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Sample records for adolescent aids clinical

  1. Behavioral Risk Factors for AIDS among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Millstein, Susan G.

    This document examines the incidence of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among adolescents in the United States and identifies several risk factors for AIDS among this population. It classifies adolescents' risk for contracting human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection by the degree to which adolescents engage in behaviors that are…

  2. Prototypical Images in Condom Scripts among AIDS-Bereaved Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Warren A.; Rubin, Rachel M.

    2007-01-01

    Twenty-five HIV-negative late adolescents (13 women and 12 men) who had lost a parent to AIDS generated vignettes in which the characters were deciding whether to use a condom (condom scripts). Two clinically trained judges rated the interpersonal tone of the condom scripts on 17 semantic differential scales. Three other clinically trained raters…

  3. Evaluation of a Computerized Contraceptive Decision Aid for Adolescent Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chewning, Betty; Mosena, Pat; Wilson, Dale; Erdman, Harold; Potthoff, Sandra; Murphy, Anita; Kuhnen, Kathleen Kennedy

    1999-01-01

    Discusses a computer-based contraceptive decision aid used with adolescent female family planning clinic patients (N=949). Results show improved short-term knowledge of and confidence in oral contraceptive (OC) efficacy. Higher OC knowledge after one year and fewer pregnancies were seen in one group. Findings suggest the usefulness of informatics…

  4. HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Fact Sheet

    MedlinePlus

    ... and effective in people. What is an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? HIV/AIDS clinical trials help researchers ... to HIV Can anyone participate in an HIV/AIDS clinical trial? It depends on the study. Some ...

  5. Social representation of AIDS among Zambian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Joffe, Hélène; Bettega, Nadia

    2003-09-01

    This study explores shared thinking about HIV/AIDS among Zambian adolescents. With high numbers affected, the question is how this group represents its risk. Social representations of the origin, spread and risk of HIV/AIDS were gleaned via 60 semistructured interviews with urban 15 to 20 year olds. A systematic analysis revealed a shared picture: AIDS was linked to the West, God and teenage girls; its spread lay beyond the control of adolescent boys and men; and the personal sense of vulnerability was low. The results are discussed in light of their corroboration of the finding that social representations of danger can be identity protective, yet also system justifying. The potential transfer of such findings to psychological theory and to health campaigns is considered.

  6. Adolescents, AIDS and HIV. Resources.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resources for Educators, 1990

    1990-01-01

    This compilation of educational resources is designed for communities which have been either overlooked in Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) education efforts or disproportionately affected by Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection. The materials listed target Blacks, Latinos, Asians and Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, young…

  7. Reducing HIV and AIDS in adolescents: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Kasedde, Susan; Luo, Chewe; McClure, Craig; Chandan, Upjeet

    2013-06-01

    Adolescents are critical to efforts to end the AIDS epidemic. Few national AIDS strategies explicitly program for children in their second decade of life. Adolescents (aged 10-19 years) are therefore largely invisible in global, regional, and country HIV and AIDS reports making it difficult to assess progress in this population. We have unprecedented knowledge to guide investment towards greater impact on HIV prevention, treatment, and care in adolescents, but it has not been applied to reach those most vulnerable and optimize efficiency and scale. The cost of this is increasing AIDS-related deaths and largely unchanged levels of new HIV infections in adolescents. An AIDS-free generation will remain out of reach if the global community does not prioritize adolescents. National AIDS responses must be accountable to adolescents, invest in strengthening and monitoring protective and supportive laws and policies and access for adolescents to high impact HIV interventions.

  8. Discrimination against South African adolescents orphaned by AIDS.

    PubMed

    Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, Gloria; Mokomane, Zitha

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the discrimination against adolescents orphaned by AIDS. A qualitative phenomenological approach using reflective diaries was used to extract how this population is discriminated on. Fifteen adolescents ages 14 to 18 living in an urban area in South Africa participated in the study. Data were collected as part of a larger study in which a peer-based mental health intervention was designed for use with adolescents orphaned by AIDS. Colaizzi's seven stages were used to analyze the data from the reflective diaries. Analysis revealed that adolescents orphaned by AIDS experienced physical, social, and institutional expressions of stigma leading to discrimination. Adolescents were discriminated on by peers, caregivers, and teachers. The results of this study show that adolescents orphaned by AIDS face discrimination; further studies on the topic with a larger sample are needed to verify these findings.

  9. HIV/AIDS Researchers Interaction with Schoolteachers: A Key to Combat AIDS among Brazilian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kashima, Simone; de Castro, Fabiola Attie; de Castro Amarante, Maria Fernanda; Barbieri, Marisa Ramos; Covas, Dimas Tadeu

    2008-01-01

    Considering the fact that information on HIV/AIDS is a strategy for disease control, this project was planned to provide comprehensive information about HIV infection and AIDS to schoolteachers and their students. Previous analysis of adolescent students' knowledge of HIV/AIDS showed that they still have doubts about transmission, diagnosis, and…

  10. Clinical Criteria for Physician Aid in Dying

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Thaddeus Mason; Rich, Ben A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract More than 20 years ago, even before voters in Oregon had enacted the first aid in dying (AID) statute in the United States, Timothy Quill and colleagues proposed clinical criteria AID. Their proposal was carefully considered and temperate, but there were little data on the practice of AID at the time. (With AID, a physician writes a prescription for life-ending medication for a terminally ill, mentally capacitated adult.) With the passage of time, a substantial body of data on AID has developed from the states of Oregon and Washington. For more than 17 years, physicians in Oregon have been authorized to provide a prescription for AID. Accordingly, we have updated the clinical criteria of Quill, et al., based on the many years of experience with AID. With more jurisdictions authorizing AID, it is critical that physicians can turn to reliable clinical criteria. As with any medical practice, AID must be provided in a safe and effective manner. Physicians need to know (1) how to respond to a patient's inquiry about AID, (2) how to assess patient decision making capacity, and (3) how to address a range of other issues that may arise. To ensure that physicians have the guidance they need, Compassion & Choices convened the Physician Aid-in-Dying Clinical Criteria Committee, in July 2012, to create clinical criteria for physicians who are willing to provide AID to patients who request it. The committee includes experts in medicine, law, bioethics, hospice, nursing, social work, and pharmacy. Using an iterative consensus process, the Committee drafted the criteria over a one-year period. PMID:26539979

  11. Preventing HIV/AIDS in Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of School Health, 1994

    1994-01-01

    Examines issues in preventing further Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection among adolescents, highlighting HIV and other sexually transmitted diseases, substance use, adolescent development, cultural and language diversity, health and social service needs, socioeconomic contexts, and role of media, school, and youth-serving organizations.…

  12. Preventing the sexual transmission of AIDS during adolescence.

    PubMed

    Remafedi, G J

    1988-03-01

    In order to be effective, the national effort to contain the spread of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) must include a youth focus. Knowledge of adolescent sexual behavior, drug use, and sexually transmitted diseases suggests that many adolescents are in jeopardy of acquiring Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections; and they are among those most likely to benefit from preventative efforts as they explore adult roles and lifestyles. Preventative education should particularly target gay and other homosexually active young men. Effective teaching uses a variety of approaches and media, both inside and outside the classroom. Learning about AIDS is most likely to effect behavioral change when accompanied by other programs to build social supports, self-esteem, and positive identity. The ethical and rational use of HIV antibody testing may be a helpful adjunct to education for certain adolescents. Ultimately, our society's ability to address complex, associated social issues will determine our ability to control AIDS.

  13. High prevalence of physical inactivity among adolescents living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Luana Fiengo; Latorre, Maria do Rosário Dias de Oliveira; da Silva, Aline Medeiros; Konstantyner, Thais Claudia Roma de Oliveira; Peres, Stela Verzinhasse; Marques, Heloisa Helena de Sousa

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To assess the prevalence of physical inactivity among adolescents with HIV/AIDS, as well as associated factors. Methods: Ninety-one adolescents (from 10 to 19 years old) with HIV/AIDS who are patients at a university follow-up service were interviewed. Anthropometric data (weight, height, and waist circumference) were measured twice; clinical information was obtained from medical records, and habitual physical activity was assessed by a questionnaire proposed by Florindo et al. The cutoff point for sedentariness was 300 minutes/week. Results: The prevalence of inadequate height for age, malnutrition, and overweight/obesity was 15.4%, 9.9% and 12.1%, respectively. The most common physical activities were soccer (44.4%), volleyball (14.4%) and cycling (7.8%). The median times spent with physical activity and walking/bicycling to school were 141 min and 39 min, respectively. Most adolescents (71.4%) were sedentary and this proportion was higher among girls (p=0.046). Conclusions: A high prevalence of physical inactivity among adolescents with HIV/AIDS was observed, similar to the general population. Promoting physical activity among adolescents, especially among girls with HIV/AIDS, as well as monitoring it should be part of the follow-up routine of these patients. PMID:25907024

  14. Spanish Aid in Clinical Dietetics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bringas, Juliet G.; Chan, Teresa Y.

    Designed to aid dietitians, nutritionists, and other health professionals to better serve the nutritional needs of Hispanics, this bilingual booklet describes the different cultural eating habits of Mexican, Cuban, and Puerto Rican Americans, with in-depth description of Mexican Americans. Written in Spanish and English, the booklet includes…

  15. Helping Mothers Discuss Sexuality and AIDS with Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefkowitz, Eva S.; Sigman, Marian; Au, Terry Kit-fong

    2000-01-01

    Examined impact of experimentally altering mothers' style when discussing sexuality and AIDS with adolescent children. Found that intervention group mothers reduced their amount of speaking, asked more open-ended questions, acted less judgmental, and discussed dating and sexuality more than did control group mothers. Intervention group adolescents…

  16. Adolescents' Behavior and Attitudes toward AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salehi, Saeed; And Others

    The need for effective programs to delay sexual activity and to educate adolescents regarding the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) has never been greater. Statistics point out that a significant number of teenagers throughout the United States engage in behavior that increases their risks of becoming infected with HIV. This study examined…

  17. Transition of adolescents with HIV to adult care: characteristics and current practices of the adolescent trials network for HIV/AIDS interventions.

    PubMed

    Gilliam, Patricia P; Ellen, Jonathan M; Leonard, Lori; Kinsman, Sara; Jevitt, Cecilia M; Straub, Diane M

    2011-01-01

    The transition process from pediatric to adult health care for adolescents with chronic diseases is always challenging and can be even more so for adolescents with HIV disease. The purpose of this study was to describe characteristics and current practices surrounding the transition of adolescents from the clinics of the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions to adult medical care. This report focuses on the processes of transition, perceived barriers and facilitators, and anecdotal reports of successes and failures. Practice models used to assist adolescents during transition to adult medical care are described. Interviews were conducted with 19 key informants from 14 Adolescent Trials Network clinics. Findings revealed no consistent definition of "successful" transition, little consensus among the sites regarding specific elements of a transition program, and a lack of mechanisms to assess outcomes. Sites that viewed transition as a process rather than an event consistently described more structured program elements.

  18. Clinical trials on AIDS start.

    PubMed

    A 6-month clinical trial in the Philippines sought to determine the efficacy of coconut oil and of "monolaurin," a coconut oil byproduct, in killing HIV by breaking down its coating. This research is based on the theory that medium-chain fatty acids, like monolaurin, can have this effect on certain viruses. The trial involves 12 women and 3 men in the early stage of HIV infection. 10 patients will take different doses of monolaurin, and 5 will consume coconut oil. It is hypothesized that the regimen will lead to higher CD4 counts and a lower viral load. The trial was almost abandoned because it received only lukewarm approval from the Health Secretary.

  19. [Current clinical aspects of AIDS].

    PubMed

    Clumeck, N

    1993-01-01

    Our knowledge of the natural history of VIH infection has considerably increased during the last years. We know now that clinical evolution will depend of host factors as well as of viral characteristics. Among the host factors, the early specific cytotoxic response to VIH components plays a major role. Phenotypic variation of the virus (syncytium inducer mutants) and viral load in the lymph node and in the circulating CD4 cells play also an important role. As far as antiviral therapeutic is concerned, at the moment we know that monotherapy with nucleosides analogues is probably of limited efficacy because of emergence of resistance. Future perspectives include combination of antivirals aimed to prevent emergence of resistance and to reduce toxicity.

  20. The nutritional status of children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS on antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Souza, Déborah Teixeira; Rondó, Patrícia Helen Carvalho; Reis, Ligia Cardoso

    2011-02-01

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the nutritional status of children and adolescents with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) receiving highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). One hundred and eighteen subjects aged 6-19 years attending an outpatient clinic in São Paulo city were involved in the study. The following anthropometric measurements were assessed: weight, height, waist circumference and triceps and subscapular skinfold thickness. One (0.9%) adolescent was diagnosed with abdominal obesity based on waist circumference measurement; three (2.5%) adolescents were obese based on subscapular skinfold thickness. According to the body mass index, the population studied was mainly eutrophic. The prevalence of fat redistribution, a characteristic of patients with HIV/AIDS under HAART, was low. We advise the development of further studies to assess the nutritional status of children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS using anthropometric measurements as well as computed tomography to detect fat redistribution.

  1. Adolescents' Thoughts and Feelings about AIDS in Relation to Cognitive Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Candida C.; Murphy, Lisa

    1990-01-01

    Studied adolescents' (N=163) formal operational reasoning in relation to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) knowledge, AIDS fear, sexual knowledge, and reactions to AIDS victims. Found that advanced reasoning predicted better AIDS knowledge and general sexual knowledge. Advanced reasoning and AIDS knowledge were also linked with heightened…

  2. Endemic mycoses in AIDS: a clinical review.

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, J

    1995-01-01

    Histoplasmosis and coccidioidomycosis are serious opportunistic infections in patients with AIDS who reside in areas of endemicity of the United States and Central and South America. Blastomycosis, although less common, also must be recognized as an opportunistic infection in patients with AIDS. Prompt diagnosis requires knowledge of the clinical syndromes and diagnostic tests as well as a high index of suspicion. Histoplasmosis and blastomycosis respond well to antifungal treatment, but relapse is common without chronic suppressive therapy. Improvements in treatment are needed in coccidioidomycosis. Research is needed to identify preventive strategies for patients at risk. These strategies may include use of prophylactic antifungal therapy or vaccination. PMID:7704892

  3. Male Adolescents' View on Sexual Activity as Basis for the Development of Aids-Prevention Programmes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steyn, Hester; Myburgh, Chris P.H.; Poggenpoel, Marie

    2005-01-01

    The world regards AIDS as the most disastrous health threat in the world. HIV/AIDS- related issues amongst adolescents were initially neglected due to the visible impact of this pandemic on babies and adults. Adolescents' behavior is however regarded as high-risk because of their involvement in sexual activities from a young age. The purpose of…

  4. Utilizing Mutual Aid in Reducing Adolescent Substance Use and Developing Group Engagement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mogro-Wilson, Cristina; Letendre, Joan; Toi, Hiroki; Bryan, Janelle

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study assessed the effectiveness of mutual aid groups for high school students. Methods: A quasi-experimental design was applied to 242 adolescents, where every other adolescent was assigned to the intervention or the control condition. The study evaluated the influence of implementing mutual aid groups in decreasing perceived risk…

  5. [Knowledge of STD/AIDS among adolescent students].

    PubMed

    Brêtas, José Roberto da Silva; Ohara, Conceição Vieira da Silva; Jardim, Dulcilene Pereira; Muroya, Renata de Lima

    2009-09-01

    This study aims to analyze the degree of knowledge adolescents have on STD/AIDS prevention, transmission, signs, and symptoms, and to contribute with the elaboration of educational actions in the University Extension Program called Corporality and Health Promotion. The research counted on 1,087 adolescents (40% females, 60% males) and was carried out in three elementary and high schools located in the municipality of Embu. A structured, multiple choice questionnaire was applied. Data indicated the achievement of the following results: as per the prevention, 92% of girls and 78% of boys referred to the use of condoms, while 42% of girls and 43% of boys affirmed to wash their genitalia after the sexual relation; 75% females and 52% males quoted television as their source of information. As per the knowledge of STD, girls and boys indicated not to have much information on the issue. Regarding STD healing programs, 57% females and 71% males affirmed not to have any knowledge on the issue; 5% of girls and 6% of boys thought AIDS to be curable. In a general perspective, we can conclude that girls were more familiar with the study's issues than boys.

  6. HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Beliefs among Haitian Adolescents in Miami-Dade County, Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marcelin, Louis Herns; McCoy, H. Virginia; DiClemente, Ralph J.

    2006-01-01

    This study examined HIV/AIDS knowledge and beliefs in Haitian adolescents in an HIV epicenter, Miami-Dade Florida. This study examined survey data from 300 Haitian adolescents, aged 13 through 18, from both low- and middle-income neighborhoods. A sub-sample of 80 adolescents was selected for in-depth interviews and continuous observations with…

  7. Adolescents growing with HIV/AIDS: experiences of the transition from pediatrics to adult care.

    PubMed

    Machado, Daisy Maria; Galano, Eliana; de Menezes Succi, Regina Célia; Vieira, Carla Maria; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of this work is to describe the formation of the Transition Adolescent Clinic (TAC) and understand the process of transitioning adolescents with HIV/AIDS from pediatric to adult care, from the vantage point of individuals subjected to this process. A qualitative method and an intentional sample selected by criteria were adopted for this investigation, which was conducted in São Paulo, Brazil. An in-depth semi-structured interview was conducted with sixteen HIV-infected adolescents who had been part of a transitioning protocol. Adolescents expressed the need for more time to become adapted in the transition process. Having grown up under the care of a team of health care providers made many participants have reluctance toward transitioning. Concerns in moving away from their pediatricians and feelings of disruption, abandonment, or rejection were mentioned. Participants also expressed confidence in the pediatric team. At the same time they showed interest in the new team and expected to have close relationships with them. They also ask to have previous contacts with the adult health care team before the transition. Their talks suggest that they require slightly more time, not the time measured in days or months, but the time measured by constitutive experiences capable of building an expectation of future. This study examines the way in which the adolescents feel, and help to transform the health care transition model used at a public university. Listening to the adolescents' voices is crucial to a better understanding of their needs. They are those who can help the professionals reaching alternatives for a smooth and successful health care transition.

  8. AIDS--Challenges to Basic and Clinical Biomedical Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fauci, Anthony S.

    1989-01-01

    Clinical trials and access to therapeutic drugs pose dilemmas for researchers, physicians, and AIDS patients. The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, recognizing the need for greater access to drugs by a broader spectrum of the infected population, is establishing the Community Programs for Clinical Research on AIDS. (Author/MLW)

  9. Grieving experiences amongst adolescents orphaned by AIDS: Analysis from event history calendars.

    PubMed

    Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, Gloria

    2012-09-07

    Mental health is an essential component of adolescent health and wellbeing. Mental health practitioners assess adolescents' mental health status to identify possible issues that may lead to mental health problems. However, very few of the tools used to assess the mental health status of adolescents include assessment for grieving and coping patterns. The current tools used for assessing an individual's mental health are lengthy and not comprehensive. The purpose of this study was to assess grieving patterns of adolescents orphaned by AIDS and to appraise the usefulness of an event history calendar as an assessment tool for identifying grieving experiences, in order to guide and support these adolescents through the grieving process. One hundred and two adolescents aged 14-18 years, who had been orphaned by AIDS, completed an event history calendar, reviewed it with the researcher and reported their perceptions of it. Thematic analysis of the event history calendar content revealed that it is an effective, time-efficient, adolescent-friendly tool that facilitated identification and discussion of the orphaned adolescents' grieving patterns. Crying, isolation, silence and violent outbursts were the main grieving patterns reported by adolescents orphaned by AIDS. The researcher recommends use of the event history calendar for identification of orphaned adolescents' grieving experiences. Early identification would enable mental health practitioners to support them in order to prevent the occurrence of mental illness due to maladaptive grieving.

  10. Gender Differences in HIV/AIDS Preventive Self-Efficacy Among Taiwanese Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hui; Salman, Ali; Cooksey-James, Tawna

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the cross-sectional study was to understand gender differences in HIV/AIDS preventive self-efficacy among Taiwanese adolescents. Self-administered questionnaires were used to measure HIV/AIDS preventive self-efficacy and covariates (age, substance use, and sexual experiences). Data were collected from 734 Taiwanese high school adolescents aged 16 to 18 years. Descriptive statistic analyses, t-test, and ANCOVA were utilized to analyze data. The results indicate significant differences exist between genders in HIV/AIDS preventive self-efficacy among Taiwanese adolescents. Compared to the males, female adolescents were found having significantly higher HIV/AIDS preventive self-efficacy related to refusing sexual intercourse, condom use, and questioning potential sexual partners than those who are males. While controlling age, sexual experience, and substance use, female Taiwanese adolescents also had higher HIV/AIDS preventive self-efficacy than those who are males. The findings suggest the importance of addressing gender differences in HIV/AIDS preventive self-efficacy when developing HIV reduction programs for Taiwanese adolescents.

  11. Child Abuse and Aids-Related Knowledge, Attitudes and Behavior among Adolescents in Zambia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slonim-Nevo, Vered; Mukuka, Lawrence

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To research the correlation between physical and sexual abuse by family members and AIDS-related knowledge, attitudes, self-efficacy and behavior among urban and rural adolescents in Zambia. Sample: The sample comprises 3,360 adolescents, aged 10-19, from urban and rural Zambia; 2,160 of them attended school, while 1,200 of them did…

  12. Risk and Resilience in Orphaned Adolescents Living in a Community Affected by AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wild, Lauren G.; Flisher, Alan J.; Robertson, Brian A.

    2013-01-01

    The AIDS pandemic has resulted in a dramatic rise in the number of orphans in South Africa. This study was designed to investigate the associations between family, peer, and community factors and resilience in orphaned adolescents. Self-report questionnaires were administered verbally to 159 parentally bereaved adolescents (aged 10-19) in an…

  13. HIV/Aids in South Africa: A Review of Sexual Behavior among Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartell, Cycil George

    2005-01-01

    South Africa has a fast-growing HIV/AIDS rate, with the highest prevalence among young people (15 to 24 years), especially females. This paper is a comprehensive analytical review of available research concerning the sexual behavior of adolescents in South Africa. It offers insight into HIV infection among adolescents and provides an important…

  14. How Latino American and European American Adolescents Discuss Conflicts, Sexuality, and AIDS with Their Mothers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lefkowitz, Eva S.; Romo, Laura F.; Corona, Rosalie; Au, Terry Kit-fong; Sigman, Marian

    2000-01-01

    Examined individual, ethnic, and age differences in structure of mother-adolescent conversations. Found Latin American mothers dominated conversations more than European Americans; mothers dominated conversations about sexuality/AIDS more than conversations about conflicts; older adolescents reported less satisfaction, less openness, and more…

  15. Female Secondary School Adolescents' Sexual Behavior and School Based HIV/AIDS Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inyang, Mfrekemfon P.

    2013-01-01

    Most adolescents engage in indiscriminate sexual experimentations. This practice exposes them to the risk of contracting sexually transmitted infections including HIV/AIDS. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndromes (AIDS) are among the deadly diseases that exist globally. Twice as many girls, compared to boys…

  16. Computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) system for construction of spinal orthosis for patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Wong, M S

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT Spinal orthoses are commonly prescribed to patients with moderate adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) for prevention of further curve deterioration. In conventional manufacturing method, plaster bandages are used to obtain the patient's body contour and then the plaster cast is rectified manually. With computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacture (CAD/CAM) system, a series of automated processes from body scanning to digital rectification and milling of the positive model can be performed in a fast and accurate fashion. The purpose of this manuscript is to introduce the application of CAD/CAM system to the construction of spinal orthosis for patients with AIS. Based on evidence within the literature, CAD/CAM method can achieve similar clinical outcomes but with higher efficiency than the conventional fabrication method. Therefore, CAD/CAM method should be considered a substitute to the conventional method in fabrication of spinal orthoses for patients with AIS.

  17. Inclusiveness: a mental health strategy for preventing future mental health problems among adolescents orphaned by AIDS.

    PubMed

    Thupayagale-Tshweneagae, G; Mokomane, Z

    2012-10-01

    The purpose of this paper is to raise an argument that inclusiveness will lessen the pain of losing a parent among adolescents orphaned by AIDS and as a result, prevent future mental health problems that may occur because of inappropriate grieving and maladaptive coping strategies. Participation of adolescents orphaned by AIDS in decisions pertaining to their parents' illnesses and funeral arrangements, for example, may shorten the grieving process and allow for closure. The paper draws data from focus group discussions that were held with 15 adolescents orphaned by AIDS in urban South Africa. The focus group discussions that were structured around four themes: grieving patterns; coping strategies; experience with loss; and expectations. The results of the study demonstrate inclusiveness as an overarching factor in the healing process. The concept is thus a strong recommendation for mental health practice and further study.

  18. Panic Disorder in Clinically Referred Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doerfler, Leonard A.; Connor, Daniel F.; Volungis, Adam M.; Toscano, Peter F., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    The present study examined the frequency and characteristics of panic disorder in children and adolescents who had been referred to a pediatric psychopharmacology clinic. Of the 280 children and adolescents evaluated in this clinic, 35 were diagnosed with panic disorder using a semi-structured clinical interview (K-SADS) and other objective…

  19. AIDS and Adolescents: The Time for Prevention Is Now.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haffner, Debra W.

    Due to indiscriminate experimentation with drugs and sex, teens are increasingly at risk of contracting AIDS. Goals of prevention include reducing the panic and misinformation surrounding the disease, helping teenagers delay sexual intercourse, ensuring condom use, and preventing I.V. drug use. AIDS prevention as a shared responsibility includes…

  20. HIV/AIDS-Anxiety among Adolescent Students in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onyewadume, Mary Adeola

    2008-01-01

    This research investigated the incidence of HIV/AIDS anxiety among students in Botswana. The sample comprised 240 randomly selected students from six schools in three districts in Botswana, with data collected via a questionnaire. Percentages and Chi-square were used to analyze the extent to which the students were anxious about HIV/AIDS and if…

  1. Referrals to a hearing aid clinic: scope for improvement.

    PubMed Central

    Keay, D G

    1990-01-01

    This study followed on from a recent national publicity campaign aiming to get earlier provision of hearing aids for elderly people, improve both patient and general practitioner awareness of hearing impairments and increase knowledge of alternative environmental aids among sufferers. The study intended to examine present patterns of patient presentation and general practitioner management within a major Scottish city. A random sample of patients over the age of 55 years referred to a hearing aid clinic were questioned on the nature of their hearing difficulty. Patients who attended their general practitioner at the suggestion of a relative were less likely to be referred at their initial visit and significantly less likely to have had their ears syringed than those who were self-motivated. Respondents had little knowledge of alternatives to hearing aids, although these are relevant to the disability experienced by the majority of these subjects. PMID:2107853

  2. Polish Adolescents and Their Beliefs and Attitudes to HIV/AIDS and Sexual Relationships

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ganczak, Maria; Boron-Kaczmarska, Anna; Leszczyszyn-Pynka, Magdalena; Szych, Zbigniew

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the study was to survey the needs for HIV/AIDS educational interventions and attitudes and beliefs concerning HIV infection, including sexual relationships, among 17-year-old Polish adolescents. A total of 761 students who attended schools located in urban and rural areas was surveyed. The study, based on the voluntary, self-completed,…

  3. Nebraska Adolescents' HIV/AIDS Attitudes, Knowledge and Related Practices: 1989. Technical Report 22.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Ian M.; And Others

    This report presents information from a survey of the knowledge, attitudes, and practices of Nebraska adolescents (N=1,240) in grades 9-12 related to the Human-Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). Schools were selected at random from each of the six classifications of Nebraska schools, and two or three…

  4. "Mbizi": Empowerment and HIV/AIDS Prevention for Adolescent Girls in Botswana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nitza, Amy; Chilisa, Bagele; Makwinja-Morara, Veronica

    2010-01-01

    This article describes a small group intervention for HIV/AIDS prevention among adolescent girls in Botswana. The psychoeducational group model is designed to empower girls to overcome the gender inequality that puts women at increased risk of HIV infection in the country. Group goals include heightening group members' awareness of the influence…

  5. Clinical Considerations in the Assessment of Adolescent Chemical Dependency.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken

    1990-01-01

    Discusses relevant research findings of clinical assessment of adolescent chemical dependency so that service providers can better address these concerns. Three major issues are discussed: the definition of adolescent chemical dependency, clinical domains of assessment (chemical use problem severity, precipitating and perpetuating risk factors,…

  6. Factors associated with adherence to antiretroviral therapy among adolescents living with HIV/AIDS in low- and middle-income countries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Hudelson, Carly; Cluver, Lucie

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents living in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) are disproportionately burdened by the global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Maintaining medication adherence is vital to ensuring that adolescents living with HIV/AIDS receive the benefits of antiretroviral therapy (ART), although this group faces unique challenges to adherence. Knowledge of the factors influencing adherence among people during this unique developmental period is needed to develop more targeted and effective adherence-promoting strategies. This systematic review summarizes the literature on quantitative observational studies examining correlates, including risk and resilience-promoting factors, of ART adherence among adolescents living with HIV/AIDS in LMICs. A systematic search of major electronic databases, conference-specific databases, gray literature, and reference lists of relevant reviews and documents was conducted in May 2014. Included studies examined relationships between at least one factor and ART adherence as an outcome and were conducted in primarily an adolescent population (age 10-19) in LMICs. The search identified 7948 unique citations from which 15 studies fit the inclusion criteria. These 15 studies identified 35 factors significantly associated with ART adherence representing a total of 4363 participants across nine different LMICs. Relevant studies revealed few consistent relationships between measured factors and adherence while highlighting potentially important themes for ART adherence including the impact of (1) adolescent factors such as gender and knowledge of serostatus, (2) family structure, (3) the burdensome ART regimens, route of administration, and attitudes about medication, and (4) health care and environmental factors, such as rural versus urban location and missed clinic appointments. Rates of adherence across studies ranged from 16% to 99%. This review identifies unique factors significantly related to ART adherence among adolescents living in LMICs. More

  7. [Sources of information and their relationship to the degree of knowledge about AIDS in Mexican adolescents].

    PubMed

    Caballero Hoyos, R; Villaseñor Sierra, A; San Martín, A H

    1997-08-01

    1410 adolescents aged 15-19 years, of both sexes and of varying socioeconomic strata in Guadalajara, completed anonymous self-administered questionnaires concerning their sources of information and knowledge of HIV/AIDS. The objective was to determine the relation between sources of information and degree of knowledge to guide future information campaigns. 95% of the adolescents knew about AIDS. 79% received information from television, 39% from radio, 26% from magazines, and 16% from newspapers. The media identified as the most important sources of information on AIDS were television (60%), and newspapers and magazines (25% each). Except for television, access to the mass media was greater in the high and medium socioeconomic strata. Interpersonal sources of information on HIV/AIDS included teachers for 39%, family members for 38%, friends for 32%, and physicians for 26%. Access to information through interpersonal means was always higher in higher strata. The adolescents had a fair degree of knowledge of AIDS, averaging 13.9 correct answers out of 24 questions. The average numbers correct were 15.7 in the high, 14.3 in the medium, 13.5 in the low, and 12.9 in the marginal strata. Analysis of variance demonstrated that newspapers were the only mass source of information presenting direct positive relation with level of knowledge. Among interpersonal relations, information from teachers had the greatest positive association with level of knowledge.

  8. Factors Associated with Lack of Viral Suppression at Delivery among HAART-Naïve HIV-Positive Women in the International Maternal Pediatric Adolescent AIDS Clinical Trials Group (IMPAACT) P1025 Study

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Ingrid T.; Leister, Erin; Kacanek, Deborah; Hughes, Michael D.; Bardeguez, Arlene; Livingston, Elizabeth; Stek, Alice; Shapiro, David E.; Tuomala, Ruth

    2014-01-01

    Background High delivery maternal plasma HIV-1 RNA level (viral load, VL) is a risk factor for mother to child transmission and poor maternal health. Objective To identify factors associated with detectable VL at delivery despite initiation of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) during pregnancy. Design Multicenter observational study. Setting 67 US AIDS clinical research sites. Patients HIV-1-positive pregnant women who initiated HAART during pregnancy. Measurements Descriptive summaries and associations between socio-demographic, HIV disease, treatment and pregnancy-related risk factors and detectable VL (>400copies/mL) at delivery. Results Between October 2002 and December 2011, 671 women met inclusion criteria and 13% had detectable VL at delivery. Factors associated with detectable VL included multiparity (16.4% vs 8% nulliparous, p=0.002), black non-Hispanic ethnicity (17.6% vs 6.6% Hispanic and 6.6% white/non-Hispanic, p<0.001), 11th grade or less education (17.6% vs.12.1% high school graduate and 6.7% some college or higher, p=0.013), and initiation of HAART in third trimester (23.9% vs 12.3% second and 8.6% first, p=0.002), timing of HIV diagnosis prior to current pregnancy (16.1% vs 11% during current pregnancy, p=0.051), and timing of first prenatal visit in 3rd trimester (33.3% vs 14.3% second and 10.5% first, p=0.002). Women who experienced treatment interruptions or reported poor medication adherence during pregnancy were more likely to have detectable VL at delivery than women with no interruptions or who reported better adherence. Limitations Women entered the study at varying times during pregnancy and for this and other reasons there was incomplete data on many covariates. Conclusions In this large U.S.-based cohort of HIV-1 positive women, 13% of women who initiated HAART during pregnancy had detectable VL at delivery. The timing of HAART initiation and prenatal care along with medication adherence during pregnancy appear to be

  9. Adolescent health care maintenance in a teen-friendly clinic.

    PubMed

    Chaisson, Nicole; Shore, William B

    2014-09-01

    Adolescence is marked by complex physical, cognitive, social, and emotional development, which can be stressful for families and adolescents. Before the onset of puberty, providers should clearly lay the groundwork for clinical care and office visits during the adolescent years. This article addresses the guidelines and current legal standards for confidentiality in adolescent care, the most frequently used psychosocial screening tools, and current recommendations for preventive health services and immunizations. Through the creation of teen-friendly clinics, primary care providers are well positioned to offer guidance and support to teens and their parents during this time of transition and growth.

  10. Psychiatric considerations in children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Benton, Tami D

    2011-08-01

    The psychosocial impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease has been recognized since the beginning of the epidemic for affected adults, but there has been less focus on the impact of HIV on young people. Among HIV-positive (HIV+) adults, high levels of distress, psychiatric symptoms, and their associations with worse health outcomes were recognized early in the epidemic. Subsequently, many studies have focused on understanding the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms among HIV+ adults and on identifying effective treatments for these symptoms. Fewer studies have examined these symptoms and their treatments among HIV+ children and adolescents. This article reviews what is known about psychiatric syndromes among HIV+ youths, their treatments, and other psychosocial factors of concern to the psychiatrist when treating children and adolescents with HIV disease.

  11. Psychiatric considerations in children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Benton, Tami D

    2010-04-01

    The psychosocial impact of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease has been recognized since the beginning of the epidemic for affected adults, but there has been less focus on the impact of HIV on young people. Among HIV-positive (HIV+) adults, high levels of distress, psychiatric symptoms, and their associations with worse health outcomes were recognized early in the epidemic. Subsequently, many studies have focused on understanding the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms among HIV+ adults and on identifying effective treatments for these symptoms. Fewer studies have examined these symptoms and their treatments among HIV+ children and adolescents. This article reviews what is known about psychiatric syndromes among HIV+ youths, their treatments, and other psychosocial factors of concern to the psychiatrist when treating children and adolescents with HIV disease.

  12. Do Thai parents discuss sex and AIDS with young adolescents? A qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Meechamnan, Chutima; Fongkaew, Warunee; Chotibang, Jutamas; McGrath, Barbara Burns

    2014-03-01

    This qualitative study explored parents' and young adolescents' perceptions of communication related to sex and HIV/AIDS. Focus group discussions and group discussion were conducted among 67 adolescents and 30 parents. For the adolescents, group discussion using participatory activities was conducted, followed by five focus group discussions. Group discussions using participatory activities were conducted among parents. Thematic analysis indicated that the adolescents received inadequate information about sex and AIDS from their parents, whom they feared as providing negative judgment, and this represented a key barrier to such discussions. Their parents, on the other hand, reported that they believed their children were still too young to learn about and engage in sexual activities. The parents perceived barriers to communication included a lack of confidence and feelings of embarrassment. Nevertheless, they also recognized their important role in their child's sexual education. Collectively, these results draw attention to the need for a culturally appropriate program to strengthen parent-child communication skills for the topics of sex and HIV/AIDS.

  13. Illusions of Immortality: The Confrontation of Adolescence and AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Dept. of Health, Albany.

    Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) is a potent and a present danger for teenagers, casting a dark shadow over their lives now and in the future. A small, but significant, number of teenagers will develop Human Immune Virus (HIV)-related illness before they turn 20; a far greater number will become infected with the virus during…

  14. Lessons Learned from "integrating" intensive family-based interventions into medical care settings for mothers living with HIV/AIDS and their adolescent children.

    PubMed

    Rice, Eric; Lester, Patricia; Flook, Lisa; Green, Sara; Valladares, Ena S; Rotheram-Borus, Mary Jane

    2009-10-01

    Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has recommended integrating behavioral interventions into medical care settings for persons living with HIV. Delivering an intensive, family-based intervention for mothers living with HIV (MLH) (n = 173) and their adolescent children (n = 116) integrated into medical care was problematic. Despite the fact that nearly half of MLH were recruited at HIV/AIDS clinics, community centers and children's hospitals were the most popular and most successful sites for the delivery of the intervention. We provide recommendations for how to integrate intensive interventions into medical care, given the needs of MLH, their adolescents, and the organizations serving them.

  15. Parent-adolescent conflict and stress when parents are living with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Rotheram-Borus, M J; Robin, L; Reid, H M; Draimin, B H

    1998-01-01

    Parental perceptions of conflict and stress with their adolescent children are described, and their associations with demographic factors, physical health, and lifestyle are examined. Adolescent-parent conflicts, parenting stress, and parents' health, substance use, and sexual lifestyle were assessed among 151 parents living with AIDS. Parents living with AIDS reported a mean of 3.3 (SD = 1.3) areas of conflict with their adolescents and 1.5 (SD = 1.7) stressful parenting events over the previous 3 months. The parents were very ill, with many physical symptoms and diseases. Simultaneously, substance use was common (17% used daily), but not injection drug use (3.3%). Half had a sexual partner (63% protected their partners by using condoms consistently). Regression analysis revealed that parent-adolescent conflict was significantly associated with high parental drug use; stressful parenting events were significantly related to the lifestyle (high drug use and frequent sex acts) of Latino and African American parents, but not of white parents. Results of the analysis indicate that, in contrast to parents with other illnesses, parent-adolescent conflict and stressful parenting events were not influenced by parents' health status, but were significantly influenced by substance use and sexual lifestyles.

  16. Engaging Transgender People in NIH-Funded HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Research

    PubMed Central

    Andrasik, Michele; Karuna, Shelly T.; Broder, Gail B.; Collins, Clare; Liu, Albert; Lucas, Jonathan Paul; Harper, Gary W.; Renzullo, Philip O.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract: In 2009, the National Institutes of Health recognized the need to expand knowledge of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) health and commissioned the Institute of Medicine to report on the health of these populations in the United States. The resulting Institute of Medicine publication called for more knowledge of the health of LGBT populations, as well as improved methodologies to reach them, more LGBT-focused research, and enhanced training programs and cultural competency of physicians and researchers. Several of the National Institutes of Health–funded HIV/AIDS clinical trials networks, including the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions, HIV Prevention Trials Network, HIV Vaccine Trials Network, and Microbicide Trials Network, have focused attention on engaging transgender (TG) individuals in research. They have identified issues that transcend the nature of research (ie, treatment or prevention, adult or adolescent) and have adopted various approaches to effectively engage the TG community. Each network has recognized the importance of developing partnerships to build trust with and seek input from TG individuals on research plans and policies. They have established standing advisory groups and convened consultations for this purpose. To ensure that trial data are reflective of the participants they are seeking to enroll, they have reviewed and revised data collection forms to incorporate the 2-step method of collecting sex at birth and gender identity as 2 independent variables, and some have also revised research protocol templates and policies for concept development to ensure that they are appropriate for the inclusion of TG participants. The networks have also initiated trainings to enhance cultural sensitivity and developed a range of materials and resources for network and clinical research site staff. They continue to identify TG-specific research needs in an effort to be more responsive to and improve

  17. Imagining the future: Community perceptions of a family-based economic empowerment intervention for AIDS-orphaned adolescents in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Ismayilova, Leyla; Ssewamala, Fred; Mooers, Elizabeth; Nabunya, Proscovia; Sheshadri, Srividya

    2012-01-01

    AIDS-orphaned children and adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa have inadequate access to basic services, including health and education. Using a qualitative approach, the study explores the meaning of education in rural Uganda, obstacles faced by AIDS-orphaned adolescents and their caregivers to access secondary education, and the potential of an economic empowerment intervention SEED in addressing the challenges of accessing educational opportunities for AIDS-orphaned adolescents. The findings come from 29 semi-structured interviews conducted with eleven adolescents study participants, four caregivers and fourteen community leaders involved in the pilot SEED intervention. Study participants and community members indicated that the savings accounts offer a unique opportunity for orphaned adolescents to stay in school and imagine the future with optimism. PMID:23543861

  18. Forgiveness: Theory, Research, and Clinical Implications for Adolescent Offenders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelayo, Stephanie L.

    This paper reviews the literature on the subject of forgiveness and suggests clinical implications for the treatment of adolescent offenders. Although research has been done in the areas of forgiveness, no studies have been conducted with adolescent offenders. This dearth of information points to a gap in understanding the role of forgiveness in…

  19. Adolescent Linkage to Care After a Large-scale Transfer From a Hospital-based HIV Clinic to the Public Sector in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Susan; Cloete, Christie; Crankshaw, Tamaryn; Rabideau, Dustin J.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Parker, Robert A.; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Losina, Elena; Bassett, Ingrid V.

    2017-01-01

    HIV clinics formerly supported by the President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief are transferring patients to public-sector clinics. We evaluated adolescent linkage to care after a large-scale transfer from a President’s Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief-subsidized pediatric HIV clinic in Durban, South Africa. All adolescents (11–18 years) in care at a pediatric state-subsidized, hospital-based clinic (HBC) were transferred, from May to June 2012, to government sites [primary health care (PHC) clinic; community health center (CHC); and HBCs] or private clinics. Caregivers were surveyed 7–8 months after transfer to assess their adolescents’ linkage to care and their reports were validated by clinic record audits in a subset of randomly selected clinics. Of the 309 (91%) caregivers reached, only 5 (2%) reported that their adolescent did not link. Of the 304 adolescents who linked, 105 (35%) were referred to a PHC, 73 (24%) to a CHC and 106 (35%) to a HBC. A total of 146 (48%) linked adolescents attended a different clinic than that assigned. Thirty-five (20%) of the 178 who linked and were assigned to a PHC or CHC ultimately attended a HBC. Based on clinic validation, the estimated transfer success was 88% (95% confidence interval: 77%–97%). The large majority of adolescents successfully transferred to a new HIV clinic, although nearly half attended a clinic other than that assigned. PMID:28192387

  20. Family Routines and Parental Monitoring as Protective Factors among Early and Middle Adolescents Affected by Maternal HIV/AIDS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Debra A.; Marelich, William D.; Herbeck, Diane M.; Payne, Diana L.

    2009-01-01

    The influence of parenting skills on adolescent outcomes among children affected by maternal HIV/AIDS (N = 118, M age = 13) was investigated. Among families with more frequent family routines, over time adolescents showed lower rates of aggression, anxiety, worry, depression, conduct disorder, binge drinking, and increased self-concept. Among…

  1. Experiences of adolescents seropositive for HIV/AIDS: a qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    Galano, Eliana; Turato, Egberto Ribeiro; Delmas, Philippe; Côté, José; Gouvea, Aida de Fátima Thomé Barbosa; Succi, Regina Célia de Menezes; Machado, Daisy Maria

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: Explore the meanings attributed by young individuals about "living as an adolescent with HIV" in a group of patients that acquired the infection at birth and the elements involved with the adherence to antiretroviral treatment. Methods: Qualitative study, involving 20 subjects (aged 13-20 years), followed at services specialized in the treatment of pediatric AIDS in São Paulo, Brazil. Semi-structured interviews were carried out of which script consisted of questions about their personal histories, experiences and difficulties they must face while living with HIV/AIDS. Results: Being "normal" and "different" were central issues voiced by the participants. However, a normal life situation is guaranteed by being responsible with one's health, the condition that the diagnosis be kept secret and concerns about HIV transmission and dissemination to a sexual partner. The answers about treatment show that adherence is a dynamic process and involves moments of greater or lesser interest in relation to care for one's health. The adolescents have plans and projects and although HIV is considered a stressor, positive perspectives for the future prevailed. Conclusions: To live as an adolescent with HIV involves subtle dimensions that need to be recognized and legitimized by professionals who follow the trajectory of these young individuals. It is necessary to allow a space in which the adolescents can reflect and find support regarding issues related to the construction of their sexuality and care of one's own body. PMID:26611887

  2. Conditional Use of Aided and Unaided AAC: A Review and Clinical Case Demonstration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigafoos, Jeff; Drasgow, Erik

    2001-01-01

    This article examines the use of multi-modal augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) with individuals with autism and other developmental disabilities. It also reviews instructional strategies for developing conditional use of aided and unaided AAC. A case study of an adolescent boy illustrates the acquisition of aided and unaided AAC…

  3. Developing an AIDS prevention intervention for incarcerated male adolescents in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Peres, Camila Alves; Peres, Rodrigo Alves; da Silveira, Fernando; Paiva, Vera; Hudes, Esther Sid; Hearst, Norman

    2002-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding AIDS among incarcerated male adolescents in Brazil and to develop an AIDS prevention intervention for this population. A questionnaire administered to 275 boys in São Paulo covered demographic and social characteristics, drugs, and HIV risk perception and behavior. Subsequently, we collected qualitative data on the development and implementation of a prevention program. Ninety-eight percent of adolescents were sexually experienced, most initiating by age 13; 22% were fathers. Injection drug use was reported by 5.5%, 12% had exchanged sex for money, 35% had more than 15 partners and 8% had homosexual experience. Although 72% had used condoms, only 9% used them consistently, and only 35% used one in their last intercourse before incarceration. Predictors of condom use included carrying condoms and endorsing the statement "I would use condoms with my girlfriend." Many said their lives include other risks more important than AIDS, such as survival in the crime scene. Initial efforts at prevention based on commonly used approaches of providing information to guide future rational decisions generated limited participation. However, when we worked with them to develop interventions based on their interests and needs, using modalities such as music, hip-hop arts, graffiti, and helping them to create an AIDS prevention compact disk, they responded with enthusiasm. These incarcerated adolescents are at extremely high social risk and report high levels of risk behavior for HIV infection. Interventions for these youth were better received when developed in collaboration with them and based on their beliefs, aspirations, and culture. The intervention that resulted went beyond AIDS to include issues such as violence, drugs, sexuality and human rights.

  4. HIV/AIDS related knowledge among school-going adolescents from the Middle East and North Africa.

    PubMed

    Boneberger, Anja; Rückinger, Simon; Guthold, Regina; Kann, Laura; Riley, Leanne

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this secondary analysis was to present cross-national data about HIV/AIDS related knowledge among 13- to 15-year-old school-going adolescents from the Middle East and North Africa. Data from 23673 school-going adolescents from seven countries (Jordan, Lebanon, Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Morocco, Oman, Tunisia and United Arab Emirates) that undertook the Global School-Based Student Health Survey between 2004 and 2008 were analysed. HIV/AIDS related knowledge varied significantly between countries and gender. Research for this sensitive topic is scarce in this region. In addition, schools could be among the many key players for HIV/AIDS education.

  5. Parents' anxieties about the risk of HIV/AIDS for their Deaf and hard of hearing adolescents in South Africa: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Mall, Sumaya; Swartz, Leslie

    2012-07-01

    Adolescents who are Deaf or hard of hearing may be vulnerable to HIV/AIDS. Adolescents' open communication with parents encourages positive sexuality. The relationship between the Deaf adolescent and their parent could be obstructed by communication difficulties. This article explores parents' anxieties about HIV risk. We interviewed nine parents of Deaf adolescents in South Africa. We explored their fears of the risk of HIV/AIDS for their children. Participants believed that their children were at risk of HIV infection. Although they did communicate with their children about sexuality and HIV/AIDS, some experienced communication difficulties. Communicative relationships between these adolescents and their parents should be encouraged.

  6. Improving Nutrition in Pregnant Adolescents: Recommendations for Clinical Practitioners

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Kristen S.

    2003-01-01

    Pregnancy represents an ideal time for health promotion activities. Many women, including adolescents, are interested and willing to change health behaviors to improve the chance that they will deliver a healthy infant. This paper focuses on improving nutrition in pregnant adolescents. Seven recommendations are presented to help achieve this goal: 1) Focus on foods, not nutrients; 2) individualize and work within the pregnant adolescent's current eating habits; 3) consider the context of family and peer groups; 4) reward efforts; 5) make it easy; 6) focus on weight gain patterns for optimal birth outcomes; and 7) refer to a dietician, as needed. Use of these recommendations comprehensively addresses adolescent developmental needs to improve nutrition during pregnancy. These recommendations are not meant to be all-inclusive; rather, they are meant to serve as a guide for clinical management of nutrition for pregnant adolescents. PMID:17273337

  7. Adolescent Participation in HPV Vaccine Clinical Trials: Are Parents Willing?

    PubMed

    Erves, Jennifer Cunningham; Mayo-Gamble, Tilicia L; Hull, Pamela C; Duke, Lauren; Miller, Stephania T

    2017-03-21

    Approximately one-quarter of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are acquired by adolescents, with a higher burden among racial/ethnic minorities. However, racial/ethnic minorities have been underrepresented in previous HPV vaccine trials. Ongoing and future HPV vaccine optimization trials would benefit from racially- and ethnically-diverse sample of adolescent trial participants. This study examined factors influencing parental willingness to consent to their adolescents' participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials and tested for possible racial differences. A convenience sample of parents of adolescents (N = 256) completed a cross-sectional survey. Chi square analyses were used to assess racial differences in parental HPV vaccine awareness and intentions and willingness to consent to their child participating in an HPV vaccine clinical trial. Ordinal logistic regression was used to identify factors associated with willingness. Approximately 47% of parents were willing to allow their adolescent to participate in HPV vaccine clinical trials (30.7% African American and 48.3% Caucasian, p = .081). African Americans had lower HPV vaccine awareness (p = .006) but not lower intentions to vaccinate (p = .086). Parental willingness was positively associated with the following variables: Child's age (p < .039), Perceived Advantages of HPV Vaccination for Adolescents (p = .002), Parental Trust in Medical Researchers (p < .001), and Level of Ease in Understanding Clinical Trial Information (p = .010). Educating parents about the advantages of HPV vaccines for younger adolescents using low-literacy educational materials and building trust between parents and researchers may increase parental willingness to consent to adolescent participation in HPV vaccine clinical trials.

  8. Adolescents in the age of AIDS: myths, misconceptions, and misunderstandings regarding sexually transmitted diseases.

    PubMed

    Cohall, A; Kassotis, J; Parks, R; Vaughan, R; Bannister, H; Northridge, M

    2001-02-01

    The purpose of this study is twofold: to evaluate the extent of knowledge possessed by young people residing in an urban sexually transmitted disease (STD) and AIDS epicenter about STDs, including AIDS; and to determine whether knowledge levels varied by age, gender, race/ ethnicity, and/or previous health instruction. A total of 867 adolescents (472 females and 395 males) attending a large public high school in New York City completed a self-administered survey. Levels of knowledge about AIDS transmission and prevention were high (mean percentage correct = 91.8%). Nonetheless, adolescent respondents locked awareness about the prevalence of common STDs, had limited understanding of the ways in which these diseases can be transmitted and prevented, and were unaware of potentially serious sequelae resulting from exposure to infectious agents (e.g., infertility from chlamydial infections). Young people who had taken a health education course in which STDs were discussed did slightly better on the knowledge survey than did their peers. While the prevention of HIV infection is, and should be, a national priority, more concerted efforts are needed to better educate young people about other STDs in the overall context of sexual health.

  9. Deviant adolescent subcultures: assessment strategies and clinical interventions.

    PubMed

    Clark, C M

    1992-01-01

    Alienation is a contributing factor in adolescents' participation in Satanism, the neo-Nazi skinhead movement, and violent street gangs. Many of their needs are met by gang and/or cult affiliation, including a sense of belonging, self-worth, companionship, and excitement. Emphasizing prevention may minimize deviant subculture involvement, but some adolescents require clinical intervention, ranging from a few outpatient sessions to lengthy inpatient hospitalization. Therapists must be knowledgeable about adolescents' involvement, empathic to their circumstances, and sophisticated in the approach to treatment.

  10. Peer mentorship program on HIV/AIDS knowledge, beliefs, and prevention attitudes among orphaned adolescents: an evidence based practice

    PubMed Central

    Nabunya, Proscovia; Ssewamala, Fred M.; Mukasa, Miriam N.; Byansi, William; Nattabi, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are particularly vulnerable to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) infection. Adolescents orphaned as a direct result of HIV/AIDS are at an elevated risk of acquiring HIV/AIDS and other sexually transmitted infections. However, limited empirical evidence exists on HIV knowledge and prevention programs, especially those designed to address HIV information gaps among adolescents. This study evaluates the effect of a peer mentorship program provided in addition to other supportive services on HIV/AIDS knowledge, beliefs, and prevention attitudes, among school-going orphaned adolescents in southern Uganda. We utilize data from the Bridges to the Future Study, a 5-year longitudinal randomized experimental study funded by the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development. Out of the 1410 adolescents enrolled in the study (average age = 12.7 at study initiation), 855 of them participated in a nine-session, curriculum based peer mentorship program. We analyzed data collected at baseline and 12-months post intervention initiation. The results from bivariate and regression analysis indicate that, controlling for socioeconomic characteristics, adolescents who participated in a peer mentorship program were more likely than non-participants to report increased scores on HIV/AIDS knowledge(b = .86, 95%CI = .47 – 1.3, p ≤ .001); better scores on desired HIV/AIDS-related beliefs (b = .29, 95%CI = .06 – .52, p ≤ .01); and better scores on HIV/AIDS prevention attitudes (b = .76, 95%CI = .16 – 1.4, p ≤ .01). Overall, the study findings point to the potential role a of peer mentorship program in promoting the much-desired HIV/AIDS knowledge, beliefs, and prevention attitudes among orphaned adolescents. Future programs and policies that support AIDS-orphaned adolescents in sub-Saharan Africa should consider incorporating peer mentoring programs that provide

  11. A Place Called HOPE: Group Psychotherapy for Adolescents of Parents with HIV/AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunther, Marianne; Crandles, Sheila; Williams, Gillian; Swain, Margaret

    1998-01-01

    Describes Project HOPE (New York), a psycho-social support program for noninfected children of HIV-positive parents, including the challenges of starting and implementing the program's psychotherapy group for grieving adolescents and clinical examples of group process and effective interventions in group leadership. Explicates the four stages in…

  12. Motivations for Adolescents' First Visit to a Family Planning Clinic.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Dana Belmonte; Darabi, Katherine F.

    1986-01-01

    New adolescent patients (N=150) at a large urban clinic were interviewed to determine what events or advice led to their decision to approach a family planning clinic for the first time. The roles of pregnancy scares, advice from significant others, and situational factors in motivating service use are presented. Program implications of these…

  13. Recruiting Chinese American adolescents to HIV/AIDS-related research: a lesson learned from a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Hui; Salman, Ali; Wang, Fan

    2012-02-01

    The purpose of this article was to report identified barriers and challenges experienced in the recruiting process of Chinese American adolescents to a cross-sectional HIV/AIDS-related study. Snowball sampling method was used to recruit Chinese American adolescents from Chinese American communities in a U.S. Midwestern state. Barriers and challenges to recruitment were reviewed and analyzed from Chinese cultural perspectives in the hope of aiding researchers and health care providers understand and facilitate future recruitment of Chinese Americans for HIV/AIDS prevention studies. Barriers to recruitment were found related to the taboo topic of sexual issues in Chinese culture, unawareness and denial of HIV/AIDS risks, authoritarian parenting style in Chinese culture, and the required active consents. Facilitating factors of recruiting Chinese American adolescents to future HIV/AIDS prevention research or intervention programs are discussed. Information provided in this article may increase nurses' awareness of various barriers that they might encounter when they conduct research or address HIV/AIDS-related topics of Chinese American adolescents.

  14. Management of pulmonary aspergillosis in AIDS: an emerging clinical problem.

    PubMed Central

    Keating, J J; Rogers, T; Petrou, M; Cartledge, J D; Woodrow, D; Nelson, M; Hawkins, D A; Gazzard, B G

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To review the clinical, radiographic, and therapeutic features of 11 cases of respiratory Aspergillus infection in patients with AIDS. METHODS--All induced sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage samples obtained from HIV seropositive patients between January 1985 and March 1993 were analysed for Aspergillus species. Additionally, where appropriate, bronchial or renal biopsy specimens, or both, were taken before treatment had started. RESULTS--In 11 patients Aspergillus fumigatus was identified in alveolar samples obtained by sputum induction. This was confirmed by bronchoalveolar lavage in eight. Three patients had Aspergillus plaques in the trachea and bronchus, while a fourth patient had an aspergilloma. Risk factors for Aspergillus infection were present in all patients, including corticosteroid treatment in three cases and neutropenia in four, three of whom had received chemotherapy for Kaposi's sarcoma. Four patients had concomitant cytomegalovirus infection. Ten patients had a CD4 count of less than 50 cells/mm3 while one patient had a disseminated T cell lymphoma with a CD4 count of 242 cells/mm3. Of the three patients with samples obtained by sputum induction who did not undergo bronchoscopy, two had a normal chest x ray picture and the third had a right lobar pneumonia complicating an aggressive lymphoma. All three were treated with itraconazole 200 mg twice a day without further investigation. Survival from the time of diagnosis of Aspergillus infection was short: seven patients died within six weeks, although only one death was directly attributed to pulmonary aspergillosis. At six monthly follow up, one patient, who initially had a positive Aspergillus culture from bronchial washings and a normal chest radiograph, developed a renal aspergilloma despite the disappearance of Aspergillus sp from the sputum. CONCLUSION--Pulmonary aspergillosis is an important clinical problem in patients with AIDS with a CD4 count of less than 50 cells/mm. Furthermore

  15. AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000594.htm HIV/AIDS To use the sharing features on this page, ... immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that causes AIDS. When a person becomes infected with HIV, the ...

  16. Risk-taking behaviors and AIDS knowledge: experiences and beliefs of minority adolescent mothers.

    PubMed

    Koniak-Griffin, D; Nyamathi, A; Vasquez, R; Russo, A A

    1994-12-01

    Using a qualitative focus-group methodology, this study investigated risk-taking behaviors and AIDS knowledge among minority pregnant and parenting adolescents at risk for heterosexual and perinatal transmission of HIV. Seven focus groups were conducted with a total of 48 young women recruited from alternative schools and residential facilities for pregnant adolescents and young mothers in Southern California. Participants also completed a background questionnaire soliciting sociodemographic information and an AIDS knowledge test. The sample included 33 Latinas and 15 African-Americans, ranging in age from 12 to 19 years. There were bipolar findings regarding risk-taking behaviors. At one end of the continuum were young women with a history of one of more of the following behaviors: multiple sex partners, drug and alcohol use, carrying weapons, and participating in gang-related activities. Contrasting with these, were those who had one or two sex partners and no history of alcohol or drug abuse. A majority of the participants were having unprotected sex. A variety of factors affected condom use, including gender inequality, embarrassment, and personal preferences and values. Risk-taking was also influenced by lack of security and safety in daily living, emotion-focused coping and peer pressure.

  17. Deviant Adolescent Subcultures: Assessment Strategies and Clinical Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Cynthia M.

    1992-01-01

    Presents assessment strategies, preventive methods, and clinical interventions to assist clinicians working with teenagers involved with deviant subcultures: Satanism, the neo-Nazi skinhead movement, and violent street gangs. Considers role of alienation as contributing factor in adolescents' participation in these subcultures. Advises therapists…

  18. Multiple Regression Analyses in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaccard, James; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Johansson, Margaret; Bouris, Alida

    2006-01-01

    A major form of data analysis in clinical child and adolescent psychology is multiple regression. This article reviews issues in the application of such methods in light of the research designs typical of this field. Issues addressed include controlling covariates, evaluation of predictor relevance, comparing predictors, analysis of moderation,…

  19. Internalizing and Externalizing Personality Dimensions and Clinical Problems in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopwood, Christopher J.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2010-01-01

    Ostensible psychiatric comorbidity can sometimes be explained by shared relations between diagnostic constructs and higher order internalizing and externalizing dimensions. However, this possibility has not been explored with regard to comorbidity between personality pathology and other clinical constructs in adolescents. In this study,…

  20. Computer-aided diagnosis and artificial intelligence in clinical imaging.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Junji; Li, Qiang; Appelbaum, Daniel; Doi, Kunio

    2011-11-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) is rapidly entering the radiology mainstream. It has already become a part of the routine clinical work for the detection of breast cancer with mammograms. The computer output is used as a "second opinion" in assisting radiologists' image interpretations. The computer algorithm generally consists of several steps that may include image processing, image feature analysis, and data classification via the use of tools such as artificial neural networks (ANN). In this article, we will explore these and other current processes that have come to be referred to as "artificial intelligence." One element of CAD, temporal subtraction, has been applied for enhancing interval changes and for suppressing unchanged structures (eg, normal structures) between 2 successive radiologic images. To reduce misregistration artifacts on the temporal subtraction images, a nonlinear image warping technique for matching the previous image to the current one has been developed. Development of the temporal subtraction method originated with chest radiographs, with the method subsequently being applied to chest computed tomography (CT) and nuclear medicine bone scans. The usefulness of the temporal subtraction method for bone scans was demonstrated by an observer study in which reading times and diagnostic accuracy improved significantly. An additional prospective clinical study verified that the temporal subtraction image could be used as a "second opinion" by radiologists with negligible detrimental effects. ANN was first used in 1990 for computerized differential diagnosis of interstitial lung diseases in CAD. Since then, ANN has been widely used in CAD schemes for the detection and diagnosis of various diseases in different imaging modalities, including the differential diagnosis of lung nodules and interstitial lung diseases in chest radiography, CT, and position emission tomography/CT. It is likely that CAD will be integrated into picture archiving and

  1. Comorbidities in Children and Adolescents with AIDS Acquired by HIV Vertical Transmission in Vitória, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Moreira-Silva, Sandra F.; Zandonade, Eliana; Frauches, Diana O.; Machado, Elisa A.; Lopes, Lays Ignacia A.; Duque, Lívia L.; Querido, Polyana P.; Miranda, Angélica E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Studying diseases associated with AIDS is essential for establishing intervention strategies because comorbidities can lead to death. The objectives were to describe the frequency of comorbidities and verify their distribution according to demographic, epidemiological and clinical data as well as to classify diseases in children and adolescents with AIDS in Vitória, Brazil. Methods A retrospective cohort study was conducted among children with AIDS, as defined according to the criteria established by the Ministry of Health, who acquired HIV via vertical transmission, were aged 0 to 18 years, and were monitored at a referral hospital from January 2001 to December 2011. Results A total of 177 patients were included, of whom 97 were female (55%). There were 60 patients (34%) <1 year old, 67 patients (38%) between the ages of 1 and 5, and 50 patients (28%) ≥6 years of age included at the time of admission to the Infectious Diseases Ward. Regarding clinical-immunological classification, 146 patients (82.5%) showed moderate/severe forms of the disease at the time of admission into the Ward, and 26 patients (14.7%) died during the study. The most common clinical signs were hepatomegaly (81.62%), splenomegaly (63.8%), lymphadenopathy (68.4%) and persistent fever (32.8%). The most common comorbidities were anaemia (67.2%), pneumonia/septicaemia/acute bacterial meningitis (ABM) (64.2%), acute otitis media (AOM)/recurrent sinusitis (55.4%), recurrent severe bacterial infections (47.4%) and dermatitis (43.1%). An association between severe clinical-immunological classification and admission to the Ward for children aged less than one year old was found for several comorbidities (p<0.001). Conclusion Delayed diagnosis was observed because the majority of patients were admitted to the Infectious Diseases Ward at ≥1 year of age and were already presenting with serious diseases. The general paediatrician should be alert to this possibility to make an early

  2. HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Health-Related Attitudes and Behaviors among Deaf and Hearing Adolescents in Southern Brazil

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bisol, Claudia Alquati; Sperb, Tania Mara; Brewer, Toye H.; Kato, Sergio Kakuta; Shor-Posner, Gail

    2008-01-01

    HIV/AIDS knowledge and health-related attitudes and behaviors among deaf and hearing adolescents in southern Brazil are described. Forty-two deaf students attending a special nonresidential public school for the deaf and 50 hearing students attending a regular public school, ages 15-21 years, answered a computer-assisted questionnaire. (There was…

  3. Pediatric, Adolescent, and Maternal AIDS Branch. Report to the National Advisory Child Health and Human Development Council.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD. Center for Research for Mothers and Children.

