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Sample records for adolescent asthma self-management

  1. Mobile phone-based asthma self-management aid for adolescents (mASMAA): a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Hyekyun; Allen, James; Mammen, Jennifer; Swift, Mary

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Adolescents report high asthma-related morbidity that can be prevented by adequate self-management of the disease. Therefore, there is a need for a developmentally appropriate strategy to promote effective asthma self-management. Mobile phone-based technology is portable, commonly accessible, and well received by adolescents. The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate the feasibility and acceptability of a comprehensive mobile phone-based asthma self-management aid for adolescents (mASMAA) that was designed to facilitate symptom monitoring, treatment adherence, and adolescent–parent partnership. The system used state-of-the-art natural language-understanding technology that allowed teens to use unconstrained English in their texts, and to self-initiate interactions with the system. Materials and methods mASMAA was developed based on an existing natural dialogue system that supports broad coverage of everyday natural conversation in English. Fifteen adolescent–parent dyads participated in a 2-week trial that involved adolescents’ daily scheduled and unscheduled interactions with mASMAA and parents responding to daily reports on adolescents’ asthma condition automatically generated by mASMAA. Subsequently, four focus groups were conducted to systematically obtain user feedback on the system. Frequency data on the daily usage of mASMAA over the 2-week period were tabulated, and content analysis was conducted for focus group interview data. Results Response rates for daily text messages were 81%–97% in adolescents. The average number of self-initiated messages to mASMAA was 19 per adolescent. Symptoms were the most common topic of teen-initiated messages. Participants concurred that use of mASMAA improved awareness of symptoms and triggers, promoted treatment adherence and sense of control, and facilitated adolescent–parent partnerships. Conclusion This study demonstrates the utility and user acceptability of mASMAA as a potential asthma

  2. Adolescent Asthma Self-Management: Patient and Parent-Caregiver Perspectives on Using Social Media to Improve Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Panzera, Anthony D.; Schneider, Tali K.; Martinasek, Mary P.; Lindenberger, James H.; Couluris, Marisa; Bryant, Carol A.; McDermott, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Self-management of asthma can now leverage new media technologies. To optimize implementation they must employ a consumer-oriented developmental approach. This study explored benefits of and barriers to improved asthma self-management and identified key elements for the development of a digital media tool to enhance asthma control.…

  3. A qualitative exploration of asthma self-management beliefs and practices in Puerto Rican families.

    PubMed

    Martin, Molly; Beebe, Jessie; Lopez, Lolita; Faux, Sandra

    2010-05-01

    Puerto Rican children suffer higher asthma morbidity than children of any other racial/ethnic group in the U.S. This study was intended to describe asthma self-management behaviors in Puerto Rican youth. Key informant interviews (n=5) and focus groups (n=4) were conducted. Informants were community pediatricians and community-based organization employees. The focus groups included Puerto Rican parents of children with asthma, children with asthma in grades 4-8, and adolescents with asthma in grades 9-12 (32 participants total). Data were audio-recorded, transcribed, and translated. Two separate analysts performed theme extraction using naturalistic inquiry. Children were assuming asthma self-management responsibilities at very young ages. The adolescents felt they needed more parental assistance with their asthma. Asthma management techniques that involved manipulation of the environment or emotions were the most popular. Fear of asthma, need for more general education and smoking cessation resources, and community supports for asthma were discussed. These findings have important implications for future interventions.

  4. Integrated Self-Management System for Improved Treatment of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    NGUYEN, Kristen T.; CULJAT, Martin O.; MIERZWA, Andrzej P.; SINGH, Rahul S.; FONG, Benson; VANLANDINGHAM, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    A mobile, affordable product that provides clinicians and patients with comprehensive asthma assessment is needed to improve asthma control. Our solution is an integrated system consisting of a portable, inexpensive, easy-to-use spirometer and a mobile application that communicates wirelessly with the spirometer. Results demonstrated that the wireless asthma management solution meets recommended American Thoracic Society (ATS) and European Respiratory Society (ERS) standards. The device is expected to empower patients to accurately self-assess their asthma for better self-management at home, work, or leisure. PMID:27046589

  5. Living with Asthma: Part 2, Manual for Teaching Children the Self-Management of Asthma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD. Div. of Lung Diseases.

    The Living with Asthma Program is designed to teach asthma self-management skills to children (ages 8-12) with asthma and to give their parents the knowledge and behavior modification skills to help their children take over responsibility for managing the condition. Both groups receive training in problem solving and in ways to improve family…

  6. Asthma self-management model: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Olivera, Carolina M X; Vianna, Elcio Oliveira; Bonizio, Roni C; de Menezes, Marcelo B; Ferraz, Erica; Cetlin, Andrea A; Valdevite, Laura M; Almeida, Gustavo A; Araujo, Ana S; Simoneti, Christian S; de Freitas, Amanda; Lizzi, Elisangela A; Borges, Marcos C; de Freitas, Osvaldo

    2016-10-01

    Information for patients provided by the pharmacist is reflected in adhesion to treatment, clinical results and patient quality of life. The objective of this study was to assess an asthma self-management model for rational medicine use. This was a randomized controlled trial with 60 asthmatic patients assigned to attend five modules presented by a pharmacist (intervention group) and 59 patients in the control group. Data collection was performed before and after this 4-month intervention and included an evaluation of asthma knowledge, lifestyle, inhaler techniques, adhesion to treatment, pulmonary function and quality of life. An economic viability analysis was also performed. The intervention group obtained an increase in asthma knowledge scores of 58.3-79.5% (P < 0.001). In this group, there was also an increase in the number of individuals who practiced physical exercise (36-43%), in the number of correct replies regarding the use of inhalers, in the percentage of adherent patients, and in quality of life scores for all domains. We concluded that this asthma self-management model was effective in improving the quality of life of asthma patients. PMID:27473571

  7. A Comparison of an Individually Tailored and a Standardized Asthma Self-Management Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shackelford, Judy; Bachman, Jean H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Asthma is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases in the United States and can be life-threatening. There are a rising number of adults with asthma that cannot be prevented or cured but may be controlled. Self-management education is essential for long-term asthma control; however, the most effective type of education is unknown.…

  8. Asthma in adolescent athletes.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Kai-Håkon; Hem, Erlend; Stensrud, Trine

    2011-12-01

    Athletes active in endurance sports are at an increased risk of acquiring asthma through their sports activities, especially so for cross-country skiers, biathlon skiers, swimmers and athletes of other endurance sports. Asthma may be present from early childhood or develop while in active sports. This article focuses on the physical activity and sports activities in children and adolescents. Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is found in 8-10% of a normal child population of school age and in about 35% of children with current asthma. EIA is caused by the markedly increased ventilation during exercise, with increased heat and water loss through respiration, leading to bronchial constriction. The risk of developing asthma in the young athlete is related to the repeated daily training activity with increased epithelial damage of the airways, delayed repair due to the daily repetition of the training and increased airway mucosal inflammation. The increased environmental exposure through the sports activity to environmental agents, such as cold, dry air in skiers and chlorine compounds in swimmers, increases symptoms and signs of asthma and bronchial hyper-responsiveness, either worsening an existing asthma or leading to a novel disease in a previously healthy athlete. Several specific aspects of daily training life, environmental exposure, diagnostic procedures and aspects of treatment related to the regulations of medication use in sports need particular attention when addressing the adolescent athlete with respiratory symptoms.

  9. Self-management of acute asthma among low-income urban adults.

    PubMed

    George, Maureen; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Rand, Cynthia

    2009-08-01

    One approach to address asthma disparities has been to create evidence-based guidelines to standardize asthma care and education. However, the adoption of these recommendations has been suboptimal among many providers. As a result, low-income minority patients may not be receiving adequate instruction in asthma self-management. In addition, these patients may fail to follow guideline-based recommendations. We conducted 25 interviews to identify the extent to which urban low-income adults have received training in, and implement, self-management protocols for acute asthma. Twenty-five adults (92% female; 76% African American; mean age 39) were enrolled. Only one subject had received asthma self-management training and only 10 (40%) used short-acting beta-(2) agonist-based (SABA) self-management protocols for the early treatment of acute asthma. No subject used a peak flow meter or an asthma action plan. Most (52%) chose to initially treat acute asthma with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) despite the availability of SABAs. Importantly, 21 (84%) preferred an integrated approach using both conventional and CAM treatments. Four themes associated with acute asthma self-management emerged from the qualitative analysis. The first theme safety reflected subjects' perception that CAM was safer than SABA. Severity addressed the calculation that subjects made in determining if SABA or CAM was indicated based on the degree of symptoms they were experiencing. The third theme speed and strength of the combination described subjects' belief in the superiority of integrating CAM and SABA for acute asthma self-management. The final themesense of identity spoke to the ability of CAM to provide a customized self-management strategy that subjects desired. It is unclear if subjects' greater use of CAM or delays in using SABA-based self-management protocols were functions of inadequate instruction or personal preference. Regardless, delays in, or under use of, conventional

  10. Self-Management of Acute Asthma among Low-Income Urban Adults

    PubMed Central

    George, Maureen; Campbell, Jacquelyn; Rand, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    One approach to address asthma disparities has been to create evidence-based guidelines to standardize asthma care and education. However, the adoption of these recommendations has been suboptimal among many providers. As a result, low-income minority patients may not be receiving adequate instruction in asthma self-management. In addition, these patients may fail to follow guideline-based recommendations. We conducted 25 interviews to identify the extent to which urban low-income adults have received training in, and implement, self-management protocols for acute asthma. Twenty-five adults (92% female; 76% African American; mean age 39) were enrolled. Only one subject had received asthma self-management training and only 10 (40%) used short-acting beta-2 agonist-based (SABA) self-management protocols for the early treatment of acute asthma. No subject used a peak flow meter or an asthma action plan. Most (52%) chose to initially treat acute asthma with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) despite the availability of SABAs. Importantly, 21 (84%) preferred an integrated approach using both conventional and CAM treatments. Four themes associated with acute asthma self-management emerged from the qualitative analysis. The first theme safety reflected subjects’ perception that CAM was safer than SABA. Severity addressed the calculation that subjects made in determining if SABA or CAM was indicated based on the degree of symptoms they were experiencing. The third theme speed and strength of the combination described subjects’ belief in the superiority of integrating CAM and SABA for acute asthma self-management. The final themesense of identity spoke to the ability of CAM to provide a customized self-management strategy that subjects desired. It is unclear if subjects’ greater use of CAM or delays in using SABA-based self-management protocols were functions of inadequate instruction or personal preference. Regardless, delays in, or under use of

  11. Improvement of Rural Children's Asthma Self-Management by Lay Health Educators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horner, Sharon D.; Fouladi, Rachel T.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The purpose of the present analysis is to examine changes in rural children's asthma self-management after they received lay health educator (LHE)-delivered classes. Methods: Elementary schools were randomly assigned to the treatment or attention-control condition and their participating students received either asthma education or…

  12. Do self-management plans reduce morbidity in patients with asthma?

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, G; Neville, R G; Smith, B; Clark, R A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Self-management plans may help patients with asthma intervene when symptoms deteriorate, thus preventing asthma attacks. AIM: A study set out to test whether a self-management plan tailored to the circumstances of the individual reduces morbidity from asthma. METHOD: General practitioners who had participated in a national audit of asthma attacks were randomized into intervention and control groups. Six months after the intervention group had issued self-management plans to patients with asthma, both groups of practitioners completed morbidity questionnaires on patients. Morbidity outcomes were compared for the 6-month periods before and after the issue of the plans. RESULTS: In the 6 months before the study, the 376 patients enrolled by the intervention group experienced higher levels of morbidity than the 530 patients for whom details were recorded by the control group. In the 6 months after the issue of the plans, control group patients showed little change in levels of morbidity, but intervention group patients showed significant reductions in hospital admissions, consultations for asthma symptoms, asthma review consultations, courses of oral steroids and use of emergency nebulized bronchodilators. CONCLUSION: General practitioners appeared to operate enthusiast bias' and issued more self-management plans to patients with uncontrolled asthma. The reduction in morbidity in this group is probably a result of the use of the plans, but the verdict on whether plans reduce morbidity must be deemed 'not proven'. PMID:8731624

  13. Development of a Novel Tool for Engaging Children and Parents in Asthma Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Nkoy, Flory L.; Stone, Bryan L.; Fassl, Bernhard A.; Koopmeiners, Karmella; Halbern, Sarah; Kim, Eun H.; Poll, Justin; Hales, Joseph W.; Lee, Dillon; Maloney, Christopher G.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the development and evaluation of an innovative application designed to engage children and their parents in weekly asthma self-monitoring and self-management to prompt an early response to deteriorations in chronic asthma control, and to provide their physicians with longitudinal data to assess the effectiveness of asthma therapy and prompt adjustments. The evaluation included 2 iterative usability testing cycles with 6 children with asthma and 2 parents of children with asthma to assess user performance and satisfaction with the application. Several usability problems were identified and changes were made to ensure acceptability of the application and relevance of the content. This novel application is unique compared to existing asthma tools and may shift asthma care from the current reactive, acute care model to a preventive, proactive patient-centered approach where treatment decisions are tailored to patients’ individual patterns of chronic asthma control to prevent acute exacerbations. PMID:23304339

  14. Home-based asthma self-management education for inner city children.

    PubMed

    Butz, Arlene M; Syron, Laura; Johnson, Betty; Spaulding, Joanne; Walker, Melissa; Bollinger, Mary Elizabeth

    2005-01-01

    Optimal home self-management in young children with asthma includes accurate symptom identification followed by timely and appropriate treatment. The objective of this study was to evaluate a home-based asthma educational intervention targeting symptom identification for parents of children with asthma. Two hundred twenty-one children with asthma were enrolled into an ongoing home-based clinical trial and randomized into either a standard asthma education (SAE) or a symptom/nebulizer education intervention (SNEI). Data included home visit records and parent's self-report on questionnaires. Symptom identification and self-management skills significantly improved from preintervention to postintervention for parents in both groups with the exception of checking medications for expiration dates and the frequency of cleaning nebulizer device and equipment. However, significantly more parents of children in the SNEI group reported treating cough symptoms as compared with the SAE group (p = 0.05). Of concern is that only 38% of all parents reported having an asthma action plan in the home. A targeted home-based asthma education intervention can be effective for improving symptom identification and appropriate use of medications in children with asthma. Home asthma educational programs should address accurate symptom identification and a demonstration of asthma medication delivery devices. PMID:15982192

  15. Behavioral and cognitive processes in the self-management of asthma.

    PubMed

    Creer, Thomas L

    2008-03-01

    The commonly used research approach to asthma self-management is based on black box theory where emphasis is placed on input (manipulation of independent variables) and output (the assessment of dependent variables). In this paradigm, little attention is paid to the behavioral and cognitive processes that occur between input and output. This paper discusses six processes--goal setting, information collection, information interpretation, decision-making, action, and self-efficacy--that mediate the transition from acquiring self-management skills to their performance over time. Operant learning and social cognitive theory provide the foundation for a process model of self-management. Each process, as well as the interactions of processes, is described by presenting information obtained from direct observation and patient reports gathered over a 40-year period with both children and adults. It illustrates that patients are far more consistent, imaginative, and confident in utilizing self-management skills to manage their asthma than might be expected. The conclusion is that in the majority of cases the combination of factors--unknown physiological changes, potent asthma medications, and the sustained performance of self-management skills--results in remission of asthma symptoms.

  16. Developing education for children with asthma through study of self-management behavior.

    PubMed

    Clark, N M; Feldman, C H; Freudenberg, N; Millman, E J; Wasilewski, Y; Valle, I

    1980-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is the major cause of disability in childhood. Among its effects are impaired levels of physical activity and self-esteem, reduced school attendance and performance, and increased utilization of emergency health services. This paper describes the development of a health education program designed to test the hypothesis that better family self-management of asthma can reduce the negative impact of the disease. Three hundred low income Black and Hispanic families were enrolled in the study. Children and primary caretakers were interviewed separately to obtain baseline data on current levels of self-management and to assess needs for educational intervention. Data have been accumulated on a variety of topics concerning asthma self-management, including health practices and beliefs, coping skills, asthma knowledge, and locus of control. An Asthma Self-Management Index was developed to measure positive management behaviors by the family. The needs assessment indicated that six core themes were priorities for these families in terms of relevant skills and behaviors. These topics were incorporated as lesson plans in the intervention.

  17. A woman with asthma: a whole systems approach to supporting self-management

    PubMed Central

    Pinnock, Hilary; Ehrlich, Elisabeth; Hoskins, Gaylor; Tomlins, Ron

    2014-01-01

    A 35-year-old lady attends for review of her asthma following an acute exacerbation. There is an extensive evidence base for supported self-management for people living with asthma, and international and national guidelines emphasise the importance of providing a written asthma action plan. Effective implementation of this recommendation for the lady in this case study is considered from the perspective of a patient, healthcare professional, and the organisation. The patient emphasises the importance of developing a partnership based on honesty and trust, the need for adherence to monitoring and regular treatment, and involvement of family support. The professional considers the provision of asthma self-management in the context of a structured review, with a focus on a self-management discussion which elicits the patient’s goals and preferences. The organisation has a crucial role in promoting, enabling and providing resources to support professionals to provide self-management. The patient’s asthma control was assessed and management optimised in two structured reviews. Her goal was to avoid disruption to her work and her personalised action plan focused on achieving that goal. PMID:25321880

  18. Developing education for children with asthma through study of self-management behavior.

    PubMed

    Clark, N M; Feldman, C H; Freudenberg, N; Millman, E J; Wasilewski, Y; Valle, I

    1980-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is the major cause of disability in childhood. Among its effects are impaired levels of physical activity and self-esteem, reduced school attendance and performance, and increased utilization of emergency health services. This paper describes the development of a health education program designed to test the hypothesis that better family self-management of asthma can reduce the negative impact of the disease. Three hundred low income Black and Hispanic families were enrolled in the study. Children and primary caretakers were interviewed separately to obtain baseline data on current levels of self-management and to assess needs for educational intervention. Data have been accumulated on a variety of topics concerning asthma self-management, including health practices and beliefs, coping skills, asthma knowledge, and locus of control. An Asthma Self-Management Index was developed to measure positive management behaviors by the family. The needs assessment indicated that six core themes were priorities for these families in terms of relevant skills and behaviors. These topics were incorporated as lesson plans in the intervention. PMID:7275647

  19. Effectiveness of asthma education with and without a self-management plan in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Palma, Tatiana; Zamorano, Alejandra; Arancibia, Francisca; Bustos, María-Francisca; Silva, Maria José; Cardenas, Consuelo; De La Barra, Pedro; Puente, Victoria; Cerda, Jaime; Castro-Rodriguez, José A; Prado, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Background. Formal education in primary care can reduce asthma exacerbations. However, there are few studies in hospitalized children, with none originating in Latin America. Methods. A prospective randomized study was designed to evaluate whether a full education with self-management plan (ESM) was more effective than an education without self-management plan (E) in reducing asthma hospitalization. Children (5 to 15 years of age) who were hospitalized for an asthma attack were divided in two groups. Children in the E group received general instructions based on a booklet. Those in the ESM group received the same booklet plus a self-management guide and a puzzle game that reinforces the lessons learned in the booklet. Patients were interviewed every 3 months, by telephone, for one year. Interviewers recording the number of hospitalizations, exacerbations, and emergency visits for asthma and oral steroid burst uses. Results. From 88 children who met the inclusion criteria, 77 (86%) completed one year of follow-up (41 from E and 36 from ESM group). Overall, after one year, the hospitalization decreased by 66% and the inhaled corticosteroids therapy increased from 36% to 79%. At the end of the study, there was no difference in exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, or hospitalizations between the two groups. Conclusions. Asthma education with or without a self-management plan during asthma hospitalization were effective in reducing exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, and future rehospitalizations. This evidence supports the importance of providing a complete asthma education plan in any patient who is admitted for asthma exacerbation. PMID:19905916

  20. Effectiveness of asthma education with and without a self-management plan in hospitalized children.

    PubMed

    Espinoza-Palma, Tatiana; Zamorano, Alejandra; Arancibia, Francisca; Bustos, María-Francisca; Silva, Maria José; Cardenas, Consuelo; De La Barra, Pedro; Puente, Victoria; Cerda, Jaime; Castro-Rodriguez, José A; Prado, Francisco

    2009-11-01

    Background. Formal education in primary care can reduce asthma exacerbations. However, there are few studies in hospitalized children, with none originating in Latin America. Methods. A prospective randomized study was designed to evaluate whether a full education with self-management plan (ESM) was more effective than an education without self-management plan (E) in reducing asthma hospitalization. Children (5 to 15 years of age) who were hospitalized for an asthma attack were divided in two groups. Children in the E group received general instructions based on a booklet. Those in the ESM group received the same booklet plus a self-management guide and a puzzle game that reinforces the lessons learned in the booklet. Patients were interviewed every 3 months, by telephone, for one year. Interviewers recording the number of hospitalizations, exacerbations, and emergency visits for asthma and oral steroid burst uses. Results. From 88 children who met the inclusion criteria, 77 (86%) completed one year of follow-up (41 from E and 36 from ESM group). Overall, after one year, the hospitalization decreased by 66% and the inhaled corticosteroids therapy increased from 36% to 79%. At the end of the study, there was no difference in exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, or hospitalizations between the two groups. Conclusions. Asthma education with or without a self-management plan during asthma hospitalization were effective in reducing exacerbations, emergency visits, oral steroid burst uses, and future rehospitalizations. This evidence supports the importance of providing a complete asthma education plan in any patient who is admitted for asthma exacerbation.

  1. The Utility of Self-Management Procedures in Modifying the Classroom Behaviors of Mentally Retarded Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Logn, James D.; Williams, Robert L.

    1976-01-01

    Tests whether self-management under a variety of experimental conditions could reduce the disruptive behavior of adolescents in a special classroom. A comparison was made of self-management using tokens without back-up reinforcement, self-management using graphic feedback, and self-management using free time as back-up reinforcement. (Author/RK)

  2. The role of the asthma nurse in treatment compliance and self-management following hospital admission.

    PubMed

    Morice, A H; Wrench, C

    2001-11-01

    Effective self-management and treatment compliance is important in achieving good symptom control in asthma. The aim of this study was to determine whether asthma nurse intervention during hospital admission could increase knowledge and improve self-management and whether this would influence the number of emergency call-out visits by Genera Practitioners (GPs) and hospital re-admissions. Patients with acute asthma (n=80) were assessed by the asthma nurse within 24 h of admission using a British Thoracic Society (BTS) guideline-based questionnaire. Main outcome measures were: know edge of inhalers, self-management plans, peak flow monitoring, recognition of worsening symptoms and appropriate emergency action, Following randomization, half received nurse intervention during hospitalization. All received a follow-up questionnaire 6 weeks post-discharge and again at 6 months (response rates 86% and 81% respectively). GPs were contacted by postal questionnaire after 4 months. Questionnaire responses indicated an increase in knowledge in the intervention group, along with an ability to identify appropriate action on worsening symptoms. Emergency GP call-outs were more frequent in the control group in the 4 months post-discharge. Hospital re-admission rates were similar in both groups. Asthma nurse intervention appeared to increase knowledge of asthma management, maintained throughout the study period, but had no significant impact on reducing re-admissions to hospital.

  3. Helping African American Children Self-Manage Asthma: The Importance of Self-Efficacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaul, Teri

    2011-01-01

    Background: Asthma is the leading cause of chronic illness among children in the United States, with a disproportionately higher incidence among minority children. In an attempt to increase understanding of the factors that may influence self-management of chronic disease, the study examined the relationship between self-efficacy belief and asthma…

  4. Randomised comparison of guided self management and traditional treatment of asthma over one year.

    PubMed Central

    Lahdensuo, A.; Haahtela, T.; Herrala, J.; Kava, T.; Kiviranta, K.; Kuusisto, P.; Perämäki, E.; Poussa, T.; Saarelainen, S.; Svahn, T.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the efficacy of self management of asthma with traditional treatment. DESIGN: 12 month prospective randomised trial. SETTING: Outpatient clinics in Finland. SUBJECTS: 115 patients with mild to moderately severe asthma. INTERVENTIONS: Patient education and adjustment of anti-inflammatory therapy guided by peak flow measurements. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Unscheduled admissions to hospital and outpatient visits, days off work, courses of antibiotics and prednisolone, lung function, and quality of life. RESULTS: The mean number of unscheduled visits to ambulatory care facilities (0.5 v 1.0), days off work (2.8 v 4.8), and courses of antibiotics (0.4 v 0.9) and prednisolone (0.4 v 1.0) per patient were lower and the quality of life score (16.6 v 8.4 at 12 months) higher in the self management group than in the traditionally treated group. In both groups admissions for asthma were rare. CONCLUSIONS: Self management reduces incidents caused by asthma and improves quality of life. PMID:8605463

  5. A systematic review of complementary and alternative medicine for asthma self-management.

    PubMed

    George, Maureen; Topaz, Maxim

    2013-03-01

    This article is a systematic review of complementary and alternative medicine use for pediatric and adult asthma self-management. The aim of the review was to summarize the existing body of research regarding the types and patterns of, adverse events and risky behaviors associated with, and patient-provider communication about complementary therapies in asthma. This evidence serves as the basis for a series of recommendations in support of patient-centered care, which addresses both patient preferences for integrated treatment and patient safety.

  6. Findings from a pilot Randomised trial of an Asthma Internet Self-management Intervention (RAISIN)

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, D; Wyke, S; Saunderson, K; McConnachie, A; Agur, K; Chaudhuri, R; Thomas, M; Thomson, N C; Yardley, L; Mair, F S

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the feasibility of a phase 3 randomised controlled trial (RCT) of a website (Living Well with Asthma) to support self-management. Design and setting Phase 2, parallel group, RCT, participants recruited from 20 general practices across Glasgow, UK. Randomisation through automated voice response, after baseline data collection, to website access for minimum 12 weeks or usual care. Participants Adults (age≥16 years) with physician diagnosed, symptomatic asthma (Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) score ≥1). People with unstable asthma or other lung disease were excluded. Intervention ‘Living Well with Asthma’ is a desktop/laptop compatible interactive website designed with input from asthma/ behaviour change specialists, and adults with asthma. It aims to support optimal medication management, promote use of action plans, encourage attendance at asthma reviews and increase physical activity. Outcome measures Primary outcomes were recruitment/retention, website use, ACQ and mini-Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ). Secondary outcomes included patient activation, prescribing, adherence, spirometry, lung inflammation and health service contacts after 12 weeks. Blinding postrandomisation was not possible. Results Recruitment target met. 51 participants randomised (25 intervention group). Age range 16–78 years; 75% female; 28% from most deprived quintile. 45/51 (88%; 20 intervention group) followed up. 19 (76% of the intervention group) used the website, for a mean of 18 min (range 0–49). 17 went beyond the 2 ‘core’ modules. Median number of logins was 1 (IQR 1–2, range 0–7). No significant difference in the prespecified primary efficacy measures of ACQ scores (−0.36; 95% CI −0.96 to 0.23; p=0.225), and mini-AQLQ scores (0.38; −0.13 to 0.89; p=0.136). No adverse events. Conclusions Recruitment and retention confirmed feasibility; trends to improved outcomes suggest use of Living Well with Asthma may improve

  7. Self-Management Behaviors among Older Adults with Asthma: Associations with Health Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Federman, Alex D.; Wolf, Michael S.; Sofianou, Anastasia; Martynenko, Melissa; O’Connor, Rachel; Halm, Ethan A.; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2014-01-01

    Background/Objectives: Older adults asthmatics experience high rates of morbidity and mortality yet little is known about their self-management behaviors. We examined self-management behaviors, including medication adherence and inhaler technique, among older adults and their association with health literacy. Design: Observational cohort study. Setting: Primary care and pulmonary specialty practices in two tertiary academic medical centers and three Federally Qualified Health Centers in New York City, NY and Chicago, IL. Participants: Adults with moderate or severe persistent asthma, ages 60 years and older (n=433). Measurements: Outcomes were adherence to asthma controller medications, metered dose inhaler (MDI) and dry powder inhaler (DPI) techniques, having a usual asthma physician, and avoidance of four common triggers. Health literacy was assessed with the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults. Results: The mean age was 67 years and 36% had marginal or low health literacy. Adherence was low (38%) overall and worse among individuals with low health literacy (22% vs. 47%, p<0.0001) and after adjusting for demographic factors and health status (odds ratio [OR] 0.48, 95% confidence [CI] 0.31-0.73). Similarly, inhaler technique was poor: only 38% and 54% had good MDI and DPI technique, respectively. Technique was worse among those with low health literacy (MDI technique: OR 0.57, 95% CI 0.38-0.85; DPI technique: OR 0.42, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.71). Asthma self-monitoring and avoidance of triggers occurred infrequently but were less consistently associated with low health literacy. Conclusion: Adherence to medications and inhaler technique are poor among older asthmatics, and worse among those with low health literacy. Clinicians should routinely assess controller medication adherence and inhaler technique, and use low-literacy communication strategies to support self-management in older asthmatics. PMID:24779482

  8. The Effects of Self-Management Education for School-Age Children on Asthma Morbidity: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Emily; Grimes, Deanna E.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of asthma self-management education for school-age children on number of school days missed, emergency department visits and hospital admissions were evaluated through a systematic review of the published research. A total of 9 studies on asthma education programs that were conducted in schools by school nurses and health educators and…

  9. Camp Superteens. An asthma education program for adolescents.

    PubMed

    Alaniz, K L; Nordstrand, J

    1999-01-01

    Camp Superteens, an asthma self-management educational program, was designed for and offered to adolescents ages 13 to 16 at a large local shopping mall. The 6-hour program was divided into four main categories: presentation of asthma information; non-pharmacological management; pharmacological management; and dealing with self and others. A pilot study on asthma self-efficacy, completed during the first year of camp, found a significant improvement in self-efficacy in five instances, with demonstrated increased confidence in ability to manage asthma when: 1. exercising; 2. at the doctor's office; 3. breathing improperly; 4. afraid; and 5. angry. While pilot study results are encouraging and have already been useful for curricular refinement purposes, the small sample size (n = 17) and other limitations suggest the need for further research. PMID:10326316

  10. Comparison of effects of a self management booklet and audiocassette for patients with asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Jenkinson, D.; Davison, J.; Jones, S.; Hawtin, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effects on self management of asthma of a specially prepared book and audiocassette tape with similar contents were observed in a controlled study of 177 patients with asthma in general practice. After a run in period of six months patients were randomly given the book, the tape, both the book and tape, or neither. Patients' knowledge of the use of drugs, perceptions of their disability, skill in using an inhaler, consumption of drugs, consultations with their general practitioners, morbidity (from patients' entries on diary cards), and use of the educational material were measured. Knowledge about the use of drugs was significantly increased in the groups who received the material after three months and persisted after 12 months. Patients who had been given the tape or the book and tape increased their scores of knowledge of drugs more than patients given the book alone. Patients in all groups given the material considered that their disability was reduced. There were no other significant changes. Patients given both the book and the tape preferred the book. Patients with asthma can obtain useful information from such material. The paradoxical result whereby patients learnt more from the tape but preferred the book suggests that a distinction can be made between information that patients need, which may be acquired better from an audiocassette, and information that they want, which may be acquired better from a book. PMID:3416147

  11. Partners in School Asthma Management: Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Children with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, L. Kay; Sockrider, Marianna M.; Abramson, Stuart L.; Swank, Paul R.; Czyzewski, Danita I.; Tortolero, Susan R.; Markham, Christine M.; Fernandez, Maria E.; Shegog, Ross; Tyrrell, Shellie

    2006-01-01

    The "Partners in School Asthma Management" program for inner-city elementary school children comprises (1) case finding; (2) linkage of school nurses, parents, and clinicians; (3) a computer-based tailored educational program; and (4) school environmental assessment and intervention. Case finding identified 1730 children in 60 elementary schools…

  12. Controlled studies of childhood asthma self-management in Italy using the "open airways" and "living with asthma" programs: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Indinnimeo, L; Midulla, F; Hindi-Alexander, M; Bonci, E; Tancredi, G C; Cutrera, R; Zicari, A M; Evans, D; Ronchetti, R

    1987-01-01

    The concept of self-management for childhood asthma was introduced to Italy through a scientific exchange agreement with the United States. Two self-management programs, Living with Asthma (LWA) and Open Airways (OA), are being evaluated in three studies, two of which (Pilot and Atri-Viterbo) were conducted by the Respiratory Service of the Pediatric Department of the University "La Sapienza" in Rome and one by 14 Italian university pediatric respiratory centers (Project Italia). In October 1985, 20 children and their 40 parents were enrolled in the Pilot Study. One hundred percent of the mothers and children and 70% of the fathers attended all of the sessions. Theoretical knowledge about asthma and knowledge of asthma self-management behavior were assessed three times by a questionnaire: at the beginning of the program, at the end of the program and one year later. Significant improvements in knowledge of asthma and in knowledge of asthma self-management behavior were demonstrated by both parents and children at the end of the program and one year later. Analysis of clinical symptoms and drug consumption indicated a statistically nonsignificant trend towards a reduction of asthma severity in the year after the program. In the Atri-Viterbo study 8229 children were initially screened by a questionnaire. One hundred eighty-two children with asthma (2.4%) were identified and invited to participate in a self-management program. Open Airways was used in a shortened version. Only 29 families in Atri (22% of the eligible families) and 24 families in Viterbo (50%) ultimately agreed to participate in the program. A comparison of these families with those who did not participate showed that higher social status (p less than 0.001) and more severe asthma (p less than 0.05) were significantly associated with participation. Attendance by mothers and children was 78% in Atri and 61% in Viterbo. Only 5% of the fathers regularly attended the program. Parents who received the

  13. Asthma and Adolescents: Review of Strategies to Improve Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hennessy-Harstad, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    One of every 10 adolescents in the United States has asthma. Adolescents who lack asthma control are at increased risk for severe asthma episodes and death. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2007 asthma guidelines and research studies indicated that school nurses are instrumental in assisting adolescents to monitor their asthma, learn…

  14. Watch, Discover, Think, and Act: Evaluation of Computer-Assisted Instruction To Improve Asthma Self-Management in Inner-City Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartholomew, L. K.; Gold, R. S.; Parcel, G. S.; Czyzewski, D. I.; Sockrider, M. M.; Fernandez, M.; Shegog, R.; Swank, P.

    2000-01-01

    An interactive multimedia computer game to enhance self-management skills and thereby improve asthma outcomes in inner city children with asthma was evaluated. Results find that the intervention was associated with fewer hospitalizations, better symptom scores, increased functional status, greater knowledge of asthma management, and better child…

  15. Self-management support and other alternatives to reduce the burden of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reddel, H K; Jenkins, C R; Partridge, M R

    2014-12-01

    While pharmacotherapy is important in the management of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, it is also important to consider additional interventions that can further reduce the burden of ill health for patients, their families and the health care system. In this review, the evidence in favour of self-management support that leads to successful self-care by the patient is reviewed, and the key components of successful strategies are outlined; areas where more research is needed are identified. In addition to self-management support, other methods of delivering care, such as telemonitoring, admission avoidance, assisted discharge schemes and use of lay educators, are reviewed.

  16. Evaluation of an Educational Program for Adolescents with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Jill; Tichacek, Mary J.; Theodorakis, Renee

    2004-01-01

    In addition to challenges of adolescence itself, teens with asthma face demands of asthma management and risks of asthma sequelae, including fatalities. Few asthma educational programs specifically address their needs. In response to school nurse concern, this pilot study evaluated an adolescent asthma education program, the "Power Breathing[TM]…

  17. Posttraumatic Stress in Adolescents with Asthma and Their Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kean, Emily Millikan; Kelsay, Kimberly; Wamboldt, Frederick; Wamboldt, Marianne Z.

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To assess posttraumatic stress (PTS) symptoms in adolescents with and without asthma and their parents and the relationship between PTS symptoms and asthma morbidity. Method: Three groups of adolescents (12-18 years) participated: adolescents who had experienced a life-threatening asthma episode (n = 49), asthma controls (n = 71), and…

  18. Development and pilot testing of a mobile health solution for asthma self-management: Asthma action plan smartphone application pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Licskai, Christopher J; Sands, Todd W; Ferrone, Madonna

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Collaborative self-management is a core recommendation of national asthma guidelines; the written action plan is the knowledge tool that supports this objective. Mobile health technologies have the potential to enhance the effectiveness of the action plan as a knowledge translation tool. OBJECTIVE: To design, develop and pilot a mobile health system to support asthma self-management. METHODS: The present study was a prospective, single-centre, nonrandomized, pilot preintervention-postintervention analysis. System design and development were guided by an expert steering committee. The network included an agnostic web browser-based asthma action plan smart-phone application (SPA). Subjects securely transmitted symptoms and peak flow data daily, and received automated control assessment, treatment advice and environmental alerts. RESULTS: Twenty-two adult subjects (mean age 47 years, 82% women) completed the study. Biophysical data were received on 84% of subject days (subject day = 1 subject × 1 day). Subjects viewed their action plan current zone of control on 54% and current air quality on 61% of subject days, 86% followed self-management advice and 50% acted to reduce exposure risks. A large majority affirmed ease of use, clarity and timeliness, and 95% desired SPA use after the study. At baseline, 91% had at least one symptom criterion for uncontrolled asthma and 64% had ≥2, compared with 45% (P=0.006) and 27% (P=0.022) at study close. Mean Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire score improved from 4.3 to 4.8 (P=0.047). CONCLUSIONS: A dynamic, real-time, interactive, mobile health system with an integrated asthma action plan SPA can support knowledge translation at the patient and provider levels. PMID:23936890

  19. Managing Ulcerative Colitis in the Adolescent: Highlighting the Developmental and Self-management Needs.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Azza H; Sonnenburg, Katie; Foli, Karen J; Walters, Becky

    2016-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a lifelong disease that peaks in diagnosis between the ages of 15 to 25 years, making UC a significant chronic disease among adolescents that could affect the adolescents throughout their life. This article provides an overview of the role of nurse practitioners as health care providers in managing adolescent patients with UC with a holistic approach that encompasses the physical aspects of the disease, as well as developmental and psychosocial needs. By describing the influence that developmental stage and psychological stress have on patients with UC, the nurse practitioners can facilitate evidence-based and holistic care for adolescents and promote self-management.

  20. Adolescents and Asthma: Why Bother with Our Meds?

    PubMed Central

    Naimi, David R.; Freedman, Tovia G.; Ginsburg, Kenneth R.; Bogen, Daniel; Rand, Cynthia S.; Apter, Andrea J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Adherence to inhaled steroid regimens for asthma is poor in adults and children. Although it is assumed that nonadherence contributes to morbidity in older adolescents, investigation is limited. Objective To describe adherence to preventive asthma medications and explore relevant beliefs and attitudes in older urban adolescents including their ideas for improving adherence. Methods Quantitative and qualitative methods were employed to collect data from a convenience sample of adolescents with asthma previously prescribed fluticasone/salmeterol. Two semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted one month apart and analyzed for themes. Fluticasone/salmeterol use was electronically monitored between visits and calculated as the number of actuations divided by the number of inhalations prescribed. Results 40 participants, 15–18 years, 19 female, 30 Black/African-American, 11 Medicaid-insured, 24 previously hospitalized for asthma, median FEV1 98% predicted, (range 67%–127%), had median adherence 43% (range 4%–89%). Adherence was not associated with FEV1 or ED visits. Themes emerged from interviews: teens 1) take fluticasone/salmeterol inconsistently; 2) believe fluticasone/salmeterol is “supposed to help me breathe”; 3) dislike its taste; 4) are “too busy” and “forget”; and 5) recommend “reminder” solutions to poor adherence. 20% believed that taking fluticasone/salmeterol was unnecessary and another 18% expressed ambivalence about its benefits. Conclusion Adherence was poor. Examining and acknowledging health beliefs of older teens in the context of their complicated lives may facilitate discussions about self-management. PMID:19395075

  1. Adolescents and Exercise Induced Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Pamela; Bickanse, Shanna; Bogenreif, Mike; VanSickle, Kyle

    2008-01-01

    This article defines asthma and exercise induced asthma, and provides information on the triggers, signs, and symptoms of an attack. It also gives treatments for these conditions, along with prevention guidelines on how to handle an attack in the classroom or on the practice field. (Contains 2 tables and 1 figure.)

  2. Promoting Self-Management in Adults with Asthma: An Overview of the UAB Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bailey, William C.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A study at the University of Alabama/Birmingham (UAB) compared adult asthma patients receiving a self-care workbook with those receiving only asthma pamphlets. Outcomes were assessed in five areas: (1) health care utilization, (2) functional status, (3) knowledge, (4) adherence, and (5) psychological reactions. (Author/CH)

  3. ERICA: prevalence of asthma in Brazilian adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Kuschnir, Fábio Chigres; Gurgel, Ricardo Queiroz; Solé, Dirceu; Costa, Eduardo; Felix, Mara Morelo Rocha; de Oliveira, Cecília Lacroix; de Vasconcellos, Maurício Teixeira Leite; Kuschnir, Maria Cristina Caetano

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the prevalence of asthma and physician-diagnosed asthma in Brazilian adolescents. METHODS Cross-sectional, national, school-based study with adolescents from 12 to 17 years old, participants in the Study of Cardiovascular Risks in Adolescents (ERICA). The study stratified the sample by region and grouped according to schools and classes with representativeness to the set of cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants of the Country, macro-regions, capitals, and Federal District. A questionnaire collected data through a self-filled in method. We calculated the prevalences and their confidence intervals of 95% (95%CI) according to sex, age group, type of school and skin color. RESULTS Between 2013 and 2014, 74,589 adolescents were evaluated, 55.3% of the female sex. The total prevalence of active asthma was of 13.1% (95%CI 12.1-13.9), being higher in girls (14.8%; 95%CI 13.7-16.0) when compared to boys (11.2%; 95%CI 10.3-12.2) in all geographical strata examined. It was also higher between students of private schools (15.9%; 95%CI 14.2-17.7) when compared to public ones (12.4%; 95%CI 11.4-13.4). It was higher in the Southeast region (14.5%; 95%CI 12.9-16.1), and in the city of Sao Paulo (16.7%; 95%CI 14.7-18.7). The lowest prevalence was observed in North region (9.7%; 95%CI 9.7-10.5), and in Teresina (6.3%; 95%CI 4.9-7.7). The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was of 8.7% (95%CI 8.2-9.1); higher in the North region (13.5%; 95%CI 12.7-14.2), and in Porto Alegre (19.8%; 95%CI 17.5-22.3). It was lower in the Midwest (6.9%; 95%CI 6.0-7.8), and in Cuiaba (4.8%; 95%CI 3.8-5.9). We found no significant difference in the expression of this rate between the sexes, as well as in other variables evaluated by the study. CONCLUSIONS The prevalence of asthma in Brazilian adolescents is high. Rates of active asthma and physician-diagnosed asthma vary widely in different regions and capitals evaluated by the ERICA. These results may assist in the

  4. Effects of Time Management Instruction on Adolescents' Ability to Self-Manage Time in a Vocational Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiPipi-Hoy, Caroline; Jitendra, Asha K.; Kern, Lee

    2009-01-01

    This study investigated the effectiveness of a time self-management intervention in the work setting of four adolescents with developmental disabilities. A multiple baseline across participants design was used to examine the adolescents' ability to independently identify time and initiate work-related activities. Intervention was delivered by…

  5. Evaluation of quality of life according to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Matsunaga, Natasha Yumi; Ribeiro, Maria Angela Gonçalves de Oliveira; Saad, Ivete Alonso Bredda; Morcillo, André Moreno; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Toro, Adyléia Aparecida Dalbo Contrera

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: To evaluate quality of life according to the level of asthma control and degree of asthma severity in children and adolescents. METHODS: We selected children and adolescents with asthma (7-17 years of age) from the Pediatric Pulmonology Outpatient Clinic of the State University of Campinas Hospital de Clínicas, located in the city of Campinas, Brazil. Asthma control and asthma severity were assessed by the Asthma Control Test and by the questionnaire based on the Global Initiative for Asthma, respectively. The patients also completed the Paediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ), validated for use in Brazil, in order to evaluate their quality of life. RESULTS: The mean age of the patients was 11.22 ± 2.91 years, with a median of 11.20 (7.00-17.60) years. We selected 100 patients, of whom 27, 33, and 40 were classified as having controlled asthma (CA), partially controlled asthma (PCA), and uncontrolled asthma (UA), respectively. As for asthma severity, 34, 19, and 47 were classified as having mild asthma (MiA), moderate asthma (MoA), and severe asthma (SA), respectively. The CA and the PCA groups, when compared with the NCA group, showed higher values for the overall PAQLQ score and all PAQLQ domains (activity limitation, symptoms, and emotional function; p < 0.001 for all). The MiA group showed higher scores for all of the PAQLQ components than did the MoA and SA groups. CONCLUSIONS: Quality of life appears to be directly related to asthma control and asthma severity in children and adolescents, being better when asthma is well controlled and asthma severity is lower. PMID:26785958

  6. The Association between Asthma and Sleep in Urban Adolescents with Undiagnosed Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koinis Mitchell, Daphne; Kopel, Sheryl J.; Williams, Brittney; Cespedes, Amarilis; Bruzzese, Jean-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Background: We examined associations between asthma and sleep in a sample of inner-city adolescents with asthma-like symptoms who are undiagnosed, and to assess the extent to which youth's report of perceived stress moderates this association. Methods: A total of 349 adolescents (83% girls), with a mean age of 15.8 years, and their primary…

  7. Frequency and Correlates of Overweight Status in Adolescent Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Abramson, Natalie Walders; Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Mansell, Anthony L.; Carter, Rick; Federico, Monica J.; Wamboldt, Marianne Z.

    2009-01-01

    Background Debate exists within the literature concerning whether asthma and obesity are linked as comorbid conditions. Further study is required to understand the relationship between asthma and overweight status, and developmental considerations are an important priority area. Objective The present study addressed gaps in the existing literature by comparing rates of overweight status among a matched sample of adolescents with and without asthma and by examining correlates of overweight status among youth with asthma. Methods Rates and correlates of overweight status were compared among a matched cohort of 103 adolescents with asthma, 75 adolescents with asthma characterized by history of a severe acute event, and 92 normal controls. Results Significantly higher rates of overweight status were found among the asthma groups compared to the control group and to population estimates. Significant correlates for overweight status included younger age and earlier age at asthma diagnosis, suggesting that receiving an asthma diagnoses in early childhood may increase the propensity for weight gain. Conclusion Asthma and obesity are problematic comorbid conditions, and specialized obesity prevention programs may be particularly necessary at the onset of a new asthma diagnosis. Clinical Implications Identifying and addressing the factors that may contribute to the potential for obesity among youth with asthma are key research and clinical practice priorities. PMID:18350405

  8. Effects of a self-management asthma educational program in Taiwan based on PRECEDE-PROCEED model for parents with asthmatic children.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Li-Chi; Huang, Jing-Long; Yeh, Kuo-Wei; Lu, Chang-Ming

    2004-04-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate the comparative effectiveness of two different asthma educational programs. One was self-management asthma education based on the PRECEDE-PROCEED model to change the influential factors based on a previous need assessment study in Taiwan. The other consisted of regular outpatient asthma education. The purposes were: 1) to compare differences in the asthma knowledge, self-efficacy, perceived effectiveness, children's cooperation, doctor-patient communication, and self-management behaviors in the experimental and control groups before education, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after education; and 2) to compare differences in drug use, medication utilization, asthma severity, signs/symptoms of asthma, school absenteeism, and exercise ability before education, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after education. Parents of asthmatic children were recruited from among outpatients of Chang Gung Children's Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan. They were grouped by registration number: those with even numbers were assigned to the experimental group, and those with odd numbers were assigned to the control group. Measurements were collected four times from all parents by means of a questionnaire and chart review. The General Linear Model: Repeat Measurement was used to compare variance differences. The following results were found. 1) Asthma knowledge, self-efficacy, perceived effectiveness, children's cooperation, and self-management behaviors significantly improved after the self-management asthma educational program based on PRECEDE-PROCEED. Except for perceived effectiveness, all variables still had good effectiveness after 6 months of follow-up. The experimental group was better than the control group in knowledge, children's cooperation, and self-management behaviors at the 3-month follow up, as well as in knowledge and children's cooperation at the 6-month follow-up. 2) In both the experimental and control groups, the educational program

  9. Usability testing of an online self-management program for adolescents with cancer.

    PubMed

    Stinson, Jennifer; Gupta, Abha; Dupuis, France; Dick, Bruce; Laverdière, Caroline; LeMay, Sylvie; Sung, Lillian; Dettmer, Elizabeth; Gomer, Stephanie; Lober, Janie; Chan, Carol Y

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to explore the usability of a bilingual (English and French) Internet-based self-management program for adolescents with cancer and their parents and refine the Internet program. A qualitative study design with semistructured, audio-taped interviews and observation was undertaken with 4 iterative cycles. A purposive sample of English-speaking and French-speaking adolescents with cancer and one of their parents/caregivers was recruited. Adolescents and parents provided similar feedback on how to improve the usability of the Internet program. Most changes to the website were completed after the initial cycles of English and French testing. Both groups also found information presented on the website to be appropriate, credible, and relevant to their experiences of going through cancer. Participants reported the program would have been extremely helpful when they were first diagnosed with cancer. Usability testing uncovered some issues that affected the usability of the website that led to refinements in the online program.

  10. Internet-based self-management support for adults with asthma: a qualitative study among patients, general practitioners and practice nurses on barriers to implementation

    PubMed Central

    van Gaalen, Johanna L; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Bakker, Moira J; Snoeck-Stroband, Jiska B; Sont, Jacob K

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to explore barriers among patients, general practitioners (GPs) and practice nurses to implement internet-based self-management support as provided by PatientCoach for asthma in primary care. Setting Primary care within South Holland, the Netherlands. Participants Twenty-two patients (12 women, mean age 38 years), 21 GPs (6 women, mean age 52 years) and 13 practice nurses (all women, mean age 41 years). Design A qualitative study using focus groups and interviews. Outcomes Barriers as perceived by patients, GPs and practice nurses to implementation of PatientCoach. Methods 10 focus groups and 12 interviews were held to collect data: 4 patient focus groups, 4 GP focus groups, 2 practice nurse focus group, 2 patient interviews, 5 GP interviews and 5 practice nurse interviews. A prototype of PatientCoach that included modules for coaching, personalised information, asthma self-monitoring, medication treatment plan, feedback, e-consultations and a forum was demonstrated. A semistructured topic guide was used. Directed content analysis was used to analyse data. Reported barriers were classified according to a framework by Grol and Wensing. Results A variety of barriers emerged among all participant groups. Barriers identified among patients include a lack of a patient–professional partnership in using PatientCoach and a lack of perceived benefit in improving asthma symptoms. Barriers identified among GPs include a low sense of urgency towards asthma care and current work routines. Practice nurses identified a low level of structured asthma care and a lack of support by colleagues as barriers. Among all participant groups, insufficient ease of use of PatientCoach, lack of financial arrangements and patient characteristics such as a lack of asthma symptoms were reported as barriers. Conclusions We identified a variety of barriers to implementation of PatientCoach. An effective implementation strategy for internet-based self-management

  11. Asthma in adolescents living in the inner city.

    PubMed

    Pongracic, Jacqueline Ann

    2010-04-01

    Asthma disproportionately affects minority individuals living in poor urban areas, particularly children and adolescents aged 5-17 years. A variety of factors are likely to account for asthma disparities in inner-city populations. Housing characteristics increase the risk of exposure to potential asthma triggers. Environmental risk factors have been studied extensively and cockroach allergen has emerged as an important determinant of asthma morbidity. Neighborhood factors also appear to contribute to the problem of inner-city asthma. Various novel treatment intervention strategies have demonstrated encouraging results. This article reviews environmental factors and recently published strategies to reduce morbidity in this vulnerable population.

  12. Adolescence and asthma management: the perspective of adolescents receiving primary health care☆

    PubMed Central

    Araújo, Alisson; Rocha, Regina Lunardi; Alvim, Cristina Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the influence of adolescence characteristics on asthma management. Methods: This was a qualitative study conducted in the city of Divinópolis, Minas Gerais, Southeast Brazil. Data were collected through semistructured interviews guided by a questionnaire with seven asthmatic adolescents followed-up in the primary public health care service of the city. Results: Using content analysis, three thematic categories were observed in the adolescents' responses: 1) family relationships in the treatment of asthma in adolescence; 2) the asthmatic adolescents and their peers; and 3) the role of the school for the asthmatic adolescents. Conclusions: The results demonstrated that peers, family, and school should be more valued by health professionals and by health care services when treating asthmatic adolescents, as these social relationships are closely associated with the adolescent and have an important role in asthma management. Attempts to meet the demands of adolescents contribute to improve asthma management. PMID:25479845

  13. Implementation strategies of internet-based asthma self-management support in usual care. Study protocol for the IMPASSE cluster randomized trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Internet-based self-management (IBSM) support cost-effectively improves asthma control, asthma related quality of life, number of symptom-free days, and lung function in patients with mild to moderate persistent asthma. The current challenge is to implement IBSM in clinical practice. Methods/design This study is a three-arm cluster randomized trial with a cluster pre-randomisation design and 12 months follow-up per practice comparing the following three IBSM implementation strategies: minimum strategy (MS): dissemination of the IBSM program; intermediate strategy (IS): MS + start-up support for professionals (i.e., support in selection of the appropriate population and training of professionals); and extended strategy (ES): IS + additional training and ongoing support for professionals. Because the implementation strategies (interventions) are primarily targeted at general practices, randomisation will occur at practice level. In this study, we aim to evaluate 14 primary care practices per strategy in the Leiden-The Hague region, involving 140 patients per arm. Patients aged 18 to 50 years, with a physician diagnosis of asthma, prescription of inhaled corticosteroids, and/or montelukast for ≥3 months in the previous year are eligible to participate. Primary outcome measures are the proportion of referred patients that participate in IBSM, and the proportion of patients that have clinically relevant improvement in the asthma-related quality of life. The secondary effect measures are clinical outcomes (asthma control, lung function, usage of airway treatment, and presence of exacerbations); self-management related outcomes (health education impact, medication adherence, and illness perceptions); and patient utilities. Process measures are the proportion of practices that participate in IBSM and adherence of professionals to implementation strategies. Cost-effective measurements are medical costs and healthcare consumption. Follow-up is six months

  14. Health Beliefs, Treatment Preferences and Complementary and Alternative Medicine for Asthma, Smoking and Lung Cancer Self-Management in Diverse Black Communities

    PubMed Central

    George, Maureen

    2012-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this literature review is to characterize unconventional health beliefs and complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) for asthma, smoking and lung cancer as those that are likely safe and those that likely increase risk in diverse Black communities. These findings should provide the impetus for enhanced patient-provider communication that elicits patients’ beliefs and self-management preferences so that they may be accommodated, or when necessary, reconciled through discussion and partnership. Methods Original research articles relevant to this topic were obtained by conducting a literature search of the PubMed Plus, PsychINFO and SCOPUS databases using combinations of the following search terms: asthma, lung cancer, emphysema, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), smoking, beliefs, complementary medicine, alternative medicine, complementary and alternative medicine (CAM), explanatory models, African American, and Black. Results Using predetermined inclusion and exclusion criteria, 51 original research papers were retained. Taken together, they provide evidence that patients hold unconventional beliefs about the origins of asthma and lung cancer and the health risks of smoking, have negative opinions of standard medical and surgical treatments, and have favorable attitudes about using CAM. All but a small number of CAM and health behaviors were considered safe. Conclusions When patients’ unconventional beliefs and preferences are not identified and discussed, there is an increased risk that standard approaches to self-management of lung disease will be sub-optimal, that potentially dangerous CAM practices might be used and that timely medical interventions may be delayed. Practice implications Providers need effective communication skills as the medical dialogue forms the basis of patients’ understanding of disease and self-management options. The preferred endpoint of such discussions should be agreement around an

  15. Asthma and Suicidal Ideation and Behavior among Puerto Rican Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Bandiera, Frank C.; Ramirez, Rafael; Arheart, Kristopher L.; Canino, Glorisa; Goodwin, Renee D.

    2013-01-01

    There is growing evidence of a positive association between asthma and suicidal ideation and behavior in the general community, although information on this potential association is scarce among adolescents and Puerto Ricans, groups at-risk for both conditions. Data came from wave three of the Boricua Youth Study, a longitudinal study of youth in the Bronx and San Juan conducted from 2000–2004. Logistic regressions for correlated data (GEE) were conducted with asthma predicting suicidal ideation and behavior among participants aged 11 years or older. After adjustment for survey design, age, gender, poverty, DSM-IV mental disorders, cigarette smoking, and stressful life events, asthma was positively associated with suicidal ideation and behavior among Puerto Rican adolescents. Public health interventions targeting Puerto Rican adolescents with asthma and future studies investigating potential biological and psychological mechanisms of association are warranted. PMID:23817156

  16. Dietary intake in adolescents with asthma--potential for improvement.

    PubMed

    Bueso, Anne Kørner; Berntsen, Sveinung; Mowinckel, Petter; Andersen, Lene Frost; Lødrup Carlsen, Karin C; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon

    2011-02-01

    Associations between an unhealthy diet and overweight and the presence of asthma are reported. The aims of this study were to assess whether the intake of nutrients and food items in adolescents with asthma differs from that of healthy adolescents, whether the intake was in accordance with the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations (NNR) or whether possible relationships were confounded by body composition. A four-day-validated 18-page pre-coded food diary was completed by 169 13- to 14-year-old adolescents, 93 with asthma and 76 healthy control subjects, in addition to clinical assessment, anthropometric measurements, lung function and skin prick tests. Neither intake of added sugar, snacks nor saturated fat was associated with asthma. All groups had an intake of saturated fat and added sugars exceeding the NNR, while the intake of fruits and vegetables, fibre and vitamin D was lower than recommended. The intake of folate, calcium, magnesium and iron was lower than recommended for girls with asthma and healthy girls. The intake of vitamin C was satisfactory for all groups. Body composition did not influence eating habits, and the prevalence of overweight was similar in the two groups. The dietary intake among Norwegian adolescents in general had a potential for improvement. As girls have a lower energy intake than boys, they have a larger demand of quality of the diet. Additional dietary research in adolescents with asthma is recommended.

  17. Evaluating the Validity of an Automated Device for Asthma Monitoring for Adolescents: Correlational Design

    PubMed Central

    Belyea, Michael J; Sterling, Mark; Bocko, Mark F

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptom monitoring is a cornerstone of asthma self-management. Conventional methods of symptom monitoring have fallen short in producing objective data and eliciting patients’ consistent adherence, particularly in teen patients. We have recently developed an Automated Device for Asthma Monitoring (ADAM) using a consumer mobile device as a platform to facilitate continuous and objective symptom monitoring in adolescents in vivo. Objective The objectives of the study were to evaluate the validity of the device using spirometer data, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), existing measures of asthma symptoms/control and health care utilization data, and to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the device in discriminating asthma cases from nonasthma cases. Methods A total of 84 teens (42 teens with a current asthma diagnosis; 42 without asthma) aged between 13 and 17 years participated in the study. All participants used ADAM for 7 consecutive days during which participants with asthma completed an asthma diary two times a day. ADAM recorded the frequency of coughing for 24 hours throughout the 7-day trial. Pearson correlation and multiple regression were used to examine the relationships between ADAM data and asthma control, quality of life, and health care utilization at the time of the 7-day trial and 3 months later. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was conducted to examine sensitivity and specificity based on the area under the curve (AUC) as an indicator of the device’s capacity to discriminate between asthma versus nonasthma cases. Results ADAM data (cough counts) were negatively associated with forced expiratory volume in first second of expiration (FEV1) (r=–.26, P=.05), forced vital capacity (FVC) (r=–.31, P=.02), and overall asthma control (r=–.41, P=.009) and positively associated with daily activity limitation (r=.46, P=.01), nighttime (r=.40, P=.02) and daytime symptoms (r=.38, P=.02), and health care

  18. Effects of physical conditioning on children and adolescents with asthma.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Liam; Kemp, Justin G; Roberts, Richard G D

    2005-01-01

    More than 40 years ago, the effects of exertional dyspnoea and the associated fear of an asthma attack usually lead to an avoidance of physical activity amongst asthmatic children. This issue still exists today, particularly in children with severe asthma. This article presents a comprehensive review of published information concerning the effects of training programmes on children and adolescents with asthma. The primary focus of these investigations was to examine the effects of physical conditioning on aerobic fitness, the severity and incidence of exercise-induced asthma (EIA) and asthma symptoms. The large majority of training studies of asthmatic children and adolescents demonstrate significant increases in aerobic fitness post-training or the achievement of normal levels of aerobic fitness. While there are a few reports of a reduced severity in EIA symptoms post-training, the majority of studies demonstrate no change in the occurrence or degree of EIA. However, a number of these studies have reported some reductions in hospitalisations, wheeze frequency, school absenteeism, doctor consultations and medication usage. It is, therefore, recommended that children and adolescents with asthma should participate in regular physical activity. This may improve asthma management and associated general health benefits, whilst minimising inactivity-related health risks. PMID:15707377

  19. Self-management in adolescents with chronic illness. What does it mean and how can it be achieved?

    PubMed

    Sawyer, Susan M; Aroni, Rosalie A

    2005-10-17

    The concept of self-management is based on the notion that it will improve wellbeing and strengthen self-determination and participation in health care, while reducing health care utilisation and health costs. Increasing self-management is a desirable goal for the 15%-20% of children and adolescents who have a significant ongoing health care need related to a chronic health condition. Promoting self-management in young people with chronic illness can be difficult for parents and health care practitioners. Doctors can help parents recognise the potentially competing aspects of the parenting role--protecting young people's health while supporting their growing independence and autonomy. Optimal care may or may not be achievable, depending on a young person's level of development. As children mature through adolescence, they increasingly want their own voice to be heard, as well as the right to privacy and confidentiality in health care consultations. As well as listening to parents and supporting their roles, doctors should see young people alone for part of the consultation, taking a psychosocial history and carefully maintaining confidentiality. PMID:16225444

  20. A job description for the effective self-management of a long-term condition: experiences of living with difficult asthma.

