nitrosamine induced by a flash of light is measured. The experiment can be performed with a commercial ultraviolet-VIS spetrophotometer with easy to make modifications. The experiment demonstrates a flash photolysis system not always available in university chemistry laboratories.…

  15. Two probable optical flashes from gamma-ray bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, B. E.; Bradt, H. V.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Cline, T. L.; Desai, U.; Teegarden, B. J.; Evans, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Two images on archival photographic plates which are most likely records of optical flashes from gamma-ray bursters (GRBs) were examined. One of these images appears on a 1901 plate in the field of the Nov. 5, 1979 GRB, while the other is in the field of the Jan. 13, 1979 GRB on a plate exposed in 1944. The 1901 optical transient image is circular in shape, while all normal star images are trailed by 8 in. No optical transients are found in a control region which is 34.3 times larger than the GRB error regions examined. Independent limits on the optical flash rate from the sky yield a probability of less than 0.0001 that any one of the optical transients is due to a background flash. A total exposure of 2.7 years was examined for GRB flashes at known GRB locations on the Harvard plates and a total of three GRB flashes were seen, that the average recurrence time scale for optical flashes is roughly one year. The optical fluence of these optical flashes was measured. For the three currently known GRB optical flashes, the ratio of gamma-ray fluence (from a modern burst) to the optical fluence (from a archival burst) were measured to be 800, 900, and 900.

  16. Two probable optical flashes from gamma-ray bursters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, B. E.; Bradt, H. V.; Barat, C.; Hurley, K.; Niel, M.; Vedrenne, G.; Cline, T. L.; Desai, U. D.; Teegarden, B. J.; Evans, W. D.

    1984-01-01

    Two images on archival photographic plates which are most likely records of optical flashes from gamma-ray bursters (GRBs) were examined. One of these images appears on a 1901 plate in the field of the 5 Nov. 1979 GRB, while the other is in the field of the 13 Jan. 1979 GRB on a plate exposed in 1944. The 1901 optical transient image is circular in shape, while all normal star images are trailed by 8 in. No optical transients are found in a control region which is 34.3 times larger than the GRB error regions examined. Independent limits on the optical flash rate from the sky yield a probability of less than 0.0001 that any one of the optical transients is due to a background flash. A total exposure of 2.7 years was examined for GRB flashes at known GRB locations on the Harvard plates and a total of three GRB flashes were seen, that the average recurrence time scale for optical flashes is roughly one year. The optical fluence of these optical flashes was measured. For the three currently known GRB optical flashes, the ratio of gamma-ray fluence (from a modern burst) to the optical fluence (from a archival burst) were measured to be 800, 900, and 900.

  17. On the proportion of upward flashes to lightning research towers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smorgonskiy, Alexander; Rachidi, Farhad; Rubinstein, Marcos; Diendorfer, Gerhard; Schulz, Wolfgang

    2013-07-01

    We compare in this paper direct measurements obtained on the towers on San Salvatore Mountain (Switzerland) and on the Gaisberg Mountain (Austria). They are situated in similar topographical environments but in different lightning activity zones. Direct measurements of lightning currents on these towers have revealed a major difference in terms of the number of downward flashes. While measurements made by Berger and co-workers revealed a significant number of downward flashes on the two towers on San Salvatore Mountain, more recent observations on the Gaisberg and Peissenberg towers were essentially composed of upward flashes. We use in this paper a new method to estimate the proportion of upward/downward flashes to a given tower, based on the data from lightning location systems. The analysis using the proposed method explains the discrepancy in terms of the measured number of downward flashes in the Gaisberg and San Salvatore towers. The analysis presented reveals also that in the evaluation of the percentage of upward flashes initiated from a tall structure, different parameters should be carefully examined, namely (i) the value of the ground flash density, (ii) the topographical conditions, and (iii) the presence of other tall structures in the region from which upward flashes might be initiated.

  18. Assessment of vulnerability to extreme flash floods in design storms.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eung Seok; Choi, Hyun Il

    2011-07-01

    There has been an increase in the occurrence of sudden local flooding of great volume and short duration caused by heavy or excessive rainfall intensity over a small area, which presents the greatest potential danger threat to the natural environment, human life, public health and property, etc. Such flash floods have rapid runoff and debris flow that rises quickly with little or no advance warning to prevent flood damage. This study develops a flash flood index through the average of the same scale relative severity factors quantifying characteristics of hydrographs generated from a rainfall-runoff model for the long-term observed rainfall data in a small ungauged study basin, and presents regression equations between rainfall characteristics and the flash flood index. The aim of this study is to develop flash flood index-duration-frequency relation curves by combining the rainfall intensity-duration-frequency relation and the flash flood index from probability rainfall data in order to evaluate vulnerability to extreme flash floods in design storms. This study is an initial effort to quantify the flash flood severity of design storms for both existing and planned flood control facilities to cope with residual flood risks due to extreme flash floods that have ocurred frequently in recent years.

  19. Treatment of Menopausal Hot Flashes with 5-Hydroxytryptophan

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Robert R.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Much recent research has focused on nonhormonal treatments for menopausal hot flashes. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of 5-Hydroxytroptophan (5-HTP), the immediate precursor of serotonin, upon menopausal hot flashes. Selective, serotonergic, reuptake inhibitors (SSRI’s), which increase the amount of serotonin in the synaptic gap, have shown some promise in the amelioration of hot flashes. Methods We administered 5-HTP or placebo, in double-blind fashion, to 24 postmenopausal women reporting frequent hot flashes. Treatment outcome was measured using a miniature, electronic, hot flash recorder. Results No significant effects of 150 mg/day 5-HTP upon hot flash frequency were found. The 5-HTP group had 23.8 ± 5.7 (SD) hot flashes/24 hours prior to treatment and 18.5 ± 9.6 at the end of treatment. The placebo group had 18.5 ± 9.6 before treatment and 22.6 ± 12.4 at treatment completion. Conclusions At the dose given, 5-HTP does not significantly ameliorate frequency of menopausal hot flashes, as measured objectively with an electronic recorder. Given the small size, this study must be considered preliminary in nature. PMID:20031347

  20. Negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baharudin, Z. A.; Ahmad, Noor Azlinda; Mäkelä, J. S.; Fernando, Mahendra; Cooray, Vernon

    2014-02-01

    The characteristics of the negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes in Malaysia are studied by analyzing the electric fields generated by the whole flash in nanosecond resolution. A total of 405 strokes obtained from 100 successive negative cloud-to-ground lightning flashes were analyzed, which were recorded from seven convective thunderstorms during the southwest monsoon period, i.e. from April to June 2009. It was found that the total number of interstroke intervals has an arithmetic mean value of 86 ms, a geometric mean value of 67 ms and does not depend on the return stroke order. Of the 100 negative ground flashes, 38 flashes (38%) have at least one subsequent return-stroke (SRS) whose electric field peak was greater than that of the first return-stroke (RS). Furthermore, 58 (19%) out of 305 SRS have electric field peak larger than those of the first RS. The arithmetic and geometric mean ratio between the peak electric field of the SRS and the peak electric field of the first RS are 0.7 and 0.6, respectively. The percentage of single-stroke flashes was 16% while the mean number of strokes per flash and maximum number of stroke per flash were 4 and 14, respectively.

  1. Algorithms for Lunar Flash Video Search, Measurement, and Archiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley; Suggs, Robert; Cooke, Bill

    2007-01-01

    Lunar meteoroid impact flashes provide a method to estimate the flux of the large meteoroid flux and thus their hazard to spacecraft. Although meteoroid impacts on the Moon have been detected using video methods for over a decade, the difficulty of manually searching hours of video for the rare, extremely brief impact flashes has discouraged the technique's systematic implementation. A prototype has been developed for the purpose of automatically searching lunar video records for impact flashes, eliminating false detections, editing the returned possible flashes, Z and archiving and documenting the results. The theory and organization of the program is discussed with emphasis on the filtering out of several classes of false detections and retaining the brief portions of the raw video necessary for in depth analysis of the flashes detected. Several utilities for measurement, analysis, and location of the flashes on the moon included in the program are demonstrated. Application of the program to a year's worth of lunar observations is discussed along with examples of impact flashes as well as several classes of false impact flashes.

  2. Algorithms for Lunar Flash Video Search, Measurement, and Archiving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swift, Wesley; Suggs, Robert; Cooke, William

    2007-01-01

    Lunar meteoroid impact flashes provide a method to estimate the flux of the large meteoroid flux and thus their hazard to spacecraft. Although meteoroid impacts on the Moon have been detected using video methods for over a decade, the difficulty of manually searching hours of video for the rare, extremely brief impact flashes has discouraged the technique's systematic implementation. A prototype has been developed for the purpose of automatically searching Lunar video records for impact flashes, eliminating false detections, editing the returned possible flashes, and archiving and documenting the results. The theory and organization of the program is discussed with emphasis on the filtering out of several classes of false detections and retaining the brief portions of the raw video necessary for in depth analysis of the flashes detected. Several utilities for measurement, analysis, and location of the flashes on the moon included in the program are demonstrated. Application of the program to a year's worth of Lunar observations is discussed along with examples of impact flashes as well as several classes of false impact flashes.

  3. Behavioral Treatment of Menopausal Hot Flashes: Evaluation by Objective Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Germaine, Leonard M.; Freedman, Robert R.

    1984-01-01

    Used latency to hot flash onset under heat stress to evaluate the effects of relaxation treatment or a control procedure in 14 menopausal women. Following treatment, the latency to hot flash onset during heat stress was increased in relaxation subjects. Reported symptom frequency was significantly reduced in relaxation subjects. (BH)

  4. Genetic Polymorphisms, Hormone Levels, and Hot Flashes in Midlife Women

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Chrissy; Gallicchio, Lisa; Miller, Susan R.; Langenberg, Patricia; Zacur, Howard; Flaws, Jodi A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective Hot flashes disrupt the lives of millions of women each year. Although hot flashes are a public health concern, little is known about risk factors that predispose women to hot flashes. Thus, the objective of this study was to examine whether sex steroid hormone levels and genetic polymorphisms in hormone biosynthesis and degradation enzymes are associated with the risk of hot flashes. Methods In a cross-sectional study design, midlife women aged 45 to 54 years (n=639) were recruited from Baltimore and its surrounding counties. Participants completed a questionnaire and donated a blood sample for steroid hormone analysis and genotyping. The associations between genetic polymorphisms and hormone levels, as well as the associations between genetic polymorphisms, hormone levels, and hot flashes were examined using statistical models. Results A polymorphism in CYP1B1 was associated with lower dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate (DHEA-S) and progesterone levels, while a polymorphism in CYP19 (aromatase) was associated with higher testosterone and DHEA-S levels. Lower progesterone and sex hormone binding globulin levels, lower free estradiol index, and a higher ratio of total androgens to total estrogens were associated with the experiencing of hot flashes. A polymorphism in CYP1B1 and a polymorphism in 3βHSD were both associated with hot flashes. Conclusion Some genetic polymorphisms may be associated with altered levels of hormones in midlife women. Further, selected genetic polymorphisms and altered hormone levels may be associated with the risk of hot flashes in midlife women. PMID:17187946

  5. Locating Initial Breakdown Pulses of Lightning Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunarathne, S.; Marshall, T.; Stolzenburg, M.; Betz, H.; Wieczorek, G.

    2010-12-01

    Lightning flashes often begin with a series of bipolar pulses, 1-5 us in width, called initial breakdown pulses or characteristic pulses. In this presentation we show electric field change data of initial breakdown pulses collected with a network of 5 flat-plate antennas with a bandwidth of 0 - 5 MHz. These pulses were obtained at the NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during the summer of 2010. The (x, y, z, t) positions of these pulses have been determined using a time of arrival technique [Koshak and Solakiewicz, JGR, 1996] for several lightning flashes. In addition, we also collected magnetic field change data with a LINET system [e.g., Betz et al., GRL, 2004], which consisted of 7 crossed-loop sensors having a bandwidth of 5 - 200 kHz; the pulse locations detected by this system were also determined by time of arrival. The locations of the initial breakdown pulses from both systems will be compared to locations of VHF lightning sources made with the KSC LDAR2 system (with a center frequency of 63 MHz and a bandwidth of 6 MHz). Possible implications of the pulse locations derived from the three different sets of sensors on lightning initiation and propagation will be discussed.

  6. Flash Infrared Thermography Contrast Data Analysis Technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides information on an IR Contrast technique that involves extracting normalized contrast versus time evolutions from the flash thermography inspection infrared video data. The analysis calculates thermal measurement features from the contrast evolution. In addition, simulation of the contrast evolution is achieved through calibration on measured contrast evolutions from many flat-bottom holes in the subject material. The measurement features and the contrast simulation are used to evaluate flash thermography data in order to characterize delamination-like anomalies. The thermal measurement features relate to the anomaly characteristics. The contrast evolution simulation is matched to the measured contrast evolution over an anomaly to provide an assessment of the anomaly depth and width which correspond to the depth and diameter of the equivalent flat-bottom hole (EFBH) similar to that used as input to the simulation. A similar analysis, in terms of diameter and depth of an equivalent uniform gap (EUG) providing a best match with the measured contrast evolution, is also provided. An edge detection technique called the half-max is used to measure width and length of the anomaly. Results of the half-max width and the EFBH/EUG diameter are compared to evaluate the anomaly. The information provided here is geared towards explaining the IR Contrast technique. Results from a limited amount of validation data on reinforced carbon-carbon (RCC) hardware are included in this paper.

  7. Flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Cooney, M.J.; Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III

    1997-03-01

    Despite the extensive research into the pyrolysis of lignin, the underlying chemical reactions that lead to product formation are poorly understood. Detailed mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of biomass and lignin under conditions relevant to current process conditions could provide insight into utilizing this renewable resource for the production of chemicals and fuel. Currently, flash or fast pyrolysis is the most promising process to maximize the yields of liquid products (up to 80 wt %) from biomass by rapidly heating the substrate to moderate temperatures, typically 500{degrees}C, for short residence times, typically less than two seconds. To provide mechanistic insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds that contain a {beta}-ether. linkage and {alpha}- or {gamma}-alcohol, which are key structural elements in lignin. The dominant products from the FVP of PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh (PPE), PhC(OH)HCH{sub 2}OPh, and PhCH{sub 2}CH(CH{sub 2}OH)OPh at 500{degrees}C can be attributed to homolysis of the weakest bond in the molecule (C-O bond) or 1,2-elimination. Surprisingly, the hydroxy-substituent dramatically increases the decomposition of PPE. It is proposed that internal hydrogen bonding is accelerating the reaction.

  8. Honeywell optical investigations on FLASH program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Rourke, Ken; Peterson, Eric; Yount, Larry

    1995-05-01

    The increasing performance and reduction of life cycle cost requirements placed on commercial and military transport aircraft are resulting in more complex, highly integrated aircraft control and management systems. The use of fiber optic data transmission media can make significant contributions in achieving these performance and cost goals. The Honeywell portion of Task 2A on the Fly-by-Light Advanced System Hardware (FLASH) program is evaluating a Primary Flight Control System (PFCS) using pilot and copilot inputs from Active Hand Controllers (AHC) which are optically linked to the primary flight Control Computers (PFCC). Customer involvement is an important element of the Task 2A activity. Establishing customer requirements and perspectives on productization of systems developed under FLASH are key to future product success. The Honeywell elements of the PFCS demonstrator provide a command path that is optically interfaced from crew inputs to commands of distributed, smart actuation subsystems commands. Optical communication architectures are implemented using several protocols including the new AS-1773A 20 Mbps data bus standard. The interconnecting fiber optic cable plant is provided by our Task 1A teammate McDonnell Douglas Aerospace (West). Fiber optic cable plant fabrication uses processed, tools and materials reflecting necessary advances in manufacturing required to make fly-by-light avionics systems marketable.

  9. Efficiently Communicating Rich Heterogeneous Geospatial Data from the FeMO2008 Dive Cruise with FlashMap on EarthRef.org

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minnett, R. C.; Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, D.; Staudigel, H.

    2008-12-01

    EarthRef.org is comprehensive and convenient resource for Earth Science reference data and models. It encompasses four main portals: the Geochemical Earth Reference Model (GERM), the Magnetics Information Consortium (MagIC), the Seamount Biogeosciences Network (SBN), and the Enduring Resources for Earth Science Education (ERESE). Their underlying databases are publically available and the scientific community has contributed widely and is urged to continue to do so. However, the net result is a vast and largely heterogeneous warehouse of geospatial data ranging from carefully prepared maps of seamounts to geochemical data/metadata, daily reports from seagoing expeditions, large volumes of raw and processed multibeam data, images of paleomagnetic sampling sites, etc. This presents a considerable obstacle for integrating other rich media content, such as videos, images, data files, cruise tracks, and interoperable database results, without overwhelming the web user. The four EarthRef.org portals clearly lend themselves to a more intuitive user interface and has, therefore, been an invaluable test bed for the design and implementation of FlashMap, a versatile KML-driven geospatial browser written for reliability and speed in Adobe Flash. FlashMap allows layers of content to be loaded and displayed over a streaming high-resolution map which can be zoomed and panned similarly to Google Maps and Google Earth. Many organizations, from National Geographic to the USGS, have begun using Google Earth software to display geospatial content. However, Google Earth, as a desktop application, does not integrate cleanly with existing websites requiring the user to navigate away from the browser and focus on a separate application and Google Maps, written in Java Script, does not scale up reliably to large datasets. FlashMap remedies these problems as a web-based application that allows for seamless integration of the real-time display power of Google Earth and the flexibility of

  10. Mapping Flash Flood Severity in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saharia, M.; Kirstetter, P. E.; Gourley, J. J.; Hong, Y.; Vergara, H. J.

    2015-12-01

    Flash floods have been a major natural hazard in terms of both fatalities and property damage. In the United States, flash floods have only been characterized on a case study basis due to the lack of a comprehensive database matching flood characteristics with geospatial and geomorphologic information. To characterize the ability of a basin to produce flash floods, a new variable called "Flashiness" is derived from the slope of the rising limb in hydrograph time series. It is the basis to document and predict the flash flood potential and severity over the U.S. First a representative and long archive of flood events spanning 78 years is used to analyze the spatial and temporal variability of observed flashiness. The areas and seasons prone to flash floods are documented, highlighting the flash flood alley in Texas, Appalachians, West Coast, and North American monsoon in Arizona etc. Then the flashiness is linked to geomorphologic and climatologic attributes to identify the basin characteristics driving the ability to produce flash floods. The significant impact of characteristics such as slope, precipitation, and basin area are quantified. Next the model is used to predict flashiness all over the continental U.S., specifically over regions poorly covered by hydrological observations. It highlights ungauged areas prone to flash floods such as parts of Florida, Southern Wisconsin, Montana and South Dakota etc. Finally these findings are validated using the National Weather Service storm reports and a historical flood fatalities database. This analysis framework will serve as a baseline for evaluating distributed hydrologic model simulations such as the Flooded Locations And Simulated Hydrographs Project (FLASH) (http://flash.ou.edu).

  11. Flood hazard assessment in areas prone to flash flooding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvočka, Davor; Falconer, Roger A.; Bray, Michaela

    2016-04-01

    Contemporary climate projections suggest that there will be an increase in the occurrence of high-intensity rainfall events in the future. These precipitation extremes are usually the main cause for the emergence of extreme flooding, such as flash flooding. Flash floods are among the most unpredictable, violent and fatal natural hazards in the world. Furthermore, it is expected that flash flooding will occur even more frequently in the future due to more frequent development of extreme weather events, which will greatly increase the danger to people caused by flash flooding. This being the case, there will be a need for high resolution flood hazard maps in areas susceptible to flash flooding. This study investigates what type of flood hazard assessment methods should be used for assessing the flood hazard to people caused by flash flooding. Two different types of flood hazard assessment methods were tested: (i) a widely used method based on an empirical analysis, and (ii) a new, physically based and experimentally calibrated method. Two flash flood events were considered herein, namely: the 2004 Boscastle flash flood and the 2007 Železniki flash flood. The results obtained in this study suggest that in the areas susceptible to extreme flooding, the flood hazard assessment should be conducted using methods based on a mechanics-based analysis. In comparison to standard flood hazard assessment methods, these physically based methods: (i) take into account all of the physical forces, which act on a human body in floodwater, (ii) successfully adapt to abrupt changes in the flow regime, which often occur for flash flood events, and (iii) rapidly assess a flood hazard index in a relatively short period of time.

  12. Mechanisms of cutaneous vasodilation during the postmenopausal hot flash

    PubMed Central

    Low, David A.; Hubing, Kimberley A.; Del Coso, Juan; Crandall, Craig G.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Menopausal hot flashes can seriously disrupt the lives of symptomatic women. The physiological mechanisms of the hot flash efferent responses, particularly in the cutaneous circulation, are not completely understood. The aim of this study was to examine the mechanisms of increases in skin blood flow during the postmenopausal hot flash in symptomatic women. Methods Healthy postmenopausal women rested in a temperature controlled laboratory while responses prior to and during hot flashes were recorded for three unique protocols. Protocols 1 and 2: Women were locally pretreated with an intradermal injection of botulinum toxin A (BTX; blocks the release of neurotransmitters from sympathetic cholinergic nerves) in the forearm (protocol 1) and in the glabellar region (protocol 2). Protocol 3: Skin sympathetic nerve activity from the peroneal nerve was recorded, along with skin blood flow and sweating within the region innervated by that neural signal. Skin blood flow was indexed using laser-Doppler flowmetry at BTX-treated and adjacent untreated control sites. The onset of a hot flash was objectively identified as a transient and pronounced elevation of sternal sweat rate. Results The elevation in forearm (protocol 1) and glabellar skin blood flow (protocol 2) during hot flashes were attenuated at BTX sites relative to adjacent untreated sites (P<0.05 for both protocols). In protocol 3, skin sympathetic nerve activity significantly increased during hot flashes and returned to pre-flash levels following the hot flashes. Conclusion Elevations in skin blood flow during the postmenopausal hot flash are neurally mediated primarily through BTX sensitive nerves; presumably sympathetic cholinergic. PMID:21107299

  13. Features of positive ground flashes observed in Kathmandu Nepal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Pitri Bhakta; Sharma, Shriram; Baral, Kedarnath

    2016-07-01

    Lightning vertical electric fields pertinent to the subtropical thunderstorms occurring over the rugged terrain have been measured and recorded at a hilly station Kathmandu, Nepal. In the present work, waveforms of the positive ground flashes have been selected from all the records and were analyzed. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that fine structure of electric field signature pertinent to the positive return stroke; have been analyzed and presented from Nepal. One hundred and thirty three (133) of the total of four hundred twenty-five (425) flashes were selected from seven thunderstorm days and analyzed. Of the data recorded for seven days, 133 flashes (31.3%) were positive flashes and 276 flashes (64.9%) were cloud flashes. Majority of the positive ground flashes were found to be single stroke ones, whereas, the average number of strokes per flash is found to be 1.1 with a maximum value of 4. Majority of the positive ground flashes were found either lacking the initial breakdown process and the leader stage or these processes could not be detected. The return strokes are found to be succeeded by large in cloud activity in the continuing current portion of the flash. The average zero-crossing time of the positive return strokes was found to be 60.45 μs with a range of 447.81 μs and the average rise time was found to be 9.44 μs with a range of 42.56 μs.

  14. Injury incidence and balance in rugby players

    PubMed Central

    M, Jaco Ras; Puckree, Threethambal

    2014-01-01

    Objective : This study determined and correlated injury incidence and balance in rugby players. Methods: A prospective survey with balance testing was conducted on first year rugby academy players (N= 114). Injury incidence, static and dynamic balance were tested pre and post-season using a Biosway portable balance system. The data was analysed using paired and independent samples t-tests at p<0.05, Odds ratios, and Spearman’s correlation coefficients. Results: 75.50% participated, 71.40% were 18 years old, and 71.40% were White. Injury was sustained by 83% of players with the knee (25%) most commonly injured. Injury incidence was 1.52 per player with an injury rate of 5.95 injuries per 1000 match playing hours. The Stability Index increased significantly (p=0.03) by 15% in the medial/lateral direction post-season compared to pre-season. Significant differences in post-test anterior posterior and overall static and front and front right dynamic stability between injured and uninjured players were noted. Risk factors for injury included the scrum-half (14.80%) playing position, injuries in the 2nd half of the match (57%), and during contact (67%). Conclusion : Injury incidence was related to static and dynamic balance in forward right direction only. PMID:25674136

  15. Game Performance Evaluation in Male Goalball Players

    PubMed Central

    Molik, Bartosz; Morgulec-Adamowicz, Natalia; Kosmol, Andrzej; Perkowski, Krzysztof; Bednarczuk, Grzegorz; Skowroński, Waldemar; Gomez, Miguel Angel; Koc, Krzysztof; Rutkowska, Izabela; Szyman, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    Goalball is a Paralympic sport exclusively for athletes who are visually impaired and blind. The aims of this study were twofold: to describe game performance of elite male goalball players based upon the degree of visual impairment, and to determine if game performance was related to anthropometric characteristics of elite male goalball players. The study sample consisted of 44 male goalball athletes. A total of 38 games were recorded during the Summer Paralympic Games in London 2012. Observations were reported using the Game Efficiency Sheet for Goalball. Additional anthropometric measurements included body mass (kg), body height (cm), the arm span (cm) and length of the body in the defensive position (cm). The results differentiating both groups showed that the players with total blindness obtained higher means than the players with visual impairment for game indicators such as the sum of defense (p = 0.03) and the sum of good defense (p = 0.04). The players with visual impairment obtained higher results than those with total blindness for attack efficiency (p = 0.04), the sum of penalty defenses (p = 0.01), and fouls (p = 0.01). The study showed that athletes with blindness demonstrated higher game performance in defence. However, athletes with visual impairment presented higher efficiency in offensive actions. The analyses confirmed that body mass, body height, the arm span and length of the body in the defensive position did not differentiate players’ performance at the elite level. PMID:26834872

  16. Nutritional requirements of young soccer players.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, O; Unnithan, V B

    1994-01-01

    The general dietary needs of the young soccer player appear to be similar to those of the adult soccer player. There are, however, several age- and maturation-related differences. Compared with adults, children's daily recommended protein intake (per kg body mass) is higher; during exercise, children's muscles rely more on fat than on carbohydrates, but it is not clear whether young soccer players need higher dietary fat; calculated per kg body mass, the metabolic demands of walking and running are considerably higher in children; and during dehydration, children's core temperature rises faster, which calls for stricter enforcement of hydration. To increase fluid palatability, drinks should be flavoured, according to the child's individual preference. The efficacy and safety of 'carbohydrate loading' have not been studied in children.

  17. Musicians' Medicine: Musculoskeletal Problems in String Players

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Han-Sung; Park, Ho Youn; Yoon, Jun O; Kim, Jin Sam; Chun, Jae Myeung; Aminata, Iman W.; Cho, Won-Joon

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing attention to medical problems of musicians. Many studies find a high prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in musicians, ranging from 73.4% to 87.7%, and string players have the highest prevalence of musculoskeletal problems. This paper examines the various positions and movements of the upper extremities in string players: 1) basic postures for holding instruments, 2) movements of left upper extremity: fingering, forearm posture, high position and vibrato, 3) movements of right upper extremity: bowing, bow angles, pizzicato and other bowing techniques. These isotonic and isometric movements can lead to musculoskeletal problems in musicians. We reviewed orthopedic disorders that are specific to string players: overuse syndrome, muscle-tendon syndrome, focal dystonia, hypermobility syndrome, and compressive neuropathy. Symptoms, interrelationships with musical performances, diagnosis and treatment of these problems were then discussed. PMID:24009899

  18. Musicians' medicine: musculoskeletal problems in string players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Sung; Park, Ho Youn; Yoon, Jun O; Kim, Jin Sam; Chun, Jae Myeung; Aminata, Iman W; Cho, Won-Joon; Jeon, In-Ho

    2013-09-01

    There is increasing attention to medical problems of musicians. Many studies find a high prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in musicians, ranging from 73.4% to 87.7%, and string players have the highest prevalence of musculoskeletal problems. This paper examines the various positions and movements of the upper extremities in string players: 1) basic postures for holding instruments, 2) movements of left upper extremity: fingering, forearm posture, high position and vibrato, 3) movements of right upper extremity: bowing, bow angles, pizzicato and other bowing techniques. These isotonic and isometric movements can lead to musculoskeletal problems in musicians. We reviewed orthopedic disorders that are specific to string players: overuse syndrome, muscle-tendon syndrome, focal dystonia, hypermobility syndrome, and compressive neuropathy. Symptoms, interrelationships with musical performances, diagnosis and treatment of these problems were then discussed. PMID:24009899

  19. Musicians' medicine: musculoskeletal problems in string players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Han-Sung; Park, Ho Youn; Yoon, Jun O; Kim, Jin Sam; Chun, Jae Myeung; Aminata, Iman W; Cho, Won-Joon; Jeon, In-Ho

    2013-09-01

    There is increasing attention to medical problems of musicians. Many studies find a high prevalence of work-related musculoskeletal disorders in musicians, ranging from 73.4% to 87.7%, and string players have the highest prevalence of musculoskeletal problems. This paper examines the various positions and movements of the upper extremities in string players: 1) basic postures for holding instruments, 2) movements of left upper extremity: fingering, forearm posture, high position and vibrato, 3) movements of right upper extremity: bowing, bow angles, pizzicato and other bowing techniques. These isotonic and isometric movements can lead to musculoskeletal problems in musicians. We reviewed orthopedic disorders that are specific to string players: overuse syndrome, muscle-tendon syndrome, focal dystonia, hypermobility syndrome, and compressive neuropathy. Symptoms, interrelationships with musical performances, diagnosis and treatment of these problems were then discussed.

  20. Individual recovery profiles in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Jordi; Ramos-Castro, Juan; Rodas, Gil; Tarragó, Joan R; Capdevila, Lluís

    2015-01-01

    In the sport context, recovery has been characterized as a multifactor process (physiological, psychological, behavioral, social, etc.). This study takes a multidisciplinary approach to find psychophysiological markers of the stress-recovery process. It aims to determine how athletes' specific recovery actions relate to their perceptions of recovery, and Heart Rate Variability (HRV). A total of 196 assessments were analyzed from 6 players on a men's professional basketball team within the Liga LEB Oro basketball federation (2012/2013 season). Perceptions of recovery, recovery strategies, and HRV were recorded. The results show a pattern of individual differences in behavior related to athletes' recovery actions and HRV profiles throughout the season (p < .05). Moreover, we observed that each player had different recovery needs. In light of these results, we suggest an individualistic approach to evaluating and monitoring recovery to attend more accurately to each player's recovery needs.

  1. Physiological characteristics of elite female basketball players.

    PubMed

    Smith, H K; Thomas, S G

    1991-12-01

    Successful performance in international basketball competition requires an appreciation of the physical demands of the sport and the capacities of the team to respond to those demands. Optimal performance now requires a combination of technical and tactical abilities as well as a high degree of physical fitness. The objectives of this study were to assess physiological components considered important to game performance in players selected to the national team roster in 1988 or 1989, and to use this information to describe the team and positional profiles. Data obtained from maximal treadmill tests, anthropometry, sprints, isokinetic dynamometry, and other tasks reflected those qualities required of elite players. In relation to previously reported data, the athletes were generally taller and heavier and had higher maximal aerobic power than international and college players of 7 to 10 years ago. The data can also be used to identify target standards for current and prospective team members.

  2. Effects of ISI and flash duration on the identification of briefly flashed stimuli.

    PubMed

    Rucci, Michele; Beck, Jacob

    2005-01-01

    The identification accuracy of briefly flashed stimuli followed by an interstimulus interval (ISI) of variable length was compared to that obtained with longer flashes that prolonged the exposure of the stimulus throughout the ISI. The interval between the onset of the stimulus and the onset of the mask (stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA)) was the same in the two conditions. Consistent with a dependence of visual identification on SOA, the percentages of correct identification in the two conditions were approximately similar at all SOAs irrespective of the level of noise, stimulus familiarity, and stimulus complexity. However, departures from the onset-onset rule were also present. While the two conditions yielded virtually identical identification accuracy with an SOA of 80 ms, small but significant differences were found for shorter and longer intervals. Possible theoretical explanations of the results are presented.