    This report describes current research activities and future plans of the Pediatric, Adolescent, and Maternal AIDS (PAMA) Branch of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development's Center for Research for Mothers and Children. The mission statement of the Branch notes that PAMA develops, implements, and directs a wide range of…

  4. Predictors of Suicide Attempts in Clinically Depressed Korean Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ahye; Song, Jungeun; Yook, Ki-Hwan; Jon, Duk-In; Jung, Myung Hun; Hong, Narei; Hong, Hyun Ju

    2016-01-01

    We examined predictors of suicide attempts in clinically depressed adolescents in Korea and gender differences in suicidal behavior. In total, 106 adolescents diagnosed with depressive disorder were recruited in South Korea. We assessed various variables that might affect suicide attempts, and used a structured interview for the diagnosis of depression and comorbidities and to evaluate suicidality. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the subjects were compared between suicide attempt and non-suicide attempt groups and we examined significant predictors of suicide attempts. Gender differences in suicidal ideation and suicidal behavior were also analyzed. Among 106 depressed participants, 50 (47.2%) adolescents were classified in the suicide attempt group. Generally, the suicide attempt and non-suicide attempt group shared similar clinical characteristics. The suicide attempt group had more females, more major depressive disorder diagnoses, more depressive episodes, and higher suicidal ideation than the non-suicide attempt group. Suicidal ideation was the only significant predictor of suicidal attempt, regardless of gender. Higher suicidal ideation frequency scores and more non-suicidal self-injurious behaviors were shown in the female suicide attempt group than the male suicide attempt group. It is recommended that suicidal ideation be assessed regularly and managed rigorously to decrease suicide risks in depressive adolescents. PMID:27776392

  5. An audit of first-aid treatment of pediatric burns patients and their clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Cuttle, Leila; Kravchuk, Olena; Wallis, Belinda; Kimble, Roy M

    2009-01-01

    This study describes the first aid used and clinical outcomes of all patients who presented to the Royal Children's Hospital, Brisbane, Australia in 2005 with an acute burn injury. A retrospective audit was performed with the charts of 459 patients and information concerning burn injury, first-aid treatment, and clinical outcomes was collected. First aid was used on 86.1% of patients, with 8.7% receiving no first aid and unknown treatment in 5.2% of cases. A majority of patients had cold water as first aid (80.2%), however, only 12.1% applied the cold water for the recommended 20 minutes or longer. Recommended first aid (cold water for >or=20 minutes) was associated with significantly reduced reepithelialization time for children with contact injuries (P=.011). Superficial depth burns were significantly more likely to be associated with the use of recommended first aid (P=.03). Suboptimal treatment was more common for children younger than 3.5 years (P<.001) and for children with friction burns. This report is one of the few publications to relate first-aid treatment to clinical outcomes. Some positive clinical outcomes were associated with recommended first-aid use; however, wound outcomes were more strongly associated with burn depth and mechanism of injury. There is also a need for more public awareness of recommended first-aid treatment.

  6. Treatment of psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Benton, Tami D

    2010-04-01

    We could not have predicted that HIV/AIDS would become one of our greatest public health challenges worldwide when the first cases were identified in the 1980s. More than 22 million people have died from the disease, and HIV is now the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States among 15- to 24-year-olds. At the beginning of this pandemic, most HIV infections of youth were acquired congenitally. Prenatal screening of pregnant women, early detection, and antiretroviral therapies have reduced mother-to-child transmission. Children born with HIV infections are now young adults living with HIV, while other adolescents are acquiring HIV primarily through high-risk behaviors. Associations between psychiatric symptoms and poor health outcomes have been recognized among adults. Few studies have examined these factors among youth. We review what is known about psychiatric syndromes among HIV-positive youth, and their treatments.

  7. Nutritional considerations and dental management of children and adolescents with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Mittal, Meenu

    2011-01-01

    The HIV infected child has increased caloric needs, yet multiple factors interfere with adequate nutritional intake. Nutritional support is needed to maintain optimum nourishment during the symptomatic period, in order to prevent further deterioration of the nutritional status during acute episodes of infection, and to improve the nutritional status during the stable symptom free period. With the advent of better methods of detection and better therapies, we are beginning to see HIV infected children surviving longer; and thus coming under the care of a host of affiliated medical personnel, including dentists. Oral health care workers need to provide dental care for HIV-infected patients and recognize as well as understand the significance of oral manifestations associated with HIV infection. The present article reviews, on the basis of literature, nutritional status, nutrition assessment and counseling in HIV/AIDS children and adolescents. Dental treatment considerations in these, as well as modifications in treatment if required, are also discussed.

  8. A Randomized Controlled Trial of Online versus Clinic-Based CBT for Adolescent Anxiety

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spence, Susan H.; Donovan, Caroline L.; March, Sonja; Gamble, Amanda; Anderson, Renee E.; Prosser, Samantha; Kenardy, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The study examined the relative efficacy of online (NET) versus clinic (CLIN) delivery of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) in the treatment of anxiety disorders in adolescents. Method: Participants included 115 clinically anxious adolescents aged 12 to 18 years and their parent(s). Adolescents were randomly assigned to NET, CLIN, or…

  9. Trends in adolescent sexual behavior, impact of information, and attitudes about HIV/AIDS in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Ramiro, Lúcia; Reis, Marta; de Matos, Margarida Gaspar; Diniz, José Alves

    2014-01-01

    There is a recent decline in HIV in a significant number of countries due to the adoption of preventive sexual behaviors, which demonstrates that HIV reduction is possible. The goal of this research was to deepen knowledge of preventive sexual behavior in adolescents, including knowledge and attitudes about HIV/AIDS, and assessing whether they changed from 2002 to 2010. Data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire from the Portuguese sample of the Health Behavior in School-aged Children, a collaborative WHO study. The study provided national representative data of 10,587 Portuguese adolescents attending 8th and 10th grade. In terms of preventive behaviors, results showed an increasing trend regarding the percentage reporting first sexual intercourse at 14 years old or more and condom use at last intercourse and a stabilized trend concerning having had intercourse, contraceptive pill use at last intercourse and having had intercourse under the influence of alcohol or drugs. Nevertheless, results showed a systematic decreasing trend in terms of knowledge and attitudes. This suggested that sex education programs are still too limited to teaching sessions, strongly homogenized in their content and inadequate to enhance knowledge and attitudes regarding HIV, let alone personal and social skills of different target groups.

  10. Genomic analysis and clinical management of adolescent cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Rabbie, Roy; Rashid, Mamun; Arance, Ana M; Sánchez, Marcelo; Tell-Marti, Gemma; Potrony, Miriam; Conill, Carles; van Doorn, Remco; Dentro, Stefan; Gruis, Nellele A; Corrie, Pippa; Iyer, Vivek; Robles-Espinoza, Carla Daniela; Puig-Butille, Joan A; Puig, Susana; Adams, David J

    2017-01-17

    Melanoma in young children is rare, however its incidence in adolescents and young adults is rising. We describe the clinical course of a 15-year-old female diagnosed with AJCC stage IB non-ulcerated primary melanoma, who died from metastatic disease four years after diagnosis despite three lines of modern systemic therapy. We also present the complete genomic profile of her tumour and compare this to a further series of 13 adolescent melanomas, and 275 adult cutaneous melanomas. A somatic BRAF(V)(600E) mutation and a high mutational load equivalent to that found in adult melanoma, and composed primarily of C>T mutations was observed. A germline genomic analysis alongside a series of 23 children and adolescents with melanoma revealed no mutations in known germline melanoma-predisposition genes. Adolescent melanomas appear to have genomes that are as complex as those arising in adulthood, and their clinical course can, as with adults, be unpredictable. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Scientific and regulatory challenges in evaluating clinical trial protocols for HIV-1/AIDS vaccines - A review from a regulatory perspective.

    PubMed

    Sheets, Rebecca L; Zhou, TieQun; Knezevic, Ivana

    2016-03-01

    Clinical development of prophylactic HIV/AIDS vaccines presents many scientific challenges that result in challenges for regulators reviewing clinical trial applications (CTAs). The World Health Organization (WHO) has the responsibility to provide technical support to these regulators. The search for an HIV/AIDS vaccine will only succeed through well-designed, -conducted and -controlled human efficacy studies reviewed and approved by regulators in countries worldwide, particularly in countries where the epidemic has hit hardest, such as in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia. This review summarizes the current candidates in development and focuses on challenges regulators face when reviewing CTAs, such as the evolving landscape of "standard of prevention," trials in adolescents, adaptive trial designs, correlates of protection and their analysis, and access to successful vaccines. There are many unknowns in the field of HIV/AIDS vaccine development and often, there is not a clear right or wrong approach because of the scientific challenges described in this review. Consequently, regulators should not feel that decisions need be made in isolation, when there are many available international collaborative efforts and opportunities to seek expert advice. The WHO provides many such opportunities and support to regulators across the globe.

  12. Altruistic reasoning in adolescent-parent dyads considering participation in a hypothetical sexual health clinical trial for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Chávez, Noé Rubén; Williams, Camille Y; Ipp, Lisa S; Catallozzi, Marina; Rosenthal, Susan L; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki

    2016-04-01

    Altruism is a well-established reason underlying research participation. Less is known about altruism in adolescent-parent decision-making about clinical trials enrolling healthy adolescents. This qualitative investigation focused on identifying spontaneous statements of altruism within adolescent-parent (dyadic) discussions of participation in a hypothetical phase I clinical trial related to adolescent sexual health. Content analysis revealed several response patterns to each other's altruistic reasoning. Across 70 adolescent-parent dyads in which adolescents were 14-17 years of age and 91% of their parents were mothers, a majority (61%) of dyadic discussions included a statement reflecting altruism. Parents responded to adolescents' statements of altruism more frequently than adolescents responded to parents' statements. Responses included: expresses concern, reiterates altruistic reasoning, agrees with altruistic reasoning, and adds to/expands altruistic reasoning. Since an altruistic perspective was often balanced with concerns about risk or study procedures, researchers cannot assume that altruism will directly lead to study participation. Optimizing the informed consent process for early phase clinical trials involving healthy adolescents may include supporting parents to have conversations with their adolescents which will enhance their capacity to consider all aspects of trial participation.

  13. Beliefs about AIDS, use of alcohol and drugs, and unprotected sex among Massachusetts adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hingson, R W; Strunin, L; Berlin, B M; Heeren, T

    1990-03-01

    In August 1988, 1,773 Massachusetts 16-19-year-olds were surveyed by telephone using anonymous random digit dialing; response rate 82 percent. Logistic regression tested whether alcohol and drug use, perceived susceptibility to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), severity of HIV if infected, effectiveness of condoms in preventing infection, barriers to condom use, and behavioral cues such as exposure to media or personal communication about acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) were independently related to condom use. Among sexually active respondents, (61 percent of those interviewed) 31 percent reported always using condoms. Respondents who believed condoms are effective in preventing HIV transmission and worried they can get AIDS were 3.1 and 1.8 times, respectively, more likely to use condoms all the time. Respondents who carried condoms and who had discussed AIDS with a physician were 2.7 and 1.7 times, respectively, more likely to use them. Those who believed condoms do not reduce sexual pleasure and would not be embarrassed if asked to use them were 3.1 and 2.4 times, respectively, more likely to use condoms. Teens who averaged five or more drinks daily or used marijuana in the previous month were 2.8 and 1.9 times, respectively, less likely to use condoms. Among respondents who drink and use drugs, 16 percent used condoms less often after drinking and 25 percent after drug use. Those counseling adolescents about HIV should assess and discuss beliefs outlined in the Health Belief Model, as well as their alcohol and drug use.

  14. Setting AIDS priorities: the need for a closer alliance of public health and clinical approaches toward the control of AIDS.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, K

    1988-01-01

    The approach to the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) taken by public health departments and clinicians varies. Public health programs often neglect the human side of AIDS while clinicians often overlook public health issues. Current research on AIDS has failed to address many fundamental questions including: the biology of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in semen; whether present antiretroviral therapy has any effect on sexual infectivity; and whether adequate counseling was given to persons in HIV discordant partner studies. These unanswered basic questions highlight how research efforts framed from clinical, basic science, or public health viewpoints may have too narrow a focus. Three suggestions are made: 1) additional studies about the biology of HIV in the genital tract need to be conducted; 2) clinical trials studying drug therapy of HIV infection need to assess effect on HIV in the genital tract; 3) clinicians involved in studies and care of HIV infection need to implement educational strategies minimizing transmission of HIV from their patients. More interaction between public health and clinical approaches toward AIDS is needed. PMID:3407822

  15. Multiple regression analyses in clinical child and adolescent psychology.

    PubMed

    Jaccard, James; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Johansson, Margaret; Bouris, Alida

    2006-09-01

    A major form of data analysis in clinical child and adolescent psychology is multiple regression. This article reviews issues in the application of such methods in light of the research designs typical of this field. Issues addressed include controlling covariates, evaluation of predictor relevance, comparing predictors, analysis of moderation, analysis of mediation, assumption violations, outliers, limited dependent variables, and directed regression and its relation to structural equation modeling. Analytic guidelines are provided within each domain.

  16. Clinical Issues in Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gadow, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Notes that psychopharmacologists have made considerable strides in establishing safety and efficacy of psychotropic drug therapy for childhood behavior disorders. Discusses controversy pertaining to appropriateness of medication or inadequacies of clinical management. Presents brief overview of the safety and efficacy of psychotropic drugs and the…

  17. Hypermentalizing, Attachment, and Epistemic Trust in Adolescent BPD: Clinical Illustrations.

    PubMed

    Bo, Sune; Sharp, Carla; Fonagy, Peter; Kongerslev, Mickey

    2015-12-21

    Borderline personality disorder (BPD) has been shown to be a valid and reliable diagnosis in adolescents and associated with a decrease in both general and social functioning. With evidence linking BPD in adolescents to poor prognosis, it is important to develop a better understanding of factors and mechanisms contributing to the development of BPD. This could potentially enhance our knowledge and facilitate the design of novel treatment programs and interventions for this group. In this paper, we outline a theoretical model of BPD in adolescents linking the original mentalization-based theory of BPD, with recent extensions of the theory that focuses on hypermentalizing and epistemic trust. We then provide clinical case vignettes to illustrate this extended theoretical model of BPD. Furthermore, we suggest a treatment approach to BPD in adolescents that focuses on the reduction of hypermentalizing and epistemic mistrust. We conclude with an integration of theory and practice in the final section of the paper and make recommendations for future work in this area. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. The clinical implications of ear canal debris in hearing aid users

    PubMed Central

    Orji, Foster Tochukwu; O. Onyero, Emmanuel; Agbo, Christian Ejiofor

    2014-01-01

    Objective : The ear irritations suffered by hearing aid (HA) users are yet to be related to the clinical state of canal. We undertook this study to examine the nature of debris and the microbial flora of ears of hearing aid users, as well as evaluate the determinant factors of ear irritation in this population. Methods : An observational clinical study was carried out involving 32 unilateral hearing aid users recruited from ENT clinic of a tertiary referral center. Each subject underwent otoscopic assessment of canal debris and microbial analysis of swab cultures taken from the hearing aid-wearing ear and contralateral normal ear without hearing aid. Results : Canal debris [wax (28%), fungal deposits (19%), bacteria exudates (13%)]. as well as microorganisms were identified in significant number of ears with hearing aids than ears without hearing aid (P = 0.003 and P = 0.006 respectively). Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the commonest identified bacteria. Others were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Proteus species. Intolerable irritations of hearing aid wearing ears were significantly associated with bacterial and fungal otitis externa, and ear discharge (P = 0.005, 0.02, 0.03 respectively). Conclusions : This study demonstrates that using hearing aid alters the ear canal flora; increases risk of both fungal and bacterial otitis externa, as well as encourage wax debris formation, with resultant ear irritations. To ensure compliance their ears should periodically be attended to, by de-waxing or given topical antimicrobial agents where indicated. PMID:24948963

  19. Altruistic reasoning in adolescent-parent dyads considering participation in a hypothetical sexual health clinical trial for adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Chávez, Noé Rubén; Williams, Camille Y; Ipp, Lisa S; Catallozzi, Marina; Rosenthal, Susan L; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki

    2014-01-01

    Altruism is a well-established reason underlying research participation. Less is known about altruism in adolescent-parent decision-making about clinical trials enrolling healthy adolescents. This qualitative investigation focused on identifying spontaneous statements of altruism within adolescent-parent (dyadic) discussions of participation in a hypothetical phase I clinical trial related to adolescent sexual health. Content analysis revealed several response patterns to each other’s altruistic reasoning. Across 70 adolescent-parent dyads in which adolescents were 14–17 years of age and 91% of their parents were mothers, a majority (61%) of dyadic discussions included a statement reflecting altruism. Parents responded to adolescents’ statements of altruism more frequently than adolescents responded to parents’ statements. Responses included: expresses concern, reiterates altruistic reasoning, agrees with altruistic reasoning, and adds to/expands altruistic reasoning. Since an altruistic perspective was often balanced with concerns about risk or study procedures, researchers cannot assume that altruism will directly lead to study participation. Optimizing the informed consent process for early phase clinical trials involving healthy adolescents may include supporting parents to have conversations with their adolescents which will enhance their capacity to consider all aspects of trial participation. PMID:27019669

  20. Perceptions of parents on how religion influences adolescents' sexual behaviours in two Ghanaian communities: implications for HIV and AIDS prevention.

    PubMed

    Osafo, Joseph; Asampong, Emmanuel; Langmagne, Sussan; Ahiedeke, Clement

    2014-08-01

    To understand the role of religion in the sexual behaviours of adolescents, the views of parents who are key agents of socialization were examined from two south-eastern communities in Ghana. Focus Group interviews were conducted with mothers (and female caregivers) of adolescents and one with fathers (and male caregivers) of adolescents. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the data. Findings indicated that parents from one community perceived religion as playing a double-edged role in adolescents' sexual behaviours as on one hand it played a protective role by restraining adolescents from risky sexual behaviours; on the other hand it disparaged the existing traditional measures that regulated adolescents' sexual behaviour. However, parents from the other community found a collaborative interface between the existing social control measures-communal socialization and proscriptive morality with religious ethics. Religious socialization, social capital theory and the concept of social suffering are used to explain some of the findings of this study. Implications for HIV and AIDS education and prevention are also discussed.

  1. Doing worse but knowing better: an exploration of the relationship between HIV/AIDS knowledge and sexual behavior among adolescents in Flemish secondary schools.

    PubMed

    Berten, Hans; Van Rossem, Ronan

    2009-10-01

    Most studies on sexual behavior have approached the relationship between AIDS knowledge and sexual behavior unidirectionally. This paper sets out to examine a reciprocal relationship between AIDS knowledge and sexual behavior, in which it is possible that adolescents who enter into sexuality may start to actively seek out information on sex. Additionally, the effects of various sources for AIDS-related information and condom use are analyzed. Data from the Flemish Educational Assessment project, which surveyed a sample of adolescents from the 3rd and 5th years of secondary school, were used. Results indicate that the relationship between AIDS knowledge and sexual behavior is quite complex. On one hand, we find that better knowledge leads to a later onset of sexuality and more consistent condom use; on the other hand, we find that adolescents who start sex earlier and use condoms inconsistently tend to be more knowledgeable about AIDS.

  2. Clinical Effectiveness and Changes in Care Utilization Derived from a Military Adolescent Multi-Disciplinary Headache Clinic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-07

    clinics. Chronic headaches within the adolescent population have ben shown to have great morbidity on patient lives, including but no limited to missed...school/work days, and loss of parental work time getting to appointments. Some studies have been completed regarding chronic adolescent headaches, but at...this time nothing has been published regarding multi-disciplinary chronic headache clinics for adolescent children of military personnel. The purpose

  3. Clinical implications of word recognition differences in earphone and aided conditions

    PubMed Central

    McRackan, Theodore R.; Ahlstrom, Jayne B.; Clinkscales, William B.; Meyer, Ted A.; Dubno, Judy R

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare word recognition scores for adults with hearing loss measured using earphones and in the sound field without and with hearing aids (HA) Study design Independent review of pre-surgical audiological data from an active middle ear implant (MEI) FDA clinical trial Setting Multicenter prospective FDA clinical trial Patients Ninety-four adult HA users Interventions/Main outcomes measured Pre-operative earphone, unaided and aided pure tone thresholds, word recognition scores, and speech intelligibility index. Results We performed an independent review of pre-surgical audiological data from a MEI FDA trial and compared unaided and aided word recognition scores with participants’ HAs fit according to the NAL-R algorithm. For 52 participants (55.3%), differences in scores between earphone and aided conditions were >10%; for 33 participants (35.1%), earphone scores were higher by 10% or more than aided scores. These participants had significantly higher pure tone thresholds at 250 Hz, 500 Hz, and 1000 Hz), higher pure tone averages, higher speech recognition thresholds, (and higher earphone speech levels (p=0.002). No significant correlation was observed between word recognition scores measured with earphones and with hearing aids (r=.14; p=0.16), whereas a moderately high positive correlation was observed between unaided and aided word recognition (r=0.68; p<0.001). Conclusion Results of the these analyses do not support the common clinical practice of using word recognition scores measured with earphones to predict aided word recognition or hearing aid benefit. Rather, these results provide evidence supporting the measurement of aided word recognition in patients who are considering hearing aids. PMID:27631832

  4. Body Dysmorphic Disorder and Other Clinically Significant Body Image Concerns in Adolescent Psychiatric Inpatients: Prevalence and Clinical Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyl, Jennifer; Kittler, Jennifer; Phillips, Katharine A.; Hunt, Jeffrey I.

    2006-01-01

    Background: This study assessed prevalence and clinical correlates of body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), eating disorders (ED), and other clinically significant body image concerns in 208 consecutively admitted adolescent inpatients. It was hypothesized that adolescents with BDD would have higher levels of depression, anxiety, and suicidality.…

  5. Understanding Locally, Culturally, and Contextually Relevant Mental Health Problems among Rwandan Children and Adolescents Affected by HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Betancourt, Theresa Stichick; Rubin-Smith, Julia E.; Beardslee, William R.; Stulac, Sara N.; Fayida, Ildephonse; Safren, Steven

    2011-01-01

    In assessing the mental health of HIV/AIDS-affected children and adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa, researchers often employ mental health measures developed in other settings. However, measures derived from standard Western psychiatric criteria are frequently based on conceptual models of illness or terminology that may or may not be an appropriate for diverse populations. Understanding local perceptions of mental health problems can aid in the selection or creation of appropriate measures. This study used qualitative methodologies (Free Listing [FL], Key Informant [KI] interviews, and Clinician Interviews [C-KIs]) to understand local perceptions of mental health problems facing HIV/AIDS-affected youth in Rwinkwavu, Rwanda. Several syndrome terms were identified by participants: agahinda kenshi, kwiheba, guhangayika, ihahamuka, umushiha and uburara. While these local syndromes share some similarities with Western mood, anxiety, and conduct disorders, they also contain important culture-specific features and gradations of severity. Our findings underscore the importance of understanding local manifestations of mental health syndromes when conducting mental health assessments and when planning interventions for HIV/AIDS-affected children and adolescents in diverse settings. PMID:21271393

  6. Doing Worse but Knowing Better: An Exploration of the Relationship between HIV/AIDS Knowledge and Sexual Behavior among Adolescents in Flemish Secondary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berten, Hans; Van Rossem, Ronan

    2009-01-01

    Most studies on sexual behavior have approached the relationship between AIDS knowledge and sexual behavior unidirectionally. This paper sets out to examine a reciprocal relationship between AIDS knowledge and sexual behavior, in which it is possible that adolescents who enter into sexuality may start to actively seek out information on sex.…

  7. Adolescents with Special Needs: Clinical Challenges in Reproductive Health Care.

    PubMed

    Quint, Elisabeth H

    2016-02-01

    Adolescents with special needs have unique reproductive health care needs related to their physical and cognitive issues. This review discusses some of the most common concerns that are encountered in clinical practice, as the clinician will partner with the adolescent and her family to guide her through the pubertal transition and to help navigate the risks and rights of reproduction. Families often seek anticipatory guidance before menarche on menstrual hygiene, abuse risk and sexuality and can be reassured that most teens with special needs do very well with menstruation. The clinician needs to evaluate the teenager's reproductive knowledge as well her risk for abuse and coercion and her ability to consent to sexual activity, if she requests contraception. Menstrual management is mostly based on the impact of the menstrual cycles on the teenager's life and activities. The adolescents may have a decreased ability to tolerate menses or pain, or experience changes in seizure pattern or altered mood. Hormonal treatment is often used to assist with menstrual hygiene, cyclical mood changes or dysmenorrhea. The goal of treatment can be complete amenorrhea, alleviate pain or regulate and decrease menstrual flow. The unique risks and benefits of hormonal treatment for this special population are highlighted.

  8. [Fatty liver and its clinical management in obese adolescents].

    PubMed

    González Jiménez, Emilio; Schmidt Río-Valle, Jacqueline; Álvarez Ferre, Judit

    2011-01-01

    Liver steatosis, also called non-alcoholic fatty liver, is characterized by a pathological fat accumulation in the liver, leading to liver damage in the form of inflammation and fibrosis. These histological features are similar to those in alcoholic hepatitis. Obesity is known to be the most common cause of simple steatosis in the preadolescent and adolescent population with a consequent serious health risk. The aim of this study was to provide an update on the concepts, pathophysiology and clinical management of hepatic steatosis secondary to obesity at an early age.

  9. Epidemiology and clinical features of HIV infection/AIDS in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, June Myung; Cho, Goon Jae; Hong, Sung Kwan; Chang, Kyung Hee; Chung, Joo Sup; Choi, Young Hwa; Song, Young Goo; Huh, Aejung; Yeom, Joon Sup; Lee, Kkot Sil; Choi, Jun Yong

    2003-06-30

    HIV infection/AIDS shows characteristic epidemiological and clinical patterns according to the region, country, and race. The epidemiological and clinical patterns of HIV infection/ AIDS in Korea was investigated by retrospectively analyzing the medical records of 176 HIV-infected persons who visited two major referral hospitals of AIDS in Korea from 1985 to April 2000. The most common transmission route was heterosexual contact (52.3%), followed by homosexual contact (23.9%). Among the opportunistic diseases, candidiasis was the most prevalent (21.6%), followed by Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (15.9%), tuberculosis (12.5%), and CMV infection (9.1%). The most common initial AIDS-defining opportunistic disease was tuberculosis (33.3%). The most common causes of death were tuberculosis (25.7%) and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (25.7%). This study describes the epidemiological and clinical patterns of HIV infection/AIDS in Korea, which not only enables us to accurately understand HIV infection/ AIDS in this country, but eventually to aid in establishing effective preventive measures and treatment guidelines in Korea.

  10. Effectiveness of a School HIV/AIDS Prevention Program for Spanish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espada, Jose P.; Orgiles, Mireia; Morales, Alexandra; Ballester, Rafael; Huedo-Medina, Tania B.

    2012-01-01

    Due to a lack of controlled studies on HIV prevention interventions among Spanish adolescents, COMPAS, a five-session behavioral intervention, was developed and tested on Spanish adolescents aged 15-18. Participants included 827 adolescents from central, east and north Spain. Six hundred and seven students (M = 15.71 years) received the…

  11. Children's Views Matter Too! A Pilot Project Assessing Children's and Adolescents' Experiences of Clinical Psychology Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gordon, Michael; Russo, Kate

    2009-01-01

    This pilot study explored the experiences and understanding of clinical psychology practices and services of children and adolescents attending clinical psychology outpatient appointments. Fifteen young participants took part in the study. A content analysis indicated that young children and adolescents have an appropriate understanding of the…

  12. A case study of school support and the psychological, emotional and behavioural consequences of HIV and AIDS on adolescents.

    PubMed

    Asikhia, Olubusayo Aduke; Mohangi, Kesh

    2015-01-01

    Various studies have reported a huge increase in the numbers of orphaned adolescents in Sub-Saharan Africa and its effects on their psychological, emotional and behavioural development. Yet, their needs are seldom recognised or adequately addressed in policy and programmes.This article uses a qualitative study to report the experiences of 11 orphaned adolescents (5 boys and 6 girls aged between 15 and 18 years) affected by HIV and AIDS in a secondary school (in Atteridgeville, Pretoria, South Africa) and the school support provided by them. The primary data-generation strategies were informal interviews and the Beck Youth Inventories-II (BYI-II) (adopted to measure the participants' level of emotional, behavioural and psychological problems). All interview transcriptions with the participants were thematically analysed. BYI-II data were subjected to T scores (in percentages) to know the participant's psychological, behavioural and emotional problems in order to compare it with their perceptions on the degree of support provided by the school. Result shows that participants have a high prevalence of psychological, behavioural and emotional problems and that the school support provided to them (teachers' support, the general school environment and the degree of discrimination, labelling and bullying that exists in the school) was not sufficient. The participants, however, reported a high level of support from the principal. In conclusion, we have suggested the urgent need for teachers to acquire and possess basic knowledge and skills in caring and paying attention to learners affected by HIV and AIDS and for government agencies and NGOs working with HIV-and AIDS-affected children, to focus on proposals that address the psychological, behavioural and emotional problems in such affected adolescents.

  13. Organization and administration of the NIDCD/VA Hearing Aid Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Henderson, William G; Larson, Vernon D; Williams, David; Leuthke, Lynn

    2002-08-01

    This article describes the organization and administration of the NIDCD/VA Hearing Aid Clinical Trial. The trial involved a total of 360 patients with bilateral, sensorineural hearing loss from eight VA Medical Centers to study three different hearing aid circuits in a three-period, three-treatment crossover design. Strong central coordination of such a complex multi-center clinical trial is essential to its success. The trial took more than 5 years to design, implement, and complete. This timeline is also described.

  14. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for ADHD in Adolescents: Clinical Considerations and a Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Sprich, Susan E.; Burbridge, Jennifer; Lerner, Jonathan A.; Safren, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Although ADHD in adolescents is an impairing and prevalent condition, with community prevalence estimates between 2% and 6%, psychosocial treatments for adolescents compared to younger children are relatively understudied. Our group has successfully developed an evidence base for cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for ADHD in medication-treated adults with ADHD with clinically significant symptoms. In the current paper, we describe an adaptation of this treatment to adolescents, and provide case reports on 3 adolescents who participated in an open pilot trial. The results suggest that the treatment approach was well tolerated by the adolescents and that they experienced clinical benefit. This early report of the approach in adolescents is promising and requires further efficacy testing. PMID:27616874

  15. "Youth friendly" clinics: considerations for linking and engaging HIV-infected adolescents into care.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Amanda E; Philbin, Morgan M; Duval, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2014-02-01

    Linkage and engagement in care are critical corollaries to the health of HIV-infected adolescents. The adolescent HIV epidemic and adolescents' unique barriers to care necessitates innovation in the provision of care, including the consideration of the clinical experience. Little research has addressed how "youth friendly" clinics may influence care retention for HIV-infected youth. We conducted 124 interviews with providers, outreach workers, and case managers, at 15 Adolescent Medicine Trials Network clinics. Photographs of each clinic documented the characteristics of the physical space. Constant comparison and content and visual narrative methods were utilized for data analysis. Three elements of youth friendliness were identified for clinics serving HIV-infected youth, including: (1) role of target population (e.g., pediatric, adolescent, HIV); (2) clinics' physical environment; and (3) clinics' social environment. Working to create 'youth friendly' clinics through changes in physical (e.g., space, entertainment, and educational materials) and social (e.g., staff training related to development, gender, sexual orientation) environments may help reduce HIV-infected adolescents' unique barriers to care engagement. The integration of clinic design and staff training within the organization of a clinical program is helpful in meeting the specialized needs of HIV-infected youth.

  16. Low Back Pain in Children and Adolescents: an Algorithmic Clinical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Kordi, Ramin; Rostami, Mohsen

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is common among children and adolescents. In younger children particularly those under 3, LBP should be considered as an alarming sign for more serious underlying pathologies. However, similar to adults, non specific low back pain is the most common type of LBP among children and adolescents. In this article, a clinical algorithmic approach to LBP in children and adolescents is presented. PMID:23056800

  17. Interpersonal Theory and Adolescents with Depression: Clinical Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mellin, Elizabeth A.; Beamish, Patricia M.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides mental health counselors with information about the prevalence and course of adolescent depression, other empirically tested treatments for adolescent depression, an explanation of Interpersonal psychotherapy for adolescents (IPT-A) treatment protocol, and results of outcome studies on the effectiveness of IPT-A. Suggestions…

  18. Clinical and diagnostic characteristics of hyperprolactinemia in childhood and adolescence.

    PubMed

    Catli, Gonul; Abaci, Ayhan; Bober, Ece; Büyükgebiz, Atilla

    2013-01-01

    Pituitary adenoma is the most common cause of hyperprolactinemia, which is a rare endocrine disorder encountered in pediatric patient care. Epidemiological and clinical information about hyperprolactinemia in childhood and adolescence is limited. Clinical signs of hyperprolactinemia are very heterogeneous. In girls, disturbances in menstrual function and galactorrhea may be seen, whereas in boys, headache, visual disturbances, delayed pubertal development and hypogonadism are often present. Owing to the ease of ordering a serum prolactin measurement, an evidence-based, cost-effective approach to the management of this endocrine disorder is required. Before a diagnosis of hyperprolactinemia is made, drug use, renal insufficiency, hypothyroidism, and parasellar tumors should be excluded. The main objectives of treatment are normalization of prolactin level, adenoma shrinkage, and recovery from clinical signs related to hyperprolactinemia. In patients with microadenoma, invasive or non-invasive macroadenoma, and even in patients with visual field defects, dopamine agonists are the first-line treatment. Surgical treatment is indicated in patients who are unresponsive or intolerant to medical treatment or who have persistent neurological signs. Radiotherapy should be considered as a supportive treatment for patients in whom surgery fails or medical response is not achieved.

  19. Revised surveillance case definitions for HIV infection among adults, adolescents, and children aged <18 months and for HIV infection and AIDS among children aged 18 months to <13 years--United States, 2008.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Eileen; Whitmore, Suzanne; Glynn, Kathleen M; Dominguez, Kenneth; Mitsch, Andrew; McKenna, Matthew T

    2008-12-05

    For adults and adolescents (i.e., persons aged >/=13 years), the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection classification system and the surveillance case definitions for HIV infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) have been revised and combined into a single case definition for HIV infection. In addition, the HIV infection case definition for children aged <13 years and the AIDS case definition for children aged 18 months to <13 years have been revised. No changes have been made to the HIV infection classification system, the 24 AIDS-defining conditions for children aged <13 years, or the AIDS case definition for children aged <18 months. These case definitions are intended for public health surveillance only and not as a guide for clinical diagnosis. Public health surveillance data are used primarily for monitoring the HIV epidemic and for planning on a population level, not for making clinical decisions for individual patients. CDC and the Council of State and Territorial Epidemiologists recommend that all states and territories conduct case surveillance of HIV infection and AIDS using the 2008 surveillance case definitions, effective immediately.

  20. The NIAID Division of AIDS enterprise information system: integrated decision support for global clinical research programs.

    PubMed

    Kagan, Jonathan M; Gupta, Nitin; Varghese, Suresh; Virkar, Hemant

    2011-12-01

    The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) Division of AIDS (DAIDS) Enterprise Information System (DAIDS-ES) is a web-based system that supports NIAID in the scientific, strategic, and tactical management of its global clinical research programs for HIV/AIDS vaccines, prevention, and therapeutics. Different from most commercial clinical trials information systems, which are typically protocol-driven, the DAIDS-ES was built to exchange information with those types of systems and integrate it in ways that help scientific program directors lead the research effort and keep pace with the complex and ever-changing global HIV/AIDS pandemic. Whereas commercially available clinical trials support systems are not usually disease-focused, DAIDS-ES was specifically designed to capture and incorporate unique scientific, demographic, and logistical aspects of HIV/AIDS treatment, prevention, and vaccine research in order to provide a rich source of information to guide informed decision-making. Sharing data across its internal components and with external systems, using defined vocabularies, open standards and flexible interfaces, the DAIDS-ES enables NIAID, its global collaborators and stakeholders, access to timely, quality information about NIAID-supported clinical trials which is utilized to: (1) analyze the research portfolio, assess capacity, identify opportunities, and avoid redundancies; (2) help support study safety, quality, ethics, and regulatory compliance; (3) conduct evidence-based policy analysis and business process re-engineering for improved efficiency. This report summarizes how the DAIDS-ES was conceptualized, how it differs from typical clinical trial support systems, the rationale for key design choices, and examples of how it is being used to advance the efficiency and effectiveness of NIAID's HIV/AIDS clinical research programs.

  1. Predictors of Medication Adherence in an AIDS Clinical Trial: Patient and Clinician Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Lisa E.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents data from an AIDS clinical trial that evaluated 238 (60 percent nonwhite) patients infected with HIV and their clinician's perceptions of medication adherence and visit attendance in relationship to lifestyle, psychosocial, and health belief model (HBM) variables. Twelve sites collected data via a prospective, multisite…

  2. Feasibility of Attachment Based Family Therapy for depressed clinic-referred Norwegian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Israel, Pravin; Diamond, Guy S

    2013-07-01

    Several studies have earned Attachment Based Family Therapy (ABFT) the designation of a promising empirically supported treatment for adolescents with depression. This study evaluated the feasibility of importing ABFT into a hospital-based outpatient clinic in Norway. This article documents the challenges of initiating and conducting research in a real world clinical setting and training staff therapists. It also reports on outcomes of a pilot randomized clinical trial. Implementation barriers rapidly emerged in relation to hospital administration, infrastructure development, and therapists. Despite these barriers, 20 clinic-referred adolescents were randomly assigned to ABFT (n= 11) or to Treatment as Usual (TAU) (n= 9). Adolescents in ABFT showed significantly better symptom reduction compared to adolescents in TAU with an effect size of 1.08. While preliminary, this study suggests that Norwegian clinical staff therapists could be engaged in learning and delivering ABFT, and in producing promising treatment results. The importance of institutional support for dissemination research is highlighted.

  3. Characteristics of Patients Visiting the Child & Adolescent Psychiatric Clinic: A 26-Year Study from North India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malhotra, Savita; Biswas, Parthasarathy; Sharan, Pratap; Grover, Sandeep

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To study the sociodemographic and clinical profile of patients, who presented to the child and adolescent psychiatric services of a tertiary care centre over a 26-year period (1980-2005). Methodology: Data were abstracted retrospectively from detailed work up files of all subjects assessed in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (CAP) Clinic…

  4. The Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS): Demographic and Clinical Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    n/a; n/a

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The Treatment for Adolescents With Depression Study is a multicenter, randomized clinical trial sponsored by the NIMH. This study is designed to evaluate the short- and long-term effectiveness of four treatments for adolescents with major depressive disorder: fluoxetine, cognitive-behavioral therapy, their combination, and, acutely,…

  5. Prevalence and Clinical Correlates of Deliberate Self-Harm among a Community Sample of Italian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerutti, R.; Manca, M.; Presaghi, F.; Gratz, Kim L.

    2011-01-01

    The aims of this study were to investigate the rates of deliberate self-harm (DSH) behavior among an Italian adolescent sample, as well as to explore its clinical correlates. On a sample of 234 adolescents in Italian secondary schools (Mean age = 16.47; SD = 1.7) were assessed the DSH as well as externalizing symptoms (including both conduct…

  6. The Relationship between the Use of Health Clinics in Rural Mississippi Schools and the CHIP-AE Adolescent Health Profile

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradford, Judith Young; O'Sullivan, Patricia S.

    2007-01-01

    School health clinics are one way to meet the objectives in "Healthy People 2010" for adolescent health. To determine the relationship between adolescent health status and use of the school health clinics in four Mississippi high schools, the Child Health and Illness Profile-Adolescent Edition (CHIP-AE) was used. The CHIP-AE identifies…

  7. Relationships between familial HIV/AIDS and symptoms of anxiety and depression: the mediating effect of bullying victimization in a prospective sample of South African children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Boyes, Mark E; Cluver, Lucie D

    2015-04-01

    South African children and adolescents living in HIV/AIDS-affected families are at elevated risk of both symptoms of anxiety and depressive symptoms. Poverty and HIV/AIDS-related stigma are additional risk factors for these negative mental health outcomes. Community level factors, such as poverty and stigma, are difficult to change in the short term and identifying additional potentially malleable mechanisms linking familial HIV/AIDS with mental health is important from an intervention perspective. HIV/AIDS-affected children are also at increased risk of bullying victimization. This longitudinal study aimed to determine whether prospective relationships between familial HIV/AIDS and both anxiety symptoms and depressive symptoms operate indirectly via bullying victimization. Adolescents (M = 13.45 years, 56.67 % female, n = 3,515) from high HIV-prevalent (>30 %) communities in South Africa were interviewed and followed-up one year later (n = 3,401, 96.70 % retention). Census enumeration areas were randomly selected from urban and rural sites in two provinces, and door-to-door sampling included all households with a resident child/adolescent. Familial HIV/AIDS at baseline assessment was not directly associated with mental health outcomes 1 year later. However, significant indirect effects operating via bullying victimization were obtained for both anxiety and depression scores. Importantly, these effects were independent of poverty, HIV/AIDS-related stigma, and baseline mental health, which highlight bullying victimization as a potential target for future intervention efforts. The implementation and rigorous evaluation of bullying prevention programs in South African communities may improve mental health outcomes for HIV/AIDS-affected children and adolescents and this should be a focus of future research and intervention.

  8. "I Can't Go to School and Leave Her in so Much Pain": Educational Shortfalls among Adolescent "Young Carers" in the South African AIDS Epidemic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cluver, L.; Operario, D.; Lane, T.; Kganakga, M.

    2012-01-01

    "I go to the hospital with my mother when she is sick. I can't go to school and leave her in so much pain. I won't concentrate." Millions of adolescents live with AIDS-affected parents or primary caregivers. Little is known about educational impacts of living in an AIDS-affected home, or of acting as a "young carer" in the…

  9. Clinical analysis of HIV/AIDS patients with drug eruption in Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yu-Ye; Jin, Yong-Mei; He, Li-Ping; Bai, Jin-Song; Liu, Jun; Yu, Min; Chen, Jian-Hua; Wen, Jing; Kuang, Yi-Qun

    2016-01-01

    Drug eruption is the most common clinical presentation in patients with HIV/AIDS. The systemic clinical and risk factors associated with drug eruption remain unknown. A retrospective analysis in HIV/AIDS patients with drug eruption was carried out with demographic data, epidemiological data, clinical characteristics, laboratory data and follow-up data. The risk factors correlated with prognosis were assessed by case control analysis. A total of 134 out of 1817 HIV/AIDS patients (7.4%) presented drug eruptions. The major class of sensitizing drug was HAART drugs (47.7%), followed by antibiotics (47.0%). Nevirapine (39.6%) was the most common sensitizing drug in the HAART regimens. The patients received HAART or had allergic history were prone to develop drug eruption. The alanine aminotransferase, albumin, globulin, creatinine, blood urea nitrogen (BUN), lymphocytes, red blood cells (RBC) and eosinophils of the drug eruption patients were significantly different the control patients. The allergic history, opportunistic infection, viral load, CD4 cell count, high globulin and low albumin were the risk factors correlated with death in HIV/AIDS patients with drug eruption. It is proposed that patients with higher viral loads, higher globulin levels and lower white blood cells (WBC) should be given special attention for the prevention of complications and death. PMID:27796328

  10. HIV and AIDS among Adolescents in the United States: Increasing Risk in the 1990s.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowler, Suzanne; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Examines recent data on Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) surveillance and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seroprevalence; surveys on teenagers' knowledge, beliefs, and behaviors related to HIV/AIDS; key treatment issues; and barriers to prevention to review the problem and propose possible ways of combating it. Notes that data suggest…

  11. Toward an Understanding of (EM)Power(Ment) for HIV/AIDS Prevention with Adolescent Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gutierrez, Lorraine; Oh, Hyun Joo; Gillmore, Mary Rogers

    Preventing the spread of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) among women is a national priority. In the United States, AIDS is the sixth leading cause of death among young adult women, and their rate of infection is four times higher than men. This article was developed to help stimulate interest in the power dynamics of relationships and…

  12. Mind-Body Practices and the Adolescent Brain: Clinical Neuroimaging Studies

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anup; Newberg, Andrew B

    2016-01-01

    Background Mind-Body practices constitute a large and diverse group of practices that can substantially affect neurophysiology in both healthy individuals and those with various psychiatric disorders. In spite of the growing literature on the clinical and physiological effects of mind-body practices, very little is known about their impact on central nervous system (CNS) structure and function in adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Method This overview highlights findings in a select group of mind-body practices including yoga postures, yoga breathing techniques and meditation practices. Results Mind-body practices offer novel therapeutic approaches for adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Findings from these studies provide insights into the design and implementation of neuroimaging studies for adolescents with psychiatric disorders. Conclusions Clinical neuroimaging studies will be critical in understanding how different practices affect disease pathogenesis and symptomatology in adolescents. Neuroimaging of mind-body practices on adolescents with psychiatric disorders will certainly be an open and exciting area of investigation. PMID:27347478

  13. Clinical Profile of the Adolescent/Adult Fontan Survivor

    PubMed Central

    Pike, Nancy A.; Evangelista, Lorraine S.; Doering, Lynn V.; Koniak-Griffin, Deborah; Lewis, Alan B.; Child, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The study aims to describe the clinical profile of the adult Fontan survivor and identify the worries, symptoms, and the impact of cardiac surveillance most commonly experienced. Design A descriptive, cross-sectional design was used. Setting The study was performed in outpatient adult and pediatric cardiology clinics in university-affiliated and private practice offices. Patients Fifty-four adolescent and adult patients with single ventricle congenital heart disease who have undergone the Fontan procedure participated in the study. The mean age was 26 ± 9 years with 52% female and 63% Caucasian. Outcome Measures Demographic and clinical data were obtained by a standard intake form and retrospective chart reviews. The Congenital Heart Disease TNO/AZL Adult Quality Of Life questionnaire was completed to assess worries, symptoms, and the impact of cardiac surveillance. Results The majority were single (73%), employed or full-time students (93%), with health insurance (94%), had a single left ventricle (78%), the diagnosis of tricuspid atresia or double inlet left ventricle (59%), lateral tunnel Fontan type (44%), history of arrhythmias (76%), left ventricle ejection fraction percentage >50 (66%), oxygen saturations >90% (70%), frequent headaches (50%), scoliosis (22%), varicose veins, ascites, and liver cirrhosis (46%), normal body mass index (59%), and New York Heart Association class I (48%) and II–III (52%). Primary worries related to current health (83%), job/employment (69%), ability to work, (61%) and living independently (54%). The most bothersome symptoms were shortness of breath with ambulation (69%), dizziness (61%), and palpitations (61%). Conclusions Fontan survivors experience residua and sequelae from multiple surgical procedures and the natural disease course. Our results support the need for ongoing assessment of both physical symptoms and psychosocial concerns, and suggest the need for multiple risk factor intervention strategies that

  14. STD Clinic Patients' Awareness of Non-AIDS Complications of HIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Castro, José Guillermo; Granovsky, Inna; Jones, Deborah; Weiss, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Participants were recruited from a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic in Florida and were assessed regarding the knowledge and awareness of non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Questionnaires were administered before and after a brief information session on non-AIDS conditions associated with HIV infection. Participants included men (n = 46) and women (n = 51). Prior to the information session, at baseline, only 34% of the participants were worried about HIV infection. Most participants (82%) agreed that HIV could be treated with antiretroviral therapy (ART), while only 38% were aware that HIV-associated conditions cannot be easily treated with ART. After the information session, almost all participants reported they were concerned regarding the risk of HIV infection. High-risk patients may have limited knowledge about the consequences of HIV infection beyond the traditional AIDS-associated conditions. Increased awareness of these less known consequences of HIV infection may decrease the potential for complacency regarding acquiring HIV infection. PMID:25331221

  15. Associations of Inflammatory Markers with AIDS and non-AIDS Clinical Events after Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy: AIDS Clinical Trials Group A5224s, a substudy of ACTG A5202

    PubMed Central

    McComsey, Grace A; Kitch, Douglas; Sax, Paul E; Tierney, Camlin; Jahed, Nasreen C; Melbourne, Kathleen; Ha, Belinda; Brown, Todd T; Bloom, Anthony; Fedarko, Neal; Daar, Eric S

    2013-01-01

    Background The association of inflammatory biomarkers with clinical events after antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation is unclear. Methods A5202 randomized 1857 treatment-naive subjects to abacavir/lamivudine or tenofovir-DF/emtricitabine with efavirenz or atazanavir/ritonavir. Substudy A5224s measured inflammatory biomarkers on subjects with available plasma from baseline and weeks 24 or 96. An exploratory analysis of the association of hsCRP, IL-6, sTNF-RI, sTNF-RII, TNF-α, sVCAM-1, and sICAM-1 with times to AIDS and to non-AIDS events used Cox proportional hazards models. Results Analysis included 244 subjects; 85% male, 48% white non-Hispanic, with median age 39 years, HIV-1 RNA 4.6 log10 copies/mL, and CD4 240 cells/μL. Overall, 13 AIDS events (9 opportunistic infections; 3 AIDS-cancers, 1 recurrent bacterial pneumonia) and 18 non-AIDS events (6 diabetes, 4 cancers, 3 cardiovascular, 5 pneumonias) occurred. Higher baseline IL-6, sTNF-RI, sTNF-RII, and sICAM-1 were significantly associated with increased risk of AIDS-defining events. Adjustment for baseline HIV-1 RNA did not change results, while adjusting for baseline CD4 count left only sTNF-RI and sICAM-1 significantly associated with increased risk. Time-updated values of IL-6, sTNFR-I and II, and sICAM-1 were also associated with an increased risk. For non-AIDS events, only higher baseline hsCRP was significantly associated with increased risk, while higher IL-6 was marginally associated with higher risk. Analyses of time-updated biomarker values showed TNF-α to be significantly associated with increased risk, even after adjustment for ART, and CD4 count or HIV-1 RNA. Conclusion Higher levels of several inflammatory biomarkers were independently associated with increased risk of AIDS and non-AIDS events. PMID:24121755

  16. The effects of HIV/AIDS intervention groups for high-risk women in urban clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, J A; Murphy, D A; Washington, C D; Wilson, T S; Koob, J J; Davis, D R; Ledezma, G; Davantes, B

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. This study reports the results of a behavior change intervention offered to women at high risk for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection seen in an urban primary health care clinic. METHODS. Participants were 197 women randomly assigned to either an HIV/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) risk reduction group or a comparison group. Women in the HIV/AIDS intervention group attended five group sessions focusing on risk education; skills training in condom use, sexual assertiveness, problem solving, and risk trigger self-management; and peer support for change efforts. Women in the comparison group attended sessions on health topics unrelated to AIDS. RESULTS. At the 3-month follow-up, women in the HIV/AIDS intervention group had increased in sexual communication and negotiation skills. Unprotected sexual intercourse had declined significantly and condom use had increased from 26% to 56% of all intercourse occasions. Women in the comparison group showed no change. CONCLUSIONS. Socially disadvantaged women can be assisted in reducing their risk of contracting HIV infection. Risk reduction behavior change interventions should be offered routinely in primary health care clinics serving low-income and high-risk patients. PMID:7998630

  17. [Diabetes mellitus in childhood and adolescence. Clinical types].

    PubMed

    Sires, J M

    1979-01-01

    It is today's general medical opinion that children's diabetes mellitus was uncommon in the past. It was generally admitted at that time the initail stages were so sudden as to make difficut its early diagnosis. It's increased incidence is at present an alarming truth; however, a parallel increase of diabetic coma or of mulminant types has rather dropped. Diabetes may be diagnosed by just considering the main symptoms at the onset which are polydipsia, polyuria and weight loss. If an early diagnosis is not made, acidosis (abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting) may appear within a few days or weeks followed by coma (Kussamul's acidotic respiration and dehydration). Coma may be avoided by an early diagnosis and a life may be saved. It must be stressed that an important percentage of children and adolescents show a slow and gradual evolution (week or months) of their diabetes: gradual weight loss, sometimes with noticeable polyphagia, occasional enuresis, but without other associated symptoms. Asymptomatic, intermittent glucosurias are also frequent; they vary in magnitude an almost always they appear without ketonuria and with fasting normal glycemia. According to our experience they may precede in weeks or months the clinical manifestations of the disease. Postprandial glycemia is a sure diagnostic resource; it is of greater trustworthines than fasting glycemia; therefore we advise it as a routine diagnostic procedure which we recommend widely. In uncertain situations, the oral glucose tolerance test is advisable.

  18. Erotomania in an Adolescent: Clinical and Theoretical Considerations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urbach, John R.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Discusses detailed case report of first reported occurrence of erotomania (delusional belief of being loved by another) in adolescent and one of few cases involving homosexual orientation. Discusses case in context of adolescent developmental phenomena, including "crushes," identity formation, and resolution of sexual orientation.…

  19. Clinical Issues in the Assessment of Adolescent Defendants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cornell, Dewey G.

    There are many practical difficulties in conducting forensic evaluations of adolescents charged with serious crimes. This paper addresses some of the reasons why adolescent forensic evaluations are problematic and suggests four strategies for establishing and maintaining rapport, based on a practitioner's experience in evaluating adolescents…

  20. Screening and Assessing Adolescent Substance Use Disorders in Clinical Populations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winters, Ken C.; Kaminer, Yifrah

    2008-01-01

    The different established screening methodologies and comprehensive assessment techniques used in evaluating adolescents suspected of or known to have substance abuse disorders are discussed. Recommendations and suggestions for establishing standards of training and professional efficiency are also highlighted to treat adolescents with substance…

  1. Peer Influence and Nonsuicidal Self Injury: Longitudinal Results in Community and Clinically-Referred Adolescent Samples

    PubMed Central

    Heilbron, Nicole; Guerry, John D.; Franklin, Joseph C.; Rancourt, Diana; Simon, Valerie; Spirito, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Research suggests that adolescents' engagement in nonsuicidal self-injurious (NSSI) behaviors may be increasing over time, yet little is known regarding distal longitudinal factors that may promote engagement in these behaviors. Data from two longitudinal studies are presented to examine whether NSSI may be associated with peer influence processes. Study 1 included 377 adolescents from a community-based sample; Study 2 included 140 clinically-referred adolescents recruited from a psychiatric inpatient facility. In Study 1, adolescents' NSSI was examined at baseline and one year later. Adolescents' nominated best friend reported their own levels of NSSI. In Study 2, adolescents' NSSI was examined at baseline as well as 9 and 18-months post-baseline. Adolescents' perceptions of their friends' engagement in self-injurious behavior (including suicidality) and depressed mood also were examined at all three time points. Baseline depressive symptoms were measured in both studies; gender and age were examined as moderators of peer influence effects. Results from both studies supported longitudinal peer socialization effects of friends' self-injurious behavior on adolescents' own NSSI for girls, but not for boys, even after controlling for depressive symptoms as a predictor. Study 1 suggested socialization effects mostly for younger youth. Results from Study 2 also suggested longitudinal socialization effects, as well as peer selection effects; adolescents' NSSI was associated with increasing perceptions of their friends' engagement in depressive/self-injurious thoughts and behavior. Findings contribute to the nascent literature on longitudinal predictors of NSSI and to work on peer influence. PMID:20437255

  2. Parent-Adolescent Cross-Informant Agreement in Clinically Referred Samples: Findings From Seven Societies.

    PubMed

    Rescorla, Leslie A; Ewing, Grace; Ivanova, Masha Y; Aebi, Marcel; Bilenberg, Niels; Dieleman, Gwen C; Döpfner, Manfred; Kajokiene, Ilona; Leung, Patrick W L; Plück, Julia; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Winkler Metzke, Christa; Zukauskiene, Rita; Verhulst, Frank C

    2017-01-01

    To conduct international comparisons of parent-adolescent cross-informant agreement in clinical samples, we analyzed ratings on the Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Youth Self-Report (YSR) for 6,762 clinically referred adolescents ages 11-18 from 7 societies (M = 14.5 years, SD = 2.0 years; 51% boys). Using CBCL and YSR data, we asked the following questions: (a) Do parents report more problems for their adolescent children than the adolescents report about themselves? (b) How do cross-informant correlations (rs) for scale scores differ by problem type and by society? (c) How well do parents and adolescents, on average, agree regarding which problems they rate as low, medium, or high? (d) How does within-dyad item agreement vary within and between societies? (e) How do societies vary in dichotomous cross-informant agreement with respect to the deviance status of the adolescents? CBCL and YSR scores were quite similar, with small and inconsistent informant effects across societies. Cross-informant rs averaged .47 across scales and societies. On average, parents and adolescents agreed well regarding which problem items received low, medium, or high ratings (M r = .87). Mean within-dyad item agreement was moderate across all societies, but dyadic agreement varied widely within every society. In most societies, adolescent noncorroboration of parent-reported deviance was more common than parental noncorroboration of adolescent-reported deviance. Overall, somewhat better parent-adolescent agreement and more consistency in agreement patterns across diverse societies were found in these seven clinical samples than in population samples studied using the same methods.

  3. Neural imaginaries and clinical epistemology: Rhetorically mapping the adolescent brain in the clinical encounter.

    PubMed

    Buchbinder, Mara

    2015-10-01

    The social work of brain images has taken center stage in recent theorizing of the intersections between neuroscience and society. However, neuroimaging is only one of the discursive modes through which public representations of neurobiology travel. This article adopts an expanded view toward the social implications of neuroscientific thinking to examine how neural imaginaries are constructed in the absence of visual evidence. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted over 18 months (2008-2009) in a United States multidisciplinary pediatric pain clinic, I examine the pragmatic clinical work undertaken to represent ambiguous symptoms in neurobiological form. Focusing on one physician, I illustrate how, by rhetorically mapping the brain as a therapeutic tool, she engaged in a distinctive form of representation that I call neural imagining. In shifting my focus away from the purely material dimensions of brain images, I juxtapose the cultural work of brain scanning technologies with clinical neural imaginaries in which the teenage brain becomes a space of possibility, not to map things as they are, but rather, things as we hope they might be. These neural imaginaries rely upon a distinctive clinical epistemology that privileges the creative work of the imagination over visualization technologies in revealing the truths of the body. By creating a therapeutic space for adolescents to exercise their imaginative faculties and a discursive template for doing so, neural imagining relocates adolescents' agency with respect to epistemologies of bodily knowledge and the role of visualization practices therein. In doing so, it provides a more hopeful alternative to the dominant popular and scientific representations of the teenage brain that view it primarily through the lens of pathology.

  4. Pathogenic Nocardia isolated from clinical specimens including those of AIDS patients in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Poonwan, N; Kusum, M; Mikami, Y; Yazawa, K; Tanaka, Y; Gonoi, T; Hasegawa, S; Konyama, K

    1995-10-01

    Forty strains of nocardioform microorganisms were isolated as clinical specimens including several from AIDS patients in Thailand. Among them, 37 strains were found to belong to the genus Nocardia. Our identification studies revealed that most of the strains (25 strains) belong to the N. asteroides group, i.e., N. asteroides sensu stricto and N. farcinica. Three strains were identified as N. otitidiscaviarum and two strains N. brasiliensis. In addition, 7 strains of rare pathogenic N. transvalensis were also isolated.

  5. Computer-Aided Design Training and Spatial Visualization Ability in Gifted Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Warren E.

    1995-01-01

    An experimental group of 20 gifted adolescents received 3 weeks of computer-assisted design (CAD) instruction. Comparison of their scores on Revised Minnesota Paper Form Board test with those of 20 gifted controls showed CAD did not improve spatial visualization ability. Possible causes were differential computer experience, lack of random…

  6. Social and Psychological Factors Associated with AIDS Risk Behaviors among Low Income, Urban, African American Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Maureen M.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Studied factors associated with sexual intercourse and substance use among young, low income, African-American adolescents. Found that sexual activity was associated with parental conflict and having sexually active friends. Boys reported less parental monitoring and family and community support than girls and were more likely to report sexual…

  7. Technology-Aided Interventions and Instruction for Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odom, Samuel L.; Thompson, Julie L.; Hedges, Susan; Boyd, Brian A.; Dykstra, Jessica R.; Duda, Michelle A.; Szidon, Kathrine L.; Smith, Leann E.; Bord, Aimee

    2015-01-01

    The use of technology in intervention and instruction for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is increasing at a striking rate. The purpose of this paper is to examine the research literature underlying the use of technology in interventions and instruction for high school students with ASD. In this paper, authors propose a theoretical…

  8. Clinical neuropsychology within adolescent and young-adult psychiatry: conceptualizing theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Allott, Kelly; Proffitt, Tina-Marie; McGorry, Patrick D; Pantelis, Christos; Wood, Stephen J; Cumner, Marnie; Brewer, Warrick J

    2013-01-01

    Historically, clinical neuropsychology has made significant contributions to the understanding of brain-behavior relationships, particularly in neurological conditions. During the past several decades, neuropsychology has also become established as an important discipline in psychiatric settings. Cognition is increasingly recognized as being core to psychiatric illnesses and predictive of functional outcomes, augmenting theories regarding symptomatology and illness progression. Adult-type psychiatric disorders (including schizophrenia and other psychotic, mood, anxiety, eating, substance-related, and personality disorders) typically emerge during adolescence or young adulthood, a critical neurodevelopmental period. Clinical neuropsychological assessment in adolescent psychiatric patients is particularly valuable in informing clinical formulation and intervention and can be therapeutic across a number of levels. This article articulates the theoretical considerations and practical challenges and applications of clinical neuropsychology within adolescent and young-adult psychiatry. The importance of considering the neurodevelopmental context and its relationship to current theoretical models underpinning clinical practice are discussed.

  9. The Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents, Psychological Symptoms, and Clinical Status in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince-Embury, Sandra

    2008-01-01

    The Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA) are three scales for assessing the relative strength of three aspects of personal resiliency as a profile in children and adolescents. This article presents preliminary evidence to support the use of the RSCA in preventive screening. First, this article examines associations between the…

  10. Quality and predictors of adolescents' first aid intentions and actions towards a peer with a mental health problem.

    PubMed

    Mason, Robert J; Hart, Laura M; Rossetto, Alyssia; Jorm, Anthony F

    2015-07-30

    While peers are a common source of informal help for young people with a mental health problem, evidence suggests that the help they provide is inadequate. By examining predictors of the quality of mental health first aid provided by adolescents to their peers, future interventions can be targeted to adolescents most at risk of providing poor help. Students (n = 518) from Australian secondary schools were presented with two vignettes, depicting persons experiencing depression with suicidal thoughts, and social phobia. Participants were asked what they thought was wrong with the person, and how they would help them. Stigma towards the person was also assessed. Additionally, participants were asked if they had recently helped anyone in their own lives with a mental health problem, and, if so, what they did. The overall quality of help reported in response to the vignettes or an actual person was low; a particular inadequacy was the low rate of engaging the help of an adult. Being female, and believing that the person is sick rather than weak, consistently predicted better help-giving.

  11. Spectrum of complicated migraine in children: A common profile in aid to clinical diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Surya N; Gupta, Vikash S; Fields, Dawn M

    2015-01-01

    Complicated migraine encompasses several individual clinical syndromes of migraine. Such a syndrome in children frequently presents with various neurological symptoms in the Emergency Department. An acute presentation in the absence of headache presents a diagnostic challenge. A delay in diagnosis and treatment may have medicolegal implication. To date, there are no reports of a common clinical profile proposed in making a clinical diagnosis for the complicated migraine. In this clinical review, we propose and describe: (1) A common clinical profile in aid to clinical diagnosis for spectrum of complicated migraine; (2) How it can be used in differentiating complicated migraine from migraine without aura, migraine with aura, and seizure; (3) We discuss the status of complicated migraine in the International Headache Society classification 2013; and (4) In addition, a common treatment strategy for the spectrum of migraine has been described. To diagnose complicated migraine clinically, it is imperative to adhere with the proposed profile. This will optimize the use of investigation and will also avoid a legal implication of delay in their management. The proposed common clinical profile is incongruent with the International Headache Society 2013. Future classification should minimize the dissociation from clinically encountered syndromes and coin a single word to address collectively this subtype of migraine with an acute presentation of a common clinical profile. PMID:25664241

  12. Construct validity of the Rotter Incomplete Sentences Blank with clinic-referred and nonreferred adolescents.

    PubMed

    Weis, Robert; Toolis, Erin E; Cerankosky, Brittany C

    2008-11-01

    We examined the construct validity of the Rotter Incomplete Sentence Blank (RISB; Rotter, Lah, & Rafferty, 1992) as a measure of psychological maladjustment in adolescents. In Study 1, we investigated the reliability and convergent and discriminant validity of the RISB with adolescents referred to treatment. In Studies 2 and 3, we examined the RISB's ability to differentiate referred and nonreferred adolescents. The RISB showed adequate interrater reliability and converged with self-reported, parent-reported, and teacher-reported social-emotional and behavioral problems. Criterion-related evidence suggests that the RISB may be useful as a screening measure for adolescents using a 135 or 140 cut score. We provide normative data to facilitate the test's use with adolescents in clinical and research settings.