    PubMed

    Deacon, Maureen; Rickards, Emma

    2013-04-01

    This paper concerns a study exploring the salience of a 'job description' for the effective self-management of a long-term condition to the experiences of a group of women living with difficult asthma. This is a life-threatening disease. It has been claimed that sufferers are a marginalised, misunderstood, mistreated and vulnerable group. The method involved secondary analysis of focus group data. The job description has been developed as a tool to enable nurses to facilitate and support effective self-management. This study was designed to examine the application of this tool to a particular case. Long-term conditions are a growing feature of the developed world and are strongly implicated in health inequalities. They are more prevalent in socially and economically disadvantaged populations and therefore add further burden to already vulnerable people. Effective self-management is critical to adapting and adjusting to the experience of a long-term condition and nurses have a responsibility to promote this process.

  1. Omalizumab therapy for children and adolescents with severe allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Romano, Ciro

    2015-01-01

    Omalizumab, a therapeutic humanized monoclonal antibody specific for human IgE, was introduced in clinical practice more than a decade ago as an add-on therapy for moderate-to-severe allergic asthma in patients aged ≥12 years. Omalizumab has been demonstrated to be effective in adults with uncontrolled persistent asthma, with an excellent safety profile. In simple terms, omalizumab works by inhibiting the allergic cascade, that is, by neutralization of the circulating free IgE. This leads to reduction in the quantity of cell-bound IgE, downregulation of high-affinity IgE receptors, and, eventually, prevention of mediator release from effector cells. Evidence is far less abundant on the role of omalizumab in pediatric asthma. Although efficacy and safety of omalizumab in children and adolescents with uncontrolled, persistent allergic asthma has been recognized as well, further studies are needed to clarify a number of open questions in this specific patient population.

  2. ALLERGIC DISEASES AND ASTHMA IN ADOLESCENTS.

    PubMed

    Adamia, N; Jorjoliani, L; Khachapuridze, D; Katamadze, N; Chkuaseli, N

    2015-06-01

    The goal of our research was to find out, whether asthma phenotyping, based on presence of accompanying allergic diseases is significant for asthma classification or not. Research was conducted on the basis of questioning of random and representative cohorts of Tbilisi children's population, by cross-section method of epidemiological research. Special extended screening questionnaire was developed for epidemiological study of allergic diseases. Diagnostic criterion for allergy was analyzed and representative cohort was selected. Research was conducted in 2010-2014 period. Studied population included 1450 children from 2 to 17 years age representing Tbilisi general population (of them, 850 girls and 600 boys). As a result of research the following findings were made: asthma was confirmed where at least two of the listed was present: diagnosis of asthma made by doctor, asthma symptoms and consumption of drugs against asthma. Allergic rhinitis was confirmed, where more than one of the listed symptoms was present and children should not have caught cold, rhinorrhea, nasal obstruction or snore, combined or IgE with some inhalation allergen. Atopic dermatitis was confirmed if the subject had atopic dermatitis at a time of interview or clinical study. Markers of asthma severity were based on number of asthma episodes and number of symptoms, or regular consumption of corticosteroids, number of missed days at school and answer of subjects to the question: for the past year what was the degree of discomfort attributable to asthma ("very high" - "absolutely not"). Allergic sensitization was assessed based on the skin prick-test and test of specific immunoglobulin E in serum and was deemed positive where the average diameter of blebs in skin prick tests was 3 mm larger than negative control and IgE-0,35kU/l. Lung function was assessed by means of respirometers, by evaluating maximal forced expiration data and flow-volume curves. Allergic rhinitis was regarded as the most

  3. InSpire to Promote Lung Assessment in Youth: Evolving the Self-Management Paradigms of Young People With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Pierre; Rajan, Nithin O; Dacso, Clifford C

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma is the most common chronic disease in childhood, disproportionately affecting urban, minority, and disadvantaged children. Individualized care plans supported by daily lung-function monitoring can reduce morbidity and mortality. However, despite 20 years of interventions to increase adherence, only 50% of US youth accurately follow their care plans, which leads to millions of preventable hospitalizations, emergency room visits, and sick days every year. We present a feasibility study of a novel, user-centered approach to increasing young people’s lung-function monitoring and asthma self-care. Promoting Lung Assessment in Youth (PLAY) helps young people become active managers of their asthma through the Web 2.0 principles of participation, cocreation, and information sharing. Specifically, PLAY combines an inexpensive, portable spirometer with the motivational power and convenience of mobile phones and virtual-community gaming. Objective The objective of this study was to develop and pilot test InSpire, a fully functional interface between a handheld spirometer and an interactive game and individualized asthma-care instant-messaging system housed on a mobile phone. Methods InSpire is an application for mobile smartphones that creates a compelling world in which youth collaborate with their physicians on managing their asthma. Drawing from design-theory on global timer mechanics and role playing, we incentivized completing spirometry maneuvers by making them an engaging part of a game young people would want to play. The data can be sent wirelessly to health specialists and return care recommendations to patients in real-time. By making it portable and similar to applications normally desired by the target demographic, InSpire is able to seamlessly incorporate asthma management into their lifestyle. Results We describe the development process of building and testing the InSpire prototype. To our knowledge, the prototype is a first-of-its kind

  4. Adolescent Asthma Pharmacotherapy in a State of Flux

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Kathryn

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) elected not to approve a once-daily inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2 agonist combination product in 12–17-year-old patients due to lack of sufficient data, despite approval of previous combination products with similar levels of supporting evidence. As the FDA's stance toward adolescent data is changing, the opportunity to learn about their response to asthma medication has now arisen. A review of the relevant issues pertinent to pharmacotherapy of asthma in the 12–17-year-old population is discussed in this review. PMID:26421215

  5. Enrolling adolescents in asthma research: Adolescent, parent, and physician influence in the decision-making process

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Janet L.; Annett, Robert D.; Scherer, David G.; Turner, Charles; Dalen, Jeanne

    2009-01-01

    Background The factors influencing family decisions to participate in adolescent asthma research are not well understood. Legal and ethical imperatives require adolescent research participation to be voluntary. While parents and adolescents often agree about research decisions, disagreements may also occur with relatively frequency. Physician recommendations are also known to influence research participation decisions. Little attention has been given to how these dynamics may affect adolescents’ involvement in decisions to participate in research. Objective To examine the influence of family and physician-investigator relationships and recommendations on adolescent asthma clinical research participation decisions. Methods A statewide community sample of 111 adolescents aged 11–17, with a diagnosis of asthma, and their parents participated in this study. Adolescents received a medical evaluation from an asthma specialist and then the family was offered participation in a hypothetical asthma clinical trial. By random assignment, the research study was presented by either the same or an unknown asthma specialist and half the families in each group also received affirmative recommendations from the asthma specialist to participate in the hypothetical asthma clinical trial. Parents and adolescent made initial private decisions about participating in the trial. Then, following a family discussion of the clinical trial, a final research participation decision was made. Results Thirty three percent of parents and adolescents initially disagreed about the research participation decision. When disagreements occurred, final decisions followed the parents’ initial views except when the physician-investigator was known and a recommendation was made. Families with initial disagreement about participating were less likely to enroll when the investigator was unknown or when no recommendation was made. Adolescents who initially disagreed with parents’ views were less likely

  6. Integrating visual dietary documentation in mobile-phone-based self-management application for adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Frøisland, Dag Helge; Årsand, Eirik

    2015-05-01

    The goal of modern diabetes treatment is to a large extent focused on self-management to achieve and maintain a healthy, low HbA1c. Despite all new technical diabetes tools and support, including advanced blood glucose meters and insulin delivery systems, diabetes patients still struggle to achieve international treatment goals, that is, HbA1c < 7.5 in children and adolescents. In this study we developed and tested a mobile-phone-based tool to capture and visualize adolescents' food intake. Our aim was to affect understanding of carbohydrate counting and also to facilitate doctor-adolescent communication with regard to daily treatment. Furthermore, we wanted to evaluate the effect of the designed tool with regard to empowerment, self-efficacy, and self-treatment. The study concludes that implementing a visualization tool is an important contribution for young people to understand the basics of diabetes and to empower young people to define their treatment challenges. By capturing a picture of their own food, the person's own feeling of being in charge can be affected and better self-treatment achieved.

  7. Integrating visual dietary documentation in mobile-phone-based self-management application for adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Frøisland, Dag Helge; Årsand, Eirik

    2015-05-01

    The goal of modern diabetes treatment is to a large extent focused on self-management to achieve and maintain a healthy, low HbA1c. Despite all new technical diabetes tools and support, including advanced blood glucose meters and insulin delivery systems, diabetes patients still struggle to achieve international treatment goals, that is, HbA1c < 7.5 in children and adolescents. In this study we developed and tested a mobile-phone-based tool to capture and visualize adolescents' food intake. Our aim was to affect understanding of carbohydrate counting and also to facilitate doctor-adolescent communication with regard to daily treatment. Furthermore, we wanted to evaluate the effect of the designed tool with regard to empowerment, self-efficacy, and self-treatment. The study concludes that implementing a visualization tool is an important contribution for young people to understand the basics of diabetes and to empower young people to define their treatment challenges. By capturing a picture of their own food, the person's own feeling of being in charge can be affected and better self-treatment achieved. PMID:25901020

  8. The Use of Behavior Change Theory in Internet-Based Asthma Self-Management Interventions: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Torio, Monika-Bianca; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2015-01-01

    Background The high prevalence rate of asthma represents a major societal burden. Advancements in information technology continue to affect the delivery of patient care in all areas of medicine. Internet-based solutions, social media, and mobile technology could address some of the problems associated with increasing asthma prevalence. Objective This review evaluates Internet-based asthma interventions that were published between 2004 and October 2014 with respect to the use of behavioral change theoretical frameworks, applied clinical guidelines, and assessment tools. Methods The search term (Asthma AND [Online or Internet or Mobile or Application or eHealth or App]) was applied to six bibliographic databases (Ovid MEDLINE, PubMed, BioMed Central, ProQuest Computing, Web of Knowledge, and ACM Digital Library) including only English-language articles published between 2004 and October 2014. In total, 3932 articles matched the priori search terms and were reviewed by the primary reviewer based on their titles, index terms, and abstracts. The matching articles were then screened by the primary reviewer for inclusion or exclusion based on their abstract, study type, and intervention objectives with respect to the full set of priori inclusion and exclusion criteria; 331 duplicates were identified and removed. A total of 85 articles were included for in-depth review and the remaining 3516 articles were excluded. The primary and secondary reviewer independently reviewed the complete content of the 85 included articles to identify the applied behavioral change theories, clinical guidelines, and assessment tools. Findings and any disagreement between reviewers were resolved by in-depth discussion and through a consolidation process for each of the included articles. Results The reviewers identified 17 out of 85 interventions (20%) where at least one model, framework, and/or construct of a behavioral change theory were applied. The review identified six clinical guidelines

  9. Pertussis Immunization in Infancy and Adolescent Asthma Medication

    PubMed Central

    Bråbäck, Lennart; Kling, Anna-Maria; Grünewald, Maria; Nilsson, Lennart

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Childhood immunization may influence the development of asthma, possibly due to lack of infections or a shift in the T-helper cell type 1/T-helper cell type 2/regulatory T cells balance. We therefore investigated whether pertussis immunization in infancy is associated with asthma medication in adolescence. METHODS: After 14 years of no general pertussis vaccination, almost 82 000 Swedish children were immunized for pertussis in a vaccination trial between June 1, 1993, and June 30, 1994. In a follow-up analysis of almost 80 000 children, their data were compared with those of ∼100 000 nonvaccinated children, born during a 5-month period before and a 7-month period after the vaccination trial. Data for the main outcome variable (ie, dispensed prescribed asthma medication for each individual in the cohort during 2008–2010) were obtained from the national prescription database. Multivariate regression models were used to calculate the effect size of vaccination on dispensed asthma medication (odds ratios [OR], 95% confidence intervals [CI]). Approaches similar to intention-to-treat and per-protocol methods were used. RESULTS: The prevalence rates of various asthma medications for study patients at 15 years of age differed between 4.6% and 7.0%. The crude ORs for any asthma medication and antiinflammatory treatment in pertussis-vaccinated children after intention-to-treat analysis were 0.97 (95% CI: 0.93–1.00) and 0.94 (95% CI: 0.90–0.98), respectively. Corresponding adjusted ORs were 0.99 (95% CI: 0.95–1.03) and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.92–1.01). Similar ORs were found after per-protocol analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Pertussis immunization in infancy does not increase the risk of asthma medication use in adolescents. Our study presents evidence that pertussis immunization in early childhood can be considered safe with respect to long-term development of asthma. PMID:25246621

  10. A Mindfulness-Based Strategy for Self-Management of Aggressive Behavior in Adolescents with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Nirbhay N.; Lancioni, Giulio E.; Manikam, Ramasamy; Winton, Alan S. W.; Singh, Ashvind N. A.; Singh, Judy; Singh, Angela D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Some individuals with autism engage in physical aggression to an extent that interferes with not only their quality of life, but also that of their parents and siblings. Behavioral and psychopharmacological treatments have been the mainstay of treatments for aggression in children and adolescents with autism. We evaluated the effectiveness of a…

  11. Use of Commonly Available Technologies for Diabetes Information and Self-Management Among Adolescents With Type 1 Diabetes and Their Parents: A Web-Based Survey Study

    PubMed Central

    Vaala, Sarah E; Hood, Korey K; Laffel, Lori; Kumah-Crystal, Yaa A; Lybarger, Cindy K

    2015-01-01

    Background For individuals with Type 1 diabetes (T1D), following a complicated daily medical regimen is critical to maintaining optimal health. Adolescents in particular struggle with regimen adherence. Commonly available technologies (eg, diabetes websites, apps) can provide diabetes-related support, yet little is known about how many adolescents with T1D use them, why they are used, or relationships between use and self-management. Objective This study examined adolescent and parent use of 5 commonly available technologies for diabetes, including proportions who use each technology, frequency of use, and number of different technologies used for diabetes. Analyses also investigated the reasons adolescents reported for using or not using technologies for diabetes, and factors correlated with adolescents’ technology use. Finally, this study examined relationships between the type and number of technologies adolescents use for diabetes and their self-management and glycemic control. Methods Adolescents (12-17 years) and their parents (N=174 pairs), recruited from a pediatric diabetes clinic (n=134) and the Children with Diabetes community website (n=40), participated in this Web-based survey study. Glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) values were obtained from medical records for pediatric clinic patients. Adolescents reported their use of 5 commonly available technologies for diabetes (ie, social networking, diabetes websites, mobile diabetes apps, text messaging, and glucometer/insulin pump software), reasons for use, and self-management behavior (Self-Care Inventory-Revised, SCI-R). Results Most adolescents and parents used at least one of the 5 technologies for diabetes. Among adolescents, the most commonly used technology for diabetes was text messaging (53%), and the least commonly used was diabetes websites (25%). Most adolescents who used diabetes apps, text messaging, or pump/glucometer software did so more frequently (≥2 times per week), compared to social

  12. Parent misperception of control in childhood/adolescent asthma: the Room to Breathe survey.

    PubMed

    Carroll, W D; Wildhaber, J; Brand, P L P

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to determine how often asthma control is achieved in children and adolescents, and how asthma affects parents' and children's daily lives. Interviews, including the childhood asthma control test (C-ACT), were conducted with 1,284 parents of asthmatic children (aged 4-15 yrs), as well as with the children themselves (aged 8-15 yrs; n=943), in Canada, Greece, Hungary, the Netherlands, South Africa and the UK. Parents reported mild asthma attacks at least weekly in 11% of children, and serious attacks (requiring oral corticosteroids or hospitalisation) at least annually in 35%. Although 73% of parents described their child's asthma as mild or intermittent, 40% of children/adolescents had C-ACT scores ≤ 19, indicating inadequate control, and only 14.7% achieved complete Global Initiative for Asthma (GINA)-defined control and just 9.2% achieved Scottish Intercollegiate Guidelines Network (SIGN)/British Thoracic Society (BTS)-defined control. Guideline-defined asthma control was significantly less common than well-controlled asthma using the C-ACT (p<0.001). Asthma restricted the child's activities in 39% of families and caused lifestyle changes in 70%. Complete asthma control is uncommon in children worldwide. Guideline-defined control measures appear to be more stringent than those defined by C-ACT or families. Overall, parents underestimate their child's asthma severity and overestimate asthma control. This is a major potential barrier to successful asthma treatment in children.

  13. Urban Adolescents Readily Comply with a Complicated Asthma Research Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Lovinsky-Desir, Stephanie; Folch, Candace; Jung, Kyung Hwa; Torrone, David; Gil, Eric; Perera, Frederica; Miller, Rachel L; Chillrud, Steven N

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Adolescents are often cited as having poor rates of compliance with medical regimens and research protocols. We quantified compliance in a cohort of urban adolescents participating in a complex research protocol in which measures were obtained without direct supervision by research personnel. METHODS A total of 54 early adolescents ages 10–13 were asked to wear a vest containing a personal air pollutant exposure monitor for two 24-hour periods and to perform daily peak expiratory flow (PEF) for six consecutive days. Compliance with wearing the vest was measured by comparing accelerometer data from a device within the vest to one worn continuously on the child’s wrist. Daily PEF data were recorded using an electronic meter. RESULTS A priori definition of compliance was met by 85% of the adolescents by wearing the exposure monitoring vest and 72% by performing PEF. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that early adolescents can be compliant with complex research protocols that are needed to help bridge gaps in pediatric asthma research. PMID:24683308

  14. Health-Related Quality of Life and Asthma among United States Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Wanjun; Zack, Matthew M.; Zahran, Hatice S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the direction and the magnitude of associations between asthma and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a population-based sample of US adolescents. Study design We obtained data from the 2001–2010 cross-sectional National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. We used multinomial logistic regression and negative binomial regression to estimate corresponding percentages, prevalence ratios (PRs), and predicted days of 4 domains of HRQoL by 3 asthma status categories: never having asthma, having asthma without symptoms, and having asthma with symptoms. Results Compared with those who never had asthma, adolescents with asthma with symptoms of dry cough or wheezing reported significantly worse self-rated health (13.58% [95% CI, 10.32%–17.67%] vs 7.54% [95% CI, 6.50%–8.72%] for fair or poor health), significantly impaired physical health (PR = 1.34, P = .004; adjusted physically unhealthy days, 2.7 days vs 2 days), and impaired mental health (PR = 1.26, P = .025). Among adolescents having asthma with symptoms, those who currently smoked reported 1 more physically unhealthy day and 2.4 more mentally unhealthy days than those who did not smoke and did not have asthma. Those reporting limited physical functioning reported 2 more physically unhealthy days and 1.5 more mentally unhealthy days than those who did not report limited functioning. Conclusion Adolescents with asthma and symptoms reported worse HRQoL compared with those with asthma not reporting symptoms and those without asthma. Those who smoked or reported limited physical functioning reported worse physical and mental HRQoL. Reducing symptoms, quitting smoking, and improving physical functioning may improve HRQoL among adolescents with asthma. PMID:25454936

  15. Laser acupuncture in children and adolescents with exercise induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Gruber, W; Eber, E; Malle-Scheid, D; Pfleger, A; Weinhandl, E; Dorfer, L; Zach, M

    2002-01-01

    Background: Laser acupuncture, a painless technique, is a widely used alternative treatment method for childhood asthma, although its efficacy has not been proved in controlled clinical studies. Methods: A double blind, placebo controlled, crossover study was performed to investigate the possible protective effect of a single laser acupuncture treatment on cold dry air hyperventilation induced bronchoconstriction in 44 children and adolescents of mean age 11.9 years (range 7.5–16.7) with exercise induced asthma. Laser acupuncture was performed on real and placebo points in random order on two consecutive days. Lung function was measured before laser acupuncture, immediately after laser acupuncture (just before cold dry air challenge (CACh)), and 3 and 15 minutes after CACh. CACh consisted of a 4 minute isocapnic hyperventilation of –10°C absolute dry air. Results: Comparison of real acupuncture with placebo acupuncture showed no significant differences in the mean maximum CACh induced decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (27.2 (18.2)% v 23.8 (16.2)%) and maximal expiratory flow at 25% remaining vital capacity (51.6 (20.8)% v 44.4 (22.3)%). Conclusions: A single laser acupuncture treatment offers no protection against exercise induced bronchoconstriction in paediatric and adolescent patients. PMID:11867825

  16. Socioeconomic and environmental determinants of adolescent asthma in urban Latin America: an ecological analysis.

    PubMed

    Fattore, Gisel Lorena; Santos, Carlos Antonio de Souza Teles; Barreto, Mauricio Lima

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of asthma is high in urban areas of many Latin-American countries where societies show high levels of inequality and different levels of development. This study aimed to examine the relationship between asthma symptoms prevalence in adolescents living in Latin American urban centers and socioeconomic and environmental determinants measured at the ecological level. Asthma prevalence symptoms were obtained from the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) phase III. A hierarchical conceptual framework was defined and the explanatory variables were organized in three levels: distal, intermediate, proximal. Linear regression models weighed by sample size were undertaken between asthma prevalence and the selected variables. Asthma prevalence was positively associated with Gini index, water supply and homicide rate, and inversely associated with the Human Development Index, crowding and adequate sanitation. This study provides evidence of the potential influence of poverty and social inequalities on current wheezing in adolescents in a complex social context like Latin America.

  17. Physical Deconditioning as a Cause of Breathlessness among Obese Adolescents with a Diagnosis of Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Herring, Richard C.; Weltman, Judith; Patrie, James T.; Weltman, Arthur L.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    Background Obese children frequently complain of breathlessness. Asthma and obesity can both contribute to the symptoms during exercise, and this symptom can contribute to a diagnosis of asthma in these children. Despite the high prevalence of obesity few studies have investigated the cardiopulmonary physiology of breathlessness in obese children with a diagnosis of asthma. Methods In this case-control study, thirty adolescents between age 12 and 19 were studied with baseline spirometry and a cardiopulmonary exercise test. Ten adolescents were normal controls, ten had obesity without a diagnosis of asthma, and ten had obesity with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. Results Baseline characteristics including complete blood count and spirometry were comparable between obese adolescents with and without a diagnosis of asthma. During exercise, obese asthmatic and obese non-asthmatic adolescents had significantly reduced physical fitness compared to healthy controls as evidenced by decreased peak oxygen uptake after adjusting for actual body weight (21.7±4.5 vs. 21.4±5.4 vs. 35.3±5.8 ml/kg/min, respectively). However, pulmonary capacity at the peak of exercise was comparable among all three groups as evidenced by similar pulmonary reserve. Conclusion In this study, breathlessness was primarily due to cardiopulmonary deconditioning in the majority of obese adolescents with or without a diagnosis of asthma. PMID:23637784

  18. Asthma in children and adolescents in Brazil: contribution of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC)

    PubMed Central

    Solé, Dirceu; Camelo-Nunes, Inês Cristina; Wandalsen, Gustavo Falbo; Mallozi, Marcia Carvalho

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To assess asthma among Brazilian pediatric population applying the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC), an internationally standardized and validated protocol. Data sources: ISAAC was conceived to maximize the value of epidemiologic studies on asthma and allergic diseases, establishing a standardized method (self-applicable written questionnaire and/or video questionnaire) capable to facilitate the international collaboration. Designed to be carried out in three successive and dependent phases, the ISAAC gathered a casuistic hitherto unimaginable in the world and in Brazil. This review included data gathered from ISAAC official Brazilian centers and others who used this method. Data synthesis: At the end of the first phase, it has been documented that the prevalence of asthma among Brazilian schoolchildren was the eighth among all centers participating all over the world. Few centers participated in the second phase and investigated possible etiological factors, especially those suggested by the first phase, and brought forth many conjectures. The third phase, repeated seven years later, assessed the evolutionary trend of asthma and allergic diseases prevalence in centers that participated simultaneously in phases I and III and in other centers not involved in phase I. Conclusions: In Brazil, the ISAAC study showed that asthma is a disease of high prevalence and impact in children and adolescents and should be seen as a Public Health problem. Important regional variations, not well understood yet, and several risk factors were found, which makes us wonder: is there only one or many asthmas in Brazil? PMID:24676199

  19. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... that you have asthma. Your doctor will diagnose asthma based on lung function tests, your medical history, and a physical exam. You may also have allergy tests. When your asthma symptoms become worse than usual, it's called an ...

  20. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Asthma KidsHealth > For Kids > Asthma Print A A A ... it can take several days. continue Who Gets Asthma? No one really knows why one person's airways ...

  1. The Seattle–King County Healthy Homes II Project: A Randomized Controlled Trial of Asthma Self-management Support Comparing Clinic-Based Nurses and In-Home Community Health Workers

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, James; Takaro, Tim K.; Song, Lin; Beaudet, Nancy; Edwards, Kristine

    2009-01-01

    Objective To compare the marginal benefit of in-home asthma self-management support provided by community health workers (CHWs) with standard asthma education from clinic-based nurses. Design Randomized controlled trial. Setting Community and public health clinics and homes. Participants Three hundred nine children aged 3 to 13 years with asthma living in low-income households. Interventions All participants received nurse-provided asthma education and referrals to community resources. Some participants also received CHW-provided home environmental assessments, asthma education, social support, and asthma-control resources. Outcome Measures Asthma symptom–free days, Pediatric Asthma Caretaker Quality of Life Scale score, and use of urgent health services. Results Both groups showed significant increases in caretaker quality of life (nurse-only group: 0.4 points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.3–0.6; nurse + CHW group: 0.6 points; 95% CI, 0.4–0.8) and number of symptom-free days (nurse only: 1.3 days; 95% CI, 0.5–2.1; nurse + CHW: 1.9 days; 95% CI, 1.1–2.8), and absolute decreases in the proportion of children who used urgent health services in the prior 3 months (nurse only: 17.6%; 95% CI, 8.1%–27.2%; nurse + CHW: 23.1%; 95% CI, 13.6%–32.6%). Quality of life improved by 0.22 more points in the nurse + CHW group (95% CI, 0.00–0.44; P=.049). The number of symptom-free days increased by 0.94 days per 2 weeks (95% CI, 0.02–1.86; P = .046), or 24.4 days per year, in the nurse + CHW group. While use of urgent health services decreased more in the nurse + CHW group, the difference between groups was not significant. Conclusion The addition of CHW home visits to clinic-based asthma education yielded a clinically important increase in symptom-free days and a modest improvement in caretaker quality of life. PMID:19188646

  2. Relationships of family functioning, self-esteem, and resourceful coping of Thai adolescents with asthma.

    PubMed

    Preechawong, Sunida; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A; Heinzer, Marjorie M V; Musil, Carol M; Kercsmar, Carolyn; Aswinanonh, Rungtiwa

    2007-01-01

    Within the context of Rosenbaum's theory of learned resourcefulness, this correlational study examined the relationships among family functioning, self-esteem, and resourceful coping in Thai adolescents with asthma. A convenience sample of 132 Thai adolescents (aged 12-17 years) with asthma was recruited from the outpatient asthma clinics of four hospitals in Bangkok. Self-administered questionnaires included an assessment of demographic information and asthma status, the revised Family APGAR, the Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale, and the Children's Self-Control Scale. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to examine the relationships among variables. Effective family functioning had a significant positive effect on self-esteem (beta = .27, p < .01) and resourceful coping (beta = .30, p < .01), controlling for gender and age. However, self-esteem was not significantly correlated with resourceful coping (beta = .15, p = .08). The findings suggest that nursing interventions should take into account the role of family functioning in promoting self-esteem and resourceful coping in Thai adolescents with asthma. Recommendations for future research include replication of the study with a larger sample of adolescents with asthma and with adolescents with other chronic illnesses.

  3. Obesity and Bronchodilator Response in Black and Hispanic Children and Adolescents With Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Castellanos, Elizabeth; Thakur, Neeta; Oh, Sam S.; Eng, Celeste; Davis, Adam; Meade, Kelley; LeNoir, Michael A.; Avila, Pedro C.; Farber, Harold J.; Serebrisky, Denise; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Kumar, Rajesh; Bibbins-Domingo, Kirsten; Thyne, Shannon M.; Sen, Saunak; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Borrell, Luisa N.; Burchard, Esteban G.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with poor asthma control, increased asthma morbidity, and decreased response to inhaled corticosteroids. We hypothesized that obesity would be associated with decreased bronchodilator responsiveness in children and adolescents with asthma. In addition, we hypothesized that subjects who were obese and unresponsive to bronchodilator would have worse asthma control and would require more asthma controller medications. METHODS: In the Study of African Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE II) and the Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) study, two identical, parallel, case-control studies of asthma, we examined the association between obesity and bronchodilator response in 2,963 black and Latino subjects enrolled from 2008 to 2013 using multivariable logistic regression. Using bronchodilator responsiveness, we compared asthma symptoms, controller medication usage, and asthma exacerbations between nonobese (< 95th% BMI) and obese (≥ 95th% BMI) subjects. RESULTS: The odds of being bronchodilator unresponsive were 24% (OR, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.03-1.49) higher among obese children and adolescents compared with their not obese counterparts after adjustment for age, race/ethnicity, sex, recruitment site, baseline lung function (FEV1/FVC), and controller medication. Bronchodilator-unresponsive obese subjects were more likely to report wheezing (OR, 1.38; 95% CI, 1.13-1.70), being awakened at night (OR, 1.34; 95% CI, 1.09-1.65), using leukotriene receptor inhibitors (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.05-1.70), and using inhaled corticosteroid with long-acting β2-agonist (OR, 1.37; 95% CI, 1.05-1.78) than were their nonobese counterpart. These associations were not seen in the bronchodilator-responsive group. CONCLUSIONS: Obesity is associated with bronchodilator unresponsiveness among black and Latino children and adolescents with asthma. The findings on obesity and bronchodilator unresponsiveness represent a unique

  4. Prevalence of asthma among Chinese adolescents living in Canada and in China

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Wong, Gary W.K.; Chen, Yu-Zhi; Ferguson, Alexander C.; Greene, Justina M.; Ma, Yu; Zhong, Nan-Shan; Lai, Christopher K.W.; Sears, Malcolm R.

    2008-01-01

    Background Studies of the prevalence of asthma among migrating populations may help in identifying environmental risk factors. Methods We analyzed data from Vancouver, Canada, and from Guangzhou, Beijing and Hong Kong, China, collected during phase 3 of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood. We subdivided the Vancouver adolescents according to whether they were Chinese immigrants to Canada, Canadian-born Chinese or Canadian-born non-Chinese. We compared the prevalence of asthma and wheezing among Chinese adolescents born in Canada, Chinese adolescents who had immigrated to Canada and Chinese adolescents living in China. Results Of 7794 Chinese adolescents who met the inclusion criteria, 3058 were from Guangzhou, 2824 were from Beijing, and 1912 were from Hong Kong. Of 2235 adolescents in Vancouver, Canada, 475 were Chinese immigrants, 617 were Canadian-born Chinese, and 1143 were Canadian-born non-Chinese. The prevalence of current wheezing among boys ranged from 5.9% in Guangzhou to 11.2% in Canadian-born Chinese adolescents. For girls, the range was 4.3% in Guangzhou to 9.8% in Canadian-born Chinese adolescents. The prevalence of ever having had asthma ranged from 6.6% to 16.6% for boys and from 2.9% to 15.0% for girls. Prevalence gradients persisted after adjustment for other environmental variables (odds ratios for ever having had asthma among Canadian-born Chinese compared with native Chinese in Guangzhou: 2.72 [95% confidence interval 1.75–4.23] for boys and 5.50 [95% confidence interval 3.21–9.44] for girls; p < 0.001 for both). Among Chinese adolescents living in Vancouver, the prevalence of ever wheezing increased with duration of residence, from 14.5% among those living in Canada for less than 7 years to 20.9% among those living their entire life in Canada. The same pattern was observed for the prevalence of ever having had asthma, from 7.7% to 15.9%. Interpretation Asthma symptoms in Chinese adolescents were lowest among

  5. Temporal trends in the prevalence of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Wilmer, Fernanda Agapito Pássaro; Maurici, Rosemeri; Nazário, Carlos Alberto Kuntz; Nazário, Kahio César Kuntz; Pássaro, Paula Fernanda Agapito; Piazza, Helena Elisa; Bertoldi, Rennan Almir; Pizzichini, Emílio; Pizzichini, Márcia Margaret Menezes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To analyze the temporal trend of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis prevalences as well as their symptoms in adolescents. METHODS Two cross-sectional studies were conducted using the same methodology and questionnaire as was used for adolescents aged 12 to 14 years in the Brazilian city of Florianopolis, SC, Southern Brazil. Based on the international protocol of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) study, adolescents were evaluated in 2001 and 3,150 in 2012. The schools included in this study were the same as in the 2001 study. These schools were randomly selected after stratification by network (public and private) and geographic location. The total average percentage variation was estimated for the prevalence of asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis and their symptoms. RESULTS The prevalence of reported asthma was 10.9% in 2001 and 14.8% in 2012, with an average variation of 2.8% in the period. The highest average variation in the period was observed among female adolescents (4.1%). In parallel a significant increase occurred in reported physician-diagnosed asthma, 7.3% in 2001 and 11,1% in 2012, with an annual variation of 4.5%. The largest increases in reported physician-diagnosed asthma were seen in female (5.9%) and male (4.5%) public school pupils. In addition, a significant increase in reported rhinoconjunctivitis occurred, with the average variation in the period being 5.2%. Reports of severe asthma symptoms remained unchanged during the period, while the annual variation for reported current wheezing (-1.3%) and wheezing during exercise (-1.2%) decreased. CONCLUSIONS The results showed a significant increase in the annual average variation for asthma and rhinoconjunctivitis prevalence during the 2001 to 2012 period. PMID:26786471

  6. Momentary Assessment of Psychosocial Stressors, Context, and Asthma Symptoms in Hispanic Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Dunton, Genevieve; Dzubur, Eldin; Li, Marilyn; Huh, Jimi; Intille, Stephen; McConnell, Rob

    2016-01-01

    The current study used a novel real-time data capture strategy, ecological momentary assessment (EMA), to examine whether within-day variability in stress and context leads to exacerbations in asthma symptomatology in the everyday lives of ethnic minority adolescents. Low-income Hispanic adolescents (N = 20; 7th-12th grade; 54% male) with chronic asthma completed 7 days of EMA on smartphones, with an average of five assessments per day during non-school time. EMA surveys queried about where (e.g., home, outdoors) and with whom (e.g., alone, with friends) participants were at the time of the prompt. EMA surveys also assessed over the past few hours whether participants had experienced specific stressors (e.g., being teased, arguing with anyone), asthma symptoms (e.g., wheezing, coughing), or used an asthma inhaler. Multilevel models tested the independent relations of specific stressors and context to subsequent asthma symptoms adjusting for age, gender, and chronological day in the study. Being outdoors, experiencing disagreements with parents, teasing, and arguing were associated with more severe self-reported asthma symptoms in the next few hours (ps < .05). Being alone and having too much to do were unrelated to the experience of subsequent self-reported asthma symptoms. Using a novel real-time data capture strategy, results provide preliminary evidence that being outdoors and experiencing social stressors may induce asthma symptoms in low-income Hispanic children and adolescents with chronic asthma. The results of this preliminary study can serve as a basis for larger epidemiological and intervention studies.

  7. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Month with a Google+ Hangout on Air for parents and caregivers to learn how to help control a child's asthma so that they can breathe ... parents build up their asthma team. Jose, his parents, a doctor and a nurse, ... forces to help Jose control his asthma. The video is recorded in Spanish ...

  8. A pedometer based physical activity self-management program for children and adolescents with physical disability – design and methods of the StepUp study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Physical activity affords a wide range of physiological and psychological benefits for children and adolescents, yet many children with physical disabilities are insufficiently active to achieve these benefits. The StepUp program is a newly developed 6-week pedometer-based self-management program for children and adolescents with physical disability. Participants use a pedometer to undertake a 6-week physical activity challenge, with personalised daily step count goals set in consultation with a physiotherapist. The study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of the StepUp program, using a randomised control trial design. Methods/design A target sample of 70 young people with physical disabilities (aged 8–17 years, ambulant with or without aid, residing in Adelaide) will be recruited. Participants will be randomly allocated to either intervention or control following completion of baseline assessments. Assessments are repeated at 8 weeks (immediately post intervention) and 20 weeks (12 weeks post intervention). The primary outcome is objective physical activity determined from 7 day accelerometry, and the secondary outcomes are exercise intention, physical self-worth, quality of life and fatigue. Analyses will be undertaken on an intention-to-treat basis using random effects mixed modelling. Discussion This study will provide information about the potential of a low-touch and low-cost physical activity intervention for children and adolescents with cerebral palsy. Trial registration Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12613000023752. PMID:24490871

  9. Intensive upper limb intervention with self-management training is feasible and promising for older children and adolescents with unilateral cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Geerdink, Yvonne; Aarts, Pauline; van der Burg, Jan; Steenbergen, Bert; Geurts, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    This study explored the feasibility and preliminary effectiveness of a short (one week) intensive intervention combining Constraint Induced Movement Therapy (CIMT) and bimanual training (BiT) to improve upper limb capacity and bimanual performance guided by individual goal setting in children and adolescents with unilateral cerebral palsy aged 8-18 years. Self-management training was added to the intervention to maximize the effect of training and to empower the participants in self-monitoring the effective use of their affected hand. Functional goals (Canadian Occupational Performance Measure), unimanual capacity (Box and Block Test), bimanual performance (ABILHAND-Kids, Children's Hand-use Experience Questionnaire (CHEQ)) and amount of use (Video Observation Aarts and Aarts - determine developmental disregard (VOAA-DDD-R)) were measured at baseline, one week and four months post intervention. Twenty children (mean age 9.5 years) participated. Repeated measures ANOVA was used to measure effects over time. Compared to baseline, there were significant improvements on all outcome measures. The largest effect sizes were found for the COPM-performance and COPM-satisfaction (Cohen's d=2.09 and d=2.42, respectively). The effect size was large for the ABILHAND-Kids (d=0.86), moderate for the CHEQ (d=0.70) and Box and Block Test (d=0.56), and small for the VOAA-DDD-R (d=0.33). All effects were retained at the four months post intervention assessment. The results of this study indicate that one-week (36h) intensive CIMT-BiT combined with self-management training is a feasible and promising intervention for improving the capacity of the upper limb and its use in bimanual activities in older children and adolescents with unilateral CP. PMID:26164301

  10. Self-Surveillance by Adolescents and Young Adults Transitioning to Self-Management of a Chronic Genetic Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giarelli, Ellen; Bernhardt, Barbara A.; Pyeritz, Reed E.

    2010-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults with Marfan syndrome (MFS) use information from self-surveillance to manage their disorder. Thirty-seven male and female adolescents with MFS aged 14 to 21 years were interviewed. They identified 58 distinct self-surveillance behaviors that fell into four categories and multiple subcategories (SCs): tracking phenotype…

  11. Seasonal Patterns of Asthma in Children and Adolescents Presenting at Emergency Departments in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Won, Youn Kyoung; Hwang, Tae ho; Roh, Eui Jung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Seasonal variations in asthma-related hospitalizations and emergency department visits have long been recognized. This study aimed to investigate the seasonal patterns of asthma in children and adolescents who presented at emergency departments in Korea. Methods We analyzed the National Emergency Department Information System records from 117 emergency departments in Korea that comprised all of the patients with asthma who were aged 3-18 years and who presented at the emergency departments from 2007 to 2012. The children and adolescents were divided into 3 groups based on their ages, namely, 3-6 years, 7-12 years, and 13-18 years. The data were tabulated, and graphs were created to show the seasonal trends in the monthly numbers of emergency department visits as a consequence of asthma. Results A total of 41,128 subjects were identified, and the male-to-female ratio was 1:0.5. General ward admissions comprised 42.6% (n=17,524 patients) of the emergency department visits, and intensive care unit admissions comprised 0.8% (n=335 patients) of the emergency department visits. The monthly numbers of emergency department visits for asthma varied according to the season, with high peaks during fall, which was from September to November, and low levels in summer, which was from June to August. Conclusions Important differences in the seasonal patterns of emergency department visits for asthma were evident in children and adolescents. Identifying seasonal trends in asthma-related emergency department visits may help determine the causes and reduce the likelihood of asthma exacerbation. PMID:26922932

  12. “The sky is the limit”: adhering to antiretroviral therapy and HIV self-management from the perspectives of adolescents living with HIV and their adult caregivers

    PubMed Central

    Denison, Julie A; Banda, Harry; Dennis, Alexis C; Packer, Catherine; Nyambe, Namakau; Stalter, Randy M; Mwansa, Jonathan K; Katayamoyo, Patrick; McCarraher, Donna R

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Worldwide, HIV-related mortality among adolescents living with HIV (ALHIV) increased by 50% from 2005 to 2012 and is attributed in part to a lack of support for adolescent retention to care and adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART). This vulnerability reinforces the need to better understand incomplete ART adherence among ALHIV, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa, where the majority of the world's 2.1 million ALHIV reside. Methods From December 2011 to February 2012, we conducted in-depth interviews with 32 ALHIV (aged 15 to 18) and 23 of their adult caregivers in the Copperbelt Province of Zambia. Interviews were transcribed and translated. An iterative qualitative process was used to code and analyze the data and main themes were summarized regarding the barriers to and facilitators of ART adherence. Results More than a quarter of ALHIV reported missing a day or more of ART (ranging from one day to six months). Barriers to ART adherence included fear of disclosure and anticipated stigma. Few youth were willing to take their drugs outside of the home, which led to missed doses of ART. Similarly, families tended to manage HIV within the home only. As a result, although caregivers and families were often the greatest source of emotional and instrumental support, they coped with HIV in isolation of other potential support from their communities, schools or churches. Factors that supported ART adherence included attending clinic-sponsored youth groups, wanting to maintain one's health and using phone and clock alarms. Involvement of adult caregivers in HIV management varied greatly and was often based on the age and health status of the youth. Some caregivers struggled with letting the adolescents assume responsibility for their medication, and ALHIV had few self-management skills and tools to help them regularly take ART. Conclusions These data highlight the importance of families and home environments in supporting adherence to ART among ALHIV

  13. Association between indoor and outdoor air pollution and adolescent asthma from 1995 to 1996 in Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, T.N.; Ko, Y.C.; Chao, Y.Y.; Huang, C.C.; Lin, R.S.

    1999-10-01

    The study aim was to estimate the contribution of indoor and outdoor air pollution to the 1-year prevalence of adolescent asthma after personal susceptibility and other potential risk factors were taken into account. A large-scaled cross-sectional study was conducted among 165,173 high school students aged 11 to 16 years in the different communities of Kaohsiung and Pintong in Taiwan, from October 1995 to June 1996. Each student and his/her parents participating in the study completed a video and a written International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood questionnaire about symptoms of wheezing and allergies, passive smoking, and demographic variables. After adjustment for potential confounders, adolescents exposed to cigarette smoking and environmental tobacco smoke were found to suffer from asthma at an increased frequency. The authors observed a statistically significant association between outdoor air pollution and asthma, after controlling for potential confound variables. Total suspended particulate, nitrogen dioxide, carbon monoxide, ozone, and airborne dust particles all displayed an independent association with asthma, respectively. There were no selection biases in this community-based study, which provides evidence that passive smoking and long-term, high average outdoor air pollution are independent risk factors of asthma.

  14. Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Karl-Christian

    2014-01-01

    'Asthma' is derived from the Greek root ασθμαινω, meaning 'gasp for breath'. The term originally did not define a disease, but was employed to describe respiratory symptoms of a variety of pulmonary conditions. Over the centuries, several models have been proposed to understand the pathophysiologic abnormalities of asthma. By the beginning of the 20th century, asthma was seen to be a unique illness characterized by 'spasmodic afflictions of the bronchial tubes'. Consistent with the nature of asthma as a complex disease, the models for asthma pathogenesis have become increasingly complex. Research has moved from antiquated ideas to a descriptive functional approach to one that relies on pathophysiology in cellular and molecular biology, immunology, microbiology and genetics/genomics. As more advanced technologies for measuring lung function were developed, the features of asthma were steadily unraveled and its pathophysiology clarified. Asthma was shown to be associated with transient increases in airway resistance, reductions in forced expiratory volumes and flows, hyperinflation of the lungs and increased work of breathing, as well as abnormalities in the distribution of ventilation, perfusion and arterial blood gases. Today, asthma is seen as a chronic inflammatory disease which is not yet fully understood in its pathophysiology; therefore, therapy is still on the path to becoming optimal. PMID:24925386

  15. Asthma.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Karl-Christian

    2014-01-01

    'Asthma' is derived from the Greek root ασθμαινω, meaning 'gasp for breath'. The term originally did not define a disease, but was employed to describe respiratory symptoms of a variety of pulmonary conditions. Over the centuries, several models have been proposed to understand the pathophysiologic abnormalities of asthma. By the beginning of the 20th century, asthma was seen to be a unique illness characterized by 'spasmodic afflictions of the bronchial tubes'. Consistent with the nature of asthma as a complex disease, the models for asthma pathogenesis have become increasingly complex. Research has moved from antiquated ideas to a descriptive functional approach to one that relies on pathophysiology in cellular and molecular biology, immunology, microbiology and genetics/genomics. As more advanced technologies for measuring lung function were developed, the features of asthma were steadily unraveled and its pathophysiology clarified. Asthma was shown to be associated with transient increases in airway resistance, reductions in forced expiratory volumes and flows, hyperinflation of the lungs and increased work of breathing, as well as abnormalities in the distribution of ventilation, perfusion and arterial blood gases. Today, asthma is seen as a chronic inflammatory disease which is not yet fully understood in its pathophysiology; therefore, therapy is still on the path to becoming optimal.

  16. Physicians' perceptions of mobile technology for enhancing asthma care for youth.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Tali; Panzera, Anthony Dominic; Martinasek, Mary; McDermott, Robert; Couluris, Marisa; Lindenberger, James; Bryant, Carol

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed physicians' receptivity to using mobile technology as a strategy in patient care for adolescents with asthma. Understanding physicians' perceived barriers and benefits of integrating mobile technology in adolescents' asthma care and self-management is an initial step in enhancing overall patient and disease outcomes. We conducted in-depth interviews with second- and third-year pediatric residents and attending physicians who oversee pediatric residents in training (N = 27) at an academic medical center in the southeastern United States. We identified both benefits from and barriers to broader use of mobile technologies for improving asthma outcomes in adolescents. Resident physicians demonstrated greater readiness for integrating these technologies than did attending physicians. Prior to adoption of mobile technologies in the care of adolescent asthma patients, barriers to implementation should be understood. Prior to widespread adoption, such systems will need to be evaluated against traditional care for demonstration of patient outcomes that improve on the current situation.

  17. Association of asthma symptoms with cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption in Korean adolescents.

    PubMed

    Kim, Oksoo; Kim, Bo Hye

    2013-03-01

    The association of asthma symptoms with cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption in Korean adolescents was investigated in this study using the data of Korean Youth Risk Behavior Survey. Associated risk factors for experiencing asthma symptoms were explored in 3432 adolescents. In the symptomatic group, 21.7% were current smokers, compared to 10.9% in the asymptomatic group. Current smokers in the symptomatic group also smoked more cigarettes than those in the asymptomatic group. In the symptomatic group, 27.4% were current drinkers, compared to 17.9% in the asymptomatic group. Current drinkers in the symptomatic group were more likely to drink alcohol and to have experienced severe intoxication than those in the asymptomatic group. Participants who had been diagnosed within one year (odds ratio = 5.19, 95% confidence interval = 4.17-6.44) and those who had smoked over 20 days during the past 30 days (odds ratio = 1.77, 95% confidence interval = 1.26-2.49) were more likely to experience asthma symptoms. Healthcare providers should identify the risk behaviors of adolescents with asthma and counsel them and their parents simultaneously.

  18. Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q& ... exercise. It's a great way to keep the body and mind healthy, so if you get exercise-induced asthma ...

  19. Asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Calverley, P. M.

    1996-01-01

    Bronchial asthma is now recognised to be a major cause of morbidity and even mortality in people of all ages. Two important ideas have changed our approach to asthma management. The first is understanding that asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder which needs regular treatment with anti-inflammatory drugs such as inhaled corticosteroids to prevent further attacks. The second development is the availability of prescribable peak flow meters, which allows both confident diagnosis and early prediction of relapse. Asthma management guidelines provide a logical treatment framework for most patients, but a few difficult cases still consume large amounts of medical time. The commonest problem is one of compliance with treatment which may respond to patient education, although this is not universally so. Other problems include misdiagnosis, acid reflux and, rarely, true corticosteroid-resistant asthma. Several potentially important new treatments have been developed. These include longer acting anticholinergic drugs, drugs with bronchodilator and some anti-inflammatory properties which antagonise or inhibit the production of leukotrienes, sub-types of phosphodiesterase inhibitor with anti-inflammatory properties and immunosuppressive drugs such as cyclosporin. Ultimately these new treatments must be rigorously tested and integrated into a care plan that remains centred on patient education. PMID:8746278

  20. Prevalences of asthma and rhinitis among adolescents in the city of Fortaleza, Brazil: temporal changes *

    PubMed Central

    de Luna, Maria de Fátima Gomes; Fischer, Gilberto Bueno; de Luna, João Rafael Gomes; da Silva, Marcelo Gurgel Carlos; de Almeida, Paulo César; Chiesa, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe the prevalences of asthma and rhinitis in adolescents (13-14 years of age) in the city of Fortaleza, Brazil, in 2010, comparing the results with those obtained in a prevalence survey conducted in 2006-2007. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study involving probabilistic samples of 3,015 and 3,020 adolescents in surveys conducted in 2006-2007 and 2010, respectively. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood protocol was used on both occasions. RESULTS: Comparing the two periods, there were no significant differences regarding cumulative wheezing, active asthma, four or more wheezing attacks within the last year, sleep disturbed by wheezing more than one night per week, and speech-limiting wheezing. The prevalences of exercise-induced wheezing, dry cough at night, and physician-diagnosed asthma were significantly higher in 2010 than in the 2006-2007 period (p < 0.01 for all). The prevalence of physician-diagnosed rhinitis was significantly lower in 2010 (p = 0.01), whereas there were no significant differences between the two periods regarding cumulative rhinitis, current rhinitis, and rhinoconjunctivitis. In both periods, dry cough at night, current rhinitis, and rhinoconjunctivitis were significantly more prevalent in females than in males (p < 0.01 for all). Also in both periods, active asthma, current rhinitis, and rhinoconjunctivitis were more prevalent in private school students than in public school students (p < 0.01 for all). CONCLUSIONS: Our data show that the prevalences of asthma and rhinitis symptoms remain high among 13- and 14-year-olds in Fortaleza, predominantly among females and private school students. PMID:23670497

  1. Relationship between exercise capacity and quality of life in adolescents with asthma *

    PubMed Central

    Basso, Renata Pedrolongo; Jamami, Mauricio; Labadessa, Ivana Gonçalves; Regueiro, Eloisa Maria Gatti; Pessoa, Bruna Varanda; de Oliveira, Antônio Delfino; Lorenzo, Valéria Amorim Pires Di; Costa, Dirceu

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the quality of life of adolescents with asthma correlates with parameters obtained prior to and after the six-minute step test (6MST); spirometric results after the 6MST; and level of physical activity. METHODS: Nineteen adolescents with asthma, ranging from 11-15 years of age, were assessed with spirometry, 6MST, the International Physical Activity Questionnaire (IPAQ), the Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ), and the 10-point Borg category-ratio scale. RESULTS: Sensation of dyspnea correlated negatively with the total PAQLQ score (r = −0.54) and with the scores of its activity limitation (AL) and symptoms domains (r = −0.64 and r = −0.63, respectively), leg fatigue also correlating negatively with those same domains (r = −0.49 and r = −0.56, respectively). The total IPAQ score correlated with the total PAQLQ score (r = 0.47) and with the PAQLQ AL domain (r = 0.51); IPAQ time spent walking correlated with the PAQLQ symptoms domain (r = 0.45); and IPAQ time spent in vigorous activity correlated with the AL domain (r = 0.50). In the regression analysis, only sensation of dyspnea remained significantly correlated with the total PAQLQ score and the PAQLQ AL domain; leg fatigue remained significantly correlated with the symptoms domain. CONCLUSIONS: Higher levels of physical activity indicate better quality of life, as do lower perception of dyspnea and less leg fatigue. The 6MST proved to be a viable option for evaluating exercise capacity in adolescents with asthma, because it reflects the discomfort that asthma causes during activities of daily living. PMID:23670496

  2. Prospectively assessed early life experiences in relation to cortisol reactivity in adolescents at risk for asthma.

    PubMed

    Kelsay, Kim; Leung, Donald Y M; Mrazek, David A; Klinnert, Mary D

    2013-03-01

    Altered cortisol reactivity in individuals with asthma likely increases the risk of inflammation in the face of stress. Understanding antecedents of cortisol reactivity enhances knowledge of factors affecting asthma. Forty-eight subjects genetically predisposed for asthma, recruited from a study that assessed them from birth, completed a laboratory stress procedure and self-report measures at ages 17-19 years. Observation and parent reports from age 0 to 2 years were used to create a parent child relationship risk variable and to define criteria for a cumulative risk variable. In repeated measures analysis of 46 adolescents, those who had experienced early parent child relationship problems, specifically insecure attachment, had an attenuated cortisol stress response, even after controlling for concurrent psychological function and recent stressors (F = 4.6, p < .005). Cortisol stress response was not related to asthma status. This study supports a relationship between the parent child relationship during the first 2 years of life and later cortisol response to stress in youth at genetic risk for asthma.

  3. Do Variants in GSTs Modify the Association between Traffic Air Pollution and Asthma in Adolescence?

    PubMed

    Bowatte, Gayan; Lodge, Caroline J; Lowe, Adrian J; Erbas, Bircan; Dennekamp, Martine; Marks, Guy B; Perret, Jennifer; Hui, Jennie; Wjst, Matthias; Gurrin, Lyle C; Allen, Katrina J; Abramson, Michael J; Matheson, Melanie C; Dharmage, Shyamali C

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in the oxidative stress response may partially explain the documented heterogeneous associations between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) exposure and asthma and allergies in children. We investigated whether the GSTT1, GSTM1 and GSTP1 gene polymorphisms modified the associations between TRAP exposure during the first year of life and asthma, wheeze and hay fever in adolescence. We used a birth cohort of 620 high risk infants from the Melbourne Atopy Cohort Study. TRAP exposure during the first year of life was defined as the cumulative length of major roads within 150 m of each participant's residence during the first year of life. Wheeze, asthma and hay fever were measured at ages 12 (n = 370) and 18 (n = 434) years. The associations and interactions with glutathione S-transferases (GST s) were investigated using regression models. Overall, there was no relationship between TRAP exposure during the first year of life and current asthma, wheeze and hay fever at ages 12 or 18 years. However, in GSTT1 null carriers, every 100 m increase in cumulative lengths of major road exposure during the first year of life was associated with a 2.31-fold increased risk of wheeze and a 2.15-fold increased risk of asthma at 12 years. TRAP is associated with some respiratory outcomes in carriers of genetic polymorphisms in oxidative stress metabolism genes. PMID:27043549

  4. Do Variants in GSTs Modify the Association between Traffic Air Pollution and Asthma in Adolescence?

    PubMed Central

    Bowatte, Gayan; Lodge, Caroline J.; Lowe, Adrian J.; Erbas, Bircan; Dennekamp, Martine; Marks, Guy B.; Perret, Jennifer; Hui, Jennie; Wjst, Matthias; Gurrin, Lyle C.; Allen, Katrina J.; Abramson, Michael J.; Matheson, Melanie C.; Dharmage, Shyamali C.

    2016-01-01

    Polymorphisms in genes involved in the oxidative stress response may partially explain the documented heterogeneous associations between traffic-related air pollution (TRAP) exposure and asthma and allergies in children. We investigated whether the GSTT1, GSTM1 and GSTP1 gene polymorphisms modified the associations between TRAP exposure during the first year of life and asthma, wheeze and hay fever in adolescence. We used a birth cohort of 620 high risk infants from the Melbourne Atopy Cohort Study. TRAP exposure during the first year of life was defined as the cumulative length of major roads within 150 m of each participant’s residence during the first year of life. Wheeze, asthma and hay fever were measured at ages 12 (n = 370) and 18 (n = 434) years. The associations and interactions with glutathione S-transferases (GST s) were investigated using regression models. Overall, there was no relationship between TRAP exposure during the first year of life and current asthma, wheeze and hay fever at ages 12 or 18 years. However, in GSTT1 null carriers, every 100 m increase in cumulative lengths of major road exposure during the first year of life was associated with a 2.31-fold increased risk of wheeze and a 2.15-fold increased risk of asthma at 12 years. TRAP is associated with some respiratory outcomes in carriers of genetic polymorphisms in oxidative stress metabolism genes. PMID:27043549

  5. Changes in willingness to self-manage pain among children and adolescents and their parents enrolled in an intensive interdisciplinary pediatric pain treatment program.

    PubMed

    Logan, Deirdre E; Conroy, Caitlin; Sieberg, Christine B; Simons, Laura E

    2012-09-01

    The importance of willingness to adopt a self-management approach to chronic pain has been demonstrated in the context of cognitive-behaviorally oriented interdisciplinary pain treatment programs for adults, both as a treatment outcome and as a process that facilitates functional improvements. Willingness to self-manage pain has not been studied in pediatric interdisciplinary pain treatment settings. Study aims were (1) to investigate willingness to self-manage pain among children and parents undergoing intensive interdisciplinary pain treatment and (2) to determine whether increased willingness to self-manage pain influenced functional treatment outcomes. A total of 157 children ages 10 to 18 and their parents enrolled in a pediatric pain rehabilitation program completed the Pain Stages of Change Questionnaire (PSOCQ youth and parent versions) at pretreatment, posttreatment, and short-term follow-up. They also reported on pain, functional disability, depressive symptoms, fear of pain, and use of passive and accommodative coping strategies. Results show that willingness to self-manage pain increased during treatment among both children and parents, with gains maintained at follow-up. Increases in children's readiness to self-manage pain from pretreatment to posttreatment were associated with decreases in functional disability, depressive symptoms, fear of pain, and use of adaptive coping strategies. Increases in parents' readiness to adopt a pain self-management approach were associated with changes in parent-reported fear of pain but not with other child outcomes. Few associations emerged between pretreatment willingness to self-manage pain and posttreatment outcomes. Findings suggest that interdisciplinary pediatric pain rehabilitation may facilitate increased willingness to self-manage pain, which is associated with improvements in function and psychological well-being.

  6. Youth and Parent Versions of the Asthma-Related Anxiety Scale: Development and Initial Testing

    PubMed Central

    Unikel, Lynne H.; Shrout, Patrick E.; Klein, Rachel G.

    2011-01-01

    Among adults, anxiety related to asthma has been acknowledged to influence asthma self-management. However, it has not been addressed in pediatric samples and there have been no measures developed to assess asthma-related anxiety in youth or parents. The objective of this study was to develop and test the psychometric properties of novel instruments assessing asthma-related anxiety: the Youth Asthma-Related Anxiety Scale (YAAS) and Parent Asthma-Related Anxiety Scale (PAAS). Scale items were analyzed for content validity. We determined the factor structure using exploratory factor analysis and tested the scales' psychometric properties with 285 Hispanic and African American early adolescents with uncontrolled asthma (mean age=12.8) and their parents (n=230) who participated in a larger randomized control trial testing the efficacy of an asthma intervention; control group families (134 youth and 103 parents) provided follow-up data to assess temporal stability. Both the YAAS and PAAS contained 2 factors with Cronbach alpha coefficients ranging from 0.75 to 0.90. The 2 factors, anxiety about asthma severity and about disease-related restrictions, were highly correlated within each measure. The measures displayed content and construct validity and demonstrated moderate temporal stability over 2–3 months (range: 0.36–0.42). The YAAS and PAAS have adequate psychometric properties and can meaningfully contribute to the assessment of asthma-related anxiety in adolescents and their parents, filling a clinical need in this population. PMID:22276225

  7. Mine dumps, wheeze, asthma, and rhinoconjunctivitis among adolescents in South Africa: any association?

    PubMed Central

    Nkosi, Vusumuzi; Wichmann, Janine; Voyi, Kuku

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the association between community proximity to mine dumps, and current wheeze, rhinoconjunctivitis, and asthma among adolescents. This study was conducted during May–November 2012 around five mine dumps in South Africa. Communities in close proximity to mine dumps had an increased likelihood of current wheeze OR 1.38 (95 % CI: 1.10–1.71), rhinoconjunctivitis OR 1.54 (95 % CI: 1.29–1.82), and a protective association with asthma OR 0.29 (95 % CI: 0.23–0.35). Factors associated with health outcomes included other indoor and outdoor pollution sources. Wheeze and rhinoconjunctivitis appear to be a public health problem in these communities. The findings of this study serve as a base for further detailed epidemiological studies for communities in close proximity to the mine dumps e.g. a planned birth cohort study. PMID:25537069

  8. Mine dumps, wheeze, asthma, and rhinoconjunctivitis among adolescents in South Africa: any association?

    PubMed

    Nkosi, Vusumuzi; Wichmann, Janine; Voyi, Kuku

    2015-01-01

    The study investigated the association between community proximity to mine dumps, and current wheeze, rhinoconjunctivitis, and asthma among adolescents. This study was conducted during May-November 2012 around five mine dumps in South Africa. Communities in close proximity to mine dumps had an increased likelihood of current wheeze OR 1.38 (95 % CI: 1.10-1.71), rhinoconjunctivitis OR 1.54 (95 % CI: 1.29-1.82), and a protective association with asthma OR 0.29 (95 % CI: 0.23-0.35). Factors associated with health outcomes included other indoor and outdoor pollution sources. Wheeze and rhinoconjunctivitis appear to be a public health problem in these communities. The findings of this study serve as a base for further detailed epidemiological studies for communities in close proximity to the mine dumps e.g. a planned birth cohort study.