  3. Anthropometric Characteristics of Spanish Professional Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Alejandro, Vaquera; Santiago, Santos; Gerardo, Villa José; Carlos, Morante Juan; Vicente, García-Tormo

    2015-06-27

    The study of elite basketball players' anthropometric characteristics alongside those of body composition contributes significantly to their profiling as professional athletes and plays an important role in the selection process, as these characteristics can have a significant impact on performance. In the current study, 110 professional basketball players from a series of Spanish professional Leagues (ACB, LEB and EBA) and youth level National Teams (U20 and U18) had their anthropometric profiles measured and compared to determine differences between them. Furthermore, all 110 players were divided into three different categories according to their playing position: guards, forwards and centres. The results obtained show no significant differences between players in different competitions in weight, height and the sum of skinfolds. Nonetheless, there were several differences related to body fat content (13.03% in ACB players and 10.52% in the lower categories and National Teams). There were also several differences found between the different playing positions amongst all playing levels in body mass (79.56 ± 2.41, 91.04 ± 1.51 and 104.56 ± 1.73 kg), height (182.28 ± 0.96, 195.65 ± 1.00 and 204.08 ± 0.67 cm), skinfold distribution and perimeters. However, there were no significant differences in body fat content between the different playing positions. The conclusions obtained from this study provide a better understanding to basketball specialists regarding the selection process of players at the elite level, especially on the transition from youth elite programs to men's elite leagues. PMID:26240653

  4. Anthropometric Characteristics of Spanish Professional Basketball Players.

    PubMed

    Alejandro, Vaquera; Santiago, Santos; Gerardo, Villa José; Carlos, Morante Juan; Vicente, García-Tormo

    2015-06-27

    The study of elite basketball players' anthropometric characteristics alongside those of body composition contributes significantly to their profiling as professional athletes and plays an important role in the selection process, as these characteristics can have a significant impact on performance. In the current study, 110 professional basketball players from a series of Spanish professional Leagues (ACB, LEB and EBA) and youth level National Teams (U20 and U18) had their anthropometric profiles measured and compared to determine differences between them. Furthermore, all 110 players were divided into three different categories according to their playing position: guards, forwards and centres. The results obtained show no significant differences between players in different competitions in weight, height and the sum of skinfolds. Nonetheless, there were several differences related to body fat content (13.03% in ACB players and 10.52% in the lower categories and National Teams). There were also several differences found between the different playing positions amongst all playing levels in body mass (79.56 ± 2.41, 91.04 ± 1.51 and 104.56 ± 1.73 kg), height (182.28 ± 0.96, 195.65 ± 1.00 and 204.08 ± 0.67 cm), skinfold distribution and perimeters. However, there were no significant differences in body fat content between the different playing positions. The conclusions obtained from this study provide a better understanding to basketball specialists regarding the selection process of players at the elite level, especially on the transition from youth elite programs to men's elite leagues.

  5. Anthropometric characteristics of Columbia, South Carolina, youth baseball players and Dixie Youth World Series players.

    PubMed

    French, Karen E; Spurgeon, John H; Nevett, Michael E

    2007-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare measures of body size in two samples of youth baseball players with normative data from the United States National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) growth charts. One sample of youth baseball players participated in a local little league. The second sample of youth baseball players were members of eight of the twelve teams participating in the 1995 Dixie Youth World Series. Normative data for the United States (NCHS) were used as comparative data. Two trained anthropometrists measured standing height, sitting height, lower limb height, upper limb length, arm girth, calf girth, tricep skinfold, and abdomen skinfold on all participants. In both samples, pitchers, short stops, and first basemen were a more highly skilled group and exhibited larger body size (greater standing height, sitting height, lower limb height, upper limb length) than children who played at other positions. The standing height of local little league players was similar to the median of reference data at ages 7, 8, and 9 years. The standing height and weight of skilled players in both samples approximated the 75th percentile for standing height and weight at ages 10, 11, 12, and 13 years. The results suggest that baseball players exhibit larger body size than the normal population at young ages. Body size may be an important criterion used by coaches to select and assign young players to certain positions.

  6. Enumeration versus multiple object tracking: the case of action video game players

    PubMed Central

    Green, C.S.; Bavelier, D.

    2010-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate that action video game play enhances subjects’ ability in two tasks thought to indicate the number of items that can be apprehended. Using an enumeration task, in which participants have to determine the number of quickly flashed squares, accuracy measures showed a near ceiling performance for low numerosities and a sharp drop in performance once a critical number of squares was reached. Importantly, this critical number was higher by about two items in video game players (VGPs) than in non-video game players (NVGPs). A following control study indicated that this improvement was not due to an enhanced ability to instantly apprehend the numerosity of the display, a process known as subitizing, but rather due to an enhancement in the slower more serial process of counting. To confirm that video game play facilitates the processing of multiple objects at once, we compared VGPs and NVGPs on the multiple object tracking task (MOT), which requires the allocation of attention to several items over time. VGPs were able to successfully track approximately two more items than NVGPs. Furthermore, NVGPs trained on an action video game established the causal effect of game playing in the enhanced performance on the two tasks. Together, these studies confirm the view that playing action video games enhances the number of objects that can be apprehended and suggest that this enhancement is mediated by changes in visual short-term memory skills. PMID:16359652

  7. Comparing spondylolysis in cricketers and soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Gregory, P; Batt, M; Kerslake, R

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether the location of spondylolysis in the lumbar spine of athletes differs with biomechanical factors. Methods: Single photon emission computerised tomography and reverse gantry computerised tomography were used to investigate 42 cricketers and 28 soccer players with activity related low back pain. Sites of increased scintigraphic uptake in the posterior elements of the lumbar spine and complete or incomplete fracture in the pars interarticularis were compared for these two sports. Results: Thirty seven (90.4%) cricketers and 23 (82.1%) soccer players studied had sites of increased uptake. In cricketers, these sites were on the left of the neural arch of 49 lumbar vertebrae and on the right of 33 vertebrae. In soccer players there was a significantly different proportion, with 17 sites on the left and 28 on the right (difference of 22.0%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.04 to 0.38). Lower lumbar levels showed increased scintigraphic uptake more frequently than did higher levels, although the trend was reversed at L3 and L4 in soccer. Forty spondylolyses were identified in the lumbar vertebrae of the cricketers and 35 spondylolyses in the soccer players. These comprised 26 complete and 14 incomplete fractures in the cricketers, and 25 complete and 10 incomplete fractures in the soccer players. Similar numbers of incomplete fractures were found either side of the neural arch in soccer players, but there were more incomplete fractures in the left pars (14) than in the right (2) in cricketers. The proportion of incomplete fractures either side of the neural arch was significantly different between cricket players and soccer players (difference of 37.5%; 95% CI 0.02 to 0.65). Most complete fractures were at L5 (66.7%) and more were found at L3 (15.7%) than L4 (6.9%). However, incomplete fractures were more evenly spread though the lower three lumbar levels with 41.7% at L5, 37.5% at L4, and 20.8% at L3. Conclusions: Fast bowling in cricket is

  8. Article coated with flash bonded superhydrophobic particles

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, John T [Clinton, TN; Blue, Craig A [Knoxville, TN; Kiggans, Jr., James O [Oak Ridge, TN

    2010-07-13

    A method of making article having a superhydrophobic surface includes: providing a solid body defining at least one surface; applying to the surface a plurality of diatomaceous earth particles and/or particles characterized by particle sizes ranging from at least 100 nm to about 10 .mu.m, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of nanopores, wherein at least some of the nanopores provide flow through porosity, the particles being further characterized by a plurality of spaced apart nanostructured features that include a contiguous, protrusive material; flash bonding the particles to the surface so that the particles are adherently bonded to the surface; and applying a hydrophobic coating layer to the surface and the particles so that the hydrophobic coating layer conforms to the nanostructured features.

  9. Fermi GBM Observations of Terrestrial Gamma Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson-Hodge, Colleen A.; Briggs, M. S.; Fishman, G. J.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Preece, R.; Kippen, R. M.; von Kienlin, A.; Dwyer, J. R.; Smith, D. M.; Holzworth, R.

    2010-01-01

    In its first two years of operation, the Fermi Gamma Ray Burst Monitor (GBM) has observed more than 77 Terrestrial Gamma Flashes (TGFs). The thick Bismuth Germanate (BGO) detectors are excellent for TGF spectroscopy, having a high probability of recording the full energy of an incident photon, spanning a broad energy range from 150 keV to 40 MeV, and recording a large number of photons per TGF. Correlations between GBM TGF triggers and lightning sferics detected with the World-Wide Lightning Location Network indicate that TGFs and lightning are simultaneous to within tens of microseconds. The energy spectra of some TGFs have strong 511 keV positron annihilation lines, indicating that these TGFs contain a large fraction of positrons

  10. Flash photolysis-shock tube studies

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, J.V.

    1993-12-01

    Even though this project in the past has concentrated on the measurement of thermal bimolecular reactions of atomic species with stable molecules by the flash or laser photolysis-shock tube (FP- or LP-ST) method using atomic resonance absorption spectrometry (ARAS) as the diagnostic technique, during the past year the authors have concentrated on studies of the thermal decompositions of selected chlorocarbon molecules. These studies are necessary if the degradation of chlorine containing organic molecules by incineration are to be understood at the molecular level. Clearly, destruction of these molecules will not only involve abstraction reactions, when possible, but also thermal decomposition followed by secondary reactions of the initially formed atoms and radicals. Studies on the thermal decomposition of CH{sub 3}Cl are complete, and the curve-of-growth for Cl-atom atomic resonance absorption has been determined. The new thermal decomposition studies are similar to those already reported for CH{sub 3}Cl.

  11. Correlated observations of three triggered lightning flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Idone, V. P.; Orville, R. E.; Hubert, P.; Barret, L.; Eybert-Berard, A.

    1984-01-01

    Three triggered lightning flashes, initiated during the Thunderstorm Research International Program (1981) at Langmuir Laboratory, New Mexico, are examined on the basis of three-dimensional return stroke propagation speeds and peak currents. Nonlinear relationships result between return stroke propagation speed and stroke peak current for 56 strokes, and between return stroke propagation speed and dart leader propagation speed for 32 strokes. Calculated linear correlation coefficients include dart leader propagation speed and ensuing return stroke peak current (32 strokes; r = 0.84); and stroke peak current and interstroke interval (69 strokes; r = 0.57). Earlier natural lightning data do not concur with the weak positive correlation between dart leader propagation speed and interstroke interval. Therefore, application of triggered lightning results to natural lightning phenomena must be made with certain caveats. Mean values are included for the three-dimensional return stroke propagation speed and for the three-dimensional dart leader propagation speed.

  12. Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sandusky, John V.; Pitts, Todd Alan

    2008-09-02

    Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

  13. Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging

    DOEpatents

    Sandusky, John V.; Pitts, Todd Alan

    2009-02-24

    Scannerless loss modulated flash color range imaging methods and apparatus are disclosed for producing three dimensional (3D) images of a target within a scene. Apparatus and methods according to the present invention comprise a light source providing at least three wavelengths (passbands) of illumination that are each loss modulated, phase delayed and simultaneously directed to illuminate the target. Phase delayed light backscattered from the target is spectrally filtered, demodulated and imaged by a planar detector array. Images of the intensity distributions for the selected wavelengths are obtained under modulated and unmodulated (dc) illumination of the target, and the information contained in the images combined to produce a 3D image of the target.

  14. An 'Anomalous' Triggered Lightning Flash in Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamerota, W. R.; Uman, M. A.; Hill, J. D.; Pilkey, J. T.; Ngin, T.; Jordan, D. M.; Mata, C.; Mata, A.

    2012-12-01

    Classical (grounded wire) rocket-and-wire triggered lightning flashes whose leaders do not traverse the path of the wire remnants are sometimes referred to as 'anomalous'. We present high-speed video images captured at 10 kilo-frames per second (kfps), with supporting data, to characterize an 'anomalous' rocket-triggered lightning flash that occurred on 15 May 2012 at the International Center for Lightning Research and Testing (ICLRT) in north-central Florida. The event begins as a classical rocket-triggered lightning flash with an upward positive leader (UPL) initiating from the tip of the wire at a height of about 280 m above ground level. The top 259 m of the trailing wire explodes 2.7 s after the rocket exits the launch tube, while the bottom 17 m of the wire does not explode (does not become luminous). Approximately 1.4 ms after wire explosion, a stepped leader initiates a few meters above the top of the wire remnants and propagates downward, attaching to the top of a grounded utility pole 2.1 ms after initiation and 117 m southwest of the launching facility. Beginning 600 μs prior to this sustained stepped leader development, attempted stepped leaders (luminous steps emanating from the UPL channel above the wire remnants) are observed in three locations: 20 m and 5 m above the top of the wire remnants and at the top of the wire remnants. Correlated electric field derivative (dE/dt), channel-base current, and high-speed video captured at 300 kfps reveal an electrical discharge of peak current 365 A initiating from about 17 m above the launching facility, apparently the top of the unexploded triggering wire, when the stepped leader is no more than 60 m above ground level. There are significant differences between the 'anomalous' triggered lightning flash described here and those observed in New Mexico and in France in the late 1970s and early 1980s: First, the time duration between explosion of our wire and the sustained stepped leader development a few meters

  15. MENOPAUSAL HOT FLASHES: MECHANISMS, ENDOCRINOLOGY, TREATMENT

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Robert R.

    2015-01-01

    Hot flashes (HFs) are a rapid and exaggerated heat dissipation response, consisting of profuse sweating, peripheral vasodilation, and feelings of intense, internal heat. They are triggered by small elevations in core body temperature (Tc) acting within a greatly reduced thermoneutral zone, i.e., the Tc region between the upper (sweating) and lower (shivering) thresholds. This is due in part, but not entirely, to estrogen depletion at menopause. Elevated central sympathetic activation, mediated through α2-adrenergic receptors, is one factor responsible for narrowing of the thermoneutral zone. Procedures which reduce this activation, such as paced respiration and clonidine administration, ameliorate HFs as will peripheral cooling. HFs are responsible for some, but not all, of the sleep disturbance reported during menopause. Recent work calls into question the role of serotonin in HFs. PMID:24012626

  16. Phthalate metabolite levels and menopausal hot flashes in midlife women.

    PubMed

    Ziv-Gal, Ayelet; Gallicchio, Lisa; Chiang, Catheryne; Ther, Sara N; Miller, Susan R; Zacur, Howard A; Dills, Russell L; Flaws, Jodi A

    2016-04-01

    During the menopausal transition, a woman's reproductive capacity declines, her hormone milieu changes, and her risk of hot flashes increases. Exposure to phthalates, which can be found in personal care products, can also result in altered reproductive function. Here, we investigated the associations between phthalate metabolite levels and midlife hot flashes. Eligible women (45-54 years of age) provided detailed information on hot flashes history and donated urine samples (n=195). Urinary phthalate metabolite levels were measured by HPLC-MS/MS. A higher total sum of phthalate metabolites commonly found in personal care products was associated with an increased risk of ever experiencing hot flashes (odds ratio (OR)=1.45; 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.07-1.96), hot flashes in the past 30days (OR=1.43; 95%CI=1.04-1.96), and more frequent hot flashes (OR=1.47; 95%CI=1.06-2.05). These data suggest that some phthalate exposures from personal care products are associated with menopausal hot flashes in women.

  17. Modulation of tropical cyclone flash density by environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lugo, A.; Abarca, S.; Kucienska, B.; Oropeza, F.; Raga, G.

    2012-12-01

    While lightning flash density has been successfully used to document azimuthal and radial distribution of convective activity in tropical cyclones, there have been less successful attempts to link flash density changes to storm intensity change. The latter efforts have been more often focused on major hurricanes and in isolation from environmental phenomena that modulate flash occurrence. Major hurricanes have more neutral vertical stratification than weaker storms and therefore, have fewer flashes. Other factors, such as the concentration of cloud condensation nuclei from continental origin, the diurnal cycle and sea surface temperature (SST), among others, will heavily modulate the lightning flash density. The Eastern Pacific basin is ideally located to study the effects of these different environmental modulators on tropical cyclones. The off-shore flow from Mexico results in a large variability of cloud condensation nuclei concentration and there is also a large range in sea surface temperatures. Note that most tropical cyclones in the basin dissipate as a result of the encounter of colder SSTs and drier air advected into the inner core . We present an analysis of lightning flash density in 96 tropical cyclones in the Eastern Pacific between 2005 and 2011. We use the best track dataset to determine location and intensity of the tropical cyclones, the World Wide Lightning Location Network to characterize flash density, MODIS (on board of the Terra and Aqua satellites) to determine the aerosol optical depth (as a proxy for cloud condensation nuclei content), and AMSR-E for sea surface temperatures. Preliminary results indicate a heavy modulation of flash density inside tropical cyclones by cloud condensation nuclei and a cap of the largest flash density as a function of sea surface temperatures.

  18. Flash ionization signature in coherent cyclotron emission from brown dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vorgul, I.; Helling, Ch.

    2016-05-01

    Brown dwarfs (BDs) form mineral clouds in their atmospheres, where charged particles can produce large-scale discharges in the form of lightning resulting in substantial sudden increase of local ionization. BDs are observed to emit cyclotron radio emission. We show that signatures of strong transient atmospheric ionization events (flash ionization) can be imprinted on a pre-existing radiation. Detection of such flash ionization events will open investigations into the ionization state and atmospheric dynamics. Such events can also result from explosion shock waves, material outbursts or (volcanic) eruptions. We present an analytical model that describes the modulation of a pre-existing electromagnetic radiation by a time-dependent (flash) conductivity that is characteristic for flash ionization events like lightning. Our conductivity model reproduces the conductivity function derived from observations of terrestrial gamma-ray flashes, and is applicable to astrophysical objects with strong temporal variations in the local ionization, as in planetary atmospheres and protoplanetary discs. We show that the field responds with a characteristic flash-shaped pulse to a conductivity flash of intermediate intensity. More powerful ionization events result in smaller variations of the initial radiation, or in its damping. We show that the characteristic damping of the response field for high-power initial radiation carries information about the ionization flash magnitude and duration. The duration of the pulse amplification or the damping is consistently shorter for larger conductivity variations and can be used to evaluate the intensity of the flash ionization. Our work suggests that cyclotron emission could be probe signals for electrification processes inside BD atmosphere.

  19. Weak positive cloud-to-ground flashes in Northeastern Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Raul E.; Maier, Michael W.; Garcia-Miguel, Juan A.; Holle, Ronald L.

    1991-01-01

    The frequency distributions of the peak magnetic field associated with the first detected return stroke of positive and negative cloud-to-ground (CG) flashes were studied using lightning data from northeastern Colorado. These data were obtained during 1985 with a medium-to-high gain network of three direction finders (DF's). The median signal strength of positive flashes was almost two times that of the negatives for flashes within 300 km of the DF's, which have an inherent detection-threshold bias that tends to discriminate against weak signals. This bias increases with range, and affects the detection of positive and negative flashes in different ways, because of the differing character of their distributions. Positive flashes appear to have a large percentage of signals clustered around very weak values that are lost to the medium-to-high gain Colorado Detection System very quickly with increasing range. The resulting median for positive signals could thus appear to be much larger than the median for negative signals, which are more clustered around intermediate values. When only flashes very close to the DF's are considered, however, the two distributions have almost identical medians. The large percentage of weak positive signals detected close to the DF's has not been explored previously. They have been suggested to come from intracloud discharges and thus are improperly classified as CG flashes. Evidence in hand, points to their being real positive, albeit weak CG flashes. Whether or not they are real positive ground flashes, it is important to be aware of their presence in data from magnetic DF networks.

  20. The Effect of Air Density on Sand Transport Structures and the Adobe Abrasion Profile: A Field Wind-Tunnel Experiment Over a Wide Range of Altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Qingjie; Qu, Jianjun; Dong, Zhibao; Zu, Ruiping; Zhang, Kecun; Wang, Hongtao; Xie, Shengbo

    2013-11-01

    Aeolian sand transport results from interactions between the surface and the airflow above. Air density strongly constrains airflow characteristics and the resulting flow of sand, and therefore should not be neglected in sand transport models. In the present study, we quantify the influence of air density on the sand flow structure, sand transport rate, adobe abrasion profiles, and abrasion rate using a portable wind-tunnel in the field. For a given wind speed, the flow's ability to transport sand decreases at low air density, so total sand transport decreases, but the saltation height increases. Thus, the damage to human structures increases compared with what occurs at lower altitudes. The adobe abrasion rate by the cloud of blowing sand decreases exponentially with increasing height above the surface, while the wind erosion and dust emission intensity both increase with increasing air density. Long-term feedback processes between air density and wind erosion suggest that the development of low-altitude areas due to long-term deflation plays a key role in dust emission, and will have a profound significance for surface Aeolian processes and geomorphology.

  1. NFPA 70E: Performing the electrical flash hazard analysis.

    PubMed

    Wallace, W Jon

    2005-08-01

    Arc flash hazards pose a serious risk to employee safety; proper safe work practices must be utilized. Electrical equipment > or = 50 volts must be deenergized and locked out/tagged out prior to servicing and maintenance unless doing so would increase hazards or is infeasible. Remember, convenience is not an acceptable reason for keeping equipment energized during servicing and maintenance. If electrical equipment must remain energized during Servicing and maintenance, NFPA 70E should be consulted to determine flash hazard boundaries as well as required PPE. Finally, circuit breakers and electrical disconnects must be marked to warn qualified employees of potential arc flash hazards. PMID:16212025

  2. Gamma ray flashes add to mystery of upper atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atmospheric electricity research has come a long way since Benjamin Franklin's kite-flying days. But what researchers have been learning lately about above-thunderstorm electricity has wrought a whole new era of mysteries.For a start, last summer a Colorado meteorologist sparked interest in a terrestrial phenomenon that the community first observed more than 100 years ago: optical flashes that occur above thunderstorms—at least 30 km above Earth. Walter Lyons with the Ft. Collins-based Mission Research Corporation, demonstrated that such flashes are not anomalies, as conventional scientific wisdom had held. He filmed hundreds of flashes during a 2-week period.

  3. Stereophotometric testing for Pulfrich's phenomenon in professional baseball players.

    PubMed

    Hofeldt, A J; Hoefle, F B

    1993-10-01

    Major League players were significantly more accurate in performing stereophotometry than were Minor League players. The stereophotometric data based upon the induction and extinction thresholds of the Pulfrich phenomenon were significantly correlated with the batting averages of Major League baseball players. The coefficient of determination, r2, implies that visual ability as measured by stereophotometry accounts for 47% or more of the variation in batting averages of the Major League players. This test may be a useful index in predicting batting ability.

  4. Motivational Traits of Elite Young Soccer Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, Craig; Meyers, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    Among the most overlooked aspects in the development of elite young soccer players is that of specific psychological traits. Of those traits, motivation has important implications for programs whose objectives are identification and cultivation of young, skilled performers. The growth in popularity of soccer by youth and the successes experienced…

  5. Assessing Soccer Players and Educating Soccer Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas

    2005-01-01

    This article offers suggestions on how to assess the abilities of young soccer athletes and ways to educate parents or guardians on how to maintain an attitude that most benefits and supports the players. The abilities of young athletes on a team vary, and the expectations of both team members and parents are high, thus presenting a major…

  6. Visual Attentional Orienting in Developing Hockey Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enns, James T.; Richards, James C.

    1997-01-01

    Covert visual orienting was measured in 13 twelve-year-old and 11 fifteen-year-old hockey players and in 13 college students with no hockey training. Found that high-skill 15-year-olds were better able than all other groups to take advantage of the general alerting effect produced by the sudden onset of a cue. (MDM)

  7. A Player-Centered Approach to Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Souza, Adriano; Oslin, Judy

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a player-centered approach (PCA), highlighting its qualities, and then to provide examples of its application in coaching and teaching sport. Most of the examples relate to the game of volleyball, but many of the recommendations and examples can be applied to most team sports. The article will conclude…

  8. Knee injuries in women collegiate rugby players.

    PubMed

    Levy, A S; Wetzler, M J; Lewars, M; Laughlin, W

    1997-01-01

    We evaluated the prevalence and patterns of knee injuries in 810 women collegiate rugby players. Injuries that resulted in players missing at least one game were recorded and a questionnaire was used to delineate players' rugby and knee injury history. There were 76 total knee injuries in 58,296 exposures. This resulted in a 1.3 knee injury rate per 1000 exposures. Twenty-one anterior cruciate ligament tears were reported for a 0.36 incidence per 1000 exposures. Other injuries included meniscal tears (25), medical collateral ligament sprains (23), patellar dislocations (5), and posterior cruciate ligament tears (2). Sixty-one percent of the medial collateral ligament sprains occurred in rugby forwards and 67% of anterior cruciate ligament tears occurred in rugby backs. All other injuries occurred with equal frequency in backs and forwards. This study demonstrates that knee injury rates in women's collegiate rugby are similar to those reported for other women's collegiate sports. The overall rate of anterior cruciate ligament injury in women's rugby, however, is slightly higher than that reported for women soccer and basketball players.

  9. Addressing Competitive Stress in Junior Tennis Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Patricia; Berne, Linda A.

    1991-01-01

    The PRECEDE model (an acronym for predisposing, reinforcing, and enabling causes in education diagnosis and evaluation) emphasizes outcomes rather than inputs. The model was used in assessing the health needs of nationally ranked junior tennis players. The objective was to reduce stress illness in high-level competition. (JD)

  10. Low Back Pain in a Tennis Player.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracker, Mark; And Others

    1988-01-01

    A group of physicians meet to discuss a case in which a middle-aged tennis player suffers from low back pain. The diagnosis, treatment and management of the case are discussed. The article is one in an occasional series. (JL)

  11. Advanced Tennis for Coaches, Teachers and Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilmanis, Gundars A.

    This book is designed to help the reader attain a real understanding of the mechanics of tennis. It provides an important link between tennis theory and practice. The book covers activities that develop skills in beginners through advanced tennis and tactics applicable for seasoned players. The author draws upon scientific principles of…

  12. Health benefits for veteran (senior) tennis players

    PubMed Central

    Marks, B L

    2006-01-01

    To explore the health benefits of tennis participation in veteran players and to identify future research needs, an electronic literature search using the Ovid (Cinhal, Medline, Sport Discus) library databases from 1966–2005 was undertaken. Specific search words were employed related to tennis, aging, exercise, health, and the psychophysiological systems. Public access internet search engines were also used (Google, PubMed), along with non‐electronic searches of library holdings. There is ample research documenting the health benefits of regular participation in moderately intense aerobic activity. There have been research studies targeting veteran tennis players but most were cross sectional. No tennis related study successfully eliminated all confounding cross training effects. The health of veteran tennis players is improved by enhanced aerobic capacity, greater bone densities in specific regions, lower body fat, greater strength, and maintained reaction time performance in comparison with age matched but less active controls. However, it is not certain whether tennis alone can be a sole contributor to these physiological variables. Well controlled longitudinal research among elite veteran and novice older adult players is needed. PMID:16632583

  13. Concussion Incidences and Severity in Secondary School Varsity Football Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerberich, Susan Goodwin; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Study of Minnesota high school football players found an injury rate of 78 per 100 players; 19/100 players reported a concussion experience characterized by loss of consciousness/awareness. Of these, 69 percent returned to play the same day. Illegal blocking and tackling contributed to increased concussion. Lasting effects were prevalent. (GC)

  14. Training Patterns of Wheelchair Basketball Players in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatar, Yasar

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze technical drills, warm-up and cool-down exercises used by wheelchair basketball players of the Turkish league in relation to training sessions. 33 male wheelchair basketball players participated in the study (mean age 26.6[plus or minus]5,95 years). All players reported that they used warm-up exercises before…

  15. Exploring Online Game Players' Flow Experiences and Positive Affect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiang, Yu-Tzu; Lin, Sunny S. J.; Cheng, Chao-Yang; Liu, Eric Zhi-Feng

    2011-01-01

    The authors conducted two studies to explore online game players' flow experiences and positive affect. Our findings indicated that online game are capable of evoking flow experiences and positive affect, and games of violent or nonviolent type may not arouse players' aggression. The players could be placed into four flow conditions: flow,…

  16. Assessment of Cardiovascular Risk in Collegiate Football Players and Nonathletes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobrosielski, Devon A.; Rosenbaum, Daryl; Wooster, Benjamin M.; Merrill, Michael; Swanson, John; Moore, J. Brian; Brubaker, Peter H.

    2010-01-01

    Collegiate American football players may be at risk for cardiovascular disease. Objective: To compare cardiovascular disease risk factors and cardiovascular structure and function parameters of football players, stratified by position, to a group of sedentary, nonathletes. Participants: Twenty-six collegiate football players and 13 nonathletes…

  17. Anthropometric Characteristics of Spanish Professional Basketball Players

    PubMed Central

    Alejandro, Vaquera; Santiago, Santos; Gerardo, Villa José; Carlos, Morante Juan; Vicente, García-Tormo

    2015-01-01

    The study of elite basketball players’ anthropometric characteristics alongside those of body composition contributes significantly to their profiling as professional athletes and plays an important role in the selection process, as these characteristics can have a significant impact on performance. In the current study, 110 professional basketball players from a series of Spanish professional Leagues (ACB, LEB and EBA) and youth level National Teams (U20 and U18) had their anthropometric profiles measured and compared to determine differences between them. Furthermore, all 110 players were divided into three different categories according to their playing position: guards, forwards and centres. The results obtained show no significant differences between players in different competitions in weight, height and the sum of skinfolds. Nonetheless, there were several differences related to body fat content (13.03% in ACB players and 10.52% in the lower categories and National Teams). There were also several differences found between the different playing positions amongst all playing levels in body mass (79.56 ± 2.41, 91.04 ± 1.51 and 104.56 ± 1.73 kg), height (182.28 ± 0.96, 195.65 ± 1.00 and 204.08 ± 0.67 cm), skinfold distribution and perimeters. However, there were no significant differences in body fat content between the different playing positions. The conclusions obtained from this study provide a better understanding to basketball specialists regarding the selection process of players at the elite level, especially on the transition from youth elite programs to men’s elite leagues. PMID:26240653

  18. The architecture of the chess player's brain.

    PubMed

    Hänggi, Jürgen; Brütsch, Karin; Siegel, Adrian M; Jäncke, Lutz

    2014-09-01

    The game of chess can be seen as a typical example for an expertise task requiring domain-specific training and experience. Despite intensive behavioural studies the neural underpinnings of chess performance and expertise are not entirely understood. A few functional neuroimaging studies have shown that expert chess players recruit different psychological functions and activate different brain areas while they are engaged in chess-related activities. Based on this functional literature, we predicted to find morphological differences in a network comprised by parietal and frontal areas and especially the occipito-temporal junction (OTJ), fusiform gyrus, and caudate nucleus. Twenty expert chess players and 20 control subjects were investigated using voxel-based and surface-based morphometry as well as diffusion tensor imaging. Grey matter volume and cortical thickness were reduced in chess players compared with those of control men in the OTJ and precunei. The volumes of both caudate nuclei were not different between groups, but correlated inversely with the years of chess playing experience. Mean diffusivity was increased in chess players compared with that of controls in the left superior longitudinal fasciculus and the Elo score (a chess tournament ranking) was inversely related to mean diffusivity within the right superior longitudinal fasciculus. To the best of our knowledge we showed for the first time that there are specific differences in grey and white matter morphology between chess players and control subjects in brain regions associated with cognitive functions important for playing chess. Whether these anatomical alterations are the cause or consequence of the intensive and long-term chess training and practice remains to be shown in future studies.

  19. 2. SECTIONAL BOILER '#4 IDEAL RED FLASH.' Hot Springs ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SECTIONAL BOILER '#4 IDEAL RED FLASH.' - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Ozark Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  20. Quantitative observation of light flash sensations experiment MA-106

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budinger, T. F.; Tobias, C. A.; Schopper, E.; Schott, J. U.; Huesman, R. H.; Upham, F. T.; Wieskamp, T. F.; Kucala, J. M.; Goulding, F. S.; Landis, D. A.

    1976-01-01

    Light flashes caused by the interaction of cosmic particles with the visual apparatus have been observed by astronauts on all space missions since Apollo 11. This Apollo Soyuz Test Project experiment compared measurements of the observer's visual sensitivity with measurements of the ambient radiation environment and with the frequency and character of the flashes observed. The data obtained reveal a latitude dependence of the frequency of observed flashes. This distribution of flashes is correlated with the distribution of cosmic particles with stopping power greater than 15 keV/ micrometers in the eye. The interaction of dark adaptation, specific ionization, and range of particles in the retina as factors in the visualization of particle passage is discussed.