  13. Substance Use in Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: Self-Report, Health Care Providers' Clinical Impressions, and Urine Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holzer, Laurent; Pihet, Sandrine; Passini, Christina Moses; Feijo, Isabelle; Camus, Didier; Eap, Chin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the prevalence of substance use among adolescent psychiatric outpatients using a variety of data sources. Method: Using a questionnaire, 3-month prevalence of substance use data were obtained from 50 adolescents and their health care providers. Adolescents' self-reports and providers' clinical impressions were compared with…

  14. A public aid clinic prototype: utilizing a dental hygiene educational facility to increase access to care.

    PubMed

    Maurizio, Sandra J; DeMattei, Ronda; Meyer, Jennifer; Cotner, Danna

    2003-01-01

    Few dentists in a rural Midwestern community participate in providing oral health care to public aid recipients. In response, faculty at a baccalaureate degree dental hygiene program located at Southern illinois University, Carbondale (SIUC) proposed, developed, and implemented the Heartland Dental Clinic to serve Medicaid participants. The unique program utilizes existing facilities, staff, and students to provide comprehensive oral health care to underserved populations. The state awarded a small grant to cover start-up costs. Two dental units were upgraded with fiber optics to allow restorative procedures. Dental hygiene students provide intake examinations and preventive care, while a staff dentist provides restorative care, dentures, and examinations. Dental technology students and faculty fabricate prostheses. A part-time clinic manager facilitates communication, patient scheduling, and billing. Two local Rotary Club members volunteer as receptionists for the clinic on the one evening per week that the clinic operates. The Rotary Club purchased educational pamphlets, a television/VCR, videotapes, and two signs for the clinic. By locating the clinic in the existing SIUC facility and utilizing dental hygiene students, a staff dentist, volunteer receptionists and dentists, student workers, and health care management interns, the clinic overhead costs have been kept to a minimum. The clinic provides a unique opportunity for dental hygiene students to experience firsthand scheduling, billing, and treating public aid patients while providing patients with an additional source for oral health care. The Heartland Dental Clinic model represents a cost effective method for increasing oral health access to underserved populations while also benefiting students in an educational program.

  15. [Can adolescents transfer their knowledge about AIDS into their partnership relations?].

    PubMed

    Ammon, A

    1991-01-01

    The following results are parts of two questionnaires carried out at Fachoberschule Freising in December 1988 and April 1990. The answers from the questions about the HIV-Test showed a considerable lack of detailed knowledge. Only 47% (in December 1988) respectively 20% (in April 1990) could correctly assess the meaning of a negative result of a HIV-Test. The pupils were very knowledgeable concerning the proper use of condoms (85-99%), however the actual usage varied and was strongly dependent on the assumed effect on the partner. Most young people talk about sexuality with their partners. The subject AIDS is discussed less often. If young people are able to talk about sexuality with their partners, 76% mention AIDS as well. But if they can't even talk about sexuality, 84% also avoid the subject AIDS. The consequences for further prevention are shown.

  16. The influence of clinical variables on the psychological adaptation of adolescents after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Elisa Kern; Moreno Jiménez, Bernardo

    2008-06-01

    This study assessed the influence of clinical and socio-demographic variables on the psychological adaptation of transplanted adolescents. Twenty-six transplanted adolescents and 25 healthy adolescents, aged 13-17, and their parents participated in the study. The following domains were measured: social competence, emotional/behavioral problems, self-concept, self-esteem and subjective well-being. The findings revealed that transplanted boys presented significantly less social competence (U = 26,000, p < .05) and more externalizing problems (U = 25,000, p < .05), social problems (U = 25,000, p < .05) and attention problems (U = 17,500, p < .01) than healthy boys. In contrast, transplanted girls displayed significantly more internalizing problems (U = 47,000, p < .05) and lower physical self-concept (U = 49,500, p < .05) than healthy girls. Hierarchical regression analysis showed clinical variables, especially waiting-list time, significantly predicted attention problems (beta = .364, p < .05) and negative affect (beta = .632, p < .05) in transplanted adolescents. Also, male (beta = -0.554, p < .01) and younger (beta = -0.444, p < .01) transplanted adolescents were at risk for attention problems. Our data suggest the importance of the waiting-list time for transplanted adolescents. Efforts to reduce the pretransplant phase would help adolescents achieve better psychological adaptation at long-term posttransplant.

  17. Perceived Difficulty of Performing Selected HIV/AIDS Preventive Behaviors and Life Satisfaction: Is there a Relationship for African American Adolescents?

    PubMed

    Valois, Robert F; Kerr, Jelani C; Hennessy, Michael; DiClemente, Ralph J; Brown, Larry K; Carey, Michael P; Vanable, Peter A; Farber, Naomi B; Salazar, Laura F; Romer, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Research on the relationship between adolescent health risk behaviors, sexual risk behaviors in particular, and perceived life satisfaction is emerging. Some researchers suggest that life satisfaction has been a neglected component of adolescent health research. African American adolescents aged 13-18 (n = 1,658) from four matched, mid-sized cities in the northeastern and southeastern USA, completed a self-report questionnaire via Audio Computer Assisted Self-Interview. Analyses were conducted to examine relationships between perceived difficulty in performing HIV/AIDS preventive behavior and perceived life satisfaction, while controlling for socioeconomic status. Results suggest that perceived life satisfaction is related to perceived difficulty in performing HIV/AIDS preventive behaviors, for both males and females, with variability in the magnitude of associations by gender. Further research is necessary to identify the particular characteristics of youth and specific aspects of adolescent life satisfaction associated with perceived difficulty in performing HIV/AIDS preventive behavior to develop gender-appropriate and culturally-sensitive quality of life/health promotion programs.

  18. Future directions in clinical child and adolescent psychology: a Delphi survey.

    PubMed

    James, Rochelle L; Roberts, Michael C

    2009-10-01

    This study sought to identify the future directions in three domains: clinical practice, research, and training of clinical child and adolescent psychologists in the upcoming decade. Doctoral-level active members in the field were surveyed via a two-round Delphi survey (45 in round 1; 35 in round 2). Evidence-based practice received the greatest consensus by the participants and highest rank in each of the three domains. Other highly ranked clinical practice directions included prevention and early diagnosis and treatment, and clinical services for specific psychological problems. Research directions focused on biological and social factors interactions in the etiology and treatment and specific child and adolescent disorders. In the training domain, major directions included the pursuit of specialty training in child and adolescent psychology and training emphasizing the biological basis of behavior. Implications of these future directions are discussed.

  19. Psychosocial barriers and facilitators to clinical trial enrollment and adherence for adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Buchanan, Natasha D; Block, Rebecca; Smith, Ashley Wilder; Tai, Eric

    2014-06-01

    Adolescents (aged 15-19 years) have not experienced the same survival gains as children and older adults diagnosed with cancer. Poor clinical trial enrollment and adherence rates among adolescents may account for some of this disparity. Although biological, regulatory, systemic, and practice-related challenges to clinical trial enrollment and adherence have been examined, studies of psychosocial factors, which can serve as barriers or facilitators to enrollment and adherence, are limited. To bring attention to these psychological factors, we reviewed existing literature on psychosocial barriers and facilitators that can affect an adolescent's decision to enroll and adhere to a clinical trial. We also provide potential strategies to address psychosocial factors affecting clinical trial accrual and adherence.

  20. HIV/AIDS Knowledge, Attitudes, and Opinions among Adolescents in the River States of Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodi, Ben E.

    2005-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa remains the epicenter of the global HIV/AIDS pandemic (Taylor et al., 2003; UNAIDS/UNICEF/WHO, 2000; Eaton, Flishera and Arob, 2002; Prat, et al., 2000). Nigeria is one of the most afflicted sub-Saharan nations (UNAIDS, 2002). Rivers State, a major industrial area of Nigeria and the nerve center of the oil industry, represents a…

  1. Evaluation of a School-Based Intervention for HIV/AIDS Prevention among Belizean Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinsler, Janni; Sneed, Carl D.; Morisky, Donald E.; Ang, Alfonso

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of a cognitive-behavioral peer-facilitated school-based HIV/AIDS education program on knowledge, attitudes and behavior among primary and secondary students in Belize. Students (N = 150) were recruited from six schools in Belize City. A quasi-experimental research design was used to assess the…

  2. Reading and Spelling Abilities of Deaf Adolescents with Cochlear Implants and Hearing Aids

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, Margaret; Terlektsi, Emmanouela

    2011-01-01

    A total of 86 deaf children aged between 12 and 16 years were recruited from schools for the deaf, specialist units attached to a school, and mainstream schools. Approximately one-third used hearing aids, one-third had received a cochlear implant before 42 months, and one-third had been implanted later. The 3 subgroups were matched for age and…

  3. Testosterone therapy for clinical symptoms of hypogonadism in eugonadal men with AIDS.

    PubMed

    Wagner, G J; Rabkin, J G

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a small exploratory study to assess whether testosterone therapy is an effective treatment for clinical symptoms characteristic of hypogonadism in eugonadal men with AIDS. Treatment consisted of 12 weeks of bi-weekly intramuscular injections of testosterone cypionate. Twenty-three men enrolled in the study; mean age was 37 and 44% were ethnic minorities. All had an AIDS diagnosis and the mean CD4 cell count was 150 cells/mm3. All baseline serum testosterone levels were within the laboratory reference range and above 500 ng/dl. Diminished libido was an inclusion criterion, plus each patient had at least one additional symptom (low mood, low energy, loss of appetite and/or weight). Nineteen men completed the trial and a majority of patients responded with regard to libido (89%), mood (67%), energy (71%), and appetite (67%) as rated by the Clinical Global Impressions Scale. With the exception of appetite, self and clinician rated measures showed significant improvement in all symptom domains. Among the 14 study completers with significant weight loss, the average weight gain was 2.3 kg, with a 1.8 kg increase in body cell mass and no change in body fat. These results suggest that testosterone is as effective in treating these symptoms in eugonadal men with AIDS as we have found in our research with hypogonadal HIV+men.

  4. An adolescent vampire cult in rural America: clinical issues and case study.

    PubMed

    Miller, T W; Veltkamp, L J; Kraus, R F; Lane, T; Heister, T

    1999-01-01

    The emergence of cult related activities in rural America are examined. Cults and their attraction to adolescents are addressed as are methods of cult indoctrination and a profile of cult members and their leader. Clinical management along with a rationale for the attraction of some adolescents to cults are discussed. A case study of a vampire cult and the psychopathology identified in the leader of the cult are provided. Import for clinicians is offered.

  5. The Adolescent Health Review: Test of a Computerized Screening Tool in School-Based Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Patricia A.; Beebe, Timothy J.; Funk, Eunkyung; Rancome, Jeanne

    2003-01-01

    Implemented a computerized screening instrument, the Adolescent Health Review, in urban school-based clinics to test the viability of a stand-alone screening process and its acceptance by patients and providers, examining the relationship between health risks and the stated purpose for the clinic visit. Patients and providers readily accepted the…

  6. [Primary prevention actions in AIDS and sexually transmitted diseases in adolescents].

    PubMed

    Barrón de Carbonetti, M; Zurlo de Mirotti, S M; Carbonetti, M E; Lesa, M E; Mercado, P; Alvarez Maldonado, A

    1995-01-01

    Considering primary prevention of ETS a priority in Adolescent Health care, we decided to investigate knowledge and attitudes of 205 students in relation to these pathologies. Results were used to organize an educational proposal based on groupal training of ¿¿Youth Health Promotors''. It is also shown the necessity of joint work between family and school in order to think and revise together with the young people involved, themes and values, in order to make a coherent, creative and holistic approach to human sexuality.

  7. Adolescents' Use of School-Based Health Clinics for Reproductive Health Services: Data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Richard A.; St. Lawrence, Janet

    2000-01-01

    Describes adolescents' use of school-based health clinics (SBCs) for family planning and sexually transmitted disease (STD)-related services, using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health. Results indicated that 13 percent received family planning and 8.9 percent received STD-related services from SBCs. Factors affecting the…

  8. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Badowski, Melissa E; Perez, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol), anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone), or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide). The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (-2.0 to 3.2 kg), dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes.

  9. Clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV and AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Badowski, Melissa E; Perez, Sarah E

    2016-01-01

    Since the beginning of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, weight loss has been a common complaint for patients. The use of various definitions defining HIV wasting syndrome has made it difficult to determine its actual prevalence. Despite the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy, it is estimated that the prevalence of HIV wasting syndrome is between 14% and 38%. HIV wasting syndrome may stem from conditions affecting chewing, swallowing, or gastrointestinal motility, neurologic disease affecting food intake or the perception of hunger or ability to eat, psychiatric illness, food insecurity generated from psychosocial or economic concerns, or anorexia due to medications, malabsorption, infections, or tumors. Treatment of HIV wasting syndrome may be managed with appetite stimulants (megestrol acetate or dronabinol), anabolic agents (testosterone, testosterone analogs, or recombinant human growth hormone), or, rarely, cytokine production modulators (thalidomide). The goal of this review is to provide an in-depth evaluation based on existing clinical trials on the clinical utility of dronabinol in the treatment of weight loss associated with HIV/AIDS. Although total body weight gain varies with dronabinol use (–2.0 to 3.2 kg), dronabinol is a well-tolerated option to promote appetite stimulation. Further studies are needed with standardized definitions of HIV-associated weight loss and clinical outcomes, robust sample sizes, safety and efficacy data on chronic use of dronabinol beyond 52 weeks, and associated virologic and immunologic outcomes. PMID:26929669

  10. Voices of Children and Adolescents in Military Families: Research and Clinical Perspectives on Adjustment and Well-being

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-12-01

    Voices of Children and Adolescents in Military Families: Research and Clinical Perspectives on Adjustment and Well-being. Eric M. Flake MD...AND SUBTITLE Voices of Children and Adolescents in Military Families: Research and Clinical Perspectives on Adjustment and Well-being 5a. CONTRACT...Objectives • Sensitize the community to military adolescent culture and support needs. • Candid interviews occurring at camp purple which capture the

  11. Tailoring clinical services to address the unique needs of adolescents from the pregnancy test to parenthood.

    PubMed

    Moriarty Daley, Alison; Sadler, Lois S; Dawn Reynolds, Heather

    2013-04-01

    Clinicians across disciplines and practice settings are likely to encounter adolescents who are at risk for a pregnancy. In 2010, 34.2/1000 15-19-year-old teens had a live birth in the United States, many more will seek care for a pregnancy scare or options counseling. Teen mothers are also at risk for a second or higher-order pregnancy during adolescence. This paper provides clinicians with adolescent-friendly clinical and counseling strategies for pregnancy prevention, pre- and post-pregnancy test counseling, pregnancy-related care, and a review of the developmental challenges encountered by teens in the transition to parenthood. Clinicians are in a better position to approach the developmental, health and mental health needs of adolescents related to pregnancy if they understand and appreciate the obstacles adolescents may face negotiating the healthcare system. In addition, when clinical services are specially tailored to the needs of the adolescent, fewer opportunities will be lost to prevent unintended pregnancies, assist teens into timely prenatal services, and improve outcomes for their pregnancies and the transition to parenthood.

  12. Tailoring Clinical Services to Address the Unique Needs of Adolescents from the Pregnancy Test to Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Daley, Alison Moriarty; Sadler, Lois S.; Reynolds, Heather Dawn

    2013-01-01

    Clinicians across disciplines and practice settings are likely to encounter adolescents who are at risk for a pregnancy. In 2010, 34.2/1000 15–19 year old teens had a live birth in the United States, many more will seek care for a pregnancy scare or options counseling. Teen mothers are also at risk for a second or higher order pregnancy during adolescence. This paper provides clinicians with adolescent-friendly clinical and counseling strategies for pregnancy prevention, pre- and post-pregnancy test counseling, pregnancy-related care, and a review of the developmental challenges encountered by teens in the transition to parenthood. Clinicians are in a better position to approach the developmental, health and mental health needs of adolescents related to pregnancy if they understand and appreciate the obstacles adolescents may face negotiating the health care system. In addition, when clinical services are specially tailored to the needs of the adolescent, fewer opportunities will be lost to prevent unintended pregnancies, assist teens into timely prenatal services, and improve outcomes for their pregnancies and the transition to parenthood. PMID:23522339

  13. Helping People with HIV/AIDS Return to Work: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Martin, David J.; Chernoff, Robert A.; Buitron, Michael; Comulada, W. Scott; Liang, Li-Jung; Wong, F. Lennie

    2013-01-01

    Objective New treatments introduced in the mid 1990s led many people with HIV/AIDS who previously had been disabled by their disease to contemplate workforce reentry; many remain unemployed, and little is known concerning interventions that might help them return to work. We report the results of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) of an intervention designed to help people with HIV/AIDS reenter the workforce. Design We tested a mixed (group – individual) modality intervention that incorporated elements of Motivational Interviewing (Miller & Rollnick, 2002), skills building from Dialectical Behavior Therapy (Linehan, 1993), and job-related skills (Price & Vinokur, 1995). A total of 174 individuals participated in either the intervention or in standard of care and were followed for 24 months. Results Compared to individuals referred for standard of care, participants in the intervention engaged in more workforce-reentry activities over time and, once employed, were more likely to remain employed. Dose-response analyses revealed that among intervention participants, participants who attended more than one individual session engaged in more workforce-reentry activities than did individual who attended one or fewer individual sessions, whereas frequency of group session participation did not effect a difference between participants who attended more than six group sessions and participants who attended six or fewer group sessions. Conclusion Theoretically-based workforce-reentry assistance programs can assist disabled people with HIV/AIDS in their return-to-work efforts. PMID:23148715

  14. Sex and drugs and nuclear war: secular, developmental and type A influences upon adolescents' fears of the nuclear threat, AIDS and drug addiction.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, R; Lewis, C

    1993-03-01

    Researchers are divided over the significance of teenagers' expressed fear of nuclear war. This study of 3556 secondary school pupils examined whether (1) fear of nuclear war remains a feature of adolescent concern during the current east-west détente; (2) the examination of responses in a large sample reveals age and sex differences in such expressed fears; (3) worry about 'real world' issues like nuclear war, AIDS and drug addiction relates more generally to Type A proneness in adolescents. The results suggest that fewer teenagers spontaneously raise fear of nuclear war than in previous "pre-Glasnost" research in Britain, that such concern is expressed differentially according to the child's age and sex and that secondary school pupils who express concern about nuclear war and AIDS are more likely to show significantly higher Type A identification.

  15. Balanced intervention for adolescents and adults with language impairment: a clinical framework.

    PubMed

    Fallon, Karen A; Katz, Lauren A; Carlberg, Rachel

    2015-02-01

    Providing effective intervention services for adolescents and adults who struggle with spoken and written language presents a variety of unique challenges. This article discusses the 5S Framework (skills, strategies, school, student buy-in, and stakeholders) for designing and implementing balanced spoken and written language interventions for adolescents and adults. An in-depth case illustration highlights the usefulness of the framework for targeting the language and literacy skills of adolescents and young adults. By describing and illustrating the five key components of the intervention framework, the article provides a useful clinical tool to help guide clinicians and educators who serve the needs of adolescents and adults who struggle with spoken and written language.

  16. [Profile of adolescents with repeated pregnancies attended at a prenatal clinic].

    PubMed

    Persona, Lia; Shimo, Antonieta Keiko Kakuda; Tarallo, Maria Celina

    2004-01-01

    This study identified the biopsychosocial profile of adolescent with repeated pregnancies, who were attended at a prenatal clinic. Data were collected through patient records and interviews and were subject to quantitative analysis. Based on the obtained results and in accordance with literature, factors that are strongly associated with the occurrence of pregnancy repetition were selected in the adolescents' profiles. These are: early menarche; first sexual intercourse shortly after menarche; school repetition; school dropout; non remunerated occupation; low family income; involvement with older partners; living with the partner; consensual union with the partner; one partner; low condom use; family history of adolescent pregnancy; father's absence because of death or abandonment; positive family reaction to previous pregnancy; previous abortion; adolescent's positive concepts about previous delivery; and absence from previous postpartum consultations.

  17. Neural Imaginaries and Clinical Epistemology: Rhetorically Mapping the Adolescent Brain in the Clinical Encounter

    PubMed Central

    Buchbinder, Mara

    2014-01-01

    The social work of brain images has taken center stage in recent theorizing of the intersections between neuroscience and society. However, neuroimaging is only one of the discursive modes through which public representations of neurobiology travel. This article adopts an expanded view toward the social implications of neuroscientific thinking to examine how neural imaginaries are constructed in the absence of visual evidence. Drawing on ethnographic fieldwork conducted over 18 months (2008–2009) in a United States multidisciplinary pediatric pain clinic, I examine the pragmatic clinical work undertaken to represent ambiguous symptoms in neurobiological form. Focusing on one physician, I illustrate how, by rhetorically mapping the brain as a therapeutic tool, she engaged in a distinctive form of representation that I call neural imagining. In shifting my focus away from the purely material dimensions of brain images, I juxtapose the cultural work of brain scanning technologies with clinical neural imaginaries in which the teenage brain becomes a space of possibility, not to map things as they are, but rather, things as we hope they might be. These neural imaginaries rely upon a distinctive clinical epistemology that privileges the creative work of the imagination over visualization technologies in revealing the truths of the body. By creating a therapeutic space for adolescents to exercise their imaginative faculties and a discursive template for doing so, neural imagining relocates adolescents’ agency with respect to epistemologies of bodily knowledge and the role of visualization practices therein. In doing so, it provides a more hopeful alternative to the dominant popular and scientific representations of the teenage brain that view it primarily through the lens of pathology. PMID:24780561

  18. What is new in adolescent psychiatry? Literature review and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Gabriel

    2013-04-01

    This article provides the adolescent medicine physician with a review of seminal psychiatric research published in 2011 and 2012 and its clinical relevance for day-to-day practice. The present review focuses on conditions commonly encountered by adolescent medicine physicians such as attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, bipolar disorder, tic disorders, and major depression. Additionally, there is a section that outlines specific clinical situations for which psychiatric consultation must be obtained, as well as helpful resources and suggestions to mitigate the unavailability of appointments in a mental health office.

  19. Attachment Organization and History of Suicidal Behavior in Clinical Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adam, Kenneth S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Adolescents in psychiatric treatment (N=133) participated in a case-comparison study investigating the association of attachment patterns with a history of suicidal behaviors. Attachment patterns were assessed using the Adult Attachment Interview. In accordance with definitions provided in the scoring system, 86% of case and 78% of comparison…

  20. Extreme Thinking in Clinically Depressed Adolescents: Results from the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Rachel H.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Jordan, Neil; Silva, Susan G.; March, John S.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine relations between extreme thinking, as measured by the Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale, and the maintenance of gains among adolescents who participated in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). We examine extreme thinking among 327 adolescents (mean age = 14.56, 57% female, 75% White) who received cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine (FLX), or a combination of CBT and FLX (COMB). Among those who met remission status on the Children's Depression Rating Scale – Revised (CDRS-R ≤ 28; 56 at week 12, 79 at week 18) extreme thinking did not predict failure to maintain remission. This is in contrast to findings with depressed adults. Treatment influenced level of extreme thinking, and this appeared to be driven by greater endorsement of positively valenced beliefs as opposed to a decrease in negatively valenced beliefs. Developmental or investigation characteristics may account for the discrepancy in findings. PMID:20843506

  1. AIDS Fact Pack.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Population Options, Washington, DC.

    The three fact sheets presented in this document address issues surrounding adolescent sexuality and sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), especially the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS). The first fact sheet, "Young Women and AIDS: A Worldwide Perspective," suggests that since open discussions of adolescent sexuality have long been…

  2. Gene therapy for the treatment of AIDS: animal models and human clinical experience.

    PubMed

    Amado, R G; Mitsuyasu, R T; Zack, J A

    1999-05-15

    Although antiretroviral drug therapy has had a significant impact on the natural history of HIV infection, complete virus eradication still remains an unattainable goal. Drug-mediated virological control only occurs transiently, in part as a result of the development of drug resistance. Gene therapy for the treatment of AIDS is a promising area of research that has as its goal the replacement of the HIV-infected cellular pool with cells engineered to resist virus replication. A variety of anti-HIV genes have been designed and tested in laboratory systems, and available results from pilot clinical trials demonstrate the safety and feasibility of this approach. Obstacles to effective application of this technology include partial protection of HIV resistance genes, lack of effective vectoring systems, and unregulated gene expression. Herein, we review recent advances in transduction methods, data from in vivo preclinical studies in relevant animal models, and emerging results derived from pilot clinical gene therapy studies.

  3. Clinical and pathologic findings of the liver in the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS).

    PubMed

    Glasgow, B J; Anders, K; Layfield, L J; Steinsapir, K D; Gitnick, G L; Lewin, K J

    1985-05-01

    Clinical data and histologic sections of the liver, including immunohistochemical studies for hepatitis B surface and core antigens, were reviewed in 42 autopsy cases of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Hepatomegaly, elevation of serum transaminases, and mild elevation of alkaline phosphatase were commonly observed clinical and biochemical abnormalities. Mildly elevated alkaline phosphatase and normal bilirubin levels were present in patients with Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare (MAI) infection, cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection, and Kaposi's sarcoma (KS). Histologic sections demonstrated liver involvement by MAI in eight cases; KS in six cases; cryptococcus in three cases; and CMV in two cases. One case of MAI infection was associated with marked central vein sclerosis, a finding previously unreported. Thirty-two (76%) of 42 cases had serologic or pathologic evidence of hepatitis exposure. Two patients had histologic evidence of chronic active hepatitis. The pathologic processes involving the liver appeared to be secondary to the infections and neoplasms for which this population is susceptible and did not significantly contribute to morbidity or mortality. No findings specific or pathognomic for AIDS were identified in the liver.

  4. Adolescent parricide as a clinical and legal problem.

    PubMed

    Malmquist, Carl P

    2010-01-01

    Criminologists contribute to the knowledge regarding the continuing problem of parricide by way of macrostudies, utilizing large samples that reveal patterns of how such acts are carried out, gender differences, and other aspects. Clinicians have the opportunity to pursue microinvestigations into the details of how cognitive processes and emotions operate in the adolescent who engages in such behavior. Such investigations entail pursuing specifics in the psychosocial realm, such as earlier maltreatments and ongoing psychological conflicts, and also being alert to the neurobiological differences between adolescents and adults. The use of battered child syndrome as a legal defense is discussed, with contrasts made between relying on a posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) approach and a duress defense, based on explanations related to shame and humiliation.

  5. The work of clinical nurse specialists (HIV/AIDS) in areas with a low prevalence of HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Irwin, R

    1998-03-01

    The role of the clinical nurse specialists (HIV/AIDS) who work in areas with a low known prevalence of HIV is considered and their contribution to patient care, either directly or indirectly through the education and support of other health care workers, is discussed. Attention is given to the implications for nursing practice and the role of the clinical nurse specialist associated with the relative infrequency of contact with patients who have HIV disease; and some of the issues for people living with HIV/AIDS in rural areas are alluded to. Finally, some of the limitations of the clinical nurse specialist role are delineated and some consideration is given to the future role of clinical nurse specialists for HIV and AIDS.

  6. Clinical study of orthokeratology in young myopic adolescents.

    PubMed

    Fan, L; Jun, J; Jia, Q; Wangqing, J; Xinjie, M; Yi, S

    1999-09-01

    This project was designed to study the efficacy of orthokeratology and its related problems in a population of young myopic adolescents. Fifty-four young myopia adolescents ages 11 to 15 years were enrolled in the study and followed over a 6-month period. The procedures included (1) baseline refraction, assessment of tear quality and quantity, and cornea examination including cornea topography, A-scan ultrasound of cornea thickness, and spectromicroscopy of the corneal endothelium; (2) diagnostic lens fitting and evaluation; (3) lens dispensing and educating the patients or their parents; (4) follow-up schedule and data analysis; and (5) maintenance lens dispensing and analysis of wearing schedules. Myopia was reduced between -1.25 and -5.00 D (-3.00 D average). Myopia reduction was almost complete in the first 6 months, with most of the reduction occurring during the first 2 weeks. Seventy-five percent of the possible reduction occurred during this 2-week time period. Tear quality and quantity influenced reduction speed and amount. Corneal thickness and endothelium remained unchanged over the study period. Subjective refraction is the most reliable method to measure the status of ocular refractive changes. Corneal staining occurred in 45% of subjects during the procedure, mainly in subjects with tear problems. Eighteen percent of the subjects showed induced astigmatism, which could be reversed by refitting the lens or changing the wearing schedule. Maintenance lenses had to be worn every night for young adolescents to maintain myopia reduction. Orthokeratology is a reliable option for reducing some myopia in young adolescents. The first 2 weeks are critical for the procedure. Complete examination and the data analysis procedures are important for monitoring prognosis and eye health.

  7. Waist circumference percentile thresholds for identifying adolescents with insulin resistance in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joyce M; Davis, Matthew M; Woolford, Susan J; Gurney, James G

    2009-08-01

    We formally evaluated waist circumference (WC) percentile cutoffs for predicting insulin resistance (IR) and whether different cutoffs should be used for adolescents of different race/ethnicities. Analysis was performed for 1575 adolescents aged 12-18 yr from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2002. Adolescents were classified as having IR if they had a homeostasis model assessment-insulin resistance level, a validated measure of IR, of >4.39, and WC percentile was classified according to previously published universal (all races combined) and race/ethnicity-specific WC percentile cutoffs. Receiver operating characteristic curves for predicting IR were constructed comparing the race/ethnicity-specific vs. universal WC percentile cutoffs, and area under the curve (AUC) was calculated. Comparing universal with race/ethnicity-specific WC percentiles, there were no significant differences in AUC for Black, Mexican-American, or White adolescents. Because race/ethnicity-specific thresholds did not discriminate better than universal WC thresholds, universal WC thresholds may be used effectively to identify adolescents with IR in primary care practices. A WC > or =75th or > or =90th percentile for all race/ethnicities combined would be appropriate to apply in clinical practice for identification of adolescents with IR, a risk factor for development of type 2 diabetes.

  8. Outcomes of antiretroviral therapy among younger versus older adolescents and adults in an urban clinic, Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Takarinda, K. C.; Owiti, P.; Mutasa-Apollo, T.; Mugurungi, O.; Buruwe, L.; Reid, A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: A non-governmental organisation-supported clinic offering health services including antiretroviral therapy (ART). Objective: To compare ART retention between younger (age 10–14 years) vs. older (age 15–19 years) adolescents and younger (age 20–29 years) vs. older (age ⩾30 years) adults and determine adolescent- and adult-specific attrition-associated factors among those initiated on ART between 2010 and 2011. Design: Retrospective cohort study. Results: Of 110 (7%) adolescents and 1484 (93%) adults included in the study, no differences in retention were observed between younger vs. older adolescents at 6, 12 and 24 months. More younger adolescents were initiated with body mass index <16 kg/m2 compared with older adolescents (64% vs. 47%; P = 0.04). There were more females (74% vs. 52%, P < 0.001) and fewer patients initiating ART with CD4 count ⩽350 cells/mm3 (77% vs. 81%, P = 0.007) among younger vs. older adults. Younger adults demonstrated more attrition than older adults at all time-points. No attrition risk factors were observed among adolescents. Attrition-associated factors among adults included being younger, having a lower CD4 count and advanced human immunodeficiency virus disease at initiation, and initiation on a stavudine-based regimen. Conclusion: Younger adults demonstrated greater attrition and may require more attention. We were unable to demonstrate differences in attrition among younger vs. older adolescents. Loss to follow-up was the main reason for attrition across all age groups. Overall, earlier presentation for ART care appears important for improved ART retention among adults. PMID:27358802

  9. A Comparative Study of Clinical Correlates in Schizophrenia with Onset in Childhood, Adolescence and Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biswas, Parthasarathy; Malhotra, Savita; Malhotra, Anil; Gupta, Nitin

    2006-01-01

    Background: Childhood onset schizophrenia (COS) is a rare disorder. Comparative data on the effect of differential age of onset on clinical profile in schizophrenia are very few. Method: Subjects with COS (n = 15), adolescence onset schizophrenia (AdOS, n = 20) and adulthood onset schizophrenia (AOS, n = 20) were compared on socio-demographic,…

  10. Preliminary Validation of a Screening Tool for Adolescent Panic Disorder in Pediatric Primary Care Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Queen, Alexander H.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Hershorin, Eugene R.

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the validity of a brief screening tool for adolescent panic disorder (PD) in a primary care setting. A total of 165 participants (ages 12-17 years) seen in two pediatric primary care clinics completed the Autonomic Nervous System Questionnaire (ANS; Stein et al. in Psychosomatic Med 61:359-364, 40). A subset of those screening…

  11. Clinical Precursors of Adolescent Conduct Disorder in Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whittinger, Naureen S.; Langley, Kate; Fowler, Tom A.; Thomas, Hollie V.; Thapar, Anita

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To examine precursors of adolescent conduct disorder (CD) in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), investigating the significance of childhood oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and ADHD. Method: A total of 151 children with ADHD recruited from child psychiatric and pediatric clinics were assessed through…

  12. Triage of Patients in the Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Outpatient Clinic

    PubMed Central

    ARAS, Şahbal; VAROL TAŞ, Fatma; BAYKARA, Burak

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to evaluate and describe the three-stage triage method used in a child and adolescent psychiatry outpatient clinic. Method The study investigated the new allocation process of 1482 children and adolescents who were assessed using this triage system for the duration of one year, in the year 2005. Data of 1423 children and adolescents who presented in 2003 regarding the waiting time for the first appointment and the rate of nonattendance at the first appointment were used for the comparison. In triage system, new patients presenting to the outpatient clinic in the morning four days a week were assessed by a three-stage procedure: An initial Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire screening and a structured interview administered by an intern was then followed by a clinical interview. Results Of the 1482 children and adolescents who presented to the outpatient clinic during the study period, 1291 were given further appointments. Among patients who presented in 2005, the 207 non-attendant patients were significantly more likely to have longer waiting times than the 1084 attendant patients. When compared to year 2003, it was found that there was a significant decrease in the median waiting time for the first appointment and the rate of nonattendance at the first appointment among patients who presented in 2005. Conclusion The triage procedure used in this study may constitute a model for developing countries with limited health care resources.

  13. Clinical Profile of Childhood Onset Depression Presenting to Child Adolescent and Family Services in Northampton

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majumder, Pallab; Hammad, Hala

    2006-01-01

    Background: The clinical profile of depressive disorder in children and young people in Child Adolescent and Family Services (CAFS), Northampton was studied. Methods: Twenty-five patients who had attended the CAFS over a period of 2 years were analysed retrospectively. Results: The age range of subjects was 8 to 19 years. Majority of patients were…

  14. Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction for the Treatment of Adolescent Psychiatric Outpatients: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biegel, Gina M.; Brown, Kirk Warren; Shapiro, Shauna L.; Schubert, Christine M.

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that mindfulness-based treatment interventions may be effective for a range of mental and physical health disorders in adult populations, but little is known about the effectiveness of such interventions for treating adolescent conditions. The present randomized clinical trial was designed to assess the effect of the…

  15. Clinical Analysis of Five Cases of AIDS-related Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Shubo; Xu, Na; Li, Zhongkun; Li, Na; Xia, Hong; Ren, Hongtao; Bao, Huizheng

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Secondary malignancy is a major life-threatening complication facing patients afflicted with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). This study aimed to retrospectively review clinical features and treatment course of five patients with AIDS-associated non-Hodgkin lymphoma (A-NHL) in Jilin Tumor Hospital. Methods: Five A-NHL patients were retrospectively and consecutively hospitalized at our oncological unit between January 2012 and June 2014. All patients received pre-emptive highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) and chemotherapy, and were subsequently followed up at the outpatient clinic. All five patients were male, aged 27–53 years, and afflicted with A-NHL involving upper jaw, right inguinal region, right-side gingiva, mediastinum, or right-side neck. Histology showed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (n = 3) or plasmablastic lymphoma (n = 2). Results: Two patients achieved complete remission after HAART and chemotherapy, whereas other three patients required a second-line treatment, with two achieving stable disease and one dying within a follow-up period of 0.5−2 years. Conclusion: The findings of the present study showed that A-NHL is a disease often diagnosed in the middle-to-late stages, with diverse clinical manifestations and short overall survival. In the cases reviewed in this study, HAART in combination with standard dose or high-dose chemotherapy, HAART and molecular targeted chemotherapy was administered, and these treatments proved to be effective for improving the prognosis of these patients. Moreover, the CD4+ cell count was important for determining the prognosis of patients. PMID:28083067

  16. Vitamin B12 in obese adolescents with clinical features of insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ho, Mandy; Halim, Jocelyn H; Gow, Megan L; El-Haddad, Nouhad; Marzulli, Teresa; Baur, Louise A; Cowell, Chris T; Garnett, Sarah P

    2014-12-04

    Emerging evidence indicates an association between obesity, metformin use and reduced vitamin B12 status, which can have serious hematologic, neurologic and psychiatric consequences. This study aimed to examine B12 status in obese adolescents with pre-diabetes and/or clinical features of insulin resistance. Serum B12 was measured using chemiluminescence immunoassay in 103 (43 male, 60 female) obese (mean body mass index (BMI) z-score ± SD (2.36 ± 0.29)), adolescents aged 10 to 17 years, median (range) insulin sensitivity index of 1.27 (0.27 to 3.38) and 13.6% had pre-diabetes. Low B12 (<148 pmol/L) was identified in eight (7.8%) and borderline status (148 to 221 pmol/L) in an additional 25 (24.3%) adolescents. Adolescents with borderline B12 concentrations had higher BMI z-scores compared to those with normal concentrations (2.50 ± 0.22 vs. 2.32 ± 0.30, p = 0.008) or those with low B12 concentration (2.50 ± 0.22 vs. 2.27 ± 0.226, p = 0.041). In conclusion, nearly a third of obese adolescents with clinical insulin resistance had a low or borderline serum B12 status. Therefore, further investigations are warranted to explore the cause and the impact of low B12 status in obese pediatric populations.

  17. Screening for Spiritual Struggle in an Adolescent Transgender Clinic: Feasibility and Acceptability.

    PubMed

    Grossoehme, Daniel H; Teeters, Alexis; Jelinek, Sue; Dimitriou, Sophia M; Conard, Lee Ann E

    2016-01-01

    Spiritual struggles are associated with poorer health outcomes, including depression, which has higher prevalence among transgender individuals than the general population. This study's objective was to improve the quality of care in an outpatient transgender clinic by screening patients and caregivers for spiritual struggle and future intervention. The quality improvement questions addressed were whether screening for spiritual struggle was feasible and acceptable; and whether the sensitivity and specificity of the Rush Protocol were acceptable. Revision of the screening was based on cognitive interviews with the 115 adolescents and caregivers who were screened. Prevalence of spiritual struggle was 38-47%. Compared to the Negative R-COPE, the Rush Protocol screener had sensitivities of 44-80% and specificities of 60-74%. The Rush Protocol was acceptable to adolescents seen in a transgender clinic, caregivers, and clinic staff; was feasible to deliver during outpatient clinic visits, and offers a straightforward means of identifying transgender persons and caregivers experiencing spiritual struggle.

  18. Case report: imaging the clinical course of FOPE—a cause of adolescent knee pain

    PubMed Central

    Bochmann, Thomas; Forrester, Richard; Smith, Jon

    2016-01-01

    Focal periphyseal oedema (FOPE) is a rare MRI finding associated with pain in adolescent patients with very few reported cases. We present a case of FOPE in a 13-year-old girl and the only follow-up imaging available for an isolated presentation of this condition.This article describes a clinical course that correlates well with the imaging obtained. This article describes a clinical course that correlates well with the imaging obtained. PMID:27887018

  19. Parents who hit and scream: interactive effects of verbal and severe physical aggression on clinic-referred adolescents' adjustment.

    PubMed

    LeRoy, Michelle; Mahoney, Annette; Boxer, Paul; Gullan, Rebecca Lakin; Fang, Qijuan

    2014-05-01

    The goals of this study were first, to delineate the co-occurrence of parental severe physical aggression and verbal aggression toward clinic-referred adolescents, and second, to examine the interactive effects of parental severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent externalizing and internalizing behavior problems. This research involved 239 referrals of 11- to 18-year-old youth and their dual-parent families to a non-profit, private community mental health center in a semi-rural Midwest community. Multiple informants (i.e., adolescents and mothers) were used to assess parental aggression and adolescent behavior problems. More than half of clinic-referred adolescents (51%) experienced severe physical aggression and/or high verbal aggression from one or both parents. A pattern of interactive effects of mother-to-adolescent severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent behavior problems emerged, indicating that when severe physical aggression was present, mother-to-adolescent verbal aggression was positively associated with greater adolescent behavior problems whereas when severe physical aggression was not present, the links between verbal aggression and behavior problems was no longer significant. No interactive effects were found for father-to-adolescent severe physical aggression and verbal aggression on adolescent adjustment; however, higher father-to-adolescent verbal aggression was consistently linked to behavior problems above and beyond the influence of severe physical aggression. The results of this study should promote the practice of routinely assessing clinic-referred adolescents and their parents about their experiences of verbal aggression in addition to severe physical aggression and other forms of abuse.

  20. Evaluating Protocol Lifecycle Time Intervals in HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Jeffrey T.; Dixon, Dennis; Varghese, Suresh; Cope, Marie T.; Marci, Joe; Kagan, Jonathan M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Identifying efficacious interventions for the prevention and treatment of human diseases depends on the efficient development and implementation of controlled clinical trials. Essential to reducing the time and burden of completing the clinical trial lifecycle is determining which aspects take the longest, delay other stages, and may lead to better resource utilization without diminishing scientific quality, safety, or the protection of human subjects. Purpose In this study we modeled time-to-event data to explore relationships between clinical trial protocol development and implementation times, as well as identify potential correlates of prolonged development and implementation. Methods We obtained time interval and participant accrual data from 111 interventional clinical trials initiated between 2006 and 2011 by NIH’s HIV/AIDS Clinical Trials Networks. We determined the time (in days) required to complete defined phases of clinical trial protocol development and implementation. Kaplan-Meier estimates were used to assess the rates at which protocols reached specified terminal events, stratified by study purpose (therapeutic, prevention) and phase group (pilot/phase I, phase II, and phase III/ IV). We also examined several potential correlates to prolonged development and implementation intervals. Results Even though phase grouping did not determine development or implementation times of either therapeutic or prevention studies, overall we observed wide variation in protocol development times. Moreover, we detected a trend toward phase III/IV therapeutic protocols exhibiting longer developmental (median 2 ½ years) and implementation times (>3years). We also found that protocols exceeding the median number of days for completing the development interval had significantly longer implementation. Limitations The use of a relatively small set of protocols may have limited our ability to detect differences across phase groupings. Some timing effects

  1. Cryptosporidiosis in HIV/AIDS Patients in Kenya: Clinical Features, Epidemiology, Molecular Characterization and Antibody Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wanyiri, Jane W.; Kanyi, Henry; Maina, Samuel; Wang, David E.; Steen, Aaron; Ngugi, Paul; Kamau, Timothy; Waithera, Tabitha; O'Connor, Roberta; Gachuhi, Kimani; Wamae, Claire N.; Mwamburi, Mkaya; Ward, Honorine D.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the epidemiological and clinical features of cryptosporidiosis, the molecular characteristics of infecting species and serum antibody responses to three Cryptosporidium-specific antigens in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) patients in Kenya. Cryptosporidium was the most prevalent enteric pathogen and was identified in 56 of 164 (34%) of HIV/AIDS patients, including 25 of 70 (36%) with diarrhea and 31 of 94 (33%) without diarrhea. Diarrhea in patients exclusively infected with Cryptosporidium was significantly associated with the number of children per household, contact with animals, and water treatment. Cryptosporidium hominis was the most prevalent species and the most prevalent subtype family was Ib. Patients without diarrhea had significantly higher serum IgG levels to Chgp15, Chgp40 and Cp23, and higher fecal IgA levels to Chgp15 and Chgp40 than those with diarrhea suggesting that antibody responses to these antigens may be associated with protection from diarrhea and supporting further investigation of these antigens as vaccine candidates. PMID:24865675

  2. Effects of Computer-Aided Manufacturing Technology on Precision of Clinical Metal-Free Restorations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ki-Hong; Yeo, In-Sung; Wu, Benjamin M.; Yang, Jae-Ho; Han, Jung-Suk; Kim, Sung-Hun; Yi, Yang-Jin; Kwon, Taek-Ka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to investigate the marginal fit of metal-free crowns made by three different computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) systems. Materials and Methods. The maxillary left first premolar of a dentiform was prepared for all-ceramic crown restoration. Thirty all-ceramic premolar crowns were made, ten each manufactured by the Lava system, Cercon, and Cerec. Ten metal ceramic gold (MCG) crowns served as control. The marginal gap of each sample was measured under a stereoscopic microscope at 75x magnification after cementation. One-way ANOVA and the Duncan's post hoc test were used for data analysis at the significance level of 0.05. Results. The mean (standard deviation) marginal gaps were 70.5 (34.4) μm for the MCG crowns, 87.2 (22.8) μm for Lava, 58.5 (17.6) μm for Cercon, and 72.3 (30.8) μm for Cerec. There were no significant differences in the marginal fit among the groups except that the Cercon crowns had significantly smaller marginal gaps than the Lava crowns (P < 0.001).  Conclusions. Within the limitation of this study, all the metal-free restorations made by the digital CAD/CAM systems had clinically acceptable marginal accuracy. PMID:26557681

  3. The aftermath of adolescent suicide: clinical, ethical, and spiritual issues.

    PubMed

    Girard, Gustavo A; Silber, Tomas J

    2011-08-01

    The aftermath of an adolescent's suicide can be devastating to family, friends, and treating professionals, yet not much has been written on this subject. In this article, we briefly develop a conceptualization of suicide and a typology of suicide and the physicians' attitudes toward suicide. This is followed with a more detailed review of the aftermath of suicide (focusing on the suicide grievers) and the impact of suicide on clinicians. The work ends with discussion of research data and the role of spirituality as well as an outline of therapeutic interventions.

  4. Effective Treatment of Depressive Disorders in Medical Clinics for Adolescents and Young Adults living with HIV: A controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Larry K.; Kennard, Betsy D.; Emslie, Graham J.; Mayes, Taryn L.; Whiteley, Laura B.; Bethel, James; Xu, Jiahong; Thornton, Sarah; Tanney, Mary R.; Hawkins, Linda A.; Garvie, Patricia A.; Subramaniam, Geetha A.; Worrell, Carol J.; Stoff, Laura W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Preliminary test of a manualized, measurement-guided treatment for depression for adolescents and young adults in care at four sites of the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV/AIDS Interventions (ATN). Design The U.S. sites were randomly assigned to either a 24-week, combination cognitive behavioral therapy and medication management algorithm (COMB) tailored for youth living with HIV (YLWH) or to treatment as usual (TAU). Methods Youth at TAU sites had access to therapists and medication management as needed. COMB site clinicians were trained in the manualized intervention and participated in supervision calls to monitor intervention fidelity. Results Over the course of the study with 44 participants, those in COMB, compared to those in TAU, reported fewer depressive symptoms, p<0.01 (as measured by the Quick Inventory for Depression Symptomatology) and were more likely to be in remission, p<0.001, (65% vs.10% at week 24 end of treatment, and 71% vs. 7% at week 48 final follow-up). A greater proportion of COMB participants received psychotherapy (95% vs. 45%, p<0.001) and attended more sessions (12.6 vs. 5, p<0.001) than those in TAU. Viral load decreased in both groups and was associated (p<0.05) with reduction in depressive symptoms. Conclusions A 24-week manualized, measurement-guided psychotherapy and medication management algorithm tailored for YLWH was more effective in achieving and sustaining remission from depression than treatment as usual at HIV care clinic sites. Given observed treatment efficacy, this structured combination treatment could be disseminated to medical clinics in order to successfully treat YLWH, who are at particular risk for depression. PMID:26761270

  5. Classroom to clinic: incorporating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into nurse practitioner education & practice.

    PubMed

    Haley, Janice M

    2014-01-01

    Although nursing is well grounded in the conceptualization of person as body-mind-spirit, there is little evidence that advanced practice nurses routinely address the spirit in giving patient care, especially with adolescents in the outpatient setting. The neglect of spiritual aspects of care may be related to lack of a framework, or education/incorporation into nurse practitioner preparation. This article describes one method of integrating adolescent spiritual/faith assessment into a nurse practitioner clinical course. Readings, assignments, and a grading rubric are offered.

  6. Treatment-resistant depression in adolescents: review and updates on clinical management.

    PubMed

    Maalouf, Fadi T; Atwi, Mia; Brent, David A

    2011-11-01

    Treatment-resistant depression (TRD) in adolescents is prevalent and impairing. We here review the definition, prevalence, clinical significance, risk factors, and management of TRD in adolescents. Risk factors associated with TRD include characteristics of depression (severity, level of hopelessness, and suicidal ideation), psychiatric and medical comorbidities, environmental factors (family conflict, maternal depression, and history of abuse), and pharmacokinetics and other biomarkers. Management options include review of the adequacy of the initial treatment, re-assessment for the above-noted factors that might predispose to treatment resistance, switching antidepressants, and augmentation with medication or psychotherapy. Other modalities, such as electroconvulsive therapy, vagal nerve stimulation, and repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation, are also reviewed.

  7. Clinical considerations in the management of inflammatory periodontal diseases in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cabanilla, Leyvee; Molinari, Gail

    2009-01-01

    Periodontal diseases and conditions, as defined by The 1999 International Workshop for Classification of Periodontal Diseases and Conditions presented some significant paradigm shifts based on evidence that the transition from plaque-associated reversible gingival diseases to periodontitis can occur in children and adolescents with characteristics which were previously thought to be typical of adult periodontitis. The purposes of this paper are to present the periodontal diseases and conditions described in the 1999 workshop sponsored by the American Academy of Periodontology, review the risk factors for the development of periodontal diseases in the pediatric and adolescent populations, and present appropriate clinical periodontal assessment and management for these age groups.

  8. Clinical Features of Adult/Adolescent Atopic Dermatitis and Chinese Criteria for Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ping; Zhao, Yan; Mu, Zhang-Lei; Lu, Qian-Jin; Zhang, Li; Yao, Xu; Zheng, Min; Tang, Yi-Wen; Lu, Xin-Xiang; Xia, Xiu-Juan; Lin, You-Kun; Li, Yu-Zhen; Tu, Cai-Xia; Yao, Zhi-Rong; Xu, Jin-Hua; Li, Wei; Lai, Wei; Yang, Hui-Min; Xie, Hong-Fu; Han, Xiu-Ping; Xie, Zhi-Qiang; Nong, Xiang; Guo, Zai-Pei; Deng, Dan-Qi; Shi, Tong-Xin; Zhang, Jian-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Background: Atopic dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory skin disease characterized by chronic recurrent dermatitis with profound itching. Most patients have personal and/or family history of atopic diseases. Several criteria have been proposed for the diagnosis of AD. Although the clinical features of childhood AD have been widely studied, there has been less large-scale study on adult/adolescent AD. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features of adult/adolescent patients with chronic symmetrical eczema/AD and to propose Chinese diagnostic criteria for adult/adolescent AD. Methods: A hospital-based study was performed. Forty-two dermatological centers participated in this study. Adult and adolescent patients (12 years and over) with chronic symmetrical eczema or AD were included in this study. Questionnaires were completed by both patients and investigators. The valid questionnaires were analyzed using EpiData 3.1 and SPSS 17.0 software. Results: A total of 2662 valid questionnaires were collected (1369 male and 1293 female). Of all 2662 patients, 2062 (77.5%) patients had the disease after 12 years old, while only 600 (22.5%) patients had the disease before 12 years old, suggesting late-onset eczema/AD is common. Two thousand one hundred and thirty-nine (80.4%) patients had the disease for more than 6 months. One thousand one hundred and forty-four (43.0%) patients had a personal and/or family history of atopic diseases. One thousand five hundred and forty-eight (58.2%) patients had an elevated total serum IgE and/or eosinophilia and/or positive allergen-specific IgE. Based on these clinical and laboratory features, we proposed Chinese criteria for adult/adolescent AD. Of all 2662 patients, 60.3% were satisfied with our criteria, while only 48.2% satisfied with Hanifin Rajka criteria and 32.7% satisfied with Williams criteria, suggesting a good sensitivity of our criteria in adult/adolescent AD patients. Conclusion: Late-onset of eczema or AD is

  9. Marital and severe parent-to-adolescent physical aggression in clinic-referred families: mother and adolescent reports on co-occurrence and links to child behavior problems.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Annette; Donnelly, William O; Boxer, Paul; Lewis, Terri

    2003-03-01

    This study examined the interplay of marital and severe parental physical aggression, and their links to child behavior problems, in 232 families of clinic-referred adolescents. Combined reports from mothers and adolescents indicated that two thirds of adolescents exposed to marital aggression in the past year had also experienced parental aggression. Mothers and fathers who used and/or were victims of marital aggression were both more likely to direct aggression toward their adolescent. Mother and youth reports of marital aggression were tied to each party's report of greater externalizing problems and to youth reports of greater internalizing problems. Severe parental aggression uniquely predicted maternal reports of both behavior problems, after controlling for marital aggression; the reverse was not true. Also, adolescents exposed to both types of family aggression did not display greater maladjustment than those subjected to only one type of family aggression.

  10. A needs analysis for computer-based telephone triage in a community AIDS clinic.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, S. B.; Schreiner, J. G.; Borchelt, D.; Musen, M. A.

    1992-01-01

    This study describes the complexity of the telephone-triage task in a community-based AIDS clinic. We identify deficiencies related to the data management for and documentation of the telephone-triage encounter, including inaccessibility of the medical record and failure to document required data elements. Our needs analysis suggests five design criteria for a computer-based system that assists nurses with the telephone-triage task: (1) online accessibility of the medical record, (2) ability to move among modules of the medical record and the triage-encounter module, (3) ease of data entry, (4) compliance with standards for documentation, and (5) notification of the primary-care physician in an appropriate and timely manner. PMID:1482941

  11. [Nursing consultation in an HIV/AIDS outpatient clinic: patients' perception].

    PubMed

    de Macêdo, Simara Moreira; Sena, Márcia Cristina dos Santos; Miranda, Karla Corrêa Lima

    2012-09-01

    The study aims to understand the patients' perception regarding the nursing consultation at an outpatient clinic for Human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) in the city of Fortaleza-CE (State of Ceará). This is an exploratory and descriptive qualitative approach. Data was collected through semi-structured interviews with fifteen patients of this institution and analyzed with the support of content analysis. The nursing consultation was reported by patients as a learning moment, focused onproviding information. The trust and emotional support provided by the professional act as a support to the conflicts experienced by the patients, allowing the construction of a new perspective of the disease. We believe that the implementation of the nursing consultation in a dialogic perspective can provide a new meaning to the conflicts surrounding the patients' illness.

  12. Targeting HIV clinical training with maps: lessons from the Pacific AIDS Education and Training Center.

    PubMed

    Myers, Janet; Bernstein, Mona; Morin, Stephen F; Reyes, Michael

    2007-12-01

    Public health providers are increasingly called on to do more with fewer resources. Aiming to help HIV clinical training providers in 15 local sites to better target their efforts, the Pacific AIDS Education and Training Center (PAETC) implemented a method for integrating disparate information, such as program-level evaluation and publicly available health services data, into one combined and useful format. The resulting local area profiles were distributed to each training site and were updated annually for 2 years. As a result, local training teams adopted data-based approaches to doing their work. Training managers and faculty reported that data presented in spatial formats (i.e., maps) were most helpful for targeting their outreach and training. In addition to achieving the aim of supporting better programs, the project increased capacity for using data to support all aspects of training and education, from grant writing to strategic planning.

  13. Isoprinosine (inosine pranobex BAN, INPX) in the treatment of AIDS and other acquired immunodeficiencies of clinical importance.

    PubMed

    Glasky, A J; Gordon, J F

    1987-01-01

    The immunopharmacologic effects of Isoprinosine (INPX) have been associated with clinical benefit to the patient in a number of conditions characterized by immunodeficiency of diverse etiology. Immunodepressed homosexuals at risk of developing acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) treated with placebo or INPX experienced an increase in the function and number of immunocompetent cells associated with clinical improvement. A multicenter trial designed to confirm these results has demonstrated that INPX produced an increase in natural killer (NK)-cell activity, total T cells, and T-helper cells, with certain effects persisting for months after completion of the 28-day treatment period. INPX-treated patients also experienced clinical improvement and decreased incidence of progression to AIDS. The administration of INPX for longer periods to patients with frank AIDS under a compassionate-use protocol has also proved useful. Clinical benefit associated with INPX treatment has been demonstrated in other patients with a depressed immune response, such as aged patients, cancer patients, severely burned patients, ill patients, and surgery patients. This program of clinical trials supports the therapeutic use of INPX in the treatment of AIDS and other acquired immunodeficiencies of clinical importance.

  14. Working Memory and Hearing Aid Processing: Literature Findings, Future Directions, and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Souza, Pamela; Arehart, Kathryn; Neher, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Working memory-the ability to process and store information-has been identified as an important aspect of speech perception in difficult listening environments. Working memory can be envisioned as a limited-capacity system which is engaged when an input signal cannot be readily matched to a stored representation or template. This "mismatch" is expected to occur more frequently when the signal is degraded. Because working memory capacity varies among individuals, those with smaller capacity are expected to demonstrate poorer speech understanding when speech is degraded, such as in background noise. However, it is less clear whether (and how) working memory should influence practical decisions, such as hearing treatment. Here, we consider the relationship between working memory capacity and response to specific hearing aid processing strategies. Three types of signal processing are considered, each of which will alter the acoustic signal: fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, which smooths the amplitude envelope of the input signal; digital noise reduction, which may inadvertently remove speech signal components as it suppresses noise; and frequency compression, which alters the relationship between spectral peaks. For fast-acting wide-dynamic range compression, a growing body of data suggests that individuals with smaller working memory capacity may be more susceptible to such signal alterations, and may receive greater amplification benefit with "low alteration" processing. While the evidence for a relationship between wide-dynamic range compression and working memory appears robust, the effects of working memory on perceptual response to other forms of hearing aid signal processing are less clear cut. We conclude our review with a discussion of the opportunities (and challenges) in translating information on individual working memory into clinical treatment, including clinically feasible measures of working memory.

  15. Psychometric properties and clinical cut-off scores of the Spanish version of the Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Lopez, Luis J; Inglés, Cándido J; García-Fernández, José M; Hidalgo, María D; Bermejo, Rosa; Puklek Levpušček, Melita

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the reliability and validity evidence drawn from the scores of the Spanish version of the Slovenian-developed Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents (SASA; Puklek, 1997; Puklek & Vidmar, 2000) using a community sample (Study 1) and a clinical sample (Study 2). Confirmatory factor analysis in Study 1 replicated the 2-factor structure found by the original authors in a sample of Slovenian adolescents. Test-retest reliability was adequate. Furthermore, the SASA correlated significantly with other social anxiety scales, supporting concurrent validity evidence in Spanish adolescents. The results of Study 2 confirmed the correlations between the SASA and other social anxiety measures in a clinical sample. In addition, findings revealed that the SASA can effectively discriminate between adolescents with a clinical diagnosis of social anxiety disorder (SAD) and those without this disorder. Finally, cut-off scores for the SASA are provided for Spanish adolescents.

  16. Clinical management of gender dysphoria in children and adolescents: the Dutch approach.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Annelou L C; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T

    2012-01-01

    The Dutch approach on clinical management of both prepubertal children under the age of 12 and adolescents starting at age 12 with gender dysphoria, starts with a thorough assessment of any vulnerable aspects of the youth's functioning or circumstances and, when necessary, appropriate intervention. In children with gender dysphoria only, the general recommendation is watchful waiting and carefully observing how gender dysphoria develops in the first stages of puberty. Gender dysphoric adolescents can be considered eligible for puberty suppression and subsequent cross-sex hormones when they reach the age of 16 years. Currently, withholding physical medical interventions in these cases seems more harmful to wellbeing in both adolescence and adulthood when compared to cases where physical medical interventions were provided.

  17. Use of antidepressants for major depressive disorder in children and adolescents: clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Picouto, María Dolores; Braquehais, María Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Major depressive disorder (MDD) is a frequent condition among children and, especially, among adolescents. However, its clinical presentation usually differs from that of adults. It is also associated with other diagnoses and with an increased morbidity and mortality. However, MDD in this population remains underrecognized and undertreated. Antidepressants (ATDs) are chosen when psychoeducational, psychosocial and/or psychotherapeutic approaches have failed. ATDs are generally used in severe cases, and are always combined with psychological treatments. The objective of this work is to discuss the role of ATD in child and adolescent MDD. We focus on the recommendations of the most cited and updated clinical guidelines and discuss some controversial aspects with regards efficacy and safety issues that have been raised based on the information obtained from clinical trials. Finally, we offer some practical recommendations for clinicians. All these findings also pose some doubt on the hypothesis of MDD as a homogeneous phenomenon during the human life cycle.

  18. Patient Access to Online Visit Notes: Perceptions of Doctors and Patients at an Urban HIV/AIDS Clinic.

    PubMed

    Oster, Natalia V; Jackson, Sara L; Dhanireddy, Shireesha; Mejilla, Roanne; Ralston, James D; Leveille, Suzanne; Delbanco, Tom; Walker, Janice D; Bell, Sigall K; Elmore, Joann G

    2015-01-01

    Patients living with HIV/AIDS face large societal and medical challenges. Inviting patients to read their doctors' visit notes via secure electronic portals may empower patients and improve health. We investigated whether utilization and perceptions about access to doctors' notes differed among doctors and patients in an HIV/AIDS clinic versus primary care setting. We analyzed pre- and 1-year postintervention data from 99 doctors and 3819 patients. HIV clinic patients did not report differences in perceived risks and benefits compared to primary care clinic patients, however, they were more likely to share notes with friends (33% versus 9%, P=.002), other health professionals (24% versus 8%, P=.03), or another doctor (38% versus 9%, P<.0001). HIV clinic doctors were less likely than primary care doctors to change the level of candor in visit notes (P<.04). Our findings suggest that HIV clinic patients and doctors are ready to share visit notes online.

  19. Clinical Hypnosis, an Effective Mind-Body Modality for Adolescents with Behavioral and Physical Complaints.

    PubMed

    Sawni, Anju; Breuner, Cora Collette

    2017-03-24

    Mind-body medicine is a system of health practices that includes meditation/relaxation training, guided imagery, hypnosis, biofeedback, yoga, art/music therapy, prayer, t'ai chi, and psychological therapies such as cognitive behavioral therapy. Clinical hypnosis is an important mind-body tool that serves as an adjunct to conventional medical care for the adolescent patient. Clinical hypnosis specifically uses self-directed therapeutic suggestions to cultivate the imagination and facilitate the mind-body connection, leading to positive emotional and physical well-being. There are many similarities between clinical hypnosis and other mind-body/self-regulatory modalities such as visual imagery, mindfulness meditation, yoga, and biofeedback that incorporate experiential learning and mechanisms for change. They may be viewed as subtypes of the hypnotic experience and share the common experience of trance as the entrée into self-empowered change in physiologic and psychological states. Clinical hypnosis can be used by health care providers to teach adolescents coping skills to deal with a wide variety of conditions such as chronic headaches, recurrent abdominal pain, anxiety, depression, grief and bereavement, phobias, anger, family stressors, sleep disorders, or enuresis. Clinical vignettes are given to help illustrate the effectiveness of hypnosis in adolescents.

  20. Dysfunctional Attitudes Scale Perfectionism: A Predictor and Partial Mediator of Acute Treatment Outcome among Clinically Depressed Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacobs, Rachel H.; Silva, Susan G.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Curry, John F.; Ginsburg, Golda S.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; March, John S.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of perfectionism on acute treatment outcomes was explored in a randomized controlled trial of 439 clinically depressed adolescents (12-17 years of age) enrolled in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS) who received cognitive behavior therapy (CBT), fluoxetine, a combination of CBT and FLX, or pill placebo. Measures…

  1. Randomized Clinical Trial of Motivational Enhancement of Substance Use Treatment among Incarcerated Adolescents: Post-Release Condom Non-Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosengard, Cynthia; Stein, L. A. R.; Barnett, Nancy P.; Monti, Peter M.; Golembeske, Charles; Lebeau-Craven, Rebecca; Miranda, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Evaluated impact of motivational enhancement (ME) of substance abuse treatment compared to relaxation training (RT) on sex without condoms (overall and involving substance use) 3 months following release among incarcerated adolescents. This randomized clinical trial involved 114 incarcerated adolescents from the Northeast. Regression analyses…

  2. Reducing HIV and AIDS through Prevention (RHAP): a theoretically based approach for teaching HIV prevention to adolescents through an exploration of popular music.

    PubMed

    Boutin-Foster, Carla; McLaughlin, Nadine; Gray, Angela; Ogedegbe, Anthony; Hageman, Ivan; Knowlton, Courtney; Rodriguez, Anna; Beeder, Ann

    2010-05-01

    Using popular culture to engage students in discussions of HIV prevention is a nontraditional approach that may complement current prevention efforts and enhance the ability to reach youth who are at high risk of contracting HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Hip-hop or rap music is the dominant genre of music among adolescents, especially Black and Latino youth who are disproportionately impacted by HIV and AIDS. This paper describes the rationale and development of the Reducing HIV and AIDS through Prevention (RHAP) program, a school-based program that uses hip-hop/rap music as a vehicle for raising awareness among adolescents about HIV/AIDS. Constructs from the Social Cognitive Theory and the Sexual Script Theory were used in developing the program. It was piloted and evaluated among 26 middle school students in East Harlem, New York. The lessons learned from a formative evaluation of the program and the implications for developing other programs targeting public health problems are discussed. The RHAP program challenges the traditional pedagogue-student paradigm and provides an alternative approach to teaching about HIV prevention and awareness.