  9. Influence of childhood growth on asthma and lung function in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Sonnenschein-van der Voort, Agnes M.M.; Howe, Laura D.; Granell, Raquel; Duijts, Liesbeth; Sterne, Jonathan A.C.; Tilling, Kate; Henderson, A. John

    2015-01-01

    Background Low birth weight and rapid infant growth in early infancy are associated with increased risk of childhood asthma, but little is known about the role of postinfancy growth in asthmatic children. Objectives We sought to examine the associations of children's growth patterns with asthma, bronchial responsiveness, and lung function until adolescence. Methods Individual growth trajectories from birth until 10 years of age were estimated by using linear spline multilevel models for 9723 children participating in a population-based prospective cohort study. Current asthma at 8, 14, and 17 years of age was based on questionnaires. Lung function and bronchial responsiveness or reversibility were measured during clinic visits at 8 and 15 years of age. Results Rapid weight growth between 0 and 3 months of age was most consistently associated with increased risks of current asthma at the ages of 8 and 17 years, bronchial responsiveness at age 8 years, and bronchial reversibility at age 15 years. Rapid weight growth was associated with lung function values, with the strongest associations for weight gain between 3 and 7 years of age and higher forced vital capacity (FVC) and FEV1 values at age 15 years (0.12 [95% CI, 0.08 to 0.17] and 0.11 [95% CI, 0.07 to 0.15], z score per SD, respectively) and weight growth between 0 and 3 months of age and lower FEV1/FVC ratios at age 8 and 15 years (−0.13 [95% CI, −0.16 to −0.10] and −0.04 [95% CI, −0.07 to −0.01], z score per SD, respectively). Rapid length growth was associated with lower FVC and FVC1 values at age 15 years. Conclusion Faster weight growth in early childhood is associated with asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness, and faster weight growth across childhood is associated with higher FVC and FEV1 values. PMID:25577593

  10. Disparate geographic prevalences of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema among adolescents in five Canadian cities.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Yu; Pizzichini, Marcia M M; Becker, Allan B; Duncan, Joanne M; Ferguson, Alexander C; Greene, Justina M; Rennie, Donna C; Senthilselvan, Ambikaipakan; Taylor, Brett W; Sears, Malcolm R

    2010-08-01

    To assess concordance of prevalence rates of asthma, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema symptoms among adolescents in five Canadian cities. The International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase 3 written questionnaires were answered by 8334 adolescents aged 13 to 14 in Vancouver, Saskatoon, Winnipeg, Hamilton and Halifax, Canada. Prevalence rates of current symptoms ranged from 13.7-33.0% for wheezing, 14.6-22.6% for allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and 8.2-10.4% for atopic eczema. Using Hamilton as reference, the prevalence of wheezing was significantly higher in Halifax (OR = 1.58; 95% CI 1.36-1.84) and Saskatoon (1.27; 1.07-1.50) and significantly lower in Vancouver (0.51; 0.44-0.59). In contrast, allergic rhinoconjunctivitis was significantly more prevalent in Winnipeg (1.39; 1.16-1.68) and Halifax (1.36; 1.14-1.61) and trended lower in Saskatoon (0.81; 0.66-1.00). Atopic eczema was significantly more prevalent in Winnipeg (1.31; 1.01-1.69) and Vancouver (1.28; 1.04-1.58). Multivariable logistic regression analyses showed the region of residence, being born in Canada, recent use of acetaminophen and heavy exposure to traffic exhaust were significantly associated with all three allergic conditions, while obesity and having two or more smokers at home was only associated with increased risk for wheezing. Chinese ethnicity decreased that risk. Among five Canadian centres, the highest prevalence rates of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis or atopic eczema were not observed in the same regions as the highest prevalence rates of wheezing. This disparity in regional variations in the prevalence rates suggests dissimilar risk factors for the development or expression of wheezing (asthma), allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and atopic eczema.

  11. [Intermittent or persistent rhinitis in children and adolescents with Asthma: «the Swiss LARA paediatrics survey»].

    PubMed

    Leuppi, J D; Wildhaber, J H; Spertini, F; Helbling, A

    2011-10-01

    Asthma and allergic rhinitis are chronic inflammatory airway diseases which often occur concomitantly. The objective of the LARA program was to identify the comorbidities and characteristics of asthma (A), intermittent or persistent rhinitis (IPR) and physician defined atopic dermatitis (AD) in 6- to 16-year old asthmatic Swiss children and adolescents. Overall, 126 general practitioners and paediatricians collected the data of 670 asthmatics. Approximately one third of the asthmatic children in Switzerland had well-controlled asthma. Almost two thirds of these asthmatics suffered from concomitant IPR. The latter presented with significantly less symptoms while the treatment rates with inhaled corticosteroids (approximately 90%) and leukotriene-receptorantagonists (approximately 50%) were comparable. However, there were almost twice as many passive smokers in the less well-controlled group. The prevalence of AD was similar in both groups. IPR and AD may play an important role as risk factors in the future development of asthma.

  12. Effect of Orem’s Self-Care Model on Self-Esteem of Adolescents with Asthma Referred to an Asthma and Allergy Clinic in Isfahan

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Zeinab; Mosaviasl, Fatemeh Sadat; Abasi, Samira; Ghazavi, Zohre

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Acquisition of chronic diseases such as asthma leads to psychological, mental and physical complications in adolescents, and hence their self-esteem may be compromised. Therefore, the present study was conducted to assess the effect of Orem’s self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma. Materials and Methods: This semi-experimental study enrolled 64 asthmatic adolescents referred to Shariati Hospital, Isfahan. Subjects were assigned to two groups of control and intervention consecutively. Then, the self-care training program was conducted according to Orem’s self-care model in eight two-hour sessions based on self-care needs, and self-esteem was measured in the two groups prior to and two months after the last training session. The data were collected by a questionnaire of demographic characteristics and the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventories (CSEI) and analyzed by SPSS version 20. Results: Independent t-test showed a significant difference in the mean score of self-esteem between the intervention and control groups after the training (P<0.05), but the difference was not statistically significant prior to the intervention. Paired t-test showed a significant difference in the mean score of self-esteem before and after the training in the intervention group (P<0.01), but this difference was not statistically significant in the control group (P>0.05). Conclusion: Regarding the effect of Orem’s self-care model on self-esteem of adolescents with asthma, we recommend the use of this model as a care intervention in healthcare centers to promote adolescents’ health. PMID:27114724

  13. The In Vivo Adherence Intervention For at Risk Adolescents With Asthma: Report of a Randomized Pilot Trial

    PubMed Central

    D'Amico, Elizabeth J.; Varni, James W.; Munafo, Jennifer K.; Britto, Maria T.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Drotar, Dennis; King, Eileen C.; Darbie, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Objective Low-income and minority adolescents are at high risk for poor asthma outcomes, due in part to adherence. We tested acceptability, feasibility, and effect sizes of an adherence intervention for low socioeconomic status (SES) minority youth with moderate- and severe-persistent asthma. Design and Methods Single-site randomized pilot trial: intervention (n = 12; asthma education, motivational interviewing, problem-solving skills training, 1 month cell-phone with tailored text messaging) versus control (n = 14; asthma education; cell-phone without tailored messaging). Calculated effect-sizes of relative change from baseline (1 and 3 months). Results Intervention was judged acceptable and feasible by participants. Participants (12–18 years, mean = 15.1, SD = 1.67) were 76.9% African-American, 80.7% public/no insurance. At 1 and 3 months, asthma symptoms (Cohen's d's = 0.40, 0.96) and HRQOL (PedsQL™; Cohen's d's = 0.23, 1.25) had clinically meaningful medium to large effect sizes. Conclusions This intervention appears promising for at-risk youth with moderate- and severe-persistent asthma. PMID:22167121

  14. Interrelationships between diagnosed asthma, asthma-like symptoms, and abnormal airway behaviour in adolescence: the Odense Schoolchild Study.

    PubMed Central

    Siersted, H. C.; Mostgaard, G.; Hyldebrandt, N.; Hansen, H. S.; Boldsen, J.; Oxhøj, H.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnosis of asthma is based on several characteristics including symptoms and suitable tests of airway lability. However, it is neither clear to what degree various tests and symptoms identify the same subjects, nor how these characteristics are best combined to diagnose asthma. The interrelationships between physician-diagnosed asthma, asthma-like symptoms, and abnormal airway function, as defined by four commonly used tests, have therefore been assessed. METHODS: A population based sample of 495 Danish schoolchildren aged 12-15 years, comprising 292 randomly selected subjects and 203 subjects considered at risk of having or developing asthma, was examined. Symptoms and background information were recorded by questionnaire. The test panel consisted of baseline forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1%), provocation with treadmill exercise (EXE) and with inhaled methacholine (PD15), and monitoring of peak expiratory flow (PEF) twice daily for two weeks. RESULTS: The sensitivity for diagnosed asthma was highest for PD15 followed by PEF monitoring, whereas specificity for asthma or asthma-like symptoms was marginally higher with the other two tests. Most symptomatic subjects with any positive test were identified by PD15 alone (75%) or in combination with PEF monitoring (89%). PEF variability was more susceptible to treatment with inhaled steroids than the PD15 index. Although inter-test agreement was weak (kappa < 0.40 for all pairs), significant associations were found between PD15 and EXE, PEF and EXE, and FEV1% and PD15. CONCLUSIONS: The agreement between the four tests was weak. In particular, PEF variability and methacholine responsiveness seem to identify different varieties of airway pathophysiology. The combined use of methacholine provocation testing and PEF monitoring may be helpful as an epidemiological screening tool for asthma. PMID:8711678

  15. Clinical characteristics of children and adolescents with severe therapy-resistant asthma in Brazil *

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Andrea Mendonça; Roncada, Cristian; Santos, Giovana; Heinzmann-Filho, João Paulo; de Souza, Rodrigo Godinho; Vargas, Mauro Henrique Moraes; Pinto, Leonardo Araújo; Jones, Marcus Herbert; Stein, Renato Tetelbom; Pitrez, Paulo Márcio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe the clinical characteristics, lung function, radiological findings, and the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum in children and adolescents with severe therapy-resistant asthma (STRA) treated at a referral center in southern Brazil. Methods: We retrospectively analyzed children and adolescents (3-18 years of age) with uncontrolled STRA treated with high-dose inhaled corticosteroids and long-acting ß2 agonists. We prospectively collected data on disease control, lung function, skin test reactivity to allergens, the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum, chest CT findings, and esophageal pH monitoring results. Results: We analyzed 21 patients (mean age, 9.2 ± 2.98 years). Of those, 18 (86%) were atopic. Most had uncontrolled asthma and near-normal baseline lung function. In 4 and 7, induced sputum was found to be eosinophilic and neutrophilic, respectively; the inflammatory cell profile in induced sputum having changed in 67% of those in whom induced sputum analysis was repeated. Of the 8 patients receiving treatment with omalizumab (an anti-IgE antibody), 7 (87.5%) showed significant improvement in quality of life, as well as significant reductions in the numbers of exacerbations and hospitalizations. Conclusions: Children with STRA present with near-normal lung function and a variable airway inflammatory pattern during clinical follow-up, showing a significant clinical response to omalizumab. In children, STRA differs from that seen in adults, further studies being required in order to gain a better understanding of the disease mechanisms. PMID:26398754

  16. See I told you I was taking it! - Attitudes of adolescents with asthma towards a device monitoring their inhaler use: Implications for future design.

    PubMed

    Howard, Sam; Lang, Alexandra; Sharples, Sarah; Shaw, Dominick

    2017-01-01

    Adherence to treatment in asthma is often poor, particularly in adolescents and children where the condition is most prevalent. Electronic monitoring devices have shown potential for improving inhaler use, yet little research has considered the attitudes of patients towards these devices. We gave seven adolescents with asthma an electronic monitoring device to use for one month and collected their views on important issues including monitoring and data sharing. Our results showed that participants felt positively about using the data to demonstrate responsibility for their condition to both their parents and medical professionals, but expressed concern for the attention the device's appearance could draw to them and their asthma. This paper considers the positive and negative perceptions of this novel device and provides new insight into the attitudes of adolescents towards inhaler monitoring, as well as future directions for design and development of monitoring devices for asthma and other chronic medical conditions. PMID:27633217

  17. An Integration of Parents’ and Best Friends’ Smoking, Smoking-Specific Cognitions, and Nicotine Dependence in Relation to Readiness to Quit Smoking: A Comparison between Adolescents with and without Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Engels, Rutger C. M. E.; Kleinjan, Marloes; van den Eijnden, Regina J. J. M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective To study the impact of parents’ and best friends’ smoking, nicotine dependence, and craving on smoking-specific cognitions, and readiness to quit in adolescents with and without asthma. Methods Structural equation analyses were applied to data from a sample of 1,120 daily smoking adolescents, 83 of whom had asthma. Results Adolescents with asthma felt more ready to quit, and cognitions were more strongly related to readiness to quit among adolescents with asthma than among adolescents without asthma. Moreover, best friends’ smoking seemed more relevant to the cognitions of adolescents with asthma. Nicotine dependence and craving were strongly related to cognitions, and to readiness to quit in both groups. The relation between craving and readiness to quit, however, was stronger among participants with asthma. Conclusions Reduction of nicotine dependence and craving is essential for both groups. Youth with asthma may benefit even more from cognitive-based cessation services than healthy youth. The finding that adolescents with asthma are relatively more ready to quit, and that their cognitions are more easily affected can be turned into advantages in asthma-specific cessation services. PMID:18287108

  18. Asthma Education Programme in Russia: Educating Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maslennikova, G. Ya.; Morosova, M. E.; Salman, N. V.; Kulikov, S. M.; Oganov, R. G.

    1998-01-01

    U.S. recommendations for asthma management were adapted for use in educating Moscow families with children with asthma (N=252). Use of anti-inflammatory drugs, doctor visits, peak flow rates, and daily peak flow were also measured. One-year follow up showed significant improvement in asthma self-management skills among the education group.…

  19. Adolescent decision-making about use of inhaled asthma controller medication: Results from focus groups with participants from a prior longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Wamboldt, Frederick S.; Bender, Bruce G.; Rankin, Allison E.

    2011-01-01

    Background Adherence with inhaled controller medications for asthma is known to be highly variable with many patients taking fewer doses than recommended for consistent control of lung inflammation. Adherence also worsens as children become teenagers, although the exact causes are not well established. Objective To use focus group methodology to examine beliefs, feelings, and behaviors about inhaled asthma controller medication in adolescents and young adults who had previously participated in a longitudinal study of asthma treatment adherence and outcome in order to develop more effective management strategies. Methods Twenty-six subjects participated in 6 focus groups comprised of 3-5 young adults (age range 12-20 years). Verbatim transcripts of these groups were analyzed using the long-table method of content analysis to identify key themes raised by participants. Results A variety of beliefs, feelings and behaviors influence the adolescent’s decision about how to use their asthma medication. Some of the adolescents understood the importance of daily medication and were committed to the treatment plan prescribed by their provider. Poorer adherence was the product of misinformation, incorrect assumptions about their asthma, and current life situations. Conclusions These results, by highlighting potential mechanisms underlying both better and worse adherence inform the development of strategies to improve adherence behavior in adolescents and young adults with asthma. Knowledge of the specific beliefs, feelings and behaviors that underlie adolescents’ use of inhaled asthma controller medication will help providers maximize treatment adherence in this notoriously difficult patient population. PMID:21854323

  20. Use of physical activity self-management strategies by high school students.

    PubMed

    Trost, Stewart G; Hutley, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Teaching adolescents to use self-management strategies may be an effective approach to promoting lifelong physical activity (PA). However, the extent to which adolescents use self-management strategies and their impact on current PA have not been studied previously. The aims of this study were 1) to describe the prevalence of self-management strategy use in adolescents; and 2) to determine relationships between self-management strategy use, PA self-efficacy, and PA participation. 197 students completed questionnaires measuring use of self-management strategies, self-efficacy, and PA behavior. The most prevalent self-management strategies (>30%) were thinking about the benefits of PA, making PA more enjoyable, choosing activities that are convenient, setting aside time to do PA, and setting goals to do PA. Fewer than 10% reported rewarding oneself for PA, writing planned activities in a book or calendar, and keeping charts of PA. Use of self-management strategies was associated with increased self-efficacy (r = .47, p < .001) and higher levels of PA (r = .34 p < .001). A 1-unit difference in self-management strategy scores was associated with a ~fourfold increase in the probability of being active (OR = 3.7, 95% CI = 1.8-7.4). Although strongly associated with PA, a relatively small percentage of adolescents routinely use self-management strategies.

  1. Effects of sulfur oxides on nasal and lung function in adolescents with extrinsic asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.Q.; Morgan, M.S.; Horike, M.; Pierson, W.E.

    1985-12-01

    Ten adolescent subjects with extrinsic asthma were exposed during intermittent exercise to filtered air, 0.5 ppm of sulfur dioxide (SO2), or 100 micrograms/m3 of sulfuric acid (H2SO4) on 5 separate days. The purpose of the study was to compare changes in nasal power (the work of nose breathing) with pulmonary functional changes depending on the route of inhalation of the sulfur oxide pollutants, oral inhalation through a rubber mouthpiece or oronasal inhalation via a face mask. Nasal power was measured with a modified skin diving mask equipped with two differential pressure transducers. Statistically significant changes in total respiratory resistance, FEV1, and maximum flow calculated at 50% and 75% vital capacity were observed after all exposures to SO2 and H2SO4. The magnitude of change in FEV1 and maximum flow calculated at 50% vital capacity was higher after oral compared to oronasal inhalation of SO2. The nasal work of breathing increased 32% after SO2 exposure by mouthpiece and 30% after SO2 exposure via face mask (p less than 0.05). The nasal power changes after the H2SO4 exposures were not different from the sham exposures. We conclude that oronasal inhalation of 0.5 ppm of SO2 produces a significant increase in the nasal work of breathing and that the route of exposure reduces but does not eliminate the lower airway reactions observed on oral exposure.

  2. Self-reported lifetime asthma and nativity status in U.S. children and adolescents: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sharon P; Borrell, Luisa N; Shapiro, Alan

    2010-05-01

    Nativity status seems to have a protective effect on asthma. However, there is little information in the literature on the effect of nativity status on asthma for non-Hispanic Black and White children and adolescents. This study investigates the association between nativity status and self-reported asthma in U.S. children and adolescents under 21 years of age after controlling for selected characteristics including education and income. Logistic regression was conducted using SUDAAN to estimate odds ratios from data of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. The prevalence of asthma for U.S. children and adolescents is 14.5%, with U.S.-born exhibiting a higher prevalence (15.1%) than foreign-born (7.3%, p<.0001). In the fully-adjusted analysis, foreign-born children and adolescents were almost twice less likely than U.S.-born counterparts to report asthma. This association differs by race/ethnicity, with the lowest odds being observed in Whites (OR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.10-0.86), followed by Mexican Americans (OR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.25-0.56) and Blacks (OR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.29-0.94). Moreover, this association varies by education: Foreign-born children of survey respondents who had at least a high school education were more than twice less likely than their U.S.-born counterparts to have asthma. The findings of this study underscore the importance of inquiring about nativity status when studying asthma among U.S. children and adolescents.

  3. Self-reported lifetime asthma and nativity status in U.S. children and adolescents: results from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Sharon P; Borrell, Luisa N; Shapiro, Alan

    2010-05-01

    Nativity status seems to have a protective effect on asthma. However, there is little information in the literature on the effect of nativity status on asthma for non-Hispanic Black and White children and adolescents. This study investigates the association between nativity status and self-reported asthma in U.S. children and adolescents under 21 years of age after controlling for selected characteristics including education and income. Logistic regression was conducted using SUDAAN to estimate odds ratios from data of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2004. The prevalence of asthma for U.S. children and adolescents is 14.5%, with U.S.-born exhibiting a higher prevalence (15.1%) than foreign-born (7.3%, p<.0001). In the fully-adjusted analysis, foreign-born children and adolescents were almost twice less likely than U.S.-born counterparts to report asthma. This association differs by race/ethnicity, with the lowest odds being observed in Whites (OR: 0.29, 95% CI: 0.10-0.86), followed by Mexican Americans (OR: 0.38; 95% CI: 0.25-0.56) and Blacks (OR: 0.52; 95% CI: 0.29-0.94). Moreover, this association varies by education: Foreign-born children of survey respondents who had at least a high school education were more than twice less likely than their U.S.-born counterparts to have asthma. The findings of this study underscore the importance of inquiring about nativity status when studying asthma among U.S. children and adolescents. PMID:20453381

  4. Asthma management programs in managed care organizations.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christine W; Maio, Vittorio; Goldfarb, Neil I; Cobb, Nicole; Nash, David B

    2005-12-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate how managed care organizations (MCOs) currently approach asthma treatment and management and to determine factors affecting asthma outcomes. A Web-based survey was administered to a national sample of 351 medical directors of MCOs to investigate the asthma management program components in their organizations as well as gaps and barriers in the management of patients with asthma. All 134 (38.2%) responding medical directors reported that their organizations monitor asthma patients. Plans use a variety of asthma management activities, including general member education (90%), member education by mail (87%), self-management education (85%), and provider education (82%). Educational resources (89%) and telephone advice nurse (77%) were the most common self-management strategies offered. Among factors impeding the provision of effective asthma care, noncompliance with asthma treatment, the inappropriate use of medications, and the need for multiple medications were cited by virtually all respondents. Health plans rely on an array of strategies to manage asthma patients. Education encouraging patient self-management is a key component of asthma management programs. However, a considerable number of treatment approach barriers are impeding the achievement of proper asthma care. Without innovative approaches to care, it appears that current MCOs' asthma management efforts may not result in substantial improvements in asthma outcomes.

  5. Effect of Orem’s Self-Care Model on Perceived Stress in Adolescents with Asthma Referring the Asthma and Allergy Clinic, Isfahan, 2014

    PubMed Central

    Hemati, Zeinab; Abasi, Samira; Mosaviasl, Fatemehsadat; Shakerian, Behzad; Kiani, Davood

    2016-01-01

    Background: Incidence of asthma in adolescents leads to variations in family status, roles and interaction with peers for them, which could be a source of stress and psychological tensions in them. Therefore, the present study was conducted to investigate the effect of Orem’s self-care model on perceived stress in adolescents with asthma. Methods: In this semi-experimental study conducted from April 2013 to February 2014, 64 asthmatic adolescents referring Shariati Hospital, Isfahan were enrolled by simple random sampling and the patients were assigned to two groups of control and intervention. Then, Orem’s self-care model-based training was implemented throughout eight sessions of two hours each and the Cohen Perceived Stress Scale was administered to both groups prior to and two months after the completion of the training. The data were analyzed by descriptive and analytical statistics consisting of paired t-test, independent t-test, Chi-square and Mann-Whitney using SPSS Version 20. Results: Mean age of the participants was 14.15±3.12 years in the intervention group and 15.21±3.09 years in the control groups. 68.8% and 59.4% of the participants were male in the intervention and control groups, respectively. Independent t-test indicated a significant difference in the mean scores of perceived stress in the intervention (25.46±5.31) and control groups (28.90±5.27) after the training. Also, the result of paired t-test indicated a significant difference in the mean score of perceived stress between before (29.18±5.27) and after (25.46±5.31) training. Conclusion: As the training based on Orem’s model had a positive effect on declining perceived stress in asthmatic adolescents, continuation of using these training interventions could contribute to ultimately achieving positive outcomes in health functions of these patients. PMID:27382591

  6. Cultural perspectives of interventions for managing diabetes and asthma in children and adolescents from ethnic minority groups.

    PubMed

    Mc Manus, V; Savage, E

    2010-09-01

    Both diabetes and asthma are increasingly being recognized as health problems for ethnic groups. Because of cultural differences, ethnicity is reported to be a risk factor for poorer quality in health care, disease management and disease control. Ethnic groups are at risk for poorer quality of life and increased disease complications when compared with non-ethnic counterparts living in the same country. There is little known about how culture is addressed in interventions developed for ethnic groups. The aim of this paper is to systematically review the cultural perspectives of interventions for managing diabetes and asthma in children, adolescents and/or their families from ethnic minority groups. A total of 92 records were identified that were potentially relevant to this review following which, 61 papers were excluded. The full texts of remaining papers (n= 31) were then read independently by both authors, and agreement was reached to exclude a further 27 papers that did not meet inclusion criteria. A total of four papers were eligible for inclusion in this review. Findings indicate that despite growing concerns about health disparities between ethnic and non-ethnic groups in relation to both asthma and diabetes in childhood, there has been little effort to develop cultural specific interventions for ethnic groups. By systematically reviewing asthma and diabetes interventions we have highlighted that few interventions have been developed from a cultural perspective. There are a limited number of interventions published that add knowledge on the specific elements of intervention that is needed to effectively and sensitively educate other cultures. More work is required into identifying which strategies or components of cultural interventions are most effective in achieving positive health outcomes for children, adolescents and/or their families from ethnic groups.

  7. Comprehensive Self-Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Bourbeau, J; Lavoie, K L; Sedeno, M

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we provide a review of the literature on self-management interventions and we are giving some thought to how, when, and by whom they should be offered to patients. The present literature based on randomized clinical trials has demonstrated benefits (reduced hospital admissions and improved health status) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients undergoing self-management interventions, although there are still problems with the heterogeneity among interventions, study populations, follow-up time, and outcome measures that make generalization difficult in real life. Key to the success, self-management intervention has to target behavior change. Proper self-management support is a basic prerequisite, for example, techniques and skills used by health care providers "case manager" to instrument patients with the knowledge, confidence, and skills required to effectively self-manage their disease. To improve health behaviors and engagement in self-management, self-management interventions need to target enhancing intrinsic motivation to change. This will best be done using client-centered communication (motivational communication) that encourages patients to express what intrinsically motivates them (e.g., consistent with their values or life goals) to adopt certain health behavior, with the goal of helping them overcome their ambivalence about change. Finally, if we want to be able to design and implement self-management interventions that are integrated, coherent, and have a strong likelihood of success, we need to take a more careful look and give more attention at the case manager, the patient (patient evaluation), and the quality assurance.

  8. Comprehensive Self-Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Bourbeau, J; Lavoie, K L; Sedeno, M

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we provide a review of the literature on self-management interventions and we are giving some thought to how, when, and by whom they should be offered to patients. The present literature based on randomized clinical trials has demonstrated benefits (reduced hospital admissions and improved health status) for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients undergoing self-management interventions, although there are still problems with the heterogeneity among interventions, study populations, follow-up time, and outcome measures that make generalization difficult in real life. Key to the success, self-management intervention has to target behavior change. Proper self-management support is a basic prerequisite, for example, techniques and skills used by health care providers "case manager" to instrument patients with the knowledge, confidence, and skills required to effectively self-manage their disease. To improve health behaviors and engagement in self-management, self-management interventions need to target enhancing intrinsic motivation to change. This will best be done using client-centered communication (motivational communication) that encourages patients to express what intrinsically motivates them (e.g., consistent with their values or life goals) to adopt certain health behavior, with the goal of helping them overcome their ambivalence about change. Finally, if we want to be able to design and implement self-management interventions that are integrated, coherent, and have a strong likelihood of success, we need to take a more careful look and give more attention at the case manager, the patient (patient evaluation), and the quality assurance. PMID:26238647

  9. Incidence of exercise-induced asthma in adolescent athletes under different training and environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Sidiropoulou, Maria P; Kokaridas, Dimitrios G; Giagazoglou, Paraskevi F; Karadonas, Michalis I; Fotiadou, Eleni G

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to establish if there were differences in the incidence of exercise-induced bronchospasm between athletes in different sports, which take place under different environmental conditions such as open places, closed courses, and swimming pools with similar exercise intensity (football, basketball, water polo) using the free running test. The study included 90 adolescents (3 groups of 30) aged 14-18 years recruited from academies in northern Greece. All the participants were initially subjected to (a) a clinical examination and cardiorespiratory assessment by a physician and (b) free running test of a 6-minute duration and measurement with a microspirometer of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV₁). Only the participants who had measured a decrease in FEV₁ ≥ 10% were reevaluated with the microspirometer during a training session. The examination of all the participants during the free running test showed that 22 athletes, that is, 9, 8, and 5 of football, basketball, and water polo athletes, respectively, demonstrated an FEV₁ ≥ 10 drop. Reevaluation of the 22 participants during training showed that 5 out 9 (55%) football athletes, 4 out of 8 basketball athletes (50%), and none of the 5 athletes of the water polo team displayed a drop of FEV₁ ≥ 10%. Despite the absence of any significant statistical differences between the 3 groups, the analysis of variances did show a trend of a lower incidence of EIA in the water polo athletes. It was found that a football or basketball game can induce EIA in young athletes but to a lesser degree than the free running test can induce. The water polo can be a safer sport even for participants with a medical history of asthma or allergies.

  10. Beta 2-adrenergic receptor gene association with overweight and asthma in children and adolescents and its relationship with physical fitness

    PubMed Central

    Leite, Neiva; Lazarotto, Leilane; Milano, Gerusa Eisfeld; Titski, Ana Claudia Kapp; Consentino, Cássio Leandro Mühe; de Mattos, Fernanda; de Andrade, Fabiana Antunes; Furtado-Alle, Lupe

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association of Arg16Gly and Gln27Glu polymorphisms of β2-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB2) with the occurrence of asthma and overweight and the gene's influence on anthropometric, clinic, biochemical and physical fitness variables in children and adolescents. Methods: Subjects were evaluated for allelic frequencies of the β2-adrenergic receptor gene, height, weight, body mass index (BMI), BMI Z-score, waist circumference (WC), pubertal stage, resting heart rate (HRres), blood pressure (BP), total cholesterol (TC), glucose, insulin, high density lipoprotein (HDL-C), low density lipoprotein (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), Homeostasis Metabolic Assessment (HOMA2-IR), Quantitative Insulin Sensitivity Check Index (QUICKI) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). The participants were divided in four groups: overweight asthmatic (n=39), overweight non-asthmatic (n=115), normal weight asthmatic (n=12), and normal weight non-asthmatic (n=40). Results: Regarding the Gln27Glu polymorphism, higher total cholesterol was observed in usual genotype individuals than in genetic variant carriers (p=0.04). No evidence was found that the evaluated polymorphisms are influencing the physical fitness. The Arg16 allele was found more frequently among the normal weight asthmatic group when compared to the normal weight non-asthmatic group (p=0.02), and the Glu27 allele was more frequently found in the overweight asthmatics group when compared to the normal weight non-asthmatic group (p=0.03). Conclusions: The association of Arg16 allele with the occurrence of asthma and of the Glu27 allele with overweight asthmatic adolescents evidenced the contribution of the β2-adrenergic receptor gene to the development of obesity and asthma. PMID:26409918

  11. ANTHROPOMETRIC INDICATORS OF GENERAL AND CENTRAL OBESITY IN THE PREDICTION OF ASTHMA IN ADOLESCENTS; CENTRAL OBESITY IN ASTHMA.

    PubMed

    Jobim Benedetti, Franceliane; Lúcia Bosa, Vera; Mariante Giesta, Juliana; Bueno Fischer, Gilberto

    2015-12-01

    Objetivo: determinar la prevalencia de riesgo de asma asociado con indicadores antropométricos de exceso de peso y la distribución de la grasa corporal. Metodología: estudio transversal que incluye adolescentes entre 10 y 19 años de edad. El indicador antropométrico utilizado para clasificar el exceso de peso fue el índice de masa corporal (IMC-Z); los utilizados para la adiposidad abdominal fueron la circunferencia de la cintura (CC), la relación cintura-estatura (RCE) y el índice de conicidad (IC). Las características del asma se evaluaron utilizando el cuestionario International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC). El nivel de significación fue del 5%, y los análisis se realizaron con el Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) versión 18.0. Resultados: fueron evaluados estudiantes adolescentes (n = 1362; 788 [57,9%] mujeres) con una edad media de 15,65 ± 1,24 años. Se observó en las mujeres una alta prevalencia de asma, exceso de peso (IMC-Z) y exceso de adiposidad abdominal (WC y RCE). Solo los valores de IC para el exceso de adiposidad abdominal fueron mayores para los hombres que para las mujeres. Los adolescentes con exceso de adiposidad abdominal, como lo demuestra la RCE, tenían 1,24 veces más riesgo de tener asma en comparación con los adolescentes no obesos. Los niños con exceso de adiposidad abdominal, según la clasificación de IC, presentaron 1,8 veces mayor riesgo de asma. El riesgo de asma grave era 3 veces mayor entre las adolescentes que fueron clasificados como severamente obesos a través del IMC-Z. Conclusión: este estudio mostró que el exceso de peso y la obesidad abdominal se asocian con un mayor riesgo de asma y asma severa en adolescentes. Por lo tanto, se sugieren mediciones de IMC adicionales para los asmáticos.

  12. Pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of an extrafine fixed pMDI combination of beclometasone dipropionate/formoterol fumarate in adolescent asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kuna, Piotr; Govoni, Mirco; Lucci, Germano; Scuri, Mario; Acerbi, Daniela; Stelmach, Iwona

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim was to investigate the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of an extrafine pressurized metered-dose inhaler (pMDI) fixed combination of beclometasone dipropionate (BDP)/formoterol fumarate (FF) in adolescent and adult asthma. Methods This was a three-way crossover study, on 30 asthmatic adolescents receiving BDP/FF pMDI with or without a valved holding chamber (VHC) or a free licenced combination of BDP pMDI and FF pMDI plus a parallel arm of 30 asthmatic adults receiving BDP/FF pMDI. All patients received a single dose of BDP and FF of 400 µg and 24 µg, for each treatment, respectively. Assessments were performed over 8 hours. Results In adolescents, the 90% confidence intervals (CIs) for the systemic exposure (AUC(0,t)) geometric mean ratio of the fixed combination with or without VHC vs. the free combination were within the bioequivalence range 0.80–1.25, both for beclometasone-17-monopropionate (B17MP, the active metabolite of BDP) and formoterol. Pharmacodynamic variables for plasma potassium and glucose, pulse rate and pulmonary function in adolescents were equivalent between treatments, 95% CI within 0.9, 1.09. The upper level of 90% CIs for AUC(0,t) geometric mean ratio adolescents : adults of B17MP and formoterol after treatment with BDP/FF pMDI was lower than 1.25, 90% CI 0.78, 1.04 and 0.86, 1.17, respectively. Conclusions In adolescents the pharmacodynamics and the overall systemic exposure to the active ingredients of an extrafine fixed combination of BDP/FF pMDI with or without a VHC was equivalent to that of a free licenced combination of pMDIs of established safety and efficacy profiles. The systemic exposure in adolescents was not higher than in adults. These results support the indication for use of inhaled corticosteroid/long acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist pMDIs in adolescents at the same dosage as in adults. PMID:25808292

  13. Changing patterns of self-management in youth with type I diabetes.

    PubMed

    Schilling, Lynne S; Knafl, Kathleen A; Grey, Margaret

    2006-12-01

    Self-management of type I diabetes is key to good physical and psychosocial outcomes of the disease, yet little is known about how youth and their parents share responsibility for illness management. This study describes the division of labor between youth and their parents, self-management conflict, and three patterns of self-management in youth across four developmental stages: preadolescence, early adolescence, mid-adolescence, and late adolescence. Twenty-two youth (8-19 years) with type I diabetes and one of their parents were interviewed using semistructured interviews. Data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results indicated that parents of preadolescents (8-11 years) performed much of their children's diabetes care. Dyads reported some conflicts, particularly over food, amount of bolus, and blood glucose testing. The dyads demonstrated a self-management pattern that we identified as parent-dominant. Most early adolescents (11-15 years) performed much of their own daily care, but parents actively participated in their self-management and oversaw it. The majority of dyads reported conflict over food and blood glucose testing. Most early adolescents demonstrated a transitional self-management pattern whereby they managed their own daily care, with varying amounts of parental oversight. In mid-adolescence (15-17 years), youth managed nearly all of their diabetes care; however, some dyads reported that parental oversight of illness care was still considerable. Exercise was conflictual for the majority of these dyads. Over half of the youth and, by late adolescence (17-19 years), all youth demonstrated a pattern of adolescent-dominant self-management. In adolescent-dominant self-management, youth independently managed their diabetes. Half of the dyads reported that there were sometimes conflicts over food and blood glucose testing. Understanding the nature of sharing self-management responsibilities, the nature of conflict in carrying out such

  14. Safety of long-acting beta agonists and inhaled corticosteroids in children and adolescents with asthma.

    PubMed

    Xia, Ying; Kelton, Christina M L; Xue, Liang; Guo, Jeff J; Bian, Boyang; Wigle, Patricia R

    2013-12-01

    The introduction of long-acting beta agonists (LABAs) was considered a major advance in bronchodilator therapy for adult, as well as pediatric, patients with asthma. However, the use of LABAs has raised safety concerns, especially the potential for severe asthma exacerbations (SAEs) resulting in hospitalizations or even death. Meanwhile, the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs), a cornerstone in the treatment of mild-to-severe persistent asthma, has been associated with growth suppression in children. The purpose of this review was to identify and discuss the major published safety studies surrounding LABA, ICS, and combined LABA/ICS usage in children. By way of a critical search for influential published clinical trials, meta-analyses, and observational studies, six studies relevant to the safety of LABA monotherapy, seven studies relevant to ICS monotherapy, and four studies on the subject of LABA/ICS combination usage were identified and reviewed. Based on the reviewed literature, the controversy surrounding these anti-asthma medications was clearly exposed. On the one hand, there is some evidence that LABA monotherapy may be associated with SAEs and asthma-related death, while ICS monotherapy may be associated with a higher risk of growth suppression. On the other hand, the concurrent use of a LABA with an ICS has been associated with positive outcomes including symptom reduction and reduced rate and severity of exacerbations. Further clinical research is warranted and has been called for by the US Food and Drug Administration. PMID:25114786

  15. Safety of long-acting beta agonists and inhaled corticosteroids in children and adolescents with asthma

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Ying; Kelton, Christina M. L.; Xue, Liang; Bian, Boyang; Wigle, Patricia R.

    2013-01-01

    The introduction of long-acting beta agonists (LABAs) was considered a major advance in bronchodilator therapy for adult, as well as pediatric, patients with asthma. However, the use of LABAs has raised safety concerns, especially the potential for severe asthma exacerbations (SAEs) resulting in hospitalizations or even death. Meanwhile, the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICSs), a cornerstone in the treatment of mild-to-severe persistent asthma, has been associated with growth suppression in children. The purpose of this review was to identify and discuss the major published safety studies surrounding LABA, ICS, and combined LABA/ICS usage in children. By way of a critical search for influential published clinical trials, meta-analyses, and observational studies, six studies relevant to the safety of LABA monotherapy, seven studies relevant to ICS monotherapy, and four studies on the subject of LABA/ICS combination usage were identified and reviewed. Based on the reviewed literature, the controversy surrounding these anti-asthma medications was clearly exposed. On the one hand, there is some evidence that LABA monotherapy may be associated with SAEs and asthma-related death, while ICS monotherapy may be associated with a higher risk of growth suppression. On the other hand, the concurrent use of a LABA with an ICS has been associated with positive outcomes including symptom reduction and reduced rate and severity of exacerbations. Further clinical research is warranted and has been called for by the US Food and Drug Administration. PMID:25114786

  16. A passenger strand variant in miR-196a2 contributes to asthma severity in children and adolescents: A preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Mohammad H; Toraih, Eman A; Aly, Nagwa M; Riad, Eman; Fawzy, Manal S

    2016-08-01

    There is emerging evidence to support the role of microRNAs in allergic airway diseases and inflammation. Genetic variants in microRNA genes might affect microRNA-mediated cell regulation. This preliminary study was designed to investigate the association of the microRNA-196a2 rs11614913 (C/T) polymorphism with susceptibility to asthma and clinical outcomes in children and adolescents. Genotyping of rs11614913 polymorphism was determined in 96 patients with bronchial asthma (6-18 years of age) and 96 unrelated controls, using real-time polymerase chain reaction technology. In-silico target prediction and network core analyses were performed. The asthmatics did not show significant differences in genotype distribution (p = 0.609) and allele frequencies (p = 0.428) compared with the controls. There were also no associations with disease duration, age at onset, asthma phenotype, asthma control, therapeutic level, airway hyper-responsiveness, or biochemical parameters in the blood. However, the CC genotype was associated with a more severe degree of asthma (p = 0. 023) and higher frequency of nocturnal asthma (p = 0.002). Carriers for CC were 17 times more likely to develop nocturnal asthma, and had a more than 2.5-fold increased risk for poor disease outcome compared with CT and TT individuals. In conclusion, microRNA-196a2 rs11614913 polymorphism might be associated with asthma severity in our sample of the Egyptian population. Further investigations in studies with a larger sample size and functional tests are needed to validate our findings and to explore the detailed biological mechanisms. PMID:27487239

  17. Self-management and creativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medvedev, B. A.; Skaptsov, A. A.; Polikarpov, M. A.

    2008-06-01

    How to improve physicist's creativity? How one can make himself an instrument for creativity? What is the role of the humanities in initiation of intuitive moments in thinking? The problems are discussed in terms of such modern conception as Self-management, in context of the dialogue between nature and human being by Prigogine, "Farther reaches of human nature" by Maslow, and mathematical approach for modeling of mental structure elements.

  18. Self-management for people with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Saibil, F; Lai, E; Hayward, A; Yip, J; Gilbert, C

    2008-03-01

    In North America and the United Kingdom, we are in the age of self-management. Many patients with chronic diseases are ready to participate in the therapeutic decision-making process, and join their physicians in a co-management model. It is particularly useful to consider this concept at a time when physician shortages and waiting times are on the front page every day, with no immediate prospect of relief. Conditions such as diabetes, asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, recurrent urinary tract infections and others lend themselves to this paradigm of medical care for the informed patient. The present paper reviews some of the literature on self-management for the patient with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and provides a framework for the use of self-management in the IBD population, with emphasis on the concept of a patient passport, and the use of e-mail, supported by an e-mail contract, as proposed by the Canadian Medical Protective Association. Examples of specific management strategies are provided for several different IBD scenarios. Eliminating the need for some office visits has clear environmental and economical benefits. Potential negative consequences of this form of patient care are also discussed. PMID:18354757

  19. Development and preliminary evaluation of the participation in life activities scale for children and adolescents with asthma: an instrument development study

    PubMed Central

    Kintner, Eileen K

    2008-01-01

    Background Being able to do things other kids do is the desire of school-age children and adolescents with asthma. In a phenomenology study, adolescents identified participation in life activities as the outcome variable and primary motivator for behavioral changes in coming to accept asthma as a chronic condition. In preparation for testing an acceptance model for older school-age children and early adolescents diagnosed with asthma, the Participation in Life Activities Scale was developed. The purposes of this paper are to describe development, and report on face and content validity of the scale designed to measure one aspect of quality of life defined as level of unrestricted involvement in chosen pursuits. Methods Items generated for the instrument evolved from statements and themes extracted from qualitative interviews. Face and content validity were evaluated by eight lay reviewers and 10 expert reviewers. Rate of accurate completion was computed using a convenience, cross-section sample consisting of 313 children and adolescents with asthma, ages 9–15 years, drawn from three studies. Preliminary cross-group comparisons of scores were assessed using t-tests and analysis of variance. Results Face and content validity were determined to be highly acceptable and relevant, respectively. Completion rate across all three studies was 97%. Although cross-group comparisons revealed no significant differences in overall participation scores based on age, race or residence groupings (p > .05), significant difference were indicated between males and females (p = .02), as well as the highest and lowest socioeconomic groups (p = .002). Conclusion Assessing content validity was the first step in evaluating properties of this newly developed instrument. Once face and content validity were established, psychometric evaluation related to internal consistency reliability and construct validity using factor analysis procedures was begun. Results will be reported elsewhere

  20. Influence of two different geo-climatic zones on the prevalence and time trends of asthma symptoms among Spanish adolescents and schoolchildren

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Marcos, Luis; Batllés-Garrido, José; Blanco-Quirós, Alfredo; García-Hernández, Gloria; Guillén-Grima, Francisco; González-Díaz, Carlos; García-Merino, Águeda; Arnedo-Pena, Alberto; Busquets-Monge, Rosa M.; Morales-Suárez-Varela, María; López-Silvarrey-Varela, Ángel; García-Andoin, Nekane

    2009-01-01

    Few studies have focused on the long-term influence of the climate on the prevalence of asthma. The aim of this study is to establish the influence of geo-climatic conditions on the prevalence of asthma symptoms both in adolescents and schoolchildren, and to discover if this influence is associated with their time trends. Eight centres in Spain performed both ISAAC phases I (1994) and III (2002) in children 13-14 years old. Six of them also surveyed children 6-7 years old. For each age group and phase, about 3,000 children were surveyed per centre. This study examines the prevalence of current wheeze and severe current wheeze in two different geo-climatic zones, coast and plateau, considering their relative humidity and temperature range. In both age groups, the mean asthma prevalence on the coast, for phase I and III, was significantly higher than on the plateau. Living on the plateau was an independent protective factor for current wheeze and severe current wheeze for the two age groups. Within the coastal centres, the increase of the annual relative humidity was a statistical significant risk factor for current wheeze, the same trend existing for current severe wheeze. These effects were independent of the sex and of the phase of the study. The prevalence of asthma and severe asthma symptoms is more frequent on the coast of Spain as compared to the inner plateau. This finding was repeated both in 1994 and in 2002.

  1. Increasing Availability to and Ascertaining Value of Asthma Action Plans in Schools through Use of Technology and Community Collaboration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanson, Tabitha K.; Aleman, Martha; Hart, Lacey; Yawn, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Background: Approximately 9% of school-aged children in the United States have asthma. Since 1997, the Asthma Action Plan (AAP) has been recommended as an asthma self-management tool for individuals with asthma. In the school setting, the use of the AAP has been primarily dependent on communication between the family and the school through a paper…

  2. Group asthma education in a pediatric inpatient setting.

    PubMed

    Tolomeo, Concettina

    2009-12-01

    Asthma education is an important component of asthma care and management. Children and parents often do not receive asthma education, and frequently, education programs are time consuming. The purpose of this medical record review was to retrospectively determine the impact of a short, group-based, inpatient asthma self-management program on the number of children/parents who received complete asthma education before discharge. The self-management program was instituted in 2006. Participants consisted of all children admitted to a New England children's hospital from January 1, 2005, through December 31, 2006, with a primary diagnosis of asthma. Findings revealed that significantly more (p < .001) children/parents received complete asthma education before discharge in 2006 versus 2005.

  3. Self-management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: strategies, outcomes, and integration into clinical care.

    PubMed

    Plevinsky, Jill M; Greenley, Rachel N; Fishman, Laurie N

    2016-01-01

    Self-management, including medication adherence, is associated with improved health and outcomes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The concept of self-management is complex, but can be divided into those aspects that involve the individual patient, those that involve the provider-patient relationship, and those that encompass the social environment. At the individual level, enhancing problem-solving skills and self-efficacy have both been shown to improve self-management tasks, particularly adherence to treatment. However, it is critical to consider these domains from a lifespan perspective because these processes by which self-management can be improved are distinct for children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. A particular emphasis is placed on strategies to improve self-management of older adolescents and young adults as they transition from pediatric to adult providers. The review concludes with recommendations for providers, including rationale and techniques for assessing and promoting patient self-efficacy, encouraging the development of problem-solving skills, improving the patient-provider relationship, and enhancing social support. Providers are encouraged to utilize elements of problem-solving skills training, engage in collaborative relationships with their patients, and offer their patients recommendations for how to increase the quality of their social support networks as ways of increasing overall self-management.

  4. Self-management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: strategies, outcomes, and integration into clinical care.

    PubMed

    Plevinsky, Jill M; Greenley, Rachel N; Fishman, Laurie N

    2016-01-01

    Self-management, including medication adherence, is associated with improved health and outcomes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The concept of self-management is complex, but can be divided into those aspects that involve the individual patient, those that involve the provider-patient relationship, and those that encompass the social environment. At the individual level, enhancing problem-solving skills and self-efficacy have both been shown to improve self-management tasks, particularly adherence to treatment. However, it is critical to consider these domains from a lifespan perspective because these processes by which self-management can be improved are distinct for children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. A particular emphasis is placed on strategies to improve self-management of older adolescents and young adults as they transition from pediatric to adult providers. The review concludes with recommendations for providers, including rationale and techniques for assessing and promoting patient self-efficacy, encouraging the development of problem-solving skills, improving the patient-provider relationship, and enhancing social support. Providers are encouraged to utilize elements of problem-solving skills training, engage in collaborative relationships with their patients, and offer their patients recommendations for how to increase the quality of their social support networks as ways of increasing overall self-management. PMID:27601930

  5. Self-management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: strategies, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Plevinsky, Jill M; Greenley, Rachel N; Fishman, Laurie N

    2016-01-01

    Self-management, including medication adherence, is associated with improved health and outcomes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The concept of self-management is complex, but can be divided into those aspects that involve the individual patient, those that involve the provider–patient relationship, and those that encompass the social environment. At the individual level, enhancing problem-solving skills and self-efficacy have both been shown to improve self-management tasks, particularly adherence to treatment. However, it is critical to consider these domains from a lifespan perspective because these processes by which self-management can be improved are distinct for children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. A particular emphasis is placed on strategies to improve self-management of older adolescents and young adults as they transition from pediatric to adult providers. The review concludes with recommendations for providers, including rationale and techniques for assessing and promoting patient self-efficacy, encouraging the development of problem-solving skills, improving the patient–provider relationship, and enhancing social support. Providers are encouraged to utilize elements of problem-solving skills training, engage in collaborative relationships with their patients, and offer their patients recommendations for how to increase the quality of their social support networks as ways of increasing overall self-management.

  6. Self-management in patients with inflammatory bowel disease: strategies, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Plevinsky, Jill M; Greenley, Rachel N; Fishman, Laurie N

    2016-01-01

    Self-management, including medication adherence, is associated with improved health and outcomes for patients with inflammatory bowel disease. The concept of self-management is complex, but can be divided into those aspects that involve the individual patient, those that involve the provider–patient relationship, and those that encompass the social environment. At the individual level, enhancing problem-solving skills and self-efficacy have both been shown to improve self-management tasks, particularly adherence to treatment. However, it is critical to consider these domains from a lifespan perspective because these processes by which self-management can be improved are distinct for children, adolescents, young adults, and adults. A particular emphasis is placed on strategies to improve self-management of older adolescents and young adults as they transition from pediatric to adult providers. The review concludes with recommendations for providers, including rationale and techniques for assessing and promoting patient self-efficacy, encouraging the development of problem-solving skills, improving the patient–provider relationship, and enhancing social support. Providers are encouraged to utilize elements of problem-solving skills training, engage in collaborative relationships with their patients, and offer their patients recommendations for how to increase the quality of their social support networks as ways of increasing overall self-management. PMID:27601930

  7. Prevalence, patterns and correlates of cigarette smoking in male adolescents in northern Jordan, and the influence of waterpipe use and asthma diagnosis: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Al-Sheyab, Nihaya; Alomari, Mahmoud A; Shah, Smita; Gallagher, Patrick; Gallagher, Robyn

    2014-09-01

    Our study investigates the prevalence, patterns and predictors of tobacco smoking among early adolescent males in Northern Jordan and whether asthma diagnosis affects smoking patterns. A descriptive cross sectional design was used. Males in grades 7 and 8 from four randomly selected high schools in the city of Irbid were enrolled. Data on waterpipe (WP) use and cigarette smoking patterns were obtained (n = 815) using a survey in Arabic language. The overall prevalence of ever having smoked a cigarette was 35.6%, with 86.2% of this group smoking currently. Almost half of the sample reported WP use. The most common age in which adolescents started to experiment with cigarettes was 11-12 years old (49.1%), although 10 years was also common (25.3%). Significant predictors of male cigarette smoking were WP use (OR = 4.15, 95% CI = 2.99-5.76), asthma diagnosis (OR = 2.35, 95% CI = 1.46-3.78), grade 8 (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.10-2.11), and having a sibling who smokes (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.53-3.24). However, this cross-sectional study cannot establish causality, thus longitudinal studies are needed. Public health programs and school-based anti-tobacco smoking interventions that target children in early years at high schools are warranted to prevent the uptake of tobacco use among this vulnerable age group. High school students with asthma should be specifically targeted.

  8. Prevalence, patterns and correlates of cigarette smoking in male adolescents in northern Jordan, and the influence of waterpipe use and asthma diagnosis: a descriptive cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Al-Sheyab, Nihaya; Alomari, Mahmoud A; Shah, Smita; Gallagher, Patrick; Gallagher, Robyn

    2014-09-01

    Our study investigates the prevalence, patterns and predictors of tobacco smoking among early adolescent males in Northern Jordan and whether asthma diagnosis affects smoking patterns. A descriptive cross sectional design was used. Males in grades 7 and 8 from four randomly selected high schools in the city of Irbid were enrolled. Data on waterpipe (WP) use and cigarette smoking patterns were obtained (n = 815) using a survey in Arabic language. The overall prevalence of ever having smoked a cigarette was 35.6%, with 86.2% of this group smoking currently. Almost half of the sample reported WP use. The most common age in which adolescents started to experiment with cigarettes was 11-12 years old (49.1%), although 10 years was also common (25.3%). Significant predictors of male cigarette smoking were WP use (OR = 4.15, 95% CI = 2.99-5.76), asthma diagnosis (OR = 2.35, 95% CI = 1.46-3.78), grade 8 (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.10-2.11), and having a sibling who smokes (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.53-3.24). However, this cross-sectional study cannot establish causality, thus longitudinal studies are needed. Public health programs and school-based anti-tobacco smoking interventions that target children in early years at high schools are warranted to prevent the uptake of tobacco use among this vulnerable age group. High school students with asthma should be specifically targeted. PMID:25257355

  9. Getting control of uncontrolled asthma.

    PubMed

    Wechsler, Michael E

    2014-11-01

    Despite various treatment modalities, a large proportion of patients have asthma that remains uncontrolled. These patients remain at an increased risk of developing severe exacerbations, have a poor quality of life, and pose a high economic healthcare burden, with an estimated mean annual cost more than double that of patients with good symptom control. It is therefore important to accurately diagnose asthma and continually assess asthma control. Several validated tools are available to do this, including questionnaires, biomarker analysis, and bronchoscopy. Current guidelines advise physicians to establish a self-management program for the patient to assess and monitor asthma control. A further recommendation is the establishment of an educational action plan to increase treatment adherence and to improve asthma control. National and international guidelines provide long-term management strategies for these patients and recommend a stepwise approach for achieving and maintaining asthma control. Despite availability of a wide range of controller and reliever therapies, uncontrolled asthma remains a challenge and reflects the need for new therapeutic options. This review discusses current global guidelines for the assessment and management of asthma control and summarizes the broad spectrum of novel therapeutic agents currently under development for the treatment of asthma, including anticholinergics, chemoattractant receptor-homologous molecules expressed on T-helper 2 lymphocyte antagonists, and anti-interleukin (IL)-5, anti-IL-13, and anti-IL-4 agents. PMID:24844737

  10. Self-Management Procedures to Stop Smoking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masten, William G.; Caldwell-Colbert, A. Toy

    While numerous approaches to inhibit smoking have appeared in the literature, self-management is one technique that allows the client to take a more active part in the treatment. To study the effectiveness of self-management in a single-subject design, an 18 year old female college student who smoked mostly on weekends was told to self-monitor her…

  11. Reconceptualizing the Self-Managing School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Brian J.

    2008-01-01

    Contrary to the claims of its critics, the introduction of self-managing schools under the ERA and its counterpart in other countries did not lead to the privatization of public education. Self-managing schools have been one manifestation of a general trend to decentralization in public education in many countries since the late 1960s. The…

  12. Reliability and construct validity of the Participation in Life Activities Scale for children and adolescents with asthma: an instrument evaluation study

    PubMed Central

    Kintner, Eileen K; Sikorskii, Alla

    2008-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the reliability and construct validity of the Participation in Life Activities Scale, an instrument designed to measure older school-age child and early adolescent level of involvement in chosen pursuits. Methods A cross-sectional design was used. The convenience sample consisted of 313 school-age children and early adolescents with asthma, ages 9–15 years. The self-report summative scale of interest is a 3-indicator survey. Higher scores are reflective of higher levels of participation. Internal consistency reliability and construct validity for the entire sample and sub groups of the sample were evaluated. Results The instrument was deemed sound for the entire sample as well as sub groups based on sex, race, age, socioeconomic status, and severity of illness. Cronbach's alpha coefficient for internal consistency reliability for the entire sample was .74. Exploratory factor analysis indicated a single component solution (loadings .79–.85) accounting for 66% of the explained variance. Construct validity was established by testing the posed relationship between participation in life activities scores and severity of illness. Confirmatory factor analysis revealed a good fit between the data and specified model, χ2(10, n = 302) = 8.074, p = .62. Conclusion This instrument could be used (a) in clinical settings to diagnose restricted participation in desired activities, guide decision-making about treatment plans to increase participation, and motivate behavioral change in the management of asthma; and (b) in research settings to explore factors influencing and consequences of restricted and unrestricted participation, and as an outcome measure to evaluate the effectiveness of programs designed to foster child and early adolescent management of asthma. PMID:18533017

  13. Predicting asthma outcomes.

    PubMed

    Sears, Malcolm R

    2015-10-01

    This review addresses predictors of remission or persistence of wheezing and asthma from early childhood through adulthood. Early childhood wheezing is common, but predicting who will remit or have persistent childhood asthma remains difficult. By adding parental history of asthma and selected infant biomarkers to the history of recurrent wheezing, the Asthma Predictive Index and its subsequent modifications provide better predictions of persistence than simply the observation of recurrent wheeze. Sensitization, especially to multiple allergens, increases the likelihood of development of classic childhood asthma. Remission is more likely in male subjects and those with milder disease (less frequent and less severe symptoms), less atopic sensitization, a lesser degree of airway hyperresponsiveness, and no concomitant allergic disease. Conversely, persistence is linked strongly to allergic sensitization, greater frequency and severity of symptoms, abnormal lung function, and a greater degree of airway hyperresponsiveness. A genetic risk score might predict persistence more accurately than family history. Remission of established adult asthma is substantially less common than remission during childhood and adolescence. Loss of lung function can begin early in life and tracks through childhood and adolescence. Despite therapy which controls symptoms and exacerbations, the outcomes of asthma appear largely resistant to pharmacologic therapy.

  14. A Brief Report on the Effects of a Self-Management Treatment Package on Stereotypic Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Timothy R.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of a self-management treatment package (SMTP) on the stereotypic behavior of an adolescent with Pervasive Developmental Disorder-Not Otherwise Specified (PDD-NOS). Latency to stereotypy was systematically increased in the training setting (academic) and the effectiveness of the SMTP was evaluated within a multiple-probe…

  15. The Saudi Initiative for Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Zeitouni, Mohamed O.; Alanezi, Mohammed O.; Al-Jahdal, Hamdan H.; Al Dabbagh, Maha

    2009-01-01

    The Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA) provides up-to-date guidelines for healthcare workers managing patients with asthma. SINA was developed by a panel of Saudi experts with respectable academic backgrounds and long-standing experience in the field. SINA is founded on the latest available evidence, local literature, and knowledge of the current setting in Saudi Arabia. Emphasis is placed on understanding the epidemiology, pathophysiology, medications, and clinical presentation. SINA elaborates on the development of patient-doctor partnership, self-management, and control of precipitating factors. Approaches to asthma treatment in SINA are based on disease control by the utilization of Asthma Control Test for the initiation and adjustment of asthma treatment. This guideline is established for the treatment of asthma in both children and adults, with special attention to children 5 years and younger. It is expected that the implementation of these guidelines for treating asthma will lead to better asthma control and decrease patient utilization of the health care system. PMID:19881170

  16. Asthma Management Disparities: A Photovoice Investigation with African American Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans-Agnew, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Disparities in asthma management are a burden on African American youth. The objective of this study is to describe and compare the discourses of asthma management disparities (AMDs) in African American adolescents in Seattle to existing youth-related asthma policies in Washington State. Adolescents participated in a three-session photovoice…

  17. Asthma in childhood.

    PubMed

    de Benedictis, Fernando Maria; Attanasi, Marina

    2016-03-01

    Several topics on childhood asthma were addressed in the Paediatric Clinical Year in Review session at the 2015 European Respiratory Society International Congress. With regard to the relationship between lower respiratory tract infections and asthma, it emerges that is the number of respiratory episodes in the first years of life, but not the particular viral trigger, to be associated with later asthma development. Understanding which characteristics of individual patients are associated with an increased risk for asthma exacerbation is a critical step to implement strategies preventing these seasonal events. Recent data suggest the possibility that exhaled volatile organic compounds may qualify as biomarkers in detecting early signs of asthma. Adding information of exhaled volatile organic compounds and expression of inflammation genes to a clinical tool significantly improves asthma prediction in preschool wheezy children. Personal communication with children and adolescents is likely more important than the tools actually used for monitoring asthma. Systemic corticosteroids do not affect the long-term prognosis in children with first viral-induced wheezing episode and should be used cautiously during acute episodes. Finally, stress and a polymorphism upstream of a specific gene are both associated with reduced bronchodilator response in children with asthma.