  1. Secrets of a Flash Card-Carrying Teacher.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkes, Mel

    1983-01-01

    Eight ways to use flash cards in mathematics instruction are described. These games and other gimmicks help increase students' concentration, build memory skills, sharpen thinking skills, and enliven drills. (PP)

  2. Impact of rainfall spatial variability on Flash Flood Forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douinot, Audrey; Roux, Hélène; Garambois, Pierre-André; Larnier, Kevin

    2014-05-01

    According to the United States National Hazard Statistics database, flooding and flash flooding have caused the largest number of deaths of any weather-related phenomenon over the last 30 years (Flash Flood Guidance Improvement Team, 2003). Like the storms that cause them, flash floods are very variable and non-linear phenomena in time and space, with the result that understanding and anticipating flash flood genesis is far from straightforward. In the U.S., the Flash Flood Guidance (FFG) estimates the average number of inches of rainfall for given durations required to produce flash flooding in the indicated county. In Europe, flash flood often occurred on small catchments (approximately 100 km2) and it has been shown that the spatial variability of rainfall has a great impact on the catchment response (Le Lay and Saulnier, 2007). Therefore, in this study, based on the Flash flood Guidance method, rainfall spatial variability information is introduced in the threshold estimation. As for FFG, the threshold is the number of millimeters of rainfall required to produce a discharge higher than the discharge corresponding to the first level (yellow) warning of the French flood warning service (SCHAPI: Service Central d'Hydrométéorologie et d'Appui à la Prévision des Inondations). The indexes δ1 and δ2 of Zoccatelli et al. (2010), based on the spatial moments of catchment rainfall, are used to characterize the rainfall spatial distribution. Rainfall spatial variability impacts on warning threshold and on hydrological processes are then studied. The spatially distributed hydrological model MARINE (Roux et al., 2011), dedicated to flash flood prediction is forced with synthetic rainfall patterns of different spatial distributions. This allows the determination of a warning threshold diagram: knowing the spatial distribution of the rainfall forecast and therefore the 2 indexes δ1 and δ2, the threshold value is read on the diagram. A warning threshold diagram is

  3. Heavy rainfall induced flash flood management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiler, Markus; Steinbrich, Andreas; Stölzle, Michael; Leistert, Hannes

    2016-04-01

    Heavy rain induced flash floods are still a serious hazard. In context of climate change even a rise of threat potential of flash flood must be suspected. To improve prediction of endangered areas hydraulic models was developed in the past that implement topography information in heigh resolution, gathered by laser scan applications. To run such models it is crucial to estimate the runoff input spatial distributed. However, this information is usually derived with relatively simple models lacking the process rigour that is required for prediction in engaged basins. Though available rain runoff models are able to model runoff response integral for measured catchments they do not indicate the spatial distribution of processes. Moreover they are commonly calibrated to measured runoff data and not applicable in other environments. Since runoff generation is commonly not measured, a calibration on it is hardly possible. In this study, we present a new approach for quantification of runoff generation in height spatial and temporal resolution. A suited model needs to work without calibration in every given environment under any given conditions. It is possible to develop such a model by combining spatial distributed input data of land surface properties (e.g. soil, geology, land use, …) with worldwide findings of runoff generation research. We developed such a model for the state of Baden-Württemberg, what has an extensive pool of spatial data. E.g. a digital elevation model of 1*1m² resolution, degree of sealing of the earth surface in 1*1m² resolution, soil properties (1:50.000) and geology (1:200.000). Within the state of Baden-Württemberg different regions are situated, with distinct environmental characteristics concerning as well climate, soil properties, land use, topography and geology. The model was tested and validated by modelling 36 observed flood events in 13 mesoscale catchments representing the different regions of Baden-Württemberg as well as by

  4. Ultrafast Coherent Diffractive Imaging at FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, H N

    2006-11-29

    Using the FLASH facility we have demonstrated high-resolution coherent diffractive imaging with single soft-X-ray free-electron laser pulses [1]. The intense focused FEL pulse gives a high resolution low-noise coherent diffraction pattern of an object before that object turns into a plasma and explodes. Our experiments are an important milestone in the development of single-particle diffractive imaging with future X-ray free-electron lasers [2, 3]. Our apparatus provides a new and unique tool at FLASH to perform imaging of biological specimens beyond conventional radiation damage resolution limits [2, 4] and to acquire images of ultrafast processes initiated by an FEL pulse or other laser pulse. Coherent diffractive imaging is an ideal method for high-resolution ultrafast imaging with an FEL. Since no optical element is required, the method can in principle be scaled to atomic resolution with short enough wavelength. Spatial and temporal coherence are necessary to ensure that the scattered light waves from all positions across the sample are correlated when they interfere at the detector, giving rise to a coherent diffraction pattern that can be phased and inverted to give a high-resolution image of the sample. In contrast to crystals, where scattering from the many unit cells constructively interfere to give Bragg spots, the coherent diffraction pattern of a non-periodic object is continuous. Such a coherent diffraction pattern contains as much as twice the information content of the pattern of its crystallized periodic counterpart--exactly the amount of information needed to solve the phase problem and deterministically invert the pattern to yield an image of the object [5, 6]. The computer algorithm that performs this function replaces the analogue computations of a lens: summing the complex-valued amplitudes of scattered waves to form an image at a particular plane. Our experimental geometry is shown in Fig. 1. We focus a coherent X-ray pulse from the FLASH

  5. Enhanced ethylene production via flash methanolysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

    1984-01-01

    In an on-going pyrolysis research project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the methods to increase the yield of ethylene through flash methanolysis of coal is being investigated. Flash methanolysis is defined as pyrolysis of coal under pressure in an atmosphere of methane. This study attempts to identify the influence of important process variables such as reaction temperature, gas pressure, solids residence time, gas/solids ratio etc. on the production characteristics of ethylene and other pyrolysis products.

  6. Enhanced ethylene production via flash methanolysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Fallon, P.; Steinberg, M.

    1984-04-01

    In an on-going pyrolysis research project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the methods to increase the yield of ethylene through flash methanolysis of coal is being investigated. Flash methanolysis is defined as pyrolysis of coal under pressure in an atmosphere of methane. This study attempts to identify the influence of important process variables such as reaction temperature, gas pressure, solids residence time, gas/solids ratio etc. on the production characteristics of ethylene and other pyrolysis products.

  7. Light flashes in cancer patients treated with heavy ions.

    PubMed

    Schardt, Dieter; Kavatsyuk, Oksana; Krämer, Michael; Durante, Marco

    2013-05-01

    Light flashes (phosphenes) are reported by most of the astronauts during spaceflight and patients treated with radiotherapy for brain tumors. They are induced by cosmic ray traversals, but the target area is unknown. With a correlation analysis of the visual sensation and the position of the beam in patients treated with energetic carbon ions for skull base tumors, we demonstrate here that light flashes are elicited only when the energetic particles hit the retina. PMID:22939278

  8. Quick Method for Making Colored-Flame Flash Paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solomon, Sally; Hur, Chinhyu; Lee, Alan; Smith, Kurt

    1995-12-01

    A very fast method for making flash paper similar in size and burning properties to the commercial type is described here. Detailed instructions are given for the preparation, storage, and lighting of flash paper that burns with single colors (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and violet) or with combinations of these colors. This method requires no more than an hour from the mixing of the nitrating acids to the lighting of the paper and eliminates prolonged drying procedures.

  9. Prospective Evaluation of Hot Flashes during Pregnancy and Postpartum

    PubMed Central

    Thurston, Rebecca C.; Luther, James F.; Wisniewski, Stephen R.; Eng, Heather; Wisner, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence, course, and risk factors for hot flashes during pregnancy and postpartum. Study Design Women (N=429) were assessed prospectively during pregnancy (weeks 20, 30, 36) and up to a year after delivery (weeks 2, 12, 26, 52). A clinical interview, physical measurements, and questionnaires were administered at each visit. Results Thirty-five percent of women reported hot flashes during pregnancy and 29% reported hot flashes after delivery. In multivariable binomial mixed effects models, women who were younger (per year: OR(95%CI): 0.94(0.88–0.99)), had a higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI; per unit increase: OR(95%CI): 1.05(1.01–1.10)), and had less than a college education (OR(95%CI): 2.58(1.19–5.60); vs. college) were more likely to report hot flashes during pregnancy. Higher depressive symptoms were associated with hot flashes during pregnancy (per unit increase: OR(95%CI): 1.08(1.04–1.13)) and after birth (OR(95%CI): 1.19(1.14–1.25), multivariable models). Conclusion Hot flashes, typically considered a menopausal symptom, were reported by over a third of women during pregnancy and/or postpartum. Predictors of hot flashes during this reproductive transition, including depressive symptoms, low education, and higher BMI are similar to those experienced during menopause. Future work should investigate the role of hormonal and affective factors in hot flashes during pregnancy and postpartum. PMID:24035604

  10. Exploring Shared Memory Protocols in FLASH

    SciTech Connect

    Horowitz, Mark; Kunz, Robert; Hall, Mary; Lucas, Robert; Chame, Jacqueline

    2007-04-01

    ABSTRACT The goal of this project was to improve the performance of large scientific and engineering applications through collaborative hardware and software mechanisms to manage the memory hierarchy of non-uniform memory access time (NUMA) shared-memory machines, as well as their component individual processors. In spite of the programming advantages of shared-memory platforms, obtaining good performance for large scientific and engineering applications on such machines can be challenging. Because communication between processors is managed implicitly by the hardware, rather than expressed by the programmer, application performance may suffer from unintended communication – communication that the programmer did not consider when developing his/her application. In this project, we developed and evaluated a collection of hardware, compiler, languages and performance monitoring tools to obtain high performance on scientific and engineering applications on NUMA platforms by managing communication through alternative coherence mechanisms. Alternative coherence mechanisms have often been discussed as a means for reducing unintended communication, although architecture implementations of such mechanisms are quite rare. This report describes an actual implementation of a set of coherence protocols that support coherent, non-coherent and write-update accesses for a CC-NUMA shared-memory architecture, the Stanford FLASH machine. Such an approach has the advantages of using alternative coherence only where it is beneficial, and also provides an evolutionary migration path for improving application performance. We present data on two computations, RandomAccess from the HPC Challenge benchmarks and a forward solver derived from LS-DYNA, showing the performance advantages of the alternative coherence mechanisms. For RandomAccess, the non-coherent and write-update versions can outperform the coherent version by factors of 5 and 2.5, respectively. In LS-DYNA, we obtain

  11. Spectral measurements of muzzle flash with multispectral and hyperspectral sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kastek, M.; Dulski, R.; Trzaskawka, P.; Piątkowski, T.; Polakowski, H.

    2011-08-01

    The paper presents some practical aspects of the measurements of muzzle flash signatures. Selected signatures of sniper shot in typical scenarios has been presented. Signatures registered during all phases of muzzle flash were analyzed. High precision laboratory measurements were made in a special ballistic laboratory and as a result several flash patterns were registered. The field measurements of a muzzle flash were also performed. During the tests several infrared cameras were used, including the measurement class devices with high accuracy and frame rates. The registrations were made in NWIR, SWIR and LWIR spectral bands simultaneously. An ultra fast visual camera was also used for visible spectra registration. Some typical infrared shot signatures were presented. Beside the cameras, the LWIR imaging spectroradiometer HyperCam was also used during the laboratory experiments and the field tests. The signatures collected by the HyperCam device were useful for the determination of spectral characteristics of the muzzle flash, whereas the analysis of thermal images registered during the tests provided the data on temperature distribution in the flash area. As a result of the measurement session the signatures of several types handguns, machine guns and sniper rifles were obtained which will be used in the development of passive infrared systems for sniper detection.

  12. Use of gabapentin in patients experiencing hot flashes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Jamie N; Wright, Betsy R

    2009-01-01

    Hot flashes occur frequently in menopausal women and in women with breast cancer, diminishing their quality of life. A report from the Women's Health Initiative published in 2002 raised concerns about the long-term safety of estrogen therapy. As a result, nonhormonal alternatives have emerged as preferred treatments. Gabapentin is an anticonvulsant that the United States Food and Drug Administration approved as an adjunct therapy for partial seizures and postherpetic neuralgia. Somnolence, dizziness, ataxia, fatigue, nystagmus, and peripheral edema are adverse effects commonly associated with gabapentin in the treatment of epilepsy and postherpetic neuralgia. The North American Menopause Society and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommend the use of gabapentin as an option for managing hot flashes in women who are unwilling to take estrogen-containing supplements. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of gabapentin for the treatment of hot flashes in women with menopause and/or breast cancer, we performed a search of the MEDLINE database (1966-March 2008) and International Pharmaceutical Abstracts, as well as manually searching reference articles for relevant articles and abstracts; 10 clinical studies were identified. Although the studies were few, all showed gabapentin to be safe and effective in the treatment of hot flashes. At doses used to control hot flashes, gabapentin was well tolerated, with drowsiness as its most reported adverse effect. Gabapentin can be considered effective in the treatment of hot flashes and should be considered a reasonable alternative when estrogen therapy is not desired. PMID:19113798

  13. Challenges of Computing with FLASH on Largest HPC Platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, A.; Daley, C.; Weide, K.

    2010-09-01

    FLASH is a highly capable multiphysics multiscale modular extensible code, originally designed for simulating reactive flows. FLASH consists of interoperable modules that can be combined to generate different applications such as simulations of novae, supernovae, X-Ray bursts, galaxy clusters, weakly compressible turbulence, and many other problems in astrophysics and other fields. FLASH has a wide user base, both within and outside the Flash Center, and is regularly used on largest available HPC platforms. With each new platform we encounter a new set of challenges, because the multiscale multiphysics nature of FLASH simulations exercise the machine's hardware and system software greatly. The increase in the degree of concurrency with each new hardware generation has imposed changes on some of FLASH's parallel algorithms. The pace of change has accelerated with the move towards petascale, and then to exascale. In this work we present some of our scaling hurdles and their solutions. In addition we discuss a more fundamental transition in the code to incorporate a hybrid shared and distributed memory model in preparation for the future million- to billion-way parallelism.

  14. Flash floods in the Tatra Mountain streams: frequency and triggers.

    PubMed

    Ballesteros-Cánovas, J A; Czajka, B; Janecka, K; Lempa, M; Kaczka, R J; Stoffel, M

    2015-04-01

    Flash floods represent a frequently recurring natural phenomenon in the Tatra Mountains. On the northern slopes of the mountain chain, located in Poland, ongoing and expected future changes in climate are thought to further increase the adverse impacts of flash floods. Despite the repeat occurrence of major floods in the densely populated foothills of the Polish Tatras, the headwaters have been characterized by a surprising lack of data, such that any analysis of process variability or hydrometeorological triggers has been largely hampered so far. In this study, dendrogeomorphic techniques have been employed in four poorly-gauged torrential streams of the northern slope of the Tatra Mountains to reconstruct temporal and spatial patterns of past events. Using more than 1100 increment cores of trees injured by past flash floods, we reconstruct 47 events covering the last 148 years and discuss synoptic situations leading to the triggering of flash floods with the existing meteorological and flow gauge data. Tree-ring analyses have allowed highlighting the seasonality of events, providing new insights about potential hydrometeorological triggers as well as a differentiating flash flood activity between catchments. Results of this study could be useful to design future strategies to deal with flash flood risks at the foothills of the Polish Tatras and in the Vistula River catchment. PMID:25594906

  15. Some Improvements in Utilization of Flash Memory Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gender, Thomas K.; Chow, James; Ott, William E.

    2009-01-01

    Two developments improve the utilization of flash memory devices in the face of the following limitations: (1) a flash write element (page) differs in size from a flash erase element (block), (2) a block must be erased before its is rewritten, (3) lifetime of a flash memory is typically limited to about 1,000,000 erases, (4) as many as 2 percent of the blocks of a given device may fail before the expected end of its life, and (5) to ensure reliability of reading and writing, power must not be interrupted during minimum specified reading and writing times. The first development comprises interrelated software components that regulate reading, writing, and erasure operations to minimize migration of data and unevenness in wear; perform erasures during idle times; quickly make erased blocks available for writing; detect and report failed blocks; maintain the overall state of a flash memory to satisfy real-time performance requirements; and detect and initialize a new flash memory device. The second development is a combination of hardware and software that senses the failure of a main power supply and draws power from a capacitive storage circuit designed to hold enough energy to sustain operation until reading or writing is completed.

  16. Ankle sprain and postural sway in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Leanderson, J; Wykman, A; Eriksson, E

    1993-01-01

    The present study compares postural ankle stability between previously injured basketball players, uninjured players and a control/group. Postural sway was recorded and analysed by stabilometry using a specially designed computer-assisted forceplate. Recordings were obtained for 60 s on each foot. The stabilometric results in the players with no previous injuries did not differ from those in the controls. Players with a previously injured ankle differed significantly from the control group. These players had a larger mean postural sway and used a larger sway area.

  17. Tracking soccer players based on homography among multiple views

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwase, Sachiko; Saito, Hideo

    2003-06-01

    In this paper, we propose a method of tracking soccer players using multiple views. As many researchers have done on soccer scene analysis by using trajectories of the playser and the soccer ball, it is desirable to track soccer players robustly. Soccer player tracking enables strategy analysis, scene recovery, making scenes for broadcasting, and automatic system of the camera control. However, soccer is a sport that occlusion occurs in many cases, and tracking often fails by the occlusion of the players. It is difficult to track the players by using a single camera alone. Therefore, we use multiple view images to avoid the occlusion problem, so that we can obtain robustness in player tracking. As a first step, inner-camera operation is performed independently in each camera to track the players. In any case that player can not be tracked in the camera, inter-camera operation is performed as a second step. Tracking information of all cameras are integrated by using the geometrical relationship between cameras called homography. Inter-camera operation makes it possible to get the location of the player who is not detected in the image, who is occluded by the other player, and who is outside the angle of view. Experimental results show that robust player tracking is available by tracking advantage using multiple cameras.

  18. Locating Preliminary Breakdown Pulses in Lightning Flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunarathne, S.; Marshall, T.; Stolzenburg, M.

    2011-12-01

    Lightning flashes often begin with a series of bipolar pulses, 1-5 us in width, called initial breakdown pulses or characteristic pulses. In 2010 we showed that these pulses can be located (find x, y, z, t) using Time of arrival method (TOA) [Koshak and Solakiewicz, JGR, 1996]. Electric field change data was obtained at the NASA/Kennedy Space Center (KSC) during the summer of 2010 at 5 stations with a band width of 0-0.5MHz and time accuracy of 1us. We concluded that in order to increase the accuracy positions; time accuracy, band width and number of stations should be increased. In summer of 2011, we placed electric field change meters with band width of 0-5Mhz and time accuracy of 0.1us at the KSC. We have doubled the number of stations (10 stations). We use TOA technique with different algorithm to locate positions of beginning pulses with greater accuracy. The locations will be compared to locations of VHF lightning sources made with the KSC LDAR2 system (which has a center frequency of 63 MHz and a bandwidth of 6 MHz). A monte-carlo method will be used to calculate the error of the locations. A statistical comparison between our TOA positions and LDAR2 positions will be presented along with possible physical connections between the preliminary breakdown pulses, the LDAD2 sources, and the developing lightning leader.

  19. Flash microwave synthesis of trevorite nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Bousquet-Berthelin, C. Chaumont, D.; Stuerga, D.

    2008-03-15

    Nickel ferrite nanoparticles have several possible applications as cathode materials for rechargeable batteries, named 'lithium-ion' batteries. In this study, NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} was prepared by microwave induced thermohydrolysis. The obtained nanoparticles were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), BET method, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). All the results show that the microwave one-step flash synthesis leads in a very short time to NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanoparticles with elementary particles size close to 4-5 nm, and high specific surfaces (close to 240 m{sup 2}/g). Thus, microwave heating appears as an efficient source of energy to produce quickly nanoparticles with complex composition as ferrite. - Graphical abstract: At the end of the 20th century, a new concept of battery was introduced, named 'Li ion', where electrodes are both lithium-storage materials. Compounds with a spinel structure are so investigated and microwave heating appears as an efficient source of energy to produce nanoparticles in a very short time and at low temperature, with controlled size (4-5 nm) and high specific area (240 m{sup 2}/g). Legend: Pictogram represents our original microwave reactor, the RAMO (French acronym of Reacteur Autoclave Micro-Onde), containing the reactants and submitted to the microwave irradiation. Multicolor candy represents obtained material.

  20. Theoretical Characterizaiton of Visual Signatures (Muzzle Flash)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashinski, D. O.; Scales, A. N.; Vanderley, D. L.; Chase, G. M.; di Nallo, O. E.; Byrd, E. F. C.

    2014-05-01

    We are investigating the accuracy of theoretical models used to predict the visible, ultraviolet and infrared spectra of product materials ejected from the muzzle of currently fielded systems. Recent advances in solid propellants has made the management of muzzle signature (flash) a principle issue in weapons development across the calibers. A priori prediction of the electromagnetic spectra of formulations will allow researchers to tailor blends that yield desired signatures and determine spectrographic detection ranges. We are currently employing quantum chemistry methods at various levels of sophistication to optimize molecular geometries, compute vibrational frequencies, and determine the optical spectra of specific gas-phase molecules and radicals of interest. Electronic excitations are being computed using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TD-DFT). A comparison of computational results to experimental values found in the literature is used to assess the affect of basis set and functional choice on calculation accuracy. The current status of this work will be presented at the conference. Work supported by the ARL, and USMA.

  1. Flash Nanoprecipitation: Particle Structure and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Pustulka, Kevin M.; Wohl, Adam R.; Lee, Han Seung; Michel, Andrew R.; Han, Jing; Hoye, Thomas R.; McCormick, Alon V.; Panyam, Jayanth; Macosko, Christopher W.

    2013-01-01

    Flash nanoprecipitation (FNP) is a process that, through rapid mixing, stabilizes an insoluble low molecular weight compound in a nano-sized, polymer-stabilized delivery vehicle. The polymeric components are typically amphiphilic diblock copolymers (BCPs). In order to fully exploit the potential of FNP, factors affecting particle structure, size, and stability must be understood. Here we show that polymer type, hydrophobicity and crystallinity of the small molecule, and small molecule loading levels all affect particle size and stability. Of the four block copolymers (BCP) that we have studied here, poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PEG-b-PLGA) was most suitable for potential drug delivery applications due to its ability to give rise to stable nanoparticles, its biocompatibility, and its degradability. We found little difference in particle size when using PLGA block sizes over the range of 5 to 15kDa. The choice of hydrophobic small molecule was important, as molecules with a calculated water-octanol partition coefficient (clogP) below 6 gave rise to particles that were unstable and underwent rapid Ostwald ripening. Studies probing the internal structure of nanoparticles were also performed. Analysis of differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), cryogenic transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM), and 1H-NMR experiments support a three-layer core-shell-corona nanoparticle structure. PMID:24053447

  2. Recognition accuracy by experienced men and women players of basketball.

    PubMed

    Millslagle, Duane G

    2002-08-01

    This study examined 30 experienced basketball players' recognition accuracy by sex, playing position (guard, forward, and center), and situations in the game of basketball. The study used a perceptual cognitive paradigm in which subjects viewed slides of structured and unstructured game situations and accurately recognized the presence or absence of the basketball. A significant difference in recognition accuracy by sex, players' position, and structure of the game situation was found. Male players' recognition accuracy was better than the female players'. The recognition accuracy of subjects who played guard was better than that of subjects who played forward or center. The players' recognition accuracy was more accurate when observing structured plays versus unstructured plays. The conclusion of this study suggested that experienced basketball players differ in their cognitive and visual searching processes by sex and player position within the sport of basketball.

  3. Exploring design features for enhancing players' challenge in strategy games.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shang Hwa; Wen, Ming-Hui; Wu, Muh-Cherng

    2007-06-01

    This paper examines how to make a player feel more challenged in a strategic computer game. It is hypothesized that information availability and resource advantage affect play difficulty, which in turn affects the challenge experienced. The difficulty of play can be defined in terms of the mental workload that players experience and the physical effort that players exert. Forty-five male college and graduate students participated in a 3 x 3 (information availability x resource advantage) between-subjects factorial design experiment. This experiment measured player mental workload, physical effort, and challenge. The results indicate that information availability affects player mental workload, and resource advantage affects levels of player physical effort, respectively. Moreover, the relationship between mental workload and challenge was found to be an inverted U-shaped curve; in other words, too much or too little mental workload may decrease player challenge. The relationship between physical effort and challenge exhibited similar characteristics.

  4. Reduced attentional capture in action video game players.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, Joseph D; Hickey, Clayton; Theeuwes, Jan; Kingstone, Alan

    2010-04-01

    Recent studies indicate that playing action video games improves performance on a number of attention-based tasks. However, it remains unclear whether action video game experience primarily affects endogenous or exogenous forms of spatial orienting. To examine this issue, action video game players and non-action video game players performed an attentional capture task. The results show that action video game players responded quicker than non-action video game players, both when a target appeared in isolation and when a salient, task-irrelevant distractor was present in the display. Action video game players additionally showed a smaller capture effect than did non-action video game players. When coupled with the findings of previous studies, the collective evidence indicates that extensive experience with action video games may enhance players' top-down attentional control, which, in turn, can modulate the negative effects of bottom-up attentional capture.

  5. "Know What to Do If You Encounter a Flash Flood": Mental Models Analysis for Improving Flash Flood Risk Communication and Public Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Lazrus, Heather; Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Lazo, Jeffrey K; Bostrom, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how people view flash flood risks can help improve risk communication, ultimately improving outcomes. This article analyzes data from 26 mental models interviews about flash floods with members of the public in Boulder, Colorado, to understand their perspectives on flash flood risks and mitigation. The analysis includes a comparison between public and professional perspectives by referencing a companion mental models study of Boulder-area professionals. A mental models approach can help to diagnose what people already know about flash flood risks and responses, as well as any critical gaps in their knowledge that might be addressed through improved risk communication. A few public interviewees mentioned most of the key concepts discussed by professionals as important for flash flood warning decision making. However, most interviewees exhibited some incomplete understandings and misconceptions about aspects of flash flood development and exposure, effects, or mitigation that may lead to ineffective warning decisions when a flash flood threatens. These include important misunderstandings about the rapid evolution of flash floods, the speed of water in flash floods, the locations and times that pose the greatest flash flood risk in Boulder, the value of situational awareness and environmental cues, and the most appropriate responses when a flash flood threatens. The findings point to recommendations for ways to improve risk communication, over the long term and when an event threatens, to help people quickly recognize and understand threats, obtain needed information, and make informed decisions in complex, rapidly evolving extreme weather events such as flash floods.

  6. "Know What to Do If You Encounter a Flash Flood": Mental Models Analysis for Improving Flash Flood Risk Communication and Public Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Lazrus, Heather; Morss, Rebecca E; Demuth, Julie L; Lazo, Jeffrey K; Bostrom, Ann

    2016-02-01

    Understanding how people view flash flood risks can help improve risk communication, ultimately improving outcomes. This article analyzes data from 26 mental models interviews about flash floods with members of the public in Boulder, Colorado, to understand their perspectives on flash flood risks and mitigation. The analysis includes a comparison between public and professional perspectives by referencing a companion mental models study of Boulder-area professionals. A mental models approach can help to diagnose what people already know about flash flood risks and responses, as well as any critical gaps in their knowledge that might be addressed through improved risk communication. A few public interviewees mentioned most of the key concepts discussed by professionals as important for flash flood warning decision making. However, most interviewees exhibited some incomplete understandings and misconceptions about aspects of flash flood development and exposure, effects, or mitigation that may lead to ineffective warning decisions when a flash flood threatens. These include important misunderstandings about the rapid evolution of flash floods, the speed of water in flash floods, the locations and times that pose the greatest flash flood risk in Boulder, the value of situational awareness and environmental cues, and the most appropriate responses when a flash flood threatens. The findings point to recommendations for ways to improve risk communication, over the long term and when an event threatens, to help people quickly recognize and understand threats, obtain needed information, and make informed decisions in complex, rapidly evolving extreme weather events such as flash floods. PMID:26369521

  7. Identification af explosive power factors as predictors of player quality in young female volleyball players.

    PubMed

    Grgantov, Zoran; Milić, Mirjana; Katić, Ratko

    2013-05-01

    With the purpose of determining the factor structure of explosive power, as well as the influence of each factor on situational efficiency, 56 young female volleyball players were tested using 14 tests for assessing nonspecific and specific explosive power. By factor analysis, 4 significant factors were isolated which explained the total of over 80% of the common variability in young female volleyball players. The first factor was defined as volleyball-specific jumping, the second factor as nonspecific jumping and sprinting, the third factor as throwing explosive power, while the fourth factor was interpreted as volleyball-specific throwing and spiking speed from the ground. Results obtained by regression analysis in the latent space of explosive power indicate that the identified factors are good predictors of player quality in young female volleyball players. The fourth factor defined as throwing and spiking speed from the ground had the largest influence on player quality, followed by volleyball-specific jumping and nonspecific jumping and sprinting, and to a much lesser extent, by throwing explosive power The results obtained in this age group bring to the fore the ability of spiking and serving a ball of high speed, which hinders the opponents from playing those balls in serve reception and field defence. This ability, combined with a high standing vertical jump reach and spike approach vertical jump reach (which is the basis of the 1st varimax factor) enables successful performance of all volleyball elements by which points are won in complex 1 (spike) and complex 2 (serve and block). Even though the 2nd factor (nonspecific jumping and sprinting) has a slightly smaller impact on situational efficiency in young players, this ability provides preconditions i.e. preparation for successful realisation of all volleyball elements, so greater attention must be paid to perfecting it in young female volleyball players.

  8. Protective Equipment and Player Characteristics Associated With the Incidence of Sport-Related Concussion in High School Football Players

    PubMed Central

    McGuine, Timothy A.; Hetzel, Scott; McCrea, Michael; Brooks, M. Alison

    2015-01-01

    Background The incidence of sport-related concussion (SRC) in high school football is well documented. However, limited prospective data are available regarding how player characteristics and protective equipment affect the incidence of SRC. Purpose To determine whether the type of protective equipment (helmet and mouth guard) and player characteristics affect the incidence of SRC in high school football players. Design Cohort study; Level of evidence, 2. Methods Certified athletic trainers (ATs) at each high school recorded the type of helmet worn (brand, model, purchase year, and recondition status) by each player as well as information regarding players’ demographics, type of mouth guard used, and history of SRC. The ATs also recorded the incidence and days lost from participation for each SRC. Incidence of SRC was compared for various helmets, type of mouth guard, history of SRC, and player demographics. Results A total of 2081 players (grades 9–12) enrolled during the 2012 and/or 2013 football seasons (2287 player-seasons) and participated in 134,437 football (practice or competition) exposures. Of these players, 206 (9%) sustained a total of 211 SRCs (1.56/1000 exposures). There was no difference in the incidence of SRC (number of helmets, % SRC [95% CI]) for players wearing Riddell (1171, 9.1% [7.6%–11.0%]), Schutt (680, 8.7% [6.7%–11.1%]), or Xenith (436, 9.2% [6.7%–12.4%]) helmets. Helmet age and recondition status did not affect the incidence of SRC. The rate of SRC (hazard ratio [HR]) was higher in players who wore a custom mouth guard (HR = 1.69 [95% CI, 1.20–2.37], P <.001) than in players who wore a generic mouth guard. The rate of SRC was also higher (HR = 1.96 [95% CI, 1.40–2.73], P <.001) in players who had sustained an SRC within the previous 12 months (15.1% of the 259 players [95% CI, 11.0%–20.1%]) than in players without a previous SRC (8.2% of the 2028 players [95% CI, 7.1%–9.5%]). Conclusion Incidence of SRC was similar

  9. Rehabilitation of the shoulder in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Plancher, K D; Litchfield, R; Hawkins, R J

    1995-01-01

    The tennis player places unique demands on the shoulder by creating a high risk for overuse and overloading of the soft tissues. Tennis requires concentric work to position and move the arm, eccentric work to stabilize the shoulder, effective depression of the humeral head to avoid impingement in the overhead position, and normal stability to prevent secondary impingement. The tennis serve produces enormous angular velocities about the shoulder joint. A comprehensive rehabilitation program has been described in which the therapist, trainer, player, and physician alike need to have an understanding of the basic biomechanics of this sport. This program can be used to treat the painful shoulder, prevent injury, and enhance performance. PMID:7712546

  10. Design and implementation of a SMIL player

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jue; Shim, Simon; Wang, Ying; Lee, Yen-Jen

    1998-12-01

    Synchronized Multimedia Integration Language (SMIL) is a recommendation developed by the Synchronized Multimedia Working Group in the World Wide Web Consortium. SMIL is a simple and standard way to specify a timeline based synchronized multimedia presentation over the Internet. It is a declarative authoring language based on a Extensible Markup Language to define language-specific data types and tags. A SMIL player schedules presentation in a SMIL file, and retrieves media objects on the Web using URLs described in the field. The SMIL file is a plain text file and can be edited using a simple text editor. We present the approaches of implementing a SMIL player within the desktop system constraints. The reference implementation is a Java applet, which follows a platform-neutral programming paradigm and makes use of Java Media Framework. The applet can run in any main stream web browser.