  3. Quorum sensing network in clinical strains of A. baumannii: AidA is a new quorum quenching enzyme

    PubMed Central

    López, María; Mayer, Celia; Fernández-García, Laura; Blasco, Lucía; Muras, Andrea; Ruiz, Federico Martín; Bou, German; Otero, Ana

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii is an important pathogen that causes nosocomial infections generally associated with high mortality and morbidity in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). Currently, little is known about the Quorum Sensing (QS)/Quorum Quenching (QQ) systems of this pathogen. We analyzed these mechanisms in seven clinical isolates of A. baumannii. Microarray analysis of one of these clinical isolates, Ab1 (A. baumannii ST-2_clon_2010), previously cultured in the presence of 3-oxo-C12-HSL (a QS signalling molecule) revealed a putative QQ enzyme (α/ß hydrolase gene, AidA). This QQ enzyme was present in all non-motile clinical isolates (67% of which were isolated from the respiratory tract) cultured in nutrient depleted LB medium. Interestingly, this gene was not located in the genome of the only motile clinical strain growing in this medium (A. baumannii strain Ab421_GEIH-2010 [Ab7], isolated from a blood sample). The AidA protein expressed in E. coli showed QQ activity. Finally, we observed downregulation of the AidA protein (QQ system attenuation) in the presence of H2O2 (ROS stress). In conclusion, most of the A. baumannii clinical strains were not surface motile (84%) and were of respiratory origin (67%). Only the pilT gene was involved in surface motility and related to the QS system. Finally, a new QQ enzyme (α/ß hydrolase gene, AidA protein) was detected in these strains. PMID:28328989

  4. Sex differences in atazanavir pharmacokinetics and associations with time to clinical events: AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5202

    PubMed Central

    Venuto, Charles S.; Mollan, Katie; Ma, Qing; Daar, Eric S.; Sax, Paul E.; Fischl, Margaret; Collier, Ann C.; Smith, Kimberly Y.; Tierney, Camlin; Morse, Gene D.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives It is uncertain whether HIV-1 antiretroviral exposure and clinical response varies between males and females or different race/ethnic groups. We describe ritonavir-enhanced atazanavir pharmacokinetics in relation to virological failure, safety and tolerability in treatment-naive individuals to investigate potential differences. Methods Plasma samples were collected from participants in AIDS Clinical Trials Group Study A5202 for measurement of antiretroviral concentrations. Individual estimates of apparent oral clearance of atazanavir (L/h) were calculated from a one-compartment model and divided into tertiles as slow (<7), middle (7 to <9; reference group) and fast (≥9). Associations between atazanavir clearance and clinical outcomes were estimated with a hazard ratio (HR) from Cox proportional hazards models. Interactions between atazanavir clearance and sex, race/ethnicity and NRTIs were investigated for each of the outcomes. Results Among 786 participants, average atazanavir clearance was slower in females (n = 131) than males (n = 655). Atazanavir clearance was associated with time to virological failure (P = 0.053) and this relationship differed significantly by sex (P = 0.003). Females in the fast atazanavir clearance group had shorter time to virological failure (HR 3.49; 95% CI 1.24–9.84) compared with the middle (reference) atazanavir clearance group. Among males, the slow atazanavir clearance group had a higher risk of virological failure (HR 2.10; 95% CI 1.16–3.77). Conclusions Atazanavir clearance differed by sex. Females with fast clearance and males with slow clearance had increased risk of virological failure. PMID:25159623

  5. Automatic Evaluations in Clinically Anxious and Nonanxious Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vervoort, Leentje; Wolters, Lidewij H.; Hogendoorn, Sanne M.; Prins, Pier J. M.; de Haan, Else; Nauta, Maaike H.; Boer, Frits

    2010-01-01

    Automatic evaluations of clinically anxious and nonanxious children (n = 40, aged 8-16, 18 girls) were compared using a pictorial performance-based measure of automatic affective associations. Results showed a threat-related evaluation bias in clinically anxious but not in nonanxious children. In anxious participants, automatic evaluations of…

  6. Factors affecting linkage to care and engagement in care for newly diagnosed HIV-positive adolescents within fifteen adolescent medicine clinics in the United States.

    PubMed

    Philbin, Morgan M; Tanner, Amanda E; DuVal, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan M; Xu, Jiahong; Kapogiannis, Bill; Bethel, Jim; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2014-08-01

    Early linkage to care and engagement in care are critical for initiation of medical interventions. However, over 50 % of newly diagnosed persons do not receive HIV-related care within 6 months of diagnosis. We evaluated a linkage to care and engagement in care initiative for HIV-positive adolescents in 15 U.S.-based clinics. Structural and client-level factors (e.g. demographic and behavioral characteristics, clinic staff and location) were evaluated as predictors of successful linkage and engagement. Within 32 months, 1,172/1,679 (69.8 %) of adolescents were linked to care of which 1,043/1,172 (89 %) were engaged in care. Only 62.1 % (1,043/1,679) of adolescents were linked and engaged in care. Linkage to care failure was attributed to adolescent, provider, and clinic-specific factors. Many adolescents provided incomplete data during the linkage process or failed to attend appointments, both associated with failure to linkage to care. Additional improvements in HIV care will require creative approaches to coordinated data sharing, as well as continued outreach services to support newly diagnosed adolescents.

  7. Polyvictimization: Latent profiles and mental health outcomes in a clinical sample of adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Zachary W.; Moreland, Angela; Cohen, Joseph R.; Lee, Robert C.; Hanson, Rochelle F.; Danielson, Carla Kmett; Self-Brown, Shannon; Briggs, Ernestine C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Exposure to multiple traumatic events (polyvictimization) is a reliable predictor of deleterious health outcomes and risk behaviors in adolescence. The current study extends the literature on the prevalence and consequences of adolescent trauma exposure by (a) empirically identifying and characterizing trauma exposure profiles in a large, ethnically diverse, multi-site, clinical sample of adolescents, and (b) evaluating relations among identified profiles with demographic characteristics and clinical correlates. Method Data from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network Core Data Set were used to identify and characterize victimization profiles using latent class analysis in a sample of 3,485 adolescents (ages 13–18, 63% female, 35.7% White, 23.2% Black/African American, 35.0% Hispanic/Latino). Multiple measures of psychological distress and risk behaviors were evaluated as covariates of trauma exposure classes. Results Five trauma exposure classes, or profiles, were identified. Four classes—representing approximately half the sample—were characterized by polyvictimization. Polyvictimization classes were differentiated on number of trauma types, whether emotional abuse occurred, and whether emotional abuse occurred over single or multiple developmental epochs. Unique relations with demographic characteristics and mental health outcomes were observed. Discussion Results suggest polyvictimization is not a unidimensional phenomenon but a diverse set of trauma exposure experiences with unique correlates among youth. Further research on prevention of polyvictimization and mechanisms linking chronic trauma exposure, gender, and ethnicity to negative outcomes is warranted. PMID:26958417

  8. The AIDS dementia complex: clinical and basic neuroscience with implications for novel molecular therapies.

    PubMed

    Navia, B A; Rostasy, K

    2005-10-01

    The AIDS dementia complex (ADC, also referred to as HIV-associated cognitive impairment) is a common disorder among HIV-infected patients associated with both inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes. This review describes recent advances in the clinical and basic neurosciences of HIV infection and discusses the multivariable nature of what has become a chronic disorder in the context of highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART). Since its initial description twenty years ago, advances in cell and molecular biology along with those in neuroimaging have furthered our understanding of the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. The clinical and neuropsychological profile of ADC is generally consistent with a "frontal-subcortical" pattern of injury. Neuropathogenesis is largely driven by indirect mechanisms mediated by infected, or more commonly, immune activated macrophages, which secrete viral and host-derived factors. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) provides a robust in vivo method to measure the inflammatory and neurotoxic events triggered by these factors and their associated signals. Although the use of combined or highly active antiretroviral therapies (HAART) has significantly improved survival rates, cerebral injury and cognitive impairment remain common events. Factors such as aging and chronic infection will likely impact the course of this disease, its pathogenesis, and treatment. The combined observations presented in this review suggest a number of critical areas for future inquiry.

  9. Clinical analysis of non-AIDS patients pathologically diagnosed with pulmonary cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kaixiong; Ding, Haibo; Xu, Bing; You, Ruixiong; Xing, Zhen; Chen, Jianfeng

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary cryptococcosis (PC) was not a rare infectious disease in non-AIDS patients. However, data on the immune status were lacking in southern China for comparative analysis of differences between immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts. This study was to investigate the epidemiological, clinical, radiological, and treatment profiles for patients with PC. Methods We performed a retrospective review of 88 patients diagnosed with tissue-confirmed PC who were not HIV-infected from 2003 to 2013. Results Of 88 patients, 35(39.7%) were immunocompromised host. Fever and CNS symptom were significantly common in immunocompromised patients compared to immunocompetent patients (P=0.019 and P=0.036, respectively). The most frequent radiologic abnormalities were solitary or multiple pulmonary nodules, and masses or consolidations, and most lesions were located in the peripheral lung field. Cavitations and halo sign were significantly frequent in immunocompromised patients than in immunocompetent patients (P<0.05). The most frequently applied and reliable diagnostic procedure was CT-guided percutaneous translung biopsy. Treatment included antifungal drug alone in 20 patients, surgery alone in 20 including 3 treated by VATS, surgery plus antifungal drugs in 20 patients. Conclusions PC was not rare in immunocompetent host in southern China. Special differences remained in clinical manifestation and radiological findings of PC between immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients. Future work on the mechanisms of possible differences is required. PMID:27867557

  10. Oral manifestations of HIV/AIDS in clients attending TASO clinics in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Tirwomwe, J F; Rwenyonyi, C M; Muwazi, L M; Besigye, B; Mboli, F

    2007-09-01

    The objective of the study is to establish the prevalence of oral manifestations and their influence on oral functions. A total of 514 subjects aged 18 to 58 years (mean 42 years) were randomly recruited from five The AIDS Support Organization (TASO) clinics in Uganda. They were clinically examined for oral lesions under field conditions by four trained dentists based on World Health Organization criteria. Women constituted 74.5% of the study population. Oral manifestations were recorded in 72% of the subjects, out of which 70% had candidiasis of pseudomembranous, erythematous, and angular cheilitis variants. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, atypical ulcers, necrotizing periodontitis, and hairy leucoplakia were least frequently observed in the subjects. Of those who had oral lesions (n = 370), 68.4% had some form of discomfort in the mouth. Tooth brushing, chewing, and swallowing were frequently associated with discomfort. Reported forms of discomfort were dry mouth, increased salivation, and burning sensation especially on taking salty and spicy foods or acidic drinks. Only 8.5% (n = 44) of the subjects were taking medications specifically for oral lesions, which included antifungal, antiviral, and antibacterial agents. None of the subjects were on antiretroviral therapy. Oral lesions associated with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome in TASO clients is a major public health problem requiring education in recognition and appropriate management.

  11. Advancing the Scientific Foundation for Evidence-Based Practice in Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Michael C; Blossom, Jennifer B; Evans, Spencer C; Amaro, Christina M; Kanine, Rebecca M

    2016-05-24

    Evidence-based practice (EBP) has become a central focus in clinical child and adolescent psychology. As originally defined, EBP in psychology is the integration of the best available research evidence, patient characteristics, and clinical expertise. Although evidence-based perspectives have garnered widespread acceptance in recent years, there has also been some confusion and disagreement about the 3-part definition of EBP, particularly the role of research. In this article, we first provide a brief review of the development of EBP in clinical child and adolescent psychology. Next, we outline the following 4 points to help clarify the understanding of EBP: (a) knowledge should not be confused with epistemic processes, (b) research on clinician and client factors is needed for EBP, (c) research on assessment is needed for EBP, and (d) the 3-part conceptualization of EBP can serve as a useful framework to guide research. Based on these principles, we put forth a slightly revised conceptualization of EBP, in which the role of research is expanded and more clearly operationalized. Finally, based on our review of the literature, we offer illustrative examples of specific directions for future research to advance the evidence base for EBP in clinical child and adolescent psychology.

  12. School-Located Vaccination Clinics for Adolescents: Correlates of Acceptance Among Parents.

    PubMed

    Gargano, Lisa M; Weiss, Paul; Underwood, Natasha L; Seib, Katherine; Sales, Jessica M; Vogt, Tara M; Rask, Kimberly; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis L; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M

    2015-08-01

    Four vaccines are recommended by The Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices for adolescents: tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis vaccine (Tdap), meningococcal conjugate vaccine (MCV4), human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV), and annual seasonal influenza vaccine. However, coverage among adolescents is suboptimal. School-located vaccination clinics (SLVCs) offer vaccines to students at school, increasing access. This study seeks to determine the relationship between attitudes of parents of middle- and high-school students and acceptance of SLVCs for all four adolescent recommended vaccines. We conducted a telephone and web-based survey among parents of students enrolled in six middle and five high schools in Georgia. Analyses were conducted to examine associations between parental attitudes and willingness to allow their child to be vaccinated at school. Tdap and influenza vaccine had the highest rates of parental SLVC acceptance while HPV vaccine had the lowest. Parents who accepted SLVCs had higher perceived severity of influenza, meningococcal, and HPV illnesses compared to parents who did not accept SLVC. Intention to vaccinate was associated with SLVC acceptance for Tdap [Adjusted OR (AOR) 7.38; 95% confidence interval (CI) 2.44-22.31], MCV4 (AOR 2.97; 95% CI 1.67-5.28), and HPV vaccines (AOR 7.61; 95% CI 3.43-16.89). Social norms were associated with acceptance of SLVCs for influenza vaccine (AOR 1.44; 95% CI 1.12-1.84). These findings suggest parents of adolescents are generally supportive of SLVCs for recommended adolescent vaccines. Perceived severity of illness and intention to get their adolescent vaccinated were the most consistent correlates of parental SLVC acceptance for all vaccines. Future SLVC planning should focus on perceptions of disease severity and benefits of vaccination.

  13. Menstrual disorders in a Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic: patient presentations and longitudinal outcomes.

    PubMed

    Chung, P W; Chan, Symphorosa S C; Yiu, K W; Lao, Terence T H; Chung, Tony K H

    2011-10-01

    OBJECTIVE. To study the presentations, diagnoses, and outcomes in adolescents with menstrual disorders. DESIGN. Prospective cohort study. SETTING. Paediatric and Adolescent Gynaecology Clinic, Hong Kong. PARTICIPANTS. A total of 577 adolescents aged 14 to 19 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES. The presentations and diagnoses of adolescents with menstrual disorders were reviewed and their menstrual outcomes determined by a telephone survey. RESULTS. In all, 47% presented with menorrhagia, prolonged menstruation, and short menstrual cycles; 27% had secondary amenorrhoea, 12% had dysmenorrhoea, 11% had oligomenorrhoea, and 3% had primary amenorrhoea. Significant diagnoses included congenital genital tract anomalies, premature ovarian failure, anorexia nervosa, and polycystic ovarian syndrome. Polycystic ovarian syndrome was diagnosed in 16% of the cohort. In all, 24% of these 577 patients had abnormal menstrual cycles 4 years later. Direct logistic regression analysis indicated a cycle length of more than 35 days at presentation (adjusted odds ratio=2.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.8-4.5), previous diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome (adjusted odds ratio=2.0; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.4), and current body mass index of 23 kg/m(2) or higher (adjusted odds ratio=1.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.0-3.0) were risk factors for persistently long menstrual cycle exceeding 35 days. Adolescents who were screened out with a definitive diagnosis after initial assessment were at low risk of persistently long menstrual cycles at follow-up (adjusted odds ratio=0.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.1-0.8). CONCLUSIONS. Adolescent menstrual disorders should not be ignored. Long cycle, diagnosis of polycystic ovarian syndrome at first consultation, and a current body mass index of 23 kg/m(2) or higher were statistically associated with persistent problems.

  14. Healthcare Reform and Preparing the Future Clinical Child and Adolescent Psychology Workforce.

    PubMed

    Janicke, David M; Fritz, Alyssa M; Rozensky, Ronald H

    2015-01-01

    The healthcare environment is undergoing important changes for both patients and providers, in part due to the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA). Ultimately the healthcare delivery system will function very differently by the end of this decade. These changes will have important implications for the education, training, scientific inquiry, and practice of clinical child and adolescent psychologists. In this article we provide a brief description of the fundamental features of the ACA, with a specific focus on critical components of the act that have important, specific implications for clinical child and adolescents psychologists. We then provide recommendations to help position our field to thrive in the evolving healthcare environment to help facilitate further awareness and promote discussion of both challenges and opportunities that face our field in this evolving health care environment.

  15. The Clinical Usefulness of Ultrasound-Aided Fixation Using an Absorbable Plate System in Patients with Zygomatico-Maxillary Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Hyung

    2013-01-01

    Background Ultrasound-aided fixation is a recently developed alternative method of treatment of zygomatico-maxillary (ZM) fracture, and it can resolve the problems of excessive torsion force and subsequent fractures of screws. We conducted this study to evaluate the clinical usefulness of ultrasound-aided fixation as compared with the conventional fixation method using a drill and an expander in patients with ZM fracture. Methods We conducted a retrospective study in 35 patients with ZM fracture who had been treated at our hospital during a period ranging from March of 2008 to December of 2010. We divided them into two groups: an ultrasound-aided fixation group, comprising 13 patients who underwent ultrasound-aided fixation (SonicWeld Rx, KLS Martin), and a conventional group, comprising 22 patients who underwent conventional fixation (Biosorb FX, Linvatec Biomaterials Ltd.). We compared such variables as sex, direction, age at operation, follow-up period, operation duration, number of fixed holes, and time to discharge between the two groups. Results The ultrasound-aided fixation reduced the operation duration by about 30 minutes as compared with that of conventional fixation. There was no significant difference in follow-up period, number of fixed holes, or time to discharge between the two groups. Furthermore, there were no complications in either group. Conclusions The ultrasound-aided fixation of fractured ZM bone using an absorbable implant system is safe and effective in promptly reducing the bone fracture and providing satisfactory cosmetic outcomes over time. PMID:23898427

  16. The Adolescent Substance Abuse Goal Commitment (ASAGC) Questionnaire: An Examination of Clinical Utility and Psychometric Properties.

    PubMed

    Kaminer, Yifrah; Ohannessian, Christine McCauley; McKay, James R; Burke, Rebecca H

    2016-02-01

    Commitment to change is an innovative potential mediator or mechanism of behavior change that has not been examined in adolescents with substance use disorders (SUD). The Adolescent Substance Abuse Goal Commitment (ASAGC) questionnaire is a 16-item measure developed to assess an individual's commitment to his/her stated treatment goal. The objectives of this study are to explore the research and clinical utility of the commitment construct as measured by the ASAGC. During sessions 3 and 9 of a 10-week SUD treatment, therapists completed the ASAGC for 170 13-18 year-old adolescents. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted on the ATAGC items. Concurrent validity with related constructs, self-efficacy and motivation for change, was examined as well. At both sessions, the factor analysis resulted in two scales--Commitment to Recovery and Commitment to Harm Reduction. The ASAGC scales were found to demonstrate a high level of internal consistency (alpha coefficients ranged from .92 to .96 over time). In contrast to the Commitment to Harm Reduction scale, the Commitment to Recovery scale consistently correlated with scales from the Situational Confidence Questionnaire assessing self-efficacy, evidencing concurrent validity. Similarly, the Commitment to Recovery scale was related to the Problem Recognition Questionnaire, providing further evidence of the validity of the ASAGC. The ASAGC is a reliable and valid clinical research instrument for the assessment of adolescents' commitment to their substance abuse treatment goal. Clinical researchers may take advantage of the clinical utility of the ASAGC including its ability to differentiate between commitment to abstinence versus commitment to harm reduction.

  17. A Short-Term, Prospective Test of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicidal Ideation in an Adolescent Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Miller, Adam Bryant; Esposito-Smythers, Christianne; Leichtweis, Richard N

    2016-06-01

    The present prospective study tested a portion of the interpersonal-psychological theory of suicide (IPTS) in an adolescent clinical sample. Participants were 143 adolescents consecutively admitted to a partial hospitalization program who completed assessments at intake and discharge from the program. Results partially supported the IPTS and suggest that (1) perceived burdensomeness may be an important socially based cognition for understanding concurrent risk for suicidal ideation (SI); (2) thwarted belongingness affects depression symptom severity over time, which indirectly predicts SI over a short follow-up time frame; and (3) the IPTS constructs may function differently in a high-risk clinical adolescent sample, compared to adults, although findings are preliminary.

  18. Implementing psychophysiology in clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety: use of rater judgments based on graphical representations of psychophysiology.

    PubMed

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Augenstein, Tara M; Aldao, Amelia; Thomas, Sarah A; Daruwala, Samantha; Kline, Kathryn; Regan, Timothy

    2015-01-01

    Social stressor tasks induce adolescents' social distress as indexed by low-cost psychophysiological methods. Unknown is how to incorporate these methods within clinical assessments. Having assessors judge graphical depictions of psychophysiological data may facilitate detections of data patterns that may be difficult to identify using judgments about numerical depictions of psychophysiological data. Specifically, the Chernoff Face method involves graphically representing data using features on the human face (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape). This method capitalizes on humans' abilities to discern subtle variations in facial features. Using adolescent heart rate norms and Chernoff Faces, we illustrated a method for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety. Twenty-two clinic-referred adolescents completed a social anxiety self-report and provided psychophysiological data using wireless heart rate monitors during a social stressor task. We graphically represented participants' psychophysiological data and normative adolescent heart rates. For each participant, two undergraduate coders made comparative judgments between the dimensions (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape) of two Chernoff Faces. One Chernoff Face represented a participant's heart rate within a context (baseline, speech preparation, or speech-giving). The second Chernoff Face represented normative heart rate data matched to the participant's age. Using Chernoff Faces, coders reliably and accurately identified contextual variation in participants' heart rate responses to social stress. Further, adolescents' self-reported social anxiety symptoms predicted Chernoff Face judgments, and judgments could be differentiated by social stress context. Our findings have important implications for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety.

  19. Preliminary Examination of the Interpersonal Psychological Theory of Suicide in an Adolescent Clinical Sample.

    PubMed

    Horton, Sarah E; Hughes, Jennifer L; King, Jessica D; Kennard, Betsy D; Westers, Nicholas J; Mayes, Taryn L; Stewart, Sunita M

    2016-08-01

    This study offers a preliminary examination of the Interpersonal-Psychological Theory of Suicide (IPTS; Joiner 2005) in an adolescent clinical sample. The IPTS offers a nuanced framework that has many conceptual and practical merits. Although this theory has a growing base of evidence among adults, it has yet to be tested in adolescents using direct measures of its central constructs. Participants were 147 adolescents (76.2 % girls) on an inpatient psychiatric unit, who completed measures of key IPTS constructs of thwarted belongingness, perceived burdensomeness, acquired capability for suicide, as well as depression severity, hopelessness, and severity of suicidal symptoms. Our findings were largely consistent with hypotheses derived from the IPTS: perceived burdensomeness, and at a marginal level, thwarted belongingness, were independently associated with current suicidal ideation. The thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness interaction marginally distinguished between adolescents with passive and active suicidal ideation. Acquired capability for suicide was associated with recent suicidal intent. Examination of all three IPTS constructs simultaneously revealed main effects of each construct (with a marginal effect of thwarted belongingness), and interaction effects for thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness, and thwarted belongingness by perceived burdensomeness by acquired capability for suicide in association with suicidal symptom severity. Sex, age, depression severity, and hopelessness were controlled in all analyses. This study offers strong, albeit preliminary, support of the IPTS in a clinical adolescent sample. Assessment of IPTS constructs may be useful in determining persistent risk for suicide attempt. Prospective tests of the theory, and extensions to intervention and prevention should be considered in future IPTS research.

  20. Sexual behavior of female adolescents on the spread of HIV/AIDS and other STDs in Carriacou

    PubMed Central

    Patrice-Coy, Celestine; Johnson, Emmanuel Janagan; Boodram, Cheryl Ann Sarita

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This article explores information relating to female adolescents knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors toward human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in Carriacou. The authors aimed at finding out whether adolescent females in Carriacou receive adequate information about HIV and other STDs. Where did students receive most of their information about HIV/STDs and whether the knowledge has influenced their sexual behaviors? Furthermore, this study focused on how female adolescents feel toward people living with HIV/STDs. Focus group method was employed with 2 age groups of female adolescent students. Content analysis was carried out by the researcher to analyze the data. Themes were developed using coding and thematic analysis. The findings revealed that female adolescents were highly aware of HIV/STDs-related facts. They were knowledgeable and have received adequate information about HIV/STDs. PMID:27603390

  1. Sexual behavior of female adolescents on the spread of HIV/AIDS and other STDs in Carriacou.

    PubMed

    Patrice-Coy, Celestine; Johnson, Emmanuel Janagan; Boodram, Cheryl Ann Sarita

    2016-09-01

    This article explores information relating to female adolescents knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors toward human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) in Carriacou. The authors aimed at finding out whether adolescent females in Carriacou receive adequate information about HIV and other STDs. Where did students receive most of their information about HIV/STDs and whether the knowledge has influenced their sexual behaviors? Furthermore, this study focused on how female adolescents feel toward people living with HIV/STDs.Focus group method was employed with 2 age groups of female adolescent students. Content analysis was carried out by the researcher to analyze the data. Themes were developed using coding and thematic analysis.The findings revealed that female adolescents were highly aware of HIV/STDs-related facts. They were knowledgeable and have received adequate information about HIV/STDs.

  2. Prosthetic rehabilitation with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis using computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing dental technology for a patient with a mandibulectomy: A clinical report.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Hyung-In; Han, Jung-Suk

    2016-02-01

    The fabrication of dental prostheses with computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing shows acceptable marginal fits and favorable treatment outcomes. This clinical report describes the management of a patient who had undergone a mandibulectomy and received an implant-supported fixed prosthesis by using additive manufacturing for the framework and subtractive manufacturing for the monolithic zirconia restorations.

  3. Religiosity and adherence to antiretroviral therapy among patients attending a public hospital-based HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Kisenyi, Rita N; Muliira, Joshua K; Ayebare, Elizabeth

    2013-03-01

    In Uganda, the prevalence of non-adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) by HIV/AIDS patients remains high and sometimes this is blamed on patients' religious behavior. A descriptive design was used to examine the relationship between religiosity and ART adherence in a sample of 220 patients attending a HIV/AIDS clinic in a Ugandan public hospital. Participants who self-identified as Pentecostal and Muslim had the highest percentage of members with high religiosity scores and ART adherence. Among Muslim participants (34), 82% reported high religiosity scores and high levels of ART adherence. Of the fifty Pentecostals participants, 96% reported high religiosity scores and 80% reported high levels of ART adherence. Correlation analysis showed a significant relationship between ART adherence and religiosity (r = 0.618, P ≤ 0.01). Therefore, collaboration between religious leaders and HIV/AIDS healthcare providers should be encouraged as one of the strategies for enhancing ART adherence.

  4. Clinical epidemiology of HIV/AIDS in China from 2004-2011.

    PubMed

    Li, Min; Shen, Yinzhong; Jiang, Xiaofei; Li, Qi; Zhou, Xiaoming; Lu, Hongzhou

    2014-02-01

    This study retrospectively analyzed Chinese publicly reported data on Human Immunodeficiency Virus/Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (HIV/AIDS). The HIV/AIDS morbidity (1/100,000) and mortality (1/100,000) rates in China continually increased from 0.23 and 0.06 in 2004 to 1.53 and 0.69 in 2011, respectively. The AIDS case fatality rate decreased yearly from 53.57% in 2008 to 45.11% in 2011, and the fatality rate in rural areas (0.25-0.42%) was higher than that in cities (0.13-0.22%). The number of HIV/AIDS patients discharged from city-level hospitals increased from 329 in 2004 to 7,266 in 2011, and this number was higher than the number of similar patients discharged from county-level (rural) hospitals (the number of HIV/AIDS patients increased from 252 in 2004 to 5,957 in 2011). The factors contributing to these trends include: enhanced physician HIV/AIDS education regarding diagnosis, intervention, monitoring, testing, and treatment; improved safety of blood collection and use; and improved management of HIV/AIDS patients. Therefore, HIV/AIDS prevention and control in rural areas of China is the key to reducing HIV transmission and mortality in China.

  5. Repetitive Concussions in Adolescent Athletes – Translating Clinical and Experimental Research into Perspectives on Rehabilitation Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Semple, Bridgette D.; Lee, Sangmi; Sadjadi, Raha; Fritz, Nora; Carlson, Jaclyn; Griep, Carrie; Ho, Vanessa; Jang, Patrice; Lamb, Annick; Popolizio, Beth; Saini, Sonia; Bazarian, Jeffrey J.; Prins, Mayumi L.; Ferriero, Donna M.; Basso, D. Michele; Noble-Haeusslein, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    Sports-related concussions are particularly common during adolescence, a time when even mild brain injuries may disrupt ongoing brain maturation and result in long-term complications. A recent focus on the consequences of repetitive concussions among professional athletes has prompted the development of several new experimental models in rodents, as well as the revision of guidelines for best management of sports concussions. Here, we consider the utility of rodent models to understand the functional consequences and pathobiology of concussions in the developing brain, identifying the unique behavioral and pathological signatures of concussive brain injuries. The impact of repetitive concussions on behavioral consequences and injury progression is also addressed. In particular, we focus on the epidemiological, clinical, and experimental evidence underlying current recommendations for physical and cognitive rest after concussion, and highlight key areas in which further research is needed. Lastly, we consider how best to promote recovery after injury, recognizing that optimally timed, activity-based rehabilitative strategies may hold promise for the adolescent athlete who has sustained single or repetitive concussions. The purpose of this review is to inform the clinical research community as it strives to develop and optimize evidence-based guidelines for the concussed adolescent, in terms of both acute and long-term management. PMID:25883586

  6. Distinctive clinical course and pattern of relapse in adolescents with medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tabori, Uri . E-mail: uri.tabori@sickkids.ca; Sung, Lillian; Laperriere, Normand; Crooks, Bruce; Wilson, Beverly

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To report the clinical course of adolescents with medulloblastoma, with specific emphasis on prognosis and pattern of relapse. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively studied the clinical course and outcomes of children aged 10-20 years with medulloblastoma, treated at centers throughout Canada between 1986 and 2003. To better assess time to relapse, a cohort of patients aged 3-20 years at diagnosis was generated. Results: A total of 72 adolescents were analyzed. Five-year overall survival and event-free survival rates were 78.3% {+-} 5.4% and 68.0% {+-} 6.2%, respectively. Late relapses occurred at a median of 3.0 years (range, 0.3-6.8 years). In univariate analysis, conventional risk stratification and the addition of chemotherapy to craniospinal radiation did not have prognostic significance. Female patients had improved overall survival (p = 0.007). Time to relapse increased with age in a linear fashion. After relapse, patients faired poorly regardless of treatment modality. Patients who did not receive chemotherapy initially had improved progression-free survival at relapse (p 0.05). Conclusions: Our study suggests that adolescents with medulloblastoma might have a unique prognosis and pattern of relapse, dissimilar to those in younger children. They might benefit from different risk stratifications and prolonged follow-up. These issues should be addressed in future prospective trials.

  7. Quality assurance and training procedures for computer-aided detection and diagnosis systems in clinical use.

    PubMed

    Huo, Zhimin; Summers, Ronald M; Paquerault, Sophie; Lo, Joseph; Hoffmeister, Jeffrey; Armato, Samuel G; Freedman, Matthew T; Lin, Jesse; Lo, Shih-Chung Ben; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Fryd, David; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Chan, Heang-Ping

    2013-07-01

    Computer-aided detection/diagnosis (CAD) is increasingly used for decision support by clinicians for detection and interpretation of diseases. However, there are no quality assurance (QA) requirements for CAD in clinical use at present. QA of CAD is important so that end users can be made aware of changes in CAD performance both due to intentional or unintentional causes. In addition, end-user training is critical to prevent improper use of CAD, which could potentially result in lower overall clinical performance. Research on QA of CAD and user training are limited to date. The purpose of this paper is to bring attention to these issues, inform the readers of the opinions of the members of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) CAD subcommittee, and thus stimulate further discussion in the CAD community on these topics. The recommendations in this paper are intended to be work items for AAPM task groups that will be formed to address QA and user training issues on CAD in the future. The work items may serve as a framework for the discussion and eventual design of detailed QA and training procedures for physicists and users of CAD. Some of the recommendations are considered by the subcommittee to be reasonably easy and practical and can be implemented immediately by the end users; others are considered to be "best practice" approaches, which may require significant effort, additional tools, and proper training to implement. The eventual standardization of the requirements of QA procedures for CAD will have to be determined through consensus from members of the CAD community, and user training may require support of professional societies. It is expected that high-quality CAD and proper use of CAD could allow these systems to achieve their true potential, thus benefiting both the patients and the clinicians, and may bring about more widespread clinical use of CAD for many other diseases and applications. It is hoped that the awareness of the need

  8. PHENOME-WIDE INTERACTION STUDY (PheWIS) IN AIDS CLINICAL TRIALS GROUP DATA (ACTG)

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Shefali S.; Frase, Alex T.; Verma, Anurag; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Mahony, Shaun; Haas, David W.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2015-01-01

    Association studies have shown and continue to show a substantial amount of success in identifying links between multiple single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and phenotypes. These studies are also believed to provide insights toward identification of new drug targets and therapies. Albeit of all the success, challenges still remain for applying and prioritizing these associations based on available biological knowledge. Along with single variant association analysis, genetic interactions also play an important role in uncovering the etiology and progression of complex traits. For gene-gene interaction analysis, selection of the variants to test for associations still poses a challenge in identifying epistatic interactions among the large list of variants available in high-throughput, genome-wide datasets. Therefore in this study, we propose a pipeline to identify interactions among genetic variants that are associated with multiple phenotypes by prioritizing previously published results from main effect association analysis (genome-wide and phenome-wide association analysis) based on a-priori biological knowledge in AIDS Clinical Trials Group (ACTG) data. We approached the prioritization and filtration of variants by using the results of a previously published single variant PheWAS and then utilizing biological information from the Roadmap Epigenome project. We removed variants in low functional activity regions based on chromatin states annotation and then conducted an exhaustive pairwise interaction search using linear regression analysis. We performed this analysis in two independent pre-treatment clinical trial datasets from ACTG to allow for both discovery and replication. Using a regression framework, we observed 50,798 associations that replicate at p-value 0.01 for 26 phenotypes, among which 2,176 associations for 212 unique SNPs for fasting blood glucose phenotype reach Bonferroni significance and an additional 9,970 interactions for high

  9. Can patient decision aids help people make good decisions about participating in clinical trials? A study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Brehaut, Jamie C; Lott, Alison; Fergusson, Dean A; Shojania, Kaveh G; Kimmelman, Jonathan; Saginur, Raphael

    2008-01-01

    Background Evidence shows that the standard process for obtaining informed consent in clinical trials can be inadequate, with study participants frequently not understanding even basic information fundamental to giving informed consent. Patient decision aids are effective decision support tools originally designed to help patients make difficult treatment or screening decisions. We propose that incorporating decision aids into the informed consent process will improve the extent to which participants make decisions that are informed and consistent with their preferences. A mixed methods study will test this proposal. Methods Phase one of this project will involve assessment of a stratified random sample of 50 consent documents from recently completed investigator-initiated clinical trials, according to existing standards for supporting good decision making. Phase two will involve interviews of a purposive sample of 50 trial participants (10 participants from each of five different clinical areas) about their experience of the informed consent process, and how it could be improved. In phase three, we will convert consent forms for two completed clinical trials into decision aids and pilot test these new tools using a user-centered design approach, an iterative development process commonly employed in computer usability literature. In phase four, we will conduct a pilot observational study comparing the new tools to standard consent forms, with potential recruits to two hypothetical clinical trials. Outcomes will include knowledge of key aspects of the decision, knowledge of the probabilities of different outcomes, decisional conflict, the hypothetical participation decision, and qualitative impressions of the experience. Discussion This work will provide initial evidence about whether a patient decision aid can improve the informed consent process. The larger goal of this work is to examine whether study recruitment can be improved from (barely) informed consent

  10. A review of technological and clinical aspects of robot-aided rehabilitation of upper-extremity after stroke.

    PubMed

    Babaiasl, Mahdieh; Mahdioun, Seyyed Hamed; Jaryani, Poorya; Yazdani, Mojtaba

    2016-01-01

    Cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or stroke is one of the leading causes of disability and loss of motor function. Millions of people around the world are effected by it each year. Stroke results in disabled arm function. Restoration of arm function is essential to regaining activities of daily living (ADL). Along with traditional rehabilitation methods, robot-aided therapy has emerged in recent years. Robot-aided rehabilitation is more intensive, of longer duration and more repetitive. Using robots, repetitive dull exercises can turn into a more challenging and motivating tasks such as games. Besides, robots can provide a quantitative measure of the rehabilitation progress. This article overviews the terms used in robot-aided upper-limb rehabilitation. It continues by investigating the requirements for rehabilitation robots. Then the most outstanding works in robot-aided upper-limb rehabilitation and their control schemes have been investigated. The clinical outcomes of the built robots are also given that demonstrates the usability of these robots in real-life applications and their acceptance. This article summarizes a review done along with a research on the design, simulation and control of a robot for use in upper-limb rehabilitation after stroke. Implications for Rehabilitation Reviewing common terms in rehabilitation of upper limb using robots Reviewing rehabilitation robots built up to date Reviewing clinical outcomes of the mentioned rehabilitation robots.

  11. Factor structure of the SOCRATES in a clinical sample of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Maisto, Stephen A; Chung, Tammy A; Cornelius, Jack R; Martin, Christopher S

    2003-06-01

    This study investigated the Stages of Change Readiness and Treatment Eagerness Scale (SOCRATES; W. R. Miller & J. S. Tonigan, 1996) in adolescents presenting for treatment of alcohol use disorder (AUD). The participants were 80 males and 43 females (mean age = 16.8 years) who presented for AUD treatment (95.1% outpatient, 4.9% inpatient). Participants completed assessments at baseline and 1 year and provided information on alcohol use and related variables monthly between these 2 assessments. Principal-components and confirmatory factor analyses of the baseline SOCRATES identified 2 factors, Taking Steps and Recognition, which showed good internal consistency and concurrent and predictive evidence of validity. The results were interpreted as supporting the use of the SOCRATES with clinical samples of adolescents.

  12. The Impact of Perceived Interpersonal Functioning on Treatment for Adolescent Depression: IPT-A versus Treatment as Usual in School-Based Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gunlicks-Stoessel, Meredith; Mufson, Laura; Jekal, Angela; Turner, J. Blake

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Aspects of depressed adolescents' perceived interpersonal functioning were examined as moderators of response to treatment among adolescents treated with interpersonal psychotherapy for depressed adolescents (IPT-A; Mufson, Dorta, Moreau, & Weissman, 2004) or treatment as usual (TAU) in school-based health clinics. Method:…

  13. Direct and indirect effects of caregiver social support on adolescent psychological outcomes in two South African AIDS-affected communities

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Marisa; Cluver, Lucie; Crankshaw, Tamaryn; Kuo, Caroline; Lachman, Jamie M.; Wild, Lauren G.

    2015-01-01

    Caregiver social support has been shown to be protective for caregiver mental health, parenting and child psychosocial outcomes. This is the first known analysis to quantitatively investigate the relationship between caregiver social support and adolescent psychosocial outcomes in HIV-endemic, resource-scarce Southern African communities. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted over 2009-2010 with 2477 South African adolescents aged 10-17 and their adult caregivers (18 years or older) in one urban and one rural community in South Africa’s KwaZulu-Natal province. Adolescent adjustment was assessed using adult caregiver reports of the Strengths and Difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), which measures peer problems, hyperactivity, conduct problems, emotional symptoms and child prosocial behavior. Hierarchical linear regressions and multiple mediation analyses, using bootstrapping procedures, were conducted to assess for: a) direct effects of more caregiver social support on better adolescent psychosocial wellbeing; and b) indirect effects mediated by better parenting and caregiver mental health. Direct associations (p<.001), and indirect associations mediated through better parenting, were found for all adolescent outcomes. Findings reinforce the importance of social support components within parenting interventions but also point to scope for positive intervention on adolescent psychosocial wellbeing through the broader family social network. PMID:25623784

  14. Direct and Indirect Effects of Caregiver Social Support on Adolescent Psychological Outcomes in Two South African AIDS-Affected Communities.

    PubMed

    Casale, Marisa; Cluver, Lucie; Crankshaw, Tamaryn; Kuo, Caroline; Lachman, Jamie M; Wild, Lauren G

    2015-06-01

    Caregiver social support has been shown to be protective for caregiver mental health, parenting and child psychosocial outcomes. This is the first known analysis to quantitatively investigate the relationship between caregiver social support and adolescent psychosocial outcomes in HIV-endemic, resource-scarce Southern African communities. A cross-sectional household survey was conducted over 2009-2010 with 2,477 South African adolescents aged 10-17 and their adult caregivers (18 years or older) in one urban and one rural community in South Africa's KwaZulu-Natal province. Adolescent adjustment was assessed using adult caregiver reports of the Strengths and Difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), which measures peer problems, hyperactivity, conduct problems, emotional symptoms and child prosocial behavior. Hierarchical linear regressions and multiple mediation analyses, using bootstrapping procedures, were conducted to assess for: (a) direct effects of more caregiver social support on better adolescent psychosocial wellbeing; and (b) indirect effects mediated by better parenting and caregiver mental health. Direct associations (p < .001), and indirect associations mediated through better parenting, were found for all adolescent outcomes. Findings reinforce the importance of social support components within parenting interventions but also point to scope for positive intervention on adolescent psychosocial wellbeing through the broader family social network.

  15. MR urography in children and adolescents: techniques and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Trout, Andrew T; Smith, Ethan A

    2016-06-01

    Renal and urinary tract imaging is commonly performed in the pediatric population, particularly in the setting of suspected or known congenital anomalies. In most cases, adequate anatomic assessment can be achieved using ultrasound and fluoroscopic techniques, and evaluation of differential renal function and urinary tract drainage can be accomplished with renal scintigraphy. However, in a subset of children, anatomic or functional questions may remain after this routine evaluation. In this setting, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) tailored to evaluate the kidneys and urinary tract, known as MR urography (MRU), can be used to depict the kidneys, ureters, and urinary bladder in detail and to determine differential renal function and assess urinary tract drainage. The objectives of this review article are to (1) describe pediatric-specific MRI techniques for assessment of the kidneys and urinary tract and (2) present common clinical applications for pediatric MRU where imaging can "add value" in terms of diagnosis and patient management.

  16. [Characteristics of children and adolescents with gender dysphoria referred to the Hamburg Gender Identity Clinic].

    PubMed

    Becker, Inga; Gjergji-Lama, Voltisa; Romer, Georg; Möller, Birgit

    2014-01-01

    Given the increasing demand for counselling in gender dysphoria in childhood in Germany, there is a definite need for empirical data on characteristics and developmental trajectories of this clinical group. This study aimed to provide a first overview by assessing demographic characteristics and developmental trajectories of a group of gender variant boys and girls referred to the specialised Gender Identity Clinic in Hamburg. Data were extracted from medical charts, transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis methods. Categories were set up by inductive-deductive reasoning based on the patients' parents' and clinicians' information in the files. Between 2006 and 2010, 45 gender variant children and adolescents were seen by clinicians; 88.9% (n = 40) of these were diagnosed with gender identity disorder (ICD-10). Within this group, the referral rates for girls were higher than for boys (1:1.5). Gender dysphoric girls were on average older than the boys and a higher percentage of girls was referred to the clinic at the beginning of adolescence (> 12 years of age). At the same time, more girls reported an early onset age. More girls made statements about their (same-sex) sexual orientation during adolescence and wishes for gender confirming medical interventions. More girls than boys revealed self-mutilation in the past or present as well as suicidal thoughts and/or attempts. Results indicate that the presentation of clinically referred gender dysphoric girls differs from the characteristics boys present in Germany; especially with respect to the most salient age differences. Therefore, these two groups require different awareness and individual treatment approaches.

  17. Improving the Implementation of Evidence-Based Clinical Practices in Adolescent Reproductive Health Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Lisa M.; Middleton, Dawn; Mueller, Trisha; Avellino, Lia; Hallum-Montes, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purposes of the study were to describe baseline data in the implementation of evidence-based clinical practices among health center partners as part of a community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative and to identify opportunities for health center improvement. Methods Health center partner baseline data were collected in the first year (2011) and before program implementation of a 5-year community-wide teen pregnancy prevention initiative. A needs assessment on health center capacity and implementation of evidence-based clinical practices was administered with 51 health centers partners in 10 communities in the United States with high rates of teen pregnancy. Results Health centers reported inconsistent implementation of evidence-based clinical practices in providing reproductive health services to adolescents. Approximately 94.1% offered same-day appointments, 91.1% had infrastructure to reduce cost barriers, 90.2% offered after-school appointments, and 80.4% prescribed hormonal contraception without prerequisite examinations or testing. Approximately three quarters provided visual and audio privacy in examination rooms (76.5%) and counseling areas (74.5%). Fewer offered a wide range of contraceptive methods (67.8%) and took a sexual health history at every visit (54.9%). Only 45.1% reported Quick Start initiation of hormonal contraception, emergency contraception (43.1%), or intrauterine devices (12.5%) were “always” available to adolescents. Conclusions The assessment highlighted opportunities for health center improvement. Strategies to build capacity of health center partners to implement evidence-based clinical practices may lead to accessibility and quality of reproductive health services for adolescents in the funded communities. PMID:26381918

  18. Model for using hip-hop music for small group HIV/AIDS prevention counseling with African American adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Stephens, T; Braithwaite, R L; Taylor, S E

    1998-10-01

    Currently little attention has been directed, with the exception of peer education efforts, to constructively develop new and innovative ways to promote HIV/AIDS primary prevention among African American (AA) adolescents and young adults. With this in mind, the aim of this conceptual effort is to present a HIV/AIDS preventive counseling protocol developed for use with AA young adults that makes use of hip-hop music, a form of music popularized by young AAs. The author contend that an increased understanding of the relationships that many AA young adults have with hip-hop music may be used by disease prevention personnel to educate these populations about protective factors for HIV. Making use of hip-hop music is one strategy for integrating counseling in prevention and health maintenance. The overall implications of using hip-hop music in health promotion are unlimited. First, this method makes use of cultural relevant materials to address the educational and health needs of the target community. Second, it is grounded in an approach that serves to stimulate cooperative learning based on peer developed content. Moreover, the use of this medium can be applied to other health promotion activities such as violence/harm reduction and substance abuse prevention, upon reviews of songs for appropriate content. The authors contend that such an approach holds heuristic value in dealing with HIV/AIDS prevention among AA young adults. Additional testing of the intervention is warranted in the refinement of this innovative intervention.

  19. "This clinic is number one": a qualitative study of factors that contribute toward "successful" care at a South African Pediatric HIV/AIDS clinic.

    PubMed

    Watermeyer, Jennifer

    2012-09-01

    HIV/AIDS has significantly affected health care practices. The need for high adherence and regular clinic visits places pressure on health care providers and patients. Poor quality of care has been described in many contexts, but some clinics have achieved excellent treatment results. Using a success case approach, this study aimed to understand factors which contribute to successful care at a South African pediatric HIV/AIDS clinic with documented high patient adherence and follow-up rates. Data included over 50 hours of ethnographic observations and interviews with a total of 35 clinic staff and caregivers. Thematic analysis highlighted strong congruence between caregiver and staff perceptions. Factors which seemed to contribute to successful care included organizational routines, staff-patient relationships, communication, teamwork, leadership, job commitment, caregivers' negative experiences at other clinics, and faith in the "life-saving" care at this clinic. Results suggest the need for all factors to be present in order to promote quality of care. Recommendations for other clinic settings are discussed.

  20. Mirror-image anterior crown fabrication with computer-aided design and rapid prototyping technology: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seok-Hwan; Chang, Won-Gun

    2013-02-01

    This clinical report describes the fabrication of a maxillary central incisor single crown with rapid prototyping (RP) technology. A patient with a recently replaced metal ceramic crown had discomfort due to the nonanatomic lingual contour of the crown. With computer-aided design (CAD) software and rapid prototyping (RP) technology, the shape of the contralateral central incisor was duplicated and reproduced to make a mirror-image for a new crown. The prosthodontic planning and treatment approach are discussed.

  1. Syphilis and HIV co-infection in patients who attend an AIDS outpatient clinic in Vitoria, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Callegari, Fabiola Mesquita; Pinto-Neto, Lauro Ferreira da Silva; Medeiros, Charlla Jezus; Scopel, Camila Binsi; Page, Kimberly; Miranda

    2013-01-01

    Our goal was to determine the prevalence of, and risk factors associated with, syphilis in HIV-infected patients who attend an AIDS outpatient clinic in Vitoria, Brazil. We conducted a cross-sectional study—including interviews for demographic, behavioral, and clinical characteristics—and blood collection (venipuncture and fingerstick) for VDRL and treponemal tests (rapid test) in a total of 438 patients. The mean age was 43.0 years (SD = 11), and mean years of school was 8.1 (SD = 4.2). The prevalence of syphilis was 5.3% (95% CI, 3.3%–7.3%). The treponemal test was positive in 18.9% of participants. In multivariate analysis, prevalent syphilis infection was independently associated with male gender (AOR 4.6, 95% CI, 1.1–20.0), a history of male-male sex (AOR 1.8, 95% CI, 1.6–4.1), current use of antiretroviral therapy (AOR 5.5, 95% CI, 1.7–16.7), and history of treated syphilis infection (AOR 5.5, 95% CI, 2.0–15.8). Syphilis prevalence was high in patients living with HIV/AIDS who attend an AIDS clinic; therefore, routine STI counseling and screening should be included in their care. PMID:23732958

  2. Conformity of pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics to the patient-centered medical home care model.

    PubMed

    Yehia, Baligh R; Agwu, Allison L; Schranz, Asher; Korthuis, P Todd; Gaur, Aditya H; Rutstein, Richard; Sharp, Victoria; Spector, Stephen A; Berry, Stephen A; Gebo, Kelly A

    2013-05-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) has been introduced as a model for providing high-quality, comprehensive, patient-centered care that is both accessible and coordinated, and may provide a framework for optimizing the care of youth living with HIV (YLH). We surveyed six pediatric/adolescent HIV clinics caring for 578 patients (median age 19 years, 51% male, and 82% black) in July 2011 to assess conformity to the PCMH. Clinics completed a 50-item survey covering the six domains of the PCMH: (1) comprehensive care, (2) patient-centered care, (3) coordinated care, (4) accessible services, (5) quality and safety, and (6) health information technology. To determine conformity to the PCMH, a novel point-based scoring system was devised. Points were tabulated across clinics by domain to obtain an aggregate assessment of PCMH conformity. All six clinics responded. Overall, clinics attained a mean 75.8% [95% CI, 63.3-88.3%] on PCMH measures-scoring highest on patient-centered care (94.7%), coordinated care (83.3%), and quality and safety measures (76.7%), and lowest on health information technology (70.0%), accessible services (69.1%), and comprehensive care (61.1%). Clinics moderately conformed to the PCMH model. Areas for improvement include access to care, comprehensive care, and health information technology. Future studies are warranted to determine whether greater clinic PCMH conformity improves clinical outcomes and cost savings for YLH.

  3. One Size Does Not Fit All: Improving Clinical Practice in Older Children and Adolescents with Language and Learning Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Cheryl M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: In the lead article for this clinical forum, Kamhi (2014) suggests ways that current knowledge on instructional practices in learning and language can be applied to clinical practice in language disorders. I propose that Kamhi's suggestions are in need of fine-tuning for older children and adolescents with language disorders. A…

  4. Patterns and predictors of health service utilization in adolescents with pain: comparison between a community and a clinical pain sample

    PubMed Central

    Toliver-Sokol, Marisol; Murray, Caitlin B.; Wilson, Anna C.; Lewandowski, Amy; Palermo, Tonya M.

    2011-01-01

    There is limited research describing the patterns of healthcare utilization in adolescents with chronic pain. This study describes healthcare utilization in a clinical chronic pain sample, and compares the patterns of service use of this group to a community sample with intermittent pain complaints. We also investigated demographic and clinical factors that predicted healthcare visits and medication use in the clinical sample. Data on 117 adolescents (aged 12-18; n=59 clinical pain sample, n=58 community) were collected. Caregivers and adolescents reported on sociodemographics, medical visits, current medications, pain, activity limitations, and depression. As hypothesized, the clinical pain sample had higher rates of healthcare consultation on all types of medical visits (general, specialty care, complementary medicine, mental health, OT/PT), and higher medication use compared to the community sample. Regression analyses revealed that higher annual income, greater pain frequency, and higher levels of caregiver reported activity limitations were associated with a greater number of healthcare visits for the total sample. Within the clinical pain sample, higher pain frequency and greater activity limitations (caregiver-report) predicted more specialty care visits. Additionally, higher income and greater levels of depressive symptoms predicted a higher number of prescribed medications. Perspective This study contributes to the limited available data on health service and medication use in a clinical chronic pain sample versus a community sample of adolescents. We also identify clinical factors (pain frequency, parent-reported activity limitations, depressive symptoms) and demographic factors (gender, income) associated with healthcare utilization. PMID:21481647

  5. Impulsivity and Clinical Symptoms among Adolescents with Non-Suicidal Self-Injury with or without Attempted Suicide

    PubMed Central

    Dougherty, Donald M.; Mathias, Charles W.; Marsh-Richard, Dawn M.; Prevette, Kristen N.; Dawes, Michael A.; Hatzis, Erin S.; Palmes, Guy; Nouvion, Sylvain O.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined clinical characteristics and laboratory-measured impulsive behavior of adolescents engaging in either non-suicidal self-injury with (NSSI+SA; n = 25) or without (NSSI-Only; n = 31) suicide attempts. We hypothesized that adolescent with NSSI+SI would exhibit more severe clinical symptoms and higher levels of behavioral impulsivity compared to adolescents with NSSI-Only. Adolescents were recruited from an inpatient psychiatric hospital unit and the two groups were compared on demographic characteristics, psychopathology, self-reported clinical ratings, methods of non-suicidal self-injury, and two laboratory impulsivity measures. Primary evaluations were conducted during psychiatric hospitalization, and a subset of those tested during hospitalization was retested 4-6 weeks after discharge. During hospitalization, NSSI+SA patients reported worse depression, hopelessness, and impulsivity on standard clinical measures, and demonstrated elevated impulsivity on a reward-directed laboratory measure compared to NSSI-Only patients. In the preliminary follow-up analyses, depression, hopelessness, suicidal ideation, and laboratory impulsivity were improved for both groups, but the NSSI+SA group still exhibited significantly more depressive symptoms, hopelessness, and impulsivity than the NSSI-Only group. Risk assessments for adolescents with NSSI+SA should include consideration not only of the severity of clinical symptoms but of the current level impulsivity as well. PMID:19631392

  6. Clinical Correlates of Non-Suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI) in an Outpatient Sample of Adolescents.

    PubMed

    García-Nieto, Rebeca; Carballo, Juan J; Díaz de Neira Hernando, Mónica; de León-Martinez, Victoria; Baca-García, Enrique

    2015-01-01

    Non-suicidal self-injury (NSSI) in adolescents is a major public health concern. The first goal of our study was to describe the characteristics and functions of NSSI and NSSI thoughts in an adolescent outpatient sample. The second goal was to examine which clinical factors discriminate between these two groups of patients. A group of 267 subjects was recruited from the Adolescent Outpatient Psychiatric Services, Jiménez Díaz Foundation (Madrid, Spain) from November 2011 to October 2012. All participants were administered the Spanish version of the Self-Injurious Thoughts and Behaviors Interview (SITBI). A total of 21.7% of patients reported having engaged in NSSI at least once in their lifetime. The most strongly endorsed function for NSSI was automatic negative reinforcement. In comparison with patients in the NSSI Thoughts group and the control group, patients in the NSSI group scored higher in Internalization of Anger and in all the scales comprising the Children's Depression Inventory. Our findings on the prevalence and functions of NSSI are consistent with the literature. NSSI was mainly performed for emotion regulation purposes; specifically, NSSI seems to be used to cope with anger and depression. In addition, internalization of anger might play a significant role in the maintenance of this behavior.

  7. Community-Based Participatory Clinical Research in Obesity by Adolescents: Pipeline for Researchers of the Future

    PubMed Central

    Branch, Robert; Chester, Ann

    2015-01-01

    We propose a novel, untapped opportunity, challenging cultural and man-power barriers to transferring advances in biomedical science knowledge that will improve community health care (Type II Clinical Translational Research) in a medically underserved community. We describe a pilot model in which adolescents apply principles of Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) at the epicenter of the obesity diabetes epidemic in rural Appalachia in West Virginia. The model invites minority, financially disadvantaged, and educationally disadvantaged adolescents to become educated on ethics, then provides infrastructure to support study design and conduct of CBPR. This experience demonstrates that these adolescents can efficiently, with quality and integrity, reach into the most vulnerable of communities and their own families to show that the prevalence of obesity is at 50% and diabetes 10.4% (n = 989). Our experience illustrates the infrastructure requirements for this strategy to be successful and emphasizes the substantial benefit that could accrue if the model is successfully sustained. The benefit includes not only the translation of knowledge to influence community lifestyle behavior but also the creation of a pipeline of new biomedical scientists for the future. PMID:20443918

  8. Clinical Decision-Making Following Disasters: Efficient Identification of PTSD Risk in Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Danielson, Carla Kmett; Cohen, Joseph R; Adams, Zachary W; Youngstrom, Eric A; Soltis, Kathryn; Amstadter, Ananda B; Ruggiero, Kenneth J

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed to utilize a Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) approach in order to improve clinical decision-making for adolescents at risk for the development of psychopathology in the aftermath of a natural disaster. Specifically we assessed theoretically-driven individual, interpersonal, and event-related vulnerability factors to determine which indices were most accurate in forecasting PTSD. Furthermore, we aimed to translate these etiological findings by identifying clinical cut-off recommendations for relevant vulnerability factors. Our study consisted of structured phone-based clinical interviews with 2000 adolescent-parent dyads living within a 5-mile radius of tornados that devastated Joplin, MO, and northern Alabama in Spring 2011. Demographics, tornado incident characteristics, prior trauma, mental health, and family support and conflict were assessed. A subset of youth completed two behavioral assessment tasks online to assess distress tolerance and risk-taking behavior. ROC analyses indicated four variables that significantly improved PTSD diagnostic efficiency: Lifetime depression (AUC = .90), trauma history (AUC = .76), social support (AUC = .70), and family conflict (AUC = .72). Youth were 2-3 times more likely to have PTSD if they had elevated scores on any of these variables. Of note, event-related characteristics (e.g., property damage) were not related to PTSD diagnostic status. The present study adds to the literature by making specific recommendations for empirically-based, efficient disaster-related PTSD assessment for adolescents following a natural disaster. Implications for practice and future trauma-related developmental psychopathology research are discussed.

  9. Transformational Impact of Health Information Technology on the Clinical Practice of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Peters, Todd E

    2017-01-01

    Compared with other medical specialties, psychiatrists have been slower adopters of health information technology (IT) practices, such as electronic health records (EHRs). This delay in implementation could compromise patient safety and impede integration into accountable care organizations and multidisciplinary treatment settings. This article focuses on optimizing use of EHRs for clinical practice, leveraging health IT to improve quality of care, and focusing on the potential for future growth in health IT in child and adolescent psychiatric practice. Aligning with other medical fields and focusing on transparency of mental health treatment will help psychiatrists reach parity with other medical specialties.

  10. Gender dysphoria in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Leibowitz, Scott; de Vries, Annelou L C

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents presenting with gender-related concerns are increasingly seeking support from providers from a variety of disciplines within health care settings across the world. For those treating young people who meet the criteria for the DSM 5 diagnosis of gender dysphoria (GD), complex decisions in clinical care are common. Defining best practice with this population with respect to interventions that span mental health, physical, and surgical domains can be challenging, given a relative dearth of empirical data available; yet practice guidelines have emerged from different professional organizations which can aid with this. For this review paper, a broad literature search was performed to identify relevant studies pertaining to the care of adolescents with GD. In addition, an overview of trends in clinical practice, including shifts in conceptualization of how clinicians and patients define care that is considered affirming when working with this population, is described. This paper explores the characteristics of referral patterns to specialized clinics, provides a brief overview of gender identity development in adolescence, and then describes the phenomenology of known aetiological factors and co-occurring psychiatric issues in adolescents with GD. Additionally, clinical management considerations that detail assessment aims and common treatment interventions across disciplines will be explored.

  11. [Burkitt's lymphoma of the caecum in a patient with AIDS: clinical case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Siani, L M; Siani, A; Ricci, V; D'Elia, M; Masoni, T; Uggeri, G

    2009-04-01

    Overall, lymphomas of the gastrointestinal tract are rare, although they are the most frequent extranodal location. The incidence of primary colic lymphoma, above all in the non-Hodgkin variant, is clearly higher in the HIV positive population, especially in subjects with AIDS. The authors present the case of a 51-year-old patient with AIDS undergoing antiviral therapy; he was suffering from abdominal pain and presented a palpable mass in the right iliac fossa; diagnosis was caecal non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL); radical right hemicolectomy was carried out with definitive histological diagnosis of Burkitt-type small cell NHL. The NHL of the colon represents no more than 1.2% of all malignant cancers of this part of the intestinal tract. Nevertheless such cases are comparatively frequent in patients with HIV virus, especially in the active phase and clinically proven to be due to immunodeficient syndrome. Of cardinal importance is the differential diagnosis between primary and secondary forms because of the different treatment and prognosis. Frequently such forms are observed in patients with AIDS, at advanced stages and with differentiated and hence more aggressive histotypes, also because they are present in organisms weakened by the underlying disease and by immunodeficiency. Primary NHLs of the colon are relatively frequent and aggressive in patients with AIDS; early diagnosis and treatment are therefore of fundamental importance to improve the oncological outcome for these patients.

  12. Non-linear dynamics models characterizing long-term virological data from AIDS clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Verotta, Davide; Schaedeli, Franziska

    2002-04-01

    illustration we demonstrate an application of the models using real AIDS clinical trial data involving patients treated with a combination of anti-retroviral agents using a model which incorporates compliance data.

  13. Previously Unidentified Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in HIV/AIDS Cases Associate with Clinical Parameters and Disease Progression

    PubMed Central

    Bakhteeva, Liliia B.; Khasanova, Gulshat R.; Tillett, Richard L.; Schlauch, Karen A.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic background of an individual plays an important role in the progression of HIV infection to AIDS. Identifying previously unknown or uncharacterized single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that associate with disease progression may reveal important therapeutic targets and provide a greater understanding of disease pathogenesis. In the present study, we employed ultra-high multiplex PCR on an Ion Torrent next-generation sequencing platform to sequence 23 innate immune genes from 94 individuals with HIV/AIDS. This data was used to identify potential associations of SNPs with clinical parameters and disease progression. SNPs that associated with an increased viral load were identified in the genes for the interleukin 15 receptor (IL15RA), toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7), tripartite motif-containing protein 5 (TRIM5), and two killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3). Additionally, SNPs that associated with progression from HIV infection to AIDS were identified in two 2′-5′-oligoadenylate synthetase genes (OAS2 and OAS3). In contrast, other SNPs identified in OAS2 and OAS3 genes, as well as in the TRIM5 and KIR2DS4 genes, were associated with a slower progression of disease. Taken together, our data demonstrates the utility of ultra-high multiplex PCR in identifying polymorphisms of potential clinical significance and further,identifies SNPs that may play a role in HIV pathogenesis. PMID:28050553

  14. Understanding and Addressing AIDS-Related Stigma: From Anthropological Theory to Clinical Practice in Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Arachu; Farmer, Paul

    2005-01-01

    For the past several years, diverse and often confused concepts of stigma have been invoked in discussions on AIDS. Many have argued compellingly that AIDS-related stigma acts as a barrier to voluntary counseling and testing. Less compelling are observations regarding the source of stigma or its role in decreasing interest in HIV care. We reviewed these claims as well as literature from anthropology, sociology, and public health. Preliminary data from research in rural Haiti suggest that the introduction of quality HIV care can lead to a rapid reduction in stigma, with resulting increased uptake of testing. Rather than stigma, logistic and economic barriers determine who will access such services. Implications for scale-up of integrated AIDS prevention and care are explored. PMID:15623859

  15. Cannabis use and mood disorders: patterns of clinical presentations among adolescents in a developing country.

    PubMed

    Konings, M; Maharajh, Hari D

    2006-01-01

    Notwithstanding the increase use of cannabis among adolescents in both developing and developed countries, few studies have looked at cannabis use and mood disorders. In a series of case studies, this research project seeks to investigate patterns of clinical presentations seen among cannabis users in psychiatric outpatients in Trinidad. Five clinical patterns of presentations are identified among cannabis users and abusers based on variables of dosing, age of initial use, duration of use, tolerance and reverse tolerance and poly-drug abuse. All patients in these case studies were standardized for method of use and potency of cannabis used. Patients were screened by urine tests to determine co-morbid use of other substances. Other variables such as environmental factors and genetic vulnerability were reviewed as far as possible from historical accounts of family members. The five patterns described are low, controlled use with mild euphoria and heightened awareness, moderate use with mixed depressive symptoms and suicidal behaviour, heavy, short term use with manic symptoms, long term incremental use with psychotic symptoms due to the trumping of depressive symptoms and cannabis mixed with other substances resulting in florid psychosis. Mood disorders appear to be a common finding among adolescents using cannabis. Sensitization to symptomatic presentation and early detection of cannabis use in young adolescents are necessary. Further research is needed on the effect of cannabinoids on emotions, behaviour and thinking and its relationship to mental disorders. This study is useful as a guideline for the implementation of public health strategies and legislation concerning the use of cannabis in youths.