  18. Evaluating a residential asthma camp program and ways to increase physical activity.

    PubMed

    Holsey, Chanda Nicole; Cummings, Lawanda

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the effectiveness of an educational asthma camp program emphasizing self-management skills. The camp's key program components were medical supervision, autonomy, peer support, and health education. Measurement of asthma knowledge gains and overall camp experience were reported. Children who attended the asthma camp increased the knowledge level of their condition. It has been well researched that asthma and obesity are related, and obesity is associated with a higher prevalence of asthma. Thus, this camp program is in an ideal position to incorporate an effective physical activity module while continuing to provide an exceptional asthma education experience for children with asthma.

  19. Medication adherence in the asthmatic child and adolescent.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mauli; Oppenheimer, John J

    2011-12-01

    Asthma is a common inflammatory condition affecting more than 7 million children in the United States alone, and tens of millions more globally. Despite effective preventive medications, medication nonadherence in children and adolescents is alarmingly high. Nonadherence can result in poor asthma control, which leads to decreased quality of life, lost productivity, increased health care utilization, and even the risk of death. Nonadherence in children and adolescents deserves special attention because they face unique barriers to adherence that change with age. Young children depend on adults for the delivery of asthma care, and their care is strongly influenced by parental motivation and attitudes and the home environment. As these children enter adolescence, they typically assume responsibility for their asthma care at the same time that they are claiming their independence and possibly experimenting with high-risk behaviors. Morbidity and mortality, as well as nonadherence, appear to be greatest among adolescents and minority children. Although no perfect tool for measuring adherence exists, objective methods, such as electronic monitoring, can provide valuable information to health care providers. Beyond asthma self-management and education, no specific resource-heavy adherence interventions have proven consistently helpful. However, large-scale, well-designed studies on this subject are lacking. In light of the fact that nonadherence is a potentially modifiable factor that impacts on morbidity and mortality, it is worth pursuing further research to determine better interventions. It is likely, however, that no one answer exists, and interventions will need to be tailored to specific at-risk populations. PMID:21968618

  20. Prevalence, Patterns and Correlates of Cigarette Smoking in Male Adolescents in Northern Jordan, and the Influence of Waterpipe Use and Asthma Diagnosis: A Descriptive Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Al-Sheyab, Nihaya; Alomari, Mahmoud A.; Shah, Smita; Gallagher, Patrick; Gallagher, Robyn

    2014-01-01

    Our study investigates the prevalence, patterns and predictors of tobacco smoking among early adolescent males in Northern Jordan and whether asthma diagnosis affects smoking patterns. A descriptive cross sectional design was used. Males in grades 7 and 8 from four randomly selected high schools in the city of Irbid were enrolled. Data on waterpipe (WP) use and cigarette smoking patterns were obtained (n = 815) using a survey in Arabic language. The overall prevalence of ever having smoked a cigarette was 35.6%, with 86.2% of this group smoking currently. Almost half of the sample reported WP use. The most common age in which adolescents started to experiment with cigarettes was 11–12 years old (49.1%), although 10 years was also common (25.3%). Significant predictors of male cigarette smoking were WP use (OR = 4.15, 95% CI = 2.99–5.76), asthma diagnosis (OR = 2.35, 95% CI = 1.46–3.78), grade 8 (OR = 1.52, 95% CI = 1.10–2.11), and having a sibling who smokes (OR = 2.23, 95% CI = 1.53–3.24). However, this cross-sectional study cannot establish causality, thus longitudinal studies are needed. Public health programs and school-based anti-tobacco smoking interventions that target children in early years at high schools are warranted to prevent the uptake of tobacco use among this vulnerable age group. High school students with asthma should be specifically targeted. PMID:25257355

  1. Asthma and Rhinitis Are Associated with Less Objectively-Measured Moderate and Vigorous Physical Activity, but Similar Sport Participation, in Adolescent German Boys: GINIplus and LISAplus Cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Berdel, Dietrich; Bauer, Carl-Peter; Koletzko, Sibylle; Nowak, Dennis; Heinrich, Joachim; Schulz, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Physical activity (PA) protects against most noncommunicable diseases and has been associated with decreased risk of allergic phenotype, which is increasing worldwide. However, the association is not always present; furthermore it is not clear whether it is strongest for asthma, rhinitis, symptoms of these, or atopic sensitization; which sex is most affected; or whether it can be explained by either avoidance of sport or exacerbation of symptoms by exercise. Interventions are thus difficult to target. Methods PA was measured by one-week accelerometry in 1137 Germans (mean age 15.6 years, 47% boys) from the GINIplus and LISAplus birth cohorts, and modeled as a correlate of allergic symptoms, sensitization, or reported doctor-diagnosed asthma or rhinitis. Results 8.3% of children had asthma, of the remainder 7.9% had rhinitis, and of the remainder 32% were sensitized to aero-allergens (atopic). 52% were lung-healthy controls. Lung-healthy boys and girls averaged 46.4 min and 37.8 min moderate-to-vigorous PA per day, of which 14.6 and 11.4 min was vigorous. PA in allergic girls was not altered, but boys with asthma got 13% less moderate and 29% less vigorous PA, and those with rhinitis with 13% less moderate PA, than lung-healthy boys. Both sexes participated comparably in sport (70 to 84%). Adolescents with wheezing (up to 68%, in asthma) and/or nose/eye symptoms (up to 88%, in rhinitis) were no less active. Conclusions We found that asthma and rhinitis, but not atopy, were independently associated with low PA in boys, but not in girls. These results indicate that allergic boys remain a high-risk group for physical inactivity even if they participate comparably in sport. Research into the link between PA and allergy should consider population-specific and sex-specific effects, and clinicians, parents, and designers of PA interventions should specifically address PA in allergic boys to ensure full participation. PMID:27560942

  2. Asthma Quiz

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asthma is a chronic disease that requires ongoing management. Personalized plans for treatment may include medications, an asthma action plan, and environmental control measures to avoid your child's asthma triggers. ...

  3. Asthma - control drugs

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma - inhaled corticosteroids; Asthma - long-acting beta-agonists; Asthma - leukotriene modifiers; Asthma - cromolyn; Bronchial asthma-control drugs; Wheezing - control drugs; Reactive airway disease - control drugs

  4. Behavioral consequences of illness: childhood asthma as a model.

    PubMed

    Creer, T L; Stein, R E; Rappaport, L; Lewis, C

    1992-11-01

    Several areas of research on childhood asthma are discussed within a transactional model of asthma. The model emphasizes the multidirectional influences that affect the severity of asthma and associated behavioral disability. The initial focus is on how the clinical presentation and morbidity of asthma are affected both by somatic predisposition and by interactions with multiple internal and external elements. Specific elements include emotional factors, neuroimmunology, temperament, and medication side effects. Second, the impact of asthma on the child, his or her family, and segments of the community are described, as are consequences of the disorder on quality of life. Third, there is a synopsis of preventative interventions for reducing the medical and behavioral impact of childhood asthma. The motif is that the interaction of medical and behavioral procedures can improve the management of asthma while consequences of the disorder are mollified. Finally, as examples of a transactional model of asthma, self-management programs for teaching children to become partners with their physicians in establishing and maintaining control over the disorder are described. A representative of self-management--the ACT (Asthma Care Training) program--is described, along with the impact such programs have on children, their families, and institutions. The conclusion emphasizes that asthma is a complicated and unpredictable disorder that puzzles physicians, behavioral scientists, and patients. Although new treatments may be over the horizon, controlling childhood asthma and its consequences currently rests on the cooperation and increased interaction of medical and behavioral scientists. PMID:1437411

  5. Respiratory Conditions Update: Asthma.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Timothy A

    2016-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease characterized by chronic airway inflammation and variable expiratory airflow limitation. Related clinical features include wheezing, dyspnea, chest tightness, and cough that worsens at night or in the early morning, and that varies over time and in intensity. A finding of variable expiratory airflow limitation on spirometry confirms the diagnosis. A forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity ratio less than the level predicted for the patient's age is suggestive of airflow limitation. Variability also must be confirmed. Updated guidelines recommend control-based management administered in a stepwise manner, with goals of achieving symptom control and minimizing the risks of exacerbations, future fixed airway limitation, and adverse effects of therapy. There is good evidence for the effectiveness of asthma education and self-management plans. Short-acting bronchodilators should be used as needed for symptom relief, with the addition of an inhaled corticosteroid early as maintenance therapy if symptoms are not well controlled. If asthma remains uncontrolled despite therapy, patients should be referred for more specialized treatment. Biomarkers, biologic drugs, and endoscopic treatments are being studied in the management of severe asthma, and ongoing research may determine which patients might benefit most from these emerging therapies. PMID:27576231

  6. Factors associated with allergic rhinitis in children and adolescents from northern Mexico: International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase IIIB.

    PubMed

    González-Díaz, Sandra N; Del Río-Navarro, Blanca E; Pietropaolo-Cienfuegos, Dino R; Escalante-Domínguez, Alberto J; García-Almaraz, Roberto G; Mérida-Palacio, Valente; Berber, Arturo

    2010-01-01

    The epidemiology of allergic diseases has not been studied extensively in Mexico. The present study, based on the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood Phase IIIB survey, reports the prevalence of allergic rhinitis and the associated risk factors in the pediatric population in four cities in northern Mexico. Children (6-7 years old) and adolescents (13-14 years old) in public elementary and secondary schools were surveyed in 2002 and 2003. The subjects were chosen randomly from Ciudad Victoria, Mexicali, Monterrey, and Tijuana. The following categories were analyzed: occurrence of rhinitis symptoms (currently or in the last 12 months), rhinoconjunctivitis symptoms, a previous diagnosis of allergic rhinitis, and relevant environmental factors. Factors associated with rhinitis that were identified previously with the chi-squared test were analyzed using logistic regression. The number of valid questionnaires was 10,892 for schoolchildren and 12,299 for adolescents. In 6- to 7-year-old children, the following frequencies were determined: rhinitis (ever), 27.9%; current rhinitis, 24.2%; rhinoconjunctivitis, 9.2%; and diagnosis of allergic rhinitis, 5.5%. The corresponding frequencies in 13- to 14-year-old children were 33.3, 34.1, 18.4, and 3.8%. In both 6- to 7-year-old and 13- to 14-year-old children, all rhinitis items were associated with asthma symptoms, dermatitis symptoms, paracetamol consumption, and maternal smoking (odds ratio, >1; p < 0.05). The main risk factors associated with allergic rhinitis symptoms in children and adolescents from cities in northern Mexico were other allergic conditions, paracetamol consumption, and passive smoking.

  7. The burden of severe asthma in childhood and adolescence: results from the paediatric U-BIOPRED cohorts.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Louise; Murray, Clare; Bansal, Aruna T; Hashimoto, Simone; Bisgaard, Hans; Bush, Andrew; Frey, Urs; Hedlin, Gunilla; Singer, Florian; van Aalderen, Wim M; Vissing, Nadja H; Zolkipli, Zaraquiza; Selby, Anna; Fowler, Stephen; Shaw, Dominick; Chung, Kian Fan; Sousa, Ana R; Wagers, Scott; Corfield, Julie; Pandis, Ioannis; Rowe, Anthony; Formaggio, Elena; Sterk, Peter J; Roberts, Graham

    2015-11-01

    U-BIOPRED aims to characterise paediatric and adult severe asthma using conventional and innovative systems biology approaches. A total of 99 school-age children with severe asthma and 81 preschoolers with severe wheeze were compared with 49 school-age children with mild/moderate asthma and 53 preschoolers with mild/moderate wheeze in a cross-sectional study. Despite high-dose treatment, the severe cohorts had more severe exacerbations compared with the mild/moderate ones (annual medians: school-aged 3.0 versus 1.1, preschool 3.9 versus 1.8; p<0.001). Exhaled tobacco exposure was common in the severe wheeze cohort. Almost all participants in each cohort were atopic and had a normal body mass index. Asthma-related quality of life, as assessed by the Paediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (PAQLQ) and the Paediatric Asthma Caregiver's Quality of Life Questionnaire (PACQLQ), was worse in the severe cohorts (mean±se school-age PAQLQ: 4.77±0.15 versus 5.80±0.19; preschool PACQLQ: 4.27±0.18 versus 6.04±0.18; both p≤0.001); however, mild/moderate cohorts also had significant morbidity. Impaired quality of life was associated with poor control and airway obstruction. Otherwise, the severe and mild/moderate cohorts were clinically very similar. Children with severe preschool wheeze or severe asthma are usually atopic and have impaired quality of life that is associated with poor control and airflow limitation: a very different phenotype from adult severe asthma. In-depth phenotyping of these children, integrating clinical data with high-dimensional biomarkers, may help to improve and tailor their clinical management.

  8. Self management of oral anticoagulation: randomised trial

    PubMed Central

    Fitzmaurice, D A; Murray, E T; McCahon, D; Holder, R; Raftery, J P; Hussain, S; Sandhar, H; Hobbs, F D R

    2005-01-01

    Objective To determine the clinical effectiveness of self management compared with routine care in patients on long term oral anticoagulants. Design Multicentre open randomised controlled trial. Setting Midlands region of the UK. Participants 617 patients aged over 18 and receiving warfarin randomised to intervention (n = 337) and routine care (n = from 2470 invited; 193/337 (57%) completed the 12 month intervention. Intervention Intervention patients used a point of care device to measure international normalised ratio twice a week and a simple dosing chart to interpret their dose of warfarin. Main outcome measure Percentage of time spent within the therapeutic range of international normalised ratio. Results No significant differences were found in percentage of time in the therapeutic range between self managment and routine care (70% v 68%). Self managed patients with poor control before the study showed an improvement in control that was not seen in the routine care group. Nine patients (2.8/100 patient years) had serious adverse events in the self managed group, compared with seven (2.7/100 patient years) in the routine care arm (χ2(df = 1) = 0.02, P = 0.89). Conclusion With appropriate training, self management is safe and reliable for a sizeable proportion of patients receiving oral anticoagulation treatment. It may improve the time spent the therapeutic range for patients with initially poor control. Trial registration ISRCTN 19313375. PMID:16216821

  9. Problem solving in diabetes self-management: a model of chronic illness self-management behavior.

    PubMed

    Hill-Briggs, Felicia

    2003-01-01

    Management of chronic illnesses is a significant public health concern that is made more challenging by problems of regimen adherence. Effective self-management of chronic illnesses such as diabetes requires not only technical skill to perform regimen behaviors but also problem-solving skills to manage daily barriers to regimen adherence and to make appropriate adjustments to the self-care regimen. A review of the empirical literature on the relation between problem solving and disease self-management in diabetes, a chronic illness exemplar, illuminates methodological limitations that indicate a need for a theoretical framework for problem solving applied to chronic disease self-management. A problem-solving model of chronic disease self-management is proposed, derived from theories of problem solving in cognitive psychology, educational/learning theory, and social problem solving. Four essential components of problem solving in disease self-management are identified: (a). problem-solving skill, (b). problem-solving orientation, (c). disease-specific knowledge, and (d). transfer of past experience. The model is illustrated, and empirical support for this problem-solving model in the diabetes literature is discussed. The model has utility in driving testable hypotheses regarding the relation of disease-specific problem solving to chronic illness management, in developing problem-solving assessment instruments relevant to disease self-management, and in guiding disease self-management training and interventions.

  10. Community Readiness for Self-Managed School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rajbhandari, Mani Man Singh

    2007-01-01

    The concept of Self-managing schools involving local community members, teachers and parents with the formation of School Management Committee is gaining ground in Nepal after the world conference on education for all (WCEFA) held in Jomtien, Thailand in the year 1990. Transferring the management of public schools in the hand of willing community…

  11. Self Directed Learning and Self Management. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on self-directed learning and self-management. "Validating a More-Dimensional Conception of Self-Directed Learning" (Gerald A. Straka, Cornelia Schaefer) discusses the development and validation of a conception of self-directed learning as a dynamic interplay between behavior, information,…

  12. Asthma control and hospitalizations among inner-city children: results of a randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Guendelman, Sylvia; Meade, Kelley; Chen, Ying Qing; Benson, Mindy

    2004-01-01

    Asthma prevalence is increasing among poor and minority children. We examined the effectiveness of a novel interactive device programmed for self-management of pediatric asthma in reducing asthma control problems and hospitalizations. A randomized controlled trial (66 children in the intervention group and 68 in the control group) was conducted at home and in an outpatient hospital clinic with 8-16-year-old inner-city children with physician-diagnosed asthma. During a 12-week period, children in the experimental group received an asthma self-management and education program, the Health Buddy (Health Hero Network), designed to enable them to monitor their symptoms and transmit this information to a case manager through a secure website. Control group participants used an asthma diary. After adjusting for baseline asthma control problems, asthma severity, and seasonality, children randomized to automated self-management had a significantly lower mean number of asthma control problems at 6 weeks (2.0, SD = 1.6) as compared to children assigned to the asthma diary (2.7, SD = 1.6) (p = 0.03). By 12 weeks, after adjusting for time and the other covariates, asthma control problems dropped markedly in both groups, and did not differ by intervention modality (p = .07). The intervention modality was not a significant predictor of hospitalization. Educational interventions that encourage children's active involvement in their own care and symptom monitoring would help children increase their control of asthma problems. Compared to the asthma diary, the automated self-management had a significant short-term impact on asthma control problems. Its initial effectiveness and more consistent use suggest that remote monitoring may be successfully used in short-term interventions and in settings where staffing for case management is weak.

  13. Information requirements of self-managing teams

    SciTech Connect

    Van Aken, E.M.

    1992-01-01

    In response to the significant challenges organizations face today, many managers have put in place continuous improvement efforts to help the organization on enhance its competitive position. A key element of continuous improvement efforts is employee involvement, and one of the most complex, mature, and effective forms of employee involvement is self-managing teams. A self-managing team is a group of employees, usually eight to fifteen, which is responsible for planning, implementing, controlling, and improving work processes. There are many characteristics of self-managing teams which are discussed frequently in the literature and are common topics of seminars and workshops on SMTs, including the role of the first-line supervisor, the structure of teams, the training necessary, and the pay system for SMTs. However, one area which has not been as widely researched is the role of information - what types of information do self-managing teams need This paper addresses this question. Results from a multiple case study research project focusing on the information requirements of SMTs are presented. Specifically, seven types of information SMTs need are identified, as well as general characteristics of the information system. By information system, I mean very broadly, the system (both formal and informal) which provides information of any kind to a self-managing team. The results of this research can be thought of as design features'' for an information system to support SMTs. Practicing managers can use these design features in two ways: they can design them into beginning SMT efforts; or, for SMTs already established, managers can compare them to the existing information system and adjust accordingly.

  14. Information requirements of self-managing teams

    SciTech Connect

    Van Aken, E.M.

    1992-12-31

    In response to the significant challenges organizations face today, many managers have put in place continuous improvement efforts to help the organization on enhance its competitive position. A key element of continuous improvement efforts is employee involvement, and one of the most complex, mature, and effective forms of employee involvement is self-managing teams. A self-managing team is a group of employees, usually eight to fifteen, which is responsible for planning, implementing, controlling, and improving work processes. There are many characteristics of self-managing teams which are discussed frequently in the literature and are common topics of seminars and workshops on SMTs, including the role of the first-line supervisor, the structure of teams, the training necessary, and the pay system for SMTs. However, one area which has not been as widely researched is the role of information - what types of information do self-managing teams need? This paper addresses this question. Results from a multiple case study research project focusing on the information requirements of SMTs are presented. Specifically, seven types of information SMTs need are identified, as well as general characteristics of the information system. By information system, I mean very broadly, the system (both formal and informal) which provides information of any kind to a self-managing team. The results of this research can be thought of as ``design features`` for an information system to support SMTs. Practicing managers can use these design features in two ways: they can design them into beginning SMT efforts; or, for SMTs already established, managers can compare them to the existing information system and adjust accordingly.

  15. Internet telehealth for pediatric asthma case management: integrating computerized and case manager features for tailoring a Web-based asthma education program.

    PubMed

    Wise, Meg; Gustafson, David H; Sorkness, Christine A; Molfenter, Todd; Staresinic, Anthony; Meis, Tracy; Hawkins, Robert P; Shanovich, Kathleen Kelly; Walker, Nola P

    2007-07-01

    This article reports on the development of a personalized, Web-based asthma-education program for parents whose 4- to 12-year-old children have moderate to severe asthma. Personalization includes computer-based tailored messages and a human coach to build asthma self-management skills. Computerized features include the Asthma Manager, My Calendar/Reminder, My Goals, and a tailored home page. These are integrated with monthly asthma-education phone calls from an asthma-nurse case manager. The authors discuss the development process and issues and describe the current randomized evaluation study to test whether the year-long integrated intervention can improve adherence to a daily asthma controller medication, asthma control, and parent quality of life to reduce asthma-related healthcare utilization. Implications for health education for chronic disease management are raised.

  16. Effect of Two Educational Interventions on Pharmacy Students' Confidence and Skills in Dealing with Adolescents with Asthma

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donnelly, Amy; Shah, Smita; Bosnic-Anticevich, Sinthia

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was: (1) to investigate the feasibility of incorporating the Triple A programme into the undergraduate pharmacy curriculum; (2) to compare the effect of the Triple A programme versus problem-based learning methods on the asthma knowledge of final-year pharmacy students and their perceived confidence in dealing…

  17. Is asthma prevalence still increasing?

    PubMed

    Lundbäck, Bo; Backman, Helena; Lötvall, Jan; Rönmark, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Increased awareness of asthma in society and altered diagnostic practices makes evaluation of data on prevalence change difficult. In most parts of the world the asthma prevalence seems to still be increasing. The increase is associated with urbanization and has been documented particularly among children and teenagers in urban areas of middle- and low-level income countries. Use of validated questionnaires has enabled comparisons of studies. Among adults there are few studies based on representative samples of the general population which allow evaluation of time trends of prevalence. This review focuses mainly on studies of asthma prevalence and symptoms among adults. Parallel with increased urbanization, we can assume that the increase in asthma prevalence in most areas of the world will continue. However, in Australia and North-West Europe studies performed, particularly among children and adolescents, indicate that the increase in asthma prevalence may now be leveling off. PMID:26610152

  18. Problem Solving Interventions for Diabetes Self-management and Control: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Stephanie L.; Schumann, Kristina P.; Hill-Briggs, Felicia

    2013-01-01

    Aims Problem solving is deemed a core skill for patient diabetes self-management education. The purpose of this systematic review is to examine the published literature on the effect of problem-solving interventions on diabetes self-management and disease control. Data Sources We searched PubMed and PsychINFO electronic databases for English language articles published between November 2006 and September 2012. Reference lists from included studies were reviewed to capture additional studies. Study Selection Studies reporting problem-solving intervention or problem solving as an intervention component for diabetes self-management training and disease control were included. Twenty-four studies met inclusion criteria. Data Extraction Study design, sample characteristics, measures, and results were reviewed. Data Synthesis Sixteen intervention studies (11 adult, 5 children/adolescents) were randomized controlled trials, and 8 intervention studies (6 adult, 2 children/adolescents) were quasi-experimental designs. Conclusions Studies varied greatly in their approaches to problem-solving use in patient education. To date, 36% of adult problem-solving interventions and 42% of children/adolescent problem-solving interventions have demonstrated significant improvement in HbA1c, while psychosocial outcomes have been more promising. The next phase of problem-solving intervention research should employ intervention characteristics found to have sufficient potency and intensity to reach therapeutic levels needed to demonstrate change. PMID:23312614

  19. Childhood Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share your child's asthma management plan with the school nurse and any coaches who oversee your child. With the approval of physicians and parents, school-age children with asthma should be allowed to ...

  20. The Revised Asthma Problem Behavior Checklist: adaptation for use in Spanish asthmatic patients.

    PubMed

    Belloch, A; Perpiñá, M; Pascual, L M; de Diego, A; Creer, T L

    1997-01-01

    Behavioral problems associated with asthma management were examined in a group of 100 adult Spanish outpatients with asthma (57 women, 43 men; 17-69 years of age). All of them completed a Spanish version of the Revised Asthma Problem Behavior Checklist (RAPBC). Data about duration, severity, and self-management of asthma (self-efficacy expectancies and health care utilization), as well as dyspnea and FEV1, were also recorded. The highest-reliability Cronbach alpha indices were for the criteria related to emotions and behaviors that could precipitate asthma attacks. Concurrent criterion validity was examined first by Pearson correlations between the RAPBC scores and clinical data about asthma (duration, FEV1, and dyspnea), and second, by examining the differences in RAPBC scores (ANOVAs) among three severity groups of patients. Severe patients reported more behavioral problems associated with poor life-styles and self-management of their asthma and showed more psychological and physical negative consequences related to asthma. In conclusion, while the RAPBC could be considered a valid instrument to assess the behavioral problems associated with asthma in Spanish patients, and shows a good concurrent criterion validity, its reliability (internal consistency) with respect to life-style and self-management behaviors related to asthma should be improved, to ensure its utility as a screening instrument for behavior-related problems in asthmatic Spanish patients.

  1. Self-Management Technology for Clients and Counselors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elson, Steven E.

    Self-management procedures constitute a special case of intensive or N=1 research design methodology. In using self-management procedures, an individual becomes a personal scientist, investigating and altering his own behavior. Five broad self-management strategies are discussed. Self-observation involves precise monitoring of one's behavior.…

  2. Oxidant and acid aerosol exposure in healthy subjects and subjects with asthma. Part 1. Effects of oxidants, combined with sulfuric or nitric acid, on the pulmonary function of adolescents with asthma. Part 2. Effects of sequential sulfuric acid and ozone exposures on the pulmonary function of healthy subjects and subjects with asthma. Research report, February 1989-April 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Koenig, J.Q.; Covert, D.S.; Pierson, W.E.; Hanley, Q.S.; Rebolledo, V.

    1994-11-01

    The study investigated the pulmonary effects of acid summer haze in a controlled laboratory setting. Of 28 adolescent subjects with allergic asthma, exercise-induced bronchospasm, and a positive response to a standardized methacholine challenge enrolled in the study, 22 completed the study. For two consecutive days each subject inhaled each of four test atmospheres by mouthpiece. The order of exposure to the four test atmospheres was assigned via a random protocol; air, oxidants (0.12 parts per million (ppm) ozone plus 0.30 ppm nitrogen dioxide), oxidants plus sulfuric acid at 70 micro/m3 of air, or oxidants plus 0.05 ppm nitric acid. Exposure to each of the different atmospheres was separated by at least one week. A postexposure methacholine challenge was performed on Day 3.

  3. Cardiopulmonary exercise testing in children and adolescents with asthma who report symptoms of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Joyner, Benny L; Fiorino, Elizabeth K; Matta-Arroyo, Esther; Needleman, Joshua P

    2006-11-01

    Patients with asthma often report symptoms of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. We performed cardiopulmonary exercise testing to establish the cause of exercise limitation in patients with asthma, under treatment, who reported symptoms of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Ten of the 42 patients meeting criteria for inclusion in our study (24%) developed exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Exercise limitation without exercise-induced bronchoconstriction was found in both obese and non-obese patients, suggesting that poor fitness is a problem independent of body habitus. Including cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the management of children with suspected exercise-induced bronchoconstriction would provide a better understanding of the etiology of their symptoms and facilitate more appropriate treatment.

  4. An Evaluation of Asthma Interventions for Preteen Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Noreen M.; Shah, Smita; Dodge, Julia A.; Thomas, Lara J.; Andridge, Rebecca R.; Little, Roderick J. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Asthma is a serious problem for low-income preteens living in disadvantaged communities. Among the chronic diseases of childhood and adolescence, asthma has the highest prevalence and related health care use. School-based asthma interventions have proven successful for older and younger students, but results have not been demonstrated…

  5. The relationships between asthma control, daytime sleepiness, and quality of life among children with asthma: a path analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zheng; Huang, I-Chan; Thompson, Lindsay; Tuli, Sanjeev; Huang, Shih-Wen; DeWalt, Darren; Revicki, Dennis; Shenkman, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to examine the relationships between asthma control, daytime sleepiness, and asthma-specific health-related quality of life (HRQOL) among children with asthma. Path analyses were conducted to test if daytime sleepiness can mediate the effect of asthma control status on asthma-specific HRQOL. Methods 160 dyads of asthmatic children and their parents were collected for analyses. The Asthma Control and Communication Instrument (ACCI) was used to categorize adequate and poor asthma control status. The Cleveland Adolescent Sleepiness Questionnaire (CASQ) was used to measure children’s daytime sleepiness, including sleep in school, awake in school, sleep in evening, and sleep during transport. The Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS) Asthma Impact Scale was used to measure asthma-specific HRQOL. Results Poorly controlled asthma was associated with daytime sleepiness and impaired asthma-specific HRQOL. Asthma control status was directly associated with asthma-specific HRQOL (P<.05), whereas sleep in school and sleep in evening domains of daytime sleepiness significantly mediated the relationship between poor asthma control and impaired HRQOL (P<.01). Conclusions Asthma control status was associated with pediatric asthma-specific HRQOL, and the association was significantly mediated by daytime sleepiness. Healthcare providers need to address pediatric sleep needs related to poor asthma control to reduce the impact on HRQOL. PMID:23684939

  6. Occupational Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Sheppard, Dean

    1982-01-01

    Bronchospasm is a common cause of morbidity in the workplace. More than 100 agents are now recognized as occupational causes of asthma and numerous agents can cause exacerbations of preexisting asthma. Because of the large number of potential causative agents and the complexity of modern industrial processes, knowledge of the characteristic clinical features of occupational asthma is the key to recognizing this disease. Early diagnosis of occupational asthma is important in preventing long-term morbidity. Present evidence that prolonged exposure to some work-encountered agents can cause asthma that persists for years after the end of exposure suggests that avoidance is the only acceptable countermeasure against this disease. PMID:7164429

  7. Oxidant and acid aerosol exposure in healthy subjects and subjects with asthma. Part I: Effects of oxidants, combined with sulfuric or nitric acid, on the pulmonary function of adolescents with asthma.

    PubMed

    Koenig, J Q; Covert, D S; Pierson, W E; Hanley, Q S; Rebolledo, V; Dumler, K; McKinney, S E

    1994-11-01

    Both peak flow decrements in children at summer camps and increased hospital admissions for asthma have been associated with summer "acid haze," which is composed of ozone and various acidic species. The objective of this study was to investigate the pulmonary effects of acid summer haze in a controlled laboratory setting. Twenty-eight adolescent subjects with allergic asthma, exercise-induced bronchospasm, and a positive response to a standardized methacholine challenge enrolled in the study; 22 completed the study. Each subject inhaled one of four test atmospheres by mouthpiece on two consecutive days. The order of exposure to the four test atmospheres was assigned via a random protocol: air, oxidants (0.12 parts per million [ppm]* ozone plus 0.30 ppm nitrogen dioxide), oxidants plus sulfuric acid at 70 micrograms/m3 of air, or oxidants plus 0.05 ppm nitric acid. Exposure to each of the different atmospheres was separated by at least one week. The exposures were carried out during alternating 15-minute periods of rest and moderate exercise for a total exposure period of 90 minutes per day. Pulmonary function was measured before and after exposure on both test days and again on the third day as a follow-up measurement. A postexposure methacholine challenge was performed on Day 3. Low methacholine concentrations were chosen for the postexposure challenge to avoid provoking a response. The protocol was designed to detect subtle changes in airway reactivity. The statistical significance of the pulmonary function values was tested using paired t tests. First, we compared the difference between baseline and postexposure measurements after air exposure on Day 1 with the differences between baseline and postexposure measurements after Day 1 exposure to each of the other three atmospheres. Second, we compared the difference between baseline and postexposure measurements after the Day 2 air exposure with the differences between baseline and postexposure measurements after

  8. Establishment and evaluation of a preschool asthma programme: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Matthews, B; Dickinson, A; Cram, F

    1998-11-01

    In New Zealand asthma has been recognised as a major health issue for preschool children and their families (Public Health Commission, 1995). While nurses have been involved with Asthma Self management programmes which have improved the outcomes for older children and adults (Garret, Kolbe, Richards, Whitlock & Rea, 1995: Mitchell, Ferguson & Norwood, 1986) self management programmes have rarely been used for preschool children. The aims of the study were to establish a Preschool Asthma Programme and evaluate whether it would enable parents and their children to increase their knowledge, confidence and skills in asthma management, while improving asthma control. Fifteen families with children aged between three and a half and five years with moderate and severe asthma participated; five families in each of the three programmes offered. The programmes were evaluated using both formative and outcome evaluation. Results indicated that the programme increased knowledge and changes in asthma management by parents and children and increased the confidence of parents in both their own ability, and that of their child, to manage asthma. Seven parents and seven children on the programme achieved positive change in all the self management criteria considered and six parents and two children made changes in most of them. Participation in the programme was associated with improved lung function, asthma control and preschool attendance. The programme was more successful if the child was over four years old and had suboptimal asthma control. It is concluded that, contrary to what has previously been thought, preschool children can be taught self management skills. There is evidence that a Preschool Asthma Programme is a useful addition to the conventional management and can result in improvements in asthma management. PMID:10481654

  9. Benefits and Barriers of Pediatric Healthcare Providers toward Using Social Media in Asthma Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinasek, Mary P.; Panzera, Anthony D.; Schneider, Tali; Lindenberger, James H.; Bryant, Carol A.; McDermott, Robert J.; Couluris, Marisa

    2011-01-01

    Background: Adolescents with asthma are the least compliant age group for asthma management. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to explore attitudes, beliefs and perceptions of two pediatric physician groups towards using social media technology (SMT) to improve asthma management in adolescents. Methods: We employed in-depth interviews and a…

  10. Asthma Medications and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Asthma: Associated Conditions Asthma and Pregnancy Asthma Medications Asthma Medications Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... make sure you are using it correctly. Other Asthma Related Medication Treatment Annual influenza vaccine (flu shot) ...

  11. Use of Gaming in Self-Management of Diabetes in Teens.

    PubMed

    Swartwout, Ellen; El-Zein, Ashley; Deyo, Patricia; Sweenie, Rachel; Streisand, Randi

    2016-07-01

    With the growing prevalence of diabetes in teens and frequent concomitant problems with adherence, adolescents are a frequent target for diabetes self-management support and education. Due to widespread use of technology among teens in general, the use of serious games, games used for purposes beyond entertainment with the intention to educate and support health behavior for teens with diabetes self-management, is an emerging and promising practice. This report explores games intended for teens with diabetes, how the use of games may enhance clinical practice, and provides suggestions for future research and better utilization of these technologies. Current research on the use of gaming for promoting diabetes management in teens is fairly limited, with some initial support for improvements in both behavioral and clinical outcomes among teens. More research is clearly needed in order to further determine how gaming can best be utilized to impact health outcomes in these teens, as well as potential mechanisms of change.

  12. Abnormal movement of the arytenoid region during exercise presenting as exercise-induced asthma in an adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Bittleman, D B; Smith, R J; Weiler, J M

    1994-08-01

    A 16-year-old female basketball player presented with a 2 1/2-year history of exercise-induced severe dyspnea, stridor, and mild wheezing that did not respond to prophylactic treatment with beta-agonists and cromolyn. Spirometric data at rest were normal, but flow-volume loops during exercise suggested a variable extrathoracic obstruction. Laryngoscopic evaluation while the patient was riding an exercise bicycle demonstrated an abnormal motion of the arytenoid region causing obstruction of the airway during inspiration. The vocal cords moved normally. This patient demonstrates the capacity of supraglottic tissue to obstruct the airway during exercise as a cause for exercise-induced dyspnea and stridor. Patients with this disorder may be misdiagnosed as having exercise-induced asthma.

  13. Psychological considerations of the child with asthma.

    PubMed

    Peters, Todd E; Fritz, Gregory K

    2010-04-01

    Asthma, the most common chronic disease in children and adolescents in industrialized countries, is typified by airway inflammation and obstruction leading to wheezing, dyspnea, and cough. However, the effect of asthma does not end with pulmonary changes. Research has shown a direct link between asthma and stress and psychiatric illness, which if untreated results in heightened morbidity and effects on society. The link between asthma and psychiatric illness, however, is often underappreciated by many pediatric and child mental health professionals. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of asthma as well as the correlation between asthma and psychiatric illness in children in an effort to improve management and treatment strategies for this prevalent disease. PMID:20478502

  14. Asthma epigenetics.

    PubMed

    Salam, Muhammad T

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, and a growing body of evidence indicates that epigenetic variations may mediate the effects of environmental exposures on the development and natural history of asthma. Epigenetics is the study of mitotically or meiotically heritable changes in gene expression that occur without directly altering the DNA sequence. DNA methylation, histone modifications and microRNAs are major epigenetic variations in humans that are currently being investigated for asthma etiology and natural history. DNA methylation results from addition of a methyl group to the 5 position of a cytosine ring and occurs almost exclusively on a cytosine in a CpG dinucleotide. Histone modifications involve posttranslational modifications such as acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the tails of core histones. MicroRNAs are short ~22 nucleotide long, non-coding, single-stranded RNAs that binds to complementary sequences in the target mRNAs, usually resulting in gene silencing. While many studies have documented relationships of environmental exposures that have been implicated in asthma etiology with epigenetic alterations, to date, few studies have directly linked epigenetic variations with asthma development. There are several methodological challenges in studying the epigenetics of asthma. In this chapter, the influence of epigenetic variations on asthma pathophysiology, methodological concerns in conducting epigenetic research and future direction of asthma epigenetics research are discussed.

  15. [Childhood asthma].

    PubMed

    Liñán Cortés, Santos; Cobos Barroso, Nicolás

    2004-11-01

    Very frequently we have to deal with children who follow specific treatment to combat their repetitive episodes of breathing difficulty and wheezing. In many cases, they suffer from asthma. Hippocrates defined asthma as "the condition which causes an excessive narrowing of the bronchi after a reaction with a provocative stimulus which usually does not produce any effect". PMID:15648894

  16. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M

    1995-01-01

    Many toxic compounds found in air emissions may induce bronchoconstriction. In the workplace, workers are exposed to these compounds, often in much higher concentrations. Some of these compounds act as sensitizers. Of these, some compounds induce asthma by producing specific IgE antibodies to the compound or its protein conjugate, while others induce asthma through yet unidentified immunologic mechanisms. Some compounds, when inhaled in high concentrations, act as irritants and produce bronchoconstriction probably by inducing acute airway inflammation. The latter condition is called Reactive Airways Dysfunction Syndrome (RADS) or irritant-induced asthma. Occupational asthma is an excellent model to study the pathogenesis and the natural history of adult onset asthma because the responsible agent can be identified, complete avoidance is possible, and exposure can be measured or estimated. PMID:8549481

  17. Illness beliefs and self-management in children and young people with chronic illness: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Law, Gary Urquhart; Tolgyesi, Charlotte Sarah; Howard, Ruth A

    2014-01-01

    To review the extent to which illness representations, based on Leventhal's Common Sense Model, relate to self-management in children and young people with chronic physical health conditions. A systematic literature review was carried out to identify relevant studies and each included paper was assessed for risk of bias. Fifteen papers met criteria for inclusion within the review. The majority of studies were cross-sectional, and small sample sizes for some studies made it difficult to generalise findings. The method of measuring both illness representations and outcomes varied. Timeline, identity, control and consequences beliefs were the most frequently assessed domains of illness representations included within the studies. While there is variability, there are indications that control beliefs, specifically treatment control beliefs, are more consistently and strongly associated with self-management than other representation domains. Control beliefs should be targeted for intervention in studies trying to improve adolescent self-management. In addition, the relationship between illness representations and self-management needs to be considered within both developmental and systemic contexts. It is likely that the variation in self-management will be more fully explained in future research that explores the combined effects of individual representations and the influence of wider contexts.

  18. Asthma in childhood.

    PubMed

    Ellis, E F

    1983-11-01

    Asthma is defined as an obstructive disease of the pulmonary airways resulting from spasm of airway muscle, increased mucus secretion, and inflammation. The airways of asthmatic individuals are hyperresponsive to a variety of stimuli including cold air, atmospheric irritants, pharmacologically active chemicals, various drugs, and hyperventilation. The fundamental abnormality underlying the hyperresponsiveness appears to be genetically determined; two theories explaining the abnormality have received the most attention. One theory suggests that asthma is due to abnormal beta-adrenergic receptor-adenylate cyclase function with decreased adrenergic responsiveness. An alternate theory proposes that increased cholinergic activity in the airway is the fundamental defect in the disease. The true prevalence of asthma has been difficult to determine owing to uncertainties regarding the definition of the disease. Prevalence in various populations of children ranged from 1.37% to 11.4% or higher. Most studies report a preponderance of asthma in boys over girls, with ratios varying from 1.3:1 to 3.3:1. Risk factors for the disease include a history of atopy, acute lower respiratory tract disease, parental cigarette smoking, and bronchiolitis or croup. The spectrum of asthma is that of an illness beginning early in life and persisting, in some cases, through adulthood. Signs of the disease may be apparent in the first 2 yr of life and are often associated with viral respiratory infections. Disproportionate narrowing of peripheral airways and decreased static elastic recoil properties of the lung predispose infants and young children to asthma. During midchildhood there is a tendency toward improvement, with continued improvement during adolescence. The goal of management of the child with asthma is to reduce symptoms sufficiently so that the child can regularly attend school, engage in play activities, and sleep through the night uninterrupted, while avoiding unacceptable

  19. Empowering the child and caregiver: yellow zone Asthma Action Plan.

    PubMed

    Dinakar, Chitra; Portnoy, Jay M

    2014-11-01

    Current guidelines, both national and international, elegantly describe evidence-based measures to attain and maintain long-term control of asthma. These strategies, typically discussed between the provider and patient, are provided in the form of written (or electronic) instructions as part of the green zone of the color-coded Asthma Action Plan. The red zone of the Asthma Action Plan has directives on when to use systemic corticosteroids and seek medical attention. The transition zone between the green zone of good control and the red zone of asthma exacerbation is the yellow zone. This zone guides the patient on self-management of exacerbations outside a medical setting. Unfortunately, the only recommendation currently available to patients per the current asthma guidelines is the repetitive use of reliever bronchodilators. This approach, while providing modest symptom relief, does not reliably prevent progression to the red zone. In this document, we present new, evidence-based, yellow zone intervention options.

  20. Self-Managed Career Services: A Team Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nonnamaker, John; Hagenbaugh, Stacie; Grote, Ann DiMeola; Denon, Gregory; Jessup, Kara

    2001-01-01

    Taking a lead from corporate culture, many colleges and universities are experimenting with the self-managed team model, an alternative to traditional hierarchical structures. This article discusses Boston's Emerson College career services staff's experience with becoming a self-managed team. They were able to improve service delivery, reduce…

  1. Self-Management Patient Education and Weight Loss

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stombaugh, Angela M.

    2010-01-01

    Self-management of a disease is defined as "having or being able to obtain, the skills and resources necessary to best accommodate to the chronic disease and its consequences" (Holman & Lorig, 1992, p. 309). Self-management has been used in the management of several chronic conditions and this model may be useful in the management of weight loss.…

  2. Career Self-Management: Its Nature, Causes and Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Zella

    2004-01-01

    In a recent special issue [Journal of Vocational Behavior 59 (2001) 284], scholars noted that the field of vocational psychology needs a better understanding of career self-management. This article proposes a conceptual framework of career self-management, based on Crites' [Vocational Psychology, McGraw-Hill, New York, 1969] model of vocational…

  3. Moving from Token Economies to Teaching Self-Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scott, Terance M.

    1998-01-01

    Shows how moving away from the token economy and contingency-contracting concepts of behavior management in the classroom is an effective way to teach self management skills to students with Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder. Supplies detailed instructions for implementing a successful self-management program. (MKA)

  4. The Misunderstood Asthma of Theodore Roosevelt.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Carlos A; Roosevelt, Tweed

    2015-01-01

    In this special article, we examine the asthma of President Theodore "TR" Roosevelt (1858-1919). Through a comprehensive review of thousands of source documents, and a modern understanding of asthma, we examine several misunderstandings, including the longstanding assertion that TR's illness was "psychosomatic." TR's respiratory problems began in early childhood, and the historical record provides strong evidence for poorly controlled, persistent asthma. Like many patients, his asthma entered a relatively quiescent stage during adolescence, coincident with initiation of a vigorous exercise program when TR was 12 years old. Nevertheless, TR continued to suffer serious asthma exacerbations, both in adolescence and adulthood. Although psychosocial issues affect most chronic diseases, there is little (if any) support for assertions that TR's asthma was psychosomatic. We believe that TR's childhood struggles with asthma, and the misconception that he vanquished his illness through exercise, were experiences that profoundly affected his worldview. TR is known for his appreciation of life's struggles and for a bedrock belief that people can create major change with sufficient motivation and hard work. In different ways, misunderstandings about asthma contributed to the early development of these personal characteristics. Together with later experiences, they contributed to a lifetime of action that changed modern history. PMID:26271837

  5. The Misunderstood Asthma of Theodore Roosevelt.

    PubMed

    Camargo, Carlos A; Roosevelt, Tweed

    2015-01-01

    In this special article, we examine the asthma of President Theodore "TR" Roosevelt (1858-1919). Through a comprehensive review of thousands of source documents, and a modern understanding of asthma, we examine several misunderstandings, including the longstanding assertion that TR's illness was "psychosomatic." TR's respiratory problems began in early childhood, and the historical record provides strong evidence for poorly controlled, persistent asthma. Like many patients, his asthma entered a relatively quiescent stage during adolescence, coincident with initiation of a vigorous exercise program when TR was 12 years old. Nevertheless, TR continued to suffer serious asthma exacerbations, both in adolescence and adulthood. Although psychosocial issues affect most chronic diseases, there is little (if any) support for assertions that TR's asthma was psychosomatic. We believe that TR's childhood struggles with asthma, and the misconception that he vanquished his illness through exercise, were experiences that profoundly affected his worldview. TR is known for his appreciation of life's struggles and for a bedrock belief that people can create major change with sufficient motivation and hard work. In different ways, misunderstandings about asthma contributed to the early development of these personal characteristics. Together with later experiences, they contributed to a lifetime of action that changed modern history.

  6. Implementation of an epilepsy self-management protocol.

    PubMed

    Cole, Kimberly A; Gaspar, Phyllis M

    2015-02-01

    It is essential that patients with epilepsy receive educational information about their disease and its management, but there is dissatisfaction with the education received. The purposes of this evidence-based project were to examine the current knowledge level and disease management behaviors of patients with epilepsy in an outpatient clinic and to measure the effectiveness of implementing a self-management protocol using the Epilepsy Self-Management Scale (ESMS). Pender's health promotion model and Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory were used to guide the development and completion of this project. An evidence-based epilepsy self-management protocol was developed and implemented at an outpatient neurology clinic by an interprofessional clinic team that consisted of (a) evaluation of self-management behaviors (ESMS), (b) individual education using the ESMS and developed resources, (c) follow-up telephone call, and (d) measurement of outcomes of the self-management protocol (patient self-management [ESMS] and process). Twenty patients participated in all or portions of the protocol. Scores on the ESMS increased from preimplementation to postimplementation of the protocol (t = -2.67). Seizure management and information management were identified as the most difficult self-management areas. Recommended changes in protocol implementation include adding information about safety measures such as medical alert bracelets and driving to the educational packets. Follow-up telephone calls were discontinued because of difficulties reaching patients. The results of this study suggest that the ESMS is an acceptable tool for evaluating patients' self-management behaviors. Epilepsy self-management protocols need to include both verbal and written educational materials. Educating patients with epilepsy about positive self-management behaviors may lead to better health outcomes.

  7. What Is Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section What Is Asthma? Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents For ... major trigger for asthma. Photo: iStock Who Gets Asthma? People get asthma because of an interaction between ...

  8. Exercise and Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Issues Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share Exercise and Asthma Page Content Article Body Almost every ... children more likely to develop asthma. How does exercise cause asthma symptoms? The symptoms of asthma are ...

  9. Asthma and allergy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - asthma and allergy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on asthma and allergies : Allergy and Asthma Network Mothers of Asthmatics -- www.aanma.org American Academy of Allergy, Asthma ...

  10. Asthma and Hispanic Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Data > Minority Population Profiles > Hispanic/Latino > Asthma Asthma and Hispanic Americans In 2014, 2.1 million Hispanics reported that they currently have asthma. Puerto Rican Americans have almost twice the asthma ...

  11. Diagnosing Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth Head Neck & ...

  12. Asthma Inhalers

    MedlinePlus

    ... reduce the release of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) into the atmosphere when taking certain asthma medications. Until recently, most ... hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) inhalers, that do not rob the atmosphere of ozone. “The FDA [Food and Drug Administration] ...

  13. Asthma - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... children. It is a leading cause of missed school days and hospital visits for children. An allergic reaction ... how to let your child take medicine during school hours. (You may ... every day to prevent asthma symptoms. Your child should take ...

  14. Asthma Basics

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... of asthma. The doctor may take a spirometer reading, give the child an inhaled medication that opens ...

  15. Self-managed work teams: what works?

    PubMed

    Yeatts, D E; Schulz, E

    1998-01-01

    Case studies have shown that under the right circumstances, employees within self-managed work teams (SMWTs) produce more at work than employees organized in a more hierarchical, traditional structure because they perform not only technical skills, but management skills as well. The purpose of this article is to clarify the specific factors most important to an SMWT's success. The information shared here comes from three sources. The primary source is a research project funded by a 3-year grant (1994-1997) from the National Science Foundation. The primary factors found to affect the success of SMWTs formed five groups. Work process factors include those that are needed when actually performing the work, such as the appropriate resources, talent, procedures, and effort. Interpersonal process factors include communication and both positive and negative conflict. Environmental factors include those within the SMWT'S organization, such as management support and the reward system, as well as factors outside the organization, such as suppliers and the market. Team design factors and team member characteristics were found to be equally important to the high performance of the SMWT. PMID:10178700

  16. Recognizing asthma mimics and asthma complications.

    PubMed

    Amundson, Dennis; Seda, Gilbert; Daheshia, Massoud

    2011-10-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways characterized by airflow obstruction, bronchial hyperreactivity, and underlying inflammation. Two common reasons asthmatics fail standard therapy are incorrect diagnosis and failure to recognize underlying contributing factors. A correct diagnosis of asthma is of great importance to military practitioners since misdiagnosis or uncontrolled asthma affects an individual's operational readiness or determines whether one can receive a medical waiver to enlist in military service. This article presents four cases of patients with dyspnea that have conditions which mimic asthma or complicate asthma management: vocal cord dysfunction misdiagnosed as asthma, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease mistaken as asthma, difficult-to-control asthma because of bronchiectasis and allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis, and difficult and fatal asthma. Asthma is contrasted to other respiratory disorders, and an outlined approach to asthma diagnosis and management is presented using the Global Initiative for Asthma guidelines.

  17. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Cambray-Gutiérrez, Julio César; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha

    2015-01-01

    The occupational asthma is the most common form of lung disease caused by factors that are attributed to a specific working environment in industrialized countries. It causes variable limitation of airflow and/or hyper-responsiveness of the airway due to contact with specific agents present in an atmosphere of work and not to stimuli found out of this place. It is recognized more and more frequently, and many agents are capable of causing occupational asthma by different pathophysiological mechanisms. More than 400 agents causing occupational asthma are known and every year new triggers are detected. Numerous factors contribute to the pathogenesis of occupational asthma induced chemically, including immunological, non-immunological mechanisms of epithelial damage, airway remodeling, oxidative stress, neurogenic inflammation as well as genetic factors. The most important risk factors for occupational asthma include: atopy, smoking and genetic factors. The diagnosis is based on the clinical history, skin tests, immunological tests and functional studies. The fundamental treatment is removing the worker from exposure as soon as possible. The advance in the knowledge of the pathogenesis of occupational asthma will importantly influence in the prevention and the management of this disease.

  18. Evaluation, modification and validation of a set of asthma illustrations in children with chronic asthma in the emergency department

    PubMed Central

    Tulloch, Joanie; Vaillancourt, Régis; Irwin, Danica; Pascuet, Elena

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To test, modify and validate a set of illustrations depicting different levels of asthma control and common asthma triggers in pediatric patients (and/or their parents) with chronic asthma who presented to the emergency department at the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario, Ottawa, Ontario. METHODS: Semistructured interviews using guessability and translucency questionnaires tested the comprehensibility of 15 illustrations depicting different levels of asthma control and common asthma triggers in children 10 to 17 years of age, and parents of children one to nine years of age who presented to the emergency department. Illustrations with an overall guessability score <80% and/or translucency median score <6, were reviewed by the study team and modified by the study’s graphic designer. Modifications were made based on key concepts identified by study participants. RESULTS: A total of 80 patients were interviewed. Seven of the original 15 illustrations (47%) required modifications to obtain the prespecified guessability and translucency goals. CONCLUSION: The authors successfully developed, modified and validated a set of 15 illustrations representing different levels of asthma control and common asthma triggers. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: These illustrations will be incorporated into a child-friendly asthma action plan that enables the child to be involved in his or her asthma self-management care. PMID:22332128

  19. The Saudi initiative for asthma – 2012 update: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Alhaider, Sami A.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.; Al-Ghobain, Mohammed O.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Zeitouni, Mohammed O.; Al-Harbi, Adel S.; Al Dabbagh, Maha M.; Al-Matar, Hussain; Alorainy, Hassan S.

    2012-01-01

    This an updated guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma, developed by the Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA) group, a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society. The main objective of SINA is to have updated guidelines, which are simple to understand and easy to use by non-asthma specialists, including primary care and general practice physicians. This new version includes updates of acute and chronic asthma management, with more emphasis on the use of Asthma Control Test in the management of asthma, and a new section on “difficult-to-treat asthma.” Further, the section on asthma in children was re-written to cover different aspects in this age group. The SINA panel is a group of Saudi experts with well-respected academic backgrounds and experience in the field of asthma. The guidelines are formatted based on the available evidence, local literature, and the current situation in Saudi Arabia. There was an emphasis on patient–doctor partnership in the management that also includes a self-management plan. The approach adopted by the SINA group is mainly based on disease control as it is the ultimate goal of treatment. PMID:23189095

  20. Usability testing of AsthmaWise with older adults.

    PubMed

    Burns, Pippa; Jones, Sandra C; Iverson, Don; Caputi, Peter

    2013-05-01

    There are many reasons why online self-management education is attractive to both patients and providers. AsthmaWise, an online self-management program, was developed using a Moodle platform, to enable older adults to learn asthma self-management skills. This study aimed to improve AsthmaWise through conducting: usability testing with a sample of end users; a cognitive walk-through undertaken by an independent health researcher; and assessment of content readability. A Perceived Health Web Site Usability Questionnaire score of 67% was achieved, indicating that there were usability issues that needed to be addressed. The cognitive walk-through and readability assessment identified unique issues that were not identified through usability testing with end users. The testing process allowed issues to be identified and rectified before piloting AsthmaWise, creating a more accessible and refined end product. The involvement of the site designer in the testing process was valuable and is highly recommended. This study shows that usability testing involving both end users and experts is an essential part of the design process that is relatively easy and inexpensive to undertake and can be effectively conducted by a nonexpert. PMID:23542306

  1. The implementation of self-managed teams in health care.

    PubMed

    Schrubb, D A

    1992-08-01

    Self-managed teams are one of the most effective tools now available for tapping the unrealized potential of health care organizations. Executives and managers involved with self-managed teams are speaking of new levels of productivity, new commitment among workers, and new optimism about meeting the challenges of competition. GSH's ability to create peak-performance teams will certainly give the hospital a critical competitive advantage over competing hospitals in the Dayton area. Success requires commitment and patience. Health care organizations that believe in the power of worker participation will not regret following the path to a self-managed team environment.

  2. Self-management education and support in chronic disease management.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Patrick T

    2012-06-01

    With the changing health care environment, prevalence of chronic health conditions, and burgeoning challenges of health literacy, obesity, and homelessness, self-management support provides an opportunity for clinicians to enhance effectiveness and, at the same time, to engage patients to participate in managing their own personal care. This article reviews the differences between patient education and self-management and describes easy-to-use strategies that foster patient self-management and can be used by health care providers in the medical setting. It also highlights the importance of linking patients to nonmedical programs and services in the community.

  3. The Association of Health Literacy with Illness and Medication Beliefs Among Older Adults with Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Federman, Alex D.; Wolf, Michael; Sofianou, Anastasia; Wilson, Elizabeth A.H.; Martynenko, Melissa; Halm, Ethan A.; Leventhal, Howard; Wisnivesky, Juan P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Suboptimal health literacy (HL) and asthma beliefs are associated with poor asthma self-management and outcomes. We tested the hypothesis that low HL is associated with inaccurate beliefs. Methods Asthmatics ≥ 60 were recruited from hospital and community practices in New York, NY and Chicago, IL (n=420). HL was measured with the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults; validated instruments derived from the Self Regulation model were used to assess beliefs. The association of beliefs with HL was evaluated with multivariate models. Results Thirty-six percent of patients had low HL; 54% believed they only have asthma when symptoms are present, 29% believed they will not always have asthma and 20% believed that their doctor can cure asthma. HL was associated with beliefs of not having asthma all the time and that asthma can be cured (OR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.2 to 2.82; OR: 2.22, 95% CI: 1.29 to 3.82, respectively). Patients with low HL were also more likely to be concerned about medication use (β = 0.92, p = .05), despite recognizing their necessity (β = -1.36, p = .01). Conclusions Older asthmatics with low HL endorse erroneous asthma beliefs. Practice implications Health communications for improving self-management behaviors in asthma should employ both health literacy-appropriate strategies and messages to counter illness-related misconceptions. PMID:23523196

  4. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Pauli, G; Bessot, J C; Gourdon, C

    1992-12-01

    The diagnosis of occupational asthma requires the integration of a multiplicity of data; the history, cutaneous skin tests, biological tests, respiratory function tests and non-specific tests of bronchial hyperreactivity and specific bronchial provocation test. The history search for the presence of an atopic state, the occurrence of similar disorders in members of the same firm and also the timing of symptoms in relation to the occupational activities. Cutaneous tests are particularly helpful in IgE-mediated asthma in relation to the inhalation of animal or vegetable materials of glycoprotein origin. For haptens, the need for their prior coupling to a protein carrier causes problems which have not been entirely resolved. Laboratory tests run into the same snags. Respiratory function and non-specific bronchial provocation tests, confirm the diagnosis of asthma and enable the medium and long term prognostic to be assessed. Specific bronchial provocation tests are the most appropriate tests to establish an aetiological diagnosis in occupational asthma. Different technical methods are possible: quantitative administration of allergen aerosols, realistic tests, and tests using exposure chambers to achieve true test doses. The products responsible for occupational asthma are multiple. The different substances are characterised in a simplified manner: first animal matter (mammalian and arthropod allergens), secondly substances of vegetable origin (roots, leaves, flowers, grain and flour, wood and its derivates) and finally chemical products. The chemical products are primarily from the pharmaceutical and metal industries and above all from the plastics industry. PMID:1296320

  5. Self-Management: Taking Charge of Your Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... management of chronic illness means that you take responsibility for doing what it takes to manage your ... As part of self-management, it’s also your responsibility to ask for the help you need to ...

  6. Didgeridoo Playing and Singing to Support Asthma Management in Aboriginal Australians

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eley, Robert; Gorman, Don

    2010-01-01

    Context: Asthma affects over 15% of Australian Aboriginal people. Compliance in asthma management is poor. Interventions that will increase compliance are required. Purpose: The purpose of the study was to determine whether Aboriginal children, adolescents and adults would engage in music lessons to increase their knowledge of asthma and support…

  7. Integrating the Revised Asthma Guidelines into School Nursing Scope and Standards of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowder, Sharron J.

    2010-01-01

    Asthma, a major health problem, is the most common chronic illness of school-aged children and adolescents, with an estimated 6.8 million students affected in the United States. Asthma is the leading cause of school absenteeism, with an estimated 14 million lost school days per year. In August 2007, the National Asthma Education and Prevention…

  8. Summary of the 2008 BTS/SIGN British Guideline on the management of asthma.

    PubMed

    Levy, Mark L; Thomas, Mike; Small, Iain; Pearce, Linda; Pinnock, Hilary; Stephenson, Paul

    2009-01-01

    The 2008 BTS/SIGN British Guideline on the management of asthma provides comprehensive updated evidence-based guidance on asthma management for healthcare professionals. This primary care-focussed summary has been produced to aid dissemination and implementation of the key guideline messages into primary care. The section on diagnosis emphasises the new integrated symptom-based approach with clinicians using their deductive skills to determine the probability that the patient has asthma. The various tools used for monitoring asthma are discussed. There are sections on both non-pharmacological and pharmacological management of chronic asthma in adults and children. Treatment options for children are subdivided into the under-5s and children aged 5-12 years. Poor asthma control is manifested by exacerbations and acute asthma. Personalised asthma action plans for guided self management should be provided and used when levels of asthma control change. There are sections on difficult asthma and the treatment of exacerbations and acute severe asthma. Various outcome measures for auditing the quality of asthma care are discussed.