  11. Evolutionary game theory: molecules as players.

    PubMed

    Bohl, Katrin; Hummert, Sabine; Werner, Sarah; Basanta, David; Deutsch, Andreas; Schuster, Stefan; Theissen, Günter; Schroeter, Anja

    2014-12-01

    In this and an accompanying paper we review the use of game theoretical concepts in cell biology and molecular biology. This review focuses on the subcellular level by considering viruses, genes, and molecules as players. We discuss in which way catalytic RNA can be treated by game theory. Moreover, genes can compete for success in replication and can have different strategies in interactions with other genetic elements. Also transposable elements, or "jumping genes", can act as players because they usually bear different traits or strategies. Viruses compete in the case of co-infecting a host cell. Proteins interact in a game theoretical sense when forming heterodimers. Finally, we describe how the Shapley value can be applied to enzymes in metabolic pathways. We show that game theory can be successfully applied to describe and analyse scenarios at the molecular level resulting in counterintuitive conclusions.

  12. Telemetry and Communication IP Video Player

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    OFarrell, Zachary L.

    2011-01-01

    Aegis Video Player is the name of the video over IP system for the Telemetry and Communications group of the Launch Services Program. Aegis' purpose is to display video streamed over a network connection to be viewed during launches. To accomplish this task, a VLC ActiveX plug-in was used in C# to provide the basic capabilities of video streaming. The program was then customized to be used during launches. The VLC plug-in can be configured programmatically to display a single stream, but for this project multiple streams needed to be accessed. To accomplish this, an easy to use, informative menu system was added to the program to enable users to quickly switch between videos. Other features were added to make the player more useful, such as watching multiple videos and watching a video in full screen.

  13. Reinforcement learning in professional basketball players.

    PubMed

    Neiman, Tal; Loewenstein, Yonatan

    2011-01-01

    Reinforcement learning in complex natural environments is a challenging task because the agent should generalize from the outcomes of actions taken in one state of the world to future actions in different states of the world. The extent to which human experts find the proper level of generalization is unclear. Here we show, using the sequences of field goal attempts made by professional basketball players, that the outcome of even a single field goal attempt has a considerable effect on the rate of subsequent 3 point shot attempts, in line with standard models of reinforcement learning. However, this change in behaviour is associated with negative correlations between the outcomes of successive field goal attempts. These results indicate that despite years of experience and high motivation, professional players overgeneralize from the outcomes of their most recent actions, which leads to decreased performance.

  14. [Suprascapular nerve entrapment in a basketball player].

    PubMed

    Tsur, A; Shahin, R

    1997-09-01

    A basketball player was shown to have a suprascapular nerve lesion without any history of shoulder girdle trauma. This acute neuropathy, never previously described in basketball players, is a result of repeated micro-trauma, due to nerve traction over the coracoid notch during violent movement ("dunking" most probably). Clinically, he was unable to abduct his arm and had some difficulty in external rotation. He developed atrophy in both the supra- and the infraspinatus muscles. Nerve conduction latency to the supraspinatus muscle was 8.0 ms, and to the infraspinatus, 8.5 ms. The compound muscle action potential registered in the supraspinatus was 1.224 mV, and in the infraspinatus, 1.237 mV. After 3 weeks of inactivity, recovery was spontaneous and practically complete.

  15. Flash Galaxy Cluster Merger, Simulated using the Flash Code, Mass Ratio 1:1

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Since structure in the universe forms in a bottom-up fashion, with smaller structures merging to form larger ones, modeling the merging process in detail is crucial to our understanding of cosmology. At the current epoch, we observe clusters of galaxies undergoing mergers. It is seen that the two major components of galaxy clusters, the hot intracluster gas and the dark matter, behave very differently during the course of a merger. Using the N-body and hydrodynamics capabilities in the FLASH code, we have simulated a suite of representative galaxy cluster mergers, including the dynamics of both the dark matter, which is collisionless, and the gas, which has the properties of a fluid. 3-D visualizations such as these demonstrate clearly the different behavior of these two components over time. Credits: Science: John Zuhone (Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Visualization: Jonathan Gallagher (Flash Center, University of Chicago)

 This research used resources of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, which is supported by the Office of Science of the U.S. Dept. of Energy (DOE) under contract DE-AC02-06CH11357. This research was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration's (NNSA) Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) Academic Strategic Alliance Program (ASAP).

  16. A Comprehensive Study on Energy Efficiency and Performance of Flash-based SSD

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Seon-Yeon; Kim, Youngjae; Urgaonkar, Bhuvan; Lee, Joonwon; Seo, Euiseong

    2011-01-01

    Use of flash memory as a storage medium is becoming popular in diverse computing environments. However, because of differences in interface, flash memory requires a hard-disk-emulation layer, called FTL (flash translation layer). Although the FTL enables flash memory storages to replace conventional hard disks, it induces significant computational and space overhead. Despite the low power consumption of flash memory, this overhead leads to significant power consumption in an overall storage system. In this paper, we analyze the characteristics of flash-based storage devices from the viewpoint of power consumption and energy efficiency by using various methodologies. First, we utilize simulation to investigate the interior operation of flash-based storage of flash-based storages. Subsequently, we measure the performance and energy efficiency of commodity flash-based SSDs by using microbenchmarks to identify the block-device level characteristics and macrobenchmarks to reveal their filesystem level characteristics.

  17. Pure Java-based streaming MPEG player

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tolba, Osama; Briceno, Hector; McMillan, Leonard

    1999-01-01

    We present a pure Java-based streaming MPEG-1 video player. By implementing the player entirely in Java, we guarantee its functionality across platforms within any Java-enabled web browsers, without the need for native libraries. This allows greater sue of MPEG video sequences, because the users will no longer need to pre-install any software to display video, beyond Java compatibility. This player features a novel forward-mapping IDCT algorithm that allows it to play locally stored, CIF-sized video sequences at 11 frames per second, when run on a personal computer with Java 'just-in-time' compiler. The IDCT algorithm can run with greater speed when the sequence is viewed at reduced size; e.g., performing approximately 1/4 the amount of computation when the user resizes the sequence to 1/2 its original width and height. We are able to play video streams stored anywhere on the Internet with acceptable performance using a proxy server, eliminating the need for large-capacity auxiliary storage. Thus, the player is well suited to small devices, such as digital TV set-top decoders, requiring little more memory than is required for three video frames. Because of our modular design, it is possible to assemble multiple video streams from remote sources and present them simultaneously to the viewers, subject to network and local performance limitations. The same modular system can further provide viewers with their own customized view of each sessions; e.g., moving and resizing the video display window dynamically, and selecting their preferred set of video controls.

  18. Head Impact Exposure in Collegiate Football Players

    PubMed Central

    Crisco, Joseph J.; Wilcox, Bethany J.; Beckwith, Jonathan G.; Chu, Jeffrey J.; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Rowson, Steve; Duma, Stefan M.; Maerlender, Arthur C.; McAllister, Thomas W.; Greenwald, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    In American football, impacts to the helmet and the resulting head accelerations are the primary cause of concussion injury and potentially chronic brain injury. The purpose of this study was to quantify exposures to impacts to the head (frequency, location and magnitude) for individual collegiate football players and to investigate differences in head impact exposure by player position. A total of 314 players were enrolled at three institutions and 286,636 head impacts were recorded over three seasons. The 95th percentile peak linear and rotational acceleration and HITsp (a composite severity measure) were 62.7g, 4378 rad/s2, and 32.6, respectively. These exposure measures as well as the frequency of impacts varied significantly by player position and by helmet impact location. Running backs (RB) and quarter backs (QB) received the greatest magnitude head impacts, while defensive line (DL), offensive line (OL) and line backers (LB) received the most frequent head impacts (more than twice as many than any other position). Impacts to the top of the helmet had the lowest peak rotational acceleration (2387 rad/s2), but the greatest peak linear acceleration (72.4 g), and were the least frequent of all locations (13.7%) among all positions. OL and QB had the highest (49.2%) and the lowest (23%.7%) frequency, respectively, of front impacts. QB received the greatest magnitude (70.8g and 5428 rad/s2) and the most frequent (44% and 38.9%) impacts to the back of the helmet. This study quantified head impact exposure in collegiate football, providing data that is critical to advancing the understanding of the biomechanics of concussive injuries and sub-concussive head impacts. PMID:21872862

  19. Head impact exposure in collegiate football players.

    PubMed

    Crisco, Joseph J; Wilcox, Bethany J; Beckwith, Jonathan G; Chu, Jeffrey J; Duhaime, Ann-Christine; Rowson, Steven; Duma, Stefan M; Maerlender, Arthur C; McAllister, Thomas W; Greenwald, Richard M

    2011-10-13

    In American football, impacts to the helmet and the resulting head accelerations are the primary cause of concussion injury and potentially chronic brain injury. The purpose of this study was to quantify exposures to impacts to the head (frequency, location and magnitude) for individual collegiate football players and to investigate differences in head impact exposure by player position. A total of 314 players were enrolled at three institutions and 286,636 head impacts were recorded over three seasons. The 95th percentile peak linear and rotational acceleration and HITsp (a composite severity measure) were 62.7g, 4378rad/s(2) and 32.6, respectively. These exposure measures as well as the frequency of impacts varied significantly by player position and by helmet impact location. Running backs (RB) and quarter backs (QB) received the greatest magnitude head impacts, while defensive line (DL), offensive line (OL) and line backers (LB) received the most frequent head impacts (more than twice as many than any other position). Impacts to the top of the helmet had the lowest peak rotational acceleration (2387rad/s(2)), but the greatest peak linear acceleration (72.4g), and were the least frequent of all locations (13.7%) among all positions. OL and QB had the highest (49.2%) and the lowest (23.7%) frequency, respectively, of front impacts. QB received the greatest magnitude (70.8g and 5428rad/s(2)) and the most frequent (44% and 38.9%) impacts to the back of the helmet. This study quantified head impact exposure in collegiate football, providing data that is critical to advancing the understanding of the biomechanics of concussive injuries and sub-concussive head impacts.

  20. Soccer injuries in female youth players.

    PubMed

    Schiff, Melissa A

    2007-04-01

    A cross-sectional survey of injuries among female youth soccer players found 44.6% (95% confidence interval 34.9%-54.8%) had ever been injured. The injury incidence rate for the current season was 2.2/1000 soccer exposure hours (95% CI 1.5-3.1). Future studies should evaluate modifiable risk factors in youth to identify injury prevention strategies.

  1. EVALUATION OF PAINFUL SHOULDER IN BASEBALL PLAYERS

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Alberto Naoki; Fregoneze, Marcelo; Santos, Pedro Doneux; da Silva, Luciana Andrade; do Val Sella, Guilherme; Junior, Adriano Fernando Mendes; Soares, André Lopes; Aihara, Leandro Jun; Checchia, Sérgio Luiz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the relationship between shoulder mobility and strength and the presence of pain among baseball players. Methods: Between April and July 2009, 55 baseball players were assessed by the Shoulder and Elbow Group of the School of Medical Sciences, Santa Casa de Misericórdia, São Paulo. They were all males, aged between 15 and 33 years (mean of 21); they attended an average of three training sessions per week and had been doing this sport for a mean of 10 years. Results: 14 of the 55 players evaluated were pitchers, and 20 reported pain during the pitching motion. The mean values for lateral and medial rotation and range of motion (ROM) in the dominant shoulder were, respectively, 110 °, 61 ° and 171 °, with a statistically significant difference in relation to the non-dominant limb. Pitchers had greater gains in lateral rotation and deficits in medial rotation than did non-pitchers. Pain presented a statistically significant correlation with diminished ROM, greater length of time playing the sport and situations of “shoulder at risk”. Conclusions: Statistically significant differences in dominant shoulder mobility were found, with increased lateral rotation, diminished medial rotation and smaller ROM, in relation to the contralateral limb. There was a statistically significant relationship between the pitcher's position and greater gain in lateral rotation and diminished medial rotation. There were statistically significant correlations between pain and diminished ROM, greater length of time playing the sport and situations of “shoulder at risk”. There was a statistical tendency suggesting that players with diminished medial rotation of the dominant shoulder presented a relationship with pain. PMID:27028320

  2. Saccades and prefrontal hemodynamics in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, K; Kiyota, N; Maekawa, M; Kunita, K; Kiyota, T; Maeda, K

    2009-09-01

    We investigated saccade performance and prefrontal hemodynamics in basketball players with different skill levels. Subjects were 27 undergraduate basketball players and 13 non-athlete undergraduates (control group: CON). The players were divided into two groups: those who had played in the National Athletic Meet during high school or played regularly (n=13, elite group: ELI) and those who were bench warmers (n=14, skilled group: SKI). Horizontal eye movement and oxy-, deoxy-, and total-hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in the prefrontal cortex during pro- and anti-saccade were measured using electro-oculography and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Only error rate in anti-saccade was less in ELI (4.8+/-4.0%) than SKI (13.7+/-12.6%) and CON (13.9+/-8.3%) (p<0.05). In ELI alone, oxy- (-0.15+/-0.18 mmol*mm) and total-Hb (-0.12+/-0.15 mmol*mm) during anti-saccade decreased significantly compared with that during rest (p<0.05), while those in CON significantly increased (oxy-Hb: 0.17+/-0.15 mmol*mm, total-Hb: 0.14+/-0.14 mmol*mm) (p<0.05). These results suggest that inhibition of eye movement to a visual target changes from voluntary to automatic through the motor learning of basketball. PMID:19569008

  3. Effects of plyometric training on soccer players

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Plyometric training (PT) is a technique used to increase strength and explosiveness. It consists of physical exercises in which muscles exert maximum force at short intervals to increase dynamic performances. In such a training, muscles undergo a rapid elongation followed by an immediate shortening (stretch-shortening contraction), utilizing the elastic energy stored during the stretching phase. There is consensus on the fact that when used, PT contributes to improvement in vertical jump performance, acceleration, leg strength, muscular power, increase of joint awareness and overall sport-specific skills. Consequently, PT which was primarily used by martial artists, sprinters and high jumpers to improve performances has gained in popularity and has been used by athletes in all types of sports. However, although PT has been shown to increase performance variables in many sports, little scientific information is currently available to determine whether PT actually enhances skill performance in soccer players, considering that soccer is an extremely demanding sport. Soccer players require dynamic muscular performance for fighting at all levels of training status, including rapid movements such as acceleration and deceleration of the body, change of direction, vertical and horizontal jumps, endurance, speed as well as power for kicking and tackling. In this review we discussed the effects of PT on soccer players by considering gender and age categories. PMID:27446242

  4. Saccades and prefrontal hemodynamics in basketball players.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, K; Kiyota, N; Maekawa, M; Kunita, K; Kiyota, T; Maeda, K

    2009-09-01

    We investigated saccade performance and prefrontal hemodynamics in basketball players with different skill levels. Subjects were 27 undergraduate basketball players and 13 non-athlete undergraduates (control group: CON). The players were divided into two groups: those who had played in the National Athletic Meet during high school or played regularly (n=13, elite group: ELI) and those who were bench warmers (n=14, skilled group: SKI). Horizontal eye movement and oxy-, deoxy-, and total-hemoglobin (Hb) concentration in the prefrontal cortex during pro- and anti-saccade were measured using electro-oculography and near-infrared spectroscopy, respectively. Only error rate in anti-saccade was less in ELI (4.8+/-4.0%) than SKI (13.7+/-12.6%) and CON (13.9+/-8.3%) (p<0.05). In ELI alone, oxy- (-0.15+/-0.18 mmol*mm) and total-Hb (-0.12+/-0.15 mmol*mm) during anti-saccade decreased significantly compared with that during rest (p<0.05), while those in CON significantly increased (oxy-Hb: 0.17+/-0.15 mmol*mm, total-Hb: 0.14+/-0.14 mmol*mm) (p<0.05). These results suggest that inhibition of eye movement to a visual target changes from voluntary to automatic through the motor learning of basketball.

  5. Impact of biomotor dimensions on player quality in young female volleybal players.

    PubMed

    Milić, Mirjana; Grgantov, Zoran; Katić, Ratko

    2013-03-01

    A set of 18 test for assessing anthropometric characteristics and 12 tests for assessing motor abilities was used on a sample of 183 young female volleyball players (average age of 13.11 +/- 1.07 years). The main goal of this research was to determine the latent structure of biomotor status, as well as relations of that status to situational efficiency in female volleyball players. Situational efficiency of young volleyball players was assessed on a five-point Likert scale, in relation to each individual player's contribution to the performance of her team, and with regard to the result of that team achieved in the competition. By factor analysis, 3 anthropometric ("endo-mesomorphy", "longitudinal dimensionality of the skeleton" and "transverse dimensionality of the skeleton") and 4 motor factors ("explosive power of legs and agility", "precision", "explosive power of arms and flexibility" and "balance") were obtained. Significant impact of morphological-motor factors on situational efficiency of young female volleyball players was obtained by regression analysis. Set of predictor variables accounts for 40% of the total variance of the system. On a univariate level, all extracted factors, except precision and balance, had a significant impact on situational efficiency. Factors named "longitudinal dimensionality of the skeleton" and "explosive power of legs and agility" had the greatest partial contribution in explaining the criteria. Obtained results confirmed previous findings about the importance of individual dimensions of biomotor status for efficiency in volleyball. PMID:23697256

  6. Reproductive History and Hot Flashes in Perimenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Nakano, Karen; Pinnow, Ellen; Flaws, Jodi A.; Sorkin, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Hot flashes affect up to 75% of women undergoing the menopausal transition. They are among the most common health problems for perimenopausal women and are associated with a decrease in quality of life. The goal of this study was to examine the associations between reproductive history variables and midlife hot flashes. Methods Data were analyzed from 388 perimenopausal women who participated in the Midlife Health Study, a population-based, cross-sectional study of 639 women aged 45–54 years living in the Baltimore metropolitan region. Results The unadjusted analyses showed that none of the reproductive history variables analyzed, including age at menarche, number of live births, ever having been pregnant, age at first birth, age at last pregnancy, and history of oral contraceptive use, were associated with ever experiencing hot flashes. However, after adjusting for race, age group, marital status, education, employment, total family income, smoking and alcohol status, and body mass index (BMI), age at last pregnancy was significantly associated with moderate to severe hot flashes. Specifically, participants who were ≥36 years of age at last pregnancy were less likely to report moderate or severe hot flashes than those ≤35 years of age at last pregnancy (odds ratio 0.36, 95% confidence interval 0.16, 0.84). Conclusions In this study, in general, characteristics of reproductive history were not associated with midlife hot flashes. However, there are a number of potentially modifiable factors that are associated with the occurrence of hot flashes. Thus, alternatives may be available when hormone treatment is contraindicated. PMID:22283476

  7. CTE characterization with post-flashed darks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Jay

    2013-10-01

    This internal-orbit calibration program will take a combination of short {100s} and long {800s} darks with various levels of post-flash in order to re-calibrate the WFC3/UVIS CTE model. When a similar set of these images was taken in mid-2012, there were not as many warm pixels as there are now and CTE losses were lower. Furthermore, this program will explore a finer spacing of charge injection to help us understand exactly what happens above the "sweet-spot" background of 12 electrons. Once the model is recalibrated using this data set {which should be taken in early 2014}, we can feel confident in making the pixel-based correction part of the pipeline.The observations will be straightforward. We will take short 100s darks with PF levels of: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, 50, 55, 60, 65, 70, 75, 80, 85, 90, 100, 115, and 130, and 150 electrons -- 30 levels in all. We will also take 800s darks {can't fit longer} with a PF level of about 100e. We should be able to take two shorts and one deep in each orbit, this will take a total of 15 orbits. This will give us 15 long darks, which can be averaged together to get the noise down.It would be best if this program could be scheduled to be executed over the course of only a few days, since I would prefer not to have much change in the dark during acquisition of the data set.

  8. Lunar Impact Flash Locations from NASA's Lunar Impact Monitoring Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, D. E.; Suggs, R. M.; Kupferschmidt, L.; Feldman, J.

    2015-01-01

    Meteoroids are small, natural bodies traveling through space, fragments from comets, asteroids, and impact debris from planets. Unlike the Earth, which has an atmosphere that slows, ablates, and disintegrates most meteoroids before they reach the ground, the Moon has little-to-no atmosphere to prevent meteoroids from impacting the lunar surface. Upon impact, the meteoroid's kinetic energy is partitioned into crater excavation, seismic wave production, and the generation of a debris plume. A flash of light associated with the plume is detectable by instruments on Earth. Following the initial observation of a probable Taurid impact flash on the Moon in November 2005,1 the NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO) began a routine monitoring program to observe the Moon for meteoroid impact flashes in early 2006, resulting in the observation of over 330 impacts to date. The main objective of the MEO is to characterize the meteoroid environment for application to spacecraft engineering and operations. The Lunar Impact Monitoring Program provides information about the meteoroid flux in near-Earth space in a size range-tens of grams to a few kilograms-difficult to measure with statistical significance by other means. A bright impact flash detected by the program in March 2013 brought into focus the importance of determining the impact flash location. Prior to this time, the location was estimated to the nearest half-degree by visually comparing the impact imagery to maps of the Moon. Better accuracy was not needed because meteoroid flux calculations did not require high-accuracy impact locations. But such a bright event was thought to have produced a fresh crater detectable from lunar orbit by the NASA spacecraft Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO). The idea of linking the observation of an impact flash with its crater was an appealing one, as it would validate NASA photometric calculations and crater scaling laws developed from hypervelocity gun testing. This idea was

  9. Expression of the nos gene and Firefly Flashing: A Test of the Nitric-Oxide-Mediated Flash Control Model

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Hajime; Yokoyama, Jun; Ohba, Nobuyoshi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Kawata, Masakado

    2014-01-01

    Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) emit various types of light that differ among species and populations of the same species. Their lights are assumed to be biological properties that play important ecological and evolutionary roles. Some species in the Lampyridae emit periodic luminescence, the patterns of which are characterized by species-specific intervals. In previous work, it was predicted that the nitric oxide (NO) regulates the oxygen supply required for the bioluminescence reaction of fireflies. Here, the expression of the NO synthase (NOS) mRNA in some fireflies was examined to verify the predictive model of nitric-oxide-mediated flash control in these insects. The expression of the nos gene in the lantern organ was observed not only in nocturnal flashing species but also in diurnal non-flashing species. It was shown that the expression levels of nos were higher in the lantern of Luciola cruciata (Motschulsky) larvae, which that emits continuous light, than in other body parts, although expression in the lantern of the adults, who flash periodically, was not high. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression levels among adults of Luciola cruciata characterized by different flashing intervals. The data do not support the model of an NO-mediated flash control mechanism, during which oxygen becomes available for the luciferin-luciferase reaction through NO-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. It is also indicated that flash patterns do not co-vary with NOS production. However, high nos expression in the larval lantern suggests that NO may play a role in producing continuous light by functioning as a neurotransmitter signal for bioluminescence. PMID:25373203

  10. Expression of the nos gene and firefly flashing: a test of the nitric-oxide-mediated flash control model.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Hajime; Yokoyama, Jun; Ohba, Nobuyoshi; Ohmiya, Yoshihiro; Kawata, Masakado

    2014-04-19

    Fireflies (Coleoptera: Lampyridae) emit various types of light that differ among species and populations of the same species. Their lights are assumed to be biological properties that play important ecological and evolutionary roles. Some species in the Lampyridae emit periodic luminescence, the patterns of which are characterized by species-specific intervals. In previous work, it was predicted that the nitric oxide (NO) regulates the oxygen supply required for the bioluminescence reaction of fireflies. Here, the expression of the NO synthase (NOS) mRNA in some fireflies was examined to verify the predictive model of nitric-oxide-mediated flash control in these insects. The expression of the nos gene in the lantern organ was observed not only in nocturnal flashing species but also in diurnal non-flashing species. It was shown that the expression levels of nos were higher in the lantern of Luciola cruciata (Motschulsky) larvae, which that emits continuous light, than in other body parts, although expression in the lantern of the adults, who flash periodically, was not high. Furthermore, there was no significant difference in expression levels among adults of Luciola cruciata characterized by different flashing intervals. The data do not support the model of an NO-mediated flash control mechanism, during which oxygen becomes available for the luciferin-luciferase reaction through NO-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration. It is also indicated that flash patterns do not co-vary with NOS production. However, high nos expression in the larval lantern suggests that NO may play a role in producing continuous light by functioning as a neurotransmitter signal for bioluminescence.

  11. Flash pyrolysis of oil shale with various gases

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.T.

    1983-10-01

    The flash pyrolysis of Colorado Oil Shale with methane at a temperature of 800/sup 0/C and pressure of 500 psi appears to give the highest yield of hydrocarbon gas and liquid followed by hydrogen and lowest with helium. In the methane pyrolysis over 54.5% of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to ethylene and benzene. The flash pyrolysis with hydrogen (flash hydropyrolysis) of the oil shale at increasing temperatures showed a rapidly increasing amount of methane formed and a decrease in ethane formation, while the BTX (benzene mainly) yield remained at approximately 10%. At 950/sup 0/C and 500 psi almost all (97.0%) of the carbon in the kerogen is converted to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons. Experiments with a mixture of a New Mexico sub-bituminous coal and oil shale under flash hydropyrolysis and methane pyrolysis conditions indicated higher yields of methane and ethylene and slightly lower yields of benzene than predicted by partial additive calculations. These exploratory experiments appear to be of sufficient interest to warrant a fuller investigation of the interaction of the natural resources, oil shale, coal and natural gas under flash pyrolysis conditions.

  12. An Evaluation of Flash Cells Used in Critical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard B.; Flowers, David; Bergevin, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Due to the common use of Flash technology in many commercial and industrial Programmable Logic Devices (PLDs) such as FPGAs and mixed-signal microcontrollers, flash technology is being utilized in fuzed munition applications. This presents a long-term reliability issue for both DoD and NASA safety- and mission-critical applications. A thorough understanding of the data retention failure modes and statistics associated with Flash data retention is of vital concern to the fuze safety community. A key retention parameter for a flash cell is the threshold voltage (VTH), which is an indirect indicator of the amount of charge stored on the cells floating gate. Initial test results based on a study of charge loss in flash cells in an FPGA device is presented. Statistical data taken from a small sample set indicates quantifiable charge loss for devices stored at both room temperature and 150 C. Initial evaluation of the distribution of threshold voltage in a large sample set (800 devices) is presented. The magnitude of charge loss from exposure to electrostatic discharge and electromagnetic fields is measured and presented. Simulated data (and measured data as available) resultant from harsh-environment testing (neutron, heavy ion, EMP) is presented.

  13. Study of Beijiang catchment flash-flood forecasting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Li, J.; Huang, S.; Dong, Y.

    2015-05-01

    Beijiang catchment is a small catchment in southern China locating in the centre of the storm areas of the Pearl River Basin. Flash flooding in Beijiang catchment is a frequently observed disaster that caused direct damages to human beings and their properties. Flood forecasting is the most effective method for mitigating flash floods, the goal of this paper is to develop the flash flood forecasting model for Beijiang catchment. The catchment property data, including DEM, land cover types and soil types, which will be used for model construction and parameter determination, are downloaded from the website freely. Based on the Liuxihe Model, a physically based distributed hydrological model, a model for flash flood forecasting of Beijiang catchment is set up. The model derives the model parameters from the terrain properties, and further optimized with the observed flooding process, which improves the model performance. The model is validated with a few observed floods occurred in recent years, and the results show that the model is reliable and is promising for flash flood forecasting.

  14. A Unified Flash Flood Database across the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gourley, Jonathan J.; Hong, Yang; Flamig, Zachary L.; Arthur, Ami; Clark, Robert; Calianno, Martin; Ruin, Isabelle; Ortel, Terry W.; Wieczorek, Michael E.; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel; Clark, Edward; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2013-01-01

    Despite flash flooding being one of the most deadly and costly weather-related natural hazards worldwide, individual datasets to characterize them in the United States are hampered by limited documentation and can be difficult to access. This study is the first of its kind to assemble, reprocess, describe, and disseminate a georeferenced U.S. database providing a long-term, detailed characterization of flash flooding in terms of spatiotemporal behavior and specificity of impacts. The database is composed of three primary sources: 1) the entire archive of automated discharge observations from the U.S. Geological Survey that has been reprocessed to describe individual flooding events, 2) flash-flooding reports collected by the National Weather Service from 2006 to the present, and 3) witness reports obtained directly from the public in the Severe Hazards Analysis and Verification Experiment during the summers 2008–10. Each observational data source has limitations; a major asset of the unified flash flood database is its collation of relevant information from a variety of sources that is now readily available to the community in common formats. It is anticipated that this database will be used for many diverse purposes, such as evaluating tools to predict flash flooding, characterizing seasonal and regional trends, and improving understanding of dominant flood-producing processes. We envision the initiation of this community database effort will attract and encompass future datasets.

  15. Multi-Level Bitmap Indexes for Flash Memory Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kesheng; Madduri, Kamesh; Canon, Shane

    2010-07-23

    Due to their low access latency, high read speed, and power-efficient operation, flash memory storage devices are rapidly emerging as an attractive alternative to traditional magnetic storage devices. However, tests show that the most efficient indexing methods are not able to take advantage of the flash memory storage devices. In this paper, we present a set of multi-level bitmap indexes that can effectively take advantage of flash storage devices. These indexing methods use coarsely binned indexes to answer queries approximately, and then use finely binned indexes to refine the answers. Our new methods read significantly lower volumes of data at the expense of an increased disk access count, thus taking full advantage of the improved read speed and low access latency of flash devices. To demonstrate the advantage of these new indexes, we measure their performance on a number of storage systems using a standard data warehousing benchmark called the Set Query Benchmark. We observe that multi-level strategies on flash drives are up to 3 times faster than traditional indexing strategies on magnetic disk drives.

  16. Dendrogeomorphic reconstruction of flash floods in the Patagonian Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casteller, Alejandro; Stoffel, Markus; Crespo, Sebastián; Villalba, Ricardo; Corona, Christophe; Bianchi, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Flash floods represent a significant natural hazard in small mountainous catchments of the Patagonian Andes and have repeatedly caused loss to life and infrastructure. At the same time, however, documentary records of past events remain fairly scarce and highly fragmentary in most cases. In this study, we therefore reconstruct the spatiotemporal patterns of past flash flood activity along the Los Cipreses torrent (Neuquén, Argentina) using dendrogeomorphic methods. Based on samples from Austrocedrus chilensis, Pseudotsuga menziesii, and Nothofagus dombeyi, we document 21 flash flood events covering the period A.D. 1890-2009 and reconstruct mean recurrence intervals of events at the level of individual trees being impacted, which varies from 4 to 93 years. Results show that trees tend to be older (younger) in sectors of the torrent with gentler (steeper) slope gradients. Potential triggers of flash floods were analyzed using daily temperature and precipitation data from a nearby weather station. Weather conditions leading to flash floods are abundant precipitations during one to three consecutive days, combined with temperatures above the rain/snow threshold (2 °C) in the whole watershed.

  17. Kinematics of illumination patterns and light echoes from flashes.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qi

    2016-09-01

    Flash-induced light echoes-the observation of light reflected from a burst-have been observed in astronomical settings for more than a century and have been observed in the laboratory recently. Because of the flight time of light, perceived light echoes are different from real light illumination patterns on a scattering plane, neglecting interreflections and non-opaque scattering effects. The shape and motion of real illumination patterns are studied from a spherical flash. Then, ellipsoids of constant time delay for a specifically chosen coordinate system are applied. Generally, perceived light echoes are elliptical annular rings and the center of a light echo will not start at the flash, which leads to light echoes moving angularly toward the flash instead of away from it, a phenomenon actually recorded by other groups. The brightness of perceived light echoes was studied, and maximum brightness occurred close to the flash's projective point on the scattering plane. Two specific examples are given and a magnification effect between perceived echoes and real illumination patterns is proposed. PMID:27607505

  18. Risk Factors, Pathophysiology, and Treatment of Hot Flashes in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, William I.; Johnson, Aimee K.; Elkins, Gary R.; Otte, Julie L.; Burns, Debra S.; Yu, Menggang; Carpenter, Janet S.