  16. Comorbid psychopathology and clinical symptomatology in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

    PubMed

    Anagnostopoulos, D C; Korlou, S; Sakellariou, K; Kondyli, V; Sarafidou, J; Tsakanikos, E; Giannakopoulos, G; Liakopoulou, M

    2016-01-01

    Revised Children's Manifest Anxiety Scale (RCMAS). In the OCD group, 48% had contamination obsessions, 42% aggressive obsessions and 52% had washing and cleaning compulsions. Moreover, 32% had one additional disorder and 16.1% had two additional disorders. In comparison, only 17.2% of the control group children had one comorbid disorder. The OCD proband group had higher Total Problems score, as well as higher Anxiety/Depression, Thought Problems and Externalizing scores on the CBCL. When proband parents and control parents (29 mothers and 21 fathers) were compared, the percentage of fathers in the clinical range was significantly higher in the study group (Fisher's exact test: p=0.011, two tailed), whereas for mothers the difference did not attain significance (Fisher's exact test: p=0.106, two tailed). The fathers and mothers of children with OCD were more clinically affected than those of controls. Mothers of probands differed from controls in compulsions, compared to fathers, who differed in both obsessions and compulsions. Comorbidity rate was higher to children and adolescents with OCD. A considerable number of children and adolescents with OCD had higher symptomatology of anxiety and depression than controls, as well as higher rates of thought problems. Children and adolescents with OCD also exhibited higher rates of externalizing problems. This latter finding is considered as important and needs to be highlighted in terms of case management and treatment. Moreover, the parents of children and adolescents with OCD had more OCD symptomatology than the parents of children and adolescents with learning disorders. The symptomatology of the parents may create difficulties in interactions within the family and become burdensome for a vulnerable child. In turn, the child's symptomatology may create or increase some of the symptoms in the parents i.e. anxiety and depression. These findings suggest that at least for a percentage of children and adolescents with OCD, parental

  17. Impact of a youth-friendly HIV clinic: 10 years of adolescent outcomes in Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    PubMed Central

    Reif, Lindsey K; Bertrand, Rachel; Benedict, Charles; Lamb, Matthew R; Rouzier, Vanessa; Verdier, Rose; Johnson, Warren D; Pape, Jean W; Fitzgerald, Daniel W; Kuhn, Louise; McNairy, Margaret L

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adolescents account for over 40% of new HIV infections in Haiti. This analysis compares outcomes among HIV-positive adolescents before and after implementation of an adolescent HIV clinic in Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Methods We conducted a cohort study using programmatic data among HIV-positive adolescents aged 13 to 19. Data from 41,218 adolescents who were HIV tested from January 2003 to December 2012 were included. Outcomes across the HIV care cascade were assessed before and after implementation of an adolescent clinic (2009), including HIV testing, enrolment in care, assessment for antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility, ART initiation and 12-month retention. Pre-ART outcomes were assessed 12 months after HIV testing. Factors associated with pre-ART and ART attrition were identified through multivariable competing risk and Cox proportional hazards regression modelling. Results Cumulatively, 1672 (4.1%) adolescents tested HIV positive (80% female, median age 16 years). Retention by cascade step comparing pre- and post-clinic included the following: 86% versus 87% of patients enrolled in care, 61% versus 79% were assessed for ART eligibility, 85% versus 92% initiated ART and 68% versus 66% were retained 12 months after ART initiation. Pre-ART attrition decreased from 61% pre-clinic to 50% post-clinic (p<0.001). Pre-ART attrition was associated with being female (sub-distributional hazard ratio (sHR): 1.59; CI: 1.31–1.93), syphilis diagnosis (sHR: 1.47; CI: 1.16–1.85) and slum residence (sHR: 0.84; CI: 0.72–0.97). ART attrition was associated with syphilis diagnosis (hazard ratio (HR): 2.23; CI: 1.35–3.68) and CD4 <50 cells/µL (HR: 1.88; CI: 1.15–3.06). Conclusions Implementation of a youth-friendly adolescent clinic improved retention in HIV care among adolescents, particularly in the assessment of ART eligibility and ART initiation. Additional interventions are needed to improve retention among pre-ART patients and support long

  18. A clinical and phenomenological study of 185 Spanish adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Toro, J; Nicolau, R; Cervera, M; Castro, J; Blecua, M J; Zaragoza, M; Toro, A

    1995-07-01

    The objectives of the present study were the following to determine the socio-familial, academic and interpersonal characteristics specific to anorexia nervosa (AN); to study comorbidity in patients with anorexia and morbidity in their parents; and to ascertain whether patients with anorexia nervosa in Spain are similar to those in other countries. The research team revised the clinical records of 185 Spanish adolescents with AN (aged 11-18 years). The results were compared with those obtained from a group of 185 psychiatric patients without AN matched by sex, age, time of consultation and centre. No significant differences were found with regard to broken home, birth order or parent-patient conflict. The parents of patients with anorexia have a higher standard of education and develop more affective disorders. When compared with other patients, the individuals with anorexia nervosa perform much better academically but are more socially withdrawn. Males with anorexia nervosa perform worse academically than females and have more anxiety diagnoses. Patients with anorexia have a high comorbidity for affective and obsessive-compulsive disorders. Sufferers from anorexia nervosa in Spain are clinically analogous to patients with anorexia in other countries. The two characteristics specific to these patients are a high standard of academic performance and an intense degree of social withdrawal, although there are certain factors common to other pathologies relating to adolescence.

  19. Clinic- and Home-Based Contingency Management Plus Parent Training for Adolescent Cannabis Use Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Stanger, Catherine; Ryan, Stacy R.; Scherer, Emily A.; Norton, Gray E.; Budney, Alan J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To conduct a randomized test comparing two multicomponent, contingency management interventions, one with and one without a full parent training curriculum, and an individual treatment for adolescent cannabis use disorders. Method 153 adolescents who met DSM-IV criteria for cannabis abuse or dependence were randomized to motivational enhancement therapy/cognitive-behavioral therapy (MET/CBT), MET/CBT+abstinence-based contingency management (CM), or MET/CBT+CM+Parent Training (PT). Results Overall, during treatment, abstinence was greater for youth receiving clinic- and home-based CM without PT compared to those who received individual MET/CBT. There was no additional benefit of the full parent training curriculum on marijuana use, youth externalizing problems, or parenting. Conclusion These results suggest that clinic- plus home-based CM for cannabis use disorders can increase rates of abstinence during treatment over and above an evidence-based treatment (individual MET/CBT), but the addition of a comprehensive parenting training curriculum did not further enhance efficacy. PMID:26004659

  20. Clinical validity of a dimensional assessment of self- and interpersonal functioning in adolescent inpatients

    PubMed Central

    Haggerty, Greg; Blanchard, Mark; Baity, Matthew R.; Defife, Jared A; Stein, Michelle B.; Siefert, Caleb J.; Sinclair, Samuel J.; Zodan, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    The Social Cognition and Object Relations Scale-Global Rating Method (SCORS-G) is a clinical rating system assessing eight domains of self and interpersonal relational experience which can be applied to narrative response data (e.g., Thematic Apperception Test [TAT; Murray, 1943]; early memories narratives) or oral data (e.g., psychotherapy narratives, Relationship Anecdotal Paradigms). In the current study, seventy-two psychiatrically hospitalized adolescents consented and were rated by their individual and group therapist using the SCORS-G. Clinicians also rated therapy engagement, personality functioning, quality of peer relationships, school functioning, global assessment of functioning (GAF), history of eating disordered behavior and history of nonsuicidal self-injury. SCORS-G composite ratings achieved an acceptable level of inter-rater reliability and were associated with theoretically predicted variables (e.g., engagement in therapy; history of nonsuicidal self-injury). SCORS-G ratings also incrementally improved the prediction of therapy engagement and global functioning beyond what was accounted for by GAF scores. This study further demonstrates the clinical utility of the SCORS-G with adolescents. PMID:25010080

  1. Informed consent and clinical research involving children and adolescents: implications of the revised APA ethics code and HIPAA.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Celia B

    2004-12-01

    In 2003, 2 new sets of rules and regulations affecting the conduct of clinical research involving children and adolescents went into effect: the revised American Psychological Association's (APA) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA, 2002; effective June 1, 2003) and the Privacy Rule (45 CFR Part 160 and A and E of Part 164; effective April; 14, 2003) of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA: Public Law 104-191). This article highlights those APA ethical standards and HIPAA regulations relevant to clinical research involving children and adolescents and discusses how psychologists can apply these rules in ways that will ensure ethical and legal compliance.

  2. [Factors influencing the course and duration of inpatient child and adolescent psychiatric treatment: between empiricism and clinical reality].

    PubMed

    Branik, Emil

    2003-09-01

    In the last two decades considerable changes influenced the scope of inpatient treatment in child and adolescent psychiatry. Proceeding from a literature review dilemmas between available research data and clinical practice will be pointed out. Proposals will be made to take into account the complex developmental processes, the individuality and the social context by psychic impaired children and adolescents requiring hospitalisation. This could improve the transfer of research findings into the clinical practice. It will be argued against a confusion of economical interests with research findings.

  3. Clinical utility of the Tower of London--Drexel University, Second Edition (TOLDX) after adolescent traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Donders, Jacobus; Larsen, Tory

    2012-01-01

    The performance of 43 adolescents with traumatic brain injury was evaluated on the Tower of London-Drexel University, second edition (TOLDX; Culbertson & Zillmer, 2005), and compared to that of 43 demographically matched healthy controls. TOLDX variables had a classification accuracy of 69.77%, with clinical patients demonstrating deficits in pre-planning of a schema as well as keeping subgoals in spatial working memory during execution. Time to follow commands and diffuse lesions on neuroimaging accounted for moderate amounts of variance in TOLDX variables. The findings support the clinical utility of the TOLDX in the assessment of adolescents with traumatic brain injury.

  4. Clinical application of a novel computer-aided detection system based on three-dimensional CT images on pulmonary nodule.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jian-Ye; Ye, Hai-Hong; Yang, Shi-Xiong; Jin, Ren-Chao; Huang, Qi-Liang; Wei, Yong-Chu; Huang, Si-Guang; Wang, Bin-Qiang; Ye, Jia-Zhou; Qin, Jian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical application effects of a novel computer-aided detection (CAD) system based on three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) images on pulmonary nodule. 98 cases with pulmonary nodule (PN) in our hospital from Jun, 2009 to Jun, 2013 were analysed in this study. All cases underwent PN detection both by the simple spiral CT scan and by the computer-aided system based on 3D CT images, respectively. Postoperative pathological results were considered as the "gold standard", for both two checking methods, the diagnostic accuracies for determining benign and malignant PN were calculated. Under simple spiral CT scan method, 63 cases is malignant, including 50 true positive cases and 13 false positive cases from the "gold standard"; 35 cases is benign, 16 true negative case and 19 false negative cases, the Sensitivity 1 (Se1)=0.725, Specificity1 (Sp1)=0.448, Agreement rate1 (Kappa 1)=0.673, J1 (Youden's index 1)=0.173, LR(+)1=1.616, LR(-)1=0.499. Kappa 1=0.673 between the 0.4 and 0.75, has a moderate consistency. Underwent computer-aided detection (CAD) based on 3D CT method, 67cases is malignant, including 62 true positive cases and 7 false positive cases; 31 cases is benign, 24 true negative case and 7 false negative cases, Sensitivity 2 (Se2)=0.899, Specificity2 (Sp2)=0.828, Agreement rate (Kappa 2)=0.877, J2 (Youden's index 2)=0.727, LR(+)2=5.212, LR(-)2=0.123. Kappa 2=0.877 >0.75, has a good consistency. Computer-aided PN detecting system based on 3D CT images has better clinical application value, and can help doctor carry out early diagnosis of lung disease (such as cancer, etc.) through CT images.

  5. Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    TITLE: Proposal for Development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support System) to Aid Prognostication in Terminally Ill Patients...SUBTITLE Proposal for development of EBM-CDSS (Evidence-based Clinical Decision Support System) to aid prognostication in terminally ill patients 5a...to improve prognostication of the life expectancy of terminally ill patients to improve referral of patients to hospice. In addition, the EBM-CDSS

  6. Health Services: Clinical. Radiographic Aide. Instructor's Manual. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cave, Julie; And Others

    This instructor's manual consists of materials for use in presenting a course in the occupational area of radiographic aide. Included in the first part of the guide are a program master sequence; a master listing of instructional materials, equipment, and supplies; an overview of the competency-based vocational education (CBVE) system; and…

  7. Modelling HIV/AIDS epidemics in sub-Saharan Africa using seroprevalence data from antenatal clinics.

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, J. A.; Murray, C. J.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To improve the methodological basis for modelling the HIV/AIDS epidemics in adults in sub-Saharan Africa, with examples from Botswana, Central African Republic, Ethiopia, and Zimbabwe. Understanding the magnitude and trajectory of the HIV/AIDS epidemic is essential for planning and evaluating control strategies. METHODS: Previous mathematical models were developed to estimate epidemic trends based on sentinel surveillance data from pregnant women. In this project, we have extended these models in order to take full advantage of the available data. We developed a maximum likelihood approach for the estimation of model parameters and used numerical simulation methods to compute uncertainty intervals around the estimates. FINDINGS: In the four countries analysed, there were an estimated half a million new adult HIV infections in 1999 (range: 260 to 960 thousand), 4.7 million prevalent infections (range: 3.0 to 6.6 million), and 370 thousand adult deaths from AIDS (range: 266 to 492 thousand). CONCLUSION: While this project addresses some of the limitations of previous modelling efforts, an important research agenda remains, including the need to clarify the relationship between sentinel data from pregnant women and the epidemiology of HIV and AIDS in the general population. PMID:11477962

  8. Graphical and Normative Analysis of Binocular Vision by Mini Computer: A Teaching Aid and Clinical Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kees, Martin; Schor, Clifton

    1981-01-01

    An inexpensive computer graphics systems (Commodore PET), used as a video aid for teaching students advanced case analysis, is described. The course provides students with the analytical tools for evaluating with graphical and statistical techniques and treating with lenses, prisms, and orthoptics various anomalies of binocular vision. (MLW)

  9. Health Services: Clinical. Respiratory Therapy Aide. Instructor's Manual. Competency-Based Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cave, Julie; And Others

    This instructor's manual consists of materials for use in presenting a course in the occupational area of respiratory therapy aide. Included in the first part of the guide are a program master sequence; a master listing of instructional materials, equipment, and supplies; an overview of the competency-based vocational education (CBVE) system; and…

  10. [Anorexia nervosa in adolescents. Clinical aspects of the diagnosis and a follow-up].

    PubMed

    Saccomani, L; Savoini, M; Naselli, A; Cirrincione, M; Matricardi, A

    1989-01-01

    In a brief review of the literature, the diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic criteria of anorexia nervosa in adolescence are considered. An interdisciplinary approach (child neuropsychiatrists, clinical psychologists, auxological pediatricians) was adopted in 52 cases with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa (46 females, 6 males; mean age 14). The results of the analysis of somatic disturbances (weight loss, anomalous sexual maturation), psychological aspects (cognitive level, organization of the personality), environmental implications (familial, social and school adjustment; mother-child relationship; pedagogic modalities; social and economic factors) are reported. The data from a follow-up of 29 patients (26 females, 3 males; mean age 19) are reported, and the degree of recovery assessed as follows: 1) clinical recovery at somatic-adjustment level (79% complete, 17% with atypical characteristics); 2) achievement of a harmonic organization of the personality (48%). The paper concludes with some remarks on the treatment, prognosis and prospects for prevention of the condition.

  11. A profile of young adolescents attending a teen family planning clinic.

    PubMed

    Swenson, I E

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the client records of adolescents attending a teen family planning clinic to determine the reported episodes of sexually transmitted diseases, sexual abuse, alcohol and drug use, and other dysfunctional situations in the family. In addition, information about the initiation of sexual activity and sexual partners was assessed in the record review. Data were obtained from a county health department located in a metropolitan area of a southeastern state. A review of the records of 183 adolescents 15 years of age or younger provided information on ethnicity, grade in school, and assessment data from the clinic interviews and exams. Twenty-five clients said they were not sexually active when they came to the family planning clinic for the first time, and were brought to the clinic by a parent (usually the mother). Those clients who came without parents said they were sexually active. Forty-one percent had their first sexual experience between 12 and 13 years of age, 18% between the ages of 14 and 15, and the remainder before the age of 12. While over 7% specifically stated that they had been sexually abused or raped, an additional 19% described situations in the home or exhibited symptoms associated with a history of sexual abuse. Eleven percent had a history of two to three different sexually transmitted diseases, and 26% had three or more diseases. Seventy-two percent indicated that there was conflict in the home; several had left home because of abuse. Fourteen percent admitted using drugs, mostly cocaine or marijuana, and 17% reported that they used alcohol at least occasionally.

  12. Cytogenetic abnormalities and monosomal karyotypes in children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia: correlations with clinical characteristics and outcome.

    PubMed

    Manola, Kalliopi N; Panitsas, Fotios; Polychronopoulou, Sophia; Daraki, Aggeliki; Karakosta, Maria; Stavropoulou, Cryssa; Avgerinou, Georgia; Hatzipantelis, Emmanuel; Pantelias, Gabriel; Sambani, Constantina; Pagoni, Maria

    2013-03-01

    The whole spectrum of chromosomal abnormalities and their prognostic significance in children and adolescents with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has not been fully elucidated yet, although a considerable amount of knowledge has been gained recently. Moreover, the incidence and prognostic impact of monosomal karyotypes (MKs), which are new cytogenetic categories reported recently in adults with AML, are currently unknown for childhood and adolescent AML. In this study, we investigated the cytogenetic and clinical characteristics of 140 children and adolescents (≤21 y) with AML, and correlated their cytogenetic features with both the clinical characteristics and outcomes of our patient cohort. The most frequent cytogenetic abnormality found in our study was the t(15;17), followed by the t(8;21). Striking differences in the genetic abnormalities and French-American-British subtypes were found among infants, children, and adolescents. Of 124 cases, 15 (12.1%) met the criteria of the MK definition, and 12 of the 15 MKs (80%) were complex karyotypes. Of 124 cases, 27 (21.8%) had cytogenetic abnormalities sufficient to be diagnosed as AML with myelodyspastic sydrome-related features. As expected, patients with the t(15;17) had the most favorable outcomes, whereas patients with 11q23 rearrangements and monosomy 7 had the worst outcomes. These data expand our knowledge by providing novel insights into the cytogenetic features and their correlations with clinical characteristics and outcomes in childhood and adolescent AML.

  13. Improvement of a Clinical Score for Necrotizing Fasciitis: 'Pain Out of Proportion' and High CRP Levels Aid the Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Borschitz, Thomas; Schlicht, Svenja; Siegel, Ekkehard; Hanke, Eric; von Stebut, Esther

    2015-01-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis (NF) is a rare mono-/polymicrobial skin infection that spreads to underlying tissues. NF is quickly progressing and leads to life threatening situations. Immediate surgical debridement together with i.v. antibiotic administration is required to avoid fatal outcome. Early diagnosis is often delayed due to underestimation or confusion with cellulitis. We now compared the initial clinical and laboratory presentation of NF and cellulitis in detail to assess if a typical pattern can be identified that aids timely diagnosis of NF and avoidance of fatal outcome. 138 different clinical and laboratory features of 29 NF patients were compared to those of 59 age- and gender matched patients with severe erysipelas requiring a subsequent hospitalization time of ≥10 days. Differences in clinical presentation were not obvious; however, NF patients suffered significantly more often from strong pain. NF patients exhibited dramatically elevated CRP levels (5-fold, p>0.001). The overall laboratory risk indicator for necrotizing fasciitis (LRINEC) score was significantly higher in NF patients as compared to cellulitis. However, a modification of the score (alteration of laboratory parameters, addition of clinical parameters) led to a clear improvement of the score with a higher positive predictive value without losing specificity. In summary, clinical differentiation of NF from cellulitis appears to be hard. 'Pain out of proportion' may be an early sign for NF. An improvement of the LRINEC score emphasizing only relevant laboratory and clinical findings as suggested may aid the early diagnosis of NF in the future leading to improvement of disease outcome by enabling rapid adequate therapy.

  14. An automatic variational level set segmentation framework for computer aided dental X-rays analysis in clinical environments.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuo; Fevens, Thomas; Krzyzak, Adam; Li, Song

    2006-03-01

    An automatic variational level set segmentation framework for Computer Aided Dental X-rays Analysis (CADXA) in clinical environments is proposed. Designed for clinical environments, the segmentation contains two stages: a training stage and a segmentation stage. During the training stage, first, manually chosen representative images are segmented using hierarchical level set region detection. Then the window based feature extraction followed by principal component analysis (PCA) is applied and results are used to train a support vector machine (SVM) classifier. During the segmentation stage, dental X-rays are classified first by the trained SVM. The classifier provides initial contours which are close to correct boundaries for three coupled level sets driven by a proposed pathologically variational modeling which greatly accelerates the level set segmentation. Based on the segmentation results and uncertainty maps that are built based on a proposed uncertainty measurement, a computer aided analysis scheme is applied. The experimental results show that the proposed method is able to provide an automatic pathological segmentation which naturally segments those problem areas. Based on the segmentation results, the analysis scheme is able to provide indications of possible problem areas of bone loss and decay to the dentists. As well, the experimental results show that the proposed segmentation framework is able to speed up the level set segmentation in clinical environments.

  15. Comparison of AIDS Knowledge, Attitudes, and Behaviors among Incarcerated Adolescents and a Public School Sample in San Francisco.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiClemente, Ralph J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Data collected in 1988 from 113 incarcerated youth and 802 San Francisco high school students demonstrated that both groups are knowledgeable about AIDS. Youth in prison were less aware of risk-reduction measures and reported higher HIV risk behaviors, and should therefore be a primary target for prevention programs. (DM)

  16. A Cultural Approach to Conducting HIV/AIDS and Hepatitis C Virus Education among Native American Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lowe, John

    2008-01-01

    This pilot study tests the feasibility of using a Talking Circle approach and measures cultural values and beliefs within a HIV/AIDS and hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevention program conducted among a Native American (Cherokee) youth population. A descriptive correlation design was used to examine the relationship between Cherokee self-reliance and…

  17. Obsessions and compulsions: normative data on the Padua Inventory from an Italian non-clinical adolescent sample.

    PubMed

    Mancini, F; Gragnani, A; Orazi, F; Pietrangeli, M G

    1999-10-01

    In the present study the structure of obsessive-compulsive phenomena in non-clinical adolescents was investigated by 'The Padua Inventory' (PI). The PI is a self-report measure of obsessive and compulsive symptoms which is used in clinical and research settings. The use of PI in adolescents has been limited by the lack of normative data. Consequently, adolescent validation has both theoretical and practical implications. PI was administered to 566 normal Italian high school subjects, ranging in age from 15 to 18 years. The mean total score of PI and the mean score of 'mental activities', 'becoming contaminated' and 'urges and worries' sub-scales points to significant differences between males and females. Females reported more obsessions and cleaning rituals than males. Males show more urges and fears than females. Moreover, our data underline that younger subjects get higher mean scores than older subjects in all scales.

  18. Clinical Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics of Antihyperglycemic Medications in Children and Adolescents with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    PubMed

    Akhlaghi, Fatemeh; Matson, Kelly L; Mohammadpour, Amir Hooshang; Kelly, Meghan; Karimani, Asieh

    2016-11-10

    The incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) among children and adolescents has been rising. This condition is associated with obesity, and it's prevalence is higher among minority or female youth. Lifestyle modification including diet and exercise is only successful in a small proportion of patients; therefore, pharmacotherapy approaches are needed to treat T2DM among youth. Currently, in the USA, only metformin and insulin are approved for the treatment of T2DM in children. However, several antihyperglycemic agents including exenatide, glimepiride, glyburide, liraglutide, pioglitazone, and rosiglitazone are also used off-label in this population. Moreover, a number of clinical trials are ongoing that are aimed at addressing the safety and efficacy of newer antihyperglycemic agents in this population. Little is known about the safety, efficacy, or pharmacokinetics of antihyperglycemic agents in children or adolescents. Our ability to predict the pharmacokinetics of these agents in youth is hampered first by the lack of information about the expression and activity of drug-metabolizing enzymes and transporters in this population and second by the presence of comorbid conditions such as obesity and fatty liver disease. This article reviews the prevalence of obesity and T2DM in children and adolescents (youth). We then summarize published studies on safety and effectiveness of antihyperglycemic medications in youth. Drug disposition may be affected by age or puberty and thus the expression and activity of different pathways for drug metabolism and xenobiotic transporters are compared between youth and adults followed by a summary of pharmacokinetics studies of antihyperglycemic agents currently used in this population.

  19. Clinical characteristics of children and adolescents with severe therapy-resistant asthma in Brazil *

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Andrea Mendonça; Roncada, Cristian; Santos, Giovana; Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; de Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Vargas, Mauro Henrique Moraes; Pinto, Leonardo Araújo; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Stein, Renato Tetelbom; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics, lung function, radiological findings, and the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum in children and adolescents with severe therapy-resistant asthma (STRA) treated at a referral center in southern Brazil. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed children and adolescents (3-18 years of age) with uncontrolled STRA treated with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting ß2 agonists. We prospectively collected data on disease control, lung function, skin test reactivity to allergens, the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum, chest CT findings, and esophageal pH monitoring results. Results: We analyzed 21 patients (mean age, 9.2 ± 2.98 years). Of those, 18 (86%) were atopic. Most had uncontrolled asthma and near-normal baseline lung function. In 4 and 7, induced sputum was found to be eosinophilic and neutrophilic, respectively; the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum having changed in 67% of those in whom induced sputum analysis was repeated. Of the 8 patients receiving treatment with omalizumab (an anti-IgE antibody), 7 (87.5%) showed significant improvement in quality of life, as well as significant reductions in the numbers of exacerbations and hospitalizations. Conclusions: Children with STRA present with near-normal lung function and a variable airway inflammatory pattern during clinical follow-up, showing a significant clinical response to omalizumab. In children, STRA differs from that seen in adults, further studies being required in order to gain a better understanding of the disease mechanisms. PMID:26398754

  20. Plasma HIV-1 Tropism and the Risk of Short-Term Clinical Progression to AIDS or Death

    PubMed Central

    Cozzi-Lepri, Alessandro; Phillips, Andrew; Noguera-Julian, Marc; Bickel, Markus; Sedlacek, Dalibor; Zilmer, Kai; Clotet, Bonaventura; Lundgren, Jens D.; Paredes, Roger

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate if plasma HIV-1 tropism testing could identify subjects at higher risk for clinical progression and death in routine clinical management. Design Nested case-control study within the EuroSIDA cohort. Methods Cases were subjects with AIDS or who died from any cause, with a plasma sample with HIV-1 RNA >1000 copies/mL available for tropism testing 3 to 12 months prior to the event. At least 1 control matched for age, HIV-1 RNA and HCV status at the time of sampling were selected per each case. Conditional logistic regression was used to investigate exposures associated with clinical progression to AIDS or death. A linear mixed model with random intercept was used to compare CD4+T-cell slopes by HIV tropism over the 12 months following the date of sampling. Results The study included 266 subjects, 100 cases and 166 controls; one quarter had X4 HIV; 26% were ART-naïve. Baseline factors independently associated with clinical progression or death were female gender (OR = 2.13 vs. male, 95CI = 1.04, 4.36), p = 0.038), CD4+T-cell count (OR = 0.90 (95CI = 0.80, 1.00) per 100 cells/mm3 higher, p = 0.058), being on ART (OR = 2.72 vs. being off-ART (95CI = 1.15, 6.41), p = 0.022) and calendar year of sample [OR = 0.84 (95CI = 0.77, 0.91) per more recent year, p<0.001). Baseline tropism was not associated with the risk of clinical progression or death. CD4+T-cell slopes did not differ within or between tropism groups. Conclusions The predictive role of plasma tropism determined using 454 sequencing in the context of people receiving cART with detectable VL is not helpful to identify subjects at higher risk for clinical progression to AIDS or death. PMID:28129343

  1. Gender differences, personality and eating behaviors in non-clinical adolescents.

    PubMed

    Cuzzocrea, F; Larcan, R; Lanzarone, C

    2012-12-01

    Few studies have focused on the relationship between personality trait and eating behaviors in a normal sample of adolescents. The purpose of this research was to examine differences between male and female non-clinical adolescents in eating behaviors, personality traits and state and trait anxiety and to verify the relationship between personality traits, anxiety and eating behaviors in males and females. 592 individuals (324 male and 267 females) were selected. Participants were asked to fill: Eating Disorder Inventory-2 (EDI-2), State-Training Anxiety Inventory (STAI - Forma Y) and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire - Revised (EPQ-R). The results highlighted specific differences in eating behaviors and in personality traits between genders. No statistical differences in anxiety were found. Our results underline the importance of focussing on anxiety levels for girls, while, for boys, on personality traits such as neuroticism and psychoticism. It was confirmed the opinion that, to prevent eating disorders, not only is it necessary to carry out a campaign based on proper nutrition, but also to investigate thoroughly aspects of personality that may be predictive of these disorders.

  2. Clinical presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in children and adolescents: Is there an age effect?

    PubMed

    Ribolsi, Michele; Lin, Ashleigh; Wardenaar, Klaas J; Pontillo, Maria; Mazzone, Luigi; Vicari, Stefano; Armando, Marco

    2017-03-01

    There is limited research on clinical features related to age of presentation of the Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in children and adolescents (CAD). Based on findings in CAD with psychosis, we hypothesized that an older age at presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome would be associated with less severe symptoms and better psychosocial functioning than presentation in childhood or younger adolescence. Ninety-four CAD (age 9-18) meeting Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome criteria participated in the study. The sample was divided and compared according to the age of presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (9-14 vs 15-18 years). The predictive value of age of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome presentation was investigated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC)-curve calculations. The two Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome groups were homogeneous in terms of gender distribution, IQ scores and comorbid diagnoses. Older Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome patients showed better functioning and lower depressive scores. ROC curves revealed that severity of functional impairment was best predicted using an age of presentation cut-off of 14.9 years for social functioning and 15.9 years for role functioning. This study partially confirmed our hypothesis; older age at presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome was associated with less functional impairment, but age was not associated with psychotic symptoms.

  3. Psychopathic-like traits in detained adolescents: clinical usefulness of self-report.

    PubMed

    Vahl, Pauline; Colins, Olivier F; Lodewijks, Henny P B; Markus, Monica T; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Vermeiren, Robert R J M

    2014-08-01

    Studies have demonstrated that self-report tools can be used to reliably and validly examine psychopathic-like traits in adolescents. However, it is unclear if self-report instruments are still reliable and valid when confidentiality cannot be guaranteed, such as during routine assessments in juvenile detention centres. To address this issue, the current study used data from the routine mental health screening of 365 detained male adolescents (12-18 years) in two juvenile detention centres. With the intention of gaining insight in the clinical usefulness of self-reported psychopathic-like traits, we examined relations known from literature with emotional and behavioural features. Self-reported psychopathic-like traits, measured by the Youth Psychopathic Traits Inventory-Short version (YPI-S), were uniquely associated with substance abuse, anger/irritability, conduct problems and hyperactivity, but not with internalizing problems. YPI-S-dimensions showed several specific relationships with variables of interest. For example, only the callous unemotional dimension was negatively related with prosocial behaviour and only the behavioural dimension was positively related with hyperactivity. In conclusion, self-reported psychopathic-like traits showed expected relations with relevant variables. These findings suggest that self-report can be used to identify detained youths with high levels of psychopathic-like traits outside a research context, thus, even when anonymity and confidentiality are not guaranteed.

  4. Informed Consent and Clinical Research Involving Children and Adolescents: Implications of the Revised APA Ethics Code and HIPAA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Celia B.

    2004-01-01

    In 2003, 2 new sets of rules and regulations affecting the conduct of clinical research involving children and adolescents went into effect: the revised American Psychological Association's (APA) Ethical Principles of Psychologists and Code of Conduct (APA, 2002; effective June 1, 2003) and the Privacy Rule (45 CFR Part 160 and A and E of Part…

  5. Conceptual Application of the Discrimination Model of Clinical Supervision for Direct Care Workers in Adolescent Residential Treatment Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrne, Andrew M.; Sias, Shari M.

    2010-01-01

    This article applies the tenets of Bernard's in "Counselor Edu Supervision" 19:60-68, (1979) discrimination model of clinical supervision to the supervision needs of those who provide direct care to adolescents in residential treatment due to abuse, neglect, behavioral, or emotional problems. The article focuses on three areas…

  6. Effectiveness Research: Transporting Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A) From the Lab to School-Based Health Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mufson, Laura H.; Dorta, Kristen Pollack; Olfson, Mark; Weissman, Myrna M.; Hoagwood, Kimberly

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the process of modifying and transporting an evidence-based treatment, Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Depressed Adolescents (IPT-A), from a university setting to school-based health clinics. It addresses conceptual issues involved in the shift from efficacy to effectiveness research as well as operational issues specific to…

  7. A Questionnaire for Screening a Broad Range of DSM-Defined Anxiety Disorder Symptoms in Clinically Referred Children and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muris, Peter; Dreessen, Laura; Bogels, Susan; Weckx, Miryam; van Melick, Marion

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To examine the reliability and validity of the 66-item Screen for Child Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders-Revised (SCARED-R), a questionnaire for measuring a broad range of DSM-defined anxiety disorder symptoms, in a sample of clinically referred youths. Method: The SCARED-R was administered to children/adolescents and their parents…

  8. Treatment of Adolescent Marijuana Abuse: A Randomized Clinical Trial. Presentation 1: Structure of the Cannabis Youth Treatment Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Janet C.; Dennis, Michael L.; Diamond, Guy; Godley, Susan H.; Babor, Thomas; Donaldson, Jean; Herrell, James; Tims, Frank; Webb, Charles

    The Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) study is a multi-site randomized field experiment examining five outpatient treatment protocols for adolescents who abuse or are dependent on marijuana. The purpose of the CYT project is twofold: (a) to test the relative clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of five promising interventions targeted at…

  9. Group-Based Preference Assessment for Children and Adolescents in a Residential Setting: Examining Developmental, Clinical, Gender, and Ethnic Differences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Volz, Jennifer L. Resetar; Cook, Clayton R.

    2009-01-01

    This study examines developmental, clinical, gender, and ethnic group differences in preference in residentially placed children and adolescents. In addition, this study considers whether residentially placed youth prefer stimuli currently being used as rewards as part of a campuswide token economy system and whether youth would identify preferred…

  10. Strategies for Overcoming Obstacles in AIDS Education for Preteens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodrick-Athans, Linda; Bhavnagri, Navaz Peshotan

    1997-01-01

    Points out that every four months the number of reported AIDS cases among adolescents doubles. Describes and evaluates a comprehensive AIDS prevention education program for preteens. Identifies adolescent attitudes as barriers to effective AIDS education. Presents strategies to break down barriers and promote acceptance of AIDS education,…

  11. Theories of AIDS Transmission: Their Development and Implications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sigelman, Carol; And Others

    This study examined knowledge of AIDS transmission, attitudes toward interacting with people who have AIDS, and concerns about being personally affected by AIDS in childhood and adolescence. Subjects were 188 children and adolescents ranging from 6 to 18 years old. An open-ended interview covering a wide range of AIDS-related topics was conducted…

  12. A Randomized Controlled Trial of a Mobile Clinical Decision Aid to Improve Access to Kidney Transplantation: iChoose Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Patzer, Rachel E.; Basu, Mohua; Mohan, Sumit; Smith, Kayla D.; Wolf, Michael; Ladner, Daniela; Friedewald, John J.; Chiles, Mariana; Russell, Allison; McPherson, Laura; Gander, Jennifer; Pastan, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage renal disease, as it substantially increases a patient's survival and is cost saving compared to a lifetime of dialysis. However, transplantation is not universally chosen by patients with renal failure, and limited knowledge about the survival benefit of transplantation vs. dialysis may play a role. We created a mobile application clinical decision aid called iChoose Kidney to improve access to individualized prognosis information comparing dialysis and transplantation outcomes. We describe the iChoose Kidney study, a randomized controlled trial designed to test the clinical efficacy of a mobile health decision aid among end-stage renal disease patients referred for kidney transplantation at three large, diverse transplant centers across the U.S. Approximately 450 patients will be randomized to receive either: (1) standard of care or “usual” transplantation education, or (2) standard of care plus iChoose Kidney. The primary outcome is change in knowledge about the survival benefit of kidney transplantation vs. dialysis from baseline to immediate follow-up; secondary outcomes include change in treatment preferences, improved decisional conflict, and increased access to kidney transplantation. Analyses are also planned to examine effectiveness across subgroups of race, socioeconomic status, health literacy and health numeracy. Engaging patients in health care choices can increase patient empowerment and improve knowledge and understanding of treatment choices. If the effectiveness of iChoose Kidney has a greater impact on patients with low health literacy, lower socioeconomic status, and minority race, this decision aid could help reduce disparities in access to kidney transplantation. PMID:27610423

  13. Manufacturing mistrust: issues in the controversy regarding foster children in the pediatric HIV/AIDS clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Slomka, Jacquelyn

    2009-12-01

    The use of foster children as subjects in the pediatric HIV/AIDS clinical trials has been the subject of media controversy, raising a range of ethical and social dimensions. Several unsettled issues and debates in research ethics underlie the controversy and the lack of consensus among professional researchers on these issues was neither adequately appreciated nor presented in media reports. These issues include (1) the tension between protecting subjects from research risk while allowing them access to the possible benefits of research; (2) the blurring of the potentially conflicting roles of investigator and physician and the boundaries between research and therapy; (3) the adequacy of Institutional Review Board oversight; and (4) trust and the relationships among physicians, investigators and industry. The media controversy about the pediatric HIV/AIDS clinical trials can be seen as a means of "manufacturing mistrust" in health care, research and social services that have not always met the needs and expectations of the public. In an era of emerging infections, it is critical to the public's health that people understand the role of rigorous and ethical research in the development of safe and effective care. Investigators, journalists and the public need to become knowledgeable about major ethical issues in the conduct of research in order to engage in dialogue about balancing research risks and benefits and to be able to distinguish fact from distortion in an era of multiple and rapid transmission of information.

  14. [Clinical and bacteriological profiles of the urinary infections associated the VIH/AIDS in hospital area of Bamako, Mali].

    PubMed

    Dao, S; Oumar, A A; Dembele, J P; Noutache, J L; Fongoro, S; Maiga, I; Bougoudogo, F

    2007-01-01

    The syndrome of immunodepression is the bed of multiple infections of which urinary infections. The goal of this study was to determine the aspects clinical and bacteriological urinary infections during the AIDS with the service of the infectious diseases of the hospital of the Point G of February 1, 2003 to June 30 2005. The diagnosis of the urinary infection was retained on the basis of bacteria number > or =10(4) bacteriury and or leucocytes count > or =10(5)/mm3. The prevalence of the urinary infection was estimated at 8.85%. The principal clinical aspects were a symptomatic pyelonephritis 73.5%, the leucocytiury 11.8%, the cystitis 8.8%, and acute prostatitis 5.9%. Escherichia coli was the most frequent bacterium (46.7%). The sensitivity of the germs was 91.7% with the aminosides, 90.9% with the fluoroquinolones, from 63.6 to 80% respectively with the cephalosporines of first and second generation. Resistance to ampicilline, chloramphenicol and sulfamides was about 72 and 80%. The systematic research of the urinary infection is necessary during the AIDS and the antibiotherapy of choice in first intention in absence of etiologic possibility of diagnosis should be the aminosides and or the fluoroquinolones.

  15. XVII International AIDS Conference: From Evidence to Action - Clinical and biomedical prevention science

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The question of whether to initiate ART at higher CD4+ cell counts than currently recommended by World Health Organization (WHO) treatment guidelines received much attention at the XVII International AIDS Conference (AIDS 2008). If studies presented at the conference ultimately lead to a revision of WHO treatment guidance, the estimated number of people who will need ART globally will increase substantially. Task-shifting is emerging as an important strategy for dealing with the acute shortage of health care workers in many high-burden countries, and several studies presented at AIDS 2008 demonstrated the impressive health system efficiencies garnered by using nurses or other health care providers to deliver HIV care and treatment. Other key presentations and discussion at the conference focused on the optimal time to start TB treatment in HIV-infected patients, the growing risk of resistance in high-burden countries, including its impact on future treatment options, and several large cohort trials testing optimal drug regimens in resource-limited settings. Biomedical prevention research continues to confirm the long-term, protective benefits of circumcision. Several studies involving HIV serodiscordant heterosexual couples have produced data suggesting a strong protective effect of ART for HIV-negative partners. Disappointing results from recent vaccine and non-ARV based microbicides trials are nevertheless providing important data to this field, and the expanding number of pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) trials and ARV-based microbicides appear to provide the best hope for a new, efficacious biomedical prevention intervention. PMID:19811670

  16. Clinical outcomes in breast cancer patients with HIV/AIDS: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Alexandra; Montero, Alberto J; Hurley, Judith

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study is to describe what is the presentation of breast cancer in women with HIV, their tolerance to therapy, the most common complications of treatment and their outcomes. Retrospective chart review of patients with HIV diagnosed with breast cancer between January 1, 1989 and December 31, 2013 at the University of Miami/Jackson Memorial Hospital (UM/JMH) 47 females and 1 male were included in the analysis. The median age of diagnosis was 46 years (IQR 41-52) and 64% of the women were premenopausal. Median CD4(+) count was 330 cells/µL (IQR 131-589 cells/µL). 41% had AIDS at time of diagnosis. 94% of patients presented with locoregional disease and 6% with late stage breast cancer. 52% had ER(+) tumors. 6% had HER-2/neu tumor expression and 21 % had triple negative disease. The 5 year PFS was 50% (95% CI 34-64%), the 5 year OS was 44% (95% CI 29-58%), and the Breast cancer-specific survival was 57% (95% CI 40-70%). Death was attributed to breast cancer in 22 patients, AIDS progression in 6 patients, other medical condition in 1, and for 4, the cause was unknown. Serious adverse events were documented in 46% of patients treated with chemotherapy. Targeted therapy was well tolerated. Patients with HIV/AIDS and breast cancer pose a major challenge for oncologists. Surgery, radiation, and endocrine therapy are well tolerated. Standard dose chemotherapy can have life-threatening side effects which can be managed with growth factor support and antimicrobial prophylaxis. All cancer therapy can be given while continuing with antiviral therapy at full dose.

  17. An Integrated Intervention for Increasing Clinical Nurses' Knowledge of HIV/AIDS-Related Occupational Safety.

    PubMed

    He, Liping; Lu, Zhiyan; Huang, Jing; Zhou, Yiping; Huang, Jian; Bi, Yongyi; Li, Jun

    2016-11-07

    Background: Approximately 35 new HIV (Human Immunodeficiency Virus, HIV) cases and at least 1000 serious infections are transmitted annually to health care workers. In China, HIV prevalence is increasing and nursing personnel are encountering these individuals more than in the past. Contaminated needle-stick injuries represent a significant occupational burden for nurses. Evidence suggests that nurses in China may not fully understand HIV/AIDS (Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, AIDS) and HIV-related occupational safety. At this time, universal protection precautions are not strictly implemented in Chinese hospitals. Lack of training may place nurses at risk for occupational exposure to blood-borne pathogens. Objectives: To assess the effectiveness of integrated interventions on nurses' knowledge improvement about reducing the risk of occupationally acquired HIV infection. Methods: We audited integrated interventions using 300 questionnaires collected from nurses at the Affiliated Hospital of Xiangnan University, a public polyclinic in Hunan Province. The intervention studied was multifaceted and included appropriate and targeted training content for hospital, department and individual levels. After three months of occupational safety integrated interventions, 234 participants who completed the program were assessed. Results: Of the subjects studied, 94.3% (283/300) were injured one or more times by medical sharp instruments or splashed by body fluids in the last year and 95.3% considered their risk of occupational exposure high or very high. After the intervention, awareness of HIV/AIDS-related knowledge improved significantly (χ² = 86.34, p = 0.00), and correct answers increased from 67.9% to 82.34%. Correct answers regarding risk perception were significantly different between pre-test (54.4%) and post-test (66.6%) (χ² = 73.2, p = 0.00). When coming into contact with patient body fluids and blood only 24.0% of subjects used gloves regularly. The pre

  18. Pharmacogenetics Informed Decision Making in Adolescent Psychiatric Treatment: A Clinical Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Teri; Sharp, Susan; Manzardo, Ann M.; Butler, Merlin G.

    2015-01-01

    Advances made in genetic testing and tools applied to pharmacogenetics are increasingly being used to inform clinicians in fields such as oncology, hematology, diabetes (endocrinology), cardiology and expanding into psychiatry by examining the influences of genetics on drug efficacy and metabolism. We present a clinical case example of an adolescent male with anxiety, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder who did not tolerate numerous medications and dosages over several years in attempts to manage his symptoms. Pharmacogenetics testing was performed and DNA results on this individual elucidated the potential pitfalls in medication use because of specific pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic differences specifically involving polymorphisms of genes in the cytochrome p450 enzyme system. Future studies and reports are needed to further illustrate and determine the type of individualized medicine approach required to treat individuals based on their specific gene patterns. Growing evidence supports this biological approach for standard of care in psychiatry. PMID:25710722

  19. Impact of Exercise on Clinical Symptom Report and Neurocognition after Concussion in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Manikas, Vicky; Babl, Franz E; Hearps, Stephen; Dooley, Julian; Anderson, Vicki

    2017-03-21

    Recovery from concussion in childhood is poorly understood, despite its importance in decisions regarding return to normal activity. Resolution of post-concussive symptoms (PCS) is widely employed as a marker of recovery in clinical practice; however, it is unclear whether subtle impairments persist only to re-emerge in the context of increased physical or cognitive demands. This study aimed to examine the effect of strenuous exercise on clinical symptom report and neurocognition in children and adolescents after PCS resolution after concussion. We recruited children and adolescents with concussion (n = 30) on presentation to an Emergency Department (ED). At Day 2 and Day 10 post-self-reported symptom resolution, participants completed a strenuous exercise protocol, and pre- and post-exercise assessment of PCS and neurocognition. Results demonstrated an overall reduction in PCS from Day 2 to Day 10 post-symptom resolution, with no evidence of symptom increase after strenuous exercise at either time point. Neurocognitive performance was linked to task complexity: on less cognitively demanding tasks, processing speed was slower post-exercise and, unexpectedly, slower on Day 10 than Day 2, while for more demanding tasks (new learning), Day 2 exercise resulted in faster responses, but Day 10 processing speed post-exercise was slower. In summary, we found the expected recovery pattern for PCS, regardless of exercise, while for neurocognition, recovery was dependent on the degree of cognitive demand, and there was an unexpected reduction in performance from Day 2 to Day 10. Findings provide some suggestion that premature return to normal activities (e.g., school) may slow neurocognitive recovery.

  20. HIV/AIDS and Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... NIAID). /* // ** // */ Prevention Research Vaccines Microbicides Related Topics on AIDS.gov Clinical Trials Immune System 101 HIV Vaccine ... Be the Generation Last revised: 12/09/2016 AIDS.gov HIV/AIDS Basics • Federal Resources • Using New ...

  1. [Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of HIV/AIDS patients followed-up in Cappadocia region: 18 years experience].

    PubMed

    Alp, Emine; Bozkurt, Ilkay; Doğanay, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    HIV/AIDS is still an important health problem worldwide and the number of people living with HIV worldwide continued to grow in the last years. The first HIV/AIDS cases had been reported in 1985 from Turkey and with an increasing trend during the following years, the number of cases reached to 3898 with 528 new cases in 2009. The aim of this retrospective study was to share the 18 years experience with the patients who were followed-up in Erciyes University Hospital Infectious Diseases Clinics in Cappadocia region. The records of 55 (81%) HIV/AIDS patients out of 68 who were admitted to our clinic between 1992- 2009 have been attained and the demographic and clinical characteristics, administered therapy regimens and adverse effects of antiretroviral therapy of those cases have been evaluated. Forty-three (78%) of the patients were male and 12 (22%) were female of which 11 (92%) of their spouses had HIV/AIDS. The median age of the patients was 45 and 20 (36%) of them were over 54 years old. Fifty (91%) of patients lived in Cappadocia region, and 24 (44%) had lived in foreign countries. Fifty (91%) patients had risky heterosexual contact as a risk factor. Of these patients, 47 (85%) were in full-blown AIDS stage at admission. Twenty-seven (49%) of the patients diagnosed occasionally during routine anti-HIV testing, did not have any symptoms. Fever, weakness and weight loss were the most frequently detected symptoms in the rest of the patients. Ten (18%) patients had underlying diseases such as hypertension, chronic hepatitis B or C, coronary artery disease, diabetes mellitus and chronic renal disfunction. Opportunistic infections were determined in 25 (45.5%) patients and 20 (40%) of these infections were determined at admission. The most frequent opportunistic infection was oral candidiasis, followed by Pneumocystis (carinii) jiroveci pneumonia and tuberculosis. Malignancy was diagnosed in three patients; two had Kaposi's sarcoma and one had multiorgan

  2. Empirically Derived Subtypes of Lifetime Anxiety Disorders: Developmental and Clinical Correlates in U.S. Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burstein, Marcy; Georgiades, Katholiki; Lamers, Femke; Swanson, Sonja A.; Cui, Lihong; He, Jian-Ping; Avenevoli, Shelli; Merikangas, Kathleen R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The current study examined the sex- and age-specific structure and comorbidity of lifetime anxiety disorders among U.S. adolescents. Method: The sample consisted of 2,539 adolescents (1,505 females and 1,034 males) from the National Comorbidity Survey-Adolescent Supplement who met criteria for "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of…

  3. Mapping the Clinical Complexities of Adolescents with Substance Use Disorders: A Typological Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyers, Kathleen; McDermott, Paul A.; Webb, Alicia; Hagan, Teresa Ann

    2006-01-01

    Because of the vast improvements in adolescent substance use assessment, it is widely recognized that adolescent substance use disorders (SUD) encompasses diverse drugs, patterns and etiologies and are characterized by extensive heterogeneity in other life domains. The next step in advancing adolescent SUD assessment is to classify adolescents…

  4. Evaluation of an Intervention among Adolescents to Reduce Preventive Misconception in HIV Vaccine Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Lally, Michelle; Goldsworthy, Richard; Sarr, Moussa; Kahn, Jessica; Brown, Larry; Peralta, Ligia; Zimet, Greg

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Placebo and randomization are important concepts that must be understood before youth can safely participate in HIV vaccine studies or other biomedical trials for HIV prevention. These concepts are central to the phenomenon of preventive misconception which may be associated with an increase in risk behavior among study participants related to mistaken beliefs. Persuasive messaging, traditionally used in the field of marketing, could enhance educational efforts associated with randomized clinical trials. Methods Two educational brochures were designed to increase knowledge about HIV vaccine clinical trials via 1 and 2-sided persuasive messaging. Through the Adolescent Medicine Trials Network, 120 youth were enrolled, administered a mock HIV vaccine trial consent, and then randomized to receive either no supplemental information or one of the two brochures. Results The 2-sided brochure group in which common clinical trial misconceptions were acknowledgedand then refuted had significantly higher scores on knowledge of randomization and interpretation of side effects than the consent-only control group, and willingness to participate in an HIV vaccine trial was not decreased with the use of this brochure. Conclusion Two sided persuasive messaging improves understanding of the concepts of randomization and placebo among youth who would consider participating in an HIV vaccine trial. Further evaluation of this approach should be considered for at-risk youth participating in an actual trial of a biomedical intervention for HIV prevention. PMID:24613097

  5. The assessment and treatment of unhealthy exercise in adolescents with anorexia nervosa: A Delphi study to synthesize clinical knowledge.

    PubMed

    Noetel, Melissa; Dawson, Lisa; Hay, Phillipa; Touyz, Stephen

    2017-01-17

    This study aimed to explore and synthesize expert clinical knowledge on defining and managing unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. The Delphi methodology was used. Clinicians (n = 25) considered experts in the treatment of AN in adolescents were recruited internationally to form the panel. The first round of the questionnaires was comprised of five open-ended questions regarding defining, assessing, and treating unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. Statements were derived from this data using content analysis, and included as Likert-based items in two subsequent rounds, in which panellists were required to rate their level of agreement for each item. All 25 respondents completed the three rounds of questionnaires. Consensus was achieved for 59.0% of the items included in the second and third round of questionnaires. Although consensus was not achieved, compulsive exercise was the preferred term for the panel when referring to unhealthy exercise in adolescents with AN. The panel clearly delineated features of unhealthy and healthy exercise, and endorsed a number of items considered important to assess for when evaluating exercise in this clinical population. A variety of treatment approaches and strategies reached consensus. Notably, for those who are medically stable and progressing toward recovery, the panel recommended initial exercise restriction practices and reintroducing healthy exercise behaviors, rather than exercise cessation practices. The current findings can serve as preliminary treatment guidelines. A unified approach to labeling and defining unhealthy exercise in the eating disorder literature and clinical settings is required to achieve further progress.

  6. Cognitive behavioral therapy for early adolescents with autism spectrum disorders and clinical anxiety: a randomized, controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jeffrey J; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Alessandri, Michael; Fujii, Cori; Renno, Patricia; Laugeson, Elizabeth; Piacentini, John C; De Nadai, Alessandro S; Arnold, Elysse; Lewin, Adam B; Murphy, Tanya K; Storch, Eric A

    2015-01-01

    Clinically elevated anxiety is a common, impairing feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A modular CBT program designed for preteens with ASD, Behavioral Interventions for Anxiety in Children with Autism (BIACA; Wood et al., 2009) was enhanced and modified to address the developmental needs of early adolescents with ASD and clinical anxiety. Thirty-three adolescents (11-15 years old) were randomly assigned to 16 sessions of CBT or an equivalent waitlist period. The CBT model emphasized exposure, challenging irrational beliefs, and behavioral supports provided by caregivers, as well as numerous ASD-specific treatment elements. Independent evaluators, parents, and adolescents rated symptom severity at baseline and posttreatment/postwaitlist. In intent-to-treat analyses, the CBT group outperformed the waitlist group on independent evaluators' ratings of anxiety severity on the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) and 79% of the CBT group met Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale criteria for positive treatment response at posttreatment, as compared to only 28.6% of the waitlist group. Group differences were not found for diagnostic remission or questionnaire measures of anxiety. However, parent-report data indicated that there was a positive treatment effect of CBT on autism symptom severity. The CBT manual under investigation, enhanced for early adolescents with ASD, yielded meaningful treatment effects on the primary outcome measure (PARS), although additional developmental modifications to the manual are likely warranted. Future studies examining this protocol relative to an active control are needed.

  7. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Early Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorders and Clinical Anxiety: A Randomized, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Jeffrey J.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Alessandri, Michael; Fujii, Cori; Renno, Patricia; Laugeson, Elizabeth; Piacentini, John C.; De Nadai, Alessandro S.; Arnold, Elysse; Lewin, Adam B.; Murphy, Tanya K.; Storch, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Clinically elevated anxiety is a common, impairing feature of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). A modular CBT program designed for preteens with ASD, Behavioral Interventions for Anxiety in Children with Autism (BIACA; Wood et al., 2009), was enhanced and modified to address the developmental needs of early adolescents with ASD and clinical anxiety. Method Thirty-three adolescents (11–15 years old) were randomly assigned to 16 sessions of CBT or an equivalent waitlist period. The CBT model emphasized exposure, challenging irrational beliefs, and behavioral supports provided by caregivers, as well as numerous ASD-specific treatment elements. Independent evaluators, parents, and adolescents rated symptom severity at baseline and post-treatment/post-waitlist. Results In intent-to-treat analyses, the CBT group outperformed the waitlist group on independent evaluators’ ratings of anxiety severity on the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale (PARS) and 79% of the CBT group met Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale criteria for positive treatment response at posttreatment, as compared to only 28.6% of the waitlist group. Group differences were not found for diagnostic remission or questionnaire measures of anxiety. However, parent-report data indicated that there was a positive treatment effect of CBT on autism symptom severity. Conclusions The CBT manual under investigation, enhanced for early adolescents with ASD, yielded meaningful treatment effects on the primary outcome measure (PARS), although additional developmental modifications to the manual are likely warranted. Future studies examining this protocol relative to an active control are needed. PMID:25526831

  8. fMRI investigation of response inhibition, emotion, impulsivity, and clinical high-risk behavior in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Matthew R. G.; Benoit, James R. A.; Juhás, Michal; Dametto, Ericson; Tse, Tiffanie T.; MacKay, Marnie; Sen, Bhaskar; Carroll, Alan M.; Hodlevskyy, Oleksandr; Silverstone, Peter H.; Dolcos, Florin; Dursun, Serdar M.; Greenshaw, Andrew J.

    2015-01-01

    High-risk behavior in adolescents is associated with injury, mental health problems, and poor outcomes in later life. Improved understanding of the neurobiology of high-risk behavior and impulsivity shows promise for informing clinical treatment and prevention as well as policy to better address high-risk behavior. We recruited 21 adolescents (age 14–17) with a wide range of high-risk behavior tendencies, including medically high-risk participants recruited from psychiatric clinics. Risk tendencies were assessed using the Adolescent Risk Behavior Screen (ARBS). ARBS risk scores correlated highly (0.78) with impulsivity scores from the Barratt Impulsivity scale (BIS). Participants underwent 4.7 Tesla functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while performing an emotional Go/NoGo task. This task presented an aversive or neutral distractor image simultaneously with each Go or NoGo stimulus. Risk behavior and impulsivity tendencies exhibited similar but not identical associations with fMRI activation patterns in prefrontal brain regions. We interpret these results as reflecting differences in response inhibition, emotional stimulus processing, and emotion regulation in relation to participant risk behavior tendencies and impulsivity levels. The results are consistent with high impulsivity playing an important role in determining high risk tendencies in this sample containing clinically high-risk adolescents. PMID:26483645

  9. Association of X4 tropism with disease progression in antiretroviral-treated children and adolescents living with HIV/AIDS in São Paulo, Brazil.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Flávia Jacqueline; Zaparoli, Mayra Simioni; Moreira, Denise Helena; Cavalcanti, Jaqueline de Souza; Rodrigues, Rosangela; Berezin, Eitan Naaman; Ferreira, João Leandro de Paula; Sáfadi, Marco Aurélio Palazzi; Brígido, Luis Fernando de Macedo

    2014-01-01

    Management of children with HIV/AIDS is specially challenging. Age-related issues do not allow for direct transposition of adult observations to this population. CXCR4 tropism has been associated with disease progression in adults. The geno2pheno web-base is a friendly tool to predict viral tropism on envelope V3 sequences, generating a false positive rate for a CXCR4 prediction. We evaluated the association of HIV-1 tropism prediction with clinical and laboratory outcome of 73 children with HIV/AIDS in São Paulo, Brazil. The CXCR4 tropism was strongly associated with a lower (nadir) CD4 documented during follow-up (p<0.0001) and with disease severity (clinical event and/or CD4 below 200cells/mm(3)) at the last observation, using commonly applied clinical cutoffs, such as (10%)FPRclonal (p=0.001). When variables obtained during follow-up are included, both treatment adherence and viral tropism show a significant association with disease severity. As for viremia suppression, 30% (22/73) were undetectable at the last observation, with only adherence strongly associated with suppression after adjustment. The study brings further support to the notion that antiretroviral treatment adherence is pivotal to management of HIV disease, but suggests that tropism prediction may provide an additional prognostic marker to monitor HIV disease in children.

  10. Implementing Psychophysiology in Clinical Assessments of Adolescent Social Anxiety: Use of Rater Judgments Based on Graphical Representations of Psychophysiology

    PubMed Central

    De Los Reyes, Andres; Augenstein, Tara M.; Aldao, Amelia; Thomas, Sarah A.; Daruwala, Samantha; Kline, Kathryn; Regan, Timothy

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Social stressor tasks induce adolescents’ social distress as indexed by low-cost psychophysiological methods. Unknown is how to incorporate these methods within clinical assessments. Having assessors judge graphical depictions of psychophysiological data may facilitate detections of data patterns that may be difficult to identify using judgments about numerical depictions of psychophysiological data. Specifically, the Chernoff Face method involves graphically representing data using features on the human face (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape). This method capitalizes on humans’ abilities to discern subtle variations in facial features. Using adolescent heart rate norms and Chernoff Faces, we illustrated a method for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety. METHOD Twenty-two clinic-referred adolescents completed a social anxiety self-report and provided psychophysiological data using wireless heart rate monitors during a social stressor task. We graphically represented participants’ psychophysiological data and normative adolescent heart rates. For each participant, two undergraduate coders made comparative judgments between the dimensions (eyes, nose, mouth, and face shape) of two Chernoff Faces. One Chernoff Face represented a participant’s heart rate within a context (baseline, speech preparation, or speech-giving). The second Chernoff Face represented normative heart rate data matched to the participant’s age. RESULTS Using Chernoff faces, coders reliably and accurately identified contextual variation in participants’ heart rate responses to social stress. Further, adolescents’ self-reported social anxiety symptoms predicted Chernoff Face judgments, and judgments could be differentiated by social stress context. CONCLUSIONS Our findings have important implications for implementing psychophysiology within clinical assessments of adolescent social anxiety. PMID:24320027

  11. An automated tuberculosis screening strategy combining X-ray-based computer-aided detection and clinical information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendez, Jaime; Sánchez, Clara I.; Philipsen, Rick H. H. M.; Maduskar, Pragnya; Dawson, Rodney; Theron, Grant; Dheda, Keertan; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-04-01

    Lack of human resources and radiological interpretation expertise impair tuberculosis (TB) screening programmes in TB-endemic countries. Computer-aided detection (CAD) constitutes a viable alternative for chest radiograph (CXR) reading. However, no automated techniques that exploit the additional clinical information typically available during screening exist. To address this issue and optimally exploit this information, a machine learning-based combination framework is introduced. We have evaluated this framework on a database containing 392 patient records from suspected TB subjects prospectively recruited in Cape Town, South Africa. Each record comprised a CAD score, automatically computed from a CXR, and 12 clinical features. Comparisons with strategies relying on either CAD scores or clinical information alone were performed. Our results indicate that the combination framework outperforms the individual strategies in terms of the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (0.84 versus 0.78 and 0.72), specificity at 95% sensitivity (49% versus 24% and 31%) and negative predictive value (98% versus 95% and 96%). Thus, it is believed that combining CAD and clinical information to estimate the risk of active disease is a promising tool for TB screening.