  9. [Occupational asthma].

    PubMed

    Pérez, Padilla Alfredo

    2009-01-01

    The work-related asthma is a disease that is frequently reported in other countries, but little recognized in our own despite the large number of workers at risk. The lack of knowledge about its etiology at work involves a mishandling and poor outcome of the patient, because its treatment requires the removal of worker of exposure at work or at least this fall. The definitive diagnosis involves specialized medical procedures that are difficult to access and workplace studies that establish at first line the diagnosis of asthma and the work as cause of the disease or its aggravation. Health workers surveillance and compliance with work regulations are strategies that should be promoted prevention of asthma at work. PMID:20873063

  10. Occupational asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Chan-Yeung, M.; Grzybowski, S.

    1976-01-01

    Occupational asthma is probably much more common than is generally realized. Though many causes have been described, undoubtedly many more are yet to be recognized. One of the diagnostic difficulties lies in the fact that in most forms of this disease a late asthmatic reaction occurs in the evening rather than at work. The pathogenetic mechanisms differ in various forms of occupational asthma. In some, an immunologic mechanism is likely; in others, a "pharmacologic" action of the offending agent is implicated. Asthma due to inhalation of dusts of western red cedar, isocyanates, detergent enzymes and textiles is considered in detail. Periodic examination of workers at risk is of value for early diagnosis and prevention of irrversible airway obstruction. PMID:766943

  11. Beliefs About Dysmenorrhea and Their Relationship to Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chen X; Kwekkeboom, Kristine L; Ward, Sandra E

    2016-08-01

    Dysmenorrhea is highly prevalent and is the leading cause of work and school absences among women of reproductive age. However, self-management of dysmenorrhea is not well understood in the US, and little evidence is available on factors that influence dysmenorrhea self-management. Guided by the Common Sense Model, we examined women's representations of dysmenorrhea (beliefs about causes, symptoms, consequences, timeline, controllability, coherence, and emotional responses), described their dysmenorrhea self-management behaviors, and investigated the relationship between representations and self-management behaviors. We conducted a cross-sectional, web-based survey of 762 adult women who had dysmenorrhea symptoms in the last six months. Participants had varied beliefs about the causes of their dysmenorrhea symptoms, which were perceived as a normal part of life. Dysmenorrhea symptoms were reported as moderately severe, with consequences that moderately affected daily life. Women believed they understood their symptoms moderately well and perceived them as moderately controllable but them to continue through menopause. Most women did not seek professional care but rather used a variety of pharmacologic and complementary health approaches. Care-seeking and use of self-management strategies were associated with common sense beliefs about dysmenorrhea cause, consequences, timeline, and controllability. The findings may inform development and testing of self-management interventions that address dysmenorrhea representations and facilitate evidence-based management. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. [Underdiagnosed asthma in third-grade children].

    PubMed

    Walus, I; Richard, G; Laquerrière, B; Perucca, M; Tuveri, R; Einbinder, V; Muller, B; Beydon, N

    2016-01-01

    Undiagnosed asthma has been poorly studied before adolescence since it can go unnoticed by parents and doctors. Moreover, it is unusual to look for undiagnosed asthma by directly questioning children on the presence of current respiratory symptoms. Epidemiologic studies show that more adolescents quote symptoms suggestive of asthma than the prevalence of doctor-diagnosed asthma, but respiratory symptoms compatible with asthma remain undetected by parents of younger children more frequently than doctors diagnose asthma in their children. We attempted to evaluate the relevance of a questionnaire used since 2011 by school doctors in Paris to detect asthma. In this questionnaire, the family history of atopy and asthma were completed by the parents when they met the school doctor (last year of preschool) and questions on current respiratory symptoms were answered by third-grade children seen alone by the school doctor. One hundred and thirty-one children out of 1135 children questioned had a positive questionnaire for suspected asthma. In three-quarters of the cases, questionnaires were positive based on the children's answers on their respiratory symptoms (without a positive answer on personal or family history being necessary). The outcome of 41 children screened by the questionnaire was known. Twenty (49%) children had received a final diagnosis of asthma, of whom 12 were put on asthma controllers. Among these 20 children, two children underwent lung function testing and two others underwent tests for allergy. In eight children, tests had been requested by the child's GP, but no final diagnosis was reported by the parents. None of the 13 children in whom asthma was ruled out had any test performed. It was concluded that it is possible to detect undiagnosed asthma in children as young as 8 years by directly asking them about their respiratory symptoms. The knowledge of personal and family history can improve screening for asthma in these children. A more thorough

  13. Non-adherence in children with asthma reviewed: The need for improvement of asthma care and medical education.

    PubMed

    Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A; Brand, Paul L P

    2015-05-01

    Adherence to daily inhaled corticosteroid therapy is a key determinant of asthma control. Therefore, improving adherence to inhaled corticosteroids is the most effective method through which healthcare providers can help children with uncontrolled asthma. However, identifying non-adherent patients is difficult, and electronic monitoring is the only reliable method to assess adherence. (Non-)adherence is a complex behavioural process influenced by many interacting factors. Intentional barriers to adherence are common; driven by illness perceptions and medication beliefs, patients and parents deliberately choose not to follow the doctor's recommendations. Common non-intentional barriers are related to family routines, child-raising issues, and to social issues such as poverty. Effective interventions improving adherence are complex, because they take intentional and non-intentional barriers to adherence into account. There is evidence that comprehensive, guideline-based asthma self-management programmes can be successful, with excellent adherence and good asthma control. Patient-centred care focused on healthcare provider-patient/parent collaboration is the key factor determining the success of guided self-management programmes. Such care should focus on shared decision-making as this has been shown to improve adherence and healthcare outcomes. Current asthma care falls short because many physicians fail to adhere to asthma guidelines in their diagnostic approach and therapeutic prescriptions, and because of the lack of application of patient-centred health care. Increased awareness of the importance of patient-centred communication and increased training in patient-centred communication skills of undergraduates and experienced attending physicians are needed to improve adherence to daily controller therapy and asthma control in children with asthma.

  14. Non-adherence in children with asthma reviewed: The need for improvement of asthma care and medical education.

    PubMed

    Klok, Ted; Kaptein, Adrian A; Brand, Paul L P

    2015-05-01

    Adherence to daily inhaled corticosteroid therapy is a key determinant of asthma control. Therefore, improving adherence to inhaled corticosteroids is the most effective method through which healthcare providers can help children with uncontrolled asthma. However, identifying non-adherent patients is difficult, and electronic monitoring is the only reliable method to assess adherence. (Non-)adherence is a complex behavioural process influenced by many interacting factors. Intentional barriers to adherence are common; driven by illness perceptions and medication beliefs, patients and parents deliberately choose not to follow the doctor's recommendations. Common non-intentional barriers are related to family routines, child-raising issues, and to social issues such as poverty. Effective interventions improving adherence are complex, because they take intentional and non-intentional barriers to adherence into account. There is evidence that comprehensive, guideline-based asthma self-management programmes can be successful, with excellent adherence and good asthma control. Patient-centred care focused on healthcare provider-patient/parent collaboration is the key factor determining the success of guided self-management programmes. Such care should focus on shared decision-making as this has been shown to improve adherence and healthcare outcomes. Current asthma care falls short because many physicians fail to adhere to asthma guidelines in their diagnostic approach and therapeutic prescriptions, and because of the lack of application of patient-centred health care. Increased awareness of the importance of patient-centred communication and increased training in patient-centred communication skills of undergraduates and experienced attending physicians are needed to improve adherence to daily controller therapy and asthma control in children with asthma. PMID:25704083

  15. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    AN ASSOCIATION between asthma and thunderstorms based on retrospective data has been noted in several papers. This study, however, draws on almost-real-time, anonymised attendance data from 35 emergency departments (EDs) in the UK, and lightning-strike plots from the Met Office. PMID:25270814

  16. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    2014-10-01

    AN ASSOCIATION between asthma and thunderstorms based on retrospective data has been noted in several papers. This study, however, draws on almost-real-time, anonymised attendance data from 35 emergency departments (EDs) in the UK, and lightning-strike plots from the Met Office.

  17. [Severe asthma].

    PubMed

    González, Claudio D

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this work were to investigate the frequency of severe asthma (SA) according to WHO definition and to compare SA patients' characteristics with those of non-severe asthma (NSA); secondly, to investigate the level of control reached throughout a period of regular treatment. Between 1-1-2005 and 12-31-2014, 471 medical records from patients with bronchial asthma assisted in Buenos Aires City were analyzed. SA frequency was 40.1% (189/471), being significantly higher among patients from the public health system (47.7%, 108/226 vs. 33%, 81/245, p = 0.001). SA patients were older than NSA ones (51.3 ± 17.4 vs. 42.6 ± 17.1 years, p = 0.000), presented longer time since onset of the disease (median 30 vs. 20 years, p = 0.000), lower educational levels (secondary level or higher 41.7% vs. 58.1%, p = 0.000), lower frequency of rhinitis (47% vs. 60.6%, p = 0.004), more severe levels of airway obstruction (FEV% 50.2 ± 13.7 vs. 77.7 ± 12.4, p = 0.000), more frequent antecedents of Near Fatal Asthma (11.1% vs. 2.8%, p = 0.000), higher levels of serum IgE (median of 410 vs. 279 UI/l, p = 0.01) and higher demand of systemic steroids requirements and hospitalizations (68.7% vs. 50.7%, p = 0.000 and 37.5% vs. 15.9%, p = 0.000, respectively). A 30.6% of SA patients (58/189) reached a follow-up period of 12 months, 13 (22.5%) of whom reached the controlled asthma level. The frequency of SA found seems to be considerable. Multicenter studies to investigate the levels of control reached by SA patients with access to proper treatment are recommended.

  18. The national review of asthma deaths: what did we learn and what needs to change?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    die from asthma, and many had no recorded rationale for an asthma diagnosis. The apparent complacency with respect to asthma care, highlighted in NRAD, serves as a wake-up call for health professionals, patients and their carers to take asthma more seriously. Based on the NRAD evidence, the report made 19 recommendations for change. The author has selected six areas related to the NRAD findings for discussion and provides suggestions for change in the provision of asthma care. The six areas are: systems for provision and optimisation of asthma care, diagnosis, identifying risk, implementation of guidelines, improved patient education and self-management, and improved quality of completion of medical certificates of the cause of death. PMID:26306100

  19. Time for a new language for asthma control: results from REALISE Asia

    PubMed Central

    Price, David; David-Wang, Aileen; Cho, Sang-Heon; Ho, James Chung-Man; Jeong, Jae-Won; Liam, Chong-Kin; Lin, Jiangtao; Muttalif, Abdul Razak; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Tan, Tze-Lee; Yunus, Faisal; Neira, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Asthma is a global health problem, and asthma prevalence in Asia is increasing. The REcognise Asthma and LInk to Symptoms and Experience Asia study assessed patients’ perception of asthma control and attitudes toward treatment in an accessible, real-life adult Asian population. Patients and methods An online survey of 2,467 patients with asthma from eight Asian countries/regions, aged 18–50 years, showed greater than or equal to two prescriptions in previous 2 years and access to social media. Patients were asked about their asthma symptoms, exacerbations and treatment type, views and perceptions of asthma control, attitudes toward asthma management, and sources of asthma information. Results Patients had a mean age of 34.2 (±7.4) years and were diagnosed with asthma for 12.5 (±9.7) years. Half had the Global Initiative for Asthma-defined uncontrolled asthma. During the previous year, 38% of patients visited the emergency department, 33% were hospitalized, and 73% had greater than or equal to one course of oral corticosteroids. About 90% of patients felt that their asthma was under control, 82% considered their condition as not serious, and 59% were concerned about their condition. In all, 66% of patients viewed asthma control as managing attacks and 24% saw it as an absence of or minimal symptoms. About 14% of patients who correctly identified their controller inhalers had controlled asthma compared to 6% who could not. Conclusion Patients consistently overestimated their level of asthma control contrary to what their symptoms suggest. They perceived control as management of exacerbations, reflective of a crisis-oriented mind-set. Interventions can leverage on patients’ trust in health care providers and desire for self-management via a new language to generate a paradigm shift toward symptom control and preventive care. PMID:26445555

  20. Effect of a home intervention program on pediatric asthma in an environmental justice community.

    PubMed

    Shani, Zalika; Scott, Richard G; Schofield, Lynne Steuerle; Johnson, John H; Williams, Ellen R; Hampton, Janiene; Ramprasad, Vatsala

    2015-03-01

    Asthma prevalence rates are at an all-time high in the United States with over 25 million persons diagnosed with asthma. African Americans and other minorities have higher asthma prevalence and higher exposure to environmental factors that worsen asthma as compared to Caucasians. This article describes the evaluation of an inner-city home-based asthma education and environmental remediation program that addressed both indoor and outdoor triggers through collaboration between a health system and local environmental justice organization. The program enrolled 132 children older than 2.5 years and centers on a 4- to 6-week intervention with peer counselors using the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Asthma Home Environment Checklist and the You Can Control Asthma curriculum. Families receive asthma-friendly environmental home kits. Peer counselors reinforce key asthma management messages and facilitate the completion of Asthma Action Plans. The environmental justice community partner organized block cleanups to reduce outdoor triggers. The evaluation used a pretest-posttest design to assess changes in client behavior and asthma symptoms. Data were collected at baseline and during a 6-month postintervention period. Participants saw enhanced conditions on asthma severity and control. The improvement was greatest for children whose asthma was considered "severe" based on the validated Asthma Control Test. Other positive results include the following: greater completion of Asthma Action Plans, significant reduction in the number of emergency room visits (p = .006), and substantial decreases in school absenteeism (p = .008) and use of rescue medications (p = .049). The evaluation suggests that the program was effective in improving asthma self-management in a high-risk population living within an environmental justice community.

  1. Self-management of medical abortion: a qualitative evidence synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Megan; Colvin, Christopher J; Swartz, Alison; Leon, Natalie

    2016-05-01

    Medical abortion is a method of pregnancy termination that by its nature enables more active involvement of women in the process of managing, and sometimes even administering the medications for, their abortions. This qualitative evidence synthesis reviewed the global evidence on experiences with, preferences for, and concerns about greater self-management of medical abortion with lesser health professional involvement. We focused on qualitative research from multiple perspectives on women's experiences of self-management of first trimester medical abortion (<12weeks gestation). We included research from both legal and legally-restricted contexts whether medical abortion was accessed through formal or informal systems. A review team of four identified 36 studies meeting inclusion criteria, extracted data from these studies, and synthesized review findings. Review findings were organized under the following themes: general perceptions of self-management, preparation for self-management, logistical considerations, issues of choice and control, and meaning and experience. The synthesis highlights that the qualitative evidence base is still small, but that the available evidence points to the overall acceptability of self-administration of medical abortion. We highlight particular considerations when offering self-management options, and identify key areas for future research. Further qualitative research is needed to strengthen this important evidence base.

  2. Self-management of medical abortion: a qualitative evidence synthesis.

    PubMed

    Wainwright, Megan; Colvin, Christopher J; Swartz, Alison; Leon, Natalie

    2016-05-01

    Medical abortion is a method of pregnancy termination that by its nature enables more active involvement of women in the process of managing, and sometimes even administering the medications for, their abortions. This qualitative evidence synthesis reviewed the global evidence on experiences with, preferences for, and concerns about greater self-management of medical abortion with lesser health professional involvement. We focused on qualitative research from multiple perspectives on women's experiences of self-management of first trimester medical abortion (<12weeks gestation). We included research from both legal and legally-restricted contexts whether medical abortion was accessed through formal or informal systems. A review team of four identified 36 studies meeting inclusion criteria, extracted data from these studies, and synthesized review findings. Review findings were organized under the following themes: general perceptions of self-management, preparation for self-management, logistical considerations, issues of choice and control, and meaning and experience. The synthesis highlights that the qualitative evidence base is still small, but that the available evidence points to the overall acceptability of self-administration of medical abortion. We highlight particular considerations when offering self-management options, and identify key areas for future research. Further qualitative research is needed to strengthen this important evidence base. PMID:27578349

  3. Asthma: Basic Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Learn How to Control Asthma Language: ... common triggers are tobacco smoke, dust mites, outdoor air pollution, cockroach allergen, pets, mold, and smoke from burning ...

  4. Asthma and school

    MedlinePlus

    Asthma action plan - school; Wheezing - school; Reactive airway disease - school; Bronchial asthma - school ... Your child's school asthma action plan should include: Phone ... nurse, parents, and guardians A brief history of your child's ...

  5. Asthma in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... have asthma. Nearly 9 million of them are children. Children have smaller airways than adults, which makes asthma especially serious for them. Children with asthma may experience wheezing, coughing, chest tightness, ...

  6. Allergies, asthma, and molds

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive airway - mold; Bronchial asthma - mold; Triggers - mold; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. Mold is a common trigger. When your asthma or allergies become worse due to mold, you are ...

  7. Diabetes: Christian Worldview, Medical Distrust & Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Newlin Lew, Kelley; Arbuah, Nancy; Banach, Paul; Melkus, Gail

    2015-01-01

    To inform development of a combined diabetes prevention and self-management intervention in partnership with church communities, this study sampled African American church leaders and members (N=44) to qualitatively study religious beliefs and practices, diabetes prevention and self-management behaviors, and related community actions. Prior to commencing the study, internal review board approval was obtained. Although not required, community consent was officially provided by the church pastors. Individual consent was subsequently obtained from eligible community members who expressed an interest in participating in the study. Following a participatory action research approach, the inquiry group method was used. Qualitative data were analyzed with content analysis. Findings revealed Christian worldview, medical mistrust, and self-management as prominent themes. Findings suggest diabetes providers address religious orientation in the provision of care with attention to rebuilding trust with the African American community to improve health outcomes. PMID:25735754

  8. Health coaching in diabetes: empowering patients to self-manage.

    PubMed

    Wong-Rieger, Durhane; Rieger, Francis P

    2013-02-01

    To effectively manage diabetes mellitus, patients must adhere to treatment recommendations and healthy lifestyle behaviors, but research shows many patients do not do this. Education is effective when combined with self-management support but peer-support programs do not lead to lasting changes. Health coaching, or professional support, can be highly effective if it focuses on developing self-efficacy and skills such as goal-setting, problem-solving and managing cognitive and emotional barriers. This overview discusses the benefits of patient self-management for chronic conditions such as diabetes, core competencies for health coaching, theoretical bases and principles of health coaching interventions, delivery methods and the evidence that health coaching works for diabetes self-management.

  9. Exercise and asthma: an overview.

    PubMed

    Del Giacco, Stefano R; Firinu, Davide; Bjermer, Leif; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon

    2015-01-01

    The terms 'exercise-induced asthma' (EIA) and 'exercise-induced bronchoconstriction' (EIB) are often used interchangeably to describe symptoms of asthma such as cough, wheeze, or dyspnoea provoked by vigorous physical activity. In this review, we refer to EIB as the bronchoconstrictive response and to EIA when bronchoconstriction is associated with asthma symptoms. EIB is a common occurrence for most of the asthmatic patients, but it also affects more than 10% of otherwise healthy individuals as shown by epidemiological studies. EIA and EIB have a high prevalence also in elite athletes, especially within endurance type of sports, and an athlete's asthma phenotype has been described. However, the occurrence in elite athletes shows that EIA/EIB, if correctly managed, may not impair physical activity and top sports performance. The pathogenic mechanisms of EIA/EIB classically involve both osmolar and vascular changes in the airways in addition to cooling of the airways with parasympathetic stimulation. Airways inflammation plays a fundamental role in EIA/EIB. Diagnosis and pharmacological management must be carefully performed, with particular consideration of current anti-doping regulations, when caring for athletes. Based on the demonstration that the inhaled asthma drugs do not improve performance in healthy athletes, the doping regulations are presently much less strict than previously. Some sports are at a higher asthma risk than others, probably due to a high environmental exposure while performing the sport, with swimming and chlorine exposure during swimming as one example. It is considered very important for the asthmatic child and adolescent to master EIA/EIB to be able to participate in physical activity on an equal level with their peers, and a precise early diagnosis with optimal treatment follow-up is vital in this aspect. In addition, surprising recent preliminary evidences offer new perspectives for moderate exercise as a potential therapeutic tool for

  10. Mobile Applications for Diabetes Self-Management: Status and Potential

    PubMed Central

    El-Gayar, Omar; Timsina, Prem; Nawar, Nevine; Eid, Wael

    2013-01-01

    Background Advancements in smartphone technology coupled with the proliferation of data connectivity has resulted in increased interest and unprecedented growth in mobile applications for diabetes self-management. The objective of this article is to determine, in a systematic review, whether diabetes applications have been helping patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes self-manage their condition and to identify issues necessary for large-scale adoption of such interventions. Methods The review covers commercial applications available on the Apple App Store (as a representative of commercially available applications) and articles published in relevant databases covering a period from January 1995 to August 2012. The review included all applications supporting any diabetes self-management task where the patient is the primary actor. Results Available applications support self-management tasks such as physical exercise, insulin dosage or medication, blood glucose testing, and diet. Other support tasks considered include decision support, notification/alert, tagging of input data, and integration with social media. The review points to the potential for mobile applications to have a positive impact on diabetes self-management. Analysis indicates that application usage is associated with improved attitudes favorable to diabetes self-management. Limitations of the applications include lack of personalized feedback; usability issues, particularly the ease of data entry; and integration with patients and electronic health records. Conclusions Research into the adoption and use of user-centered and sociotechnical design principles is needed to improve usability, perceived usefulness, and, ultimately, adoption of the technology. Proliferation and efficacy of interventions involving mobile applications will benefit from a holistic approach that takes into account patients’ expectations and providers’ needs. PMID:23439183

  11. Interactive Multimedia Tailored to Improve Diabetes Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felecia G; Alley, Elizabeth; Baer, Spencer; Johnson, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    A pilot program was initiated to improve self-management of type 2 diabetes by rural adults. Using an iOS-based, individually tailored pre-/postintervention to improve diabetes self-management, undergraduate students developed a native mobile application to help participants effectively manage their diabetes. Brief quizzes assessed diabetes knowledge. A diabetes dictionary and physical activity assessment provided additional support to users of the app. On completion of the pilot, data analysis indicated increased diabetes knowledge and self-efficacy, and ease of use of the technology. Native app technology permits ready access to important information for those living with type 2 diabetes. PMID:26333610

  12. Interactive Multimedia Tailored to Improve Diabetes Self-Management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Felecia G; Alley, Elizabeth; Baer, Spencer; Johnson, Rebecca

    2015-09-01

    A pilot program was initiated to improve self-management of type 2 diabetes by rural adults. Using an iOS-based, individually tailored pre-/postintervention to improve diabetes self-management, undergraduate students developed a native mobile application to help participants effectively manage their diabetes. Brief quizzes assessed diabetes knowledge. A diabetes dictionary and physical activity assessment provided additional support to users of the app. On completion of the pilot, data analysis indicated increased diabetes knowledge and self-efficacy, and ease of use of the technology. Native app technology permits ready access to important information for those living with type 2 diabetes.

  13. Biologically-Inspired Concepts for Self-Management of Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, G.

    2006-01-01

    Inherent complexity in large-scale applications may be impossible to eliminate or even ameliorate despite a number of promising advances. In such cases, the complexity must be tolerated and managed. Such management may be beyond the abilities of humans, or require such overhead as to make management by humans unrealistic. A number of initiatives inspired by concepts in biology have arisen for self-management of complex systems. We present some ideas and techniques we have been experimenting with, inspired by lesser-known concepts in biology that show promise in protecting complex systems and represent a step towards self-management of complexity.

  14. COPD self-management supportive care: chaos and complexity theory.

    PubMed

    Cornforth, Amber

    This paper uses the emergent theories of chaos and complexity to explore the self-management supportive care of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients within the evolving primary care setting. It discusses the concept of self-management support, the complexity of the primary care context and consultations, smoking cessation, and the impact of acute exacerbations and action planning. The author hopes that this paper will enable the acquisition of new insight and better understanding in this clinical area, as well as support meaningful learning and facilitate more thoughtful, effective and high quality patient-centred care within the context of primary care.

  15. Self-managing teams: a strategy for quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Feifer, Chris; Nocella, Kiki; DeArtola, Ignacio; Rowden, Suzanne; Morrison, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Organizations are impacted by their environments, and health care settings are no different. Individuals charged with improving a practice are often impeded by environmental barriers, including incomplete information for decision making. One strategy to empower an organization for change is to form a self-managing team. This paper discusses the self-managing team concept and uses a case study to illustrate its application in primary care. Factors contributing to team success are presented as a guide, and a reminder--there is more to an effective team than gathering people in a room.

  16. INFLUENCES OF ASTHMA AND HOUSEHOLD ENVIRONMENT ON LUNG FUNCTION OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS: THE THIRD NATIONAL HEALTH AND NUTRITION EXAMINATION SURVEY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined influences of asthma and household environment (passive smoking, gas stove use, and having a dog or cat), on seven measures of spirometric lung function in 8-16 yearold subjects, as measured in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). ...

  17. Occupational asthma: a case of Baker's asthma.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Thomas R; Sheffer, Albert L

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is one of the most prominent respiratory diseases worldwide. It is defined by airflow limitation and/or airway hyperresponsiveness and can be exacerbated by a number of environmental allergens. When allergic asthma exacerbations are attributed to stimuli in a particular work environment, then occupational asthma must be considered. Incidence estimates vary, but in 1999 the Surveillance of Work-Related and Occupational Respiratory Disease in the United Kingdom estimated 4293 incident cases of occupational respiratory disease, an increase of 1427 cases over the previous year. Occupational asthma represented 26% of these cases. Baker's asthma is one of the most frequently reported types of occupational asthma in several countries. Diagniostic steps include thorough history, careful exam, and demonstration of functional reversible airflow obstruction. Treatment modalities used for occupational asthma are similar to those used in the management of other forms of asthma, with particular attention to reducing the level of exposure to the inciting allergen.

  18. Self-management of diabetes in children and young adults using technology and smartphone applications.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Siobhan; Cohen, Georgia; Owen, Katharine R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment compliance and adherence are often a challenge in patients with type 1 diabetes, particularly for adolescent and young adult patients. With the availability of the internet and smart phone applications (apps) there is a hope that such technology could provide a means to encourage treatment adherence in this group of patients. This review focuses on whether telemedicine and smartphone technology in diabetes can influence self-management in young people with diabetes. A large number of smartphone apps are targeted at people with diabetes, but a limited number of well designed evaluation studies have been performed. As our review shows, the evidence base for efficacy of most of these applications is minimal and improvement in hard outcomes such as HbA1c and complication development is largely lacking. PMID:25311195

  19. Self-management of diabetes in children and young adults using technology and smartphone applications.

    PubMed

    Sheehy, Siobhan; Cohen, Georgia; Owen, Katharine R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment compliance and adherence are often a challenge in patients with type 1 diabetes, particularly for adolescent and young adult patients. With the availability of the internet and smart phone applications (apps) there is a hope that such technology could provide a means to encourage treatment adherence in this group of patients. This review focuses on whether telemedicine and smartphone technology in diabetes can influence self-management in young people with diabetes. A large number of smartphone apps are targeted at people with diabetes, but a limited number of well designed evaluation studies have been performed. As our review shows, the evidence base for efficacy of most of these applications is minimal and improvement in hard outcomes such as HbA1c and complication development is largely lacking.

  20. Problematizing health coaching for chronic illness self-management.

    PubMed

    Howard, Lisa M; Ceci, Christine

    2013-09-01

    To address the growing costs associated with chronic illness care, many countries, both developed and developing, identify increased patient self-management or self-care as a focus of healthcare reform. Health coaching, an implementation strategy to support the shift to self-management, encourages patients to make lifestyle changes to improve the management of chronic illness. This practice differs from traditional models of health education because of the interactional dynamics between nurse and patient, and an orientation to care that ostensibly centres and empowers patients. The theoretical underpinnings of coaching reflect these differences, however in its application, the practices arranged around health coaching for chronic illness self-management reveal the social regulation and professional management of everyday life. This becomes especially problematic in contexts defined by economic constraint and government withdrawal from activities related to the 'care' of citizens. In this paper, we trace the development of health coaching as part of nursing practice and consider the implications of this practice as an emerging element of chronic illness self-management. Our purpose is to highlight health coaching as an approach intended to support patients with chronic illness and at the same time, problematize the tensions contained in (and by) this practice.

  1. Self-Management in Children Labeled Learning Disabled

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Joseph S.

    1976-01-01

    Available from: Psychonomic Society, 1108 W. 34th Street, Austin, Texas 78705. Studied with 10 learning disabled children (5-9 years old) was the development of self-management skills without direct teacher supervision through the use of operant reinforcement procedures. (IM)

  2. String Quartets as Self-Managed Teams: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilboa, Avi; Tal-Shmotkin, Malka

    2012-01-01

    This article examines empirically and systematically whether a string quartet (SQ) ensemble is perceived as a self-managed team (SMT). SMTs, which were initially employed in the industrial world, are groups of employees that have a total responsibility for a defined project. The hypothesis that the SQ would exhibit more typical SMT characteristics…

  3. Use of Medicare's Diabetes Self-Management Training Benefit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strawbridge, Larisa M.; Lloyd, Jennifer T.; Meadow, Ann; Riley, Gerald F.; Howell, Benjamin L.

    2015-01-01

    Medicare began reimbursing for outpatient diabetes self-management training (DSMT) in 2000; however, little is known about program utilization. Individuals diagnosed with diabetes in 2010 were identified from a 20% random selection of the Medicare fee-for-service population (N = 110,064). Medicare administrative and claims files were used to…

  4. Self Management Techniques and Disclosure of Sero Status

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falaye, Ajibola; Afolayan, Joel Adeleke

    2015-01-01

    This study looked at using Self Management Technique (SMT) to promote self-disclosure of Sero status in Kwara State, Nigeria. A pre-test, post-test and control group quasi experimental design using a 2x2x2 factorial matrix was adopted. Sixty participants were sampled by balloting from two HIV/AIDS screening centres. Four instruments were used such…

  5. Training Professionals to Engage with and Promote Self-Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kennedy, Anne; Gask, Linda; Rogers, Anne

    2005-01-01

    We have set out to investigate an approach to improve patients' ability to self-manage chronic illness. For effective health care in chronic disease, we believe patients need to work in partnership with their doctor; patient-centred consultations are one way to achieve this. This report describes our experience of training specialists in…

  6. Planning Self-Managed Work Groups. Features of Self-Managed Work Groups. Results of Using Self-Managed Work Groups. Issues and Implications in Using Self-Managed Work Groups. Status of Ohio Manufacturing Companies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smylie, Patrick E.; Jacobs, Ronald L.

    A study was conducted to describe the present status of self-managed work groups in Ohio manufacturing companies. Data for the study were gathered through lengthy interviews and site visits with 45 manufacturing companies in the state, 24 employing 2,000-14,000 workers and 21 employing 300 to 1,900 workers. The results of the study are presented…

  7. Partnership as an Intervention Strategy in Self-Managing Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Timperley, Helen S.; Robinson, Viviane M. J.

    2003-01-01

    Describes strategy used by New Zealand Ministry of Education to intervene in 26 self-managing schools by developing a partnership with the schools and their communities. Documents difficulties encountered in the first phase (year one) of the intervention and the successes of the second phase (year two). (Contains 1 figure, 3 tables, and 27…

  8. Arthritis Self-Management Studies: A Twelve-Year Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorig, Kate; Holman, Halsted

    1993-01-01

    Studies of the Arthritis Self-Management Program conclude that (1) it improves patient behaviors and self-efficacy; (2) formal reinforcement does not improve long-term outcomes; (3) improvement gains have both clinical and cost-saving effects; and (4) changes in health status are more closely linked to self-efficacy than to behavior. (SK)

  9. Covert Conditioning: Case Studies in Self-Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yager, Geoffrey G.

    The self-management of thoughts and mental images was used in a series of empirical case studies to influence behavior changes. The target behaviors in the cases reported were smoking, overeating, fingernail biting, thinking self-depreciative thoughts, and responding assertively. Self-monitoring, covert positive reinforcement, covert…

  10. Diabetes Self-Management Education in the Home

    PubMed Central

    Zeitoun, Joanah; Stern, Marianne; Butkiewicz, Elise; Wegner, Elfie; Reinisch, Courtney

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes self-management education and home visits have been found to improve clinical outcomes in individuals living with diabetes. The purpose of this pilot project was to evaluate the feasibility and effectiveness of conducting self-management education in patients' homes. Methods Baseline biometric data was collected from a cohort of adult patients with diabetes. Home visits to 19 patients were conducted by doctoral students from Rutgers University School of Nursing. The visits included knowledge assessment, review of foods in the home, diabetes self-management education, and teaching the proper use of monitoring tools such as the glucometer and blood pressure monitor. Biomarkers were obtained post-intervention and were compared to baseline biomarkers. Descriptive lifestyle data was collected and opportunities for customized patient education were provided. Results The biomarkers improved overall during the four months after the education intervention. The mean A1C reduced 12% (p=0.0107), the mean glucose reduced 12% (p=0.0994), the mean BMI reduced 2% (p=0.1490), the systolic pressure reduced 1% (p=0.4196), and the diastolic pressure remained stable. Specific goal setting further increased the improvement in the area the individual planned to address.  Conclusions This project supports prior studies that found that in-home educational programs can improve the self-management of diabetes and lead to improvement in health indicators. The benefits of the study included personal attention in ensuring the correct use of home health monitoring devices, building self-management confidence, and identifying treatment barriers that may not be easily discerned in a clinic setting. PMID:27588231

  11. An Internet Intervention to Improve Asthma Management: Rationale and Protocol of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Annie YS; Dennis, Sarah; Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Coiera, Enrico

    2013-01-01

    Background Many studies have shown the effectiveness of self-management for patients with asthma. In particular, possession and use of a written asthma action plan provided by a doctor has shown to significantly improve patients’ asthma control. Yet, uptake of a written asthma action plan and preventative asthma management is low in the community, especially amongst adults. Objective A Web-based personally controlled health management system (PCHMS) called Healthy.me will be evaluated in a 2010 CONSORT-compliant 2-group (static websites verse PCHMS) parallel randomized controlled trial (RCT) (allocation ratio 1:1). Methods The PCHMS integrates an untethered personal health record with consumer care pathways and social forums. After eligibility assessment, a sample of 300 adult patients with moderate persistent asthma will be randomly assigned to one of these arms. After 12 months of using either Healthy.me or information websites (usual care arm), a post-study assessment will be conducted. Results The primary outcome measure is possession of or revision of an asthma action plan during the study. Secondary outcome measures include: (1) adherence to the asthma action plan, (2) rate of planned and unplanned visits to healthcare providers for asthma issues, (3) usage patterns of Healthy.me and attrition rates, (4) asthma control and asthma exacerbation scores, and (5) impact of asthma on life and competing demands, and days lost from work. Conclusions This RCT will provide insights into whether access to an online PCHMS will improve uptake of a written asthma action plan and preventative asthma actions. Trial Registration Trial Registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ACTRN12612000716864; https://www.anzctr.org.au/Trial/Registration/TrialReview.aspx?id=362714 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6IYBJGRnW). PMID:23942523

  12. A Qualitative Exploration of Motivation to Self-Manage and Styles of Self-Management amongst People Living with Type 2 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Newton, Paul; Asimakopoulou, Koula; Scambler, Sasha

    2015-01-01

    The study examined the motives that people living with type 2 diabetes (T2D) had for self-managing their condition and ways they used to assess the success of their self-management efforts. Using semistructured interviews (N = 25), focus groups (3 × N = 12 participants), and open-ended questionnaires (N = 6), people living with and self-managing T2D were recruited from a community-based T2D participation group. Most participants were older (aged 60+) and lived in a socioeconomically deprived area in the United Kingdom. Data were analysed thematically using framework analysis. Patients' motives for self-management included (i) concern about the anticipative effects of T2D; (ii) wishing to "stay well"; (iii) maintaining independence; (iv) reducing the need for healthcare professionals; and (v) improving quality of life. Six self-management styles were found and pertained to self-managing: (i) through routinisation; (ii) as a burden; (iii) as maintenance; (iv) through delegation; (v) through comanagement; and (vi) through autonomy. Motivators for self-management shaped the criteria people used to judge the success of their self-management practices and influenced their self-management style. The findings show that styles of T2D self-management are mediated and moderated by sociocontextual issues. Healthcare professionals should take these into account when supporting people living with T2D. PMID:26075285

  13. Measuring HIV Self-Management in Women Living with HIV/AIDS: A Psychometric Evaluation Study of the HIV Self-Management Scale

    PubMed Central

    Webel, Allison R.; Asher, Alice; Cuca, Yvette; Okonsky, Jennifer G.; Kaihura, Alphoncina; Rose, Carol Dawson; Hanson, Jan E.; Salata, Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To develop and validate the HIV Self-Management Scale for women, a new measure of HIV self-management, defined as the day-to-day decisions that individuals make to manage their illness. Methods The development and validation of the scale was undertaken in three phases: focus groups, expert review and psychometric evaluation. Focus groups identified items describing the process and context of self-management in women living with HIV/AIDS (WLHA). Items were refined using expert review and were then administered to WLHA in two sites in the U.S. (n=260). Validity of the scale was assessed through factor analyses, model fit statistics, reliability testing, and convergent and discriminate validity. Results The final scale consists of 3-domains with 20 items describing the construct of HIV self-management. Daily self-management health practices, Social support and HIV self-management, and Chronicity of HIV self-management comprise the three domains. These domains explained 48.6% of the total variance in the scale. The item mean scores ranged from 1.7-2.77, and each domain demonstrated acceptable reliability (0.72-0.86) and stability (0.61-0.85). Conclusions Self-management is critical for WLHA, who constitute over 50% of PLWHA and have poorer health outcomes than their male counterparts. Methods to assess the self-management behavior of WLHA are needed to enhance their health and well-being. Presently no scales exist to measure HIV self-management. Our new 20-item HIV Self-Management Scale is a valid and reliable measure of HIV self-management in this population. Differences in aspects of self-management may be related to social roles and community resources and interventions targeting these factors may decrease morbidity in WLHA. PMID:22569267

  14. Exercise and asthma: an overview

    PubMed Central

    Giacco, Stefano R. Del; Firinu, Davide; Bjermer, Leif; Carlsen, Kai-Håkon

    2015-01-01

    The terms ‘exercise-induced asthma’ (EIA) and ‘exercise-induced bronchoconstriction’ (EIB) are often used interchangeably to describe symptoms of asthma such as cough, wheeze, or dyspnoea provoked by vigorous physical activity. In this review, we refer to EIB as the bronchoconstrictive response and to EIA when bronchoconstriction is associated with asthma symptoms. EIB is a common occurrence for most of the asthmatic patients, but it also affects more than 10% of otherwise healthy individuals as shown by epidemiological studies. EIA and EIB have a high prevalence also in elite athletes, especially within endurance type of sports, and an athlete's asthma phenotype has been described. However, the occurrence in elite athletes shows that EIA/EIB, if correctly managed, may not impair physical activity and top sports performance. The pathogenic mechanisms of EIA/EIB classically involve both osmolar and vascular changes in the airways in addition to cooling of the airways with parasympathetic stimulation. Airways inflammation plays a fundamental role in EIA/EIB. Diagnosis and pharmacological management must be carefully performed, with particular consideration of current anti-doping regulations, when caring for athletes. Based on the demonstration that the inhaled asthma drugs do not improve performance in healthy athletes, the doping regulations are presently much less strict than previously. Some sports are at a higher asthma risk than others, probably due to a high environmental exposure while performing the sport, with swimming and chlorine exposure during swimming as one example. It is considered very important for the asthmatic child and adolescent to master EIA/EIB to be able to participate in physical activity on an equal level with their peers, and a precise early diagnosis with optimal treatment follow-up is vital in this aspect. In addition, surprising recent preliminary evidences offer new perspectives for moderate exercise as a potential therapeutic

  15. [Challenges of adolescents' adherence to therapy].

    PubMed

    Brand, P L P; Kaptein, A A; Janssens, L P F; Klok, T

    2016-01-01

    Non-adherence occurs at any age, in all chronic diseases, and has a major impact on clinical outcomes. Non-adherence is primarily determined by perceptions of illness and medication beliefs. During puberty, adolescents attain independence from their parents and attach to their peers. This complicates successful self-management of chronic illness, because the adolescents avoid standing out from their peers. Discussion of barriers hindering successful self-management in adolescents can be promoted by seeing the patient alone, without the parents being present, and by acknowledging the patient's independence and responsibilities. PMID:27581866

  16. The Saudi Initiative for Asthma - 2016 update: Guidelines for the diagnosis and management of asthma in adults and children

    PubMed Central

    Al-Moamary, Mohamed S.; Alhaider, Sami A.; Idrees, Majdy M.; Al Ghobain, Mohammed O.; Zeitouni, Mohammed O.; Al-Harbi, Adel S.; Yousef, Abdullah A.; Al-Matar, Hussain; Alorainy, Hassan S.; Al-Hajjaj, Mohamed S.

    2016-01-01

    This is an updated guideline for the diagnosis and management of asthma, developed by the Saudi Initiative for Asthma (SINA) group, a subsidiary of the Saudi Thoracic Society. The main objective of SINA is to have guidelines that are up to date, simple to understand and easy to use by nonasthma specialists, including primary care and general practice physicians. SINA approach is mainly based on symptom control and assessment of risk as it is the ultimate goal of treatment. The new SINA guidelines include updates of acute and chronic asthma management, with more emphasis on the use of asthma control in the management of asthma in adults and children, inclusion of a new medication appendix, and keeping consistency on the management at different age groups. The section on asthma in children is rewritten and expanded where the approach is stratified based on the age. The guidelines are constructed based on the available evidence, local literature, and the current situation in Saudi Arabia. There is also an emphasis on patient–doctor partnership in the management that also includes a self-management plan. PMID:26933455

  17. Wheezing and Asthma in Infants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Wheezing and Asthma in Infants KidsHealth > For Parents > Wheezing and Asthma ... of asthma.) My Baby Is Wheezing. Is It Asthma? If your baby has a cold and is ...

  18. Psychological Factors in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Asthma has long been considered a condition in which psychological factors have a role. As in many illnesses, psychological variables may affect outcome in asthma via their effects on treatment adherence and symptom reporting. Emerging evidence suggests that the relation between asthma and psychological factors may be more complex than that, however. Central cognitive processes may influence not only the interpretation of asthma symptoms but also the manifestation of measurable changes in immune and physiologic markers of asthma. Furthermore, asthma and major depressive disorder share several risk factors and have similar patterns of dysregulation in key biologic systems, including the neuroendocrine stress response, cytokines, and neuropeptides. Despite the evidence that depression is common in people with asthma and exerts a negative impact on outcome, few treatment studies have examined whether improving symptoms of depression do, in fact, result in better control of asthma symptoms or improved quality of life in patients with asthma. PMID:20525122

  19. Is Chronic Asthma Associated with Shorter Leukocyte Telomere Length at Midlife?

    PubMed Central

    Shalev, Idan; Sears, Malcolm R.; Hancox, Robert J.; Lee Harrington, Hona; Houts, Renate; Moffitt, Terrie E.; Sugden, Karen; Williams, Benjamin; Poulton, Richie; Caspi, Avshalom

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Asthma is prospectively associated with age-related chronic diseases and mortality, suggesting the hypothesis that asthma may relate to a general, multisystem phenotype of accelerated aging. Objectives: To test whether chronic asthma is associated with a proposed biomarker of accelerated aging, leukocyte telomere length. Methods: Asthma was ascertained prospectively in the Dunedin Multidisciplinary Health and Development Study cohort (n = 1,037) at nine in-person assessments spanning ages 9–38 years. Leukocyte telomere length was measured at ages 26 and 38 years. Asthma was classified as life-course-persistent, childhood-onset not meeting criteria for persistence, and adolescent/adult-onset. We tested associations between asthma and leukocyte telomere length using regression models. We tested for confounding of asthma-leukocyte telomere length associations using covariate adjustment. We tested serum C-reactive protein and white blood cell counts as potential mediators of asthma-leukocyte telomere length associations. Measurements and Main Results: Study members with life-course-persistent asthma had shorter leukocyte telomere length as compared with sex- and age-matched peers with no reported asthma. In contrast, leukocyte telomere length in study members with childhood-onset and adolescent/adult-onset asthma was not different from leukocyte telomere length in peers with no reported asthma. Adjustment for life histories of obesity and smoking did not change results. Study members with life-course-persistent asthma had elevated blood eosinophil counts. Blood eosinophil count mediated 29% of the life-course-persistent asthma-leukocyte telomere length association. Conclusions: Life-course-persistent asthma is related to a proposed biomarker of accelerated aging, possibly via systemic eosinophilic inflammation. Life histories of asthma can inform studies of aging. PMID:24956257

  20. Development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C.; Wendel, Christopher S.; Krouse, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality of life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies. PMID:23104143

  1. Development of a chronic care ostomy self-management program.

    PubMed

    Grant, Marcia; McCorkle, Ruth; Hornbrook, Mark C; Wendel, Christopher S; Krouse, Robert

    2013-03-01

    Each year a percentage of the 1.2 million men and women in the United States with a new diagnosis of colorectal cancer join the 700,000 people who have an ostomy. Education targeting the long-term, chronic care of this population is lacking. This report describes the development of a Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program, which was informed by (1) evidence on published quality-of-life changes for cancer patients with ostomies, (2) educational suggestions from patients with ostomies, and (3) examination of the usual care of new ostomates to illustrate areas for continued educational emphases and areas for needed education and support. Using these materials, the Chronic Care Ostomy Self-Management Program was developed by a team of multi-disciplinary researchers accompanied by experienced ostomy nurses. Testing of the program is in process. Pilot study participants reported high satisfaction with the program syllabus, ostomy nurse leaders, and ostomate peer buddies.

  2. Web-Based Self-Management in Chronic Care: A Study of Change in Patient Activation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solomon, Michael R.

    2010-01-01

    Web-based self-management interventions (W-SMIs) are designed to help a large number of chronically ill people become more actively engaged in their health care. Despite the potential to engage more patients in self-managing their health, the use of W-SMIs by patients and their clinicians is low. Using a self-management conceptual model based on…

  3. Extending Self-Management Strategies: The Use of a Classwide Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Kathryn E.; Ervin, Ruth A.

    2013-01-01

    Notwithstanding the wealth of research that documents the effectiveness of self-management programs in the classroom, few investigations have explored classwide use of self-management procedures as a universal intervention. To extend existing research in this area, we examined the effectiveness of a classwide self-management intervention for…

  4. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  5. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  6. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule...

  7. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  8. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  9. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management..., payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician fee schedule...

  10. 42 CFR 410.141 - Outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Outpatient diabetes self-management training. 410... HUMAN SERVICES MEDICARE PROGRAM SUPPLEMENTARY MEDICAL INSURANCE (SMI) BENEFITS Outpatient Diabetes Self-Management Training and Diabetes Outcome Measurements § 410.141 Outpatient diabetes self-management...

  11. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip E; Jonsson, Haflidi

    2004-09-01

    Thunderstorms have often been linked to epidemics of asthma, especially during the grass flowering season; however, the precise mechanisms explaining this phenomenon are unknown. Evidence of high respirable allergen loadings in the air associated with specific meteorologic events combined with an analysis of pollen physiology suggests that rupture of airborne pollen can occur. Strong downdrafts and dry, cold outflows distinguish thunderstorm rain from frontal rain. The weather system of a mature thunderstorm likely entrains grass pollen into the cloud base, where pollen rupture would be enhanced, then transports the respirable-sized fragments of pollen debris to ground level where outflows distribute them ahead of the rain. The conditions occurring at the onset of a thunderstorm might expose susceptible people to a rapid increase in concentrations of pollen allergens in the air that can readily deposit in the lower airways and initiate asthmatic reactions. PMID:15283882

  12. Thunderstorm asthma.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Philip E; Jonsson, Haflidi

    2004-09-01

    Thunderstorms have often been linked to epidemics of asthma, especially during the grass flowering season; however, the precise mechanisms explaining this phenomenon are unknown. Evidence of high respirable allergen loadings in the air associated with specific meteorologic events combined with an analysis of pollen physiology suggests that rupture of airborne pollen can occur. Strong downdrafts and dry, cold outflows distinguish thunderstorm rain from frontal rain. The weather system of a mature thunderstorm likely entrains grass pollen into the cloud base, where pollen rupture would be enhanced, then transports the respirable-sized fragments of pollen debris to ground level where outflows distribute them ahead of the rain. The conditions occurring at the onset of a thunderstorm might expose susceptible people to a rapid increase in concentrations of pollen allergens in the air that can readily deposit in the lower airways and initiate asthmatic reactions.

  13. Children's Roles in Parents’ Diabetes Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Laroche, Helena H.; Davis, Matthew M.; Forman, Jane; Palmisano, Gloria; Reisinger, Heather Schacht; Tannas, Cheryl; Spencer, Michael; Heisler, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Background Family support is important in diabetes self-management. However, children as providers of support have received little attention. This study examines the role of children in their parents’ diabetes self-management, diet, and exercise. Methods This research used community-based participatory research principles. Researchers conducted semi-structured parallel interviews of 24 Latino and African-American adults with diabetes and with a child (age 10–17 years) in their home (2004–06). Interviews were transcribed, coded, and analyzed for themes (2004–07). Results Adults and children perceived that children play many roles related to adults’ diabetes self-management. Parents described children as monitoring parents’ dietary intake and reminding them what they should not be eating. Some children helped with shopping and meal preparation. Families described children reminding parents to exercise and exercising with their parent. Children reminded parents about medications and assisted with tasks such as checking blood sugar. Parents and children perceived that children played a role in tempting parents to stray from their diabetes diet, because children's diets included food that parents desired but tried to avoid. Conclusion Children and parents perceived that children have many roles in both supporting and undermining adults’ diabetes self-management. There is more to learn about the bidirectional relationships between adults and children in this setting and the most beneficial roles children can play. Health-care providers should encourage family lifestyle change, strengthen social support for families and direct children toward roles that are beneficial for both parent and child and do not place an unreasonable level of responsibility on the child. PMID:19896027

  14. [Self-Management in Patients With Chronic Kidney Disease].

    PubMed

    Chiou, Chou-Ping; Lu, Yung-Chuan; Hung, Shih-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients typically self-manage their disease-care program. Self-management requires the investment of considerable time and energy in health management and in following the multifaceted CKD treatment regimen. CKD, a progressive disease, is classified into five stages that correspond to the five stages of decline in kidney function, as measured using the glomerular filtration rate (GRF). Each of these stages requires that a patient modify his / her lifestyle and shoulder the responsibility for day-to-day health management tasks. Key to promoting self-management is the partnership and collaboration between healthcare providers and patients. Tasks in this partnership include patient assessment and communication, regimen adherence, emotional management, negotiation of care plans, and the enhancement of self-efficacy, with the aims of creating positive changes in behavior, promoting correct symptoms interpretation and reporting, and promoting the appropriate use of resources. Nurses may help patients maneuver this initially frightening and sometimes difficult terrain with strategies that are tailored to each CKD stage.

  15. Product self-management: evolution in recycling and reuse.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Valerie M

    2003-12-01

    This paper explores the potential to make product recycling and reuse easier by shifting responsibility for product management toward the product itself. Examples range from barcode-enabled Internet sales of used products to RFID-enabled garbage trucks that identify recyclable items and provide rebates. Initial steps toward product self-management have made opportunistic use of product bar codes and Internet markets. In the United States, Internet markets are driving increased reuse of products. In the European Union, recycling and waste management policy is driving the use of radio electronics in waste management. Prospects for product self-management are assessed from both a technological and an economic perspective. The technological analysis indicates that radio-frequency tags offer some advantages over bar codes, but their application to product self-management requires considerable investment in the waste management infrastructure. This suggests that early applications of advanced product tags are most suitable for Germany and other countries where the waste management industry has already integrated information technology into its operations. The economic analysis indicates that increased reuse of products can reduce consumption of new products and materials, although on a less than one-to-one basis, simultaneously reducing costs for consumers and deriving more value from existing products.

  16. Product self-management: evolution in recycling and reuse.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Valerie M

    2003-12-01

    This paper explores the potential to make product recycling and reuse easier by shifting responsibility for product management toward the product itself. Examples range from barcode-enabled Internet sales of used products to RFID-enabled garbage trucks that identify recyclable items and provide rebates. Initial steps toward product self-management have made opportunistic use of product bar codes and Internet markets. In the United States, Internet markets are driving increased reuse of products. In the European Union, recycling and waste management policy is driving the use of radio electronics in waste management. Prospects for product self-management are assessed from both a technological and an economic perspective. The technological analysis indicates that radio-frequency tags offer some advantages over bar codes, but their application to product self-management requires considerable investment in the waste management infrastructure. This suggests that early applications of advanced product tags are most suitable for Germany and other countries where the waste management industry has already integrated information technology into its operations. The economic analysis indicates that increased reuse of products can reduce consumption of new products and materials, although on a less than one-to-one basis, simultaneously reducing costs for consumers and deriving more value from existing products. PMID:14700313

  17. Condition Self-Management in Pediatric Spina Bifida: A Longitudinal Investigation of Medical Adherence, Responsibility-Sharing, and Independence Skills

    PubMed Central

    Psihogios, Alexandra M.; Kolbuck, Victoria

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to evaluate rates of medical adherence, responsibility, and independence skills across late childhood and adolescence in youth with spina bifida (SB) and to explore associations among these disease self-management variables. Method 111 youth with SB, their parents, and a health professional participated at two time points. Informants completed questionnaires regarding medical adherence, responsibility-sharing, and child independence skills. Results Youth gained more responsibility and independence skills across time, although adherence rates did not follow a similar trajectory. Increased child medical responsibility was related to poorer adherence, and father-reported independence skills were associated with increased child responsibility. Conclusions This study highlights medical domains that are the most difficult for families to manage (e.g., skin checks). Although youth appear to gain more autonomy across time, ongoing parental involvement in medical care may be necessary to achieve optimal adherence across adolescence. PMID:26002195

  18. Smoking cessation strategies for patients with asthma: improving patient outcomes.

    PubMed

    Perret, Jennifer L; Bonevski, Billie; McDonald, Christine F; Abramson, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is common in adults with asthma, yet a paucity of literature exists on smoking cessation strategies specifically targeting this subgroup. Adverse respiratory effects from personal smoking include worse asthma control and a predisposition to lower lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some data suggest that individuals with asthma are more likely than their non-asthmatic peers to smoke regularly at an earlier age. While quit attempts can be more frequent in smokers with asthma, they are also of shorter duration than in non-asthmatics. Considering these asthma-specific characteristics is important in order to individualize smoking cessation strategies. In particular, asthma-specific information such as "lung age" should be provided and longer-term follow-up is advised. Promising emerging strategies include reminders by cellular phone and web-based interventions using consumer health informatics. For adolescents, training older peers to deliver asthma education is another promising strategy. For smokers who are hospitalized for asthma, inpatient nicotine replacement therapy and counseling are a priority. Overall, improving smoking cessation rates in smokers with asthma may rely on a more personalized approach, with the potential for substantial health benefits to individuals and the population at large. PMID:27445499

  19. Smoking cessation strategies for patients with asthma: improving patient outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Jennifer L; Bonevski, Billie; McDonald, Christine F; Abramson, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Smoking is common in adults with asthma, yet a paucity of literature exists on smoking cessation strategies specifically targeting this subgroup. Adverse respiratory effects from personal smoking include worse asthma control and a predisposition to lower lung function and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Some data suggest that individuals with asthma are more likely than their non-asthmatic peers to smoke regularly at an earlier age. While quit attempts can be more frequent in smokers with asthma, they are also of shorter duration than in non-asthmatics. Considering these asthma-specific characteristics is important in order to individualize smoking cessation strategies. In particular, asthma-specific information such as “lung age” should be provided and longer-term follow-up is advised. Promising emerging strategies include reminders by cellular phone and web-based interventions using consumer health informatics. For adolescents, training older peers to deliver asthma education is another promising strategy. For smokers who are hospitalized for asthma, inpatient nicotine replacement therapy and counseling are a priority. Overall, improving smoking cessation rates in smokers with asthma may rely on a more personalized approach, with the potential for substantial health benefits to individuals and the population at large. PMID:27445499

  20. Asthma triggers (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes. ... common asthma triggers are mold, pets, dust, grasses, pollen, cockroaches, odors from chemicals, and smoke from cigarettes.

  1. Asthma - child - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Pediatric asthma - discharge; Wheezing - discharge; Reactive airway disease - discharge ... Your child has asthma , which causes the airways of the lungs to swell and narrow. In the hospital, the doctors and nurses helped ...

  2. Allergies, asthma, and pollen

    MedlinePlus

    Reactive airway - pollen; Bronchial asthma - pollen; Triggers - pollen; Allergic rhinitis - pollen ... Things that make allergies or asthma worse are called triggers. It is important to know your triggers because avoiding them is your first step toward feeling better. ...

  3. Test Your Asthma Knowledge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section Test Your Asthma Knowledge Past Issues / Fall 2007 Table of Contents ... page please turn Javascript on. True or False? Asthma is caused by an inflammation of the inner ...

  4. Paediatric asthma and obesity.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Sean R; Platts-Mills, Thomas A E

    2006-12-01

    None of the explanations proposed for the increase in paediatric asthma have been adequate. It is becoming apparent that the cause of the increase in asthma must be multi-factorial. Increasing attention has been focused on the role of lifestyle in the development of asthma. Lifestyle changes that have occurred in children are those in diet and decreased physical activity, with obesity being the product of these changes. The increase in asthma, obesity and a sedentary lifestyle have occurred together. However, a temporal relationship between asthma, obesity and decreased physical activity has not been determined in the paediatric literature. Limited data suggest that decreased physical activity could be playing a role in the aetiology of asthma independent of obesity. Furthermore, there has been substantial research on the benefits of exercise programmes for paediatric patients with asthma. Longitudinal trials monitoring physical activity, obesity and the development of asthma are needed. PMID:17098637

  5. Viruses and Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Dulek, Daniel E.; Peebles, R. Stokes

    2011-01-01

    Background Viral respiratory infection has long been known to influence the occurrence of asthma exacerbations. Over the last twenty years much effort has been put into clarifying the role that viral respiratory infections play in the eventual development of asthma. Scope of Review In this review we give a general background of the role of viruses in the processes of asthma exacerbation and asthma induction. We review recent additions to the literature in the last three years with particular focus on clinical and epidemiologic investigations of influenza, rhinovirus, bocavirus, respiratory syncytial virus, and metapneumovirus. Major Conclusions The development of asthma emerges from a complex interaction of genetic predisposition and environmental factors with viral infection likely playing a significant role in the effect of environment on asthma inception. General Significance Further understanding of the role that viruses play in asthma exacerbation and inception will contribute to decreased asthma morbidity in the future. PMID:21291960

  6. Asthma and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... best live chat Live Help Fact Sheets Share Asthma and Pregnancy Saturday, 01 August 2015 In every ... her background risk. This sheet talks about whether asthma may increase the risk for birth defects over ...

  7. Self-management in patients with COPD: theoretical context, content, outcomes, and integration into clinical care

    PubMed Central

    Kaptein, Ad A; Fischer, Maarten J; Scharloo, Margreet

    2014-01-01

    In this narrative review, we put self-management in the context of a 50-year history of research about how patients with COPD respond to their illness. We review a definition of self-management, and emphasize that self-management should be combined with disease management and the chronic care model in order to be effective. Reviewing the empirical status of self-management in COPD, we conclude that self-management is part and parcel of modern, patient-oriented biopsychosocial care. In pulmonary rehabilitation programs, self-management is instrumental in improving patients’ functional status and quality of life. We conclude by emphasizing how studying the way persons with COPD make sense of their illness helps in refining self-management, and thereby patient-reported outcomes in COPD. PMID:25214777

  8. Identifying asthma triggers.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Justin C; Ferguson, Berrylin J

    2014-02-01

    Asthma has many triggers including rhinosinusitis; allergy; irritants; medications (aspirin in aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease); and obesity. Paradoxic vocal fold dysfunction mimics asthma and may be present along with asthma. This article reviews each of these triggers, outlining methods of recognizing the trigger and then its management. In many patients more than one trigger may be present. Full appreciation of the complexity of these relationships and targeted therapy to the trigger is needed to best care for the patient with asthma.

  9. An internet-based interactive telemonitoring system for improving childhood asthma outcomes in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Jan, Ren-Long; Wang, Jiu-Yao; Huang, Mei-Chih; Tseng, Shin-Mu; Su, Huey-Jen; Liu, Li-Fan

    2007-06-01

    A randomized, controlled trial was conducted to assess the effectiveness of Blue Angel for Asthma Kids, an Internet-based interactive asthma educational and monitoring program, used in the management of asthmatic children. One hundred sixty-four (n = 164) pediatric patients with persistent asthma were enrolled and randomized into two study groups for a 12-week controlled trial. The intervention group had 88 participants who were taught to monitor their peak expiratory flows (PEF) and asthma symptoms daily on the Internet. They also received an interactive response consisting of a self-management plan from the Blue Angel monitoring program. The control group had 76 participants who received a traditional asthma care plan consisting of a written asthma diary supplemented with instructions for self-management. Disease control was assessed by weekly averaged PEF values, symptom scores, and asthma control tests. Adherence measures were assessed by therapeutic and diagnostic monitoring. Outcome was assessed by examining quality of life and retention of asthma knowledge. The data were analyzed by comparing results before and after the trial. At the end of trial, the intervention group decreased nighttime (-0.08 +/- 0.33 vs. 0.00 +/- 0.20, p = 0.028) and daytime symptoms (-0.08 +/- 0.33 vs. 0.01 +/- 0.18, p =0.009); improved morning (241.9 +/- 81.4 vs. 223.1 +/- 55.5, p =0.017) and night PEF (255.6 +/- 86.7 vs. 232.5 +/- 55.3, p =0.010); increased adherence rates (p < 0.05); improved well-controlled rates (70.4% vs. 55.3%, p < 0.05); improved knowledge regarding self-management (93.2% vs. 70.3%, p < 0.05); and improved quality of life (6.5 +/- 0.5 vs. 4.3 +/- 1.2 on a 7-point scale, p < 0.05) when compared with conventional management. The Internet-based asthma telemonitoring program increases selfmanagement skills, improves asthma outcomes, and appears to be an effective and well-accepted technology for the care of children with asthma and their caregivers.