    2012-01-01

    Hot flashes are prevalent and severe symptoms that can interfere with mood, sleep, and quality of life for women and men with cancer. The purpose of this article is to review existing literature on the risk factors, pathophysiology, and treatment of hot flashes in persons with cancer. Electronic searches were conducted to identify relevant, English-language literature published through June 15, 2012. Results indicated that risk factors for hot flashes in cancer include patient-related factors (eg, age, race/ethnicity, educational level, smoking history, cardiovascular risk including BMI, and genetics) and disease-related factors (eg, cancer diagnosis, and dose/type of treatment). In addition, although the pathophysiology of hot flashes has remained elusive, these symptoms are likely attributable to disruptions in thermoregulation and neurochemicals. Therapies that have been offered or tested fall into 4 broad categories: pharmacological, nutraceutical, surgical, and complementary/behavioral strategies. The evidence base for this broad range of therapies varies, with some treatments not yet having been fully tested or showing equivocal results. The evidence base surrounding all therapies is evaluated to enhance hot flash treatment decision making by clinicians and patients. PMID:23355109

  19. Flash on disk for low-power multimedia computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, Leo; Nathuji, Ripal; Schwan, Karsten

    2007-01-01

    Mobile multimedia computers require large amounts of data storage, yet must consume low power in order to prolong battery life. Solid-state storage offers low power consumption, but its capacity is an order of magnitude smaller than the hard disks needed for high-resolution photos and digital video. In order to create a device with the space of a hard drive, yet the low power consumption of solid-state storage, hardware manufacturers have proposed using flash memory as a write buffer on mobile systems. This paper evaluates the power savings of such an approach and also considers other possible flash allocation algorithms, using both hardware- and software-level flash management. Its contributions also include a set of typical multimedia-rich workloads for mobile systems and power models based upon current disk and flash technology. Based on these workloads, we demonstrate an average power savings of 267 mW (53% of disk power) using hardware-only approaches. Next, we propose another algorithm, termed Energy-efficient Virtual Storage using Application-Level Framing (EVS-ALF), which uses both hardware and software for power management. By collecting information from the applications and using this metadata to perform intelligent flash allocation and prefetching, EVS-ALF achieves an average power savings of 307 mW (61%), another 8% improvement over hardware-only techniques.

  20. Vascular Health in American Football Players: Cardiovascular Risk Increased in Division III Players

    PubMed Central

    Feairheller, Deborah L.; Aichele, Kristin R.; Oakman, Joyann E.; Neal, Michael P.; Cromwell, Christina M.; Lenzo, Jessica M.; Perez, Avery N.; Bye, Naomi L.; Santaniello, Erica L.; Hill, Jessica A.; Evans, Rachel C.; Thiele, Karla A.; Chavis, Lauren N.; Getty, Allyson K.; Wisdo, Tia R.; McClelland, JoAnna M.; Sturgeon, Kathleen; Chlad, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Studies report that football players have high blood pressure (BP) and increased cardiovascular risk. There are over 70,000 NCAA football players and 450 Division III schools sponsor football programs, yet limited research exists on vascular health of athletes. This study aimed to compare vascular and cardiovascular health measures between football players and nonathlete controls. Twenty-three athletes and 19 nonathletes participated. Vascular health measures included flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). Cardiovascular measures included clinic and 24 hr BP levels, body composition, VO2 max, and fasting glucose/cholesterol levels. Compared to controls, football players had a worse vascular and cardiovascular profile. Football players had thicker carotid artery IMT (0.49 ± 0.06 mm versus 0.46 ± 0.07 mm) and larger brachial artery diameter during FMD (4.3 ± 0.5 mm versus 3.7 ± 0.6 mm), but no difference in percent FMD. Systolic BP was significantly higher in football players at all measurements: resting (128.2 ± 6.4 mmHg versus 122.4 ± 6.8 mmHg), submaximal exercise (150.4 ± 18.8 mmHg versus 137.3 ± 9.5 mmHg), maximal exercise (211.3 ± 25.9 mmHg versus 191.4 ± 19.2 mmHg), and 24-hour BP (124.9 ± 6.3 mmHg versus 109.8 ± 3.7 mmHg). Football players also had higher fasting glucose (91.6 ± 6.5 mg/dL versus 86.6 ± 5.8 mg/dL), lower HDL (36.5 ± 11.2 mg/dL versus 47.1 ± 14.8 mg/dL), and higher body fat percentage (29.2 ± 7.9% versus 23.2 ± 7.0%). Division III collegiate football players remain an understudied population and may be at increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:26904291

  1. Vascular Health in American Football Players: Cardiovascular Risk Increased in Division III Players.

    PubMed

    Feairheller, Deborah L; Aichele, Kristin R; Oakman, Joyann E; Neal, Michael P; Cromwell, Christina M; Lenzo, Jessica M; Perez, Avery N; Bye, Naomi L; Santaniello, Erica L; Hill, Jessica A; Evans, Rachel C; Thiele, Karla A; Chavis, Lauren N; Getty, Allyson K; Wisdo, Tia R; McClelland, JoAnna M; Sturgeon, Kathleen; Chlad, Pam

    2016-01-01

    Studies report that football players have high blood pressure (BP) and increased cardiovascular risk. There are over 70,000 NCAA football players and 450 Division III schools sponsor football programs, yet limited research exists on vascular health of athletes. This study aimed to compare vascular and cardiovascular health measures between football players and nonathlete controls. Twenty-three athletes and 19 nonathletes participated. Vascular health measures included flow-mediated dilation (FMD) and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). Cardiovascular measures included clinic and 24 hr BP levels, body composition, VO2 max, and fasting glucose/cholesterol levels. Compared to controls, football players had a worse vascular and cardiovascular profile. Football players had thicker carotid artery IMT (0.49 ± 0.06 mm versus 0.46 ± 0.07 mm) and larger brachial artery diameter during FMD (4.3 ± 0.5 mm versus 3.7 ± 0.6 mm), but no difference in percent FMD. Systolic BP was significantly higher in football players at all measurements: resting (128.2 ± 6.4 mmHg versus 122.4 ± 6.8 mmHg), submaximal exercise (150.4 ± 18.8 mmHg versus 137.3 ± 9.5 mmHg), maximal exercise (211.3 ± 25.9 mmHg versus 191.4 ± 19.2 mmHg), and 24-hour BP (124.9 ± 6.3 mmHg versus 109.8 ± 3.7 mmHg). Football players also had higher fasting glucose (91.6 ± 6.5 mg/dL versus 86.6 ± 5.8 mg/dL), lower HDL (36.5 ± 11.2 mg/dL versus 47.1 ± 14.8 mg/dL), and higher body fat percentage (29.2 ± 7.9% versus 23.2 ± 7.0%). Division III collegiate football players remain an understudied population and may be at increased cardiovascular risk. PMID:26904291

  2. Variability of flashes and background luminances of clinical electroretinography stimuli across 14 UK centres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, R.; Abdlseaed, A. Al; Healey, J.; Neveu, M. M.; Brown, L.; Keating, D.; McBain, V. A.; Sculfor, D.; Thompson, D. A.

    2013-08-01

    Three different flash strengths (dim, 0.01 cd s m-2; strong, 3 cd s m-2; strongest, 10 or 30 cd s m-2) and one adapting field luminance (30 cd m-2) are used for clinical electroretinograms (ERGs). To quantify their variability for local, LED-flash protocols, and for an ISCEV-specified, xenon-flash protocol, photometric measurements were made at 14 ERG centres across the UK. For local protocols, flashes were within a median of 0.01 log units of nominal, target levels and six, nine, eight and eight of 14 centres were within ISCEV tolerance (±0.05 log units) for dim, strong, strongest flashes and backgrounds, respectively. For the ISCEV-specified protocol, flashes were within a median of 0.02, 0.001 and 0.01 log units of ISCEV target dim, strong and strongest flashes, and fewer (5/12, 7/13, 3/13 and 11/13) centres were within ISCEV tolerance for dim, strong and strongest flashes and backgrounds, respectively. Paired LED-xenon comparison for a subset of centres showed close agreement. Variability of flashes was less for LED than xenon flashtube sources for strong and strongest flashes; for the strongest flash, LED flashes were closer to target values than xenon flashes. These data support a recommendation of LED use for clinical electroretinography.

  3. Does education matter? Major League Baseball players and longevity.

    PubMed

    Kalist, David E; Peng, Yingwei

    2007-08-01

    The authors used duration analysis to examine the longevity of Major League Baseball players. Using data on players who were born between 1945 and 1964, the authors found that the hazard rate of death for players who only attended high school was almost 2.0 times higher than those players who attended a 4-year university, evidence that the educaton [sic]-health link applies to professional athletes. Another important determinant of longevity was race. In addition, a player's body mass index was positively associated with a higher hazard of death. Compared with the general population, the death rate of baseball players was lower--the observed number of deaths in the dataset was only 31% of the expected number. Findings in this article are likely attributable to education being correlated with other variables that affect longevity, most likely intelligence and time preference.

  4. Analyzing Movements of Tennis Players by Dynamic Image Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazaki, Shunpei; Yamamoto, Osami

    Recently, we can easily obtain a fast computer and a digital video camera as their prices go down. In this paper, we describe a method and a system for analyzing performance of tennis players of a given singles tennis game. We assume that a movie of the game has been shot by a digital video camera which is fixed at a place such that the camera could film whole area of the tennis court and the two players, and that we have the sequence of the images in the computer. Using the positions of the players and the ball detected by techniques of image processing and partially by human assistance, we analyzed the game by defining an evaluation function. We made a prototype of a tennis-player-evaluation system by implementing the method. The system appropriately evaluated performances of players of some sample tennis games, although the evaluation function cannot analyze the player's tactics enough.

  5. A study of thunderstorm microphysical properties and lightning flash counts associated with terrestrial gamma-ray flashes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, D. E.; Splitt, M. E.; Dwyer, J. R.; Lazarus, S.; Smith, D. M.; Rassoul, H. K.

    2015-04-01

    The terrestrial gamma ray flash (TGF) is an emission of highly energetic radiation produced by or at least in close association with lightning. Previous investigations attempted to isolate the production mechanisms and production altitude(s) of TGFs as well as macrophysical characteristics, while thunderstorm microphysical characteristics were largely ignored. This investigation into thunderstorms and their hydrometeor and flash characteristics utilize temporal and spatial coincident satellite passes between the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission to determine the bulk (or footprint) microphysical properties of two types of study events, the thunderstorm complexes which are associated with TGFs (TGF case) and the thunderstorm complexes which did not produce a TGF detected by Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager during the pass (non-TGF case). Results are presented for two different comparison methods. The first case utilizes geographic region weighted by TGF distribution, and the second is based on TGF percentage of occurrence when compared to total flash count of data set. Results show that the associated storms around the TGF location possess differences in the hydrometeor concentrations: cloud liquid water, cloud ice, precipitation water, and precipitation ice. These results take place at different levels of the atmosphere, including the mixed phase region. Additionally, results will show that TGFs are a consistent percentage of observed flashes as the rate of TGFs as a function of Lightning Imaging Sensor flash count is relatively constant.

  6. A simple experiment that demonstrates the ``green flash''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courtial, Johannes

    2012-11-01

    The green flash occurs when, under certain atmospheric conditions, the top segment of the low sun is visibly green. It is surrounded—in at least a few minds—by an air of mystery. I describe a simple experiment that demonstrates different aspects of the green flash. The experiment uses an odd-shaped, water-filled, fish tank to simulate the refractive properties of the atmosphere; milk powder added to the water mimicks the atmosphere's scattering properties. A circular white-light source is viewed through the fish tank and the combination of refraction and scattering makes one end of the light source look green. The setup also allows experimentation with mirage effects, thereby drawing attention to their often neglected contribution to the green flash.

  7. FLASH magnetohydrodynamic simulations of shock-generated magnetic field experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzeferacos, P.; Fatenejad, M.; Flocke, N.; Gregori, G.; Lamb, D. Q.; Lee, D.; Meinecke, J.; Scopatz, A.; Weide, K.

    2012-12-01

    We report the results of benchmark FLASH magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of experiments conducted by the University of Oxford High Energy Density Laboratory Astrophysics group and its collaborators at the Laboratoire pour l'Utilisation des Lasers Intenses (LULI). In these experiments, a long-pulse laser illuminates a target in a chamber filled with Argon gas, producing shock waves that generate magnetic fields via the Biermann battery mechanism. We first outline the implementation of 2D cylindrical geometry in the unsplit MHD solver in FLASH and present results of verification tests. We then describe the results of benchmark 2D cylindrical MHD simulations of the LULI experiments using FLASH that explore the impact of external fields along with the possibility of magnetic field amplification by turbulence that is associated with the shock waves and that is induced by a grid placed in the gas-filled chamber.

  8. Flash trajectory imaging of target 3D motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinwei; Zhou, Yan; Fan, Songtao; He, Jun; Liu, Yuliang

    2011-03-01

    We present a flash trajectory imaging technique which can directly obtain target trajectory and realize non-contact measurement of motion parameters by range-gated imaging and time delay integration. Range-gated imaging gives the range of targets and realizes silhouette detection which can directly extract targets from complex background and decrease the complexity of moving target image processing. Time delay integration increases information of one single frame of image so that one can directly gain the moving trajectory. In this paper, we have studied the algorithm about flash trajectory imaging and performed initial experiments which successfully obtained the trajectory of a falling badminton. Our research demonstrates that flash trajectory imaging is an effective approach to imaging target trajectory and can give motion parameters of moving targets.

  9. Flash Points of Secondary Alcohol and n-Alkane Mixtures.

    PubMed

    Esina, Zoya N; Miroshnikov, Alexander M; Korchuganova, Margarita R

    2015-11-19

    The flash point is one of the most important characteristics used to assess the ignition hazard of mixtures of flammable liquids. To determine the flash points of mixtures of secondary alcohols with n-alkanes, it is necessary to calculate the activity coefficients. In this paper, we use a model that allows us to obtain enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of the pure components to calculate the liquid-solid equilibrium (LSE) and vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE). Enthalpy of fusion and enthalpy of vaporization data of secondary alcohols in the literature are limited; thus, the prediction of these characteristics was performed using the method of thermodynamic similarity. Additionally, the empirical models provided the critical temperatures and boiling temperatures of the secondary alcohols. The modeled melting enthalpy and enthalpy of vaporization as well as the calculated LSE and VLE flash points were determined for the secondary alcohol and n-alkane mixtures. PMID:26491811

  10. PNNL 331 Building Arc Flash Team Investigation Report

    SciTech Connect

    Deichman, Mark L.; Drewrey, John C.; Hodges, Hurtis; Madson, Vernon J.; Minton, Allen L.; Montgomery, Daniel M.; Olson, Marvin E.; Rojas, Pedro H.; Sanan, Sanjay K.; Sharp, Reed D.; Sparks, Bobby R.; Swearingen, Gary L.

    2006-06-06

    On Friday, April 21, 2006, a PNNL electrician was performing repair of an electrical system for the 331 Building chilled water pump (CHWP) No.2, when an electrical arc flash occurred inside a 480V combination motor starter. The electrician was taken to the on-site medical provider for evaluation and was released for return to work without restriction. The electrician was not shocked, but did receive a minor, superficial (first degree) burn on the left wrist. This report, the result of a thorough review by the 331 Building Arc Flash Assessment Team, provides an in-depth look at the steps leading up to the arc-flash and recommendations and opportunities for improvement.

  11. Modular, Microprocessor-Controlled Flash Lighting System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Dwayne; Gray, Elizabeth; Skupinski, Robert; Stachowicz, Arthur; Birchenough, William

    2006-01-01

    A microprocessor-controlled lighting system generates brief, precisely timed, high-intensity flashes of light for scientific imaging at frame rates up to about 1 kHz. The system includes an array of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that are driven in synchronism with an externally generated timing signal (for example, a timing signal generated by a video camera). The light output can be varied in peak intensity, pulse duration, pulse delay, and pulse rate, all depending on the timing signal and associated externally generated control signals. The array of LEDs comprises as many as 16 LED panels that can be attached together. Each LED panel is a module consisting of a rectangular subarray of 10 by 20 LEDs of advanced design on a printed-circuit board in a mounting frame with a power/control connector. The LED panels are controlled by an LED control module that contains an AC-to-DC power supply, a control board, and 8 LED-panel driver boards. In prior LED panels, the LEDs are packaged at less than maximum areal densities in bulky metal housings that reduce effective active areas. In contrast, in the present LED panels, the LEDs are packed at maximum areal density so as to afford 100-percent active area and so that when panels are joined side by side to form the array, there are no visible seams between them and the proportion of active area is still 100 percent. Each panel produces an illuminance of .5 x 10( exp 4) lux at a distance of 5.8 in. (approx.1.6 cm). The LEDs are driven according to a pulse-width-modulation control scheme that makes it safe to drive the LEDs beyond their rated steady-state currents in order to generate additional light during short periods. The drive current and the pulse-width modulation for each LED panel can be controlled independently of those of the other 15 panels. The maximum allowable duration of each pulse of drive current is a function of the amount of overdrive, the total time to be spent in overdrive operation, and the limitations

  12. Recent Flash X-Ray Injector Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T; Blackfield, D; Burke, J; Chen, Y; Javedani, J; Paul, A C

    2004-11-10

    The injector of the Flash X-Ray (FXR) accelerator has a significantly larger than expected beam emittance. A computer modeling effort involving three different injector design codes was undertaken to characterize the FXR injector and determine the cause of the large emittance. There were some variations between the codes, but in general the simulations were consistent and pointed towards a much smaller normalized, rms emittance (36 cm-mr) than what was measured (193 cm-mr) at the exit of the injector using a pepperpot technique. The simulations also indicated that the present diode design was robust with respect to perturbations to the nominal design. Easily detected mechanical alignment/position errors and magnet errors did not lead to appreciable increase in the simulated emittance. The physics of electron emission was not modeled by any of the codes and could be the source of increased emittance. The nominal simulation assumed uniform Child-Langmuir Law emission from the velvet cathode and no shroud emission. Simulations that looked at extreme non-uniform cathode and shroud emission scenarios resulted in doubling of the emittance. An alternative approach was to question the pepperpot measurement. Simulations of the measurement showed that the pepperpot aperture foil could double the emittance with respect to the non-disturbed beam. This leads to a diplomatic explanation of the discrepancy between predicted and measured emittance where the fault is shared. The measured value is too high due to the effect of the diagnostic on the beam and the simulations are too low because of unaccounted cathode and/or shroud emission physics. Fortunately there is a relatively simple experiment that can resolve the emittance discrepancy. If the large measured emittance value is correct, the beam envelope is emittance dominated at modest values of focusing field and beam radius. Measurements of the beam envelope on an imaging foil at the exit of the injector would lead to an

  13. How to know and choose online games: differences between current and potential players.

    PubMed

    Teng, Ching-I; Lo, Shao-Kang; Wang, Pe-Cheng

    2007-12-01

    This study investigated how different adolescent players acquire game information and the criteria they use in choosing online games and found that (1) current players generally use comprehensive information sources more than potential players do; (2) current players rely on free trials and smooth display of motion graphics as choice criteria more than potential players do; (3) potential players rely on the look of advertisements more than current players do; (4) both current and potential players most likely use word-of-mouth and gaming programs on TV as information sources; and (5) endorser attractiveness is ranked the least important among six choice criteria by both current and potential players.

  14. Multisensory Integration, Aging, and the Sound-Induced Flash Illusion

    PubMed Central

    DeLoss, Denton J.; Pierce, Russell S.; Andersen, George J.

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined age-related differences in multisensory integration and the role of attention in age-related differences in multisensory integration. The sound-induced flash illusion---the misperception of the number of visual flashes due to the simultaneous presentation of a different number of auditory beeps---was used to examine the strength of multisensory integration in older and younger observers. The effects of integration were examined when discriminating 1–3 flashes, 1–3 beeps, or 1–3 flashes presented with 1–3 beeps. Stimulus conditions were blocked according to these conditions, with baseline (unisensory) performance assessed during the multisensory block. Older participants demonstrated greater multisensory integration--a greater influence of the beeps when judging the number of visual flashes--than younger observers. In a second experiment, the role of attention was assessed using a go/no-go paradigm. The results of Experiment 2 replicated those of Experiment 1. In addition, the strength of the illusion was modulated by the sensory domain of the go/no-go task, though this did not differ by age group. In the visual go/no-go task we found a decrease in the illusion, while in the auditory go/no-go task we found an increase in the illusion. These results demonstrate that older individuals exhibit increased multisensory integration compared to younger individuals. Attention was also found to modulate the strength of the sound-induced flash illusion. However, the results also suggest that attention was not likely to be a factor in the age-related differences in multisensory integration. PMID:23978009

  15. Flash heat simulation events in the north Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazon, Jordi; Pino, David

    2013-04-01

    According to the definition of flash heat event proposed by Mazon et al. in the European Meteorology Meeting (2011 and 2012) from the studied case produced in the Northeast of the Iberian peninsula on 27th August 20120, some other flash heat events have been detected by automatic weather stations around the in the Mediterranean basin (South Italy, Crete island, South Greece and the northeast of the Iberian peninsula). Flash heat event covers those events in which a large increase of temperature last a spatial and temporal scale between heat wave (defined by the WMO as a phenomenon in which the daily maximum temperature of more than five consecutive days exceeds the average maximum temperature by 5°C, with respect to the 1961-1990 period) and heat burst (defined by the AMS as a rare atmospheric event characterized by gusty winds and a rapid increase in temperature and decrease in humidity that can last some minutes). Thus flash heat event may be considered as a rapid modification of the temperature that last several hours, lower than 48 hours, but usually less than 24 hours. Two different flash heat events have been simulated with the WRF mesoscale model in the Mediterranean basin. The results show that two different mechanisms are the main causes of these flash heat events. The first one occurred on 23rd March 2008 in Crete Island due to a strong Foehn effect caused by a strong south and southeast wind, in which the maximum temperature increased during some hours on the night at 32°C. The second one occurred on 1st August 2012 in the northeast of the Iberian Peninsula, caused by a rapid displacement of warm a ridge from North Africa that lasted around 24 hours.

  16. Another look at baseball player initials and longevity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gary

    2011-02-01

    Abel and Kruger (2007) reported that Major League Baseball players whose names have positive initials (such as ACE or GOD) live an average of 13 years longer than do players with negative initials (such as ASS or BAD) or players with neutral initials (such as GHR or TSW). However, this conclusion is based on a very small sample, selective initials, and a flawed statistical test. There is no statistically significant relationship between initials and longevity for Major League Baseball players when a correct test is applied to independently selected initials. PMID:21466094

  17. Stereophotometric testing for Pulfrich's phenomenon in professional baseball players.

    PubMed

    Hofeldt, A J; Hoefle, F B

    1993-10-01

    Major League players were significantly more accurate in performing stereophotometry than were Minor League players. The stereophotometric data based upon the induction and extinction thresholds of the Pulfrich phenomenon were significantly correlated with the batting averages of Major League baseball players. The coefficient of determination, r2, implies that visual ability as measured by stereophotometry accounts for 47% or more of the variation in batting averages of the Major League players. This test may be a useful index in predicting batting ability. PMID:8247659

  18. Skinfold Estimates of Body Fat in Major League Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Coleman, A E

    1981-10-01

    In brief: One hundred and thirty-seven major league baseball players and 32 coaches were tested for body composition, and comparisons were made among positions and among teams. Shortstops were the leanest players (9.2% fat), outfielders averaged 9.9%, and pitchers were the fattest (14.7% fat). The players' body composition reflected the movement patterns and defensive requirements of their positions. There were few differences among teams, and in general, the baseball players were comparable to other professional athletes.

  19. Another look at baseball player initials and longevity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gary

    2011-02-01

    Abel and Kruger (2007) reported that Major League Baseball players whose names have positive initials (such as ACE or GOD) live an average of 13 years longer than do players with negative initials (such as ASS or BAD) or players with neutral initials (such as GHR or TSW). However, this conclusion is based on a very small sample, selective initials, and a flawed statistical test. There is no statistically significant relationship between initials and longevity for Major League Baseball players when a correct test is applied to independently selected initials.

  20. A Comprehensive Preseason Fitness Evaluation for Professional Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Gurry, M; Pappas, A; Michaels, J; Maher, P; Shakman, A; Goldberg, R; Rippe, J

    1985-06-01

    In brief: Preseason health and fitness evaluations were performed on 40 professional baseball players to assess level of conditioning, potential for injury, and health-related lifestyle habits. Group means for coronary risk profile, muscular endurance, flexibility, and maximum aerobic capacity were normal, but screening identified many players with problems or potential problems. Test findings resulted in at least one training or life-style recommendation in every player tested. This information provides a comprehensive physiological profile of one professional baseball team. Further research is needed to define sport-specific testing for the professional baseball player.

  1. Arthroscopic Shoulder Surgery in Female Professional Tennis Players

    PubMed Central

    Young, Simon W.; Safran, Marc R.; Dakic, Jodie; Nguyen, Michael L.; Stroia, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Recent publications have highlighted the relatively poor outcome of other overhead athletes, particularly baseball players, with regard to return to sports at the same or higher level after shoulder surgery. However, true assessment of their ability when returning to sport is not as clear. Further, ability to return to other overhead sports has not been reported. Our objective was to assess outcome and time to return to previous level of function following shoulder surgery in professional tennis players. Methods: The records of all female tennis players on the Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) professional circuit between January 2008 and June 2010 were reviewed to identify players who underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant (serving) shoulder. Details of the surgery including date, procedures performed, and complications were recorded. The primary outcomes were ability and time to return to professional play, and if they were able to return to their previous level of function, as determined by singles ranking. Pre and post-operative singles rankings were used to determine rate and completeness of return to preoperative function. Their highest ranking pre-injury, post operatively, and the time to return to pre-injury ranking were evaluated. Results: During the study period eight professional women tennis players from the WTA underwent shoulder surgery on their dominant arm. All surgery was performed arthroscopically, 7 out of 8 players had more than one procedure performed during the surgery. In total, 3 players underwent debridement of a partial rotator cuff tear and 2 players underwent repair of a complete supraspinatus tear. Three players had an anterior labral repair or reconstruction for anterior instability, and one player underwent repair of a SLAP lesion. Two players underwent neurolysis of a suprascapular nerve, and three players in total underwent a subacromial decompression. All players (100%) returned to professional play. The mean

  2. Dynamic criteria: a longitudinal analysis of professional basketball players' outcomes.

    PubMed

    García-Izquierdo, Antonio León; Ramos-Villagrasa, Pedro José; Navarro, José

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the fluctuations of temporal criteria dynamics in the context of professional sport. Specifically, we try to verify the underlying deterministic patterns in the outcomes of professional basketball players. We use a longitudinal approach based on the analysis of the outcomes of 94 basketball players over ten years, covering practically players' entire career development. Time series were analyzed with techniques derived from nonlinear dynamical systems theory. These techniques analyze the underlying patterns in outcomes without previous shape assumptions (linear or nonlinear). These techniques are capable of detecting an intermediate situation between randomness and determinism, called chaos. So they are very useful for the study of dynamic criteria in organizations. We have found most players (88.30%) have a deterministic pattern in their outcomes, and most cases are chaotic (81.92%). Players with chaotic patterns have higher outcomes than players with linear patterns. Moreover, players with power forward and center positions achieve better results than other players. The high number of chaotic patterns found suggests caution when appraising individual outcomes, when coaches try to find the appropriate combination of players to design a competitive team, and other personnel decisions. Management efforts must be made to assume this uncertainty.

  3. Foot types and lower limb injuries in elite netball players.

    PubMed

    Hopper, D; Bryant, A; Elliott, B

    1994-07-01

    In assessing the foot types and lower limb injuries of elite netball players, the following summary seems warranted. Ninety percent of elite female netball players had symmetrical foot types for both feet and these players had experienced at least one lower limb injury. Only 7.6% players (N = 16) of the 204 players surveyed had never sustained a lower limb injury during their netball careers. Regardless of foot type, the injury history of these elite netball players presented with a total number of 449 injuries that occurred to both ankle joints (36%), one ankle joint (16%), both knee joints (6%), one knee joint (13%), shin soreness (18%), and retropatellar pain problems (11%). On further inspection, 55% of players experienced one to two lower limb injuries throughout their netball careers. Injured players showed that players with the pronating foot types with rearfoot abnormalities (57%) were the most commonly injured and that compensated rearfoot varus foot type presented the most lower limb injuries for all body sites.

  4. Making star teams out of star players.

    PubMed

    Mankins, Michael; Bird, Alan; Root, James

    2013-01-01

    Top talent is an invaluable asset: In highly specialized or creative work, for instance, "A" players are likely to be six times as productive as "B" players. So when your company has a crucial strategic project, why not multiply all that firepower and have a team of your best performers tackle it? Yet many companies hesitate to do this, believing that all-star teams don't work: Big egos will get in the way. The stars won't be able to work with one another. They'll drive the team Leader crazy. Mankins, Bird, and Root of Bain & Company believe it's time to set aside that thinking. They have seen all-star teams do extraordinary work. But there is a right way and a wrong way to organize them. Before you can even begin to assemble such a team, you need to have the right talent management practices, so you hire and develop the best people and know what they're capable of. You have to give the team appropriate incentives and leaders and support staffers who are stars in their own right. And projects that are ill-defined or small scale are not for all-star teams. Use them only for critical missions, and make sure their objectives are clear. Even with the right setup, things can still go wrong. The wise executive will take steps to manage egos, prune non-team-players, and prevent average coworkers from feeling completely undervalued. She will also invest a lot of time in choosing the right team Leader and will ask members for lots of feedback to monitor how that leader is doing. PMID:23390743

  5. Player preferences among new and old violins

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Claudia; Curtin, Joseph; Poitevineau, Jacques; Morrel-Samuels, Palmer; Tao, Fan-Chia

    2012-01-01

    Most violinists believe that instruments by Stradivari and Guarneri “del Gesu” are tonally superior to other violins—and to new violins in particular. Many mechanical and acoustical factors have been proposed to account for this superiority; however, the fundamental premise of tonal superiority has not yet been properly investigated. Player's judgments about a Stradivari's sound may be biased by the violin's extraordinary monetary value and historical importance, but no studies designed to preclude such biasing factors have yet been published. We asked 21 experienced violinists to compare violins by Stradivari and Guarneri del Gesu with high-quality new instruments. The resulting preferences were based on the violinists’ individual experiences of playing the instruments under double-blind conditions in a room with relatively dry acoustics. We found that (i) the most-preferred violin was new; (ii) the least-preferred was by Stradivari; (iii) there was scant correlation between an instrument's age and monetary value and its perceived quality; and (iv) most players seemed unable to tell whether their most-preferred instrument was new or old. These results present a striking challenge to conventional wisdom. Differences in taste among individual players, along with differences in playing qualities among individual instruments, appear more important than any general differences between new and old violins. Rather than searching for the “secret” of Stradivari, future research might best focused on how violinists evaluate instruments, on which specific playing qualities are most important to them, and on how these qualities relate to measurable attributes of the instruments, whether old or new. PMID:22215592

  6. 46 CFR 113.25-10 - Emergency red-flashing lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... heard over the background noise, there must be a red-flashing light or rotating beacon, in addition to... system. (b) A red-flashing light or rotating beacon must be installed so that it is visible in the...

  7. 46 CFR 113.25-10 - Emergency red-flashing lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... heard over the background noise, there must be a red-flashing light or rotating beacon, in addition to... system. (b) A red-flashing light or rotating beacon must be installed so that it is visible in the...

  8. 46 CFR 113.25-10 - Emergency red-flashing lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... heard over the background noise, there must be a red-flashing light or rotating beacon, in addition to... system. (b) A red-flashing light or rotating beacon must be installed so that it is visible in the...