  12. Treatment outcomes of HIV-infected adolescents attending public-sector HIV clinics across Gauteng and Mpumalanga, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Evans, Denise; Menezes, Colin; Mahomed, Kay; Macdonald, Philippa; Untiedt, Sanlie; Levin, Leon; Jaffray, Imogen; Bhana, Nainisha; Firnhaber, Cindy; Maskew, Mhairi

    2013-06-01

    There is little evidence comparing treatment outcomes between adolescents and other age groups, particularly in resource-limited settings. A retrospective analysis of data from seven HIV clinics across urban Gauteng (n=5) and rural Mpumalanga (n=2), South Africa was conducted. The analysis compared HIV-positive antiretroviral treatment (ART)-naive young adolescents (10-14 years), older adolescents (15-19), and young adults (20-24 years) to adults (≥25 years) initiated onto standard first-line ART between April 2004 and August 2010. Log-binomial regression was used to estimate relative risk (RR) of failure to suppress viral load (≥400 copies/ml) or failure to achieve an adequate CD4 response at 6 or 12 months. The effect of age group on virological failure, mortality, and loss to follow-up (LTFU; ≥90 days since scheduled visit date) was estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Of 42,427 patients initiating ART, 310 (0.7%) were young adolescents, 342 (0.8%) were older adolescents, and 1599 (3.8%) were young adults. Adolescents were similar to adults in terms of proportion male, baseline CD4 count, hemoglobin, and TB. Compared to adults, both older adolescents (6 months RR 1.75 95% CI 1.25-2.47) and young adults (6 months RR 1.33 95% CI 1.10-1.60 and 12 months RR 1.64 95% CI 1.23-2.19) were more likely to have an unsuppressed viral load and were more likely to fail virologically (HR 2.90 95% CI 1.74-4.86; HR 2.94 95% CI 1.63-5.31). Among those that died or were LTFU, the median time from ART initiation until death or LTFU was 4.7 months (IQR 1.5-13.2) and 10.9 months (IQR 5.0-22.7), respectively. There was no difference in risk of mortality by age category, compared to adults. Young adolescents were less likely to be LTFU at any time period after ART initiation (HR 0.43 95% CI 0.26-0.69) whereas older adolescents and young adults were more likely to be LTFU after ART initiation (HR 1.78 95% CI 1.34-2.36; HR 1.63 95% CI 1.41-1.89) compared to adults. HIV

  13. FAMILIES' RESPONSE TO AIDS: NEW INSIGHTS INTO PARENTAL ROLES IN FOSTERING HIV/AIDS KNOWLEDGE.

    PubMed

    Dimbuene, Zacharie Tsala

    2015-11-01

    Worldwide, there is a consensus that parents must be involved in children's HIV/AIDS education. However, there is little evidence that speaks to this advocacy for improving adolescent health. This study developed and tested four hypotheses about (i) the relationship between parents' and adolescents' knowledge of HIV/AIDS transmission routes and prevention strategies conditional upon (ii) parents' gender, (iii) communication about sexuality, and (iv) the parent-adolescent education gap. The sample consisted of 306 parent-adolescent dyads from the 2002 Cameroon Family and Health Survey. Adolescents were aged 12-19 years. Overall, fifteen items about HIV/AIDS transmission routes and prevention strategies were analysed. Descriptive results showed that parents fared better than adolescents regardless of the AIDS fact considered. An exception was the correct use of condoms (parents 57% vs adolescents 61%). The generation gap probably explains this result: parents are more conservative, reluctant and distant from condoms compared with adolescents, who are more receptive and open to discussing sex with peers. Multivariate ordered logistic regressions showed a significant positive effect of parents' HIV/AIDS knowledge on adolescents' HIV/AIDS knowledge, thus supporting the main hypothesis of direct parental influences. Parent-adolescent communication about sexuality showed positive and significant effects on adolescents' HIV/AIDS knowledge, suggesting an 'enhancing effect' when combined with the effect of parents' HIV/AIDS knowledge. Against the background that parents in sub-Saharan Africa do not teach their children about sexuality, the study demonstrated that families can play an important role in HIV/AIDS education. These findings have major implications for HIV/AIDS interventions involving adolescents, parents or both, in fostering accurate HIV/AIDS knowledge among adolescents, which could lead to protective sexual behaviours.

  14. Poor peer relations predict parent- and self-reported behavioral and emotional problems of adolescents with gender dysphoria: a cross-national, cross-clinic comparative analysis.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Annelou L C; Steensma, Thomas D; Cohen-Kettenis, Peggy T; VanderLaan, Doug P; Zucker, Kenneth J

    2016-06-01

    This study is the third in a series to examine behavioral and emotional problems in children and adolescents with gender dysphoria in a comparative analysis between two clinics in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and Amsterdam, the Netherlands. In the present study, we report Child Behavior Checklist (CBCL) and Youth Self-Report (YSR) data on adolescents assessed in the Toronto clinic (n = 177) and the Amsterdam clinic (n = 139). On the CBCL and the YSR, we found that the percentage of adolescents with clinical range behavioral and emotional problems was higher when compared to the non-referred standardization samples but similar to the referred adolescents. On both the CBCL and the YSR, the Toronto adolescents had a significantly higher Total Problem score than the Amsterdam adolescents. Like our earlier studies of CBCL data of children and Teacher's Report Form data of children and adolescents, a measure of poor peer relations was the strongest predictor of CBCL and YSR behavioral and emotional problems in gender dysphoric adolescents.

  15. Alterations in left ventricular, left atrial, and right ventricular structure and function to cardiovascular risk factors in adolescents with type 2 diabetes participating in the TODAY clinical trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk in adolescents with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are limited. Echocardiography was performed in the last year of the Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) clinical trial (median 4.5 yr from diagnosis of T2D, average age 18 yr), incl...

  16. A Comparison of the Concurrent and Predictive Validity of Three Measures of Readiness to Change Alcohol Use in a Clinical Sample of Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maisto, Stephen A.; Krenek, Marketa; Chung, Tammy; Martin, Christopher S.; Clark, Duncan; Cornelius, Jack

    2011-01-01

    The authors compared 3 measures of readiness to change alcohol use commonly used in clinical research and practice with adolescents: the Readiness Ruler, the SOCRATES (subscales of Recognition and Taking Steps), and a Staging Algorithm. The analysis sample consisted of 161 male and female adolescents presenting for intensive outpatient…

  17. A Manual-Based Intervention to Address Clinical Crises and Retain Patients in the Treatment of Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Diane E.; Kratochvil, Christopher J.; Puumala, Susan E.; Silva, Susan G.; Rezac, Amy J.; Hallin, Mary J.; Reinecke, Mark A.; Vitiello, Benedetto; Weller, Elizabeth B.; Pathak, Sanjeev; Simons, Anne D.; March, John S.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To describe a manual-based intervention to address clinical crises and retain participants in the Treatment for Adolescents with Depression Study (TADS). Method: The use of adjunct services for attrition prevention (ASAP) is described for adolescents (ages 12-17 years) during the 12-week acute treatment in TADS, from 2000 to 2003.…

  18. The current practice trends in pediatric bone-anchored hearing aids in Canada: a national clinical and surgical practice survey

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Since the introduction of bone-anchored hearing aids (BAHAs) in the 1980s, the practices of surgeons who implant these hearing aids have become varied; different indications and surgical techniques are utilized depending on the surgeon and institution. The objective of the current study is to describe the clinical and surgical practices of otolaryngologists in Canada who perform pediatric BAHA operations. Methods A detailed practice questionnaire was devised and sent to all members of the Canadian Society of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Those who performed pediatric BAHA surgeries were asked to participate. Results Twelve responses were received (response rate of 80%). All of the respondents identified congenital aural atresia to be an indication for pediatric BAHAs. Other indications were chronic otitis externa or media with hearing loss (92%), allergic reactions to conventional hearing aids (75%), congenital fixation or anomaly of ossicular chain (67%), and unilateral deafness (25%). Minor complications, such as skin reactions, were reported in 25% of cases, while major complications were very rare. There was great variability with regards to surgical techinque and post-operative management. The extent of financial support for the BAHA hardware and device also varied between provinces, and even within the same province. Conclusion There is a lack of general consensus regarding pediatric BAHA surgeries in Canada. With such a small community of otolaryngologists performing this procedure, we are hopeful that this survey can serve as an impetus for a national collaboration to establish a set of general management principles and inspire multi-site research ventures. PMID:23815797

  19. Clinical holistic medicine: a pilot study on HIV and quality of life and a suggested cure for HIV and AIDS.

    PubMed

    Ventegodt, Søren; Flensborg-Madsen, Trine; Andersen, Niels Jørgen; Morad, Mohammed; Merrick, Joav

    2004-05-11

    This study was undertaken to examine the association between the immunological impact of HIV (measured by CD4 count) and global self-assessed quality of life (QOL) (measured with QOL1) for people suffering from HIV, to see if the connection was large and statistically strong enough to support our hypothesis of a strong QOL-immunological connection through the nonspecific, nonreceptor-mediated immune system, and thus to give a rationale for a holistic cure for HIV. This cross-sectional population study in Uganda included 20 HIV infected persons with no symptoms of AIDS and a CD4 count above 200 mill./liter. The main outcome measures were CD4 count, global QOL measured with the validated questionnaire QOL1, translated to Luganda and translated back to English. We found a large, clinically significant correlation between the number of T-helper cells (CD4) and global self-assessed quality of life (QOL1) (r = 0.57, p = 0.021), when controlled for age, gender, and years of infection. Together with other studies and holistic medicine theory, the results have given rationale for a holistic cure for HIV. We suggest, based on our findings and theoretical considerations, that HIV patients who improve their global QOL, also will improve their CD4 counts. Using the technique of holistic medicine based on the life mission theory and the holistic process theory of healing, we hypothesize that the improvement of QOL can have sufficient biological effect on the CD4, which could avoid or postpone the development of AIDS. A holistic HIV/AIDS cure improving the QOL draws on hidden resources in the person and is thus affordable for everybody. Improving global QOL also means a higher consciousness and a more ethical attitude, making it more difficult for the HIV-infected person to pass on the infection.

  20. Information needs of health care professionals in an AIDS outpatient clinic as determined by chart review.

    PubMed Central

    Giuse, N B; Huber, J T; Giuse, D A; Brown, C W; Bankowitz, R A; Hunt, S

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the information needs of health care professionals in HIV-related clinical encounters, and to determine the suitability of existing information sources to address those needs. SETTING: HIV outpatient clinic. PARTICIPANTS: Seven health care professionals with diverse training and patient care involvement. METHODS: Based on patient charts describing 120 patient encounters, participants generated 266 clinical questions. Printed and on-line information sources were used to answer questions in two phases: using commonly available sources and using all available medical library sources. MEASUREMENTS: The questions were divided into 16 categories by subject. The number of questions answered, their categories, the information source(s) providing answers, and the time required to answer questions were recorded for each phase. RESULTS: Each participant generated an average of 3.8 clinical questions per chart. Five categories accounted for almost 75% of all questions; the treatment protocols/regimens category was most frequent (24%). A total of 245 questions (92%) were answered, requiring an average of 15 minutes per question. Most (87%) of the questions were answered via electronic sources, even though paper sources were consulted first. CONCLUSIONS: The participating professionals showed considerable information needs. A combination of on-line and paper sources was necessary to provide the answers. The study suggests that present-day information sources are not entirely satisfactory for answering clinical questions generated by examining charts of HIV-infected patients. PMID:7850563

  1. Clinical problems encountered in the treatment of adolescents with anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed

    Knoll, Susanne; Föcker, Manuel; Hebebrand, Johannes

    2013-11-01

    The conceptualization of anorexia nervosa (AN) depends on the diagnostic criteria. Most patients with teenage onset AN seem to remit within 3-10 years depending on the definitions of recovery. The mortality of adolescent onset anorexia nervosa (AN) has fortunately decreased over the last two decades. Based on randomized controlled trials, we review different treatments including individual and group psychotherapy, family therapy, psychopharmacology, and hormone therapy. Treatment settings vary over time for any individual patient. Despite high rates of inpatient treatment, the respective evidence for effectiveness is meager. In underage patients with severe AN clinical, ethical and legal aspects need to be dealt with systematically if intermittent compulsory treatment is deemed necessary. The prolonged and frequently chronic course of AN often entails therapeutic discontinuity; the transition into adulthood requires a graded therapeutic concept that considers the severity of the disorder, developmental and chronological age, and parental involvement. Finally, we consider future clinical and research options to improve treatment and outcome of this eating disorder.

  2. Computer-aided optimal design of custom scoliosis braces considering clinical and patient evaluations.

    PubMed

    Visser, Daniel; Xue, Deyi; Ronsky, Janet L; Harder, James; Zernicke, Ronald F

    2012-09-01

    Scoliosis causes an abnormal three dimensional curvature of the spine that is often treated by an orthotic device called brace. The objective of this research was to develop a new approach to automatically identify the optimal design of custom-built brace, based on clinical and patient evaluations. In this approach, torso geometry of the scoliosis patient was achieved using a 3-D imaging system that generated a 3-D torso surface model, which was modified using a custom CAD system to design the 3-D brace surface model. Two design parameters, a translational correction factor and a rotational correction factor, were selected to design the brace geometry from the torso geometry. The 3-D digital brace was evaluated by three clinical evaluation measures (imbalance, rib hump and principal axis angle reduction) and one patient evaluation measure (discomfort). A multi-objective optimization method was employed to identify the optimal design parameters considering both clinical and patient evaluations.

  3. Clinical Correlates of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale in a Sample of Obese Adolescents Seeking Bariatric Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Roberto, Christina A.; Sysko, Robyn; Bush, Jennifer; Pearl, Rebecca; Puhl, Rebecca M.; Schvey, Natasha A.; Dovidio, John F.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate psychometric properties and clinical correlates of the Weight Bias Internalization Scale (WBIS) in a sample of obese adolescents seeking bariatric surgery. Sixty five adolescents enrolled in a bariatric surgery program at a large, urban medical center completed psychiatric evaluations, self-report questionnaires including the WBIS and other measures of psychopathology and physical assessments. The WBIS had high internal consistency (Cronbach’s α = .92). As in previous research with adults, the one underlying factor structure was replicated and 10 of the original 11 items were retained. The scale had significant partial correlations with depression (r = .519), anxiety (r = .465), social and behavioral problems (r = .364), quality of life (r = −.480), and eating (r = .579), shape (r = .815), and weight concerns (r = .545), controlling for body mass index. However, WBIS scores did not predict current or past psychiatric diagnosis or treatment or past suicidal ideation. Overall, the WBIS had excellent psychometric properties in a sample of obese treatment-seeking adolescents and correlated significantly with levels of psychopathology. These findings suggest that the WBIS could be a useful tool for healthcare providers to assess internalized weight bias among treatment-seeking obese youth. Assessment of internalized weight bias among this clinical population has the potential to identify adolescents who may benefit from information on coping with weight stigma which in turn can augment weight loss efforts. PMID:21593805

  4. Patient flow improvement for an ophthalmic specialist outpatient clinic with aid of discrete event simulation and design of experiment.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chong; Zhang, Dali; Kon, Audrey Wan Mei; Wai, Charity Sue Lea; Ang, Woo Boon

    2015-06-01

    Continuous improvement in process efficiency for specialist outpatient clinic (SOC) systems is increasingly being demanded due to the growth of the patient population in Singapore. In this paper, we propose a discrete event simulation (DES) model to represent the patient and information flow in an ophthalmic SOC system in the Singapore National Eye Centre (SNEC). Different improvement strategies to reduce the turnaround time for patients in the SOC were proposed and evaluated with the aid of the DES model and the Design of Experiment (DOE). Two strategies for better patient appointment scheduling and one strategy for dilation-free examination are estimated to have a significant impact on turnaround time for patients. One of the improvement strategies has been implemented in the actual SOC system in the SNEC with promising improvement reported.

  5. Are adolescents with internet addiction prone to aggressive behavior? The mediating effect of clinical comorbidities on the predictability of aggression in adolescents with internet addiction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jae-A; Gwak, Ah Reum; Park, Su Mi; Kwon, Jun-Gun; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Kim, Jae-Won; Kim, Dai Jin; Choi, Jung-Seok

    2015-05-01

    Previous studies have reported associations between aggression and Internet addiction disorder (IAD), which has also been linked with anxiety, depression, and impulsiveness. However, the causal relationship between aggression and IAD has thus far not been clearly demonstrated. This study was designed to (a) examine the association between aggression and IAD and (b) investigate the mediating effects of anxiety, depression, and impulsivity in cases in which IAD predicts aggression or aggression predicts IAD. A total of 714 middle school students in Seoul, South Korea, were asked to provide demographic information and complete the Young's Internet Addiction Test (Y-IAT), the Buss-Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the State-Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Conners-Wells Adolescent Self-Report Scale. Three groups were identified based on the Y-IAT: the usual user group (n=487, 68.2%), the high-risk group (n=191, 26.8%), and the Internet addiction group (n=13, 1.8%). The data revealed a linear association between aggression and IAD such that one variable could be predicted by the other. According to the path analysis, the clinical scales (BAI, BDI, and CASS) had partial or full mediating effects on the ability of aggression to predict IAD, but the clinical scales had no mediating effect on the ability of IAD to predict aggression. The current findings suggest that adolescents with IAD seem to have more aggressive dispositions than do normal adolescents. If more aggressive individuals are clinically prone to Internet addiction, early psychiatric intervention may contribute to the prevention of IAD.

  6. Are Adolescents with Internet Addiction Prone to Aggressive Behavior? The Mediating Effect of Clinical Comorbidities on the Predictability of Aggression in Adolescents with Internet Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Jae-A; Gwak, Ah Reum; Park, Su Mi; Kwon, Jun-Gun; Lee, Jun-Young; Jung, Hee Yeon; Sohn, Bo Kyung; Kim, Jae-Won

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Previous studies have reported associations between aggression and Internet addiction disorder (IAD), which has also been linked with anxiety, depression, and impulsiveness. However, the causal relationship between aggression and IAD has thus far not been clearly demonstrated. This study was designed to (a) examine the association between aggression and IAD and (b) investigate the mediating effects of anxiety, depression, and impulsivity in cases in which IAD predicts aggression or aggression predicts IAD. A total of 714 middle school students in Seoul, South Korea, were asked to provide demographic information and complete the Young's Internet Addiction Test (Y-IAT), the Buss–Perry Aggression Questionnaire, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11, the State–Trait Anger Expression Inventory-2, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Beck Depression Inventory, and the Conners–Wells Adolescent Self-Report Scale. Three groups were identified based on the Y-IAT: the usual user group (n=487, 68.2%), the high-risk group (n=191, 26.8%), and the Internet addiction group (n=13, 1.8%). The data revealed a linear association between aggression and IAD such that one variable could be predicted by the other. According to the path analysis, the clinical scales (BAI, BDI, and CASS) had partial or full mediating effects on the ability of aggression to predict IAD, but the clinical scales had no mediating effect on the ability of IAD to predict aggression. The current findings suggest that adolescents with IAD seem to have more aggressive dispositions than do normal adolescents. If more aggressive individuals are clinically prone to Internet addiction, early psychiatric intervention may contribute to the prevention of IAD. PMID:25902276

  7. A Computer-Aided Analysis Method of SPECT Brain Images for Quantitative Treatment Monitoring: Performance Evaluations and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wentao; Huang, Qiu; Wan, Jieqing; Huang, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The objective and quantitative analysis of longitudinal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images are significant for the treatment monitoring of brain disorders. Therefore, a computer aided analysis (CAA) method is introduced to extract a change-rate map (CRM) as a parametric image for quantifying the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in longitudinal SPECT brain images. The performances of the CAA-CRM approach in treatment monitoring are evaluated by the computer simulations and clinical applications. The results of computer simulations show that the derived CRMs have high similarities with their ground truths when the lesion size is larger than system spatial resolution and the change rate is higher than 20%. In clinical applications, the CAA-CRM approach is used to assess the treatment of 50 patients with brain ischemia. The results demonstrate that CAA-CRM approach has a 93.4% accuracy of recovered region's localization. Moreover, the quantitative indexes of recovered regions derived from CRM are all significantly different among the groups and highly correlated with the experienced clinical diagnosis. In conclusion, the proposed CAA-CRM approach provides a convenient solution to generate a parametric image and derive the quantitative indexes from the longitudinal SPECT brain images for treatment monitoring. PMID:28251150

  8. A Computer-Aided Analysis Method of SPECT Brain Images for Quantitative Treatment Monitoring: Performance Evaluations and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiujuan; Wei, Wentao; Huang, Qiu; Song, Shaoli; Wan, Jieqing; Huang, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The objective and quantitative analysis of longitudinal single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images are significant for the treatment monitoring of brain disorders. Therefore, a computer aided analysis (CAA) method is introduced to extract a change-rate map (CRM) as a parametric image for quantifying the changes of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in longitudinal SPECT brain images. The performances of the CAA-CRM approach in treatment monitoring are evaluated by the computer simulations and clinical applications. The results of computer simulations show that the derived CRMs have high similarities with their ground truths when the lesion size is larger than system spatial resolution and the change rate is higher than 20%. In clinical applications, the CAA-CRM approach is used to assess the treatment of 50 patients with brain ischemia. The results demonstrate that CAA-CRM approach has a 93.4% accuracy of recovered region's localization. Moreover, the quantitative indexes of recovered regions derived from CRM are all significantly different among the groups and highly correlated with the experienced clinical diagnosis. In conclusion, the proposed CAA-CRM approach provides a convenient solution to generate a parametric image and derive the quantitative indexes from the longitudinal SPECT brain images for treatment monitoring.

  9. Incomplete Reconstitution of T Cell Subsets on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 384

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Gregory K.; Spritzler, John G.; Chan, Ellen S.; Asmuth, David M.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Rodriguez, Benigno A.; Skowron, Gail; Skolnik, Paul R.; Shafer, Robert W.; Pollard, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) results in higher total CD4 cell counts, a surrogate for immune reconstitution. Whether the baseline CD4 cell count affects reconstitution of immune cell subsets has not been well characterized. Methods Using data from 978 patients (621 with comprehensive immunological assessments) from the AIDS [Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome] Clinical Trials Group protocol 384, a randomized trial of initial ART, we compared reconstitution of CD4+, CD4+ naive and memory, CD4+ activation, CD8+, CD8+ activation, B, and natural killer cells among patients in different baseline CD4+ strata. Reference ranges for T cell populations in control patients negative for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were calculated using data from AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol A5113. Results Patients in the lower baseline CD4+ strata did not achieve total CD4+ cell counts similar to those of patients in the higher strata during 144 weeks of ART, although CD4+ cell count increases were similar. Ratios of CD4+ naive-memory cell counts and CD4+:CD8+ cell counts remained significantly reduced in patients with lower baseline CD4+ cell counts (≤350 cells/mm3). These immune imbalances were most notable for those initiating ART with a baseline CD4+ cell count ≤200 cells/mm3, even after adjustment for baseline plasma HIV RNA levels. Conclusions After nearly 3 years of ART, T cell subsets in patients with baseline CD4+ cell counts >350 cells/mm3 achieved or approached the reference range those of control individuals without HIV infection. In contrast, patients who began ART with ≤350 CD4+ cells/mm3 generally did not regain normal CD4+ naive-memory cell ratios. These results support current guidelines to start ART at a threshold of 350 cells/mm3 and suggest that there may be immunological benefits associated with initiating therapy at even higher CD4+ cell counts. PMID:19123865

  10. Instant Experience in Clinical Trials: A Computer-Aided Simulation Technique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Michael A.

    1976-01-01

    Describes "Instant Experience," a simulation and game method in which students are given information about a promising new drug and asked to design a protocol for a clinical trial of the drug. Evaluation of a trial workshop showed positive response to the method. Educational goals to be achieved through its use are noted. (JT)

  11. Orphans of the AIDS Epidemic: An Examination of Clinical Level Problems of Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelton, Jennifer; Forehand, Rex

    2005-01-01

    Objective: The percentage of children with clinical levels of internalizing and externalizing problems before and after maternal death from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome was contrasted with two comparison groups: children whose mothers were human immunodeficiency virus infected but continued to live and children whose mothers were not…

  12. Stroke: First Aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid Stroke: First aid Stroke: First aid By Mayo Clinic Staff A stroke occurs when there's bleeding into your brain or when normal blood flow to ... next several hours. Seek immediate medical assistance. A stroke is a true emergency. The sooner treatment is ...

  13. Clinical evolution and nutritional status in asthmatic children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care

    PubMed Central

    Morishita, Rosinha Yoko Matsubayaci; Strufaldi, Maria Wany Louzada; Puccini, Rosana Fiorini

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical evolution and the association between nutritional status and severity of asthma in children and adolescents enrolled in Primary Health Care. Methods: A retrospective cohort study of 219 asthmatic patients (3-17 years old) enrolled in Primary Care Services (PCSs) in Embu das Artes (SP), from 2007 to 2011. Secondary data: gender, age, diagnosis of asthma severity, other atopic diseases, family history of atopy, and body mass index. To evaluate the clinical outcome of asthma, data were collected on number of asthma exacerbations, number of emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids at follow-up visits in the 6th and 12th months. The statistical analysis included chi-square and Kappa agreement index, with 5% set as the significance level. Results: 50.5% of patients started wheezing before the age of 2 years, 99.5% had allergic rhinitis and 65.2% had a positive family history of atopy. Regarding severity, intermittent asthma was more frequent (51.6%) and, in relation to nutritional status, 65.8% of patients had normal weight. There was no association between nutritional status and asthma severity (p=0.409). After 1 year of follow-up, 25.2% of patients showed reduction in exacerbations and emergency room consultations, and 16.2% reduced the amount of inhaled corticosteroids. Conclusions: The monitoring of asthmatic patients in Primary Care Services showed improvement in clinical outcome, with a decreased number of exacerbations, emergency room consultations and doses of inhaled corticosteroids. No association between nutritional status and asthma severity was observed in this study. PMID:26316387

  14. Neuropsychological and Clinical Profiles of Children and Adolescents Diagnosed with Childhood Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

    PubMed Central

    BAYKAL, Saliha; KARABEKİROĞLU, Koray; ŞENSES, Ahmet; KARAKURT, Melih Nuri; ÇALIK, Tülay; YÜCE, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The differential features of childhood-onset obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) compared to adult-onset OCD are being more of a focus of attention in recent years. The aim of this study was to determine the clinical and neuropsychological profiles of children and adolescents diagnosed with childhood-onset OCD and to investigate the association between the duration, severity, comorbidity, and family history of the disorder and clinical and neuropsychological functional impairments. Methods Thirty-five OCD patients (patient group) and 35 healthy control subjects (control group) between 8–15 years of age were included. To investigate the neuropsychological profiles, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (WCST), Stroop Test, and Continuous Performance Test (CPT) were applied. To assess the clinical and behavioral profiles, the Children’s Depression Inventory (CDI), Conner’s Parent Rating Scale (CPRS-48), and the Yale Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale (YB-OCS) and Yale Global Tic Severity Rating Scale (YGTSRS) were given. Results Based on the performance in the WCST, Stroop Test, and SPT, the results of the study reveal that childhood-onset OCD patients have statistically significant worse performance compared to healthy controls in terms of executive functions, sustained attention, and motor inhibition tasks. Excluding the comorbid diagnoses, childhood-onset OCD patients did not show a difference in behavioral problems, but they had higher levels of anxiety compared to healthy controls. Conclusion The findings of this study reveal that independent of the duration, severity, comorbid problems, and anxiety levels, the disorder itself is associated with worse performance in executive functions, attention, and motor inhibition processes, and a positive family history of OCD is an important risk factor. Long-term follow-up studies with patients diagnosed with childhood-onset OCD would be a logical next step in order to determine the cause-effect relation

  15. Evaluation of clinical and laboratory markers of cardiometabolic risk in overweight and obese children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    da Cunha Palhares, Heloísa Marcelina; da Silva, Adriana Paula; Resende, Daniela Cristina Silva; de Araújo Pereira, Gilberto; Rodrigues-Júnior, Virmondes; de Fátima Borges, Maria

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study analyzed the frequency of cardiometabolic risk markers and metabolic syndrome occurrence in overweight and obese children and adolescents. METHODS: The participants included 161 overweight (n=65) and obese (n=96) individuals aged between 5 and 19 years. Clinical markers were assessed (body mass index, body fat percentage, waist circumference, acanthosis, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, laboratory parameters [glucose, insulin, cholesterol (total and fractions) and triglyceride levels and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index] and leptin and adiponectin levels). The frequency of changes, odds ratios and correlations among markers were determined. Metabolic syndrome was assessed according to International Diabetes Federation criteria. RESULTS: A high frequency of acanthosis (51.6%); increased waist circumference (45.4%), systolic blood pressure / diastolic blood pressure (8.1% / 9.3%), glucose (10%), insulin (36.9%) and HOMA-IR (44.3%) values; and reduced high-density lipoprotein levels (47.2%) were observed. Leptin levels were increased in 95% of obese and in 66% of overweight subjects. Adiponectin was decreased in 29.5% of obese and in 34% of overweight subjects. An odd ratio analysis revealed a greater probability of increased waist circumference (9.0), systolic blood pressure (4.1), triglyceride (2.3) and insulin (2.9) levels and HOMA-IR (3.0) in the obese group than in the overweight group. The clinical and laboratory parameters and leptin levels exhibited significant correlations, whereas adiponectin was negatively correlated with systolic blood pressure. The occurrence rate of metabolic syndrome was 13.6%. CONCLUSIONS: The high frequency of changes in clinical, laboratory and adipokine markers indicates the need for early interventions aimed at preventing cardiometabolic complications in adulthood. PMID:28226031

  16. Empirical Derivation and Validation of a Clinical Case Definition for Neuropsychological Impairment in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Beauchamp, Miriam H; Brooks, Brian L; Barrowman, Nick; Aglipay, Mary; Keightley, Michelle; Anderson, Peter; Yeates, Keith O; Osmond, Martin H; Zemek, Roger

    2015-09-01

    Neuropsychological assessment aims to identify individual performance profiles in multiple domains of cognitive functioning; however, substantial variation exists in how deficits are defined and what cutoffs are used, and there is no universally accepted definition of neuropsychological impairment. The aim of this study was to derive and validate a clinical case definition rule to identify neuropsychological impairment in children and adolescents. An existing normative pediatric sample was used to calculate base rates of abnormal functioning on eight measures covering six domains of neuropsychological functioning. The dataset was analyzed by varying the range of cutoff levels [1, 1.5, and 2 standard deviations (SDs) below the mean] and number of indicators of impairment. The derived rule was evaluated by bootstrap, internal and external clinical validation (orthopedic and traumatic brain injury). Our neuropsychological impairment (NPI) rule was defined as "two or more test scores that fall 1.5 SDs below the mean." The rule identifies 5.1% of the total sample as impaired in the assessment battery and consistently targets between 3 and 7% of the population as impaired even when age, domains, and number of tests are varied. The NPI rate increases in groups known to exhibit cognitive deficits. The NPI rule provides a psychometrically derived method for interpreting performance across multiple tests and may be used in children 6-18 years. The rule may be useful to clinicians and scientists who wish to establish whether specific individuals or clinical populations present within expected norms versus impaired function across a battery of neuropsychological tests.

  17. Vestibular Migraine in Children and Adolescents: Clinical Findings and Laboratory Tests

    PubMed Central

    Langhagen, Thyra; Lehrer, Nicole; Borggraefe, Ingo; Heinen, Florian; Jahn, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common cause of episodic vertigo in children. We summarize the clinical findings and laboratory test results in a cohort of children and adolescents with VM. We discuss the limitations of current classification criteria for dizzy children. Methods: A retrospective chart analysis was performed on 118 children with migraine related vertigo at a tertiary care center. Patients were grouped in the following categories: (1) definite vestibular migraine (dVM); (2) probable vestibular migraine (pVM); (3) suspected vestibular migraine (sVM); (4) benign paroxysmal vertigo (BPV); and (5) migraine with/without aura (oM) plus vertigo/dizziness according to the International Classification of Headache Disorders, 3rd edition (beta version). Results: The mean age of all patients was 12 ± 3 years (range 3–18 years, 70 females). 36 patients (30%) fulfilled criteria for dVM, 33 (28%) for pVM, 34 (29%) for sVM, 7 (6%) for BPV, and 8 (7%) for oM. Somatoform vertigo (SV) co-occurred in 27% of patients. Episodic syndromes were reported in 8%; the family history of migraine was positive in 65%. Mild central ocular motor signs were found in 24% (most frequently horizontal saccadic pursuit). Laboratory tests showed that about 20% had pathological function of the horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex, and almost 50% had abnormal postural sway patterns. Conclusion: Patients with definite, probable, and suspected VM do not differ in the frequency of ocular motor, vestibular, or postural abnormalities. VM is the best explanation for their symptoms. It is essential to establish diagnostic criteria in clinical studies. In clinical practice, however, the most reasonable diagnosis should be made in order to begin treatment. Such a procedure also minimizes the fear of the parents and children, reduces the need to interrupt leisure time and school activities, and prevents the development of SV. PMID:25674076

  18. Longitudinal feasibility of MINDSET: a clinic decision aid for epilepsy self-management.

    PubMed

    Begley, Charles; Shegog, Ross; Harding, Angelique; Goldsmith, Corey; Hope, Omotola; Newmark, Michael

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report on the development and feasibility of the longitudinal version of MINDSET, a clinical tool to assist patients and health-care providers in epilepsy self-management. A previous study described the feasibility of using MINDSET to identify and prioritize self-management issues during a clinic visit. This paper describes the development of the longitudinal version of MINDSET and feasibility test over multiple visits with a printed action plan for goal setting and the capacity for monitoring changes in self-management. Feasibility was assessed based on 1) postvisit patient and provider interviews addressing ease of use and usefulness, patient/provider communication, and shared decision-making and 2) the capacity of the tool to monitor epilepsy characteristics and self-management over time. Results indicate MINDSET feasibility for 1) identifying and facilitating discussion of self-management issues during clinic visits, 2) providing a printable list of prioritized issues and tailored self-management goals, and 3) tracking changes in epilepsy characteristics and self-management over time.

  19. Sexual resilience within intimate relations among unmarried adolescent girls seeking abortion in an abortion clinic of Delhi, India

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Rakhi; Muralidhar, Sumathi; Talwar, Richa

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Sexually experienced, unmarried adolescent women, usually commence sex, with marriage in mind. Initially, they resist sex but are unsuccessful due to lack of resilience to end an oppressive relationship, or convince their partners to postpone sex or use protection. To retain partners, they accept unprotected sex and suffer its consequences such as unwanted pregnancies, sexually transmitted diseases, HIV/AIDS and cervical cancer. Considerable numbers of adolescents face this emotional stress and suffer the consequences, while some manage to endure and emerge from the ordeal. This study attempts to determine this resilience and extrapolate it to others who might not be so successful without an intervention. Methodology: The study compares sexual resilience in 100 unmarried adolescent abortion-seekers, in terms of time taken from meeting the partner, to sexual debut and correlates this with background factors such as age, education, family income, self-esteem, sexual knowledge, attitude toward pre-marital sex (PMS) and partner pressure. Results: Mean debut age was 17.32 years. Partners took more initiative to form emotional (64%) and physical relationship (78%). Adolescent girls’ initiative reduced markedly from emotional (22%) to physical relation (5%). Correlation of sexual resilience with age, family income education and knowledge was not significant. It was significantly correlated with attitude toward PMS, self-esteem and partner pressure. Interpretation and Conclusion: It is desirable to improve self-esteem and attitude of young women to build negotiation skills in intimate relations. Counselors have to reorient the perspectives to improve attitude toward abstinence and increase self-esteem to resist pressure from partners. PMID:24958983

  20. Multiphenotype association study of patients randomized to initiate antiretroviral regimens in AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol A5202

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Anurag; Bradford, Yuki; Verma, Shefali S.; Pendergrass, Sarah A.; Daar, Eric S.; Venuto, Charles; Morse, Gene D.; Ritchie, Marylyn D.

    2017-01-01

    Background High-throughput approaches are increasingly being used to identify genetic associations across multiple phenotypes simultaneously. Here, we describe a pilot analysis that considered multiple on-treatment laboratory phenotypes from antiretroviral therapy-naive patients who were randomized to initiate antiretroviral regimens in a prospective clinical trial, AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol A5202. Participants and methods From among 5 9545 294 polymorphisms imputed genome-wide, we analyzed 2544, including 2124 annotated in the PharmGKB, and 420 previously associated with traits in the GWAS Catalog. We derived 774 phenotypes on the basis of context from six variables: plasma atazanavir (ATV) pharmacokinetics, plasma efavirenz (EFV) pharmacokinetics, change in the CD4+ T-cell count, HIV-1 RNA suppression, fasting low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and fasting triglycerides. Permutation testing assessed the likelihood of associations being by chance alone. Pleiotropy was assessed for polymorphisms with the lowest P-values. Results This analysis included 1181 patients. At P less than 1.5×10−4, most associations were not by chance alone. Polymorphisms with the lowest P-values for EFV pharmacokinetics (CYPB26 rs3745274), low-density lipoprotein -cholesterol (APOE rs7412), and triglyceride (APOA5 rs651821) phenotypes had been associated previously with those traits in previous studies. The association between triglycerides and rs651821 was present with ATV-containing regimens, but not with EFV-containing regimens. Polymorphisms with the lowest P-values for ATV pharmacokinetics, CD4 T-cell count, and HIV-1 RNA phenotypes had not been reported previously to be associated with that trait. Conclusion Using data from a prospective HIV clinical trial, we identified expected genetic associations, potentially novel associations, and at least one context-dependent association. This study supports high-throughput strategies that simultaneously explore multiple

  1. 78 FR 45246 - Office of Clinical and Preventive Services National HIV Program: Enhanced HIV/AIDS Screening and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ...: Enhanced HIV/AIDS Screening and Engagement in Care Announcement Type: New. Funding Announcement Number: HHS... accepting competitive cooperative agreement applications for Enhanced HIV/AIDS Screening and Engagement in... Services (HHS). Funding for the HIV/AIDS award will be provided by OS via an Intra-Departmental...

  2. Adolescent care

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Andrée; Maheux, Brigitte; Frappier, Jean-Yves; Haley, Nancy

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate how often family physicians see adolescents with mental health problems and how they manage these problems. DESIGN Mailed survey completed anonymously. SETTING Province of Quebec. PARTICIPANTS All 358 French-speaking family physicians who practise primarily in local community health centres (CLSCs), including physicians working in CLSC youth clinics, and 749 French-speaking practitioners randomly selected from private practice. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Frequency with which physicians saw adolescents with mental health problems, such as depression, suicidal thoughts, behavioural disorders, substance abuse, attempted suicide, or suicide, during the last year or since they started practice. RESULTS Response rate was 70%. Most physicians reported having seen adolescents with mental health problems during the last year. About 10% of practitioners not working in youth clinics reported seeing adolescents with these disorders at least weekly. Anxiety was the most frequently seen problem. A greater proportion of physicians working in youth clinics reported often seeing adolescents for all the mental health problems examined in this study. Between 8% and 33% of general practitioners not working in youth clinics said they had not seen any adolescents with depression, behavioural disorders, or substance abuse. More than 80% of physicians had seen adolescents who had attempted suicide, and close to 30% had had adolescent patients who committed suicide. CONCLUSION Family physicians play a role in adolescent mental health care. The prevalence of mental health problems seems higher among adolescents who attend youth clinics. Given the high prevalence of these problems during adolescence, we suggest on the basis of our results that screening for these disorders in primary care could be improved. PMID:17279202

  3. Perceptions about sexual abstinence and knowledge of HIV/AIDS prevention among in-school adolescents in a western Nigerian city

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Young people are becoming increasingly exposed to the risk of HIV infection. According to the 2008 HIV/Syphilis sentinel survey in Nigeria, 3.3% of young people aged 15-19 years are infected. Primary prevention especially abstinence, remains one of the most realistic interventions for reducing further spread of the virus. However, the adoption of sexual abstinence as a prevention strategy among adolescents remains low and factors influencing its practice among urban young people in Nigeria are relatively unknown. The aim of the study was to document the sexual abstinence behaviour of in-school adolescents, the factors influencing or obstructing abstinence, and knowledge of HIV and AIDS in Ibadan, South-West Nigeria. Methods The study was a descriptive cross-sectional survey of students in Ibadan South-West Local Government Area. A total of 420 respondents (52% males and 48% females), selected through a multistage sampling technique, completed a semi-structured questionnaire. This was supplemented with eight focus group discussions (FGDs) which had an average of 9 respondents within the 10 and 19 years age group. The data from the FGDs were transcribed and summarized manually while the quantitative data was analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences to generate frequencies, cross tabulations of variables and logistic regression analysis. Results Twelve percent of the entire sample had ever had sex. Overall, knowledge of HIV transmission and prevention was high and most respondents favoured the promotion of abstinence as an HIV prevention strategy. A smaller proportion of male respondents (79%) abstained compared with the females (98%). Major predictors of sexual abstinence were being a female, not having a boyfriend or girl friend, not using alcohol and having a positive attitude towards abstinence (P < 0.05). Sexual abstinence was also significantly associated with perceived self efficacy to refuse sex and negative perception of peers

  4. Clinical use of vaginal or rectally applied microbicides in patients suffering from HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Satish Kumar; Nutan

    2013-01-01

    Microbicides, primarily used as topical pre-exposure prophylaxis, have been proposed to prevent sexual transmission of HIV. This review covers the trends and challenges in the development of safe and effective microbicides to prevent sexual transmission of HIV Initial phases of microbicide development used such surfactants as nonoxynol-9 (N-9), C13G, and sodium lauryl sulfate, aiming to inactivate the virus. Clinical trials of microbicides based on N-9 and C31G failed to inhibit sexual transmission of HIV. On the contrary, N-9 enhanced susceptibility to sexual transmission of HIV-1. Subsequently, microbicides based on polyanions and a variety of other compounds that inhibit the binding, fusion, or entry of virus to the host cells were evaluated for their efficacy in different clinical setups. Most of these trials failed to show either safety or efficacy for prevention of HIV transmission. The next phase of microbicide development involved antiretroviral drugs. Microbicide in the form of 1% tenofovir vaginal gel when tested in a Phase IIb trial (CAPRISA 004) in a coitally dependent manner revealed that tenofovir gel users were 39% less likely to become HIV-infected compared to placebo control. However, in another trial (VOICE MTN 003), tenofovir gel used once daily in a coitally independent mode failed to show any efficacy to prevent HIV infection. Tenofovir gel is currently in a Phase III safety and efficacy trial in South Africa (FACTS 001) employing a coitally dependent dosing regimen. Further, long-acting microbicide-delivery systems (vaginal ring) for slow release of such antiretroviral drugs as dapivirine are also undergoing clinical trials. Discovering new markers as correlates of protective efficacy, novel long-acting delivery systems with improved adherence in the use of microbicides, discovering new compounds effective against a broad spectrum of HIV strains, developing multipurpose technologies incorporating additional features of efficacy against other

  5. Towards the routine use of brain imaging to aid the clinical diagnosis of disorders of consciousness.

    PubMed

    Coleman, M R; Davis, M H; Rodd, J M; Robson, T; Ali, A; Owen, A M; Pickard, J D

    2009-09-01

    Clinical audits have highlighted the many challenges and dilemmas faced by clinicians assessing persons with disorders of consciousness (vegetative state and minimally conscious state). The diagnostic decision-making process is highly subjective, dependent upon the skills of the examiner and invariably dictated by the patients' ability to move or speak. Whilst a considerable amount has been learnt since Jennett and Plum coined the term 'vegetative state', the assessment process remains largely unchanged; conducted at the bedside, using behavioural assessment tools, which are susceptible to environmental and physiological factors. This has created a situation where the rate of misdiagnosis is unacceptably high (up to 43%). In order to address these problems, various functional brain imaging paradigms, which do not rely upon the patient's ability to move or speak, have been proposed as a source of additional information to inform the diagnostic decision making process. Although accumulated evidence from brain imaging, particularly functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), has been encouraging, the empirical evidence is still based on relatively small numbers of patients. It remains unclear whether brain imaging is capable of informing the diagnosis beyond the behavioural assessment and whether brain imaging has any prognostic utility. In this study, we describe the functional brain imaging findings from a group of 41 patients with disorders of consciousness, who undertook a hierarchical speech processing task. We found, contrary to the clinical impression of a specialist team using behavioural assessment tools, that two patients referred to the study with a diagnosis of vegetative state did in fact demonstrate neural correlates of speech comprehension when assessed using functional brain imaging. These fMRI findings were found to have no association with the patient's behavioural presentation at the time of investigation and thus provided additional diagnostic

  6. Profiles of Personal Resiliency for Normative and Clinical Samples of Youth Assessed by the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents[TM

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prince-Embury, Sandra; Steer, Robert A.

    2010-01-01

    Cluster analyses with the three global scores of the Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents[TM] (RSCA) were used to determine personal resiliency profiles within normative (641) and outpatient clinical (285) samples of youth aged 9 to 18 years. Normative and clinical profiles were compared with each other and the clinical profiles were…

  7. High-definition optical coherence tomography - an aid to clinical practice and research in dermatology.

    PubMed

    Cao, Taige; Tey, Hong Liang

    2015-09-01

    At present, beyond clinical assessment, the diagnosis of skin diseases is primarily made histologically. However, skin biopsies have many disadvantages, including pain, scarring, risk of infection, and sampling error. With recent advances in skin imaging technology, the clinical use of imaging methods for the practical management of skin diseases has become an option. The in vivo high-definition optical coherence tomography (HD-OCT) has recently been developed and commercialized (Skintell; Agfa, Belgium). Compared with conventional OCT, it has a higher resolution; compared with reflectance confocal microscopy, it has a shorter time for image acquisition as well as a greater penetration depth and a larger field of view. HD-OCT is promising but much work is still required to develop it from a research tool to a valuable adjunct for the noninvasive diagnosis of skin lesions. Substantial work has been done to identify HD-OCT features in various diseases but interpretation can be time-consuming and tedious. Projects aimed at automating these processes and improving image quality are currently under way.

  8. Clinical effectiveness of dolutegravir in the treatment of HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Taha, Huda; Das, Archik; Das, Satyajit

    2015-01-01

    Dolutegravir (DTG) is a second-generation integrase strand transfer inhibitor (INSTI), which has now been licensed to be used in different countries including the UK. Earlier studies have demonstrated that DTG when used with nucleoside backbone in treatment-naïve and - experienced patients has been well tolerated and demonstrated virological suppression comparable to other INSTIs and superiority against other first-line agents, including efavirenz and boosted protease inhibitors. Like other INSTIs, DTG uses separate metabolic pathways compared to other antiretrovirals and is a minor substrate for CYP-450. It does not appear to have a significant interaction with drugs, which uses the CYP-450 system. Nonetheless, it uses renal solute transporters that may potentially inhibit the transport of other drugs and can have an effect on the elimination of other drugs. However, the impact of this mechanism appears to be very minimal and insignificant clinically. The side effect profiles of DTG are similar to raltegravir and have been found to be well tolerated. DTG has a long plasma half-life and is suitable for once daily use without the need for a boosting agent. DTG has all the potential to be used as a first-line drug in combination with other nucleoside backbones, especially in the form of a single tablet in combination with abacavir and lamivudine. The purpose of this review article is to present the summary of the available key information about the clinical usefulness of DTG in the treatment of HIV infection. PMID:26491363

  9. Linking HIV-positive adolescents to care in 15 different clinics across the United States: creating solutions to address structural barriers for linkage to care.

    PubMed

    Philbin, Morgan M; Tanner, Amanda E; Duval, Anna; Ellen, Jonathan; Kapogiannis, Bill; Fortenberry, J Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Linkage to care is a critical corollary to expanded HIV testing, but many adolescents are not successfully linked to care, in part due to fragmented care systems. Through a collaboration of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Adolescent Trials Network (ATN), a linkage to care outreach worker was provided to ATN clinics. Factors related to linkage were explored to better understand how to improve retention rates and health outcomes for HIV-positive adolescents. We conducted 124 interviews with staff at 15 Adolescent Trials Network clinics to better understand linkage to care processes, barriers, and facilitators. Content analysis was conducted focusing on structural barriers to care and potential solutions, specifically at the macro-, meso-, and micro-levels. Macro-level barriers included navigating health insurance policies, transportation to appointments, and ease of collecting and sharing client-level contact information between testing agencies, local health departments and clinics; meso-level barriers included lack of youth friendliness within clinic space and staff, and duplication of linkage services; micro-level barriers included adolescents' readiness for care and adolescent developmental capacity. Staff initiated solutions included providing transportation for appointments and funding clinic visits and tests with a range of grants and clinic funds while waiting for insurance approval. However, such solutions were often ad hoc and partial, using micro-level solutions to address macro-level barriers. Comprehensive initiatives to improve linkage to care are needed to address barriers to HIV-care for adolescents, whose unique developmental needs make accessing care particularly challenging. Matching the level of structural solution to the level of structural barriers (i.e., macro-level with macro-level), such as creating policy to address needed youth healthcare entitlements versus covering

  10. "Teens Talk Healthy Weight": the impact of a motivational digital video disc on parental knowledge of obesity-related diseases in an adolescent clinic.

    PubMed

    Windham, Meghan E; Hastings, Elisabeth S; Anding, Roberta; Hergenroeder, Albert C; Escobar-Chaves, Soledad Liliana; Wiemann, Constance M

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the impact of a 7-minute educational and motivational weight-management digital video disc (DVD) that uses real patient/parent testimonials and provider-patient interactions, on adolescent and parent knowledge of obesity-related diseases; readiness, motivation, and self-efficacy to lose weight; connectedness to care provider; and likelihood of return to clinic for follow-up care. A randomized controlled trial was conducted among 40 overweight/obese adolescent participants (22.5% male, 77.5% female, mean age=15.43 years) and their parents (n=38) who visited a referral-only adolescent clinic for the first time from October 2009 to March 2010. Adolescents were randomly assigned by a research assistant to standard care alone or standard care plus DVD. Standard care (protocol-driven medical and nutritional assessment and counseling) was provided to all adolescents by a registered dietitian nutritionist and physician or nurse practitioner. Adolescents in the intervention group also viewed the DVD. Adolescents and parents completed assessments pre- and post-clinic visit. Repeated measures analysis of covariance was used to evaluate group differences, while controlling for race/ethnicity and age. Parents who viewed the DVD experienced greater improvements in obesity-related disease knowledge than parents who did not view the DVD. Adolescents in both groups improved on measures of motivation to lose weight and dieting self-efficacy, based on pre and post-test questionnaires. A 7-minute educational and motivational DVD helped improve parent knowledge, but was not more powerful than standard care alone in changing other weight-related outcomes in this adolescent clinic. Because it led to increased parental knowledge, incorporating the DVD into clinical practice could also allow more time for health providers to focus on specific obesity-related treatment/education. Future research might examine whether the DVD has more utility in

  11. A 5-year retrospective study of demographic, anamnestic, and clinical factors related to psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescent patients

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cimino, Nina; Di Pietro, Elena; Pollutri, Gabriella; Neviani, Vittoria; Ferri, Paola

    2016-01-01

    Background Psychiatric emergencies of children and adolescents have greatly increased during the last years, but this phenomenon has not been studied in detail. The aim of this study was to analyze the correlation between acute psychiatric hospitalizations of adolescents and selected variables to highlight risk factors for psychiatric emergencies. Methods This retrospective research was conducted in the acute psychiatric public ward, Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment (SPDT), and in the residential facility for adolescents, “The Medlar”, located in Modena. The sample was constituted by all adolescent patients (n=101, age range 14–18) who had acute hospitalizations (n=140) in SPDT and had been successively transferred to “The Medlar” (n=83), from February 2, 2010 to January 31, 2015. From clinical charts, we extracted demographic and anamnestic characteristics of patients and clinical variables related to hospitalizations. Data were statistically analyzed. Results Sixty-one percent of our patients lived with one divorced parent, with adoptive or immigrant family, or in institutions; 51% had experienced stressful events during childhood; 81% had a normal intellective level, but only 6% presented regular school performance. Parental psychiatric illness was negatively related, in a statistically significantly way, with onset age of adolescent mental disorders (coefficient −2.28, 95% confidence interval [CI]: −3.53 to 1.01, P<0.001, single linear regression; odds ratio: 4.39, 95% CI: 1.43–13.47, P<0.010, single logistic regression). The most frequent reasons for admission were aggressive behavior in males and suicide risk in females (P=0.002). The most frequent psychiatric diagnosis at SPDT discharge was “conduct disorder”, more frequent in males, followed by “adjustment disorder”, more frequent in females (P=0.001). In SPDT, the adolescent hospitalizations progressively increased fivefold at the end of the observation period

  12. Clinical and Cognitive Characteristics Associated with Mathematics Problem Solving in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Tasha M; Beck, Jonathan S; Iosif, Ana-Maria; McCauley, James B; Gilhooly, Leslie J; Matter, John C; Solomon, Marjorie

    2016-04-01

    Mathematics achievement in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has been understudied. However, the ability to solve applied math problems is associated with academic achievement, everyday problem-solving abilities, and vocational outcomes. The paucity of research on math achievement in ASD may be partly explained by the widely-held belief that most individuals with ASD are mathematically gifted, despite emerging evidence to the contrary. The purpose of the study was twofold: to assess the relative proportions of youth with ASD who demonstrate giftedness versus disability on applied math problems, and to examine which cognitive (i.e., perceptual reasoning, verbal ability, working memory) and clinical (i.e., test anxiety) characteristics best predict achievement on applied math problems in ASD relative to typically developing peers. Twenty-seven high-functioning adolescents with ASD and 27 age- and Full Scale IQ-matched typically developing controls were assessed on standardized measures of math problem solving, perceptual reasoning, verbal ability, and test anxiety. Results indicated that 22% of the ASD sample evidenced a mathematics learning disability, while only 4% exhibited mathematical giftedness. The parsimonious linear regression model revealed that the strongest predictor of math problem solving was perceptual reasoning, followed by verbal ability and test anxiety, then diagnosis of ASD. These results inform our theories of math ability in ASD and highlight possible targets of intervention for students with ASD struggling with mathematics.

  13. Compensation for research-related injury in NIH-sponsored HIV/AIDS clinical trials in Africa.

    PubMed

    Mamotte, Nicole; Wassenaar, Douglas; Singh, Nivedhna

    2013-02-01

    Concern has been voiced in the research ethics literature that under U.S. federal regulations U.S. sponsors, particularly the NIH, are not required to provide compensation for the treatment of research-related injury for trial participants or to allow grant funds to be used by investigators for appropriate insurance. This is problematic in developing country contexts because most participants are unlikely to have health insurance, resulting in overburdened and under-resourced health systems in many developing countries being responsible for providing care and treatment for research-related injury. This study provides preliminary insight into how respondent principal investigators of NIH-sponsored HIV/AIDS clinical trials in Africa and African research ethics committees deal with compensation for research-related injury. The majority of PIs surveyed provided free treatment for research-related injury, but few provided other forms of financial reparation to participants. The study also found that half of the PIs surveyed indicated that NIH funds were used for compensation, highlighting a contradiction between literature and practice. The majority of REC chairs surveyed indicated that their RECs routinely reviewed compensation plans for research-related injury and that their ethics application forms specifically requested information on compensation. Findings from one southern African country revealed that NIH funds were not used to provide treatment and/or financial reparation for research-related injury. Instead, PIs from this country relied on the government or the individual research participant (and/or their medical aid/health insurer) to cover the costs of research-related injury. The findings are discussed in the light of the recent (December 2011) U.S. Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethics report which recommends that research participants are morally entitled to compensation for research-related injury.

  14. Implementing Dialectical Behavior Therapy with Adolescents and Their Families in a Community Outpatient Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodberry, Kristen A.; Popenoe, Ellen J.

    2008-01-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT), an empirically supported treatment for adult women diagnosed with borderline personality disorder (BPD), has been increasingly adapted for use with adolescents across a variety of settings. This article describes a community-based application of DBT principles and strategies for adolescents and their families.…

  15. Association of Educational Attainment and Adolescent Substance Use Disorder in a Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apantaku-Olajide, Tunde; James, Philip D.; Smyth, Bobby P.

    2014-01-01

    This study explores substance use, psychosocial problems, and the relationships to educational status in 193 adolescents (school dropouts, 63; alternative education, 46; mainstream students, 84) who attended a substance abuse treatment facility in Dublin, Ireland, within a 42-month period. For each adolescent, data on demographics, family…

  16. Capoeira as a Clinical Intervention: Addressing Adolescent Aggression with Brazilian Martial Arts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burt, Isaac; Butler, S. Kent

    2011-01-01

    Aggression in adolescents is harmful and emotionally devastating to youth and surrounding communities. This article integrates martial arts and therapeutic principles into a culturally sensitive model that cultivates change in the aggressive behaviors of disenfranchised adolescents. The art form of Capoeira is proposed for promoting positive…

  17. Depressive Symptoms and Clinical Status during the Treatment of Adolescent Suicide Attempters (TASA) Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vitiello, Benedetto; Brent, David A.; Greenhill, Laurence L.; Emslie, Graham; Wells, Karen; Walkup, John T.; Stanley, Barbara; Bukstein, Oscar; Kennard, Betsy D.; Compton, Scott; Coffey, Barbara; Cwik, Mary F.; Posner, Kelly; Wagner, Ann; March, John S.; Riddle, Mark; Goldstein, Tina; Curry, John; Capasso, Lisa; Mayes, Taryn; Shen, Sa; Gugga, S. Sonia; Turner, J. Blake; Barnett, Shannon; Zelazny, Jamie

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine the course of depression during the treatment of adolescents with depression who had recently attempted suicide. Method: Adolescents (N = 124), ages 12 to 18 years, with a 90-day history of suicide attempt, a current diagnosis of depressive disorder (96.0% had major depressive disorder), and a Children's Depression Rating…

  18. Adolescents and the Media: Medical and Psychological Impact. Developmental Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry, Volume 33.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strasburger, Victor C.

    Aimed at primary care physicians and nurses, educators, and parents, this book reviews media effects on adolescent behavior and psychology. The book notes that television is a powerful medium to which adolescents are uniquely susceptible and how studies have shown television's ability to shape social attitudes. Theories of how television affects…

  19. Factors facilitating a national quality registry to aid clinical quality improvement: findings of a national survey

    PubMed Central

    Eldh, Ann Catrine; Wallin, Lars; Fredriksson, Mio; Vengberg, Sofie; Winblad, Ulrika; Halford, Christina; Dahlström, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    Objectives While national quality registries (NQRs) are suggested to provide opportunities for systematic follow-up and learning opportunities, and thus clinical improvements, features in registries and contexts triggering such processes are not fully known. This study focuses on one of the world's largest stroke registries, the Swedish NQR Riksstroke, investigating what aspects of the registry and healthcare organisations facilitate or hinder the use of registry data in clinical quality improvement. Methods Following particular qualitative studies, we performed a quantitative survey in an exploratory sequential design. The survey, including 50 items on context, processes and the registry, was sent to managers, physicians and nurses engaged in Riksstroke in all 72 Swedish stroke units. Altogether, 242 individuals were presented with the survey; 163 responded, representing all but two units. Data were analysed descriptively and through multiple linear regression. Results A majority (88%) considered Riksstroke data to facilitate detection of stroke care improvement needs and acknowledged that their data motivated quality improvements (78%). The use of Riksstroke for quality improvement initiatives was associated (R2=0.76) with ‘Colleagues’ call for local results’ (p=<0.001), ‘Management Request of Registry data’ (p=<0.001), and it was said to be ‘Simple to explain the results to colleagues’ (p=0.02). Using stepwise regression, ‘Colleagues’ call for local results’ was identified as the most influential factor. Yet, while 73% reported that managers request registry data, only 39% reported that their colleagues call for the unit's Riksstroke results. Conclusions While an NQR like Riksstroke demonstrates improvement needs and motivates stakeholders to make progress, local stroke care staff and managers need to engage to keep the momentum going in terms of applying registry data when planning, performing and evaluating quality initiatives. PMID

  20. A prospective, randomized clinical trial of antiretroviral therapies on carotid wall thickness: AIDS Clinical Trial Group Study A5260s

    PubMed Central

    Stein, James H.; Ribaudo, Heather J.; Hodis, Howard N.; Brown, Todd T.; Tran, Thuy Tien T.; Yan, Mingzhu; Brodell, Elizabeth Lauer; Kelesidis, Theodore; McComsey, Grace A.; Dube, Michael P.; Murphy, Robert L.; Currier, Judith S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective This article compares the effects of initiating three contemporary antiretroviral therapy (ART) regimens on progression of carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT) over 3 years. Design Randomized clinical trial. Setting Multicenter (26 institutions). Patients ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals (n = 328) without known cardiovascular disease or diabetes mellitus. Intervention Random assignment to tenofovir/emtricitabine along with atazanavir/ritonavir (ATV/r), darunavir/ritonavir (DRV/r), or raltegravir (RAL). Main outcome measures Right-sided carotid IMT was evaluated by B-mode ultra-sonography before ART initiation, and then after 48, 96, and 144 weeks. Comparisons of yearly rates of change in carotid IMT used mixed-effects linear regression models that permitted not only evaluation of the effects of ART on carotid IMT progression but also how ART-associated changes in traditional risk factors, bilirubin, and markers of HIV infection were associated carotid IMT progression. Results HIV-1 RNA suppression rates were high in all arms (>85%) over 144 weeks. Modest increases in triglycerides and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were observed in the protease inhibitor containing arms compared with decreases with RAL. In contrast, carotid IMT progressed more slowly on ATV/r [8.2, 95% confidence interval (5.6, 10.8) μm/year] than DRV/r [12.9 (10.3, 15.5) μm/year, P = 0.013]; changes with RAL were intermediate [10.7 (9.2, 12.2) μm/year, P = 0.15 vs. ATV/r; P = 0.31 vs. DRV/r]. Bilirubin and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels appeared to influence carotid IMT progression rates. Conclusion In ART-naïve HIV-infected individuals at low cardiovascular disease risk, carotid IMT progressed more slowly in participants initiating ATV/r than those initiating DRV/r, with intermediate changes associated with RAL. This effect may be due, in part, to hyperbilirubinemia. PMID:26372383

  1. The clinical usefulness of the new LPE specifier for subtyping adolescents with conduct disorder in the DSM 5.

    PubMed

    Jambroes, Tijs; Jansen, Lucres M C; Vermeiren, Robert R J M; Doreleijers, Theo A H; Colins, Olivier F; Popma, Arne

    2016-08-01

    In DSM 5, conduct disorder (CD) has been expanded with a new specifier 'with Limited Prosocial Emotions' (LPE) in addition to the age-of-onset (AoO) subtyping, and is thought to identify a severe antisocial subgroup of CD. However, research in clinical practice has been scarce. Therefore, the current study will examine differences in clinical symptoms between subtypes of CD, based on both subtyping schemes. Subsequently, it will investigate whether the LPE specifier explains unique variance in aggression, added to the AoO subtyping. A sample of 145 adolescents with CD (51 % male, mean age 15.0) from a closed treatment institution participated in this study. CD diagnoses and AoO subtype were assessed using a structured diagnostic interview. The LPE specifier was assessed using the callous-unemotional dimension of the Youth Psychopathy Traits Inventory (YPI). Self-reported proactive and reactive aggression, rule-breaking behavior and internalizing problems within the subtypes were compared. Youth with childhood-onset CD and LPE showed significantly more aggression than adolescent-onset CD without LPE (proactive aggression: F = 3.1, p < 0.05, reactive aggression: F = 3.7, p < 0.05). Hierarchical regression revealed that the LPE specifier uniquely explained 7 % of the variance in reactive aggression, additionally to the AoO subtyping. For proactive aggression, the interaction between AoO and the LPE added 4.5 % to the explained variance. Although the LPE specifier may help to identify a more aggressive subtype of CD in adolescents, the incremental utility seems to be limited. Therefore, clinical relevance of the LPE specifier in high-risk adolescent samples still needs to be investigated thoroughly.

  2. The index line as a new aid in clinical and forensic toxicology.

    PubMed

    von Clarmann, M; Mathes, G; Solfrank, G; Bystrich, E

    1978-04-27

    On behalf of the German Federal Ministry for Research and Technology, we investigated the use of electronic data processing for clinical toxicological purposes. Initially, sufficient funds were available for a comprehensive approach to the problem and programs covering the following areas were established: 1. A casuistic data program; 2. an identification program for wild fruits; 3. a program for the identification of tablets by their shapes. Due to a subsequent lack of funds, it was necessary to develop a partial solution: this solution is what we call the Index Line. The Index Line--limited data on poisonings--should enable the user to receive information by telex from the German Institute for Medical Documentation and Information, i.e., information on "who has what, where". As a first step the continuous Index Line registration of all cases of poisoning recorded at the poison control centers in Munich, Freiburg, Hamburg, and Nürnberg as well as at the State Institute for Food, Pharmaceutical and Forensic Chemistry in Berlin was founded in 1975. To participate in the program, complete instructions are necessary.

  3. Research on Clinical Preventive Services for Adolescents and Young Adults: Where Are We and Where Do We Need to Go?

    PubMed

    Harris, Sion K; Aalsma, Matthew C; Weitzman, Elissa R; Garcia-Huidobro, Diego; Wong, Charlene; Hadland, Scott E; Santelli, John; Park, M Jane; Ozer, Elizabeth M

    2017-03-01

    We reviewed research regarding system- and visit-level strategies to enhance clinical preventive service delivery and quality for adolescents and young adults. Despite professional consensus on recommended services for adolescents, a strong evidence base for services for young adults, and improved financial access to services with the Affordable Care Act's provisions, receipt of preventive services remains suboptimal. Further research that builds off successful models of linking traditional and community clinics is needed to improve access to care for all youth. To optimize the clinical encounter, promising clinician-focused strategies to improve delivery of preventive services include screening and decision support tools, particularly when integrated into electronic medical record systems and supported by training and feedback. Although results have been mixed, interventions have moved beyond increasing service delivery to demonstrating behavior change. Research on emerging technology-such as gaming platforms, mobile phone applications, and wearable devices-suggests opportunities to expand clinicians' reach; however, existing research is based on limited clinical settings and populations. Improved monitoring systems and further research are needed to examine preventive services facilitators and ensure that interventions are effective across the range of clinical settings where youth receive preventive care, across multiple populations, including young adults, and for more vulnerable populations with less access to quality care.