  10. How Is Asthma Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Month with a Google+ Hangout on Air for parents and caregivers to learn how to help control a child's asthma so that they can breathe ... parents build up their asthma team. Jose, his parents, a doctor and a nurse, ... forces to help Jose control his asthma. The video is recorded in Spanish ...

  11. Do Allergies Cause Asthma?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Help a Friend Who Cuts? Do Allergies Cause Asthma? KidsHealth > For Teens > Do Allergies Cause Asthma? Print A A A Text Size en español ¿Las alergias provocan asma? Do allergies cause asthma? The answer to that question is: yes and ...

  12. Strategies for Improving Self-Managing Behavior Skills among Second Grade Students: The Self-Management and Responsibility Training (SMART) Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Gina M.

    This practicum report describes a program in which strategies for improving self-managing behavior skills of second graders were designed and implemented. The goals of the Self-Management and Responsibility Training (SMART) Program were to improve students' behavior and encourage development of students' critical thinking skills. The four basic…

  13. Strategies for self-management of HIV-related anxiety.

    PubMed

    Kemppainen, J K; Eller, L S; Bunch, E; Hamilton, M J; Dole, P; Holzemer, W; Kirksey, K; Nicholas, P K; Corless, I B; Coleman, C; Nokes, K M; Reynolds, N; Sefcik, L; Wantland, D; Tsai, Y-F

    2006-08-01

    This study examines the frequency and effectiveness of commonly used strategies for self management of anxiety in an international sample of 502 participants from Norway (n=42, 8%), Taiwan (n=35, 7%), and the US (n=426, 85%). An activities checklist summarized into five categories of self-care behaviours including activities/thoughts, exercise, medications, complementary therapies, and substance use determined self-care behaviours. Ratings of frequency and effectiveness for each self-care activity were also included. Praying received the highest overall rating of effectiveness of any self-management strategies included in this study at 8.10 (scale 1 to 10), followed by meditation (7.37), exercising (7.32), using relaxation techniques (7.22), cooking (6.98), and walking (6.90). An analysis of effectiveness scores for each self-care strategy by country reflected a wide variation. The three most effective anxiety self-care strategies reported by participants from Norway included exercise (7.31), walking (6.96), and reading (6.44). Highest ratings of effectiveness by participants from Taiwan included talking with others with HIV (6.0), attending support groups (6.0), and exercising (6.0). US participants allocated highest ratings of effectiveness to complementary/alternative therapies, including praying (8.10), meditating (7.43), and using relaxation techniques (7.35). Regardless of the country, watching television and talking with family and friends were the two most frequently reported strategies. These strategies for self-management of HIV-related anxiety are important for clinicians to be aware of in the care of persons with HIV/AIDS.

  14. Update in paediatric asthma management: where is evidence challenging current practice?

    PubMed

    Robinson, Paul D; Van Asperen, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Extrapolation of management strategies based on results from predominantly adult asthma studies frequently occurs in paediatric asthma despite increasing evidence that paediatric asthma and, in particular, pre-school recurrent wheeze are very different disease entities. Response to medications in paediatric subjects is often different from that seen in their older adolescent and adult counterparts. In this update, we discussed recent studies that have had important implications for future paediatric asthma management. The overuse of combination inhaled steroid and long-acting beta2 agonist inhalers in paediatric asthma despite ongoing safety concerns is an increasing trend in paediatric asthma, and recent evidence has helped clarify how they should be used in children. Other aspects discussed include the role of oral corticosteroids in pre-school viral-induced wheeze and the utility of leukotriene receptor antagonists in exercise-induced asthma.

  15. Epigenetic Mechanisms in Asthma.

    PubMed

    DeVries, Avery; Vercelli, Donata

    2016-03-01

    Asthma and allergic diseases are among the most prevalent chronic noncommunicable diseases of childhood, but the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms are poorly understood. Because epigenetic mechanisms link gene regulation to environmental cues and developmental trajectories, their contribution to asthma and allergy pathogenesis is under active investigation. DNA methylation signatures associated with concurrent disease and with the development of asthma during childhood asthma have been identified, but their significance is not easily interpretable. On the other hand, the characterization of early epigenetic predictors of asthma points to a potential role of epigenetic mechanisms in regulating the inception of, and the susceptibility to, this disease. PMID:27027952

  16. Asthma and coagulation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Majoor, Christof J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Bel, Elisabeth H D; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by paroxysmal airflow obstruction evoked by irritative stimuli on a background of allergic lung inflammation. Currently, there is no cure for asthma, only symptomatic treatment. In recent years, our understanding of the involvement of coagulation and anticoagulant pathways, the fibrinolytic system, and platelets in the pathophysiology of asthma has increased considerably. Asthma is associated with a procoagulant state in the bronchoalveolar space, further aggravated by impaired local activities of the anticoagulant protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease-activated receptors have been implicated as the molecular link between coagulation and allergic inflammation in asthma. This review summarizes current knowledge of the impact of the disturbed hemostatic balance in the lungs on asthma severity and manifestations and identifies new possible targets for asthma treatment.

  17. What is severe asthma?

    PubMed

    Blakey, J D; Wardlaw, A J

    2012-05-01

    Asthma is common, and some individuals are severely affected by it. Learned institutions have sought to provide a definition of 'severe asthma' to facilitate research and clinical care. This is a challenging undertaking given the difficulty in defining asthma and the lack of supportive evidence for a distinct severe asthma phenotype. In this review, we discuss the rationale for a definition of severe asthma and the relative merits of the sequential attempts that have been made to produce such a definition. The difficulty in disentangling control and severity is highlighted, as is the heterogeneity of phenotype in severe asthma, and potential for misclassification. We conclude that the search for a singular definition of severe asthma is problematic, though likely to continue. We suggest the alternative strategy of using classifiers with a specific aim related to symptoms, pathophysiology or service provision.

  18. Asthma and coagulation.

    PubMed

    de Boer, J Daan; Majoor, Christof J; van 't Veer, Cornelis; Bel, Elisabeth H D; van der Poll, Tom

    2012-04-01

    Asthma is a chronic airway disease characterized by paroxysmal airflow obstruction evoked by irritative stimuli on a background of allergic lung inflammation. Currently, there is no cure for asthma, only symptomatic treatment. In recent years, our understanding of the involvement of coagulation and anticoagulant pathways, the fibrinolytic system, and platelets in the pathophysiology of asthma has increased considerably. Asthma is associated with a procoagulant state in the bronchoalveolar space, further aggravated by impaired local activities of the anticoagulant protein C system and fibrinolysis. Protease-activated receptors have been implicated as the molecular link between coagulation and allergic inflammation in asthma. This review summarizes current knowledge of the impact of the disturbed hemostatic balance in the lungs on asthma severity and manifestations and identifies new possible targets for asthma treatment. PMID:22262775

  19. Serious Asthma Events with Budesonide plus Formoterol vs. Budesonide Alone.

    PubMed

    Peters, Stephen P; Bleecker, Eugene R; Canonica, Giorgio W; Park, Yong B; Ramirez, Ricardo; Hollis, Sally; Fjallbrant, Harald; Jorup, Carin; Martin, Ubaldo J

    2016-09-01

    Background Concerns remain about the safety of adding long-acting β2-agonists to inhaled glucocorticoids for the treatment of asthma. In a postmarketing safety study mandated by the Food and Drug Administration, we evaluated whether the addition of formoterol to budesonide maintenance therapy increased the risk of serious asthma-related events in patients with asthma. Methods In this multicenter, double-blind, 26-week study, we randomly assigned patients, 12 years of age or older, who had persistent asthma, were receiving daily asthma medication, and had had one to four asthma exacerbations in the previous year to receive budesonide-formoterol or budesonide alone. Patients with a history of life-threatening asthma were excluded. The primary end point was the first serious asthma-related event (a composite of adjudicated death, intubation, and hospitalization), as assessed in a time-to-event analysis. The noninferiority of budesonide-formoterol to budesonide was defined as an upper limit of the 95% confidence interval for the risk of the primary safety end point of less than 2.0. The primary efficacy end point was the first asthma exacerbation, as assessed in a time-to-event analysis. Results A total of 11,693 patients underwent randomization, of whom 5846 were assigned to receive budesonide-formoterol and 5847 to receive budesonide. A serious asthma-related event occurred in 43 patients who were receiving budesonide-formoterol and in 40 patients who were receiving budesonide (hazard ratio, 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.70 to 1.65]); budesonide-formoterol was shown to be noninferior to budesonide alone. There were two asthma-related deaths, both in the budesonide-formoterol group; one of these patients had undergone an asthma-related intubation. The risk of an asthma exacerbation was 16.5% lower with budesonide-formoterol than with budesonide (hazard ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.74 to 0.94; P=0.002). Conclusions Among adolescents and adults with predominantly

  20. Clinical assessment of asthma progression in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Spahn, Joseph D; Covar, Ronina

    2008-03-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disorder with a variable course, characterized by episodes of cough, wheezing and shortness of breath, reversible airflow limitation, and bronchial hyperresponsiveness. It begins early in life in many subjects with intermittent symptoms occurring with viral respiratory tract infections. Over time, and in genetically susceptible children (those with an atopic predisposition), the disease becomes more persistent with symptoms occurring in the absence of respiratory tract infections. Children with persistent wheezing are eventually diagnosed with asthma, with those at greatest risk having developed allergic sensitization early in life. Among children with asthma, some will have lifelong asthma with active symptoms and progressive loss of lung function over time, whereas other children will undergo asthma remission in adolescence. Once in remission, the disease may remain quiescent, or it may relapse in midadult life. This review focuses on studies that have enhanced our understanding of the progression of asthma from infancy to adulthood. Studies evaluating progressive loss of lung function, the best-studied measure of asthma progression, are also reviewed, followed by a brief discussion of whether asthma progression can be modified by inhaled glucocorticoid therapy.

  1. Feasibility of Adapting Multisystemic Therapy to Improve Illness Management Behaviors and Reduce Asthma Morbidity in High Risk African American Youth: A Case Series

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naar-King, Sylvie; Ellis, Deborah; Kolmodin, Karen; Cunningham, Phillippe; Secord, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    African-American adolescents have the highest rates of asthma morbidity and mortality, yet there are few successful behavioral interventions to improve illness management for this group. Mental health providers have an opportunity to expand their services and impact by targeting adolescents with poor asthma management. We describe the adaptation…

  2. Improving hypertension self-management with community health coaches.

    PubMed

    Dye, Cheryl J; Williams, Joel E; Evatt, Janet Hoffman

    2015-03-01

    Approximately two thirds of those older than 60 years have a hypertension diagnosis. The aim of our program, Health Coaches for Hypertension Control, is to improve hypertension self-management among rural residents older than 60 years through education and support offered by trained community volunteers called Health Coaches. Participants received baseline and follow-up health risk appraisals with blood work, educational materials, and items such as blood pressure monitors and pedometers. Data were collected at baseline, 8 weeks, and 16 weeks on 146 participants who demonstrated statistically significant increases in hypertension-related knowledge from baseline to 8 weeks that persisted at 16 weeks, as well as significant improvements in stage of readiness to change behaviors and in actual behaviors. Furthermore, clinically significant decreases in all outcome measures were observed, with statistically significant changes in systolic blood pressure (-5.781 mmHg; p = .001), weight (-2.475 lb; p < .001), and glucose (-5.096 mg/dl; p = .004) after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Although 40.4% of participants met the Healthy People 2020 definition of controlled hypertension at baseline, the proportion of participants meeting this definition at 16 weeks postintervention increased to 51.0%. This article describes a university-community-hospital system model that effectively promotes hypertension self-management in a rural Appalachian community.

  3. Improving hypertension self-management with community health coaches.

    PubMed

    Dye, Cheryl J; Williams, Joel E; Evatt, Janet Hoffman

    2015-03-01

    Approximately two thirds of those older than 60 years have a hypertension diagnosis. The aim of our program, Health Coaches for Hypertension Control, is to improve hypertension self-management among rural residents older than 60 years through education and support offered by trained community volunteers called Health Coaches. Participants received baseline and follow-up health risk appraisals with blood work, educational materials, and items such as blood pressure monitors and pedometers. Data were collected at baseline, 8 weeks, and 16 weeks on 146 participants who demonstrated statistically significant increases in hypertension-related knowledge from baseline to 8 weeks that persisted at 16 weeks, as well as significant improvements in stage of readiness to change behaviors and in actual behaviors. Furthermore, clinically significant decreases in all outcome measures were observed, with statistically significant changes in systolic blood pressure (-5.781 mmHg; p = .001), weight (-2.475 lb; p < .001), and glucose (-5.096 mg/dl; p = .004) after adjusting for multiple comparisons. Although 40.4% of participants met the Healthy People 2020 definition of controlled hypertension at baseline, the proportion of participants meeting this definition at 16 weeks postintervention increased to 51.0%. This article describes a university-community-hospital system model that effectively promotes hypertension self-management in a rural Appalachian community. PMID:24837989

  4. Self-management for people with long-term neurological conditions.

    PubMed

    Chaplin, Hema; Hazan, Jill; Wilson, Patricia

    2012-06-01

    Although English government policy has encouraged the implementation of self-management programmes in services for people with long-term conditions, the evidence for their efficacy has been limited. People with long-term neurological conditions use community-based health services including community nursing, and have particular needs in regards to self-management. This article provides an overview of the evidence for the effectiveness of self-management interventions for people with long-term neurological conditions, in particular those with stroke, Parkinson's disease and multiple sclerosis. The current need for better interventions is highlighted, particularly the importance of providing condition-specific information and deliverance of interventions in a group setting to improve self-management outcomes. In response to weaknesses of previous self-management interventions for this population, an innovative Hertfordshire Neurological Service self-management programme is discussed, and the implications for future research are described.

  5. Know How to Use Your Asthma Inhaler

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health Know How to Use Your Asthma ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  6. Self-management in patients with end stage renal disease: exploring domains and dimensions.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Roberta Braun; Mapes, Donna; Schatell, Dori; Burrows-Hudson, Sally

    2005-01-01

    The management and appropriate treatment of chronic disease are ongoing challenges in health care. As the population ages, the prevalence of chronic disease can be expected to increase. Since by definition there is no cure for chronic disease, controlling, minimizing, or managing its negative effects becomes a primary goal. In the self-management perspective, it is neither clinicians nor health care systems who must accomplish the bulk of chronic disease management but rather the patients themselves. Moreover, self-management has been shown to be associated with improved outcomes. Self-management is comprised of two domains: self-management of health care and self management of everyday life. Self-management of health care includes self-care activity, partnership in care, communication, self-care self-efficacy, and adherence. Self-management of everyday life entails achieving/maintaining "normality" in everyday roles and functioning. End stage renal disease (ESRD) is a chronic disease for which self-management is particularly relevant. Understanding the components of self-management may help patients and clinicians to embrace this approach, to enter the mutual relationship it requires, and to maximize positive outcomes for patients with ESRD.

  7. Genetics Home Reference: allergic asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions allergic asthma allergic asthma Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Asthma is a breathing disorder characterized by inflammation of ...

  8. Predicting Asthma in Preschool Children with Asthma-Like Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  9. Self-Management in Daily Life with Psoriasis: An Integrative Review of Patient Needs for Structured Education

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Gitte Susanne; Maindal, Helle Terkildsen; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this integrative review is to identify and discuss patient needs for education to support self-management in daily life with psoriasis. As psoriasis increasingly gains recognition as a serious chronic autoimmune skin disease with long-term impairment on the life course, and not mainly a cosmetic problem, nurses are highly challenged to develop efficient education to support patient self-management. The paper includes five stages: (1) problem identification, (2) literature search, (3) data evaluation, (4) data analysis and synthesis, and (5) presentation, based on theoretic scaffolding around the concept “need.” Nineteen of 164 original papers within nursing, medicine and psychology, and reflecting patient perspective were included. To capture the patients' cultural understanding of the implications of the disease and care, we developed an interlevel model indicating that self-experienced burden of disease and its visibility, personal conditions such as illness perception, and the patient's age at onset time are high-impact factors that should be addressed in future structured patient education programmes. The research on patient needs has hitherto focused on adults, but the problems and vulnerability associated with having a chronic and visible disease during adolescence must be acknowledged, and patient education initiatives designed for this young group are recommended. PMID:23304484

  10. Feasibility of a pediatric cognitive-behavioral self-management intervention: Coping Openly and Personally with Epilepsy (COPE).

    PubMed

    Wagner, Janelle L; Smith, Gigi; Ferguson, Pamela; van Bakergem, Karen; Hrisko, Stephanie

    2011-07-01

    A pilot study was conducted to examine the feasibility and satisfaction of an integrated cognitive-behavioral and self-management intervention for youth with epilepsy (YWE) and caregivers. The Coping Openly and Personally with Epilepsy (COPE) intervention was based on empirically supported cognitive-behavioral techniques and theory driven self-management content. Content of the intervention consists of epilepsy education, primary and secondary coping skills. Children and adolescents ages 10-15, who had been diagnosed with epilepsy for at least six months (ICD-9345 codes), had at least average intelligence, no history of a serious mental illness, were not currently being treated for major depression, and lived within an 80 mile radius were considered eligible. Nine youth and their caregivers completed the COPE program and provided self-report data on feasibility, accuracy, and satisfaction of the COPE program. Caregivers and youth reported a high level of satisfaction with the COPE program, and findings support the feasibility and accuracy of the intervention content and delivery. Results provide a foundation for future randomized, controlled, clinical trials to examine the effectiveness of the COPE program for youth with epilepsy and their caregivers.

  11. Asthma in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Forno, Erick; Gogna, Mudita; Cepeda, Alfonso; Yañez, Anahi; Solé, Dirceu; Cooper, Philip; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Consistent with the diversity of Latin America, there is profound variability in asthma burden among and within countries in this region. Regional variation in asthma prevalence is likely multifactorial and due to genetics, perinatal exposures, diet, obesity, tobacco use, indoor and outdoor pollutants, psychosocial stress, and microbial or parasitic infections. Similarly, nonuniform progress in asthma management leads to regional variability in disease morbidity. Future studies of distinct asthma phenotypes should follow up well-characterized Latin American subgroups and examine risk factors that are unique or common in Latin America (e.g. stress and violence, parasitic infections and use of biomass fuels for cooking). Because most Latin American countries share the same barriers to asthma management, concerted and multifaceted public health and research efforts are needed, including approaches to curtail tobacco use, campaigns to improve asthma treatment, broadening access to care and clinical trials of non-pharmacologic interventions (e.g. replacing biomass fuels with gas or electric stoves). PMID:26103996

  12. Asthma in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Forno, Erick; Gogna, Mudita; Cepeda, Alfonso; Yañez, Anahi; Solé, Dirceu; Cooper, Philip; Avila, Lydiana; Soto-Quiros, Manuel; Castro-Rodriguez, Jose A; Celedón, Juan C

    2015-09-01

    Consistent with the diversity of Latin America, there is profound variability in asthma burden among and within countries in this region. Regional variation in asthma prevalence is likely multifactorial and due to genetics, perinatal exposures, diet, obesity, tobacco use, indoor and outdoor pollutants, psychosocial stress and microbial or parasitic infections. Similarly, non-uniform progress in asthma management leads to regional variability in disease morbidity. Future studies of distinct asthma phenotypes should follow-up well-characterised Latin American subgroups and examine risk factors that are unique or common in Latin America (eg, stress and violence, parasitic infections and use of biomass fuels for cooking). Because most Latin American countries share the same barriers to asthma management, concerted and multifaceted public health and research efforts are needed, including approaches to curtail tobacco use, campaigns to improve asthma treatment, broadening access to care and clinical trials of non-pharmacological interventions (eg, replacing biomass fuels with gas or electric stoves).

  13. [Asthma and diving].

    PubMed

    Wurzinger, G

    1999-01-01

    Until recently asthma was considered a contraindication for scuba diving due to possible "air trapping" and subsequent barotrauma. However, in view of the wide prevalence and heterogeneity of the illness this is no longer justified. There are, nevertheless, certain prerequisites for diving with asthma: a complete anamnesis and an analysis of the pulmonary function, an exact diagnosis of the trigger factors as well as of the bronchial hyperreactivity in order to correctly ascertain the asthma level. When scuba diving, asthmatics need to observe certain rules. Still, some types of asthma remain incompatible with diving. Among these are the pseudo-allergic, exercise-induced, and psychogenic-induced asthma as well as allergic bronchopulmonal aspergillosis. Asthma due to bronchial infections and GERD are considered relative contraindications.

  14. Cybersupport: empowering asthma caregivers.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Claire E

    2008-01-01

    In the United States, an estimated 6.5 million children have asthma (Akinbami, 2005). Due to the chronic and unpredictable nature of asthma, the condition places excessive demands on the primary caregiver. The complexity of asthma management has required parents to take increased responsibility for the assessment and treatment of their child's asthma (Dickinson & Dignam, 2002). Many families are turning to the Internet for information and support. The purpose of this study was to gain insight into the "lived" experiences of an online asthma caregivers support group. Archived messages posted to an online discussion list were analyzed using phenomenological thematic analysis. Five themes emerged providing insight into the meaning of caregiving and the provision of social support. Online support narratives provide a unique way to gain insight and understanding of the experiences of mother's enacting the caregiver role. Understanding the everyday lives of asthma caregivers can help nurses and other health care providers better meet caregiver needs.

  15. Diabulimia: how eating disorders can affect adolescents with diabetes.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Jennifer

    2014-09-16

    Adherence to self-management and medication regimens is required to achieve optimal blood glucose control in adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus. Non-adherence places adolescents at serious risk of short and long-term health complications. Adherence difficulties may be exacerbated by concurrent eating disorders. Diabulimia is a term used to describe the deliberate administration of insufficient insulin to maintain glycaemic control for the purpose of causing weight loss. This article explores the concept of diabulimia and the compounding complications of an eating disorder on maintaining self-management regimens in adolescents with diabetes. PMID:25204951

  16. Chronic Disease Self-Management by People With HIV.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Karalyn; Slavin, Sean; Pitts, Marian K; Elliott, Julian H

    2016-05-01

    As HIV has transitioned into a chronic disease, reappraisal of clinical management has occurred with chronic disease self-management (CDSM) as one possibility. However, despite extensive work on CDSM across a range of diseases, little attention has focused on psychosocial contexts of the lives of people for whom programs are intended. This article reports semi-structured interviews used to explore health practices and motivations of 33 people with HIV (PWHIV) in Australia. Within participants' accounts, different forms of subjectivity and agency emerged with implications for how they understood and valued health-related behaviors. Four themes arose: health support and disclosure, social support and stigma, employment/structure, and health decisions beyond HIV. The experience of stigma and its intersection with CDSM remains relatively un-chartered. This study found stigma shapes agency and engagement with health. Decisions concerning health behaviors are often driven by perceived social and emotional benefit embedded in concerns of disclosure and stigma.

  17. Viral diversity in asthma

    PubMed Central

    McErlean, Peter; Greiman, Alyssa; Favoreto, Silvio; Avila, Pedro C.

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Asthma exacerbations are precipitated primarily by respiratory virus infection and frequently require immediate medical intervention. Studies of childhood and adult asthma have implicated a wide variety of respiratory viruses in exacerbations. By focusing on both RNA and DNA respiratory viruses and some newly identified viruses, this review illustrates the diversity and highlights some of the uncertainties that exist in our understanding of virus-related asthma exacerbations. PMID:21029933

  18. Teaching Your Child about Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    American Academy of Allergy Asthma & Immunology Menu Search Main navigation Skip to content Conditions & Treatments Allergies Asthma Primary Immunodeficiency Disease Related Conditions Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just ...

  19. Asthma and the diver.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J; Fisher, Laura H; Chegini, Soheil; Craig, Timothy J

    2005-10-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving has grown in popularity, with nearly 9 million sport divers in the United States alone. Approximately 7% of the population has been diagnosed with asthma, which is similar to the percentage of divers admitting they have asthma. Numerous concerns exist regarding subjects with asthma who choose to participate in recreational diving. Among these concerns are pulmonary barotrauma, pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, arterial gas embolism, ear barotrauma, sinus barotrauma, and dental barotrauma. Despite these concerns, a paucity of information exists linking asthma to increased risk of diving complications. However, it has long been the norm to discourage individuals with asthma from participating in recreational scuba diving. This article examines the currently available literature to allow for a more informed decision regarding the possible risks associated with diving and asthma. It examines the underlying physiological principles associated with diving, including Henry's law and Boyle's law, to provide a more intimate understanding on physiological changes occurring in the respiratory system under compressive stress. Finally, this article offers a framework for guiding the patient with asthma who is interested in scuba diving. Under the right circumstances, the patient with asthma can safely participate in recreational diving without apparent increased risk of an asthma-related event. PMID:16251767

  20. Biomarkers in Severe Asthma.

    PubMed

    Wan, Xiao Chloe; Woodruff, Prescott G

    2016-08-01

    Biomarkers have been critical for studies of disease pathogenesis and the development of new therapies in severe asthma. In particular, biomarkers of type 2 inflammation have proven valuable for endotyping and targeting new biological agents. Because of these successes in understanding and marking type 2 inflammation, lack of knowledge regarding non-type 2 inflammatory mechanisms in asthma will soon be the major obstacle to the development of new treatments and management strategies in severe asthma. Biomarkers can play a role in these investigations as well by providing insight into the underlying biology in human studies of patients with severe asthma. PMID:27401625

  1. Asthma and the diver.

    PubMed

    Davies, Michael J; Fisher, Laura H; Chegini, Soheil; Craig, Timothy J

    2005-10-01

    Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba) diving has grown in popularity, with nearly 9 million sport divers in the United States alone. Approximately 7% of the population has been diagnosed with asthma, which is similar to the percentage of divers admitting they have asthma. Numerous concerns exist regarding subjects with asthma who choose to participate in recreational diving. Among these concerns are pulmonary barotrauma, pneumomediastinum, pneumothorax, arterial gas embolism, ear barotrauma, sinus barotrauma, and dental barotrauma. Despite these concerns, a paucity of information exists linking asthma to increased risk of diving complications. However, it has long been the norm to discourage individuals with asthma from participating in recreational scuba diving. This article examines the currently available literature to allow for a more informed decision regarding the possible risks associated with diving and asthma. It examines the underlying physiological principles associated with diving, including Henry's law and Boyle's law, to provide a more intimate understanding on physiological changes occurring in the respiratory system under compressive stress. Finally, this article offers a framework for guiding the patient with asthma who is interested in scuba diving. Under the right circumstances, the patient with asthma can safely participate in recreational diving without apparent increased risk of an asthma-related event.

  2. Home asthma triggers: barriers to asthma control in Chicago Puerto Rican children.

    PubMed

    Martin, Molly A; Thomas, Ann Marie; Mosnaim, Giselle; Greve, Matthew; Swider, Susan M; Rothschild, Steven K

    2013-05-01

    We sought objectively to measure, summarize, and contextualize the asthma triggers found in the homes of urban high-risk Puerto Rican children and adolescents with asthma in Chicago. Data were from the baseline home assessments of Project CURA. Research assistants interviewed caregivers, conducted a home visual inspection, and collected saliva samples for cotinine analysis. A trigger behavior summary score was created. The housing inspected was old with multiple units and obvious structural deficiencies. Many allergic and irritant triggers were observed. Having a controller medicine or private insurance was associated with lower trigger behavior summary scores; caregiver depression, caregiver perceived stress, and child negative life events were associated with high trigger scores. The final multivariate model retained had a controller medicine, private insurance, and caregiver perceived stress. The data from this high-risk cohort identified modifiable areas where environmental interventions could reduce morbidity in Puerto Rican children and adolescents. PMID:23728047

  3. Home asthma triggers: barriers to asthma control in Chicago Puerto Rican children.

    PubMed

    Martin, Molly A; Thomas, Ann Marie; Mosnaim, Giselle; Greve, Matthew; Swider, Susan M; Rothschild, Steven K

    2013-05-01

    We sought objectively to measure, summarize, and contextualize the asthma triggers found in the homes of urban high-risk Puerto Rican children and adolescents with asthma in Chicago. Data were from the baseline home assessments of Project CURA. Research assistants interviewed caregivers, conducted a home visual inspection, and collected saliva samples for cotinine analysis. A trigger behavior summary score was created. The housing inspected was old with multiple units and obvious structural deficiencies. Many allergic and irritant triggers were observed. Having a controller medicine or private insurance was associated with lower trigger behavior summary scores; caregiver depression, caregiver perceived stress, and child negative life events were associated with high trigger scores. The final multivariate model retained had a controller medicine, private insurance, and caregiver perceived stress. The data from this high-risk cohort identified modifiable areas where environmental interventions could reduce morbidity in Puerto Rican children and adolescents.

  4. [Air pollution and asthma in children].

    PubMed

    Just, J; Nisakinovic, L; Laoudi, Y; Grimfeld, A

    2006-07-01

    The prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases has increased world-wide during the last quarter of the 20th century, particularly among children and adolescents. No change common to all sites where asthma has increased throughout the world has been identified, suggesting that this 'epidemic' phenomenon is likely due to multiple factors. The following have been most discussed: exposure to indoor and outdoor allergens, modification of the patterns of respiratory infections, decreasing trends of physical activity, evolution in the make-up of environmental irritants, including tobacco smoke and urban air toxicants. In this review, we point out the role of exposure to air pollutants, in addition to and in combination with other asthma enhancers or precipitators. Whereas concentrations of the 'classical' air quality indicators (SO2, CO) have more or less steadily decreased, asthma prevalence augmented in developed countries during the same period. However, the nature of the air pollution mix has deeply evolved, and should also be considered. Ambient air concentrations of industrial and house heating combustion sources of pollutants in the city have substantially decreased, but by contrast the concentrations of various ultrafine particles have increased. Now, there is in vitro and in vivo evidence that exposure to urban air particles, and particularly to diesel exhausts, elicits chronic oxidative stress and repeated inflammatory responses, so that they may enhance allergic inflammation and airway hyper-responsiveness. Several epidemiological studies suggested an association between traffic density close to places of children's residence and prevalence of respiratory symptoms, and more specifically of asthma or allergic rhinitis symptoms in them. Chronic exposure during infancy to traffic-related pollutants may accelerate or even provoke, among genetically sensitive subjects, disruption of the normal regulatory and repair processes eventually contributing to the increase

  5. Feasibility of a smartphone application based action plan and monitoring in asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Yeong; Lee, Suh-Young; Jo, Eun-Jung; Lee, Seung-Eun; Kang, Min-Gyu; Song, Woo-Jung; Kim, Sae-Hoon; Cho, Sang-Heon; Min, Kyung-Up; Ahn, Ki-Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Background Asthma patients may experience acute episodic exacerbation. The guidelines recommend that written action plan should be given to asthma patients. However, no one can predict when and where acute exacerbation will happen. As people carry smart phone almost anytime and anywhere, smartphone application could be a useful tool in asthma care. We evaluated the feasibility of the ubiquitous healthcare system of asthma care using a smartphone application (snuCare) based on the self-management guideline or action plan. Methods Forty-four patients including fragile asthmatics were enrolled from Seoul National University Bundang Hospital between December 2011 and February 2012. They were randomly assigned into application user (n = 22) or application nonuser group (n = 22). We evaluated user-satisfaction, and clinical parameters such as asthma control, Quality of Life Questionnaire for Adult Korean Asthmatics, and the adherence of patients. Results The characteristics were similar at baseline between the 2 groups except those who treated with short-term systemic steroid or increased dose of systemic steroid during previous 8 weeks (user vs. nonuser: 31.8% vs. 4.5%, p = 0.020). Total of 2,226 signals was generated during 8 weeks including 5 risky states. After eight weeks, the users answered that it was very easy to use the application, which was shown in highest scores in terms of satisfaction (mean ± standard deviation, 4.3 ± 0.56). Seventy-three percent of patients answered that the application was very useful for asthma care. User group showed improved the adherence scores (p = 0.017). One patient in application user group could avoid Emergency Department visit owing to the application while a patient in nonuser group visited Emergency Department. Conclusion The ubiquitous healthcare system using a smartphone application (snuCare) based on the self-management guideline or action plan could be helpful in the monitoring and the management of asthma. PMID

  6. Determinants of activation for self-management in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Korpershoek, YJG; Bos-Touwen, ID; de Man-van Ginkel, JM; Lammers, J-WJ; Schuurmans, MJ; Trappenburg, JCA

    2016-01-01

    Background COPD self-management is a complex behavior influenced by many factors. Despite scientific evidence that better disease outcomes can be achieved by enhancing self-management, many COPD patients do not respond to self-management interventions. To move toward more effective self-management interventions, knowledge of characteristics associated with activation for self-management is needed. The purpose of this study was to identify key patient and disease characteristics of activation for self-management. Methods An explorative cross-sectional study was conducted in primary and secondary care in patients with COPD. Data were collected through questionnaires and chart reviews. The main outcome was activation for self-management, measured with the 13-item Patient Activation Measure (PAM). Independent variables were sociodemographic variables, self-reported health status, depression, anxiety, illness perception, social support, disease severity, and comorbidities. Results A total of 290 participants (age: 67.2±10.3; forced expiratory volume in 1 second predicted: 63.6±19.2) were eligible for analysis. While poor activation for self-management (PAM-1) was observed in 23% of the participants, only 15% was activated for self-management (PAM-4). Multiple linear regression analysis revealed six explanatory determinants of activation for self-management (P<0.2): anxiety (β: −0.35; −0.6 to −0.1), illness perception (β: −0.2; −0.3 to −0.1), body mass index (BMI) (β: −0.4; −0.7 to −0.2), age (β: −0.1; −0.3 to −0.01), Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease stage (2 vs 1 β: −3.2; −5.8 to −0.5; 3 vs 1 β: −3.4; −7.1 to 0.3), and comorbidities (β: 0.8; −0.2 to 1.8), explaining 17% of the variance. Conclusion This study showed that only a minority of COPD patients is activated for self-management. Although only a limited part of the variance could be explained, anxiety, illness perception, BMI, age, disease severity

  7. The Breathe-Easy Home: The Impact of Asthma-Friendly Home Construction on Clinical Outcomes and Trigger Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, James; Song, Lin; Sharify, Denise; Beaudet, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. We examined the asthma-control benefit of moving into an asthma-friendly Breathe-Easy home (BEH). Methods. We used a quasi-experimental design to compare the asthma outcomes of 2 groups of low-income children and adolescents with asthma: 34 participants who moved into a BEH, and a local matched cohort of 68 participants who had received a previous asthma-control intervention. Both groups received in-home asthma education. BEHs were constructed with moisture-reduction features, enhanced ventilation systems, and materials that minimized dust and off-gassing. Results. BEH residents’ asthma-symptom–free days increased from a mean of 8.6 per 2 weeks in their old home to 12.4 after 1 year in the BEH. The proportion of BEH residents with an urgent asthma-related clinical visit in the previous 3 months decreased from 62% to 21%. BEH caretakers’ quality of life increased significantly. The BEH group improved more than did the comparison group, but most differences in improvements were not significant. Exposures to mold, rodents, and moisture were reduced significantly in BEHs. Conclusions. Children and adolescents with asthma who moved into an asthma-friendly home experienced large decreases in asthma morbidity and trigger exposure. PMID:21148715

  8. Mobile phone technology in the management of asthma.

    PubMed

    Ryan, D; Cobern, W; Wheeler, J; Price, D; Tarassenko, L

    2005-01-01

    Peak flow monitoring is widely recommended as part of a self-management plan for asthma. We conducted an observational study using electronic peak flow monitoring and mobile phone technology in a UK general practice population over a nine-month period. Patients between 12 and 55 years of age who required treatment with regular inhaled steroids and (as needed) bronchodilators were recruited from nine general practices. Patients were included if their asthma was considered stable (i.e. no exacerbation in the previous three months). No therapeutic intervention was proposed. The primary outcome measure was compliance. In all, 69% of the 46 participants who filled in the post-study questionnaire were 'satisfied' or 'very satisfied' by the study, citing the ease of use and the increased autonomy and understanding of asthma as the main advantages. In total, 74% indicated that the system had helped to improve their ability to manage their symptoms. The most positive features of the telemedicine system were described as follows: increased awareness and information about asthma, improved ability to monitor/manage the condition with the feedback screens on the mobile phone and ease of use.

  9. The effectiveness of one-on-one nurse education on the outcomes of high-risk adult and pediatric patients with asthma.

    PubMed

    Forshee, J D; Whalen, E B; Hackel, R; Butt, L T; Smeltzer, P A; Martin, J; Lavin, P T; Buchner, D A

    1998-12-01

    The effects of an asthma self-management program on asthma outcomes were evaluated in adult and pediatric patients with asthma who were considered at high risk (i.e., those who were not in control of their disease as determined by resource utilization, medication use, or lack of use). The program consisted of one-on-one nurse-to-patient ("nurse champion") education and subsequent assessment of asthma outcomes using the Asthma Quality Assessment System (AQAS) questionnaire, which measured asthma severity, patient quality of life, asthma awareness and knowledge, confidence in managing asthma, use of peak flow meters, asthma symptoms, medication use, lost work or school days, and affect of asthma. Over the course of six months, nurse champions educated 201 patients from four managed care plans and collected data at baseline and during four follow-up sessions. Adult patients and pediatric patient caregivers reported significant improvements in quality of life, and clinical and process measures. Significant increases in asthma knowledge were observed immediately after patient education, including greater than 89% increase in the proportion of patients who reported that they know "a lot" about the "things that cause asthma symptoms." Significant decreases were also found in work or school days missed, urgent care utilization, and hospital admission rates. Appropriate preventive care visits increased by more than 40%. These results indicate that the nurse champion program was associated with an improvement in asthma outcomes in high-risk adult and pediatric patients and warrant further evaluation in controlled studies. Incorporating one-on-one education programs into asthma management is an effective and rapid means of improving asthma outcomes.

  10. Obstructive sleep apnea and asthma*

    PubMed Central

    Salles, Cristina; Terse-Ramos, Regina; Souza-Machado, Adelmir; Cruz, Álvaro A

    2013-01-01

    Symptoms of sleep-disordered breathing, especially obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS), are common in asthma patients and have been associated with asthma severity. It is known that asthma symptoms tend to be more severe at night and that asthma-related deaths are most likely to occur during the night or early morning. Nocturnal symptoms occur in 60-74% of asthma patients and are markers of inadequate control of the disease. Various pathophysiological mechanisms are related to the worsening of asthma symptoms, OSAS being one of the most important factors. In patients with asthma, OSAS should be investigated whenever there is inadequate control of symptoms of nocturnal asthma despite the treatment recommended by guidelines having been administered. There is evidence in the literature that the use of continuous positive airway pressure contributes to asthma control in asthma patients with obstructive sleep apnea and uncontrolled asthma. PMID:24310634

  11. Integrating Self-Management and Exercise for People Living with Arthritis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mendelson, A. D.; McCullough, C.; Chan, A.

    2011-01-01

    The Program for Arthritis Control through Education and Exercise, PACE-Ex[TM}, is an arthritis self-management program incorporating principles and practice of self-management, goal setting and warm water exercise. The purpose of this program review is to examine the impact of PACE-Ex on participants' self-efficacy for condition management,…

  12. The South Australia Health Chronic Disease Self-Management Internet Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorig, Kate; Ritter, Philip L.; Plant, Kathryn; Laurent, Diana D.; Kelly, Pauline; Rowe, Sally

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the effectiveness of an online chronic disease self-management program for South Australia residents. Method: Data were collected online at baseline, 6 months, and 12 months. The intervention was an asynchronous 6-week chronic disease self-management program offered online. The authors measured eight health status measures,…

  13. Self-Management of Sharing in Three Pre-Schoolers with Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinecke, Dana R.; Newman, Bobby; Meinberg, Deborah L.

    1999-01-01

    Use of a token economy to encourage self-management and spontaneous sharing behaviors by three preschool boys with autism was effective in increasing the frequency of sharing behaviors. However, the accuracy of the self-management component was not high, suggesting that the contingent relationship between token and response may not have been the…

  14. Enhancing the Effectiveness of Self-Managed Learning Groups: Understanding Students' Choices and Concerns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lizzio, Alf; Wilson, Keithia

    2006-01-01

    Self-managed learning groups are regularly used in higher education. However, there is little direct evidence as to strategies that can enhance their efficacy, or the factors that influence students' engagement with the process of self-management. If students are expected to manage their out-of-class collaborative learning experiences, then…

  15. Behavioural Change in Type 1 Diabetes Self-Management: Why and How?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Valerie L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To examine whether the communication process between diabetes health professionals and people intensively self-managing their type 1 diabetes influenced behavioural change. Design: Telephone interviews to provide insight into the communication process and its influence on diabetes intensive self-management behaviour. Setting:…

  16. Self-Management Abilities of Diabetes in People with an Intellectual Disability Living in New Zealand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Leigh A.; Trip, Henrietta T.; Whitehead, Lisa; Conder, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Self-management of diabetes is encouraged; however, it is not an easy task and requires a good understanding of the disease. To determine how to improve the self-management abilities of diabetes in people with an intellectual disability (ID), this study explored the knowledge and understanding of diabetes held by a select group of adults with…

  17. Cost Analysis of Chronic Disease Self-Management Programmes Being Delivered in South Florida

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Timothy F.; Palmer, Richard C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Chronic disease accounts for the majority of healthcare costs. The Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) has been shown to be effective in reducing the burden of chronic disease. Objectives: The objective of this study was to measure the cost of delivering the Chronic Disease Self-Management Programme (CDSMP) in order to…

  18. Employment and Self-Management: A Meta-Evaluation of Seven Literature Reviews

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rusch, Frank R.; Dattilo, John

    2012-01-01

    Efforts focused on teaching individuals with intellectual disabilities to manage their own affairs have evolved over the past 30 years. Self-management strategies, in particular, hold much promise when the goal is to promote self-determination. In this article, the authors describe trends in the evolution of self-management strategies by analyzing…

  19. Reported Use and Acceptability of Self-Management Interventions to Target Behavioral Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Briesch, Amy M.; Briesch, Jacquelyn M.; Mahoney, Corrine

    2014-01-01

    Although self-management interventions have a long history of empirical evaluation, attention has not been paid toward understanding actual use of this class of interventions. From a nationally representative sample of school psychology practitioners, a total of 295 respondents were presented with a description of a self-management intervention as…

  20. Career-Self Management and Entrepreneurship: An Experience with PhD Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pinto, Joana Carneiro; do Ceu Taveira, Maria; Sa, Elisabete

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: This study presents an experience developed with PhD students aimed to analyze the extent to which career self-management should be approached along with entrepreneurship issues to promote students' career development. Method: An intervention group who attended a Career Self-Management Seminar (EG1), a comparison group who attended…

  1. Self-Management for Students with Mental Retardation in Public School Settings; A Research Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughes, Charles A.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This review analyzes data-based studies dealing with self-management procedures (self-monitoring, self-evaluation, self-reinforcement, and self-instruction) used by individuals with mental retardation in public school settings. Although support is found for the positive effects of self-management, questions regarding efficient implementation of…

  2. Effective School Self-Management--What's Ahead? Conference Proceedings (October 1998).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webber, Bev, Comp.

    This proceedings of an international conference examines the nature of school self-management around the world. The volume opens with the keynote address by, Tony Townsend, which provides an overview of school self-management, effective education, and the school-effectiveness movement. Some of the topics addressed include student achievement, the…

  3. Evaluation of WebEase: An Epilepsy Self-Management Web Site

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiIorio, Colleen; Escoffery, Cam; McCarty, Frances; Yeager, Katherine A.; Henry, Thomas R.; Koganti, Archana; Reisinger, Elizabeth L.; Wexler, Bethany

    2009-01-01

    People with epilepsy have various education needs and must adopt many self-management behaviors in order to control their condition. This study evaluates WebEase, an Internet-based, theory-driven, self-management program for adults with epilepsy. Thirty-five participants took part in a 6-week pilot implementation of WebEase. The main components of…

  4. The Benefits of Teaching Self-Management Skills to Students of Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kazemi, Ellie; Rice, Brian; Rylander, Alyssa; Morgan, Shannon F.

    2011-01-01

    The various student gains and reported satisfaction with self-management projects have been well documented. However, we found that few psychology programs explicitly teach these skills. In this paper we demonstrate how self-management projects can meet nine out of the ten undergraduate student learning goals outlined by the APA Task Force (2002).…

  5. Increasing Academic Productivity of Severely Multi-Handicapped Children with Self-Management: Idiosyncratic Effects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Edward S.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Productivity of four severely multiply disabled elementary students on a paper-and-pencil task was increased with an externally managed token economy. Ss were then instructed to self-manage the token economy. Two of the four subjects accurately self-managed the token economy, although all subjects maintained productivity levels. (Author/CL)

  6. The Impact of a Short Self-Management Training Intervention in a Retail Banking Environment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pattni, Indira; Soutar, Geoffrey N.; Klobas, Jane E.

    2007-01-01

    The study discussed in this article investigated the impact of a short self-management skills training course on frontline bank employees' learning about the use of self-management to overcome obstacles to the initiation of banking product sales, perceived self-efficacy in initiating the sale of a product, and performance in activities related to…

  7. Exploring the Moderating Role of Self-Management of Learning in Mobile English Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Rui-Ting

    2014-01-01

    Although a considerable number of studies have revealed that self-management of learning (SML) could be closely related to learning achievements, there is still a paucity of research investigating the moderating effect of self-management of learning on mobile learning outcomes. Accordingly, the primary purpose of this study was to explore the…

  8. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  9. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  10. 42 CFR 414.63 - Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Payment for outpatient diabetes self-management... HEALTH SERVICES Physicians and Other Practitioners § 414.63 Payment for outpatient diabetes self... this section, payment for outpatient diabetes self-management training is made under the physician...

  11. iCanCope with Pain™: User-centred design of a web- and mobile-based self-management program for youth with chronic pain based on identified health care needs

    PubMed Central

    Stinson, Jennifer N; Lalloo, Chitra; Harris, Lauren; Isaac, Lisa; Campbell, Fiona; Brown, Stephen; Ruskin, Danielle; Gordon, Allan; Galonski, Marilyn; Pink, Leah R; Buckley, Norman; Henry, James L; White, Meghan; Karim, Allia

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While there are emerging web-based self-management programs for children and adolescents with chronic pain, there is currently not an integrated web- and smartphone-based app that specifically addresses the needs of adolescents with chronic pain. OBJECTIVES: To conduct a needs assessment to inform the development of an online chronic pain self-management program for adolescents, called iCanCope with Pain™. METHODS: A purposive sample of adolescents (n=23; 14 to 18 years of age) was recruited from two pediatric chronic pain clinics in Ontario. Interdisciplinary health care providers were also recruited from these sites. Three focus groups were conducted with adolescents (n=16) and one with pediatric health care providers (n=7). Individual adolescent interviews were also conducted (n=7). RESULTS: Qualitative analysis uncovered four major themes: pain impact; barriers to care; pain management strategies; and transition to adult care. Pain impacted social, emotional, physical and role functioning, as well as future goals. Barriers to care were revealed at the health care system, patient and societal levels. Pain management strategies included support systems, and pharmacological, physical and psychological approaches. Transition subthemes were: disconnect between pediatric and adult systems; skills development; parental role; and fear/anxiety. Based on these identified needs, the iCanCope with Pain™ architecture will include the core theory-based functionalities of: symptom self-monitoring; personalized goal setting; pain coping skills training; peer-based social support; and chronic pain education. CONCLUSIONS: The proposed iCanCope with Pain™ program aims to address the self-management needs of adolescents with chronic pain by improving access to disease information, strategies to manage symptoms and social support. PMID:25000507

  12. The self-management experience of people with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Costantini, Lucia; Beanlands, Heather; McCay, Elizabeth; Cattran, Daniel; Hladunewich, Michelle; Francis, Daphene

    2008-01-01

    This qualitative, exploratory study examined the self-management experiences of people with mild to moderate chronic kidney disease (CKD, Stages 1-3) to elicit participants' perceptions of health, kidney disease, and supports needed for self-management. Findings revealed a process of renegotiating life with chronic kidney disease, which encompassed Discovering Kidney Disease and Learning To Live With Kidney Disease. A number of themes were identified including searching for evidence, realizing kidney disease is forever, managing the illness, taking care of the self and the need for disease-specific information. The findings indicate participants with early CKD want to self-manage their illness in collaboration with health care providers. As well, people with early CKD need guidance and support from health professionals to successfully self-manage. Nephrology nurses are uniquely positioned to provide this support while collaborating with other care providers to facilitate self-management. PMID:18472683

  13. Kerosene-induced asthma

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez de la Vega, A.; Casaco, A.; Garcia, M.; Noa, M.; Carvajal, D.; Arruzazabala, L.; Gonzalez, R. )

    1990-04-01

    Clinical evaluation of 286 asthmatic women showed 15.5% of those who improved clinically had contact with kerosene, while 43.9% of those who failed to improve used kerosene as fuel for cooking. In 16 women the onset of asthma occurred soon after they began to use kerosene. Kerosene can cause and aggravate asthma.

  14. Occupational asthma: a review.

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, L J; Balmes, J R

    2000-01-01

    Occupational asthma is the most common form of occupational lung disease in the developed world at the present time. In this review, the epidemiology, pathogenesis/mechanisms, clinical presentations, management, and prevention of occupational asthma are discussed. The population attributable risk of asthma due to occupational exposures is considerable. Current understanding of the mechanisms by which many agents cause occupational asthma is limited, especially for low-molecular-weight sensitizers and irritants. The diagnosis of occupational asthma is generally established on the basis of a suggestive history of a temporal association between exposure and the onset of symptoms and objective evidence that these symptoms are related to airflow limitation. Early diagnosis, elimination of exposure to the responsible agent, and early use of inhaled steroids may play important roles in the prevention of long-term persistence of asthma. Persistent occupational asthma is often associated with substantial disability and consequent impacts on income and quality of life. Prevention of new cases is the best approach to reducing the burden of asthma attributable to occupational exposures. Future research needs are identified. PMID:10931788

  15. The Digital Asthma Patient: The History and Future of Inhaler Based Health Monitoring Devices.

    PubMed

    Kikidis, Dimitrios; Konstantinos, Votis; Tzovaras, Dimitrios; Usmani, Omar S

    2016-06-01

    The wave of digital health is continuously growing and promises to transform healthcare and optimize the patients' experience. Asthma is in the center of these digital developments, as it is a chronic disease that requires the continuous attention of both health care professionals and patients themselves. The accurate and timely assessment of the state of asthma is the fundamental basis of digital health approaches and is also the most significant factor toward the preventive and efficient management of the disease. Furthermore, the necessity of inhaled medication offers a basic platform upon which modern technologies can be integrated, namely the inhaler device itself. Inhaler-based monitoring devices were introduced in the beginning of the 1980s and have been evolving but mainly for the assessment of medication adherence. As technology progresses and novel sensing components are becoming available, the enhancement of inhalers with a wider range of monitoring capabilities holds the promise to further support and optimize asthma self-management. The current article aims to take a step for the mapping of this territory and start the discussion among healthcare professionals and engineers for the identification and the development of technologies that can offer personalized asthma self-management with clinical significance. In this direction, a technical review of inhaler based monitoring devices is presented, together with an overview of their use in clinical research. The aggregated results are then summarized and discussed for the identification of key drivers that can lead the future of inhalers.

  16. [Occupational asthma in Hungary].

    PubMed

    Endre, László

    2015-05-10

    Occupational asthma belongs to communicable diseases, which should be reported in Hungary. During a 24-year period between January 1990 and December 2013, 180 occupational asthma cases were reported in Hungary (52 cases between 1990 and 1995, 83 cases between 1996 and 2000, 40 cases between 2001 and 2006, and 5 cases between 2007 and 2013). These data are unusual, because according to the official report of the National Korányi Pulmonology Institute in Budapest, at least 14,000 new adult asthma cases were reported in every year between 2000 and 2012 in Hungary. Also, international data indicate that at least 2% of adult patients with asthma have occupational asthma and at least 50 out of 1 million employees develop occupational asthma in each year. In 2003, 631 new occupational asthma patients were reported in the United Kingdom, but only 7 cases in Hungary. Because it is unlikely that the occupational environment in Hungary is much better than anywhere else in the world, it seems that not all new occupational asthma cases are reported in Hungary. Of the 180 reported cases in Hungary, 55 were bakers or other workers in flour mills. There were 11 metal-workers, 10 health care assistants, 9 workers dealing with textiles (tailors, dressmakers, workers in textile industry) and 9 employees worked upon leather and animal fur. According to international data, the most unsafe profession is the animal keeper in scientific laboratories, but only 4 of them were reported as having occupational asthma during the studied 24 years in Hungary. Interestingly, 3 museologists with newly-diagnosed occupational asthma were reported in 2003, but not such cases occurred before or after that year. In this paper the Hungarian literature of occupational asthma is summarized, followed by a review on the classification, pathomechanism, clinical presentation, predisposing factors, diagnostics and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Epidemiological data of adult asthma in Hungary and data from

  17. Finding Meaning: HIV Self-Management and Wellbeing among People Taking Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Russell, Steve; Martin, Faith; Zalwango, Flavia; Namukwaya, Stella; Nalugya, Ruth; Muhumuza, Richard; Katongole, Joseph; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    The health of people living with HIV (PLWH) and the sustained success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes depends on PLWH's motivation and ability to self-manage the condition over the long term, including adherence to drugs on a daily basis. PLWH's self-management of HIV and their wellbeing are likely to be interrelated. Successful self-management sustains wellbeing, and wellbeing is likely to motivate continued self-management. Detailed research is lacking on PLWH's self-management processes on ART in resource-limited settings. This paper presents findings from a study of PLWH's self-management and wellbeing in Wakiso District, Uganda. Thirty-eight PLWH (20 women, 18 men) were purposefully selected at ART facilities run by the government and by The AIDS Support Organisation in and around Entebbe. Two in-depth interviews were completed with each participant over three or four visits. Many were struggling economically, however the recovery of health and hope on ART had enhanced wellbeing and motivated self-management. The majority were managing their condition well across three broad domains of self-management. First, they had mobilised resources, notably through good relationships with health workers. Advice and counselling had helped them to reconceptualise their condition and situation more positively and see hope for the future, motivating their work to self-manage. Many had also developed a new network of support through contacts they had developed at the ART clinic. Second, they had acquired knowledge and skills to manage their health, a useful framework to manage their condition and to live their life. Third, participants were psychologically adjusting to their condition and their new 'self': they saw HIV as a normal disease, were coping with stigma and had regained self-esteem, and were finding meaning in life. Our study demonstrates the centrality of social relationships and other non-medical aspects of wellbeing for self-management which ART

  18. Finding Meaning: HIV Self-Management and Wellbeing among People Taking Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda.

    PubMed

    Russell, Steve; Martin, Faith; Zalwango, Flavia; Namukwaya, Stella; Nalugya, Ruth; Muhumuza, Richard; Katongole, Joseph; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    The health of people living with HIV (PLWH) and the sustained success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes depends on PLWH's motivation and ability to self-manage the condition over the long term, including adherence to drugs on a daily basis. PLWH's self-management of HIV and their wellbeing are likely to be interrelated. Successful self-management sustains wellbeing, and wellbeing is likely to motivate continued self-management. Detailed research is lacking on PLWH's self-management processes on ART in resource-limited settings. This paper presents findings from a study of PLWH's self-management and wellbeing in Wakiso District, Uganda. Thirty-eight PLWH (20 women, 18 men) were purposefully selected at ART facilities run by the government and by The AIDS Support Organisation in and around Entebbe. Two in-depth interviews were completed with each participant over three or four visits. Many were struggling economically, however the recovery of health and hope on ART had enhanced wellbeing and motivated self-management. The majority were managing their condition well across three broad domains of self-management. First, they had mobilised resources, notably through good relationships with health workers. Advice and counselling had helped them to reconceptualise their condition and situation more positively and see hope for the future, motivating their work to self-manage. Many had also developed a new network of support through contacts they had developed at the ART clinic. Second, they had acquired knowledge and skills to manage their health, a useful framework to manage their condition and to live their life. Third, participants were psychologically adjusting to their condition and their new 'self': they saw HIV as a normal disease, were coping with stigma and had regained self-esteem, and were finding meaning in life. Our study demonstrates the centrality of social relationships and other non-medical aspects of wellbeing for self-management which ART

  19. Nutrition and asthma.

    PubMed

    Varraso, Raphaëlle

    2012-06-01

    Over the past four decades, the prevalence of asthma has markedly increased in Westernized countries and countries transitioning to this lifestyle. It has been hypothesized that these increases are a consequence of changing environmental and/or behavioral factors. The modification of dietary habits (ie, decreased intake of fruits/vegetables and increased intake of "Westernized" processed foods) and a decrease in sun exposure have led to decreased intake of antioxidant vitamins and fatty acids and to decreased circulating levels of vitamin D, and have been proposed to explain the rise in asthma prevalence. This article summarizes the main findings on foods and nutrients connected to asthma based on several exhaustive recent reviews on the topic, and examines the evidence for an effect of dietary patterns on asthma. Overall, findings underscore the importance of conducting prospective studies and clinical trials to better understand the role of diet in the etiology of asthma.

  20. [Distinguishing asthma from COPD].

    PubMed

    Ohara, Kouhei; Samukawa, Takuya; Inoue, Hiromasa

    2016-05-01

    Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are major public health burdens. Asthma is characterized by airway inflammation, airway narrowing with reversibility, and hyperresponsiveness of airways. COPD has been associated with smoking and exposure to environmental fumes, which typically characterized by persistent airflow limitation and chronic inflammation of the airways. These differences are most apparent when young non-smoker with asthma and older smokers with COPD are compared. However, it would be difficult to differentiate asthma from COPD, especially in elderly who currently smoke or have a significant history of smoking. Furthermore, some patients exhibit characteristics of both diseases, this may represent a phenotype known as asthma-COPD overlap syndrome (ACOS). Therefore, the precise understanding of these diseases is important.

  1. Asthma and height in twins: a cohort and within-pair analyses study.

    PubMed

    Protudjer, Jennifer L P; Lundholm, Cecilia; Almqvist, Catarina

    2015-04-01

    In singletons, asthma may be associated with shorter height and delayed growth during adolescence. Yet, these studies do not account for heritability of asthma, puberty/menarche, and height. We aimed to study the association between asthma and puberty in boys and menarche in girls, and height, in a cohort of twins and subsequently in same-sex twin pairs discordant for asthma. From a Swedish twin cohort, parent- and self-reported data on asthma, puberty/menarche, and height were collected. Pubertal staging was established via the Petersen index. Logistic and linear regression was used to estimate associations between asthma and puberty/menarche and height, respectively. For within-pair analyses in twins discordant for asthma, conditional logistic and linear regression were used. Data on 2,658 (49.1% boys) twins were included. Among boys, asthma prevalence was 8.2% at 8-9 years and 10.2% at 13-14 years. Corresponding numbers for girls were 4.2% and 4.9%, respectively. In the entire cohort, no statistically significant associations were found between current asthma and puberty/menarche. Boys with asthma were shorter than boys without asthma at 8-9 years (on average, 1.86 [0.17-3.56] cm, p = .03) and at 13-14 years (on average, 2.94 [0.98-4.91] cm, p = .003) but not at 19-20 years. No such associations were found for girls. Within same-sex twin pairs discordant for asthma, no statistically significant associations were found for either sex. Twin boys, but not girls, with asthma were shorter than those without asthma. Non-statistically significant estimates from within-pair analyses suggest the association is partly confounded by genetic or familial environmental factors. PMID:25761570

  2. Smoking among upper secondary pupils with asthma: reasons for their smoking behavior: a population-based study.

    PubMed

    Precht, Dorthe Hansen; Keiding, Lis; Nielsen, Gert Allan; Madsen, Mette

    2006-07-01

    We compared why adolescent pupils with and without asthma started smoking and currently smoke. Girls with asthma started smoking less often because of friends smoking, and asthmatics started more often because of pressure, especially asthmatic boys. Fewer asthmatics smoked currently for social reasons and more to stay slim, mainly asthmatic boys.