  9. Racism in soccer? Perception of challenges of black and white players by white referees, soccer players, and fans.

    PubMed

    Wagner-Egger, Pascal; Gygax, Pascal; Ribordy, Farfalla

    2012-02-01

    This experiment investigated challenge evaluations in soccer and their relation to prejudice: more precisely, whether skin colour may influence judgments of soccer tackles. Three groups of participants (soccer players, referees,and soccer fans) were asked to evaluate challenges, featuring Black and White players as aggressors and victims in a mixed-design study. Results showed that participants made some differentiations between Black and White players in a challenge evaluation task. Participants were more likely to consider within-group challenges as fouls and were faster to consider challenges made by Black players as fouls. On the other hand, fouls made by White players were seen as more severe. There were no major differences between the participating groups, suggesting that the observed effects were independent of how good players were or whether the participants were referees or not.

  10. Special technical services for investigation of light flash phenomena

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Details are presented of an investigation aimed at an explanation of the phenomenon of light flashes observed by Apollo crew members. The various theories considered include: penetration of the eye by cosmic particles resulting in retinal stimulation; production of phosphenes or sensations of light through ionization or excitation; appearance of heavily ionized single tracks misinterpreted as light flashes; Cerenkov radiation; and direct excitation of neural tissue by penetrating cosmic rays. It is concluded that the latter two theories are the likeliest mechanisms for the development of a definitive explanation.

  11. Parallel data analysis in a multichannel flash-ADC-system

    SciTech Connect

    Eckerlin, G.; Elsen, E.; Schmitt, H.V.D.; Wagner, A.; Walter, P.V.; Zimmer, M.

    1987-02-01

    Parallel analysis of drift chamber signals with M68000 processors has proven to be an efficient way to deal with the tremendous data flow generated by high speed (100 MHz) Flash-ADCs in real time. The authors report on the experience gained with a network of 34 processors, placed in 3 VME crates, to read out the 3072 Flash-ADC channels of the JADE Jet-Chamber at PETRA (1). The properties of such a system are compared to more conventional readout schemes for drift chambers.

  12. Method of forming tiny silicon nitride spacer for flash EPROM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H. H.; Wu, K. C.; Hwang, Yuan-Ko; Chen, Shih-Shiung

    2001-04-01

    The silicon nitride spacer technology is widely used in split gate non-volatile memory device sand flash EPROM. A tiny spacer structure is formed on tunnel oxide layer adjacent to the sidewall of floating gate electrode to prevent write disturbance that caused by reverse tunneling. But the processing is very critical for such flash EPROM devices since the dimension the SN spacer are so small. It was influenced not only by SN spacer dry etching but also later photo-resistance strip process of implantation for threshold voltage adjustment. A new method of forming tiny SN spacer by using anisotropic dry etching and isotropic wet etching was presented in this paper.

  13. Mitochondrial Flashes: Dump Superoxide and Dance with Protons Now.

    PubMed

    Demaurex, Nicolas; Schwarzländer, Markus

    2016-09-20

    Transient changes in the physiology of individual mitochondria have recently drawn much interest. The use of a circular permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) to monitor mitochondrial flashes and their interpretation as superoxide bursts has added confusion, however. Reviewing mitochondrial flashes in this Forum, Wang et al. again deem cpYFP to be a specific and reversible superoxide indicator, dismissing evidence that purified cpYFP is insensitive to superoxide. This interpretation lacks reproducible evidence and conflicts with the parsimony principle. We offer a constructive, transparent pathway to reach definitive clarification of contradictory reports. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 550-551. PMID:27400996

  14. Mitochondrial Flashes: Dump Superoxide and Dance with Protons Now

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transient changes in the physiology of individual mitochondria have recently drawn much interest. The use of a circular permuted yellow fluorescent protein (cpYFP) to monitor mitochondrial flashes and their interpretation as superoxide bursts has added confusion, however. Reviewing mitochondrial flashes in this Forum, Wang et al. again deem cpYFP to be a specific and reversible superoxide indicator, dismissing evidence that purified cpYFP is insensitive to superoxide. This interpretation lacks reproducible evidence and conflicts with the parsimony principle. We offer a constructive, transparent pathway to reach definitive clarification of contradictory reports. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 25, 550–551. PMID:27400996

  15. Fibular Fracture in a Female Rugby Player.

    PubMed

    Mendola, Jonathan A; Johnson, Michael; Goss, Don

    2016-07-01

    A 20-year-old female rugby player was injured when an opponent landed on her leg during a match. Twelve days after injury, the team's certified athletic trainer referred the patient to a physical therapist due to continued pain. Following fluoroscopic imaging, which was utilized by the physical therapist because standard radiographs were unavailable in close proximity, she was referred for radiographs, which demonstrated a midfibular diaphyseal fracture. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(7):608. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0411. PMID:27363575

  16. Elbow and Shoulder Lesions of Baseball Players*

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    George Eli Bennett was born in Claryville, NY, in the Catskill Mountains, in 1885 [3]. His parents both died by the time he was 11, leaving him the need to work while going to school, but he excelled in school and sports. He played semipro baseball at the age of 16. After high school he work in various jobs in the Midwest before he could afford to attend the University of Maryland Medical School, from which he graduated in 1908. At the age of 25 in 1910, he joined the staff at the Johns Hopkins Hospital, where he remained until his resignation in 1947. Dr. Bennett was one of a few men who served as President of both the American Orthopaedic Association and the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons. While Dr. Bennett made many contributions to orthopaedic surgery, including children’s and nonoperative orthopaedics, he was best known for his work in sports medicine (undoubtedly related to his being a gifted athlete). His fame extended well beyond the orthopaedic community, for he treated many famous athletes. Sports Illustrated recognized him upon his death in an article entitled, “Mender of Immortals” [4]. His intimate knowledge of sports undoubtedly contributed to his sage judgments. At an emotional dinner in 1958 many famous athletes sometimes tearfully paid tribute to Dr. Bennett. Joe Garagiola commented on the occasion, “After listening to that all-star team of players Dr. Bennett has mended, I’m sorry I didn’t break my leg” [4]. Among Dr. Bennett’s many publications, including those related to sports, we have chosen one [2] of two articles [1,2] he wrote on elbow and shoulder problems in baseball players. He described the now well-known degenerative changes and periarticular calcific deposits that occur in the elbows and shoulders of pitchers. Some of these, he suggested, were not symptomatic and he advised against treatment. Dr. Bennett commented, however, “Since professional athletes are human beings, not supermen, general health often

  17. Occupational acroosteolysis in a guitar player.

    PubMed

    Baran, R; Tosti, A

    1993-02-01

    A case of occupational acroosteolysis in a 24-year-old classical guitar player is reported. Nail tenderness was the only manifestation of initial acroosteolysis, which was due to mechanical stress on the fingers. Radiographs showed initial resorption of the 2nd, 3rd and 4th finger of the left hand. The authors review the clinical and radiological features of acroosteolysis. The pathogenesis of acroosteolysis is discussed as well as the different diseases that may cause destructive changes of the distal phalangeal bones.

  18. Meniscal ossicle in a professional soccer player.

    PubMed

    Ogassawara, R; Zayni, R; Orhant, E; Noel, E; Fournier, Y; Hager, J-P; Chambat, P; Sonnery-Cottet, B

    2011-06-01

    Meniscal ossicles are an unusual finding and a rare cause for knee pain. They are often initially diagnosed as a loose body, chondrocalcinosis or meniscal calcification within the knee joint. Few cases have been reported in the literature. We present a case of a meniscal ossicle with an associated femoral cartilage lesion in a healthy 26-year-old male professional soccer player who presented with swelling and pain. The purpose of this article is to discuss the origins, radiological features, clinical symptoms and prognosis of meniscal ossicles.

  19. Cervical spine injuries in rugby players.

    PubMed

    Sovio, O M; Van Peteghem, P K; Schweigel, J F

    1984-03-15

    Nine patients with serious cervical spine injuries that occurred while they were playing rugby were seen in a British Columbia acute spinal cord injury unit during the period 1975-82. All the injuries had occurred during the "scrum" or the "tackle". Two of the patients were rendered permanently quadriplegic, and one patient died. There is a need for a central registry that would record all cervical spine injuries in rugby players as well as for changes in the rules of the game. PMID:6697282

  20. Tibial sesamoid fracture in a softball player.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jeanine L; Losito, James M

    2007-01-01

    A single case of a tibial sesamoid fracture in a softball player is reported here. A review of the literature confirms that this is an unusual and difficult problem to treat in the athletic population given the significant loads placed on the sesamoids during athletic activity. In the case presented, conservative care was not effective, and the athlete underwent surgical excision of the fractured sesamoid. With use of a postoperative orthosis and cleat modification, surgical management was successful and allowed the athlete to return to her athletic endeavors without restrictions in 8 weeks.

  1. Subtalar Dislocation in a Basketball Player.

    PubMed

    Crosby, L A

    1989-10-01

    In brief: Easily mistaken for an ankle fracture during the initial examination, medial subtalar dislocation-also known as 'basketball foot'-requires plaster immobilization for no more than 3 weeks. To extend immobilization beyond this time can lead to reduced range of motion in the subtalar joint, making it difficult for the athlete to resume sports activities. Encouraging toe motion while the patient is still in the cast prevents tendon adhesions. In this case report, the author discusses the importance of short-term immobilization and early rehabilitation for a 21-year-old basketball player recovering from medial subtalar dislocation.

  2. Facial lesions on a college basketball player.

    PubMed

    Leggit, J

    2001-12-01

    A 20-year-old male African-American college basketball player reported to the training room for evaluation of recurrent bumps on his face. He stated that these lesions began occurring after he started shaving. His healthcare provider had told him that they were "shaving bumps" and that there was nothing he could do for them. The patient had tried an over-the-counter product (Bump Stopper, Long Beach, California) with minimal success. He used a single-edged razor, and was concerned because some of the lesions were painful and leaving scars.

  3. Relations between basic and specific motor abilities and player quality of young basketball players.

    PubMed

    Marić, Kristijan; Katić, Ratko; Jelicić, Mario

    2013-05-01

    Subjects from 5 first league clubs from Herzegovina were tested with the purpose of determining the relations of basic and specific motor abilities, as well as the effect of specific abilities on player efficiency in young basketball players (cadets). A battery of 12 tests assessing basic motor abilities and 5 specific tests assessing basketball efficiency were used on a sample of 83 basketball players. Two significant canonical correlations, i.e. linear combinations explained the relation between the set of twelve variables of basic motor space and five variables of situational motor abilities. Underlying the first canonical linear combination is the positive effect of the general motor factor, predominantly defined by jumping explosive power, movement speed of the arms, static strength of the arms and coordination, on specific basketball abilities: movement efficiency, the power of the overarm throw, shooting and passing precision, and the skill of handling the ball. The impact of basic motor abilities of precision and balance on specific abilities of passing and shooting precision and ball handling is underlying the second linear combination. The results of regression correlation analysis between the variable set of specific motor abilities and game efficiency have shown that the ability of ball handling has the largest impact on player quality in basketball cadets, followed by shooting precision and passing precision, and the power of the overarm throw.

  4. Hot Flashes and Panic Attacks: A Comparison of Symptomatology, Neurobiology, Treatment, and a Role for Cognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanisch, Laura J.; Hantsoo, Liisa; Freeman, Ellen W.; Sullivan, Gregory M.; Coyne, James C.

    2008-01-01

    Despite decades of research, the causal mechanisms of hot flashes are not adequately understood, and a biopsychosocial perspective on hot flashes remains underdeveloped. This article explores overlooked parallels between hot flashes and panic attacks within 5 areas: course and symptomatology, physiological indicators, neurocircuitry and…

  5. 46 CFR 167.65-5 - Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Special Operating Requirements § 167.65-5 Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light. Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding...

  6. 46 CFR 167.65-5 - Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Special Operating Requirements § 167.65-5 Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light. Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding...

  7. 46 CFR 167.65-5 - Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Special Operating Requirements § 167.65-5 Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light. Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding...

  8. 46 CFR 167.65-5 - Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Special Operating Requirements § 167.65-5 Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light. Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding...

  9. 46 CFR 167.65-5 - Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding...) NAUTICAL SCHOOLS PUBLIC NAUTICAL SCHOOL SHIPS Special Operating Requirements § 167.65-5 Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light. Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding...

  10. Shape recognition elicited by microsecond flashes is not based on photon quantity

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    It is generally thought that the perceptual impact of a brief flash of light is determined by the quantity of photons the flash delivers. This means that only the total quantity of photons is important below a critical duration of about 30–100 ms. Recent findings have challenged this concept and the present work provides additional evidence that it is not correct. The first experiment reported here delivered a given quantity of photons in under 200 μs, either as a single threshold-intensity flash or as multiple flashes at the same intensity. The single flash was ineffective at eliciting recognition, but multiple flashes became progressively more effective as the number of flashes was increased. A second experiment varied the number of 10 μs flashes. The effectiveness of multiple flashes was far higher than would be expected on the basis of the total quantity of photons being delivered. The results of both experiments suggest that the brief transitions of intensity provided by the flashes are far more important than the quantity of photons. A final experiment examined the combined impact from two threshold-intensity flashes as the interstimulus interval was increased. The pair members were able to combine their influence for at least 100 ms. These results call for more attention to how very brief light flashes generate signals that convey image content. PMID:25469213

  11. 49 CFR 234.253 - Flashing light units and lamp voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flashing light units and lamp voltage. 234.253 Section 234.253 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD....253 Flashing light units and lamp voltage. (a) Each flashing light unit shall be inspected...

  12. 49 CFR 234.253 - Flashing light units and lamp voltage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flashing light units and lamp voltage. 234.253 Section 234.253 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD....253 Flashing light units and lamp voltage. (a) Each flashing light unit shall be inspected...

  13. 46 CFR 113.25-10 - Emergency red-flashing lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Emergency red-flashing lights. 113.25-10 Section 113.25... heard over the background noise, there must be a red-flashing light or rotating beacon, in addition to... system. (b) A red-flashing light or rotating beacon must be installed so that it is visible in the...

  14. 46 CFR 113.25-10 - Emergency red-flashing lights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Emergency red-flashing lights. 113.25-10 Section 113.25... heard over the background noise, there must be a red-flashing light or rotating beacon, in addition to... system. (b) A red-flashing light or rotating beacon must be installed so that it is visible in the...

  15. Strength Asymmetry of the Shoulders in Elite Volleyball Players

    PubMed Central

    Hadzic, Vedran; Sattler, Tine; Veselko, Matjaž; Markovic, Goran; Dervisevic, Edvin

    2014-01-01

    Context: Volleyball players are reported to have shoulder strength imbalances. Previous authors have primarily investigated small samples of male players at a single skill level, without considering playing position, and with inconsistent findings. Objective: To evaluate shoulder strength asymmetry and a history of shoulder injury in a large sample of professional volleyball players of both sexes across different playing positions and skill levels. Design: Descriptive laboratory study. Patients or Other Participants: A sample of 183 volleyball players (99 men, 84 women). Main Outcome Measure(s): We assessed shoulder internal-rotator and external-rotator concentric strength at 60°/s using an isokinetic dynamometer and dominant-nondominant differences in shoulder strength and strength ratios using repeated-measures analyses of variance. Peak torque was normalized for body mass and external-rotation/internal-rotation concentric strength. Results: Internal-rotation strength was asymmetric in favor of the dominant side in both sexes, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. Male volleyball players had a lower shoulder strength ratio on the dominant side, regardless of previous shoulder injury status. However, this finding was valid only when hand dominance was taken into account. Female volleyball players playing at a higher level (ie, first versus second division) were 3.43 times more likely to have an abnormal strength ratio. Playing position was not associated with an abnormal shoulder strength ratio or strength asymmetry. Conclusions: In male volleyball players, the external-rotation/internal-rotation strength ratio of the dominant shoulder was lower, regardless of playing position, skill level, or a previous shoulder injury. In female players, the ratio was less only in those at a higher skill level. Although speculative, these findings generally suggest that female volleyball players could have a lower risk of developing shoulder-related problems than male

  16. Match analysis and player characteristics in rugby sevens.

    PubMed

    Ross, Alex; Gill, Nicholas; Cronin, John

    2014-03-01

    Rugby sevens is a contact sport contested by two teams of seven players who compete over two 7-min halves, most frequently played in a tournament style. The IRB Sevens World Series is thought of as the preeminent rugby sevens competition in the world and has grown in competitiveness from its inception in 2000. The decision to include rugby sevens in the 2016 Olympics is likely to increase the global profile and participation in the game. Many rugby sevens players concurrently compete in 15-a-side rugby union as backs and loose forwards; however, a continued increase in the popularity of rugby sevens will likely see the emergence of the specialist rugby sevens player. Often thought of as the abbreviated version of rugby union, rugby sevens is played under nearly identical laws and on the same field dimensions as the 15-man code. However, research has shown the movement demands of rugby sevens and rugby union are dissimilar, with rugby sevens players spending a larger proportion of the game running at high intensity (≥ 5 m s(-1)). Given the dissimilarity in match demands in conjunction with differences in the competition structure between the codes, it appears the considerable depth of literature specific to performance in rugby union may be of little value for the preparation of rugby sevens players. Investigations of the physical characteristics of rugby sevens players show backs are lighter and shorter than forwards, while players across all positions possess a lean body composition. International rugby sevens players have similar speed characteristics to rugby union backs across distances of 10-30 m; however, rugby sevens players appear to have superior intermittent aerobic endurance. Despite being of likely importance, little is known of the strength and power characteristics of rugby sevens players. Research into the speed and aerobic endurance characteristics of rugby sevens players has not distinguished between backs and forwards and, as such, it is unclear

  17. Sex-specific differences in injury types among basketball players

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Eri; Iwamoto, Jun; Azuma, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate sex-specific differences in injury types among basketball players. According to our database, during the 20-year period between October 1991 and June 2011, 1,219 basketball players (640 males and 579 females) consulted our sports medicine clinic; in total, 1,414 injuries in basketball players (729 injuries in males and 685 injuries in females) were recorded. The mean age of patients was 19.6 years. The most common injury site was the knee, followed by the foot and ankle, lower back, and upper extremities. There was a higher proportion of female players presenting with a knee injury, compared with male players (50.4% vs 41.7%), and a lower proportion of female players presenting with an upper extremity injury (5.1% vs 9.7%). The proportion of anterior cruciate ligament injury in the 10–19-year-old age group was higher among female players than among male players (45.9% vs 22.1%), while the proportions of Osgood–Schlatter disease in the 10–19-year-old age group and jumper’s knee (patellar and femoral tendinopathy) in the 20–29-year-old age group were higher among male players than among female players (12.5% vs 1.8% and 14.6% vs 3.7%, respectively). However, the proportions of other injuries did not differ significantly between male and female players. The present observational study, which was performed using a retrospective case-series design, showed the existence of sex-specific differences in knee injuries sustained while participating in basketball. PMID:25565908

  18. Sex-specific differences in injury types among basketball players.

    PubMed

    Ito, Eri; Iwamoto, Jun; Azuma, Koichiro; Matsumoto, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate sex-specific differences in injury types among basketball players. According to our database, during the 20-year period between October 1991 and June 2011, 1,219 basketball players (640 males and 579 females) consulted our sports medicine clinic; in total, 1,414 injuries in basketball players (729 injuries in males and 685 injuries in females) were recorded. The mean age of patients was 19.6 years. The most common injury site was the knee, followed by the foot and ankle, lower back, and upper extremities. There was a higher proportion of female players presenting with a knee injury, compared with male players (50.4% vs 41.7%), and a lower proportion of female players presenting with an upper extremity injury (5.1% vs 9.7%). The proportion of anterior cruciate ligament injury in the 10-19-year-old age group was higher among female players than among male players (45.9% vs 22.1%), while the proportions of Osgood-Schlatter disease in the 10-19-year-old age group and jumper's knee (patellar and femoral tendinopathy) in the 20-29-year-old age group were higher among male players than among female players (12.5% vs 1.8% and 14.6% vs 3.7%, respectively). However, the proportions of other injuries did not differ significantly between male and female players. The present observational study, which was performed using a retrospective case-series design, showed the existence of sex-specific differences in knee injuries sustained while participating in basketball.

  19. Scapula Kinematics of Youth Baseball Players

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Gretchen; Weimar, Wendi

    2015-01-01

    Literature has revealed the importance of quantifying resting scapular posture in overhead athletes as well as quantifying scapular kinematics during dynamic movement. Prior to this project much of the attention in throwing research had been focused on the position of the humerus without description of the positioning of the scapula. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to present scapular kinematics during pitching in youth baseball players. Twenty-five youth baseball players (age 11.3 + 1.0 years; body height 152.4 + 9.0 cm; body mass 47.5 + 11.3 kg), with no history of injury, participated in the study. Scapular kinematics at the events of maximum humeral external rotation (MER) and maximum humeral internal rotation (MIR) during the pitching motion were assessed three-dimensionally while pitching fastballs for strikes. Results revealed that at the event of MER, the scapula was in a position of retraction, upward rotation and a posterior tilt. While at the event of MIR, the scapula was protracted, upward rotated and tilted anteriorly. PMID:26839605

  20. Effective glenoid version in professional baseball players.

    PubMed

    Drakos, Mark C; Barker, Joseph U; Osbahr, Daryl C; Lehto, Scott; Rudzki, Jonas R; Potter, Hollis; Coleman, Struan H; Allen, Answorth A; Altchek, David W

    2010-07-01

    The pathomechanics of the throwing shoulder have yet to be fully elucidated. The focus of this study reported here was to further characterize the morphology of the glenoid in a population of elite throwing athletes. We obtained magnetic resonance imaging scans of 38 professional baseball players (dominant shoulders) and of 35 age matched nonthrowing control patients (17 dominant and 18 nondominant shoulders). Seven measurements were made by 3 blinded reviewers on 3 axial images per patient: version of superior glenoid, middle glenoid, inferior glenoid, superior capsulolabral junction, middle capsulolabral junction, inferior capsulolabral junction, and depth of concavity of glenoid in a middle slice. Mean age of the 38 players (24 pitchers, 14 fielders) was 26.8 years, and mean age of the 35 control patients was 27.6 years. Intraclass correlation coefficients ranged from .55 to .84 for the version measurements. There were no statistically significant differences between the pitchers and the fielders on any of the 7 measurements, but such differences were found between the throwers and the dominant-shoulder control patients on all 7 measurements. There were only 2 differences (version of superior glenoid, depth of concavity of glenoid in a middle slice) between dominant- and nondominant- shoulder control patients. There was significantly more retroversion in the osseous and soft tissues of the elite throwing athletes than in the nonthrowing control patients. This increased retroversion may play a role in development of internal impingement in the overhead athlete.

  1. Scapula Kinematics of Youth Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen; Weimar, Wendi

    2015-12-22

    Literature has revealed the importance of quantifying resting scapular posture in overhead athletes as well as quantifying scapular kinematics during dynamic movement. Prior to this project much of the attention in throwing research had been focused on the position of the humerus without description of the positioning of the scapula. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to present scapular kinematics during pitching in youth baseball players. Twenty-five youth baseball players (age 11.3 + 1.0 years; body height 152.4 + 9.0 cm; body mass 47.5 + 11.3 kg), with no history of injury, participated in the study. Scapular kinematics at the events of maximum humeral external rotation (MER) and maximum humeral internal rotation (MIR) during the pitching motion were assessed three-dimensionally while pitching fastballs for strikes. Results revealed that at the event of MER, the scapula was in a position of retraction, upward rotation and a posterior tilt. While at the event of MIR, the scapula was protracted, upward rotated and tilted anteriorly.

  2. Young tennis players and balance performance.

    PubMed

    Malliou, Vasiliki J; Beneka, Anastasia G; Gioftsidou, Asimenia F; Malliou, Paraskevi K; Kallistratos, Elias; Pafis, Giorgos K; Katsikas, Christos A; Douvis, Stavros

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of a tennis training session on the balance performance of young tennis players. The study was conducted on 36 elite tennis players (age 14 +/- 2 years; body mass 55 +/- 6 kg; body height 165 +/- 6 cm; mean +/- SD) participating in the national young tennis championship. Balance performance was assessed before and immediately after a tennis training session (pre-training and post-training, respectively). The balance assessment was performed with 2 different balance boards and the Biodex Stability System. In addition, dynamometric measurements of peak isokinetic moment in the knee flexors and extensors were performed pre and post tennis training session, to quantify the degree of muscle fatigue induced by the tennis training session. One-way analysis of variance with repeated measures was used to test for differences in balance performance and in isokinetic performance between pre and post tennis training session. The data analysis revealed no significant differences (p > 0.05) in balance performance, whereas there were significant differences in knee joint moment production between pre and post tennis training measures. Although the tennis training session of the present study had no significant effect (p > 0.05) on any of the balance performance indicators examined, there was a decline in balance performance, which suggests that different level of fatigue for an extended period (games) will have greater effect on balance performance. It is suggested that a tennis-specific balance exercise program should be included in the tennis training session.

  3. Scapula Kinematics of Youth Baseball Players.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen; Weimar, Wendi

    2015-12-22

    Literature has revealed the importance of quantifying resting scapular posture in overhead athletes as well as quantifying scapular kinematics during dynamic movement. Prior to this project much of the attention in throwing research had been focused on the position of the humerus without description of the positioning of the scapula. Therefore, it was the purpose of this study to present scapular kinematics during pitching in youth baseball players. Twenty-five youth baseball players (age 11.3 + 1.0 years; body height 152.4 + 9.0 cm; body mass 47.5 + 11.3 kg), with no history of injury, participated in the study. Scapular kinematics at the events of maximum humeral external rotation (MER) and maximum humeral internal rotation (MIR) during the pitching motion were assessed three-dimensionally while pitching fastballs for strikes. Results revealed that at the event of MER, the scapula was in a position of retraction, upward rotation and a posterior tilt. While at the event of MIR, the scapula was protracted, upward rotated and tilted anteriorly. PMID:26839605

  4. Measuring and Estimating Normalized Contrast in Infrared Flash Thermography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshti, Ajay M.

    2013-01-01

    Infrared flash thermography (IRFT) is used to detect void-like flaws in a test object. The IRFT technique involves heating up the part surface using a flash of flash lamps. The post-flash evolution of the part surface temperature is sensed by an IR camera in terms of pixel intensity of image pixels. The IR technique involves recording of the IR video image data and analysis of the data using the normalized pixel intensity and temperature contrast analysis method for characterization of void-like flaws for depth and width. This work introduces a new definition of the normalized IR pixel intensity contrast and normalized surface temperature contrast. A procedure is provided to compute the pixel intensity contrast from the camera pixel intensity evolution data. The pixel intensity contrast and the corresponding surface temperature contrast differ but are related. This work provides a method to estimate the temperature evolution and the normalized temperature contrast from the measured pixel intensity evolution data and some additional measurements during data acquisition.

  5. Clinical Inquiry: Which nonhormonal treatments are effective for hot flashes?

    PubMed

    Kelsberg, Gary; Maragh, Leticia; Safranek, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs [fluoxetine, sertraline, paroxetine]) and the selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI) venlafaxine, as well as clonidine and gabapentin, reduce hot flashes by about 25% (approximately one per day) in women with and without a history of breast cancer. No studies compare medications against each other to determine a single best option. PMID:27275942

  6. Spectral unfolds of PITHON Flash X-ray source.

    SciTech Connect

    Zarick, Thomas Andrew; Sheridan, Timothy J.; Hartman, E. Frederick; Riordan, John C.

    2007-11-01

    Using a differential absorption spectrometer we obtained experimental spectral information for the PITHON Flash X-ray Machine located in San Leandro, California at L-3 Communications. Spectral information we obtained pertained to the 200 keV to 800 keV endpoint operation of PITHON. We also obtained data on the temporal behavior of high energy and low energy spectral content.

  7. Measuring x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources

    SciTech Connect

    Gehring, Amanda Elizabeth; Espy, Michelle A.; Haines, Todd Joseph; Mendez, Jacob; Moir, David C.; Sedillo, Robert; Shurter, Roger P.; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Webb, Timothy J

    2015-11-02

    The x-ray spectra of flash radiographic sources is difficult to measure. The sources measured were Radiographic Integrated Test Stand-6 (370 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse) and Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) (550 rad at 1 m; 50 ns pulse). Features of the Compton spectrometer are described, and spectra are shown. Additional slides present data on instrumental calibration.

  8. DETAIL OF TYPICAL ALUMINUM FLASHING AT THE BOTTOM OF AN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF TYPICAL ALUMINUM FLASHING AT THE BOTTOM OF AN EXTERIOR WALL AT UNIT B. VIEW FACING NORTH - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, U-Shaped Two-Bedroom Duplex Type 1, Acacia Road, Birch Circle, and Cedar Drive, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. Monitoring of flash visual evoked potentials during neurosurgical operations.

    PubMed

    Cedzich, C; Schramm, J

    1990-01-01

    In summary, our results suggest that flash VEP monitoring is not specific for visual acuity and has not proved helpful as an intraoperative warning system. The future challenge will be to devise a method which activates only those fibers specific to visual acuity and which provides reproducible and reliable information quickly enough that adjustments in patient management can be made.

  10. Thermal diffusivity of nonflat plates using the flash method

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, Agustin; Fuente, Raquel; Apinaniz, Estibaliz; Mendioroz, Arantza

    2011-01-15

    The flash method is the standard technique to measure the thermal diffusivity of solid samples. It consists of heating the front surface of an opaque sample by a brief light pulse and detecting the temperature evolution at its rear surface. The thermal diffusivity is obtained by measuring the time corresponding to the half maximum of the temperature rise, which only depends on the sample thickness and thermal diffusivity through a simple formula. Up to now, the flash method has been restricted to flat samples. In this work, we extend the flash method to measure the thermal diffusivity of nonflat samples. In particular, we focus on plates with cylindrical and spherical shapes. The theoretical model indicates that the same expression for flat samples can also be applied to cylindrical and spherical plates, except for extremely curved samples. Accordingly, a curvature limit for the application of the expression for flat samples is established. Flash measurements on lead foils of cylindrical shape confirm the validity of the model.

  11. An evaluation of three biological indicator systems in flash sterilization.

    PubMed

    Kotilainen, H R; Gantz, N M

    1987-08-01

    An evaluation of two flash-sterilization-specific biological indicators (BI) and a traditional spore strip indicator was performed to assess sensitivity and reliability as reflected in survive/kill ratios. The BIs tested included: 3M's Attest #1261, Amsco's Proof Flash, and Castle Tec Test. Survival after "come-up" time alone, (0 exposure) and one-, two-, and three-minute exposures at 273 degrees F in a gravity displacement sterilizer was measured by media color change or turbidity after incubation at 55 degrees C. Each cycle was replicated three times on two separate days with six of each BI per run. Positive BIs were subcultured as necessary. Proof Flash presented technical difficulties due to incomplete or impossible crushing of media vials, unexpected media color changes, and evaporation of media. Tec Test was not sufficiently resistant as survivors were not detected at any exposure time. The Attest had 100% survival at zero and one-minute exposures and 94% survival after the two-minute exposure. No survivors were detected after the three-minute exposure. Although each institution should evaluate BIs for their own use independently, the data indicate that Attest #1261 monitored the three-minute flash cycles more satisfactorily than the other BIs tested. PMID:3115909

  12. Characterization of flash floods induced by tropical cyclones in Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Real-Rangel, R. A.; Pedrozo-Acuña, A.

    2015-12-01

    This study investigates the role of tropical cyclones (hurricanes, tropical storms and depressions) in the generation of flash floods in Mexico. For this, a severity assessment during several cyclonic events for selected catchments was estimated through the evaluation of a flash flood index recently proposed by Kim and Kim (2014). This classification is revised, considering the forcing and areal extent of torrential rainfall generated by the incidence of tropical cyclones on the studied catchments, enabling the further study of the flood regime in catchments located in tropical regions. The analysis incorporates characteristics of the flood hydrographs such as the hydrograph shape (rising curve gradient, magnitude of the peak discharge and flood response time) in order to identify flash-flood prone areas. Results show the Qp-A scaling relationship in catchments that were impacted by tropical cyclones, enabling their comparison against floods generated by other meteorological events (e.g. convective and orographic storms). Results will inform on how peak flows relationships are modified by cyclonic events and highlighting the contribution of cyclonic precipitation to flash-flooding susceptibility.

  13. Method and apparatus for flash evaporation of liquids

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, D.