  4. Teaching AIDS.

    PubMed

    Short, R V

    1989-06-01

    This article reviews a peer group Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) educational program at a university in Australia. Studies in the US have shown that most adolescents, although sexually active, do not believe they are likely to become infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus, and therefore do not attempt to modify their sexual behavior. A 1st step in educating students is to introduce them to condoms and impress upon them the fact that condoms should be used at the beginning of all sexual relationships, whether homosexual or heterosexual. In this program 3rd year medical students were targeted, as they are effective communicators and disseminators of information to the rest of the student body. After class members blow up condoms, giving them a chance to handle various brands and observe the varying degrees of strength, statistical evidence about the contraceptive failure rate of condoms (0.6-14.7 per 100 women-years) is discussed. Spermicides, such as nonoxynol-9 used in conjunction with condoms, are also discussed, as are condoms for women, packaging and marketing of condoms, including those made from latex and from the caecum of sheep, the latter condoms being of questionable effectiveness in preventing transmission of the virus. The care of terminal AIDS cases and current global and national statistics on AIDS are presented. The program also includes cash prizes for the best student essays on condom use, the distribution of condoms, condom key rings and T-shirts, and a student-run safe sex stand during orientation week. All of these activities are intended to involve students and attract the interest of the undergraduate community. Questionnaires administered to students at the end of the course revealed that the lectures were received favorably. Questionnaires administered to new medical and English students attending orientation week revealed that 72% of students thought the stand was a good idea and 81% and 83%, respectively found it

  5. Skin and Mucocutaneous Manifestations: Useful Clinical Predictors of HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Shashi; Arora, Usha

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The HIV infection is associated with several dermatological conditions which may be the first pointer towards the existence of HIV. These may present with unusual and atypical manifestations in the course of the HIV infection. Keeping this in mind, the seroprevalence of HIV in these persons and the spectrum of the skin and the mucocutaneous lesions in the HIV positive patients was studied. Methods The current prospective study was conducted over a period of 3 years (2006-2008). A total of 604 persons who had any kind of skin and mucocutaneous infections were screened for the HIV infection as per the NACO guidelines after recording their clinical and epidemiological profiles. Results Out of the 604 patients who were screened, 90(14.90%) were seropositive for the HIV-I antibodies and none was positive for the HIV-2 antibodies. Seventy three point thirty three percent 73.33 of the seropositive patients were in the age group of 15-40 years, with a male-female ratio of 1:1.05. The heterosexual route was the most common mode of transmission (86.6%).A wide range of infectious and noninfectious lesions were observed. In the HIV seropositive patients, oral candidiasis (32.22%) was the most common infectious disease which was observed, followed by herpes zoster (13.33%), genital warts (7.77%) and genital herpes (6.66%). The most common noninfectious manifestation was seborrhoic dermatitis (8.88%), followed by pruritic papular eruptions (7.77%). Conclusion As there is a high prevalence of the HIV infection in patients who have skin and mucocutaneous disorders, the doctors, during the investigation of these patients, must have a high level of suspicion for the HIV infection in their mind. An early detection of HIV optimizes the chemoprophylaxis for many opportunistic mucocutaneous disorders. PMID:23373031

  6. A clinic-based youth development program to reduce sexual risk behaviors among adolescent girls: prime time pilot study.

    PubMed

    Sieving, Renee E; Bernat, Debra H; Resnick, Michael D; Oliphant, Jennifer; Pettingell, Sandra; Plowman, Shari; Skay, Carol

    2012-07-01

    Multifaceted, sustained efforts are needed to reduce early pregnancy and sexually transmitted diseases among high-risk adolescents. An important area for research is testing youth development interventions offered through clinic settings, where access to high-risk adolescents is plentiful and few efforts have rigorously evaluated a dual approach of building protective factors while addressing risk. This article presents findings from a pilot study of Prime Time, a clinic-based youth development intervention to reduce sexual risk behaviors among girls at risk for early pregnancy. Girls aged 13 to 17 years meeting specified risk criteria were assigned to Prime Time treatment groups. The Prime Time intervention included a combination of case management services and peer leadership groups. Participants completed self-report surveys at baseline, 12 and 18 months following enrollment. At 12 months, the intervention group reported significantly fewer sexual partners than the control group. At 18 months, the intervention group reported significantly more consistent condom use with trends toward more consistent hormonal and dual method use. Dose-response analyses suggested that relatively high levels of exposure to a youth development intervention were needed to change contraceptive use behaviors among adolescents at risk for early pregnancy. Given promising findings, further testing of the Prime Time intervention is warranted.

  7. Developmentally informed research on the effectiveness of clinical trials: a primer for assessing how developmental issues may influence treatment responses among adolescents with alcohol use problems.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Eric F

    2008-04-01

    The goal of this article is to familiarize readers with the adolescent developmental issues and processes most likely to affect responses to treatment for alcohol use problems. Although the need for research that blends developmental science and treatment outcome research is widely acknowledged, scant information exists about developmentally informed approaches to treatment research with alcohol-abusing teens. Exactly how developmental issues may influence treatment responses among adolescents with alcohol use problems remains an open question. In the hope of moving developmentally informed research forward, this article reports findings from a literature review regarding the degree to which developmental issues and processes have been considered in adolescent alcohol treatment research. Moreover, promising concepts and methods from applied developmental science are discussed, as are various developmental processes and transitions that may influence adolescent risk behavior. Finally, guidance is provided regarding how applied developmental science conceptualizations and methods may be incorporated successfully into randomized, clinical trials with adolescents with alcohol use problems.

  8. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Info » Hearing, Ear Infections, and Deafness Hearing Aids On this page: What is a hearing aid? ... the ear through a speaker. How can hearing aids help? Hearing aids are primarily useful in improving ...

  9. Progestin only contraceptives and their use in adolescents: clinical options and medical indications.

    PubMed

    Burkett, Amy M; Hewitt, Geri D

    2005-10-01

    Some adolescents use progestin only contraceptive products because of an underlying medical condition; others simply prefer them. Current options include pills, a long -acting intramuscular injection, an implant, and a progestin-releasing intrauterine device. Also available is Plan B, a progestin only emergency contraceptive option. Although these products vary in efficacy, they are generally safe and well tolerated by adolescents. The implants and intramuscular injections are particularly well suited for adolescent use because of their need for little compliance, well-tolerated adverse effect profile, and excellent efficacy rates.

  10. Reliability and Validity Study of Clinical Ultrasound Imaging on Lateral Curvature of Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q.; Li, M.; Lou, Edmond H. M.; Wong, M. S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-ionizing radiation imaging assessment has been advocated for the patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). As one of the radiation-free methods, ultrasound imaging has gained growing attention in scoliosis assessment over the past decade. The center of laminae (COL) method has been proposed to measure the spinal curvature in the coronal plane of ultrasound image. However, the reliability and validity of this ultrasound method have not been validated in the clinical setting. Objectives To evaluate the reliability and validity of clinical ultrasound imaging on lateral curvature measurements of AIS with their corresponding magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) measurements. Methods Thirty curves (ranged 10.2°–68.2°) from sixteen patients with AIS were eligible for this study. The ultrasound scan was performed using a 3-D ultrasound unit within the same morning of MRI examination. Two researchers were involved in data collection of these two examinations. The COL method was used to measure the coronal curvature in ultrasound image, compared with the Cobb method in MRI. The intra- and inter-rater reliability of the COL method was evaluated by intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC). The validity of this method was analyzed by paired Student’s t-test, Bland–Altman statistics and Pearson correlation coefficient. The level of significance was set as 0.05. Results The COL method showed high intra- and inter-rater reliabilities (both with ICC (2, K) >0.9, p<0.05) to measure the coronal curvature. Compared with Cobb method, COL method showed no significant difference (p<0.05) when measuring coronal curvature. Furthermore, Bland-Altman method demonstrated an agreement between these two methods, and Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) was high (r>0.9, p<0.05). Conclusion The ultrasound imaging could provide a reliable and valid measurement of spinal curvature in the coronal plane using the COL method. Further research is needed to validate the

  11. Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma in children and adolescents--a comprehensive review of biology, clinical course and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Ananth; Daw, Stephen

    2012-11-01

    Nodular lymphocyte predominant Hodgkin lymphoma (nLPHL) is a unique variant of Hodgkin lymphoma with an overall good prognosis. It is conspicuously different from classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) and is now recognized as distinctive form of B cell lymphoma. Although it has an indolent clinical course, it has a propensity for multiple and often late relapses. Although the majority of children present with early stage disease and without B symptoms, treatment strategy has, until recently, been identical to that used for cHL. This approach is excessively toxic as it predisposes these children and adolescents to serious late effects including end organ damage to heart, gonads, lungs, thyroid and second malignant neoplasms. The aim of this article is to review the published literature on the treatment outcomes of nLPHL in affected children and adolescents, and discuss the options for treatment including surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and targeted anti-CD 20 antibody therapy.

  12. [Consensus document on the clinical use of melatonin in children and adolescents with sleep-onset insomnia].

    PubMed

    Pin Arboledas, G; Merino Andreu, M; de la Calle Cabrera, T; Hidalgo Vicario, M I; Rodríguez Hernández, P J; Soto Insuga, V; Madrid Pérez, J A

    2014-11-01

    Sleep problems are highly prevalent among our children and adolescents. Its treatment is mainly based on cognitive behavioural therapies and habit modification procedures. However, the use of sleep promoting drugs and substances is widespread without being supported by clinical guidelines. Exogenous melatonin is a neurohormone marketed as a nutritional supplement that is being increasingly used in the management of sleep problems, and with no control over its use. The consensus document is presented on the use of melatonin in sleep-onset insomnia prepared by representatives of the Spanish Paediatric Association, the Spanish Society of Sleep, the Spanish Society of Paediatric Outpatients and Primary Care, the Spanish Society for Adolescent Medicine, the Spanish Society of Child Psychiatry, and the Spanish Society of Paediatric Neurology.

  13. MACVIA clinical decision algorithm in adolescents and adults with allergic rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Jean; Schünemann, Holger J; Hellings, Peter W; Arnavielhe, Sylvie; Bachert, Claus; Bedbrook, Anna; Bergmann, Karl-Christian; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia; Brozek, Jan; Calderon, Moises; Canonica, G Walter; Casale, Thomas B; Chavannes, Niels H; Cox, Linda; Chrystyn, Henry; Cruz, Alvaro A; Dahl, Ronald; De Carlo, Giuseppe; Demoly, Pascal; Devillier, Phillipe; Dray, Gérard; Fletcher, Monica; Fokkens, Wytske J; Fonseca, Joao; Gonzalez-Diaz, Sandra N; Grouse, Lawrence; Keil, Thomas; Kuna, Piotr; Larenas-Linnemann, Désirée; Lodrup Carlsen, Karin C; Meltzer, Eli O; Mullol, Jaoquim; Muraro, Antonella; Naclerio, Robert N; Palkonen, Susanna; Papadopoulos, Nikolaos G; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Price, David; Ryan, Dermot; Samolinski, Boleslaw; Scadding, Glenis K; Sheikh, Aziz; Spertini, François; Valiulis, Arunas; Valovirta, Erkka; Walker, Samantha; Wickman, Magnus; Yorgancioglu, Arzu; Haahtela, Tari; Zuberbier, Torsten

    2016-08-01

    The selection of pharmacotherapy for patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) depends on several factors, including age, prominent symptoms, symptom severity, control of AR, patient preferences, and cost. Allergen exposure and the resulting symptoms vary, and treatment adjustment is required. Clinical decision support systems (CDSSs) might be beneficial for the assessment of disease control. CDSSs should be based on the best evidence and algorithms to aid patients and health care professionals to jointly determine treatment and its step-up or step-down strategy depending on AR control. Contre les MAladies Chroniques pour un VIeillissement Actif en Languedoc-Roussillon (MACVIA-LR [fighting chronic diseases for active and healthy ageing]), one of the reference sites of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing, has initiated an allergy sentinel network (the MACVIA-ARIA Sentinel Network). A CDSS is currently being developed to optimize AR control. An algorithm developed by consensus is presented in this article. This algorithm should be confirmed by appropriate trials.

  14. Associating Drugs, Targets and Clinical Outcomes into an Integrated Network Affords a New Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing

    PubMed Central

    Oprea, Tudor I.; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Ursu, Oleg; Yang, Jeremy J.; Taboureau, Olivier; Mathias, Stephen L.; Kouskoumvekaki, lrene; Sklar, Larry A.; Bologa, Cristian G.

    2012-01-01

    Finding new uses for old drugs is a strategy embraced by the pharmaceutical industry, with increasing participation from the academic sector. Drug repurposing efforts focus on identifying novel modes of action, but not in a systematic manner. With intensive data mining and curation, we aim to apply bio- and cheminformatics tools using the DRUGS database, containing 3,837 unique small molecules annotated on 1,750 proteins. These are likely to serve as drug targets and antitargets (i.e., associated with side effects, SE). The academic community, the pharmaceutical sector and clinicians alike could benefit from an integrated, semantic-web compliant computer-aided drug repurposing (CADR) effort, one that would enable deep data mining of associations between approved drugs (D), targets (T), clinical outcomes (CO) and SE. We report preliminary results from text mining and multivariate statistics, based on 7,684 approved drug labels, ADL (Dailymed) via text mining. From the ADL corresponding to 988 unique drugs, the “adverse reactions” section was mapped onto 174 SE, then clustered via principal component analysis into a 5x5 self-organizing map that was integrated into a Cytoscape network of SE-D-T-CO. This type of data can be used to streamline drug repurposing and may result in novel insights that can lead to the identification of novel drug actions. PMID:22287994

  15. Does clinical examination aid in the diagnosis of urinary tract infections in women? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Clinicians should be aware of the diagnostic values of various symptoms, signs and antecedents. This information is particularly important in primary care settings, where sophisticated diagnostic approaches are not always feasible. The aim of the study is to determine the probability that various symptoms, signs, antecedents and tests predict urinary tract infection (UTI) in women. Methods We conducted a systematic search of the MEDLINE and EMBASE databases to identify articles published in all languages through until December 2008. We particularly focused on studies that examined the diagnostic accuracy of at least one symptom, sign or patient antecedent related to the urinary tract. We included studies where urine culture, a gold standard, was preformed by primary care providers on female subjects aged at least 14 years. A meta-analysis of the likelihood ratio was performed to assess variables related to the urinary tract symptoms. Results Of the 1, 212 articles identified, 11 met the selection criteria. Dysuria, urgency, nocturia, sexual activity and urgency with dysuria were weak predictors of urinary tract infection, whereas increases in vaginal discharge and suprapubic pain were weak predictors of the absence of infection. Nitrites or leukocytes in the dipstick test are the only findings that clearly favored a diagnosis of UTI. Conclusions Clinical findings do not aid in the diagnosis of UTI among women who present with urinary symptoms. Vaginal discharge is a weak indicator of the absence of infection. The urine dipstick test was the most reliable tool for detecting UTI. PMID:21985418

  16. Associating Drugs, Targets and Clinical Outcomes into an Integrated Network Affords a New Platform for Computer-Aided Drug Repurposing.

    PubMed

    Oprea, Tudor I; Nielsen, Sonny Kim; Ursu, Oleg; Yang, Jeremy J; Taboureau, Olivier; Mathias, Stephen L; Kouskoumvekaki, Lrene; Sklar, Larry A; Bologa, Cristian G

    2011-03-14

    Finding new uses for old drugs is a strategy embraced by the pharmaceutical industry, with increasing participation from the academic sector. Drug repurposing efforts focus on identifying novel modes of action, but not in a systematic manner. With intensive data mining and curation, we aim to apply bio- and cheminformatics tools using the DRUGS database, containing 3,837 unique small molecules annotated on 1,750 proteins. These are likely to serve as drug targets and antitargets (i.e., associated with side effects, SE). The academic community, the pharmaceutical sector and clinicians alike could benefit from an integrated, semantic-web compliant computer-aided drug repurposing (CADR) effort, one that would enable deep data mining of associations between approved drugs (D), targets (T), clinical outcomes (CO) and SE. We report preliminary results from text mining and multivariate statistics, based on 7,684 approved drug labels, ADL (Dailymed) via text mining. From the ADL corresponding to 988 unique drugs, the "adverse reactions" section was mapped onto 174 SE, then clustered via principal component analysis into a 5x5 self-organizing map that was integrated into a Cytoscape network of SE-D-T-CO. This type of data can be used to streamline drug repurposing and may result in novel insights that can lead to the identification of novel drug actions.

  17. Triarchic dimensions of psychopathy in young adulthood: Associations with clinical and physiological measures after accounting for adolescent psychopathic traits.

    PubMed

    Kyranides, Melina Nicole; Fanti, Kostas A; Sikki, Maria; Patrick, Christopher J

    2017-04-01

    This study examined associations of psychopathy facets of boldness, meanness, and disinhibition with clinically relevant variables and physiological reactivity to affective stimuli. These associations were examined after accounting for developmental associations with adolescent psychopathic traits, namely callous-unemotional traits, narcissism, and impulsivity. Psychopathic traits were assessed during adolescence using the Antisocial Process Screening Device and the Inventory of Callous Unemotional traits and during young adulthood via the Triarchic Psychopathy Measure. Clinical variables (N = 99, Mage = 15.91, 53% female), as well as affective and physiological responses (heart rate, skin conductance, startle modulation) to violent and erotic videos (N = 88, Mage = 19.92, 50% female) were also assessed during adulthood. After accounting for adolescent psychopathic traits, boldness was associated with high cognitive reappraisal and low anxiety, fear, and hostility, and meanness was related to callous-unemotional traits, hostility, less sympathy to victims, and less use of cognitive reappraisal. Disinhibition, by contrast, was associated with impulsivity, increased anxiety, and hostile and aggressive tendencies, as well as conduct disorder, antisocial personality disorder symptoms, and cognitive suppression. In addition, evidence was found for different physiological measures operating as biological indicators of these distinctive dimensions, with reduced resting heart rate and cardiac reactivity to violent stimuli indicative of boldness, above and beyond adolescent psychopathic traits, and low startle potentiation for violent stimuli indicative of callous-unemotional traits and meanness. These findings provide evidence for the value of a multidomain approach for clarifying neurobiological mechanisms of psychopathic tendencies that can inform prevention and treatment efforts. (PsycINFO Database Record

  18. Assessment of suicidality in children and adolescents with diagnosis of high functioning autism spectrum disorder in a Turkish clinical sample

    PubMed Central

    Karakoç Demirkaya, Sevcan; Tutkunkardaş, Mustafa Deniz; Mukaddes, Nahit Motavalli

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Considering that suicide is one of the most common reasons of adolescent death worldwide, there is a lack of clinical awareness on suicidal behaviors of children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The present study aims to assess the rate of suicidality (suicidal ideation, behaviors and attempts) and associated risk factors for suicidality in high functioning ASD. Methods Medical records of 55 adolescents (six girls, 49 boys), aged between 7–20 years, with diagnosis of ASD were reviewed. The participants were all able to speak fluently and had no significant limitations in intellectual functioning. Clinical assessment of participants was carried out on the basis of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 4th Edition, Text Revision criteria and Schedule for Affective Disorders and Schizophrenia for School-Age Children-Present and Lifetime Version. Eskin’s Suicide Screening Questionnaire and sociodemographic data form including detailed history of suicidal behaviors were used. The study group was also divided into suicidal and non-suicidal groups for the purpose of comparing the results. Results The rate of suicidal behaviors was 29% and suicide attempt was 12.7%. Types of suicidality were behaviors (43.7%), thoughts (37.5%), and verbal declarations (18.7%). A number of bizarre acts were recorded. Rates of comorbid psychiatric disorders such as mood disorders, anxiety disorders and disruptive behaviors were 23.6%, 43.6% and 65.4% respectively. Groups with the psychotic features, positive family history for suicidal behaviors and completed suicide showed more suicidality than the non-suicidal group. Conclusion Consistent with the previous findings, rate of suicidality is higher in individuals with ASD. The type of suicidal behaviors showed some differences compared to typically developing individuals. The presence of psychotic features and positive family history for suicidality may be risk factors for suicidality in

  19. A review of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) and the Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) with an emphasis on juvenile justice samples.

    PubMed

    Baum, Linda J; Archer, Robert P; Forbey, Johnathan D; Handel, Richard W

    2009-12-01

    The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-Adolescent (MMPI-A) and Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory (MACI) are frequently used objective personality self-report measures. Given their widespread use, the purpose of the current study was to examine and compare the literature base for the two instruments. A comprehensive review of the literature was conducted between the years 1992 and 2007 using the PsycINFO Database. Results indicate the publication of 277 articles, books, book chapters, monographs, and dissertation abstracts on the MMPI-A. This was compared with the results of a comparable search for the MACI, which yielded 84 citations. The literature was further explored by determining the content of the topic areas addressed for both instruments. A particular focus was placed on the utility of the instruments with juvenile justice populations; scale means, standard deviations, and effect sizes calculated from this literature were examined. Results indicate that the use of the MMPI-A is supported by a substantial literature and a growing research base is also available for the MACI. Both instruments appear to provide useful results in juvenile justice settings.

  20. Genome-wide Association Study of Atazanavir Pharmacokinetics and Hyperbilirubinemia in AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol A5202

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Daniel H.; Venuto, Charles; Ritchie, Marylyn D.; Morse, Gene D.; Daar, Eric S.; McLaren, Paul J.; Haas, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Atazanavir-associated hyperbilirubinemia can cause premature discontinuation of atazanavir and avoidance of its initial prescribing. We used genome-wide genotyping and clinical data to characterize determinants of atazanavir pharmacokinetics and hyperbilirubinemia in AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol A5202. Methods Plasma atazanavir pharmacokinetics and indirect bilirubin concentrations were characterized in HIV-1-infected subjects randomized to atazanavir/ritonavir-containing regimens. A subset had genome-wide genotype data available. Results Genome-wide assay data were available from 542 subjects, of who 475 also had estimated atazanavir clearance and relevant covariate data available. Peak bilirubin concentration and relevant covariates were available for 443 participants. By multivariate analysis, higher peak on-treatment bilirubin was associated with UGT1A1 rs887829 T allele (P=6.4×10−12), higher baseline hemoglobin (P=4.9×10−13), higher baseline bilirubin (P=6.7×10−12), and slower plasma atazanavir clearance (P=8.6×10−11). For peak bilirubin >3.0 mg/dL, the positive predictive value of baseline bilirubin ≥0.5 mg/dL with hemoglobin ≥14g/dL was 0.51, which increased to 0.85 with rs887829 TT homozygosity. For peak bilirubin ≤3.0 mg/dL, the positive predictive value of baseline bilirubin <0.5 mg/dL with hemoglobin <14 g/dL was 0.91, which increased to 0.96 with rs887829 CC homozygosity. No polymorphism predicted atazanavir pharmacokinetics at genome-wide significance. Conclusions Atazanavir-associated hyperbilirubinemia is best predicted by considering UGT1A1 genotype, baseline bilirubin, and baseline hemoglobin values in combination. Use of ritonavir as a pharmacokinetic enhancer may have abrogated genetic associations with atazanavir pharmacokinetics. PMID:24557078

  1. Adolescent Behavior Change: A Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Educational Programs and Studies Information Service.

    This focus paper contains reprints of 11 articles intended to provide an overview of the key issues in the area of adolescent behavior change as it relates to Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) education. Included are: (1) "Preventing HIV Infection and AIDS in Children and Adolescents" (J.…

  2. Troubled Adolescents and HIV Infection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woodruff, John O., Ed.; And Others

    This report on adolescents, Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS), and Human Immune Virus (HIV) infection had its beginning in the Knowledge Development Workshop "Issues in the Prevention and Treatment of AIDS Among Adolescents with Serious Emotional Disturbance," held June 9-10, 1988 in the District of Columbia. These papers are included:…

  3. Substance Abuse Prevention Program for Children and Adolescents in a Community-Based Clinic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelton, Andrea; Harvin, Sheila; White, Janeana

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a community-based substance abuse prevention program utilizing a cognitive-behavioral curriculum to children and adolescents affected by a substance use disorder in a parent or caretaker.

  4. Clinical variability in cardiovascular disease risk factor screening and management in adolescent and young adult women with polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baer, Tamara E.; Milliren, Carly E.; Walls, Courtney; DiVasta, Amy D.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives To review the clinical presentation, evaluation and management of normal-weight, overweight and obese adolescent and young adult women with PCOS over 2-year follow-up. Design Retrospective chart review Participants 173 adolescent and young adult women, aged 12–22 years, diagnosed with PCOS Interventions Demographic, health data, and laboratory measures were abstracted from 3 clinic visits: baseline and 1- and 2- year follow-up. Subjects were classified as normal-weight (NW), overweight (OW) or obese (OB). Longitudinal data were analyzed using repeated measures ANOVA. Main Outcome Measures BMI, self-reported concerns, lifestyle changes. Results Most patients (73%) were OW or OB. Family history of type II diabetes was greater in OW (38%) and OB (53%) as compared to NW (22%) patients (p=0.002). Acanthosis nigricans was identified in OW (62%) and OB (21%) patients, but not NW patients (0%; p <0.001). OW and OB patients had higher fasting insulin (p<0.001) and lower HDL cholesterol (p=0.005) than NW patients, although screening rates were low. BMI Z-scores decreased in both OW and OB patients over time (0.07 units/year; p<0.001). Conclusions Most patients with PCOS were OW/OB. Substantial clinical variability existed in CVD screening; among those screened, OW and OB patients had greater CVD risk factors. Despite self-reported concerns about weight and diabetes risk among OW/OB patients, no clinically significant change in BMI percentile occurred. Evidence-based interventions and recommendations for screening tests are needed to address CVD risk in adolescents and young adults with PCOS. PMID:26081478

  5. The Invisible Epidemic: Teenagers and AIDS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Humm, Andy; Kunreuther, Frances

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the alarming spread of AIDS among teenagers, virtually ignored until recently. Discusses reasons why adolescents are at high risk, including misinformation and denial about who can contract the AIDS virus. Addresses the recent controversy over AIDS education and condom distribution in the public schools and suggests ways to better reach…

  6. Analysis of some clinical and laboratory aspects of adolescent patients with thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Gurgey, Aytemiz; Balta, Gunay; Gumruk, Fatma; Altay, Cigdem

    2004-10-01

    A total of 360 pediatric patients aged 1 month to 18 years were diagnosed as having thrombosis between January 1998 and April 2003. Of these patients, those aged 11-18 years (n=131) were regarded as adolescents and the rest as children. The proportion of adolescents in the whole group excluding the neonates was 36%. The peak age of diagnosis in adolescents was 11-14 years, comprising 58% of all thrombotic events in adolescents. In 73% of the adolescents, there was at least one risk factor. The four most common underlying disorders were infection, malignancy, connective tissue and cardiac disorders, in decreasing order of frequency. In children, on the other hand, infection was followed by congenital heart disease, malignancy and liver disease. Three common types of thrombosis in adolescents were deep venous thrombosis, cerebro-vascular events and portal venous thrombosis, while cerebro-vascular events were the most common in children. The frequency of factor V G1691A mutation in the adolescents (22.1%) was significantly higher than that found in a group of healthy controls (7.4%) and this mutation was associated with a 3.6-fold increase in the risk of developing thrombosis (95% confidence interval, 1.4-9.0). The carrier frequency of prothrombin G20210A mutation (3.1%) in adolescents did not differ significantly from that of the healthy population (2.3%) and no association was observed between this mutation and a risk of developing thrombosis in this group (odds ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.2-7.5). The rate of recurrent thrombosis was 6%.

  7. Intervention with Substance Abusing Runaway Adolescents and their Families: Results of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Slesnick, Natasha; Erdem, Gizem; Bartle-Haring, Suzanne; Brigham, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To examine the efficacy of three theoretically distinct interventions among substance-abusing runaway adolescents and to explore individual differences in trajectories of change. Methods Adolescents (N=179) between the ages of 12–17 were recruited from a runaway shelter in a Midwestern city. The sample included 94 females (52.5%) and 85 males (47.5%), the majority of the adolescents were African American (n= 118, 65.9%). Adolescents were randomly assigned to the Community Reinforcement Approach (CRA, n = 57), Motivational Interviewing (MI, n = 61), or Ecologically-Based Family Therapy (EBFT, n = 61). Substance use was assessed at baseline, 3, 6, 9, 12, 18, and 24 months via Form 90 and urine screens. Results Hierarchical linear modeling revealed statistically significant improvement in frequency of substance use among runaways in all three treatment groups with a slight increase at post-treatment. Latent trajectory profile analysis explored individual differences in change trajectories and yielded a 3 class model. The majority of adolescents (n = 136, 76%) showed reductions in substance use over time with a slight increase at follow-up (Class 1: Decreasing). Twenty-four (13.4%) adolescents had shown high levels of substance use over time with patterns of increase and decrease (Class 2: Fluctuating high users), and 19 (10.6%) decreased but returned to baseline levels by two years post-baseline (Class 3: U shaped). Few differences among treatment conditions were noted; within the “decreasing” group, adolescents in MI treatment showed a quicker decline in their substance use but a faster relapse compared to those receiving EBFT. Conclusions These findings suggest that CRA, EBFT and MI are viable treatments for runaway substance-abusing adolescents. PMID:23895088

  8. The feasibility of a clinic-based parent intervention to prevent HIV, sexually transmitted infections, and unintended pregnancies among Latino and African American adolescents.

    PubMed

    Bouris, Alida; Guilamo-Ramos, Vincent; Jaccard, James; McCoy, Wanda; Aranda, Diane; Pickard, Angela; Boyer, Cherrie B

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the feasibility of conducting a parent-based intervention in a pediatric health clinic to prevent HIV, sexually transmitted infections (STIs), and unintended pregnancies among urban African American and Latino youth. Eight focus groups were conducted with health care providers, adolescent patients and the mothers of adolescent patients (n = 41) from December 2007 to February 2008. All participants were recruited from a community-based pediatric health clinic in the Bronx, New York. Content analysis of focus group transcripts identified results in three primary areas: (1) the role of parents and providers in preventing HIV, STDs and unintended pregnancies among adolescents, (2) feasibility of the intervention in the clinic setting; and (3) optimal recruitment, retention and intervention delivery strategies. Study results suggest that a parent-based intervention delivered in a community-based pediatric health clinic setting is feasible. Focused recommendations for intervention recruitment, delivery, and retention are provided.

  9. Garrett County Aids AID

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appalachia, 1975

    1975-01-01

    Garrett County, Maryland volunteered to act as a pre-overseas learning laboratory for AID (Agency for International Development) interns who practiced data collection and planning techniques with the help of local citizenry. (JC)

  10. HIV/AIDS-related knowledge and misconceptions among women attending government-owned antenatal clinics in Gwagwalada Area Council of Abuja, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Otokpa, Aboh O; Lawoyin, Taiwo O; Asuzu, Michael C

    2013-03-01

    This study assessed the level of knowledge and misconceptions about HIV/AIDS transmission and prevention among women. Using a semi-structured pretested questionnaire we obtained relevant data from 420 respondents in five randomly selected antenatal clinics (ANCs) in Gwagwalada Area Council (GAC) of Abuja, Nigeria. Knowledge about the existence of HIV/AIDS was high (92.8%). Only 52.1% knew the cause of AIDS and 58.6% were aware that AIDS had no cure. About twenty percent of respondents believed that breast-milk could not transmit HIV and 27.9% were unaware that condom protects against HIV. Only 33.3% were aware that HIV infected persons may look and feel healthy. Mothers with at least secondary level education had significantly higher knowledge scores on HIV/AIDS transmission (X2 = 14.8, p = 0.01) than less educated mothers and less educated mothers were more likely to relate HIV infection to past misdeeds (X2 = 13.6, p = 0.01). Significant misconception concerning HIV transmission existed in the study population. More community outreach programmes to intensify HIV education and counseling in GAC is required.

  11. Introduction to a Special Issue of the Journal of Immunological Methods: Building global resource programs to support HIV/AIDS clinical trial studies.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Ana M; Denny, Thomas N; O'Gorman, Maurice

    2014-07-01

    This Special Issue of the Journal of Immunological Methods includes 16 manuscripts describing quality assurance activities related to virologic and immunologic monitoring of six global laboratory resource programs that support international HIV/AIDS clinical trial studies: Collaboration for AIDS Vaccine Discovery (CAVD); Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology (CHAVI); External Quality Assurance Program Oversight Laboratory (EQAPOL); HIV Vaccine Trial Network (HVTN); International AIDS Vaccine Initiative (IAVI); and Immunology Quality Assessment (IQA). The reports from these programs address the many components required to develop comprehensive quality control activities and subsequent quality assurance programs for immune monitoring in global clinical trials including: all aspects of processing, storing, and quality assessment of PBMC preparations used ubiquitously in HIV clinical trials, the development and optimization of assays for CD8 HIV responses and HIV neutralization, a comprehensive global HIV virus repository, and reports on the development and execution of novel external proficiency testing programs for immunophenotyping, intracellular cytokine staining, ELISPOT and luminex based cytokine measurements. In addition, there are articles describing the implementation of Good Clinical Laboratory Practices (GCLP) in a large quality assurance laboratory, the development of statistical methods specific for external proficiency testing assessment, a discussion on the ability to set objective thresholds for measuring rare events by flow cytometry, and finally, a manuscript which addresses a framework for the structured reporting of T cell immune function based assays. It is anticipated that this series of manuscripts covering a wide range of quality assurance activities associated with the conduct of global clinical trials will provide a resource for individuals and programs involved in improving the harmonization, standardization, accuracy, and sensitivity of

  12. Behavioral Risk Elicits Selective Activation of the Executive System in Adolescents: Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Yaxley, Richard H.; Van Voorhees, Elizabeth E.; Bergman, Sara; Hooper, Stephen R.; Huettel, Scott A.; De Bellis, Michael D.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated adolescent brain processing of decisions under conditions of varying risk, reward, and uncertainty. Adolescents (n = 31) preformed a Decision–Reward Uncertainty task that separates decision uncertainty into behavioral and reward risk, while they were scanned using functional magnetic resonance imaging. Behavioral risk trials involved uncertainty about which action to perform to earn a fixed monetary reward. In contrast, during reward risk the decision that might lead to a reward was known, but the likelihood of earning a reward was probabilistically determined. Behavioral risk trials evoked greater activation than the reward risk and no risk conditions in the anterior cingulate, medial frontal gyrus, bilateral frontal poles, bilateral inferior parietal lobe, precuneus, bilateral superior-middle frontal gyrus, inferior frontal gyrus, and insula. Our results were similar to those of young adults using the same task (Huettel, 2006) except that adolescents did not show significant activation in the posterior supramarginal gyrus during behavioral risk. During the behavioral risk condition regardless of reward outcome, overall mean frontal pole activity showed a positive correlation with age during the behavioral and reward risk conditions suggesting a developmental difference of this region of interest. Additionally, reward response to the Decision–Reward Uncertainty task in adolescents was similar to that seen in young adults (Huettel, 2006). Our data did not show a correlation between age and mean ventral striatum activity during the three conditions. While our results came from a healthy high functioning non-maltreated sample of adolescents, this method can be used to address types of risks and reward processing in children and adolescents with predisposing vulnerabilities and add to the paucity of imaging studies of risk and reward processing during adolescence. PMID:22194728

  13. Parent-youth agreement on symptoms and diagnosis: assessment with a diagnostic interview in an adolescent inpatient clinical population.

    PubMed

    Lauth, Bertrand; Arnkelsson, Guðmundur B; Magnússon, Páll; Skarphéðinsson, Guðmundur Á; Ferrari, Pierre; Pétursson, Hannes

    2010-12-01

    Diagnostic information on adolescents may be elicited from both youths and their parents, especially for depressive and suicidal symptomatology. The objective of this study was to examine the degree of agreement between parent and adolescent reports of major psychiatric disorders, at the diagnostic and at the symptom level, in a severely affected inpatient clinical population. 64 parent-adolescent pairs were interviewed separately with the semi-structured diagnostic interview Kiddie-SADS-PL. Symptomatology was also assessed with 11 self-report and parent-report scales, all translated, adapted and in most cases validated in Iceland. A total of 25 subscales were included to assess emotional dimensions such as depression or anxiety and cognitive dimensions such as attention deficit or self-concept. Good agreement was found for social phobia and fair agreement for generalized anxiety disorder. Although parent-youth agreement was poor in most cases at the symptoms level, significant correlations indicated consistency for most severity scores, except those related to depressive symptomatology, attention deficit, separation anxiety or conduct disorder. The low agreement between reports of suicidal ideation is in line with results from previous studies and suggests that parents might under- or over-estimate this symptomatology. The combination of data obtained with diagnostic interviews and rating-scales confirmed results from prior empirical work, giving greater weight to parents' reports of observable behavior and to adolescents' reports of subjective experiences, especially depressive symptomatology. Our findings suggest that both parent and child informants are necessary to obtain adequate assessments in adolescents. Further research should explore the correspondence between discrepant diagnoses and external criteria such as parental psychopathology or parent-child relationships and attachment. Psychoanalysis could benefit from cognitive neuroscience and use cognitive

  14. Distinguishing Primary and Secondary Variants of Callous Unemotional Traits among Adolescents in a Clinic-referred Sample

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, Rachel E.; Frick, Paul J.; Youngstrom, Eric A.; Youngstrom, Jennifer Kogos; Feeny, Norah C.; Findling, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The current study used model-based cluster analyses to determine if there are two distinct variants of adolescents (ages 11 - 18) high on callous-unemotional (CU) traits that differ on their level of anxiety and history of trauma. The sample (n = 272) consisted of clinic-referred youths who were primarily African-American (90%) and from low income families. Consistent with hypotheses, three clusters emerged, including a group low on CU traits, as well as two groups high on CU traits that differed in their level of anxiety and past trauma. Consistent with past research on incarcerated adults and adolescents, the group high on anxiety (i.e., secondary variant) was more likely to have histories of abuse and had higher levels of impulsivity, externalizing behaviors, aggression, and behavioral activation. In contrast, the group low on anxiety (i.e., primary variant) scored lower on a measure of behavioral inhibition. On measures of impulsivity and externalizing behavior, the higher scores for the secondary cluster only were found for self-report measures, not on parent-report measures. Youths in the primary cluster also were perceived as less credible reporters than youth in the secondary or cluster low on CU traits. These reporter and credibility differences suggest that adolescents within the primary variant may underreport their level of behavioral disturbance, which has important assessment implications. PMID:23647031

  15. Epigenetic and genetic variants in the HTR1B gene and clinical improvement in children and adolescents treated with fluoxetine.

    PubMed

    Gassó, Patricia; Rodríguez, Natalia; Blázquez, Ana; Monteagudo, Ana; Boloc, Daniel; Plana, Maria Teresa; Lafuente, Amalia; Lázaro, Luisa; Arnaiz, Joan Albert; Mas, Sergi

    2017-04-03

    The serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1B) is important to both the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder and the antidepressant effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors. Although fluoxetine has been shown to be effective and safe in children and adolescents, not all patients experience a proper clinical response, which has led to further study into the main factors involved in this inter-individual variability. Our aim was to study the effect of epigenetic and genetic factors that could affect 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1B (HTR1B) gene expression, and thereby response to fluoxetine. A total of 83 children and adolescents were clinically assessed 12weeks after of initiating an antidepressant treatment with fluoxetine for the first time. We evaluated the influence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) specifically located in transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) on their clinical improvement. A combined genetic analysis considering the significant SNPs together with the functional variant rs130058 previously associated in our population was also performed. Moreover, we assessed, for the first time in the literature, whether methylation levels of the HTR1B promoter region could be associated with the pharmacological response. Two, rs9361233 and rs9361235, were significantly associated with clinical improvement after treatment with fluoxetine. The heterozygous genotype combination analysis showed a negative correlation with clinical improvement. The lowest improvement was experienced by patients who were heterozygous for all three SNPs. Moreover, a negative correlation was found between clinical improvement and the average methylation level of the HTR1B promoter. These results give new evidence for the role of epigenetic and genetic factors which could modulate HTR1B expression in the pharmacological response to antidepressants.

  16. Clinical Strategies for Integrating Medication Interventions Into Behavioral Treatment for Adolescent ADHD: The Medication Integration Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hogue, Aaron; Bobek, Molly; Tau, Gregory Z.; Levin, Frances R.

    2014-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is highly prevalent among adolescents enrolled in behavioral health services but remains undertreated in this age group. Also the first-line treatment for adolescent ADHD, stimulant medication, is underutilized in routine practice. This article briefly describes three behavioral interventions designed to promote stronger integration of medication interventions into treatment planning for adolescent ADHD: family ADHD psychoeducation, family-based medication decision-making, and behavior therapist leadership in coordinating medication integration. It then introduces the Medication Integration Protocol (MIP), which incorporates all three interventions into a five-task protocol: ADHD Assessment and Medication Consult; ADHD Psychoeducation and Client Acceptance; ADHD Symptoms and Family Relations; ADHD Medication and Family Decision-Making; and Medication Management and Integration Planning. The article concludes by highlighting what behavior therapists should know about best practices for medication integration across diverse settings and populations: integrating medication interventions into primary care, managing medication priorities and polypharmacy issues for adolescents with multiple diagnoses, providing ADHD medications to adolescent substance users, and the compatibility of MIP intervention strategies with everyday practice conditions. PMID:25505817

  17. Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder among adolescents: a review of the diagnosis, treatment, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Wolraich, Mark L; Wibbelsman, Charles J; Brown, Thomas E; Evans, Steven W; Gotlieb, Edward M; Knight, John R; Ross, E Clarke; Shubiner, Howard H; Wender, Esther H; Wilens, Timothy

    2005-06-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is the most common mental disorder in childhood, and primary care clinicians provide a major component of the care for children with ADHD. However, because of limited available evidence, the American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines did not include adolescents and young adults. Contrary to previous beliefs, it has become clear that, in most cases, ADHD does not resolve once children enter puberty. This article reviews the current evidence about the diagnosis and treatment of adolescents and young adults with ADHD and describes how the information informs practice. It describes some of the unique characteristics observed among adolescents, as well as how the core symptoms change with maturity. The diagnostic process is discussed, as well as approaches to the care of adolescents to improve adherences. Both psychosocial and pharmacologic interventions are reviewed, and there is a discussion of these patients' transition into young adulthood. The article also indicates that research is needed to identify the unique adolescent characteristics of ADHD and effective psychosocial and pharmacologic treatments.

  18. Case study of an adolescent Cambodian refugee: a clinical, developmental and cultural perspective.

    PubMed

    Bemak, F; Timm, J

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study of Tu, a Cambodian man who came to the US as an unaccompanied war refugee when he was 15 years old after experiencing severe trauma. Tu was diagnosed with post traumatic stress disorder and underwent 2.5 years of therapy with a clinical consultant. At this point, Tu became somewhat acculturated and resolved but found the process of self-evaluation too painful to continue. The therapist moved away and lost track of Tu for 7 years until contacted by his current therapist for a conference because Tu's period of adjustment had ended and his serious mental health problems were causing problematic deviant behavior. Initial therapy had allowed Tu to replace aggressive behavior with a moderate depression caused by his inability to adjust to life in the US. During the 4 years between therapists, Tu moved from place to place and experienced increasingly severe problems, including arrests. The success of the early therapy was achieved by establishing a climate of trust and safety with a therapist who understood Tu's cultural background and allowed Tu to control the pace of therapy. Non-Western interventions, such as using Tu's Cambodian caseworker as a partner in the healing process and enlisting the aid of a Buddhist monk also proved of value. Tu's continuing difficulties occurred because his therapeutic sessions ended before he could achieve the developmental stage that would have allowed him to believe that his new world was safe and, perhaps, because his new therapist was a woman (as was the head of his foster home). Understanding of cultural issues, including the gender roles of women in patriarchal Cambodia, may have helped Tu's counselors succeed in providing the ongoing support needed by all patients suffering post-traumatic stress disorder.

  19. Computer aided identification of sodium channel blockers in the clinical treatment of epilepsy using molecular docking tools

    PubMed Central

    Shaheen, Uzma; Akka, Jyothy; Hinore, Jitendra Singh; Girdhar, Amandeep; Bandaru, Srinivas; Sumithnath, Tharaparambil Gangadharan; Nayarisseri, Anuraj; Munshi, Anjana

    2015-01-01

    Phenytoin (PHT) and Carbamazepine (CBZ) are excellent sodium channel blockers administered in clinical treatment of epileptic seizures. However, the narrow therapeutic range and limited pharmacokinetics of these drugs have raised serious concerns in the proper management of epilepsy. To overcome this, the present study attempts to identify a candidate molecule with superior pharmacological profile than PHT and CBZ through In silico approaches. PHT and CBZ served as query small molecules for Tanimoto based similarity search with a threshold of 95% against PubChem database. Aided by MolDock algorithm, high affinity similar compound against each query was retrieved. PHT and CBZ and their respective similar were further tested for toxicity profiles, LC 50 values and biological activity. Compounds, NSC403438 and AGN-PC-0BPCBP respectively similar to PHT and CBZ demonstrated higher affinity to sodium channel protein than their respective leads. Of particular relevance, NSC403438 demonstrated highest binding affinity bestowed with least toxicity, better LC 50 values and optimal bioactivity. NSC403438 was further mapped for its structure based pharmacophoric features. In the study, we report NSC403438 as potential sodium channel blocker as a better candidate than PHT and CBZ which can be put forth for pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic studies. Abbreviations AEDs - Antiepileptic drugs, BLAST - Basic Local Alignment Search Tool, CBZ - Carbamazepine, GEFS+ - Generalized Epilepsy with Febrile Seizures Plus, GPCR - G Protein Coupled Receptor, Nav - Sodium channel with specific voltage conduction, PDB - Protein Data Bank, PHT - Phenytoin, PIR - Protein Information resources, SAVES - Structural Analysis and Verification Server, VGSC - Voltage-gated Sodium channels. PMID:25914447

  20. Impact of Adding a Decision Aid to Patient Education in Adults with Asthma: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Légaré, France; Moisan, Jocelyne; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Background Not providing adequate patient education interventions to asthma patients remains a major care gap. To help asthma patients and caregivers discuss inhaled controller medication use, our team has previously developed a decision aid (DA). We sought to assess whether adding this DA to education interventions improved knowledge, decisional conflict, and asthma control among adults with asthma. Methods A parallel clinical trial (NCT02516449). We recruited adults with asthma, aged 18 to 65 years, prescribed inhaled controller medication to optimize asthma control. Educators randomly allocated participants either to the education + DA or to the education group. At baseline and two-month follow-up, we measured asthma knowledge (primary outcome) with a validated self-administered questionnaire (score –37 to +37). Secondary outcomes included decisional conflict and asthma control. Blinded assessors collected data. Between the two time points, the within- and between-group changes were estimated by generalized linear mixed models. Results Fifty-one participants (response rate: 53%; age: 44 ± 13 years; women: n = 32) were randomized either to the education + DA group (n = 26) or to the education group (n = 25), and included in statistical analyses. Between baseline and follow-up, mean [95% CI] knowledge scores increased from 21.5 [19.9–23.2] to 25.1 [23.1–27.0] in the education + DA group (P = 0.0002) and from 24.0 [22.3–25.7] to 26.0 [24.0–28.0] in the education group (P = 0.0298). In both of the groups, decisional conflict and asthma control improved. There were no differences between groups. Conclusions Education improved knowledge, decisional conflict, and asthma control whether the DA was added or not. PMID:28107540

  1. Birth defects among children born to HIV-infected women: Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Protocols 219 and 219C

    PubMed Central

    Brogly, Susan B.; Abzug, Mark J.; Watts, D. Heather; Cunningham, Coleen K.; Williams, Paige L.; Oleske, James; Conway, Daniel; Sperling, Rhoda S.; Spiegel, Hans; Van Dyke, Russell B.

    2010-01-01

    Background Some studies have detected associations between in utero antiretroviral therapy (ARV) exposure and birth defects but evidence is inconclusive. Methods 2,202 HIV-exposed children enrolled in the Pediatric AIDS Clinical Trials Group 219 and 219C protocols before one year of age were included. Birth defects were classified using the Metropolitan Atlanta Congenital Defects Program (MACDP) coding. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate associations between first trimester in utero ARV exposure and birth defects. Results 117 live-born children had birth defects for a prevalence of 5.3% (95% CI: 4.4, 6.3). Prevalence did not differ by HIV infection status or overall ARV exposure; rates were 4.8% (95% CI: 3.7, 6.1) and 5.8% (95% CI: 4.2, 7.8) in children without and with first trimester ARV exposure, respectively. The defect rate was higher among children with first trimester efavirenz exposure (5/32, 15.6%) versus children without first trimester efavirenz exposure [adjusted odds ratio (aOR)=4.31 (95% CI: 1.56, 11.86)]. Protective effects of first trimester zidovudine exposure on musculoskeletal defects were detected [aOR=0.24 (95% CI: 0.08, 0.69)], while a higher risk of heart defects was found [aOR=2.04 (95% CI: 1.03, 4.05)]. Conclusion The prevalence of birth defects was higher in this cohort of HIV-exposed children than in other pediatric cohorts. There was no association with overall ARV exposure, but there were some associations with specific agents including efavirenz. Additional studies are needed to rule out confounding and to evaluate newer ARV agents. PMID:20539252

  2. The eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic: an interdisciplinary model of care for children and adolescents with sex chromosome aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Nicole; Howell, Susan; Wilson, Rebecca; Janusz, Jennifer; Boada, Richard; Martin, Sydney; Frazier, Jacqueline B; Pfeiffer, Michelle; Regan, Karen; McSwegin, Sarah; Zeitler, Philip

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Individuals with sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs) are born with an atypical number of X and/or Y chromosomes, and present with a range of medical, developmental, educational, behavioral, and psychological concerns. Rates of SCA diagnoses in infants and children are increasing, and there is a need for specialized interdisciplinary care to address associated risks. The eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic was established to provide comprehensive and experienced care for children and adolescents with SCA, with an interdisciplinary team composed of developmental–behavioral pediatrics, endocrinology, genetic counseling, child psychology, pediatric neuropsychology, speech–language pathology, occupational therapy, nursing, and social work. The clinic model includes an interdisciplinary approach to care, where assessment results by each discipline are integrated to develop unified diagnostic impressions and treatment plans individualized for each patient. Additional objectives of the eXtraordinarY Kids Clinic program include prenatal genetic counseling, research, education, family support, and advocacy. Methods Satisfaction surveys were distributed to 496 patients, and responses were received from 168 unique patients. Results Satisfaction with the overall clinic visit was ranked as “very satisfied” in 85%, and as “satisfied” in another 9.8%. Results further demonstrate specific benefits from the clinic experience, the importance of a knowledgeable clinic coordinator, and support the need for similar clinics across the country. Three case examples of the interdisciplinary approach to assessment and treatment are included. PMID:26229481

  3. Evidence based clinical assessment of child and adolescent social phobia: a critical review of rating scales.

    PubMed

    Tulbure, Bogdan T; Szentagotai, Aurora; Dobrean, Anca; David, Daniel

    2012-10-01

    Investigating the empirical support of various assessment instruments, the evidence based assessment approach expands the scientific basis of psychotherapy. Starting from Hunsley and Mash's evaluative framework, we critically reviewed the rating scales designed to measure social anxiety or phobia in youth. Thirteen of the most researched social anxiety scales for children and adolescents were identified. An overview about the scientific support accumulated by these scales is offered. Our main results are consistent with recent reviews that consider the Social Phobia and Anxiety Scale for Children (SPAI-C) and the Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents (SAS-A) among the most pertinent and empirically supported measures of social anxiety for youngsters. However, after considering the existing evidence, we highly recommend another couple of scales that proved to be empirically supported (i.e., the Social Phobia Inventory-SPIN, and the Liebowitz Social Anxiety Scale for Children and Adolescents-LSAS-CA).

  4. Clinical assessment of attachment patterns and personality disorder in adolescents and adults.

    PubMed

    Westen, Drew; Nakash, Ora; Thomas, Cannon; Bradley, Rebekah

    2006-12-01

    The relevance of attachment theory and research for practice has become increasingly clear. The authors describe a series of studies with 3 aims: (a) to validate measures of attachment for use by clinicians with adolescents and adults, (b) to examine the relation between attachment and personality pathology, and (c) to ascertain whether factor analysis can recover dimensions of attachment reflecting both interpersonal and narrative style. In 3 studies, experienced clinicians provided psychometric data using 1 of 4 attachment questionnaires (2 adolescent and 2 adult samples). Attachment dimensions predicted both personality pathology and developmental experiences in predictable ways. Factor analysis identified 4 dimensions that replicated across adolescent and adult samples on the basis of a combination of interpersonal and narrative indicators: secure, dismissing, preoccupied, and incoherent/disorganized.

  5. Physical, clinical, and psychosocial parameters of adolescents with different degrees of excess weight☆

    PubMed Central

    Antonini, Vanessa Drieli Seron; da Silva, Danilo Fernandes; Bianchini, Josiane Aparecida Alves; Lopera, Carlos Andres; Moreira, Amanda Caroline Teles; Locateli, João Carlos; Nardo, Nelson

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare body composition, hemodynamic parameters, health-related physical fitness, and health-related quality of life of adolescents with anthropometric diagnosis of overweight, obesity, and severe obesity. METHODS: 220 adolescents with excess body weight were enrolled. They were beginners in a intervention program that included patients based on age, availability, presence of excess body weight, place of residence, and agreement to participate in the study . This study collected anthropometric and hemodynamic variables, health-related physical fitness, and health-related quality of life of the adolescents. To compare the three groups according to nutritional status, parametric and non-parametric tests were applied. Significance level was set at p<0.05. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in resting heart rate, health-related physical fitness, relative body fat, absolute and relative lean mass, and health-related quality of life between overweight, obese, and severely obese adolescents (p>0.05). Body weight, body mass index, waist and hip circumference, and systolic blood pressure increased as degree of excess weightincreased (p<0.05). Dyastolic blood pressure of the severe obesity group was higher than the other groups (p<0.05). There was an association between the degree of excess weight and the prevalence of altered blood pressure (overweight: 12.1%; obesity: 28.1%; severe obesity: 45.5%; p<0.001). The results were similar when genders were analyzed separately. CONCLUSION: Results suggest that overweight adolescents presented similar results compared to obese and severely obese adolescents in most of the parameters analyzed. PMID:25510998

  6. Cumulative risk and AIDS-orphanhood: interactions of stigma, bullying and poverty on child mental health in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Cluver, Lucie; Orkin, Mark

    2009-10-01

    Research shows that AIDS-orphaned children are more likely to experience clinical-range psychological problems. Little is known about possible interactions between factors mediating these high distress levels. We assessed how food insecurity, bullying, and AIDS-related stigma interacted with each other and with likelihood of experiencing clinical-range disorder. In South Africa, 1025 adolescents completed standardised measures of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress. 52 potential mediators were measured, including AIDS-orphanhood status. Logistic regressions and hierarchical log-linear modelling were used to identify interactions among significant risk factors. Food insecurity, stigma and bullying all independently increased likelihood of disorder. Poverty and stigma were found to interact strongly, and with both present, likelihood of disorder rose from 19% to 83%. Similarly, bullying interacted with AIDS-orphanhood status, and with both present, likelihood of disorder rose from 12% to 76%. Approaches to alleviating psychological distress amongst AIDS-affected children must address cumulative risk effects.

  7. Development of an Easy to Use Tool to Assess HIV Treatment Readiness in Adolescent Clinical Care Settings

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, M. Isabel; Hosek, Sybil; Warren, Jacob C.; Jacobs, Robin J.; Hernandez, Nilda; Martinez, Jaime

    2011-01-01

    Optimal management of HIV disease requires high levels of lifelong adherence once a patient initiates highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Because suboptimal adherence to HAART is associated with adverse consequences, many providers are hesitant to prescribe HAART for patients whom they perceive as not being ready to initiate treatment. Accurately predicting HIV treatment readiness is challenging. Despite the importance of this construct, few reliable and valid instruments to assess HIV treatment readiness have been developed; none of these have been validated with adolescents and young adults, who comprise an increasing proportion of new HIV cases diagnosed. As a first step to achieve this goal, we developed the HIV Treatment Readiness Measure (HTRM) for administration via audio-computer-assisted self interview and conducted a study to examine its internal consistency, test-retest reliability, acceptability, and preliminary factor structure. We recruited 201 youth from 15 adolescent medicine clinics that were part of the Adolescent Trials Network for HIV Interventions. Youth completed the initial assessment and two weeks later the re-test assessment. The refined HTRM had high internal consistency (α = 0.84). Test-retest reliability using both sum scores and mean scores were high. The HTRM was also highly acceptable and feasible to use in routine clinical practice. In exploratory factor analysis we found that a five-factor solution was the best fit; each of the subscales (Disclosure, Psychosocial Issues, Connection with Care, HIV Medication Beliefs, Alcohol and Drugs) had good to acceptable alphas and eigenvalues greater than 2.0. Our findings support conducting a future study to examine the tool’s predictive validity. PMID:22022853

  8. Danish clinical guidelines for examination and treatment of overweight and obese children and adolescents in a pediatric setting.

    PubMed

    Johansen, Anders; Holm, Jens-Christian; Pearson, Seija; Kjærsgaard, Mimi; Larsen, Lone Marie; Højgaard, Birgitte; Cortes, Dina

    2015-05-01

    Overweight children are at an increased risk of becoming obese adults, which may lead to shorter life expectancies in the current generation of children as compared to their parents. Furthermore, being an overweight child has a negative psycho-social impact. We consider obesity in children and adolescents a chronic illness, which is in line with the American Medical Society. We summarize the evidence for the efficacy of a combination of diet, physical activity and behavior-focused interventions in a family-based setting. The present guidelines propose a multidisciplinary service implemented as a "chronic care model" based on "best clinical practice" inspired by an American expert committee and the daily practice of The Children's Obesity Clinic at Copenhagen University Hospital Holbaek. Children and adolescents should be referred for examination and treatment in a pediatric setting when BMI corresponds to an isoBMI of minimum 30 or BMI corresponds to an isoBMI of 25 and complex obesity is suspected. Obtaining a thorough medical history is pivotal. We propose a structured interview to ensure collection of all relevant information. We recommend physical examination focused on BMI, waist circumference, growth, pubertal stage, blood pressure, neurology and skin and provide comprehensive paraclinical investigations for obesity and obesity related conditions. Treatment of obesity in children and adolescents is fully dependent on the combined effort of the entire family. This cannot be overemphasized! The main principle of the treatment is developing an individual detailed plan for every patient to reduce caloric intake whilst increasing physical activity, leaving no ambiguity with the recommendations.

  9. HIV / AIDS

    MedlinePlus

    ... facebook share with twitter share with linkedin HIV/AIDS HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the virus ... HIV/AIDS. Why Is the Study of HIV/AIDS a Priority for NIAID? Nearly 37 million people ...

  10. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Consumer Devices Consumer Products Hearing Aids Hearing Aids Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... to restrict your daily activities. Properly fitted hearing aids and aural rehabilitation (techniques used to identify and ...

  11. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Hearing Aids KidsHealth > For Teens > Hearing Aids Print A A ... with certain types of hearing loss. How Hearing Aids Help So you went to audiologist and found ...

  12. Parent-Adolescent Sexual Communication.

    PubMed

    Harris, Allyssa L

    2016-01-01

    Risky sexual behavior among adolescents is a major public health concern with potentially long-lasting consequences, including pregnancy, sexually transmitted infections, and HIV/AIDS. Researchers have demonstrated that parent-adolescent sexual communication can mitigate adolescent risky sexual behaviors; the development of interventions that support this process are vital. This column examines a recent study that evaluated a parent-adolescent sexual communication intervention.

  13. Clinical intake of child and adolescent consumers in a rural community mental health center: does wait-time predict attendance?

    PubMed

    Sherman, Marne L; Barnum, David D; Buhman-Wiggs, Adam; Nyberg, Erik

    2009-02-01

    This study examines the clinic variable of wait-time as a predictor of intake attendance in a rural community mental health center (CMHC) serving child and adolescent consumers. Data from 1,317 contacts seeking services for a child or adolescent (ages 2-17) were examined. In logistic regression analysis, wait-time between initial consumer contact and intake appointment was identified as a significant predictor of appointment attendance, even after accounting for consumer variables. The impact of wait-time on the likelihood of intake appointment attendance was not moderated by the urgency of consumer need. Findings elucidate the odds of intake attendance versus non-attendance associated with each day of wait-time and clarify the impact of this clinic variable on pre-intake attrition above and beyond more often studied consumer variables. These results provide information that can assist rural CMHCs in assessing the costs and benefits of steps to reduce wait-time or its impact.

  14. The Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-5 Internet Gaming Disorder: Development and Validation for Diagnosing IGD in Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hoon Jung; Han, Doug Hyun; Park, Sung-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to develop and validate a Structured Clinical Interview for Internet Gaming Disorder (SCI-IGD) in adolescents. Methods First, we generated preliminary items of the SCI-IGD based on the information from the DSM-5 literature reviews and expert consultations. Next, a total of 236 adolescents, from both community and clinical settings, were recruited to evaluate the psychometric properties of the SCI-IGD. Results First, the SCI-IGD was found to be consistent over the time period of about one month. Second, diagnostic concordances between the SCI-IGD and clinician's diagnostic impression were good to excellent. The Likelihood Ratio Positive and the Likelihood Ratio Negative estimates for the diagnosis of SCI-IGD were 10.93 and 0.35, respectively, indicating that SCI-IGD was ‘very useful test’ for identifying the presence of IGD and ‘useful test’ for identifying the absence of IGD. Third, SCI-IGD could identify disordered gamers from non-disordered gamers. Conclusion The implications and limitations of the study are also discussed. PMID:28096871

  15. Resource list: Clinical care programs for gender-nonconforming children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Sam; Leininger, Jennifer

    2014-06-01

    Locating specialized services for gender-nonconforming children and adolescents can be challenging. The following resource list--organized by U.S. and Canada geographical region--serves to help clinicians access the most up-to-date information on this special population and pass it along to their patients and families.

  16. Readiness to Change in Adolescents Screening Positive for Substance Use in Urban Primary Care Clinics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Jack; McGeehan, Jennifer; Kelleher, Kelly J.

    2010-01-01

    Primary care physicians often perceive patients as unlikely to decrease their substance use and suggest this reluctance to change diminishes their willingness to screen and intervene. The literature on readiness to change has primarily focused on adults, and the available studies on adolescents have largely included hospitalized and/or…

  17. Adolescents' Physical Aggression toward Parents in a Clinic-Referred Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boxer, Paul; Gullan, Rebecca Lakin; Mahoney, Annette

    2009-01-01

    Physical aggression directed toward parents by their adolescents is a serious issue both practically and scientifically. In contrast to the extensive literature on other forms of aggression within families (e.g., marital violence, child physical abuse) as well as youth aggression construed broadly, a major gap exists in our knowledge of…

  18. To Befriend or Not: Naturally Developing Friendships Amongst a Clinical Group of Adolescents with Chronic Pain.

    PubMed

    Forgeron, Paula A; MacLaren Chorney, Jill; Carlson, Torie E; Dick, Bruce D; Plante, Erica

    2015-10-01

    Adolescents with chronic pain frequently perceive a lack of support from friends. Support from a peer with a shared experience has been found to provide emotional, informational, and appraisal support. We sought to quantify the frequency with which adolescents with chronic pain want to befriend other adolescents with chronic pain, and to describe the features of these friendships. Adolescents with chronic pain who had attended a 10-week structured self-management program from 3 sites were invited to complete an online survey. Forty teens participated, 95% (n = 38) were girls; 32% (n = 13) befriended another; 52% (n = 21) were interested in befriending another but did not; 15% (n = 6) were not interested in befriending anyone. Over half (62%) of the friendships lasted at least 1 year (n = 8), but only 2 intermingled these with their regular friendships. Pain was discussed frequently during interactions. The most common reasons for not forming friendships were no time to exchange contact information during group and not having things in common. Reasons for not being interested in forming a friendship also included not having anything in common apart from pain. The majority of participants were interested in befriending another. Emotional support, by feeling understood and discussing pain without fear that the other is disinterested, was the main peer support provided. Without common interests, this form of friendship may not last and is at risk for being overly solicitous by focusing on pain. It remains unclear whether the benefits of peer support translate into improved function.

  19. Peer Influence and Nonsuicidal Self Injury: Longitudinal Results in Community and Clinically-Referred Adolescent Samples

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prinstein, Mitchell J.; Heilbron, Nicole; Guerry, John D.; Franklin, Joseph C.; Rancourt, Diana; Simon, Valerie; Spirito, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    Research suggests that adolescents' engagement in nonsuicidal self-injurious (NSSI) behaviors may be increasing over time, yet little is known regarding distal longitudinal factors that may promote engagement in these behaviors. Data from two longitudinal studies are presented to examine whether NSSI may be associated with peer influence…

  20. Treating Children and Adolescents in Residential and Inpatient Settings. Developmental Clinical Psychology and Psychiatry. Volume 36.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Robert D.; Campbell, Nancy R.

    This book examines the various components of hospital, residential, and outpatient treatments for children and adolescents with mental disorders. Options and settings for residential care are presented, including the principles and practical issues, such as providing continuing education, that underlie the decision making for placement of youth in…

  1. Mother-Daughter Communication about Sexuality in a Clinical Sample of Hispanic Adolescent Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Lucia F.; Jaramillo, Beatriz M. S.; Moreau, Donna; Meyer-Bahlburg, Heino F. L.

    1999-01-01

    Surveys of 110 inner-city Hispanic adolescent girls referred for psychiatric assessment and their mothers found that the quality of mother/daughter communication in general was more useful in predicting onset of sexual experiences than aspects of later sexual experiences. However, specific communication about sexuality was not related to…

  2. Teens Who Hurt: Clinical Interventions to Break the Cycle of Adolescent Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardy, Kenneth V.; Laszloffy, Tracey A.

    2005-01-01

    Offering a fresh perspective on treatment, this book presents an overarching framework and many specific strategies for working with violent youth and their families. The authors shed light on the complex interplay of individual, family, community, and societal forces that lead some adolescents to hurt others or themselves. Effective ways to…

  3. Adolescent Brain and Cognitive Developments: Implications for Clinical Assessment in Traumatic Brain Injury

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ciccia, Angela Hein; Meulenbroek, Peter; Turkstra, Lyn S.