  3. The costs of asthma.

    PubMed

    Barnes, P J; Jonsson, B; Klim, J B

    1996-04-01

    At present, asthma represents a substantial burden on health care resources in all countries so far studied. The costs of asthma are largely due to uncontrolled disease, and are likely to rise as its prevalence and severity increase. Costs could be significantly reduced if disease control is improved. A large proportion of the total cost of illness is derived from treating the consequences of poor asthma control-direct costs, such as emergency room use and hospitalizations. Indirect costs, which include time off work or school and early retirement, are incurred when the disease is not fully controlled and becomes severe enough to have an effect on daily life. In addition, quality of life assessments show that asthma has a significant socioeconomic impact, not only on the patients themselves, but on the whole family. Underuse of prescribed therapy, which includes poor compliance, significantly contributes towards the poor control of asthma. The consequences of poor compliance in asthma include increased morbidity and sometimes mortality, and increased health care expenditure. To improve asthma management, international guidelines have been introduced which recommend an increase in the use of prophylactic therapy. The resulting improvements in the control of asthma will reduce the number of hospitalizations associated with asthma, and may ultimately produce a shift within direct costs, with subsequent reductions in indirect costs. In addition, costs may be reduced by improving therapeutic interventions and through effective patient education programmes. This paper reviews current literature on the costs of asthma to assess how effectively money is spent and, by estimating the proportion of the cost attributable to uncontrolled disease, will identify where financial savings might be made. PMID:8726924

  4. [Self management or managerial autonomy. SESPAS report, 2012].

    PubMed

    Ledesma Castelltort, Albert

    2012-03-01

    Western countries with strong primary care systems organize their health services around this healthcare modality, which serves as a gateway to the system and is characterized by multidisciplinary teamwork, management transferred to the teams and a broad services portfolio. The contractual relationship between professionals and the public health system is a useful tool to modulate the efficiency of services and their ability to meet the expectations of citizens and professionals. Some countries choose to contract professionals directly, either individually or through a professional organization, an option known as a self-management system. Others opt to contract public or private entities, which in turn recruit health professionals as employees. In the latter countries, the concept of management decentralization and managerial autonomy has arisen. In Spain, only Catalonia has enabled professional entities to be hired to provide public health services, through commercial formulas, i.e. in a competitive market relationship. This relationship allows the use of corporate governance mechanisms that are not subject to public control through state intervention. The other forms of management promoted in Spain to avoid the controls of state intervention - foundations or associations - have been unsuccessful, except in the autonomous region of Valencia and some models in the autonomous region of Madrid. PMID:22327059

  5. [Self management or managerial autonomy. SESPAS report, 2012].

    PubMed

    Ledesma Castelltort, Albert

    2012-03-01

    Western countries with strong primary care systems organize their health services around this healthcare modality, which serves as a gateway to the system and is characterized by multidisciplinary teamwork, management transferred to the teams and a broad services portfolio. The contractual relationship between professionals and the public health system is a useful tool to modulate the efficiency of services and their ability to meet the expectations of citizens and professionals. Some countries choose to contract professionals directly, either individually or through a professional organization, an option known as a self-management system. Others opt to contract public or private entities, which in turn recruit health professionals as employees. In the latter countries, the concept of management decentralization and managerial autonomy has arisen. In Spain, only Catalonia has enabled professional entities to be hired to provide public health services, through commercial formulas, i.e. in a competitive market relationship. This relationship allows the use of corporate governance mechanisms that are not subject to public control through state intervention. The other forms of management promoted in Spain to avoid the controls of state intervention - foundations or associations - have been unsuccessful, except in the autonomous region of Valencia and some models in the autonomous region of Madrid.

  6. Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in China

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wenhong; Sun, Changxian; Lin, Lin; Wang, Meifeng; Zhang, Hongjie; Song, Yulei

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease with a high incidence worldwide. The various symptoms have substantial impact on the quality of life of affected individuals. A long-term self-management program can increase the ability of patients to make behavioral changes, and health outcomes can improve as a consequence. This study's aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-management program for gastroesophageal reflux disease. A total of 115 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease were allocated to the experimental group and the control group. The former received self-management intervention along with conventional drug therapy, whereas the latter received standard outpatient care and conventional drug therapy. After the clinical trial, the control group also received the same self-management intervention. The levels of self-management behaviors, self-efficacy, gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, and psychological condition were compared. Those in the experimental group demonstrated significantly higher self-efficacy for managing their illness, showed positive changes in self-management behaviors, and had comparatively better remission of symptoms and improvement in psychological distress. The program helped patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease self-manage their illness as possible. PMID:27684637

  7. Evaluation of a Self-Management Program for Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wenhong; Sun, Changxian; Lin, Zheng; Lin, Lin; Wang, Meifeng; Zhang, Hongjie; Song, Yulei

    2016-01-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease is a chronic disease with a high incidence worldwide. The various symptoms have substantial impact on the quality of life of affected individuals. A long-term self-management program can increase the ability of patients to make behavioral changes, and health outcomes can improve as a consequence. This study's aim was to evaluate the effectiveness of a self-management program for gastroesophageal reflux disease. A total of 115 patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease were allocated to the experimental group and the control group. The former received self-management intervention along with conventional drug therapy, whereas the latter received standard outpatient care and conventional drug therapy. After the clinical trial, the control group also received the same self-management intervention. The levels of self-management behaviors, self-efficacy, gastroesophageal reflux disease symptoms, and psychological condition were compared. Those in the experimental group demonstrated significantly higher self-efficacy for managing their illness, showed positive changes in self-management behaviors, and had comparatively better remission of symptoms and improvement in psychological distress. The program helped patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease self-manage their illness as possible. PMID:27684637

  8. Are Behavioural Interventions Doomed to Fail? Challenges to Self-Management Support in Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Vallis, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Self-management and self-management support are concepts very familiar to those of us in diabetes care. These concepts require openness to understanding the behaviours of persons with diabetes broadly, not only behaviours restricted to the biomedical perspective. Understanding the importance of health behaviour change and working within the Expanded Chronic Care Model define the context within which self-management support should occur. The purpose of this perspective is to identify a potential limitation in existing self-management support initiatives. This potential limitation reflects provider issues, not patient issues; that is, true self-management support might require changes by healthcare providers. Specifically, although behavioural interventions within the context of academic research studies are evidence based, behaviour change interventions implemented in general practice settings might prove less effective unless healthcare providers are able to shift from a practice based on the biomedical model to a practice based on the self-management support model. The purpose of this article is to facilitate effective self-management support by encouraging providers to switch from a model of care based on the expert clinician encountering the uninformed help seeker (the biomedical model) to one guided by collaboration grounded in the principles of description, prediction and choice. Key to understanding the value of making this shift are patient-centered communication principles and the tenets of complexity theory. PMID:25837809

  9. Self-management and bipolar disorder--a clinician's guide to the literature 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Janney, Carol A; Bauer, Mark S; Kilbourne, Amy M

    2014-09-01

    This review provides clinicians and individuals with bipolar disorder (BD) with an overview of evidence-based skills shown to be effective in BD and amenable to self-management including psychoeducation; monitoring moods, medications, and social function; sleep hygiene; setting goals and relapse plans; and healthy lifestyles (physical activity, healthy eating, weight loss and management, medical comorbidities). Currently available self-management resources for BD are summarized by mode of delivery (workbooks, mobile technologies, internet, and peer-led interventions). Regardless of the self-management intervention/topic, the research suggests that personally tailored interventions of longer duration and greater frequency may be necessary to achieve the maximal benefit among individuals with BD. Means to support these self-management interventions as self-sustaining identities are critically needed. Hopefully, the recent investment in patient-centered research and care will result in best practices for the self-management of BD by mode of delivery. Since self-management of BD should complement rather than replace medical care, clinicians need to partner with their patients to incorporate and support advances in self-management for individuals with BD. PMID:25123130

  10. Are Behavioural Interventions Doomed to Fail? Challenges to Self-Management Support in Chronic Diseases.

    PubMed

    Vallis, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Self-management and self-management support are concepts very familiar to those of us in diabetes care. These concepts require openness to understanding the behaviours of persons with diabetes broadly, not only behaviours restricted to the biomedical perspective. Understanding the importance of health behaviour change and working within the Expanded Chronic Care Model define the context within which self-management support should occur. The purpose of this perspective is to identify a potential limitation in existing self-management support initiatives. This potential limitation reflects provider issues, not patient issues; that is, true self-management support might require changes by healthcare providers. Specifically, although behavioural interventions within the context of academic research studies are evidence based, behaviour change interventions implemented in general practice settings might prove less effective unless healthcare providers are able to shift from a practice based on the biomedical model to a practice based on the self-management support model. The purpose of this article is to facilitate effective self-management support by encouraging providers to switch from a model of care based on the expert clinician encountering the uninformed help seeker (the biomedical model) to one guided by collaboration grounded in the principles of description, prediction and choice. Key to understanding the value of making this shift are patient-centered communication principles and the tenets of complexity theory.

  11. Perspectives of Adults With Epilepsy and Their Support Persons on Self-Management Support

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Elizabeth Reisinger; Barmon, Christina; McGee, Robin E.; Engelhard, George; Sterk, Claire E.; DiIorio, Colleen; Thompson, Nancy J.

    2015-01-01

    Social support is an important mechanism for improving self-management, although little is known about its role in epilepsy self-management. We examined the type of support provided to people with epilepsy and its influence on self-management. We conducted in-depth interviews with 22 people with epilepsy and 16 support persons, representing 14 pairs and 10 unpaired individuals. We analyzed the data using principles of grounded theory. Supporters, who were mainly parents and spouses, aided people with epilepsy in every dimension of self-management. Support for self-management occurred along a continuum from person with epilepsy-led management to support person-led management. Where the pairs fell on the continuum depended on developmental stage, relationship type, and relationship dynamics. Seizure control shaped individuals' experiences with self-management and support within each group. The self-management continuum provides a new aspect that can be integrated into existing models of self-and family-management. PMID:25192759

  12. Chlamydia pneumoniae and asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cook, P; Davies, P; Tunnicliffe, W; Ayres, J; Honeybourne, D; Wise, R

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—This study was designed to test the association of Chlamydia pneumoniae infection with asthma in a multiracial population, after adjustments for several potential confounding variables.
METHODS—Antibodies to C pneumoniae were measured by microimmunofluorescence in 123 patients with acute asthma, 1518 control subjects admitted to the same hospital with various non-cardiovascular, non-pulmonary disorders, and 46 patients with severe chronic asthma, including some with "brittle" asthma. Acute infection or reinfection was defined by titres of IgG of ⩾512 or IgM ⩾8 or a fourfold rise in IgG, and previous infection by IgG 64-256 or IgA ⩾8. Logistic regression was used to control for likely confounders, including ethnic origin, age, sex, smoking habit, steroid medication, diabetes mellitus and social deprivation, on antibody levels.
RESULTS—Antibody titres consistent with acute C pneumoniae infection were found in 5.7% of patients with acute asthma and 5.7% of control patients, while 14.6% of patients with acute asthma and 12.7% of control patients had titres suggesting previous infection. These two groups did not differ significantly. However, titres suggesting previous infection were found in 34.8% of patients with severe chronic asthma: the difference between this group and the control group was statistically significant with an adjusted odds ratio of 3.99 (95% confidence interval 1.60 to 9.97).
CONCLUSIONS—These data raise important questions about the previously demonstrated association of C pneumoniae infection with asthma, and suggest that future studies of this association should give particular attention to the presence or absence of a history of severe chronic asthma.

 PMID:9741366

  13. The over time development of chronic illness self-management patterns: a longitudinal qualitative study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There currently exists a vast amount of literature concerning chronic illness self-management, however the developmental patterns and sustainability of self-management over time remain largely unknown. This paper aims to describe the patterns by which different chronic illness self-management behaviors develop and are maintained over time. Method Twenty-one individuals newly diagnosed with chronic illnesses (e.g., diabetes, rheumatism, ischemic heart disease, multiple sclerosis, chronic renal disease, inflammatory bowel disease) were repeatedly interviewed over two-and-a-half years. The interviews were conducted in Sweden from 2006 to 2008. A total of 81 narrative interviews were analyzed with an interpretive description approach. Results The participants’ self-management behaviors could be described in four different developmental patterns: consistent, episodic, on demand, and transitional. The developmental patterns were related to specific self-management behaviors. Most participants took long-term medications in a consistent pattern, whereas exercise was often performed according to an episodic pattern. Participants managed health crises (e.g., angina, pain episodes) according to an on demand pattern and everyday changes due to illness (e.g., adaptation of work and household activities) according to a transitional pattern. All of the participants used more than one self-management pattern. Conclusion The findings show that self-management does not develop as one uniform pattern. Instead different self-management behaviors are enacted in different patterns. Therefore, it is likely that self-management activities require support strategies tailored to each behavior’s developmental pattern. PMID:23647658

  14. The future of asthma.

    PubMed Central

    Hall, I. P.

    1997-01-01

    Reports in the media describing the discovery of "the asthma gene" or "a new vaccine for asthma" may be inaccurate and often raise patients' hopes unjustifiably. This article is a personal view of key areas in current asthma research, and it examines how they may impinge on the care of asthmatic patients in the next decade. I have tried to explain the thinking behind some of the approaches under study. I discuss the potential contributions of genetic studies, immunological approaches, and new therapeutic approaches. PMID:9001482

  15. Eosinophilic Endotype of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Aleman, Fernando; Lim, Hui Fang; Nair, Parameswaran

    2016-08-01

    Asthma is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into different clinical endotypes, depending on the type of airway inflammation, clinical severity, and response to treatment. This article focuses on the eosinophilic endotype of asthma, which is defined by the central role that eosinophils play in the pathophysiology of the condition. It is characterized by elevated sputum and/or blood eosinophils on at least 2 occasions and by a significant response to treatments that suppress eosinophilia. Histopathologic demonstration of eosinophils in the airways provides the most direct diagnosis of eosinophilic asthma; but it is invasive, thus, impractical in clinical practice. PMID:27401626

  16. Improving self-management for patients with long-term conditions.

    PubMed

    Davies, Nicola J

    An increasing number of people are living with long-term conditions. These conditions cannot be cured, but can be managed through education, health promotion, medication, therapy and self-management. Self-management involves people taking responsibility for their own health and wellbeing, as well as learning to manage any long-term illnesses. Nurses play a pivotal role in providing advice, guidance, education and support to people living with long-term conditions. Self-management is important as it not only benefits the patient, but also provides wider opportunities for community and specialist nurses to use and develop their clinical and interpersonal skills.

  17. The chronic disease self-management program--A pilot study in patients undergoing hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Slesnick, Nate; Pienkos, Shawn; Sun, Sumi; Doss-McQuitty, Sheila; Schiller, Brigitte

    2015-04-01

    A strong emphasis on self-management for health maintenance in a variety of chronic diseases has been shown to benefit patients' outcomes and quality of life. However, little has been published on such programs in patients with chronic kidney disease. We studied the feasibility and effectiveness of the Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) in 14 patients with ESRD undergoing conventional hemodialysis. This program is designed to enhance skills in the areas of medical, emotional, and role management. Outcome measures in health status, self-management behaviors, self-efficacy, and health care utilization were evaluated through use of questionnaires at baseline and after six months. PMID:26263750

  18. Work-related asthma: diagnosis and prognosis of immunological occupational asthma and work-exacerbated asthma.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, X; Cruz, M J; Bustamante, V; Lopez-Campos, J L; Barreiro, E

    2014-01-01

    The incidence and prevalence of asthma are increasing. One reason for this trend is the rise in adult-onset asthma, especially occupational asthma, which is 1 of the 2 forms of work-related asthma. Occupational asthma is defined as asthma caused by agents that are present exclusively in the workplace. The presence of pre-existing asthma does not rule out the possibility of developing occupational asthma. A distinction has traditionally been made between immunological occupational asthma (whether IgE-mediated or not) and nonimmunological occupational asthma caused by irritants, the most characteristic example of which is reactive airway dysfunction syndrome. The other form of work-related asthma is known as work-exacerbated asthma, which affects persons with pre-existing or concurrent asthma that is worsened by work-related factors. It is important to differentiate between the 2 entities because their treatment, prognosis, and medical and social repercussions can differ widely. In this review, we discuss diagnostic methods, treatment, and avoidance/nonavoidance of the antigen in immunological occupational asthma and work-exacerbated asthma. Key words: Specific inhalation challenge. Peak expiratory flow. Workplace. Irritants.

  19. Care Utilization Patterns and Diabetes Self-Management Education Duration

    PubMed Central

    Richards, Jennifer; Churilla, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. Previous studies have shown that receiving diabetes self-management education (DSME) is associated with increased care utilization. However, the relationship between DSME duration and care utilization patterns remains largely unexamined. Our purpose is to characterize DSME duration and examine the relationship between DSME duration and clinical- and self-care utilization patterns. Methods. The study sample included 1,446 adults who were ≥18 years of age, had diabetes, and had participated in the 2008 Florida Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey. Clinical- and self-care outcomes were derived using responses to the survey’s diabetes module and were based on minimum standards of care established by the American Diabetes Association. The outcomes examined included self-monitoring of blood glucose at least once per day; receiving at least one eye exam, one foot exam, A1C tests, and an influenza vaccination in the past year; and ever receiving a pneumococcal vaccination. DSME duration was categorized as no DSME, >0 to <4 hours, 4–10 hours, and >10 hours. Results. After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, compared to those who did not receive DSME, those who had 4–10 or 10+ hours of DSME were more likely to receive two A1C tests (odds ratio [95% CI] 2.69 [1.30–5.58] and 2.63 [1.10–6.31], respectively) and have a pneumococcal vaccination (1.98 [1.03–3.80] and 1.92 [1.01–3.64], respectively). Those receiving 10+ hours of DSME were 2.2 times (95% CI 1.18–4.09) as likely to have an influenza vaccination. Conclusion. These data reveal a positive relationship between DSME duration and utilization of some diabetes clinical care services. PMID:26300613

  20. National Asthma Control Program State Profiles

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health State Data Profiles (2011) Recommend on ... 1 MB] ASL Asthma Film Asthma Clinical Guidelines Air Pollution & Respiratory Health File Formats Help: How do I ...

  1. What's an Asthma Flare-Up?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy What's an Asthma Flare-Up? KidsHealth > For Parents > What's an Asthma ... of a straw that's being pinched. Causes of Asthma Flare-Ups People with asthma have airways that ...

  2. Common Asthma Triggers

    MedlinePlus

    ... your bedding on the hottest water setting. Outdoor Air Pollution Outdoor air pollution can trigger an asthma attack. This pollution can ... your newspaper to plan your activities for when air pollution levels will be low. Cockroach Allergen Cockroaches and ...

  3. Exercise-induced asthma

    MedlinePlus

    Wheezing - exercise-induced; Reactive airway disease - exercise ... Having asthma symptoms when you exercise does not mean you cannot or should not exercise. But be aware of your EIA triggers. Cold or dry air may ...

  4. Asthma and Food Allergies

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Issues Conditions Abdominal ADHD Allergies & Asthma Autism Cancer Chest & Lungs Chronic Conditions Cleft & Craniofacial Developmental Disabilities Ear Nose & Throat Emotional Problems Eyes Fever From Insects or Animals Genitals and Urinary Tract Glands & Growth ...

  5. Asthma Action Plan

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cold or warm water used with detergent and bleach can also be effective. • Wash the sheets and ... hot water or cooler water with detergent and bleach. Ë Cockroaches Many people with asthma are allergic ...

  6. Precipitating factors of asthma.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H

    1992-01-01

    Asthma is characterised by bronchial hyperresponsiveness. This feature of the asthmatic diathesis predisposes patients to wheezing in response to a number of different factors. These precipitating factors include specific allergen acting via sensitised mediator cells through an IgE-dependent mechanism. There are irritants which may work through a non-specific manner, or stimuli such as exercise and hyperventilation, which probably also act through mediator release via a non-IgE-dependent manner. The mechanism whereby physical stimuli such as exercise induce bronchoconstriction is of interest, because it increases the context in which the mast cell may participate in acute asthmatic bronchoconstriction. Respiratory infections also commonly provoke asthma, especially in infants and may, indeed, precipitate the asthmatic state itself. Finally, drugs can often trigger asthma attacks and the mechanisms of asthma precipitated by non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin have been the subject of recent research.

  7. Asthma, Allergies and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just for Kids Library School Tools Videos Virtual Allergist Education & Training Careers in A/I Continuing Education Center Fellows-in-Training Grants & Awards Program Directors Practice Resources ASTHMA IQ Consultation ...

  8. Transcendental meditation and asthma.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A F; Honsberger, R; Chiu, J T; Novey, H S

    1975-01-01

    A 6-month study with crossover at 3 months was designed to evaluate the possible beneficial effects of transcendental meditation upon bronchial asthma. 21 patients kept daily diaries of symptoms and medications and answered questionnaires at the end of the study and 6 months later. Other measurements included physician evaluation, pulmonary function testing, and galvanic skin resistance. The results indicated that transcendental meditation is a useful adjunct in treating asthma.

  9. Relvar Ellipta for asthma.

    PubMed

    2014-08-01

    ▼Relvar Ellipta (GSK) is a dry powder inhaler that contains a corticosteroid (fluticasone furoate) and a long-acting beta2 agonist (vilanterol trifenatate). It is licensed for once-daily use as maintenance therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. In a previous article we considered its use in the management of COPD.1 Here we review the evidence for Relvar Ellipta in the treatment of patients with asthma.

  10. Vaccination for asthma exacerbations.

    PubMed

    Bardin, P G

    2004-06-01

    Most asthma exacerbations are caused by common cold virus infections, predominantly rhinovirus infections. Full protection against repeat infections with the same rhinovirus serotype is given by serum neutralizing antibody, but cross-reactive antibody developed against other serotypes could yield partial protection and result in attenuated cold and airway symptoms. It is proposed that vaccine-mediated induction of cross-reactive antibody might not prevent rhinovirus infections but might reduce severe asthma symptoms and exacerbations.

  11. Asthma in inner cities.

    PubMed Central

    LeNoir, M. A.

    1999-01-01

    While the management of asthma has improved over the past two decades, the incidence of asthma in the inner city has not. The inner city, comprising a disproportionate number of people who live close to or below the poverty line, shows increased rates of morbidity and mortality from asthma. African Americans and Hispanic Americans are two to six times more likely to die from asthma than their white counterparts. When federally funded programs have targeted reducing morbidity and mortality in children from these populations, they have succeeded, but in a national study only 18 states had initiatives targeting asthma in low-income populations. This is tantamount to a public health crisis. Patients are not always properly diagnosed and are often without a regular source of health care, and symptoms are seen only in an acute context. Living conditions for the inner-city child have significant allergen triggers associated with house dust, cockroaches, cigarette smoke, chemical pollutants, and particulate matter. Viral infections, such as those caused by respiratory syncytial virus, are worse in crowded living conditions. The desirability of an increased public awareness of the seriousness of the disease and the need for chronic health care are issues that should be raised, through culturally relevant public means and in the knowledge that visual information is most effective. Physicians must understand the proper use of rescue and controller drugs, and asthma education must expand beyond doctors and nurses in their offices. The National Medical Association is committed to doing this aggressively, and community organizations, alliances, and coalitions must also aggressively follow. Public agencies must be lobbied to set high standards for proper asthma care and resources. With organizations acting in concert, the mortality and morbidity from asthma can be substantially prevented in the inner city. PMID:12653387

  12. Evolving Concepts of Asthma.

    PubMed

    Gauthier, Marc; Ray, Anuradha; Wenzel, Sally E

    2015-09-15

    Our understanding of asthma has evolved over time from a singular disease to a complex of various phenotypes, with varied natural histories, physiologies, and responses to treatment. Early therapies treated most patients with asthma similarly, with bronchodilators and corticosteroids, but these therapies had varying degrees of success. Similarly, despite initial studies that identified an underlying type 2 inflammation in the airways of patients with asthma, biologic therapies targeted toward these type 2 pathways were unsuccessful in all patients. These observations led to increased interest in phenotyping asthma. Clinical approaches, both biased and later unbiased/statistical approaches to large asthma patient cohorts, identified a variety of patient characteristics, but they also consistently identified the importance of age of onset of disease and the presence of eosinophils in determining clinically relevant phenotypes. These paralleled molecular approaches to phenotyping that developed an understanding that not all patients share a type 2 inflammatory pattern. Using biomarkers to select patients with type 2 inflammation, repeated trials of biologics directed toward type 2 cytokine pathways saw newfound success, confirming the importance of phenotyping in asthma. Further research is needed to clarify additional clinical and molecular phenotypes, validate predictive biomarkers, and identify new areas for possible interventions.

  13. [Exercise-induced asthma].

    PubMed

    Dinh Xuan, A T; Marsac, J; Lockhart, A

    1988-12-10

    Exercise-induced asthma only differs from common asthma in its causative factor. It is a typical asthmatic attack which follows a strenuous and continuous physical exercise lasting 5 to 10 minutes, most often in cold and dry weather. The prevalence of exercise-induced asthma has not yet been firmly established; its pathophysiological mechanisms are still debated, and the respective roles of heat and water losses by the airways are not clearly defined. However, the influence of the type of exercise as a precipitating factor of exercise-induced asthma is now well-known. All things being equal, swimming generates less asthma than running and cycling. This enables the subjects to be directed towards the most suitable sports and encouraged to improve their physical fitness. Drug treatment of exercise-induced asthma must preferentially be preventive; it relies on cromoglycate and beta-2 adrenergic agonists, the latter being also capable of treating acute exercise-induced bronchial obstruction. Education of the patients and their family is also important.

  14. Asthma is Different in Women

    PubMed Central

    Erzurum, Serpil C.

    2015-01-01

    Gender differences in asthma incidence, prevalence and severity have been reported worldwide. After puberty, asthma becomes more prevalent and severe in women, and is highest in women with early menarche or with multiple gestations, suggesting a role for sex hormones in asthma genesis. However, the impact of sex hormones on the pathophysiology of asthma is confounded by and difficult to differentiate from age, obesity, atopy, and other gender associated environmental exposures. There are also gender discrepancies in the perception of asthma symptoms. Understanding gender differences in asthma is important to provide effective education and personalized management plans for asthmatics across the lifecourse. PMID:26141573

  15. A Qualitative Description of Women’s HIV Self-Management Techniques: Context, Strategies, and Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Webel, Allison R.; Dolansky, Mary A.; Henry, Anna G.; Salata, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Women living with HIV face unique challenges managing their disease. The purpose of this descriptive, qualitative study was to describe self-management techniques reported by 48 women living with HIV in the United States. Participants were involved in one, 90-minute, digitally-recorded focus group exploring aspects of HIV self-management strategies. Descriptive statistics, qualitative description, and content analysis were used to analyze the data. Participants had been living with HIV for an average of 12 years, most (69%) were engaged in routine HIV care (85%) and were currently prescribed antiretroviral therapy. Participants reported using self-management techniques: taking personal time (n = 23; 48%), advocacy (n = 12; 25%), sleeping (n = 17, 35%); attending support groups (n = 10; 21%), and attending medical appointments (n = 8; 17%). Nurses can add strategies to enhance HIV self-management to routine clinical care, which may have a positive impact on the health of women living with HIV. PMID:22079674

  16. Mobile phone technologies and advanced data analysis towards the enhancement of diabetes self-management.

    PubMed

    Kouris, Ioannis; Mougiakakou, Stavroula; Scarnato, Luca; Iliopoulou, Dimitra; Diem, Peter; Vazeou, Andriani; Koutsouris, Dimitris

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the area of mobile and wireless communication for healthcare (m-Health) along with the improvements in information science allow the design and development of new patient-centric models for the provision of personalised healthcare services, increase of patient independence and improvement of patient's self-control and self-management capabilities. This paper comprises a brief overview of the m-Health applications towards the self-management of individuals with diabetes mellitus and the enhancement of their quality of life. Furthermore, the design and development of a mobile phone application for Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) self-management is presented. The technical evaluation of the application, which permits the management of blood glucose measurements, blood pressure measurements, insulin dosage, food/drink intake and physical activity, has shown that the use of the mobile phone technologies along with data analysis methods might improve the self-management of T1DM.

  17. Arthritis Self-Management: A Study of the Effectiveness of Patient Education for the Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lorig, Kate; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Assessed the effectiveness of an Arthritis Self Management course for people aged 55-95 (N=200). Results indicated significant gains in knowledge and pain reduction. Trends toward less disability were observed for participants under age 74. (JAC)

  18. Starting early: integration of self-management support into an acute stroke service

    PubMed Central

    Mäkelä, Petra; Gawned, Sara; Jones, Fiona

    2014-01-01

    Self-management support following stroke is rare, despite emerging evidence for impact on patient outcomes. The promotion of a common approach to self-management support across a stroke pathway requires collaboration between professionals. To date, the feasibility of self-management support in acute stroke settings has not been evaluated. The Bridges stroke self-management package (SMP) is based on self-efficacy principles. It is delivered by professionals and supported by a patient-held workbook. The aim of this project was to introduce the Bridges stroke SMP to the multidisciplinary staff of a London hyperacute and acute stroke unit. The ‘Plan Do Study Act’ (PDSA) cycle guided iterative stages of project development, with normalisation process theory helping to embed the intervention into existing ways of working. Questionnaires explored attitudes, beliefs and experiences of the staff who were integrating self-management support into ways of working in the acute stroke setting. Self-management support training was delivered to a total of 46 multidisciplinary stroke staff. Of the staff who attended the follow-up training, 66% had implemented Bridges self-management support with patients since initial training, and 100% felt their practice had changed. Questionnaire findings demonstrated that staff attitudes and beliefs had changed following training, particularly regarding ownership and type of rehabilitation goals set, and prioritisation of self-management support within acute stroke care. Staff initiated an audit of washing and dressing practices pre- and post-training. This was designed to evaluate the number of occasions when techniques were used by staff to facilitate patients’ independence and self-management. They found that the number of occasions featuring optimum practice went from 54% at baseline to 63% at three months post-training. This project demonstrated the feasibility of integrating self-management support into an acute stroke setting

  19. "This does my head in". Ethnographic study of self-management by people with diabetes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Self-management is rarely studied 'in the wild'. We sought to produce a richer understanding of how people live with diabetes and why self-management is challenging for some. Method Ethnographic study supplemented with background documents on social context. We studied a socio-economically and ethnically diverse UK population. We sampled 30 people with diabetes (15 type 1, 15 type 2) by snowballing from patient groups, community contacts and NHS clinics. Participants (aged 5-88, from a range of ethnic and socio-economic groups) were shadowed at home and in the community for 2-4 periods of several hours (total 88 visits, 230 hours); interviewed (sometimes with a family member or carer) about their self-management efforts and support needs; and taken out for a meal. Detailed field notes were made and annotated. Data analysis was informed by structuration theory, which assumes that individuals' actions and choices depend on their dispositions and capabilities, which in turn are shaped and constrained (though not entirely determined) by wider social structures. Results Self-management comprised both practical and cognitive tasks (e.g. self-monitoring, menu planning, medication adjustment) and socio-emotional ones (e.g. coping with illness, managing relatives' input, negotiating access to services or resources). Self-management was hard work, and was enabled or constrained by economic, material and socio-cultural conditions within the family, workplace and community. Some people managed their diabetes skilfully and flexibly, drawing on personal capabilities, family and social networks and the healthcare system. For others, capacity to self-manage (including overcoming economic and socio-cultural constraints) was limited by co-morbidity, cognitive ability, psychological factors (e.g. under-confidence, denial) and social capital. The consequences of self-management efforts strongly influenced people's capacity and motivation to continue them. Conclusion Self-management

  20. Seasonal Risk Factors for Asthma Exacerbations among Inner City Children

    PubMed Central

    Teach, Stephen J.; Gergen, Peter J.; Szefler, Stanley J.; Mitchell, Herman E.; Calatroni, Agustin; Wildfire, Jeremy; Bloomberg, Gordon; Kercsmar, Carolyn; Liu, Andrew H.; Makhija, Melanie; Matsui, Elizabeth; Morgan, Wayne; O'Connor, George; Busse, William W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Exacerbations of asthma remain common even in children and adolescents despite optimal medical management. Identification of host risk factors for exacerbations is incomplete, particularly for seasonal episodes. Objective Define host risk factors for asthma exacerbations unique to their season of occurrence. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of patients aged 6-20 years who comprised the control groups of the Asthma Control Evaluation trial and the Inner City Anti-IgE Therapy for Asthma trial. Univariate and multivariate models were constructed to determine if patient demographic and historical factors, allergic sensitization, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, spirometric measurements, asthma control, and treatment requirements were associated with seasonal exacerbations. Results The analysis included 400 patients (54.5% male; 59.0% African American; median age 13 years). Exacerbations occurred in 37.5% of participants over the periods of observation and were most common in the fall (28.8% of participants). In univariate analysis, impaired pulmonary function was significantly associated with greater odds of exacerbations for all seasons, as was an exacerbation in the previous season for all seasons except spring. In multivariate analysis, exacerbation in the previous season was the strongest predictor in fall and winter while a higher requirement for inhaled corticosteroids was the strongest predictor in spring and summer. The multivariate models had the best predictive power for fall exacerbations (30.5% variance attributed). Conclusions Among a large cohort of inner city children with asthma, patient risk factors for exacerbations vary by season. Thus, individual patient information may be beneficial in strategies to prevent these seasonal events. Clinical Implications Inner city children remain at risk for asthma exacerbations despite appropriate therapy. Because their risk factors vary by season, strategies to prevent them may need to differ as

  1. Vascular risk management through nurse-led self-management programs.

    PubMed

    Sol, Berna G M; van der Bijl, Jaap J; Banga, Jan-Dirk; Visseren, Frank L J

    2005-03-01

    In current clinical practice, adequate cardiovascular risk reduction is difficult to achieve. Treatment is primarily focused on clinical vascular disease and not on long-term risk reduction. Pertinent to success in vascular risk reduction are proper medication use, weight control, healthy food choices, smoking cessation, and physical exercise. Atherosclerotic vascular disease and its risk constitute a chronic condition, which poses specific requirements on affected patients and caregivers who should be aware of the chronicity. In patients with vascular disease, there is lack of awareness of their chronic condition because of the invisibility of most risk factors. In other patient groups with chronic illness, self-management programs were successful in achieving behavioral change. This strategy can also be useful for patients with vascular disease to adapt and adhere to an improved lifestyle. Self-management refers to the individual's ability to manage both physical and psychosocial consequences including lifestyle changes inherent to living with a chronic condition. Interventions that promote self-management are based on enhancing self-efficacy. In self-management, attention can be given to what is important and motivational to the individual patient. In this article the challenge of nursing care promoting self-management for patients with vascular risk and how this care can be applied will be explained. Nurses can play a central role in vascular risk management with a self-management approach for patients with chronic vascular disease. In vascular prevention clinics, nursing care can be delivered that includes medical treatment of vascular risks (hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, hyperglycemia, and hyperhomocystinemia) and counseling on promoting self-management (changes in diet, body weight, smoking habits, and level of exercise). Nursing interventions based on self-management promotion can provide a new and promising approach to actually achieve vascular risk

  2. ‘Get Your Life Back’: process and impact evaluation of an asthma social marketing campaign targeting older adults

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Asthma in older adults is underdiagnosed and poorly self-managed. This population has little knowledge about the key symptoms, the prevalence among older adults, and the serious consequences of untreated asthma. The purpose of this study was to undertake a multifaceted evaluation of a social marketing campaign to increase asthma awareness among older adults in a regional Australian community. Methods A cohort of older adults in an intervention region (n = 316) and a control region (n = 394) were surveyed immediately prior to and following the social marketing campaign. Campaign awareness, message recall, materials recognition, and actions taken as a result of the campaign were assessed in both regions. Asthma knowledge and perceptions, experience of asthma symptoms, and general health were also assessed in both regions at baseline and follow-up. Analyses were conducted to explore the effects of the campaign in the intervention region, and to examine outcomes among different audience segments. Results The survey data showed that those in the target segments (Wheezers and Strugglers) had better message recall, and were more likely to report having taken action to control their respiratory symptoms. The campaign significantly increased the number of calls to an asthma information line from the target audience in the intervention community. Conclusions A theory-based social marketing campaign conducted over 3-months increased the asthma information seeking behaviours of older adults in the intervention community compared to the control community. Recommendations are outlined for future community health promotion campaigns targeting older adults. PMID:23947479

  3. Self-management among Patients Living with Diabetes in the United States Virgin Islands

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, Maxine A.; Yarandi, Hossein; Nunez-Smith, Marcella

    2011-01-01

    The United States Virgin Islands (USVI) is facing a diabetes epidemic similar to the one on the U.S. mainland, yet little is known regarding the cultural context relevant to self-management in this U.S. territory. We conducted in-home interviews (n = 53) supplemented by self-administered questionnaire and A1c testing with U.S. Virgin Islanders to characterize self-management knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors among patients living with diabetes. The mean glycosylated hemoglobin (A1c) was 7.63 (Range = 5–13); a composite score of traditional self-management behaviors was not associated with A1c. Several recurrent themes emerged from qualitative analysis including: 1) cultural nuances shaped perspectives on self-management, 2) culturally-specific challenges were barriers to effective self-management, 3) medical homes were rarely viewed as the primary source of education and support, and 4) fear largely motivated or stalled self-management practices. This study highlights the need for culturally-tailored measures and interventions to address the specific needs within this population. PMID:21317521

  4. An empowerment-based approach to developing innovative e-health tools for self-management.

    PubMed

    Alpay, Laurence; van der Boog, Paul; Dumaij, Adrie

    2011-12-01

    E-health is seen as an important technological tool in achieving self-management; however, there is little evidence of how effective e-health is for self-management. Example tools remain experimental and there is limited knowledge yet about the design, use, and effects of this class of tools. By way of introducing a new view on the development of e-health tools dedicated to self-management we aim to contribute to the discussion for further research in this area. Our assumption is that patient empowerment is an important mechanism of e-health self-management and we suggest incorporating it within the development of self-management tools. Important components of empowerment selected from literature are: communication, education and health literacy, information, self-care, decision aids and contact with fellow patients. All components require skills of both patients and the physicians. In this discussion paper we propose how the required skills can be used to specify effective self-management tools. PMID:22193825

  5. Gamifying Self-Management of Chronic Illnesses: A Mixed-Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Wills, Gary; Ranchhod, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Background Self-management of chronic illnesses is an ongoing issue in health care research. Gamification is a concept that arose in the field of computer science and has been borrowed by many other disciplines. It is perceived by many that gamification can improve the self-management experience of people with chronic illnesses. This paper discusses the validation of a framework (called The Wheel of Sukr) that was introduced to achieve this goal. Objective This research aims to (1) discuss a gamification framework targeting the self-management of chronic illnesses and (2) validate the framework by diabetic patients, medical professionals, and game experts. Methods A mixed-method approach was used to validate the framework. Expert interviews (N=8) were conducted in order to validate the themes of the framework. Additionally, diabetic participants completed a questionnaire (N=42) in order to measure their attitudes toward the themes of the framework. Results The results provide a validation of the framework. This indicates that gamification might improve the self-management of chronic illnesses, such as diabetes. Namely, the eight themes in the Wheel of Sukr (fun, esteem, socializing, self-management, self-representation, motivation, growth, sustainability) were perceived positively by 71% (30/42) of the participants with P value <.001. Conclusions In this research, both the interviews and the questionnaire yielded positive results that validate the framework (The Wheel of Sukr). Generally, this study indicates an overall acceptance of the notion of gamification in the self-management of diabetes. PMID:27612632

  6. Social barriers to Type 2 diabetes self-management: the role of capital.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Julie; Wilson, Christine; Roberts, Louise; Munt, Rebecca; Crotty, Mikaila

    2014-12-01

    Approaches to self-management traditionally focus upon individual capacity to make behavioural change. In this paper, we use Bourdieu's concepts of habitus and capital to demonstrate the impact of structural inequalities upon chronic illness self-management through exploring findings from 28 semi-structured interviews conducted with people from a lower socioeconomic region of Adelaide, South Australia who have type 2 diabetes. The data suggests that access to capital is a significant barrier to type 2 diabetes self-management. While many participants described having sufficient cultural capital to access and assess health information, they often lacked economic capital and social capital in the form of support networks who promote health. Participants were often involved in social networks in which activities which are contrary to self-management have symbolic value. As a consequence, they entered relationships with health professionals at a disadvantage. We conclude that structural barriers to self-management arising from habitus resulting in the performance of health behaviours rooted in cultural and class background and limited access to capital in the form of economic resources, social networks, health knowledge and prestige may have a negative impact on capacity for type 2 diabetes self-management. PMID:24916370

  7. Integrating self-management and exercise for people living with arthritis.

    PubMed

    Mendelson, A D; McCullough, C; Chan, A

    2011-02-01

    The Program for Arthritis Control through Education and Exercise, PACE-Ex™, is an arthritis self-management program incorporating principles and practice of self-management, goal setting and warm water exercise. The purpose of this program review is to examine the impact of PACE-Ex on participants' self-efficacy for condition management, self-management behaviors, goal achievement levels and self-reported disability, pain and health status. A retrospective review was conducted on participants who completed PACE-Ex from 1998 to 2006. A total of 347 participants completed 24 PACE-Ex programs [mean age 69.9 (±12.2) years, living with arthritis mean of 14.1 (±13.2) years]. Participants showed statistically significant improvements in their self-efficacy to manage their condition (Program for Rheumatic Independent Self-Management Questionnaire) (P < 0.001) and performance of self-management behaviors (Self-Management Behavior Questionnaire) (P < 0.01). Self-reported health status, disability and pain levels improved post-program (P < 0.01) despite reporting statistically significant increase in the total swollen and tender joint counts (Health Assessment Questionnaire) (P < 0.05). Sixty-eight percent of participants achieved or exceeded their long-term goal as measured by Goal Attainment Scaling. These findings remain to be proven with a more rigorous method yet they suggest that PACE-Ex is a promising intervention that supports healthy living for individuals with arthritis.

  8. Social barriers to Type 2 diabetes self-management: the role of capital.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Julie; Wilson, Christine; Roberts, Louise; Munt, Rebecca; Crotty, Mikaila

    2014-12-01

    Approaches to self-management traditionally focus upon individual capacity to make behavioural change. In this paper, we use Bourdieu's concepts of habitus and capital to demonstrate the impact of structural inequalities upon chronic illness self-management through exploring findings from 28 semi-structured interviews conducted with people from a lower socioeconomic region of Adelaide, South Australia who have type 2 diabetes. The data suggests that access to capital is a significant barrier to type 2 diabetes self-management. While many participants described having sufficient cultural capital to access and assess health information, they often lacked economic capital and social capital in the form of support networks who promote health. Participants were often involved in social networks in which activities which are contrary to self-management have symbolic value. As a consequence, they entered relationships with health professionals at a disadvantage. We conclude that structural barriers to self-management arising from habitus resulting in the performance of health behaviours rooted in cultural and class background and limited access to capital in the form of economic resources, social networks, health knowledge and prestige may have a negative impact on capacity for type 2 diabetes self-management.

  9. Pilot program to improve self-management of patients with heart failure by redesigning care coordination.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Jessica D; O'Neal, Daniel J; Siddharthan, Kris; Neugaard, Britta I

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We tested both an educational and a care coordination element of health care to examine if better disease-specific knowledge leads to successful self-management of heart failure (HF). Background. The high utilization of health care resources and poor patient outcomes associated with HF justify tests of change to improve self-management of HF. Methods. This prospective study tested two components of the Chronic Care Model (clinical information systems and self-management support) to improve outcomes in the self-management of HF among patients who received intensive education and care coordination during their acute care stay. A postdischarge follow-up phone call assessed their knowledge of HF self-management compared to usual care patients. Results. There were 20 patients each in the intervention and usual care groups. Intervention patients were more likely to have a scale at home, write down their weight, and practice new or different health behaviors. Conclusion. Patients receiving more intensive education knew more about their disease and were better able to self-manage their weight compared to patients receiving standard care.

  10. An empowerment-based approach to developing innovative e-health tools for self-management.

    PubMed

    Alpay, Laurence; van der Boog, Paul; Dumaij, Adrie

    2011-12-01

    E-health is seen as an important technological tool in achieving self-management; however, there is little evidence of how effective e-health is for self-management. Example tools remain experimental and there is limited knowledge yet about the design, use, and effects of this class of tools. By way of introducing a new view on the development of e-health tools dedicated to self-management we aim to contribute to the discussion for further research in this area. Our assumption is that patient empowerment is an important mechanism of e-health self-management and we suggest incorporating it within the development of self-management tools. Important components of empowerment selected from literature are: communication, education and health literacy, information, self-care, decision aids and contact with fellow patients. All components require skills of both patients and the physicians. In this discussion paper we propose how the required skills can be used to specify effective self-management tools.

  11. Comparative Effectiveness on Cognitive Asthma Outcomes of the SHARP Academic Asthma Health Education and Counseling Program and a Non-Academic Program.

    PubMed

    Kintner, Eileen; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C Nathan; Stoddard, Debbie; Gomes, Melissa; Harmon, Phyllis; Van Egeren, Laurie A

    2015-12-01

    Asthma morbidity and mortality is higher among older school-age children and early adolescents than other age groups across the lifespan. NIH recommended expanding asthma education to schools and community settings to meet cognitive outcomes that have an impact on morbidity and mortality. Guided by the acceptance of asthma model, an evidence-guided, comprehensive school-based academic health education and counseling program, Staying Healthy-Asthma Responsible & Prepared™ (SHARP), was developed. The program complements existing school curricula by integrating biology, psychology, and sociology content with related spelling, math, and reading and writing assignments. Feasibility, benefits, and efficacy have been established. We compared the effectiveness of SHARP to a non-academic program, Open Airways for Schools, in improving asthma knowledge and reasoning about symptom management. A two-group, cluster-randomized, single-blinded design was used with a sample of 205 students in grades 4-5 with asthma and their caregivers. Schools were matched prior to randomization. The unit of analysis was the student. Certified elementary school teachers delivered the programs during instructional time. Data were collected from student/caregiver dyads at baseline and at 1, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. In multilevel modeling, students enrolled in the academic SHARP program demonstrated significant (p< .001) improvement in asthma knowledge and reasoning over students enrolled in the non-academic program. Knowledge advantages were retained at 24 months. Findings support delivery in schools of the SHARP academic health education program for students with asthma. PMID:26296595

  12. Comparative Effectiveness on Cognitive Asthma Outcomes of the SHARP Academic Asthma Health Education and Counseling Program and a Non-Academic Program.

    PubMed

    Kintner, Eileen; Cook, Gwendolyn; Marti, C Nathan; Stoddard, Debbie; Gomes, Melissa; Harmon, Phyllis; Van Egeren, Laurie A

    2015-12-01

    Asthma morbidity and mortality is higher among older school-age children and early adolescents than other age groups across the lifespan. NIH recommended expanding asthma education to schools and community settings to meet cognitive outcomes that have an impact on morbidity and mortality. Guided by the acceptance of asthma model, an evidence-guided, comprehensive school-based academic health education and counseling program, Staying Healthy-Asthma Responsible & Prepared™ (SHARP), was developed. The program complements existing school curricula by integrating biology, psychology, and sociology content with related spelling, math, and reading and writing assignments. Feasibility, benefits, and efficacy have been established. We compared the effectiveness of SHARP to a non-academic program, Open Airways for Schools, in improving asthma knowledge and reasoning about symptom management. A two-group, cluster-randomized, single-blinded design was used with a sample of 205 students in grades 4-5 with asthma and their caregivers. Schools were matched prior to randomization. The unit of analysis was the student. Certified elementary school teachers delivered the programs during instructional time. Data were collected from student/caregiver dyads at baseline and at 1, 12, and 24 months after the intervention. In multilevel modeling, students enrolled in the academic SHARP program demonstrated significant (p< .001) improvement in asthma knowledge and reasoning over students enrolled in the non-academic program. Knowledge advantages were retained at 24 months. Findings support delivery in schools of the SHARP academic health education program for students with asthma.

  13. Cross-site evaluation of a comprehensive pediatric asthma project: the Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. (MCAN).

    PubMed

    Viswanathan, Meera; Mansfield, Carol; Smith, Lucia Rojas; Woodell, Carol; Darcy, Niamh; Ohadike, Yvonne U; Lesch, Julie Kennedy; Malveaux, Floyd J

    2011-11-01

    The Merck Childhood Asthma Network, Inc. (MCAN) initiative selected five sites that had high asthma burden and established asthma programs but were ready for greater program integration across schools, health care systems, and communities. MCAN supported a community-based approach that was tailored to the needs of each program site. As a result, each site was unique in its combination of interventions, but all sites served common goals of integration of care, incorporation of evidence-based programs, and improvement in knowledge, self-management, health, and quality of life. This case study of the MCAN cross-site evaluation discusses the challenges associated with evaluating interventions involving multiple stakeholders that have been adjusted to fit the unique needs of specific communities. The evaluation triangulates data from site-specific monitoring and evaluation data; site documents, site visits, and cross-site meetings; qualitative assessments of families, organizational partners, and other stakeholders; and quantitative data from a common instrument on health indicators before and after the intervention. The evaluation employs the RE-AIM framework--reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance--to assess the barriers and facilitators of translation from theory into practice. Our experience suggests trade-offs between rigor of evaluation and burden of assessment that have applicability for other community-based translational efforts.

  14. [Asthma and exercise].

    PubMed

    Lecomte, J

    2002-09-01

    Exercise-induced asthma (EIA) is defined as the clinical occurrence of shortness of breath, cough or wheeze that occurs typically 5-15 minutes after the cessation of the exercise. In most patients with EIA, bronchoconstriction is followed by a refractory period, during which repeated exertion causes less bronchoconstriction. The occurrence of this type of asthma is influenced by the intensity and the duration of exercise. It is now generally believed that EIA affects all patients with asthma if challenged with exercise of sufficient intensity. The estimate prevalence varies from 7 to 15% in the general population. EIA appears also to affect 3-14% of athletes. It is now clear that hyperventilation and hypertonicity of airway-lining fluid provide the stimulus for EIA with release of constrictor mediators. Recently, incidence of new diagnoses of asthma is associated with heavy exercise in communities with high concentrations of ozone, thus, air pollution and outdoor exercise could contribute to the development of asthma in children. Beta-agonists and/or disodium cromoglycate remain the preferred first-line therapy for EIA but now antileukotrienes provide an attractive therapeutic alternative. General recommendations can help reduce its severity: warm-up; breath through mask when exercising in cold, dry conditions; in recent years some reports have suggested that training and conditioning may help athletes and non-athletes with asthma have fewer symptoms after exercise, increase the threshold of exercise necessary to induce airway obstruction and finally improve their well-being. Scuba diving stays an absolute contra-indication if asthma.

  15. Finding Meaning: HIV Self-Management and Wellbeing among People Taking Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Russell, Steve; Martin, Faith; Zalwango, Flavia; Namukwaya, Stella; Nalugya, Ruth; Muhumuza, Richard; Katongole, Joseph; Seeley, Janet

    2016-01-01

    The health of people living with HIV (PLWH) and the sustained success of antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes depends on PLWH’s motivation and ability to self-manage the condition over the long term, including adherence to drugs on a daily basis. PLWH’s self-management of HIV and their wellbeing are likely to be interrelated. Successful self-management sustains wellbeing, and wellbeing is likely to motivate continued self-management. Detailed research is lacking on PLWH’s self-management processes on ART in resource-limited settings. This paper presents findings from a study of PLWH’s self-management and wellbeing in Wakiso District, Uganda. Thirty-eight PLWH (20 women, 18 men) were purposefully selected at ART facilities run by the government and by The AIDS Support Organisation in and around Entebbe. Two in-depth interviews were completed with each participant over three or four visits. Many were struggling economically, however the recovery of health and hope on ART had enhanced wellbeing and motivated self-management. The majority were managing their condition well across three broad domains of self-management. First, they had mobilised resources, notably through good relationships with health workers. Advice and counselling had helped them to reconceptualise their condition and situation more positively and see hope for the future, motivating their work to self-manage. Many had also developed a new network of support through contacts they had developed at the ART clinic. Second, they had acquired knowledge and skills to manage their health, a useful framework to manage their condition and to live their life. Third, participants were psychologically adjusting to their condition and their new ‘self’: they saw HIV as a normal disease, were coping with stigma and had regained self-esteem, and were finding meaning in life. Our study demonstrates the centrality of social relationships and other non-medical aspects of wellbeing for self-management

  16. The application of theory in childhood asthma self-help programs.

    PubMed

    Bruhn, J G

    1983-11-01

    Theories from research in health education and compliance (adherence) behavior are reviewed and examined for their applicability to studies of self-management of childhood asthma. Specific theories discussed include: (1) the health belief model, (2) models of health, illness, and sick-role behavior, (3) social learning theory, (4) models of physician-patient relationships, (5) self-regulation model, (6) communication theory, (7) attribution, control, and decision-making theory, (8) grounded theory, (9) ecologic theory, and (10) family and social systems theories. A scheme to guide development and testing of theories in children's health and illness behavior is presented. The key common elements in the examined theories on adherence behavior are integrated and organized into a paradigm for the family determinants of the self-management of chronic illness.

  17. Allergen-induced asthma

    PubMed Central

    Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-01-01

    It was only in the late 19th century that specific allergens, pollen, animal antigens and, later, house dust mite, were identified to cause upper and lower airway disease. Early allergen challenge studies, crudely monitored before measurement of forced expiratory volume in 1 s became widespread in the 1950s, focused on the immediate effects but noted in passing prolonged and/or recurrent asthma symptoms. The late asthmatic response, recurrent bronchoconstriction after spontaneous resolution of the early responses occurring 3 h to 8 h or more postchallenge, has been identified and well characterized over the past 50 years. The associated allergen-induced airway hyper-responsiveness (1977) and allergen-induced airway inflammation (1985) indicate that these late sequelae are important in the mechanism of allergen-induced asthma. Allergens are now recognized to be the most important cause of asthma. A standardized allergen inhalation challenge model has been developed and is proving to be a valuable research tool in the investigation of asthma pathophysiology and of potential new pharmacological agents for the treatment of asthma. PMID:24791256

  18. [Epigenetics, environment and asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha; Silva-García, Raúl; Oliva-Rico, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory tract with a complex genetic background influenced by the exposition to a series of environmental factors. Genetic studies can only elucidate part of the heritability and susceptibility of asthma and even though several diseases have an evident genetic etiology, only a fraction of the genes involved in their pathogenicity have been identified. The epigenetic regulation of the latter is a fact one should bear in mind in order to explain the major triggers of diseases whose understanding is complicated, such as allergies and asthma. External stimulus such as nourishment, stress, physical activity, atmospheric pollution, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking can induce either gene silencing or gene expression. In this regard, epigenetics can explain how these environmental factors influence our genetic inheritance. There is growing evidence that backs-up the fact that DNA methylation, histone post-translational modification and microRNA expression are influenced by the environment. This helps explaining how several of the risk factors mentioned contribute to the development and inheritance of asthma. In this review, different environmental factors and their relation with the main epigenetic regulatory mechanisms will be analyzed, as well as their possible role in the development of asthma.

  19. The Microbiome in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yvonne J.; Boushey, Homer A.

    2014-01-01

    The application of recently developed sensitive, specific, culture-independent tools for identification of microbes is transforming concepts of microbial ecology, including concepts of the relationships between the vast, complex populations of microbes associated with ourselves and with states of health and disease. While most work initially focused on the community of microbes (microbiome) in the gastrointestinal tract and its relationships to gastrointestinal disease, interest has expanded to include study of the relationships of the microbiome of the airways to asthma and its phenotypes, and to the relationships between the gastrointestinal microbiome, development of immune function, and predisposition to development of allergic sensitization and asthma. We here provide our perspective on the findings of studies of differences in the airway microbiome in patients with asthma vs. healthy subjects, and of studies of relationships between environmental microbiota, gut microbiota, immune function, and the development of asthma, and additionally provide our perspective on how these findings suggest in broad outline a rationale for approaches involving directed manipulation of the gut and airway microbiome for treatment and prevention of allergic asthma. PMID:25567040

  20. [Epigenetics, environment and asthma].

    PubMed

    Rico-Rosillo, Guadalupe; Vega-Robledo, Gloria Bertha; Silva-García, Raúl; Oliva-Rico, Diego

    2014-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the respiratory tract with a complex genetic background influenced by the exposition to a series of environmental factors. Genetic studies can only elucidate part of the heritability and susceptibility of asthma and even though several diseases have an evident genetic etiology, only a fraction of the genes involved in their pathogenicity have been identified. The epigenetic regulation of the latter is a fact one should bear in mind in order to explain the major triggers of diseases whose understanding is complicated, such as allergies and asthma. External stimulus such as nourishment, stress, physical activity, atmospheric pollution, tobacco smoking and alcohol drinking can induce either gene silencing or gene expression. In this regard, epigenetics can explain how these environmental factors influence our genetic inheritance. There is growing evidence that backs-up the fact that DNA methylation, histone post-translational modification and microRNA expression are influenced by the environment. This helps explaining how several of the risk factors mentioned contribute to the development and inheritance of asthma. In this review, different environmental factors and their relation with the main epigenetic regulatory mechanisms will be analyzed, as well as their possible role in the development of asthma. PMID:24915622

  1. Managing Asthma in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamm, Ellen M.

    2004-01-01

    Asthma is the most common chronic disease of childhood, affecting nearly 5 million children under the age of 18. Children with asthma account for 3 million hospital visits and 200,000 hospitalizations yearly. This adds up to an estimated $2 billion annually in health care costs (American Academy of Pediatrics, 1999). A child with asthma has three…

  2. Smoking and Asthma (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Teens > Smoking and Asthma Print A A A Text Size What's in ... the health problems it causes. If you have asthma, smoking is especially risky because of the damage ...

  3. Smoking and Asthma (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Smoking and Asthma KidsHealth > For Parents > Smoking and Asthma Print A A A Text Size What's in ... unhealthy for everyone, but especially for someone with asthma. The lungs of a smoker, with or without ...

  4. Enhancing the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education: the diabetes literacy project.

    PubMed

    Van den Broucke, S; Van der Zanden, G; Chang, P; Doyle, G; Levin, D; Pelikan, J; Schillinger, D; Schwarz, P; Sørensen, K; Yardley, L; Riemenschneider, H

    2014-12-01

    Patient empowerment through self-management education is central to improving the quality of diabetes care and preventing Type 2 Diabetes. Although national programs exist, there is no EU-wide strategy for diabetes self-management education, and patients with limited literacy face barriers to effective self-management. The Diabetes Literacy project, initiated with the support of the European Commission, aims to fill this gap. The project investigates the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education, targeting people with or at risk of Type 2 Diabetes in the 28 EU Member States, as part of a comprehensive EU-wide diabetes strategy. National diabetes strategies in the EU, US, Taiwan, and Israel are compared, and diabetes self-management programs inventorized. The costs of the diabetes care pathway are assessed on a per person basis at national level. A comparison is made of the (cost)-effectiveness of different methods for diabetes self-management support, and the moderating role of health literacy, organization of the health services, and implementation fidelity of education programs are considered. Web-based materials are developed and evaluated by randomized trials to evaluate if interactive internet delivery can enhance self-management support for people with lower levels of health literacy. The 3-year project started in December 2012. Several literature reviews have been produced and protocol development and research design are in the final stages. Primary and secondary data collection and analysis take place in 2014. The results will inform policy decisions on improving the prevention, treatment, and care for persons with diabetes across literacy levels.