    1984-01-01

    A vertical tube flash evaporator for introducing a super-heated liquid into a flash evaporation chamber includes a vertical inlet tube with a flared diffuser portion at its upper outlet end. A plurality of annular screens are positioned in axially spaced-apart relation to each other around the periphery of the vertical tube and below the diffuser portion thereof. The screens are preferably curved upward in a cup-shaped configuration. These flash evaporators are shown in an ocean thermal energy conversion unit designed for generating electric power from differential temperature gradients in ocean water. The method of use of the flash evaporators of this invention includes flowing liquid upwardly through the vertical tube into the diffuser where initial expansion and boiling occurs quite violently and explosively. Unvaporized liquid sheets and drops collide with each other to enhance surface renewal and evaporation properties, and liquid flowing over the outlet end of the diffuser falls onto the curved screens for further surface renewal and evaporation.

  14. Method and apparatus for flash evaporation of liquids

    DOEpatents

    Bharathan, Desikan

    1984-01-01

    A vertical tube flash evaporator for introducing a superheated liquid into a flash evaporation chamber includes a vertical inlet tube with a flared diffuser portion at its upper outlet end. A plurality of annular screens are positioned in axially spaced-apart relation to each other around the periphery of the vertical tube and below the diffuser portion thereof. The screens are preferably curved upward in a cup-shaped configuration. These flash evaporators are shown in an ocean thermal energy conversion unit designed for generating electric power from differential temperature gradients in ocean water. The method of use of the flash evaporators of this invention includes flowing liquid upwardly through the vertical tube into the diffuser where initial expansion and boiling occurs quite violently and explosively. Unvaporized liquid sheets and drops collide with each other to enhance surface renewal and evaporation properties, and liquid flowing over the outlet end of the diffuser falls onto the curved screens for further surface renewal and evaporation.

  15. Compact 3D flash lidar video cameras and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stettner, Roger

    2010-04-01

    The theory and operation of Advanced Scientific Concepts, Inc.'s (ASC) latest compact 3D Flash LIDAR Video Cameras (3D FLVCs) and a growing number of technical problems and solutions are discussed. The solutions range from space shuttle docking, planetary entry, decent and landing, surveillance, autonomous and manned ground vehicle navigation and 3D imaging through particle obscurants.

  16. Ultrafast-Contactless Flash Sintering using Plasma Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Theo; Grasso, Salvatore; Reece, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel derivative of flash sintering, in which contactless flash sintering (CFS) is achieved using plasma electrodes. In this setup, electrical contact with the sample to be sintered is made by two arc plasma electrodes, one on either side, allowing current to pass through the sample. This opens up the possibility of continuous throughput flash sintering. Preheating, a usual precondition for flash sintering, is provided by the arc electrodes which heat the sample to 1400 °C. The best results were produced with pre-compacted samples (bars 1.8 mm thick) of pure B4C (discharge time 2s, current 4A) and SiC:B4C 50 wt% (3s at 6A), which were fully consolidated under a heating rate approaching 20000 °C/min. For the composite a cylindrical volume of 14 mm(3) was sintered to full density with limited grain growth. PMID:27273255

  17. Ultrafast-Contactless Flash Sintering using Plasma Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Saunders, Theo; Grasso, Salvatore; Reece, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel derivative of flash sintering, in which contactless flash sintering (CFS) is achieved using plasma electrodes. In this setup, electrical contact with the sample to be sintered is made by two arc plasma electrodes, one on either side, allowing current to pass through the sample. This opens up the possibility of continuous throughput flash sintering. Preheating, a usual precondition for flash sintering, is provided by the arc electrodes which heat the sample to 1400 °C. The best results were produced with pre-compacted samples (bars 1.8 mm thick) of pure B4C (discharge time 2s, current 4A) and SiC:B4C 50 wt% (3s at 6A), which were fully consolidated under a heating rate approaching 20000 °C/min. For the composite a cylindrical volume of 14 mm3 was sintered to full density with limited grain growth. PMID:27273255

  18. Recognizing Words and Reading Sentences with Microsecond Flash Displays

    PubMed Central

    Greene, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Strings of dots can be used to construct easily identifiable letters, and these in turn can be used to write words and sentences. Prior work found that respondents could identify individual letters when all the dots were simultaneously flashed for an ultra-brief duration. Four of the experiments reported here constructed five-letter words with these dot-letters and a fifth experiment used them to write complete sentences. Respondents were able to recognize individual words that were displayed with a single, simultaneous ultra-brief flash of all the letters. Further, sentences could be efficiently read with a sequence of simultaneous flashes at a frequency that produced perceptual fusion. One experiment determined the frequency range that would produce flicker-fusion. Two experiments established the relation of intensity to probability of recognition with single flashes and with fused-flicker frequencies. Another established the intensities at which flicker-fused and steady displays were judged to be equal in brightness. The final experiment used those flicker-fused and steady intensities to display sentences. The two display conditions were read with equal efficiency, even though the flicker-fused displays provided light stimulation only 0.003% of the time. PMID:26800027

  19. Lightning flash density in relation to aerosol over Nanjing (China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Y. B.; Peng, L.; Shi, Z.; Chen, H. R.

    2016-06-01

    Time series data of lightning flash density, aerosol optical depth (AOD), surface temperature, convective available potential energy (CAPE) and thunderstorm days for 10 years (2002-2011), cloud-to-ground lightning (CG), and AOD of 5 years for summer season, i.e., June, July, and August over Nanjing, China, have been analyzed, to investigate the impact of aerosols on lightning. The results indicate that the radiative effect of aerosol may be one of the main reason for the decrease of the lightning flash density in a long period, while the aerosol microphysical effect may be a major role in the increase of the percent of + CG flashes (P+ CG). The dependence of surface temperature, CAPE, and thunderstorm days on AOD (R = - 0.748, - 0.741, - 0.744), and the negative correlation (R = - 0.634) between lightning flash density and AOD may lend support for the radiative effect of aerosol on lightning. In addition, elevated aerosols may change the charge distribution in thundercloud, hence enhancing the positive cloud-to-ground lightning (+ CG) activity, as P+ CG is positively correlated with AOD.

  20. Evaluation of nickel flash smelting through piloting and simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Varnas, S.R.; Koh, P.T.L.; Kemori, N.

    1998-12-01

    An extensive study of the nickel flash smelting process has been undertaken. It is aimed at the optimization of the burner design to improve the smelting performance and to increase the throughput of the rebuilt furnace. A design-based mathematical model was developed to simulate the operation of the four burners and the reaction shaft of the flash furnace at Western Mining Corporation Ltd.`s Kalgoorlie Nickel Smelter. A modified single burner version of the model was validated against data obtained from the pilot plant at the Pyrometallurgical Research Centre (PRC) of the Sumitomo Metal Mining Co.`s Toyo Smelter. The approach taken involved experimental measurements of key process parameters in the pilot plant and detailed numerical simulation of the fluid flow, heat transfer, and combustion in the entire burner-shaft complex. Several burner designs have been tested experimentally at the pilot plant and theoretically through computer simulation. The main outcome of the study was the development of an experimentally validated mathematical model of the flash smelter providing a new powerful design tool. The insight gained about the process from the application of this tool led to the design of a more efficient nickel flash smelting process.

  1. Novel approach for low-cost muzzle flash detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voskoboinik, Asher

    2008-04-01

    A low-cost muzzle flash detection based on CMOS sensor technology is proposed. This low-cost technology makes it possible to detect various transient events with characteristic times between dozens of microseconds up to dozens of milliseconds while sophisticated algorithms successfully separate them from false alarms by utilizing differences in geometrical characteristics and/or temporal signatures. The proposed system consists of off-the-shelf smart CMOS cameras with built-in signal and image processing capabilities for pre-processing together with allocated memory for storing a buffer of images for further post-processing. Such a sensor does not require sending giant amounts of raw data to a real-time processing unit but provides all calculations in-situ where processing results are the output of the sensor. This patented CMOS muzzle flash detection concept exhibits high-performance detection capability with very low false-alarm rates. It was found that most false-alarms due to sun glints are from sources at distances of 500-700 meters from the sensor and can be distinguished by time examination techniques from muzzle flash signals. This will enable to eliminate up to 80% of falsealarms due to sun specular reflections in the battle field. Additional effort to distinguish sun glints from suspected muzzle flash signal is made by optimization of the spectral band in Near-IR region. The proposed system can be used for muzzle detection of small arms, missiles and rockets and other military applications.

  2. Differences in Soccer Kick Kinematics between Blind Players and Controls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giagazoglou, Paraskevi; Katis, Athanasios; Kellis, Eleftherios; Natsikas, Christos

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the kinematic differences during instep soccer kicks between players who were blind and sighted controls. Eleven male soccer players who were blind and nine male sighted performed instep kicks under static and dynamic conditions. The results indicated significantly higher (p less than 0.05) ball…

  3. The Mental Skills Training of University Soccer Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sadeghi, Hassan; Omar-Fauzee, Mohd-Sofian; Jamalis, Marjohan; Ab-Latif, Rozita; Cheric, Majid Chahrdah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to identify the kind of mental skills training needed most by the university soccer players. Eight male university football players (aged 25 to 36) from one large university in Kuala Lumpur agreed to participate in this study. On average, they have 10 years of playing experience. All of them have signed the informed…

  4. Do Baseball Positions Correspond with a Player's Race?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hildreth, David J.

    1996-01-01

    Compares observed to expected counts of white, African American, and Hispanic major-league baseball players (n=650) in 1989. Uses chi-square values to determine that racial differences are highly significant for pitcher, catcher, shortstop, and outfielder. Includes appendix with 1993 player counts and seven suggested student activities. (SEW)

  5. Dynamic Visual Acuity of Varsity Women Volleyball and Basketball Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, G. S. Don; Kreighbaum, Ellen

    1977-01-01

    Comparison of the dynamic visual acuity (DVA) scores of high-ability and low-ability female basketball players, and between these two groups and a group of female volleyball players, resulted in the conclusion that there were no differences in the mean DVA scores between any of the groups. (MB)

  6. Labor Market Structure and Salary Determination among Professional Basketball Players.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Michael

    1988-01-01

    The author investigates the labor market structure and determinants of salaries for professional basketball players. An expanded version of the resource perspective is used. A three-tiered model of labor market segmentation is revealed for professional basketball players, but other variables also are important in salary determination. (Author/CH)

  7. Gender Differences in Coping among Elite Table Tennis Players

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirimoglu, Huseyin

    2011-01-01

    The current study aims to investigate the explanatory power of social support and coping in relation to a competitive sport event between male and female table tennis players. 246 university students table tennis players (120 men and 126 women) from different region and part of Turkey were invited to participate in a survey study included the…

  8. Proximal interphalangeal joint fracture dislocations in professional baseball players.

    PubMed

    Birman, Michael V; Rossenwasser, Melvin P

    2012-08-01

    Treatment of professional baseball players with PIP injuries requires careful evaluation and prompt treatment. Stability of the injury dictates treatment and return to play. The majority of injuries can be managed with minimal splinting or buddy taping, but the most complex injuries require operative intervention to ensure stable reduction. Consideration of players' position and handedness is important in determining return to practice and play.

  9. Relative risk for concussions in young female soccer players.

    PubMed

    Strand, Sarah; Lechuga, David; Zachariah, Thomas; Beaulieu, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relative risk and reported symptoms of concussions in 11- to 13-year-old, female soccer players. For this, a survey to compare the reported incidence of concussion in age-matched female soccer players to nonsoccer players was performed. The survey included 342 girls between the ages of 11 and 13: 195 were involved in an organized soccer team and 147 were not involved in organized soccer but were allowed to participate in any other sport or activity. A total of 94 of the 195 soccer players, or 48%, reported at least one symptom consistent with a concussion. The most prevalent symptom for these girls was headache (84%). A total of 34 of the 147 nonsoccer players, or 23%, reported at least one symptom consistent with a concussion in the previous six months. These results determined that the relative risk of probable concussions among 11- to 13-year-old, female soccer players is 2.09 (p < .001, α = .05, CI = 95%). This demonstrates that the relative risk of probable concussions in young female soccer players is significantly higher than in a control group of nonsoccer players of the same sex and age.

  10. Early sport involvement in young Portuguese basketball players.

    PubMed

    Leite, Nuno; Sampaio, Jaime

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the quantity and type of sporting activities undertaken by young Portuguese basketball players in early stages of athletic development. 750 basketball players aged between 12 and 16 years served as participants, grouped by sex and competitive level. The Skilled group comprised players representing the 9 highly ranked regional teams (n=378) while the Less-skilled group comprised the players representing the remaining 9 regional teams (n=372). All the participants filled out a previously validated questionnaire based on retrospective information linked to the training activities experienced throughout their involvement in sport. Results suggest that the majority of the players started practicing sports preferentially between 6 and 10 years. However, a significant number of players reported a later start, between 11 and 14 years of age. The pattern of sport involvement confirmed important divergences in the path reported by the players by the team's competitive level. The major findings of this study confirmed that players representing the highly ranked teams demonstrated a tendency to extend their training activities during longer periods during the week and throughout each season.

  11. Sub-seasonal forecasting of flash droughts in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xing; Wang, Linying

    2016-04-01

    Short-term droughts during the crop growing seasons sometimes occur with abnormally high temperature, the decreasing soil moisture but increasing evapotranspiration (ET) often intensify the drought conditions. These droughts are recently termed as "flash droughts" due to their rapid development, unusual intensity and devastating impacts. For example, a flash drought that lasted for less than a month during the summer of 2013 affected 13 provinces in southern China and damaged over 2 million hectares of crops in two southern provinces alone. Currently, seasonal forecasting of flash droughts remains a grand challenge because they usually happened without persistent oceanic anomalies while mainly due to the short-term anomalies in the atmospheric circulations and the land surface conditions. Moreover, forecasting of a flash drought event is not only to predict a water deficit, but also to predict a heat extreme (i.e., abnormally high temperature) and the water-energy coupling anomaly between the land and atmosphere (e.g., ET anomaly). On the other hand, sub-seasonal to seasonal (S2S) forecasting that intends to bridge the weather and climate predictions for a seamless climate service is an emerging area and will also be essential for advancing the extended hydrological forecasting. Recently, a number of S2S projects including the second phase of the North American Multimodel Ensemble (NMME) project have been launched to understand the hydro-climate predictability from weeks to a season, and to explore its usefulness for the applications within the Global Framework for Climate Services. Therefore, the emerging S2S forecasting activities provide an unprecedent opportunity for improving the understanding of the predictability of flash drought, and sub-seasonal forecasting of flash drought will in turn be a good measure for assessing the phenomenological forecast skill of the S2S forecasting practices. In this presentation, a 29-year daily NCEP Climate Forecast System

  12. Enhanced ethylene production via flash methanolysis of coal

    SciTech Connect

    Sundaram, M.S.; Steinberg, M.; Fallon, P.

    1983-12-01

    According to a recent report, an estimated 31 billion pounds of ethylene was produced in the US alone. Ethylene is an important raw material in the vast plastic and polymer markets. An upward trend in the demand for ethylene has been predicted for the future years. Currently, ethylene is produced mainly through thermal and catalytic hydrocracking of ethane and other hydrocarbons. Although a large amount of work has been performed on the production of gaseous and liquid fuels from coal, much less attention has been focused on the production of ehtylene using coal as the raw material. In an on-going pyrolysis research project at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, methods for increasing the yield of ethylene through flash methanolysis of coal are being investigated. Flash methanolysis is defined as pyrolysis of coal under pressure in an atmosphere of methane. This study attempts to identify the influence of important process variables such as reaction temperature, gas pressure, solids residence time, gas/solids ratio etc on the production of ethylene and other pyrolysis products. We have shown that there are definite advantages in the use of methane as an atmosphere in the flash pyrolysis of coal. At temperatures higher than 800/sup 0/C, 2 to 5 times greater yields of ethylene are obtainable in methane atmosphere compared to flash pyrolysis in an inert helium atmosphere. An enhancement in the yield of ethylene and BTX are important raw materials in the vast polymer and plastic markets, flash methanolysis of coal has potential process applications. 5 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  13. Temporal integration of light flashes by the human circadian system

    PubMed Central

    Najjar, Raymond P.; Zeitzer, Jamie M.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Beyond image formation, the light that is detected by retinal photoreceptors influences subcortical functions, including circadian timing, sleep, and arousal. The physiology of nonimage-forming (NIF) photoresponses in humans is not well understood; therefore, the development of therapeutic interventions based on this physiology, such as bright light therapy to treat chronobiological disorders, remains challenging. METHODS. Thirty-nine participants were exposed to 60 minutes of either continuous light (n = 8) or sequences of 2-millisecond light flashes (n = 31) with different interstimulus intervals (ISIs; ranging from 2.5 to 240 seconds). Melatonin phase shift and suppression, along with changes in alertness and sleepiness, were assessed. RESULTS. We determined that the human circadian system integrates flash sequences in a nonlinear fashion with a linear rise to a peak response (ISI = 7.6 ± 0.53 seconds) and a power function decrease following the peak of responsivity. At peak ISI, flashes were at least 2-fold more effective in phase delaying the circadian system as compared with exposure to equiluminous continuous light 3,800 times the duration. Flashes did not change melatonin concentrations or alertness in an ISI-dependent manner. CONCLUSION. We have demonstrated that intermittent light is more effective than continuous light at eliciting circadian changes. These findings cast light on the phenomenology of photic integration and suggest a dichotomous retinohypothalamic network leading to circadian phase shifting and other NIF photoresponses. Further clinical trials are required to judge the practicality of light flash protocols. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01119365. FUNDING. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (1R01HL108441-01A1) and Department of Veterans Affairs Sierra Pacific Mental Illness Research, Education, and Clinical Center. PMID:26854928

  14. A Comparison of Radiometric Calibration Techniques for Lunar Impact Flashes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suggs, R.

    2016-01-01

    Video observations of lunar impact flashes have been made by a number of researchers since the late 1990's and the problem of determination of the impact energies has been approached in different ways (Bellot Rubio, et al., 2000 [1], Bouley, et al., 2012.[2], Suggs, et al. 2014 [3], Rembold and Ryan 2015 [4], Ortiz, et al. 2015 [5]). The wide spectral response of the unfiltered video cameras in use for all published measurements necessitates color correction for the standard filter magnitudes available for the comparison stars. An estimate of the color of the impact flash is also needed to correct it to the chosen passband. Magnitudes corrected to standard filters are then used to determine the luminous energy in the filter passband according to the stellar atmosphere calibrations of Bessell et al., 1998 [6]. Figure 1 illustrates the problem. The camera pass band is the wide black curve and the blue, green, red, and magenta curves show the band passes of the Johnson-Cousins B, V, R, and I filters for which we have calibration star magnitudes. The blackbody curve of an impact flash of temperature 2800K (Nemtchinov, et al., 1998 [7]) is the dashed line. This paper compares the various photometric calibration techniques and how they address the color corrections necessary for the calculation of luminous energy (radiometry) of impact flashes. This issue has significant implications for determination of luminous efficiency, predictions of impact crater sizes for observed flashes, and the flux of meteoroids in the 10s of grams to kilogram size range.

  15. Upper limits of flash flood stream power in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchi, Lorenzo; Cavalli, Marco; Amponsah, William; Borga, Marco; Crema, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Flash floods are characterized by strong spatial gradients of rainfall inputs that hit different parts of a river basin with different intensity. Stream power values associated with flash floods therefore show spatial variations that depend on geological controls on channel geometry and sediment characteristics, as well as on the variations of flood intensity: this stresses the need for a field approach that takes into account the variability of the controlling factors. Post-flood assessment of peak discharge after major floods makes it possible to analyse stream power in fluvial systems affected by flash floods. This study analyses the stream power of seven intense (return period of rainfall > 100 years at least in some sectors of the river basin) flash floods that occurred in mountainous basins of central and southern Europe from 2007 to 2014. In most of the analysed cross sections, high values of unit stream power were observed; this is consistent with the high severity of the studied floods. The highest values of cross-sectional stream power and unit stream power usually occur in Mediterranean regions. This is mainly ascribed to the larger peak discharges that characterize flash floods in these regions. The variability of unit stream power with catchment area is clearly nonlinear and has been represented by log-quadratic relations. The values of catchment area at which maximum values of unit stream power occur show relevant differences among the studied floods and are linked to the spatial scale of the events. Values of stream power are generally consistent with observed geomorphic changes in the studied cross sections: bedrock channels show the highest values of unit stream power but no visible erosion, whereas major erosion has been observed in alluvial channels. Exceptions to this general pattern, which mostly occur in semi-alluvial cross sections, urge the recognition of local or event-specific conditions that increase the resistance of channel bed and

  16. Flash flood warning based on fully dynamic hydrology modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejanovic, Goran; Petkovic, Slavko; Cvetkovic, Bojan; Nickovic, Slobodan

    2016-04-01

    Numerical hydrologic modeling has achieved limited success in the past due to, inter alia, lack of adequate input data. Over the last decade, data availability has improved substantially. For modelling purposes, high-resolution data on topography, river routing, and land cover and soil features have meanwhile become available, as well as the observations such as radar precipitation information. In our study, we have implemented the HYPROM model (Hydrology Prognostic Model) to predict a flash flood event at a smaller-scale basin in Southern Serbia. HYPROM is based on the full set of governing equations for surface hydrological dynamics, in which momentum components, along with the equation of mass continuity, are used as full prognostic equations. HYPROM also includes a river routing module serving as a collector for the extra surface water. Such approach permits appropriate representation of different hydrology scales ranging from flash floods to flows of large and slow river basins. The use of full governing equations, if not appropriately parameterized, may lead to numerical instability systems when the surface water in a model is vanishing. To resolve these modelling problems, an unconditionally stable numerical scheme and a method for height redistribution avoiding shortwave height noise have been developed in HYPROM, which achieve numerical convergence of u, v and h when surface water disappears. We have applied HYPROM, driven by radar-estimated precipitation, to predict flash flooding occurred over smaller and medium-size river basins. Two torrential rainfall cases have been simulated to check the accuracy of the model: the exceptional flooding of May 2014 in Western Serbia, and the convective flash flood of January 2015 in Southern Serbia. The second episode has been successfully predicted by HYPROM in terms of timing and intensity six hours before the event occurred. Such flash flood warning system is in preparation to be operationally implemented in the

  17. Mechanisms of neck and shoulder injuries in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Lee, H W

    1995-01-01

    Shoulder injuries are common among athletes involved in repetitive overhead arm movements, particularly baseball pitchers and tennis players. Due to the similarities between pitching and serving, both athletes often present with similar types of shoulder injuries. However, subtle differences in neck and shoulder movements between the pitcher and tennis player may be responsible for additional mechanisms of injuries specific to tennis players. This paper outlines the similarities and differences between the pitch and serve and discusses how these differences may relate to additional neck and/or shoulder injuries specific to tennis players. In the analyses of mechanisms of injuries sustained by tennis players, such detailed analyses of movement patterns occurring during the serve may optimize a clinician's sports-specific rehabilitation protocol. PMID:7889030

  18. National survey of spinal injuries in hockey players.

    PubMed Central

    Tator, C. H.; Edmonds, V. E.

    1984-01-01

    There has been an alarming increase in the number of spinal injuries in hockey players. Between 1976 and 1983, 42 were reported to the Committee on Prevention of Spinal Injuries due to Hockey. The median age of the injured players was 17 years. Of the 42 players 28 had spinal cord injuries, and 17 of them had complete paralysis below the vertebral level of the injury. Strikes from behind and collisions with the boards were common mechanisms of injury. Many of the players had suffered a burst fracture of the cervical spine following a blow to the top of the helmet when the neck was slightly flexed. The committee studied a number of possible etiologic factors and made several recommendations regarding prevention. League officials, coaches, players and equipment manufacturers can all play a role in prevention. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6704840

  19. Mechanisms of neck and shoulder injuries in tennis players.

    PubMed

    Lee, H W

    1995-01-01

    Shoulder injuries are common among athletes involved in repetitive overhead arm movements, particularly baseball pitchers and tennis players. Due to the similarities between pitching and serving, both athletes often present with similar types of shoulder injuries. However, subtle differences in neck and shoulder movements between the pitcher and tennis player may be responsible for additional mechanisms of injuries specific to tennis players. This paper outlines the similarities and differences between the pitch and serve and discusses how these differences may relate to additional neck and/or shoulder injuries specific to tennis players. In the analyses of mechanisms of injuries sustained by tennis players, such detailed analyses of movement patterns occurring during the serve may optimize a clinician's sports-specific rehabilitation protocol.

  20. Morphologic and anthropometric characteristics of high level Dutch korfball players.

    PubMed

    Godinho, M; Fragoso, I; Vieira, F

    1996-02-01

    In this study a morphologic and anthropometric characterisation of Dutch korfball players (N = 36) is performed. Data, compared with those of other sports populations, showed that (1) korfball athletes are smaller and lighter than basketball and volleyball players but heavier and taller than other team-sport players; (2) korfball players have less relative body fat, more lean body mass, more limb fat, and less or similar trunk fat than the other athletes. (3) Male korfball players presented a somatotype (1.9-4.4-3.4) similar to endurance athletes and an endomorphic value lower than or similar to the other athletes. (4) The only apparent similarity between female korfball somatotype (3.2-4.0-2.8) and other athletes' somatotypes is the dominance of mesomorphy.

  1. An unusual characteristic “flower-like” pattern: flash suppressor burns

    PubMed Central

    Gurcan, Altun

    2012-01-01

    The case on contact shots from firearms with a flash suppressor is rare. When a rifle fitted with a flash suppressor is fired, the emerging soot-laden gas in the barrel escapes from the slits of the flash suppressor. If the shot is contact or near contact, the flash suppressor will produce a characteristic “flower-like” pattern of seared, blackened zones around the entrance. This paper presents the injury pattern of the flash suppressor in a 29-year-old man who committed suicide with a G3 automatic infantry rifle. PMID:23935280

  2. Neuropsychological consequence of soccer play in adolescent U.K. School team soccer players.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Richard; Rutherford, Andrew; Potter, Douglas; Fernie, Gordon

    2010-01-01

    To assess mild head injury effects in adolescent soccer players, neuropsychological performance across school team soccer players, rugby players and noncontact sport players was assessed in a quasi-experimental cross-sectional design. One hundred eighty-five males were tested (ages 13-16; response rate 55%) and 86 contributed data to the analyses after exclusion for recent concussion and overlapping sports participation. Soccer players showed lower premorbid intellectual functioning, but neither soccer players nor rugby players showed neuropsychological decrement compared with noncontact sport players. Cumulative heading did not predict neuropsychological performance. While no specific attribute of soccer was linked with neuropsychological impairment, head injury predicted reduced attention for all participants.

  3. Characteristics of junctionless charge trap flash memory for 3D stacked NAND flash.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jinho; Na, Heedo; Park, Sunghoon; Sohn, Hyunchul

    2013-09-01

    The electrical characteristics of tunnel barrier engineered-charge trap flash (TBE-CTF) memory devices with junctionless (JL) source and drain (S/D) were investigated. The JL structure is composed of an n(+)-poly-Si based ultra-thin channel and S/D with identical doping concentrations. The band engineered Hf-silicate/Al2O3 tunnel barrier stack was applied to a JL-TBE-CTF memory device in order to enhance the field sensitivity. The Hf-silicate/Al2O3 tunnel barrier, HfO2 trap layer, and Al2O3 blocking layer were deposited by atomic layer deposition. The fabricated device exhibited a large memory window of 9.43 V, as well as high programming and erasing speeds. Moreover, it also showed adequate retention times and endurance properties. Hence, the JL-TBE-CTF memory (which has a low process complexity) is expected to be an appropriate structure for 3D stacked ultra-high density memory applications. PMID:24205672

  4. Influence of players' physique on rugby football injuries.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, A J; Myers, J L; Garraway, W M

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether there is an association between a player's physique and injuries incurred while playing rugby football. METHODS: A cohort study was carried out involving all senior rugby clubs in the Scottish Borders during the 1993-1994 rugby season. Somatotype estimates were determined for 1152 (95%) of the 1216 eligible players. Body mass index (BMI), chest to waist ratio, and the ponderal index (PI) were used to classify players' physique as endomorphic (obese), mesomorphic (muscular), and ectomorphic (linear). RESULTS: A strong association was found between physique and age (chi 2 test: chi 2 = 317.2, df = 10, P < 0.0001). More younger players were ectomorphs. Older players were more often endomorphic. The physiques of forwards and backs were significantly different (chi 2 test: chi 2 = 58.6, df = 2, P < 0.0001), with forwards being of a heavier build than three-quarters, even after adjustment for age. Endomorphic players were more likely than ectomorphs to be injured in a match after adjustment for age (age-adjusted mean BMI for players who were injured in a match was 25.4 compared with 24.6 for players who were not injured in a match, P < 0.0001; adjusted chest to waist ratio means were 1.136 and 1.125 respectively, P = 0.0307; adjusted PI means were 0.414 and 0.417 respectively, P = 0.0056). Increased risk of injury may occur when players play out of position, since one fifth of all injuries occurred in this circumstance. CONCLUSIONS: Further research needs to be conducted using a more objective method of measuring somatotype on a further cohort of players so that the risk of injury for different body types can be examined more closely and related to other potential confounding factors. The level of increased risk for individuals playing out of their usual playing position needs to be established with a greater degree of certainty. PMID:9192128

  5. Anthropometric and performance comparisons in professional baseball players.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Jay R; Vazquez, Jose; Pichardo, Napoleon; Tenenbaum, Gershon

    2009-11-01

    This study compared anthropometric and performance variables in professional baseball players and examined the relationship between these variables and baseball-specific performance (i.e., home runs, total bases, slugging percentage, and stolen bases). During a 2-year period, 343 professional baseball players were assessed for height, weight, body composition, grip strength, vertical jump power, 10-yard sprint speed, and agility. Subject population consisted of players on the rosters of one of the minor league affiliates (Rookie, A, AA, AAA) or major league team (MLB). All testing occurred at the beginning of spring training. Players in Rookie and A were significantly (p < 0.05) leaner than players in MLB and AAA. These same players had significantly lower lean body mass than seen in MLB, AAA, and AA players. Greater grip strength (p < 0.05) was seen in MLB and AAA than in Rookie and A. Players in MLB were also faster (p < 0.05) than players in AA, A, and Rookie. Vertical jump power measures were greater (p < 0.05) in MLB than AA, A, and Rookie. Regression analysis revealed that performance measures accounted for 25-31% of the variance in baseball-specific power performance. Anthropometric measures failed to add any additional explanation to the variance in these baseball-specific performance variables. Results indicated that both anthropometric and performance variables differed between players of different levels of competition in professional baseball. Agility, speed, and lower-body power appeared to provide the greatest predictive power of baseball-specific performance.

  6. A Method for Using Player Tracking Data in Basketball to Learn Player Skills and Predict Team Performance.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Brian; Guy, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Player tracking data represents a revolutionary new data source for basketball analysis, in which essentially every aspect of a player's performance is tracked and can be analyzed numerically. We suggest a way by which this data set, when coupled with a network-style model of the offense that relates players' skills to the team's success at running different plays, can be used to automatically learn players' skills and predict the performance of untested 5-man lineups in a way that accounts for the interaction between players' respective skill sets. After developing a general analysis procedure, we present as an example a specific implementation of our method using a simplified network model. While player tracking data is not yet available in the public domain, we evaluate our model using simulated data and show that player skills can be accurately inferred by a simple statistical inference scheme. Finally, we use the model to analyze games from the 2011 playoff series between the Memphis Grizzlies and the Oklahoma City Thunder and we show that, even with a very limited data set, the model can consistently describe a player's interactions with a given lineup based only on his performance with a different lineup. PMID:26351846

  7. A Method for Using Player Tracking Data in Basketball to Learn Player Skills and Predict Team Performance.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Brian; Guy, Stephen J

    2015-01-01

    Player tracking data represents a revolutionary new data source for basketball analysis, in which essentially every aspect of a player's performance is tracked and can be analyzed numerically. We suggest a way by which this data set, when coupled with a network-style model of the offense that relates players' skills to the team's success at running different plays, can be used to automatically learn players' skills and predict the performance of untested 5-man lineups in a way that accounts for the interaction between players' respective skill sets. After developing a general analysis procedure, we present as an example a specific implementation of our method using a simplified network model. While player tracking data is not yet available in the public domain, we evaluate our model using simulated data and show that player skills can be accurately inferred by a simple statistical inference scheme. Finally, we use the model to analyze games from the 2011 playoff series between the Memphis Grizzlies and the Oklahoma City Thunder and we show that, even with a very limited data set, the model can consistently describe a player's interactions with a given lineup based only on his performance with a different lineup.