    2009-01-01

    Adolescence is a time of significant physical, social, and emotional developments, accompanied by changes in cognitive and language skills. Underlying these are significant developments in brain structures and functions including changes in cortical and subcortical gray matter and white matter tracts. Among the brain regions that develop during…

  4. Pursuit of Muscularity in Adolescent Boys: Relations among Biopsychosocial Variables and Clinical Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cafri, Guy; van den Berg, Patricia; Thompson, J. Kevin

    2006-01-01

    Adolescent boys (n = 269) were assessed for levels of several risky behaviors related to the pursuit of muscularity, including substance use (anabolic steroids, prohormones, and ephedrine) dieting to gain weight, and symptoms of muscle dysmorphia (MD). The association between these behaviors and a variety of putative biological, psychological, and…

  5. Clinical Assessment of Attachment Patterns and Personality Disorder in Adolescents and Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westen, Drew; Nakash, Ora; Thomas, Cannon; Bradley, Rebekah

    2006-01-01

    The relevance of attachment theory and research for practice has become increasingly clear. The authors describe a series of studies with 3 aims: (a) to validate measures of attachment for use by clinicians with adolescents and adults (b) to examine the relation between attachment and personality pathology, and (c) to ascertain whether factor…

  6. Early Onset Recurrent Subtype of Adolescent Depression: Clinical and Psychosocial Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammen, Constance; Brennan, Patricia A.; Keenan-Miller, Danielle; Herr, Nathaniel R.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Evaluated trajectories of adolescent depression and their correlates in a longitudinal study of a community sample: early onset (by age 15) with major depression (MDE) recurrence between 15 and 20; early onset with no recurrence; later onset of major depression after age 15 with and without recurrence by 20; and never-depressed.…

  7. Adiposity in children and adolescents: Correlates and clinical consequences of fat stored in specific body depots

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The 2011 Pennington Biomedical Research Center's Scientific Symposium focused on adiposity in children and adolescents. The symposium was attended by 15 speakers and other invited experts. The specific objectives of the symposium were to (i) integrate the latest published and unpublished findings on...

  8. Five-year results of a prospective randomised controlled clinical trial of posterior computer-aided design-computer-aided manufacturing ZrSiO4 -ceramic crowns.

    PubMed

    Passia, N; Stampf, S; Strub, J R

    2013-08-01

    The aim of this prospective randomised controlled clinical trial was to evaluate the clinical outcome of shrinkage-free ZrSiO4 -ceramic full-coverage crowns on premolars and molars in comparison with conventional gold crowns over a 5-year period. Two hundred and twenty-three patients were included and randomly divided into two treatment groups. One hundred and twenty-three patients were restored with 123 ZrSiO4 -ceramic crowns, and 100 patients received 100 gold crowns, which served as the control. All crowns were conventionally cemented with glass-ionomer cement. After an observation period of 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months, the survival probability (Kaplan-Meier) for the shrinkage-free ZrSiO4 -ceramic crowns was 98·3%, 92·0%, 84·7%, 79% and 73·2% and for the gold crowns, 99%, 97·9%, 95·7%, 94·6% and 92·3%, respectively. The difference between the test and control group was statistically significant (P = 0·0027). The gold crowns showed a better marginal integrity with less marginal discoloration than the ceramic crowns. The most common failure in the ceramic crown group was fracture of the crown. The 60-month results of this prospective randomised controlled clinical trial suggest that the use of these shrinkage-free ZrSiO4 -ceramic crowns in posterior tooth restorations cannot be recommended.

  9. Isotretinoin and mental health in adolescents: Australian consensus.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Casey; Spelman, Lynda; Oziemski, Margaret; Ryan, Alexander; Manoharan, Shobhan; Wilson, Perry; Daubney, Michael; Scott, James

    2014-05-01

    Acne is a common condition among adolescents and has the potential to negatively impact on the psychological well-being of those who suffer from it. In particular, depression and suicidal ideation are more common in adolescents with acne. Successful treatment of acne can improve the quality of life and reduce levels of anxiety and depression in these individuals. The current treatment of choice for severe or refractive acne is isotretinoin, a retinoid. While the possible causal association between isotretinoin and mental illness remains a controversial topic, a recent systematic review has presented evidence to support this relationship. In light of this evidence, a group of dermatologists and psychiatrists have collaborated to develop these recommendations to aid the safe prescribing of isotretinoin in adolescents. These clinical suggestions are aimed at practitioners in both disciplines to increase awareness of the current evidence in support of the association between isotretinoin and adolescent depression.

  10. Adolescent Depression

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Mary N.; Peterson, John; Sheldon, Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Depression in adolescence and adulthood is common, afflicting up to 20 percent of these populations. It represents a significant public health concern and is associated with considerable suffering and functional impairment. Adolescent-onset depression tends to be a particularly malignant and recalcitrant condition, increasing the likelihood of recurrence and chronicity in adulthood. Clinical presentations for various medical and psychiatric conditions, as well as reactions to psychosocial stressors, can mimic or confound the picture of depression in adolescents. Therefore, careful assessment and differential diagnosis is essential. Effective treatments, both pharmacological and psychosocial in nature, exist, and so early detection and intervention is paramount. This article presents an overview of optimal prevention, assessment, and clinical decision-making strategies for managing depression in adolescents. PMID:19855857

  11. Enhancing Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology Research Within the National Clinical Trials Network: Rationale, Progress, and Emerging Strategies.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Aaron R; Nichols, Craig R; Freyer, David R

    2015-10-01

    Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology (AYAO, including patients 15-39 years of age) is an emerging discipline in the field of cancer treatment and research. Poorer survival outcomes for this population and characteristic age-related challenges in care have called attention to the need for increased AYAO research. This chapter outlines pressing questions and reviews recent progress in AYAO research within the current organizational structure of the federal clinical trials enterprise, emphasizing how the United States National Cancer Institute's National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) has created novel opportunities for collaborative AYAO research among the pediatric and adult NCTN groups. Potential strategies for expanding AYAO research, both within the NCTN and with other partners in the federal and advocacy domains are identified.

  12. Group-based preference assessment for children and adolescents in a residential setting: examining developmental, clinical, gender, and ethnic differences.

    PubMed

    Resetar Volz, Jennifer L; Cook, Clayton R

    2009-11-01

    This study examines developmental, clinical, gender, and ethnic group differences in preference in residentially placed children and adolescents. In addition, this study considers whether residentially placed youth prefer stimuli currently being used as rewards as part of a campuswide token economy system and whether youth would identify preferred stimuli that are not currently offered. The article discusses a survey devised specifically for the purpose of this study. Stimuli currently offered as rewards are listed and rated on a 5-point Likert-type scale. Results indicate that the majority of stimuli available within the token economy system were rated as preferred. Also, significant developmental, clinical, gender, and ethnic group differences are found, indicating the benefit of considering group-level characteristics when designing and implementing a groupwide token economy system. The implications of the results and directions for future research are discussed.

  13. Genome-wide Association Study of Tenofovir Pharmacokinetics and Creatinine Clearance in AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol A5202

    PubMed Central

    Wanga, Valentine; Venuto, Charles; Morse, Gene D.; Acosta, Edward P.; Daar, Eric S.; Haas, David W.; Li, Chun; Shepherd, Bryan E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Tenofovir disoproxil fumarate (TDF) causes kidney toxicity in some patients. We performed genome-wide analyses to identify associations with plasma tenofovir clearance and change in creatinine clearance (CrCl) during the first 6 months after initiating therapy among subjects randomized to TDF/emtricitabine-containing regimens in AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol A5202. Methods Pharmacokinetic analyses involved 501 subjects randomized to the tenofovir arm. The CrCl analyses involved 1096 subjects, including 548 control subjects randomized to abacavir-containing regimens. All had been randomized to also receive atazanavir/ritonavir or efavirenz. Multivariable linear regression and generalized least squares models tested for associations between polymorphisms and tenofovir clearance and CrCl change, with Bonferroni correction. Planned sub-analyses considered candidate genes and polymorphisms. Results Median CrCl at baseline was 116 ml/min (interquartile range [IQR] 99.8 to 135.5). Median change in CrCl after 6 months was −0.5 ml/min (−10.7 to +10.8) and 2.2 (IQR −9.9 to +13.2) in tenofovir and abacavir arms, respectively. In genome-wide analyses SLC17A1 rs12662869 was associated with an increase in tenofovir clearance (P = 7.1x10−9). In candidate gene analysis for tenofovir clearance, most polymorphisms evaluated were in ABCC4. In the ABCC4 region, the lowest p-value was for CLDN10 rs12866697 (P=1.4x10−3). Among African Americans, SLC22A2 rs3127573 was associated with a greater 6-month CrCl increase in the tenofovir arm after correcting for multiple comparisons (P = 3.3x10−5). Conclusions Among subjects randomized to receive TDF/emtricitabine in A5202, there were no genome-wide significant associations with change in CrCl. This study did not replicate polymorphisms previously implicated in tenofovir-associated renal injury. PMID:26148204

  14. The Spectrum of Clinical and Pathological Manifestations of AIDS in a Consecutive Series of 236 Autopsied Cases in Mumbai, India

    PubMed Central

    Lanjewar, Dhaneshwar Namdeorao

    2011-01-01

    The HIV epidemic in the Asian subcontinent has a significant impact on India. The AIDS associated pathology has not been well evaluated in a representative study hence very little is known about the spectrum of HIV/AIDS associated diseases in Indian subcontinent. To determine the important postmortem findings in HIV infected individuals in Mumbai, autopsy study was carried out. The patient population included patients with AIDS who died at the tertiary care hospital over a 20 year period from 1988 to 2007. A total of 236 (182; 77% males and 54; 23%) females) patients with AIDS were autopsied. The main risk factor for HIV transmission was heterosexual contact (226 patients; 96%) and 223/236 (94%) patients died of HIV-related diseases. Tuberculosis was the prime cause of death in 149 (63%) patients, followed by bacterial pneumonia 33 (14%), cryptococcosis 18 (8%), toxoplasmosis of brain 15 (6%), pneumocystis jiroveci (PCJ) 1 (0.5%) and Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma 7 (3%) cases. The major underlying pathologies are either preventable or treatable conditions. There is an urgent need for attention towards the diagnosis, issue of therapy, and care of HIV disease in developing countries. Reducing mortality in patients with AIDS from infections must be highest public health policy in India. PMID:21660276

  15. HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report: U.S. HIV and AIDS Cases Reported through December 2001. Year-End Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report, 2002

    2002-01-01

    This report presents tables on: persons reported to be living with HIV infection and AIDS, by area and age group; AIDS cases and annual rates and HIV infection cases, by area and age group; male and female adult/adolescent annual AIDS and HIV infection rates; AIDS and HIV cases by age group, exposure category, and sex; male and female…

  16. Improving glycaemic control and life skills in adolescents with type 1 diabetes: A randomised, controlled intervention study using the Guided Self-Determination-Young method in triads of adolescents, parents and health care providers integrated into routine paediatric outpatient clinics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Adolescents with type 1 diabetes face demanding challenges due to conflicting priorities between psychosocial needs and diabetes management. This conflict often results in poor glycaemic control and discord between adolescents and parents. Adolescent-parent conflicts are thus a barrier for health care providers (HCPs) to overcome in their attempts to involve both adolescents and parents in improvement of glycaemic control. Evidence-based interventions that involve all three parties (i.e., adolescents, parents and HCPs) and are integrated into routine outpatient clinic visits are lacking. The Guided Self-Determination method is proven effective in adult care and has been adapted to adolescents and parents (Guided Self-Determination-Young (GSD-Y)) for use in paediatric diabetes outpatient clinics. Our objective is to test whether GSD-Y used in routine paediatric outpatient clinic visits will reduce haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) concentrations and improve adolescents' life skills compared with a control group. Methods/Design Using a mixed methods design comprising a randomised controlled trial and a nested qualitative evaluation, we will recruit 68 adolescents age 13 - 18 years with type 1 diabetes (HbA1c > 8.0%) and their parents from 2 Danish hospitals and randomise into GSD-Y or control groups. During an 8-12 month period, the GSD-Y group will complete 8 outpatient GSD-Y visits, and the control group will completes an equal number of standard visits. The primary outcome is HbA1c. Secondary outcomes include the following: number of self-monitored blood glucose values and levels of autonomous motivation, involvement and autonomy support from parents, autonomy support from HCPs, perceived competence in managing diabetes, well-being, and diabetes-related problems. Primary and secondary outcomes will be evaluated within and between groups by comparing data from baseline, after completion of the visits, and again after a 6-month follow-up. To illustrate how GSD

  17. Now That You Want to Take Your HIV/AIDS Vaccine/Biological Product Research Concept into the Clinic: What are “cGMP”?

    PubMed Central

    Sheets, Rebecca L.; Rangavajhula, Vijaya; Pullen, Jeffrey K.; Butler, Chris; Mehra, Vijay; Shapiro, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The Division of AIDS Vaccine Research Program funds the discovery and development of HIV/AIDS vaccine candidates. Basic researchers, having discovered a potential vaccine in the laboratory, next want to take that candidate into the clinic to test the concept in humans, to see if it translates. Many of them have heard of “cGMP” and know that they are supposed to make a “GMP product” to take into the clinic, but often they are not very familiar with what “cGMP” means and why these good practices are so important. As members of the Vaccine Translational Research Branch, we frequently get asked “can’t we use the material we made in the lab in the clinic?” or “aren’t Phase 1 studies exempt from cGMP?” Over the years, we have had many experiences where researchers or their selected contract manufacturing organizations have not applied an appropriate degree of compliance with cGMP suitable for the clinical phase of development. We share some of these experiences and the lessons learned, along with explaining the importance of cGMP, just what cGMP means, and what they can assure, in an effort to de-mystify this subject and facilitate the rapid and safe translational development of HIV vaccines. PMID:25698494

  18. Outcomes of antiretroviral therapy among younger versus older adolescents and adults in an urban clinic, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Matyanga, C M J; Takarinda, K C; Owiti, P; Mutasa-Apollo, T; Mugurungi, O; Buruwe, L; Reid, A J

    2016-06-21

    Contexte : Un centre de santé soutenu par une organisation non gouvernementale offrant des services de santé, notamment les services de traitement antirétroviral (TAR).Objectif : Comparer la rétention du TAR entre des adolescents plus jeunes (10–14 ans) et plus âgés (15–19 ans) et des adultes plus jeunes (20–29 ans) et plus âgés (⩾30 ans) et déterminer les facteurs associés à l'attrition et spécifiques des adolescents et des adultes parmi ceux qui ont mis en route du TAR en 2010–2011.Schéma : Etude rétrospective de cohorte.Résultats : L'étude a inclus 110 (7%) adolescents et 1484 (93%) adultes. Aucune différence en termes de rétention n'a été observée entre les adolescents plus jeunes et plus âgés à 6, 12 et 24 mois. Davantage des plus jeunes adolescents ont été initiés au traitement avec un index de masse corporelle <16 kg/m(2) comparé aux adolescents plus âgés (64% contre 47% ; P = 0,04). Il y avait plus de femmes (74% contre 52% ; P < 0,001) et moins de patients démarrant le TAR avec un comptage de CD4 ⩽ 350 cellules/mm(3) (77% contre 81% ; P = 0,007) parmi les adultes plus jeunes comparés aux plus âgés. Les adultes plus jeunes ont eu davantage d'attrition à tout moment que les plus âgés. Aucun facteur de risque d'attrition n'a été observé parmi les adolescents. Chez les adultes, les facteurs associés à l'attrition ont inclus l'âge plus jeune, un comptage de CD4 plus faible et une infection au virus de l'immunodéficience humaine plus avancée lors de la mise en route du traitement et son initiation dans le cadre d'un protocole basé sur la stavudine.Conclusion : Les adultes plus jeunes ont eu davantage d'attrition et devraient susciter davantage d'attention. Nous n'avons pas pu démontrer de différences d'attrition entre les adolescents plus jeunes et plus âgés. La perte de vue a été la cause principale d'attrition dans tous les groupes d'âge. Dans l'ensemble, un démarrage plus précoce du TAR parait

  19. Randomized Clinical Trial of Family-Based Treatment and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Bulimia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Le Grange, Daniel; Lock, James; Agras, W. Stewart; Bryson, Susan W.; Jo, Booil

    2015-01-01

    Objective There is a paucity of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN). Prior studies suggest cognitive-behavioral therapy adapted for adolescents (CBT-A) and family-based treatment (FBT-BN) could be effective for this patient population. The objective of this study was to compare the relative efficacy of these two specific therapies, FBT-BN and CBT-A. In addition, a smaller group was randomized to a non-specific treatment (supportive psychotherapy [SPT]), whose data were to be used if there were no differences between FBT-BN and CBT-A at end of treatment (EOT). Method This two-site RCT (Chicago and Stanford) randomized 130 participants (aged 12–18 years) meeting DSM, 4th Edition criteria for BN or partial BN (binge eating and purging ≥once per week for six months). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, EOT, 6 and 12 months post treatment. Treatments involved 18 outpatient sessions over 6 months. Primary outcome was defined as abstinence from binge eating and purging for 4 weeks prior to assessment, using the Eating Disorder Examination. Results Participants in FBT-BN achieved higher abstinence rates than in CBT-A at EOT (39% vs. 20%; p=.040, number needed to treat [NNT]=5) and at 6-month follow-up (44% vs. 25%; p=.030, NNT=5). Abstinence rates between these two groups did not differ statistically at 12- month follow-up (49% vs. 32%; p=.130, NNT=6). Conclusion FBT-BN is more effective in promoting abstinence from binge eating and purging than CBT-A in adolescent BN at EOT and 6-month follow-up. By 12-month follow-up there were no statistically significant differences between the two treatments. PMID:26506579

  20. Feasibility of activity-promoting video games among obese adolescents and young adults in a clinical setting.

    PubMed

    Radon, Katja; Fürbeck, Barbara; Thomas, Silke; Siegfried, Wolfgang; Nowak, Dennis; von Kries, Rüdiger

    2011-01-01

    One component of the recent obesity epidemic is the sedentary behaviour of children and adolescents e.g., use of video games consoles. The new generation of video games requires body movements and might thus increase activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether such games could have an effect on physical activity in obese adolescents in a clinical setting. Between March and May 2007 activity-promoting video games ("apvg") were offered to all 84 inpatients (aged 13-28 years) registered in a long-term rehabilitation programme on a voluntary base. Reasons for (non-)attendance were assessed. Frequency and duration of use of the activity-promoting video game sessions were documented. Furthermore, heart rate and activity counts during use of "apvg", endurance training, and strength training were measured. Of 84 inpatients, 51 used the "apvg" at least once (69%) over the study period. The median weekly use of the intervention was 27 min during the first week (range 0-182 min), declining to zero (range 0-74 min) in week four. Mean heart rate during the sessions (mean 115 bpm; 95% confidence interval 108-122 bpm) was similar to the heart rate during strength training (106 bpm; 101-112 bpm). The results indicate that the video games could have an impact on the activity of obese adolescents and young adults. However, as the interest in the devices seems to be too low the suitability of them for weight reduction programmes in young people cannot be ensured.

  1. Prevalence, clinical characteristics, and prognosis of GATA2-related myelodysplastic syndromes in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wlodarski, Marcin W; Hirabayashi, Shinsuke; Pastor, Victor; Starý, Jan; Hasle, Henrik; Masetti, Riccardo; Dworzak, Michael; Schmugge, Markus; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry; Ussowicz, Marek; De Moerloose, Barbara; Catala, Albert; Smith, Owen P; Sedlacek, Petr; Lankester, Arjan C; Zecca, Marco; Bordon, Victoria; Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Kühl, Jörn Sven; Sykora, Karl-Walter; Albert, Michael H; Przychodzien, Bartlomiej; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Schwarz, Stephan; Göhring, Gudrun; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Cseh, Annámaria; Noellke, Peter; Yoshimi, Ayami; Locatelli, Franco; Baumann, Irith; Strahm, Brigitte; Niemeyer, Charlotte M

    2016-03-17

    Germline GATA2 mutations cause cellular deficiencies with high propensity for myeloid disease. We investigated 426 children and adolescents with primary myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and 82 cases with secondary MDS enrolled in 2 consecutive prospective studies of the European Working Group of MDS in Childhood (EWOG-MDS) conducted in Germany over a period of 15 years. Germline GATA2 mutations accounted for 15% of advanced and 7% of all primary MDS cases, but were absent in children with MDS secondary to therapy or acquired aplastic anemia. Mutation carriers were older at diagnosis and more likely to present with monosomy 7 and advanced disease compared with wild-type cases. For stratified analysis according to karyotype, 108 additional primary MDS patients registered with EWOG-MDS were studied. Overall, we identified 57 MDS patients with germline GATA2 mutations. GATA2 mutations were highly prevalent among patients with monosomy 7 (37%, all ages) reaching its peak in adolescence (72% of adolescents with monosomy 7). Unexpectedly, monocytosis was more frequent in GATA2-mutated patients. However, when adjusted for the selection bias from monosomy 7, mutational status had no effect on the hematologic phenotype. Finally, overall survival and outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) were not influenced by mutational status. This study identifies GATA2 mutations as the most common germline defect predisposing to pediatric MDS with a very high prevalence in adolescents with monosomy 7. GATA2 mutations do not confer poor prognosis in childhood MDS. However, the high risk for progression to advanced disease must guide decision-making toward timely HSCT.

  2. Recruitment Strategies and the Retention of Obese Urban Racial/Ethnic Minority Adolescents in Clinical Trials: The FIT Families Project, Michigan, 2010–2014

    PubMed Central

    Jacques-Tiura, Angela J.; Naar-King, Sylvie; Ellis, Deborah A.; Jen, Kai-Lin Catherine; Marshall, Sharon

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The successful recruitment and retention of participants is integral to the translation of research findings. We examined the recruitment and retention rates of racial/ethnic minority adolescents at a center involved in the National Institutes of Health Obesity Research for Behavioral Intervention Trials (ORBIT) initiative by the 3 recruitment strategies used: clinic, informatics, and community. Methods During the 9-month study, 186 family dyads, each composed of an obese African American adolescent and a caregiver, enrolled in a 6-month weight-loss intervention, a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial. We compared recruitment and retention rates by recruitment strategy and examined whether recruitment strategy was related to dyad baseline characteristics. Results Of the 186 enrolled families, 110 (59.1%) were recruited through clinics, 53 (28.5%) through informatics, and 23 (12.4%) through community. Of those recruited through community, 40.4% enrolled in the study, compared with 32.7% through clinics and 8.2% through informatics. Active refusal rate was 3%. Of the 1,036 families identified for the study, 402 passively refused to participate: 290 (45.1%) identified through informatics, 17 (29.8%) through community, and 95 (28.3%) through clinics. Recruitment strategy was not related to the age of the adolescent, adolescent comorbidities, body mass index of the adolescent or caregiver, income or education of the caregiver, or retention rates at 3 months, 7 months, or 9 months. Study retention rate was 87.8%. Conclusion Using multiple recruitment strategies is beneficial when working with racial/ethnic minority adolescents, and each strategy can yield good retention. Research affiliated with health care systems would benefit from the continued specification, refinement, and dissemination of these strategies. PMID:25695260

  3. American Academy of Pediatrics. Clinical report--gynecologic examination for adolescents in the pediatric office setting.

    PubMed

    Braverman, Paula K; Breech, Lesley

    2010-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics promotes the inclusion of the gynecologic examination in the primary care setting within the medical home. Gynecologic issues are commonly seen by clinicians who provide primary care to adolescents. Some of the most common concerns include questions related to pubertal development; menstrual disorders such as dysmenorrhea, amenorrhea, oligomenorrhea, and abnormal uterine bleeding; contraception; and sexually transmitted and non-sexually transmitted infections. The gynecologic examination is a key element in assessing pubertal status and documenting physical findings. Most adolescents do not need an internal examination involving a speculum or bimanual examination. However, for cases in which more extensive examination is needed, the primary care office with the primary care clinician who has established rapport and trust with the patient is often the best setting for pelvic examination. This report reviews the gynecologic examination, including indications for the pelvic examination in adolescents and the approach to this examination in the office setting. Indications for referral to a gynecologist are included. The pelvic examination may be successfully completed when conducted without pressure and approached as a normal part of routine young women's health care.

  4. Do gender and age moderate the symptom structure of PTSD? Findings from a national clinical sample of children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Contractor, Ateka A; Layne, Christopher M; Steinberg, Alan M; Ostrowski, Sarah A; Ford, Julian D; Elhai, Jon D

    2013-12-30

    A substantial body of evidence documents that the frequency and intensity of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms are linked to such demographic variables as female sex (e.g., Kaplow et al., 2005) and age (e.g., Meiser-Stedman et al., 2008). Considerably less is known about relations between biological sex and age with PTSD's latent factor structure. This study systematically examined the roles that sex and age may play as candidate moderators of the full range of factor structure parameters of an empirically supported five-factor PTSD model (Elhai et al., 2011). The sample included 6591 trauma-exposed children and adolescents selected from the National Child Traumatic Stress Network's Core Data Set. Confirmatory factor analysis using invariance testing (Gregorich, 2006) and comparative fit index difference values (Cheung and Rensvold, 2002) reflected a mixed pattern of test item intercepts across age groups. The adolescent subsample produced lower residual error variances, reflecting less measurement error than the child subsample. Sex did not show a robust moderating effect. We conclude by discussing implications for clinical assessment, theory building, and future research.

  5. Adolescents and Young Adults with Down Syndrome Presenting to a Medical Clinic with Depression: Phenomenology and Characterization Using the Reiss Scales and Aberrant Behavior Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, George T.; Aidikoff, Jenna M.; Goyal, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Caretakers of adolescents and young adults with Down syndrome (DS) may report the onset of a depressive illness in previously mentally well individuals. However, the behavioral phenomenology of these conditions has not been well characterized. We ascertained a cohort of DS patient-subjects presenting to a specialty clinic with medical and/or…

  6. Sources of Site Differences in the Efficacy of a Multisite Clinical Trial: The Treatment of SSRI-Resistant Depression in Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spirito, Anthony; Abebe, Kaleab Z.; Iyengar, Satish; Brent, David; Vitiello, Benedetto; Clarke, Gregory; Wagner, Karen Dineen; Asarnow, Joan; Emslie, Graham; Keller, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Site differences in treatment outcomes are not often highlighted when the results of multisite randomized clinical trials (MRCTs) are reported. The primary analyses of a 6-site MRCT, the Treatment of SSRI-Resistant Depression in Adolescents (TORDIA) study, showed substantial variation by site in the performance of a medication-only condition and a…

  7. The Role of Co-Occurring Disruptive Behavior in the Clinical Presentation of Children and Adolescents with Anxiety in the Context of Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Storch, Eric A.; Arnold, Elysse B.; Jones, Anna M.; Ale, Chelsea M.; Wood, Jeffrey J.; Ehrenreich-May, Jill; Lewin, Adam B.; Mutch, P. Jane; Murphy, Tanya K.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored the impact of disruptive behavior disorder (DBD) comorbidity on theoretically relevant correlates among 87 children and adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and clinically significant anxiety. Relative to youth with ASD and anxiety alone, participants with ASD, anxiety, and DBD: (a) presented with significantly more…

  8. The Effect of Frequency Transposition on Speech Perception in Adolescents and Young Adults with Profound Hearing Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gou, J.; Smith, J.; Valero, J.; Rubio, I.

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a clinical trial evaluating outcomes of a frequency-lowering technique for adolescents and young adults with severe to profound hearing impairment. Outcomes were defined by changes in aided thresholds, speech perception, and acceptance. The participants comprised seven young people aged between 13 and 25 years. They were…

  9. [Dysmenorrhea in adolescents: epidemio-clinical study at the referral health center, Bamako District. Report of 300 cases].

    PubMed

    Diarra, I; Kouyaté, Y M; Sow, S A; Maiga, M K

    2009-01-01

    This clinical epidemiological study has been conducted at the district hospital of Commune II in Bamako area.Dysmenorrhea has become a very common feature during out patients consultation. It affects almost one adolescent out of 3 examined during this study which represent 42, 8% of the studied population ranged from 10 to 19 years, with a men age of 16 years. Most of them were household women (50%),never pregnant (60%) and never delivery (64%). Most of them have been mainly claiming about contraction pain (33%) and discomfort (17,3%). The pain has been followed by asthenia (86,7%), and irritability (87,7%).Dysmenorrhea was a major cause of absenteism (48,3%). The factors influencing this type of dysmenorhea was the age and psychological stress.

  10. Perceived problems with computer gaming and internet use among adolescents: measurement tool for non-clinical survey studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Existing instruments for measuring problematic computer and console gaming and internet use are often lengthy and often based on a pathological perspective. The objective was to develop and present a new and short non-clinical measurement tool for perceived problems related to computer use and gaming among adolescents and to study the association between screen time and perceived problems. Methods Cross-sectional school-survey of 11-, 13-, and 15-year old students in thirteen schools in the City of Aarhus, Denmark, participation rate 89%, n = 2100. The main exposure was time spend on weekdays on computer- and console-gaming and internet use for communication and surfing. The outcome measures were three indexes on perceived problems related to computer and console gaming and internet use. Results The three new indexes showed high face validity and acceptable internal consistency. Most schoolchildren with high screen time did not experience problems related to computer use. Still, there was a strong and graded association between time use and perceived problems related to computer gaming, console gaming (only boys) and internet use, odds ratios ranging from 6.90 to 10.23. Conclusion The three new measures of perceived problems related to computer and console gaming and internet use among adolescents are appropriate, reliable and valid for use in non-clinical surveys about young people’s everyday life and behaviour. These new measures do not assess Internet Gaming Disorder as it is listed in the DSM and therefore has no parity with DSM criteria. We found an increasing risk of perceived problems with increasing time spent with gaming and internet use. Nevertheless, most schoolchildren who spent much time with gaming and internet use did not experience problems. PMID:24731270

  11. Developmental Trajectories of Aggression, Prosocial Behavior, and Social-Cognitive Problem Solving in Emerging Adolescents with Clinically Elevated ADHD Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kofler, Michael J.; Larsen, Ross; Sarver, Dustin E.; Tolan, Patrick H.

    2015-01-01

    Middle school is a critical yet understudied period of social behavioral risks and opportunities that may be particularly difficult for emerging adolescents with ADHD given their childhood social difficulties. Although childhood ADHD has been associated with increased aggression and peer relational difficulties, relatively few ADHD studies have examined social behavior beyond the elementary years, or examined aspects of positive (prosocial) behavior. In addition, social-cognitive problem solving has been implicated in ADHD; however, its longitudinal impact on prosocial and aggressive behavior is unclear. The current study examined how middle school students with clinically elevated ADHD symptoms differ from their non-ADHD peers on baseline (sixth grade) and age-related changes in prosocial and aggressive behavior, and the extent to which social-cognitive problem solving strategies mediate these relations. Emerging adolescents with (n = 178) and without (n = 3,806) clinically elevated, teacher-reported ADHD inattentive and hyperactive/impulsive symptoms were compared longitudinally across sixth through eighth grades using parallel process latent growth curve modeling, accounting for student demographic characteristics, ODD symptoms, deviant peer association, school climate, and parental monitoring. Sixth graders with elevated ADHD symptoms engaged in somewhat fewer prosocial behaviors (d= −0.44) and more aggressive behavior (d= 0.20) relative to their peers. These small social behavioral deficits decreased but were not normalized across the middle school years. Contrary to hypotheses, social-cognitive problem solving was not impaired in the ADHD group, and did not mediate the association between ADHD and social behavior during the middle school years. ADHD and social-cognitive problem solving contributed independently to social behavior, both in sixth grade and across the middle school years; the influence of social-cognitive problem solving on social behavior was

  12. Modafinil as a treatment for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in children and adolescents: a double blind, randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Shahrokh; Mohammadi, Mohammad-Reza; Mohammadi, Mohammad; Nouroozinejad, Gholam-Hossein; Kahbazi, Manijeh; Akhondzadeh, Shahin

    2008-01-01

    Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is the most prevalent psychiatric disorder currently afflicting children and is among the most common chronic conditions affecting school-age children. Modafinil is structurally different from the psychostimulants that are typically used to treat ADHD and has been reported to be effective in improving the symptoms of ADHD. The aim of the present study was to further evaluate, under double blind and controlled conditions, the efficacy of modafinil for ADHD in children and adolescents as compared to methylphenidate. Patients included 60 outpatients, children (47 boys and 13 girls) between the ages of 6-15 who clearly met the DSM-IV-TR diagnostic criteria for ADHD. Subjects were recruited from an outpatient child and adolescent clinic for a 6 week double blind, randomized clinical trial. All study subjects were randomly assigned to receive either treatment with modafinil film coated tablet (in doses of 200-300 mg/day) depending on weight (200 mg/day for <30 kg and 300 mg/day for >30 kg) (group 1) or methylphenidate (in doses of 20-30 mg/day) depending on weight (20 mg/day for <30 kg and 30 mg/day for >30 kg) (group 2). The principal measure of outcome was the Teacher and Parent ADHD Rating Scale-IV. Patients were assessed at baseline and at 21 and 42 days after the medication started. No significant differences were observed between the two groups on the Parent and Teacher Rating Scale scores. Side effects of decreased appetite and difficulty falling asleep were observed more in the methylphenidate group. The results of this study indicate that modafinil significantly improved symptoms of ADHD and was well tolerated and it is beneficial in the treatment of children with ADHD.

  13. Does neighbourhood social capital aid in levelling the social gradient in the health and well-being of children and adolescents? A literature review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although most countries in the European Union are richer and healthier than ever, health inequalities remain an important public health challenge. Health-related problems and premature death have disproportionately been reported in disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Neighbourhood social capital is believed to influence the association between neighbourhood deprivation and health in children and adolescents, making it a potentially interesting concept for policymakers. Methods This study aims to review the role of social capital in health inequalities and the social gradient in health and well-being of children and adolescents. A systematic review of published quantitative literature was conducted, focussing on (1) the mediating role of neighbourhood social capital in the relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and health-related outcomes in children and adolescents and (2) the interaction between neighbourhood social capital and socio-economic characteristics in relation to health-related outcomes in children and adolescents. Three electronic databases were searched. Studies executed between 1 January 1990 and 1 September 2011 in Western countries (USA, New Zealand, Australia and Europe) that included a health-related outcome in children or adolescents and a variable that measured neighbourhood social capital were included. Results Eight studies met the inclusion criteria for the review. The findings are mixed. Only two of five studies confirmed that neighbourhood social capital mediates the association between neighbourhood deprivation and health and well-being in adolescents. Furthermore, two studies found a significant interaction between neighbourhood socio-economic factors and neighbourhood social capital, which indicates that neighbourhood social capital is especially beneficial for children who reside in deprived neighbourhoods. However, two other studies did not find a significant interaction between SES and neighbourhood social capital. Due

  14. Type 2 diabetes mellitus in children and adolescents: a relatively new clinical problem within pediatric practice

    PubMed Central

    Temneanu, OR; Trandafir, LM; Purcarea, MR

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a complex, chronic metabolic disease, presents a heterogeneous etiology, with risk factors at the social level and behavioral, environmental, and genetic susceptibility. It is associated with serious complications, but the early diagnosis and initiation of therapy may prevent or delay the onset of long-term complications. In children and adolescents, it was observed in particular increasing the prevalence of T2DM along with obesity, which is associated with insulin resistance. Patient and family education for a young person with T2DM is very important and will focus on behavioral changes (diet and activity). PMID:27974926

  15. Death after closed adolescent knee injury and popliteal artery occlusion: a case report and clinical review.

    PubMed

    Reid, Jeremy J; Kremen, Thomas J; Oppenheim, William L

    2013-11-01

    A healthy adolescent male soccer player sustained a radiograph-negative, effusion-negative physeal injury of the proximal tibia from a ground-level fall with traumatic occlusion of the popliteal artery. Orthopaedic evaluation and arteriography were delayed for 72 hours after the injury. He arrived at a tertiary referral center in multisystem organ failure secondary to lower extremity ischemic necrosis, septic pulmonary thromboembolism, and systemic shock. Emergent medical evaluation, a high index of suspicion, and a careful neurovascular examination are imperative after every closed knee injury in the young athlete.

  16. Clinical utility of valsartan in treatment of children and adolescents with high blood pressure.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Manu; Mohiuddin, Syed M

    2011-01-01

    The incidence of hypertension in the pediatric population has been increasing secondary to lifestyle changes in children and adolescents. Recent studies have enhanced our understanding of the treatment of pediatric hypertension. Angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors have traditionally been the most commonly used class of medication in children with hypertension. This is partly due to the important role of the renin angiotensin aldosterone system pathway in the mediation of pediatric hypertension. Angiotensin receptor blockers provide a reasonable alternative to angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The need for better tolerated antihypertensives had led to development of many new antihypertensives. Valsartan is a relatively novel angiotensin receptor blocker that has been shown to be effective in the treatment of pediatric hypertension. Two recent trials have demonstrated the efficacy of valsartan monotherapy in the pediatric population aged 1-16 years. Once-daily oral preparations of valsartan achieve adequate blood pressure control in the pediatric population. Lack of generic formulations is an important disadvantage. Plasma levels are predictable and clearance is primarily by the liver. Valsartan should be prescribed cautiously for sexually active adolescent females due to concern about angiotensin receptor blocker fetopathy. Otherwise, the drug has infrequent side effects. In summary, valsartan is a new and useful alternative to conventional antihypertensive therapy in pediatric population.

  17. American Academy of Pediatrics. Clinical report--sport-related concussion in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Halstead, Mark E; Walter, Kevin D

    2010-09-01

    Sport-related concussion is a "hot topic" in the media and in medicine. It is a common injury that is likely underreported by pediatric and adolescent athletes. Football has the highest incidence of concussion, but girls have higher concussion rates than boys do in similar sports. A clear understanding of the definition, signs, and symptoms of concussion is necessary to recognize it and rule out more severe intracranial injury. Concussion can cause symptoms that interfere with school, social and family relationships, and participation in sports. Recognition and education are paramount, because although proper equipment, sport technique, and adherence to rules of the sport may decrease the incidence or severity of concussions, nothing has been shown to prevent them. Appropriate management is essential for reducing the risk of long-term symptoms and complications. Cognitive and physical rest is the mainstay of management after diagnosis, and neuropsychological testing is a helpful tool in the management of concussion. Return to sport should be accomplished by using a progressive exercise program while evaluating for any return of signs or symptoms. This report serves as a basis for understanding the diagnosis and management of concussion in children and adolescent athletes.

  18. Adolescent Outpatient Treatment and Continuing Care: Main Findings from a Randomized Clinical Trial*

    PubMed Central

    Godley, Susan H.; Garner, Bryan R.; Passetti, Lora L.; Funk, Rodney R.; Dennis, Michael L.; Godley, Mark D.

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of two types of outpatient treatment with and without Assertive Continuing Care (ACC) for 320 adolescents with substance use disorders. Study participants were randomly assigned to one of four conditions: (a) Chestnut’s Bloomington Outpatient Treatment (CBOP) without ACC; (b) CBOP with ACC; (c) Motivational Enhancement Therapy/Cognitive Behavior Therapy-7 session model (MET/CBT7) without ACC; and (d) MET/CBT7 with ACC. All study conditions attained high rates of participant engagement and retention. Follow-up interviews were completed with over 90% of the adolescents at three, six, nine, and twelve months after treatment admission. There was a significant time by condition effect over 12 months, with CBOP having a slight advantage for average percentage of days abstinent. Unlike previous findings that ACC provided incremental effectiveness following residential treatment, there were no statistically significant findings with regard to the incremental effectiveness of ACC following outpatient treatment. Analysis of the costs of each intervention combined with its outcomes revealed that the most cost-effective condition was MET/CBT7 without ACC. PMID:20219293

  19. The AFFORD Clinical Decision Aid To Identify Emergency Department Patients With Atrial Fibrillation At Low Risk For 30-Day Adverse Events

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Tyler W.; Storrow, Alan B.; Jenkins, Cathy A.; Abraham, Robert L.; Liu, Dandan; Miller, Karen F.; Moser, Kelly M.; Russ, Stephan; Roden, Dan M.; Harrell, Frank E.; Darbar, Dawood

    2015-01-01

    There is wide variation in the management of emergency department (ED) patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). We aimed to derive and internally validate the first prospective, ED-based clinical decision aid to identify patients with AF at low risk for 30-day adverse events. We performed a prospective cohort study at a university-affiliated, tertiary-care, ED. Patients were enrolled from June 9, 2010 to February 28, 2013 and followed for 30 days. We enrolled a convenience sample of ED patients presenting with symptomatic AF. Candidate predictors were based on ED data available in the first two hours. The decision aid was derived using model approximation (preconditioning) followed by strong bootstrap internal validation. We utilized an ordinal outcome hierarchy defined as the incidence of the most severe adverse event within 30 days of the ED evaluation. Of 497 patients enrolled, stroke and AF-related death occurred in 13 (3%) and 4 (<1%) patients, respectively. The decision aid included the following: age, triage vitals (systolic blood pressure, temperature, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, supplemental oxygen requirement); medical history (heart failure, home sotalol use, prior percutaneous coronary intervention, electrical cardioversion, cardiac ablation, frequency of AF symptoms); ED data (2 hour heart rate, chest radiograph results, hemoglobin, creatinine, and brain natriuretic peptide). The decision aid’s c-statistic in predicting any 30-day adverse event was 0.7 (95% CI, 0.65, 0.76). In conclusion, among ED patients with AF, AFFORD provides the first evidence based decision aid for identifying patients who are at low risk for 30-day adverse events and candidates for safe discharge. PMID:25633190

  20. The clinical characteristics and prognostic significance of AID, miR-181b, and miR-155 expression in adult patients with de novo B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangquan; Cao, Yang; Dong, Weimin; Lin, Yan; Wang, Qi; Wu, Wei; Hua, Xiaoying; Ling, Yun; Xie, Xiaobao; Hu, Shaoyan; Cen, Jiannong; Gu, Weiying

    2017-01-31

    This study aimed to investigate clinical characteristics and prognostic significance of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) gene, miR-181b and miR-155 expression in de novo adult B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) patients. Results showed that AID and miR-155 expression were higher in B-ALL patients than healthy controls, while miR-181b expression was lower in B-ALL patients. In addition, Ph(+) B-ALLs had higher AID expression than Ph(-) B-ALLs, and its high expression was associated with BCR-ABL. Moreover, B-ALL patients with AID(high) or miR-181b(low) expression had a shorter overall survival (OS). AID(high) with miR-181b(low), AID(high) with miR-155(low), miR-181b(low), miR-155(low), AID(high) with miR-181b(low) and miR-155(low) expression were associated with shorter OS. Combination of the three molecules are more accurate predictors for unfavorable OS compared with univariate group. Therefore, AID, miR-181b and miR-155 provide clinical prognosis of adult de novo B-ALL patients and may refine their molecular risk classification.

  1. Hearing Aids

    MedlinePlus

    ... more in both quiet and noisy situations. Hearing aids help people who have hearing loss from damage ... your doctor. There are different kinds of hearing aids. They differ by size, their placement on or ...

  2. AIDS (image)

    MedlinePlus

    AIDS (acquired immune deficiency syndrome) is caused by HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), and is a syndrome that ... life-threatening illnesses. There is no cure for AIDS, but treatment with antiviral medicine can suppress symptoms. ...

  3. Patch test results in children and adolescents. Study from the Santa Casa de Belo Horizonte Dermatology Clinic, Brazil, from 2003 to 2010*

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Dulcilea Ferraz; Goulart, Eugênio Marcos Andrade

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patch testing is an efficient method to identify the allergen responsible for allergic contact dermatitis. OBJECTIVE To evaluate the results of patch tests in children and adolescents comparing these two age groups' results. METHODS Cross-sectional study to assess patch test results of 125 children and adolescents aged 1-19 years, with suspected allergic contact dermatitis, in a dermatology clinic in Brazil. Two Brazilian standardized series were used. RESULTS Seventy four (59.2%) patients had "at least one positive reaction" to the patch test. Among these positive tests, 77.0% were deemed relevant. The most frequent allergens were nickel (36.8%), thimerosal (18.4%), tosylamide formaldehyde resin (6.8%), neomycin (6.4%), cobalt (4.0%) and fragrance mix I (4.0%). The most frequent positive tests came from adolescents (p=0.0014) and females (p=0.0002). There was no relevant statistical difference concerning contact sensitizations among patients with or without atopic history. However, there were significant differences regarding sensitization to nickel (p=0.029) and thimerosal (p=0.042) between the two age groups under study, while adolescents were the most affected. CONCLUSION Nickel and fragrances were the only positive (and relevant) allergens in children. Nickel and tosylamide formaldehyde resin were the most frequent and relevant allergens among adolescents. PMID:26560213

  4. [Update on the morbidity of psychiatric disorders in patients with AIDS: results of a clinical follow-up].

    PubMed

    Crespo, M D; Ochoa, E; Vicente, N; Pérez de los Cobos, J; Morales, P

    1990-01-01

    A follow-up study after one or two years of treatment was carried out on 107 AIDS patients who were seen by the Consultation-Liaison Psychiatry Unit of the Ramon y Cajal Hospital. The sample was reduced to 52 patients (49%) mainly due to the lack of check-ups in 43% and to the death of 8% of the cases. 36% of patients suffered from Delirium or Dementia and these had the greater mortality rate. Grade IV patients and those with a diagnosis of Adjustment Disorders came to the check-ups most frequently.

  5. Challenges in Conducting A Multi-Site Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Treatments for Adolescent Anorexia Nervosa

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Harry; Woodside, Blake; Agras, Stewart; Halmi, Katherine; Johnson, Craig; Kaye, Walter; Wilfley, Denise

    2011-01-01

    Objective To describe obstacles in the implementation of a controlled treatment trial of adolescent anorexia nervosa (AN). Method The original aim was to enter 240 participants with AN to one of 4 cells: Behavioral family therapy (BFT) plus fluoxetine; BFT plus placebo; systems family therapy (SFT) plus fluoxetine; SFT plus placebo. Results Recruitment was delayed pending a satisfactory resolution concerning participant safety. After 6 months of recruitment it became clear that the medication was associated with poor recruitment leading to a study redesign resulting in a comparison of two types of family therapy with a projected sample size of 160. One site was unable to recruit and was replaced. Discussion Problems with the delineation of safety procedures, recruitment, re-design of the study, and replacement of a site, were the main elements resulting in a 1-year delay. Suggestions are made for overcoming such problems in future AN trials. PMID:21495052

  6. Post-adolescent acne in women: more common and more clinical considerations.

    PubMed

    Kim, Grace K; Michaels, Brent B

    2012-06-01

    Current evidence suggests that post-adolescent acne in women is on the rise. Acne in this subgroup of patients commonly follows a specific pattern that can often be treatment resistant and/or prone to relapse, including after oral isotretinoin therapy. With a plethora of medications to choose from for acne treatment, many of which have been used in the past by patients without success, dermatology practitioners often find oral contraceptives and spironolactone to be of benefit in otherwise healthy adult females. Also, some of these patients may have concurrent hormonal anomalies such as polycystic ovarian syndrome or other underlying endocrine disorders, which should also be appropriately worked up by the clinician and managed accordingly. This article reviews some of the underlying pathophysiological factors, available treatment options, and screening guidelines to assist clinicians in the management of acne in adult females.

  7. Complications and comorbidities of T2DM in adolescents: findings from the TODAY clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Tryggestad, Jeanie B; Willi, Steven M

    2015-03-01

    With the rise in childhood obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) has been recognized to occur in adolescents with increasing frequency. Although much is known about T2DM in adults, few studies have examined the treatment and complications of T2DM in youth. The Treatment Options for type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Youth (TODAY) study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of various treatments and provided a unique opportunity to study the disease progression and appearance of complications in a pediatric cohort with recent onset of the disease. In the TODAY study, hypertension was present in 11.6% of the population at baseline and increased to 33.8% by the end of the study. Prevalence of high-risk LDL-cholesterol rose from 4.5% at baseline to 10.7% at the end of the study. Microalbuminuria was found in 6.3% of the cohort at baseline and increased to 16.6%. Retinopathy was not assessed upon entry into TODAY, but was present in 13.9% of the TODAY cohort at the end of the study. Experience to date indicates that these complications and comorbidities are similar to those seen in adults, but occur on an accelerated timeline. The early manifestation of diabetes complications in youth-onset T2DM suggests that this group will be burdened with the tangible consequences of cardiovascular disease, nephropathy, and retinopathy in the third and fourth decades of life. It is hoped that through an early, aggressive approach to treatment and prevention, we may be able to curb the onset and progression of these potentially devastating outcomes.

  8. Trajectories of Childhood Sexual Abuse and Early Adolescent HIV/AIDS Risk Behaviors: The Role of Other Maltreatment, Witnessed Violence, and Child Gender

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Deborah J.; Runyan, Desmond K.; Lewis, Terri; Litrownik, Alan J.; Black, Maureen M.; Wiley, Tisha; English, Diana E.; Proctor, Laura J.; Jones, Bobby L.; Nagin, Daniel S.

    2010-01-01

    Childhood sexual abuse (CSA) has been associated with HIV/AIDS risk behavior; however, much of this work is retrospective and focuses on women. The current study used semi-parametric mixture modeling with youth (n = 844; 48.8% boys) from the Longitudinal Studies of Child Abuse and Neglect (LONGSCAN) to examine the link between trajectories of CSA…

  9. Low Enrollment of Adolescents and Young Adults Onto Cancer Trials: Insights From the Community Clinical Oncology Program

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Michael E.; O’Mara, Ann M.; Seibel, Nita L.; Dickens, David S.; Langevin, Anne-Marie; Pollock, Brad H.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Stagnant outcomes for adolescents and young adults (AYAs; 15 to 39 years old) with cancer are partly attributed to poor enrollment onto clinical trials. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) Community Clinical Oncology Program (CCOP) was developed to improve clinical trial participation in the community setting, where AYAs are most often treated. Further, many CCOP sites had pediatric and medical oncologists with collaborative potential for AYA recruitment and care. For these reasons, we hypothesized that CCOP sites enrolled proportionately more AYAs than non-CCOP sites onto Children’s Oncology Group (COG) trials. Methods: For the 10-year period 2004 through 2013, the NCI Division of Cancer Prevention database was queried to evaluate enrollments into relevant COG studies. The proportional enrollment of AYAs at CCOP and non-CCOP sites was compared and the change in AYA enrollment patterns assessed. All sites were COG member institutions. Results: Although CCOP sites enrolled a higher proportion of patients in cancer control studies than non-CCOP sites (3.5% v 1.8%; P < .001), they enrolled a lower proportion of AYAs (24.1% v 28.2%, respectively; P < .001). Proportional AYA enrollment at CCOP sites decreased during the intervals 2004 through 2008 and 2009 through 2013 (26.7% v 21.7%; P < .001). Conclusion: Despite oncology practice settings that might be expected to achieve otherwise, CCOP sites did not enroll a larger proportion of AYAs in clinical trials than traditional COG institutions. Our findings suggest that the CCOP (now the NCI Community Oncology Research Program) can be leveraged for developing targeted interventions for overcoming AYA enrollment barriers. PMID:27026648

  10. Comparison of Commercial Wrist-Based and Smartphone Accelerometers, Actigraphy, and PSG in a Clinical Cohort of Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Toon, Elicia; Davey, Margot J.; Hollis, Samantha L.; Nixon, Gillian M.; Horne, Rosemary S.C.; Biggs, Sarah N.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare two commercial sleep devices, an accelerometer worn as a wristband (UP by Jawbone) and a smartphone application (MotionX 24/7), against polysomnography (PSG) and actigraphy (Actiwatch2) in a clinical pediatric sample. Methods: Children and adolescents (n = 78, 65% male, mean age 8.4 ± 4.0 y) with suspected sleep disordered breathing (SDB), simultaneously wore an actiwatch, a commercial wrist-based device and had a smartphone with a sleep application activated placed near their right shoulder, during their diagnostic PSG. Outcome variables were sleep onset latency (SOL), total sleep time (TST), wake after sleep onset (WASO), and sleep efficiency (SE). Paired comparisons were made between PSG, actigraphy, UP, and MotionX 24/7. Epoch-by-epoch comparisons determined sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy between PSG, actigraphy, and UP. Bland-Altman plots determined level of agreement. Differences in bias between SDB severity and developmental age were assessed. Results: No differences in mean TST, WASO, or SE between PSG and actigraphy or PSG and UP were found. Actigraphy overestimated SOL (21 min). MotionX 24/7 underestimated SOL (12 min) and WASO (63 min), and overestimated TST (106 min) and SE (17%). UP showed good sensitivity (0.92) and accuracy (0.86) but poor specificity (0.66) when compared to PSG. Bland-Altman plots showed similar levels of bias in both actigraphy and UP. Bias did not differ by SDB severity, however was affected by age. Conclusions: When compared to PSG, UP was analogous to Actiwatch2 and may have some clinical utility in children with sleep disordered breathing. MotionX 24/7 did not accurately reflect sleep or wake and should be used with caution. Citation: Toon E, Davey MJ, Hollis SL, Nixon GM, Horne RS, Biggs SN. Comparison of commercial wrist-based and smartphone accelerometers, actigraphy, and PSG in a clinical cohort of children and adolescents. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(3):343–350. PMID:26446248

  11. Motivational Interviewing and Adolescent Psychopharmacology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dilallo, John J.; Weiss, Gony

    2009-01-01

    The use of motivational interviewing strategies in the practice of adolescent psychopharmacology is described. Motivational interviewing is an efficient and collaborative style of clinical interaction and this helps adolescent patients to integrate their psychiatric difficulties into a more resilient identity.

  12. Child and Adolescent Mental Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Chats with Experts Clinical Trials Share Child and Adolescent Mental Health Overview Teen Depression Study: Understanding Depression ... Continue reading Recruitment Begins for Landmark Study of Adolescent Brain Development September 13, 2016 • Press Release The ...

  13. A Clinical Pilot Study of Individual and Group Treatment for Adolescents with Chronic Pain and Their Parents: Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Functioning

    PubMed Central

    Kanstrup, Marie; Wicksell, Rikard K.; Kemani, Mike; Wiwe Lipsker, Camilla; Lekander, Mats; Holmström, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric chronic pain is common and can result in substantial long-term disability. Previous studies on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) have shown promising results in improving functioning in affected children, but more research is still urgently needed. In the current clinical pilot study, we evaluated an ACT-based interdisciplinary outpatient intervention (14 sessions), including a parent support program (four sessions). Adolescents were referred to the clinic if they experienced disabling chronic pain. They were then randomized, along with their parents, to receive group (n = 12) or individual (n = 18) treatment. Adolescent pain interference, pain reactivity, depression, functional disability, pain intensity and psychological flexibility, along with parent anxiety, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility were assessed using self-reported questionnaires. There were no significant differences in outcomes between individual and group treatment. Analyses illustrated significant (p < 0.01) improvements (medium to large effects) in pain interference, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. Additionally, analyses showed significant (p < 0.01) improvements (large effects) in parent pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. On all significant outcomes, clinically-significant changes were observed for 21%–63% of the adolescents across the different outcome measures and in 54%–76% of the parents. These results support previous findings and thus warrant the need for larger, randomized clinical trials evaluating the relative utility of individual and group treatment and the effects of parental interventions. PMID:27854323

  14. A Clinical Pilot Study of Individual and Group Treatment for Adolescents with Chronic Pain and Their Parents: Effects of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy on Functioning.

    PubMed

    Kanstrup, Marie; Wicksell, Rikard K; Kemani, Mike; Wiwe Lipsker, Camilla; Lekander, Mats; Holmström, Linda

    2016-11-16

    Pediatric chronic pain is common and can result in substantial long-term disability. Previous studies on acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) have shown promising results in improving functioning in affected children, but more research is still urgently needed. In the current clinical pilot study, we evaluated an ACT-based interdisciplinary outpatient intervention (14 sessions), including a parent support program (four sessions). Adolescents were referred to the clinic if they experienced disabling chronic pain. They were then randomized, along with their parents, to receive group (n = 12) or individual (n = 18) treatment. Adolescent pain interference, pain reactivity, depression, functional disability, pain intensity and psychological flexibility, along with parent anxiety, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility were assessed using self-reported questionnaires. There were no significant differences in outcomes between individual and group treatment. Analyses illustrated significant (p < 0.01) improvements (medium to large effects) in pain interference, depression, pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. Additionally, analyses showed significant (p < 0.01) improvements (large effects) in parent pain reactivity and psychological flexibility post-treatment. On all significant outcomes, clinically-significant changes were observed for 21%-63% of the adolescents across the different outcome measures and in 54%-76% of the parents. These results support previous findings and thus warrant the need for larger, randomized clinical trials evaluating the relative utility of individual and group treatment and the effects of parental interventions.

  15. Decision-tree analysis of clinical data to aid diagnostic reasoning for equine laminitis: a cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wylie, C E; Shaw, D J; Verheyen, K L P; Newton, J R

    2016-04-23

    The objective of this cross-sectional study was to compare the prevalence of selected clinical signs in laminitis cases and non-laminitic but lame controls to evaluate their capability to discriminate laminitis from other causes of lameness. Participating veterinary practitioners completed a checklist of laminitis-associated clinical signs identified by literature review. Cases were defined as horses/ponies with veterinary-diagnosed, clinically apparent laminitis; controls were horses/ponies with any lameness other than laminitis. Associations were tested by logistic regression with adjusted odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals, with veterinary practice as an a priori fixed effect. Multivariable analysis using graphical classification tree-based statistical models linked laminitis prevalence with specific combinations of clinical signs. Data were collected for 588 cases and 201 controls. Five clinical signs had a difference in prevalence of greater than +50 per cent: 'reluctance to walk' (OR 4.4), 'short, stilted gait at walk' (OR 9.4), 'difficulty turning' (OR 16.9), 'shifting weight' (OR 17.7) and 'increased digital pulse' (OR 13.2) (all P<0.001). 'Bilateral forelimb lameness' was the best discriminator; 92 per cent of animals with this clinical sign had laminitis (OR 40.5, P<0.001). If, in addition, horses/ponies had an 'increased digital pulse', 99 per cent were identified as laminitis. 'Presence of a flat/convex sole' also significantly enhanced clinical diagnosis discrimination (OR 15.5, P<0.001). This is the first epidemiological laminitis study to use decision-tree analysis, providing the first evidence base for evaluating clinical signs to differentially diagnose laminitis from other causes of lameness. Improved evaluation of the clinical signs displayed by laminitic animals examined by first-opinion practitioners will lead to equine welfare improvements.

  16. Human Subjects Issues in AIDS Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bayer, Ronald, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Six articles are presented on the use of human subjects in research on acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Topics include the ethics of human experimentation, female and pediatric AIDS patients, Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and AIDS among correctional inmates, community-based AIDS research, and clinical trials of HIV…

  17. Perceptions and acceptability of mHealth interventions for improving patient care at a community-based HIV/AIDS clinic in Uganda: a mixed methods study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Larry W; Njie-Carr, Veronica; Kalenge, Sheila; Kelly, Jack F; Bollinger, Robert C; Alamo-Talisuna, Stella

    2013-01-01

    Mobile technologies for health (mHealth) represents a growing array of tools being applied in diverse health care settings. mHealth interventions for improving HIV/AIDS care is a promising strategy, but its evidence base is limited. We conducted a formative research evaluation to inform the development of novel mHealth HIV/AIDS care interventions to be used by community health workers (CHWs) in Kampala, Uganda. A mixed methods formative research approach was utilized. Qualitative methods included 20 in-depth interviews (IDIs) and six focus groups with CHWs, clinic staff, and patients. Thematic analysis was performed and selected quotations used to illustrate themes. Quantitative methods consisted of a survey administered to CHWs and clinic staff, using categorical and Likert scale questions regarding current mobile phone and internet access and perceptions on the potential use of smartphones by CHWs. Qualitative results included themes on significant current care challenges, multiple perceived mHealth benefits, and general intervention acceptability. Key mHealth features desired included tools to verify CHWs' task completions, clinical decision support tools, and simple access to voice calling. Inhibiting factors identified included concerns about CHWs' job security and unrealistic expectations of mHealth capabilities. Quantitative results from 27 staff participants found that 26 (96%) did not have internet access at home, yet only 2 (7.4%) did not own a mobile phone. Likert scale survey responses (1-5, 1 = Strongly Disagree, 5 = Strongly Agree) indicated general agreement that smartphones would improve efficiency (Mean = 4.35) and patient care (4.31) but might be harmful to patient confidentiality (3.88) and training was needed (4.63). Qualitative and quantitative results were generally consistent, and, overall, there was enthusiasm for mHealth technology. However, a number of potential inhibiting factors were also discovered. Findings from this study may help

  18. HIV/AIDS and Children in the English Speaking Caribbean.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dicks, Barbara A., Ed.

    This collection of papers addresses the HIV/AIDS situation among English-speaking children in the Caribbean. Papers include: "Preface" (C. James Hospedales); "Introduction"; (Barbara A. Dicks); "HIV/AIDS: Challenging a Monster" (Brendan Bain); "HIV/AIDS in Caribbean Children and Adolescents" (Noreen Jack);…

  19. High Accuracy of Common HIV-Related Oral Disease Diagnoses by Non-Oral Health Specialists in the AIDS Clinical Trial Group

    PubMed Central

    Shiboski, Caroline H.; Chen, Huichao; Secours, Rode; Lee, Anthony; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Evans, Scott; Bernard, Daphné; Reznik, David; Dittmer, Dirk P.; Hosey, Lara; Sévère, Patrice; Aberg, Judith A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many studies include oral HIV-related endpoints that may be diagnosed by non-oral-health specialists (non-OHS) like nurses or physicians. Our objective was to assess the accuracy of clinical diagnoses of HIV-related oral lesions made by non-OHS compared to diagnoses made by OHS. Methods A5254, a cross-sectional study conducted by the Oral HIV/AIDS Research Alliance within the AIDS Clinical Trial Group, enrolled HIV-1-infected adults participants from six clinical trial units (CTU) in the US (San Francisco, New York, Chapel Hill, Cleveland, Atlanta) and Haiti. CTU examiners (non-OHS) received standardized training on how to perform an oral examination and make clinical diagnoses of specific oral disease endpoints. Diagnoses by calibrated non-OHS were compared to those made by calibrated OHS, and sensitivity and specificity computed. Results Among 324 participants, the majority were black (73%), men (66%), and the median CD4+ cell count 138 cells/mm3. The overall frequency of oral mucosal disease diagnosed by OHS was 43% in US sites, and 90% in Haiti. Oral candidiasis (OC) was detected in 153 (47%) by OHS, with erythematous candidiasis (EC) the most common type (39%) followed by pseudomembranous candidiasis (PC; 26%). The highest prevalence of OC (79%) was among participants in Haiti, and among those with CD4+ cell count ≤ 200 cells/mm3 and HIV-1 RNA > 1000 copies/mL (71%). The sensitivity and specificity of OC diagnoses by non-OHS were 90% and 92% (for EC: 81% and 94%; PC: 82% and 95%). Sensitivity and specificity were also high for KS (87% and 94%, respectively), but sensitivity was < 60% for HL and oral warts in all sites combined. The Candida culture confirmation of OC clinical diagnoses (as defined by ≥ 1 colony forming unit per mL of oral/throat rinse) was ≥ 93% for both PC and EC. Conclusion Trained non-OHS showed high accuracy of clinical diagnoses of OC in comparison with OHS, suggesting their usefulness in studies in resource-poor settings

  20. Clinical significance of psychiatric comorbidity in children and adolescents with obsessive-compulsive disorder: subtyping a complex disorder.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, A E; Morer, A; Moreno, E; Plana, M T; Cordovilla, C; Lázaro, L

    2016-04-01

    A promising approach in relation to reducing phenotypic heterogeneity involves the identification of homogeneous subtypes of OCD based on age of onset, gender, clinical course and comorbidity. This study aims to assess the sociodemographic characteristics and clinical features of OCD patients in relation to gender and the presence or absence of another comorbid disorder. The sample comprised 112 children and adolescents of both sexes and aged 8-18 years, all of whom had a diagnosis of OCD. Overall, 67 % of OCD patients had one comorbid diagnosis, 20.5 % had two such diagnoses and 2.6 % had three comorbid diagnoses. The group of OCD patients with a comorbid neurodevelopmental disorder had significantly more family history of OCD in parents (p = .049), as compared with the no comorbidity group and the group with a comorbid internalizing disorder, and they also showed a greater predominance of males (p = .013) than did the group with a comorbid internalizing disorder. The group of OCD patients with internalizing comorbidity had a later age of onset of OCD (p = .001) compared with both the other groups. Although the initial severity was similar in all three groups, the need for pharmacological treatment and for hospitalization due to OCD symptomatology was greater in the groups with a comorbid neurodevelopmental disorder (p = .038 and p = .009, respectively) and a comorbid internalizing disorder (p = .008 and p = .004, respectively) than in the group without comorbidity. Our findings suggest that two subtypes of OCD can be defined on the basis of the comorbid pathology presented. The identification of different subtypes according to comorbidity is potentially useful in terms of understanding clinical variations, as well as in relation to treatment management and the use of therapeutic resources.