  5. Enhancing the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education: the diabetes literacy project.

    PubMed

    Van den Broucke, S; Van der Zanden, G; Chang, P; Doyle, G; Levin, D; Pelikan, J; Schillinger, D; Schwarz, P; Sørensen, K; Yardley, L; Riemenschneider, H

    2014-12-01

    Patient empowerment through self-management education is central to improving the quality of diabetes care and preventing Type 2 Diabetes. Although national programs exist, there is no EU-wide strategy for diabetes self-management education, and patients with limited literacy face barriers to effective self-management. The Diabetes Literacy project, initiated with the support of the European Commission, aims to fill this gap. The project investigates the effectiveness of diabetes self-management education, targeting people with or at risk of Type 2 Diabetes in the 28 EU Member States, as part of a comprehensive EU-wide diabetes strategy. National diabetes strategies in the EU, US, Taiwan, and Israel are compared, and diabetes self-management programs inventorized. The costs of the diabetes care pathway are assessed on a per person basis at national level. A comparison is made of the (cost)-effectiveness of different methods for diabetes self-management support, and the moderating role of health literacy, organization of the health services, and implementation fidelity of education programs are considered. Web-based materials are developed and evaluated by randomized trials to evaluate if interactive internet delivery can enhance self-management support for people with lower levels of health literacy. The 3-year project started in December 2012. Several literature reviews have been produced and protocol development and research design are in the final stages. Primary and secondary data collection and analysis take place in 2014. The results will inform policy decisions on improving the prevention, treatment, and care for persons with diabetes across literacy levels. PMID:25337960

  6. Self-Management Support Interventions for Stroke Survivors: A Systematic Meta-Review

    PubMed Central

    Parke, Hannah L.; Epiphaniou, Eleni; Pearce, Gemma; Taylor, Stephanie J. C.; Sheikh, Aziz; Griffiths, Chris J.; Greenhalgh, Trish; Pinnock, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    Background There is considerable policy interest in promoting self-management in patients with long-term conditions, but it remains uncertain whether these interventions are effective in stroke patients. Design Systematic meta-review of the evidence for self-management support interventions with stroke survivors to inform provision of healthcare services. Methods We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED, BNI, Database of Abstracts of Reviews for Effectiveness, and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews for systematic reviews of self-management support interventions for stroke survivors. Quality was assessed using the R-AMSTAR tool, and data extracted using a customised data extraction form. We undertook a narrative synthesis of the reviews' findings. Results From 12,400 titles we selected 13 systematic reviews (published 2003-2012) representing 101 individual trials. Although the term ‘self-management’ was rarely used, key elements of self-management support such as goal setting, action planning, and problem solving were core components of therapy rehabilitation interventions. We found high quality evidence that supported self-management in the context of therapy rehabilitation delivered soon after the stroke event resulted in short-term (< 1 year) improvements in basic and extended activities of daily living, and a reduction in poor outcomes (dependence/death). There is some evidence that rehabilitation and problem solving interventions facilitated reintegration into the community. Conclusions Self-management terminology is rarely used in the context of stroke. However, therapy rehabilitation currently successfully delivers elements of self-management support to stroke survivors and their caregivers with improved outcomes. Future research should focus on managing the emotional, medical and social tasks of long-term survivorship. PMID:26204266

  7. Self-management education for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Monninkhof, E; van der Valk, P; van der Palen, J; van Herwaarden, C; Partridge, M; Zielhuis, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: The idea of self-management is to teach patients how to carry out the activities of daily living optimally in the face of their physiological impairment, and to prevent or decrease the severity of exacerbations by means of life style adaptation. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) the value of self-management education is not clear. This review was undertaken to clarify the effectiveness of self-management programmes in COPD. Methods: A search was made of the Cochrane Airways Group trial registers, Medline, reference lists, and abstracts of medical conferences for controlled trials of self-management education in patients with COPD. Two reviewers independently assessed each paper for methodological quality and extracted the data. Results: The reviewers included 12 articles describing eight randomised controlled trials and one controlled clinical trial in which self-management education was compared with usual care. The studies assessed a broad spectrum of outcome measures with different follow up times so meta-analysis could not be undertaken. Self-management education had no effect on hospital admissions, emergency room visits, days lost from work, and lung function. Inconclusive results were observed on health related quality of life, COPD symptoms, and use of healthcare facilities such as doctor and nurse visits. Self-management education reduced the need for rescue medication and led to increased use of courses of oral steroids and antibiotics for respiratory symptoms. Conclusions: Insufficient data were obtained to make recommendations because of the wide variation in outcome measures used and other limitations to generalisations in the current published literature. Further research in this area is needed. PMID:12728158

  8. A Systematic Review of Self-Management Health Care Models for Individuals With Serious Mental Illnesses

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Erin L.; Fenwick, Karissa M.; Barr, Nicholas; Cohen, Heather; Brekke, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The general medical health of individuals with serious mental illnesses is compromised relative to those without serious mental illnesses. To address this health disparity, numerous integrated care strategies are being employed from the system level to the level of individual patients. However, self-management of health care, a strategy considered an integral aspect of typical care, has been infrequently included in interventions for this population. Despite reservations about the capacity of those with serious mental illnesses to self-manage health care, a subset of new interventions focused on general medical health in this population has tested whether models including self-management strategies have empirical support. To understand whether these models are supported, the authors reviewed the evidence for self-management models. Methods This systematic review examined collaborative and integrated care models that include self-management components for individuals with serious mental illnesses. Results Across the 14 studies identified in this review, promising evidence was found that individuals with serious mental health issues can collaborate with health professionals or be trained to self-manage their health and health care. The evidence supports the use of mental health peers or professional staff to implement health care interventions. However, the substantial heterogeneity in study design, types of training, and examined outcomes limited conclusions about the comparative effectiveness of existing studies. Conclusions This review found preliminary support that self-management interventions targeting the general medical health of those with serious mental illnesses are efficacious, but future work is needed to determine what elements of training or skills lead to the most salient changes. PMID:25023057

  9. Workshop: Patient Self-Management: Update of Ongoing Studies in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Stigendal; André

    1998-01-01

    Anti-vitamin K (AVK) therapy (e.g., warfarin) requires regular blood tests for adequate dosing of the drug. The therapeutic window for these drugs is narrow, with a risk of bleeding if the dose is too high and of thrombotic complications if the dose is too low. Moreover, the required dose to achieve an optimal level of anticoagulation is individual and depends on such factors as the general health of the patient, food intake, and concomitant medication. Although control requires regular monitoring, most patients are reluctant to visit an anticoagulation clinic (ACC) more than 6-12 times yearly because each visit costs the patient both money and time. The development of prothrombin time (PT) monitors that are simple to operate and highly portable has made self-management possible for large groups of patients on long-term AVK therapy. Self-management increases the safety of AVK therapy through frequent testing (3-4 times per month) and timely dose adjustments when they are indicated. The concept of self-management of AVK therapy was introduced in Germany a decade ago with great success. Swedish patient education in self-management was started in September 1996. As of May 1997, 38 patients have completed the training program, 37 of whom have continued with self-management. Experience with the first seven groups of patients has convinced us that self-management is possible and has great potential. Randomized controlled studies are needed to determine the cost effectiveness of self-management with regard to a reduction in bleeding and thrombotic complications.

  10. Factors Influencing Self-Management in Chinese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiaoping; Liu, Tingting; Yuan, Xiaojing; Ge, Song; Yang, Jing; Li, Changwei; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-09-10

    Diabetes is a major public health problem in China. Diabetes self-management is critical for patients to achieved better health outcomes, however, previous studies have shown suboptimal diabetes self-management performance. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify factors associated with diabetes self-management in Chinese adults. The results showed that confrontation, resignation, overall health beliefs, perceived susceptibility, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy were factors associated with overall diabetes self-management performance and six aspects of diabetes self-management behaviors. There is some limited evidence to suggest that provider-patient communication, married individuals, higher educational level, and higher household income level may also be linked to better diabetes self-management practice. Having healthcare insurance and utilizing chronic illness resources generally appeared to have a favorable effect on diabetes self-management performance. In addition, there were a number of factors for which the evidence is too limited to be able to ascertain its strength of association with diabetes self-management practice. The findings of this review suggest that diabetes self-management behaviors are affected by a wide range of personal and environmental factors, which allow health care providers to develop theory-based strategies to improve diabetes-self-management behaviors in this population.

  11. Factors Influencing Self-Management in Chinese Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xiaoping; Liu, Tingting; Yuan, Xiaojing; Ge, Song; Yang, Jing; Li, Changwei; Sun, Wenjie

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes is a major public health problem in China. Diabetes self-management is critical for patients to achieved better health outcomes, however, previous studies have shown suboptimal diabetes self-management performance. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to identify factors associated with diabetes self-management in Chinese adults. The results showed that confrontation, resignation, overall health beliefs, perceived susceptibility, perceived barriers, and self-efficacy were factors associated with overall diabetes self-management performance and six aspects of diabetes self-management behaviors. There is some limited evidence to suggest that provider-patient communication, married individuals, higher educational level, and higher household income level may also be linked to better diabetes self-management practice. Having healthcare insurance and utilizing chronic illness resources generally appeared to have a favorable effect on diabetes self-management performance. In addition, there were a number of factors for which the evidence is too limited to be able to ascertain its strength of association with diabetes self-management practice. The findings of this review suggest that diabetes self-management behaviors are affected by a wide range of personal and environmental factors, which allow health care providers to develop theory-based strategies to improve diabetes-self-management behaviors in this population. PMID:26378555

  12. [Inhaled therapy in asthma].

    PubMed

    Plaza Moral, Vicente; Giner Donaire, Jordi

    2016-04-01

    Because of its advantages, inhaled administration of aerosolized drugs is the administration route of choice for the treatment of asthma and COPD. Numerous technological advances in the devices used in inhaled therapy in recent decades have boosted the appearance of multiple inhalers and aerosolized drugs. However, this variety also requires that the prescribing physician is aware of their characteristics. The main objective of the present review is to summarize the current state of knowledge on inhalers and inhaled drugs commonly used in the treatment of asthma. The review ranges from theoretical aspects (fundamentals and available devices and drugs) to practical and relevant aspects for asthma care in the clinical setting (therapeutic strategies, education, and adherence to inhalers). PMID:26683076

  13. Asthma Pharmacogenomics: 2015 Update.

    PubMed

    Davis, Joshua S; Weiss, Scott T; Tantisira, Kelan G

    2015-07-01

    There is evidence that genetic factors are implicated in the observed differences in therapeutic responses to the common classes of asthma therapy such as β2-agonists, corticosteroids, and leukotriene modifiers. Pharmacogenomics explores the roles of genetic variation in drug response and continues to be a field of great interest in asthma therapy. Prior studies have focused on candidate genes and recently emphasized genome-wide association analyses. Newer integrative omics and system-level approaches have recently revealed novel understanding of drug response pathways. However, the current known genetic loci only account for a fraction of variability in drug response and ongoing research is needed. While the field of asthma pharmacogenomics is not yet fully translatable to clinical practice, ongoing research should hopefully achieve this goal in the near future buttressed by the recent precision medicine efforts in the USA and worldwide.

  14. [Asthma and scuba diving].

    PubMed

    Héritier, Francis; Leuenberger, Philippe

    2003-02-01

    In scuba diving, the density of the gases supplied increases with depth. During ascent, overinflation of the lungs is avoided by exhalation. In case of airway obstruction, the theoretical risk of pulmonary barotrauma and drowning increases. For this reason, asthma has been considered as a contraindication to scuba diving. This recommendation is often ignored and many people with asthma dive, apparently without problems. Certifying that an asthmatic patient is fit to dive remains a controversial and difficult matter. In case of mild intermittent asthma, scuba diving seems possible when the pulmonary function test is normal and the patient is asymptomatic, including during exercise and exposure to cold air. The asthmatic diver should be fully informed of the risks incurred and should notify his or her informed-consent to the physician.

  15. What Works for Asthma Education Programs: Lessons from Experimental Evaluations of Social Programs and Interventions for Children. Fact Sheet. Publication #2012-01

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chrisler, Alison

    2012-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic respiratory disease that affects millions of children and adolescents each year. In 2009, 7.1 million children ages 0 to 17 years were reported to have asthma. Unfortunately, when children and teens are unable to manage and cope with their disease, it can compromise their physical, academic, and social development. Therefore,…

  16. Are Students with Asthma at Increased Risk for Being a Victim of Bullying in School or Cyberspace? Findings from the 2011 Florida Youth Risk Behavior Survey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibson-Young, Linda; Martinasek, Mary P.; Clutter, Michiko; Forrest, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    Background: Adolescents with asthma are at risk for psychological and behavioral problems. The aim of this study was to determine whether high school students with asthma are at increased risk for bullying in school and cyberspace, and to explore the role of depressive symptoms in moderating this association. Methods: A secondary data analysis was…

  17. The influence of education on morbidity and mortality in asthma (including the use of open access hospital admission for severe attacks).

    PubMed

    Clark, C J

    1994-04-01

    Despite the availability of effective drugs, asthma morbidity and mortality are increasing. Undertreatment is a significant contributory factor providing the rationale for improved concentration on education of asthmatics. A review of asthma education programmes reveals improvements in a variety of outcome measures. However, the types of patients studied in these programmes are very variable and it remains an unproven assumption that previously non-compliant and undertreated patients are amenable to improving asthma through education. The problems of compliance are common both in childhood and adult asthma. Further concentration on strategies to improve the management of this particular sub-group require development. In general, education programmes appear more effective when they consist of specific self-management instructions rather than general education regarding the disease process. PMID:8049704

  18. Asthma Outcomes: Pulmonary Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Tepper, Robert S.; Wise, Robert S.; Covar, Ronina; Irvin, Charles G.; Kercsmar, Carolyn M.; Kraft, Monica; Liu, Mark C.; O’Connor, George T.; Peters, Stephen P.; Sorkness, Ronald; Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    Background Outcomes of pulmonary physiology have a central place in asthma clinical research. Objective At the request of National Institutes of Health (NIH) institutes and other federal agencies, an expert group was convened to provide recommendations on the use of pulmonary function measures as asthma outcomes that should be assessed in a standardized fashion in future asthma clinical trials and studies to allow for cross-study comparisons. Methods Our subcommittee conducted a comprehensive search of PubMed to identify studies that focused on the validation of various airway response tests used in asthma clinical research. The subcommittee classified the instruments as core (to be required in future studies), supplemental (to be used according to study aims and in a standardized fashion), or emerging (requiring validation and standardization). This work was discussed at an NIH-organized workshop in March 2010 and finalized in September 2011. Results A list of pulmonary physiology outcomes that applies to both adults and children older than 6 years was created. These outcomes were then categorized into core, supplemental, and emerging. Spirometric outcomes (forced expiratory volume in 1 second [FEV1], forced vital capacity [FVC], and FEV1/FVC) are proposed as core outcomes for study population characterization, for observational studies, and for prospective clinical trials. Bronchodilator reversibility and pre- and post-bronchodilator FEV1 also are core outcomes for study population characterization and observational studies. Conclusions The subcommittee considers pulmonary physiology outcomes of central importance in asthma and proposes spirometric outcomes as core outcomes for all future NIH-initiated asthma clinical research. PMID:22386510

  19. Asthma in Hispanics

    PubMed Central

    Hunninghake, Gary M.; Weiss, Scott T.; Celedón, Juan C.

    2006-01-01

    Hispanic individuals trace their ancestry to countries that were previously under Spanish rule, including Mexico, large parts of Central and South America, and some Caribbean islands. Most—but not all—Hispanics have variable proportions of European, Amerindian, and African ancestry. Hispanics are diverse with regard to many factors, including racial ancestry, country of origin, area of residence, socioeconomic status, education, and access to health care. Recent findings suggest that there is marked variation in the prevalence, morbidity, and mortality of asthma in Hispanics in the United States and in Hispanic America. The reasons for differences in asthma and asthma morbidity among and within Hispanic subgroups are poorly understood but are likely due to the interaction between yet-unidentified genetic variants and other factors, including environmental tobacco smoke exposure, obesity, allergen exposure, and availability of health care. Barriers to optimal management of asthma in Hispanics in the United States and in Hispanic America include inadequate access to health care, suboptimal use of antiinflammatory medications, and lack of reference values for spirometric measures of lung function in many subgroups (e.g., Puerto Ricans). Future studies of asthma in Hispanics should include large samples of subgroups that are well characterized with regard to self-reported ethnicity, country of origin, place of birth, area of residence, and indicators of socioeconomic status. Because Hispanics are disproportionately represented among the poor in the United States, implementation of adequate access to health care and social reforms (e.g., improving housing conditions) would likely have a major impact on reducing asthma morbidity in this population. PMID:16210666

  20. Pathology of asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kudo, Makoto; Ishigatsubo, Yoshiaki; Aoki, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Asthma is a serious health and socioeconomic issue all over the world, affecting more than 300 million individuals. The disease is considered as an inflammatory disease in the airway, leading to airway hyperresponsiveness, obstruction, mucus hyper-production and airway wall remodeling. The presence of airway inflammation in asthmatic patients has been found in the nineteenth century. As the information in patients with asthma increase, paradigm change in immunology and molecular biology have resulted in an extensive evaluation of inflammatory cells and mediators involved in the pathophysiology of asthma. Moreover, it is recognized that airway remodeling into detail, characterized by thickening of the airway wall, can be profound consequences on the mechanics of airway narrowing and contribute to the chronic progression of the disease. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition plays an important role in airway remodeling. These epithelial and mesenchymal cells cause persistence of the inflammatory infiltration and induce histological changes in the airway wall, increasing thickness of the basement membrane, collagen deposition and smooth muscle hypertrophy and hyperplasia. Resulting of airway inflammation, airway remodeling leads to the airway wall thickening and induces increased airway smooth muscle mass, which generate asthmatic symptoms. Asthma is classically recognized as the typical Th2 disease, with increased IgE levels and eosinophilic inflammation in the airway. Emerging Th2 cytokines modulates the airway inflammation, which induces airway remodeling. Biological agents, which have specific molecular targets for these Th2 cytokines, are available and clinical trials for asthma are ongoing. However, the relatively simple paradigm has been doubted because of the realization that strategies designed to suppress Th2 function are not effective enough for all patients in the clinical trials. In the future, it is required to understand more details for phenotypes of

  1. Immunotherapy in asthma.

    PubMed

    Warrington, Richard

    2010-09-01

    Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the airways in which many cells and cellular elements play a role. Chronic inflammation is associated with airway hyper-responsiveness that leads to recurrent episodes of wheezing, breathlessness, chest tightness and coughing, as well as variable airflow obstruction within the lung. With time, such airflow obstruction may become permanent due to remodeling. It has been treated for more than 100 years by subcutaneous immunotherapy with allergen extracts but in recent years, other forms and types of immunotherapy have been introduced. Perhaps the most successful of these to date, is sublingual immunotherapy, which has attained significant usage in European countries but has yet to make inroads into clinical practice in North America. Other mechanisms to modify the inflammatory responses of asthma have included immunotherapy with recombinant allergens, the use of allergen peptides targeting antigen-specific T cells and the administration of Toll-like receptor agonists coupled to allergen proteins. As the inflammatory responses in asthma frequently involve IgE, a modified monoclonal antibody to IgE and interfering with its binding to the IgE receptor have gained acceptance for treating severe allergic asthma. Other monoclonal antibodies or recombinant receptor antagonists are being assessed for their ability to block other contributors to the inflammatory response. Finally, attempts have been made to generate autoantibody responses to cytokines implicated in asthma. Most of these therapies aim to modify or inhibit the so-called Th 2 immune response, which is implicated in many forms of asthma, or to inhibit cytokines involved in these responses. However, an added benefit of classical immunotherapy seems to be the ability to prevent the allergic progression to new sensitivities and new forms of allergic disease.

  2. Inner City Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Togias, Alkis

    2014-01-01

    SYNOPSIS The inner city has long been recognized as an area of high asthma morbidity and mortality. A wide range of factors interact to create this environment. These factors include well-recognized asthma risk factors that are not specific to the inner city, the structure and delivery of health care, the location and function of the urban environment, and social inequities. This article will review these facets and discuss successful and unsuccessful interventions in order to understand what is needed to solve this problem. PMID:25459579

  3. The impact of social context on self-management in women living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Webel, Allison R; Cuca, Yvette; Okonsky, Jennifer G; Asher, Alice K; Kaihura, Alphoncina; Salata, Robert A

    2013-06-01

    HIV self-management is central to the health of people living with HIV and is comprised of the daily tasks individuals employ to manage their illness. Women living with HIV are confronted with social context vulnerabilities that impede their ability to conduct HIV self-management behaviors, including demanding social roles, poverty, homelessness, decreased social capital, and limited access to health care. We examined the relationship between these vulnerabilities and HIV self-management in a cross-sectional secondary analysis of 260 women living with HIV from two U.S. sites. All social context variables were assessed using validated self-report scales. HIV Self-Management was assessed using the HIV Self-Management Scale that measures daily health practices, HIV social support, and the chronic nature of HIV. Data were analyzed using appropriate descriptive statistics and multivariable regression. Mean age was 46 years and 65% of participants were African-American. Results indicated that social context variables, particularly social capital, significantly predicted all domains of HIV self-management including daily health practices (F = 5.40, adjusted R(2) = 0.27, p < 0.01), HIV social support (F = 4.50, adjusted R(2) = 0.22, p < 0.01), and accepting the chronic nature of HIV (F = 5.57, adjusted R(2) = 0.27, p < 0.01). We found evidence to support the influence of the traditional social roles of mother and employee on the daily health practices and the chronic nature of HIV domains of HIV self-management. Our data support the idea that women's social context influences their HIV self-management behavior. While social context has been previously identified as important, our data provide new evidence on which aspects of social context might be important targets of self-management interventions for women living with HIV. Working to improve social capital and to incorporate social roles into the daily health practices of women living with HIV may improve the health of

  4. The Impact of Social Context on Self-Management in Women Living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Webel, Allison R.; Cuca, Yvette; Okonsky, Jennifer G.; Asher, Alice K.; Kaihura, Alphoncina; Salata, Robert A.

    2013-01-01

    HIV self-management is central to the health of people living with HIV and is comprised of the daily tasks individuals employ to manage their illness. Women living with HIV are confronted with social context vulnerabilities that impede their ability to conduct HIV self-management behaviors, including demanding social roles, poverty, homelessness, decreased social capital, and limited access to health care. We examined the relationship between these vulnerabilities and HIV self-management in a cross-sectional secondary analysis of 260 women living with HIV from two U.S. sites. All social context variables were assessed using validated self-report scales. HIV Self-Management was assessed using the HIV Self-Management Scale that measures daily health practices, HIV social support, and the chronic nature of HIV. Data were analyzed using appropriate descriptive statistics and multivariable regression. Mean age was 46 years and 65% of participants were African-American. Results indicated that social context variables, particularly social capital, significantly predicated all domains of HIV self-management including daily health practices (F=5.40, adjusted R2=0.27, p<0.01), HIV social support (F=4.50, adjusted R2=0.22, p<0.01), and accepting the chronic nature of HIV (F=5.57, adjusted R2=0.27, p<0.01). We found evidence to support the influence of the traditional social roles of mother and employee on the daily health practices and the chronic nature of HIV domains of HIV self-management. Our data support the idea that women’s social context influences their HIV self-management behavior. While social context has been previously identified as important, our data provide new evidence on which aspects of social context might be important targets of self-management interventions for women living with HIV. Working to improve social capital and to incorporate social roles into the daily health practices of women living with HIV may improve the health of this population. PMID

  5. Maternal smoking in pregnancy and its influence on childhood asthma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Maternal smoking in pregnancy (MSP) is a large modifiable risk factor for pregnancy related mortality and morbidity and also the most important known modifiable risk factor for asthma. This review summarises the effects of MSP throughout infancy, childhood and adolescence with regards to asthma (development and severity). Firstly, the direct damage caused by nicotine on fetal lung development, fetal growth and neuronal differentiation is discussed, as well as the indirect effects of nicotine on placental functioning. Secondly, the effects of MSP on later immune functioning resulting in increased infection rate are summarised and details are given on the effects of MSP modulating airway hyperreactivity, reducing lung function and therefore increasing asthma morbidity. Furthermore, epigenetic effects are increasingly being recognised. These can also result in transgenerational detrimental effects induced by cigarette smoke. In summary, the causal relationship between MSP and asthma development is well documented and presents a major health problem for generations to come. The high prevalence of MSP is alarming and epigenetic effects of nicotine on immune functioning potentiate this danger. A considerable part of the increase in asthma prevalence worldwide is due to MSP. PMID:27730206

  6. The role of particulate matter in exacerbation of atopic asthma.

    PubMed

    Gavett, S H; Koren, H S

    2001-01-01

    Increasing evidence shows that elevated levels of particulate matter (PM) can exacerbate existing asthma, while evidence that PM can promote the induction of asthma is limited. PM in ambient air has been associated with increased emergency room visits and medication use by asthmatics. Controlled human exposure studies of acid aerosols suggest increased responses among adolescent asthmatics. Increased ambient and indoor levels of bioaerosols (e.g., house dust mite, fungal spores, endotoxin) have been associated with exacerbation of asthma. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) studies focus on the effects of exposing humans and animal models to a combination of various PM samples (e.g., diesel exhaust particles, oil fly ash) and allergens (e.g., house dust mite, ovalbumin). These research efforts to understand the mechanisms by which PM exposure can promote allergic sensitization and exacerbate existing asthma concentrate on the role of transition metals. Exposure of animal models to combined PM and allergen promotes allergic sensitization and increases allergic inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness. Exposure of healthy human volunteers to emission source PM samples promotes inflammation and increased indices of oxidant formation correlating with the quantity of transition metals in the samples. Results of these studies suggest that transition metals in ambient PM promote the formation of reactive oxygen species and subsequent lung injury, inflammation, and airway hyperresponsiveness leading to airflow limitation and symptoms of asthma.

  7. Challenges of self-management when living with multiple chronic conditions

    PubMed Central

    Liddy, Clare; Blazkho, Valerie; Mill, Karina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the perspectives of patients who live with multiple chronic conditions as they relate to the challenges of self-management. Data sources On September 30, 2013, we searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL using relevant key words including chronic disease, comorbidity, multimorbidity, multiple chronic conditions, self-care, self-management, perspective, and perception. Study selection Three reviewers assessed and extracted the data from the included studies after study quality was rated. Qualitative thematic synthesis method was then used to identify common themes. Twenty-three articles met the inclusion criteria, with most coming from the United States. Synthesis Important themes raised by people living with multiple chronic conditions related to their ability to self-manage included living with undesirable physical and emotional symptoms, with pain and depression highlighted. Issues with conflicting knowledge, access to care, and communication with health care providers were raised. The use of cognitive strategies, including reframing, prioritizing, and changing beliefs, was reported to improve people’s ability to self-manage their multiple chronic conditions. Conclusion This study provides a unique view into patients’ perspectives of living with multiple chronic conditions, which are clearly linked to common functional challenges as opposed to specific diseases. Future policy and programming in self-management support should be better aligned with patients’ perspectives on living with multiple chronic conditions. This might be achieved by ensuring a more patient-centred approach is adopted by providers and health service organizations. PMID:25642490

  8. Implementing chronic disease self-management in community settings: lessons from Australian demonstration projects.

    PubMed

    Francis, Caitlin F; Feyer, Anne-Marie; Smith, Ben J

    2007-11-01

    The evaluation of the Sharing Health Care Initiative addressed the translation of different models of chronic disease self-management into health and community service contexts in Australia. Across seven projects, four intervention models were adopted: (1) the Stanford Chronic Disease Self Management course; (2) generic disease management planning, training and support; (3) tailored disease management planning, training and support, and; (4) telephone coaching. Targeted recruitment through support groups and patient lists was most successful for reaching high-needs clients. Projects with well developed organisational structures and health system networks demonstrated more effective implementation. Engagement of GPs in recruitment and client support was limited. Future self-management programs will require flexible delivery methods in the primary health care setting, involving practice nurses or the equivalent. After 12 months there was little evidence of potential sustainability, although structures such as consumer resource centres and client support clubs were established in some locations. Only one project was able to use Medicare chronic disease-related items to integrate self-management support into routine general practice. Participants in all projects showed improvements in self-management practices, but those receiving Model 3, flexible and tailored support, and Model 4, telephone coaching, reported the greatest benefits. PMID:17973606

  9. Self-Management: Enabling and empowering patients living with cancer as a chronic illness

    PubMed Central

    McCorkle, Ruth; Ercolano, Elizabeth; Lazenby, Mark; Schulman-Green, Dena; Schilling, Lynne S.; Lorig, Kate; Wagner, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    With recent improvements in early detection, diagnosis and treatment of cancer, people with cancer are living longer, and their cancer may be managed as a chronic illness. Cancer as a chronic illness places new demands on patients and families to manage their own care, and it challenges old paradigms that oncology's work is done after treatment. As a chronic illness, however, cancer care occurs on a continuum that stretches from prevention to the end of life, with early detection, diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship in between. In this paper, we review self-management interventions that enable patients and families to participate in managing their care along this continuum. We review randomized controlled trials of self-management interventions with cancer patients and families in the treatment, survivorship, and end-of-life phases of the cancer-care continuum. We also present the Chronic Care Model as a model of care that oncology practices can use to enable and empower patients and families to engage in self-management. We conclude that, the need for a common language by which to speak about self-management and a common set of self-management actions for cancer care notwithstanding, oncology practices can now build strong relationships with their patients and formulate mutually-agreed upon care plans that enable and empower patients to care for themselves in the way they prefer. PMID:21205833

  10. Assistive technologies for self-managed pressure ulcer prevention in spinal cord injury: a scoping review.

    PubMed

    Tung, James Y; Stead, Brent; Mann, William; Ba'Pham; Popovic, Milos R

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) present a persistent and costly problem. Continuing effort in developing new technologies that support self-managed care is an important prevention strategy. Specifically, the aims of this scoping review are to review the key concepts and factors related to self-managed prevention of PUs in individuals with SCI and appraise the technologies available to assist patients in self-management of PU prevention practices. There is broad consensus that sustaining long-term adherence to prevention regimens is a major concern. Recent literature highlights the interactions between behavioral and physiological risk factors. We identify four technology categories that support self-management: computer-based educational technologies demonstrated improved short-term gains in knowledge (2 studies), interface pressure mapping technologies demonstrated improved adherence to pressure-relief schedules up to 3 mo (5 studies), electrical stimulation confirmed improvements in tissue tolerance after 8 wk of training (3 studies), and telemedicine programs demonstrated improvements in independence and reduced hospital visits over 6 mo (2 studies). Overall, self-management technologies demonstrated low-to-moderate effectiveness in addressing a subset of risk factors. However, the effectiveness of technologies in preventing PUs is limited due to a lack of incidence reporting. In light of the key findings, we recommend developing integrated technologies that address multiple risk factors.

  11. Risk and self-managing chronic joint pain: looking beyond individual lifestyles and behaviour.

    PubMed

    Morden, Andrew; Jinks, Clare; Ong, Bie Nio

    2015-07-01

    Self-managing chronic musculoskeletal pain is predominantly framed within a discourse of modifying behaviour, or lifestyle risk factors such as diet, weight loss and exercise by policymakers, researcher and clinicians. Little research has been conducted which explores how 'risk' is understood or encountered by those with joint pain and how it may relate to self-management. Drawing from serial interviews and a diary study with 22 participants, the findings demonstrate that people with chronic pain engage in a process of assessing and adapting to hazardous or pain conferring situations in relation to daily activities. 'Risks' are embedded within a dialectic between corporeal experience and the design features of everyday social environments. Self-management, in this context, is not necessarily solely related to following clinical advice, rather it includes dealing with 'risks' of pain, hazards relating to bodily limitations and the environment, and ensuring the ability to continue with valued activities. Findings contribute to sociological understandings of self-management and risk while demonstrating the limits of viewing self-management as an individualised endeavour of changing behaviour. PMID:26171691

  12. Context and complexity: the meaning of self-management for older adults with heart disease.

    PubMed

    Moore, Lucy; Frost, Julia; Britten, Nicky

    2015-11-01

    Self-management policies have presented opportunities for patients with long-term conditions to take control and actively improve their health. However, the work of self-management appears to be packaged in the form of essential and desirable skills and attributes required for success. This article presents the findings of a qualitative study, employing longitudinal diary interviews with 21 patients aged between 60 and 85 years diagnosed with coronary heart disease from three contrasting general practice areas. Drawing on concepts of the care of the self and the reflexive self, this article presents the diversity of self-management practices by older patients in the context of their lifeworld. Illustrated through individual case studies, it clearly identifies where patients are engaged self-managers with the agency, knowledge and self-discipline to modify their behaviour for an improved health outcome. This study highlights their life and illness perspectives as well as those of patients who are burdened with emotional insecurity, comorbidities and caring responsibilities. It shows the spectrum of relationships with health professionals that influence engaged self-management. We suggest that policy initiatives that favour behavioural change neglect social context and the individualised practices that are a necessary response to structural and psychosocial constraints.

  13. Implementing chronic disease self-management in community settings: lessons from Australian demonstration projects.

    PubMed

    Francis, Caitlin F; Feyer, Anne-Marie; Smith, Ben J

    2007-11-01

    The evaluation of the Sharing Health Care Initiative addressed the translation of different models of chronic disease self-management into health and community service contexts in Australia. Across seven projects, four intervention models were adopted: (1) the Stanford Chronic Disease Self Management course; (2) generic disease management planning, training and support; (3) tailored disease management planning, training and support, and; (4) telephone coaching. Targeted recruitment through support groups and patient lists was most successful for reaching high-needs clients. Projects with well developed organisational structures and health system networks demonstrated more effective implementation. Engagement of GPs in recruitment and client support was limited. Future self-management programs will require flexible delivery methods in the primary health care setting, involving practice nurses or the equivalent. After 12 months there was little evidence of potential sustainability, although structures such as consumer resource centres and client support clubs were established in some locations. Only one project was able to use Medicare chronic disease-related items to integrate self-management support into routine general practice. Participants in all projects showed improvements in self-management practices, but those receiving Model 3, flexible and tailored support, and Model 4, telephone coaching, reported the greatest benefits.

  14. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Use as Health Self-Management: Rural Older Adults With Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Bell, Ronny A.; Snively, Beverly M.; Smith, Shannon L.; Skelly, Anne H.; Wetmore, Lindsay K.; Quandt, Sara A.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives This study describes complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among rural older adults with diabetes, delineates the relationship of health self-management predictors to CAM therapy use, and furthers conceptual development of CAM use within a health self-management framework. Methods Survey interview data were collected from a random sample of 701 community dwelling African American, Native American, and White elders residing in two rural North Carolina counties. We summarize CAM use for general use and for diabetes care and use multiple logistic modeling to estimate the effects of health self-management predictors on use of CAM therapies. Results The majority of respondents used some form of CAM for general purpose, whereas far fewer used CAM for diabetes care. The most widely used CAM categories were food home remedies, other home remedies, and vitamins. The following health self-management predictors were related to the use of different categories of CAM therapies: personal characteristics (ethnicity), health status (number of health conditions), personal resources (education), and financial resources (economic status). Discussion CAM is a widely used component of health self-management among rural among older adults with diabetes. Research on CAM use will benefit from theory that considers the specific behavior and cognitive characteristics of CAM therapies. PMID:16497962

  15. Coping strategies used by poorly adherent patients for self-managing bipolar disorder

    PubMed Central

    Blixen, Carol; Levin, Jennifer B; Cassidy, Kristin A; Perzynski, Adam T; Sajatovic, Martha

    2016-01-01

    Background Bipolar disorder (BD) is a chronic mental illness associated with reduced quality of life, high rates of suicide, and high financial costs. Evidence indicates that psychosocial stress might play an important role in the onset and course of BD. Objective The objective of this study was to address the gap between coping theory and the clinical use of coping strategies used to self-manage BD. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of 21 poorly adherent patients with BD. All interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using content analysis with an emphasis on dominant themes. Results Transcript-based analysis generated two major domains of coping strategies used to self-manage BD: 1) problem focused (altering eating habits, managing mood-stabilizing medications, keeping psychiatric appointments, seeking knowledge, self-monitoring, and socializing) and 2) emotion focused (distracting activities, denial, isolation, modifying/avoiding, helping others, and seeking social support). Participants used both types of coping strategies to deal with stressful situations brought about by the internal and external demands associated with self-management of BD. Conclusion This qualitative study provided a first step in evaluating coping strategies as a possible mediator in the self-management of BD and has implications for health care providers. Being able to characterize an individual’s coping behaviors can help patients modify or replace more maladaptive coping with better coping strategies in the self-management of this chronic mental illness. PMID:27524888

  16. Factor analyses of an Adult Epilepsy Self-Management Measurement Instrument (AESMMI).

    PubMed

    Escoffery, Cam; Bamps, Yvan; LaFrance, W Curt; Stoll, Shelley; Shegog, Ross; Buelow, Janice; Shafer, Patricia; Thompson, Nancy J; McGee, Robin E; Hatfield, Katherine

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the psychometric properties of an enhanced Adult Epilepsy Self-Management Measurement Instrument (AESMMI). An instrument of 113 items, covering 10 a priori self-management domains, was generated through a multiphase process, based on a review of the literature, validated epilepsy and other chronic condition self-management scales and expert input. Reliability and exploratory factor analyses were conducted on data collected from 422 adults with epilepsy. The instrument was reduced to 65 items, converging on 11 factors: Health-care Communication, Coping, Treatment Management, Seizure Tracking, Social Support, Seizure Response, Wellness, Medication Adherence, Safety, Stress Management, and Proactivity. Exploratory factors supported the construct validity for 6 a priori domains, albeit with significant changes in the retained items or in their scope and 3 new factors. One a priori domain was split in 2 subscales pertaining to treatment. The configuration of the 11 factors provides additional insight into epilepsy self-management behaviors. Internal consistency reliability of the 65-item instrument was high (α=.935). Correlations with independent measures of health status, quality of life, depression, seizure severity, and life impact of epilepsy further validated the instrument. This instrument shows potential for use in research and clinical settings and for assessing intervention outcomes and self-management behaviors in adults with epilepsy.

  17. Evolution of asthma through childhood.

    PubMed

    Sears, M R

    1998-11-01

    The greatest incidence of childhood asthma is among males under 5 years, with decreasing numbers of new cases with age. Many young children wheeze, but remission is common especially in non-atopic children without a family history of allergy or asthma, whose wheezing relates more to infections and environmental tobacco smoke exposure. The prognosis of childhood asthma is best established from population studies, in which some two-thirds of wheezy children become symptom-free as adults, whereas follow-up studies of wheezing children seen in office or specialty clinic practice, who generally have more severe asthma, show a much greater likelihood (60-80%) of persistence of asthma into adulthood. Factors predisposing to persistence of childhood asthma include a positive family history, development of atopy, environmental exposures to allergens and cigarette smoke, markers of severity of childhood asthma, and female gender.

  18. Efficacy of Nasal Mometasone for the Treatment of Chronic Sinonasal Disease in Inadequately Controlled Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Anne E.; Castro, Mario; Cohen, Rubin I.; Gerald, Lynn B.; Holbrook, Janet T.; Irvin, Charles G.; Mohapatra, Shyam; Peters, Stephen P.; Rayapudi, Sobharani; Sugar, Elizabeth A.; Wise, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic sinonasal disease is common in asthma and associated with poor asthma control; however there are no long term trials addressing whether chronic treatment of sinonasal disease improves asthma control. Objective To determine if treatment of chronic sinonasal disease with nasal corticosteroids improves asthma control as measured by the Childhood Asthma Control Test (cACT) and Asthma Control Test (ACT) in children and adults respectively. Methods A 24 week multi-center randomized placebo controlled double-blinded trial of placebo versus nasal mometasone in adults and children with inadequately controlled asthma. Treatments were randomly assigned with concealment of allocation. Results 237 adults and 151 children were randomized to nasal mometasone versus placebo, 319 participants completed the study. There was no difference in the cACT (difference in change with mometasone – change with placebo [ΔM - ΔP]: -0.38, CI: -2.19 to 1.44, p = 0.68 ages 6 to 11) or the ACT (ΔM - ΔP: 0.51, CI: -0.46 to 1.48, p = 0.30, ages 12 and older) in those assigned to mometasone versus placebo. In children and adolescents, ages 6 to 17, there was no difference in asthma or sinus symptoms, but a decrease in episodes of poorly controlled asthma defined by a drop in peak flow. In adults there was a small difference in asthma symptoms measured by the Asthma Symptom Utility Index (ΔM - ΔP: 0.06, CI: 0.01 to 0.11, p <0.01) and in nasal symptoms (sinus symptom score ΔM - ΔP: -3.82, CI: -7.19 to- 0.45, p =0.03), but no difference in asthma quality of life, lung function or episodes of poorly controlled asthma in adults assigned to mometasone versus placebo. Conclusions Treatment of chronic sinonasal disease with nasal corticosteroids for 24 weeks does not improve asthma control. Treatment of sinonasal disease in asthma should be determined by the need to treat sinonasal disease rather than to improve asthma control. PMID:25174863

  19. Childhood Obesity and Asthma Control in the GALA II and SAGE II Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Elizabeth A.; Roth, Lindsey A.; Oh, Sam S.; Tcheurekdjian, Haig; Sen, Saunak; Davis, Adam; Farber, Harold J.; Avila, Pedro C.; Brigino-Buenaventura, Emerita; LeNoir, Michael A.; Lurmann, Fred; Meade, Kelley; Serebrisky, Denise; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Kumar, Rajesh; Rodriguez-Santana, Jose R.; Thyne, Shannon M.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Obesity is associated with increased asthma morbidity, lower drug responsiveness to inhaled corticosteroids, and worse asthma control. However, most prior investigations on obesity and asthma control have not focused on pediatric populations, considered environmental exposures, or included minority children. Objectives: To examine the association between body mass index categories and asthma control among boys and girls; and whether these associations are modified by age and race/ethnicity. Methods: Children and adolescents ages 8–19 years (n = 2,174) with asthma were recruited from the Genes-environments and Admixture in Latino Americans (GALA II) Study and the Study of African Americans, Asthma, Genes, and Environments (SAGE II). Ordinal logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (OR) and their confidence intervals (95% CI) for worse asthma control. Measurements and Main Results: In adjusted analyses, boys who were obese had a 33% greater chance of having worse asthma control than their normal-weight counterparts (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.04–1.71). However, for girls this association varied with race and ethnicity (P interaction = 0.008). When compared with their normal-weight counterparts, obese African American girls (OR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.41–1.05) were more likely to have better controlled asthma, whereas Mexican American girls had a 1.91 (95% CI, 1.12–3.28) greater odds of worse asthma control. Conclusions: Worse asthma control is uniformly associated with increased body mass index in boys. Among girls, the direction of this association varied with race/ethnicity. PMID:23392439

  20. Research on psychosocial aspects of asthma in the Arab world: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Al-Khateeb, Anas J; Al Khateeb, Jamal M

    2015-01-01

    The importance of psychosocial factors in the management of bronchial asthma has long been recognized. This paper offers a review of research published in the English language related to psychosocial aspects of bronchial asthma in Arab countries. Several databases (PubMed, Science Direct, Springer Link, ERIC, and PsychInfo) were searched using the following keywords: bronchial asthma, Arab countries, Algiers, Bahrain, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Palestine (West Bank, Gaza), Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Sudan, Somalia; United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. Thirty-two studies were conducted in 9 Arab countries. Almost all studies found were published in the last fourteen years with an apparent increasing rate in the last five years. In descending order, these studies addressed: knowledge of and attitudes toward asthma, quality of life, behavioral and emotional problems and factors related to academic achievement. The main results of the studies reviewed were: (a) physicians', school staff's, and parents' knowledge of and attitudes toward asthma were generally unsatisfactory, (b) in-service asthma education programs significantly impacted parent and staff knowledge and attitudes, and asthma management practices, (c) quality of life in children and adolescents was significantly adversely affected by asthma, (d) asthma was a common cause of school absenteeism, and had a significant negative impact on academic achievement of students, and (e) students with asthma had significantly higher rates of behavioral and emotional difficulties compared to students without asthma. The paper concludes with a discussion about the implications of these results and a call for further research in this area. PMID:25905019

  1. Research on psychosocial aspects of asthma in the Arab world: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Al-Khateeb, Anas J; Al Khateeb, Jamal M

    2015-01-01

    The importance of psychosocial factors in the management of bronchial asthma has long been recognized. This paper offers a review of research published in the English language related to psychosocial aspects of bronchial asthma in Arab countries. Several databases (PubMed, Science Direct, Springer Link, ERIC, and PsychInfo) were searched using the following keywords: bronchial asthma, Arab countries, Algiers, Bahrain, Comoros, Djibouti, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Libya, Mauritania, Morocco, Oman, Palestine (West Bank, Gaza), Qatar, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, Sudan, Somalia; United Arab Emirates, and Yemen. Thirty-two studies were conducted in 9 Arab countries. Almost all studies found were published in the last fourteen years with an apparent increasing rate in the last five years. In descending order, these studies addressed: knowledge of and attitudes toward asthma, quality of life, behavioral and emotional problems and factors related to academic achievement. The main results of the studies reviewed were: (a) physicians', school staff's, and parents' knowledge of and attitudes toward asthma were generally unsatisfactory, (b) in-service asthma education programs significantly impacted parent and staff knowledge and attitudes, and asthma management practices, (c) quality of life in children and adolescents was significantly adversely affected by asthma, (d) asthma was a common cause of school absenteeism, and had a significant negative impact on academic achievement of students, and (e) students with asthma had significantly higher rates of behavioral and emotional difficulties compared to students without asthma. The paper concludes with a discussion about the implications of these results and a call for further research in this area.

  2. Results of a community translation of the "Women Take PRIDE" heart disease self-management program.

    PubMed

    Gallant, Mary P; Pettinger, Tianna M; Coyle, Cassandra L; Spokane, Linda S

    2015-03-01

    This article reports the results of a community demonstration of an evidence-based heart disease self-management program for older women. Women Take PRIDE (WTP) is a group-based education and behavior modification program, based on social cognitive theory, designed to enhance heart disease self-management among older women. We implemented the program in community settings with 129 participants. Evaluation data was collected at baseline and at 4- and 12-month follow-ups. Outcomes included general health status, functional health status, and knowledge. Results showed significant improvements in self-rated health, energy, social functioning, knowledge of community resources, and number, frequency, and bother of cardiac symptoms. These results demonstrate that an evidence-based heart disease self-management program can be effective at improving health and quality of life among older women with heart disease when implemented in community settings.

  3. Building a Virtual Environment for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Constance; Feenan, Kevin; Setliff, Glenn; Pereira, Katherine; Hassell, Nancy; Beresford, Henry F.; Epps, Shelly; Nicollerat, Janet; Tatum, William; Feinglos, Mark; Vorderstrasse, Allison

    2015-01-01

    The authors developed an immersive diabetes community to provide diabetes self-management education and support for adults with type 2 diabetes. In this article the authors describe the procedures used to develop this virtual environment (VE). Second Life Impacts Diabetes Education & Self-Management (SLIDES), the VE for our diabetes community was built in Second Life. Social Cognitive Theory, behavioral principles and key aspects of virtual environments related to usability were applied in the development in this VE. Collaboration between researchers, clinicians and information technology (IT) specialists occurred throughout the development process. An interactive community was successfully built and utilized to provide diabetes self-management education and support. VEs for health applications may be innovative and enticing, yet it must be kept in mind that there are substantial effort, expertise, and usability factors that must be considered in the development of these environments for health care consumers. PMID:25699133

  4. Development and validation of a diabetes self-management instrument for older African-Americans.

    PubMed

    McCaskill, Gina M; Bolland, Kathleen A; Burgio, Kathryn L; Leeper, James

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop and validate a new diabetes self-management instrument for older African-Americans 65 years of age and older. The Self-Care Utility Geriatric African-American Rating (SUGAAR) was developed using the American Diabetes Association's standards for the management of type 2 diabetes in older adults and cognitive interviews with older African-Americans. The instrument underwent extensive review by a panel of experts, two rounds of cognitive interviews, and a pilot test before it was administered in an interview format to 125 community-dwelling older African-Americans. The instrument demonstrated content validity and significant, but modest, convergent validity with items from an established diabetes self-management instrument. Social workers and health care professionals can use the SUGARR to assess diabetes self-management and to identify areas for education and support for older African-Americans with type 2 diabetes.

  5. Men, rheumatoid arthritis, psychosocial impact and self-management: A narrative review.

    PubMed

    Flurey, Caroline A; Hewlett, Sarah; Rodham, Karen; White, Alan; Noddings, Robert; Kirwan, John

    2016-10-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a chronic disease affecting fewer men than women. We systematically reviewed the literature on impact and self-management of rheumatoid arthritis in men. A total of 28 papers were included and grouped into two categories: psychosocial impact of rheumatoid arthritis, and coping and self-management. This review finds gender differences relating to quality of life, work, distress, self-management, coping and support. We conclude that there is a dearth of literature focussing on rheumatoid arthritis in men only, and mixed gender studies include insufficient men to draw strong conclusions about men. Thus, further research is needed to understand the support needs of men with rheumatoid arthritis in depth. PMID:25759375

  6. Managing Asthma at School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Madden, Julie A.

    2000-01-01

    School personnel must know which students have asthma, typical warning signs, and appropriate actions in an emergency. Administering appropriate medication and reducing environmental triggers are not enough. Policymaking in schools and workplaces and legislation to increase health care access and eliminate substandard housing and air pollution are…

  7. Medications for Chronic Asthma.

    PubMed

    Falk, Nathan P; Hughes, Scott W; Rodgers, Blake C

    2016-09-15

    Chronic asthma is a major health concern for children and adults worldwide. The goal of treatment is to prevent symptoms by reducing airway inflammation and hyperreactivity. Step-up therapy for symptom control involves initiation with low-dose treatment and increasing intensity at subsequent visits if control is not achieved. Step-down therapy starts with a high-dose regimen, reducing intensity as control is achieved. Multiple randomized controlled trials have shown that inhaled corticosteroids are the most effective monotherapy. Other agents may be added to inhaled corticosteroids if optimal symptom control is not initially attained. Long-acting beta2 agonists are the most effective addition, but they are not recommended as monotherapy because of questions regarding their safety. Leukotriene receptor antagonists can be used in addition to inhaled corticosteroids, but they are not as effective as adding a long-acting beta2 agonist. Patients with mild persistent asthma who prefer not to use inhaled corticosteroids may use leukotriene receptor antagonists as monotherapy, but they are less effective. Because of their high cost and a risk of anaphylaxis, monoclonal antibodies should be reserved for patients with severe symptoms not controlled by other agents. Immunotherapy should be considered in persons with asthma triggered by confirmed allergies if they are experiencing adverse effects with medication or have other comorbid allergic conditions. Many patients with asthma use complementary and alternative agents, most of which lack data regarding their safety or effectiveness. PMID:27637121

  8. Exercise training in asthma.

    PubMed

    Satta, A

    2000-12-01

    Asthma is a chronic disease that is often limiting the exercise capacity. Rehabilitation programs are recommended and widely applied in asthmatic patients, and exercise prescription is a keystone of these programs. The impairment of exercise performance in asthmatics, the role of exercise training in such patients, the mechanisms of its beneficial effects and the suggested programs are discussed in a review, accordingly to the current evidence and available data in scientific literature. Exercise performance is impaired in most asthmatics. There is no conclusive evidence that asthma may involve a ventilatory limitation to exercise. The lesser fitness in asthmatics seems mainly due to inactivity and sedentary lifestyle. Exercise induced asthma (EIA) is a significant problem, and the best approach to minimise its effects on exercise capacity is prevention. Exercise training has been proved to have health-related benefits and to improve the quality of life. There is substantial evidence that exercise training increases exercise performance and fitness in asthmatics. It is still unclear whether physical training improves pulmonary function and bronchial responsiveness. Since asthma ranges widely, exercise prescription varies for each patient. The proper selection of the patients and the choice of exercise programs are the steps required. Accordingly with the severity of the disease, exercise strategies may range from sports activities to, when the disease is severe, inpatient hospital programs that overlap with COPD rehabilitation. Further research to clarify some aspects (effects on pulmonary function and EIA, outcomes, cost-benefit relationship) is necessary. PMID:11296996

  9. The microbiome in asthma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yvonne J; Boushey, Homer A

    2015-01-01

    The application of recently developed sensitive, specific, culture-independent tools for identification of microbes is transforming concepts of microbial ecology, including concepts of the relationships between the vast complex populations of microbes associated with ourselves and with states of health and disease. Although most work initially focused on the community of microbes (microbiome) in the gastrointestinal tract and its relationship to gastrointestinal disease, interest has expanded to include study of the relationships of the airway microbiome to asthma and its phenotypes and to the relationships between the gastrointestinal microbiome, development of immune function, and predisposition to allergic sensitization and asthma. Here we provide our perspective on the findings of studies of differences in the airway microbiome between asthmatic patients and healthy subjects and of studies of relationships between environmental microbiota, gut microbiota, immune function, and asthma development. In addition, we provide our perspective on how these findings suggest the broad outline of a rationale for approaches involving directed manipulation of the gut and airway microbiome for the treatment and prevention of allergic asthma.

  10. Focus Group Evaluation of the LIVE Network—An Audio Music Program to Promote ART Adherence Self-Management

    PubMed Central

    Holstad, Marcia McDonnell; Baumann, Maya; Ofotokun, Ighovwerha; Logwood, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of 3 focus groups conducted to assess the utility, appeal, and feasibility of the LIVE Network (LN), a 70-minute audio music program developed to educate and motivate HIV-infected persons to adhere to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and self-manage medication-related side effects. Participants included 15 African American, 2 caucasian, and 1 race unknown HIV-infected persons who had been taking ART for at least 6 months. In general, the LN was well liked, relevant, educational, and motivational. It empowered and motivated participants to be responsible for their adherence self-care. One of the more surprising findings was how freely focus group participants shared the program with family and friends as a means of education and also as a means of disclosure. Moreover, the positive reception of the LN by individuals outside of the focus groups, especially children and adolescents, speaks well for the potential broad appeal of this type of program. PMID:24013689

  11. Acute asthma during pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Stenius-Aarniala, B. S.; Hedman, J.; Teramo, K. A.

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Acute asthma during pregnancy is potentially dangerous to the fetus. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of an acute attack of asthma during pregnancy on the course of pregnancy or delivery, or the health of the newborn infant, and to identify undertreatment as a possible cause of the exacerbations. METHODS: Five hundred and four pregnant asthmatic subjects were prospectively followed and treated. The data on 47 patients with an attack of asthma during pregnancy were compared with those of 457 asthmatics with no recorded acute exacerbation and with 237 healthy parturients. RESULTS: Of 504 asthmatics, 177 patients were not initially treated with inhaled corticosteroids. Of these, 17% had an acute attack compared with only 4% of the 257 patients who had been on inhaled anti-inflammatory treatment from the start of pregnancy. There were no differences between the groups as to length of gestation, length of the third stage of labour, or amount of haemorrhage after delivery. No differences were observed between pregnancies with and without an exacerbation with regard to relative birth weight, incidence of malformations, hypoglycaemia, or need for phototherapy for jaundice during the neonatal period. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with inadequate inhaled anti-inflammatory treatment during pregnancy run a higher risk of suffering an acute attack of asthma than those treated with an anti-inflammatory agent. However, if the acute attack of asthma is relatively mild and promptly treated, it does not have a serious effect on the pregnancy, delivery, or the health of the newborn infant. PMID:8733495

  12. Clinical review: Severe asthma

    PubMed Central

    Papiris, Spyros; Kotanidou, Anastasia; Malagari, Katerina; Roussos, Charis

    2002-01-01

    Severe asthma, although difficult to define, includes all cases of difficult/therapy-resistant disease of all age groups and bears the largest part of morbidity and mortality from asthma. Acute, severe asthma, status asthmaticus, is the more or less rapid but severe asthmatic exacerbation that may not respond to the usual medical treatment. The narrowing of airways causes ventilation perfusion imbalance, lung hyperinflation, and increased work of breathing that may lead to ventilatory muscle fatigue and life-threatening respiratory failure. Treatment for acute, severe asthma includes the administration of oxygen, β2-agonists (by continuous or repetitive nebulisation), and systemic corticosteroids. Subcutaneous administration of epinephrine or terbutaline should be considered in patients not responding adequately to continuous nebulisation, in those unable to cooperate, and in intubated patients not responding to inhaled therapy. The exact time to intubate a patient in status asthmaticus is based mainly on clinical judgment, but intubation should not be delayed once it is deemed necessary. Mechanical ventilation in status asthmaticus supports gas-exchange and unloads ventilatory muscles until aggressive medical treatment improves the functional status of the patient. Patients intubated and mechanically ventilated should be appropriately sedated, but paralytic agents should be avoided. Permissive hypercapnia, increase in expiratory time, and promotion of patient-ventilator synchronism are the mainstay in mechanical ventilation of status asthmaticus. Close monitoring of the patient's condition is necessary to obviate complications and to identify the appropriate time for weaning. Finally, after successful treatment and prior to discharge, a careful strategy for prevention of subsequent asthma attacks is imperative. PMID:11940264

  13. From Here to Autonomicity: Self-Managing Agents and the Biological Metaphors that Inspire Them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sterritt, Roy; Hinchey, Mike

    2005-01-01

    We seek inspiration for self-managing systems from (obviously, pre-existing) biological mechanisms. Autonomic Computing (AC), a self-managing systems initiative based on the biological metaphor of the autonomic nervous system, is increasingly gaining momentum as the way forward for integrating and designing reliable systems, while agent technologies have been identified as a key enabler for engineering autonomicity in systems. This paper looks at other biological metaphors such as reflex and healing, heart- beat monitors, pulse monitors and apoptosis for assisting in the realization of autonomicity.

  14. Rheumatology clinicians’ experiences of brief training and implementation of skills to support patient self-management

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Self-management of arthritis requires informed, activated patients to manage its physical and psychosocial consequences. Patient activation and self-management can be enhanced through the use of cognitive-behavioural approaches, which have a strong evidence base and provide insight into the variation in outcome of patients with ostensibly the same degree of disease activity. However, training for rheumatology health professionals in theory and skills underpinning the facilitation of self-management is not widely available. To develop such training, this study explored rheumatology clinicians’ experiences of a variety of brief skills training courses to understand which aspects were helpful or unhelpful, and to identify the barriers and facilitators of applying the skills in clinical practice. Methods 16 clinicians who had previously attended communication and self-management skills training participated in semi-structured interviews: 3 physicians, 3 physiotherapists, 4 nurses, 6 occupational therapists. Transcripts were analysed (ED) using a hybrid inductive and deductive thematic approach, with a subset independently analysed (SH, RG-H, RJ). Results 3 overarching themes captured views about training undertaken and subsequent use of approaches to facilitate self-management. In ‘putting theory into practice’, clinicians felt that generic training was not as relevant as rheumatology-specific training. They wanted a balance between theory and skills practice, and identified the importance of access to ongoing support. In ‘challenging professional identity’, models of care and working cultures influenced learning and implementation. Training often challenged a tendency to problem-solve on behalf of patients and broadened clinicians’ remit from a primary focus on physical symptoms to the mind and body interaction. In ‘enhanced practice’, clinicians viewed consultations as enhanced after training. Focus had shifted from clinicians’ agendas to

  15. ACT-asthma control y tratamiento para niños: a progress report.

    PubMed

    Lewis, M A; de la Sota, A; Rachelefsky, G; Lewis, C E; Quinones, H; Richards, W

    1987-01-01

    A randomized clinical trial is in progress to evaluate an asthma educational program for Latino children and their parents. The intervention, "ACT-Asma Control y Tratamiento Para Niños," was adapted from ACT for Kids, an asthma self-management program for English-speaking families. Results of a pilot study indicated that socioeconomic status was a critical variable to be considered in the design of such programs. Latino children and parents encounter significant barriers to access and continuity of medical care. Therefore, the intervention was redesigned to include "linkages" using a nurse to reduce barriers and to coordinate care. The lesson plans emphasize concrete, experimental learning experiences, with repetition of key points in each session. PMID:3654235

  16. Empathy and Effortful Control Effects on Early Adolescents' Aggression: When Do Students' Perceptions of Their School Climate Matter?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batanova, Milena; Loukas, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    Guided by the social emotional learning framework, this study examined whether early adolescents' social awareness (empathic concern, perspective taking) and self-management (effortful control) would uniquely contribute to early adolescents' subsequent forms of aggression, and whether perceptions of their school climate (friction, cohesion,…

  17. Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Population Profiles > American Indian/Alaska Native > Asthma Asthma and American Indians/Alaska Natives In 2014, 218, ... Native American adults reported that they currently have asthma. American Indian/Alaska Native children are 30% more ...

  18. First report of asthma prevalence in Afghanistan using international standardized methods.

    PubMed

    Bemanin, M H; Fallahpour, M; Arshi, S; Nabavi, M; Yousofi, T; Shariatifar, A

    2015-05-19

    No data on the prevalence of asthma in Afghanistan have been published before. In a school-based survey in 2010-2011 the wheezing section of the International Study of Asthma and Allergies in Childhood (ISAAC) questionnaire was completed by a random sample of 1500 children aged 6-7 years and 1500 adolescents aged 13-14 years old. The prevalence of physician-diagnosed asthma was 12.5% in 6-7-year-olds and 17.3% in 13-14-year-olds (P = 0.002). The prevalence of wheeze in the last 12 months was similar in children and adolescents (19.2% and 21.7% respectively). The prevalence of ever wheezing, night attacks, speech-limiting wheeze and exercise-induced wheeze was 23.1%, 4.8%, 12.2% and 9.6% respectively in children and 30.5%, 4.4%, 13.0% and 13.6% respectively in adolescents. These rates are higher than those in neighbouring countries. This first epidemiological survey of asthma in Afghanistan shows that asthma and wheezing are common in Kabul students.

  19. Definition of critical asthma syndromes.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Nicholas; Zeki, Amir A; Albertson, Timothy E; Louie, Samuel

    2015-02-01

    Urgent visits to the clinic and emergency department for acute severe asthma exacerbations are all too frequent. Existing national guidelines do not present consistent or specific recommendations for the evaluation and treatment of individual asthma patients in respiratory distress. In this vein, we propose the term "critical asthma syndrome" (CAS) to describe any child or adult who is at high risk for fatal asthma. Acute severe asthma, refractory asthma, status asthmaticus, and near-fatal asthma all describe CAS where physical exhaustion from the overwhelming work of breathing leads to respiratory arrest and death from hypoxia or related complications. The authors of this supplement seek to emphasize the importance of early recognition, prompt and coordinated evaluation, and treatment of CAS in the emergency department, hospital, and intensive care units by experienced healthcare provider teams. CAS is not severe persistent asthma where control of symptoms and prevention of exacerbations are targets of chronic disease management in the outpatient setting. The authors address the distinctions between the two entities throughout the supplement, and elaborate on the considerations important in the care of a critically ill patient, including the common errors to avoid. In addition, gaps in knowledge and clinical experience in regards to critical asthma are highlighted. Knowledge gaps include a lack of understanding of how to recognize CAS, how to coordinate and integrate hospital and outpatient resources, when to further phenotype patients with critical asthma in order to facilitate effective treatment, and how to prevent future acute exacerbations. Lastly, CAS is complicated by the fact that asthma care in diverse healthcare settings is haphazard. We recommend that primary care physicians refer patients promptly to an asthma specialist for consultation to reduce the frequency of acute exacerbations and prevent the development of CAS.

  20. Mitral Stenosis Presenting as Asthma.

    PubMed

    Li, Shenjing; Jbeli, Aiham; Stys, Maria; Stys, Adam

    2016-02-01

    Although wheezing is one of the most common symptoms and physical findings in asthma, other causes of wheezing should be kept in mind: vocal cord dysfunction, postnasal drip syndrome, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, bronchiectasis, and non-pulmonary diseases, like heart failure and pulmonary edema. Here, we present a case of severe mitral stenosis with pulmonary edema treated for resistant asthma. If asthma is difficult to control, other etiologies of wheezing, including cardiac disease, should be taken into consideration during diagnosis. PMID:26999914