  8. Flash memory management system and method utilizing multiple block list windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chow, James (Inventor); Gender, Thomas K. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention provides a flash memory management system and method with increased performance. The flash memory management system provides the ability to efficiently manage and allocate flash memory use in a way that improves reliability and longevity, while maintaining good performance levels. The flash memory management system includes a free block mechanism, a disk maintenance mechanism, and a bad block detection mechanism. The free block mechanism provides efficient sorting of free blocks to facilitate selecting low use blocks for writing. The disk maintenance mechanism provides for the ability to efficiently clean flash memory blocks during processor idle times. The bad block detection mechanism provides the ability to better detect when a block of flash memory is likely to go bad. The flash status mechanism stores information in fast access memory that describes the content and status of the data in the flash disk. The new bank detection mechanism provides the ability to automatically detect when new banks of flash memory are added to the system. Together, these mechanisms provide a flash memory management system that can improve the operational efficiency of systems that utilize flash memory.

  9. Histone variants: emerging players in cancer biology

    PubMed Central

    Vardabasso, Chiara; Hasson, Dan; Ratnakumar, Kajan; Chung, Chi-Yeh; Duarte, Luis F.

    2014-01-01

    Histone variants are key players in shaping chromatin structure, and, thus, in regulating fundamental cellular processes such as chromosome segregation and gene expression. Emerging evidence points towards a role for histone variants in contributing to tumor progression, and, recently, the first cancer-associated mutation in a histone variant-encoding gene was reported. In addition, genetic alterations of the histone chaperones that specifically regulate chromatin incorporation of histone variants are rapidly being uncovered in numerous cancers. Collectively, these findings implicate histone variants as potential drivers of cancer initiation and/or progression, and, therefore, targeting histone deposition or the chromatin remodeling machinery may be of therapeutic value. Here, we review the mammalian histone variants of the H2A and H3 families in their respective cellular functions, and their involvement in tumor biology. PMID:23652611

  10. Coach/player relationships in tennis.

    PubMed

    Prapavessis, H; Gordon, S

    1991-09-01

    The present study examined the variables that predict coach/athlete compatibility. Compatibility among a sample of 52 elite tennis coach/player dyads was assessed using a sport adapted version of Schutz's (1966) Fundamental Interpersonal Relations Orientation-Behaviour (FIRO-B), a sport adapted version of Fiedler's (1967) Least Preferred Co-worker scale (LPC), and Chelladurai and Saleh's (1980) Leadership Scale for Sport (LSS). Self-ratings of the quality of the interaction were obtained from both coach and athlete. Multiple-regression analyses using self-rating scores as the dependent measure were carried out to determine which variables best predicted the degree of compatibility. The sole inventory that significantly predicted compatibility was the LSS. More specifically, the discrepancy between the athlete's preferences and perceptions on the autocratic dimension was the best predictor. Implications for tennis coaches and recommendations for future research in this area are discussed.

  11. Cellular Players in Skeletal Muscle Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ceafalan, Laura Cristina; Popescu, Bogdan Ovidiu; Hinescu, Mihail Eugen

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle, a tissue endowed with remarkable endogenous regeneration potential, is still under focused experimental investigation mainly due to treatment potential for muscle trauma and muscular dystrophies. Resident satellite cells with stem cell features were enthusiastically described quite a long time ago, but activation of these cells is not yet controlled by any medical interventions. However, after thorough reports of their existence, survival, activation, and differentiation there are still many questions to be answered regarding the intimate mechanism of tissue regeneration. This review delivers an up-to-date inventory of the main known key players in skeletal muscle repair, revealed by various models of tissue injuries in mechanical trauma, toxic lesions, and muscular dystrophy. A better understanding of the spatial and temporal relationships between various cell populations, with different physical or paracrine interactions and phenotype changes induced by local or systemic signalling, might lead to a more efficient approach for future therapies. PMID:24779022

  12. Peripheral nerve injuries in baseball players.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Craig A; Schneider, David S

    2009-02-01

    Baseball players place significant stress across their shoulders and elbows during the throwing motion, causing unique patterns of injuries in the overhead throwing athlete. Specific nerve injuries include suprascapular neuropathy, quadrilateral space syndrome, and cubital tunnel syndrome. Nonoperative treatment includes cessation of throwing and symptom management. As symptoms improve, athletes should start rehabilitation, focusing on restoring shoulder and trunk flexibility and strength. The final rehabilitation phase involves an interval throwing program with attention directed at proper mechanics, with the goal of returning the athlete to competitive throwing. Surgery may assist in a positive outcome in particular patients who fail to improve with nonoperative treatment. Additional indications for surgery may include more profound neuropathy and nerve compression by a mass lesion.

  13. Peripheral nerve injuries in baseball players.

    PubMed

    Cummins, Craig A; Schneider, David S

    2008-02-01

    Baseball players place significant stress across their shoulders and elbows during the throwing motion, causing unique patterns of injuries in the overhead throwing athlete. Specific nerve injuries include suprascapular neuropathy, quadrilateral space syndrome, and cubital tunnel syndrome. Nonoperative treatment includes cessation of throwing and symptom management. As symptoms improve, athletes should start rehabilitation, focusing on restoring shoulder and trunk flexibility and strength. The final rehabilitation phase involves an interval throwing program with attention directed at proper mechanics, with the goal of returning the athlete to competitive throwing. Surgery may assist in a positive outcome in particular patients who fail to improve with nonoperative treatment. Additional indications for surgery may include more profound neuropathy and nerve compression by a mass lesion.

  14. Thoracic compression fracture in a basketball player.

    PubMed

    McHugh-Pierzina, V L; Zillmer, D A; Giangarra, C E

    1995-06-01

    Thoracolumbar pain is a frequent complaint of many athletes, but the cause is often difficult to diagnose. Compression fractures of the spine are rarely seen in athletics and are not always recognized as a potential cause of the symptoms. Reported here is a case of a T12 compression fracture in a male basketball player. Pain films revealed the percentage of loss of vertebral body height, thereby determining the stability of the fracture. If treated with a thoracolumbar spinal orthosis brace and activity restrictions, stable compression fractures heal without surgical intervention and athletes can return to activity within a number of months. Athletic trainers and physicians should maintain a level of suspicion for this injury when violent trunk flexion or lateral flexion is the mechanism of injury.

  15. [Decision making by intercollegiate basketball players].

    PubMed

    Proteau, L; Dugas, C

    1982-06-01

    The results of several studies suggest that in an event incertitude situation, elite athletes can select the appropriate response faster than the novice. There are at least two possibilities to explain such a difference. First, it could be that the elite athlete has more facility to reduce the amount of information he/she is confronted with, that is he/she is able to identify more easily certain sequences and patterns in the play of his/her opponents. Secondly, it is possible that the athlete uses the available information in a different manner. The purpose of this study was to verify the second hypothesis. 10 subjects (5 novices and 4 intercollegiate basketball players) were submitted to a choice time task where the required response was a total body displacement over 2 meters. The results suggest that elite athletes use their knowledge of probability of events in the same way as the novice subjects.

  16. Osteitis Pubis in a Basketball Player.

    PubMed

    Pearson, R L; Nagle, C E

    1988-07-01

    In brief:An 18-year-old male varsity basketball player complained of lower left abdominal pain of a month's duration. Laboratory tests were normal, and no hernia was present. A computed tomography scan showed no abnormality, and fraying of the pubic bone along the symphysis was too subtle to detect on x-ray. A bone scan (pelvic views), however, confirmed a diagnosis of osteitis pubis. Although this disease is self-limited, the patient was treated with corticosteroids and anti-inflammatory medication to enhance his comfort. His condition gradually improved within a few months, and he returned to competition the following season. Follow-up bone scans at one and two years were normal.

  17. 46 CFR 35.20-30 - Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding... VESSELS OPERATIONS Navigation § 35.20-30 Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light—T/ALL. No person shall flash, or cause to be flashed, the rays of a search light or other blinding...

  18. 46 CFR 35.20-30 - Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding... VESSELS OPERATIONS Navigation § 35.20-30 Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light—T/ALL. No person shall flash, or cause to be flashed, the rays of a search light or other blinding...

  19. 46 CFR 35.20-30 - Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding... VESSELS OPERATIONS Navigation § 35.20-30 Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light—T/ALL. No person shall flash, or cause to be flashed, the rays of a search light or other blinding...

  20. 46 CFR 35.20-30 - Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding... VESSELS OPERATIONS Navigation § 35.20-30 Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light—T/ALL. No person shall flash, or cause to be flashed, the rays of a search light or other blinding...

  1. 46 CFR 35.20-30 - Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light-T/ALL.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding... VESSELS OPERATIONS Navigation § 35.20-30 Flashing the rays of a searchlight or other blinding light—T/ALL. No person shall flash, or cause to be flashed, the rays of a search light or other blinding...

  2. University Football Players, Postural Stability, and Concussions.

    PubMed

    Graves, Barbara Sue

    2016-02-01

    Concussion in football athletes is certainly more prevalent and has potentially serious outcomes. With current concerns and increasing return-to-play issues, additional assessment focus is needed. Division 1 college football athletes, from 18 to 20.9 years (n = 177; age, 19.7 ± 1.2 years; height, 182.3 ± 4.5 cm; weight, 97.3 ± 10.6 kg), before fall practice, over a period of 3 years, underwent baseline postural stability testing (sensory organization test [SOT], NeuroCom). Individuals, who were diagnosed with a concussion (headache, dizziness, fatigue, confusion, or loss of consciousness) during practice or actual competition (n = 15; age, 18.9 ± 0.9 years; height, 181.8 ± 2.5 cm; weight, 86.6 ± 3.6 kg), underwent serial evaluation after injury and 24 hours after concussion. As soon as the player was considered asymptomatic, the test was completed on the first and 14th day. A control group of noninjured male athletes (n = 15; age, 19.1 ± 0.4 years; height, 178.2 ± 3.2 cm; weight, 78.6 ± 2.1 kg) were tested for the same time frame. This particular study was only one part of the total evaluation conducted for the concussed athlete's return to play. Results indicated that the concussion group had a statistically significant (p = 0.037) change from their baseline SOT score and the control group (p = 0.025). This change remained significant until day 14 of posttesting. These data indicate that the SOT, when available, may be a positive additional assessment of concussed college-aged football players. Professionals, when dealing with concussion in competitive sports, do need to continue to work together, but awareness of SOT assessments may also contribute to the return-to-play decisions. PMID:26284680

  3. University Football Players, Postural Stability, and Concussions.

    PubMed

    Graves, Barbara Sue

    2016-02-01

    Concussion in football athletes is certainly more prevalent and has potentially serious outcomes. With current concerns and increasing return-to-play issues, additional assessment focus is needed. Division 1 college football athletes, from 18 to 20.9 years (n = 177; age, 19.7 ± 1.2 years; height, 182.3 ± 4.5 cm; weight, 97.3 ± 10.6 kg), before fall practice, over a period of 3 years, underwent baseline postural stability testing (sensory organization test [SOT], NeuroCom). Individuals, who were diagnosed with a concussion (headache, dizziness, fatigue, confusion, or loss of consciousness) during practice or actual competition (n = 15; age, 18.9 ± 0.9 years; height, 181.8 ± 2.5 cm; weight, 86.6 ± 3.6 kg), underwent serial evaluation after injury and 24 hours after concussion. As soon as the player was considered asymptomatic, the test was completed on the first and 14th day. A control group of noninjured male athletes (n = 15; age, 19.1 ± 0.4 years; height, 178.2 ± 3.2 cm; weight, 78.6 ± 2.1 kg) were tested for the same time frame. This particular study was only one part of the total evaluation conducted for the concussed athlete's return to play. Results indicated that the concussion group had a statistically significant (p = 0.037) change from their baseline SOT score and the control group (p = 0.025). This change remained significant until day 14 of posttesting. These data indicate that the SOT, when available, may be a positive additional assessment of concussed college-aged football players. Professionals, when dealing with concussion in competitive sports, do need to continue to work together, but awareness of SOT assessments may also contribute to the return-to-play decisions.

  4. Cosmic X-ray Flashes Reveal Their Distance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    Astronomers using X-ray, radio, and optical telescopes have announced a big leap in solving the origin of mysterious objects known as X-ray flashes (XRFs) by finding that they originate from blue star forming galaxies. This discovery of the cosmic distance scale effectively ends the widely-held speculation that XRFs are the death-cries from stars exploding in the infant universe. X-ray flashes resemble a lower energy and longer-duration version of a gamma-ray burst, an energetic explosion thought to signal the death of a massive star. The properties of XRFs led to speculation that they were gamma-ray bursts that occurred less than a few billion years after the Big Bang, and whose light had been subsequently weakened and time-stretched by the expansion of the universe. "Now that the very distant origin has been ruled out, X-ray flashes could be due to exploding massive stars, just like gamma-ray bursts" explained Dr. Joshua Bloom at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics in Cambridge, Mass., lead author on the paper announcing the results to be published in The Astrophysical Journal. Bloom continued: "But the explosion from an X-ray flash would need to contain less matter or less energy than a typical gamma-ray burst. Alternatively, X-ray flashes could be gamma-ray bursts viewed off-axis." These results are being discussed at the "30th Anniversary of the Discovery of Gamma-ray Bursts" conference currently being held in Sante Fe, New Mexico. The location of the sources studied by Bloom's group required a careful coordination of NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope, along with the National Radio Astronomy Observatory's Very Large Array (VLA) in Socorro, New Mexico. Chandra and the VLA provided a precise location of the fading X-ray and radio "afterglow" of two X-ray flashes known as XRF 011030 and XRF 020427. The Hubble Space Telescope was used to identify and study galaxies at these locations and estimate their distances to between

  5. The role of attention in motion extrapolation: are moving objects 'corrected' or flashed objects attentionally delayed?

    PubMed

    Khurana, B; Watanabe, K; Nijhawan, R

    2000-01-01

    Objects flashed in alignment with moving objects appear to lag behind [Nijhawan, 1994 Nature (London) 370 256-257]. Could this 'flash-lag' effect be due to attentional delays in bringing flashed items to perceptual awareness [Titchener, 1908/1973 Lectures on the Elementary Psychology of Feeling and Attention first published 1908 (New York: Macmillan); reprinted 1973 (New York: Arno Press)]? We overtly manipulated attentional allocation in three experiments to address the following questions: Is the flash-lag effect affected when attention is (a) focused on a single event in the presence of multiple events, (b) distributed over multiple events, and (c) diverted from the flashed object? To address the first two questions, five rings, moving along a circular path, were presented while observers attentively tracked one or multiple rings under four conditions: the ring in which the disk was flashed was (i) known or (ii) unknown (randomly selected from the set of five); location of the flashed disk was (i) known or (ii) unknown (randomly selected from ten locations). The third question was investigated by using two moving objects in a cost-benefit cueing paradigm. An arrow cued, with 70% or 80% validity, the position of the flashed object. Observers performed two tasks: (a) reacted as quickly as possible to flash onset; (b) reported the flash-lag effect. We obtained a significant and unaltered flash-lag effect under all the attentional conditions we employed. Furthermore, though reaction times were significantly shorter for validly cued flashes, the flash-lag effect remained uninfluenced by cue validity, indicating that quicker responses to validly cued locations may be due to the shortening of post-perceptual delays in motor responses rather than the perceptual facilitation. We conclude that the computations that give rise to the flash-lag effect are independent of attentional deployment.

  6. Impact Flash Physics: Modeling and Comparisons With Experimental Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainey, E.; Stickle, A. M.; Ernst, C. M.; Schultz, P. H.; Mehta, N. L.; Brown, R. C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Michaelis, C. H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    Hypervelocity impacts frequently generate an observable "flash" of light with two components: a short-duration spike due to emissions from vaporized material, and a long-duration peak due to thermal emissions from expanding hot debris. The intensity and duration of these peaks depend on the impact velocity, angle, and the target and projectile mass and composition. Thus remote sensing measurements of planetary impact flashes have the potential to constrain the properties of impacting meteors and improve our understanding of impact flux and cratering processes. Interpreting impact flash measurements requires a thorough understanding of how flash characteristics correlate with impact conditions. Because planetary-scale impacts cannot be replicated in the laboratory, numerical simulations are needed to provide this insight for the solar system. Computational hydrocodes can produce detailed simulations of the impact process, but they lack the radiation physics required to model the optical flash. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) developed a model to calculate the optical signature from the hot debris cloud produced by an impact. While the phenomenology of the optical signature is understood, the details required to accurately model it are complicated by uncertainties in material and optical properties and the simplifications required to numerically model radiation from large-scale impacts. Comparisons with laboratory impact experiments allow us to validate our approach and to draw insight regarding processes that occur at all scales in impact events, such as melt generation. We used Sandia National Lab's CTH shock physics hydrocode along with the optical signature model developed at APL to compare with a series of laboratory experiments conducted at the NASA Ames Vertical Gun Range. The experiments used Pyrex projectiles to impact pumice powder targets with velocities ranging from 1 to 6 km/s at angles of 30 and 90 degrees with respect to

  7. Tracking of Ball and Players in Beach Volleyball Videos

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Gabriel; Herrera López, Patricia; Link, Daniel; Eskofier, Bjoern

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents methods for the determination of players' positions and contact time points by tracking the players and the ball in beach volleyball videos. Two player tracking methods are compared, a classical particle filter and a rigid grid integral histogram tracker. Due to mutual occlusion of the players and the camera perspective, results are best for the front players, with 74,6% and 82,6% of correctly tracked frames for the particle method and the integral histogram method, respectively. Results suggest an improved robustness against player confusion between different particle sets when tracking with a rigid grid approach. Faster processing and less player confusions make this method superior to the classical particle filter. Two different ball tracking methods are used that detect ball candidates from movement difference images using a background subtraction algorithm. Ball trajectories are estimated and interpolated from parabolic flight equations. The tracking accuracy of the ball is 54,2% for the trajectory growth method and 42,1% for the Hough line detection method. Tracking results of over 90% from the literature could not be confirmed. Ball contact frames were estimated from parabolic trajectory intersection, resulting in 48,9% of correctly estimated ball contact points. PMID:25426936

  8. Throwing speed and accuracy in baseball and cricket players.

    PubMed

    Freeston, Jonathan; Rooney, Kieron

    2014-06-01

    Throwing speed and accuracy are both critical to sports performance but cannot be optimized simultaneously. This speed-accuracy trade-off (SATO) is evident across a number of throwing groups but remains poorly understood. The goal was to describe the SATO in baseball and cricket players and determine the speed that optimizes accuracy. 20 grade-level baseball and cricket players performed 10 throws at 80% and 100% of maximal throwing speed (MTS) toward a cricket stump. Baseball players then performed a further 10 throws at 70%, 80%, 90%, and 100% of MTS toward a circular target. Baseball players threw faster with greater accuracy than cricket players at both speeds. Both groups demonstrated a significant SATO as vertical error increased with increases in speed; the trade-off was worse for cricketers than baseball players. Accuracy was optimized at 70% of MTS for baseballers. Throwing athletes should decrease speed when accuracy is critical. Cricket players could adopt baseball-training practices to improve throwing performance.

  9. Physical performance of elite and subelite Spanish female futsal players.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Campo, D J; Rubio-Arias, J A; Carrasco-Poyatos, M; Alcaraz, P E

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the parameters distinguishing top female futsal players from lower level players. Twenty-seven female futsal players participated in the study, composed of professional first division (elite; n = 15) players and semi-professional second division players (sub-elite; n = 14). Active and passive straight leg raise tests, isokinetic strength of the knee extensor and flexor muscles at 60° · s(-1) angular velocity, squat and counter movement jumps, 30 m sprint, 30 m agility, repeated sprint ability test and maximum ball speed during shooting were measured. The elite players were more agile and kicked harder than sub-elite players in maximum ball speed during the shooting test (P ≤ 0.05). However, no significant differences between teams were observed in active and passive hamstring flexibility, jumping ability, repeated sprint ability test, 30 m sprint time, H/Q ratio and absolute and relative torque from 60° · s(-1) angular velocity. Based on these findings we conclude that agility and maximum ball speed during shooting may be important determinant factors of Spanish female futsal actions and could distinguish ability at high-level games. PMID:27601786

  10. Physical performance of elite and subelite Spanish female futsal players

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Arias, JA; Carrasco-Poyatos, M; Alcaraz, PE

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the parameters distinguishing top female futsal players from lower level players. Twenty-seven female futsal players participated in the study, composed of professional first division (elite; n = 15) players and semi-professional second division players (sub-elite; n = 14). Active and passive straight leg raise tests, isokinetic strength of the knee extensor and flexor muscles at 60° · s-1 angular velocity, squat and counter movement jumps, 30 m sprint, 30 m agility, repeated sprint ability test and maximum ball speed during shooting were measured. The elite players were more agile and kicked harder than sub-elite players in maximum ball speed during the shooting test (P ≤ 0.05). However, no significant differences between teams were observed in active and passive hamstring flexibility, jumping ability, repeated sprint ability test, 30 m sprint time, H/Q ratio and absolute and relative torque from 60° · s-1 angular velocity. Based on these findings we conclude that agility and maximum ball speed during shooting may be important determinant factors of Spanish female futsal actions and could distinguish ability at high-level games.

  11. Safety attitudes and beliefs of junior Australian football players

    PubMed Central

    Finch, C; Donohue, S; Garnham, A

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To describe the safety attitudes and beliefs of junior (aged 16–18 years) Australian football players. Setting: Six Victorian Football League Under 18 (VFL U18) clubs in Victoria, Australia. Methods: Cross sectional survey. Altogether 103 players completed a self report questionnaire about their safety beliefs and perceptions of support when injured, across three contexts in which they played: VFL U18 club, local club, and school. Results: Although only 6% believed it was safe to play with injuries, 58% were willing to risk doing so. This increased to almost 80% when players perceived that their chances of being selected to play for a senior elite team would be adversely affected if they did not play. There were significant differences in the perceived level of support for injured players and in the ranking of safety as a high priority across the three settings. In general, the VFL U18 clubs were perceived as providing good support for injured players and giving a high priority to safety issues, but local clubs and particularly schools were perceived to address these issues less well. Conclusions: Junior Australian football players have certain beliefs and perceptions in relation to injury risk that have the potential to increase injuries. These negative beliefs need to be addressed in any comprehensive injury prevention strategy aimed at these players. PMID:12120836

  12. Nutrition and hydration concerns of the female football player.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Ronald J; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2007-08-01

    There is little information on the nutritional habits of female football players at any level of the game. There is also a shortage of information on the nutrition and hydration strategies that players should adopt. In general, differences in nutritional needs between males and females are smaller than differences between individuals, so that principles developed for male players also apply to women. There is a need to address energy balance and body composition: prolonged energy deficits cannot be sustained without harm to health and performance. Published reports show mean carbohydrate intakes for female players of about 5 g/kg/day, and this seems to be too low to sustain consistent intensive training. The timing of protein intake may be as important as the amounts consumed, provided that the total intake is adequate. Dehydration adversely affects skill and stamina in women as it does in men, so an individualised hydration strategy should be developed. The prevalence of iron deficiency in women generally is high, but it seems to be alarmingly high in female players. All players should adopt dietary habits that ensure adequate iron intake. Football training seems to increase bone mass in the weight-bearing limbs, with positive implications for bone health in later life, but some players may be at risk from inadequate calcium dietary intake. PMID:17646250

  13. Nutrition and hydration concerns of the female football player.

    PubMed

    Maughan, Ronald J; Shirreffs, Susan M

    2007-08-01

    There is little information on the nutritional habits of female football players at any level of the game. There is also a shortage of information on the nutrition and hydration strategies that players should adopt. In general, differences in nutritional needs between males and females are smaller than differences between individuals, so that principles developed for male players also apply to women. There is a need to address energy balance and body composition: prolonged energy deficits cannot be sustained without harm to health and performance. Published reports show mean carbohydrate intakes for female players of about 5 g/kg/day, and this seems to be too low to sustain consistent intensive training. The timing of protein intake may be as important as the amounts consumed, provided that the total intake is adequate. Dehydration adversely affects skill and stamina in women as it does in men, so an individualised hydration strategy should be developed. The prevalence of iron deficiency in women generally is high, but it seems to be alarmingly high in female players. All players should adopt dietary habits that ensure adequate iron intake. Football training seems to increase bone mass in the weight-bearing limbs, with positive implications for bone health in later life, but some players may be at risk from inadequate calcium dietary intake.

  14. Shoulder and elbow kinematics in throwing of young baseball players.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Kazuyuki; Murata, Masahiro; Hirano, Yuichi

    2006-07-01

    In this study we compared the kinematic features of the throwing motion between young baseball players of different age groups. Forty-four Japanese baseball players aged 6.1 to 12.3 years who regularly played baseball, including pitchers and position players, had their throwing actions analyzed three-dimensionally using high speed videography. Of this sample, 26 players aged above 9 years of age were categorized as the senior group, while the remaining 18 were categorized as the junior group. Senior group throwers had greater height and body mass, and produced a greater ball speed than junior group throwers. The throwing arm movement of senior group throwers was similar to that of adult skilled players. However, in the junior group throwers, the shoulder horizontal adduction angle was larger during the arm acceleration phase, and the maximum angular velocities of elbow extension and shoulder internal rotation occurred later than in senior group throwers. These results indicate that players aged above 9 years can acquire a mature throwing arm movement, while players younger than that will use an immature motion. A possible reason why these differences were shown is that the official baseball is relatively heavy for junior group throwers; they would be better advised to use a lighter ball in throwing practice.

  15. Psychomotor performance of elite volleyball players during a game.

    PubMed

    Mroczek, Dariusz; Kawczyński, Adam; Superlak, Edward; Chmura, Jan

    2013-12-01

    Prior studies have found that reaction time and movement time increase with fatigue (measured by blood lactate concentration) in laboratory situations. The study tested whether these relationships occurred for reaction time and movement time of elite volleyball players during a training game. Components of the players' psychomotor performance (reaction time, movement time) and physiological parameters (heart rate, blood lactate concentration) were analyzed. Fourteen male, adolescent volleyball players participated in the study. Reaction time and movement time were measured with the Optojump measurement system during the game in off-the-court periods. All measurements were performed during a pre-game test and during each of the four sets of the game. During Set 1, players' reaction time decreased significantly compared with the pre-game test indicating a likely warm-up effect. Blood lactate concentration increased significantly across sets. However, the players' reaction times remained constant across sets. The studied players did not exceed the psychomotor fatigue threshold anytime during the entire game. These findings indicate that the amount of training (20 hours a week) done by elite players is sufficient to prevent threshold fatigue levels that create significant decreases in psychomotor performance. PMID:24665798

  16. Physical performance of elite and subelite Spanish female futsal players

    PubMed Central

    Rubio-Arias, JA; Carrasco-Poyatos, M; Alcaraz, PE

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the parameters distinguishing top female futsal players from lower level players. Twenty-seven female futsal players participated in the study, composed of professional first division (elite; n = 15) players and semi-professional second division players (sub-elite; n = 14). Active and passive straight leg raise tests, isokinetic strength of the knee extensor and flexor muscles at 60° · s-1 angular velocity, squat and counter movement jumps, 30 m sprint, 30 m agility, repeated sprint ability test and maximum ball speed during shooting were measured. The elite players were more agile and kicked harder than sub-elite players in maximum ball speed during the shooting test (P ≤ 0.05). However, no significant differences between teams were observed in active and passive hamstring flexibility, jumping ability, repeated sprint ability test, 30 m sprint time, H/Q ratio and absolute and relative torque from 60° · s-1 angular velocity. Based on these findings we conclude that agility and maximum ball speed during shooting may be important determinant factors of Spanish female futsal actions and could distinguish ability at high-level games. PMID:27601786

  17. Structural measures as predictors of injury basketball players.

    PubMed

    Shambaugh, J P; Klein, A; Herbert, J H

    1991-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between structure and injury in basketball players, with the goal of developing equations to predict injury. We examined 45 subjects who were participating in a community center basketball league. Each subject was measured prior to the season for bilateral weight, quadricep girth, calf girth, Q-angle of the knee, dorsiflexion of the ankle, forefoot varus, rearfoot valgus, and true and apparent leg length. All lower extremity injuries causing a game to be missed were recorded during the 16-game season. Average values for bilateral weight, quadricep girth, Q-angle, rearfoot valgus, and leg length measures for the injured players were all larger than the average for the non-injured players by at least one standard deviation. A logistic regression equation using three of the variables correctly predicted the injury status of 91% of the players. The three-variable equation was then used prospectively to predict injury status for members of a small college basketball team. Only one player missed a game due to injury, and the equation identified that player as the most likely to be injured. This study demonstrates a strong relationship between structural measures and lower extremity injury in basketball players.

  18. Development of repeated sprint ability in talented youth basketball players.

    PubMed

    Te Wierike, Sanne C M; de Jong, Mark C; Yvonne Tromp, E J; Vuijk, Pieter Jelle; Lemmink, Koen A P M; Malina, Robert M; Elferink-Gemser, Marije T; Visscher, Chris

    2013-11-20

    Factors affecting repeated sprint ability (RSA) were evaluated in a mixed-longitudinal sample of 48 elite basketball players 14 to 19 years of age (16.1±1.7 years). Players were observed on six occasions during the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 seasons. Three basketball-specific field tests were administered on each occasion: the Shuttle Sprint Test (SST) for RSA, the Vertical Jump (VJ) for lower body explosive strength (power), and the Interval Shuttle Run Test (ISRT) for interval endurance capacity. Height and weight were measured; body composition was estimated (percent fat, lean body mass). Multilevel modeling of RSA development curve was used with 32 players (16.0±1.7 years) who had two or more observations. The 16 players (16.1±1.8 years) measured on only one occasion were used as a control group to evaluate the appropriateness of the model. Age, lower body explosive strength, and interval endurance capacity significantly contributed to RSA (p < .05). RSA improved with age from 14-17 years (p < .05) and reached a plateau at 17-19 years. Predicted RSA did not significantly differ from measured RSA in the control group (p > .05). The results suggest a potentially important role for the training of lower body explosive strength and interval endurance capacity in the development of RSA among youth basketball players. Age-specific reference values for RSA of youth players may assist basketball coaches in setting appropriate goals for individual players.

  19. Analysis of sprinting activities of professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Andrzejewski, Marcin; Chmura, Jan; Pluta, Beata; Strzelczyk, Ryszard; Kasprzak, Andrzej

    2013-08-01

    The aim of the study was a detailed analysis of the sprinting activity of professional soccer players. The study involved 147 players who played in 10 matches of the 2008-09 and 2010-11 UEFA Europa League seasons. The number of performed sprints and total sprint distances covered by the players were examined using collected statistical material. Two types of sprints were distinguished based on their duration: S, short-duration sprint (below 5 seconds) and L, long-duration sprint (above 5 seconds). Additionally, sprints were classified according to their distance: 0-10, 10.1-20.0, and >20 m, respectively. The analysis of the sprinting activity of soccer players also involved their respective positions of play. The study was carried out using Amisco Pro (version. 1.0.2), one of the most comprehensive up-to-date computer systems for match analysis. The statistical analysis revealed that the mean total sprint distance covered by players (≥24 km·h) amounted to 237 ± 123 m. With regard to the position of play, the forwards covered the longest sprint distance (345 ± 129 m), that is, 9% longer than midfielders (313 ± 119 m) and over 100% longer than central midfielders (167 ± 87 m). The average number of sprints performed by the soccer players was 11.2 ± 5.3. It should also be emphasized that about 90% of sprints performed by professional soccer players were shorter than 5 seconds, whereas only 10% were longer than 5 seconds. Analysis of physical loads of soccer players during matches can be useful for individualization of training of soccer players' speed capabilities. It is an essential instrument of modern planning and application of training loads.

  20. Management of concussion in the professional football player.

    PubMed

    Pieroth, Elizabeth M; Hanks, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    There is no other sport that has come under greater scrutiny surrounding the incidence and treatment of concussion than football, and there is no other professional sports league that has experienced more intense focus of its handling of concussions than the National Football League (NFL). The NFL has received significant criticism of their management of concussion in players from both the popular press and the medical community. However, those working with active NFL players have changed their assessment and treatment of these injuries as the knowledge of concussions has evolved over time. We review the current approach to the management of concussions in the professional football player.